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Sample records for human t-cell line

  1. Synthetic copolymer 1 inhibits human T-cell lines specific for myelin basic protein.

    PubMed Central

    Teitelbaum, D; Milo, R; Arnon, R; Sela, M

    1992-01-01

    Copolymer 1 (Cop 1) is a synthetic basic random copolymer of amino acids that has been shown to be effective in suppression of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and has been proposed as a candidate drug for multiple sclerosis. Cop 1 is immunologically cross reactive with myelin basic protein (BP) and was shown to inhibit murine BP-specific T-cell lines of various H-2 restrictions. In the present study these findings were extended to include human T-cell lines. Cop 1 competitively inhibited the proliferative responses and interleukin 2 secretion of six BP-specific T-cell lines and 13 clones with several DR restrictions and epitope specificities. Conversely, BP inhibited--albeit to a lesser extent--the response of all the Cop 1-specific T-cell lines and clones, irrespective of their DR restrictions. Another random copolymer of tyrosine, glutamic acid, and alanine, denoted TGA, had no effect on these lines. Neither Cop 1 nor BP inhibited the response of lines and clones specific for purified protein derivative. Cop 1 and BP exerted their cross-inhibitory effects only in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. These results suggest that Cop 1 can compete with BP for the binding to human major histocompatibility complex molecules. In view of recent studies implicating BP reactivity in multiple sclerosis, these findings suggest a possible mechanism for the beneficial effect of Cop 1 in this disease. Images PMID:1370347

  2. T cell binding to B lymphoid cell lines in humans: a marker for T-B cell interaction?

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Fudenberg, H H

    1983-04-15

    Binding of human circulating T cells to established normal and malignant B cell lines results in rosette formation. The percentage of B cells, circulating T cells, and thymocytes able to bind to the B-LCL Raji were 0%, 59 +/- 4% and 61 +/- 6%, respectively. The percentage of rosettes formed between Raji cells and circulating mononuclear cells from 92 normal individuals was 27.8 +/- 5.3%, and remained stable over several months. This phenomenon seems to involve relatively mature B cells, and a T cell marker which appears early in T cell ontogeny. In the peripheral blood, most of the B-LCL binding T cells exhibit a 'helper-inducer' phenotype, as determined with the monoclonal antibodies Leu 3a and OKT4. However, a significant percentage of T cells with so-called 'cytotoxic-suppressor' markers (Leu 2a and OKT8) also bind to B-LCL. The T cells involved in this morphological interactive reaction with B cells might conceivably be specifically involved in regulating B cell functions. Enumeration of this particular subset may be useful in conditions where abnormal T-B cell interactions are suspected. PMID:6601166

  3. Inhibition of proliferation by agricultural plant extracts in seven human adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL)-related cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kai, Hisahiro; Akamatsu, Ena; Torii, Eri; Kodama, Hiroko; Yukizaki, Chizuko; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Matsuno, Koji

    2011-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) is caused by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I) infection and is resistant to conventional chemotherapy. We evaluated the inhibitory effects of agricultural plants on the proliferation of seven ATL-related human leukaemia cells, using three ATL cell lines (ED, Su9T01 and S1T), two human T-cell lines transformed by HTLV-I infection (HUT-102 and MT-2) and two HTLV-I-negative human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell lines (Jurkat and MOLT-4). A total of 52 samples of 80% ethanol extracts obtained from 30 types of agricultural plants were examined. On the basis of IC(50) values, we selected samples with greater activity than genistein, which was used as a positive control. The highest inhibitory effect was observed with extracts from leaves of Vaccinium virgatum Aiton (blueberry) on four cell lines (ED, Su9T01, HUT-102 and Jurkat); seeds of Momordica charantia L. (bitter gourd) exhibited the second highest activity. The bitter gourd seeds suppressed the proliferation of three cell lines (Su9T01, HUT-102 and Jurkat). The extracts from edible parts of Ipomea batatas LAM. (sweet potato), edible parts of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott (taro), skin of taro and seeds of Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc. (mume) showed markedly greater inhibitory effects on Su9T01 than genistein. These findings suggest that ATL-preventative bioactive compounds may exist in these agricultural plants, which are considered to be functional foods. PMID:21293936

  4. Increasing cellular uptake of mesoporous silica nanoparticles in human embryonic kidney cell line 293T cells by using Lipofectamine 2000.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiandong; Teng, Zhaogang; Tian, Ying; Fang, Tian; Ma, Jie; Sun, Jin; Zhu, Feipeng; Wu, Jinrong; Wang, Xin; Yang, Nannan; Zhou, Xiaojun; Yun, Shifeng; Lu, Guangming

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are ideal nanocarriers that have recently gained attention in important bioapplications such as drug, gene, and protein delivery. The efficacy of endocytosis greatly affects the biological functions of MSNs. In the present study, we investigated the effect of cationic liposomes of Lipofectamine 2000 on cellular uptake of MSNs and the cytotoxicity of cationic liposomes combining with MSNs both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, mesoporous silica nanoparticles with an average diameter of 130 nm and negative surface charge were synthesized and characterized. The possible role of Lipofectamine 2000 in cellular uptake of MSNs was evaluated in human embryonic kidney cell line 293T cells by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis. The toxicities of liposomes combining with MSNs were tested in vitro via cell apoptosis assay and MTT cell viability assay, and in vivo by histological examination of six organs of mice after intravenous injection. The endocytosis efficiency of MSNs in human embryonic kidney 293T cells was greatly increased using Lipofectamine 2000 compared with controls (P < 0.001). No apparent in vitro or in vivo cytotoxicity was found for Lipofectamine 2000 combining with MSNs. Our data indicate that cationic liposomes of Lipofectamine 2000 has the potential to greatly increase cellular uptake of MSNs with negative surface charge in human renal 293T cells without apparent toxicity. PMID:24059087

  5. FoxO1 regulates apoptosis induced by asbestos in the MT-2 human T-cell line.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Maeda, Megumi; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Otsuki, Takemi

    2016-09-01

    Asbestos is known to cause malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer. Recent studies implicate tumor immunity in the development of various tumors, including malignant mesothelioma. In order to establish an in vitro T-cell model to clarify the effects of long-term exposure of asbestos on tumor immunity, in this study, human T-cell line MT-2 cells were cultured with asbestos for longer than 8 months and the resultant cells (MT-2Rst) were assessed for the expression of forkhead transcription factor FoxO1. Gene expression analysis revealed that the amount of FoxO1 mRNA decreased after long-term exposure of the MT-2 cells to asbestos. In accordance with this reduction in FoxO1, pro-apoptotic Foxo1 target genes Puma, Fas ligand and Bim were also seen to be down-regulated in MT-2Rst cells. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated knock-down of FoxO1 reduced the number of apoptotic parental MT-2 cells after treatment with asbestos. On the other hand, over-expression of FoxO1 did not affect asbestos-induced apoptosis in MT-2Rst cells. These results suggested that FoxO1 played an important role in regulating asbestos-induced apoptosis and confirmed the presence of multiple pathways regulating resistance to asbestos in MT-2Rst cells. PMID:27042963

  6. Alteration of cytoskeletal molecules in a human T cell line caused by continuous exposure to chrysotile asbestos.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Megumi; Chen, Ying; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Hiratsuka, Jun-Ichi; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Kimura, Yoshinobu; Otsuki, Takemi

    2013-09-01

    Among the various biological effects of asbestos such as fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis, we have been focusing on the immunological effects becausesilica (SiO(2)) and asbestos chemically is a mineral silicate of silica. Observations of the effects of asbestos on CD4+ T cells showed reduction of CXCR3 chemokine receptor and reduced capacity of interferon γ production. In particular, use of theHTLV-1 immortalized human T cell line, MT-2, and cDNA array analysis have helped to identify the modification of CXCR3. We investigated alteration of protein expression among MT-2 original cells that had no contact with asbestos, and six chrysotile-continuously exposed independent sublines using ProteinChip and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) assays. Further confirmation of the changes in protein expression due to asbestos exposure was obtained after the 2DGE method indicated protein modification of β-actin. β-actin was upregulated in mRNA, as were the levels of protein expression and phosphorylation. Moreover, a binding assay between cells and chrysotile showed that various molecules related to the cytoskeleton such as vimentin, myosin-9 and tubulin-β2, as well as β-actin, exhibited enhanced bindings in asbestos-exposed cells. The overall findings indicate that the cell surface cytoskeleton may play an important role in inducing the cellular changes caused by asbestos in immune cells, since fibers are not incorporated to the cells and how the alterations of cytoskeleton determined cell destiny to cause the reduction of tumor immunity is important to consider the biological effects of asbestos. Further studies to target several cytoskeleton-related molecules associated with the effects of asbestos will result in a better understanding of the immunological effects of asbestos and support the development of chemo-prevention to recover anti-tumor immunity in asbestos-exposed patients.

  7. Activation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1-infected cell lines and primary adult T-cell leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Mariko; Semenza, Gregg L.; Michiels, Canine; Matsuda, Takehiro; Uchihara, Jun-Nosuke; Okudaira, Taeko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Taira, Naoya; Ohshiro, Kazuiku; Mori, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    HTLV-1 (human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1) is the causative agent for ATL (adult T-cell leukaemia). HTLV-1 Tax can activate the PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt signalling pathway, which is responsible for survival of HTLV-1-infected T-cells. HIFs (hypoxia-inducible factors) are transcriptional regulators that play a central role in the response to hypoxia. Overexpression of HIF-1α in many cancers is associated with a poor response to treatment and increased patient mortality. Our objectives in the present study were to investigate whether HIF-1 was activated in HTLV-1-infected T-cells and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of HIF-1 activation by focusing on the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. We detected a potent pathway that activated HIF-1 in the HTLV-1-infected T-cells under a normal oxygen concentration. Enhanced HIF-1α protein expression and HIF-1 DNA-binding activity were exhibited in HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. Knockdown of HIF-1α by siRNA (small interfering RNA) suppressed the growth and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) expression of the HTLV-1-infected T-cell line. HIF-1 protein accumulation and transcriptional activity were enhanced by Tax, which was inhibited by dominant-negative Akt. Importantly, mutant forms of Tax that are defective in activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway failed to induce HIF-1 transcriptional activity. The PI3K inhibitor LY294002 suppressed HIF-1α protein expression, HIF-1 DNA-binding and HIF-1 transcriptional activity in HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. In primary ATL cells, HIF-1α protein levels were strongly correlated with levels of phosphorylated Akt. The results of the present study suggest that PI3K/Akt activation induced by Tax leads to activation of HIF-1. As HIF-1 plays a major role in tumour progression, it may represent a molecular target for the development of novel ATL therapeutics. PMID:17576198

  8. Murine leukemia virus vector integration favors promoter regions and regional hot spots in a human T-cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukahara, Tomonori; Agawa, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Sayori; Matsuda, Mizuho; Ueno, Shuichi; Yamashita, Yuki; Yamada, Koichiro; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kojima, Katsuhiko; Takeshita, Toshikazu . E-mail: takesit@sch.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp

    2006-07-07

    Genomic analysis of integration will be important in evaluating the safety of human gene therapy with retroviral vectors. Here, we investigated MLV vector integration sites in human T-cells, since they are amenable to gene transfer studies, and have been used therapeutically in clinical trials. We mapped 340 MLV vector integration sites in the infected human T-cell clones we established. The data showed that MLV preferred integration near the transcription start sites ({+-}5 kb), near CpG islands ({+-}1 kb), and within the first intron of RefSeq genes. We also identified MLV integration hot spots that contained three or more integrations within a 100 kb region. RT-PCR revealed that mRNA-levels of T-cell clones that contained MLV integrations near transcription start sites or introns were dysregulated compared to the uninfected cells. These studies help define the profile of MLV integration in T-cells and the risks associated with MLV-based gene therapy.

  9. Silver nanoparticles exert a long-lasting antiproliferative effect on human keratinocyte HaCaT cell line.

    PubMed

    Zanette, Caterina; Pelin, Marco; Crosera, Matteo; Adami, Gianpiero; Bovenzi, Massimo; Larese, Francesca Filon; Florio, Chiara

    2011-08-01

    For their antibacterial activity, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are largely used in various commercially available products designed to come in direct contact with the skin. In this study we investigated the effects of Ag NPs on skin using the human-derived keratinocyte HaCaT cell line model. Ag NPs caused a concentration- and time-dependent decrease of cell viability, with IC(50) values of 6.8 ± 1.3 μM (MTT assay) and 12 ± 1.2 μM (SRB assay) after 7 days of contact. A 24h treatment, followed by a 6 day recovery period in Ag NPs-free medium, reduced cell viability with almost the same potency (IC(50)s of 15.3 ± 4.6 and 35 ± 20 μM, MTT and SRB assays, respectively). Under these conditions, no evidence of induction of necrotic events (propidium iodide assay) was found. Apocynin, NADPH-oxidase inhibitor, or N(G)-monomethyl-L-argynine, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, did not prevent NPs-induced reduction of cell viability. TEM analysis of cells exposed to NPs for 24h revealed alteration of nuclear morphology but only a marginal presence of individual NPs inside the cells. These results demonstrate that on HaCaT keratinocytes a relatively short time of contact with Ag NPs causes a long-lasting inhibition of cell growth, not associated with consistent Ag NPs internalization.

  10. Microgravity modifies protein kinase C isoform translocation in the human monocytic cell line U937 and human peripheral blood T-cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Jason P.; Gaubert, Francois; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Schmitt, Didier; Hashemi, B. B. (Principal Investigator); Hughes-Fulford, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Individual protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms fulfill distinct roles in the regulation of the commitment to differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in both monocytes and T-cells. The human monocyte like cell line U937 and T-cells were exposed to microgravity, during spaceflight and the translocation (a critical step in PKC signaling) of individual isoforms to cell particulate fraction examined. PKC activating phorbol esters induced a rapid translocation of several PKC isoforms to the particulate fraction of U937 monocytes under terrestrial gravity (1 g) conditions in the laboratory. In microgravity, the translocation of PKC beta II, delta, and epsilon in response to phorbol esters was reduced in microgravity compared to 1 g, but was enhanced in weak hypergravity (1.4 g). All isoforms showed a net increase in particulate PKC following phorbol ester stimulation, except PKC delta which showed a net decrease in microgravity. In T-cells, phorbol ester induced translocation of PKC delta was reduced in microgravity, compared to 1 g, while PKC beta II translocation was not significantly different at the two g-levels. These data show that microgravity differentially alters the translocation of individual PKC isoforms in monocytes and T-cells, thus providing a partial explanation for the modifications previously observed in the activation of these cell types under microgravity.

  11. Complement mediates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of a human T cell line in a CD4- and antibody-independent fashion.

    PubMed

    Boyer, V; Desgranges, C; Trabaud, M A; Fischer, E; Kazatchkine, M D

    1991-05-01

    Incubation of the human T cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-IIIB and HTLV-RF strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with normal seronegative human serum under conditions that allow complement activation resulted in enhancement of infection of the MT2 human T cell line cultured in the presence of low amounts of virus. Infection of MT2 cells was assessed by measuring reverse transcriptase activity in supernatants at day 9 of culture. Complement activation by viral suspensions occurred through the alternative pathway. Opsonization of HTLV-RF viral particles with complement was sufficient to allow a productive infection to occur in cells exposed to suboptimal amounts of virus. Infection of MT2 cells with suboptimal amounts of serum-opsonized HIV-1 was suppressed by blocking the C3dg receptor (CR2, CD21) on MT2 cells with monoclonal anti-CR2 antibody and rabbit F(ab')2 anti-mouse immunoglobulin antibodies. Blocking of the gp120-binding site on CD4 under similar experimental conditions had no inhibitory effect on infection of MT2 cells with opsonized virus. Opsonization of HIV-1 with seronegative serum also resulted in a CR2-mediated enhancement of the infection of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells and T lymphocytes. These results indicate that complement in the absence of antibody may enhance infection of C3 receptor-bearing T cells with HIV-1, and that the interaction of opsonized virus with the CR2 receptor may result by itself in the infection of target T cells in a CD4- and antibody-independent fashion. PMID:1827139

  12. NKG2D- and T-cell receptor-dependent lysis of malignant glioma cell lines by human γδ T cells: Modulation by temozolomide and A disintegrin and metalloproteases 10 and 17 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chitadze, Guranda; Lettau, Marcus; Luecke, Stefanie; Wang, Ting; Janssen, Ottmar; Fürst, Daniel; Mytilineos, Joannis; Wesch, Daniela; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Held-Feindt, Janka; Kabelitz, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The interaction of the MHC class I-related chain molecules A and B (MICA and MICB) and UL-16 binding protein (ULBP) family members expressed on tumor cells with the corresponding NKG2D receptor triggers cytotoxic effector functions in NK cells and γδ T cells. However, as a mechanism of tumor immune escape, NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs) can be released from the cell surface. In this study, we investigated the NKG2DL system in different human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, the most lethal brain tumor in adults. Flow cytometric analysis and ELISA revealed that despite the expression of various NKG2DLs only ULBP2 is released as a soluble protein via the proteolytic activity of “a disintegrin and metalloproteases” (ADAM) 10 and 17. Moreover, we report that temozolomide (TMZ), a chemotherapeutic agent in clinical use for the treatment of GBM, increases the cell surface expression of NKG2DLs and sensitizes GBM cells to γδ T cell-mediated lysis. Both NKG2D and the T-cell receptor (TCR) are involved. The cytotoxic activity of γδ T cells toward GBM cells is strongly enhanced in a TCR-dependent manner by stimulation with pyrophosphate antigens. These data clearly demonstrate the complexity of mechanisms regulating NKG2DL expression in GBM cells and further show that treatment with TMZ can increase the immunogenicity of GBM. Thus, TMZ might enhance the potential of the adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded γδ T cells for the treatment of malignant glioblastoma. PMID:27141377

  13. Characterization of the modes of action of deoxynivalenol (DON) in the human Jurkat T-cell line.

    PubMed

    Katika, Madhumohan R; Hendriksen, Peter J M; van Loveren, Henk; A C M Peijnenburg, Ad

    2015-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of the most abundant mycotoxins worldwide and mostly detected in cereals and grains. As such, DON poses a risk for many adverse health effects to human and animals. In particular, immune cells are very sensitive to DON, with the initiating step leading to toxicity being a binding to the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit and induction of ribotoxic stress. The present study aimed to: (1) extend insight into the mechanism of action (MOA) of DON in immune cells; and (2) understand why immune cells are more sensitive to DON than most other cell types. Previously published microarray studies have described the effects of DON on immune cells. To build upon these findings, here, immunocytological and biochemical studies were performed using human T-lymphocyte Jurkat cells that were exposed for 3 h to 0.5 µM DON. Induction of ER stress by DON was confirmed by immunocytology demonstrating increased protein expression of two major ER stress markers ATF3 and DDIT3. T-cell activation was confirmed by induction of phosphorylation of protein kinases JNK and AKT, activation of NF-κB (p65), and increased expression of NFAT target gene NUR77; each of these are known inducers of the T-cell activation response. Induction of an oxidative stress response was also confirmed by monitoring the nuclear translocation of major oxidative stress markers NRF2 and KEAP1, as well as by changes (i.e. decreases) in cell levels of reduced glutathione. Lastly, this study showed that DON induced cleavage of caspase-3, an event known to mediate apoptosis. Taken together, these results allowed us to formulate a potential mechanism of action of DON in immune cells, i.e. binding to eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit → ribotoxic stress → ER stress → calcium release from the ER into cytoplasm → T-cell activation and oxidative stress → apoptosis. It is proposed that immune cells are more sensitive to DON than other cell types due to the induction of a T-cell

  14. Lymphotoxin activation by human T-cell leukemia virus type I-infected cell lines: role for NF-kappa B.

    PubMed

    Paul, N L; Lenardo, M J; Novak, K D; Sarr, T; Tang, W L; Ruddle, N H

    1990-11-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected T-cell lines constitutively produce high levels of biologically active lymphotoxin (LT; tumor necrosis factor-beta) protein and LT mRNA. To understand the regulation of LT transcription by HTLV-I, we analyzed the ability of a series of deletions of the LT promoter to drive the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene in HTLV-I-positive MT-2 cells. The smallest LT promoter fragment (-140 to +77) that was able to drive CAT activity contained a site that was similar to the immunoglobulin kappa-chain NF-kappa B-binding site. Since the HTLV-I tax gene activates the nuclear form of NF-kappa B, this finding suggested a possible means of HTLV-I activation of LT production. We found that the LT kappa B-like site specifically formed a complex with NF-kappa B-containing nuclear extract from MT-2, C81-66-45, and other activated T cells. Mutation of the LT kappa B site in the context of the LT promoter (-293 to +77) (mutant M1) reduced the ability of the promoter to drive the CAT gene in HTLV-I-infected and noninfected human T-cell lines. These data suggest a general role for NF-kappa B activation in the induction of LT gene transcription. Activation of LT in HTLV-I-infected cells may explain the pathology associated with HTLV-I infection, including the hypercalcemia that is prevalent in adult T-cell leukemia.

  15. T-cell receptor alpha-chain gene is split in a human T-cell leukemia cell line with a t(11;14)(p15;q11).

    PubMed Central

    Le Beau, M M; McKeithan, T W; Shima, E A; Goldman-Leikin, R E; Chan, S J; Bell, G I; Rowley, J D; Diaz, M O

    1986-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements in malignant T-cell disease frequently involve the chromosome bands containing the T-cell receptor genes. The RPMI 8402 cell line, which was established from the leukemia cells of a patient with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, is characterized by a translocation involving chromosome 14 (band q11) and chromosome 11 (band p15) [t(11;14)(p15;q11)]. By using in situ chromosomal hybridization and Southern blot analysis to examine RPMI 8402 cells, we determined that the break at 14q11 occurs within the variable region sequences of the T-cell receptor alpha-chain gene (TCRA); the break at 11p15 occurs between the HRAS1 gene and the genes for insulin and the insulin-like growth factor 2. These results suggest that the TCRA sequences activate a cellular gene located at 11p15 in malignant T-cell disorders. Images PMID:3540949

  16. Cultured human Langerhans' cells are superior to fresh cells at presenting native HIV-1 protein antigens to specific CD4+ T-cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Girolomoni, G; Valle, M T; Zacchi, V; Costa, M G; Giannetti, A; Manca, F

    1996-01-01

    Cultured Langerhans' cells (CLC) exhibit enhanced antigen-presenting function compared to freshly isolated LC (FLC), but they are commonly believed to be inefficient at processing intact proteins. In this study, FLC and CLC from normal, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seronegative volunteers were compared for their ability to present the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 or reverse transcriptase (p66) antigens to autologous, specific CD4+ T cell lines. Epidermal cell suspensions enriched for LC were prepared from suction blister roofs. FLC stimulated T cells at lower antigen concentrations compared to unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). CLC were more potent on a per cell basis than FLC, PBMC or adherent monocytes at presenting native gp120, native p66 or immunogenic peptides. CLC were also more efficient than FLC or PBMC in terms of the amount of antigen required for T-cell activation. Chloroquine and leupeptin inhibited presentation of intact p66, but not of an immunodominant peptide, by FLC or CLC, thus indicating that both cells utilize antigen-processing mechanisms that are based on intracellular acidification and protease activity. Incubation of CLC with monoclonal antibodies against HLA-DR, CD11b, CD18, CD50, CD54, CD58 or CD80, but not anti-major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I), inhibited antigen-specific T-cell proliferation to varying degrees. We conclude that human CLC retain the ability to process and present protein antigens potently to CD4+ T cells. Thus, CLC have the capacity to participate actively in the generation and maintenance of T-helper cell immunity to viral antigens during HIV-1 infection. PMID:8698396

  17. Aberrant life cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CRF15_01B-like clinical isolates from Thailand in human CD4+ T-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Warachit, Jiranan; Iwabu, Yukie; Li, Yong-Gang; Li, Gui-Mei; Isarangkura, Panasda; Ibrahim, Madiha S; Balachandra, Kruavon; Tsuji, Shoutaro; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2007-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is separated into several subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). Here, infections of 4 clinical isolates (0-47-1, CU98-26, CU98-28, and CU98-31) from Thailand were examined in human CD4(+) T-cell lines, MT-4 and MOLT-4. The CU98-26 isolates in both cells and 0-47-1 in MT-4 established chronic infections, as in control 2 subtype B isolates from Japan, while 0-47-1 in MOLT-4 caused a latent infection. In contrast, CU98-28 and CU98-31 established aberrant infections in both cells. Integrated provirus was detected in all the chronic infections, including 0-47-1 in both cells. In contrast, extrachromosomal circular forms of HIV-1 DNA were detected in CU98-28- and CU98-31-infected cells, whereas the amount of the integrated form was below the limit of detection. Interestingly, phylogenetic trees and sequencing revealed that all the Thai isolates, except 0-47-1, displayed CRF15_01B-like mosaic structures of CRF01_AE with subtype B-like sequences in several regions that were apparently different from those of the inocula in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Thus, in the infections of most of the above Thai isolates it was suggested that a minor population with mosaic patterns having multiple breakpoints between CRF01_AE and subtype B in the inocula could be selected by the T-cell lines.

  18. Human regulatory T cells control TCR signaling and susceptibility to suppression in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Chellappa, Stalin; Lieske, Nora V; Hagness, Morten; Line, Pål D; Taskén, Kjetil; Aandahl, Einar M

    2016-07-01

    Human CD4(+)CD25(hi)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells maintain immunologic tolerance and prevent autoimmune and inflammatory immune responses. Regulatory T cells undergo a similar activation cycle as conventional CD4(+) T cells upon antigen stimulation. Here, we demonstrate that T cell receptors and costimulation are required to activate the regulatory T cell suppressive function. Regulatory T cells suppressed the T cell receptor signaling in effector T cells in a time-dependent manner that corresponded with inhibition of cytokine production and proliferation. Modulation of the activation level and thereby the suppressive capacity of regulatory T cells imposed distinct T cell receptor signaling signatures and hyporesponsiveness in suppressed and proliferating effector T cells and established a threshold for effector T cell proliferation. The immune suppression of effector T cells was completely reversible upon removal of regulatory T cells. However, the strength of prior immune suppression by regulatory T cells and corresponding T cell receptor signaling in effector T cells determined the susceptibility to suppression upon later reexposure to regulatory T cells. These findings demonstrate how the strength of the regulatory T cell suppressive function determines intracellular signaling, immune responsiveness, and the later susceptibility of effector T cells to immune suppression and contribute to unveiling the complex interactions between regulatory T cells and effector T cells. PMID:26715685

  19. Use of new T-cell-based cell lines expressing two luciferase reporters for accurately evaluating susceptibility to anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drugs.

    PubMed

    Chiba-Mizutani, Tomoko; Miura, Hideka; Matsuda, Masakazu; Matsuda, Zene; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Miyauchi, Kosuke; Nishizawa, Masako; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sugiura, Wataru

    2007-02-01

    Two new T-cell-based reporter cell lines were established to measure human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infectivity. One cell line naturally expresses CD4 and CXCR4, making it susceptible to X4-tropic viruses, and the other cell line, in which a CCR5 expression vector was introduced, is susceptible to both X4- and R5-tropic viruses. Reporter cells were constructed by transfecting the human T-cell line HPB-Ma, which demonstrates high susceptibility to HIV-1, with genomes expressing two different luciferase reporters, HIV-1 long terminal repeat-driven firefly luciferase and cytomegalovirus promoter-driven renilla luciferase. Upon HIV infection, the cells expressed firefly luciferase at levels that were highly correlated (r2=0.91 to 0.98) with the production of the capsid antigen p24. The cells also constitutively expressed renilla luciferase, which was used to monitor cell numbers and viability. The reliability of the cell lines for two in vitro applications, drug resistance phenotyping and drug screening, was confirmed. As HIV-1 efficiently replicated in these cells, they could be used for multiple-round replication assays as an alternative method to a single-cycle replication protocol. Coefficients of variation for drug susceptibility evaluated with the cell lines ranged from 17 to 41%. The new cell lines were beneficial for evaluating antiretroviral drug resistance. Firefly luciferase gave a wider dynamic range for evaluating virus infectivity, and the introduction of renilla luciferase improved assay reproducibility. The cell lines were also beneficial for screening new antiretroviral agents, as false inhibition caused by the cytotoxicity of test compounds was easily detected by monitoring renilla luciferase activity.

  20. The lymphotoxin promoter is stimulated by HTLV-I tax activation of NF-kappa B in human T-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Paul, N L; Millet, I; Ruddle, N H

    1993-07-01

    The HTLV-I transcriptional activator tax was used to gain insight into the mechanism of lymphotoxin (LT; TNF-beta) gene induction. Tax-expressing cell lines produce LT biologic activity. An LT promoter (LT-293) CAT construct that contained an NF-kappa B site was active in the LT-producing C81-66-45 cell line, which contains defective HTLV-I but expresses tax. The observation that a mutated LT-kappa B construct (M1-CAT) was inactive in C81-66-45, confirmed the importance of NF-kappa B in LT gene expression. Tax was transfected into HTLV-I-negative human T-cell lines. Jurkat T cells stably expressing tax contained elevated levels of NF-kappa B that directly bound to the LT-kappa B site. Tax co-transfected with reporter constructs into Jurkat cells maximally activated HTLV-I-LTR-CAT and kappa B-fos-CAT and also activated LT-293 to a lesser extent. In JM T cells, tax induced LT-293 activity by two- to four-fold, though there was no induction of M1-CAT. The increase in LT-293 CAT activity mirrored the increase in LT biologic activity seen under these conditions. These studies, the first to demonstrate induction of LT promoter activity over basal levels, indicate that HTLV-I tax causes low-level activation of both endogenous LT and the LT promoter, at least in part through activation of NF-kappa B.

  1. Monocytotropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants detectable in all stages of HIV-1 infection lack T-cell line tropism and syncytium-inducing ability in primary T-cell culture.

    PubMed Central

    Schuitemaker, H; Kootstra, N A; de Goede, R E; de Wolf, F; Miedema, F; Tersmette, M

    1991-01-01

    We previously demonstrated a correlation between the presence of syncytium-inducing (SI) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants showing tropism for cell line H9 and the occurrence of rapid CD4 cell decline and progression to AIDS. In contrast, in stable asymptomatic individuals, we detected only isolates with low replication rates that were non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) and nontropic for the H9 cell line. Here, we investigated the monocytotropism of established HIV-1 isolates with a panel of isolates and with biological HIV-1 clones with distinct phenotypes. Moreover, the prevalence and biological phenotypes of monocytotropic HIV-1 variants in the course of HIV-1 infection were analyzed in comparative primary isolation studies on peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). In cell-free infection studies with MDM from eight blood donors, 13 of 17 NSI isolates but only 4 of 14 SI isolates were able to infect MDM. NSI isolates also infected significantly more different donors than SI variants (median, 3 of 8 versus 0 of 8). This enhanced monocytotropism of NSI isolates was confirmed in experiments with biological HIV-1 clones with distinct phenotypes recovered from the same donor. To investigate the prevalence and biological phenotypes of monocytotropic variants in different stages of HIV-1 infection, sequential isolates from peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from nine asymptomatic individuals, five of whom progressed to AIDS and seven of whom had a known time of seroconversion, were recovered by cocultivation with both PBL and MDM. Monocytotropic variants were obtained from 37 of 42 time points. All monocytotropic variants were NSI in PBL culture and non-T-cell-line tropic, even when SI, T-cell-line-tropic HIV-1 variants could be recovered from the same patient sample by cocultivation with PBL. We conclude that monocytotropic HIV-1 variants mostly have an NSI phenotype in PBL and, in contrast to SI variants, are

  2. Quantitative model of antibody- and soluble CD4-mediated neutralization of primary isolates and T-cell line-adapted strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P J; Moore, J P

    1996-01-01

    Primary isolates (PI) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considerably less sensitive than T-cell line-adapted strains to neutralization by soluble CD4 and by most cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies to the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein, as well as by postinfection and postvaccination sera (J. P. Moore and D. D. Ho, AIDS 9 [suppl. A]:5117-5136, 1995). We developed a quantitative model to explain the neutralization resistance of PI. The factors incorporated into the model are the dissociation constants for the binding of the neutralizing agent to native Env oligomers, the number of outer Env molecules on the viral surface (which decreases by shedding), and the minimum number of Env molecules required for attachment and fusion. We conclude that modest differences in all these factors can, when combined, explain a relative neutralization resistance of PI versus T-cell line-adapted strains that sometimes amounts to several orders of magnitude. The hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is due to the reduction below a minimum number of the Env molecules on a virion available for attachment and fusion is at odds with single- and few-hit neutralization theories. Our analysis of these ideas favors the hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is instead a competitive blocking of interactions with cellular factors, including adsorption receptors. PMID:8648701

  3. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs.

  4. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs. PMID:26526988

  5. Expression of Ley antigen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected human T cell lines and in peripheral lymphocytes of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex (ARC)

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Ley determinant (Fuc alpha 1----2Gal beta 1----4[Fuc alpha 1---- 3]GlcNAc beta 1----R) defined by mAb BM-1 is highly expressed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected T cell lines and in CD3+ peripheral mature T cells of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or with AIDS-related complex (ARC). Ley expression increased greatly in the CD3+ population in the advanced stage of AIDS when the CD4+ population decreased greatly. Six other carbohydrate antigens tested by their respective mAbs were not detected in these same cells. None of the carbohydrate antigens tested by the seven mAbs used in this study were found in noninfected T cell lines and in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes. PMID:3258005

  6. Failure in activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax in non-hematopoietic cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mizukoshi, Terumi; Komori, Hideyuki; Mizuguchi, Mariko; Abdelaziz, Hussein; Hara, Toshifumi; Higuchi, Masaya; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Ohara, Yoshiro; Funato, Noriko; Fujii, Masahiro; Nakamura, Masataka

    2013-09-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax (Tax1) plays crucial roles in leukemogenesis in part through activation of NF-κB. In this study, we demonstrated that Tax1 activated an NF-κB binding (gpκB) site of the gp34/OX40 ligand gene in a cell type-dependent manner. Our examination showed that the gpκΒ site and authentic NF-κB (IgκB) site were activated by Tax1 in hematopoietic cell lines. Non-hematopoietic cell lines including hepatoma and fibroblast cell lines were not permissive to Tax1-mediated activation of the gpκB site, while the IgκB site was activated in those cells in association with binding of RelB. However RelA binding was not observed in the gpκB and IgκB sites. Our results suggest that HTLV-1 Tax1 fails to activate the canonical pathway of NF-κB in non-hematopoietic cell lines. Cell type-dependent activation of NF-κB by Tax1 could be associated with pathogenesis by HTLV-1 infection. - Highlights: • HTLV-1 Tax1 does not activate RelA of NF-κB in non-hematopoietic cell lines. • Tax1 activates the NF-κB non-canonical pathway in non-hematopoietic cell lines. • Tax1 does not induce RelA nuclear translocation in those cell lines, unlike TNFα. • The OX40L promoter κB site is activated by ectopic, but not endogenous, RelA.

  7. T-cell receptor gene therapy in human melanoma-bearing immune-deficient mice: human but not mouse T cells recapitulate outcome of clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Straetemans, Trudy; Coccoris, Miriam; Berrevoets, Cor; Treffers-Westerlaken, Elike; Scholten, Csilla E V; Schipper, Debby; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Debets, Reno

    2012-02-01

    Adoptive cell therapy using T-cell receptor (TCR)-engineered T cells is a clinically feasible and promising approach to target tumors, but is currently faced with compromised antitumor efficacies in patients. Here, we extensively validated immune-deficient mice to facilitate further development of the therapeutic potential of TCR-engineered T cells. Treatment of human melanoma-bearing SCID or NSG mice with high doses of human T cells transduced with an hgp100/HLA-A2-specific TCR did not result in antitumor responses irrespective of chemotherapeutic preconditioning. Imaging of human green fluorescent protein-labeled T cells demonstrated significant T-cell accumulation in intratumoral vasculature directly upon T-cell transfer, which was followed by loss of T cells within 72 hr. Peripheral persistence of human T cells was highly compromised and appeared related to T-cell differentiation. On the contrary, adoptive transfer (AT) of relatively low numbers of hgp100/HLA-A2 TCR-transduced mouse T cells resulted in rapid clearance of large established human melanomas. Unexpectedly and in contrast to reported studies with chimeric antibody receptor-engineered T cells, antitumor activity and homeostatic expansion of T cells were independent of TCR transgene as evidenced in two SCID strains and using two different human melanoma cell lines. Interestingly, the xeno-reactive melanoma response of mouse T cells appeared to be dictated by CD4(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and did not require in vitro T-cell activation, retroviral gene transfer, or subcutaneous interleukin-2 support. Taken together, AT of human but not mouse T cells in human melanoma-bearing immune-deficient mice is in close accordance with clinical studies. PMID:21958294

  8. Molecular and Cellular Analysis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Induced Apoptosis in Lymphoblastoid T-Cell-Line-Expressing Wild-Type and Mutated CD4 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Moutouh, Laure; Estaquier, Jérôme; Richman, Douglas D.; Corbeil, Jacques

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that the presence of the CD4 cytoplasmic tail is critical for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced apoptosis (J. Corbeil, M. Tremblay, and D. D. Richman, J. Exp. Med. 183:39–48, 1996). We have pursued our investigation of the role of the CD4 transduction pathway in HIV-induced apoptosis. To do this, wild-type and mutant forms of the CD4 cytoplasmic tail were stably expressed in the lymphoblastoid T-cell line A2.01. Apoptosis was prevented when CD4 truncated at residue 402 was expressed; however, cells expressing mutated receptors that do not associate with p56lck (mutated at the dicysteine motif and truncated at residue 418) but which conserved proximal domains of the cytoplasmic tail underwent apoptosis like wild-type CD4. The differences between wild-type and mutated receptors in the induction of apoptosis were not related to levels of p56lck or NF-κB activation. Initial signaling through the CD4 receptor played a major role in the sensitization of HIV-infected T cells to undergo apoptosis. Incubation of HIV-infected cells with monoclonal antibody (MAb) 13B8-2, which binds to CD4 in a region critical for dimerization of the receptor, prevented apoptosis without inhibiting HIV replication. Moreover, the apoptotic process was not related to Fas-Fas ligand interaction; however, an antagonistic anti-Fas MAb (ZB-4) enhanced apoptosis in HIV-infected cells without inducing apoptosis in uninfected cells. These observations demonstrate that CD4 signaling mediates HIV-induced apoptosis by a mechanism independent of Fas-Fas ligand interaction, does not require p56lck signaling, and may involve a critical region for CD4 dimerization. PMID:9733846

  9. Pushing the frontiers of T-cell vaccines: accurate measurement of human T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Fadi; Gorski, Stacey Ann; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for novel approaches to tackle major vaccine challenges such as malaria, tuberculosis and HIV, among others. Success will require vaccines able to induce a cytotoxic T-cell response – a deficiency of most current vaccine approaches. The successful development of T-cell vaccines faces many hurdles, not least being the lack of consensus on a standardized T-cell assay format able to be used as a correlate of vaccine efficacy. Hence, there remains a need for reproducible measures of T-cell immunity proven in human clinical trials to correlate with vaccine protection. The T-cell equivalent of a neutralizing antibody assay would greatly accelerate the development and commercialization of T-cell vaccines. Recent advances have seen a plethora of new T-cell assays become available, including some like cytometry by time-of-flight with extreme multiparameter T-cell phenotyping capability. However, whether it is historic thymidine-based proliferation assays or sophisticated new cytometry assays, each assay has its relative advantages and disadvantages, and relatively few of these assays have yet to be validated in large-scale human vaccine trials. This review examines the current range of T-cell assays and assesses their suitability for use in human vaccine trials. Should one or more of these assays be accepted as an agreed surrogate of T-cell protection by a regulatory agency, this would significantly accelerate the development of T-cell vaccines. PMID:23252389

  10. Rhizoctonia Bataticola Lectin (RBL) Induces Caspase-8-Mediated Apoptosis in Human T-Cell Leukemia Cell Lines but Not in Normal CD3 and CD34 Positive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pujari, Radha; Eligar, Sachin M.; Kumar, Natesh; Barkeer, Srikanth; Reddy, Vishwanath; Swamy, Bale M.; Inamdar, Shashikala R.; Shastry, Padma

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated immunostimulatory activity of a fungal lectin, Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), towards normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The present study aimed to explore the anticancer activities of RBL using human leukemic T-cell lines, Molt-4, Jurkat and HuT-78. RBL exhibited significant binding (>90%) to the cell membrane that was effectively inhibited by complex glycoproteins such as mucin (97% inhibition) and asialofetuin (94% inhibition) but not simple sugars such as N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, glucose and sucrose. RBL induced a dose and time dependent inhibition of proliferation and induced cytotoxicity in the cell lines. The percentage of apoptotic cells, as determined by hypodiploidy, was 33% and 42% in Molt-4 and Jurkat cells, respectively, compared to 3.11% and 2.92% in controls. This effect was associated with a concomitant decrease in the G0/G1 population. Though initiator caspase-8 and -9 were activated upon exposure to RBL, inhibition of caspase-8 but not caspase-9 rescued cells from RBL-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that RBL induced cleavage of Bid, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspase-3. The expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-X was down regulated without altering the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins- Bad and Bax. In contrast to leukemic cells, RBL did not induce apoptosis in normal PBMC, isolated CD3+ve cells and undifferentiated CD34+ve hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The findings highlight the differential effects of RBL on transformed and normal hematopoietic cells and suggest that RBL may be explored for therapeutic applications in leukemia. PMID:24244478

  11. Syncytium induction in primary CD4+ T-cell lines from normal donors by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates with non-syncytium-inducing genotype and phenotype in MT-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, B J; Kedar, P; Pope, J H

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates classified as syncytium-inducing (SI) or non-SI (NSI) in the MT-2 T-cell line exhibit characteristic sequence differences in the V1-V2 and V3 regions of the env gene. Seven HIV-1 isolates were phenotyped as NSI or SI in the MT-2 cell line. Unexpectedly, all four NSI viruses induced large syncytia 4 to 8 days postinoculation in a panel of five primary CD4+ T-cell lines (including two clones) generated from the peripheral blood of normal donors by exposure to infectious HIV-1, inactivated HIV-1, or Epstein-Barr virus. The primary T-cell lines yielded neither HIV-1 provirus nor infectious HIV by PCR analysis or exhaustive coculture with phytohemagglutinin-treated blast cells. Three isolates (TC354, PK1, and PK2) were biologically cloned and retained their SI or NSI phenotypes in MT-2 and primary T-cell lines. The biologically cloned provirus DNA was also used to clone and sequence the relevant V2 and V3 regions of the env genes. The amino acid sequences of the V2 and V3 regions were characteristic of patterns already reported for the NSI, switch NSI, and SI phenotypes, respectively. This evidence precludes the possibility that these results were due to contamination of the NSI isolates with SI virus. The results unequivocally indicate that HIV-1 isolates with the NSI genotype and phenotype in MT-2 cells may actively induce syncytia in cloned CD4+ T cells in vitro and support the view that direct cytopathic effects may contribute to the steady decline in CD4+ T cells in asymptomatic HIV-1-seropositive patients without detectable SI virus. PMID:7474129

  12. Early signaling defects in human T cells anergized by T cell presentation of autoantigen

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II-positive human T cell clones are nontraditional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that are able to simultaneously present and respond to peptide or degraded antigen, but are unable to process intact protein. Although T cell presentation of peptide antigen resulted in a primary proliferative response, T cells that had been previously stimulated by T cells presenting antigen were completely unresponsive to antigen but not to interleukin 2 (IL-2). In contrast, peptide antigen presented by B cells or DR2+ L cell transfectants resulted in T cell activation and responsiveness to restimulation. The anergy induced by T cell presentation of peptide could not be prevented by the addition of either autologous or allogeneic B cells or B7+ DR2+ L cell transfectants, suggesting that the induction of anergy could occur in the presence of costimulation. T cell anergy was induced within 24 h of T cell presentation of antigen and was long lasting. Anergized T cells expressed normal levels of T cell receptor/CD3 but were defective in their ability to release [Ca2+]i to both alpha CD3 and APCs. Moreover, anergized T cells did not proliferate to alpha CD2 monoclonal antibodies or alpha CD3 plus phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), nor did they synthesize IL-2, IL-4, or interferon gamma mRNA in response to either peptide or peptide plus PMA. In contrast, ionomycin plus PMA induced both normal proliferative responses and synthesis of cytokine mRNA, suggesting that the signaling defect in anergized cells occurs before protein kinase C activation and [Ca2+]i release. PMID:1535366

  13. Neoantigen landscape dynamics during human melanoma-T cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Verdegaal, Els M E; de Miranda, Noel F C C; Visser, Marten; Harryvan, Tom; van Buuren, Marit M; Andersen, Rikke S; Hadrup, Sine R; van der Minne, Caroline E; Schotte, Remko; Spits, Hergen; Haanen, John B A G; Kapiteijn, Ellen H W; Schumacher, Ton N; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2016-08-01

    Recognition of neoantigens that are formed as a consequence of DNA damage is likely to form a major driving force behind the clinical activity of cancer immunotherapies such as T-cell checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell therapy. Therefore, strategies to selectively enhance T-cell reactivity against genetically defined neoantigens are currently under development. In mouse models, T-cell pressure can sculpt the antigenicity of tumours, resulting in the emergence of tumours that lack defined mutant antigens. However, whether the T-cell-recognized neoantigen repertoire in human cancers is constant over time is unclear. Here we analyse the stability of neoantigen-specific T-cell responses and the antigens they recognize in two patients with stage IV melanoma treated by adoptive T-cell transfer. The T-cell-recognized neoantigens can be selectively lost from the tumour cell population, either by overall reduced expression of the genes or loss of the mutant alleles. Notably, loss of expression of T-cell-recognized neoantigens was accompanied by development of neoantigen-specific T-cell reactivity in tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes. These data demonstrate the dynamic interactions between cancer cells and T cells, which suggest that T cells mediate neoantigen immunoediting, and indicate that the therapeutic induction of broad neoantigen-specific T-cell responses should be used to avoid tumour resistance. PMID:27350335

  14. Proteomic profiling of the human T-cell nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Jarboui, Mohamed Ali; Wynne, Kieran; Elia, Giuliano; Hall, William W; Gautier, Virginie W

    2011-12-01

    The nucleolus, site of ribosome biogenesis, is a dynamic subnuclear organelle involved in diverse cellular functions. The size, number and organisation of nucleoli are cell-specific and while it remains to be established, the nucleolar protein composition would be expected to reflect lineage-specific transcriptional regulation of rDNA genes and have cell-type functional components. Here, we describe the first characterisation of the human T-cell nucleolar proteome. Using the Jurkat T-cell line and a reproducible organellar proteomic approach, we identified 872 nucleolar proteins. In addition to ribosome biogenesis and RNA processing networks, network modeling and topological analysis of nucleolar proteome revealed distinct macromolecular complexes known to orchestrate chromatin structure and to contribute to the regulation of gene expression, replication, recombination and repair, and chromosome segregation. Furthermore, among our dataset, we identified proteins known to functionally participate in T-cell biology, including RUNX1, ILF3, ILF2, STAT3, LSH, TCF-1, SATB1, CTCF, HMGB3, BCLAF1, FX4L1, ZAP70, TIAM1, RAC2, THEMIS, LCP1, RPL22, TOPK, RETN, IFI-16, MCT-1, ISG15, and 14-3-3τ, which support cell-specific composition of the Jurkat nucleolus. Subsequently, the nucleolar localisation of RUNX1, ILF3, STAT3, ZAP70 and RAC2 was further validated by Western Blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Overall, our T-cell nucleolar proteome dataset not only further expands the existing repertoire of the human nucleolar proteome but support a cell type-specific composition of the nucleolus in T cell and highlights the potential roles of the nucleoli in lymphocyte biology.

  15. Optimization of methods for the genetic modification of human T cells.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Mahmood Y; Vacaflores, Aldo; Houtman, Jon Cd

    2015-11-01

    CD4(+) T cells are not only critical in the fight against parasitic, bacterial and viral infections, but are also involved in many autoimmune and pathological disorders. Studies of protein function in human T cells are confined to techniques such as RNA interference (RNAi) owing to ethical reasons and relative simplicity of these methods. However, introduction of RNAi or genes into primary human T cells is often hampered by toxic effects from transfection or transduction methods that yield cell numbers inadequate for downstream assays. Additionally, the efficiency of recombinant DNA expression is frequently low because of multiple factors including efficacy of the method and strength of the targeting RNAs. Here, we describe detailed protocols that will aid in the study of primary human CD4(+) T cells. First, we describe a method for development of effective microRNA/shRNAs using available online algorithms. Second, we illustrate an optimized protocol for high efficacy retroviral or lentiviral transduction of human T-cell lines. Importantly, we demonstrate that activated primary human CD4(+) T cells can be transduced efficiently with lentiviruses, with a highly activated population of T cells receiving the largest number of copies of integrated DNA. We also illustrate a method for efficient lentiviral transduction of hard-to-transduce un-activated primary human CD4(+) T cells. These protocols will significantly assist in understanding the activation and function of human T cells and will ultimately aid in the development or improvement of current drugs that target human CD4(+) T cells.

  16. Optimization of Methods for the Genetic Modification of Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Mahmood Y.; Vacaflores, Aldo; Houtman, Jon C.D.

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are critical in the fight against parasitic, bacterial, and viral infections, but are also involved in many autoimmune and pathological disorders. Studies of protein function in human T cells are confined to techniques such as RNAi due to ethical reasons and relative simplicity of these methods. However, introduction of RNAi or genes into primary human T cells is often hampered by toxic effects from transfection or transduction methods that yield cell numbers inadequate for downstream assays. Additionally, the efficiency of recombinant DNA expression is frequently low due to multiple factors including efficacy of the method and strength of the targeting RNAs. Here, we describe detailed protocols that will aid in the study of primary human CD4+ T cells. First, we describe a method for development of effective microRNA/shRNAs using available online algorithms. Second, we illustrate an optimized protocol for high efficacy retroviral or lentiviral transduction of human T cell lines. Importantly, we demonstrate that activated primary human CD4+ T cells can be transduced efficiently with lentiviruses, with a highly activated population of T cells receiving the largest number of copies of integrated DNA. We also illustrate a method for efficient lentiviral transduction of hard-to-transduce un-activated primary human CD4+ T cells. These protocols will significantly assist in understanding the activation and function of human T cells and will ultimately aid in the development or improvement of current drugs that target human CD4+ T cells. PMID:26027856

  17. Glutathione metabolism in the HaCaT cell line as a model for the detoxification of the model sensitisers 2,4-dinitrohalobenzenes in human skin.

    PubMed

    Jacquoilleot, Sandrine; Sheffield, David; Olayanju, Adedamola; Sison-Young, Rowena; Kitteringham, Neil R; Naisbitt, Dean J; Aleksic, Maja

    2015-08-19

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most prominent antioxidant in cells and the co-factor of an important set of enzymes involved in the skin metabolic clearance system, glutathione S-transferases (GST). Here, we describe an LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy) method to measure GSH and its disulfide form (GSSG) in HaCaT cells and a 3D Reconstructed Human Epidermis (RHE) model. In our assay, the basal level of GSH in both systems was in the low nmol/mg soluble protein range, while the level of GSSG was systematically below our limit of quantification (0.1 μM). We found that 2,4-dinitrohalobenzenes deplete the GSH present in HaCaT cells within the first hour of exposure, in a dose dependent manner. The level of GSH in HaCaT cells treated with a single non-toxic dose of 10 μM of dinitrohalobenzene was also shown to increase after two hours. While cells treated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB) and 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB) repleted GSH to levels similar to untreated control cells within 24h, 1-bromo-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNBB) seemed to prevent such a repletion and appeared to be the most toxic compound in all assays. A mathematical modelling of experimental results was performed to further rationalise the differences observed between test chemicals. For this purpose the biological phenomena observed were simplified into two sequential events: the initial depletion of the GSH stock after chemical treatment followed by the repletion of the GSH once the chemical was cleared. Activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway was observed with all compounds within two hours, and at concentrations less than 10 μM. These data show that GSH depletion and repletion occur rapidly in skin cells and emphasize the importance of conducting kinetic studies when performing in vitro experiments exploring skin sensitization.

  18. Induction of IL-10- and IFN-gamma-producing T-cell responses by autoreactive T-cells expressing human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax.

    PubMed

    Takatsuka, Natsuko; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Takamori, Ayako; Shimizu, Yukiko; Kato, Hirotomo; Ohashi, Takashi; Amagasa, Teruo; Masuda, Takao; Kannagi, Mari

    2009-09-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is associated with adult T-cell leukemia, HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis and various autoimmune-like disorders. T-cell immune suppression is also associated with HTLV-I infection. Mechanisms of diverse immune dysregulation in HTLV-I infection are obscure. Here, we investigated a potential link between autoimmunity and immune suppression in HTLV-I infection. G14, an IL-2-dependent HTLV-I-negative CD4(+)CD8(+) T-cell line previously established from an HTLV-I-infected rat, constantly proliferated and produced IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma production by G14 cells was dependent on interactions between CD4 and MHC-II, suggesting that G14 cells recognized self-antigens presented by MHC-II on themselves. To examine immune response to G14 cells, we inoculated G14 cells into syngeneic naive rats. Interestingly, T-cells isolated from these rats vigorously proliferated when stimulated with G14-Tax cells that stably expressed HTLV-I Tax, but not with G14 cells. G14-Tax-mediated T-cell proliferation was abrogated by antibodies to CD80 and CD86 that were up-regulated in G14-Tax cells. T-cells propagated by repetitive G14-Tax cell stimulations in culture with IL-2 expressed CD4, CD25 and cytolytic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), produced abundant amounts of IL-10 and IFN-gamma in response to G14 cells and suppressed growth of G14 cells mainly through supernatant-mediated mechanisms. Similar IL-10- and IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+)CD25(+)CTLA-4(+) T-cells were predominantly induced in culture of splenocytes from HTLV-I-infected rats following stimulation with G14-Tax cells. These results implied that expression of Tax in the otherwise low immunogenic autoreactive T-cells induced IL-10- and IFN-gamma-producing T-cell responses with regulatory effects against the autoreactive cells. Our findings provide new insights into the complex immune conditions underlying HTLV-I-associated diseases. PMID:19654198

  19. CD1 and mycobacterial lipids activate human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Moody, D. Branch

    2014-01-01

    Summary For decades, proteins were thought to be the sole or at least the dominant source of antigens for T cells. Studies in the 1990s demonstrated that CD1 proteins and mycobacterial lipids form specific targets of human αβ T cells. The molecular basis by which T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize CD1-lipid complexes is now well understood. Many types of mycobacterial lipids function as antigens in the CD1 system, and new studies done with CD1 tetramers identify T-cell populations in the blood of tuberculosis patients. In human populations, a fundamental difference between the CD1 and major histocompatibility complex systems is that all humans express nearly identical CD1 proteins. Correspondingly, human CD1 responsive T cells show evidence of conserved TCRs. In addition to natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells), conserved TCRs define other subsets of human T cells, including germline-encoded mycolyl-reactive (GEM) T cells. The simple immunogenetics of the CD1 system and new investigative tools to measure T-cell responses in humans now creates a situation in which known lipid antigens can be developed as immunodiagnostic and immunotherapeutic reagents for tuberculosis disease. PMID:25703557

  20. Human skin cells support thymus-independent T cell development.

    PubMed

    Clark, Rachael A; Yamanaka, Kei-ichi; Bai, Mei; Dowgiert, Rebecca; Kupper, Thomas S

    2005-11-01

    Thymic tissue has previously been considered a requirement for the generation of a functional and diverse population of human T cells. We report that fibroblasts and keratinocytes from human skin arrayed on a synthetic 3-dimensional matrix support the development of functional human T cells from hematopoietic precursor cells in the absence of thymic tissue. Newly generated T cells contained T cell receptor excision circles, possessed a diverse T cell repertoire, and were functionally mature and tolerant to self MHC, indicating successful completion of positive and negative selection. Skin cell cultures expressed the AIRE, Foxn1, and Hoxa3 transcription factors and a panel of autoantigens. Skin and bone marrow biopsies can thus be used to generate de novo functional and diverse T cell populations for potential therapeutic use in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:16224538

  1. Human skin cells support thymus-independent T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rachael A.; Yamanaka, Kei-ichi; Bai, Mei; Dowgiert, Rebecca; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    Thymic tissue has previously been considered a requirement for the generation of a functional and diverse population of human T cells. We report that fibroblasts and keratinocytes from human skin arrayed on a synthetic 3-dimensional matrix support the development of functional human T cells from hematopoietic precursor cells in the absence of thymic tissue. Newly generated T cells contained T cell receptor excision circles, possessed a diverse T cell repertoire, and were functionally mature and tolerant to self MHC, indicating successful completion of positive and negative selection. Skin cell cultures expressed the AIRE, Foxn1, and Hoxa3 transcription factors and a panel of autoantigens. Skin and bone marrow biopsies can thus be used to generate de novo functional and diverse T cell populations for potential therapeutic use in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:16224538

  2. Glutathione metabolism in the HaCaT cell line as a model for the detoxification of the model sensitisers 2,4-dinitrohalobenzenes in human skin.

    PubMed

    Jacquoilleot, Sandrine; Sheffield, David; Olayanju, Adedamola; Sison-Young, Rowena; Kitteringham, Neil R; Naisbitt, Dean J; Aleksic, Maja

    2015-08-19

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most prominent antioxidant in cells and the co-factor of an important set of enzymes involved in the skin metabolic clearance system, glutathione S-transferases (GST). Here, we describe an LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy) method to measure GSH and its disulfide form (GSSG) in HaCaT cells and a 3D Reconstructed Human Epidermis (RHE) model. In our assay, the basal level of GSH in both systems was in the low nmol/mg soluble protein range, while the level of GSSG was systematically below our limit of quantification (0.1 μM). We found that 2,4-dinitrohalobenzenes deplete the GSH present in HaCaT cells within the first hour of exposure, in a dose dependent manner. The level of GSH in HaCaT cells treated with a single non-toxic dose of 10 μM of dinitrohalobenzene was also shown to increase after two hours. While cells treated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB) and 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB) repleted GSH to levels similar to untreated control cells within 24h, 1-bromo-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNBB) seemed to prevent such a repletion and appeared to be the most toxic compound in all assays. A mathematical modelling of experimental results was performed to further rationalise the differences observed between test chemicals. For this purpose the biological phenomena observed were simplified into two sequential events: the initial depletion of the GSH stock after chemical treatment followed by the repletion of the GSH once the chemical was cleared. Activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway was observed with all compounds within two hours, and at concentrations less than 10 μM. These data show that GSH depletion and repletion occur rapidly in skin cells and emphasize the importance of conducting kinetic studies when performing in vitro experiments exploring skin sensitization. PMID:26022718

  3. Resident memory T cells in human health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    Resident memory T cells are non-recirculating memory T cells that persist long term in epithelial barrier tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, lung, skin and reproductive tract. Resident memory T cells persist in the absence of antigens, have impressive effector functions and provide rapid on-site immune protection against known pathogens in peripheral tissues. A fundamentally distinct gene expression program differentiates resident memory T cells from circulating T cells. Although these cells likely evolved to provide rapid immune protection against pathogens, autoreactive, aberrantly activated and malignant resident memory cells contribute to numerous human inflammatory diseases including mycosis fungoides and psoriasis. This review will discuss both the science and medicine of resident memory T cells, exploring how these cells contribute to healthy immune function and discussing what is known about how these cells contribute to human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:25568072

  4. 5-HT3 receptor-channels coupled with Na+ influx in human T cells: role in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Khan, N A; Poisson, J P

    1999-09-01

    The study was conducted on a human (Jurkat) T cell line, loaded with a Na+ fluorescent probe, SBFI/AM. Serotonin and an agonist of 5-HT3 receptor-channels, 2-methyl-5HT, evoked Na+ influx, whereas the agonists of other serotonergic receptor subtypes, i.e., 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors, failed to induce Na+ influx in these cells. By using 3H-BRL43694, an agonist of 5-HT3 receptor-channels, we characterized 5-HT3 lymphocyte receptors which exhibited a density (Bmax) of 300 +/- 20 fmol/10(6) cells and a Kd of 30 nM in Jurkat T cells. The T-cell 5-HT3 receptor-channel is not regulated either by the protein kinase C or by the free intracellular calcium concentrations as the agents known to activate the PKC and to induce increases in intracellular free calcium concentrations failed to influence the free intracellular Na+ concentrations, [Na+]i, in these cells. Furthermore, an increase in [Na+]i, induced by 2-methyl-5HT, via 5-HT3 receptor-channels seems to stimulate T-cell activation by facilitating the progression of T cells from S to G2/M phase of the cell cycle.

  5. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein represses the expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor in T-cells.

    PubMed

    Takachi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takahashi-Yoshita, Manami; Higuchi, Masaya; Obata, Miki; Mishima, Yukio; Okuda, Shujiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Matsuoka, Masao; Saitoh, Akihiko; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), which is an aggressive form of T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 oncoproteins, Tax and HBZ, play crucial roles in the immortalization of T-cells and/or leukemogenesis by dysregulating the cellular functions in the host. Recent studies show that HTLV-1-infected T-cells have reduced expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor protein. In the present study, we explored whether Tax and/or HBZ play a role in downregulating BCL11B in HTLV-1-infected T-cells. Lentiviral transduction of Tax in a human T-cell line repressed the expression of BCL11B at both the protein and mRNA levels, whereas the transduction of HBZ had little effect on the expression. Tax mutants with a decreased activity for the NF-κB, CREB or PDZ protein pathways still showed a reduced expression of the BCL11B protein, thereby implicating a different function of Tax in BCL11B downregulation. In addition, the HTLV-2 Tax2 protein reduced the BCL11B protein expression in T-cells. Seven HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, including three ATL-derived cell lines, showed reduced BCL11B mRNA and protein expression relative to an uninfected T-cell line, and the greatest reductions were in the cells expressing Tax. Collectively, these results indicate that Tax is responsible for suppressing BCL11B protein expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells; Tax-mediated repression of BCL11B is another mechanism that Tax uses to promote oncogenesis of HTLV-1-infected T-cells.

  6. Multiple sclerosis and human T-cell lymphotropic retroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Defreitas, Elaine C.; Harper, Mary E.; Sandberg-Wollheim, Magnhild; Sheremata, William A.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Saxinger, Carl W.; Feinberg, Mark B.; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Gallo, Robert C.

    1985-11-01

    A combination of different types of data suggests that some multiple sclerosis patients respond immunologically to, and have cerebrospinal T cells containing, a retrovirus that is related to, but distinct from, the three types of human T-cell lymphotropic viruses. The role of this virus in multiple sclerosis is uncertain.

