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Sample records for human t-cell line

  1. HIV-1 latency in actively dividing human T cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Jeeninga, Rienk E; Westerhout, Ellen M; van Gerven, Marja L; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Background Eradication of HIV-1 from an infected individual cannot be achieved by current drug regimens. Viral reservoirs established early during the infection remain unaffected by anti-retroviral therapy and are able to replenish systemic infection upon interruption of the treatment. Therapeutic targeting of viral latency will require a better understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying the establishment and long-term maintenance of HIV-1 in resting memory CD4 T cells, the most prominent reservoir of transcriptional silent provirus. However, the molecular mechanisms that permit long-term transcriptional control of proviral gene expression in these cells are still not well understood. Exploring the molecular details of viral latency will provide new insights for eventual future therapeutics that aim at viral eradication. Results We set out to develop a new in vitro HIV-1 latency model system using the doxycycline (dox)-inducible HIV-rtTA variant. Stable cell clones were generated with a silent HIV-1 provirus, which can subsequently be activated by dox-addition. Surprisingly, only a minority of the cells was able to induce viral gene expression and a spreading infection, eventhough these experiments were performed with the actively dividing SupT1 T cell line. These latent proviruses are responsive to TNFα treatment and alteration of the DNA methylation status with 5-Azacytidine or genistein, but not responsive to the regular T cell activators PMA and IL2. Follow-up experiments in several T cell lines and with wild-type HIV-1 support these findings. Conclusion We describe the development of a new in vitro model for HIV-1 latency and discuss the advantages of this system. The data suggest that HIV-1 proviral latency is not restricted to resting T cells, but rather an intrinsic property of the virus. PMID:18439275

  2. Expression of recombination-activating genes and T cell receptor gene recombination in the human T cell leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hong-yun; Ma, Li; Meng, Min-jie; Yao, Xin-sheng; Lin, Ying; Wu, Zhen-qiang; He, Xiao-wei; Wang, Ju-fang; Wang, Xiao-ning

    2007-03-05

    Recent studies have suggested that mature T cells can change their specificity through reexpression of recombination-activating genes (RAG) and RAG-mediated V(D)J recombination. This process is named receptor revision and has been observed in mature peripheral T cells from transgenic mice and human donors. However, whether thebreceptor revision in mature T cells is a random or orientated process remains poorly understood. Here we used the Jurkathuman T cell line, which represents a mature stage of T cell development, as a model to investigate the regulation of Tcell receptor (TCR) gene recombination. TCR Dbeta-Jbeta signal joint T cell receptor excision DNA circles (sjTRECs) were determined by nested and seminested PCR. Double-strand DNA breaks at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) in the TCRVbeta chain locus were detected by ligation-mediated-PCR. Further analysis of the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) size of the TCRVbeta chain was examined by the TCR GeneScan technique. RAG1, RAG2, and three crucial components of the nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ) pathway were readily detected in Jurkat. Characteristics of junctional diversity of Dbeta2-Jbeta2 signal joints and ds RSS breaks associated with the Dbeta2 5' and Dbeta 2 3' sites were detected in DNA from Jurkat cells. CDR3 size and the gene sequences of the TCRVbeta chain did not change during cell proliferation. RAG1 and RAG2 and ongoing TCR gene recombination are coexpressed in Jurkat cells, but the ongoing recombination process may not play a role in modification of the TCR repertoire.However, the results suggest that Jurkat could be used as a model for studying the regulation of RAGs and V(D)J recombination and as a "special" model of the coexistence of TCR gene rearrangements and "negative" receptor revision.

  3. Interleukin 2 inhibits in vitro growth of human T cell lines carrying retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Sugamura, K; Nakai, S; Fujii, M; Hinuma, Y

    1985-05-01

    Four human T cell lines, TL-Mor, TL-Su, TL-TerI, and TL-OmI, carrying human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV), were established previously. TL-Mor, TL-Su, and TL-TerI were derived from interleukin 2 (IL-2)-dependent parental cell lines cloned from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) of three healthy HTLV carriers, while TL-OmI was directly established from PBL of a patient with adult T cell leukemia. These four TL cell lines grow autonomously without IL-2. When they were cultured in the presence of IL-2, their growth was inhibited after a few days. This growth inhibition depended on the dose of IL-2, and the effective dose significantly promoted growth of their parental IL-2-dependent cell lines. The growth inhibition is demonstrated to be due to specific binding of IL-2 to receptors on the TL cells.