  7. Induction of T-cell apoptosis by human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Y; Yasukawa, M; Fujita, S

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms of cell death in CD4+ T cells mediated by human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) were investigated. The frequency of cell death in the human CD4+ T-cell line JJHAN, which had been inoculated with HHV-6 variant A or B, appeared to be augmented by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA from HHV-6-inoculated cells showed DNA fragmentation in multiples of the oligonucleosome length unit. The degree of DNA fragmentation increased when HHV-6-inoculated cells were cultured in the presence of TNF-alpha. Flow cytometry and Scatchard analysis of TNF receptors revealed an increase in the number of the p55 form of TNF receptors on JJHAN cells after HHV-6 inoculation. It also appeared that treatment with anti-Fas monoclonal antibody (MAb) induced marked apoptosis in HHV-6-inoculated cells. Transmission electron microscopy showed characteristics of apoptosis, such as chromatin condensation and fragmentation of nuclei, but virus particles were hardly detected in apoptotic cells. Two-color flow cytometric analysis using anti-HHV-6 MAb and propidium iodide revealed that DNA fragmentation was present predominantly in uninfected cells but not in productively HHV-6-infected cells. In addition, JJHAN cells incubated with UV light-irradiated and ultracentrifuged culture supernatant of HHV-6-infected cells appeared to undergo apoptosis. The present study demonstrated that both HHV-6 variants A and B induce apoptosis in CD4+ T cells by indirect mechanisms, as reported recently in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection. PMID:9094650

  8. Plasticity of Human CD4 T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Alfen, Johanna Sophie; Kastirr, Ilko; Gruarin, Paola; De Simone, Marco; Pagani, Massimiliano; Abrignani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to a variety of different pathogens, which induce tailored immune responses and consequently generate highly diverse populations of pathogen-specific T cells. CD4+ T cells have a central role in adaptive immunity, since they provide essential help for both cytotoxic T cell- and antibody-mediated responses. In addition, CD4+ regulatory T cells are required to maintain self-tolerance and to inhibit immune responses that could damage the host. Initially, two subsets of CD4+ helper T cells were identified that secrete characteristic effector cytokines and mediate responses against different types of pathogens, i.e., IFN-γ secreting Th1 cells that fight intracellular pathogens, and IL-4 producing Th2 cells that target extracellular parasites. It is now well established that this dichotomy is insufficient to describe the complexity of CD4+ T cell differentiation, and in particular the human CD4 compartment contains a myriad of T cell subsets with characteristic capacities to produce cytokines and to home to involved tissues. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that these T cell subsets are not all terminally differentiated cells, but that the majority is plastic and that in particular central memory T cells can acquire different properties and functions in secondary immune responses. In addition, there is compelling evidence that helper T cells can acquire regulatory functions upon chronic stimulation in inflamed tissues. The plasticity of antigen-experienced human T cell subsets is highly relevant for translational medicine, since it opens new perspectives for immune-modulatory therapies for chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. PMID:25566245

  9. Differential Responses of Human Regulatory T Cells (Treg) and Effector T Cells to Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Laura; Czystowska, Malgorzata; Szajnik, Marta; Mandapathil, Magis; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2009-01-01

    Background The immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RAPA) promotes the expansion of CD4+ CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells via mechanisms that remain unknown. Here, we studied expansion, IL-2R-γ chain signaling, survival pathways and resistance to apoptosis in human Treg responding to RAPA. Methodology/Principal Findings CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25neg T cells were isolated from PBMC of normal controls (n = 21) using AutoMACS. These T cell subsets were cultured in the presence of anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies and 1000 IU/mL IL-2 for 3 to 6 weeks. RAPA (1–100 nM) was added to half of the cultures. After harvest, the cell phenotype, signaling via the PI3K/mTOR and STAT pathways, expression of survival proteins and Annexin V binding were determined and compared to values obtained with freshly-separated CD4+CD25high and CD4+CD25neg T cells. Suppressor function was tested in co-cultures with autologous CFSE-labeled CD4+CD25neg or CD8+CD25neg T-cell responders. The frequency and suppressor activity of Treg were increased after culture of CD4+CD25+ T cells in the presence of 1–100 nM RAPA (p<0.001). RAPA-expanded Treg were largely CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ cells and were resistant to apoptosis, while CD4+CD25neg T cells were sensitive. Only Treg upregulated anti-apoptotic and down-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins. Treg expressed higher levels of the PTEN protein than CD4+CD25neg cells. Activated Treg±RAPA preferentially phosphorylated STAT5 and STAT3 and did not utilize the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Conclusions/Significance RAPA favors Treg expansion and survival by differentially regulating signaling, proliferation and sensitivity to apoptosis of human effector T cells and Treg after TCR/IL-2 activation. PMID:19543393

  10. Immunosuppressive Effects of Erythropoietin on Human Alloreactive T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cravedi, Paolo; Manrique, Joaquin; Hanlon, Katherine E.; Reid-Adam, Jessica; Brody, Joshua; Prathuangsuk, Praeophayom; Mehrotra, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Correction of anemia with erythropoietin (EPO) is associated with improved kidney transplant outcomes. Emerging evidence, predominantly from animal models, indicates that these observations may be erythropoiesis-independent and that EPO exhibits immunosuppressive properties. We examined the effects of EPO on human T-cell alloimmunity by first documenting that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells express EPO receptor (EPO-R) on their surfaces. In mixed lymphocyte reactions, EPO induced a dose-dependent decrease in allogeneic CD4+ T-cell proliferation (EPO 1000 U/ml: 44.6%±22.9% of vehicle, P<0.05; 2000 U/ml: 11.1%±4% of vehicle, P<0.001) without inducing cell death. The effects required signals transmitted directly through the EPO-R expressed on T cells, resulting in diminished Th1 differentiation without effects on regulatory T-cell induction. Mechanistic studies revealed that EPO prevented IL-2–induced proliferation by uncoupling IL-2 receptor signaling, inhibiting phosphorylation of the intracellular intermediaries AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase that are known to mediate T-cell expansion. EPO treatment reduced expansion of human naïve CD4+ T cells after adoptive transfer into NOD scid γcnull mouse recipients, verifying the effects in vivo. Although activated T cells expressed CD131, an alternative EPO receptor, addition of a specific CD131 agonist peptide, ARA290, did not alter T-cell proliferation or cytokine production. Our findings link EPO-R signaling on T cells to inhibition of T-cell immunity, providing one mechanism that could explain the observed protective effects of EPO in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:24676641

  11. Immunosuppressive effects of erythropoietin on human alloreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Cravedi, Paolo; Manrique, Joaquin; Hanlon, Katherine E; Reid-Adam, Jessica; Brody, Joshua; Prathuangsuk, Praeophayom; Mehrotra, Anita; Heeger, Peter S

    2014-09-01

    Correction of anemia with erythropoietin (EPO) is associated with improved kidney transplant outcomes. Emerging evidence, predominantly from animal models, indicates that these observations may be erythropoiesis-independent and that EPO exhibits immunosuppressive properties. We examined the effects of EPO on human T-cell alloimmunity by first documenting that CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells express EPO receptor (EPO-R) on their surfaces. In mixed lymphocyte reactions, EPO induced a dose-dependent decrease in allogeneic CD4(+) T-cell proliferation (EPO 1000 U/ml: 44.6%±22.9% of vehicle, P<0.05; 2000 U/ml: 11.1%±4% of vehicle, P<0.001) without inducing cell death. The effects required signals transmitted directly through the EPO-R expressed on T cells, resulting in diminished Th1 differentiation without effects on regulatory T-cell induction. Mechanistic studies revealed that EPO prevented IL-2-induced proliferation by uncoupling IL-2 receptor signaling, inhibiting phosphorylation of the intracellular intermediaries AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase that are known to mediate T-cell expansion. EPO treatment reduced expansion of human naïve CD4(+) T cells after adoptive transfer into NOD scid γc(null) mouse recipients, verifying the effects in vivo. Although activated T cells expressed CD131, an alternative EPO receptor, addition of a specific CD131 agonist peptide, ARA290, did not alter T-cell proliferation or cytokine production. Our findings link EPO-R signaling on T cells to inhibition of T-cell immunity, providing one mechanism that could explain the observed protective effects of EPO in kidney transplant recipients.

  12. T-cell receptor Vbeta gene usage by lymphocytes infiltrating human renal allografts.

    PubMed

    Gecim, I E; Christmas, S E; Brew, R; Flanagan, B F; Wheatcroft, N J; Bakran, A; Sells, R A

    1992-01-01

    T cell lines have been derived from human kidney allograft biopsies using mitogenic stimulation. Southern blotting using a T-cell receptor (TCR) Cbeta probe revealed an oligoclonal pattern of rearranged bands in all 12 samples analysed. In some cases, differences in band patterns were noted between independent cultures from the same biopsy. Most T-cell clones derived from 2 biopsies showed different patterns of rearranged bands. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to study TCR Vbeta gene usage in allograft-derived T-cell cultures. This was more sensitive and more informative than Southern blotting and revealed that most TCR Vbeta genes were expressed in T cells from biopsies showing cellular rejection. The potential usefulness of this technique to quantify TCR V gene usage in allospecific T-cell populations is discussed.

  13. Human autoreactive T cells recognize CD1b and phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Van Rhijn, Ildiko; van Berlo, Twan; Hilmenyuk, Tamara; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Wolf, Benjamin J.; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Uldrich, Adam P.; Napolitani, Giorgio; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Altman, John D.; Willemsen, Peter; Huang, Shouxiong; Rossjohn, Jamie; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Brenner, Michael B.; Godfrey, Dale I.; Moody, D. Branch

    2016-01-01

    In contrast with the common detection of T cells that recognize MHC, CD1a, CD1c, or CD1d proteins, CD1b autoreactive T cells have been difficult to isolate in humans. Here we report the development of polyvalent complexes of CD1b proteins and carbohydrate backbones (dextramers) and their use in identifying CD1b autoreactive T cells from human donors. Activation is mediated by αβ T-cell receptors (TCRs) binding to CD1b-phospholipid complexes, which is sufficient to activate autoreactive responses to CD1b-expressing cells. Using mass spectrometry and T-cell responses to scan through the major classes of phospholipids, we identified phosphatidylglycerol (PG) as the immunodominant lipid antigen. T cells did not discriminate the chemical differences that distinguish mammalian PG from bacterial PG. Whereas most models of T-cell recognition emphasize TCR discrimination of differing self and foreign structures, CD1b autoreactive T cells recognize lipids with dual self and foreign origin. PG is rare in the cellular membranes that carry CD1b proteins. However, bacteria and mitochondria are rich in PG, so these data point to a more general mechanism of immune detection of infection- or stress-associated lipids. PMID:26621732

  14. Rapid tumor formation of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-infected cell lines in novel NOD-SCID/gammac(null) mice: suppression by an inhibitor against NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Dewan, M Zahidunnabi; Terashima, Kazuo; Taruishi, Midori; Hasegawa, Hideki; Ito, Mamoru; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Mori, Naoki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Maeda, Michiyuki; Kubuki, Yoko; Okayama, Akihiko; Fujii, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2003-05-01

    We established a novel experimental model for human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced tumor using NOD-SCID/gammac(null) (NOG) mice. This model is very useful for investigating the mechanism of tumorigenesis and malignant cell growth of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL)/lymphoma, which still remains unclear. Nine HTLV-1-infected cell lines were inoculated subcutaneously in the postauricular region of NOG mice. As early as 2 to 3 weeks after inoculation, seven cell lines produced a visible tumor while two transformed cell lines failed to do so. Five of seven lines produced a progressively growing large tumor with leukemic infiltration of the cells in various organs that eventually killed the animals. Leukemic cell lines formed soft tumors, whereas some transformed cell lines developed into hemorrhagic hard tumors in NOG mice. One of the leukemic cell lines, ED-40515(-), was unable to produce visible tumors in NOD-SCID mice with a common gamma-chain after 2 weeks. In vivo NF-kappaB DNA binding activity of the ED-40515(-) cell line was higher and the NF-kappaB components were changed compared to cells in vitro. Bay 11-7082, a specific and effective NF-kappaB inhibitor, prevented tumor growth at the sites of the primary region and leukemic infiltration in various organs of NOG mice. This in vivo model of ATL could provide a novel system for use in clarifying the mechanism of growth of HTLV-1-infected cells as well as for the development of new drugs against ATL.

  15. Human T cell lymphotropic virus-associated leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ratner, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review This article summarizes the current pathophysiologic basis for human T cell lymphotropic virus-associated leukemia/lymphoma as well as past, present, and future therapeutic options. Recent findings New studies have been published on allogeneic stem cell transplantation, arsenic trioxide, and bortezomib for this condition. Summary Studies of the molecular biology of human T cell lymphotropic virus-1-induced T cell leukemia/lymphoma have defined a critical role for oncoprotein, Tax, and activation of nuclear factor κB transcription pathways, which have provided rational approaches to improved therapy for T cell leukemia/lymphoma as well as a model for other hematopoietic malignancies characterized by nuclear factor κB activation. PMID:16093798

  16. The preparation of interferon gamma-producing T-cell hybridomas from jacalin-stimulated T lymphocytes and the SH9 T-cell line.

    PubMed

    Crane, I; Leung, H; Barwick, S; Parti, S; Meager, A

    1984-12-01

    Jacalin, a lectin(s) extracted from the seeds of Artocarpus integrifolia (Jackfruit), was shown to induce the production of gamma interferon (IFN gamma) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and human T-lymphocyte cultures. The amount of IFN gamma produced was enhanced in the presence of mezerein, a phorbol ester derivative. Fusion of jacalin stimulated T lymphocytes with the SH9 T-cell line resulted in the formation of T-cell hybridomas which spontaneously secreted IFN gamma. The spontaneous production of IFN gamma by T-cell hybridomas was not influenced by the presence of jacalin, although significant enhancement of production was observed when the cells were cultured in the presence of mezerein.

  17. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations.

  18. HIV Disrupts Human T Cells That Target Mycobacterial Glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Kasprowicz, Victoria O; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Sunpath, Henry; Moody, D Branch; Kasmar, Anne G

    2016-02-15

    Single-cell analysis captures the heterogeneity of T-cell populations that target defined antigens. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection results in defects of antimycobacterial immunity, which remain poorly defined. We therefore recruited a small number of subjects, including those with latent and active M. tuberculosis infection, with or without concomitant HIV infection, and tracked the mycobacterial glycolipid-reactive T-cell repertoire by using CD1b tetramers. Glycolipid-reactive T cells expressed memory markers and the HIV coreceptors CD4 and CCR5; they were not detected in subjects with HIV-associated active M. tuberculosis infection. HIV infection may affect T cells that recognize mycobacterial glycolipids and influence immunity.

  19. Suppressive effects of tumor cell-derived 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine on human T cells.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Frederik C; Singer, Katrin; Poller, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Luise; Strobl, Carolin D; Limm, Katharina; Ritter, Axel P; Gottfried, Eva; Völkl, Simon; Jacobs, Benedikt; Peter, Katrin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Dettmer, Katja; Oefner, Peter J; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Kreutz, Marina P; Aigner, Michael; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment represents one of the main obstacles for immunotherapy of cancer. The tumor milieu is among others shaped by tumor metabolites such as 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Increased intratumoral MTA levels result from a lack of the MTA-catabolizing enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in tumor cells and are found in various tumor entities. Here, we demonstrate that MTA suppresses proliferation, activation, differentiation, and effector function of antigen-specific T cells without eliciting cell death. Conversely, if MTA is added to highly activated T cells, MTA exerts cytotoxic effects on T cells. We identified the Akt pathway, a critical signal pathway for T cell activation, as a target of MTA, while, for example, p38 remained unaffected. Next, we provide evidence that MTA exerts its immunosuppressive effects by interfering with protein methylation in T cells. To confirm the relevance of the suppressive effects of exogenously added MTA on human T cells, we used an MTAP-deficient tumor cell-line that was stably transfected with the MTAP-coding sequence. We observed that T cells stimulated with MTAP-transfected tumor cells revealed a higher proliferative capacity compared to T cells stimulated with Mock-transfected cells. In conclusion, our findings reveal a novel immune evasion strategy of human tumor cells that could be of interest for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27622058

  20. Antiviral activity of human Vδ2 T-cells against WNV includes both cytolytic and non-cytolytic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Agrati, Chiara; Castilletti, Concetta; Cimini, Eleonora; Romanelli, Antonella; Lapa, Daniele; Quartu, Serena; Martini, Federico; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2016-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes a severe central nervous system infection in humans, primarily in the elderly and immunocompromised subjects. Human γδ T-cells play a critical role in the immune response against viruses, and studies of WNV meningoencephalitis in laboratory mice described a role of γδ T-cells in the protective immune response. Aim of this study was to analyze the cytolytic and non-cytolytic antiviral activity of human Vδ2 T-cells against WNV replication. The anti-WNV activity of soluble factor released by zoledronic acid (ZA)-activated Vδ2 T-cell lines and the cytotoxic capability of Vδ2 T-cell lines against WNV-infected cells were tested in vitro. The activation of Vδ2 T-cell lines was able to inhibit WNV replication through the release of soluble factors. IFN-γ is massively released by activated Vδ2 T-cell lines and is involved in the anti-WNV activity. Moreover, the Vδ2 T-cell lines can efficiently kill WNV-infected cells possibly through perforin-mediated mechanism. Altogether, our results provide insight into the effector functions of human Vδ2 T-cells against WNV. The possibility to target these cells by ZA, a commercially available drug used in humans, could potentially offer a new immunotherapeutic strategy for WNV infection. PMID:27196553

  1. Activation of Human T Cells in Hypertension: Studies of Humanized Mice and Hypertensive Humans.

    PubMed

    Itani, Hana A; McMaster, William G; Saleh, Mohamed A; Nazarewicz, Rafal R; Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P; Kaszuba, Anna M; Konior, Anna; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Norlander, Allison E; Chen, Wei; Bonami, Rachel H; Marshall, Andrew F; Poffenberger, Greg; Weyand, Cornelia M; Madhur, Meena S; Moore, Daniel J; Harrison, David G; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence supports an important role for T cells in the genesis of hypertension. Because this work has predominantly been performed in experimental animals, we sought to determine whether human T cells are activated in hypertension. We used a humanized mouse model in which the murine immune system is replaced by the human immune system. Angiotensin II increased systolic pressure to 162 versus 116 mm Hg for sham-treated animals. Flow cytometry of thoracic lymph nodes, thoracic aorta, and kidney revealed increased infiltration of human leukocytes (CD45(+)) and T lymphocytes (CD3(+) and CD4(+)) in response to angiotensin II infusion. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the memory T cells (CD3(+)/CD45RO(+)) in the aortas and lymph nodes. Prevention of hypertension using hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide prevented the accumulation of T cells in these tissues. Studies of isolated human T cells and monocytes indicated that angiotensin II had no direct effect on cytokine production by T cells or the ability of dendritic cells to drive T-cell proliferation. We also observed an increase in circulating interleukin-17A producing CD4(+) T cells and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that produce interferon-γ in hypertensive compared with normotensive humans. Thus, human T cells become activated and invade critical end-organ tissues in response to hypertension in a humanized mouse model. This response likely reflects the hypertensive milieu encountered in vivo and is not a direct effect of the hormone angiotensin II.

  2. Activation of Human T Cells in Hypertension: Studies of Humanized Mice and Hypertensive Humans.

    PubMed

    Itani, Hana A; McMaster, William G; Saleh, Mohamed A; Nazarewicz, Rafal R; Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P; Kaszuba, Anna M; Konior, Anna; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Norlander, Allison E; Chen, Wei; Bonami, Rachel H; Marshall, Andrew F; Poffenberger, Greg; Weyand, Cornelia M; Madhur, Meena S; Moore, Daniel J; Harrison, David G; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence supports an important role for T cells in the genesis of hypertension. Because this work has predominantly been performed in experimental animals, we sought to determine whether human T cells are activated in hypertension. We used a humanized mouse model in which the murine immune system is replaced by the human immune system. Angiotensin II increased systolic pressure to 162 versus 116 mm Hg for sham-treated animals. Flow cytometry of thoracic lymph nodes, thoracic aorta, and kidney revealed increased infiltration of human leukocytes (CD45(+)) and T lymphocytes (CD3(+) and CD4(+)) in response to angiotensin II infusion. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the memory T cells (CD3(+)/CD45RO(+)) in the aortas and lymph nodes. Prevention of hypertension using hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide prevented the accumulation of T cells in these tissues. Studies of isolated human T cells and monocytes indicated that angiotensin II had no direct effect on cytokine production by T cells or the ability of dendritic cells to drive T-cell proliferation. We also observed an increase in circulating interleukin-17A producing CD4(+) T cells and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that produce interferon-γ in hypertensive compared with normotensive humans. Thus, human T cells become activated and invade critical end-organ tissues in response to hypertension in a humanized mouse model. This response likely reflects the hypertensive milieu encountered in vivo and is not a direct effect of the hormone angiotensin II. PMID:27217403

  3. VISTA is an immune checkpoint molecule for human T cells.

    PubMed

    Lines, J Louise; Pantazi, Eirini; Mak, Justin; Sempere, Lorenzo F; Wang, Li; O'Connell, Samuel; Ceeraz, Sabrina; Suriawinata, Arief A; Yan, Shaofeng; Ernstoff, Marc S; Noelle, Randolph

    2014-04-01

    V-domain Ig suppressor of T cell activation (VISTA) is a potent negative regulator of T-cell function that is expressed on hematopoietic cells. VISTA levels are heightened within the tumor microenvironment, in which its blockade can enhance antitumor immune responses in mice. In humans, blockade of the related programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) pathway has shown great potential in clinical immunotherapy trials. Here, we report the structure of human VISTA and examine its function in lymphocyte negative regulation in cancer. VISTA is expressed predominantly within the hematopoietic compartment with highest expression within the myeloid lineage. VISTA-Ig suppressed proliferation of T cells but not B cells and blunted the production of T-cell cytokines and activation markers. Our results establish VISTA as a negative checkpoint regulator that suppresses T-cell activation, induces Foxp3 expression, and is highly expressed within the tumor microenvironment. By analogy to PD-1 and PD-L1 blockade, VISTA blockade may offer an immunotherapeutic strategy for human cancer.

  4. Dendritic Cells Enhance HIV Infection of Memory CD4(+) T Cells in Human Lymphoid Tissues.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Rodriguez, Angel L; Reuter, Morgan A; McDonald, David

    2016-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in controlling infections by coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses to invading pathogens. Paradoxically, DCs can increase HIV-1 dissemination in vitro by binding and transferring infectious virions to CD4(+) T cells, a process called transinfection. Transinfection has been well characterized in cultured cell lines and circulating primary T cells, but it is unknown whether DCs enhance infection of CD4(+) T cells in vivo. In untreated HIV infection, massive CD4(+) T-cell infection and depletion occur in secondary lymphoid tissues long before decline is evident in the peripheral circulation. To study the role of DCs in HIV infection of lymphoid tissues, we utilized human tonsil tissues, cultured either as tissue blocks or as aggregate suspension cultures, in single-round infection experiments. In these experiments, addition of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) to the cultures increased T-cell infection, particularly in CD4(+) T cells expressing lower levels of HLA-DR. Subset analysis demonstrated that MDDCs increased HIV-1 infection of central and effector memory T-cell populations. Depletion of endogenous myeloid DCs (myDCs) from the cultures decreased memory T-cell infection, and readdition of MDDCs restored infection to predepletion levels. Using an HIV-1 fusion assay, we found that MDDCs equally increased HIV delivery into naïve, central, and effector memory T cells in the cultures, whereas predepletion of myDCs reduced fusion into memory T cells. Together, these data suggest that resident myDCs facilitate memory T-cell infection in lymphoid tissues, implicating DC-mediated transinfection in driving HIV dissemination within these tissues in untreated HIV/AIDS.

  5. Features of Human CD3+CD20+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Elisabeth; Berer, Kerstin; Mulazzani, Matthias; Feil, Katharina; Meinl, Ingrid; Lahm, Harald; Krane, Markus; Lange, Rüdiger; Pfannes, Kristina; Subklewe, Marion; Gürkov, Robert; Bradl, Monika; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Kümpfel, Tania; Meinl, Edgar; Krumbholz, Markus

    2016-08-15

    Monoclonal Abs against CD20 reduce the number of relapses in multiple sclerosis (MS); commonly this effect is solely attributed to depletion of B cells. Recently, however, a subset of CD3(+)CD20(+) T cells has been described that is also targeted by the anti-CD20 mAb rituximab. Because the existence of cells coexpressing CD3 and CD20 is controversial and features of this subpopulation are poorly understood, we studied this issue in detail. In this study, we confirm that 3-5% of circulating human T cells display CD20 on their surface and transcribe both CD3 and CD20. We report that these CD3(+)CD20(+) T cells pervade thymus, bone marrow, and secondary lymphatic organs. They are found in the cerebrospinal fluid even in the absence of inflammation; in the cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients they occur at a frequency similar to B cells. Phenotypically, these T cells are enriched in CD8(+) and CD45RO(+) memory cells and in CCR7(-) cells. Functionally, they show a higher frequency of IL-4-, IL-17-, IFN-γ-, and TNF-α-producing cells compared with T cells lacking CD20. CD20-expressing T cells respond variably to immunomodulatory treatments given to MS patients: they are reduced by fingolimod, alemtuzumab, and dimethyl fumarate, whereas natalizumab disproportionally increases them in the blood. After depletion by rituximab, they show earlier and higher repopulation than CD20(+) B cells. Taken together, human CD3(+)CD20(+) T cells pervade lymphatic organs and the cerebrospinal fluid, have a strong ability to produce different cytokines, and respond to MS disease modifying drugs. PMID:27412413

  6. DMBA induces tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-[gamma]1 and activates the tyrosine kinases lck and fyn in the HPB-ALL human T-cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.; Schieven, G.L.; Ledbetter, J.A.; Burchiel, S.W. . Coll. of Pharmacy)

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that DMBA alters biochemical events associated with lymphocyte activation including formation of the second messenger IP[sub 3] and the release of intracellular Ca[sup 2+]. The purpose of the present studies was to evaluate the mechanisms by which DMBA induces IP[sub 3] formation and Ca[sup 2+] release by examining phosphorylation of membrane associated proteins and activation of protein tyrosine kinases lck and fyn. These studies demonstrated that exposure of HPB-ALL cells to 10[mu]M DMBA resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-[gamma]1 that correlated with our earlier findings of IP[sub 3] formation and Ca[sup 2+] release. These results indicate that the effects of DMBA on the PI-PLC signaling pathway are in part, the result of DMBA-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the PLC-[gamma]1 enzyme. The mechanism of DMBA- induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-[gamma]1 may be due to activation of fyn or lck kinase activity, since it was found that DMBA increased the activity of these PTKs by more than 2-fold. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that DMBA may disrupt T cell activation by stimulating PTK activation with concomitant tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-[gamma]1, release of IP[sub 3], and mobilization of intracellular Ca[sup 2+].

  7. DMBA induces tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-{gamma}1 and activates the tyrosine kinases lck and fyn in the HPB-ALL human T-cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.; Schieven, G.L.; Ledbetter, J.A.; Burchiel, S.W.

    1993-02-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that DMBA alters biochemical events associated with lymphocyte activation including formation of the second messenger IP{sub 3} and the release of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. The purpose of the present studies was to evaluate the mechanisms by which DMBA induces IP{sub 3} formation and Ca{sup 2+} release by examining phosphorylation of membrane associated proteins and activation of protein tyrosine kinases lck and fyn. These studies demonstrated that exposure of HPB-ALL cells to 10{mu}M DMBA resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-{gamma}1 that correlated with our earlier findings of IP{sub 3} formation and Ca{sup 2+} release. These results indicate that the effects of DMBA on the PI-PLC signaling pathway are in part, the result of DMBA-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the PLC-{gamma}1 enzyme. The mechanism of DMBA- induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-{gamma}1 may be due to activation of fyn or lck kinase activity, since it was found that DMBA increased the activity of these PTKs by more than 2-fold. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that DMBA may disrupt T cell activation by stimulating PTK activation with concomitant tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-{gamma}1, release of IP{sub 3}, and mobilization of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}.

  8. Method for the production of human T-T cell hybrids and production suppressor factor by human T-T cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Platsoucas, C.

    1989-06-27

    This patent describes a method for production of human T-T cell hybrids which produce Suppressor Factor wherein cells of lymphoid origin are fused with comprises: (a) mixing cells from a first parent cell line comprising a non-mutagenized Jurkat lymoblastoid T cell line, wherein the Jurkat lymphoblastoid cells are not sensitive and cannot be killed by hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine medium, with a second parent cell comprising mitogen or alloantigen activated peripheral blood leukocyte T cells or purified T-cells, (b) allowing the first and second parent cells to fuse in the presence of polyethylene glycol for about 10-20 minutes with gentle agitation to generate hybrids in the cell mixture, (c) incubating the cell mixture containing the hybrids and the first and second parent cells, after removal of the polyethylene glycol, for periods of between one to sixty days at 37{sup 0} in 5% CO/sub 2/, (d) selecting for the hybrids by separating the hybrids from the first parent Jurkat lymphoblastoid cells by coloning in agar medium wherein the hybrids form colonies, (e) recovering the hybrids that form colonies in agar medium and expanding them in culture, and (f) determining the presence of Suppressor Factor in the culture and recovering the T-T cell hybrids which produce suppressor factor.

  9. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer.

  10. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  11. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones

    PubMed Central

    Theaker, Sarah M.; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J.; Cole, David K.; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K.; Dolton, Garry

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8+ or CD4+ polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein–Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  12. Peridinin, a carotenoid, inhibits proliferation and survival of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Chie; Jomori, Takahiro; Tanaka, Junichi; Senba, Masachika; Mori, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes either adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) or chronic inflammatory disorders such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. These diseases are not curable as yet; therefore new agents for treatment and prevention are needed. Carotenoids are natural plant compounds with anti-carcinogenic activities. Peridinin is one of the most abundant carotenoids found in nature. Based on a series of past experiments, here we investigated the effects of peridinin extracted from Okinawan coral Isis hippuris on the proliferation and survival of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. The results of water-soluble tetrazolium-8 assay indicated that peridinin dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation and viability of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. Flow cytometry showed that low concentration of peridinin induced cell cycle arrest at G1 phase, while higher concentration induced apoptosis. Peridinin caused cleavage of caspase-3, -8 and -9. Peridinin significantly reduced the expression of G1 cell cycle regulators, including cyclin D1, cyclin D2, CDK4, CDK6 and c-Myc, and anti-apoptotic proteins, including survivin, XIAP and Bcl-2, in a dose-dependent manner. Peridinin suppressed DNA binding of NF-κB. Peridinin inhibited phosphorylation of IκBα, RelA, Akt and p70 S6 kinase, and reduced protein expression level of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1. Thus, peridinin exerts its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects by suppressing NF-κB and Akt signaling in HTLV-1-infected T cells. Peridinin also reduced tumor growth in mice harboring ATL xenograft tumors. The results suggested that peridinin is a potentially suitable therapeutic agent against HTLV-1-associated diseases.

  13. Peridinin, a carotenoid, inhibits proliferation and survival of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Chie; Jomori, Takahiro; Tanaka, Junichi; Senba, Masachika; Mori, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes either adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) or chronic inflammatory disorders such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. These diseases are not curable as yet; therefore new agents for treatment and prevention are needed. Carotenoids are natural plant compounds with anti-carcinogenic activities. Peridinin is one of the most abundant carotenoids found in nature. Based on a series of past experiments, here we investigated the effects of peridinin extracted from Okinawan coral Isis hippuris on the proliferation and survival of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. The results of water-soluble tetrazolium-8 assay indicated that peridinin dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation and viability of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. Flow cytometry showed that low concentration of peridinin induced cell cycle arrest at G1 phase, while higher concentration induced apoptosis. Peridinin caused cleavage of caspase-3, -8 and -9. Peridinin significantly reduced the expression of G1 cell cycle regulators, including cyclin D1, cyclin D2, CDK4, CDK6 and c-Myc, and anti-apoptotic proteins, including survivin, XIAP and Bcl-2, in a dose-dependent manner. Peridinin suppressed DNA binding of NF-κB. Peridinin inhibited phosphorylation of IκBα, RelA, Akt and p70 S6 kinase, and reduced protein expression level of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1. Thus, peridinin exerts its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects by suppressing NF-κB and Akt signaling in HTLV-1-infected T cells. Peridinin also reduced tumor growth in mice harboring ATL xenograft tumors. The results suggested that peridinin is a potentially suitable therapeutic agent against HTLV-1-associated diseases. PMID:27499015

  14. Antibodies targeting human OX40 expand effector T cells and block inducible and natural regulatory T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Voo, Kui S.; Bover, Laura; Harline, Megan L.; Vien, Long T.; Facchinetti, Valeria; Arima, Kazuhiko; Kwak, Larry W.; Liu, Yong J.

    2013-01-01

    Current cancer vaccines induce tumor-specific T cell responses without sustained tumor regression because immunosuppressive elements within the tumor induce exhaustion of effector T cells and infiltration of immune-suppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs). Therefore, much effort has been made to generate agonistic Abs targeting members of the TNFR superfamily, such as OX40, 4- 1BB, and GITR, expressed on effector T cells and Tregs, to reinvigorate T cell effector function and block Treg-suppressive function. In this article, we describe the development of a panel of anti-human OX40 agonistic mouse mAbs that could promote effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation, inhibit the induction of CD4+ IL-10 -producing type 1 regulatory T cells, inhibit the expansion of ICOS+IL-10+ Tregs, inhibit TGF-b–induced FOXP3 expression on naive CD4+ T cells, and block natural Treg–suppressive function. We humanized two anti–human OX40 mAb clones, and they retained the potency of their parental clones. These Abs should provide broad opportunities for potential combination therapy to treat a wide realm of cancers and preventative vaccines against infectious diseases. PMID:24014877

  15. Antibodies targeting human OX40 expand effector T cells and block inducible and natural regulatory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Voo, Kui S; Bover, Laura; Harline, Megan L; Vien, Long T; Facchinetti, Valeria; Arima, Kazuhiko; Kwak, Larry W; Liu, Yong J

    2013-10-01

    Current cancer vaccines induce tumor-specific T cell responses without sustained tumor regression because immunosuppressive elements within the tumor induce exhaustion of effector T cells and infiltration of immune-suppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs). Therefore, much effort has been made to generate agonistic Abs targeting members of the TNFR superfamily, such as OX40, 4-1BB, and GITR, expressed on effector T cells and Tregs, to reinvigorate T cell effector function and block Treg-suppressive function. In this article, we describe the development of a panel of anti-human OX40 agonistic mouse mAbs that could promote effector CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation, inhibit the induction of CD4(+) IL-10 -producing type 1 regulatory T cells, inhibit the expansion of ICOS(+)IL-10(+) Tregs, inhibit TGF-β-induced FOXP3 expression on naive CD4(+) T cells, and block natural Treg-suppressive function. We humanized two anti-human OX40 mAb clones, and they retained the potency of their parental clones. These Abs should provide broad opportunities for potential combination therapy to treat a wide realm of cancers and preventative vaccines against infectious diseases. PMID:24014877

  16. Inter-Relationship between Low-Dose Hyper-Radiosensitivity and Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in the Human T98G Glioma and the Epithelial HaCaT Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel

    2016-02-01

    Over the past several years, investigations in both low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and increased radioresistance have been a focus of radiation oncology and biology research, since both conditions occur primarily in tumor cell lines. There has been significant progress in elucidating their signaling pathways, however uncertainties exist when they are studied together with radiation-induced bystander effects. Therefore, the aim of this work was to further investigate this relationship using the T98G glioma and HaCaT cell lines. T98G glioma cells have demonstrated a strong transition from hyper-radiosensitivity to induced radioresistance, and HaCaT cells do not show low-dose hypersensitivity. Both cell lines were paired using a mix-and-match protocol, which involved growing nonirradiated cells in culture media from irradiated cells and covering all possible combinations between them. The end points analyzed were clonogenic cell survival and live calcium measurements through the cellular membrane. Our data demonstrated that T98G cells produced bystander signals that decreased the survival of both reporter T98G and HaCaT cells. The bystander effect occurred only when T98G cells were exposed to doses below 1 Gy, which was corroborated by the induction of calcium fluxes. However, when bystander signals originated from HaCaT cells, the survival fraction increased in reporter T98G cells while it decreased in HaCaT cells. Moreover, the corresponding calcium data showed no calcium fluxes in T98G cells, while HaCaT cells displayed a biphasic calcium profile. In conclusion, our findings indicate a possible link between low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and bystander effects. This relationship varies depending on which cell line functions as the source of bystander signals. This further suggests that the bystander mechanisms are more complex than previously expected and caution should be taken when extrapolating bystander results across all cell lines and all radiation doses

  17. Effector Vγ9Vδ2 T cells dominate the human fetal γδ T-cell repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Dimova, Tanya; Brouwer, Margreet; Gosselin, Françoise; Tassignon, Joël; Leo, Oberdan; Donner, Catherine; Marchant, Arnaud; Vermijlen, David

    2015-01-01

    γδ T cells are unconventional T cells recognizing antigens via their γδ T-cell receptor (TCR) in a way that is fundamentally different from conventional αβ T cells. γδ T cells usually are divided into subsets according the type of Vγ and/or Vδ chain they express in their TCR. T cells expressing the TCR containing the γ-chain variable region 9 and the δ-chain variable region 2 (Vγ9Vδ2 T cells) are the predominant γδ T-cell subset in human adult peripheral blood. The current thought is that this predominance is the result of the postnatal expansion of cells expressing particular complementary-determining region 3 (CDR3) in response to encounters with microbes, especially those generating phosphoantigens derived from the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway of isoprenoid synthesis. However, here we show that, rather than requiring postnatal microbial exposure, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are the predominant blood subset in the second-trimester fetus, whereas Vδ1+ and Vδ3+ γδ T cells are present only at low frequencies at this gestational time. Fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are phosphoantigen responsive and display very limited diversity in the CDR3 of the Vγ9 chain gene, where a germline-encoded sequence accounts for >50% of all sequences, in association with a prototypic CDR3δ2. Furthermore, these fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are functionally preprogrammed (e.g., IFN-γ and granzymes-A/K), with properties of rapidly activatable innatelike T cells. Thus, enrichment for phosphoantigen-responsive effector T cells has occurred within the fetus before postnatal microbial exposure. These various characteristics have been linked in the mouse to the action of selecting elements and would establish a much stronger parallel between human and murine γδ T cells than is usually articulated. PMID:25617367

  18. Quantitative analysis of the human T cell palmitome

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Eliot; Kuropka, Benno; Kliche, Stefanie; Brügger, Britta; Krause, Eberhard; Freund, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Palmitoylation is a reversible post-translational modification used to inducibly compartmentalize proteins in cellular membranes, affecting the function of receptors and intracellular signaling proteins. The identification of protein “palmitomes” in several cell lines raises the question to what extent this modification is conserved in primary cells. Here we use primary T cells with acyl-biotin exchange and quantitative mass spectrometry to identify a pool of proteins previously unreported as palmitoylated in vivo. PMID:26111759

  19. Activation requirements and responses to TLR ligands in human CD4+ T cells: comparison of two T cell isolation techniques.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Christina L; Thomas, Jeremy J; Rojas, Roxana E

    2009-05-15

    Direct regulation of T cell function by microbial ligands through Toll-like receptors (TLR) is an emerging area of T cell biology. Currently either immunomagnetic cell sorting (IMACS) or fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), are utilized to isolate T-cell subsets for such studies. However, it is unknown to what extent differences in T cell purity between these isolation techniques influence T cell functional assays. We compared the purity, response to mitogen, activation requirements, and response to TLR ligands between human CD4(+) T cells isolated either by IMACS (IMACS-CD4(+)) or by IMACS followed by FACS (IMACS/FACS-CD4(+)). As expected, IMACS-CD4(+) were less pure than IMACS/FACS-CD4(+) (92.5%+/-1.4% versus 99.7%+/-0.2%, respectively). Consequently, IMACS-CD4(+) proliferated and produced cytokines in response to mitogen alone and had lower activation requirements compared to IMACS/FACS-CD4(+). In addition IMACS-CD4(+) but not IMACS/FACS-CD4(+) responses were upregulated by the TLR-4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). On the other hand, TLR-2 and TLR-5 engagement induced costimulation in both IMACS-CD4(+) and highly purified IMACS-/FACS-CD4(+). Altogether these results indicate that small differences in cell purity can significantly alter T cell responses to TLR ligands. This study stresses the importance of a stringent purification method when investigating the role of microbial ligands in T cell function. PMID:19272393

  20. Polyfunctional T cells accumulate in large human cytomegalovirus-specific T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, Raskit; Bajwa, Martha; Vita, Serena; Smith, Helen; Cheek, Elizabeth; Akbar, Arne; Kern, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Large cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD8 T-cell responses are observed in both young and, somewhat more often, old people. Frequent CMV reactivation is thought to exhaust these cells and render them dysfunctional so that larger numbers of them are needed to control CMV. Expansions of CMV-specific CD4 T cells are also seen but are less well studied. In this study, we examined the T-cell response to the dominant CMV pp65 and IE-1 antigens in healthy CMV-infected people across a wide age range (20 to 84 years) by using multicolor flow cytometry. CMV-specific T cells were characterized by the activation markers CD40 ligand (CD40L), interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and the memory markers CD27 and CD45RA. The proportions of effector memory T cells increased in large responses, as did the proportions of polyfunctional CD8 (IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+/-) TNF-α(+)) and CD4 (CD40L(+/-) IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+) TNF-α(+)) T-cell subsets, while the proportion of naïve T cells decreased. The bigger the CD4 or CD8 T-cell response to pp65, the larger was the proportion of T cells with an advanced memory phenotype in the entire (including non-CMV-specific) T-cell compartment. In addition, the number of activation markers per cell correlated with the degree of T-cell receptor downregulation, suggesting increased antigen sensitivity in polyfunctional cells. In summary, our findings show that polyfunctional CMV-specific T cells were not superseded by dysfunctional cells, even in very large responses. At the same time, however, the memory subset composition of the entire T-cell compartment correlated with the size of the T-cell response to CMV pp65, confirming a strong effect of CMV infection on the immune systems of some, but not all, infected people. PMID:22072753

  1. Downregulation of proapoptotic Bim augments IL-2-independent T-cell transformation by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, immortalizes and transforms primary human T cells in vitro in both an interleukin (IL)-2-dependent and IL-2-independent manner. Expression of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax transforms the growth of the mouse T-cell line CTLL-2 from being IL-2-dependent to IL-2-independent. Withdrawal of IL-2 from normal activated T cells induces apoptosis, which is mediated through the inducible expression of several proapoptotic proteins, including Bim. In this study, we found that Tax protects IL-2-depleted T cells against Bim-induced apoptosis. Withdrawal of IL-2 from CTLL-2 cells induced a prominent increase in the level of Bim protein in CTLL-2 cells, but not in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells. This inhibition of Bim in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells was mediated by two mechanisms: downregulation of Bim mRNA and posttranscriptional reduction of Bim protein. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also inhibited IL-2 depletion-induced expression of Bim, however, this decrease in Bim protein expression was not due to downregulation of Bim mRNA, thus indicating that Bim mRNA downregulation in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 occurs only after long-term expression of Tax. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also induced Erk activation, however, this was not involved in the reduction of Bim protein. Knockdown of Bim expression in CTLL-2 cells augmented Tax-induced IL-2-independent transformation. HTLV-1 infection of human T cells also reduced their levels of Bim protein, and restoring Bim expression in HTLV-1-infected cells reduced their proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that Tax-induced downregulation of Bim in HTLV-1-infected T cells promotes their IL-2-independent growth, thereby supporting the persistence of HTLV-1 infection in vivo.

  2. Development and characterization of Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine T-cell lines and clones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepe, George S., Jr.; Smith, James G.; Denman, David; Bullock, Ward E.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Several Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine cloned T-cell lines (TCLs) were isolated from spleens of C57BL/6 mice immunized with viable H. capsulatum yeast cells, using the methodology of Kimoto and Fathman (1980). These T-cells were characterized phenotypically as Thy-1.2(+) Lyt-1(+) L3T4(+) Lyt-2(-), that is, as the helper/inducer phenotype. The cloned T cells proliferate in response to histoplasmin and, in some cases, to heterologous fungal anigens. Upon injection of mice with the antigen, the T-cells mediate local delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and, after stimulation, release regulatory lymphokines.

  3. CD4 T cell activation by B cells in human Leishmania (Viannia) infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An effective adaptive immune response requires activation of specific CD4 T cells. The capacity of B cells to activate CD4 T cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) has not been evaluated. Methods CD4 T cell activation by B cells of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients was evaluated by culture of PBMCs or purified B cells and CD4 T cells with Leishmania panamensis antigens. CD4 T cell and B cell activation markers were evaluated by flow cytometry and 13 cytokines were measured in supernatants with a bead-based capture assay. The effect of Leishmania antigens on BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin was evaluated in the Ramos human B cell line by targeting the antigen with anti-IgM-biotin and anti-biotin-ovalbumin-FITC. Results Culture of PBMCs from cutaneous leishmaniasis patients with Leishmania antigens resulted in upregulation of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 as well as increased frequency of CD25hiCD127- cells among CD4 T cells. Concomitantly, B cells upregulated the costimulatory molecule CD86. These changes were not observed in PBMCs from healthy subjects, indicating participation of Leishmania-specific lymphocytes expanded in vivo. Purified B cells from these patients, when interacting with purified CD4 T cells and Leishmania antigens, were capable of inducing significant increases in CD25 and CD69 expression and CD25hiCD127- frequency in CD4 T cells. These changes were associated with upregulation of CD86 in B cells. Comparison of changes in CD4 T cell activation parameters between PBMC and B cell/CD4 T cell cultures showed no statistically significant differences; further, significant secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-13 was induced in both types of cultures. Additionally, culture with Leishmania antigens enhanced BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin in Ramos human B cells. Conclusions The capacity of B cells specific for Leishmania antigens in peripheral blood of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients to

  4. Deep Profiling Human T Cell Heterogeneity by Mass Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y; Newell, E W

    2016-01-01

    Advances of mass cytometry and high-dimensional single-cell data analysis have brought cellular immunological research into a new generation. By coupling these two powerful technology platforms, immunologists now have more tools to resolve the tremendous diversity of immune cell subsets, and their heterogeneous functionality. Since the first introduction of mass cytometry, many reports have been published using this novel technology to study a range of cell types. At the outset, studies of human hematopoietic stem cell and peripheral CD8(+) T cells using mass cytometry have shad the light of future experimental approach in interrogating immune cell phenotypic and functional diversity. Here, we briefly revisit the past and present understanding of T cell heterogeneity, and the technologies that facilitate this knowledge. In addition, we review the current progress of mass cytometry and high-dimensional cytometric analysis, including the methodology, panel design, experimental procedure, and choice of computational algorithms with a special focus on their utility in exploration of human T cell immunology.

  5. First Insight into the Kinome of Human Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    König, Sebastian; Probst-Kepper, Michael; Reinl, Tobias; Jeron, Andreas; Huehn, Jochen; Schraven, Burkhart; Jänsch, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for controlling peripheral tolerance by the active suppression of various immune cells including conventional T effector cells (Teffs). Downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR), more than 500 protein kinases encoded by the human genome have to be considered in signaling cascades regulating the activation of Tregs and Teffs, respectively. Following TCR engagement, Tregs posses a number of unique attributes, such as constitutive expression of Foxp3, hyporesponsiveness and poor cytokine production. Furthermore, recent studies showed that altered regulation of protein kinases is important for Treg function. These data indicate that signaling pathways in Tregs are distinctly organized and alterations at the level of protein kinases contribute to the unique Treg phenotype. However, kinase-based signaling networks in Tregs are poorly understood and necessitate further systematic characterization. In this study, we analyzed the differential expression of kinases in Tregs and Teffs by using a kinase-selective proteome strategy. In total, we revealed quantitative information on 185 kinases expressed in the human CD4+ T cell subsets. The majority of kinases was equally abundant in both T cell subsets, but 11 kinases were differentially expressed in Tregs. Most strikingly, Tregs showed an altered expression of cell cycle kinases including CDK6. Quantitative proteomics generates first comparative insight into the kinase complements of the CD4+ Teff and Treg subset. Treg-specific expression pattern of 11 protein kinases substantiate the current opinion that TCR-mediated signaling cascades are altered in Tregs and further suggests that Tregs exhibit significant specificities in cell-cycle control and progression. PMID:22815858

  6. Induction of Human Regulatory T Cells with Bacterial Superantigens.

    PubMed

    Caserta, Stefano; Taylor, Amanda L; Terrazzini, Nadia; Llewelyn, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress the activation of immune effector cells limit immunopathology and are fast emerging as therapeutic targets for autoimmune and cancer disease. Tools enabling Treg in vitro-induction, expansion, and characterization and manipulation will help future clinical developments. In this chapter, we describe in detail how to use bacterial superantigens to induce human Tregs efficiently from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. How to assess human Treg phenotype and suppressive capacity are also described. Technical details, variations, and alternative experimental conditions are provided.

  7. Phenotypical characterization of regulatory T cells in humans and rodents.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Perea, A L; Arcia, E D; Rueda, C M; Velilla, P A

    2016-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs ) constitute a fascinating subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells due to their ability to limit the immune response against self and non-self antigens. Murine models and antibodies directed against surface and intracellular molecules have allowed elucidation of the mechanisms that govern their development and function. However, these markers used to their classification lack of specificity, as they can be expressed by activated T cells. Similarly, there are slight differences between animal models, in steady state and pathological conditions, anatomical localization and strategy of analysis by flow cytometry. Here, we revised the most common markers utilized for Treg typification by flow cytometry such as CD25, forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) and CD127, along with our data obtained in different body compartments of humans, mice and rats. Furthermore, we revised and determined the expression of other molecules important for the phenotypical characterization of Treg cells. We draw attention to the drawbacks of those markers used in chronic states of inflammation. However, until a specific marker for the identification of Tregs is discovered, the best combination of markers will depend upon the tissue or the degree of inflammation from which Tregs derive. PMID:27124481

  8. Tetanus toxoid-specific T cell responses in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, R; Jacob, L; Herlyn, D

    1995-01-01

    SCID mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) have repeatedly been shown to produce antigen-specific B cell responses. We have derived tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific human T cell lines from cells of the peritoneal cavity, spleen and lymph nodes of SCID mice reconstituted with human PBL and boosted with TT. Establishment of these cell lines was dependent on the time interval between reconstitution of the mice with human PBL and initiation of lymphocyte cultures in vitro. When lymphocytes were collected from the mice 8 weeks after reconstitution, human lymphocytes with TT-specific proliferative activity in vitro were isolated from the peritoneal cavity and spleen, but long-term cell lines could not be established after repeated lymphocyte stimulation with TT, IL-2 and autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells. In contrast, three long-term (> 10 months) TT-specific human T cell lines were established from lymphocytes collected from two of the eight mice in the group 4 weeks after reconstitution. The T cell lines were either CD4+ (two lines derived from peritoneal cavity and lymph node, respectively) or CD8+ (one line derived from spleen) and all expressed CD3, T cell receptor alpha/beta, and human histocompatibility leucocyte class I antigen. The T cell lines, however, lacked cytotoxic, helper and suppressor activities. Thus, SCID mice can support human T cells that actively migrate to various organs and respond to antigenic stimuli both in vivo and in vitro, but these T cells lack characteristic functions. PMID:7621599

  9. New insights on human T cell development by quantitative T cell receptor gene rearrangement studies and gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Dik, Willem A.; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Weerkamp, Floor; de Ridder, Dick; de Haas, Edwin F.E.; Baert, Miranda R.M.; van der Spek, Peter; Koster, Esther E.L.; Reinders, Marcel J.T.; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.; Langerak, Anton W.; Staal, Frank J.T.

    2005-01-01

    To gain more insight into initiation and regulation of T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement during human T cell development, we analyzed TCR gene rearrangements by quantitative PCR analysis in nine consecutive T cell developmental stages, including CD34+ lin− cord blood cells as a reference. The same stages were used for gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. We show that TCR loci rearrange in a highly ordered way (TCRD-TCRG-TCRB-TCRA) and that the initiating Dδ2-Dδ3 rearrangement occurs at the most immature CD34+CD38−CD1a− stage. TCRB rearrangement starts at the CD34+CD38+CD1a− stage and complete in-frame TCRB rearrangements were first detected in the immature single positive stage. TCRB rearrangement data together with the PTCRA (pTα) expression pattern show that human TCRβ-selection occurs at the CD34+CD38+CD1a+ stage. By combining the TCR rearrangement data with gene expression data, we identified candidate factors for the initiation/regulation of TCR recombination. Our data demonstrate that a number of key events occur earlier than assumed previously; therefore, human T cell development is much more similar to murine T cell development than reported before. PMID:15928199

  10. Heterosubtypic T-Cell Immunity to Influenza in Humans: Challenges for Universal T-Cell Influenza Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Saranya

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) remains a significant global health issue causing annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic human infections with highly pathogenic avian or swine influenza viruses. Current inactivated and live vaccines are the mainstay of the public health response to influenza, although vaccine efficacy is lower against antigenically distinct viral strains. The first pandemic of the twenty-first century underlined the urgent need to develop new vaccines capable of protecting against a broad range of influenza strains. Such “universal” influenza vaccines are based on the idea of heterosubtypic immunity, wherein immune responses to epitopes conserved across IAV strains can confer protection against subsequent infection and disease. T-cells recognizing conserved antigens are a key contributor in reducing viral load and limiting disease severity during heterosubtypic infection in animal models. Recent studies undertaken during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic provided key insights into the role of cross-reactive T-cells in mediating heterosubtypic protection in humans. This review focuses on human influenza to discuss the epidemiological observations that underpin cross-protective immunity, the role of T-cells as key players in mediating heterosubtypic immunity including recent data from natural history cohort studies and the ongoing clinical development of T-cell-inducing universal influenza vaccines. The challenges and knowledge gaps for developing vaccines to generate long-lived protective T-cell responses is discussed. PMID:27242800

  11. T cell receptor V gene usage by human T cells stimulated with the superantigen streptococcal M protein

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    M proteins, the major virulence factor of group A streptococci, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and other streptococcal related autoimmune diseases. A 22-kD fragment of M type 5 protein is a potent stimulant of human T cells and has recently been shown by our laboratory to belong to the newly designated family of superantigens. Using flow cytometry and the polymerase chain reaction, we demonstrate that this molecule reacts with subsets of human T cells expressing specific T cell receptor (TCR) V beta elements, namely V beta 2, 4, and 8. We employed similar techniques to analyze the TCR V alpha usage of pep M5-stimulated T cells. These studies revealed that the preferential usage of particular V alpha elements is not specific for the superantigen; rather, it may reflect the repertoire of the individual being tested. The expansion of a large number of T cells bearing specific TCR V beta sequences by M protein may account for its role in mediating the pathogenesis of post- streptococcal diseases. Furthermore, the preferential usage of TCR V alpha elements in certain individuals may be an important factor that predisposes them to development of self-reactivity. PMID:1711564

  12. A cytoplasmic activator of DNA replication is involved in signal transduction in antigen-specific T cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wong, R L; Clark, R B; Gutowski, J K; Katz, M E; Fresa, K L; Cohen, S

    1990-05-01

    Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from T cell lines undergoing antigen-specific, interleukin-2 (IL-2)-dependent proliferation were tested for their ability to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. A tetanus toxoid (TET)-specific T cell line, established from peripheral blood of a normal human volunteer, was stimulated in the presence of relevant antigen and 1 unit/ml IL-2. Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from these cells were capable of inducing DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts to induce DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei correlated positively with the degree of proliferation induced in these cells. In contrast, incubation of this T cell line in the absence of antigen failed to induce proliferation and cytoplasmic extracts prepared from these cells induced little to no DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The factor present in the cytoplasm of T cells stimulated with relevant antigen in the presence of IL-2 is similar, if not identical, to a factor which we have previously demonstrated in cytoplasmic extracts prepared from transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines and from mitogenically stimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This factor, which we have called activator of DNA replication (ADR) is a heat-labile protein, and is inactivated by treatment with protease inhibitors, including aprotinin. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts from T cells undergoing antigen-specific, IL-2-dependent proliferation to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei was markedly inhibited in the presence of aprotinin, providing strong evidence that a cytoplasmic activator of DNA replication, ADR, is involved in the signal transduction process for antigen-specific, IL-2-dependent T cell proliferation. ADR may represent a common intracellular mediator of DNA synthesis in activated and transformed lymphocytes

  13. Characterization of a novel canine T-cell line established from a spontaneously occurring aggressive T-cell lymphoma with large granular cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Bonnefont-Rebeix, Catherine; Fournel-Fleury, Corinne; Ponce, Frédérique; Belluco, Sara; Watrelot, Dorothée; Bouteille, Sylvie E; Rapiteau, Sylvie; Razanajaona-Doll, Diane; Pin, Jean-Jacques; Leroux, Caroline; Marchal, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Dogs with lymphoma are established as good model for human non-Hodgkin lymphoma studies. Canine cell lines derived from lymphomas may be valuable tools for testing new therapeutic drugs. In this context, we established a canine T-cell line, PER-VAS, from a primary aggressive T-cell lymphoma with large granular morphology. Flow cytometric analysis revealed a stable immunophenotype: PER-VAS cells were positively labelled for CD5, CD45, MHC II and TLR3, and were negative for CD3, CD4 and CD8 expression. Although unstable along the culture process, IL-17 and MMP12 proteins were detectable as late as at passages 280 and 325i.e. respectively 24 and 29 months post isolation. At passage 325, PER-VAS cells maintained the expression of IL-17, CD3, CD56, IFNγ and TNFα mRNAs as shown by RT-PCR analysis. Stable rearrangement of the TCRγ gene has been evidenced by PCR. PER-VAS cells have a high proliferation index with a doubling time of 16.5h and were tumorigenic in Nude mice. Compared to the canine cell lines already reported, PER-VAS cells display an original expression pattern, close to NKT cells, which makes them valuable tools for in vitro comparative research on lymphomas. PMID:26345430

  14. Characterization of human T cells reactive with the Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen (MAM): generation of a monoclonal antibody against V beta 17, the T cell receptor gene product expressed by a large fraction of MAM-reactive human T cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    While all known microbial superantigens are mitogenic for human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), the functional response induced by Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen (MAM) is unique in that MAM stimulation of PBL consistently results in T cell-dependent B cell activation characterized by polyclonal IgM and IgG production. These immunostimulatory effects of MAM on the humoral arm of the human immune system warranted a more precise characterization of MAM-reactive human T cells. Using an uncloned MAM reactive human T cell line as immunogen, we have generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (termed C1) specific for the T cell receptor V beta gene expressed by the major fraction of MAM- reactive human T cells, V beta 17. In addition, a V beta 17- MAM- reactive T cell population exists, assessed by MAM, induced T cell proliferation and cytotoxic T cell activity. mAb C1 will be useful in characterizing the functional properties of V beta 17+ T cells and their potential role in autoimmune disease. PMID:1833503

  15. Differentiation of human alloreactive CD8+ T cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rentenaar, Rob J; Vosters, Jelle L G; Van Diepen, Frank N J; Remmerswaal, Ester B M; Van Lier, René A W; Ten Berge, Ineke J M

    2002-01-01

    Expansion and differentiation of alloantigen-reactive CD8+ T cells in mixed lymphocyte cultures was followed by measurement of the loss of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) fluorescence of responder cells. Proliferation of CD8+ T cells became detectable on day 4 of culture and, 2 days later, > 60% of the CD8+ T cells in culture were dividing alloreactive lymphocytes. In parallel with expansion, CD8+ T-cell differentiation was initiated, as evidenced by an increase in the number of CD45RA− and CD27− T cells and acquisition of the ability to produce interferon-γ after restimulation with the specific alloantigen. Finally, although short-term stimulation and measurement of intracellular cytokine production allowed visualization of alloreactive CD8+ T cells expanded in vitro, this procedure did not detect circulating alloreactive CD8+ T cells activated in vivo in recipients of allogeneic kidney grafts. PMID:11918689

  16. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  17. A new effect of IL-4 on human γδ T cells: promoting regulatory Vδ1 T cells via IL-10 production and inhibiting function of Vδ2 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yujia; Yin, Shanshan; Zhang, Jianmin; Hu, Yu; Huang, Bo; Cui, Lianxian; Kang, Ning; He, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) has a variety of immune functions, including helper T-cell (Th-cell) differentiation and innate immune-response processes. However, the impact of IL-4 on gamma delta (γδ) T cells remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the effects of IL-4 on the activation and proliferation of γδ T cells and the balance between variable delta 1 (Vδ1) and Vδ2 T cells in humans. The results show that IL-4 inhibits the activation of γδ T cells in the presence of γδ T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation in a STAT6-dependent manner. IL-4 promoted the growth of activated γδ T cells and increased the levels of Vδ1 T cells, which in turn inhibited Vδ2 T-cell growth via significant IL-10 secretion. Vδ1 T cells secreted significantly less interferon gamma (IFNγ) and more IL-10 relative to Vδ2. Furthermore, Vδ1 T cells showed relatively low levels of Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) expression in the presence of IL-4, suggesting that Vδ1 T cells weaken the γδ T cell-mediated anti-tumor immune response. For the first time, our findings demonstrate a negative regulatory role of IL-4 in γδ T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. PMID:25942601

  18. T-cell receptor heterogeneity of gamma delta T-cell clones from human female reproductive tissues.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Brew, R; Deniz, G; Taylor, J J

    1993-03-01

    gamma delta T cells were isolated from human decidua parietalis, decidua basalis and cervix and cloned in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2). T-cell receptor (TcR) expression was then analysed and compared with that of a panel of gamma delta T-cell clones from peripheral blood. Only 17/40 (42.5%) clones from decidua parietalis were V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ as compared to 68/94 (72%) of peripheral blood clones (P < 0.005). Conversely, 50% of clones from decidua parietalis but only 15% of clones from peripheral blood were V delta 1+ (P < 0.001). At least seven distinct TcR types were identified among the panel of clones from decidua parietalis and at least six different types were expressed by the panel of 17 clones from cervix. This receptor heterogeneity was not a result of interdonor variation as in all instances where more than one clone was obtained from a single sample, individual clones having between two and five receptor types were identified. However, 23/24 (95.8%) of clones from decidua basalis were V gamma 9+/V delta 2+. Most clones from decidua parietalis and cervix, whether V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ or V delta 1+, were positive for the mucosal lymphocyte marker, HML-1, but expression was often heterogeneous within a single clone. In contrast, almost all gamma delta T-cell clones from peripheral blood were HML-1-. Thus, unlike the mouse, gamma delta T cells within these human female reproductive tissues have a diverse TcR repertoire which, in decidua parietalis, is distinct from that of peripheral blood.

  19. Induction of Adult T-Cell Leukemia-Like Lymphoproliferative Disease and Its Inhibition by Adoptive Immunotherapy in T-Cell-Deficient Nude Rats Inoculated with Syngeneic Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Immortalized Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Takashi; Hanabuchi, Shino; Kato, Hirotomo; Koya, Yoshihiro; Takemura, Fumiyo; Hirokawa, Katsuiku; Yoshiki, Takashi; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro; Kannagi, Mari

    1999-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been shown to be the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), but the in vivo mechanism by which the virus causes the malignant transformation is largely unknown. In order to investigate the mechanisms of HTLV-1 leukemogenesis, we developed a rat model system in which ATL-like disease was reproducibly observed, following inoculation of various rat HTLV-1-immortalized cell lines. When previously established cell lines, F344-S1 and TARS-1, but not TART-1 or W7TM-1, were inoculated, systemic multiple tumor development was observed in adult nude (nu/nu) rats. FPM1 cells, newly established from a heterozygous (nu/+) rat syngeneic to nu/nu rats, caused transient tumors only at the injection site in adult nu/nu rats, but could progressively grow in newborn nu/nu rats and metastasize in lymph nodes. The derivative cell line (FPM1-V1AX) serially passed through newborn nu/nu rats acquired the potency to grow in adult nu/nu rats. These results indicated that only some with additional changes but not all of the in vitro HTLV-1-immortalized cell lines possessed in vivo tumorigenicity. Using the syngeneic system, we further showed the inhibition of tumor development by transferring splenic T cells from immunized rats, suggesting the involvement of T cells in the regression of tumors. This novel and reproducible nude rat model of human ATL would be useful for investigation of leukemogenesis and antitumor immune responses in HTLV-1 infection. PMID:10364355

  20. A rapid diagnostic test for human regulatory T-cell function to enable regulatory T-cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Canavan, James B.; Afzali, Behdad; Scottà, Cristiano; Fazekasova, Henrieta; Edozie, Francis C.; Macdonald, Thomas T.; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria P.; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lord, Graham M.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25hiCD127lo-FOXP3+ T cells [Tregs]) are a population of lymphocytes involved in the maintenance of self-tolerance. Abnormalities in function or number of Tregs are a feature of autoimmune diseases in humans. The ability to expand functional Tregs ex vivo makes them ideal candidates for autologous cell therapy to treat human autoimmune diseases and to induce tolerance to transplants. Current tests of Treg function typically take up to 120 hours, a kinetic disadvantage as clinical trials of Tregs will be critically dependent on the availability of rapid diagnostic tests before infusion into humans. Here we evaluate a 7-hour flow cytometric assay for assessing Treg function, using suppression of the activation markers CD69 and CD154 on responder T cells (CD4+CD25− [Tresp]), compared with traditional assays involving inhibition of CFSE dilution and cytokine production. In both freshly isolated and ex vivo expanded Tregs, we describe excellent correlation with gold standard suppressor cell assays. We propose that the kinetic advantage of the new assay may place it as the preferred rapid diagnostic test for the evaluation of Treg function in forthcoming clinical trials of cell therapy, enabling the translation of the large body of preclinical data into potentially useful treatments for human diseases. PMID:22219224

  1. Ligation of the functional domain of complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) is relevant for complex formation in T cell lines.

    PubMed

    Prodinger, W M; Larcher, C; Schwendinger, M; Dierich, M P

    1996-04-01

    We investigated the potential of CD21, the complement receptor type 2, to form receptor complexes with other membrane molecules on T cell lines. CD21 from T cell lines transformed with human T cell leukemia virus type I (MT2, HUT-102, C5.MJ, Mondi, and C91.PL) and T cell lines that were not virus transformed was analyzed by coprecipitation following cell lysis with digitonin. mAbs binding to functional and nonfunctional epitopes of CD21 and a polyclonal antiserum against its intracellular portion precipitated CD21, which was indistinguishable from CD21 on B cell lines. In contrast to B cells, where CD21 is complexed with CD19 and CD81 (target of anti-proliferative Ab 1) or, alternatively, with CD35 (CR1), no surface molecules could be coprecipitated with three of four mAbs from these T cell lines. Therefore, we assume that CD21 is not part of a preformed complex in T cell lines. OKB7, the only mAb directed against the functional C3d binding site, coprecipitated two proteins of 105 and 55 Mr with CD21 from MT2 and Mondi cells and from the T cell lines Jurkat E6-1 and SupT1. These bands were also recovered with CD21 precipitated from MT2 cells with C3d bound to Sepharose via the internal thioester, but were absent in CD21-expressing B cell lines. As C3d and OKB7 are functional ligands for B cells, we propose that upon ligation on T cells, CD21 associates with molecules of 105/55 Mr in the plasma membrane. Whether this is the first event of a signal delivered to the T cell is under current investigation. PMID:8786322

  2. Structure of the T-cell receptor in a Ti alpha beta, Ti gamma delta double positive T-cell line.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, J; Geisler, C

    1993-02-01

    The multichain T-cell receptor is composed of at least six different polypeptide chains. The clonotypic Ti heterodimer (Ti alpha beta or Ti gamma delta) is non-covalently associated with the CD3 chains (CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta). The exact number of subunits constituting the T-cell receptor is still not known. It has been suggested that each T-cell receptor contains two Ti dimers. To gain insight into the structure of the T-cell receptor we constructed a Ti alpha beta, Ti gamma delta double positive T-cell line which contained four functional Ti chains (Ti alpha, beta, gamma, and delta). The data demonstrated an absence of Ti dimers containing mixtures of chains other than the typical Ti alpha beta and Ti gamma delta combinations. Furthermore, by co-modulation experiments we demonstrated that the Ti alpha beta and the Ti gamma delta dimers were not expressed in the same T-cell receptor. Our data indicate that the T-cell receptor does not contain two Ti dimers.

  3. Human T Cell Crosstalk Is Induced by Tumor Membrane Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Uzana, Ronny; Eisenberg, Galit; Merims, Sharon; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Pato, Aviad; Yefenof, Eitan; Engelstein, Roni; Peretz, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC). Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+T-APCs). We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1) Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2) Fratricide (killing) of CD8+T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response. PMID:25671577

  4. Exploiting virus stealth technology for xenotransplantation: reduced human T cell responses to porcine cells expressing herpes simplex virus ICP47.

    PubMed

    Crew, Mark D; Phanavanh, Bounleut

    2003-01-01

    Direct recognition of porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins by human T cells is well documented. Eliminating donor (porcine) MHC proteins may therefore be beneficial in pig-to-human xenotransplants. To this end, we have attempted to exploit viral stealth mechanisms to eliminate pig MHC class I cell-surface expression. PK(15) (pig kidney) cells stably transfected with the herpes simplex virus (HSV) ICP47 gene [PK(15)-ICP47 cells] exhibited a dramatic reduction of MHC class I cell-surface expression when compared with untransfected PK(15) cells. To test the effect of down-regulation of porcine MHC class I on human cellular immune responses, a human CD8+ enriched T cell line (anti-PK15 T cells) with reactivity towards PK(15) cells was derived by repeated stimulation of human T cells with PK(15) cells stably transfected with the costimulatory molecule B7.1 [PK(15)-B7.1 cells]. Anti-PK15 T cells efficiently lyzed PK(15) cells but not PK(15)-ICP47 (class I negative) cells. Consistent with effector function, anti-PK15 T cells showed a robust proliferative response to PK(15)-B7.1 cells but did not proliferate at all to PK(15)-B7.1 cells which also expressed HSV ICP47. These results suggest that virus stealth technology can be exploited for xenotransplantation.

  5. Unconventional Human T Cells Accumulate at the Site of Infection in Response to Microbial Ligands and Induce Local Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Anna Rita; Kift-Morgan, Ann; Lopez-Anton, Melisa; Friberg, Ida M.; Zhang, Jingjing; Brook, Amy C.; Roberts, Gareth W.; Donovan, Kieron L.; Colmont, Chantal S.; Toleman, Mark A.; Bowen, Timothy; Johnson, David W.; Topley, Nicholas; Moser, Bernhard; Fraser, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial responsiveness and function of unconventional human T cells are poorly understood, with only limited access to relevant specimens from sites of infection. Peritonitis is a common and serious complication in individuals with end-stage kidney disease receiving peritoneal dialysis. By analyzing local and systemic immune responses in peritoneal dialysis patients presenting with acute bacterial peritonitis and monitoring individuals before and during defined infectious episodes, our data show that Vγ9/Vδ2+ γδ T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells accumulate at the site of infection with organisms producing (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate and vitamin B2, respectively. Such unconventional human T cells are major producers of IFN-γ and TNF-α in response to these ligands that are shared by many microbial pathogens and affect the cells lining the peritoneal cavity by triggering local inflammation and inducing tissue remodeling with consequences for peritoneal membrane integrity. Our data uncover a crucial role for Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in bacterial infection and suggest that they represent a useful predictive marker for important clinical outcomes, which may inform future stratification and patient management. These findings are likely to be applicable to other acute infections where local activation of unconventional T cells contributes to the antimicrobial inflammatory response. PMID:27527598

  6. Preparation of human immune effector T cells containing iron-oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Iida, Hironori; Takayanagi, Kosuke; Nakanishi, Takuya; Kume, Akiko; Muramatsu, Kouji; Kiyohara, Yoshio; Akiyama, Yasuto; Osaka, Tetsuya

    2008-12-15

    Preparation of human immune T cells containing iron-oxide nanoparticles was carried out for the development of magnetically mediated immunotherapy. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) after the incubation with magnetite nanoparticles were found to contain measurable ferric ions, which suggested the incorporation of magnetite nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) study indicated that the incorporation of magnetite nanoparticles was mediated by endocytosis of PBLs. Furthermore, the effects of dosages and diameter of magnetite nanoparticles on the magnetite incorporation were investigated, and it was demonstrated that the increase in dosage promoted the incorporation of nanoparticles and the uptake into PBLs was more effective for magnetite nanoparticles, which formed smaller aggregations in medium. Finally, the demonstration of magnetite incorporation into enriched T cells and tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) line promises the achievement of magnetically mediated immunotherapy with tumor-specific CTLs containing magnetic nanoparticles.

  7. Regulation of human tonsillar T-cell proliferation by the active metabolite of vitamin D3.

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, J D; Katz, D R; Barker, S; Fraher, L J; Hewison, M; Hendy, G N; O'Riordan, J L

    1986-01-01

    We have examined the effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 on T-cell populations isolated by buoyant density and E rosetting from human tonsils. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring the incorporation of 125iododeoxyuridine; interleukin-2 (IL-2) production was measured using an IL-2-dependent cell line, and the number of 1,25(OH)2D3 receptors was measured by whole-cell nuclear association assay. At a concentration of 10(-7) M, 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibited mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation in all E+ T-cell populations. This effect was more pronounced in the cells from the intermediate and high density layers and was reflected both in cell proliferative responses and in relative IL-2 synthesis. By adding the 1,25(OH)2D3 during the course of the mitogen assay, we demonstrated that activation of the T cell precedes the 1,25(OH)2D3-mediated inhibition. Cells that had been preincubated with mitogen in the presence of the 1,25(OH)2D3 were refractory to further stimulation by mitogens. Receptors for 1,25(OH)2D3 could not be detected in unstimulated T cells. However, activation led to the expression of high-affinity receptors for 1,25(OH)2D3. Co-incubation of the cells with mitogen and 1,25(OH)2D3 increased the number of receptors compared with mitogen alone. The effects provide further evidence for the hypothesis that 1,25(OH)2D3 is an important potential modulator of the immune system through its action on T cells. Taking our observations in conjunction with the known capacity of monocytes to hydroxylate the precursor metabolite (and thus synthesize the active form of cholecalciferol), the results support the suggestion that 1,25(OH)2D3 plays a role as a local mediator of mononuclear phagocyte-T cell interaction in human lymphomedullary tissues. PMID:3026959

  8. T cell receptor diversity in the human thymus.

    PubMed

    Vanhanen, Reetta; Heikkilä, Nelli; Aggarwal, Kunal; Hamm, David; Tarkkila, Heikki; Pätilä, Tommi; Jokiranta, T Sakari; Saramäki, Jari; Arstila, T Petteri

    2016-08-01

    A diverse T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is essential for adaptive immune responses and is generated by somatic recombination of TCRα and TCRβ gene segments in the thymus. Previous estimates of the total TCR diversity have studied the circulating mature repertoire, identifying 1 to 3×10(6) unique TCRβ and 0.5×10(6) TCRα sequences. Here we provide the first estimate of the total TCR diversity generated in the human thymus, an organ which in principle can be sampled in its entirety. High-throughput sequencing of samples from four pediatric donors detected up to 10.3×10(6) unique TCRβ sequences and 3.7×10(6) TCRα sequences, the highest directly observed diversity so far for either chain. To obtain an estimate of the total diversity we then used three different estimators, preseq and DivE, which measure the saturation of rarefaction curves, and Chao2, which measures the size of the overlap between samples. Our results provide an estimate of a thymic repertoire consisting of 40 to 70×10(6) unique TCRβ sequences and 60 to 100×10(6) TCRα sequences. The thymic repertoire is thus extremely diverse. Moreover, extrapolation of the data and comparison with earlier estimates of peripheral diversity also suggest that the thymic repertoire is transient, with different clones produced at different times.

  9. Human T-cell receptor variable gene segment families

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Clark, S.P.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    Multiple DNA and protein sequence alignments have been constructed for the human T-cell receptor {alpha}/{delta}, {beta}, and {gamma} (TCRA/D, B, and G) variable (V) gene segments. The traditional classification into subfamilies was confirmed using a much larger pool of sequences. For each sequence, a name was derived which complies with the standard nomenclature. The traditional numbering of V gene segments in the order of their discovery was continued and changed when in conflict with names of other segments. By discriminating between alleles at the same locus versus genes from different loci, we were able to reduce the number of more than 150 different TCRBV sequences in the database to a repertoire of only 47 functional TCRBV gene segments. An extension of this analysis to the over 100 TCRAV sequences results in a predicted repertoire of 42 functional TCRAV gene segments. Our alignment revealed two residues that distinguish between the highly homologous V{delta} and V{alpha}, one at a site that in V{sub H} contacts the constant region, the other at the interface between immunoglobulin V{sub H} and V{sub L}. This site may be responsible for restricted pairing between certain V{delta} and V{gamma} chains. On the other hand, V{beta} and V{gamma} appear to be related by the fact that their CDR2 length is increased by four residues as compared with that of V{alpha}/{delta} peptides. 150 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Primary responses of human T cells to mycobacteria: a frequent set of gamma/delta T cells are stimulated by protease-resistant ligands.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, K; Schoel, B; Gulle, H; Kaufmann, S H; Wagner, H

    1990-05-01

    T lymphocyte subsets expressing either T cell receptor alpha/beta or gamma/delta were selected from human peripheral blood T cells and proliferative responses to molecular mass-fractionated mycobacterial lysates were determined. alpha/beta T cells primarily responded to fractions greater than 30 kDa whereas gamma/delta T cells preferentially reacted to fractions less than 3 kDa. Protease digestion abolished the stimulating activities for alpha/beta T cells, confirming that alpha/beta T cells respond to protein components. In contrast, components recognized by gamma/delta T cells proved resistant to protease digestion. In limiting dilution studies, frequencies of proliferating gamma/delta T cells remained virtually unaltered by protease treatment of stimulating lysates, while those of alpha/beta T cells became almost undetectable. Furthermore, only few gamma/delta T cells responded to the 65-kDa heat-shock protein. Our data indicate that, unlike alpha/beta T cells, gamma/delta T cells respond to mycobacterial components which are resistant to vigorous protease digestion.

  11. Human Vδ2 versus non-Vδ2 γδ T cells in antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kabelitz, Dieter; Kalyan, Shirin; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Wesch, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    The Vδ2 and non-Vδ2 (mainly Vδ1) subsets of human γδ T cells have distinct homing patterns and recognize different types of ligands, yet both exert potent antitumor effects. While the T-cell receptor of Vδ2 T cells primarily recognizes tumor cell-derived pyrophosphates, non-Vδ2 γδ T cells preferentially recognize stress-associated surface antigens. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of Vδ2 versus non-Vδ2 γδ T cells as tools for future immunotherapeutic interventions against cancer. PMID:23802074

  12. Evidence against T-cell development in the adult human intestinal mucosa based upon lack of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase expression.

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, M E; Frantz, M E; Canning, C; Ritz, J; Blumberg, R S; Balk, S P

    1996-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that a subset of murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (iIEL), particularly those which express the CD8 alpha alpha homodimer, mature extrathymically. This study confirms that a small fraction of adult human iIEL also express the CD8 alpha alpha homodimer and demonstrates that most of these cells in the small intestine are T cells using the alpha beta T-cell receptor (TCR). Whether these cells or other subsets of adult human iIEL mature extrathymically in the intestine was assessed by measuring the expression of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT), an enzyme expressed exclusively by immature lymphocytes. Very low levels of TdT message could be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification in some iIEL samples. The level of TdT expression was assayed by competitive PCR amplification and compared with thymocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes. These measurements indicated that the number of immature T cells expressing TdT in the intestinal epithelium was less than one cell per 10(7) lymphocytes. This demonstrates that there are few if any TdT expressing immature T cells in the adult human intestinal mucosa and indicates, therefore, that T-cell development in the intestinal mucosa does not contribute significantly to the T-cell repertoire of the adult human intestine. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8778025

  13. In vitro primary sensitization and restimulation of hapten-specific T cells by fresh and cultured human epidermal Langerhans' cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moulon, C; Péguet-Navarro, J; Courtellemont, P; Redziniak, G; Schmitt, D

    1993-01-01

    We examined the capacity of human Langerhans's cells (LC) to sensitize autologous T cells to the trinitrophenyl hapten (TNP) in vitro. Two-day cultured Langerhans' cells, but not freshly prepared Langerhans' cells, can induce in vitro primary proliferative reactions to the TNP hapten. Using a CD45RA+ naive T-cell subset, similar results were found, therefore making the possibility of a previous in vivo T-cell contact with the hapten unlikely. The primary in vitro response was strongly inhibited by monoclonal antibodies to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II, CD4 antigens and ICAM-1 and LFA-3 adhesion molecules. Furthermore, we found that fresh LC can prime T cells to TNP, as revealed by a significant secondary T-cell proliferation after restimulation of the recovered T lymphocytes by fresh hapten-modified autologous LC. Nevertheless, the ability of these fresh LC to stimulate in vitro secondary hapten-specific T-cell proliferation was very limited in comparison with that of 2-day incubated Langerhans' cells. After secondary stimulation with TNP-cultured LC, sensitized T cells could be non-specifically expanded without losing hapten specificity. The TNP-specific T-cell lines were mostly of the CD4+ phenotype. The present findings extend previous studies in the mouse, showing that culture LC are potent antigen-presenting cells (APC) in primary hapten-dependent proliferation assays. Furthermore, this in vitro priming assay, using cultured human Langerhans' cells as APC, might be useful to analyse the early steps of T-cell sensitization and subsequently to develop in vitro predictive tests allowing detection of sensitizing compounds. PMID:7507088

  14. Novel immunostimulatory effects of osteoclasts and macrophages on human γδ T cells.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Angela; Thompson, Keith

    2015-02-01

    It has been widely reported that T cells are capable of influencing osteoclast formation and bone remodelling, yet relatively little is known of the reciprocal effects of osteoclasts for affecting T cell function and/or activity. In this study we investigated the effects of human osteoclasts on the function of γδ T cells, a subset of non-CD4(+) T cells implicated in a variety of inflammatory disease states. γδ T cells and CD4(+) T cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and were co-cultured with autologous mature osteoclasts (generated by treatment with M-CSF and RANKL) before phenotypical and functional changes in the T cell populations were assessed. Macrophages, osteoclasts, and conditioned medium derived from macrophages or osteoclasts induced activation of γδ T cells, as determined by the expression of the early activation marker CD69. TNFα was a major mediator of this stimulatory effect on γδ T cells. Consistent with this stimulatory effect, osteoclasts augmented proliferation of IL-2-stimulated γδ T cells and also supported the survival of unstimulated γδ and CD4(+) T cells, although these effects required co-culture with osteoclasts. Co-culture with osteoclasts also increased the proportion of γδ T cells producing IFNγ, but did not modulate IFNγ or IL-17 production by CD4(+) T cells. We provide new insights into the in vitro interactions between human γδ T cells and osteoclasts/macrophages, and demonstrate that osteoclasts or their precursors are capable of influencing γδ T function both via the release of soluble factors and also through direct cell-cell interactions.

  15. Restoration of Viral Immunity in Immunodeficient Humans by the Adoptive Transfer of T Cell Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddell, Stanley R.; Watanabe, Kathe S.; Goodrich, James M.; Li, Cheng R.; Agha, Mounzer E.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    1992-07-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells to establish immunity is an effective therapy for viral infections and tumors in animal models. The application of this approach to human disease would require the isolation and in vitro expansion of human antigen-specific T cells and evidence that such T cells persist and function in vivo after transfer. Cytomegalovirus-specific CD8^+ cytotoxic T cell (CTL) clones could be isolated from bone marrow donors, propagated in vitro, and adoptively transferred to immunodeficient bone marrow transplant recipients. No toxicity developed and the clones provided persistent reconstitution of CD8^+ cytomegalovirus-specific CTL responses.

  16. Global Analysis of O-GlcNAc Glycoproteins in Activated Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Peder J.; Elias, Joshua E.

    2016-01-01

    T cell activation in response to Ag is largely regulated by protein posttranslational modifications. Although phosphorylation has been extensively characterized in T cells, much less is known about the glycosylation of serine/threonine residues by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc). Given that O-GlcNAc appears to regulate cell signaling pathways and protein activity similarly to phosphorylation, we performed a comprehensive analysis of O-GlcNAc during T cell activation to address the functional importance of this modification and to identify the modified proteins. Activation of T cells through the TCR resulted in a global elevation of O-GlcNAc levels and in the absence of O-GlcNAc, IL-2 production and proliferation were compromised. T cell activation also led to changes in the relative expression of O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) isoforms and accumulation of OGT at the immunological synapse of murine T cells. Using a glycoproteomics approach, we identified >200 O-GlcNAc proteins in human T cells. Many of the identified proteins had a functional relationship to RNA metabolism, and consistent with a connection between O-GlcNAc and RNA, inhibition of OGT impaired nascent RNA synthesis upon T cell activation. Overall, our studies provide a global analysis of O-GlcNAc dynamics during T cell activation and the first characterization, to our knowledge, of the O-GlcNAc glycoproteome in human T cells. PMID:27655845

  17. Neonatal thymectomy reveals differentiation and plasticity within human naive T cells.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Theo; Delemarre, Eveline M; Janssen, Willemijn J M; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Broen, Jasper C; Tesselaar, Kiki; Borghans, Jose A M; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Prakken, Berent J; Mokry, Michal; Jansen, Nicolaas J G; van Wijk, Femke

    2016-03-01

    The generation of naive T cells is dependent on thymic output, but in adults, the naive T cell pool is primarily maintained by peripheral proliferation. Naive T cells have long been regarded as relatively quiescent cells; however, it was recently shown that IL-8 production is a signatory effector function of naive T cells, at least in newborns. How this functional signature relates to naive T cell dynamics and aging is unknown. Using a cohort of children and adolescents who underwent neonatal thymectomy, we demonstrate that the naive CD4+ T cell compartment in healthy humans is functionally heterogeneous and that this functional diversity is lost after neonatal thymectomy. Thymic tissue regeneration later in life resulted in functional restoration of the naive T cell compartment, implicating the thymus as having functional regenerative capacity. Together, these data shed further light on functional differentiation within the naive T cell compartment and the importance of the thymus in human naive T cell homeostasis and premature aging. In addition, these results affect and alter our current understanding on the identification of truly naive T cells and recent thymic emigrants. PMID:26901814

  18. Neonatal thymectomy reveals differentiation and plasticity within human naive T cells

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Theo; Delemarre, Eveline M.; Janssen, Willemijn J.M.; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Broen, Jasper C.; Tesselaar, Kiki; Borghans, Jose A.M.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.S.; Prakken, Berent J.; Mokry, Michal; Jansen, Nicolaas J.G.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of naive T cells is dependent on thymic output, but in adults, the naive T cell pool is primarily maintained by peripheral proliferation. Naive T cells have long been regarded as relatively quiescent cells; however, it was recently shown that IL-8 production is a signatory effector function of naive T cells, at least in newborns. How this functional signature relates to naive T cell dynamics and aging is unknown. Using a cohort of children and adolescents who underwent neonatal thymectomy, we demonstrate that the naive CD4+ T cell compartment in healthy humans is functionally heterogeneous and that this functional diversity is lost after neonatal thymectomy. Thymic tissue regeneration later in life resulted in functional restoration of the naive T cell compartment, implicating the thymus as having functional regenerative capacity. Together, these data shed further light on functional differentiation within the naive T cell compartment and the importance of the thymus in human naive T cell homeostasis and premature aging. In addition, these results affect and alter our current understanding on the identification of truly naive T cells and recent thymic emigrants. PMID:26901814

  19. Next generation adoptive immunotherapy--human T cells as carriers of therapeutic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, M W; Kahns, L; Hansen, T; Sorensen, P G; Björkdahl, O; Jensen, M R; Gundersen, H J G; Bjørnholm, T

    2007-12-01

    An important step in adoptive immunotherapy in general and specifically with respect to cancer treatment is the initiation of an inflammatory T cell response at the tumor site. Here we suggest a new concept for a controlled inflammatory response in which the intrinsic cytotoxic properties of T cells are upgraded with the properties of nanoparticles transfected into the T cells during the ex vivo expansion process. We report in vitro upgrading of human T cells using PEGylated boron carbide nanoparticles functionalised with a translocation peptide aimed at Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). A key finding is that the metabolism of such upgraded human T cells were not affected by a payload of 0.13 pg boron per cell and that the nanoparticles were retained in the cell population after several cell divisions. This is vital for transporting nanoparticles by T cells to the tumor site.

  20. Retargeting T cells to GD2 pentasaccharide on human tumors using bispecific humanized antibody

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Cheng, Ming; Guo, Hongfen; Chen, Yuedan; Huse, Morgan; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-disialoganglioside GD2 IgG antibodies have shown clinical efficacy in solid tumors that lack human leukocyte antigens (e.g. neuroblastoma) by relying on Fc-dependent cytotoxicity. However, there are pain side effects secondary to complement activation. T-cell retargeting bispecific antibodies (BsAb) also have clinical potential, but it is thus far only effective against liquid tumors. In this study, a fully humanized hu3F8-BsAb was developed, in which the anti-CD3 huOKT3 single chain Fv fragment (ScFv) was linked to the carboxyl end of the anti-GD2 hu3F8 IgG1 light chain, and was aglycosylated at N297 of Fc to prevent complement activation and cytokine storm. In vitro, hu3F8-BsAb activated T cells through classic immunological synapses, inducing GD2-specific tumor cytotoxicity at femtomolar EC50 with >105-fold selectivity over normal tissues, releasing Th1 cytokines (TNFα, IFNγ and IL2) when GD2(+) tumors were present. In separate murine neuroblastoma and melanoma xenograft models, intravenous hu3F8-BsAb activated T cells in situ and recruited intravenous T cells for tumor ablation, significantly prolonging survival from local recurrence or from metastatic disease. Hu3F8-BsAb, but not control BsAb, drove T cells and monocytes to infiltrate tumor stroma. These monocytes were necessary for sustained T-cell proliferation and/or survival and contributed significantly to the antitumor effect. The in vitro and in vivo antitumor properties of hu3F8-BsAb and its safety profile support its further clinical development as a cancer therapeutic, and provide the rationale for exploring aglycosylated IgG-scFv as a structural platform for retargeting human T cells. PMID:25542634

  1. The BMP Pathway Participates in Human Naive CD4+ T Cell Activation and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Víctor G.; Sacedón, Rosa; Hidalgo, Laura; Valencia, Jaris; Fernández-Sevilla, Lidia M.; Hernández-López, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) form a group of secreted factors that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily. Among different roles in a number of immune cell types, BMPs are known to regulate T cell development within the thymus, although the role of BMP signaling in human mature T cells remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that canonical BMP signaling is necessary during two critical events that regulate the size and function of human naive CD4+ T cell population: activation and homeostasis. Upon stimulation via TCR, naive CD4+ T cells upregulate the expression of BMP ligands triggering canonical BMP signaling in CD25+ cells. Blockade of BMP signaling severely impairs CD4+ T cell proliferation after activation mainly through regulation of IL-2, since the addition of this cytokine recuperates normal T cell expansion after inhibition of BMP signaling. Similarly, activation of canonical BMP pathway is required for both the maintenance of cell survival and the homeostatic proliferation induced by IL-7, a key factor for T cell homeostasis. Moreover, upregulation of two critical receptors for T cell homeostasis, CXCR4 and CCR9, triggered by IL-7 is also abrogated in the absence of BMP signaling. Collectively, we describe important roles of the canonical BMP signaling in human naive CD4+ T cell activation and homeostasis that could be valuable for clinical application. PMID:26110906

  2. Human lymph-node CD8+ T cells display an altered phenotype during systemic autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ramwadhdoebe, Tamara H; Hähnlein, Janine; van Kuijk, Bo J; Choi, Ivy Y; van Boven, Leonard J; Gerlag, Danielle M; Tak, Paul P; van Baarsen, Lisa G

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies are focused on auto-reactive CD4+ T cells, the precise role of CD8+ T cells in autoimmunity is poorly understood. The objective of this study is to provide more insight into the phenotype and function CD8+ T cells during the development of autoimmune disease by studying CD8+ T cells in human lymph-node biopsies and peripheral blood obtained during the earliest phases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we show that lymphoid pro-inflammatory CD8+ T cells exhibit a less-responsive phenotype already during the earliest phases of autoimmunity compared with healthy individuals. We found an increase in CD8+ memory T cells in lymphoid tissue during the earliest phases of autoimmunity, even before clinical onset of RA, accompanied by an increased frequency of non-circulating or recently activated (CD69+) CD8+ T cells in lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood. Importantly, lymphoid pro-inflammatory CD8+IL-17A+ T cells displayed a decreased capacity of cytokine production, which was related to disease activity in early RA patients. In addition, a decreased frequency of regulatory CD8+IL-10+ T cells in peripheral blood was also related to disease activity in early RA patients. Our results suggest that different CD8+ T-cell subsets are affected already during the earliest phases of systemic autoimmunity. PMID:27195110

  3. Interleukin-1 alpha produced by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I-infected T cells induces intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression on lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yuko; Ishikawa, Chie; Tamaki, Kazumi; Senba, Masachika; Fujita, Jiro; Mori, Naoki

    2011-12-01

    The pathogenic mechanism of human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-related pulmonary disease, which involves overexpression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in lung epithelial cells, was investigated. The supernatant of HTLV-I-infected Tax(+) MT-2 and C5/MJ cells induced ICAM-1 expression on A549 cells, a human tumour cell line with the properties of alveolar epithelial cells. Neutralization of ICAM-1 partially inhibited HTLV-I-infected T-cell adhesion to A549 cells. Analysis of the ICAM-1 promoter showed that the nuclear factor-kappa B-binding site was important for supernatant-induced ICAM-1 expression. Induction of interleukin (IL)-1 alpha (IL-1α) expression in MT-2 and C5/MJ cells was observed compared with uninfected controls and HTLV-I-infected Tax-negative cell lines. The significance of IL-1α as a soluble messenger was supported by blocking the biological activities of MT-2 supernatant with an IL-1α-neutralizing mAb. Moreover, Tax and IL-1α expression was demonstrated in the bronchoalveolar lavage cells of patients with HTLV-I-related pulmonary disease. Immunohistochemistry confirmed ICAM-1 and IL-1α expression in lung epithelial cells and lymphocytes of patients with HTLV-I-related pulmonary diseases, and in a transgenic mouse model of Tax expression. These results suggest that IL-1α produced by HTLV-I-infected Tax(+) T cells is crucial for ICAM-1 expression in lung epithelial cells and subsequent adhesion of lymphocytes in HTLV-I-related pulmonary diseases.

  4. Major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted cytolytic activity of human T cells: analysis of precursor frequency and effector phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.S.; Thiele, D.L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1987-12-01

    The frequency and phenotype of human T cells that mediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted cytolysis were analyzed. T cell clones were generated by culturing adherent cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a density of 0.3 cell/well with phytohemagglutinin, recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), and irradiated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and/or Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. All of the 198 clones generated by this method were T cells (CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD4/sup +/ or CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD8/sup +/) that possessed potent lytic activity against K562, an erythroleukemia line sensitive to lysis by human natural killer cells, and Cur, a renal carcinoma cell line resistant to human natural killer activity. Cytolysis, measured by /sup 51/Cr release, was MHC-unrestricted, since the clones were able to lyse MHC class I or class II negative targets, as well as MHC class I and class II negative targets. Although the clones produced tissue necrosis factor/lymphotoxin-like molecules, lysis of Cur of K562 was not mediated by a soluble factor secreted by the clones. These data indicate that the capacity for MHC-unrestricted tumoricidal activity and expression of NKH1 and CD11b, but not CD 16, are properties common to all or nearly all human peripheral blood-derived T cell clones regardless of CD4 or CD8 phenotype.

  5. Human memory T cells with a naive phenotype accumulate with aging and respond to persistent viruses.

    PubMed

    Pulko, Vesna; Davies, John S; Martinez, Carmine; Lanteri, Marion C; Busch, Michael P; Diamond, Michael S; Knox, Kenneth; Bush, Erin C; Sims, Peter A; Sinari, Shripad; Billheimer, Dean; Haddad, Elias K; Murray, Kristy O; Wertheimer, Anne M; Nikolich-Žugich, Janko

    2016-08-01

    The number of naive T cells decreases and susceptibility to new microbial infections increases with age. Here we describe a previously unknown subset of phenotypically naive human CD8(+) T cells that rapidly secreted multiple cytokines in response to persistent viral antigens but differed transcriptionally from memory and effector T cells. The frequency of these CD8(+) T cells, called 'memory T cells with a naive phenotype' (TMNP cells), increased with age and after severe acute infection and inversely correlated with the residual capacity of the immune system to respond to new infections with age. CD8(+) TMNP cells represent a potential new target for the immunotherapy of persistent infections and should be accounted for and subtracted from the naive pool if truly naive T cells are needed to respond to antigens. PMID:27270402

  6. CTLA4 mediates antigen-specific apoptosis of human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gribben, J G; Freeman, G J; Boussiotis, V A; Rennert, P; Jellis, C L; Greenfield, E; Barber, M; Restivo, V A; Ke, X; Gray, G S

    1995-01-01

    The regulation of T cell-mediated immune responses requires a balance between amplification and generation of effector function and subsequent selective termination by clonal deletion. Although apoptosis of previously activated T cells can be induced by signaling of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, these molecules do not appear to regulate T-cell clonal deletion in an antigen-specific fashion. We demonstrate that cross-linking of the inducible T-cell surface molecule CTLA4 can mediate apoptosis of previously activated human T lymphocytes. This function appears to be antigen-restricted, since a concomitant signal T-cell receptor signal is required. Regulation of this pathway may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to delete antigen-specific activated T cells. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7846057

  7. Bay 11-7082 inhibits transcription factor NF-kappaB and induces apoptosis of HTLV-I-infected T-cell lines and primary adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Mori, Naoki; Yamada, Yasuaki; Ikeda, Shuichi; Yamasaki, Yoshihiro; Tsukasaki, Kunihiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Tomonaga, Masao; Yamamoto, Naoki; Fujii, Masahiro

    2002-09-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is the causative agent of an aggressive form of leukemia designated adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). We have previously demonstrated that all T-cell lines infected with HTLV-I and primary leukemic cells from ATL patients display constitutively high activity of transcription factor NF-kappaB. In this study we showed that Bay 11-7082, an inhibitor of NF-kappaB, induced apoptosis of HTLV-I-infected T-cell lines but only negligible apoptosis of HTLV-I-negative T cells. Bay 11-7082 rapidly and efficiently reduced the DNA binding of NF-kappaB in HTLV-I-infected T-cell lines and down-regulated the expression of the antiapoptotic gene, Bcl-x(L), regulated by NF-kappaB, whereas it had little effect on the DNA binding of another transcription factor, AP-1. Although the viral protein Tax is an activator of NF-kappaB, Bay 11-7082-induced apoptosis of HTLV-I-infected cells was not associated with reduced expression of Tax. Furthermore, Bay 11-7082- induced apoptosis of primary ATL cells was more prominent than that of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and apoptosis of these cells was also associated with down-regulation of NF-kappaB activity. Our results indicate that NF-kappaB plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of HTLV-I-infected leukemic cells and that it is a suitable target for the prevention and treatment of ATL.

  8. The effects of Cyclosporine A and azathioprine on human T cells activated by different costimulatory signals

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Judith; Drobits, Karin; Pickl, Winfried F.; Majdic, Otto; Zlabinger, Gerhard; Steinberger, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Immunosuppression is an important treatment modality in transplantation and human diseases that are associated with aberrant T cell activation. There are considerable differences regarding the cellular processes targeted by the immunosuppressive drugs that are in clinical use. Drugs like azathioprine (Aza) mainly act by halting proliferation of fast dividing cells, whereas others like cyclosporine A (CsA) specifically target signaling pathways in T cells. Since the outcome of T cell responses critically depends on the quality and strength of costimulatory signals, this study has addressed the interplay between costimulation and the immunosuppressive agents CsA and Aza during the in vitro activation of human T cells. We used an experimental system that allows analyzing T cells activated in the presence of selected costimulatory ligands to study T cells stimulated via CD28, CD2, LFA-1, ICOS or 4-1BB. The mean inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for Aza and CsA were determined for the proliferation of T cells receiving different costimulatory signals as well as for T cells activated in the absence of costimulation. CD28 signals but not costimulation via CD2, 4-1BB, ICOS or LFA-1 greatly increased the IC50 for CsA. By contrast, the inhibitory effects of Aza were not influenced by T cell costimulatory signals. Our results might have implications for combining standard immunosuppressive drugs with CTLA-4Ig fusion proteins, which act by blocking CD28 costimulation. PMID:21756939

  9. Azathioprine therapy selectively ablates human Vδ2⁺ T cells in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Neil E; Hedin, Charlotte R; Sanders, Theodore J; Amon, Protima; Hoti, Inva; Ayada, Ibrahim; Baji, Vidya; Giles, Edward M; Wildemann, Martha; Bashir, Zora; Whelan, Kevin; Sanderson, Ian; Lindsay, James O; Stagg, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    Tumor-derived and bacterial phosphoantigens are recognized by unconventional lymphocytes that express a Vγ9Vδ2 T cell receptor (Vδ2 T cells) and mediate host protection against microbial infections and malignancies. Vδ2 T cells are absent in rodents but readily populate the human intestine, where their function is largely unknown. Here, we assessed Vδ2 T cell phenotype and function by flow cytometry in blood and intestinal tissue from Crohn's disease patients (CD patients) and healthy controls. Blood from CD patients included an increased percentage of gut-tropic integrin β7-expressing Vδ2 T cells, while "Th1-committed" CD27-expressing Vδ2 T cells were selectively depleted. A corresponding population of CD27+ Vδ2 T cells was present in mucosal biopsies from CD patients and produced elevated levels of TNFα compared with controls. In colonic mucosa from CD patients, Vδ2 T cell production of TNFα was reduced by pharmacological blockade of retinoic acid receptor-α (RARα) signaling, indicating that dietary vitamin metabolites can influence Vδ2 T cell function in inflamed intestine. Vδ2 T cells were ablated in blood and tissue from CD patients receiving azathioprine (AZA) therapy, and posttreatment Vδ2 T cell recovery correlated with time since drug withdrawal and inversely correlated with patient age. These results indicate that human Vδ2 T cells exert proinflammatory effects in CD that are modified by dietary vitamin metabolites and ablated by AZA therapy, which may help resolve intestinal inflammation but could increase malignancy risk by impairing systemic tumor surveillance.

  10. DOCK8 deficiency impairs CD8 T cell survival and function in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Katrina L.; Chan, Stephanie S.-Y.; Ma, Cindy S.; Fung, Ivan; Mei, Yan; Yabas, Mehmet; Tan, Andy; Arkwright, Peter D.; Al Suwairi, Wafaa; Lugo Reyes, Saul Oswaldo; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco A.; de la Luz Garcia-Cruz, Maria; Smart, Joanne M.; Picard, Capucine; Okada, Satoshi; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Lambe, Teresa; Cornall, Richard J.; Russell, Sarah; Oliaro, Jane; Tangye, Stuart G.; Bertram, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    In humans, DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome is characterized by severe cutaneous viral infections. Thus, CD8 T cell function may be compromised in the absence of DOCK8. In this study, by analyzing mutant mice and humans, we demonstrate a critical, intrinsic role for DOCK8 in peripheral CD8 T cell survival and function. DOCK8 mutation selectively diminished the abundance of circulating naive CD8 T cells in both species, and in DOCK8-deficient humans, most CD8 T cells displayed an exhausted CD45RA+CCR7− phenotype. Analyses in mice revealed the CD8 T cell abnormalities to be cell autonomous and primarily postthymic. DOCK8 mutant naive CD8 T cells had a shorter lifespan and, upon encounter with antigen on dendritic cells, exhibited poor LFA-1 synaptic polarization and a delay in the first cell division. Although DOCK8 mutant T cells underwent near-normal primary clonal expansion after primary infection with recombinant influenza virus in vivo, they showed greatly reduced memory cell persistence and recall. These findings highlight a key role for DOCK8 in the survival and function of human and mouse CD8 T cells. PMID:22006977

  11. Comparative Analysis of T Cell Imaging with Human Nuclear Reporter Genes

    PubMed Central

    Moroz, Maxim A.; Zhang, Hanwen; Lee, Jason; Moroz, Ekaterina; Zurita, Juan; Shenker, Larissa; Serganova, Inna; Blasberg, Ronald; Ponomarev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring genetically altered T cells is an important component of adoptive T cell therapy in patients, and the ability to visualize their trafficking/targeting, proliferation/expansion, and retention/death using highly sensitive reporter systems that do not induce an immunologic response would provide useful information. Therefore, we focused on human reporter gene systems that have the potential for translation to clinical studies. The objective of the in vivo imaging studies was to determine the minimum number of T cells that could be visualized with the different nuclear reporter systems. We determined the imaging sensitivity (lower limit of T cell detection) of each reporter using appropriate radiolabeled probes for PET or SPECT imaging. Methods Human T cells were transduced with retroviral vectors encoding for the human norepinephrine transporter (hNET), human sodiumiodide symporter (hNIS), a human deoxycytidine kinase double mutant (hdCKDM), and herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (hsvTK) reporter genes. After viability and growth were assessed, 105 to 3 × 106 reporter T cells were injected subcutaneously on the shoulder area. The corresponding radiolabeled probe was injected intravenously 30 min later, followed by sequential PET or SPECT imaging. Radioactivity at the T cell injection sites and in the thigh (back-ground) was measured. Results The viability and growth of experimental cells were unaffected by transduction. The hNET/meta-18F-fluorobenzylguanidine (18F-MFBG) reporter system could detect less than 1 × 105 T cells because of its high uptake in the transduced T cells and low background activity. The hNIS/124I-iodide reporter system could detect approximately 1 × 106 T cells; 124I-iodide uptake at the T cell injection site was time-dependent and associated with high background. The hdCKDM/2′-18F-fluoro-5-ethyl-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (18F-FEAU) and hsvTK/18F-FEAU reporter systems detected approximately 3 × 105 T cells

  12. Identification and Phylogeny of the First T Cell Epitope Identified from a Human Gut Bacteroides Species.

    PubMed

    Perez-Muñoz, Maria Elisa; Joglekar, Payal; Shen, Yi-Ju; Shen, Yi-Ji; Chang, Kuan Y; Peterson, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Host T cell reactivity toward gut bacterial epitopes has been recognized as part of disease pathogenesis. However, the specificity of T cells that recognize this vast number of epitopes has not yet been well described. After colonizing a C57BL/6J germ-free mouse with the human gut symbiotic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, we isolated a T cell that recognized these bacteria in vitro. Using this T cell, we mapped the first known non-carbohydrate T cell epitope within the phylum Bacteroidetes. The T cell also reacted to two other additional Bacteroides species. We identified the peptide that stimulated the T cell by using a genetic approach. Genomic data from the epitope-positive and epitope-negative bacteria explain the cross-reactivity of the T cell to multiple species. This epitope degeneracy should shape our understanding of the T cell repertoire stimulated by the complex microbiome residing in the gastrointestinal tract in both healthy and disease states. PMID:26637014

  13. Activated human T cells accomplish MHC class II expression through T cell-specific occupation of class II transactivator promoter III.

    PubMed

    Holling, Tjadine M; van der Stoep, Nienke; Quinten, Edwin; van den Elsen, Peter J

    2002-01-15

    Activated human T cells express HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DP on their surface, but the regulation and functioning of MHC class II molecules in T lymphocytes are poorly understood. Because the MHC class II transactivator (CIITA) is essential for MHC class II expression, we have investigated transcriptional activation of CIITA in activated T cells. In this study, we show that in human activated CD4(+) T cells, CIITA promoter III (CIITA-PIII) drives the expression of CIITA. The in vivo genomic footprint analysis revealed activated T cell-specific occupation of CIITA-PIII. Subsequent EMSA analysis of several promoter regions showed differences in banding pattern among activated T cells, naive T cells, primary B cells, and Raji B cells. Activating response element (ARE)-1 is shown to interact with the acute myeloid leukemia 2 transcription factor in nuclear extracts derived from both T and B cells. Interestingly, the acute myeloid leukemia 3 transcription factor was bound in nuclear extracts of T cells only. The ARE-2 sequence is able to bind CREB/activating transcription factor family members in both T and B cells. In addition, a yet unidentified Ets family member was found to interact with site C in activated T cells, whereas in B cells site C was bound by PU.1 and Pip/IFN regulatory factor 4/IFN consensus sequence binding protein for activated T cells. In Jurkat T cells, both ARE-1 and ARE-2 are crucial for CIITA-PIII activity, similar to Raji B cells. The differential banding pattern in in vivo genomic footprinting and transcription factor binding at the ARE-1 and site C between T cells and B cells probably reflects differences in CIITA-PIII activation pathways employed by these cell types. PMID:11777970

  14. Generation of functional CD8+ T Cells by human dendritic cells expressing glypican-3 epitopes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glypican 3 (GPC-3) is an oncofoetal protein that is expressed in most hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). Since it is a potential target for T cell immunotherapy, we investigated the generation of functional, GPC-3 specific T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods Dendritic cells (DC) were derived from adherent PBMC cultured at 37°C for 7 days in X-Vivo, 1% autologous plasma, and 800 u/ml GM-CSF plus 500 u/ml IL-4. Immature DC were transfected with 20 μg of in vitro synthesised GPC-3 mRNA by electroporation using the Easy-ject plus system (Equibio, UK) (300 V, 150 μF and 4 ms pulse time), or pulsed with peptide, and subsequently matured with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Six predicted GPC-3 peptide epitopes were synthesized using standard f-moc technology and tested for their binding affinity to HLA-A2.1 molecules using the cell line T2. Results DC transfected with GPC-3 mRNA but not control DC demonstrated strong intracellular staining for GPC-3 and in vitro generated interferon-gamma expressing T cells from autologous PBMC harvested from normal subjects. One peptide, GPC-3522-530 FLAELAYDL, fulfilled our criteria as a naturally processed, HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope: i) it showed high affinity binding to HLA-A2, in T2 cell binding assay; ii) it was generated by the MHC class I processing pathway in DC transfected with GPC-3 mRNA, and iii) HLA-A2 positive DC loaded with the peptide stimulated proliferation in autologous T cells and generated CTL that lysed HLA-A2 and GPC-3 positive target cells. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that electroporation of GPC-3 mRNA is an efficient method to load human monocyte-derived DC with antigen because in vitro they generated GPC-3-reactive T cells that were functional, as shown by interferon-gamma production. Furthermore, this study identified a novel naturally processed, HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope, GPC-3522-530 FLAELAYDL, which can be used to monitor HLA-A2

  15. Sleeping beauty system to redirect T-cell specificity for human applications.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Sourindra N; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Dawson, Margaret; Figliola, Matthew; Olivares, Simon; Rao, Pullavathi; Zhao, Yi Jue; Multani, Asha; Yang, Ge; Zhang, Ling; Crossland, Denise; Ang, Sonny; Torikai, Hiroki; Rabinovich, Brian; Lee, Dean A; Kebriaei, Partow; Hackett, Perry; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-02-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase DNA plasmid system is used to genetically modify cells for long-term transgene expression. We adapted the SB system for human application and generated T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for CD19. Electrotransfer of CD19-specific SB DNA plasmids in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and propagation on CD19 artificial antigen presenting cells was used to numerically expand CD3 T cells expressing CAR. By day 28 of coculture, >90% of expanded CD3 T cells expressed CAR. CAR T cells specifically killed CD19 target cells and consisted of subsets expressing biomarkers consistent with central memory, effector memory, and effector phenotypes. CAR T cells contracted numerically in the absence of the CD19 antigen, did not express SB11 transposase, and maintained a polyclonal TCR Vα and TCR Vβ repertoire. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that CAR T cells preserved the telomere length. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization showed CAR transposon integrated on average once per T-cell genome. CAR T cells in peripheral blood can be detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction at a sensitivity of 0.01%. These findings lay the groundwork as the basis of our first-in-human clinical trials of the nonviral SB system for the investigational treatment of CD19 B-cell malignancies (currently under 3 INDs: 14193, 14577, and 14739). PMID:23377665

  16. CD56+ T Cells Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus Replication in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Li; Wang, Xu; Wang, Shihong; Wang, Yanjian; Song, Li; Hou, Wei; Zhou, Lin; Li, He; Ho, Wenzhe

    2009-01-01

    CD56+ T cells are abundant in liver and play an important role in defense against viral infections. However, the role of CD56+ T cells in control of HCV infection remains to be determined. We investigated the noncytolytic anti-HCV activity of primary CD56+ T cells in human hepatocytes. When HCV JFH-1-infected hepatocytes were co-cultured with CD56+ T cells or incubated in media conditioned with CD56+ T cell culture supernatants (SN), HCV infectivity and replication were significantly inhibited. The antibodies to interferon (IFN)-γ or IFN-γ receptor could largely block CD56+ T cell-mediated anti-HCV activity. Investigation of mechanism(s) responsible for CD56+ T cell-mediated noncytolytic anti-HCV activity showed that CD56+ T SN activated the multiple elements of janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway and enhanced the expression of IFN regulatory factors (IRFs) 1, 3, 7, 8 and 9, resulting in the induction of endogenous IFN-α/β expression in hepatocytes. Moreover, CD56+ T SN treatment inhibited the expression of HCV-supportive miRNA-122 and enhanced the levels of anti-HCV miRNA-196a in human hepatocytes. Conclusion: These findings provide direct in vitro evidence at cellular and molecular levels that CD56+ T cells may have an essential role in innate immune cell-mediated defense against HCV infection. PMID:19085952

  17. Complement receptor type 1 (CR1/CD35) expressed on activated human CD4+ T cells contributes to generation of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Török, Katalin; Dezső, Balázs; Bencsik, András; Uzonyi, Barbara; Erdei, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The role of complement in the regulation of T cell immunity has been highlighted recently by several groups. We were prompted to reinvestigate the role of complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) [corrected] in human T cells based on our earlier data showing that activated human T cells produce C3 (Torok et al. (2012) [48]) and also by results demonstrating that engagement of Membrane Cofactor Protein (MCP, CD46) induces a switch of anti-CD35-activated [corrected] helper T cells into regulatory T cells (Kemper et al. (2003) [17]). We demonstrate here that co-ligation of CD46 and CD35, [corrected] the two C3b-binding structures present on activated CD4+ human T cells significantly enhances CD25 expression, elevates granzyme B production and synergistically augments cell proliferation. The role of CR1 in the development of the Treg phenotype was further confirmed by demonstrating that its engagement enhances IL-10 production and reduces IFNγ release by the activated CD4+ T cells in the presence of excess IL-2. The functional in vivo relevance of our findings was highlighted by the immunohistochemical staining of tonsils, revealing the presence of CD4/CD35 [corrected] double positive lymphocytes mainly in the inter-follicular regions where direct contact between CD4+ T cells and B lymphocytes occurs. Regarding the in vivo relevance of the complement-dependent generation of regulatory T cells in secondary lymphoid organs we propose a scenario shown in the figure. The depicted process involves the sequential binding of locally produced C3 fragments to CD46 and CD35 [corrected] expressed on activated T cells, which - in the presence of excess IL-2 - leads to the development of Treg cells.

  18. Ikaros Induces Quiescence and T-Cell Differentiation in a Leukemia Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Kathrein, Katie L.; Lorenz, Rachelle; Innes, Angela Minniti; Griffiths, Erin; Winandy, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Ikaros is a hematopoietic cell-specific zinc finger DNA binding protein that plays an important role in lymphocyte development. Genetic disruption of Ikaros results in T-cell transformation. Ikaros null mice develop leukemia with 100% penetrance. It has been hypothesized that Ikaros controls gene expression through its association with chromatin remodeling complexes. The development of leukemia in Ikaros null mice suggests that Ikaros has the characteristics of a tumor suppressor gene. In this report, we show that the introduction of Ikaros into an established mouse Ikaros null T leukemia cell line leads to growth arrest at the G0/G1 stage of the cell cycle. This arrest is associated with up-regulation of the cell cycle-dependent kinase inhibitor p27kip1, the induction of expression of T-cell differentiation markers, and a global and specific increase in histone H3 acetylation status. These studies provide strong evidence that Ikaros possesses the properties of a bona fide tumor suppressor gene for the T-cell lineage and offer insight into the mechanism of Ikaros's tumor suppressive activity. PMID:15713624

  19. Human CD8+ T Cells Clear Cryptosporidium parvum from Infected Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pantenburg, Birte; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Dann, Sara M.; Connelly, Rhykka L.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Ward, Honorine D.; Clinton White, A.

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular protozoans of the genus Cryptosporidium are a major cause of diarrheal illness worldwide, especially in immunocompromised individuals. CD4+ T cells and interferon-gamma are key factors in the control of cryptosporidiosis in human and murine models. Previous studies led us to hypothesize that CD8+ T cells contribute to clearance of intestinal epithelial Cryptosporidium infection in humans. We report here that antigen expanded sensitized CD8+ T cells reduce the parasite load in infected intestinal epithelial cell cultures and lyse infected intestinal epithelial cells. These effects are most likely mediated by the release of cytotoxic granules. Elimination of parasites seems to require antigen presentation through both human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A and HLA-B. These data suggest that cytotoxic CD8+ T cells play a role in clearing Cryptosporidium from the intestine, a previously unrecognized feature of the human immune response against this parasite. PMID:20348507

  20. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) A*1101-Restricted Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific T-cell Receptor Gene Transfer to Target Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong; Parsonage, Greg; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Machado, Lee R; James, Christine H; Salman, Asmaa; Searle, Peter F; Hui, Edwin P; Chan, Anthony T C; Lee, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Infusing virus-specific T cells is effective treatment for rare Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated posttransplant lymphomas, and more limited success has been reported using this approach to treat a far more common EBV-associated malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, current approaches using EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines to reactivate EBV-specific T cells for infusion take 2 to 3 months of in vitro culture and favor outgrowth of T cells targeting viral antigens expressed within EBV(+) lymphomas, but not in NPC. Here, we explore T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer to rapidly and reliably generate T cells specific for the NPC-associated viral protein LMP2. We cloned a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A*1101-restricted TCR, which would be widely applicable because 40% of NPC patients carry this HLA allele. Studying both the wild-type and modified forms, we have optimized expression of the TCR and demonstrated high-avidity antigen-specific function (proliferation, cytotoxicity, and cytokine release) in both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. The engineered T cells also inhibited LMP2(+) epithelial tumor growth in a mouse model. Furthermore, transduced T cells from patients with advanced NPC lysed LMP2-expressing NPC cell lines. Using this approach, within a few days large numbers of high-avidity LMP2-specific T cells can be generated reliably to treat NPC, thus providing an ideal clinical setting to test TCR gene transfer without the risk of autoimmunity through targeting self-antigens.

  1. Grouping Annotations on the Subcellular Layered Interactome Demonstrates Enhanced Autophagy Activity in a Recurrent Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis T Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Dong, Yucui; Ju, Huanyu; Yang, Jinfeng; Sun, Jianhua; Li, Xia; Ren, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Human uveitis is a type of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that often shows relapse–remitting courses affecting multiple biological processes. As a cytoplasmic process, autophagy has been seen as an adaptive response to cell death and survival, yet the link between autophagy and T cell-mediated autoimmunity is not certain. In this study, based on the differentially expressed genes (GSE19652) between the recurrent versus monophasic T cell lines, whose adoptive transfer to susceptible animals may result in respective recurrent or monophasic uveitis, we proposed grouping annotations on a subcellular layered interactome framework to analyze the specific bioprocesses that are linked to the recurrence of T cell autoimmunity. That is, the subcellular layered interactome was established by the Cytoscape and Cerebral plugin based on differential expression, global interactome, and subcellular localization information. Then, the layered interactomes were grouping annotated by the ClueGO plugin based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. The analysis showed that significant bioprocesses with autophagy were orchestrated in the cytoplasmic layered interactome and that mTOR may have a regulatory role in it. Furthermore, by setting up recurrent and monophasic uveitis in Lewis rats, we confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that, in comparison to the monophasic disease, recurrent uveitis in vivo showed significantly increased autophagy activity and extended lymphocyte infiltration to the affected retina. In summary, our framework methodology is a useful tool to disclose specific bioprocesses and molecular targets that can be attributed to a certain disease. Our results indicated that targeted inhibition of autophagy pathways may perturb the recurrence of uveitis. PMID:25116327

  2. T cell responses to human platelet antigen–1a involve a unique form of indirect allorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Ahlen, Maria Therese; Husebekk, Anne; Killie, Ida Løken; Skogen, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a pregnancy-related condition caused by maternal antibodies binding an alloantigen on fetal platelets. In most cases the alloantigen is formed by a single amino acid, integrin β3 Leu33, referred to as human platelet antigen–1a (HPA-1a). Production of anti–HPA-1a antibodies likely depends on CD4+ T cells that recognize the same alloantigen in complex with the HLA-DRA/DRB3*01:01 molecule. While this complex is well characterized, T cell recognition of it is not. Here, to examine the nature of antigen recognition by HPA-1a–specific T cells, we assayed native and synthetic variants of the integrin β3 peptide antigen for binding to DRA/DRB3*01:01-positive antigen-presenting cells and for T cell activation. We found that HPA-1a–specific T cells recognize non-allogeneic integrin β3 residues anchored to DRA/DRB3*01:01 by the allogeneic Leu33, which itself is not directly recognized by these T cells. Furthermore, these T cell responses are diverse, with different T cells depending on different residues for recognition. This represents a unique form of indirect allorecognition in which a non-allogeneic peptide sequence becomes immunogenic by stable anchoring to MHC by an allogeneic residue.

  3. T cell responses to human platelet antigen–1a involve a unique form of indirect allorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Ahlen, Maria Therese; Husebekk, Anne; Killie, Ida Løken; Skogen, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a pregnancy-related condition caused by maternal antibodies binding an alloantigen on fetal platelets. In most cases the alloantigen is formed by a single amino acid, integrin β3 Leu33, referred to as human platelet antigen–1a (HPA-1a). Production of anti–HPA-1a antibodies likely depends on CD4+ T cells that recognize the same alloantigen in complex with the HLA-DRA/DRB3*01:01 molecule. While this complex is well characterized, T cell recognition of it is not. Here, to examine the nature of antigen recognition by HPA-1a–specific T cells, we assayed native and synthetic variants of the integrin β3 peptide antigen for binding to DRA/DRB3*01:01-positive antigen-presenting cells and for T cell activation. We found that HPA-1a–specific T cells recognize non-allogeneic integrin β3 residues anchored to DRA/DRB3*01:01 by the allogeneic Leu33, which itself is not directly recognized by these T cells. Furthermore, these T cell responses are diverse, with different T cells depending on different residues for recognition. This represents a unique form of indirect allorecognition in which a non-allogeneic peptide sequence becomes immunogenic by stable anchoring to MHC by an allogeneic residue. PMID:27699233

  4. TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 expression in human CD4+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Hayley G.; Roostalu, Urmas; Walter, Gina J.; Gullick, Nicola J.; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Roberts, Ceri A.; Sumner, Jonathan; Baeten, Dominique L.; Gerwien, Jens G.; Cope, Andrew P.; Geissmann, Frederic; Kirkham, Bruce W.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2014-02-01

    IL-17+ CD4+ T (Th17) cells contribute to the pathogenesis of several human inflammatory diseases. Here we demonstrate that TNF inhibitor (TNFi) drugs induce the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. TNFi-mediated induction of IL-10 in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells is Treg-/Foxp3-independent, requires IL-10 and is overcome by IL-1β. TNFi-exposed IL-17+ CD4+ T cells are molecularly and functionally distinct, with a unique gene signature characterized by expression of IL10 and IKZF3 (encoding Aiolos). We show that Aiolos binds conserved regions in the IL10 locus in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, IKZF3 and IL10 expression levels correlate in primary CD4+ T cells and Aiolos overexpression is sufficient to drive IL10 in these cells. Our data demonstrate that TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including Th17 cells and suggest a role for the transcription factor Aiolos in the regulation of IL-10 in CD4+ T cells.

  5. Human CD4+ T cells require exogenous cystine for glutathione and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Levring, Trine B; Kongsbak, Martin; Rode, Anna K O; Woetmann, Anders; Ødum, Niels; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Geisler, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Adaptive immune responses require activation and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. Whereas early T cell activation is independent of exogenous cystine (Cys2), T cell proliferation is dependent of Cys2. However, the exact roles of Cys2 in T cell proliferation still need to be determined. The aim of this study was to elucidate why activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 in order to proliferate. We activated purified naïve human CD4+ T cells and found that glutathione (GSH) levels and DNA synthesis were dependent on Cys2 and increased in parallel with increasing concentrations of Cys2. Vice-versa, the GSH synthesis inhibitor L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) and inhibition of Cys2 uptake with glutamate inhibited GSH and DNA synthesis in parallel. We further found that thioredoxin (Trx) can partly substitute for GSH during DNA synthesis. Finally, we show that GSH or Trx is required for the activity of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the enzyme responsible for generation of the deoxyribonucleotide DNA building blocks. In conclusion, we show that activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 to proliferate and that this is partly explained by the fact that Cys2 is required for production of GSH, which in turn is required for optimal RNR-mediated deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and DNA replication.

  6. Echinococcus granulosus-specific T-cell lines derived from patients at various clinical stages of cystic echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Riganò, R; Buttari, B; De Falco, E; Profumo, E; Ortona, E; Margutti, P; Scottà, C; Teggi, A; Siracusano, A

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the role of T lymphocytes in the immune response to Echinococcus granulosus, using sheep hydatid fluid (SHF) and antigen B (AgB), we generated T-cell lines from patients with active, transitional and inactive hydatid cysts. We established 16 T-cell lines, eight specific to SHF and eight specific to AgB. At surface phenotyping 88-98% of cells displayed the helper/inducer CD4 antigen. In all patients, at all clinical stages of hydatid cyst disease, T-cell stimulation with SHF and AgB invariably amplified a large number of almost identical Vbeta subfamily fragments. Irrespective of antigen-specificity, the two cell lines from the patient with an inactive cyst had a Th1 profile, because they exclusively expressed and produced IFN-gamma. Conversely, the T-cell lines derived from the seven patients with active and transitional hydatid cysts had mixed Th1/Th2 and Th0 clones. The functional characteristics of the 16 T-cell lines differed markedly in the various clinical stages of cystic echinococcosis, thus providing new in vitro evidence that Th1 lymphocytes contribute decisively to the inactive stage of hydatid disease, Th2 lymphocytes in the active and transitional stages. The parasite-specific T-cell lines, especially the two Th1 lines from the patient with an inactive cyst, may help identify Th1 protective epitopes on SHF and AgB.

  7. Suppression of human T-cell leukemia virus I gene expression by pokeweed antiviral protein.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Sheila; Choudhary, Gunjan; Sarzala, Paulina M; Ratner, Lee; Hudak, Katalin A

    2009-11-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus I (HTLV-I) is a deltaretrovirus that is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and the neurological disorder HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Currently, no effective antiretroviral treatment options are available to restrict the development of diseases associated with the virus. In this work, we investigated the activity of pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) on HTLV-I, when expressed from a proviral clone in 293T cells or in an HTLV-I immortalized cell line. PAP is a plant-derived N-glycosidase that exhibits antiviral activity against a number of viruses; however, its mode of action has not been clearly defined. Here, we describe the mechanism by which PAP inhibited production of HTLV-I. We show that PAP depurinated nucleotides within the gag open reading frame and suppressed the synthesis of viral proteins in part by decreasing the translational efficiency of HTLV-I gag/pol mRNA. Observed reduction in levels of viral mRNAs were not due to enhanced degradation; rather, decreased amounts of viral transactivator protein, Tax, led to feed-back inhibition of transcription from the viral promoter. Therefore, PAP efficiently suppressed HTLV-I gene expression at both translational and transcriptional levels, resulting in substantially diminished virus production. Significantly, no changes in viability or rates of cellular transcription or translation were observed in cells expressing PAP, indicating that this protein was not toxic. Antiviral activity, together with the absence of cytotoxicity, supports further investigation of this enzyme as a novel therapeutic agent against the progression of HTLV-I infection.

  8. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine candidates using human CD4+ T-cells expression cloning

    PubMed Central

    Coler, Rhea N.; Dillon, Davin C.; Skeiky, Yasir A. W.; Kahn, Maria; Orme, Ian M.; Lobet, Yves; Reed, Steven G.; Alderson, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    To identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens as candidates for a subunit vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), we have employed a CD4+ T-cell expression screening method. Mtb-specific CD4+ T-cell lines from nine healthy PPD positive donors were stimulated with different antigenic substrates including autologous dendritic cells (DC) infected with Mtb, culture filtrate proteins (CFP), and purified protein derivative of Mtb (PPD). These lines were used to screen a genomic Mtb library expressed in Escherichia coli and processed and presented by autologous DC. This screening led to the recovery of numerous T-cell antigens, including both novel and previously described antigens. One of these novel antigens, referred to as Mtb9.8 (Rv0287), was recognized by multiple T-cell lines, stimulated with either Mtb-infected DC or CFP. Using the mouse and guinea pig models of TB, high levels of IFN-γ were produced, and solid protection from Mtb challenge was observed following immunization with Mtb9.8 formulated in either AS02A or AS01B Adjuvant Systems. These results demonstrate that T-cell screening of the Mtb genome can be used to identify CD4+ T-cell antigens that are candidates for vaccine development. PMID:19000730

  9. Human CD4 T cell epitopes selective for Vaccinia versus Variola virus.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alicia; Besse, Aurore; Favry, Emmanuel; Imbert, Gilles; Tanchou, Valérie; Castelli, Florence Anne; Maillere, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Due to the high degree of sequence identity between Orthopoxvirus species, the specific B and T cell responses raised against these viruses are largely cross-reactive and poorly selective. We therefore searched for CD4 T cell epitopes present in the conserved parts of the Vaccinia genome (VACV) but absent from Variola viruses (VARV), with a view to identifying immunogenic sequences selective for VACV. We identified three long peptide fragments from the B7R, B10R and E7R proteins by in silico comparisons of the poxvirus genomes, and evaluated the recognition of these fragments by VACV-specific T cell lines derived from healthy donors. For the 12 CD4 T cell epitopes identified, we assessed their binding to common HLA-DR allotypes and their capacity to induce peptide-specific CD4 T-cell lines. Four peptides from B7R and B10R displayed a broad binding specificity for HLA-DR molecules and induced multiple T cell lines from healthy donors. Besides their absence from VARV, the two B10R peptide sequences were mutated in the Cowpox virus and completely absent from the Monkeypox genome. This work contributes to the development of differential diagnosis of poxvirus infections.

  10. Distinct Effects of IL-18 on the Engraftment and Function of Human Effector CD8+ T Cells and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn; Liu, Ronghua; Jiang, Shuguang; Albelda, Steven M.; Golovina, Tatiana; Coukos, George; Riley, James L.; Jonak, Zdenka L.; June, Carl H.

    2008-01-01

    IL-18 has pleotropic effects on the activation of T cells during antigen presentation. We investigated the effects of human IL-18 on the engraftment and function of human T cell subsets in xenograft mouse models. IL-18 enhanced the engraftment of human CD8+ effector T cells and promoted the development of xenogeneic graft versus host disease (GVHD). In marked contrast, IL-18 had reciprocal effects on the engraftment of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the xenografted mice. Adoptive transfer experiments indicated that IL-18 prevented the suppressive effects of Tregs on the development of xenogeneic GVHD. The IL-18 results were robust as they were observed in two different mouse strains. In addition, the effects of IL-18 were systemic as IL-18 promoted engraftment and persistence of human effector T cells and decreased Tregs in peripheral blood, peritoneal cavity, spleen and liver. In vitro experiments indicated that the expression of the IL-18Rα was induced on both CD4 and CD8 effector T cells and Tregs, and that the duration of expression was less sustained on Tregs. These preclinical data suggest that human IL-18 may have use as an adjuvant for immune reconstitution after cytotoxic therapies, and to augment adoptive immunotherapy, donor leukocyte infusions, and vaccine strategies. PMID:18818761

  11. Genomic organization of the human T-cell receptor variable {alpha} (TCRAV) gene cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Ibberson, M.R.; Copier, J.P.; So, A.K.