  4. Human B cell activating factor (BCAF): production by a human T cell tumor line.

    PubMed

    Fevrier, M; Diu, A; Mollier, P; Abadie, A; Olive, D; Mawas, C; Theze, J

    1989-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that supernatants from human T cell clones stimulated by a pair of anti-CD2 monoclonal antibodies cause resting human B cells to become activated and to proliferate in the absence of any other signals. The activity responsible for these effects was shown to be different from already characterized lymphokines and in particular from IL-2 and IL-4, and was named B Cell Activating Factor or BCAF. In this paper, we describe the production of BCAF by a human T cell tumor line T687 after phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation; this production can be potentiated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). We further show that the stimulatory phase can be separated from the secretory phase thereby avoiding contamination of BCAF-containing supernatant by PMA and PHA. Supernatants produced under these conditions do not contain either IL-4 or IFN but contain traces of lymphotoxin and 2 to 10 ng/ml of IL-2. The T687 cell line will allow us to obtain a large volume of supernatant for biochemical study and purification of the molecule(s) responsible for BCAF activity.

  5. Altered Expression of Tyrosine Kinases of the Src and Syk Families in Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Infected T-Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Robert; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Dodon, Madeleine Duc; Bessia, Christine; Hazan, Uriel; Kourilsky, Philippe; Israël, Alain

    1999-01-01

    During the late phase of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, a severe lymphoproliferative disorder caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), leukemic cells no longer produce interleukin-2. Several studies have reported the lack of the Src-like protein tyrosine kinase Lck and overexpression of Lyn and Fyn in these cells. In this report we demonstrate that, in addition to the downregulation of TCR, CD45, and Lck (which are key components of T-cell activation), HTLV-1-infected cell lines demonstrate a large increase of FynB, a Fyn isoform usually poorly expressed in T cells. Furthermore, similar to anergic T cells, Fyn is hyperactive in one of these HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, probably as a consequence of Csk downregulation. A second family of two proteins, Zap-70 and Syk, relay the signal of T-cell activation. We demonstrate that in contrast to uninfected T cells, Zap-70 is absent in HTLV-1-infected T cells, whereas Syk is overexpressed. In searching for the mechanism responsible for FynB overexpression and Zap-70 downregulation, we have investigated the ability of the Tax and Rex proteins to modulate Zap-70 expression and the alternative splicing mechanism which gives rise to either FynB or FynT. By using Jurkat T cells stably transfected with the tax and rex genes or inducibly expressing the tax gene, we found that the expression of Rex was necessary to increase fynB expression, suggesting that Rex controls fyn gene splicing. Conversely, with the same Jurkat clones, we found that the expression of Tax but not Rex could downregulate Zap-70 expression. These results suggest that the effect of Tax and Rex must cooperate to deregulate the pathway of T-cell activation in HTLV-1-infected T cells. PMID:10196263

  6. Entrance and survival of Salmonella typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica within human B- and T-cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Verjans, G M; Ringrose, J H; van Alphen, L; Feltkamp, T E; Kusters, J G

    1994-01-01

    Lymphocytes, located within the Peyer's patches, might be involved in the dissemination of enteropathogenic Salmonella typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we have investigated the susceptibility of human B- and T-cell lines to bacterial adhesion and invasion. The two S. typhimurium strains analyzed were highly invasive, while the two Y. enterocolitica (O:8) strains adhered to the B- and T-cell lines but did not enter the cell lines in significant amounts. We hypothesize that the incapability of the Y. enterocolitica (O:8) strains to enter the human B- and T-cell lines is most probably due to the bacterial inability to induce the internalization process upon adhesion to both cell lines. Although immortalized B- and T-cell lines were used in this study, the results presented suggest the possibility that both cell types could play a role in the dissemination of intracellularly residing S. typhimurium in vivo. PMID:7514574