    1995-07-20

    A long-range physical map of the human T-cell receptor variable {alpha} (TCRAV) locus was produced using 23 V{alpha} subgroup-specific probes. Linkage disequilibrium across the locus was also studied using polymorphic TCRAV markers. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to map V{alpha} gene segments onto one SfiI fragment of 500 kb and two of 200 kb using DNA from peripheral blood neutrophils. PCR and conventional Southern techniques on Jurkat, CEM, and H9 T-cell lines were used to establish the 5{prime} to 3{prime} order of the gene segments and the relative positions of V{alpha} gene segments on the SfiI fragments. The linkage disequilibrium study used single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis to genotype 100 normal caucasoid subjects for TCRAV5S1, V6S1, V8S1, V17S1, and V21S1 polymorphisms. Strong linkage disequilibrium was detected between V5S1 and V8S1, in concordance with the physical map. This new information will be useful for future studies of genetic variation at the TCRAV locus, its role in the shaping of the TCR repertoire, and its possible contribution to autoimmune diseases. 46 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. The mucosal T cell integrin alpha M290 beta 7 recognizes a ligand on mucosal epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Roberts, K; Kilshaw, P J

    1993-07-01

    The integrin alpha M290 beta 7 is expressed at high levels on mucosal T cells, particularly on those within the epithelium of the gut. We now report that a mouse T cell hybridoma, MTC-1, with similar surface expression of this molecule, adhered strongly to cells of the mouse rectal carcinoma line CMT93 and that adhesion was blocked completely by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) M290. Other mAb to the alpha M290 or beta 7 subunits had little or no inhibitory effect. M290 also inhibited adhesion of the hybridoma to cells of the mouse lung carcinomas CTM64/61 and KLN205 but had little or no effect on adhesion to seven other mouse epithelial cell lines or to the human colon carcinoma line, HT29. Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) isolated from the small intestine of BALB/c mice displayed potent T cell receptor-dependent cytotoxic effector function against CMT93 in the presence of low concentrations of Phytolacca americana lectin. This cytotoxic activity also was inhibited by the M290 mAb. Treatment of CMT93 cells with tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma induced expression de novo of ICAM-1 and reduced the inhibitory effect of M290 in tests both for adhesion and cytotoxicity. In further experiments cytotoxic activity of IEL against the mastocytoma P815 was investigated. This target cell was considered not to possess a ligand for the integrin. In this case cytotoxic effector function was triggered by anti-CD3 mAb and, in contrast to results with CMT93, target cell lysis was increased in the presence of M290 and other antibodies to the integrin, suggesting a co-stimulatory effect. These results show that alpha M290 beta 7 recognizes a ligand on the surface of certain epithelial cell lines. Further, they provide the first clear indication that this integrin may play an important role in functional interactions between T cells and the mucosal epithelium.

  13. Human cartilage aggrecan CS1 region contains cryptic T-cell recognition sites.

    PubMed Central

    Goodacre, J A; Middleton, S; Lynn, S; Ross, D A; Pearson, J

    1993-01-01

    Cartilage proteoglycan aggregates (PG) are candidate T-cell autoantigens in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We have investigated the possibility that responses to class II-restricted T-cell recognition sites in human cartilage aggrecan (core protein) may depend upon whether these sites are available as free peptide antigens or as part of intact monomers. Analysis of mouse T-cell responses to intact or deglycosylated monomers, purified from human articular cartilage, and to synthetic peptides of the chondroitin sulphate (CS) attachment region homologous repeat sequence showed that recognition of T-cell epitopes in the CS1 region was strongly dependent upon the form of antigen used. The results show that the CS1 region contains cryptic T-cell recognition sites and raise the possibility that fragments of PG, released through the action of extracellular proteases in inflamed joints, may be capable of activating T cells with specificities for epitopes which are not made available following processing of intact PG. T cells with specificities for cryptic epitopes in PG may play a role in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:8388364

  14. Aging and cytomegalovirus infection differentially and jointly affect distinct circulating T cell subsets in humans.

    PubMed

    Wertheimer, Anne M; Bennett, Michael S; Park, Byung; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L; Martinez, Carmine; Pulko, Vesna; Currier, Noreen L; Nikolich-Žugich, Dragana; Kaye, Jeffrey; Nikolich-Žugich, Janko

    2014-03-01

    The impact of intrinsic aging upon human peripheral blood T cell subsets remains incompletely quantified and understood. This impact must be distinguished from the influence of latent persistent microorganisms, particularly CMV, which has been associated with age-related changes in the T cell pool. In a cross-sectional cohort of 152 CMV-negative individuals, aged 21-101 y, we found that aging correlated strictly to an absolute loss of naive CD8, but not CD4, T cells but, contrary to many reports, did not lead to an increase in memory T cell numbers. The loss of naive CD8 T cells was not altered by CMV in 239 subjects (range 21-96 y), but the decline in CD4(+) naive cells showed significance in CMV(+) individuals. These individuals also exhibited an absolute increase in the effector/effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells with age. That increase was seen mainly, if not exclusively, in older subjects with elevated anti-CMV Ab titers, suggesting that efficacy of viral control over time may determine the magnitude of CMV impact upon T cell memory, and perhaps upon immune defense. These findings provide important new insights into the age-related changes in the peripheral blood pool of older adults, demonstrating that aging and CMV exert both distinct and joint influence upon blood T cell homeostasis in humans. PMID:24501199

  15. Noncytotoxic T cell clones obtained from a human mixed leukocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Chu, M H; Wee, S L; Bach, F H

    1990-02-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a DQW-1 homozygous individual were cocultured with irradiated lymphoblastoid cell line from a DQW-1 homozygous unrelated donor bearing BW35-DW1 haplotype. From T cell cloning of primary and twice-stimulated mixed leukocyte cultures (MLC), 7 and 11 T cell clones were obtained respectively. None of the 18 clones showed specific cytotoxic activity against the alloantigen of the stimulator cell as well as natural killer (NK)-like activity against K562 cells. However, most T cell clones from both primary and re-stimulated MLC demonstrated moderate cytotoxic activity in lectin-dependent cell-mediated cytolysis (LDCC) assay. Screening assay for cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) performed on growing microcultures obtained from restimulated MLC cloning confirmed the non-cytotoxic status of these T cell clones by showing that 41 out of 44 growing microcultures were not cytotoxic against the stimulator cell; the other 3 clones lyzed the target cell mildly. The cells from all 5 T cell clones detected for indirect fluorescence expressed CD3 and CD4 surface markers. Taken together, the results suggested that proliferation-regulating T cell subsets or factor(s) may be generated during the course of MLCs under the present responder-stimulator combination, and may suppress the development of alloreactive cytotoxic T cells and NK-like cells. PMID:2144231

  16. Sequestration from Immune CD4^+ T Cells of Mycobacteria Growing in Human Macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancholi, Preeti; Mirza, Asra; Bhardwaj, Nina; Steinman, Ralph M.

    1993-05-01

    CD4^+ helper T cells mediate resistance to tuberculosis, presumably by enhancing the antimicrobial activity of macrophages within which the Mycobacterium tuberculosis organism grows. A first step in resistance should be the presentation of mycobacterial antigens by macrophages to CD4^+ T cells. However, when the antigenic stimulus is limited to organisms growing in human monocytes, the organisms become sequestered from immune CD4^+ T cells. This block in presentation is selective for growing mycobacteria and not for other stimuli. Sequestration would allow replicating organisms to persist in infected individuals and may contribute to virulence.

  17. Elimination of human T cell leukemia virus type-1-infected cells by neutralizing and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-inducing antibodies against human t cell leukemia virus type-1 envelope gp46.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuetsu; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Kodama, Akira; Fujii, Hideki; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kannagi, Mari; Ansari, Aftab A; Saito, Mineki

    2014-06-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is prevalent worldwide with foci of high prevalence. However, to date no effective vaccine or drug against HTLV-1 infection has been developed. In efforts to define the role of antibodies in the control of HTLV-1 infection, we capitalized on the use of our previously defined anti-gp46 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) (clone LAT-27) and high titers of human anti-HTLV-1 IgG purified from HAM/TSP patients (HAM-IgG). LAT-27 and HAM-IgG completely blocked syncytium formation and T cell immortalization mediated by HTLV-1 in vitro. The addition of these antibodies to cultures of CD8(+) T cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HAM/TSP patients at the initiation of culture not only decreased the numbers of Tax-expressing cells and the production of HTLV-1 p24 but also inhibited the spontaneous immortalization of T cells. Coculture of in vitro-HTLV-1-immortalized T cell lines with autologous PBMCs in the presence of LAT-27 or HAM-IgG, but not an F(ab')2 fragment of LAT-27 or nonneutralizing anti-gp46 mAbs, resulted in depletion of HTLV-1-infected cells. A 24-h (51)Cr release assay showed the presence of significant antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity in LAT-27 and HAM-IgG, but not F(ab')2 of LAT-27, resulting in the depletion of HTLV-1-infected T cells by autologous PBMCs. The depletion of natural killer (NK) cells from the effector PBMCs reduced this ADCC activity. Altogether, the present data demonstrate that the neutralizing and ADCC-inducing activities of anti-HTLV-1 antibodies are capable of reducing infection and eliminating HTLV-1-infected cells in the presence of autologous PBMCs. PMID:24524420

  18. A Combined Omics Approach to Generate the Surface Atlas of Human Naive CD4+ T Cells during Early T-Cell Receptor Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Graessel, Anke; Hauck, Stefanie M.; von Toerne, Christine; Kloppmann, Edda; Goldberg, Tatyana; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schindler, Michael; Knapp, Bettina; Krause, Linda; Dietz, Katharina; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B.; Suttner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Naive CD4+ T cells are the common precursors of multiple effector and memory T-cell subsets and possess a high plasticity in terms of differentiation potential. This stem-cell-like character is important for cell therapies aiming at regeneration of specific immunity. Cell surface proteins are crucial for recognition and response to signals mediated by other cells or environmental changes. Knowledge of cell surface proteins of human naive CD4+ T cells and their changes during the early phase of T-cell activation is urgently needed for a guided differentiation of naive T cells and may support the selection of pluripotent cells for cell therapy. Periodate oxidation and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation technology was applied with subsequent quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem MS to generate a data set describing the surface proteome of primary human naive CD4+ T cells and to monitor dynamic changes during the early phase of activation. This led to the identification of 173 N-glycosylated surface proteins. To independently confirm the proteomic data set and to analyze the cell surface by an alternative technique a systematic phenotypic expression analysis of surface antigens via flow cytometry was performed. This screening expanded the previous data set, resulting in 229 surface proteins, which were expressed on naive unstimulated and activated CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, we generated a surface expression atlas based on transcriptome data, experimental annotation, and predicted subcellular localization, and correlated the proteomics result with this transcriptional data set. This extensive surface atlas provides an overall naive CD4+ T cell surface resource and will enable future studies aiming at a deeper understanding of mechanisms of T-cell biology allowing the identification of novel immune targets usable for the development of therapeutic treatments. PMID:25991687

  19. Hobit and human effector T-cell differentiation: The beginning of a long journey.

    PubMed

    Braun, Julian; Frentsch, Marco; Thiel, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Besides growing plants, eating a lot, and drinking beer, Tolkien's Hobbits enjoy maintaining a quiet state. Regarding the latter, the name chosen for a recently discovered transcription factor seems to be unintentionally appropriate. The zinc finger protein ZNF683 was originally named "Hobit" for Homolog of Blimp-1 in T cells. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Braga et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 2945-2958] demonstrate that in humans, Hobit is almost exclusively expressed in effector T cells, in particular in quiescent and long-lived effector-type CD8(+) T cells. Hobit may initially appear as another "player" in the quest for transcription factors guiding T-cell differentiation; the discoveries of T-bet, Eomes, Blimp-1, and others have significantly contributed to our understanding of how this process is tightly regulated. However, Hobit may be special--the currently available results suggest substantial differences in Hobit's regulatory functions between mice and humans, such as expression patterns and IFN-γ regulation. And it may turn out that Hobit's function in human T cells is highly adapted to lifelong, periodic challenges with varying, physiological doses of pathogens. Thus, the new study about Hobit in human T cells may be the beginning of a long journey.

  20. Glycoproteins of 210,000 and 130,000 m.w. on activated T cells: cell distribution and antigenic relation to components on resting cells and T cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hemler, M E; Sanchez-Madrid, F; Flotte, T J; Krensky, A M; Burakoff, S J; Bhan, A K; Springer, T A; Strominger, J L

    1984-06-01

    A glycoprotein complex of 210,000 and 130,000 m.w., found on mitogen or alloantigen-stimulated human T cells and not on other hematopoietic cells, has been defined by a monoclonal antibody (Mab). The components of this complex are a subset of a larger family of proteins (210,000, 165,000 and 130,000 m.w.) defined by a second Mab. In a panel of hematopoietic cell lines and cell types, only activated T cells (including the cell line HUT-102) express the 210,000/130,000 complex and these cells also express the IL 2 receptor, a characteristic marker for activated T cells. The 210,000/130,000 m.w. complex (reactive with the Mab TS2/7) is present on all long-term activated T cells, including both the OKT4 and OKT8 subsets. The 210,000 m.w. subunit is expressed only on activated T cells. Other lymphoid cells express either the 130,000 m.w. subunit alone (unactivated lymphocytes, thymocytes, HUT-78) or the 130,000 subunit together with a 165,000 subunit (MOLT-4, HSB, and other leukemic T cell lines). The 210,000/130,000 m.w., 165,000/130,000 m.w. and 130,000 m.w. complexes are antigenically related in that all share reactivity with the Mab A- 1A5 . Among non-lymphoid hematopoietic cells and cell lines, none express the 210,000 m.w. chain; adherent cells (monocytes) and myeloid cell lines each express single proteins of 130,000 to 155,000 m.w. Granulocytes and red blood cells are negative and platelets express multiple bands (165,000 and 140,000 m.w.). Immunoperoxidase staining of tissue sections showed that a broad range of tissues and cell types had material cross-reactive with the lymphoid 130,000 m.w. protein. However, only a discrete subset of those tissues and cells including blood vessel walls, connective tissue, smooth muscle, kidney mesangial cells, and some non-cellular matrix tissue, had material cross-reactive with the 210,000 m.w. protein on activated T lymphocytes. PMID:6327814

  1. Expression and regulation of Schlafen (SLFN) family members in primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, Alexander; Aigner, Regina; Modak, Madhura; Cejka, Petra; Blaas, Dieter; Stöckl, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Schlafen (SLFN/Slfn) family members have been investigated for their involvement in fundamental cellular processes including growth regulation, differentiation and control of viral replication. However, most research has been focused on the characterization of Slfns within the murine system or in human cell lines. Since little is known about SLFNs in primary human immune cells, we set out to analyze the expression and regulation of the six human SLFN genes in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and T cells. Comparison of SLFN gene expression across these three cell types showed high mRNA expression of SLFN11 in monocytes and moDCs and high SLFN5 expression in T cells, indicating functional importance within these cell types. Differentiation of monocytes to moDCs leads to the gradual upregulation of SLFN12L and SLFN13 while SLFN12 levels were decreased by differentiation stimuli. Stimulation of moDCs via human rhinovirus, lipopolysaccharide, or IFN-α lead to strong upregulation of SLFN gene expression, while peptidoglycan poorly stimulated regulation of both SLFNs and the classical interferon-stimulated gene MxA. T cell activation was found to downregulate the expression of SLFN5, SLFN12 and SLFN12L, which was reversible upon addition of exogenous IFN-α. In conclusion, we demonstrate, that SLFN gene upregulation is mainly dependent on autocrine type I interferon signaling in primary human immune cells. Rapid decrease of SLFN expression levels following T cell receptor stimulation indicates a role of SLFNs in the regulation of human T cell quiescence. PMID:26623250

  2. Immune response of human propagated gammadelta-T-cells to neuroblastoma recommend the Vdelta1+ subset for gammadelta-T-cell-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schilbach, Karin; Frommer, Klaus; Meier, Sybille; Handgretinger, Rupert; Eyrich, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Human peripheral gammadelta-T-cells are able to induce cytolysis of neuroblastoma (Nb) tumor cells. Besides innate effector functions against infected cells and tumors, gammadelta-T-cells are involved in T-helper 1/T-helper 2 (TH1/TH2) differentiation of alphabeta-T-cells. However, as different gammadelta-T-cell subsets vary considerably in their functional properties, the aim of the present study was to define repertoires of cytokines, chemokines, and angiogenic factors of in vitro expanded Vdelta1+ and Vdelta2+ T cells in response to Nb. After short-term culture, both subsets released TH1 [interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-gamma, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, TNF-beta)] and TH2 cytokines (IL-4, -5, -6, -10, -13, Vdelta1 also transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, chemokines (I-309, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1-3, regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted), ILs (IL-1, -8, -15), cytokines (leptin) as well as angiogenic growth factors [angiogenin (ANG), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I]. These molecules were expressed at higher levels in Vdelta2+ than Vdelta1+ T cells. Nb challenge changed protein expression. TH2 cytokine and IFN-gamma release was blocked in both gammadelta-T-cell subsets. In Vdelta2 gammadelta-T-cells, TH1 cytokines were down-regulated and tumor growth-promoting factors (ANG, VEGF, EGF, and IGF-I) were strongly up-regulated. In contrast, Vdelta1+ gammadelta-T-cells stopped the release of tumor-supportive factors and tolerogenic TGF-beta, and strongly up-regulated TNF-alpha, TNF-beta, MCP-1 and -2 and maintained their IL-2 production. In summary, our data show that after being challenged with Nb cells, propagated Vdelta1+ rather than Vdelta2+ T cells support antitumor responses by secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, in contrast to other cell types, Vdelta1+ T cells do not sustain a growth-promoting or tolerogenic

  3. Potential Limitations of the NSG Humanized Mouse as a Model System to Optimize Engineered Human T cell Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alcantar-Orozco, Erik M.; Gornall, Hannah; Baldan, Vania; Hawkins, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The genetic modification of peripheral blood lymphocytes using retroviral vectors to redirect T cells against tumor cells has been recently used as a means to generate large numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive cell therapy protocols. However, commonly used retroviral vector-based genetic modification requires T cells to be driven into cell division; this potent mitogenic stimulus is associated with the development of an effector phenotype that may adversely impact upon the long-term engraftment potential and subsequent antitumor effects of T cells. To investigate whether the cytokines used during culture impact upon the engraftment potential of gene-modified T cells, a humanized model employing T cells engrafted with a MART-1-specific T cell receptor adoptively transferred into NOD/Shi-scid IL-2rγ−/− (NSG) immune-deficient mice bearing established melanoma tumors was used to compare the effects of the common γ chain cytokines IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15 upon gene-modified T cell activity. MART-1-specific T cells cultured in IL-7 and IL-15 demonstrated greater relative in vitro proliferation and viability of T cells compared with the extensively used IL-2. Moreover, the IL-15 culture prolonged the survival of animals bearing melanoma tumors after adoptive transfer. However, the combination of IL-7 and IL-15 produced T cells with improved engraftment potential compared with IL-15 alone; however, a high rate of xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease prevented the identification of a clear improvement in antitumor effect of these T cells. These results clearly demonstrate modulation of gene-modified T cell engraftment in the NSG mouse, which supports the future testing of the combination of IL-7 and IL-15 in adoptive cell therapy protocols; however, this improved engraftment is also associated with the long-term maintenance of xenoreactive T cells, which limits the ultimate usefulness of the NSG mouse model in this situation. PMID:23931270

  4. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Marson, Alexander

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.

  5. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E; Haliburton, Genevieve E; Ye, Chun J; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Doudna, Jennifer A; Marson, Alexander

    2015-08-18

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently "knock out" genes and "knock in" targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4(+) T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ∼40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ∼20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.

  6. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; et al

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9more » RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.« less

  7. Assessment of immunosuppressive activity of human mesenchymal stem cells using murine antigen specific CD4 and CD8 T cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immunosuppressive activity. They do not induce allospecific T cell responses, making them promising tools for reducing the severity of graft versus host disease (GVHD) as well as treating various immune diseases. Currently, there is a need in the MSC field to develop a robust in vitro bioassay which can characterize the immunosuppressive function of MSCs. Methods Murine clonal CD4 and CD8 T cells were stimulated with cognate peptide antigen and antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the absence or presence of human MSCs, different aspects of T cell activation were monitored and analyzed using flow cytometery, real time RT-PCR and cytokine measurement. Results Human MSCs (hMSCs) can alter multiple aspects of murine T cell activation induced by stimulation with specific antigen, including: reduced proliferation, inhibited or stimulated cell surface marker expression (CD25, CD69, CD44 and CD62L), inhibited mRNA expression of transcription factors (T-bet and GATA-3) and decreased cytokine expression (interferon-gamma, interleukin-10). Disappearance of activation-induced cluster formation and decreased apoptosis of CD8 T cells were also observed. Moreover, the effects are specific to MSCs; incubating the T cells with non-MSC control cell lines had no effect on T cell proliferation and activation. Conclusions Clonal murine T cells can be used to measure, characterize, and quantify the in vitro immunosuppressive activity of human MSCs, representing a promising approach to improve bioassays for immunosuppression. PMID:24406271

  8. Role of the MHC restriction during maturation of antigen-specific human T cells in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Hesnard, Leslie; Legoux, François; Gautreau, Laetitia; Moyon, Melinda; Baron, Olivier; Devilder, Marie-Claire; Bonneville, Marc; Saulquin, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    In the thymus, a T-cell repertoire able to confer protection against infectious and noninfectious agents in a peptide-dependent, self-MHC-restricted manner is selected. Direct detection of Ag-specific thymocytes, and analysis of the impact of the expression of the MHC-restricting allele on their frequency or function has never been studied in humans because of the extremely low precursor frequency. Here, we used a tetramer-based enrichment protocol to analyze the ex vivo frequency and activation-phenotype of human thymocytes specific for self, viral and tumor-antigens presented by HLA-A*0201 (A2) in individuals expressing or not this allele. Ag-specific thymocytes were quantified within both CD4CD8 double or single-positive compartments in every donor. Our data indicate that the maturation efficiency of Ag-specific thymocytes is poorly affected by HLA-A2 expression, in terms of frequencies. Nevertheless, A2-restricted T-cell lines from A2(+) donors reacted to A2(+) cell lines in a highly peptide-specific fashion, whereas their alloreactive counterparts showed off-target activity. This first ex vivo analysis of human antigen-specific thymocytes at different stages of human T-cell development should open new perspectives in the understanding of the human thymic selection process. PMID:26635029

  9. Human T cells expressing V beta 8 do not predominantly recognize DR2 alloantigen.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Brew, R; Crosby, I; Gecim, I E; Sells, R A

    1992-06-01

    A panel of seven monoclonal antibodies recognizing human T-cell antigen receptor (TcR) V alpha or V beta subsets has been used to measure TcR gene expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes and mixed lymphocyte culture responses (MLR) between DR2- and DR2+ (DRw15+) donors. There were no significant differences between DR2- and DR2+ donors in per cent T cells in fresh peripheral blood labelled with any of these antibodies, which included an antibody recognizing V beta 8. This indicates strongly that increased negative selection of V beta 8+ T cells does not occur in DR2+ compared with DR2- individuals. In MLR between DR2- and DR2+ donors the only significant change compared with fresh peripheral lymphocytes was that T cells expressing V beta 5.1 were decreased in DR2- lymphocyte populations responding to DR2 alloantigen. No changes in levels of V beta 8+ T cells were detected in MLR between DR2- and DR2+ donors. This suggests that V beta 8+ T cells are not predominantly reactive against DR2 (DRw15). The data support the concept that alloreactivity against a single class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatch is mediated by T cells expressing a range of different TcR V beta molecules.

  10. Immuno-PET Imaging of Engineered Human T Cells in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Mall, Sabine; Yusufi, Nahid; Wagner, Ricarda; Klar, Richard; Bianchi, Henrique; Steiger, Katja; Straub, Melanie; Audehm, Stefan; Laitinen, Iina; Aichler, Michaela; Peschel, Christian; Ziegler, Sibylle; Mustafa, Mona; Schwaiger, Markus; D'Alessandria, Calogero; Krackhardt, Angela M

    2016-07-15

    Sensitive in vivo imaging technologies applicable to the clinical setting are still lacking for adoptive T-cell-based immunotherapies, an important gap to fill if mechanisms of tumor rejection or escape are to be understood. Here, we propose a highly sensitive imaging technology to track human TCR-transgenic T cells in vivo by directly targeting the murinized constant TCR beta domain (TCRmu) with a zirconium-89 ((89)Zr)-labeled anti-TCRmu-F(ab')2 fragment. Binding of the labeled or unlabeled F(ab')2 fragment did not impair functionality of transgenic T cells in vitro and in vivo Using a murine xenograft model of human myeloid sarcoma, we monitored by Immuno-PET imaging human central memory T cells (TCM), which were transgenic for a myeloid peroxidase (MPO)-specific TCR. Diverse T-cell distribution patterns were detected by PET/CT imaging, depending on the tumor size and rejection phase. Results were confirmed by IHC and semiquantitative evaluation of T-cell infiltration within the tumor corresponding to the PET/CT images. Overall, these findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for an imaging approach that is readily tractable for clinical translation. Cancer Res; 76(14); 4113-23. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27354381

  11. Double-Negative αβ T Cells Are Early Responders to AKI and Are Found in Human Kidney.

    PubMed

    Martina, Maria N; Noel, Sanjeev; Saxena, Ankit; Bandapalle, Samatha; Majithia, Richa; Jie, Chunfa; Arend, Lois J; Allaf, Mohamad E; Rabb, Hamid; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A

    2016-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major cause of AKI, and previous studies established important roles for conventional CD4(+) T cells, natural killer T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in AKI pathogenesis. We recently identified CD4(-)CD8(-) (double-negative; DN) T cells as an important subset of αβ T cell receptor-positive cells residing in mouse kidney. However, little is known about the pathophysiologic functions of kidney DN T cells. In this study, we phenotypically and functionally characterized murine kidney DN T cells in the steady state and in response to IRI. Unlike CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, DN T cells in the steady state expressed high levels of CD69, CD28, and CD40L; differentially expressed IL-27 and IL-10 anti-inflammatory cytokines; spontaneously proliferated at a very high rate; and suppressed in vitro proliferation of activated CD4(+) T cells. Within the first 3-24 hours after IRI, kidney DN T cells expanded significantly and upregulated expression of IL-10. In adoptive transfer experiments, DN T cells significantly protected recipients from AKI by an IL-10-dependent mechanism. DN T cells also made up a large fraction of the T cell compartment in human kidneys. Our results indicate that DN T cells are an important subset of the resident αβ(+) T cell population in the mammalian kidney and are early responders to AKI that have anti-inflammatory properties.

  12. CD4+ T cells defined by their Vβ T cell receptor expression are associated with immunoregulatory profiles and lesion size in human leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Keesen, T S L; Antonelli, L R V; Faria, D R; Guimarães, L H; Bacellar, O; Carvalho, E M; Dutra, W O; Gollob, K J

    2011-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is caused by infection with the protozoan parasite, Leishmania, that parasitizes human cells, and the cellular immune response is essential for controlling infection. In order to measure the host T cell response to Leishmania infection, we have measured the expansion, activation state and functional potential of specific T cells as identified by their T cell receptor Vβ region expression. In a group of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) patients, we evaluated these characteristics in nine different T cell subpopulations as identified by their Vβ region expression, before and after specific Leishmania antigen stimulation. Our results show: (1) an increase in CD4+ T cells expressing Vβ 5·2 and Vβ 24 in CL compared to controls; (2) a Leishmania antigen-induced increase in CD4+ T cells expressing Vβ 5·2, 11, 12 and 17; (3) a profile of previous activation of CD4+ Vβ 5·2-, 11- and 24-positive T cells, with higher expression of CD45RO, HLA-DR, interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 compared to other Vβ-expressing subpopulations; (4) a positive correlation between higher frequencies of CD4+Vβ5·2+ T cells and larger lesions; and (5) biased homing of CD4+ T cells expressing Vβ 5·2 to the lesion site. Given that CL disease involves a level of pathology (ulcerated lesions) and is often followed by long-lived protection and cure, the identification of specific subpopulations active in this form of disease could allow for the discovery of immunodominant Leishmania antigens important for triggering efficient host responses against the parasite, or identify cell populations most involved in pathology. PMID:21726211

  13. Effectiveness of combinations of bispecific antibodies for delivering saporin to human acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukaemia cell lines via CD7 and CD38 as cellular target molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Flavell, D. J.; Cooper, S.; Morland, B.; French, R.; Flavell, S. U.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the effectiveness of three different F(ab' gamma)2 bispecific antibodies (BsAb) for delivering the ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) saporin via the CD7 or CD38 cell surface molecules to the human T-ALL cell lines HSB-2 and HPB-ALL. Inhibition of 3H-leucine uptake by target cells was used as the parameter of cellular cytotoxicity. Used singly against HSB-2 cells in the presence of varied concentrations of saporin, an anti-CD7 BsAb, (HB2 x DB7-18) and an anti-CD38 BsAb (OKT10 x RabSap), gave 435- and 286-fold increases in saporin toxicity, respectively. For HPB-ALL cells the anti-CD7 BsAb performed poorly giving only an eight-fold increase in toxicity whilst on the same cell line the anti-CD38 BsAb was highly potent giving an 80,000-fold increase in saporin toxicity. A combination of both BsAb used together against HSB-2 cells was ten times more effective, than the best single BsAb HB2 x DB7-18 used alone. Kinetic studies conducted with HSB-2 cells revealed that the BsAb combination also gave an increased rate of protein synthesis inactivation in comparison to either BsAb used alone. These investigations clearly demonstrate a synergistic action when both BsAb are used in combination to target saporin against CD7 and CD38 expressed on the surface of the HSB-2 cell line. PMID:1373293

  14. Effect of irradiation on human T-cell proliferation: low dose irradiation stimulates mitogen-induced proliferation and function of the suppressor/cytotoxic T-cell subset

    SciTech Connect

    Gualde, N.; Goodwin, J.S.

    1984-04-01

    Unfractionated human T cells exposed to 10-50 rad of X irradiation incorporated less (/sup 3/H)thymidine than nonirradiated T cells when subsequently cultured with PHA or Con A. The cytotoxic/suppressor T-cell subset, isolated as either OKT8(+) or OKT4(-) cells, demonstrated significantly enhanced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation in PHA- or Con A-stimulated cultures after exposure to 10-50 rad, compared to unirradiated cells, while the proliferation of the OKT4(+) helper/inducer subset was inhibited by low dose irradiation. It has been previously reported that approximately 30% of the cytotoxic/suppressor subset also stains with OKM1. When the cytotoxic/suppressor subset was further subdivided into OKT4(-), OKM1(+), and OKT4(-), OKM1(-) cells, proliferation of the OKT4(-), OKM1(+) population was inhibited by exposure to 25 rad while proliferation of the OKT4(-), OKM1(-) population was stimulated. The increase in proliferation of the cytotoxic/suppressor T-cell subset after low dose irradiation is paralleled by an increase in suppressor activity of these cells. T cells exposed to 25 rad and then cultured with Con A for 48 hr caused greater inhibition of IgG production when added to fresh autologous lymphocytes stimulated by pokeweed mitogen than did unirradiated cells. Thus, low dose irradiation enhances both the proliferation and function of the human suppressor T-cell subset.

  15. Current approaches to measuring human islet-antigen specific T cell function in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mannering, S I; Wong, F S; Durinovic-Belló, I; Brooks-Worrell, B; Tree, T I; Cilio, C M; Schloot, N C; Mallone, R

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease caused by the T cell-mediated destruction of the pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Currently there are no widely accepted and standardized assays available to analyse the function of autoreactive T cells involved in T1D. The development of such an assay would greatly aid efforts to understand the pathogenesis of T1D and is also urgently required to guide the development of antigen-based therapies intended to prevent, or cure, T1D. Here we describe some of the assays used currently to detect autoreactive T cells in human blood and review critically their strengths and weaknesses. The challenges and future prospects for the T cell assays are discussed. PMID:20846160

  16. RevM10-expressing T cells derived in vivo from transduced human hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells inhibit human immunodeficiency virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Bonyhadi, M L; Moss, K; Voytovich, A; Auten, J; Kalfoglou, C; Plavec, I; Forestell, S; Su, L; Böhnlein, E; Kaneshima, H

    1997-01-01

    A key feature of the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is the gradual loss of CD4-positive T cells. A number of gene therapy strategies have been designed with the intent of inhibiting HIV replication in mature T cells. As T cells are products of hematolymphoid differentiation, insertion of antiviral genes into hematopoietic stem cells could serve as a vehicle to confer long-term protection in progeny T cells derived from transduced stem cells. One such "cellular immunization" strategy utilizes the gene coding for the HIV-1 rev trans-dominant mutant protein RevM10 which has been demonstrated to inhibit HIV-1 replication in T-cell lines and in primary T cells. In this study, we used a Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retrovirus encoding a bicistronic message coexpressing RevM10 and the murine CD8-alpha' chain (Lyt2). This vector allows rapid selection of transgene-expressing cells as well as quantitation of transgene expression. We demonstrate that RevM10-transduced CD34-enriched hematopoietic progenitor-stem cells (HPSC) isolated from human umbilical cord blood or from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood can give rise to mature thymocytes in the SCID-hu thymus/liver mouse model. The phenotypic distribution of HPSC-derived thymocytes is normal, and expression of the transgene can be detected by flow cytometric analysis. Moreover, we demonstrate that RevM10 can inhibit HIV replication in T cells derived from transduced HPSC after expansion in vitro. This is the first demonstration of anti-HIV efficacy in T cells derived from transduced human HPSC. PMID:9151864

  17. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mazliah, Damián; Albareda, María C.; Alvarez, María G.; Lococo, Bruno; Bertocchi, Graciela L.; Petti, Marcos; Viotti, Rodolfo J.; Laucella, Susana A.

    2012-01-01

    Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza (Flu) virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23049532

  18. Human CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells do not constitutively express IL-35.

    PubMed

    Bardel, Emilie; Larousserie, Frédérique; Charlot-Rabiega, Pascaline; Coulomb-L'Herminé, Aurore; Devergne, Odile

    2008-11-15

    EBV-induced gene 3 (EBI3) can associate with p28 to form the heterodimeric cytokine IL-27, or with the p35 subunit of IL-12 to form the EBI3/p35 heterodimer, recently named IL-35. In mice, IL-35 has been shown to be constitutively expressed by CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and suggested to contribute to their suppressive activity. In this study, we investigated whether human Treg cells express IL-35. Double-staining analysis of human thymuses showed that neither Foxp3(+) nor CD25(+) cells coexpressed EBI3. Similarly, Foxp3(+) cells present in human lymph nodes, tonsils, spleens, and intestines did not express EBI3. Consistent with these in situ observations, Treg cells purified from blood or tonsils were negative for EBI3 by immunoblotting. Other human T cell subsets, including effector T cells, naive and memory CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) and gammadelta T cells also did not constitutively express EBI3, which contrasts with IL-35 expression observed in murine CD8(+) and gammadelta T cells. Furthermore, although CD3/CD28 stimulation consistently induced low levels of EBI3 in various CD4(+) T cell subsets, no EBI3 could be detected in CD3/CD28-stimulated Treg cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that, whereas p35 transcripts were detected in both Teff and Treg cells, EBI3 transcripts were detected only in activated Teff cells, but not in resting or activated Treg cells. Thus, in contrast to their murine counterpart, human Treg cells do not express detectable amounts of IL-35.

  19. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection

    PubMed Central

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells. PMID:27031961

  20. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection.

    PubMed

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells.

  1. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection.

    PubMed

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells. PMID:27031961

  2. Production of interferon and tumour necrosis factor by cloned human natural cytotoxic lymphocytes and T cells.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Meager, A; Moore, M

    1987-08-01

    Cell lines and clones, derived from natural killer (NK) cell-enriched (B73.1+) peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from several human donors, that expressed distinct surface phenotypes and were cytolytically active against K562 target cells were tested for their capacity to produce interferon (IFN) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF), IFN and TNF were measured firstly in biological assays and secondly in specific immunoassays for alpha-IFN, gamma-IFN and tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha). It was found that the majority of NK-derived lines and clones were highly cytotoxic towards K562, but generally produced relatively low or undetectable levels of gamma-IFN and TNF alpha following stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin. No alpha-IFN was detected in supernatants from these cells. In comparison, cell lines and clones, derived from T lymphocyte (B73.1-) enriched PBL from the same donors were poorly cytotoxic towards K562, but generally produced higher levels of gamma-IFN and TNF than NK-derived cells. Thus, neither gamma-IFN nor TNF production were shown to correlate well with the capacity of NK-derived or T cell clones to effect cytotoxic action towards K562 in vitro. These results suggest that the co-production of gamma-IFN and TNF is not indicative of cytotoxic potential.

  3. Metabolic engineering of Salmonella vaccine bacteria to boost human Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Workalemahu, Grefachew; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Nada, Mohanad H; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Jones, Bradley D; Jin, Chenggang; Morita, Craig T

    2014-07-15

    Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells monitor isoprenoid metabolism by recognizing foreign (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a metabolite in the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway used by most eubacteria and apicomplexan parasites, and self isopentenyl pyrophosphate, a metabolite in the mevalonate pathway used by humans. Whereas microbial infections elicit prolonged expansion of memory Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, immunization with prenyl pyrophosphates or aminobisphosphonates elicit short-term Vγ2Vδ2 expansion with rapid anergy and deletion upon subsequent immunizations. We hypothesized that a live, attenuated bacterial vaccine that overproduces HMBPP would elicit long-lasting Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity by mimicking a natural infection. Therefore, we metabolically engineered the avirulent aroA(-) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 strain by deleting the gene for LytB (the downstream enzyme from HMBPP) and functionally complementing for this loss with genes encoding mevalonate pathway enzymes. LytB(-) Salmonella SL7207 had high HMBPP levels, infected human cells as efficiently as did the wild-type bacteria, and stimulated large ex vivo expansions of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells from human donors. Importantly, vaccination of a rhesus monkey with live lytB(-) Salmonella SL7207 stimulated a prolonged expansion of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells without significant side effects or anergy induction. These studies provide proof-of-principle that metabolic engineering can be used to derive live bacterial vaccines that boost Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity. Similar engineering of metabolic pathways to produce lipid Ags or B vitamin metabolite Ags could be used to derive live bacterial vaccine for other unconventional T cells that recognize nonpeptide Ags.

  4. Metabolic Engineering of Salmonella Vaccine Bacteria to Boost Human Vγ2Vδ2 T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Workalemahu, Grefachew; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Nada, Mohanad H.; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Jones, Bradley D.; Jin, Chenggang; Morita, Craig T.

    2014-01-01

    Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells monitor isoprenoid metabolism by recognizing foreign (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a metabolite in the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway used by most eubacteria and apicomplexan parasites, and self isopentenyl pyrophosphate, a metabolite in the mevalonate pathway used by humans. Whereas microbial infections elicit prolonged expansion of memory Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, immunization with prenyl pyrophosphates or aminobisphosphonates elicit short-term Vγ2Vδ2 expansion with rapid anergy and deletion upon subsequent immunizations. We hypothesized that a live, attenuated bacterial vaccine that overproduces HMBPP would elicit long lasting Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity by mimicking a natural infection. Therefore, we metabolically engineered the avirulent aroA− Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 strain by deleting the gene for LytB (the downstream enzyme from HMBPP) and functionally complementing for this loss with genes encoding mevalonate pathway enzymes. LytB− Salmonella SL7207 had high HMBPP levels, infected human cells as efficiently as the wild-type bacteria, and stimulated large ex vivo expansions of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells from human donors. Importantly, vaccination of a rhesus monkey with live lytB− Salmonella SL7207 stimulated a prolonged expansion of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells without significant side effects or anergy induction. These studies provide proof-of-principle that metabolic engineering can be used to derive live bacterial vaccines that boost Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity. Similar engineering of metabolic pathways to produce lipid Ags or B vitamin metabolite Ags could be used to derive live bacterial vaccine for other unconventional T cells that recognize nonpeptide Ags. PMID:24943221

  5. B7-H5 costimulates human T cells via CD28H

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuwen; Yao, Sheng; Iliopoulou, Bettina P.; Han, Xue; Augustine, Mathew M.; Xu, Haiying; Phennicie, Ryan T.; Flies, Sarah J.; Broadwater, Megan; Ruff, William; Taube, Janis M.; Zheng, Linghua; Luo, Liqun; Zhu, Gefeng; Chen, Jianzhu; Chen, Lieping

    2013-01-01

    The B7/CD28 family has profound modulatory effects in immune responses and constitutes important targets for the development of novel therapeutic drugs against human diseases. Here we describe a new CD28 homolog (CD28H) that has unique functions in the regulation of the human immune response and is absent in mice. CD28H is constitutively expressed on all naive T cells. Repetitive antigenic exposure, however, induces a complete loss of CD28H on many T cells, and CD28H-negative T cells have a phenotype of terminal differentiation and senescence. After extensive screening in a receptor array, a B7-like molecule, B7 homolog 5 (B7-H5), was identified as a specific ligand for CD28H. B7-H5 is constitutively found in macrophages and could be induced on dendritic cells. The B7-H5/CD28H interaction co-stimulates human T cell growth and cytokine production, selectively via an AKT-dependent signaling cascade. Our study identifies a novel co-stimulatory pathway regulating human T cell responses. PMID:23784006

  6. Engineering human peripheral blood stem cell grafts that are depleted of naïve T cells and retain functional pathogen-specific memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Marie; Heimfeld, Shelly; Jones, Lori A; Turtle, Cameron; Krause, Diane; Riddell, Stanley R; Shlomchik, Warren

    2014-05-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a frequent major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Approaches that selectively deplete T cells that cause GVHD from allogeneic stem cell grafts and preserve T cells specific for pathogens may improve HCT outcomes. It has been hypothesized that the majority of T cells that can cause GVHD reside within the naïve T cell (TN) subset, and previous studies performed in mouse models and with human cells in vitro support this hypothesis. As a prelude to translating these findings to the clinic, we developed and evaluated a novel 2-step clinically compliant procedure for manipulating peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) to remove TN, preserve CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells, and provide for a fixed dose of memory T cells (TM) that includes T cells with specificity for common opportunistic pathogens encountered after HCT. Our studies demonstrate effective and reproducible performance of the immunomagnetic cell selection procedure for depleting TN. Moreover, after cell processing, the CD45RA-depleted PBSC products are enriched for CD4(+) and CD8(+) TM with a central memory phenotype and contain TM cells that are capable of proliferating and producing effector cytokines in response to opportunistic pathogens.

  7. Molecular profiling of cytomegalovirus-induced human CD8+ T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hertoghs, Kirsten M.L.; Moerland, Perry D.; van Stijn, Amber; Remmerswaal, Ester B.M.; Yong, Sila L.; van de Berg, Pablo J.E.J.; van Ham, S. Marieke; Baas, Frank; ten Berge, Ineke J.M.; van Lier, René A.W.

    2010-01-01

    CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the immune response to viral pathogens. Persistent human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection results in a strong increase in the number of virus-specific, quiescent effector-type CD8+ T cells with constitutive cytolytic activity, but the molecular pathways involved in the induction and maintenance of these cells are unknown. We show here that HCMV infection induced acute and lasting changes in the transcriptomes of virus-reactive T cells collected from HCMV-seropositive patients at distinct stages of infection. Enhanced cell cycle and metabolic activity was restricted to the acute phase of the response, but at all stages, HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells expressed the Th1-associated transcription factors T-bet (TBX21) and eomesodermin (EOMES), in parallel with continuous expression of IFNG mRNA and IFN-γ–regulated genes. The cytolytic proteins granzyme B and perforin as well as the fractalkine-binding chemokine receptor CX3CR1 were found in virus-reactive cells throughout the response. During HCMV latency, virus-specific CD8+ T cells lacked the typical features of exhausted cells found in other chronic infections. Persistent effector cell traits together with the permanent changes in chemokine receptor usage of virus-specific, nonexhausted, long-lived CD8+ T cells may be crucial to maintain lifelong protection from HCMV reactivation. PMID:20921622

  8. Human GATA-3: a lineage-restricted transcription factor that regulates the expression of the T cell receptor alpha gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, I C; Vorhees, P; Marin, N; Oakley, B K; Tsai, S F; Orkin, S H; Leiden, J M

    1991-01-01

    In addition to its role in the recognition of foreign antigens, the T cell receptor (TCR) alpha gene serves as a model system for studies of developmentally-regulated, lineage-specific gene expression in T cells. TCR alpha gene expression is restricted to cells of the TCR alpha/beta+ lineage, and is controlled by a T cell-specific transcriptional enhancer located 4.5 kb 3' to the C alpha gene segment. The TCR alpha enhancer contains four nuclear protein binding sites called T alpha 1-T alpha 4. In this report we describe the identification and characterization of a novel human cDNA, hGATA-3 that binds to the T alpha 3 element of the human TCR alpha enhancer. hGATA-3 contains a zinc finger domain that is highly related to the DNA-binding domain of the erythroid-specific transcription factor, GATA-1, and binds to a region of T alpha 3 that contains a consensus GATA binding site (AGATAG). Northern blot analyses of hematopoietic cell lines demonstrate that hGATA-3 is expressed exclusively in T cells. Overexpression of hGATA-3 in HeLa cells or human B cells specifically activated transcription from a co-transfected reporter plasmid containing two copies of the T alpha 3 binding site located upstream of the minimal SV40 promoter. Taken together these results demonstrate that hGATA-3 is a novel lineage-specific hematopoietic transcription factor that appears to play an important role in regulating the T cell-specific expression of the TCR alpha gene. Images PMID:1827068

  9. Targeting human CD27 with an agonist antibody stimulates T-cell activation and antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lawrence J; He, Li-Zhen; Marsh, Henry; Keler, Tibor

    2014-01-01

    CD27 is an important co-stimulatory receptor of T cells that can potentially be exploited for immunotherapy. We developed a human IgG1 antibody that targets human CD27, and demonstrated its immunostimulatory and antineoplastic activity in various preclinical models. Currently, the antibody (1F5, CDX-1127) is being tested in patients affected by advanced malignancies. PMID:24605266

  10. Multiple isolates and characteristics of human T-cell leukemia virus type II.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, W W; Takahashi, H; Liu, C; Kaplan, M H; Scheewind, O; Ijichi, S; Nagashima, K; Gallo, R C

    1992-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia (or lymphotropic) virus type II (HTLV-II) was isolated from eight HTLV-seropositive patients, six of whom were also infected with human immunodeficiency virus, by cocultivation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with BJAB, a continuous B-cell line. Restriction endonuclease mapping of the proviruses demonstrated consistent differences among isolates, and two distinct physical map patterns were observed. The results suggest the existence of two closely related molecular subtypes of HTLV-II, which are tentatively designated HTLV-IIa and HTLV-IIb. This finding was supported by preliminary nucleotide sequence analysis of the env gene region encoding the transmembrane glycoprotein gp21, which showed consistent differences between the two proposed virus subtypes. Exploitation of differences in restriction endonuclease sites allowed polymerase chain reaction amplification to detect and differentiate the two subtypes in fresh PBMCs of HTLV-seropositive intravenous drug abusers (IVDAs). The results of these studies confirm that HTLV-II infection is the prominent HTLV infection in seropositive IVDAs and also show that infection with both subtypes occurs. The finding of genetic heterogeneity in the HTLV-II group of viruses may have important implications for studies on its role in human disease and will be useful in characterizing the viruses present in newly discovered endemic foci in New World indigenous populations. Images PMID:1347796

  11. Comparative proteomics of exosomes secreted by tumoral Jurkat T cells and normal human T cell blasts unravels a potential tumorigenic role for valosin-containing protein

    PubMed Central

    Sanclemente, Manuel; Iturralde, María; Naval, Javier; Alava, María Angeles; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Thierse, Hermann-Josef; Anel, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We have previously characterized that FasL and Apo2L/TRAIL are stored in their bioactive form inside human T cell blasts in intraluminal vesicles present in multivesicular bodies. These vesicles are rapidly released to the supernatant in the form of exosomes upon re-activation of T cells. In this study we have compared for the first time proteomics of exosomes produced by normal human T cell blasts with those produced by tumoral Jurkat cells, with the objective of identify proteins associated with tumoral exosomes that could have a previously unrecognized role in malignancy. We have identified 359 and 418 proteins in exosomes from T cell blasts and Jurkat cells, respectively. Interestingly, only 145 (around a 40%) are common. The major proteins in both cases are actin and tubulin isoforms and the common interaction nodes correspond to these cytoskeleton and related proteins, as well as to ribosomal and mRNA granule proteins. We detected 14 membrane proteins that were especially enriched in exosomes from Jurkat cells as compared with T cell blasts. The most abundant of these proteins was valosin-containing protein (VCP), a membrane ATPase involved in ER homeostasis and ubiquitination. In this work, we also show that leukemic cells are more sensitive to cell death induced by the VCP inhibitor DBeQ than normal T cells. Furthermore, VCP inhibition prevents functional exosome secretion only in Jurkat cells, but not in T cell blasts. These results suggest VCP targeting as a new selective pathway to exploit in cancer treatment to prevent tumoral exosome secretion. PMID:27086912

  12. Infection of human synovial cells by human T cell lymphotropic virus type I. Proliferation and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor production by synovial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, M; Eguchi, K; Terada, K; Nakashima, M; Yamashita, I; Ida, H; Kawabe, Y; Aoyagi, T; Takino, H; Nakamura, T

    1993-01-01

    The present study was performed to clarify the relationship between human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infection and chronic inflammatory arthropathy. To determine the ability of HTLV-I to infect synovial cells and the effect on synovial cell proliferation, synovial cells were cocultured with the HTLV-I-producing T cell lines (MT-2 or HCT-1). After coculture with HTLV-I-infected T cells, the synovial cells expressed HTLV-I-specific core antigens, and HTLV-I proviral DNA was detected from the synovial cells by polymerase chain reaction. These cocultured synovial cells with HTLV-I-infected T cells proliferated more actively than the synovial cells cocultured with uninfected T cells. This stimulatory effect of HTLV-I-infected T cells on synovial cell proliferation seems necessary to contact each other. After being cocultured with MT-2 cells, synovial cells proliferated more actively than control cells even after several passages. Furthermore, HTLV-I-infected synovial cells produced significant amounts of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor. These results suggest that HTLV-I can infect synovial cells, resulting their active proliferation and may be involved in the pathogenesis of proliferative synovitis similar to that found in rheumatoid arthritis. Images PMID:8408648

  13. MHC II tetramers visualize human CD4+ T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus infection and demonstrate atypical kinetics of the nuclear antigen EBNA1 response.

    PubMed

    Long, Heather M; Chagoury, Odette L; Leese, Alison M; Ryan, Gordon B; James, Eddie; Morton, Laura T; Abbott, Rachel J M; Sabbah, Shereen; Kwok, William; Rickinson, Alan B

    2013-05-01

    Virus-specific CD4(+) T cells are key orchestrators of host responses to viral infection yet, compared with their CD8(+) T cell counterparts, remain poorly characterized at the single cell level. Here we use nine MHC II-epitope peptide tetramers to visualize human CD4(+) T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis (IM), a disease associated with large virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. We find that, while not approaching virus-specific CD8(+) T cell expansions in magnitude, activated CD4(+) T cells specific for epitopes in the latent antigen EBNA2 and four lytic cycle antigens are detected at high frequencies in acute IM blood. They then fall rapidly to values typical of life-long virus carriage where most tetramer-positive cells display conventional memory markers but some, unexpectedly, revert to a naive-like phenotype. In contrast CD4(+) T cell responses to EBNA1 epitopes are greatly delayed in IM patients, in line with the well-known but hitherto unexplained delay in EBNA1 IgG antibody responses. We present evidence from an in vitro system that may explain these unusual kinetics. Unlike other EBNAs and lytic cycle proteins, EBNA1 is not naturally released from EBV-infected cells as a source of antigen for CD4(+) T cell priming. PMID:23569328

  14. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A.; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4+ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo. PMID:27409630

  15. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-07-11

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4⁺ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo.

  16. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4⁺ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo. PMID:27409630

  17. Complexity of the primary genetic response to mitogenic activation of human T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zipfel, P.F.; Siebenlist, U. ); Irving, S.G.; Kelly, K. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors describe the isolation and characterization of more than 60 novel cDNA clones that constitute part of the immediate genetic response to resting human peripheral blood T cells after mitogen activation. This primary response was highly complex, both in the absolute number of inducible genes and in the diversity of regulation. Although most of the genes expressed in activated T cells were shared with the activation response of normal human fibroblasts, a significant number were more restricted in tissue specificity and thus likely encode or effect the differentiated functions of activated T cells. The activatable genes could be further differentiated on the basis of kinetics of induction, response to cycloheximide, and sensitivity to the immunosuppressive drug cylcosporin A. It is of note that cyclosporin A inhibited the expression of more than 10 inducible genes, which suggests that this drug has a broad genetic mechanism of action.

  18. Hormone Conjugated with Antibody to CD3 Mediates Cytotoxic T Cell Lysis of Human Melanoma Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Margaret Ann; Nussbaum, Samuel R.; Eisen, Herman N.

    1988-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes can be activated by antibodies to their antigen-specific receptor complex (TCR-CD3) to destroy target cells, regardless of the specificity of the cytotoxic T cells. A novel hormone-antibody conjugate, consisting of an analog of melanocyte-stimulating hormone chemically coupled to a monoclonal antibody to CD3, the invariant component of the T cell receptor complex, was used to target human melanoma cells for destruction by human cytotoxic T lymphocytes that bear no specificity for the tumor cells. As targeting components of such anti-CD3 conjugates, hormones or growth factors are expected to prove more effective than antibodies to tumor-associated antigens in focusing the destructive activity of cytotoxic T cells on tumor target cells.

  19. Production and Concentration of Lentivirus for Transduction of Primary Human T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Alan; Cribbs, Adam P

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors have emerged as efficient tools for investigating T cell biology through their ability to efficiently deliver transgene expression into both dividing and nondividing cells. Such lentiviral vectors have the potential to infect a wide variety of cell types. However, despite this advantage, the ability to transduce primary human T cells remains challenging and methods to achieve efficient gene transfer are often time consuming and expensive. We describe a method for generating lentivirus that is simple to perform and does not require the purchase of non-standard equipment to transduce primary human T cells. Therefore, we provide an optimized protocol that is easy to implement and allow transduction with high efficiency and reproducibility. PMID:27317175

  20. A non-canonical adenosinergic pathway led by CD38 in human melanoma cells induces suppression of T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Fabio; Morandi, Barbara; Horenstein, Alberto L; Chillemi, Antonella; Quarona, Valeria; Zaccarello, Gianluca; Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Pistoia, Vito; Malavasi, Fabio

    2015-09-22

    Nucleotide-metabolizing ectoenzymes are endowed with an extracellular catalytic domain, which is involved in regulating the extracellular nucleotide/nucleoside balance. The tumor microenvironment contains high levels of adenosine (ADO) generated by this enzymatic network, thus promoting tumor growth by inhibiting anti-tumor immune responses. ADO inhibition in melanoma murine models limits tumor metastases and restores anti-tumor immune responses. This work investigates the expression and function of ectoenzymes in primary human melanoma cell lines. All of latter cells expressed CD38, CD39, CD73, and CD203a/PC-1, and produced ADO from AMP and NAD(+ )T cell proliferation. Accordingly, phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein, p38 and Stat1 was lower in activated memory cells than in naïve CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Melanoma cells also inhibited proliferation of naïve, memory and -to a lesser extent- of effector CD8(+) T cells. These different inhibitory effects correlated with distinct patterns of expression of the ADO receptor A2a and A2b. These results show that primary human melanoma cell lines suppress in vitro T cell proliferation through an adenosinergic pathway in which CD38 and CD73 play a prominent role. PMID:26329660

  1. Chemical proteomic map of dimethyl fumarate-sensitive cysteines in primary human T cells.

    PubMed

    Blewett, Megan M; Xie, Jiji; Zaro, Balyn W; Backus, Keriann M; Altman, Amnon; Teijaro, John R; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an electrophilic drug that is used to treat autoimmune conditions, including multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. The mechanism of action of DMF is unclear but may involve the covalent modification of proteins or DMF serving as a prodrug that is converted to monomethyl fumarate (MMF). We found that DMF, but not MMF, blocked the activation of primary human and mouse T cells. Using a quantitative, site-specific chemical proteomic platform, we determined the DMF sensitivity of >2400 cysteine residues in human T cells. Cysteines sensitive to DMF, but not MMF, were identified in several proteins with established biochemical or genetic links to T cell function, including protein kinase Cθ (PKCθ). DMF blocked the association of PKCθ with the costimulatory receptor CD28 by perturbing a CXXC motif in the C2 domain of this kinase. Mutation of these DMF-sensitive cysteines also impaired PKCθ-CD28 interactions and T cell activation, designating the C2 domain of PKCθ as a key functional, electrophile-sensing module important for T cell biology. PMID:27625306

  2. Chemical proteomic map of dimethyl fumarate-sensitive cysteines in primary human T cells.

    PubMed

    Blewett, Megan M; Xie, Jiji; Zaro, Balyn W; Backus, Keriann M; Altman, Amnon; Teijaro, John R; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-09-13

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an electrophilic drug that is used to treat autoimmune conditions, including multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. The mechanism of action of DMF is unclear but may involve the covalent modification of proteins or DMF serving as a prodrug that is converted to monomethyl fumarate (MMF). We found that DMF, but not MMF, blocked the activation of primary human and mouse T cells. Using a quantitative, site-specific chemical proteomic platform, we determined the DMF sensitivity of >2400 cysteine residues in human T cells. Cysteines sensitive to DMF, but not MMF, were identified in several proteins with established biochemical or genetic links to T cell function, including protein kinase Cθ (PKCθ). DMF blocked the association of PKCθ with the costimulatory receptor CD28 by perturbing a CXXC motif in the C2 domain of this kinase. Mutation of these DMF-sensitive cysteines also impaired PKCθ-CD28 interactions and T cell activation, designating the C2 domain of PKCθ as a key functional, electrophile-sensing module important for T cell biology.

  3. Chemical proteomic map of dimethyl fumarate–sensitive cysteines in primary human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Megan M.; Xie, Jiji; Zaro, Balyn W.; Backus, Keriann M.; Altman, Amnon; Teijaro, John R.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an electrophilic drug that is used to treat autoimmune conditions, including multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. The mechanism of action of DMF is unclear, but may involve the covalent modification of proteins or DMF serving as a pro-drug that is converted to monomethyl fumarate (MMF). Here, we found that DMF, but not MMF, blocked the activation of primary human and mouse T cells. Using a quantitative, site-specific chemical proteomic platform, we determined the DMF-sensitivity of > 2400 cysteine residues in human T cells. Cysteines sensitive to DMF, but not MMF, were identified in several proteins with established biochemical or genetic links to T cell function, including protein kinase C θ (PKCθ). Furthermore, DMF blocked the association of PKCθ with the costimulatory receptor CD28 by perturbing a CXXC motif in the C2 domain of this kinase. Mutation of these DMF-sensitive cysteines also impaired PKCθ-CD28 interactions and T cell activation, designating the C2 domain of PKCθ as a key functional, electrophile-sensing module important for T cell biology. PMID:27625306

  4. Norovirus-Specific Memory T Cell Responses in Adult Human Donors

    PubMed Central

    Malm, Maria; Tamminen, Kirsi; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in people of all ages worldwide. NoV-specific serum antibodies which block the binding of NoV virus-like particles (VLPs) to the cell receptors have been thoroughly investigated. In contrast, only a few publications are available on the NoV capsid VP1 protein-specific T cell responses in humans naturally infected with the virus. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of eight healthy adult human donors previously exposed to NoV were stimulated with purified VLPs derived from NoV GII.4-1999, GII.4-2012 (Sydney), and GI.3, and IFN-γ production was measured by an ELISPOT assay. In addition, 76 overlapping synthetic peptides spanning the entire 539-amino acid sequence of GII.4 VP1 were pooled into two-dimensional matrices and used to identify putative T cell epitopes. Seven of the eight subjects produced IFN-γ in response to the peptides and five subjects produced IFN-γ in response to the VLPs of the same origin. In general, stronger T cell responses were induced with the peptides in each donor compared to the VLPs. A CD8+ T cell epitope in the shell domain of the VP1 (134SPSQVTMFPHIIVDVRQL151) was identified in two subjects, both having human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A∗02:01 allele. To our knowledge, this is the first report using synthetic peptides to study NoV-specific T cell responses in human subjects and identify T cell epitopes. PMID:27752254

  5. Genetically modified T cells targeting interleukin-11 receptor α-chain kill human osteosarcoma cells and induce the regression of established osteosarcoma lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gangxiong; Yu, Ling; Cooper, Laurence J N; Hollomon, Mario; Huls, Helen; Kleinerman, Eugenie S

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of osteosarcoma pulmonary metastases remains a challenge. T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), which recognizes a tumor-associated antigen, have shown activity against hematopoietic malignancies in clinical trials, but this requires the identification of a specific receptor on the tumor cell. In the current study, we found that interleukin (IL)-11Rα was selectively expressed on 14 of 16 osteosarcoma patients' lung metastases and four different human osteosarcoma cell lines, indicating that IL-11Rα may be a novel target for CAR-specific T-cell therapy. IL-11Rα expression was absent or low in normal organ tissues, with the exception of the gastrointestinal tract. IL-11Rα-CAR-specific T cells were obtained by non-viral gene transfer of Sleeping Beauty DNA plasmids and selectively expanded ex vivo using artificial antigen-presenting cells derived from IL-11Rα + K562 cells genetically modified to coexpress T-cell costimulatory molecules. IL-11Rα-CAR(+) T cells killed all four osteosarcoma cell lines in vitro; cytotoxicity correlated with the level of IL-11Rα expression on the tumor cells. Intravenous injection of IL-11Rα-CAR(+) T cells into mice resulted in the regression of osteosarcoma pulmonary metastases with no organ toxicity. Together, the data suggest that IL-11Rα-CAR T cells may represent a new therapy for patients with osteosarcoma pulmonary metastases. PMID:22075555

  6. Intestinal alpha beta T cells differentiate and rearrange antigen receptor genes in situ in the human infant.

    PubMed

    Williams, Amanda M; Bland, Paul W; Phillips, Anne C; Turner, Susan; Brooklyn, Trevor; Shaya, Gabriel; Spicer, Richard D; Probert, Christopher S J

    2004-12-15

    Intestinal Ag exposure during neonatal life influences appropriate adult immune responses. To define the mechanisms shaping the T cell repertoire during this period, we examined T cell differentiation and receptor diversity in the intestine of human infants. Developmental phenotypes of intraepithelial and lamina propria intestinal T cells from infants aged 1 day to 2 years were assessed ex vivo by flow cytometry and in situ by triple-fluorescent immunohistochemistry. Gene recombination-specific enzymes were assessed by PCR. TCR beta-chain V region gene diversity was determined by sequencing. Several different early lineage T cell populations were present neonatally: CD3(+)4(-)8(-) T cells were present at birth and numbers decreased during the neonatal period; CD3(+)4(+)8(+) T cells were present in low numbers throughout infancy; and CD3(+)4(+)8(-) or CD3(+)4(-)8(+) T cells increased with age. Very early lineage T cells, CD3(-)2(-)7(+) and CD3(-)2(+)7(+), were present neonatally, but were essentially absent at 1 year. Most lamina propria T cells differentiated rapidly after birth, but maturation of intraepithelial T cells took place over 1 year. Intestinal samples from infants less than 6 mo old contained transcripts of T early alpha and TdT, and 15 of 19 infant samples contained mRNA for RAG-1, some coexpressing RAG-2. TCR beta-chain repertoires were polyclonal in infants. Immature T cells, pre-T cells, and genes involved in T cell recombination were found in the intestine during infancy. T cell differentiation occurs within the neonatal human intestine, and the TCR repertoire of these developing immature T cells is likely to be influenced by luminal Ags. Thus, mucosal T cell responsiveness to environmental Ag is shaped in situ during early life.