  7. Fucoidan extracted from Cladosiphon okamuranus Tokida induces apoptosis of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-infected T-cell lines and primary adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Haneji, Kaori; Matsuda, Takehiro; Tomita, Mariko; Kawakami, Hirochika; Ohshiro, Kazuiku; Uchihara, Jun-Nosuke; Masuda, Masato; Takasu, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Ohta, Takao; Mori, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and remains incurable. The highest endemic area of HTLV-1 carriers in Japan is located in Okinawa, and novel treatments are urgently needed in this area. We extracted fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide, from the brown seaweed Cladosiphon okamuranus Tokida cultivated in Okinawa, Japan and examined its tumor-suppression activity against ATL. Fucoidan significantly inhibited the growth of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of ATL patients and HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines but not that of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Fucoidan induced apoptosis of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines mediated through downregulation of cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2 and survivin and G1 phase accumulation through the downregulation of cyclin D2, c-myc, and hyperphosphorylated form of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein. Further analysis showed that fucoidan inactivated NF-kappaB and activator protein-1 and inhibited NF-kappaB-inducible chemokine, C-C chemokine ligand 5 (regulated on activation, normal T expressed and secreted) production, and homotypic cell-cell adhesion of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. In vivo use of fucoidan resulted in partial inhibition of growth of tumors of an HTLV-1-infected T-cell line transplanted subcutaneously in severe combined immune deficient mice. Our results indicate that fucoidan is a potentially useful therapeutic agent for patients with ATL.

  8. Antibody to heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) inhibits human T-cell lymphoptropic virus type I (HTLV-I) production by transformed rabbit T-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fallouh, Hanan; Mahana, Wahib

    2012-10-01

    Adult T cell leukemia is a fatal malignant transformation caused by the human T-cell lymphoptropic virus type I (HTLV-I). HTLV-I is only associated with the development of this disease in a small percentage of infected individuals. Using two rabbit transformed T-cell lines; RH/K30 (asymptomatic) and RH/K34 (leukemogenic), we have investigated the expression of heat shock proteins (HSP) 90 and 70 and the role of anti-HSPs antibodies on virus production. HSPs surface expression was higher on RH/K34 than RH/K30 cells. Heat treatment of cells increased the expression of HSPs proteins and virus production; HSPs augmentation was stabilized after 12 h and virus production reached a maximum between 8 h-12 h then returned to normal level after 24 h of culture. Incubation of cells only with rabbit anti-HSP 70 antibodies prevented virus production specifically in the leukemogenic cell line. The results indicate a relationship between HSP 70 and virus production.

  9. In vitro posttranslational modification of lamin B cloned from a human T-cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, K M; Chan, E K; Grant, B J; Sullivan, K F; Tan, E M; Glass, C A

    1990-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by spontaneously occurring autoantibodies which have proven to be useful reagents for the characterization of specific nuclear proteins. Using a monoclonal autoantibody (72B9) derived from a murine lupus strain, we have cloned a cDNA from the human T-cell line MOLT-4, which encodes nuclear lamin B. The identity of the encoded protein as lamin B was established by both biochemical and immunological criteria. Inspection of the deduced amino acid sequence of lamin B revealed the presence in coil 1B of the alpha-helical domain of a leucine heptad repeat region. Analysis of mRNA in HL60 and MOLT-4 cells, which express only lamin B, or HeLa cells, which express all three major lamins (A, B, and C), together with the comigration of in vitro-translated product with isolated HeLa cell lamin B by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, suggests that a single lamin B is expressed in mammalian somatic cells. In vitro translation with the cDNA clone revealed an EDTA-sensitive posttranslational modification which resulted in an increase in the apparent molecular weight to that equivalent to the native in vivo-synthesized lamin B protein. This in vitro modification included incorporation of a product of mevalonolactone and required an intact carboxy terminus. Images PMID:2325650