  7. Chimeric NKG2D CAR-Expressing T Cell-Mediated Attack of Human Ovarian Cancer Is Enhanced by Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Song, De-Gang; Ye, Qunrui; Santoro, Stephen; Fang, Chongyun; Best, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Abstract NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs) are widely expressed on ovarian cancers to various degrees, making them attractive targets for immunotherapy. Here, we applied a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) approach for the targeting of NKG2DLs expressed on human ovarian cancer cells and evaluated the impact of pharmacological upregulation of NKG2DLs on immune recognition. Various NKG2DLs, including MICA/B and ULBP-1, -2, -3, and -4, were expressed at various levels on the surface of all established ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian cancer samples tested. To redirect human T cells against NKG2DLs, an NKG2DL-specific CAR was generated by fusing the extracellular domain of the NKG2D receptor to the 4-1BB costimulatory and CD3-ζ chain signaling domains. In vitro expansion of chimeric NKG2D CAR T cells was delayed compared with untransduced T cells and control CAR T cells; the likely result of fratricide among activated T cells expressing NKG2DLs. However, NKG2D CAR T cells did expand and were selectively enriched during prolonged culture. In coculture, CD4+ and CD8+ NKG2D CAR T cells specifically recognized and killed NKG2DL-expressing ovarian cancer cell lines but not NKG2DL-negative cells. Notably, pretreatment of ovarian cancer cells expressing moderate to low levels of NKG2DLs with the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium valproate (VPA) upregulated NKG2DL cell surface expression and consequently enhanced their immune recognition by chimeric NKG2D CAR T cells. Our results demonstrate that VPA-induced upregulation of NKG2DL expression enhances the immune recognition of ovarian cancer cells by engineered NKG2D CAR T cells, and rationalizes the use of VPA in combination with NKG2DL-targeted immunotherapy in ovarian cancer. PMID:23297870

  8. Plumbagin exerts an immunosuppressive effect on human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Kyoung Jun; Lee, Yura; Kim, Soon Ae; Kim, Jiyeon

    2016-04-22

    Of the hematological disorders typified by poor prognoses and survival rates, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is one of the most commonly diagnosed. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents, the treatment options for this cancer remain limited. In this manuscript, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of plumbagin, mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and inhibition of NF-κB signaling; the human T-ALL MOLT-4 cell line was used as our experimental system. Plumbagin is a natural, plant derived compound, which exerts an anti-proliferative activity against many types of human cancer. Our experiments confirm that plumbagin induces a caspase-dependent apoptosis of MOLT-4 cells, with no significant cytotoxicity seen for normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Plumbagin also inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p65, and the transcription of NF-κB target genes. Our results now show that plumbagin is a potent inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and suppressor of T-ALL cell proliferation. PMID:27018383

  9. Differentiation of human B lymphocyte subpopulations induced by an alloreactive helper T-cell clone

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.J.; Hummell, D.S.; Lawton, A.R.

    1988-07-01

    We have used cloned alloreactive helper T cells to determine if direct T cell-B cell interaction can induce differentiation of human peripheral blood B cells which do not respond to pokeweed mitogen (PWM). T-cell clone 2F8 was derived from a one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction. 2F8 cells are T3+T4+T8-IL-2R+ and proliferate in response to irradiated stimulator cells, but not autologous cells, in the absence of exogenous interleukin-2. 2F8 cells provide allospecific help for polyclonal proliferation and differentiation of B cells in the absence of any other stimulus. The magnitude of this response is comparable to that of the response of the same B cells to PWM and fresh autologous T cells. 2F8 cells could also provide nonspecific help for unrelated donor B cells in the presence of PWM, with no requirement for costimulation by irradiated stimulator cells. Allospecific stimulation of B cells was completely inhibited by antibodies to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) framework determinants and was abrogated by 1000-rad irradiation. Cloned 2F8 T cells stimulated differentiation of both small, high-density B cells and larger B cells, generating up to 30% plasma cells with either fraction. B cells forming rosettes with mouse erythrocytes were also induced to differentiate by the helper T cell clone. As found previously, neither small, high-density B cells nor mouse rosette+ B cells responded well to PWM. Direct interaction with allospecific T cells induces differentiation of a broader spectrum of B cells than soluble growth and differentiation factors in conjunction with polyclonal activators such as PWM and protein A containing staphylococci.

  10. Activated human B lymphocytes express three CTLA-4 counterreceptors that costimulate T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Boussiotis, V A; Freeman, G J; Gribben, J G; Daley, J; Gray, G; Nadler, L M

    1993-01-01

    Signaling via the T-cell receptor complex is necessary but not sufficient to induce antigen-specific T lymphocytes to expand clonally. To proliferate, T cells must receive one or more costimulatory signals provided by antigen presenting cells (APCs). One such critical costimulatory signal is delivered by the CD28/CTLA-4 counterreceptor, B7, expressed on APCs. B7 costimulation induces CD28 signaling, resulting in interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion, and T-cell proliferation. Conversely, T-cell receptor signaling in the absence of B7 costimulation results in induction of antigen-specific tolerance. Here, we show that activated human B lymphocytes express two additional CTLA-4 counterreceptors also capable of providing T-cell costimulation. At 24 hr postactivation, B cells express a CTLA-4 counterreceptor not recognized by anti-B7 or -BB-1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which induces detectable IL-2 secretion and T-cell proliferation. At 48 and 72 hr postactivation, B cells express both B7 and a third CTLA-4 counterreceptor identified by the anti-BB-1 mAb. BB-1 appears to be a molecule distinct from B7 by its expression on B7- cells and its capacity to induce T cells to proliferate without significant accumulation of IL-2. As observed for B7, costimulatory signals mediated by these alternative CTLA-4/CD28 counterreceptors are likely to be essential for generation of an immune response and their absence may result in antigen-specific tolerance. We propose the following terminology for these CTLA-4 counterreceptors: (i) B7, B7-1; (ii) early CTLA-4 binding counterreceptor, B7-2; and (iii) BB-1, B7-3. PMID:7504293

  11. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) Suppresses the Effects of Glycerol Monolaurate (GML) on Human T Cell Activation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Michael S.; Houtman, Jon C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol monolaurate (GML) is a monoglyceride with well characterized anti-microbial properties. Because of these properties, GML is widely used in food, cosmetics, and personal care products and currently being tested as a therapeutic for menstrual associated toxic shock syndrome, superficial wound infections, and HIV transmission. Recently, we have described that GML potently suppresses select T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling events, leading to reduced human T cell effector functions. However, how soluble host factors present in the blood and at sites of infection affect GML-mediated human T cell suppression is unknown. In this study, we have characterized how human serum albumin (HSA) affects GML-induced inhibition of human T cells. We found that HSA and other serum albumins bind to 12 carbon acyl side chain of GML at low micromolar affinities and restores the TCR-induced formation of LAT, PLC-γ1, and AKT microclusters at the plasma membrane. Additionally, HSA reverses GML mediated inhibition of AKT phosphorylation and partially restores cytokine production in GML treated cells. Our data reveal that HSA, one of the most abundant proteins in the human serum and at sites of infections, potently reverses the suppression of human T cells by GML. This suggests that GML-driven human T cell suppression depends upon the local tissue environment, with albumin concentration being a major determinant of GML function. PMID:27764189

  12. Cross-reactive human B cell and T cell epitopes between influenza A and B viruses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A and B viruses form different genera, which were originally distinguished by antigenic differences in their nucleoproteins and matrix 1 proteins. Cross-protection between these two genera has not been observed in animal experiments, which is consistent with the low homology in viral proteins common to both viruses except for one of three polymerase proteins, polymerase basic 1 (PB1). Recently, however, antibody and CD4+ T cell epitopes conserved between the two genera were identified in humans. A protective antibody epitope was located in the stalk region of the surface glycoprotein, hemagglutinin, and a CD4+ T cell epitope was located in the fusion peptide of the hemagglutinin. The fusion peptide was also found to contain antibody epitopes in humans and animals. A short stretch of well-conserved peptide was also identified in the other surface glycoprotein, neuraminidase, and antibodies binding to this peptide were generated by peptide immunization in rabbits. Although PB1, the only protein which has relatively high overall sequence homology between influenza A and B viruses, is not considered an immunodominant protein in the T cell responses to influenza A virus infection, amino acid sequence comparisons show that a considerable number of previously identified T cell epitopes in the PB1 of influenza A viruses are conserved in the PB1 of influenza B viruses. These data indicate that B and T cell cross-reactivity exists between influenza A and B viruses, which may have modulatory effects on the disease process and recovery. Although the antibody titers and the specific T cell frequencies induced by natural infection or standard vaccination may not be high enough to provide cross protection in humans, it might be possible to develop immunization strategies to induce these cross-reactive responses more efficiently. PMID:23886073

  13. Amplification of the polyclonal activation of human T cells. I. Null-cell products promote the polyclonal proliferation of T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Caraux, J; Klein, B; Thierry, C; Serrou, B

    1982-01-01

    Synergy can be observed in the proliferative response to mitogens of cultures containing human T and Null cells when compared with those containing only highly purified cells of those two types. This synergy was analysed (i) by evaluation of the proliferative response at each step of the purification process leading to separation of T and Null cells; (ii) by back-mixing T and Nul cells at different rations; and (iii) by evaluation of the proliferative response of free suspension cultures of T cells overlaying a semi-solid layer containing Null cells, or of free suspension cultures of Null cells over a semi-solid culture layer of T cells. The following conclusions were reached: (i) purified Null cells are unresponsive to mitogen when cultured alone or in the presence of diffusible T-cell products; (ii) the T cells are less responsive when cultured alone than in the presence of Null cells or diffusible Null cell products. Thus the synergistic effect observed between T and Null cells is not due to the promotion of Null-cell proliferation by T -cell products but can be accounted for by diffusible Null-cell products enhancing the process of T lymphocyte activation by mitogens. PMID:6977479

  14. IL-12 Delivered Intratumorally by Multilamellar Liposomes Reactivates Memory T Cells in Human Tumor Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R.; Purohit, Vivek S.; Pang, Wing Man; Iyer, Vandana; Odunsi, Kunle; Demmy, Todd L; Yokota, Sandra J.; Loyall, Jenni L.; Kelleher, Raymond J.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy; Bankert, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Using a novel loading technique, IL-12 is reported here to be efficiently encapsulated within large multilamellar liposomes. The preclinical efficacy of the cytokine loaded liposomes to deliver IL-12 into human tumors and to reactive tumor-associated T cells in situ is tested using a human tumor xenograft model. IL-12 is released in vivo from these liposomes in a biologically active form when injected into tumor xenografts that are established by the subcutaneous implantation of non-disrupted pieces of human lung, breast or ovarian tumors into immunodeficient mice. The histological architecture of the original tumor tissue, including tumor-associated leukocytes, tumor cells and stromal cells is preserved anatomically and the cells remain functionally responsive to cytokines in these xenografts. The local and sustained release of IL-12 into the tumor microenvironment reactivates tumor-associated quiescent effector memory T cells to proliferate, produce and release IFN-γ resulting in the killing of tumor cells in situ. Very little IL-12 is detected in the serum of mice for up to 5 days after an intratumoral injection of the IL-12 liposomes. We conclude that IL-12 loaded large multilamellar liposomes provide a safe method for the local and sustained delivery of IL-12 to tumors and a therapeutically effective way of reactivating existing tumor-associated T cells in human solid tumor microenvironments. The potential of this local in situ T cell re-stimulation to induce a systemic anti-tumor immunity is discussed. PMID:19395317

  15. Comparative genomics of the human and mouse T cell receptor loci.

    PubMed

    Glusman, G; Rowen, L; Lee, I; Boysen, C; Roach, J C; Smit, A F; Wang, K; Koop, B F; Hood, L

    2001-09-01

    The availability of the complete genomic sequences of the human and mouse T cell receptor loci opens up new opportunities for understanding T cell receptors (TCRs) and their genes. The full complement of TCR gene segments is finally known and should prove a valuable resource for supporting functional studies. A rational nomenclature system has been implemented and is widely available through IMGT and other public databases. Systematic comparisons of the genomic sequences within each locus, between loci, and across species enable precise analyses of the various diversification mechanisms and some regulatory signals. The genomic landscape of the TCR loci provides fundamental insights into TCR evolution as highly localized and tightly regulated gene families.

  16. Human T cell responses to Japanese encephalitis virus in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Lance; Bali, Tanushka; Buxton, Gemma; Chib, Savita; Chan, Sajesh; Soni, Mohammed; Hussain, Mohammed; Isenman, Heather; Fadnis, Prachi; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Satishkumar, Vishali; Lewthwaite, Penny; Kurioka, Ayako; Krishna, Srinivasa; Shankar, M Veera; Ahmed, Riyaz; Begum, Ashia; Ravi, Vasanthapuram; Desai, Anita; Yoksan, Sutee; Fernandez, Stefan; Willberg, Christian B; Kloverpris, Henrik N; Conlon, Christopher; Klenerman, Paul; Satchidanandam, Vijaya; Solomon, Tom

    2016-06-27

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus (JEV) is an important cause of encephalitis in children of South and Southeast Asia. However, the majority of individuals exposed to JEV only develop mild symptoms associated with long-lasting adaptive immunity. The related flavivirus dengue virus (DENV) cocirculates in many JEV-endemic areas, and clinical data suggest cross-protection between DENV and JEV. To address the role of T cell responses in protection against JEV, we conducted the first full-breadth analysis of the human memory T cell response using a synthetic peptide library. Ex vivo interferon-γ (IFN-γ) responses to JEV in healthy JEV-exposed donors were mostly CD8(+) and targeted nonstructural (NS) proteins, whereas IFN-γ responses in recovered JE patients were mostly CD4(+) and targeted structural proteins and the secreted protein NS1. Among patients, a high quality, polyfunctional CD4(+) T cell response was associated with complete recovery from JE. T cell responses from healthy donors showed a high degree of cross-reactivity to DENV that was less apparent in recovered JE patients despite equal exposure. These data reveal divergent functional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses linked to different clinical outcomes of JEV infection, associated with distinct targeting and broad flavivirus cross-reactivity including epitopes from DENV, West Nile, and Zika virus.

  17. Human CD8(+) T Cells Target Multiple Epitopes in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Burbulla, Daniel; Günther, Patrick S; Peper, Janet K; Jahn, Gerhard; Dennehy, Kevin M

    2016-06-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a serious health problem in young children, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. The development of novel prevention strategies, such as a vaccine to RSV, is a high priority. One strategy is to design a peptide-based vaccine that activates appropriate CD8(+) T-cell responses. However, this approach is limited by the low number of RSV peptide epitopes defined to date that activate CD8(+) T cells. We aimed to identify peptide epitopes that are presented by common human leukocyte antigen types (HLA-A*01, -A*02, and -B*07). We identify one novel HLA-A*02-restricted and two novel HLA-A*01-restricted peptide epitopes from RSV polymerase. Peptide-HLA multimer staining of specific T cells from healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cell, the memory phenotype of such peptide-specific T cells ex vivo, and functional IFNγ responses in short-term stimulation assays suggest that these peptides are recognized during RSV infection. Such peptides are candidates for inclusion into a peptide-based RSV vaccine designed to stimulate defined CD8(+) T-cell responses.

  18. Human T cell responses to Japanese encephalitis virus in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Lance; Bali, Tanushka; Buxton, Gemma; Chib, Savita; Chan, Sajesh; Soni, Mohammed; Hussain, Mohammed; Isenman, Heather; Fadnis, Prachi; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Satishkumar, Vishali; Lewthwaite, Penny; Kurioka, Ayako; Krishna, Srinivasa; Shankar, M Veera; Ahmed, Riyaz; Begum, Ashia; Ravi, Vasanthapuram; Desai, Anita; Yoksan, Sutee; Fernandez, Stefan; Willberg, Christian B; Kloverpris, Henrik N; Conlon, Christopher; Klenerman, Paul; Satchidanandam, Vijaya; Solomon, Tom

    2016-06-27

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus (JEV) is an important cause of encephalitis in children of South and Southeast Asia. However, the majority of individuals exposed to JEV only develop mild symptoms associated with long-lasting adaptive immunity. The related flavivirus dengue virus (DENV) cocirculates in many JEV-endemic areas, and clinical data suggest cross-protection between DENV and JEV. To address the role of T cell responses in protection against JEV, we conducted the first full-breadth analysis of the human memory T cell response using a synthetic peptide library. Ex vivo interferon-γ (IFN-γ) responses to JEV in healthy JEV-exposed donors were mostly CD8(+) and targeted nonstructural (NS) proteins, whereas IFN-γ responses in recovered JE patients were mostly CD4(+) and targeted structural proteins and the secreted protein NS1. Among patients, a high quality, polyfunctional CD4(+) T cell response was associated with complete recovery from JE. T cell responses from healthy donors showed a high degree of cross-reactivity to DENV that was less apparent in recovered JE patients despite equal exposure. These data reveal divergent functional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses linked to different clinical outcomes of JEV infection, associated with distinct targeting and broad flavivirus cross-reactivity including epitopes from DENV, West Nile, and Zika virus. PMID:27242166

  19. Changing the peptide specificity of a human T cell receptor by directed evolution

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sheena N.; Wang, Yuhang; Baylon, Javier L.; Singh, Nishant K.; Baker, Brian M.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Kranz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Binding of a T cell receptor (TCR) to a peptide/major histocompatibility complex is the key interaction involved in antigen specificity of T cells. The recognition involves up to six complementarity determining regions (CDR) of the TCR. Efforts to examine the structural basis of these interactions and to exploit them in adoptive T cell therapies has required the isolation of specific T cell clones and their clonotypic TCRs. Here we describe a strategy using in vitro, directed evolution of a single TCR to change its peptide specificity, thereby avoiding the need to isolate T cell clones. The human TCR A6, which recognizes the viral peptide Tax/HLA-A2, was converted to TCR variants that recognized the cancer peptide MART1/HLA-A2. Mutational studies and molecular dynamics simulations identified CDR residues that were predicted to be important in the specificity switch. Thus, in vitro engineering strategies alone can be used to discover TCRs with desired specificities. PMID:25376839

  20. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies.

  1. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  2. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Jones, David R.; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1–mediated (PD-1–mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB–based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  3. Human iPS cell-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells induce T-cell anergy in in vitro-generated alloreactive CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Manzar, Gohar; Zavazava, Nicholas

    2013-06-27

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have emerged as an alternative source of pluripotent stem cells that can be used for tissue regeneration in place of the controversial human embryonic stem cells. However, immunologic knowledge about iPSC derivatives remains enigmatic. Here, we characterized human iPS-derived CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). These HPCs poorly express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I antigens and are MHC-II negative. Interestingly, they moderately express nonclassical HLA-G and HLA-E molecules. Consequently, alloreactive HLA-A2-specific cytotoxic T cells failed to recognize HLA-A2-expressing HPCs but became anergic. Subsequent upregulation of MHC-I using interferon-γ stimulation and provision of CD28 cosignaling led to T-cell activation, confirming that poor delivery of signals 1 and 2 by the HPCs mediated T-cell anergy. These data indicate for the first time that HPCs induce T-cell anergy, a unique characteristic of iPSC-derived cells that confers immunologic advantage for allogenic transplantation. Although iPSCs are ideal for patient-tailored treatments with the anticipation that no immunosuppression will be required, in cases of gene defects, their derivatives could be used to treat diseases in nonhistocompatible recipients. PMID:23687092

  4. Human iPS cell–derived hematopoietic progenitor cells induce T-cell anergy in in vitro–generated alloreactive CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Manzar, Gohar

    2013-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have emerged as an alternative source of pluripotent stem cells that can be used for tissue regeneration in place of the controversial human embryonic stem cells. However, immunologic knowledge about iPSC derivatives remains enigmatic. Here, we characterized human iPS-derived CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). These HPCs poorly express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I antigens and are MHC-II negative. Interestingly, they moderately express nonclassical HLA-G and HLA-E molecules. Consequently, alloreactive HLA-A2–specific cytotoxic T cells failed to recognize HLA-A2–expressing HPCs but became anergic. Subsequent upregulation of MHC-I using interferon-γ stimulation and provision of CD28 cosignaling led to T-cell activation, confirming that poor delivery of signals 1 and 2 by the HPCs mediated T-cell anergy. These data indicate for the first time that HPCs induce T-cell anergy, a unique characteristic of iPSC-derived cells that confers immunologic advantage for allogenic transplantation. Although iPSCs are ideal for patient-tailored treatments with the anticipation that no immunosuppression will be required, in cases of gene defects, their derivatives could be used to treat diseases in nonhistocompatible recipients. PMID:23687092

  5. Morphological interactions of interdigitating dendritic cells with B and T cells in human mesenteric lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Kenji, A; Norihiro, T; Eisaku, K; Takashi, O; Kazuhiko, H; Tadashi, Y; Tadaatsu, A

    2001-07-01

    Interdigitating dendritic cells (IDC) of the human mesenteric lymph nodes (LN) were examined by two-color immunofluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry to clarify their exact localization, immunophenotype, and relationships with T and B cells. IDC were identified as HLA-DR(bright) large dendriform cells of the T cell areas co-expressing CD40, CD54 (ICAM-1), CD80 (B7/B7-1), CD83, and CD86 (B70/B7-2). The majority of IDC directly attached to a few IgD+ naive B cells as well as to numerous CD4+ T cells. When LN cells were singly suspended and briefly incubated in vitro, IDC formed clusters with IgD+ IgM+ naive B cells, but not with IgA+ or IgG+ B cells. When suspended LN cells were cultured, clustered B cells disappeared within 7 days, and on prolonged culture, some IDC developed into extensively dendriform cells forming stable complexes with several or sometimes numerous CD4+ IL-2R+ CD40L+ activated T cells. These findings indicate that resting naive B cells actually interact with IDC directly in T cell areas of human secondary lymphoid tissues. IDC have a non-antigen (Ag)-specific, strong affinity for resting naive B cells, but this affinity is transient and IDC cannot form stable complexes with B cells, although they can form stable complexes with activated T cells. It is suggested that the stable IDC/Ag-activated T cell complexes make it possible to capture and to stimulate rare Ag-specific resting naive B cells with high efficiency.

  6. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4+ T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4+ effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4+ EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4+ T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4+ EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component. PMID:26376930

  7. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Saghaug, Christina Skår; Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina; Hanevik, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4(+) T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4(+) effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4(+) EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4(+) T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4(+) EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component. PMID:26376930

  8. Putative prethymic T cell precursors within the early human embryonic liver: a molecular and functional analysis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells present in the liver in early human fetal life were characterized by phenotypic analysis using a broad panel of monoclonal antibodies. Expression of very late antigen 4 and leukocyte function- associated antigen 3 cell adhesion receptors and 4F2 cell activation molecules was found in all fetal liver hematopoietic cells before acquisition of T cell-, B cell-, or myeloid-specific surface markers, and before the time of intrathymic colonization. Molecular studies showed that expression of the interleukin 2 receptor beta (IL-2R beta) also occurred in the embryonic liver at this early ontogenic stage. In contrast, no expression of IL-2R alpha or IL-2 transcripts was found in fetal liver cells, whereas transcription of the IL-4 gene was detected in a small fetal liver cell subset. Putative T cell precursors were identified among the hematopoietic fetal liver cells by the expression of genes encoding the gamma, delta, epsilon, and zeta invariant chains of the CD3-T cell receptor (TCR) complex. However, no transcription of the polymorphic alpha and beta TCR genes was detected. Functional in vitro assays further demonstrated that fetal liver hematopoietic cells from those early embryos were capable of proliferating in response to T cell growth factors, including IL-4 and IL-2. However, whereas IL-4- induced proliferation paralleled the appearance in vitro of CD45+CD7- CD4dull cells expressing the CD14 myeloid antigen, as well as of CD34+ primitive hematopoietic progenitors, differentiation into CD45+CD7+CD8+CD3- immature T cells was observed when using IL-2. Moreover, coculture with thymic epithelial cell monolayers provided additional evidence that early fetal liver hematopoietic cells may include very primitive T cell precursors, which were able to differentiate in vitro into TCR alpha/beta+ mature T cells. Therefore, our results indicate that, after triggering of the T cell-specific maturation program in primitive fetal liver hematopoietic progenitors

  9. Cholesteryl esters stabilize human CD1c conformations for recognition by self-reactive T cells

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Salah; Tocheva, Anna S.; Cave-Ayland, Chris; Machelett, Moritz M.; Sander, Barbara; Lissin, Nikolai M.; Molloy, Peter E.; Baird, Mark S.; Stübs, Gunthard; Schröder, Nicolas W. J.; Schumann, Ralf R.; Rademann, Jörg; Postle, Anthony D.; Jakobsen, Bent K.; Marshall, Ben G.; Gosain, Rajendra; Elkington, Paul T.; Elliott, Tim; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Essex, Jonathan W.; Tews, Ivo; Gadola, Stephan D.

    2016-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation 1c (CD1c)-dependent self-reactive T cells are abundant in human blood, but self-antigens presented by CD1c to the T-cell receptors of these cells are poorly understood. Here we present a crystal structure of CD1c determined at 2.4 Å revealing an extended ligand binding potential of the antigen groove and a substantially different conformation compared with known CD1c structures. Computational simulations exploring different occupancy states of the groove reenacted these different CD1c conformations and suggested cholesteryl esters (CE) and acylated steryl glycosides (ASG) as new ligand classes for CD1c. Confirming this, we show that binding of CE and ASG to CD1c enables the binding of human CD1c self-reactive T-cell receptors. Hence, human CD1c adopts different conformations dependent on ligand occupancy of its groove, with CE and ASG stabilizing CD1c conformations that provide a footprint for binding of CD1c self-reactive T-cell receptors. PMID:26884207

  10. Target epitope in the Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I recognized by class I major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    Kannagi, M; Shida, H; Igarashi, H; Kuruma, K; Murai, H; Aono, Y; Maruyama, I; Osame, M; Hattori, T; Inoko, H

    1992-05-01

    A trans-acting regulatory gene product p40tax (Tax) of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is one of the main target antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific for HTLV-I. A CTL epitope within the Tax protein was identified in this report. HTLV-I-specific CD8+ CTL lines established from two HTLV-I carriers with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy or Sjögren syndrome were previously demonstrated to kill predominantly the target cells expressing HTLV-I Tax. The CTL from two patients showed significant levels of cytotoxicity to autologous target cells pulsed with a synthetic peptide of 24 amino acids corresponding to the amino-terminal sequences of the Tax protein. Allogeneic target cells were also sensitized for CTL by this peptide when the target cells have HLA-A2. Tax-specific cytotoxicity, detected as cytolysis of the target cells infected with vaccinia virus-HTLV-I recombinant expressing Tax protein, was almost completely inhibited by competitor cells pulsed with the synthetic peptide. This indicates that a major CTL epitope is present in this peptide. Further analysis using shorter peptides revealed that the core sequence of the CTL epitope was LLFGYPVYV at positions 11 through 19. This sequence can be aligned with the HLA-A2-specific motifs reported recently. PMID:1373197

  11. CD4+CD25+ FOXP3+ regulatory T cells from human thymus and cord blood suppress antigen-specific T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Kajsa; Larsson, Pia; Sandström, Kerstin; Lundin, Samuel B; Suri-Payer, Elisabeth; Rudin, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Activation of self-reactive T cells in healthy adults is prevented by the presence of autoantigen-specific CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (CD25+ Treg). To explore the functional development of autoantigen-reactive CD25+ Treg in humans we investigated if thymic CD25+ Treg from children aged 2 months to 11 years and cord blood CD25+ Treg are able to suppress proliferation and cytokine production induced by specific antigens. While CD4+CD25− thymocytes proliferated in response to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin, suppression of proliferation was not detected after the addition of thymic CD25+ Treg. However, CD25+ Treg inhibited interferon (IFN)-γ production induced by MOG, which indicates that MOG-reactive CD25+ Treg are present in the thymus. In contrast, cord blood CD25+ Treg suppressed both proliferation and cytokine production induced by MOG. Both cord blood and thymic CD25+ Treg expressed FOXP3 mRNA. However, FOXP3 expression was lower in cord blood than in thymic CD25+ T cells. Further characterization of cord blood CD25+ T cells revealed that FOXP3 was highly expressed by CD25+CD45RA+ cells while CD25+CD45RA− cells contained twofold less FOXP3, which may explain the lower expression level of FOXP3 in cord blood CD25+ T cells compared to thymic CD25+ T cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that low numbers of MOG-reactive functional CD25+ Treg are present in normal thymus, but that the suppressive ability of the cells is broader in cord blood. This suggests that the CD25+ Treg may be further matured in the periphery after being exported from the thymus. PMID:16011520

  12. On the organization of human T-cell receptor loci: log-periodic distribution of T-cell receptor gene segments

    PubMed Central

    Toor, Amir A.; Toor, Abdullah A.; Rahmani, Mohamed; Manjili, Masoud H.

    2016-01-01

    The human T-cell repertoire is complex and is generated by the rearrangement of variable (V), diversity (D) and joining (J) segments on the T-cell receptor (TCR) loci. The T-cell repertoire demonstrates self-similarity in terms clonal frequencies when defined by V, D and J gene segment usage; therefore to determine whether the structural ordering of these gene segments on the TCR loci contributes to the observed clonal frequencies, the TCR loci were examined for self-similarity and periodicity in terms of gene segment organization. Logarithmic transformation of numeric sequence order demonstrated that the V and J gene segments for both T-cell receptor α (TRA) and β (TRB) loci are arranged in a self-similar manner when the spacing between the adjacent segments was considered as a function of the size of the neighbouring gene segment, with an average fractal dimension of approximately 1.5. Accounting for the gene segments occurring on helical DNA molecules with a logarithmic distribution, sine and cosine functions of the log-transformed angular coordinates of the start and stop nucleotides of successive TCR gene segments showed an ordered progression from the 5′ to the 3′ end of the locus, supporting a log-periodic organization. T-cell clonal frequency estimates, based on V and J segment usage, from normal stem cell donors were plotted against the V and J segment on TRB locus and demonstrated a periodic distribution. We hypothesize that this quasi-periodic variation in gene-segment representation in the T-cell clonal repertoire may be influenced by the location of the gene segments on the periodic-logarithmically scaled TCR loci. Interactions between the two strands of DNA in the double helix may influence the probability of gene segment usage by means of either constructive or destructive interference resulting from the superposition of the two helices. PMID:26763333

  13. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Scott G; Bennett, Michael; Galić, Zoran; Kim, Joanne; Xu, Qing; Young, Alan; Lieberman, Alexis; Joseph, Aviva; Goldstein, Harris; Ng, Hwee; Yang, Otto; Zack, Jerome A

    2009-01-01

    There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR). Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  14. Human CD1-restricted T cell recognition of lipids from pollens.

    PubMed

    Agea, Elisabetta; Russano, Anna; Bistoni, Onelia; Mannucci, Roberta; Nicoletti, Ildo; Corazzi, Lanfranco; Postle, Anthony D; De Libero, Gennaro; Porcelli, Steven A; Spinozzi, Fabrizio

    2005-07-18

    Plant pollens are an important source of environmental antigens that stimulate allergic responses. In addition to acting as vehicles for foreign protein antigens, they contain lipids that incorporate saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, which are necessary in the reproduction of higher plants. The CD1 family of nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex-related molecules is highly conserved in mammals, and has been shown to present microbial and self lipids to T cells. Here, we provide evidence that pollen lipids may be recognized as antigens by human T cells through a CD1-dependent pathway. Among phospholipids extracted from cypress grains, phosphatidyl-choline and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine were able to stimulate the proliferation of T cells from cypress-sensitive subjects. Recognition of phospholipids involved multiple cell types, mostly CD4(+) T cell receptor for antigen (TCR)alphabeta(+), some CD4(-)CD8(-) TCRgammadelta(+), but rarely Valpha24i(+) natural killer-T cells, and required CD1a(+) and CD1d(+) antigen presenting cell. The responding T cells secreted both interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon-gamma, in some cases IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta, and could provide help for immunoglobulin E (IgE) production. Responses to pollen phospholipids were maximally evident in blood samples obtained from allergic subjects during pollinating season, uniformly absent in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-exposed health care workers, but occasionally seen in nonallergic subjects. Finally, allergic, but not normal subjects, displayed circulating specific IgE and cutaneous weal and flare reactions to phospholipids. PMID:16009719

  15. Antigen-specific activation and cytokine-facilitated expansion of naive, human CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wölfl, Matthias; Greenberg, Philip D

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-specific priming of human, naïve T-cells has been difficult to assess. Due to the low initial frequency in the naïve cell pool of specific T-cell precursors, such an analysis has been obscured by the requirements for repeated stimulations and prolonged culture time. In this protocol, we describe how to rapidly evaluate antigen-specific priming of CD8+ -cells following a single stimulation. The assay provides reference conditions, which result in the expansion of a significant population of antigen-specific T-cells from the naïve repertoire. Various conditions and modifications during the priming process (e.g. testing new cytokines, costimulators, etc.) can now be directly compared to the reference conditions. Factors relevant to achieving effective priming include the dendritic cell preparation, the T-cell preparation, the cell ratio at the time of priming, the serum source used for the experiment, and the timing of addition and concentration of the cytokines used for expansion. This protocol is relevant for human immunology, vaccine biology and drug development. PMID:24675735

  16. Mechanism of Activation-Induced Downregulation of Mitofusin 2 in Human Peripheral Blood T Cells.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Asish; Chen, Kuang-Hueih; Munk, Rachel B; Sasaki, Carl Y; Curtis, Jessica; Longo, Dan L; Ghosh, Paritosh

    2015-12-15

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), a mitochondrial protein, was shown to have antiproliferative properties when overexpressed. In this article, we show that activation of resting human peripheral blood T cells caused downregulation of Mfn2 levels. This downregulation of Mfn2 was blocked by different inhibitors (mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, PI3K inhibitor LY294002, and Akt inhibitor A443654), producing cells that were arrested in the G0/G1 stage of the cell cycle. Furthermore, the activation-induced downregulation of Mfn2 preceded the entry of the cells into the cell cycle, suggesting that Mfn2 downregulation is a prerequisite for activated T cell entry into the cell cycle. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Mfn2 resulted in increased T cell proliferation. Overexpression of constitutively active AKT resulted in the downregulation of Mfn2, which can be blocked by a proteasome inhibitor. Akt-mediated downregulation of Mfn2 was via the mTORC1 pathway because this downregulation was blocked by rapamycin, and overexpression of wild-type, but not kinase-dead mTOR, caused Mfn2 downregulation. Our data suggested that activation-induced reactive oxygen species production plays an important role in the downregulation of Mfn2. Collectively, our data suggest that the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway plays an important role in activation-induced downregulation of Mfn2 and subsequent proliferation of resting human T cells. PMID:26566676

  17. Divergent phenotypes of human regulatory T cells expressing the receptors TIGIT and CD226

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrman, Christopher A.; Yeh, Wen-I; Seay, Howard R.; Lakshmi, Priya Saikumar; Chopra, Gaurav; Zhang, Lin; Perry, Daniel J.; McClymont, Stephanie A.; Yadav, Mahesh; Lopez, Maria-Cecilia; Baker, Henry V.; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yizheng; Whitley, Maryann; von Schack, David; Atkinson, Mark A.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Brusko, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a central role in counteracting inflammation and autoimmunity. A more complete understanding of cellular heterogeneity and the potential for lineage plasticity in human Treg subsets may identify markers of disease pathogenesis and facilitate the development of optimized cellular therapeutics. To better elucidate human Treg subsets, we conducted direct transcriptional profiling of CD4+FOXP3+Helios+ thymic-derived Treg (tTreg) and CD4+FOXP3+Helios− T cells, followed by comparison to CD4+FOXP3−Helios− T conventional (Tconv) cells. These analyses revealed that the coinhibitory receptor T-cell immunoglobulin and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif domain (TIGIT) was highly expressed on tTreg. TIGIT and the costimulatory factor CD226 bind the common ligand CD155. Thus, we analyzed the cellular distribution and suppressive activity of isolated subsets of CD4+CD25+CD127lo/− T cells expressing CD226 and/or TIGIT. We observed TIGIT is highly expressed and upregulated on Treg following activation and in vitro expansion and is associated with lineage stability and suppressive capacity. Conversely, the CD226+TIGIT− population was associated with reduced Treg purity and suppressive capacity following expansion, along with a marked increase in IL-10 and effector cytokine production. These studies provide additional markers to delineate functionally distinct Treg subsets that may help direct cellular therapies and provide important phenotypic markers for assessing the role of Treg in health and disease. PMID:25994968

  18. S-antigen. Identification of human T-cell lymphocyte proliferation sites.

    PubMed

    Vrabec, T R; Reber, R N; Magargal, L E; Donoso, L A

    1990-10-01

    Immune responses to normal retinal proteins, including S-antigen, have been demonstrated in patients with a variety of retinal disorders, as well as in those who have received panretinal laser photocoagulation. T-cell lymphocytes (T cells) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several ocular inflammatory diseases of possible autoimmune etiology. We used synthetic peptides that correspond to the amino acid sequence of S-antigen in lymphocyte proliferation assays to identify specific sites in the molecule recognized by human T cells. Ten patients with type II diabetes were studied before and after initial panretinal laser photocoagulation for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. T-cell responses, expressed as a stimulation index, to S-antigen and peptides were negative in all patients before treatment. Three weeks after panretinal laser photocoagulation, eight of 10 assays were positive (stimulation index greater than 2; P less than .01) when lymphocytes were stimulated with peptide BSA(273-292); six of nine were positive (P less than .01) with peptide BSA(303-332); and six of six were positive (P less than .001) with peptide BSA(343-362). Our study identifies several specific sites in S-antigen that elicit human immune responses. The implications of these findings with regard to the pathogenesis and treatment of autoimmune uveitis are discussed. PMID:2222280

  19. Chromogranin A is a T Cell Antigen in Human Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Peter A; Delong, Thomas; Baker, Rocky L.; Fitzgerald-Miller, Lisa; Wagner, Rebecca; Cook, Gabrielle; Rewers, Marian R.; Michels, Aaron; Haskins, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Chromogranin A (ChgA) is a beta cell secretory granule protein and a peptide of ChgA, WE14, was recently identified as a ligand for diabetogenic CD4 T cell clones derived from the NOD mouse. In this study we compared responses of human CD4 T cells from recent onset type 1 diabetic (T1D) and control subjects to WE14 and to an enzymatically modified version of this peptide. T cell responders to antigens were detected in PBMCs from study subjects by an indirect CD4 ELISPOT assay for IFN-γ. T1D patients (n=27) were recent onset patients within one year of diagnosis, typed for HLA-DQ8. Controls (n=31) were either 1st degree relatives with no antibodies or from the HLA-matched general population cohort of DAISY/TEDDY. A second cohort of patients (n=11) and control subjects (n=11) was tested at lower peptide concentrations. We found that WE14 is recognized by T cells from diabetic subjects vs. controls in a dose dependent manner. Treatment of WE14 with transglutaminase increased reactivity to the peptide in some patients. This work suggests that ChgA is an important target antigen in human T1D subjects and that post-translational modification may play a role in its reactivity and relationship to disease. PMID:24239002

  20. T Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... or turn off the immune response. Cytotoxic or “killer” T cells directly attack and destroy cells bearing ... involve selective activation of helper T cells and killer T cells, with a corresponding decrease in regulatory ...

  1. Differentiation between cutaneous form of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and cutaneous T cell lymphoma by in situ hybridization using a human T cell leukemia virus-1 DNA probe.

    PubMed Central

    Arai, E.; Chow, K. C.; Li, C. Y.; Tokunaga, M.; Katayama, I.

    1994-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) shares overlapping clinicopathological features with cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), requiring detection of monoclonal integration of proviral DNA of type 1 human T cell leukemia virus for its differential diagnosis from the latter. We applied in situ hybridization (ISH) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to paraffin sections from 63 Japanese autopsy cases that had been diagnosed as CTCL in earlier years when ATLL was still not widely known. Eleven and two cases with confirmed diagnoses of ATLL and CTCL served as positive and negative controls, respectively. It was found that ISH was positive in 7 of 63 test cases and 10 of 11 positive controls, whereas PCR was positive in none of the test cases and eight of the positive control cases. Two negative controls were negative for both ISH and PCR. We conclude that ISH is superior to PCR for detecting type 1 human T cell leukemia virus proviral DNA on paraffin sections and that the ISH method is useful for differentiating CTCL from the cutaneous form of ATLL. Images Figure 1 PMID:8291605

  2. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hao; Brown, Christine E; Ostberg, Julie R; Priceman, Saul J; Chang, Wen-Chung; Weng, Lihong; Lin, Paul; Wakabayashi, Mark T; Jensen, Michael C; Forman, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM) were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R), which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:26761817

  3. In vivo imaging and quantitation of adoptively transferred human antigen-specific T cells transduced to express a human norepinephrine transporter gene.

    PubMed

    Doubrovin, Mikhail M; Doubrovina, Ekaterina S; Zanzonico, Pat; Sadelain, Michel; Larson, Steven M; O'Reilly, Richard J

    2007-12-15

    Sequential imaging of genetically marked effector cells after adoptive transfer in vivo has greatly enhanced analyses of their biodistribution, growth, and activity both in animal models and in clinical trials of cellular immunotherapy. However, the immunogenicity of cells expressing xenogeneic reporter constructs limits their survival and clinical utility. To address this limitation, we have evaluated a human norepinephrine transporter (hNET) permitting imaging of transduced cells in vivo with a previously approved clinical grade radiolabeled probe, metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG). The hNET gene cDNA was cloned from the SK-N-SH cell line and inserted into a bicistronic retroviral vector also encoding green fluorescent protein. Following transfection, human EBV-specific T lymphocytes seemed fully functional in vitro and also selectively accumulated [(123)I]MIBG. In nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice bearing human EBV lymphoma xenografts, as few as 10(4) transduced T cells injected into the tumors could be imaged by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) after i.v. infusion of [(123)I]MIBG or [(124)I]MIBG, respectively. When hNET(+) EBV-specific T cells were infused i.v., their migration and specific accumulation in EBV(+) tumors expressing their restricting HLA allele could be imaged by SPECT or PET over 28 days. Image intensity was closely correlated with the number of T cells accumulated in targeted tumors. The use of two reporter probes (MIBG and 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil) permitted independent contemporaneous tracking of two distinct EBV-specific T-cell subpopulations expressing different reporter genes (hNET-CD4(+) T cells and HSV-TK-CD8(+) T cells) in the same animal using three-dimensional nuclear modalities (SPECT and PET). The hNET-based system described may thus have significant potential as a nonimmunogenic reporter for extended repeated quantitative in

  4. Cernunnos Deficiency Reduces Thymocyte Life Span and Alters the T Cell Repertoire in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Vera, Gabriella; Rivera-Munoz, Paola; Abramowski, Vincent; Malivert, Laurent; Lim, Annick; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Martin, Christelle; Florkin, Benoit; Latour, Sylvain; Revy, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Cernunnos is a DNA repair factor of the nonhomologous end-joining machinery. Its deficiency in humans causes radiosensitive severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) with microcephaly, characterized in part by a profound lymphopenia. In contrast to the human condition, the immune system of Cernunnos knockout (KO) mice is not overwhelmingly affected. In particular, Cernunnos is dispensable during V(D)J recombination in lymphoid cells. Nevertheless, the viability of thymocytes is reduced in Cernunnos KO mice, owing to the chronic activation of a P53-dependent DNA damage response. This translates into a qualitative alteration of the T cell repertoire to one in which the most distal Vα and Jα segments are missing. This results in the contraction of discrete T cell populations, such as invariant natural killer T (iNKT) and mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, in both humans and mice. PMID:23207905

  5. Tumor-associated neutrophils stimulate T cell responses in early-stage human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B.; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S.; Quatromoni, Jon G.; Stephen, Tom Li; Ranganathan, Anjana; Deshpande, Charuhas; Akimova, Tatiana; Vachani, Anil; Litzky, Leslie; Hancock, Wayne W.; Conejo-Garcia, José R.; Feldman, Michael; Albelda, Steven M.; Singhal, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Infiltrating inflammatory cells are highly prevalent within the tumor microenvironment and mediate many processes associated with tumor progression; however, the contribution of specific populations remains unclear. For example, the nature and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in the cancer microenvironment is largely unknown. The goal of this study was to provide a phenotypic and functional characterization of TANs in surgically resected lung cancer patients. We found that TANs constituted 5%–25% of cells isolated from the digested human lung tumors. Compared with blood neutrophils, TANs displayed an activated phenotype (CD62LloCD54hi) with a distinct repertoire of chemokine receptors that included CCR5, CCR7, CXCR3, and CXCR4. TANs produced substantial quantities of the proinflammatory factors MCP-1, IL-8, MIP-1α, and IL-6, as well as the antiinflammatory IL-1R antagonist. Functionally, both TANs and neutrophils isolated from distant nonmalignant lung tissue were able to stimulate T cell proliferation and IFN-γ release. Cross-talk between TANs and activated T cells led to substantial upregulation of CD54, CD86, OX40L, and 4-1BBL costimulatory molecules on the neutrophil surface, which bolstered T cell proliferation in a positive-feedback loop. Together our results demonstrate that in the earliest stages of lung cancer, TANs are not immunosuppressive, but rather stimulate T cell responses. PMID:25384214

  6. Generation of monoclonal antibodies against soluble human T cell receptor polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Devaux, B; Bjorkman, P J; Stevenson, C; Greif, W; Elliott, J F; Sagerström, C; Clayberger, C; Krensky, A M; Davis, M M

    1991-09-01

    One approach to the diagnosis and therapy of T cell-mediated diseases is to develop reagents specific for T cell receptor (TcR) variable (V) regions. To date, however, TcR expressed on the surface of antigen-specific T lymphocytes have proven to be poorly immunogenic. As a result, few monoclonal antibodies (mAb) recognizing human variable regions are available. In this report, we have used the "phosphatidylinositol linkage" strategy to generate soluble forms of two human allogeneic TcR derived from human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) known to be specific for HLA-A2 and HLA-Aw68/HLA-Aw69, respectively. Monomeric TcR alpha and beta chains from the HLA-A2-specific CTL were purified in large quantities from CHO cells and each was used to immunize mice to generate mAb. In particular, the anti-beta chain mAb, denoted anti-V beta 13, stain a significant (approximately 5%) fraction of human peripheral blood alpha/beta T lymphocytes, immunoprecipitate native anti-A2 TcR molecules, and activate T cells transfected with the relevant alpha and beta chain cDNA. Anti-alpha chain mAb were also obtained against a constant region determinant which can immunoprecipitate detergent-solubilized polypeptides. In general, we find that immunizations with soluble protein are far superior to those with cells bearing TcR chimeras or in combination with the purified protein. PMID:1832385

  7. Physical mapping of the human t-cell receptor beta gene complex, using yeast artificial chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hashim, Y.; So, A.K.; Kearney, L.

    1995-04-01

    Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) were used to construct a physical map of the germline human T-cell {beta} chain gene complex (TCRB). Variable region genes (BV) for the 25 known subfamilies were used as probes to screen the ICRF AM4x YAC library. Of the five positive YACs identified, one YAC designated B3, 820 kilobase pairs (kbp) in size, scored positive for all 25 TCRBV subfamilies plus the constant region genes (BC) when analyzed by pulse field gel electrophoresis. Restriction enzyme mapping of B3 located TCRBV and TCRBC gene regions to 4 Sfi I fragments of 280, 110, 90, and 125 kbp and was in accordance with published data. In addition, comparison of hybridization results of Sfi I-restricted B3 and genomic DNA from the parental cell line GM1416B revealed identical banding patterns. The data thus showed YAC B3 encoded a complete and unrearranged TCRB gene locus of some 600-620 kbp. The map was further resolved by locating restriction sites for Sal I and Bss HII on B3, giving more precise localization of the individual TCRBV gene families. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of B3 to spreads of human metaphase chromosomes localized B3 to 7q35. However, two additional signals were obtained; one attributable to the TCRBV orphon cluster on 9p21, the second to the long arm of chromosome 2. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of a chromosome 2 somatic cell hybrid, using primers for all 25 TCRBV gene families, revealed that the signal was not attributable to a second orphon cluster. It is suggested that B3 is a chimeric YAC with an intact TCRB locus flanked by chromosome 2 sequences. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Human T-cell receptor v{beta} gene polymorphism and multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, S.; Charmley, P.; Birchfield, R.I.; Concannon, P.

    1995-04-01

    Population-based genetic associations have been reported between RFLPs detected with probes corresponding to the genes encoding the {beta} chain of the T-cell receptor for antigen (RCRB) and a variety of autoimmune disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis (MS), these studies have localized a putative disease-associated gene to a region of {approximately}110 kb in length, located within the TCRB locus. In the current study, all 14 known TCRBV (variable region) genes within the region of localization were mapped and identified. The nucleotide sequences of these genes were determined in a panel of six MS patients and six healthy controls, who were human-leukocyte antigen and TCRB-RFLP haplotype matched. Nine of the 14 TCRBV genes studied showed evidence of polymorphism. PCR-based assays for each of these polymorphic genes were developed, and allele and genotype frequencies were determined in a panel of DNA samples from 48 MS patients and 60 control individuals. No significant differences in allele, genotype, or phenotype frequencies were observed between the MS patients and controls for any of the 14 TCRBV-gene polymorphisms studied. In light of the extensive linkage disequilibrium across the region studied, the saturating numbers of polymorphisms examined, and the direct sequence analysis of all BV genes in the region, these results suggest that it is unlikely that germ-line polymorphism in the TCRBV locus makes a major contribution to MS susceptibility. The TCRBV coding region-specific markers generated in these studies, as well as the approach of testing for associations with specific functionally relevant polymorphic sites within individual BV genes, should be useful in the evaluation of the many reported disease associations involving the human TCRB region. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Assessment of costimulation and coinhibition in a triple parameter T cell reporter line: Simultaneous measurement of NF-κB, NFAT and AP-1.

    PubMed

    Jutz, Sabrina; Leitner, Judith; Schmetterer, Klaus; Doel-Perez, Iago; Majdic, Otto; Grabmeier-Pfistershammer, Katharina; Paster, Wolfgang; Huppa, Johannes B; Steinberger, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Engagement of the T cell receptor complex reprograms T cells for proliferation, cytokine production and differentiation towards effector cells. This process depends on activating costimulatory signals and is counteracted by coinhibitory molecules. Three transcription factors, namely NF-κB, NFAT and AP-1, have a major role in inducing the transcriptional program that is required for T cell activation and differentiation. Here we describe the generation of a triple parameter reporter based on the human Jurkat T cell line, where response elements for NF-κB, NFAT and AP-1 drive the expression of the fluorescent proteins CFP, eGFP and mCherry, respectively. The emission spectra of these proteins allow simultaneous assessment of NF-κB, NFAT and AP-1 activity in response to stimulation. Ligation of the TCR complex induced moderate reporter activity, which was strongly enhanced upon coengagement of the costimulatory receptors CD2 or CD28. Moreover, we have generated and tested triple parameter reporter cells that harbor costimulatory and inhibitory receptors not endogenously expressed in the Jurkat cells. In these experiments we could show that engagement of the costimulatory molecule 4-1BB enhances NF-κB and AP-1 activity, whereas coinhibition via PD-1 or BTLA strongly reduced the activation of NF-κB and NFAT. Engagement of BTLA significantly inhibited AP-1, whereas PD-1 had little effect on the activation of this transcription factor. Our triple parameter reporter T cell line is an excellent tool to assess the effect of costimulatory and coinhibitory receptors on NF-κB, NFAT and AP-1 activity and has a wide range of applications beyond the evaluation of costimulatory pathways.

  10. Investigating human T cell lymphotropic retrovirus (HTLV) Tax function with molecular and immunophenotypic techniques.

    PubMed

    Forlani, Greta; Accolla, Roberto S; Tosi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Human T cell Lymphotropic Viruses 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) are the first described human retroviruses. HTLV-1 is the causative agent of an aggressive malignancy of CD4+ T lymphocytes named adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and of a chronic neurological disease known as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HTLV-2 shares many similarities with HTLV-1, but displays lower or absent association to diseases. Among the proteins encoded by HTLVs, the viral transactivator Tax exerts an essential role in viral transcription as well as in cell transformation. Different experimental methods to study Tax activity on HTLV-LTR promoter and Tax subcellular distribution are described. Emphasis is given to the functional and physical interaction between Tax-1/Tax-2 and cellular cofactors which may have an impact on the infectivity process of the HTLVs and on the capacity of cell transformation.

  11. Modes of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Transmission, Replication and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Alexandre; Barez, Pierre-Yves; Hamaidia, Malik; Gazon, Hélène; de Brogniez, Alix; Perike, Srikanth; Gillet, Nicolas; Willems, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that causes cancer (Adult T cell Leukemia, ATL) and a spectrum of inflammatory diseases (mainly HTLV-associated myelopathy—tropical spastic paraparesis, HAM/TSP). Since virions are particularly unstable, HTLV-1 transmission primarily occurs by transfer of a cell carrying an integrated provirus. After transcription, the viral genomic RNA undergoes reverse transcription and integration into the chromosomal DNA of a cell from the newly infected host. The virus then replicates by either one of two modes: (i) an infectious cycle by virus budding and infection of new targets and (ii) mitotic division of cells harboring an integrated provirus. HTLV-1 replication initiates a series of mechanisms in the host including antiviral immunity and checkpoint control of cell proliferation. HTLV-1 has elaborated strategies to counteract these defense mechanisms allowing continuous persistence in humans. PMID:26198240

  12. Brucella melitensis T Cell Epitope Recognition in Humans with Brucellosis in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Cannella, Anthony P.; Arlehamn, Cecilia S. Lindestam; Sidney, John; Patra, Kailash P.; Torres, Katherine; Tsolis, Renee M.; Liang, Li; Felgner, Philip L.; Saito, Mayuko; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H.; Sette, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Brucella melitensis, one of the causative agents of human brucellosis, causes acute, chronic, and relapsing infection. While T cell immunity in brucellosis has been extensively studied in mice, no recognized human T cell epitopes that might provide new approaches to classifying and prognosticating B. melitensis infection have ever been delineated. Twenty-seven pools of 500 major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) restricted peptides were created by computational prediction of promiscuous MHC-II CD4+ T cell derived from the top 50 proteins recognized by IgG in human sera on a genome level B. melitensis protein microarray. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) analyses were used to quantify and compare Th1 and Th2 responses of leukapheresis-obtained peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Peruvian subjects cured after acute infection (n = 9) and from patients who relapsed (n = 5). Four peptide epitopes derived from 3 B. melitensis proteins (BMEI 1330, a DegP/HtrA protease; BMEII 0029, type IV secretion system component VirB5; and BMEII 0691, a predicted periplasmic binding protein of a peptide transport system) were found repeatedly to produce significant IFN-γ ELISPOT responses in both acute-infection and relapsing patients; none of the peptides distinguished the patient groups. IL-5 responses against the panel of peptides were insignificant. These experiments are the first to systematically identify B. melitensis MHC-II-restricted CD4+ T cell epitopes recognized by the human immune response, with the potential for new approaches to brucellosis diagnostics and understanding the immunopathogenesis related to this intracellular pathogen. PMID:24126518

  13. Human Influenza A Virus-Specific CD8+ T-Cell Response Is Long-lived.

    PubMed

    van de Sandt, Carolien E; Hillaire, Marine L B; Geelhoed-Mieras, Martina M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2015-07-01

    Animal and human studies have demonstrated the importance of influenza A virus (IAV)-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in heterosubtypic cross-protective immunity. Using peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained intermittently from healthy HLA-typed blood donors between 1999 and 2012, we were able to demonstrate that IAV-specific CTLs are long-lived. Intercurrent IAV infections transiently increase the frequency of functionally distinct subsets of IAV-specific CTLs, in particular effector and effector memory T cells.

  14. Increased Caspase Activity Primes Human Lyme Arthritis Synovial γδ T cells for Proliferation and Death

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Phan T.; Collins, Cheryl C.; Fortner, Karen A.; Koenig, Andreas; Hayes, Sandra M.; Budd, Ralph C.

    2011-01-01

    γδ T cells function between the innate and adaptive immune responses, promoting antigen-presenting cell function, and manifesting cytolytic activity. Their numbers often increase during infections, such as HIV, and at sites of chronic inflammation. However, the turnover dynamics of human γδ T cells are poorly understood. Here we find that despite more rapid proliferation in vitro by human Lyme arthritis synovial γδ T cells of the Vδ1 subset, they have reduced surviving cell numbers compared to αβ T cells due to increased cell death by the γδ T cells. Because caspases are involved in cell proliferation and death, and signaling is more efficient through TCR-γδ than TCR-αβ, we examined the levels of active caspases during cell cycling and following TCR restimulation. We observed higher overall caspase activity in Borrelia-reactive γδ T cells than comparable αβ T cells. This was paralleled by greater spontaneous cell death and TCR restimulation-induced cell death of the γδ T cells, which was caspase dependent. Our current findings thus are consistent with a model where human γδ T cells evolved to function quickly and transiently, in an innate fashion. PMID:21983117

  15. In vitro regulation of thyroglobulin (Tg) autoantibody production by Tg-specific T-cell lines and hybridomas.

    PubMed Central

    Champion, B R; Hutchings, P; Rayner, D C; Page, K; Tite, J; Cooke, A; Roitt, I M

    1991-01-01

    To define the interactions between self thyroglobulin (Tg)-reactive T and B we co-cultured enriched B cells taken from rat or mouse Tg-primed mice with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted T-cell lines specific for iodinated determinants on self-Tg, or hybridomas derived from those lines. Using two clonally distinct T-cell hybridomas, ADA2 and CH9, in vitro help for Tg autoantibody responses was observed using mouse (M)Tg-primed B cells and a 100 ng/ml MTg challenge. Using rat Tg-primed B cells and the same conditions, only CH9 provided help, indicating that the fine specificity of B cells influences their ability to interact with specific anti-Tg T-cell clones. In contrast to T-cell hybridomas, their parent T-cell lines MTg9B3 and MTg12B suppressed Tg autoantibody responses in vitro, although they augmented bystander proliferation of unprimed B cells. The MTg12B cells also (i) diminished the survival of Tg-primed B cells, and (ii) inhibited the proliferation of an antigen-presenting B-cell hybridoma (LK35.2) in a cytostasis assay. These findings together support the view that their suppressive activity is mediated through cytotoxicity. While the role of class II-restricted cytotoxic cells in thyroid autoimmunity is unknown, the results suggest that such cells may act to suppress autoantibody responses as well as to mediate tissue damage to class II-expressing thyroid cells. PMID:1717368

  16. Enhancing Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses with Heteroclitic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Adegoke, Adeolu Oyemade; Grant, Michael David

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific CD8+ T cells play a critical role in containing HIV replication and delaying disease progression. However, HIV-specific CD8+ T cells become progressively more “exhausted” as chronic HIV infection proceeds. Symptoms of T cell exhaustion range from expression of inhibitory receptors and selective loss of cytokine production capacity through reduced proliferative potential, impaired differentiation into effector cells and increased susceptibility to apoptosis. While effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) durably reduces HIV viremia to undetectable levels, this alone does not restore the full pluripotency of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells. In a number of studies, a subset of peptide epitope variants categorized as heteroclitic, restimulated more potent cellular immune responses in vitro than did the native, immunizing peptides themselves. This property of heteroclitic peptides has been exploited in experimental cancer and chronic viral infection models to promote clearance of transformed cells and persistent viruses. In this review, we consider the possibility that heteroclitic peptides could improve the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines as part of HIV immunotherapy or eradication strategies. We review literature on heteroclitic peptides and illustrate their potential to beneficially modulate the nature of HIV-specific T cell responses toward those found in the small minority of HIV-infected, aviremic cART-naïve persons termed elite controllers or long-term non-progressors. Our review suggests that the efficacy of HIV vaccines could be improved by identification, testing, and incorporation of heteroclitic variants of native HIV peptide epitopes. PMID:26257743

  17. Differential role of ICAM ligands in determination of human memory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Omar D; Mitchell, Dennis; Nolan, Garry P

    2007-01-01

    Background Leukocyte Function Antigen-1 (LFA-1) is a primary adhesion molecule that plays important roles in T cell activation, leukocyte recirculation, and trans-endothelial migration. By applying a multivariate intracellular phospho-proteomic analysis, we demonstrate that LFA-1 differentially activates signaling molecules. Results Signal intensity was dependent on both ICAM ligand and LFA-1 concentration. In the presence of CD3 and CD28 stimulation, ICAM-2 and ICAM-3 decreased TGFβ1 production more than ICAM-1. In long-term differentiation experiments, stimulation with ICAM-3, CD3, and CD28 generated IFNγ producing CD4+CD45RO+CD62L-CD11aBrightCD27- cells that had increased expression of intracellular BCL2, displayed distinct chemokine receptor profiles, and exhibited distinct migratory characteristics. Only CD3/CD28 with ICAM-3 generated CD4+CD45RO+CD62L-CD11aBrightCD27- cells that were functionally responsive to chemotaxis and exhibited higher frequencies of cells that signaled to JNK and ERK1/2 upon stimulation with MIP3α. Furthermore, these reports identify that the LFA-1 receptor, when presented with multiple ligands, can result in distinct T cell differentiation states and suggest that the combinatorial integration of ICAM ligand interactions with LFA-1 have functional consequences for T cell biology. Conclusion Thus, the ICAM ligands, differentially modulate LFA-1 signaling in T cells and potentiate the development of memory human T cells in vitro. These findings are of importance in a mechanistic understanding of memory cell differentiation and ex vivo generation of memory cell subsets for therapeutic applications. PMID:17233909

  18. Early-life compartmentalization of human T cell differentiation and regulatory function in mucosal and lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Thome, Joseph J C; Bickham, Kara L; Ohmura, Yoshiaki; Kubota, Masaru; Matsuoka, Nobuhide; Gordon, Claire; Granot, Tomer; Griesemer, Adam; Lerner, Harvey; Kato, Tomoaki; Farber, Donna L

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear how the immune response in early life becomes appropriately stimulated to provide protection while also avoiding excessive activation as a result of diverse new antigens. T cells are integral to adaptive immunity; mouse studies indicate that tissue localization of T cell subsets is important for both protective immunity and immunoregulation. In humans, however, the early development and function of T cells in tissues remain unexplored. We present here an analysis of lymphoid and mucosal tissue T cells derived from pediatric organ donors in the first two years of life, as compared to adult organ donors, revealing early compartmentalization of T cell differentiation and regulation. Whereas adult tissues contain a predominance of memory T cells, in pediatric blood and tissues the main subset consists of naive recent thymic emigrants, with effector memory T cells (T(EM)) found only in the lungs and small intestine. Additionally, regulatory T (T(reg)) cells comprise a high proportion (30-40%) of CD4(+) T cells in pediatric tissues but are present at much lower frequencies (1-10%) in adult tissues. Pediatric tissue T(reg) cells suppress endogenous T cell activation, and early T cell functionality is confined to the mucosal sites that have the lowest T(reg):T(EM) cell ratios, which suggests control in situ of immune responses in early life. PMID:26657141

  19. Early-life compartmentalization of human T cell differentiation and regulatory function in mucosal and lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Thome, Joseph J C; Bickham, Kara L; Ohmura, Yoshiaki; Kubota, Masaru; Matsuoka, Nobuhide; Gordon, Claire; Granot, Tomer; Griesemer, Adam; Lerner, Harvey; Kato, Tomoaki; Farber, Donna L

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear how the immune response in early life becomes appropriately stimulated to provide protection while also avoiding excessive activation as a result of diverse new antigens. T cells are integral to adaptive immunity; mouse studies indicate that tissue localization of T cell subsets is important for both protective immunity and immunoregulation. In humans, however, the early development and function of T cells in tissues remain unexplored. We present here an analysis of lymphoid and mucosal tissue T cells derived from pediatric organ donors in the first two years of life, as compared to adult organ donors, revealing early compartmentalization of T cell differentiation and regulation. Whereas adult tissues contain a predominance of memory T cells, in pediatric blood and tissues the main subset consists of naive recent thymic emigrants, with effector memory T cells (T(EM)) found only in the lungs and small intestine. Additionally, regulatory T (T(reg)) cells comprise a high proportion (30-40%) of CD4(+) T cells in pediatric tissues but are present at much lower frequencies (1-10%) in adult tissues. Pediatric tissue T(reg) cells suppress endogenous T cell activation, and early T cell functionality is confined to the mucosal sites that have the lowest T(reg):T(EM) cell ratios, which suggests control in situ of immune responses in early life.

  20. Paucity of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells in human neuromyelitis optica lesions.

    PubMed

    Saadoun, Samira; Bridges, Leslie R; Verkman, A S; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2012-12-19

    Neuromyelitis optica is a severe inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Most patients with neuromyelitis optica have circulating immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the astrocytic water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which are pathogenic. Anti-AQP4 IgG-mediated complement-dependent astrocyte toxicity is a key mechanism of central nervous system damage in neuromyelitis optica, but the role of natural killer and cytotoxic T cells is unknown. Our objective was to determine whether natural killer and cytotoxic T cells play a role in human neuromyelitis optica lesions. We immunostained four actively demyelinating lesions, obtained from patients with anti-AQP4 IgG positive neuromyelitis optica, for Granzyme B and Perforin. The inflammatory cells were perivascular neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages, with only occasional Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells. Greater than 95% of inflamed vessels in each lesion had no surrounding Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells. Granzyme B+ or Perforin+ cells were abundant in human spleen (positive control). Although natural killer cells produce central nervous system damage in mice injected with anti-AQP4 IgG, our findings here indicate that natural killer-mediated and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity are probably not involved in central nervous system damage in human neuromyelitis optica.

  1. Human papillomavirus type 16-specific T cell responses and their association with recurrence of cervical disease following treatment.

    PubMed

    Luxton, Jenny C; Nath, Rahul; Derias, Nawal; Herbert, Amanda; Shepherd, Philip S

    2003-05-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) L1- and E7-specific T cell responses were measured in 58 women with abnormal cervical cytology in a prospective study. On recruitment, patients responded most frequently and with the highest numbers of responding cells to the L1 region aa 311-345 and this response was significantly associated with the presence of cervical disease (P=0.041). Responses to the L1 peptide aa 281-295 were significantly higher in patients with CIN III than in those with HPV/CIN I or CIN II lesions (P=0.027). The E7 region aa 70-98 was the most immunogenic in patients with squamous intraepithelial lesions of the cervix (SIL) but the responses detected were not significantly higher than in patients without SIL. Following treatment, the T cell response profiles of patient groups did not change significantly. However, on analysis of the responses of individual patients with and without recurrent disease on follow-up, significant differences were found. Recurrence of disease was associated with T cell responses to the E7 region aa 70-98 at the patient's first clinic visit (P=0.017). Recurrence of disease was also accompanied by an increase in the total number of L1-specific short-term T cell lines (STLs) at follow-up, whereas absence of disease was accompanied by a decrease in L1-specific STLs. The data also suggested a possible link between E7 70-98-specific responses and acquisition of disease by patients who were previously disease-free. Further studies are warranted to determine whether this response could be useful as a marker of recurrent disease in some patients.

  2. Modulation of both activator protein-1 and nuclear factor-kappa B signal transduction of human T cells by amiodarone

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shu-Meng; Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Ho, Ling-Jun; Tsai, Tsung-Neng; Wu, Chun-Hsien; Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2015-01-01

    Amiodarone, a common and effective antiarrhythmic drug, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects such as reducing the activation and movement of neutrophils. However, its effects on human T cells remain unclear. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects and possible underlying mechanisms of amiodarone on human T cells. We isolated human primary T cells from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), flow cytometry, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, luciferase assay, and Western blotting to evaluate the modulatory effects of amiodarone on human T cells. We found that amiodarone dose dependently inhibited the production of cytokines, including interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma in activated human T cells. By flow cytometry, we demonstrated that amiodarone suppressed the expression of IL-2 receptor-alpha (CD25) and CD69, the cell surface markers of activated T cells. Moreover, molecular investigations revealed that amiodarone down-regulated activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) DNA-binding activities in activated human T cells and also inhibited DNA binding and transcriptional activities of both AP-1 and NF-κB in Jurkat cells. Finally, by Western blotting, we showed that amiodarone reduced the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and suppressed stimuli-induced I-kappa B-alpha degradation in activated human T cells. Through regulation of AP-1 and NF-κB signaling, amiodarone inhibits cytokine production and T cell activation. These results show the pleiotropic effects of amiodarone on human T cells and suggest its therapeutic potential in inflammation-related cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25073960

  3. Human T-cell subset requirements for the production of specific anti-influenza virus antibody in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yarchoan, R.; Biddison, W.E.; Schneider, H.S.; Nelson, D.L.

    1982-04-01

    Studies were undertaken to define the helper T-cell requirements for in vitro specific antibody production to influenza virus. Subpopulations of human T cells were separated on the basis of their reactivity with the monoclonal antibody OKT4. B cells cultured with OKT4+ T cells produced specific antibody to influenza virus, while B cells cultured with OKT4- T cells did not. Irradiation (1200 rads) of the OKT4- subset to potentially eliminate suppressor-cell activity did not augment the helper-cell function of that subset. Thus, unlike the cytotoxic T-cell response to influenza, help for an in vitro antibody response is mediated only by OKT4+ T cells.

  4. Human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II exhibit different DNase I protection patterns.

    PubMed

    Altman, R; Harrich, D; Garcia, J A; Gaynor, R B

    1988-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus types I (HTLV-I) and II (HTLV-II) are human retroviruses which normally infect T-lymphoid cells. HTLV-I infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, and HTLV-II is associated with an indolent form of hairy-cell leukemia. To identify potential transcriptional regulatory elements of these two related human retroviruses, we performed DNase I footprinting of both the HTLV-I and HTLV-II long terminal repeats (LTRs) by using extracts prepared from uninfected T cells, HTLV-I and HTLV-II transformed T cells, and HeLa cells. Five regions of the HTLV-I LTR and three regions of the HTLV-II LTR showed protection by DNase I footprinting. All three of the 21-base-pair repeats previously shown to be important in HTLV transcriptional regulation were protected in the HTLV-I LTR, whereas only one of these repeats was protected in the HTLV-II LTR. Several regions exhibited altered protection in extracts prepared from lymphoid cells as compared with HeLa cells, but there were minimal differences in the protection patterns between HTLV-infected and uninfected lymphoid extracts. A number of HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTR fragments which contained regions showing protection in DNase I footprinting were able to function as inducible enhancer elements in transient CAT gene expression assays in the presence of the HTLV-II tat protein. The alterations in the pattern of the cellular proteins which bind to the HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTRs may in part be responsible for differences in the transcriptional regulation of these two related viruses.

  5. Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma in a pregnant woman diagnosed as a human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 carrier.

    PubMed

    Fuchi, Naoki; Miura, Kiyonori; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL), which is difficult to cure. In Japan, a nationwide HTLV-1 screening test in pregnant women has been recommended since 2011. A 30-year-old woman was diagnosed as being an HTLV-1 carrier in her previous pregnancy. During the current pregnancy, she had persistent fever and cough. Although she had treatment with antibiotics, peripheral white blood cell count remained high, with an abnormal lymphocyte count. Given that she was an HTLV-1 carrier, she was diagnosed with unfavorable chronic ATL (aggressive ATL) at 12 weeks gestation. After pregnancy termination, her ATL status became favorable chronic ATL (indolent ATL). Therefore, watchful waiting was performed until disease progression. This is the first case report of chronic ATL in early pregnancy, in a woman already diagnosed as an HTLV-1 carrier on screening test. PMID:26663442

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 Vpr induces differential regulation of T cell costimulatory molecules: Direct effect of Vpr on T cell activation and immune function

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatachari, Narasimhan J.; Majumder, Biswanath; Ayyavoo, Velpandi . E-mail: velpandi@pitt.edu

    2007-02-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral proteins disrupt the normal host cellular immune pathways thus exploiting the cellular machinery for replication, survival and to escape host immune attack. Here we evaluated the direct effects of HIV-1 Vpr-mediated immune modulation of infected T cells. Vpr specifically downregulated the expression of CD28 and increased the expression of CTLA-4, whereas no significant difference in the expression of CD25 and HLA-DR was observed. Interferon gamma (IFN-{gamma}) production in T cells was evaluated as a measure of the downstream effector functions. Results indicate that Vpr significantly inhibited IFN-{gamma} production and this may, in part, due to Vpr's ability to inhibit the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, and its transcriptional regulation. Together these results support that HIV-1 Vpr selectively dysregulates the immune functions at multiple levels and exerts its inhibitory effects in the presence of other viral proteins.

  7. Molecular Imprint of Exposure to Naturally Occurring Genetic Variants of Human Cytomegalovirus on the T cell Repertoire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Corey; Gras, Stephanie; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Bird, Nicola L.; Valkenburg, Sophie A.; Twist, Kelly-Anne; Burrows, Jacqueline M.; Miles, John J.; Chambers, Daniel; Bell, Scott; Campbell, Scott; Kedzierska, Katherine; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Khanna, Rajiv

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to naturally occurring variants of herpesviruses in clinical settings can have a dramatic impact on anti-viral immunity. Here we have evaluated the molecular imprint of variant peptide-MHC complexes on the T-cell repertoire during human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and demonstrate that primary co-infection with genetic variants of CMV was coincident with development of strain-specific T-cell immunity followed by emergence of cross-reactive virus-specific T-cells. Cross-reactive CMV-specific T cells exhibited a highly conserved public T cell repertoire, while T cells directed towards specific genetic variants displayed oligoclonal repertoires, unique to each individual. T cell recognition foot-print and pMHC-I structural analyses revealed that the cross-reactive T cells accommodate alterations in the pMHC complex with a broader foot-print focussing on the core of the peptide epitope. These findings provide novel molecular insight into how infection with naturally occurring genetic variants of persistent human herpesviruses imprints on the evolution of the anti-viral T-cell repertoire.

  8. Generation of multi-functional antigen-specific human T-cells by lentiviral TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Perro, M; Tsang, J; Xue, S-A; Escors, D; Cesco-Gaspere, M; Pospori, C; Gao, L; Hart, D; Collins, M; Stauss, H; Morris, E C

    2010-06-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an attractive strategy to generate antigen-specific T-cells for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer and chronic viral infection. However, current TCR gene transfer protocols trigger T-cell differentiation into terminally differentiated effector cells, which likely have reduced ability to mediate disease protection in vivo. We have developed a lentiviral gene transfer strategy to generate TCR-transduced human T-cells without promoting T-cell differentiation. We found that a combination of interleukin-15 (IL15) and IL21 facilitated lentiviral TCR gene transfer into non-proliferating T-cells. The transduced T-cells showed redirection of antigen specificity and produced IL2, IFNgamma and TNFalpha in a peptide-dependent manner. A significantly higher proportion of the IL15/IL21-stimulated T-cells were multi-functional and able to simultaneously produce all three cytokines (P<0.01), compared with TCR-transduced T-cells generated by conventional anti-CD3 plus IL2 stimulation, which primarily secreted only one cytokine. Similarly, IL15/IL21 maintained high levels of CD62L and CD28 expression in transduced T-cells, whereas anti-CD3 plus IL2 accelerated the loss of CD62L/CD28 expression. The data demonstrate that the combination of lentiviral TCR gene transfer together with IL15/IL21 stimulation can efficiently redirect the antigen specificity of resting primary human T-cells and generate multi-functional T-cells.

  9. Tumor-Targeted Human T Cells Expressing CD28-Based Chimeric Antigen Receptors Circumvent CTLA-4 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Condomines, Maud; Arnason, Jon; Benjamin, Reuben; Gunset, Gertrude; Plotkin, Jason; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy represents a promising treatment for cancer. Human T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) recognize and kill tumor cells in a MHC-unrestricted manner and persist in vivo when the CAR includes a CD28 costimulatory domain. However, the intensity of the CAR-mediated CD28 activation signal and its regulation by the CTLA-4 checkpoint are unknown. We investigated whether T cells expressing an anti-CD19, CD3 zeta and CD28-based CAR (19-28z) displayed the same proliferation and anti-tumor abilities than T cells expressing a CD3 zeta-based CAR (19z1) costimulated through the CD80/CD28, ligand/receptor pathway. Repeated in vitro antigen-specific stimulations indicated that 19-28z+ T cells secreted higher levels of Th1 cytokines and showed enhanced proliferation compared to those of 19z1+ or 19z1-CD80+ T cells. In an aggressive pre-B cell leukemia model, mice treated with 19-28z+ T cells had 10-fold reduced tumor progression compared to those treated with 19z1+ or 19z1-CD80+ T cells. shRNA-mediated CTLA-4 down-regulation in 19z1-CD80+ T cells significantly increased their in vivo expansion and anti-tumor properties, but had no effect in 19-28z+ T cells. Our results establish that CTLA-4 down-regulation may benefit human adoptive T cell therapy and demonstrate that CAR design can elude negative checkpoints to better sustain T cell function. PMID:26110267

  10. Generation of multi-functional antigen-specific human T-cells by lentiviral TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Perro, M; Tsang, J; Xue, S-A; Escors, D; Cesco-Gaspere, M; Pospori, C; Gao, L; Hart, D; Collins, M; Stauss, H; Morris, E C

    2010-06-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an attractive strategy to generate antigen-specific T-cells for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer and chronic viral infection. However, current TCR gene transfer protocols trigger T-cell differentiation into terminally differentiated effector cells, which likely have reduced ability to mediate disease protection in vivo. We have developed a lentiviral gene transfer strategy to generate TCR-transduced human T-cells without promoting T-cell differentiation. We found that a combination of interleukin-15 (IL15) and IL21 facilitated lentiviral TCR gene transfer into non-proliferating T-cells. The transduced T-cells showed redirection of antigen specificity and produced IL2, IFNgamma and TNFalpha in a peptide-dependent manner. A significantly higher proportion of the IL15/IL21-stimulated T-cells were multi-functional and able to simultaneously produce all three cytokines (P<0.01), compared with TCR-transduced T-cells generated by conventional anti-CD3 plus IL2 stimulation, which primarily secreted only one cytokine. Similarly, IL15/IL21 maintained high levels of CD62L and CD28 expression in transduced T-cells, whereas anti-CD3 plus IL2 accelerated the loss of CD62L/CD28 expression. The data demonstrate that the combination of lentiviral TCR gene transfer together with IL15/IL21 stimulation can efficiently redirect the antigen specificity of resting primary human T-cells and generate multi-functional T-cells. PMID:20164855

  11. Isolation of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 from Guaymi Indians in Panama.

    PubMed Central

    Lairmore, M D; Jacobson, S; Gracia, F; De, B K; Castillo, L; Larreategui, M; Roberts, B D; Levine, P H; Blattner, W A; Kaplan, J E

    1990-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and with a chronic degenerative myelopathy. However, another major type of HTLV, HTLV-II, has been isolated only sporadically, and little is known of disease associations, transmission routes, and risk factors for HTLV-II infection. Recent studies indicate that a high percentage of certain groups of i.v. drug users and blood donors are infected with HTLV-II. Seroepidemiologic studies have found an elevated rate of seroreactivity to HTLV among Guaymi Indians from Bocas del Toro Province, Panama. To identify the cause of seroreactivity among this unique population we used HTLV-II-specific polymerase chain reaction techniques to detect HTLV genetic sequences from blood leukocytes of three seropositive Guaymi Indians. The HTLV-II primer-amplified polymerase chain reaction products from two of these subjects were partially sequenced and matched published HTLV-II nucleotide sequences in both p24 gag (94% of 107 bases) and pol (98% of 112 bases) regions. A CD4+ T-lymphocyte line established from one of these same subjects produced HTLV-II-specific proteins when tested in antigen-capture and immunoblot assays, as well as mature HTLV particles. The demonstration of HTLV-II infection in this geographically and culturally isolated Central American Indian population without typical risk factors for HTLV infection suggests that HTLV-II infection is endemic in this population and provides an important clue to potential natural reservoir for this virus. Images PMID:2247455

  12. Generation of human memory stem T cells after haploidentical T-replete hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cieri, Nicoletta; Oliveira, Giacomo; Greco, Raffaella; Forcato, Mattia; Taccioli, Cristian; Cianciotti, Beatrice; Valtolina, Veronica; Noviello, Maddalena; Vago, Luca; Bondanza, Attilio; Lunghi, Francesca; Marktel, Sarah; Bellio, Laura; Bordignon, Claudio; Bicciato, Silvio; Peccatori, Jacopo; Ciceri, Fabio; Bonini, Chiara

    2015-04-30

    Memory stem T cells (TSCM) have been proposed as key determinants of immunologic memory. However, their exact contribution to a mounting immune response, as well as the mechanisms and timing of their in vivo generation, are poorly understood. We longitudinally tracked TSCM dynamics in patients undergoing haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), thereby providing novel hints on the contribution of this subset to posttransplant immune reconstitution in humans. We found that donor-derived TSCM are highly enriched early after HSCT. We showed at the antigen-specific and clonal level that TSCM lymphocytes can differentiate directly from naive precursors infused within the graft and that the extent of TSCM generation might correlate with interleukin 7 serum levels. In vivo fate mapping through T-cell receptor sequencing allowed defining the in vivo differentiation landscapes of human naive T cells, supporting the notion that progenies of single naive cells embrace disparate fates in vivo and highlighting TSCM as relevant novel players in the diversification of immunological memory after allogeneic HSCT.

  13. CD1d-restricted peripheral T cell lymphoma in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Bachy, Emmanuel; Urb, Mirjam; Chandra, Shilpi; Robinot, Rémy; Bricard, Gabriel; de Bernard, Simon; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Gazzo, Sophie; Blond, Olivier; Khurana, Archana; Baseggio, Lucile; Heavican, Tayla; Ffrench, Martine; Crispatzu, Giuliano; Mondière, Paul; Schrader, Alexandra; Taillardet, Morgan; Thaunat, Olivier; Martin, Nadine; Dalle, Stéphane; Le Garff-Tavernier, Magali; Salles, Gilles; Lachuer, Joel; Hermine, Olivier; Asnafi, Vahid; Roussel, Mikael; Lamy, Thierry; Herling, Marco; Iqbal, Javeed; Buffat, Laurent; Marche, Patrice N; Gaulard, Philippe; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Defrance, Thierry; Genestier, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a heterogeneous entity of neoplasms with poor prognosis, lack of effective therapies, and a largely unknown pathophysiology. Identifying the mechanism of lymphomagenesis and cell-of-origin from which PTCLs arise is crucial for the development of efficient treatment strategies. In addition to the well-described thymic lymphomas, we found that p53-deficient mice also developed mature PTCLs that did not originate from conventional T cells but from CD1d-restricted NKT cells. PTCLs showed phenotypic features of activated NKT cells, such as PD-1 up-regulation and loss of NK1.1 expression. Injections of heat-killed Streptococcus pneumonia, known to express glycolipid antigens activating NKT cells, increased the incidence of these PTCLs, whereas Escherichia coli injection did not. Gene expression profile analyses indicated a significant down-regulation of genes in the TCR signaling pathway in PTCL, a common feature of chronically activated T cells. Targeting TCR signaling pathway in lymphoma cells, either with cyclosporine A or anti-CD1d blocking antibody, prolonged mice survival. Importantly, we identified human CD1d-restricted lymphoma cells within Vδ1 TCR-expressing PTCL. These results define a new subtype of PTCL and pave the way for the development of blocking anti-CD1d antibody for therapeutic purposes in humans. PMID:27069116

  14. Crystal structures of inhibitor complexes of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1) protease

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tadashi; Li, Mi; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-28

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with several serious diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy. For a number of years, the protease (PR) encoded by HTLV-1 has been a target for designing antiviral drugs, but that effort was hampered by limited available structural information. We report a high-resolution crystal structure of HTLV-1 PR complexed with a statine-containing inhibitor, a significant improvement over the previously available moderate-resolution structure. We also report crystal structures of the complexes of HTLV-1 PR with five different inhibitors that are more compact and more potent. A detailed study of structure-activity relationships was performed to interpret in detail the influence of the polar and hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the protease.

  15. Crystal Structures of Inhibitir Complexes of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus (HTLV-1) Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tadashi; Li, Mi; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-17

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with several serious diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy. For a number of years, the protease (PR) encoded by HTLV-1 has been a target for designing antiviral drugs, but that effort was hampered by limited available structural information. We report a high-resolution crystal structure of HTLV-1 PR complexed with a statine-containing inhibitor, a significant improvement over the previously available moderate-resolution structure. We also report crystal structures of the complexes of HTLV-1 PR with five different inhibitors that are more compact and more potent. A detailed study of structure-activity relationships was performed to interpret in detail the influence of the polar and hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the protease.

  16. High-resolution analysis of the human T-cell receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Eliana; Nicolay, Jan P.; Fronza, Raffaele; Arens, Anne; Paruzynski, Anna; Nowrouzi, Ali; Ürenden, Gökçe; Lulay, Christina; Schneider, Sven; Goerdt, Sergij; Glimm, Hanno; Krammer, Peter H.; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased dissection of T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire diversity at the nucleotide level could provide important insights into human immunity. Here we show that TCR ligation-anchored-magnetically captured PCR (TCR-LA-MC PCR) identifies TCR α- and β-chain diversity without sequence-associated or quantitative restrictions in healthy and diseased conditions. TCR-LA-MC PCR identifies convergent recombination events, classifies different stages of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in vivo and demonstrates TCR reactivation after in vitro cytomegalovirus stimulation. TCR-LA-MC PCR allows ultra-deep data access to both physiological TCR diversity and mechanisms influencing clonality in all clinical settings with restricted or distorted TCR repertoires. PMID:26324409

  17. Inability to detect human T cell lymphotropic virus type 2-specific antibodies in a patient coinfected with HIV-1, human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1, human T cell lymphotropic virus type 2, and hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Caterino-de-Araujo, Adele; Magri, Mariana Cavalheiro; Sato, Neuza Satomi; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Brigido, Luis Fernando de Macedo; Morimoto, Arilson Akira

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1, human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are common among intravenous drug users (IDUs) and can cause chronic infections in the host. Usually, the diagnosis of such viruses employs serological assays; however, some difficulties in confirming HTLV-2 infection have been reported in high-risk populations in Brazil. We present data of an unusual case of coinfection with HIV-1, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, and HCV in a male IDU in which HTLV-2 was detected only by molecular assays. Comparative analysis of retroviruses from 2002 and 2012 showed identical HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 sequences (LTR, env, and tax), and a change in HIV-1 tropism from CXCR4 to CCR5. No mutation was detected in the hot points of the env region of the HTLV-2 isolate that justified the lack of rgp46-II-specific antibodies. These data emphasize the need for molecular assays to diagnose HTLV-2 in high-risk populations in Brazil.

  18. Inability to Detect Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 2-Specific Antibodies in a Patient Coinfected with HIV-1, Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1, Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 2, and Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Mariana Cavalheiro; Sato, Neuza Satomi; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Brigido, Luis Fernando de Macedo; Morimoto, Arilson Akira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1, human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are common among intravenous drug users (IDUs) and can cause chronic infections in the host. Usually, the diagnosis of such viruses employs serological assays; however, some difficulties in confirming HTLV-2 infection have been reported in high-risk populations in Brazil. We present data of an unusual case of coinfection with HIV-1, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, and HCV in a male IDU in which HTLV-2 was detected only by molecular assays. Comparative analysis of retroviruses from 2002 and 2012 showed identical HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 sequences (LTR, env, and tax), and a change in HIV-1 tropism from CXCR4 to CCR5. No mutation was detected in the hot points of the env region of the HTLV-2 isolate that justified the lack of rgp46-II-specific antibodies. These data emphasize the need for molecular assays to diagnose HTLV-2 in high-risk populations in Brazil. PMID:23875602

  19. Induction of Cell Death in Growing Human T-Cells and Cell Survival in Resting Cells in Response to the Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax

    PubMed Central

    Mizuguchi, Mariko; Sasaki, Yuka; Hara, Toshifumi; Higuchi, Masaya; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Funato, Noriko; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Fujii, Masahiro; Nakamura, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Tax1 encoded by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been believed to dysregulate the expression of cellular genes involved in cell survival and mortality, leading to the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). The function of Tax1 in ATL development however is still controversial, primarily because Tax1 induces cell cycle progression and apoptosis. To systemically understand cell growth phase-dependent induction of cell survival or cell death by Tax1, we established a single experimental system using an interleukin 2 (IL-2)-dependent human T-cell line Kit 225 that can be forced into resting phase by IL-2 deprivation. Introduction of Tax1 and HTLV-2 Tax (Tax2B) decreased mitochondrial activity alongside apoptosis in growing cells but not in resting cells. Cell cycle profile analysis indicated that Tax1 and Tax2B were likely to perturb the S phase in growing cells. Studies with Tax1 mutants and siRNA for NF-κB/RelA revealed that Tax1-mediated cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in growing Kit 225 cells depend on RelA. Interestingly, inactivation of the non-canonical NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways relieved Tax1-mediated apoptosis, suggesting that the Tax1-NF-κB-p38 MAPK axis may be associated with apoptosis in growing cells. Inflammatory mediators such as CCL3 and CCL4, which are involved in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS), were induced by Tax1 and Tax2B in growing cells. In contrast, RelA silencing in resting cells reduced mitochondrial activity, indicating that NF-κB/RelA is also critical for Tax1-mediated cell survival. These findings suggest that Tax1-mediated cell survival and death depend on the cell growth phase. Both effects of Tax1 may be implicated in the long latency of HTLV-1 infection. PMID:26829041

  20. Cutting edge: Human regulatory T cells require IL-35 to mediate suppression and infectious tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Vandana; Collison, Lauren W; Guy, Clifford S; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-06-15

    Human regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are essential for the maintenance of immune tolerance. However, the mechanisms they use to mediate suppression remain controversial. Although IL-35 has been shown to play an important role in T(reg)-mediated suppression in mice, recent studies have questioned its relevance in human T(reg). In this study, we show that human T(reg) express and require IL-35 for maximal suppressive capacity. Substantial upregulation of EBI3 and IL12A, but not IL10 and TGFB, was observed in activated human T(reg) compared with conventional T cells (T(conv)). Contact-independent T(reg)-mediated suppression was IL-35 dependent and did not require IL-10 or TGF-β. Lastly, human T(reg)-mediated suppression led to the conversion of the suppressed T(conv) into iTr35 cells, an IL-35-induced T(reg) population, in an IL-35-dependent manner. Thus, IL-35 contributes to human T(reg)-mediated suppression, and its conversion of suppressed target T(conv) into IL-35-induced T(reg) may contribute to infectious tolerance.

  1. IMMORTALIZATION OF HUMAN AND RHESUS MACAQUE PRIMARY ANTIGEN-SPECIFIC T CELLS BY RETROVIRALLY TRANSDUCED TELOMERASE REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE

    PubMed Central

    Barsov, Eugene V.

    2011-01-01

    Human and rhesus macaque primary antigen-specific T cells derived from infected or immunized individuals or animals are a valuable material with which to study cellular immune responses against pathogens and tumors. Antigen-specific T cells can be expanded in vitro but have a finite proliferative life span. After a limited period in culture, primary T cells undergo replicative senescence and stop dividing. This restricts their applicability to short term experiments and complicates their use in adoptive immunotherapy. The proliferative life span of primary human and rhesus macaque T cells can be considerably extended by ectopically expressed human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). Antigen-specific T cells transduced with TERT-expressing retroviral vectors can proliferate and expand in culture for long periods of time while maintaining their primary T cell characteristics including antigen-specific responses. Thus, TERT-immortalized T cells are an important and valuable resource for studying T cell immune responses and, potentially, for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:22048804

  2. Rapid and strong human CD8+ T cell responses to vaccination with peptide, IFA, and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide 7909.

    PubMed

    Speiser, Daniel E; Liénard, Danielle; Rufer, Nathalie; Rubio-Godoy, Verena; Rimoldi, Donata; Lejeune, Ferdy; Krieg, Arthur M; Cerottini, Jean-Charles; Romero, Pedro

    2005-03-01

    The induction of potent CD8+ T cell responses by vaccines to fight microbes or tumors remains a major challenge, as many candidates for human vaccines have proved to be poorly immunogenic. Deoxycytidyl-deoxyguanosin oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) trigger Toll-like receptor 9, resulting in dendritic cell maturation that can enhance immunogenicity of peptide-based vaccines in mice. We tested whether a synthetic ODN, CpG 7909, could improve human tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Eight HLA-A2+ melanoma patients received 4 monthly vaccinations of low-dose CpG 7909 mixed with melanoma antigen A (Melan-A; identical to MART-1) analog peptide and incomplete Freund's adjuvant. All patients exhibited rapid and strong antigen-specific T cell responses: the frequency of Melan-A-specific T cells reached over 3% of circulating CD8+ T cells. This was one order of magnitude higher than the frequency seen in 8 control patients treated similarly but without CpG and 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than that seen in previous studies with synthetic vaccines. The enhanced T cell populations consisted primarily of effector memory cells, which in part secreted IFN- and expressed granzyme B and perforin ex vivo. In vitro, T cell clones recognized and killed melanoma cells in an antigen-specific manner. Thus, CpG 7909 is an efficient vaccine adjuvant that promotes strong antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in humans. PMID:15696196

  3. Initial viral load determines the magnitude of the human CD8 T cell response to yellow fever vaccination.

    PubMed

    Akondy, Rama S; Johnson, Philip L F; Nakaya, Helder I; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Mulligan, Mark J; Lawson, Benton; Miller, Joseph D; Pulendran, Bali; Antia, Rustom; Ahmed, Rafi

    2015-03-10

    CD8 T cells are a potent tool for eliminating intracellular pathogens and tumor cells. Thus, eliciting robust CD8 T-cell immunity is the basis for many vaccines under development. However, the relationship between antigen load and the magnitude of the CD8 T-cell response is not well-described in a human immune response. Here we address this issue by quantifying viral load and the CD8 T-cell response in a cohort of 80 individuals immunized with the live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YFV-17D) by sampling peripheral blood at days 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 14, 30, and 90. When the virus load was below a threshold (peak virus load < 225 genomes per mL, or integrated virus load < 400 genome days per mL), the magnitude of the CD8 T-cell response correlated strongly with the virus load (R(2) ∼ 0.63). As the virus load increased above this threshold, the magnitude of the CD8 T-cell responses saturated. Recent advances in CD8 T-cell-based vaccines have focused on replication-incompetent or single-cycle vectors. However, these approaches deliver relatively limited amounts of antigen after immunization. Our results highlight the requirement that T-cell-based vaccines should deliver sufficient antigen during the initial period of the immune response to elicit a large number of CD8 T cells that may be needed for protection.

  4. Constitutive activation of different Jak tyrosine kinases in human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) tax protein or virus-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, X; Kang, S H; Heidenreich, O; Okerholm, M; O'Shea, J J; Nerenberg, M I

    1995-01-01

    HTLV-1 infection causes an adult T cell leukemia in humans. The viral encoded protein tax, is thought to play an important role in oncogenesis. Our previous data obtained from a tax transgenic mouse model revealed that tax transforms mouse fibroblasts but not thymocytes, despite comparable levels of tax expression in both tissues. Constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of a 130-kD protein(s) was observed in the tax transformed fibroblast B line and in HTLV-1 transformed human lymphoid lines, but not in thymocytes from Thy-tax transgenic mice. Phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis with a set of Jak kinase specific antibodies, identified p130 as Jak2 in the tax transformed mouse fibroblastic cell line and Jak3 in HTLV-1 transformed human T cell lines. Phosphorylation of Jak2 in tax transformed cells resulted from high expression of IL-6. Tyrosine phosphorylation of this protein could also be induced in Balb/c3T3 cells using a supernatant from the B line, which was associated with induction of cell proliferation. Both phosphorylation and proliferation were inhibited by IL-6 neutralizing antibodies. Constitutive phosphorylation of Jak kinases may facilitate tumor growth in both HTLV-1 infected human T cells and the transgenic mouse model. Images PMID:7657825

  5. Development of leukemia in mice transgenic for the tax gene of human T-cell leukemia virus type I.

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, W J; Kimata, J T; Wong, F H; Zutter, M; Ley, T J; Ratner, L

    1995-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax protein trans-activates several cellular genes implicated in T-cell replication and activation. To investigate its leukemogenic potential, Tax was targeted to the mature T-lymphocyte compartment in transgenic mice by using the human granzyme B promoter. These mice developed large granular lymphocytic leukemia, demonstrating that expression of Tax in the lymphocyte compartment is sufficient for the development of leukemia. Furthermore, these observations suggest that human T-cell leukemia virus infection may be involved in the development of large granular lymphocytic leukemia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7862633

  6. An inducible transcription factor activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus in T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Gary; Baltimore, David

    1987-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production from latently infected T lymphocytes can be induced with compounds that activate the cells to secrete lymphokines1,2. The elements in the HIV genome which control activation are not known but expression might be regulated through a variety of DNA elements. The cis-acting control elements of the viral genome are enhancer and promoter regions. The virus also encodes trans-acting factors specified by the tat-III (refs 3-6) and art genes7. We have examined whether products specific to activated T cells might stimulate viral transcription by binding to regions on viral DNA. Activation of T cells, which increases HIV expression up to 50-fold, correlated with induction of a DNA binding protein indistinguishable from a recognized transcription factor, called NF-κB (ref. 8), with binding sites in the viral enhancer. Mutation of these binding sites abolished inducibility. That NF-κB acts in synergy with the viral tat-III gene product to enhance HIV expression in T cells may have implications for the pathogenesis of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome).

  7. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response. PMID:27127520

  8. Maturation stage and proliferation-dependent expression of dUTPase in human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Strahler, J R; Zhu, X X; Hora, N; Wang, Y K; Andrews, P C; Roseman, N A; Neel, J V; Turka, L; Hanash, S M

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a database of lymphoid polypeptides detected by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to aid in studies of leukemogenesis and of mutation affecting protein structure. In prior studies, we observed a 19-kDa phosphopolypeptide which was induced with proliferation in mature T cells and constitutively expressed in immature thymocytes. In this report we describe the identification of this polypeptide as the phosphorylated form of dUTPase (EC 3.6.1.23), following cDNA cloning of the gene, based on a partial amino acid sequence of the phosphopolypeptide. Studies of the expression and phosphorylation of dUTPase in human T cells indicate that accumulation and phosphorylation of dUTPase in mature T cells occur in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Interestingly, noncycling immature thymocytes express constitutively high levels of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated dUTPase. These results suggest an important role for dUTPase in immature thymocytes that is independent of proliferation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8389461

  9. Allelic Exclusion and Peripheral Reconstitution by TCR Transgenic T Cells Arising From Transduced Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giannoni, Francesca; Hardee, Cinnamon L; Wherley, Jennifer; Gschweng, Eric; Senadheera, Shantha; Kaufman, Michael L; Chan, Rebecca; Bahner, Ingrid; Gersuk, Vivian; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Baltimore, David; Witte, Owen N; Economou, James S; Ribas, Antoni; Kohn, Donald B

    2013-01-01

    Transduction and transplantation of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) with the genes for a T-cell receptor (TCR) that recognizes a tumor-associated antigen may lead to sustained long-term production of T cells expressing the TCR and confer specific antitumor activity. We evaluated this using a lentiviral vector (CCLc-MND-F5) carrying cDNA for a human TCR specific for an HLA-A*0201-restricted peptide of Melanoma Antigen Recognized by T cells (MART-1). CD34+ HSPC were transduced with the F5 TCR lentiviral vector or mock transduced and transplanted into neonatal NSG mice or NSG mice transgenic for human HLA-A*0201 (NSG-A2). Human CD8+ and CD4+ T cells expressing the human F5 TCR were present in the thymus, spleen, and peripheral blood after 4–5 months. Expression of human HLA-A*0201 in NSG-A2 recipient mice led to significantly increased numbers of human CD8+ and CD4+ T cells expressing the F5 TCR, compared with control NSG recipients. Transduction of the human CD34+ HSPC by the F5 TCR transgene caused a high degree of allelic exclusion, potently suppressing rearrangement of endogenous human TCR-β genes during thymopoiesis. In summary, we demonstrated the feasibility of engineering human HSPC to express a tumor-specific TCR to serve as a long-term source of tumor-targeted mature T cells for immunotherapy of melanoma. PMID:23380815

  10. Allelic exclusion and peripheral reconstitution by TCR transgenic T cells arising from transduced human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Francesca; Hardee, Cinnamon L; Wherley, Jennifer; Gschweng, Eric; Senadheera, Shantha; Kaufman, Michael L; Chan, Rebecca; Bahner, Ingrid; Gersuk, Vivian; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Baltimore, David; Witte, Owen N; Economou, James S; Ribas, Antoni; Kohn, Donald B

    2013-05-01

    Transduction and transplantation of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) with the genes for a T-cell receptor (TCR) that recognizes a tumor-associated antigen may lead to sustained long-term production of T cells expressing the TCR and confer specific antitumor activity. We evaluated this using a lentiviral vector (CCLc-MND-F5) carrying cDNA for a human TCR specific for an HLA-A*0201-restricted peptide of Melanoma Antigen Recognized by T cells (MART-1). CD34(+) HSPC were transduced with the F5 TCR lentiviral vector or mock transduced and transplanted into neonatal NSG mice or NSG mice transgenic for human HLA-A*0201 (NSG-A2). Human CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells expressing the human F5 TCR were present in the thymus, spleen, and peripheral blood after 4-5 months. Expression of human HLA-A*0201 in NSG-A2 recipient mice led to significantly increased numbers of human CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells expressing the F5 TCR, compared with control NSG recipients. Transduction of the human CD34(+) HSPC by the F5 TCR transgene caused a high degree of allelic exclusion, potently suppressing rearrangement of endogenous human TCR-β genes during thymopoiesis. In summary, we demonstrated the feasibility of engineering human HSPC to express a tumor-specific TCR to serve as a long-term source of tumor-targeted mature T cells for immunotherapy of melanoma.

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus-positive secondary syphilis mimicking cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Michiko; Fujii, Yoshiyuki; Ozaki, Keiji; Urano, Yoshio; Iwasa, Masami; Nakamura, Shingen; Fujii, Shiro; Abe, Masahiro; Sato, Yasuharu; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Malignant syphilis or lues maligna is a severe form of secondary syphilis that was commonly reported in the pre-antibiotic era, and has now reemerged with the advent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. However, the characteristic histopathological findings of malignant syphilis remain controversial. The aim of this case report was to clarify the clinical and histopathological findings of HIV-positive malignant secondary syphilis. A Japanese man in his forties complained of fever, skin lesions, headache, and myalgia without lymphadenopathy during the previous 4 weeks. The skin lesions manifested as erythematous, nonhealing, ulcerated papules scattered on his trunk, extremities, palm, and face. Although the skin lesions were suspected to be cutaneous T-cell lymphomas on histological analyses, they lacked T-cell receptor Jγ rearrangement; moreover, immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the presence of spirochetes. The patient was administered antibiotics and anti-retroviral therapy, which dramatically improved the symptoms. On the basis of these observations of the skin lesions, we finally diagnosed the patient with HIV-associated secondary syphilis that mimicked cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The patient's systemic CD4+ lymphocyte count was very low, and the infiltrate was almost exclusively composed of CD8+ atypical lymphocytes; therefore, the condition was easily misdiagnosed as cutaneous lymphoma. Although the abundance of plasma cells is a good indicator of malignant syphilis on skin histological analyses, in some cases, the plasma cell count may be very low. Therefore, a diagnosis of malignant secondary syphilis should be considered before making a diagnosis of primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma or lymphoma associated with HIV infection. PMID:26449225

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus-positive secondary syphilis mimicking cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Michiko; Fujii, Yoshiyuki; Ozaki, Keiji; Urano, Yoshio; Iwasa, Masami; Nakamura, Shingen; Fujii, Shiro; Abe, Masahiro; Sato, Yasuharu; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2015-10-08

    Malignant syphilis or lues maligna is a severe form of secondary syphilis that was commonly reported in the pre-antibiotic era, and has now reemerged with the advent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. However, the characteristic histopathological findings of malignant syphilis remain controversial. The aim of this case report was to clarify the clinical and histopathological findings of HIV-positive malignant secondary syphilis. A Japanese man in his forties complained of fever, skin lesions, headache, and myalgia without lymphadenopathy during the previous 4 weeks. The skin lesions manifested as erythematous, nonhealing, ulcerated papules scattered on his trunk, extremities, palm, and face. Although the skin lesions were suspected to be cutaneous T-cell lymphomas on histological analyses, they lacked T-cell receptor Jγ rearrangement; moreover, immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the presence of spirochetes. The patient was administered antibiotics and anti-retroviral therapy, which dramatically improved the symptoms. On the basis of these observations of the skin lesions, we finally diagnosed the patient with HIV-associated secondary syphilis that mimicked cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The patient's systemic CD4+ lymphocyte count was very low, and the infiltrate was almost exclusively composed of CD8+ atypical lymphocytes; therefore, the condition was easily misdiagnosed as cutaneous lymphoma. Although the abundance of plasma cells is a good indicator of malignant syphilis on skin histological analyses, in some cases, the plasma cell count may be very low. Therefore, a diagnosis of malignant secondary syphilis should be considered before making a diagnosis of primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma or lymphoma associated with HIV infection.

  13. Isolation of a new herpes virus from human CD4 sup + T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, N.; Schirmer, E.C.; Wyatt, L.S.; Katsafanas, G.; Roffman, E.; Danovich, R.M. ); June, C.H. )

    1990-01-01

    A new human herpes virus has been isolated from CD4{sup +} T cells purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy individual (RK), following incubation of the cells under conditions promoting T-cell activation. The virus could not be recovered from nonactivated cells. Cultures of lymphocytes infected with the RK virus exhibited a cytopathic effect, and electron microscopic analyses revealed a characteristic herpes virus structure. RK virus DNA did not hybridize with large probes derived from herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus, varicella-zoster virus, and human cytomegalovirus. The genetic relatedness of the RK virus to the recently identified T-lymphotropic human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) was investigated by restriction enzyme analyses using 21 different enzymes and by blot hydridization analyses using 11 probes derived from two strains of HHV-6 (Z29 and U1102). Whereas the two HHV-6 strains exhibited only limited restriction enzyme polymorphism, cleavage of the RK virus DNA yielded distinct patterns. Of the 11 HHV-6 DNA probes tested, only 6 cross-hybridized with DNA fragments derived from the RK virus. Taken together, the maximal homology amounted to 31 kilobases of the 75 kilobases tested. The authors conclude that the RK virus is distinct from previously characterized human herpesviruses. The authors propose to designate it as the prototype of a new herpes virus, the seventh human herpes virus identified to date.

  14. Identification of STAT5A and STAT5B target genes in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Takahiro; Seki, Scott; Jenks, Jennifer A; Kohli, Arunima; Kawli, Trupti; Martin, Dorrelyn Patacsil; Snyder, Michael; Bacchetta, Rosa; Nadeau, Kari C

    2014-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) comprises a family of universal transcription factors that help cells sense and respond to environmental signals. STAT5 refers to two highly related proteins, STAT5A and STAT5B, with critical function: their complete deficiency is lethal in mice; in humans, STAT5B deficiency alone leads to endocrine and immunological problems, while STAT5A deficiency has not been reported. STAT5A and STAT5B show peptide sequence similarities greater than 90%, but subtle structural differences suggest possible non-redundant roles in gene regulation. However, these roles remain unclear in humans. We applied chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing using human CD4(+) T cells to detect candidate genes regulated by STAT5A and/or STAT5B, and quantitative-PCR in STAT5A or STAT5B knock-down (KD) human CD4(+) T cells to validate the findings. Our data show STAT5A and STAT5B play redundant roles in cell proliferation and apoptosis via SGK1 interaction. Interestingly, we found a novel, unique role for STAT5A in binding to genes involved in neural development and function (NDRG1, DNAJC6, and SSH2), while STAT5B appears to play a distinct role in T cell development and function via DOCK8, SNX9, FOXP3 and IL2RA binding. Our results also suggest that one or more co-activators for STAT5A and/or STAT5B may play important roles in establishing different binding abilities and gene regulation behaviors. The new identification of these genes regulated by STAT5A and/or STAT5B has major implications for understanding the pathophysiology of cancer progression, neural disorders, and immune abnormalities. PMID:24497979

  15. CRISPR-Cas9 mediated efficient PD-1 disruption on human primary T cells from cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shu; Hu, Bian; Shao, Jie; Shen, Bin; Du, Juan; Du, Yinan; Zhou, Jiankui; Yu, Lixia; Zhang, Lianru; Chen, Fangjun; Sha, Huizi; Cheng, Lei; Meng, Fanyan; Zou, Zhengyun; Huang, Xingxu; Liu, Baorui

    2016-01-01

    Strategies that enhance the function of T cells are critical for immunotherapy. One negative regulator of T-cell activity is ligand PD-L1, which is expressed on dentritic cells (DCs) or some tumor cells, and functions through binding of programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor on activated T cells. Here we described for the first time a non-viral mediated approach to reprogram primary human T cells by disruption of PD-1. We showed that the gene knockout of PD-1 by electroporation of plasmids encoding sgRNA and Cas9 was technically feasible. The disruption of inhibitory checkpoint gene PD-1 resulted in significant reduction of PD-1 expression but didn’t affect the viability of primary human T cells during the prolonged in vitro culture. Cellular immune response of the gene modified T cells was characterized by up-regulated IFN-γ production and enhanced cytotoxicity. These results suggest that we have demonstrated an approach for efficient checkpoint inhibitor disruption in T cells, providing a new strategy for targeting checkpoint inhibitors, which could potentialy be useful to improve the efficacy of T-cell based adoptive therapies. PMID:26818188

  16. CRISPR-Cas9 mediated efficient PD-1 disruption on human primary T cells from cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Su, Shu; Hu, Bian; Shao, Jie; Shen, Bin; Du, Juan; Du, Yinan; Zhou, Jiankui; Yu, Lixia; Zhang, Lianru; Chen, Fangjun; Sha, Huizi; Cheng, Lei; Meng, Fanyan; Zou, Zhengyun; Huang, Xingxu; Liu, Baorui

    2016-01-28

    Strategies that enhance the function of T cells are critical for immunotherapy. One negative regulator of T-cell activity is ligand PD-L1, which is expressed on dentritic cells (DCs) or some tumor cells, and functions through binding of programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor on activated T cells. Here we described for the first time a non-viral mediated approach to reprogram primary human T cells by disruption of PD-1. We showed that the gene knockout of PD-1 by electroporation of plasmids encoding sgRNA and Cas9 was technically feasible. The disruption of inhibitory checkpoint gene PD-1 resulted in significant reduction of PD-1 expression but didn't affect the viability of primary human T cells during the prolonged in vitro culture. Cellular immune response of the gene modified T cells was characterized by up-regulated IFN-γ production and enhanced cytotoxicity. These results suggest that we have demonstrated an approach for efficient checkpoint inhibitor disruption in T cells, providing a new strategy for targeting checkpoint inhibitors, which could potentialy be useful to improve the efficacy of T-cell based adoptive therapies.

  17. Amino-Terminal Extended Peptide Single-Chain Trimers are Potent Synthetic Agonists for Memory Human CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Carreno, Beatriz M.; Becker-Hapak, Michelle; Chan, Megan; Lie, Wen-Rong; Wang, Xiaoli; Hansen, Ted H.; Linette, Gerald P.

    2012-01-01

    Upon antigen exposure, most memory T cells undergo re-stimulation induced cell death. Here we describe a novel synthetic agonist, an amino-terminal extended decamer peptide expressed as a single chain trimer, the AT-SCT, that preferentially promotes the growth of memory human CD8+ T cells with minimal re-stimulation-induced cell death. Using the CMV pp65 and melanoma gp100 antigens, we observe the in vitro numerical expansion of a clonally diverse poly-functional population of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells from normal individuals and vaccinated melanoma patients, respectively. Memory CD8+ T cells stimulated with AT-SCT presented on MHC class I/II null cells show reduced cytokine production, slower kinetics of TCR down-regulation and decreased cell death when compared to native nonamer SCT-activated T cells. However, both ERK phosphorylation and cell cycle kinetics are identical in AT-SCT- and SCT-activated T cells. Probing of SCT and AT-SCT peptide-MHC (p-MHC) complexes using fluorochrome-conjugated TCR multimers suggest that nonamer and decamer-linked peptides may be anchored differently to HLA-A2 peptide binding groove. Our findings demonstrate that modified p-MHC structures such as AT-SCT can be engineered as T cell agonists to promote the growth and expansion of memory human CD8+ T cells. PMID:22573808

  18. Alterations in T Cell Subsets in Human Immunodeficiency Virus–Infected Adults with Co-infections in Southern Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Naniche, Denise; Letang, Emilio; Nhampossa, Tacilta; David, Catarina; Menendez, Clara; Alonso, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    T cell activation and depletion of naive T cells are hallmarks of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pathogenesis. This study explored the relationships between certain co-infections (including syphilis, hepatitis B and C, human T cell lymphotrophic viruses I and II [HTLV-I/II], Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus [KSHV], Plasmodium falciparum malaria, and tuberculosis), and levels of activated CD8 and CD4 T cell subsets as well as naive and memory CD4 T cells in HIV-infected adults in a rural area of southern Mozambique. We found that syphilis infection and to a lesser extent HTLV-I/II seropositivity were independently associated with higher CD8 T cell activation (CD8+ CD38+ HLA-DR+) whereas only syphilis was associated with higher CD4 T cell activation. Furthermore, KSHV and HTLV-I/II seropositivities were independently associated with a lower percentage of naive CD4 T cells (CD4+ CD45RA+ CD62L+). These results highlight the importance of screening and prompt treatment of syphilis, and raise questions as to whether HIV-positive persons with certain chronic viral co-infections should initiate combined antiretroviral therapy at higher CD4 cell counts. PMID:21976586

  19. PTEN expression in PTEN-null leukaemic T cell lines leads to reduced proliferation via slowed cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Seminario, Maria-Cristina; Precht, Patricia; Wersto, Robert P; Gorospe, Myriam; Wange, Ronald L

    2003-11-01

    The balance of activities between the proto-oncogene phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and the tumour suppressor gene PTEN has been shown to affect cellular growth and proliferation, as well as tumorigenesis. Previously, PTEN expression in the PTEN-null Jurkat T cell leukaemia line was shown to cause reduced proliferation without cell cycle arrest. Here, we further these investigations by determining the basis for this phenomenon. By BrdU pulse-chase and cell cycle arrest and release assays, we find that PTEN expression reduced proliferation by slowing progression through all phases of the cell cycle. This was associated with reduced levels of cyclins A, B1 and B2, cdk4, and cdc25A and increased p27KIP1 expression. Apoptosis played no role in the antiproliferative effect of PTEN, since only marginal increases in the rate of apoptosis were detected upon PTEN expression, and inhibitors of effector caspases did not restore proliferative capacity. Active Akt blocked the antiproliferative effects of PTEN, indicating that PTEN mediates its effects through conventional PI3K-linked signalling pathways. Similar results were obtained from a different PTEN-null leukaemia T cell line, CEM. Together, these results show that PTEN expression in leukaemic T cells leads to reduced proliferation via an apoptosis-independent mechanism involving slower passage through the cell cycle.

  20. Diverse Gene Expression in Human Regulatory T Cell Subsets Uncovers Connection between Regulatory T Cell Genes and Suppressive Function.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jing; Davis, Scott P; Hill, Jonathan A; Yamagata, Tetsuya

    2015-10-15

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells have a critical role in the control of immunity, and their diverse subpopulations may allow adaptation to different types of immune responses. In this study, we analyzed human Treg cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood by performing genome-wide expression profiling of 40 Treg cell subsets from healthy donors. We found that the human peripheral blood Treg cell population is comprised of five major genomic subgroups, represented by 16 tractable subsets with a particular cell surface phenotype. These subsets possess a range of suppressive function and cytokine secretion and can exert a genomic footprint on target effector T (Teff) cells. Correlation analysis of variability in gene expression in the subsets identified several cell surface molecules associated with Treg suppressive function, and pharmacological interrogation revealed a set of genes having causative effect. The five genomic subgroups of Treg cells imposed a preserved pattern of gene expression on Teff cells, with a varying degree of genes being suppressed or induced. Notably, there was a cluster of genes induced by Treg cells that bolstered an autoinhibitory effect in Teff cells, and this induction appears to be governed by a different set of genes than ones involved in counteracting Teff activation. Our work shows an example of exploiting the diversity within human Treg cell subpopulations to dissect Treg cell biology. PMID:26371251

  1. First-line cART regimen impacts the course of CD8+ T-cell counts in HIV-infected patients that achieve sustained undetectable viral load.

    PubMed Central

    Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Allavena, Clotilde; Delpierre, Cyrille; Duvivier, Claudine; Obry-Roguet, Véronique; Cano, Carla E.; Guillouet de Salvador, Francine; Rey, David; Dellamonica, Pierre; Cheret, Antoine; Cuzin, Lise; Katlama, Christine; Cabié, André; Hoen, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of first-line combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) regimen on the course of CD8+ T-cell counts in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. A retrospective observational study conducted on the French DAT’AIDS Cohort of HIV-infected patients. We selected 605 patients initiating a first-line cART between 2002 and 2009, and which achieved a sustained undetectable HIV plasma viral load (pVL) for at least 12 months without cART modification. The evolution of CD8+ T-cell counts according to cART regimen was assessed. CD8+ T-cell counts were assessed in 572 patients treated with 2NRTIs+1PI/r (n= 297), 2NRTIs+1NNRTI (n= 207) and 3NRTIs (n= 68). In multivariate analysis, after 12 months of follow-up, the 3NRTIs regimen was associated with a significantly smaller decrease of CD8+ T-cell count compared with NNRTI-containing regimens (–10.2 cells/μL in 3NRTIs vs –105.1 cells/μL; P=0.02) but not compared with PI-containing regimens (10.2 vs –60.9 cells/μL; P=0.21). After 24 months, the 3NRTIs regimen was associated with a smaller decrease of CD8+ T-cell count and % compared with PI/r- and NNRTI-containing regimens (0.2 in 3NRTIs vs –9.9 with PI/r-regimens, P=0.001, and vs –11.1 with NNRTI-regimens, p < 0.0001). A focus analysis on 11 patients treated with an INSTI-containing cART regimen during the study period showed after 12 months of follow-up, a median decrease of CD8+ T-cell count of –155 [inter quartile range: –302; –22] cells/μL. Our data highlight the fact that cART regimens have differential effects on CD8 pool down regulation. PMID:27741125

  2. Communication between Human Dendritic Cell Subsets in Tuberculosis: Requirements for Naive CD4+ T Cell Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lozza, Laura; Farinacci, Maura; Bechtle, Marina; Stäber, Manuela; Zedler, Ulrike; Baiocchini, Andrea; del Nonno, Franca; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Human primary dendritic cells (DCs) are heterogeneous by phenotype, function, and tissue localization and distinct from inflammatory monocyte-derived DCs. Current information regarding the susceptibility and functional role of primary human DC subsets to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is limited. Here, we dissect the response of different primary DC subsets to Mtb infection. Myeloid CD11c+ cells and pDCs (C-type lectin 4C+ cells) were located in human lymph nodes (LNs) of tuberculosis (TB) patients by histochemistry. Rare CD141hi DCs (C-type lectin 9A+ cells) were also identified. Infection with live Mtb revealed a higher responsiveness of myeloid CD1c+ DCs compared to CD141hi DCs and pDCs. CD1c+ DCs produced interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor α, and IL-1β but not IL-12p70, a cytokine important for Th1 activation and host defenses against Mtb. Yet, CD1c+ DCs were able to activate autologous naïve CD4+ T cells. By combining cell purification with fluorescence-activated cell sorting and gene expression profiling on rare cell populations, we detected in responding CD4+ T cells, genes related to effector-cytolytic functions and transcription factors associated with Th1, Th17, and Treg polarization, suggesting multifunctional properties in our experimental conditions. Finally, immunohistologic analyses revealed contact between CD11c+ cells and pDCs in LNs of TB patients and in vitro data suggest that cooperation between Mtb-infected CD1c+ DCs and pDCs favors stimulation of CD4+ T cells. PMID:25071784

  3. A novel 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugate induces apoptosis in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Altenburg, Jeffrey D.; Harvey, Kevin A.; McCray, Sharon; Xu, Zhidong; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} 2,6-Diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugates (DIP-DHA) inhibits the proliferation of T-cell leukemic cell lines. {yields} DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. {yields} DIP-DHA significantly downregulated CXCR4 surface expression. -- Abstract: We have previously characterized the effects of 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide (DIP-DHA) conjugates and their analogs on the proliferation and progression of breast cancer cell lines. For this study, we investigated the effects of the DIP-DHA conjugate on 2 representative T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines: CEM and Jurkat. Treatment of both cell lines with DIP-DHA resulted in significantly greater inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis than that of parent compounds, 2,6-diisopropylphenol (DIP) or docosahexaenoate (DHA). Treatment of the cells with DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis in both cell lines was reversed in the presence of a caspase family inhibitor. Treatment with DIP-DHA reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. These observations suggest that the effects are driven by intrinsic apoptotic pathways. DIP-DHA treatment also downregulated surface CXCR4 expression, an important chemokine receptor involved in cancer metastasis that is highly expressed in both CEM and Jurkat cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the DIP-DHA conjugate exhibits significantly more potent effects on CEM and Jurkat cells than that of DIP or DHA alone. These conjugates have potential use for treatment of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  4. PTD-hFOXP3 protein acts as an immune regulator to convert human CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells to regulatory T-like cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Xu, Xun; Lin, Xin; Tian, Yuxiang; Ji, Baoju; Xia, Sheng; Xu, Sanrong; Yin, Qing; Zhang, Miaomiao; Jiao, Zhijun; Wang, Shengjun; Xu, Huaxi; Shao, Qixiang

    2012-12-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical for maintaining self-tolerance and homeostasis, and have potential application in clinical disease therapy, such as autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection, but their numbers are limited. FOXP3 is a key transcription factor controlling Tregs development and function. Although transfection of CD4(+)CD25(-) lymphocytes with the FOXP3 gene can convert them to Treg-like cells, there is the risk of insertional mutagenesis and thus an alternative to genetic intervention is sought. The protein transduction domain (PTD) from the HIV transactivator of transcription is a useful tool to deliver protein to the cytoplasm and nucleus. In this study, we generated a fusion protein linking the human FOXP3 to PTD (PTD-hFOXP3), and explored its function in T cells. The results showed that the PTD rapidly and effectively delivered the hFOXP3 protein into cells where it localized not only in the cytoplasm, but also to the nucleus. PTD-hFOXP3-transduced Jurkat cells (human T lymphoma cell line) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells failed to proliferate and produce IL-2 and IFN-γ, but produced large amounts of the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β, in response to TCR stimulation in vitro. PTD-hFOXP3-transduced CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells also expressed high levels of CTLA-4 and low levels of CD25 after stimulation. Most importantly, PTD-hFOXP3-transduced T cells inhibited the proliferation of activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that PTD-hFOXP3 can bind with the IL-2 gene promoter and repress the expression of IL-2. These results indicate that PTD-hFOXP3 has the capability to convert conventional T cells to Treg-like cells.

  5. Compartmentalization of Total and Virus-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells in Human Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jane; Smith, Corey; Edwards, Jarem; Sierro, Frederic; Feng, Carl G.; Khanna, Rajiv; Bell, Andrew; Hislop, Andrew D.; Tangye, Stuart G.; Rickinson, Alan B.; Gebhardt, Thomas; Britton, Warwick J.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of T cell memory during severe immune suppression results in reactivation of chronic viral infections, such as Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and Cytomegalovirus (CMV). How different subsets of memory T cells contribute to the protective immunity against these viruses remains poorly defined. In this study we examined the compartmentalization of virus-specific, tissue resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid organs. This revealed two distinct populations of memory CD8+ T cells, that were CD69+CD103+ and CD69+CD103—, and were retained within the spleen and tonsils in the absence of recent T cell stimulation. These two types of memory cells were distinct not only in their phenotype and transcriptional profile, but also in their anatomical localization within tonsils and spleen. The EBV-specific, but not CMV-specific, CD8+ memory T cells preferentially accumulated in the tonsils and acquired a phenotype that ensured their retention at the epithelial sites where EBV replicates. In vitro studies revealed that the cytokine IL-15 can potentiate the retention of circulating effector memory CD8+ T cells by down-regulating the expression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, required for T cell exit from tissues, and its transcriptional activator, Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2). Within the tonsils the expression of IL-15 was detected in regions where CD8+ T cells localized, further supporting a role for this cytokine in T cell retention. Together this study provides evidence for the compartmentalization of distinct types of resident memory T cells that could contribute to the long-term protection against persisting viral infections. PMID:27540722

  6. Redox Regulation of T-Cell Function: From Molecular Mechanisms to Significance in Human Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kesarwani, Pravin; Murali, Anuradha K.; Al-Khami, Amir A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to have effects on T-cell function and proliferation. Low concentrations of ROS in T cells are a prerequisite for cell survival, and increased ROS accumulation can lead to apoptosis/necrosis. The cellular redox state of a T cell can also affect T-cell receptor signaling, skewing the immune response. Various T-cell subsets have different redox statuses, and this differential ROS susceptibility could modulate the outcome of an immune response in various disease states. Recent advances in T-cell redox signaling reveal that ROS modulate signaling cascades such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT, and JAK/STAT pathways. Also, tumor microenvironments, chronic T-cell stimulation leading to replicative senescence, gender, and age affect T-cell susceptibility to ROS, thereby contributing to diverse immune outcomes. Antioxidants such as glutathione, thioredoxin, superoxide dismutase, and catalase balance cellular oxidative stress. T-cell redox states are also regulated by expression of various vitamins and dietary compounds. Changes in T-cell redox regulation may affect the pathogenesis of various human diseases. Many strategies to control oxidative stress have been employed for various diseases, including the use of active antioxidants from dietary products and pharmacologic or genetic engineering of antioxidant genes in T cells. Here, we discuss the existence of a complex web of molecules/factors that exogenously or endogenously affect oxidants, and we relate these molecules to potential therapeutics. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1497–1534. PMID:22938635

  7. Guttate morphoea in human T-cell lymphoma/lymphotrophic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection.

    PubMed

    Oiso, N; Fukai, K; Hosomi, N; Ishii, M

    2003-07-01

    A 62-year-old Japanese man presented with multiple small atrophic macules on the trunk and extremities. The lesions were discrete, oval in shape and enclosed by lilac ring. They were distributed in a Christmas tree distribution, reminiscent of pityriasis rosea. Skin biopsy showed increased collagen fibres in the dermis and invading subcutaneous tissue. The clinico-pathological features were consistent with guttate morphoea, a rare variant of localized scleroderma. Serological tests revealed a positive reaction to human T-cell lymphoma/lymphotropic virus type-1 infection.

  8. Stimulated human peripheral T cells produce high amounts of IL-35 protein in a proliferation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Guttek, Karina; Reinhold, Dirk

    2013-10-01

    The p35 subunit of IL-12 and the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) have been shown to form a heterodimeric cytokine, named interleukin-35 (IL-35). Recently, mRNA expression of both IL-12p35 and EBI3 was clearly shown in stimulated human T effector cells. Here, we investigated the production of IL-35 protein in human anti-CD3/CD28-stimulated pan T cells as well as T cell subpopulations using a specific human IL-35 ELISA system. We measured high concentrations of IL-35 (up to 3 ng/ml) in cell culture supernatants of stimulated pan T cells as well as CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cell subpopulations at 72 h after stimulation. Very low amounts of IL-35, in the range of 100pg/ml, were detectable in supernatants of resting T cells. These observations could be confirmed using a dot-blot assay for IL-12p35 and EBI3. High concentrations of IL-35 could be also measured in cell culture supernatants of both, resting and stimulated CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells. In order to learn more about the regulation of IL-35 production, we studied the effect of dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and rapamycin on IL-35 production of anti-CD3/CD28-stimulated human pan T cells as well as CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell subpopulations. All three drugs significantly suppressed IL-35 production of these cells in a proliferation-dependent manner. In summary, we could show that stimulated human peripheral blood T cells of healthy donors produce high amounts of IL-35 protein. However, the biological function of this cytokine remains to be elucidated.

  9. Ex vivo expanded human circulating Vδ1 γδT cells exhibit favorable therapeutic potential for colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dang; Wu, Pin; Wu, Xianguo; Ye, Jun; Wang, Zhen; Zhao, Shuai; Ni, Chao; Hu, Guoming; Xu, Jinghong; Han, Yuehua; Zhang, Ting; Qiu, Fuming; Yan, Jun; Huang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Gamma delta T (γδT) cells are innate-like lymphocytes with strong, MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity against cancer cells and show a promising prospect in adoptive cellular immunotherapy for various malignancies. However, the clinical outcome of commonly used Vγ9Vδ2 γδT (Vδ2 T) cells in adoptive immunotherapy for most solid tumors is limited. Here, we demonstrate that freshly isolated Vδ1 γδT (Vδ1 T) cells from human peripheral blood (PB) exhibit more potent cytotoxicity against adherent and sphere-forming human colon cancer cells than Vδ2 T cells in vitro. We also develop an optimized protocol to preferentially expand Vδ1 T cells isolated from PB of both healthy donors and colon cancer patients by in vitro short-term culture with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and interleukin-7 (IL-7). Expanded Vδ1 T cells highly expressed cytotoxicity-related molecules, chemokine receptors and cytokines with enhanced cytolytic effect against adherent and sphere-forming colon cancer cells in a cell-to-cell contact dependent manner. In addition, PHA and IL-7 expanded Vδ1 T cells showed proliferation and survival advantage partly through an IL-2 signaling pathway. Furthermore, ex vivo expanded Vδ1 T cells also restrained the tumor growth and prolonged the tumor-burdened survival of human colon carcinoma xenografted mice. Our findings suggest that human PB Vδ1 T cells expanded by PHA and IL-7 are a promising candidate for anticancer adoptive immunotherapy for human solid tumors such as colon cancer. PMID:25949914

  10. The human application of gene therapy to re-program T-cell specificity using chimeric antigen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Alan D; Moyes, Judy S; Cooper, Laurence JN

    2014-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of T cells is a promising approach to treat cancers. Primary human T cells can be modified using viral and non-viral vectors to promote the specific targeting of cancer cells via the introduction of exogenous T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). This gene transfer displays the potential to increase the specificity and potency of the anticancer response while decreasing the systemic adverse effects that arise from conventional treatments that target both cancerous and healthy cells. This review highlights the generation of clinical-grade T cells expressing CARs for immunotherapy, the use of these cells to target B-cell malignancies and, particularly, the first clinical trials deploying the Sleeping Beauty gene transfer system, which engineers T cells to target CD19+ leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:25189715

  11. Epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Proietti, Fernando Augusto; Ribas, João Gabriel Ramos; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Pinheiro, Sônia Regina; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara F

    2010-07-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus to be discovered, is present in diverse regions of the world, where its infection is usually neglected in health care settings and by public health authorities. Since it is usually asymptomatic in the beginning of the infection and disease typically manifests later in life, silent transmission occurs, which is associated with sexual relations, breastfeeding, and blood transfusions. There are no prospects of vaccines, and screening of blood banks and in prenatal care settings is not universal. Therefore, its transmission is active in many areas such as parts of Africa, South and Central America, the Caribbean region, Asia, and Melanesia. It causes serious diseases in humans, including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and an incapacitating neurological disease (HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis [HAM/TSP]) besides other afflictions such as uveitis, rheumatic syndromes, and predisposition to helminthic and bacterial infections, among others. These diseases are not curable as yet, and current treatments as well as new perspectives are discussed in the present review.

  12. Human gammadelta T cells from G-CSF-mobilized donors retain strong tumoricidal activity and produce immunomodulatory cytokines after clinical-scale isolation.

    PubMed

    Otto, Mario; Barfield, Raymond C; Iyengar, Rekha; Gatewood, Janet; Müller, Ingo; Holladay, Martha S; Houston, Jim; Leung, Wing; Handgretinger, Rupert

    2005-01-01

    Human gammadelta T cells are a small fraction of T cells that have been shown to exert major histocompatibility (MHC)-unrestricted natural cytotoxicity against a variety of solid tumors and some subsets of leukemias and lymphomas. They are also involved in the immune response to certain bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections and expand significantly in CMV- or HSV-infected organ allografts. They are able to mediate antibody-dependent cytotoxicity and are not alloreactive, which makes them attractive candidates for cell-based immunotherapy. However, their frequency in peripheral blood is low and ex vivo expansion of gammadelta T cells is labor-extensive, does not always yield cells with full innate cytotoxic power, and has the potential for microbial contamination. Therefore, the authors developed a clinical-scale, automated cell purification method for the efficient enrichment of gammadelta T cells from leukapheresis products. Six leukapheresis products were purified for gammadelta T cells using a single-step immunomagnetic method. Purity and phenotype were assessed by flow cytometry. A standard Europium release assay was performed to determine the cytotoxic capacity of the cells. Cytokine production was measured using a multiplex sandwich immunoassay. The mean percentage of gammadelta T cells in the final product was 91%, with an average recovery of 63%. The cells showed a high co-expression of CD8, CD56, CD28, and CD11b/CD18. In some products an unusually high proportion of Vgamma9Vdelta1 T cells was found. The isolated cells were cytotoxic against the neuroblastoma cell line NB1691 and the erythroleukemic line K562 in vitro. They were able to produce a variety of immunomodulatory cytokines such as IFNgamma, TNFalpha, and MIP-1beta, but also GM-CSF and G-CSF when co-incubated in culture with and without various stimuli. In summary, the authors describe a rapid, automated, and efficient method for the large-scale enrichment of human gammadelta T cells. The

  13. Human and Mouse CD8+CD25+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells at Steady State and during Interleukin-2 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Churlaud, Guillaume; Pitoiset, Fabien; Jebbawi, Fadi; Lorenzon, Roberta; Bellier, Bertrand; Rosenzwajg, Michelle; Klatzmann, David

    2015-01-01

    In addition to CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), CD8+ suppressor T cells are emerging as an important subset of regulatory T cells. Diverse populations of CD8+ T cells with suppressive activities have been described. Among them, a small population of CD8+CD25+FOXP3+ T cells is found both in mice and humans. In contrast to thymic-derived CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs, their origin and their role in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are less understood. We report here the number, phenotype, and function of CD8+ Tregs cells in mice and humans, at the steady state and in response to low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2). CD8+ Tregs represent approximately 0.4 and 0.1% of peripheral blood T cells in healthy humans and mice, respectively. In mice, their frequencies are quite similar in lymph nodes (LNs) and the spleen, but two to threefold higher in Peyer patches and mesenteric LNs. CD8+ Tregs express low levels of CD127. CD8+ Tregs express more activation or proliferation markers such as CTLA-4, ICOS, and Ki-67 than other CD8+ T cells. In vitro, they suppress effector T cell proliferation as well as or even better than CD4+ Tregs. Owing to constitutive expression of CD25, CD8+ Tregs are 20- to 40-fold more sensitive to in vitro IL-2 stimulation than CD8+ effector T cells, but 2–4 times less than CD4+ Tregs. Nevertheless, low-dose IL-2 dramatically expands and activates CD8+ Tregs even more than CD4+ Tregs, in mice and humans. Further studies are warranted to fully appreciate the clinical relevance of CD8+ Tregs in AIDs and the efficacy of IL-2 treatment. PMID:25926835

  14. Recombinant human interleukin 10 suppresses gliadin dependent T cell activation in ex vivo cultured coeliac intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Salvati, V M; Mazzarella, G; Gianfrani, C; Levings, M K; Stefanile, R; De Giulio, B; Iaquinto, G; Giardullo, N; Auricchio, S; Roncarolo, M G; Troncone, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: Enteropathy in coeliac disease (CD) is sustained by a gliadin specific Th1 response. Interleukin (IL)-10 can downregulate Th1 immune responses. Aim: We investigated the ability of recombinant human (rh) IL-10 to suppress gliadin induced Th1 response. Patients and methods: IL-10 RNA transcripts were analysed by competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in duodenal biopsies from untreated and treated CD patients, non-coeliac enteropathies (NCE), and controls. CD biopsies were cultured with a peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin with or without rhIL-10. The proportion of CD80+ and CD25+ cells in the lamina propria, epithelial expression of Fas, intraepithelial infiltration of CD3+ cells, as well as cytokine synthesis (interferon γ (IFN-γ) and IL-2) were measured. Short term T cell lines (TCLs) obtained from treated CD biopsies cultured with gliadin with or without rhIL-10 were analysed by ELISPOT for gliadin specific production of IFN-γ. Results: In untreated CD and NCE, IL-10 RNA transcripts were significantly upregulated. In ex vivo organ cultures, rhIL-10 downregulated gliadin induced cytokine synthesis, inhibited intraepithelial migration of CD3+ cells, and reduced the proportion of lamina propria CD25+ and CD80+ cells whereas it did not interfere with epithelial Fas expression. In short term TCLs, rhIL-10 abrogated the IFN-γ response to gliadin. Conclusions: rhIL-10 suppresses gliadin specific T cell activation. It may interfere with the antigen presenting capacity of lamina propria mononuclear cells as it reduces the expression of CD80. Interestingly, rhIL-10 also induces a long term hyporesponsiveness of gliadin specific mucosal T cells. These results offer new perspectives for therapeutic strategies in coeliac patients based on immune modulation by IL-10. PMID:15591503

  15. 24 Hours in the Life of HIV-1 in a T Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Pejman; Desfarges, Sébastien; Bartha, István; Joos, Beda; Zangger, Nadine; Muñoz, Miguel; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Telenti, Amalio; Ciuffi, Angela

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 infects CD4+ T cells and completes its replication cycle in approximately 24 hours. We employed repeated measurements in a standardized cell system and rigorous mathematical modeling to characterize the emergence of the viral replication intermediates and their impact on the cellular transcriptional response with high temporal resolution. We observed 7,991 (73%) of the 10,958 expressed genes to be modulated in concordance with key steps of viral replication. Fifty-two percent of the overall variability in the host transcriptome was explained by linear regression on the viral life cycle. This profound perturbation of cellular physiology was investigated in the light of several regulatory mechanisms, including transcription factors, miRNAs, host-pathogen interaction, and proviral integration. Key features were validated in primary CD4+ T cells, and with viral constructs using alternative entry strategies. We propose a model of early massive cellular shutdown and progressive upregulation of the cellular machinery to complete the viral life cycle. PMID:23382686

  16. Lung CD8+ T Cell Impairment Occurs during Human Metapneumovirus Infection despite Virus-Like Particle Induction of Functional CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Sherry C.; Schuster, Jennifer E.; Gilchuk, Pavlo; Boyd, Kelli L.; Joyce, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a major cause of respiratory disease in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals worldwide. There is currently no licensed HMPV vaccine. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are an attractive vaccine candidate because they are noninfectious and elicit a neutralizing antibody response. However, studies show that serum neutralizing antibodies are insufficient for complete protection against reinfection and that adaptive T cell immunity is important for viral clearance. HMPV and other respiratory viruses induce lung CD8+ T cell (TCD8) impairment, mediated by programmed death 1 (PD-1). In this study, we generated HMPV VLPs by expressing the fusion and matrix proteins in mammalian cells and tested whether VLP immunization induces functional HMPV-specific TCD8 responses in mice. C57BL/6 mice vaccinated twice with VLPs and subsequently challenged with HMPV were protected from lung viral replication for at least 20 weeks postimmunization. A single VLP dose elicited F- and M-specific lung TCD8s with higher function and lower expression of PD-1 and other inhibitory receptors than TCD8s from HMPV-infected mice. However, after HMPV challenge, lung TCD8s from VLP-vaccinated mice exhibited inhibitory receptor expression and functional impairment similar to those of mice experiencing secondary infection. HMPV challenge of VLP-immunized μMT mice also elicited a large percentage of impaired lung TCD8s, similar to mice experiencing secondary infection. Together, these results indicate that VLPs are a promising vaccine candidate but do not prevent lung TCD8 impairment upon HMPV challenge. IMPORTANCE Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a leading cause of acute respiratory disease for which there is no licensed vaccine. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are an attractive vaccine candidate and induce antibodies, but T cell responses are less defined. Moreover, HMPV and other respiratory viruses induce lung CD8+ T cell (TCD8) impairment mediated by

  17. Arsenic trioxide and interferon-alpha synergize to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Bazarbachi, A; El-Sabban, M E; Nasr, R; Quignon, F; Awaraji, C; Kersual, J; Dianoux, L; Zermati, Y; Haidar, J H; Hermine, O; de Thé, H

    1999-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). ATL is an aggressive proliferation of mature activated T cells associated with a poor prognosis. The combination of the antiviral agents, zidovudine (AZT) and interferon (IFN), is a potent treatment of ATL. Recently, arsenic trioxide (As) was shown to be an effective treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). We have tested the effects of the combination of As and IFN on cell proliferation, cell cycle phases distribution, and apoptosis in ATL-derived or control T-cell lines. A high synergistic effect between IFN and As was observed in ATL-derived cell lines in comparison to the control cell lines, with a dramatic inhibition of cell proliferation, G1 arrest, and induction of apoptosis. Similar results were obtained with fresh leukemia cells derived from an ATL patient. Although the mechanisms involved are unclear, these results could provide a rational basis for combined As and IFN treatments in ATL. PMID:9864171

  18. Glycerol Monolaurate (GML) inhibits human T cell signaling and function by disrupting lipid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Michael S.; Sandouk, Aline; Houtman, Jon C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol Monolaurate (GML) is a naturally occurring fatty acid widely utilized in food, cosmetics, and homeopathic supplements. GML is a potent antimicrobial agent that targets a range of bacteria, fungi, and enveloped viruses but select findings suggest that GML also has immunomodulatory functions. In this study, we have mechanistically examined if GML affects the signaling and functional output of human primary T cells. We found that GML potently altered order and disorder dynamics in the plasma membrane that resulted in reduced formation of LAT, PLC-γ, and AKT microclusters. Altered membrane events induced selective inhibition of TCR-induced phosphorylation of regulatory P85 subunit of PI3K and AKT as well as abrogated calcium influx. Ultimately, GML treatment potently reduced TCR-induced production of IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-10. Our data reveal that the widely used anti-microbial agent GML also alters the lipid dynamics of human T cells, leading to their defective signaling and function. PMID:27456316

  19. B7-H3 as a promising target for cytotoxicity T cell in human cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xin; Han, Huamin; Liu, Changzhen; Tao, Hua; Xiu, Weigang; Cai, Jia; Zhang, Man

    2016-01-01

    Targeting B7-H3 over-expressed tumor cells with anti-B7-H3 monoclonal antibodies inhibits tumor growth. Here we demonstrated the expression of B7 family homologue 3 (B7-H3) in a wide range of human tumor cells and further investigated whether B7-H3 could be served as a target for T-cell mediated immunotherapy against human cancers. The specific cytotoxic activity of activated T cell (ATC) armed with a novel anti-CD3 x anti-B7-H3 bispecific antibody (B7-H3Bi-Ab) against tumor cell was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. In contrast with unarmed ATC, an increase in cytotoxic activity of B7-H3Bi-armed ATC against tumor cells was observed at effector/target (E/T) ratios of 5:1, 10:1, and 20:1. Moreover, B7-H3Bi-armed ATC secreted more IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 than unarmed ATC. Infusion of B7-H3Bi-armed ATC inhibited tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) xenograft models, along with a significant survival benefit. Therefore, treatment with novel B7-H3Bi-armed ATC will be a promising strategy for current cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27121051

  20. Glycerol Monolaurate (GML) inhibits human T cell signaling and function by disrupting lipid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Michael S; Sandouk, Aline; Houtman, Jon C D

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol Monolaurate (GML) is a naturally occurring fatty acid widely utilized in food, cosmetics, and homeopathic supplements. GML is a potent antimicrobial agent that targets a range of bacteria, fungi, and enveloped viruses but select findings suggest that GML also has immunomodulatory functions. In this study, we have mechanistically examined if GML affects the signaling and functional output of human primary T cells. We found that GML potently altered order and disorder dynamics in the plasma membrane that resulted in reduced formation of LAT, PLC-γ, and AKT microclusters. Altered membrane events induced selective inhibition of TCR-induced phosphorylation of regulatory P85 subunit of PI3K and AKT as well as abrogated calcium influx. Ultimately, GML treatment potently reduced TCR-induced production of IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-10. Our data reveal that the widely used anti-microbial agent GML also alters the lipid dynamics of human T cells, leading to their defective signaling and function. PMID:27456316

  1. Activated inflammatory T cells correlate with lesion size in human cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Lis R V; Dutra, Walderez O; Almeida, Roque P; Bacellar, Olivia; Carvalho, Edgar M; Gollob, Kenneth J

    2005-11-15

    Leishmaniasis is an important parasitic disease affecting millions worldwide. In attempts to understand the clinical relevance of immunological measurements as determined using flow cytometry, several immunological phenotypes were determined for a group of well defined human leishmaniasis patients and correlated with clinical measurements of the disease (Montenegro skin test (MST) and lesion area). The analysis demonstrated a positive correlation between the MST size and the frequency of ex vivo recent activated CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, higher frequencies of recent activated CD8(+) T cells were correlated with a smaller MST size. Moreover, a positive correlation was observed between the lesion total area and the frequency of activated CD69(+) (ex vivo) and CD40L(+) (cultured with Leishmania soluble antigen (SLA)) T lymphocytes. Finally, larger lesions were also correlated with a higher frequency of SLA specific inflammatory cytokine (IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha) producing lymphocytes. These studies demonstrate that immunological markers are correlated with clinical indicators of human leishmaniasis and serve to better understand the evolution of this important parasitic disease.

  2. SIRT1 Suppresses Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hei-Man Vincent; Gao, Wei-Wei; Chan, Chi-Ping; Cheng, Yun; Deng, Jian-Jun; Yuen, Kit-San; Iha, Hidekatsu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated diseases are poorly treatable, and HTLV-1 vaccines are not available. High proviral load is one major risk factor for disease development. HTLV-1 encodes Tax oncoprotein, which activates transcription from viral long terminal repeats (LTR) and various types of cellular promoters. Counteracting Tax function might have prophylactic and therapeutic benefits. In this work, we report on the suppression of Tax activation of HTLV-1 LTR by SIRT1 deacetylase. The transcriptional activity of Tax on the LTR was largely ablated when SIRT1 was overexpressed, but Tax activation of NF-κB was unaffected. On the contrary, the activation of the LTR by Tax was boosted when SIRT1 was depleted. Treatment of cells with resveratrol shunted Tax activity in a SIRT1-dependent manner. The activation of SIRT1 in HTLV-1-transformed T cells by resveratrol potently inhibited HTLV-1 proviral transcription and Tax expression, whereas compromising SIRT1 by specific inhibitors augmented HTLV-1 mRNA expression. The administration of resveratrol also decreased the production of cell-free HTLV-1 virions from MT2 cells and the transmission of HTLV-1 from MT2 cells to uninfected Jurkat cells in coculture. SIRT1 associated with Tax in HTLV-1-transformed T cells. Treatment with resveratrol prevented the interaction of Tax with CREB and the recruitment of CREB, CRTC1, and p300 to Tax-responsive elements in the LTR. Our work demonstrates the negative regulatory function of SIRT1 in Tax activation of HTLV-1 transcription. Small-molecule activators of SIRT1 such as resveratrol might be considered new prophylactic and therapeutic agents in HTLV-1-associated diseases. IMPORTANCE Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes a highly lethal blood cancer or a chronic debilitating disease of the spinal cord. Treatments are unsatisfactory, and vaccines are not available. Disease progression is associated with robust expression of HTLV-1 genes

  3. The combination of IκB kinase β inhibitor and everolimus modulates expression of interleukin-10 in human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1-infected T cells.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Chie; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Yang, Jing; Udaka, Keiko; Yokoyama, Akihito

    2013-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma (ATLL) is an aggressive malignancy of CD4(+)  CD25(+) T lymphocytes, characterized by a severely compromised immunosystem, in which the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been recognized as the aetiological agent. This study found that an IκB kinase β (IKKβ) inhibitor Bay11-7082 inactivated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and transcription factor nuclear factor-κB in HTLV-1-infected T cells; this was significantly enhanced in the presence of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. In addition, Bay11-7082 decreased production of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10), which was further down-regulated when Bay11-7082 was combined with evelolimus in HTLV-1-infected T and ATLL cells isolated from patients. Interleukin-10 is known to inhibit maturation and the antigen-presenting function of dendritic cells (DCs). The culture media of HTLV-1-infected MT-1 cells, which contained a large amout of IL-10, hampered tumour necrosis factor-α-induced maturation of DCs isolated from healthy volunteers. Culture supernatant of MT-1 cells treated with a combination of Bay11-7082 and everolimus augmented maturation of DCs in association with a decrease in production of IL-10 and enhanced the allostimulatory function of DCs. Similarly, when DCs isolated from patients with ATLL were treated with the combination of Bay11-7082 and everolimus, they were fully matured and their capability to stimulate proliferation of lymphocytes was augmented. Taken together, the combination of Bay11-7082 and everolimus might exhibit immunostimulatory properties in HTLV-1-infected T and ATLL cells isolated from patients, and this combination may be potentially therapeutic to regain the compromised immunosystem in ATLL patients.

  4. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I-associated adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma: new directions in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Tsukasaki, Kunihiro; Tobinai, Kensei

    2014-10-15

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) is a distinct malignancy of regulatory T cell (Treg)/TH2 cells caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1), with a high frequency of expression of CD3/CD4/CD25/CCR4 and FoxP3 in about half of the cells. However, in primary ATL cells, although expression of the virus, including the Tax oncoprotein, appears just after an in vitro culture, integration sites of the provirus into the host genome are random, and chromosomal/genetic abnormalities are complex. ATL is thus a single disease entity that is caused by HTLV-1 and possesses diverse molecular features. The clinical features and prognosis of ATL vary, and this has led to subtypes classified into four categories: acute, lymphomatous, chronic, and smoldering types, based on lactate dehydrogenase and calcium values and organ involvement. Approximately 15 to 20 million individuals are infected with HTLV-1 worldwide, 1.1 million of whom reside in Japan, and the annual incidence of ATL has been estimated to be approximately 1,000. HTLV-1 infection early in life, mainly from breast feeding, is crucial for the development of ATL. The age-specific occurrence of ATL and complex genome abnormalities that accumulate with disease progression suggest a multistep carcinogenesis model following HTLV-1 infection. Various treatment options are available for ATL and consist of watchful waiting for indolent ATL, intensive chemotherapy followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for aggressive ATL, and a combination of IFNα and zidovudine for ATL with leukemic manifestation. Several promising new agents, including an anti-CCR4 antibody, are currently undergoing clinical trials associated with translational research. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Paradigm Shifts in Lymphoma." PMID:25320371

  5. The interaction of influenza H5N1 viral hemagglutinin with sialic acid receptors leads to the activation of human γδ T cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanlai; Li, Zhen; Ma, Chi; Wang, Hao; Zheng, Jing; Cui, Lianxian; He, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 epidemics are a significant public health hazard. Genetically engineered H5N1 viruses with mammalian transmission activity highlight the potential risk of a human influenza H5N1 pandemic. Understanding the underlying principles of the innate immune system in response to influenza H5N1 viruses will lead to improved prevention and control of these potentially deadly viruses. γδ T cells act as the first line of defense against microbial infection and help initiate adaptive immune responses during the early stages of viral infection. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of γδ T cells in response to influenza H5N1 viral infection. We found that recombinant hemagglutinin (rHA) derived from three different strains of influenza H5N1 viruses elicited the activation of γδ T cells cultured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Both the cell surface expression of CD69, an early activation marker on γδ T cells, and the production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were significantly increased. Notably, the rHA protein-induced γδ T-cell activation was not mediated by TCRγδ, NKG2D or pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) or NKp46 receptors. The interaction of rHA proteins with sialic acid receptors may play a critical role in γδ T-cell activation. Our data may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying γδ T-cell activation in response to infection with H5N1 viruses. PMID:23912782

  6. Modulation of the Human T Cell Response by a Novel Non-Mitogenic Anti-CD3 Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Chen, Chen; Hikida, Masaki; Watanabe, Takeshi; Shimizu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The agonistic anti-human CD3ε antibody (Ab), OKT3, has been used to control acute transplant rejection. The in vivo administration of OKT3 was previously shown to induce the partial depletion of T cells and unresponsiveness (anergy) in the remaining CD4+ T cells. However, this therapy is also associated with the systemic release of several cytokines, which leads to a series of adverse side effects. We established a novel anti-human CD3ε Ab, 20-2b2, which recognized a close, but different determinant on the CD3ε molecule from that recognized by OKT3. 20-2b2 was non-mitogenic for human CD4+ T cells, could inhibit the activation of T cells in vitro, and induced T cell anergy in in vivo experiments using humanized mice. Cytokine release in humanized mice induced by the administration of 20-2b2 was significantly less than that induced by OKT3. Our results indicated that the CD3ε molecule is still an attractive, effective, and useful target for the modulation of T cell responses. The establishment of other Abs that recognize CD3ε, even though the determinant recognized by those Abs may be close to or different from that recognized by OKT3, may represent a novel approach for the development of safer Ab therapies using anti-CD3 Abs, in addition to the modification of OKT3 in terms of the induction of cytokine production. PMID:24710513

  7. Transcriptome-wide RNA interaction profiling reveals physical and functional targets of hnRNP L in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Shankarling, Ganesh; Cole, Brian S; Mallory, Michael J; Lynch, Kristen W

    2014-01-01

    The RNA processing factor hnRNP L is required for T cell development and function. However, the spectrum of direct targets of hnRNP L activity in T cells has yet to be defined. In this study, we used cross-linking and immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq) to identify the RNA binding sites of hnRNP L within the transcriptomes of human CD4(+) and cultured Jurkat T cells. We find that hnRNP L binds preferentially to transcripts encoding proteins involved in RNA processing and in Wnt and T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. This binding is largely conserved across both quiescent and activated T cells, in agreement with the critical role of hnRNP L throughout T cell biology. Importantly, based on the binding profile of hnRNP L, we validate numerous instances of hnRNP L-dependent alternative splicing of genes critical to T cell function. We further show that alternative exons with weak 5' splice site sequences specifically show a strong correlation between hnRNP L binding and hnRNP L-dependent splicing regulation. Together, these data provide the first transcriptome-wide analysis of the RNA targets of hnRNP L in lymphoid cells and add to the functional understanding of hnRNP L in human biology.

  8. Aqueous extract of Curcuma aromatica induces apoptosis and G2/M arrest in human colon carcinoma LS-174-T cells independent of p53.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Shen, Ke-Ping; An, Hong-Mei; Wu, Yang; Du, Qin

    2011-02-01

    Curcuma aromatica is a common Chinese herb for treating diseases with blood stasis and has been regarded as an anticancer herb in modern clinical practice. However, the anticancer effects and related molecular mechanisms of Curcuma aromatica remain unclear. In the present study, human colon carcinoma LS-174-T cell line with wild-type p53 was used as a model cell to evaluate the anticancer effects of aqueous extract of Curcuma aromatica (AECA). AECA inhibits LS-174-T cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner and colony formation in a dose-dependent manner. AECA treatment induces apoptosis accompanied by caspase-8, -9, and -3 activation in LS-174-T cells. Moreover, blocking the activities of these caspases with a specific inhibitor significantly protected LS-174-T cells from AECA-induced apoptosis. AECA treatment also induces G2/M phase arrest in LS-174-T cells. Expression of p53 was unchanged after AECA treatment; specific silence of p53 did not influence AECA-induced apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest. Further, the expression of cyclin B1 and CDK1 was reduced by AECA. This study suggests that AECA might be effective as an antiproliferative herb for colon carcinoma, the antitumor activity of AECA may involve both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis, and AECA induces G2/M phase arrest via downregulation of cyclin B1 and CDK1 and without the participation of p53.

  9. Expanded CD8+ T cells of murine and human CLL are driven into a senescent KLRG1+ effector memory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Göthert, Joachim Rudolf; Eisele, Lewin; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Weber, Stefanie; Zesewitz, Marie-Louise; Sellmann, Ludger; Röth, Alexander; Pircher, Hanspeter; Dührsen, Ulrich; Dürig, Jan

    2013-11-01

    Altered numbers and functions of T cells have previously been demonstrated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. However, dynamics and specific T-cell subset alterations have not been studied in great detail. Therefore, we studied CLL blood lymphocyte subsets of individual patients in a longitudinal manner. Dynamic expansions of blood CD4 + and CD8 + T-cell numbers were consistently associated with a progressively increasing CLL leukemic compartment. Interestingly, the T-cell subset expansion over time was more pronounced in CD38 + CLL. Additionally, we performed gene expression profiling of CD3 + T cells of CLL patients and normal donors. Using gene set enrichment analysis, we found significant enrichment of genes with higher expression in CLL T cells within CD8+ effector memory and terminal effector T-cell gene signatures. In agreement with these data, we observed a marked expansion of phenotypic CD8 + effector memory T cells in CLL by flow cytometry. Moreover, we observed that increments of CD8 + effector memory T cells in human CLL and also mouse CLL (Eμ-TCL1 model) were due to an expansion of the inhibitory killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1) expressing cellular subset. Furthermore, higher plasma levels of the natural KLRG1 ligand E-cadherin were detected in CLL patients compared to normal donor controls. The predominance of KLRG1+ expression within CD8+ T cells in conjunction with increased systemic soluble E-cadherin might significantly contribute to CLL immune dysfunction and might additionally represent an important component of the CLL microenvironment.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor-I stimulates IL-10 production in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, Ron; Coppens, Astrid

    2004-10-01

    There is vast body of evidence that the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I exerts immunomodulatory effects in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies indicate that stimulatory effects of IGF-I may be exerted through augmentation of inflammatory cytokine production. To further explore the immunomodulatory effects of IGF-I through regulation of cytokine production, we tested the in vitro effects of IGF-I on the secretion of inflammatory T helper cell type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). To this end, PBMC were stimulated with the T cell mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and cytokines in the culture media were assessed after 18, 42, 66, and 80 h of culture. We found that IGF-I stimulated the secretion of the Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 by 40-70% in PHA-stimulated PBMC. In addition, we observed a small stimulatory effect (15%) on the secretion of another Th2 cytokine IL-4. The secretion of IL-2, IL-5, IL-6, interferon-gamma, and the inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor alpha was not or was hardly affected. IL-10 secretion was also stimulated in purified T cells, and we established that IGF-I also stimulated IL-10 mRNA expression by 100-150%. The monocyte-activating bacterial cell-wall product lipopolysaccharide induced IL-10 production in PBMC, but this was not affected by IGF-I. As IL-10 predominantly exerts anti-inflammatory actions and suppresses Th1-dependent immune responses, our results indicate that IGF-I may exert inhibitory actions on inflammatory and Th1-mediated cellular immune responses through stimulation of IL-10 production in T cells.

  11. T cell receptor V beta gene usage in a human alloreactive response. Shared structural features among HLA-B27-specific T cell clones

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A strategy, based on using V beta family-specific oligonucleotides, was developed for specific amplification and direct sequencing of human TCR V beta genes. With this strategy, it was possible to undertake a structural analysis of TCRs from human T cell clones in specific responses. 12 HLA-B27-specific cytotoxic clones were examined. The results reveal a nonrandom use of V beta gene diversity in this alloreactive response in that: (a) the clones express a restricted number of V beta segments, including a subset of V beta families that are significantly more related to one another than to most other V beta families; (b) five of seven clones having a particular reaction pattern with HLA-B27 subtypes possess Alanine at the D-J junction; and (c) identical J beta segments are found associated in several instances with identical or highly homologous V beta gene segments. In addition, two new V beta 13 members are reported. PMID:1691261

  12. A High Affinity hRpn2-Derived Peptide That Displaces Human Rpn13 from Proteasome in 293T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Sarah E.; Tarasov, Sergey G.; Walters, Kylie J.

    2015-01-01

    Rpn13 is a proteasome ubiquitin receptor that has emerged as a therapeutic target for human cancers. Its ubiquitin-binding activity is confined to an N-terminal Pru (pleckstrin-like receptor for ubiquitin) domain that also docks it into the proteasome, while its C-terminal DEUBAD (DEUBiquitinase ADaptor) domain recruits deubiquitinating enzyme Uch37 to the proteasome. Bis-benzylidine piperidone derivatives that were found to bind covalently to Rpn13 C88 caused the accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins as well as ER stress-related apoptosis in various cancer cell lines, including bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma lines. We find that a 38-amino acid peptide derived from the C-terminus of proteasome PC repeat protein hRpn2/PSMD1 binds to hRpn13 Pru domain with 12 nM affinity. By using NMR, we identify the hRpn13-interacting amino acids in this hRpn2 fragment, some of which are conserved among eukaryotes. Importantly, we find the hRpn2-derived peptide to immunoprecipitate endogenous Rpn13 from 293T cells, and to displace it from the proteasome. These findings indicate that this region of hRpn2 is the primary binding site for hRpn13 in the proteasome. Moreover, the hRpn2-derived peptide was no longer able to interact with endogenous hRpn13 when a strictly conserved phenylalanine (F948 in humans) was replaced with arginine or a stop codon, or when Y950 and I951 were substituted with aspartic acid. Finally, over-expression of the hRpn2-derived peptide leads to an increased presence of ubiquitinated proteins in 293T cells. We propose that this hRpn2-derived peptide could be used to develop peptide-based strategies that specifically target hRpn13 function in the proteasome. PMID:26466095

  13. Large-scale in vitro expansion of polyclonal human CD4(+)CD25high regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Petra; Eder, Ruediger; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Andreesen, Reinhard; Edinger, Matthias

    2004-08-01

    CD4(+)CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are pivotal for the maintenance of self-tolerance, and their adoptive transfer gives protection from autoimmune diseases and pathogenic alloresponses after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation in murine model systems. In vitro, human CD4(+)CD25+ Treg cells display phenotypic and functional characteristics similar to those of murine CD4(+)CD25+ Treg cells: namely, hyporesponsiveness to T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and suppression of CD25- T cells. Thus far, the detailed characterization and potential clinical application of human CD4(+)CD25+ Treg cells have been hampered by their paucity in peripheral blood and the lack of appropriate expansion protocols. Here we describe the up to 40 000-fold expansion of highly purified human CD4(+)CD25high T cells in vitro through the use of artificial antigen-presenting cells for repeated stimulation via CD3 and CD28 in the presence of high-dose interleukin 2 (IL-2). Expanded CD4(+)CD25high T cells were polyclonal, maintained their phenotype, exceeded the suppressive activity of freshly isolated CD4(+)CD25high T cells, and maintained expression of the lymph node homing receptors L-selectin (CD62L) and CCR7. The ability to rapidly expand human CD4(+)CD25high Treg cells on a large scale will not only facilitate their further exploration but also accelerate their potential clinical application in T cell-mediated diseases and transplantation medicine. PMID:15090447

  14. Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf.) modulates antioxidant activity and human T-cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf.) also known as Jujube, is a deciduous shrub which belongs to Rhamnaceae family. This plant is used in Algerian traditional medicine for its anti-diabetic, sedative, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic activities. In the present study, we determined the concentrations of different vitamins (vitamin A, C and E) and fatty acids in root, stem, leaves, fruit pulp and seed of Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf.) and assessed the effects of their aqueous extracts on antioxidant status and human T-cell proliferation. Methods Aqueous filtrates from different parts, i.e, root, leaf, stem, fruit pulp and seed, of Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf.) were prepared. Vitamin C levels were determined by precipitating with 10% trichloroacetic acid and vitamin A and E were assessed by HPLC. Lipid composition of these extracts was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Anti-oxidant capacity was evaluated by using anti-radical resistance kit [Kit Radicaux Libres (KRL@; Kirial International SA, Couternon, France)]. T-cell blastogenesis was assessed by the incorporation of 3H-thymidine. IL-2 gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Results Our results show that fruit pulp contained higher vitamin A and C contents than other parts of the plant. Furthermore, the fruit pulp was the richest source of linoleic acid (18:2n-6), a precursor of n-6 fatty acids. Fruit seeds possessed higher vitamin C levels than leaves, roots and stem. The leaves were the richest source of vitamin E and linolenic acid (18:3n-3), a precursor of n-3 fatty acids. The antioxidant capacity of the different extracts, measured by KRL@ test, was as follows: pulp < seedT-cell proliferation is concerned, we observed that the different extracts of Zizyphus lotus L. (Desf.) exerted immunosuppressive effects. Conclusion Seed extracts exerted the most potent immunosuppressive effects on T cell proliferation and IL-2 mRNA expression. The results of the present study are

  15. Clinical grade manufacturing of human alloantigen-reactive regulatory T cells for use in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Putnam, A L; Safinia, N; Medvec, A; Laszkowska, M; Wray, M; Mintz, M A; Trotta, E; Szot, G L; Liu, W; Lares, A; Lee, K; Laing, A; Lechler, R I; Riley, J L; Bluestone, J A; Lombardi, G; Tang, Q

    2013-11-01

    Regulatory T cell (Treg) therapy has the potential to induce transplantation tolerance so that immunosuppression and associated morbidity can be minimized. Alloantigen-reactive Tregs (arTregs) are more effective at preventing graft rejection than polyclonally expanded Tregs (PolyTregs) in murine models. We have developed a manufacturing process to expand human arTregs in short-term cultures using good manufacturing practice-compliant reagents. This process uses CD40L-activated allogeneic B cells to selectively expand arTregs followed by polyclonal restimulation to increase yield. Tregs expanded 100- to 1600-fold were highly alloantigen reactive and expressed the phenotype of stable Tregs. The alloantigen-expanded Tregs had a diverse TCR repertoire. They were more potent than PolyTregs in vitro and more effective at controlling allograft injuries in vivo in a humanized mouse model.

  16. Sialyl Lewis x (CD15s) identifies highly differentiated and most suppressive FOXP3high regulatory T cells in humans

    PubMed Central

    Miyara, Makoto; Chader, Driss; Sage, Edouard; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Bouvry, Diane; Claër, Laetitia; Hingorani, Ravi; Balderas, Robert; Rohrer, Jurg; Warner, Noel; Chapelier, Alain; Valeyre, Dominique; Kannagi, Reiji; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Amoura, Zahir; Gorochov, Guy

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells expressing CD25 and the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) are indispensable for immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. FOXP3+CD25+CD4+ T cells in humans, however, are heterogeneous in function and differentiation status, including suppressive or nonsuppressive cells as well as resting or activated Treg cells. We have searched for cell surface markers specific for suppression-competent Treg cells by using a panel of currently available monoclonal antibodies reactive with human T cells. We found that CD15s (sialyl Lewis x) was highly specific for activated, terminally differentiated, and most suppressive FOXP3high effector Treg (eTreg) cells and able to differentiate them in various clinical settings from nonsuppressive FOXP3+ T cells secreting inflammatory cytokines. For example, CD15s+FOXP3+ eTreg cells were increased in sarcoidosis, whereas it was nonsuppressive CD15s−FOXP3+ T cells that were expanded in lupus flares. FOXP3+ cells induced from conventional CD4+ T cells by T-cell receptor stimulation hardly expressed CD15s. CD15s+CD4+ T-cell depletion was sufficient to evoke and enhance in vitro immune responses against tumor or viral antigens. Collectively, we have identified CD15s as a biomarker instrumental in both phenotypic and functional analysis of FOXP3+CD4+ T-cell subpopulations in health and disease. It allows specific targeting of eTreg cells, rather than whole FOXP3+CD4+ T cells, in controlling immune responses. PMID:26015572

  17. Manufacture of Gene-Modified Human T-Cells with a Memory Stem/Central Memory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; Nuijen, Bastiaan; Heemskerk, Bianca; van Rooij, Nienke; van den Berg, Joost H.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Uckert, Wolfgang; Kvistborg, Pia; Schumacher, Ton N.; Jorritsma, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Advances in genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T-cell products that carry desired functionalities, such as the ability to recognize cancer cells. The currently used strategies for the generation of gene-modified T-cell products lead to highly differentiated cells within the infusion product, and on the basis of data obtained in preclinical models, this is likely to impact the efficacy of these products. We set out to develop a good manufacturing practice (GMP) protocol that yields T-cell receptor (TCR) gene-modified T-cells with more favorable properties for clinical application. Here, we show the robust clinical-scale production of human peripheral blood T-cells with an early memory phenotype that express a MART-1-specific TCR. By combining selection and stimulation using anti-CD3/CD28 beads for retroviral transduction, followed by expansion in the presence of IL-7 and IL-15, production of a well-defined clinical-scale TCR gene-modified T-cell product could be achieved. A major fraction of the T-cells generated in this fashion were shown to coexpress CD62L and CD45RA, and express CD27 and CD28, indicating a central memory or memory stemlike phenotype. Furthermore, these cells produced IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-2 and displayed cytolytic activity against target cells expressing the relevant antigen. The T-cell products manufactured by this robust and validated GMP production process are now undergoing testing in a phase I/IIa clinical trial in HLA-A*02:01 MART-1-positive advanced stage melanoma patients. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical trial protocol in which the combination of IL-7 and IL-15 has been applied for the generation of gene-modified T-cell products. PMID:25143008

  18. The human NTT gene: Identification of a novel 17-kb noncoding nuclear RNA expressed in activated CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.Y.; Torchia, B.S.; Migeon, B.R.

    1997-01-15

    We describe the cloning and characterization of the NTT gene (noncoding transcript in T cells), identified by differential display RT-PCR based on the differential presence of its transcript in a subset of activated, human CD4{sup +} T-cell clones. The full-length cDNA and genomic sequences were cloned and found to produce a 17-kb transcript that is polyadenylated, but is not spliced. Consistent with the transcript`s nuclear predominance, NTT has no open reading frame larger than 270 bp. It is transcribed in a select subset of CD4{sup +} T-cell clones propagated in vitro. Its transcription can also be induced in freshly isolated T cells by in vitro activation with PHA or with PMA and ionomycin. In vivo, NTT transcripts are found only in activated, but not resting, T cells. Transcripts were absent in a variety of lymphoid cell lines and transformed lines from other tissues. NTT is a new member of the small group of genes including XIST (X{sub i}-specific transcript), H19, and IPW (imprinted gene in the Prader-Willi syndrome region), which are transcribed but not translated, and may have a role in the regulation of neighboring genes. XIST, H19, and IPW exhibit monoallelic expression, but both NTT alleles are expressed in CD4{sup +} T-cell clones. Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses show that NTT is a single-copy gene residing in chromosome 6q23-q24, near the interferon-{gamma} receptor gene (IFN-{gamma}R). Their proximity and shared expression pattern suggest a possible functional relationship. 57 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Zoledronate sensitizes neuroblastoma-derived tumor-initiating cells to cytolysis mediated by human γδ T cells.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Nobuhiro; Fujita, Mitsugu; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Maki, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Rong; Hirosawa, Tomoya; Demachi-Okamura, Ayako; Uemura, Yasushi; Taguchi, Osamu; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka

    2012-10-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children that is refractory to intensive multimodal therapy. In particular, tumor-initiating cells (TICs) derived from neuroblastoma are believed responsible for tumor formation and resistance to the conventional therapy; an optimal strategy therefore should target this population. Technically, TICs can be enriched from neuroblastoma-derived spheres when the tumor cells are cultured in a serum-free medium supplemented with certain growth factors. Recently, a line of evidence has suggested antitumor potential of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells (γδ T cells), a T-cell population that recognizes and kills target cells independent of surface HLA expressions. Furthermore, a mevalonate pathway inhibitor, zoledronate, has been reported to enhance cytolytic activity of γδ T cells. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesized that zoledronate would sensitize neuroblastoma TICs to γδ T-cell-mediated cytolysis and promote therapeutic efficacy against neuroblastoma. In the current study, we show that zoledronate efficiently sensitizes both neuroblastoma-derived adherent cells and sphere-forming cells to γδ T-cell-mediated cytolysis. Subsequently, in vitro colony formation inhibition assay and in vivo animal studies reveal that the presence of γδ T cells decelerates outgrowth of neuroblastoma TICs. We finally show that addition of interleukin-15 and/or interleukin-18 in culture enhances the cytolytic activity of γδ T cells. On the basis of these data, we conclude that ex vivo expanded γδ T cells are a promising tool for antineuroblastoma immunotherapy with options for further improvement.

  20. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease.

    PubMed Central

    Gershenfeld, H K; Hershberger, R J; Shows, T B; Weissman, I L

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage lambda gt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16+ natural killer cells and CD3+, CD16- T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The predicted protein has a 22-amino acid presegment, a 6-amino acid prosegment, and an active enzyme of 234 amino acids with a calculated unglycosylated molecular weight of 25,820. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. We propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Images PMID:3257574

  1. Dissecting the Molecular Mechanisms of the Tropism of Varicella-Zoster Virus for Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Studies of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) tropism for T cells support their role in viral transport to the skin during primary infection. Multiparametric single-cell mass cytometry demonstrates that, instead of preferentially infecting skin-homing T cells, VZV alters cell signaling and remodels surface proteins to enhance T cell skin trafficking. Viral proteins dispensable in skin, such as that encoded by open reading frame 66, are necessary in T cells. Interference with VZV T cell tropism may offer novel strategies for drug and vaccine design. PMID:26792747

  2. High Endemicity of Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Among Pregnant Women in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón, Jorge O.; Friedman, Heidi B.; Montano, Silvia M.; Zunt, Joseph R.; Holmes, King K.; Quinnan, Gerald V.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1(HTLV-1) is associated with adult T-cell leukemia, tropical spastic paraparesis, and other immune-mediated diseases. There are reports of groups with high prevalences of HTLV-1 infection in Peru, but there is limited knowledge of the epidemiology of infection or which routes of infection are most important. We studied 2492 women presenting to a large maternity hospital in Lima for prenatal, delivery, or abortion services. HTLV-1 seropositivity was confirmed in 42 women (1.7%; 95% confidence interval, 1.2–2.2). Seroprevalence increased with age but did not vary by region of birth or recency of migration to Lima. Age greater than 30 years and sexual intercourse before 20 years of age were strongly and independently associated with infection. History of abortion and history of transfusion were of borderline significance. Women whose male partner had a characteristic that might be a marker for risk of sexually transmitted infections were also more likely to be infected. HTLV-1 is common among Peruvians throughout the country and is maintained by a low level of neonatally acquired infection that is amplified by sexual transmission. In addition to screening of the blood supply, instituted in 1997, programs designed to reduce neonatal and sexual transmission should be effective. PMID:16773029

  3. High endemicity of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 among pregnant women in peru.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, Jorge O; Friedman, Heidi B; Montano, Silvia M; Zunt, Joseph R; Holmes, King K; Quinnan, Gerald V

    2006-08-15

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1(HTLV-1) is associated with adult T-cell leukemia, tropical spastic paraparesis, and other immune-mediated diseases. There are reports of groups with high prevalences of HTLV-1 infection in Peru, but there is limited knowledge of the epidemiology of infection or which routes of infection are most important. We studied 2,492 women presenting to a large maternity hospital in Lima for prenatal, delivery, or abortion services. HTLV-1 seropositivity was confirmed in 42 women (1.7%; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.2). Seroprevalence increased with age but did not vary by region of birth or recency of migration to Lima. Age greater than 30 years and sexual intercourse before 20 years of age were strongly and independently associated with infection. History of abortion and history of transfusion were of borderline significance. Women whose male partner had a characteristic that might be a marker for risk of sexually transmitted infections were also more likely to be infected. HTLV-1 is common among Peruvians throughout the country and is maintained by a low level of neonatally acquired infection that is amplified by sexual transmission. In addition to screening of the blood supply, instituted in 1997, programs designed to reduce neonatal and sexual transmission should be effective.

  4. T-cell proliferative response to human papillomavirus type 16 peptides: relationship to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, M; Stites, D P; Farhat, S; Judd, A; Moscicki, A B; Canchola, A J; Hilton, J F; Palefsky, J M

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer is increased with immunodeficiency, but the role of immune response, including cell-mediated immunity, in disease prevention is not well understood. In this study, T-cell proliferative responses to six synthetic peptides with predicted immunogenic determinants from the HPV-16 E4, E6, E7, and L1 open reading frames were analyzed in 22 sexually active women with new-onset CIN and 65 sexually active women without cervical disease, characterized by cytology, colposcopy, and HPV testing. T-cell proliferative responses were demonstrated to all six HPV-16 peptides. Although not statistically significant, rates of reactivity to E6 (24-45) were higher among sexually active women without disease (26%) than among women with current CIN (7%), as was the overall number of peptides stimulating a response. Women with CIN may not respond to selected HPV antigens as well as women without disease do. PMID:8991637

  5. Intersection of population variation and autoimmunity genetics in human T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chun Jimmie; Feng, Ting; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Raj, Towfique; Wilson, Michael T; Asinovski, Natasha; McCabe, Cristin; Lee, Michelle H; Frohlich, Irene; Paik, Hyun-il; Zaitlen, Noah; Hacohen, Nir; Stranger, Barbara; De Jager, Philip; Mathis, Diane; Regev, Aviv; Benoist, Christophe

    2014-09-12

    T lymphocyte activation by antigen conditions adaptive immune responses and immunopathologies, but we know little about its variation in humans and its genetic or environmental roots. We analyzed gene expression in CD4(+) T cells during unbiased activation or in T helper 17 (T(H)17) conditions from 348 healthy participants representing European, Asian, and African ancestries. We observed interindividual variability, most marked for cytokine transcripts, with clear biases on the basis of ancestry, and following patterns more complex than simple T(H)1/2/17 partitions. We identified 39 genetic loci specifically associated in cis with activated gene expression. We further fine-mapped and validated a single-base variant that modulates YY1 binding and the activity of an enhancer element controlling the autoimmune-associated IL2RA gene, affecting its activity in activated but not regulatory T cells. Thus, interindividual variability affects the fundamental immunologic process of T helper activation, with important connections to autoimmune disease.

  6. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  7. Distinct activation thresholds of human conventional and innate-like memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Slichter, Chloe K.; Miller, Hannah W.; Seymour, Brenda J.; McNevin, John P.; Diaz, Gabriela; Czartoski, Julie L.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Gottardo, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Conventional memory CD8+ T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAIT cells) are found in blood, liver, and mucosal tissues and have similar effector potential following activation, specifically expression of IFN-γ and granzyme B. To better understand each subset’s unique contributions to immunity and pathology, we interrogated inflammation- and TCR-driven activation requirements using human memory CD8+ T and MAIT cells isolated from blood and mucosal tissue biopsies in ex vivo functional assays and single cell gene expression experiments. We found that MAIT cells had a robust IFN-γ and granzyme B response to inflammatory signals but limited responsiveness when stimulated directly via their TCR. Importantly, this is not due to an overall hyporesponsiveness to TCR signals. When delivered together, TCR and inflammatory signals synergize to elicit potent effector function in MAIT cells. This unique control of effector function allows MAIT cells to respond to the same TCR signal in a dichotomous and situation-specific manner. We propose that this could serve to prevent responses to antigen in noninflamed healthy mucosal tissue, while maintaining responsiveness and great sensitivity to inflammation-eliciting infections. We discuss the implications of these findings in context of inflammation-inducing damage to tissues such as BM transplant conditioning or HIV infection. PMID:27331143

  8. Characterization of a novel baboon virus closely resembling human T-cell leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Vincent, M J; Novembre, F J; Yamshchikov, V F; McClure, H M; Compans, R W

    1996-12-01

    We report the isolation of a virus from a baboon imported from Kenya and the analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the env gene. Comparison of the complete nucleotide sequence of the env gene of different HTLV-1 strains and the baboon T-cell leukemia virus (designated BTLV) indicated similarities ranging from 92.5 to 97.4%. In contrast, only 89.1% similarity was observed between the BTLV env sequence and that of simian T-cell leukemia virus (PtM3). The sequences corresponding to the glycosylation sites, endoproteolytic processing site, and major immunological determinants were strictly conserved between BTLV and HTLV-1. To characterize the expressed protein we used a vaccinia expression system, which indicated that a protein of 62 kDa is encoded by the envelope gene. The protein acquired mostly high mannose modifications and was localized predominantly in the endoplasmic reticulum. A fraction of the protein was expressed at the cell surface, where it could induce membrane fusion of target cells. The existence of HTLV-1-like viruses in baboons indicates the potential risk of transmission of such virus from these nonhuman primates to humans, thus highlighting the need for specific screening for such viruses during xenotransplantation.

  9. An optimized single chain TCR scaffold relying on the assembly with the native CD3-complex prevents residual mispairing with endogenous TCRs in human T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Knies, Diana; Klobuch, Sebastian; Xue, Shao-An; Birtel, Matthias; Echchannaoui, Hakim; Yildiz, Oezlem; Omokoko, Tana; Guillaume, Philippe; Romero, Pedro; Stauss, Hans; Sahin, Ugur; Herr, Wolfgang; Theobald, Matthias; Thomas, Simone; Voss, Ralf-Holger

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer envisions the adoptive transfer of T-cells genetically engineered with tumor-specific heterodimeric α/β T-cell receptors (TCRα/β). However, potential mispairing of introduced TCRα/β-chains with endogenous β/α-ones may evoke unpredictable autoimmune reactivities. A novel single chain (sc)TCR format relies on the fusion of the Vα-Linker-Vβ-fragment to the TCR Cβ-domain and coexpression of the TCR Cα-domain capable of recruiting the natural CD3-complex for full and hence, native T-cell signaling. Here, we tested whether such a gp100(280-288)- or p53(264-272) tumor antigen-specific scTCR is still prone to mispairing with TCRα. In a human Jurkat-76 T-cell line lacking endogenous TCRs, surface expression and function of a scTCR could be reconstituted by any cointroduced TCRα-chain indicating mispairing to take place on a molecular basis. In contrast, transduction into human TCRα/β-positive T-cells revealed that mispairing is largely reduced. Competition experiments in Jurkat-76 confirmed the preference of dcTCR to selfpair and to spare scTCR. This also allowed for the generation of dc/scTCR-modified cytomegalovirus/tumor antigen-bispecific T-cells to augment T-cell activation in CMV-infected tumor patients. Residual mispairing was prevented by strenghtening the Vα-Li-Vβ-fragment through the design of a novel disulfide bond between a Vα- and a linker-resident residue close to Vβ. Multimer-stainings, and cytotoxicity-, IFNγ-secretion-, and CFSE-proliferation-assays, the latter towards dendritic cells endogenously processing RNA-electroporated gp100 antigen proved the absence of hybrid scTCR/TCRα-formation without impairing avidity of scTCR/Cα in T-cells. Moreover, a fragile cytomegalovirus pp65(495-503)-specific scTCR modified this way acquired enhanced cytotoxicity. Thus, optimized scTCR/Cα inhibits residual TCR mispairing to accomplish safe adoptive immunotherapy for bulk endogenous TCRα/β-positive T-cells. PMID:27028870

  10. A Human ErbB2-Specific T-Cell Receptor Confers Potent Antitumor Effector Functions in Genetically Engineered Primary Cytotoxic Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lanitis, Evripidis; Smith, Jenessa B.; Dangaj, Denarda; Flingai, Seleeke; Poussin, Mathilde; Xu, Shuwen; Czerniecki, Brian J.; Li, Yong F.; Robbins, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The ErbB2 protein is a member of the tyrosine kinase family of growth factor receptors that is overexpressed in cancers of the breast, ovary, stomach, kidney, colon, and lung, and therefore represents an attractive candidate antigen for targeted cancer immunotherapy. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for various immunogenic ErbB2 peptides have been described, but they often exhibit both poor functional avidity and tumor reactivity. In order to generate potent CD8+ T cells with specificity for the ErbB2369–377 peptide, we performed one round of in vitro peptide stimulation of CD8+ T cells isolated from an HLA-A2+ patient who was previously vaccinated with autologous dendritic cells pulsed with HLA class I ErbB2 peptides. Using this approach, we enriched highly avid ErbB2-reactive T cells with strong ErbB2-specific, antitumor effector functions. We then stimulated these ErbB2-reactive T cells with ErbB2+ HLA-A2+ tumor cells in vitro and sorted tumor-activated ErbB2369–377 peptide T cells, which allowed for the isolation of a novel T-cell receptor (TCR) with ErbB2369–377 peptide specificity. Primary human CD8+ T cells genetically modified to express this ErbB2-specific TCR specifically bound ErbB2369–377 peptide containing HLA-A2 tetramers, and efficiently recognized target cells pulsed with low nanomolar concentrations of ErbB2369–377 peptide as well as nonpulsed ErbB2+ HLA-A2+ tumor cell lines in vitro. In a novel xenograft model, ErbB2-redirected T cells also significantly delayed progression of ErbB2+ HLA-A2+ human tumor in vivo. Together, these results support the notion that redirection of normal T-cell specificity by TCR gene transfer can have potential applications in the adoptive immunotherapy of ErbB2-expressing malignancies. PMID:25003657

  11. Efficient Modification of the CCR5 Locus in Primary Human T Cells With megaTAL Nuclease Establishes HIV-1 Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Paul, Biswajit; Sather, Blythe D; Younan, Patrick M; Sommer, Karen; Kowalski, John P; Hale, Malika; Stoddard, Barry; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Rawlings, David J

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring 32-base pair deletion of the HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5 has demonstrated protection against HIV infection of human CD4+ T cells. Recent genetic engineering approaches using engineered nucleases to disrupt the gene and mimic this mutation show promise for HIV therapy. We developed a megaTAL nuclease targeting the third extracellular loop of CCR5 that we delivered to primary human T cells by mRNA transfection. The CCR5 megaTAL nuclease established resistance to HIV in cell lines and disrupted the expression of CCR5 on primary human CD4+ T cells with a high efficiency, achieving up to 80% modification of the locus in primary cells as measured by molecular analysis. Gene-modified cells engrafted at levels equivalent to unmodified cells when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Furthermore, genetically modified CD4+ cells were preferentially expanded during HIV-1 infection in vivo in an immunodeficient mouse model. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of targeting CCR5 in primary T cells using an engineered megaTAL nuclease, and the potential to use gene-modified cells to reconstitute a patient's immune system and provide protection from HIV infection.

  12. Efficient Modification of the CCR5 Locus in Primary Human T Cells With megaTAL Nuclease Establishes HIV-1 Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Paul, Biswajit; Sather, Blythe D; Younan, Patrick M; Sommer, Karen; Kowalski, John P; Hale, Malika; Stoddard, Barry; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Rawlings, David J

    2016-01-01

    A naturally occurring 32-base pair deletion of the HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5 has demonstrated protection against HIV infection of human CD4+ T cells. Recent genetic engineering approaches using engineered nucleases to disrupt the gene and mimic this mutation show promise for HIV therapy. We developed a megaTAL nuclease targeting the third extracellular loop of CCR5 that we delivered to primary human T cells by mRNA transfection. The CCR5 megaTAL nuclease established resistance to HIV in cell lines and disrupted the expression of CCR5 on primary human CD4+ T cells with a high efficiency, achieving up to 80% modification of the locus in primary cells as measured by molecular analysis. Gene-modified cells engrafted at levels equivalent to unmodified cells when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Furthermore, genetically modified CD4+ cells were preferentially expanded during HIV-1 infection in vivo in an immunodeficient mouse model. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of targeting CCR5 in primary T cells using an engineered megaTAL nuclease, and the potential to use gene-modified cells to reconstitute a patient's immune system and provide protection from HIV infection. PMID:27741222

  13. Human T-cell leukemia virus infection of human hematopoietic progenitor cells: maintenance of virus infection during differentiation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, G; Fraser, J K; Zack, J A; Lee, F; Feuer, R; Chen, I S

    1996-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy-tropical spastic paraparesis. We examined whether HTLV could productively infect human hematopoietic progenitor cells. CD34+ cells were enriched from human fetal liver cells and cocultivated with cell lines transformed with HTLV-1 and -2. HTLV-1 infection was established in between 10 and >95% of the enriched CD34+ cell population, as demonstrated by quantitative PCR analysis. HTLV-1 p19 Gag expression was also detected in infected hematopoietic progenitor cells. HTLV-1-infected hematopoietic progenitor cells were cultured in semisolid medium permissive for the development of erythbroid (BFU-E), myeloid (CFU-GM), and primitive progenitor (CFU-GEMM, HPP-CFC, or CFU-A) colonies. HTLV-1 sequences were detected in colonies of all hematopoietic lineages; furthermore, the ratio of HTLV genomes to the number of human cells in each infected colony was 1:1, consistent with each colony arising from a single infected hematopoietic progenitor cell. Severe combined immunodeficient mice engrafted with human fetal thymus and liver tissues (SCID-hu) develop a conjoint organ which supports human thymocyte differentiation and maturation. Inoculation of SCID-hu mice with HTLV-1-infected T cells or enriched populations of CD34+ cells established viral infection of thymocytes 4 to 6 weeks postreconstitution. Thymocytes from two mice with the greatest HTLV-1 proviral burdens showed increased expression of the CD25 marker and the interleukin 2 receptor alpha chain and perturbation of CD4+ and CD8+ thymocyte subset distribution profiles. Hematopoietic progenitor cells and thymuses may be targets for HTLV infection in humans, and these events may play a role in the pathogenesis associated with infection. PMID:8648741

  14. Detection and differentiation of antibodies to human T-cell lymphotropic virus types I and II by the immunofluorescence method.

    PubMed

    Gallo, D; Penning, L M; Hanson, C V

    1991-10-01

    We compared the sensitivities of the prototype human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I)- and HTLV-II-transformed cell lines, MT2 and Mo-T, with that of an HTLV-II-infected cell line, clone 19, established in our laboratory, in the immunofluorescence (IF) test for detection of antibody to HTLV-I and HTLV-II. In addition, IF antibody titers with the three antigens were determined, and the results were compared with HTLV-I and HTLV-II typing by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The MT2 cell line was more sensitive than the two HTLV-II cell lines for detecting HTLV-I antibody by IF, and clone 19 was more sensitive than Mo-T or MT2 for measuring HTLV-II antibody. In the titration study, the antigen that gave the highest titer correlated completely with the HTLV type determined by PCR, indicating that the relatively simple IF titration method can be used for differentiating HTLV-I and HTLV-II antibody in sera and plasmas.

  15. PD-1/PD-Ls pathways between CD4(+) T cells and pleural mesothelial cells in human tuberculous pleurisy.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wen; Tong, Zhao-Hui; Cui, Ai; Zhang, Jian-Chu; Ye, Zhi-Jian; Yuan, Ming-Li; Zhou, Qiong; Shi, Huan-Zhong

    2014-03-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1), PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and PD-L2 have been demonstrated to be involved in tuberculosis immunity, however, the expression and regulation of PD-1/PD-Ls pathways in pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) and CD4(+) T cells in tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) have not been investigated. Expression of PD-1 on CD4(+) T cells and expressions of PD-L1 and PD-L2 on PMCs in TPE were determined. The impacts of PD-1/PD-Ls pathways on proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and migration of CD4(+) T cells were explored. Concentrations of soluble PD-l, but not of soluble PD-Ls, were much higher in TPE than in serum. Expressions of PD-1 on CD4(+) T cells in TPE were significantly higher than those in blood. Expressions of PD-Ls were much higher on PMCs from TPE when compared with those from transudative effusion. Interferon-γ not only upregulated the expression of PD-1 on CD4(+) T cells, but also upregulated the expressions of PD-Ls on PMCs. Blockage PD-1/PD-Ls pathways abolished the inhibitory effects on proliferation and adhesion activity of CD4(+) T cells induced by PMCs. PD-1/PD-Ls pathways on PMCs inhibited proliferation and adhesion activity of CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that Mycobacterium tuberculosis might exploit PD-1/PD-Ls pathways to evade host cell immune response in human.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef does not alter T-cell sensitivity to antigen-specific stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Page, K A; van Schooten, W C; Feinberg, M B

    1997-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro model to study the influence that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) may have on the ability of T cells to respond to antigenic challenge. We have examined consequences of HIV-1 gene expression on T-cell activation in antigen-dependent T cells that have stably integrated copies of replication-defective proviral HIV-1. Virus production by HIV-infected, antigen-dependent T cells was induced in response to antigenic stimulation and then decreased as infected cells returned to a state of quiescence. Contrary to the predictions of models proposing that Nef alters signal transduction pathways in T lymphocytes and thereby alters cellular activation, Nef expression in antigen-dependent T-cell clones did not influence their proliferative responses to low or intermediate concentrations of antigen and did not affect other measures of T-cell activation, such as induction of interleukin 2 receptor alpha-chain expression and cytokine production. In addition, we found no evidence for alteration of T-cell responsiveness to antigen by the gag, pol, vif, tat, or rev gene of HIV-1. PMID:9094653

  17. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4+ T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model

    PubMed Central

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-01-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann–Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4+CD45RO+ and CD4+CD45RO+CXCR5+ cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans. PMID:21488866

  18. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4(+) T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model.

    PubMed

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-06-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann-Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CXCR5(+) cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans.

  19. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4(+) T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model.

    PubMed

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-06-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann-Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CXCR5(+) cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans. PMID:21488866

  20. Emodin induces human T cell apoptosis in vitro by ROS-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Kai; Shen, Nai-ying; Xu, Xin-sen; Su, Hai-bo; Wei, Ji-chao; Tai, Ming-hui; Meng, Fan-di; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Yue-lang; Liu, Chang

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the immunosuppressive effects of emodin isolated from Rheum palmatum L. Methods: Human T cells were isolated from the peripheral venous blood of 10 healthy adult donors. Cell viability was analyzed with MTT assay. AO/EB and Annexin V/PI staining and DNA damage assay were used to detect cell apoptosis. Fluorescence staining was used to detect the levels of ROS, the mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular Ca2+. Colorimetry was used to detect the levels of MDA and total SOD and GSH/GSSG ratio. The expression and activity of caspase-3, -4, and -9 were detected with Western blotting and a fluorometric assay. Western blotting was also used to detect the expression of Bcl-2, Bax, cytochrome C, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) markers. Results: Emodin (1, 10, and 100 μmol/L) inhibited the growth of human T cells and induced apoptosis in dose- and time dependent manners. Emodin triggered ER stress and significantly elevated intracellular free Ca2+ in human T cells. It also disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential, and increased cytosolic level of cytochrome C, and the levels of activated cleavage fragments of caspase-3, -4, and -9 in human T cells. Furthermore, emodin significantly increased the levels of ROS and MDA, inhibited both SOD level and GSH/GSSG ratio in human T cells, whereas co-incubation with the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 20 μmol/L) almost completely blocked emodin-induced ER stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in human T cells, and decreased the caspase cascade-mediated apoptosis. Conclusion: Emodin exerts immunosuppressive actions at least partly by inducing apoptosis of human T cells, which is triggered by ROS-mediated ER stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23811723

  1. Broadly targeted human cytomegalovirus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells dominate the memory compartments of exposed subjects.

    PubMed

    Sylwester, Andrew W; Mitchell, Bridget L; Edgar, John B; Taormina, Cara; Pelte, Christian; Ruchti, Franziska; Sleath, Paul R; Grabstein, Kenneth H; Hosken, Nancy A; Kern, Florian; Nelson, Jay A; Picker, Louis J

    2005-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of immunocompetent hosts are characterized by a dynamic, life-long interaction in which host immune responses, particularly of T cells, restrain viral replication and prevent disease but do not eliminate the virus or preclude transmission. Because HCMV is among the largest and most complex of known viruses, the T cell resources committed to maintaining this balance have never been characterized completely. Here, using cytokine flow cytometry and 13,687 overlapping 15mer peptides comprising 213 HCMV open reading frames (ORFs), we found that 151 HCMV ORFs were immunogenic for CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T cells, and that ORF immunogenicity was influenced only modestly by ORF expression kinetics and function. We further documented that total HCMV-specific T cell responses in seropositive subjects were enormous, comprising on average approximately 10% of both the CD4(+) and CD8(+) memory compartments in blood, whereas cross-reactive recognition of HCMV proteins in seronegative individuals was limited to CD8(+) T cells and was rare. These data provide the first glimpse of the total human T cell response to a complex infectious agent and will provide insight into the rules governing immunodominance and cross-reactivity in complex viral infections of humans. PMID:16147978

  2. Broadly targeted human cytomegalovirus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells dominate the memory compartments of exposed subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sylwester, Andrew W.; Mitchell, Bridget L.; Edgar, John B.; Taormina, Cara; Pelte, Christian; Ruchti, Franziska; Sleath, Paul R.; Grabstein, Kenneth H.; Hosken, Nancy A.; Kern, Florian; Nelson, Jay A.; Picker, Louis J.

    2005-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of immunocompetent hosts are characterized by a dynamic, life-long interaction in which host immune responses, particularly of T cells, restrain viral replication and prevent disease but do not eliminate the virus or preclude transmission. Because HCMV is among the largest and most complex of known viruses, the T cell resources committed to maintaining this balance have never been characterized completely. Here, using cytokine flow cytometry and 13,687 overlapping 15mer peptides comprising 213 HCMV open reading frames (ORFs), we found that 151 HCMV ORFs were immunogenic for CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cells, and that ORF immunogenicity was influenced only modestly by ORF expression kinetics and function. We further documented that total HCMV-specific T cell responses in seropositive subjects were enormous, comprising on average ∼10% of both the CD4+ and CD8+ memory compartments in blood, whereas cross-reactive recognition of HCMV proteins in seronegative individuals was limited to CD8+ T cells and was rare. These data provide the first glimpse of the total human T cell response to a complex infectious agent and will provide insight into the rules governing immunodominance and cross-reactivity in complex viral infections of humans. PMID:16147978

  3. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ersching, Jonatan; Basso, Alexandre Salgado; Kalich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho; Rodrigues, Maurício M

    2016-06-01

    Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections. PMID:27332899

  4. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ersching, Jonatan; Basso, Alexandre Salgado; Kalich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho

    2016-01-01

    Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections. PMID:27332899

  5. Class II major histocompatibility complex mutant mice to study the germ-line bias of T-cell antigen receptors.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Daniel; Krovi, Sai Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D; Crooks, James; Reisdorph, Richard; White, Janice; Gross, James; Matsuda, Jennifer L; Gapin, Laurent; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W

    2016-09-20

    The interaction of αβ T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with peptides bound to MHC molecules lies at the center of adaptive immunity. Whether TCRs have evolved to react with MHC or, instead, processes in the thymus involving coreceptors and other molecules select MHC-specific TCRs de novo from a random repertoire is a longstanding immunological question. Here, using nuclease-targeted mutagenesis, we address this question in vivo by generating three independent lines of knockin mice with single-amino acid mutations of conserved class II MHC amino acids that often are involved in interactions with the germ-line-encoded portions of TCRs. Although the TCR repertoire generated in these mutants is similar in size and diversity to that in WT mice, the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC is suggested by a shift and preferential use of some TCR subfamilies over others in mice expressing the mutant class II MHCs. Furthermore, T cells educated on these mutant MHC molecules are alloreactive to each other and to WT cells, and vice versa, suggesting strong functional differences among these repertoires. Taken together, these results highlight both the flexibility of thymic selection and the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC. PMID:27588903

  6. Class II major histocompatibility complex mutant mice to study the germ-line bias of T-cell antigen receptors.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Daniel; Krovi, Sai Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D; Crooks, James; Reisdorph, Richard; White, Janice; Gross, James; Matsuda, Jennifer L; Gapin, Laurent; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W

    2016-09-20

    The interaction of αβ T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with peptides bound to MHC molecules lies at the center of adaptive immunity. Whether TCRs have evolved to react with MHC or, instead, processes in the thymus involving coreceptors and other molecules select MHC-specific TCRs de novo from a random repertoire is a longstanding immunological question. Here, using nuclease-targeted mutagenesis, we address this question in vivo by generating three independent lines of knockin mice with single-amino acid mutations of conserved class II MHC amino acids that often are involved in interactions with the germ-line-encoded portions of TCRs. Although the TCR repertoire generated in these mutants is similar in size and diversity to that in WT mice, the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC is suggested by a shift and preferential use of some TCR subfamilies over others in mice expressing the mutant class II MHCs. Furthermore, T cells educated on these mutant MHC molecules are alloreactive to each other and to WT cells, and vice versa, suggesting strong functional differences among these repertoires. Taken together, these results highlight both the flexibility of thymic selection and the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC.

  7. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of IL-21-expressing CD8+ T cells in human nasal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Li; Jia, Lei; Bai, Lu; He, Long; Yang, Binyan; Wu, Changyou; Li, Huabin

    2016-01-01

    Although CD4+ T cells are recognized to play an important role in the inflammatory response of nasal polyps (NPs), the biological functions of CD8+ T cells in polypogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed cell markers, cytokine expression and transcription factors in IL-21-expressing CD8+ T cells in polyp tissues of NP patients. The results showed that the majority of IL-21-producing CD8+ T cells were effector memory cells and they co-expressed IFN-γ. IL-21-expressing CD8+ T cells in polyp tissues expressed higher CXCR5, PD-1, and ICOS levels than cells in control tissues and showed significantly higher T-bet and Bcl-6 expression levels compared with IL-21−CD8+ T cells. Purified polyp CD8+ T cells promoted IgG production from isolated polyp B cells in vitro, and recombinant IL-12 modulated the expression of IL-21, IFN-γ and CD40L in purified polyp CD8+ T cells. Moreover, the percentage of IL-21+CD8+ T cells in polyp tissues was positively correlated with endoscopic and CT scan scores in NP patients. These findings indicated that polyp CD8+ T cells, by co-expressing IL-21 and IFN-γ and other markers, display a Tfh cell functionality, which is associated with the clinical severity of NP patients. PMID:27468819

  8. EphB and Ephrin-B Interactions Mediate Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Suppression of Activated T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao M.; Arthur, Agnes; Hayball, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) express the contact-dependent erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular (Eph) receptor tyrosine kinase family and their cognate ephrin ligands, which are known to regulate thymocyte maturation and selection, T-cell transendothelial migration, activation, co-stimulation, and proliferation. However, the contribution of Eph/ephrin molecules in mediating human MSC suppression of activated T-cells remains to be determined. In the present study, we showed that EphB2 and ephrin-B2 are expressed by ex vivo expanded MSC, while the corresponding ligands, ephrin-B1 and EphB4, respectively, are highly expressed by T-cells. Initial studies demonstrated that EphB2-Fc and ephrin-B2-Fc molecules suppressed T-cell proliferation in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assays compared with human IgG-treated controls. While the addition of a third-party MSC population demonstrated dramatic suppression of T-cell proliferation responses in the MLR, blocking the function of EphB2 or EphB4 receptors using inhibitor binding peptides significantly increased T-cell proliferation. Consistent with these observations, shRNA EphB2 or ephrin-B2 knockdown expression in MSC reduced their ability to inhibit T-cell proliferation. Importantly, the expression of immunosuppressive factors, indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase, transforming growth factor-β1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase expressed by MSC, was up-regulated after stimulation with EphB4 and ephrin-B1 in the presence of interferon (IFN)-γ, compared with untreated controls. Conversely, key factors involved in T-cell activation and proliferation, such as interleukin (IL)-2, IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-17, were down-regulated by T-cells treated with EphB2 or ephrin-B2 compared with untreated controls. Studies utilizing signaling inhibitors revealed that inhibition of T-cell proliferation is partly mediated through EphB2-induced ephrin-B1 reverse signaling or ephrin-B2-mediated EphB4 forward

  9. The Role of CD4 and CD8 T Cells in Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    da Silva Santos, Claire; Brodskyn, Cláudia Ida

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis, caused by infection with parasites of the Leishmania genus, affects millions of individuals worldwide. This disease displays distinct clinical manifestations ranging from self-healing skin lesions to severe tissue damage. The control of Leishmania infection is dependent on cellular immune mechanisms, and evidence has shown that CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes play different roles in the outcome of leishmaniasis. Although the presence of CD4 T cells is important for controlling parasite growth, the results in the literature suggest that the inflammatory response elicited by these cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of lesions. However, recent studies on CD8 T lymphocytes show that these cells are mainly involved in tissue damage through cytotoxic mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the study of the human adaptive immunological response in the pathogenesis of tegumentary leishmaniasis.

  10. Construction and characterization of a human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 infectious molecular clone.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Sébastien Alain; Ko, Nga Ling; Calattini, Sara; Mallet, Adeline; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Kehn, Kylene; Brady, John N; Kashanchi, Fatah; Gessain, Antoine; Mahieux, Renaud

    2008-07-01

    We and others have uncovered the existence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 (HTLV-3). We have now generated an HTLV-3 proviral clone. We established that gag, env, pol, pro, and tax/rex as well as minus-strand mRNAs are present in cells transfected with the HTLV-3 clone. HTLV-3 p24(gag) protein is detected in the cell culture supernatant. Transfection of 293T-long terminal repeat (LTR)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells with the HTLV-3 clone promotes formation of syncytia, a hallmark of Env expression, together with the appearance of fluorescent cells, demonstrating that Tax is expressed. Viral particles are visible by electron microscopy. These particles are infectious, as demonstrated by infection experiments with purified virions.

  11. Microbe-specific unconventional T-cells induce human neutrophil differentiation into antigen cross-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Anna Rita; Tyler, Christopher J.; Khan, Mohd Wajid A.; Szakmany, Tamas; Hall, Judith E.; Moser, Bernhard; Eberl, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The early immune response to microbes is dominated by the recruitment of neutrophils whose primary function is to clear invading pathogens. However, there is emerging evidence that neutrophils play additional effector and regulatory roles. The present study demonstrates that human neutrophils assume antigen cross-presenting functions, and suggests a plausible scenario for the local generation of APC-like neutrophils through the mobilization of unconventional T-cells in response to microbial metabolites. Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cells and MAIT cells are abundant in blood, inflamed tissues and mucosal barriers. Here, both human cell types responded rapidly to neutrophils after phagocytosis of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria producing the corresponding ligands, and in turn mediated the differentiation of neutrophils into APCs for both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells through secretion of GM-CSF, IFN-γ and TNF-α. In patients with acute sepsis, circulating neutrophils displayed a similar APC-like phenotype and readily processed soluble proteins for cross-presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8+ T-cells, at a time when peripheral Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cells were highly activated. Our findings indicate that unconventional T-cells represent key controllers of neutrophil-driven innate and adaptive responses to a broad range of pathogens. PMID:25165152

  12. Identification of a novel human memory T-cell population with the characteristics of stem-like chemo-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Emori, Makoto; Shibayama, Yuji; Mizushima, Emi; Matsumiya, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Keiji; Kaya, Mitsunori; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Kubo, Terufumi; Himi, Tetsuo; Ichimiya, Shingo; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-dose chemotherapy may kill not only tumor cells but also immunocytes, and frequently induces severe lymphocytopenia. On the other hand, patients who recover from the nadir maintain immunity against infection, suggesting the existence of an unknown memory T-cell population with stress resistance, long-living capacity, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, the differentiation system of T-cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T-cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. Here we report a novel human T-cell memory population, “young memory” T (TYM) cells. TYM cells are defined by positive expression of CD73, which represents high aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity and CXCR3 among CD8+CD45RA+CD62L+ T cells. TYM proliferate upon TCR stimulation, with differentiation capacity into TCM and TEM and drug resistance. Moreover, TYM are involved in memory function for viral and tumor-associated antigens in healthy donors and cancer patients, respectively. Regulation of TYM might be very attractive for peptide vaccination, adoptive cell-transfer therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27471640

  13. Identification of a novel human memory T-cell population with the characteristics of stem-like chemo-resistance.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Emori, Makoto; Shibayama, Yuji; Mizushima, Emi; Matsumiya, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Keiji; Kaya, Mitsunori; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Kubo, Terufumi; Himi, Tetsuo; Ichimiya, Shingo; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-06-01

    High-dose chemotherapy may kill not only tumor cells but also immunocytes, and frequently induces severe lymphocytopenia. On the other hand, patients who recover from the nadir maintain immunity against infection, suggesting the existence of an unknown memory T-cell population with stress resistance, long-living capacity, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, the differentiation system of T-cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T-cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. Here we report a novel human T-cell memory population, "young memory" T (TYM) cells. TYM cells are defined by positive expression of CD73, which represents high aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity and CXCR3 among CD8(+)CD45RA(+)CD62L(+) T cells. TYM proliferate upon TCR stimulation, with differentiation capacity into TCM and TEM and drug resistance. Moreover, TYM are involved in memory function for viral and tumor-associated antigens in healthy donors and cancer patients, respectively. Regulation of TYM might be very attractive for peptide vaccination, adoptive cell-transfer therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27471640

  14. Ex vivo analysis of human memory CD4 T cells specific for hepatitis C virus using MHC class II tetramers

    PubMed Central

    Day, Cheryl L.; Seth, Nilufer P.; Lucas, Michaela; Appel, Heiner; Gauthier, Laurent; Lauer, Georg M.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Szczepiorkowski, Zbigniew M.; Casson, Deborah R.; Chung, Raymond T.; Bell, Shannon; Harcourt, Gillian; Walker, Bruce D.; Klenerman, Paul; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2003-01-01

    Containment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and other chronic human viral infections is associated with persistence of virus-specific CD4 T cells, but ex vivo characterization of circulating CD4 T cells has not been achieved. To further define the phenotype and function of these cells, we developed a novel approach for the generation of tetrameric forms of MHC class II/peptide complexes that is based on the cellular peptide-exchange mechanism. HLA-DR molecules were expressed as precursors with a covalently linked CLIP peptide, which could be efficiently exchanged with viral peptides following linker cleavage. In subjects who spontaneously resolved HCV viremia, but not in those with chronic progressive infection, HCV tetramer–labeled cells could be isolated by magnetic bead capture despite very low frequencies (1:1,200 to 1:111,000) among circulating CD4 T cells. These T cells expressed a set of surface receptors (CCR7+CD45RA–CD27+) indicative of a surveillance function for secondary lymphoid structures and had undergone significant in vivo selection since they utilized a restricted Vβ repertoire. These studies demonstrate a relationship between clinical outcome and the presence of circulating CD4 T cells directed against this virus. Moreover, they show that rare populations of memory CD4 T cells can be studied ex vivo in human diseases. PMID:12975468

  15. In vivo prevention of transplant arteriosclerosis by ex vivo-expanded human regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Nadig, Satish N; Wieckiewicz, Joanna; Wu, Douglas C; Warnecke, Gregor; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Shiqiao; Schiopu, Alexandru; Taggart, David P; Wood, Kathryn J

    2010-07-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is the hallmark of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) affecting transplanted organs in the long term. These fibroproliferative lesions lead to neointimal thickening of arteries in all transplanted allografts. Luminal narrowing then leads to graft ischemia and organ demise. To date, there are no known tolerance induction strategies that prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we designed this study to test the hypothesis that human regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) expanded ex vivo can prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Here we show the comparative capacity of T(reg) cells, sorted via two separate strategies, to prevent transplant arteriosclerosis in a clinically relevant chimeric humanized mouse system. We found that the in vivo development of transplant arteriosclerosis in human arteries was prevented by treatment of ex vivo-expanded human T(reg) cells. Additionally, we show that T(reg) cells sorted on the basis of low expression of CD127 provide a more potent therapy to conventional T(reg) cells. Our results demonstrate that human T(reg) cells can inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis by impairing effector function and graft infiltration. We anticipate our findings to serve as a foundation for the clinical development of therapeutics targeting transplant arteriosclerosis in both allograft transplantation and other immune-mediated causes of vasculopathy.

  16. Human homologues of a Borrelia T cell epitope associated with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Elise E; Glickstein, Lisa; Kwok, William W; Nepom, Gerald T; Steere, Allen C

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis, which may result from infection-induced autoimmunity, is associated with HLA-DR molecules that bind an epitope of Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) outer-surface protein A (OspA(165-173)) and with T cell reactivity with this epitope. One potential mechanism to explain these associations is molecular mimicry between OspA(165-173) and a self-peptide. Here, we searched the published human genome for peptides with sequence homology with OspA(165-173). The two peptides identified with the greatest sequence homology with the OspA epitope were MAWD-BP(276-288), which had identity at eight of the nine core amino acid residues, and T-span7(58-70), which had identity at six residues. MAWD-BP mRNA was expressed by synoviocytes, while T-span7 mRNA was not. However, neither peptide bound all of the HLA-DR molecules associated with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. Among 11 patients, 9 had T cell reactivity with OspA(161-170), 6 had responses to MAWD-BP(276-288), and 3 had reactivity with T-span7(58-70), but reactivity with the self-peptides was lower than that induced by the spirochetal epitope. Thus, there remains an association between OspA(165-173) and antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis, and infection-induced autoimmunity is an attractive hypothesis to explain this outcome. However, molecular mimicry due to sequence homology between OspA(165-173) and a human peptide seems unlikely to be the critical mechanism.

  17. Human Homologues of a Borrelia T cell Epitope Associated with Antibiotic-Refractory Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, Elise E.; Glickstein, Lisa; Kwok, William W.; Nepom, Gerald T.; Steere, Allen C.

    2007-01-01

    Antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis, which may result from infection-induced autoimmunity, is associated with HLA-DR molecules that bind an epitope of Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) outer-surface protein A (OspA165−173) and with T cell reactivity with this epitope. One potential mechanism to explain these associations is molecular mimicry between OspA165−173 and a self-peptide. Here, we searched the published human genome for peptides with sequence homology with OspA165−173. The two peptides identified with the greatest sequence homology with the OspA epitope were MAWD-BP276−288, which had identity at eight of the nine core amino acid residues, and T-span758−70, which had identity at six residues. MAWD-BP mRNA was expressed by synoviocytes, while T-span7 mRNA was not. However, neither peptide bound all of the HLA-DR molecules associated with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. Among 11 patients, nine had T cell reactivity with OspA161−170, six had responses to MAWD-BP276−288, and three had reactivity with T-span758−70, but reactivity with the self-peptides was lower than that induced by the spirochetal epitope. Thus, there remains an association between OspA165−173 and antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis, and infection-induced autoimmunity is an attractive hypothesis to explain this outcome. However, molecular mimicry due to sequence homology between OspA165−173 and a human peptide seems unlikely to be the critical mechanism. PMID:17555819

  18. Intrahepatic Xenograft of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines: A Useful Model for Rapid Biological and Therapeutic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Andrique, Laetitia; Poglio, Sandrine; Prochazkova-Carlotti, Martina; Kadin, Marshall Edward; Giese, Alban; Idrissi, Yamina; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Chevret, Edith

    2016-07-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases primarily involving the skin that could have an aggressive course with circulating blood cells, especially in Sézary syndrome and transformed mycosis fungoides. So far, few CTCL cell lines have been adapted for in vivo experiments and their tumorigenicity has not been adequately assessed, hampering the use of a reproducible model for CTCL biological evaluation. In fact, both patient-derived xenografts and cell line xenografts at subcutaneous sites failed to provide a robust tool, because engraftment was dependent on mice strain and cell line subtype. Herein, we describe an original method of intrahepatic injection into adult NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid)Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice liver of both aggressive (My-La, HUT78, HH, MAC2A, and MAC2B) and indolent (FE-PD and MAC1) CTCL cell lines. Six of the seven CTCL cell lines were grafted with a high rate of success (80%). Moreover, this model provided a quick (15 days) and robust assay for in vivo evaluation of CTCL cell lines tumorigenicity and therapeutic response in preclinical studies. Such a reproducible model can be therefore used for further functional studies and in vivo drug testing. PMID:27181405

  19. T cell-dependent survival of CD20+ and CD20- plasma cells in human secondary lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed

    Withers, David R; Fiorini, Claudia; Fischer, Randy T; Ettinger, Rachel; Lipsky, Peter E; Grammer, Amrie C

    2007-06-01

    The signals mediating human plasma cell survival in vivo, particularly within secondary lymphoid tissue, are unclear. Human tonsils grafted into immunodeficient mice were therefore used to delineate the mechanisms promoting the survival of plasma cells. Tonsillar plasma cells were maintained within the grafts and the majority were nonproliferating, indicating a long-lived phenotype. A significant depletion of graft plasma cells was observed after anti-CD20 treatment, consistent with the expression of CD20 by most of the cells. Moreover, anti-CD52 treatment caused the complete loss of all graft lymphocytes, including plasma cells. Unexpectedly, anti-CD3, but not anti-CD154, treatment caused the complete loss of plasma cells, indicating an essential role for T cells, but not CD40-CD154 interactions in plasma cell survival. The in vitro coculture of purified tonsillar plasma cells and T cells revealed a T-cell survival signal requiring cell contact. Furthermore, immunofluorescence studies detected a close association between human plasma cells and T cells in vivo. These data reveal that human tonsil contains long-lived plasma cells, the majority of which express CD20 and can be deleted with anti-CD20 therapy. In addition, an important role for contact-dependent interactions with T cells in human plasma cell survival within secondary lymphoid tissue was identified.

  20. The pan-ErbB tyrosine kinase inhibitor canertinib induces caspase-mediated cell death in human T-cell leukemia (Jurkat) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Trinks, Cecilia; Severinsson, Emelie A.; Holmlund, Birgitta; Green, Anna; Green, Henrik; Joensson, Jan-Ingvar; Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta; Walz, Thomas M.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Canertinib induces caspase-mediated apoptosis in T-cell leukemia cells in vitro. {yields} Canertinib mediates activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. {yields} Canertinib induces apoptosis in an ErbB receptor independent manner. {yields} Lymphocyte specific proteins as well as survival kinases are inhibited. {yields} Canertinib may act as a multi-kinase inhibiting drug in human T-cell malignancies. -- Abstract: Canertinib is a novel ErbB-receptor inhibitor currently in clinical development for the treatment of solid tumors overexpressing ErbB-receptors. We have recently demonstrated that canertinib displays anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in human myeloid leukemia cells devoid of ErbB-receptors. The mechanism mediating these effects are however unknown. In this study, we show that canertinib is able to act as a multi-kinase inhibitor by inhibition of several intracellular kinases involved in T-cell signaling such as Akt, Erk1/2 and Zap-70, and reduced Lck protein expression in the human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat. Treatment with canertinib at a concentration of 2 {mu}M caused accumulation of Jurkat cells in the G{sub 1} cell cycle phase and increased doses induced apoptosis in a time-dependent manner. Apoptotic signs of treated cells were detected by Annexin V staining and cleavage of PARP, caspase-3, -8, -9, -10 and Bid. A subset of the pro-apoptotic signals mediated by canertinib could be significantly reduced by specific caspase inhibitors. Taken together, these results demonstrate the dual ability of canertinib to downregulate important signaling pathways and to activate caspase-mediated intrinsic apoptosis pathway in human T-cell leukemia cells.

  1. A lectin-binding, protease-resistant mycobacterial ligand specifically activates V gamma 9+ human gamma delta T cells.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, K; Schoel, B; Plesnila, N; Lipford, G B; Kromer, S; Deusch, K; Wagner, H

    1992-01-15

    Bacterial (exogeneous) superantigens have been defined as bifunctional proteinaceous molecules. They bind to class II MHC molecules of presenting cells and engage with particular TCR-V beta gene elements, thereby activating alpha beta T cells in a V beta-oriented fashion. In previous studies we have elucidated that gamma delta T cells exhibit a propensity to vigorously respond toward mycobacterial Ag. Intrigued by this finding we now analyzed whether mycobacteria express a superantigen for a subset of human gamma delta T cells definable by the selective use of TCR-V gene elements. Here we describe that a protease-resistant, low m.w. (1 to 3 kDa) component of mycobacteria selectively activates gamma delta T cells expressing TCR-V gamma 9 gene segments. Contained in mycobacterial lysates it stimulates TCR-V gamma 9-positive gamma delta T cells at a frequency of 1/6. Stimulation is critically dependent on the presence of class II MHC-positive presenting cells, the important structure being HLA-DR molecules. The fine specificity of the V gamma 9 seeking mycobacterial ligand differs from the gamma delta T cell-stimulating structures expressed by Daudi cells. In addition, the mycobacterial, V gamma 9-seeking ligand is bound selectively to lectins such as UEAI, SBA, and DBA. We conclude that mycobacteria contain a component that acts as a superantigen for human gamma delta T cells and we believe it is this property that explains the vigorous participation of gamma delta T cells in mycobacterial infections.

  2. Human Regulatory T Cells with Alloantigen Specificity Are More Potent Inhibitors of Alloimmune Skin Graft Damage than Polyclonal Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sagoo, Pervinder; Ali, Niwa; Garg, Garima; Nestle, Frank O.; Lechler, Robert I.; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Graft rejection by the immune system is a major cause of transplant failure. Lifelong immunosuppression decreases the incidence of graft rejection; however, nonspecific immunosuppression results in increased susceptibly to infection and cancer. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which suppress the activation of the immune system and induce tolerance, are currently under evaluation for use in clinical transplantation. Ex vivo expanded polyclonal Tregs that are introduced into transplant recipients alter the balance of T effector cells to Tregs; however, experimental data suggest that alloantigen-specific Tregs would be more effective at preventing graft rejection. We have developed a method to enrich alloantigen-specific human Tregs based on the coexpression of activation markers, CD69 and CD71. These Tregs could be readily expanded in vitro and demonstrated potent antigen-specific suppression. In a humanized mouse model of alloimmune-mediated injury of human skin grafts, alloantigen-specific Tregs resulted in a significant reduction in clinically relevant indicators of dermal tissue injury when compared with polyclonal Tregs, restoring a histology comparable to healthy skin. This method of human allospecific Treg selection should be scalable to the clinic. The improved in vivo efficacy of alloantigen-specific Tregs over polyclonal Tregs shown here suggests that generating “customized” Tregs with defined anti-donor allospecificities may improve current practice in clinical immunotherapy. PMID:21593402

  3. STAT3 governs hyporesponsiveness and granzyme B-dependent suppressive capacity in human CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmetterer, Klaus G.; Neunkirchner, Alina; Wojta-Stremayr, Daniela; Leitner, Judith; Steinberger, Peter; Pickl, Winfried F.

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) integrates key signals of cell surface immune receptors, yet its precise role in cluster of differentiation (CD)4+ T cells is not well-established. Current research has indicated T-helper cell 17–inducing roles but also tolerogenic roles. To address this issue, human T cells were transduced with the constitutively active STAT3 mutant STAT3C. Following stimulation, STAT3C+ T cells up-regulated IL-10 (4.1 ± 0.5-fold; P < 0.001) and granzyme B (2.5 ± 1.2, P < 0.05) secretion, combined with significantly reduced IFN-γ (35 ± 5%), IL-2 (57 ± 4%), TNF-α (64 ± 8%), and IL-13 (89 ± 3%) secretion (P < 0.001). CD3/CD2- or CD3/CD28-activated STAT3C+ T cells revealed reduced proliferation (53.4 ± 23.5% and 70.5 ± 10.4%, respectively), which was independent of IL-10 production and significantly suppressed effector T cell proliferation by 68.7 ± 10.6% and 65.9 ± 2.6%, respectively (P < 0.001). Phenotypically, STAT3C-transgenic CD4+ T cells resembled effector T cells regarding expression of T regulatory cell markers, but up-regulated granzyme B expression levels by 2.4-fold (P < 0.05). Suppression was cell contact dependent and mediated by granzyme B-induced cell death, but was independent of IL-10 and TGF-β. Notably, peripheral blood CD4+CD45RA−lymphocyte activation gene-3+CD49+ type 1 regulatory T cells revealed activation-induced hyperphosphorylation of STAT3. In agreement, pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 activation partially reverted hyporesponsiveness of peripheral type 1 regulatory T cells (increasing their division index from 0.46 ± 0.11 to 0.89 ± 0.04; P < 0.01). These observations indicate a clear-cut relation between activation of STAT3 and the acquisition of a tolerogenic program, which is also used by peripheral blood type 1 regulatory T cells.—Schmetterer, K. G., Neunkirchner, A., Wojta-Stremayr, D., Leitner, J., Steinberger, P., Pickl, W. F. STAT3 governs hyporesponsiveness and

  4. Isolation of viable and functional T-cells from human palatine tonsils.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Cynthia; Geißler, Katharina; Markwart, Robby; Schubert, Katja; Rubio, Ignacio; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Requardt, Robert Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Increasing clinical evidence indicates that removal of the palatine tonsils enhances the risk for adults to suffer from severe illnesses. Together with recent experimental findings pointing to the presence of immunologically competent immune cells these findings illustrate that adult palatine tonsils likely play an appreciable role in the host immune response. T-cells are abundant in the palatine tonsil and are a pivotal entity of the adaptive immune response. However, investigation of T-cells from tonsils has been widely neglected and largely restricted to immune phenotyping. Accordingly, methodological literature describing the experimental preparation and isolation of T-cells from tonsils is scarce and has rarely been complemented with rigorous tests of T-cell functionality. We report here on a comparative investigation of three isolation protocols composed of permutations of different tissue grinding approaches, density gradient centrifugation and automated magnetic collection of CD4/CD8 T-cells. Importantly we put a strong emphasis on assessing the impact of the preparative procedures on the functionality of T-cells at the level of viability and functional response to T-cell receptor (TCR) ligation. The reported, optimized preparation protocols allow for the rapid isolation of highly viable, functional T-cells within 2.5h and represent a useful, affordable approach for the analysis of tonsillar T-cells. PMID:26472683

  5. Cloning of the gene coding for a shared human melanoma antigen recognized by autologous T cells infiltrating into tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Y; Eliyahu, S; Delgado, C H; Robbins, P F; Rivoltini, L; Topalian, S L; Miki, T; Rosenberg, S A

    1994-01-01

    By cDNA expression cloning we have isolated a gene encoding a shared human melanoma antigen recognized by HLA-A2 restricted autologous and allogenic tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from patients with metastatic melanoma. By using both transient and stable expression systems, transfection of this gene into non-antigen-expressing HLA-A2+ cell lines resulted in recognition by the antigen-specific TILs. The sequence of this cDNA revealed a previously undescribed putative transmembrane protein whose expression was restricted to melanoma and melanocyte cell lines and human retina but no other fresh or cultured normal tissues tested or other tumor histologies. Thus, we have identified a gene encoding a melanocyte lineage-specific protein (MART-1; melanoma antigen recognized by T cells 1) that is a widely shared melanoma antigen recognized by the T lymphocytes of patients with established malignancy. Identification of this gene opens possibilities for the development of immunotherapies for patients with melanoma. PMID:8170938

  6. The complete primary structure of the T-cell receptor genes from an alloreactive cytotoxic human T-lymphocyte clone.

    PubMed

    Leiden, J M; Fraser, J D; Strominger, J L

    1986-01-01

    The complete primary structure of the cDNAs encoding the alpha and beta chains of the T-lymphocyte receptor for antigen from a human alloreactive, cytotoxic T-cell clone, L17, is presented. Sequence analysis of these genes reveals that both are related to immunoglobulins and are composed of variable, diversity (at least in the case of the Ti beta clone), joining, and constant region sequences. Comparison of the sequence of the alpha-chain cDNA to that of previously sequenced mouse and human alpha cDNAs suggests the presence of human T-cell receptor alpha D-region sequences. Southern blot analysis confirms the finding that these cDNAs represent the functional receptor genes expressed by the L17 cytotoxic T-cell clone. The availability of these full-length T-cell receptor cDNA clones from a human T-lymphocyte clone of known antigen specificity should allow an analysis of the relationship between T-cell receptor structure and function. PMID:2426193

  7. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Diaz, Rosa M; Vile, Richard; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs). The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ)-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2) bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR) and the selection context (cell synapse), which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells. PMID:23695536

  8. Study of the Association between Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infection and Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Banihashemi, Mahnaz; Kiafar, Bita; Ashkezari, Mohammad; sharifi, Noorieh; Pishgooei, Nasibe; Livani, Fatemah; Bazargani, Reyhaneh; Esmail Khayami, Mohammad; Yazdanpanah, Mohammad Javad

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Lichen Planus is a common disease with unknown etiology which affects the skin and mucosa. Recent studies have focused on the possible role of the virus in the pathogenesis of Lichen Planus. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and Lichen Planus. Materials and Methods: This case control study was conducted on a total of 200 patients. The case group consisted of 100 patients with a confirmed histopathological diagnosis of lichen planus disease, and the control group consisted of 100 healthy blood donors without any signs or symptoms of skin diseases, and who were similar in age and sex to the case group. Blood samples of both participants in the case and control groups were examined for the presence of anti –HTLV-I antibodies using the ELISA method. The polymerase chain reaction for human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 was conducted in cases in which the findings for antihuman T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 antibody test was positive, and statistical analysis was conducted on the obtain results. Results: One case in the case group was infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1; however, no infection was observed in the control group. The difference was not statistically significant (P = 1). Conclusion: Based on the obtained results, no association was observed between the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection and Lichen Planus. PMID:24470877

  9. Aberrant TAL1 activation is mediated by an interchromosomal interaction in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Patel, B; Kang, Y; Cui, K; Litt, M; Riberio, M S J; Deng, C; Salz, T; Casada, S; Fu, X; Qiu, Y; Zhao, K; Huang, S

    2014-02-01

    Long-range chromatin interactions control metazoan gene transcription. However, the involvement of intra- and interchromosomal interactions in development and oncogenesis remains unclear. TAL1/SCL is a critical transcription factor required for the development of all hematopoietic lineages; yet, aberrant TAL1 transcription often occurs in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we report that oncogenic TAL1 expression is regulated by different intra- and interchromosomal loops in normal hematopoietic and leukemic cells, respectively. These intra- and interchromosomal loops alter the cell-type-specific enhancers that interact with the TAL1 promoter. We show that human SET1 (hSET1)-mediated H3K4 methylations promote a long-range chromatin loop, which brings the +51 enhancer in close proximity to TAL1 promoter 1 in erythroid cells. The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) facilitates this long-range enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in erythroid cells while blocking the same enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in human T-cell leukemia. In human T-ALL, a T-cell-specific transcription factor c-Maf-mediated interchromosomal interaction brings the TAL1 promoter into close proximity with a T-cell-specific regulatory element located on chromosome 16, activating aberrant TAL1 oncogene expression. Thus, our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism involving changes in three-dimensional chromatin interactions that activate the TAL1 oncogene in human T-cell leukemia. PMID:23698277

  10. From Murine to Human Nude/SCID: The Thymus, T-Cell Development and the Missing Link

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Rosa; Palamaro, Loredana; Fusco, Anna; Iannace, Leucio; Maio, Stefano; Vigliano, Ilaria; Giardino, Giuliana; Pignata, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are disorders of the immune system, which lead to increased susceptibility to infections. T-cell defects, which may affect T-cell development/function, are approximately 11% of reported PIDs. The pathogenic mechanisms are related to molecular alterations not only of genes selectively expressed in hematopoietic cells but also of the stromal component of the thymus that represents the primary lymphoid organ for T-cell differentiation. With this regard, the prototype of athymic disorders due to abnormal stroma is the Nude/SCID syndrome, first described in mice in 1966. In man, the DiGeorge Syndrome (DGS) has long been considered the human prototype of a severe T-cell differentiation defect. More recently, the human equivalent of the murine Nude/SCID has been described, contributing to unravel important issues of the T-cell ontogeny in humans. Both mice and human diseases are due to alterations of the FOXN1, a developmentally regulated transcription factor selectively expressed in skin and thymic epithelia. PMID:22474479

  11. Interleukin-2 induces tyrosine phosphorylation of the vav proto-oncogene product in human T cells: lack of requirement for the tyrosine kinase lck.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, G A; Howard, O M; Erwin, R; Farrar, W L

    1993-01-01

    The haematopoietic protein, p95vav, has been shown to be a tyrosine kinase substrate and to have tyrosine kinase-modulated guanine-nucleotide-releasing-factor activity. This implies a function in the control of ras or ras-like proteins. Because ras activation has been shown to be a downstream event following stimulation of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor, we investigated the possibility that vav was involved in IL-2 signal transduction pathways, using human T cells as a model. We found rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of vav in response to IL-2 within 1 min, with maximum increase of phosphorylation of 5-fold occurring by 5 min after treatment in normal human T cells. IL-2 stimulation of the human T-cell line YT and a subclone of the YT cell line (YTlck-) that does not express message for the src-family kinase p56lck also results in a rapid rate of tyrosine phosphorylation of vav of more than 5-fold by 5 min. These results suggest that vav may play an important role in IL-2-stimulated signal transduction and that there is not a strict requirement for the tyrosine kinase p56lck. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7690544

  12. High-titer lentiviral vectors stimulate fetal calf serum-specific human CD4 T-cell responses: implications in human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bao, L; Guo, H; Huang, X; Tammana, S; Wong, M; McIvor, R S; Zhou, X

    2009-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1-derived lentiviral vectors have been increasingly used for gene delivery in both pre-clinical and clinical models. Numerous studies have shown that dendritic cells (DC) transduced with concentrated lentiviral vectors can induce primary T-cell responses to viral and tumor antigens. In this study, we attempted to generate influenza hemagglutinin-specific CD4 T cells using lentiviral vectors containing the signal sequence and human lysosome-associated membrane protein to target hemagglutinin to the major histocompatibility complex class II processing pathway. Autologous dendritic cells were generated in serum-free medium and transduced with concentrated, high-titer lentiviruses to stimulate autologous T cells. Unexpectedly, we failed to generate influenza hemagglutinin-specific CD4 T cells rather than T cells specific for fetal calf serum (FCS). By limiting dilution, we established several FCS-specific CD4 T-cell clones restricted by human leukocyte antigen-DR1 and human leukocyte antigen-DR4. Lentiviruses produced in human serum-adapted 293 cells or in serum-free medium were unable to sensitize dendritic cells for recognition by FCS-specific CD4 T-cell clones. Our results indicate that residual FCS in concentrated lentiviral pellets is, in part, responsible for its immunogenicity. These FCS-specific CD4 T cells may be useful in testing clinical grade lentiviral vectors for the presence of contaminating FCS.

  13. Human T cells expressing BEND3 on their surface represent a novel subpopulation that preferentially produces IL-6 and IL-8.

    PubMed

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Kitagori, Koji; Sasaki, Chiyomi; Kobayashi, Shio; Aoyama, Takane; Urata, Kozue; Oku, Takuma; Hirayama, Yoshitaka; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Hikida, Masaki; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Watanabe, Takeshi; Shimizu, Jun

    2014-06-01

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has no transmembrane region, is localized in the cytoplasm, and is involved in chromatin function and transcription. We here identified a novel subpopulation of human T cells that expressed BEND3 on their cell surface (BEND3(+) T cells). BEND3(+) T cells consisted of approximately 3% of T cells in the peripheral blood, were present in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and were also observed in cord blood. The stimulation of BEND3(+) T cells through the TCR/CD3 complex led to the production of various kinds of cytokines; however, the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 produced by BEND3(+) T cells were higher than those by BEND3(-) T cells. The proportion of BEND3(+) T cells was also increased in some patients with inflammatory diseases. Taken together, these results indicate that BEND3(+) T cells are a new subpopulation of T cells in terms of their cytokine profile. Further analyses on BEND3(+) T cells may be of importance and useful in understanding human T cell immunology.

  14. Human T cells expressing BEND3 on their surface represent a novel subpopulation that preferentially produces IL-6 and IL-8

    PubMed Central

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Kitagori, Koji; Sasaki, Chiyomi; Kobayashi, Shio; Aoyama, Takane; Urata, Kozue; Oku, Takuma; Hirayama, Yoshitaka; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Hikida, Masaki; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Watanabe, Takeshi; Shimizu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has no transmembrane region, is localized in the cytoplasm, and is involved in chromatin function and transcription. We here identified a novel subpopulation of human T cells that expressed BEND3 on their cell surface (BEND3+ T cells). BEND3+ T cells consisted of approximately 3% of T cells in the peripheral blood, were present in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and were also observed in cord blood. The stimulation of BEND3+ T cells through the TCR/CD3 complex led to the production of various kinds of cytokines; however, the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 produced by BEND3+ T cells were higher than those by BEND3− T cells. The proportion of BEND3+ T cells was also increased in some patients with inflammatory diseases. Taken together, these results indicate that BEND3+ T cells are a new subpopulation of T cells in terms of their cytokine profile. Further analyses on BEND3+ T cells may be of importance and useful in understanding human T cell immunology. PMID:25400923

  15. Human T cells expressing BEND3 on their surface represent a novel subpopulation that preferentially produces IL-6 and IL-8.

    PubMed

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Kitagori, Koji; Sasaki, Chiyomi; Kobayashi, Shio; Aoyama, Takane; Urata, Kozue; Oku, Takuma; Hirayama, Yoshitaka; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Hikida, Masaki; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Watanabe, Takeshi; Shimizu, Jun

    2014-06-01

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has no transmembrane region, is localized in the cytoplasm, and is involved in chromatin function and transcription. We here identified a novel subpopulation of human T cells that expressed BEND3 on their cell surface (BEND3(+) T cells). BEND3(+) T cells consisted of approximately 3% of T cells in the peripheral blood, were present in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and were also observed in cord blood. The stimulation of BEND3(+) T cells through the TCR/CD3 complex led to the production of various kinds of cytokines; however, the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 produced by BEND3(+) T cells were higher than those by BEND3(-) T cells. The proportion of BEND3(+) T cells was also increased in some patients with inflammatory diseases. Taken together, these results indicate that BEND3(+) T cells are a new subpopulation of T cells in terms of their cytokine profile. Further analyses on BEND3(+) T cells may be of importance and useful in understanding human T cell immunology. PMID:25400923

  16. Hibernation is associated with depression of T-cell independent humoral immune responses in the 13-lined ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Hjalmar R; Henning, Robert H; Kroese, Frans G M; Carey, Hannah V

    2013-03-01

    Mammalian hibernation consists of periods of low metabolism and body temperature (torpor), interspersed by euthermic arousal periods. The function of both the innate and adaptive immune system is suppressed during hibernation. In this study, we analyzed the humoral adaptive immune response to a T-cell independent (TI-2) and a T-cell dependent (TD) antigen. Thirteen-lined ground squirrels were immunized in summer or during hibernation with either a TI-2 or TD antigen on day 0 and day 14. Blood was drawn on day 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Both types of antigens induced a significant rise in antibody titer in summer animals. Much to our surprise, however, only immunization with the TD antigen, and not with the TI-2 antigen induced a humoral response in hibernators. Flow cytometric analysis of CD4 (helper T-lymphocytes), CD8 (cytotoxic T-lymphocytes) and CD45RA (B-lymphocytes) in blood, spleen and lymph nodes ruled out massive apoptosis as explanation of the absent TI humoral response during hibernation. Rather, reduced TI-2 stimulation of B-lymphocytes, possibly due to lowered serum complement during torpor, may explain the reduced antibody production in response to a TI-2 antigen. These results demonstrate that hibernation diminishes the capacity to induce a TI-2 humoral immune response, while the capacity to induce a humoral response to a TD antigen is maintained.

  17. Class II major histocompatibility complex mutant mice to study the germ-line bias of T-cell antigen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Daniel; Krovi, Sai Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D.; Crooks, James; Reisdorph, Richard; White, Janice; Gross, James; Matsuda, Jennifer L.; Gapin, Laurent; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of αβ T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with peptides bound to MHC molecules lies at the center of adaptive immunity. Whether TCRs have evolved to react with MHC or, instead, processes in the thymus involving coreceptors and other molecules select MHC-specific TCRs de novo from a random repertoire is a longstanding immunological question. Here, using nuclease-targeted mutagenesis, we address this question in vivo by generating three independent lines of knockin mice with single-amino acid mutations of conserved class II MHC amino acids that often are involved in interactions with the germ-line–encoded portions of TCRs. Although the TCR repertoire generated in these mutants is similar in size and diversity to that in WT mice, the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC is suggested by a shift and preferential use of some TCR subfamilies over others in mice expressing the mutant class II MHCs. Furthermore, T cells educated on these mutant MHC molecules are alloreactive to each other and to WT cells, and vice versa, suggesting strong functional differences among these repertoires. Taken together, these results highlight both the flexibility of thymic selection and the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC. PMID:27588903

  18. Molecular epidemiology and clinical features of human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection in Spain.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Ana; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos; Benito, Rafael; Caballero, Estrella; Aguilera, Antonio; Ramos, José Manuel; de Mendoza, Carmen; Rodríguez, Carmen; García, Juan; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Roc, Lourdes; Parra, Patricia; Eiros, José; del Romero, Jorge; Soriano, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection in Spain is rare and mainly affects immigrants from endemic regions and native Spaniards with a prior history of sexual intercourse with persons from endemic countries. Herein, we report the main clinical and virological features of cases reported in Spain. All individuals with HTLV-1 infection recorded at the national registry since 1989 were examined. Phylogenetic analysis was performed based on the long terminal repeat (LTR) region. A total of 229 HTLV-1 cases had been reported up to December 2012. The mean age was 41 years old and 61% were female. Their country of origin was Latin America in 59%, Africa in 15%, and Spain in 20%. Transmission had occurred following sexual contact in 41%, parenteral exposure in 12%, and vertically in 9%. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) was diagnosed in 27 cases and adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in 17 subjects. HTLV-1 subtype could be obtained for 45 patients; all but one belonged to the Cosmopolitan subtype a. One Nigerian pregnant woman harbored HTLV-1 subtype b. Within the Cosmopolitan subtype a, two individuals (from Bolivia and Peru, respectively) belonged to the Japanese subgroup B, another two (from Senegal and Mauritania) to the North African subgroup D, and 39 to the Transcontinental subgroup A. Of note, one divergent HTLV-1 strain from an Ethiopian branched off from all five known Cosmopolitan subtype 1a subgroups. Divergent HTLV-1 strains have been introduced and currently circulate in Spain. The relatively large proportion of symptomatic cases (19%) suggests that HTLV-1 infection is underdiagnosed in Spain.

  19. Dermatological Manifestations of Individuals Infected with Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Lorena; Netto, Eduardo; Glesby, Marshall; Carvalho, Edgar; Machado, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Background Human T-cell lymphotropic virus - type 1 (HTLV-1) is associated with specific manifestations such as adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia (ATLL), HTLV-1-associated myelopathy / tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), HTLV-1-associated uveitis and infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 (IDH). Although ATLL and IDH are considered specific manifestations of HTLV-1 infection, several dermatological manifestations have been described in HTLV-1-infected patients. Methods A prevalence study was conducted between 2008 and 2010 with two groups of individuals, 179 HTLV-1 seropositive (positive ELISA and positive Western Blot) and 193 seronegative individuals (ELISA negative). The subjects were selected at a random basis and evaluated using a questionnaire to obtain epidemiological and clinical data. A physical examination was performed to verify the presence of skin lesions. Results Superficial mycoses were found in 54 HTLV-1-positive subjects (30.2%) and in 26 (13.5%) of the seronegative group (p<0.001). Xerosis was found in 39.1% of HTLV-1 infected subjects and in 9.3% of seronegative controls (p<0.001). Ichthyosis was diagnosed in 9 HTLV-1 positive cases (5%) whereas absent in the control group (p=0.001). A seborrheic dermatitis diagnosis was made in 43 HTLV-1 infected subjects (24%) and in 24 seronegative controls (12.4%) (p=0.004). Furthermore, the dermatological manifestations were more intense in the HTLV-1 group. Conclusions Several dermatological manifestations are more common and more severe in HTLV-1 subjects. The presence of these manifestations in an endemic area for HTLV- 1 infection may be a clue for the investigation of this infection. PMID:24111739

  20. Molecular Epidemiology and Clinical Features of Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infection in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Alcantara, Luiz Carlos; Benito, Rafael; Caballero, Estrella; Aguilera, Antonio; Ramos, José Manuel; de Mendoza, Carmen; Rodríguez, Carmen; García, Juan; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Roc, Lourdes; Parra, Patricia; Eiros, José; del Romero, Jorge; Soriano, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection in Spain is rare and mainly affects immigrants from endemic regions and native Spaniards with a prior history of sexual intercourse with persons from endemic countries. Herein, we report the main clinical and virological features of cases reported in Spain. All individuals with HTLV-1 infection recorded at the national registry since 1989 were examined. Phylogenetic analysis was performed based on the long terminal repeat (LTR) region. A total of 229 HTLV-1 cases had been reported up to December 2012. The mean age was 41 years old and 61% were female. Their country of origin was Latin America in 59%, Africa in 15%, and Spain in 20%. Transmission had occurred following sexual contact in 41%, parenteral exposure in 12%, and vertically in 9%. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) was diagnosed in 27 cases and adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in 17 subjects. HTLV-1 subtype could be obtained for 45 patients; all but one belonged to the Cosmopolitan subtype a. One Nigerian pregnant woman harbored HTLV-1 subtype b. Within the Cosmopolitan subtype a, two individuals (from Bolivia and Peru, respectively) belonged to the Japanese subgroup B, another two (from Senegal and Mauritania) to the North African subgroup D, and 39 to the Transcontinental subgroup A. Of note, one divergent HTLV-1 strain from an Ethiopian branched off from all five known Cosmopolitan subtype 1a subgroups. Divergent HTLV-1 strains have been introduced and currently circulate in Spain. The relatively large proportion of symptomatic cases (19%) suggests that HTLV-1 infection is underdiagnosed in Spain. PMID:24924996

  1. Regulatory T cells in human and angiotensin II-induced mouse abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Wu, Wenxue; Lindholt, Jes S.; Sukhova, Galina K.; Libby, Peter; Yu, Xueqing; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Aims Regulatory T cells (Tregs) protect mice from angiotensin II (Ang-II)-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). This study tested whether AAA patients are Treg-insufficient and the Treg molecular mechanisms that control AAA pathogenesis. Methods and results ELISA determined the Foxp3 concentration in blood cell lysates from 485 AAA patients and 204 age- and sex-matched controls. AAA patients exhibited lower blood cell Foxp3 expression than controls (P < 0.0001). Pearson's correlation test demonstrated a significant but negative correlation between Foxp3 and AAA annual expansion rate before (r = –0.147, P = 0.007) and after (r = –0.153, P = 0.006) adjustment for AAA risk factors. AAA in apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe–/–) mice that received different doses of Ang-II exhibited a negative correlation of lesion Foxp3+ Treg numbers with AAA size (r = –0.883, P < 0.0001). Adoptive transfer of Tregs from wild-type (WT) and IL10-deficient (Il10–/–) mice increased AAA lesion Treg content, but only WT mice Tregs reduced AAA size, AAA incidence, blood pressure, lesion macrophage and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell accumulation, and angiogenesis with concurrent increase of lesion collagen content. Both AAA lesion immunostaining and plasma ELISA demonstrated that adoptive transfer of WT Tregs, but not Il10–/– Tregs, reduced the expression of MCP-1. In vitro cell culture and aortic ring assay demonstrated that only Tregs from WT mice, but not those from Il10–/– mice, reduced macrophage MCP-1 secretion, macrophage and vascular cell protease expression and activity, and aortic ring microvessel formation. Conclusion This study supports a protective role of Tregs in human and experimental AAA by releasing IL10 to suppress inflammatory cell chemotaxis, arterial wall remodelling, and angiogenesis. PMID:25824145

  2. VacA’s Induction of VacA-Containing Vacuoles (VCVs) and Their Immunomodulatory Activities on Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Utsch, Ciara; Haas, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA) is a secreted pore-forming toxin and one of the major virulence factors of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which actively supports the persistence and survival of the bacteria in the special ecological niche of the human stomach. H. pylori genomes harbor different allelic forms of the vacA gene, which translate into functionally distinct VacA toxin types. VacA internalizes into various cell types via membrane or specific receptor interactions finally forming acidic endocytic VacA-containing vacuoles (VCVs). In this review, we focus on different characteristics of VacA, its interaction with host cells, the formation and protein content of VCVs and their intracellular transport into human T cells, which finally leads to the immunosuppressive phenotype of VacA. Immunomodulatory activities of VacA on human T cells are discussed with a focus on T-cell proliferation and calcium signaling. PMID:27322323

  3. Identification of human viral protein-derived ligands recognized by individual MHCI-restricted T-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Szomolay, Barbara; Liu, Jie; Brown, Paul E; Miles, John J; Clement, Mathew; Llewellyn-Lacey, Sian; Dolton, Garry; Ekeruche-Makinde, Julia; Lissina, Anya; Schauenburg, Andrea J; Sewell, Andrew K; Burrows, Scott R; Roederer, Mario; Price, David A; Wooldridge, Linda; van den Berg, Hugo A

    2016-07-01

    Evidence indicates that autoimmunity can be triggered by virus-specific CD8(+) T cells that crossreact with self-derived peptide epitopes presented on the cell surface by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules. Identification of the associated viral pathogens is challenging because individual T-cell receptors can potentially recognize up to a million different peptides. Here, we generate peptide length-matched combinatorial peptide library (CPL) scan data for a panel of virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell clones spanning different restriction elements and a range of epitope lengths. CPL scan data drove a protein database search limited to viruses that infect humans. Peptide sequences were ranked in order of likelihood of recognition. For all anti-viral CD8(+) T-cell clones examined in this study, the index peptide was either the top-ranked sequence or ranked as one of the most likely sequences to be recognized. Thus, we demonstrate that anti-viral CD8(+) T-cell clones are highly focused on their index peptide sequence and that 'CPL-driven database searching' can be used to identify the inciting virus-derived epitope for a given CD8(+) T-cell clone. Moreover, to augment access to CPL-driven database searching, we have created a publicly accessible webtool. Application of these methodologies in the clinical setting may clarify the role of viral pathogens in the etiology of autoimmune diseases.

  4. Thymopentin enhances the generation of T-cell lineage derived from human embryonic stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ming-Xia; Wan, Wen-Li; Li, Hai-Shen; Wang, Jing; Chen, Gui-An; Ke, Xiao-Yan

    2015-02-15

    Thymopentin is a group of biologically active peptide secreted mainly by the epithelial cells of thymic cortex and medulla. Whether it promotes T cells production from human embryonic stem cells(hESCs) in vitro remains an elusive issue. In the present study, we develop a novel strategy that enhances T-cell lineage differentiation of hESCs in collagen matrix culture by sequential cytokine cocktails treatment combined with thymopentin stimulation. We observed that approximately 30.75% cells expressed CD34 on day 14 of the cultures and expressed the surface markers of erythroid, lymphoid and myeloid lineages. The results of colony assays and gene expressions by RT-PCR analysis also demonstrated that hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) derived from hESCs were capable of multi-lineage differentiation. Further study revealed that culturing with thymopentin treatment, the CD34(+)CD45RA(+)CD7(+) cells sorted from HPCs expressed T-cell-related genes, IKAROS, DNTT, TCRγ and TCRβ, and T-cell surface markers, CD3, cytoplasmic CD3, CD5, CD27, TCRγδ, CD4 and CD8. The differentiated cells produced the cytokines including IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α in response to stimulation, providing the evidence for T-cell function of these cells. In conclusion, thymopentin enhances T-cell lineage differentiation from hESCs in vitro by mimicking thymus peptide environment in vivo.

  5. Defining the nature of human γδ T cells: a biographical sketch of the highly empathetic

    PubMed Central

    Kalyan, Shirin; Kabelitz, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The elusive task of defining the character of γδ T cells has been an evolving process for immunologists since stumbling upon their existence during the molecular characterization of the α and β T cell receptor genes of their better understood brethren. Defying the categorical rules used to distinctly characterize lymphocytes as either innate or adaptive in nature, γδ T cells inhabit a hybrid world of their own. At opposing ends of the simplified spectrum of modes of antigen recognition used by lymphocytes, natural killer and αβ T cells are particularly well equipped to respond to the ‘missing self' and the ‘dangerous non-self', respectively. However, between these two reductive extremes, we are chronically faced with the challenge of making peace with the ‘safe non-self' and dealing with the inevitable ‘distressed self', and it is within this more complex realm γδ T cells excel thanks to their highly empathetic nature. This review gives an overview of the latest insights revealing the unfolding story of human γδ T cells, providing a biographical sketch of these unique lymphocytes in an attempt to capture the essence of their fundamental nature and events that influence their life trajectory. What hangs in their balance is their nuanced ability to differentiate the friends from the foe and the pathological from the benign to help us adapt swiftly and efficiently to life's many stresses. PMID:23085947

  6. Characterisation of the Immunomodulatory Effects of Meningococcal Opa Proteins on Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susan; Payne, Isabelle; Saleem, Muhammad; Derrick, Jeremy P.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Opa proteins are major surface-expressed proteins located in the Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane, and are potential meningococcal vaccine candidates. Although Opa proteins elicit high levels of bactericidal antibodies following immunisation in mice, progress towards human clinical trials has been delayed due to previous findings that Opa inhibits T cell proliferation in some in vitro assays. However, results from previous studies are conflicting, with different Opa preparations and culture conditions being used. We investigated the effects of various Opa+ and Opa- antigens from N. meningitidis strain H44/76 in a range of in vitro conditions using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and purified CD4+ T cells, measuring T cell proliferation by CFSE dilution using flow cytometry. Wild type recombinant and liposomal Opa proteins inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation after stimulation with IL-2, anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, and these effects were reduced by mutation of the CEACAM1-binding region of Opa. These effects were not observed in culture with ex vivo PBMCs. Opa+ and Opa- OMVs did not consistently exert a stimulatory or inhibitory effect across different culture conditions. These data do not support a hypothesis that Opa proteins would be inhibitory to T cells if given as a vaccine component, and T cell immune responses to OMV vaccines are unlikely to be significantly affected by the presence of Opa proteins. PMID:27111850

  7. Identification of human viral protein-derived ligands recognized by individual MHCI-restricted T-cell receptors

    PubMed Central

    Szomolay, Barbara; Liu, Jie; Brown, Paul E; Miles, John J; Clement, Mathew; Llewellyn-Lacey, Sian; Dolton, Garry; Ekeruche-Makinde, Julia; Lissina, Anya; Schauenburg, Andrea J; Sewell, Andrew K; Burrows, Scott R; Roederer, Mario; Price, David A; Wooldridge, Linda; van den Berg, Hugo A

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates that autoimmunity can be triggered by virus-specific CD8+ T cells that crossreact with self-derived peptide epitopes presented on the cell surface by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules. Identification of the associated viral pathogens is challenging because individual T-cell receptors can potentially recognize up to a million different peptides. Here, we generate peptide length-matched combinatorial peptide library (CPL) scan data for a panel of virus-specific CD8+ T-cell clones spanning different restriction elements and a range of epitope lengths. CPL scan data drove a protein database search limited to viruses that infect humans. Peptide sequences were ranked in order of likelihood of recognition. For all anti-viral CD8+ T-cell clones examined in this study, the index peptide was either the top-ranked sequence or ranked as one of the most likely sequences to be recognized. Thus, we demonstrate that anti-viral CD8+ T-cell clones are highly focused on their index peptide sequence and that ‘CPL-driven database searching' can be used to identify the inciting virus-derived epitope for a given CD8+ T-cell clone. Moreover, to augment access to CPL-driven database searching, we have created a publicly accessible webtool. Application of these methodologies in the clinical setting may clarify the role of viral pathogens in the etiology of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26846725

  8. Identification of human viral protein-derived ligands recognized by individual MHCI-restricted T-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Szomolay, Barbara; Liu, Jie; Brown, Paul E; Miles, John J; Clement, Mathew; Llewellyn-Lacey, Sian; Dolton, Garry; Ekeruche-Makinde, Julia; Lissina, Anya; Schauenburg, Andrea J; Sewell, Andrew K; Burrows, Scott R; Roederer, Mario; Price, David A; Wooldridge, Linda; van den Berg, Hugo A

    2016-07-01

    Evidence indicates that autoimmunity can be triggered by virus-specific CD8(+) T cells that crossreact with self-derived peptide epitopes presented on the cell surface by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules. Identification of the associated viral pathogens is challenging because individual T-cell receptors can potentially recognize up to a million different peptides. Here, we generate peptide length-matched combinatorial peptide library (CPL) scan data for a panel of virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell clones spanning different restriction elements and a range of epitope lengths. CPL scan data drove a protein database search limited to viruses that infect humans. Peptide sequences were ranked in order of likelihood of recognition. For all anti-viral CD8(+) T-cell clones examined in this study, the index peptide was either the top-ranked sequence or ranked as one of the most likely sequences to be recognized. Thus, we demonstrate that anti-viral CD8(+) T-cell clones are highly focused on their index peptide sequence and that 'CPL-driven database searching' can be used to identify the inciting virus-derived epitope for a given CD8(+) T-cell clone. Moreover, to augment access to CPL-driven database searching, we have created a publicly accessible webtool. Application of these methodologies in the clinical setting may clarify the role of viral pathogens in the etiology of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26846725

  9. Comparison of stress-induced PRINS gene expression in normal human keratinocytes and HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Bari, Lilla; Bacsa, Sarolta; Sonkoly, Eniko; Bata-Csörgo, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos; Dobozy, Attila; Széll, Márta

    2011-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects approximately 2-4% of the population. We recently described a novel non-coding RNA, psoriasis susceptibility related RNA gene induced by stress (PRINS), that was overexpressed in non-lesional psoriatic epidermis, and its expression was induced by various stress factors such as serum starvation, contact inhibition, ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation, viral infection and translational inhibition in HaCaT cells. In the present work we set out to compare the stress and microbial agent-induced PRINS expression in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) and HaCaT cells. Since nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is involved in the cellular stress response, we sought to explore whether there is a connection between the NF-κB and PRINS-mediated signal transduction pathways in NHKs and HaCaT cells. We found that the PRINS expression responded differentially to various stress signals and microbial agents in HaCaT cells and in NHKs: after translational inhibition and UV-B treatment, similar induction of PRINS expression occurred with different time courses while after microbial agent treatment, the PRINS expression was significantly induced in HaCaT cells, whereas we could not detect similar changes in NHKs. To explore whether the known NF-κB abnormalities in HaCaT cells could be related to this differential PRINS expression, we silenced the PRINS gene expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA) in both HaCaT cells and in NHKs and monitored NF-κB signal transduction after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. Silencing of PRINS had no effect on LPS-induced NF-κB activity either in HaCaT cells or in NHKs. Our results indicate that PRINS probably affects keratinocytes functions independently of NF-κB signalling. PMID:21750967

  10. Human T cell activation. III. Induction of an early activation antigen, EA 1 by TPA, mitogens and antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Jung, L.K.L.; FU, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    With human T cells activated for 12 hours by 12-o-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as immunogen, an IgG/sub 2a/ monoclonal antibody, mAb Ea 1, has been generated to a 60KD phosphorylated protein with 32KD and 28KD subunits. The antigen, Ea 1, is readily detected on 60% of isolated thymocytes by indirect immunofluorescence. A low level of Ea 1 expression is detectable on 2-6% of blood lymphocytes. Isolated T cells have been induced to express Ea 1 by TPA, mitogens and anitgens. TPA activated T cells express Ea 1 as early as 1 hour after activation. By 4 hours, greater than 95% of the T cells stain with mAb Ea 1. About 50% of the PHA or Con A activated T cells express Ea 1 with a similar kinetics. Ea 1 expression proceeds that of IL-2 receptor in these activation processes. T cells activated by soluble antigens (tetanus toxoid and PPD) and alloantigens in MLR also express Ea 1 after a long incubation. About 20% of the T cells stain for Ea 1 at day 6. Ea 1 expression is not limited to activated T cells. B cells activated by TPA or anti-IgM Ab plus B cell growth factor express Ea 1. The kinetics of Ea 1 expression is slower and the staining is less intense. Repeated attempts to detect Ea 1 on resting and activated monocytes and granulocytes have not been successful. Ea 1 expression is due to de novo synthesis for its induction is blocked by cycloheximide and actinomycin D. Ea 1 is the earliest activation antigen detectable to-date.

  11. Curcumin induces apoptotic cell death of activated human CD4+ T cells via increasing endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Zhang, Qinggao; Joe, Yeonsoo; Lee, Bong Hee; Ryu, Do Gon; Kwon, Kang Beom; Ryter, Stefan W; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2013-03-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic antioxidant compound, exerts well-known anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects, the latter which can influence the activation of immune cells including T cells. Furthermore, curcumin can inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, through suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway. The beneficial effects of curcumin in diseases such as arthritis, allergy, asthma, atherosclerosis, diabetes and cancer may be due to its immunomodulatory properties. We studied the potential of curcumin to modulate CD4+ T cells-mediated autoimmune disease, by examining the effects of this compound on human CD4+ lymphocyte activation. Stimulation of human T cells with PHA or CD3/CD28 induced IL-2 mRNA expression and activated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. The treatment of T cells with curcumin induced the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway, initiated by the phosphorylation of PERK and IRE1. Furthermore, curcumin increased the expression of the ER stress associated transcriptional factors XBP-1, cleaved p50ATF6α and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in human CD4+ and Jurkat T cells. In PHA-activated T cells, curcumin further enhanced PHA-induced CHOP expression and reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Finally, curcumin treatment induced apoptotic cell death in activated T cells via eliciting an excessive ER stress response, which was reversed by the ER-stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyric acid or transfection with CHOP-specific siRNA. These results suggest that curcumin can impact both ER stress and mitochondria functional pathways, and thereby could be used as a promising therapy in the context of Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:23415873

  12. The Distribution of Human Stem Cell–like Memory T Cell in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hai; Gu, Yong; Sheng, Si Yuan; Lu, Chuan Gang; Zou, Jian Yong

    2016-01-01

    Human stem cell–like memory T (Tscm) cells are long-lived, self-renewing memory lymphocytes that can differentiate into effector cells and mediate strong antitumour response in murine model. The distribution and function of Tscm cells in human lung cancer remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the properties of human Tscm cells in the blood and lymph node of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. There were more CD4+ Tscm cells in blood from NSCLC patients than from healthy donors, fewer CD4+ and CD8+ TSCM cells in blood than in lymph node from NSCLC patients. To further analyze their properties, we stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from NSCLC patients by mitogens to examine cytokine production. Our data suggest that both CD4 and CD8 Tscm cells in blood produced int