  10. T cell binding to B lymphoid cell lines in humans: a marker for T-B cell interaction?

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Fudenberg, H H

    1983-04-15

    Binding of human circulating T cells to established normal and malignant B cell lines results in rosette formation. The percentage of B cells, circulating T cells, and thymocytes able to bind to the B-LCL Raji were 0%, 59 +/- 4% and 61 +/- 6%, respectively. The percentage of rosettes formed between Raji cells and circulating mononuclear cells from 92 normal individuals was 27.8 +/- 5.3%, and remained stable over several months. This phenomenon seems to involve relatively mature B cells, and a T cell marker which appears early in T cell ontogeny. In the peripheral blood, most of the B-LCL binding T cells exhibit a 'helper-inducer' phenotype, as determined with the monoclonal antibodies Leu 3a and OKT4. However, a significant percentage of T cells with so-called 'cytotoxic-suppressor' markers (Leu 2a and OKT8) also bind to B-LCL. The T cells involved in this morphological interactive reaction with B cells might conceivably be specifically involved in regulating B cell functions. Enumeration of this particular subset may be useful in conditions where abnormal T-B cell interactions are suspected.

  11. Chronic exposure to asbestos enhances TGF-β1 production in the human adult T cell leukemia virus-immortalized T cell line MT-2.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Megumi; Chen, Ying; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Otsuki, Takemi

    2014-12-01

    Asbestos exposure causes various tumors such as lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma. To elucidate the immunological alteration in asbestos-related tumors, an asbestos-induced apoptosis-resistant subline (MT-2Rst) was established from a human adult T cell leukemia virus-immortalized T cell line (MT-2Org) by long-term exposure to asbestos chrysotile-B (CB). In this study, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) knockdown using lentiviral vector-mediated RNA interference showed that MT-2Rst cells secreted increased levels of TGF-β1, and acquired resistance to TGF-β1-mediated growth inhibition. We showed that exposure of MT-2Org cells to CB activated the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), ERK1/2, p38 and JNK1. Furthermore, TGF-β1-knockdown cells and treatment with MAPK inhibitors revealed that MT-2Rst cells secreted a high level of TGF-β1 mainly through phosphorylation of p38. However, an Annexin V assay indicated that TGF-β1 resistance in MT-2Rst cells was not directly involved in the acquisition of resistance to apoptosis that is triggered by CB exposure. The overall results demonstrate that long-term exposure of MT-2Org cells to CB induces a regulatory T cell-like phenotype, suggesting that chronic exposure to asbestos leads to a state of immune suppression.

  12. Multiplexed gene transfer to a human T-cell line by combining Sleeping Beauty transposon system with methotrexate selection.

    PubMed

    Kacherovsky, Nataly; Liu, Gary W; Jensen, Michael C; Pun, Suzie H

    2015-07-01

    Engineered human T-cells are a promising therapeutic modality for cancer immunotherapy. T-cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors combined with additional genes to enhance T-cell proliferation, survival, or tumor targeting may further improve efficacy but require multiple stable gene transfer events. Methods are therefore needed to increase production efficiency for multiplexed engineered cells. In this work, we demonstrate multiplexed, non-viral gene transfer to a human T-cell line with efficient selection (∼ 50%) of cells expressing up to three recombinant open reading frames. The efficient introduction of multiple genes to T-cells was achieved using the Sleeping Beauty transposon system delivered in minicircles by nucleofection. We demonstrate rapid selection for engineered cells using methotrexate (MTX) and a mutant human dihydrofolate reductase resistant to methotrexate-induced metabolic inhibition. Preferential amplification of cells expressing multiple transgenes was achieved by two successive rounds of increasing MTX concentration. This non-viral gene transfer method with MTX step selection can potentially be used in the generation of clinical-grade T-cells housing multiplexed genetic modifications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Natural OX40L expressed on human T cell leukemia virus type-I-immortalized T cell lines interferes with infection of activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells by CCR5-utilizing human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background OX40 ligand (OX40L) co-stimulates and differentiates T cells via ligation of OX40 that is transiently induced on T cells upon activation, resulting in prolonged T cell survival and enhanced cytokine production by T cells. This view has led to the targeting of OX40 as a strategy to boost antigen specific T cells in the context of vaccination. In addition, the ligation of OX40 has also been shown to inhibit infection by CCR5-utilizing (R5) but not CXCR4-utilizing (X4) human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) via enhancement of production of CCR5-binding β-chemokines. It was reasoned that human T cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-1) immortalized T cell lines that express high levels of OX40L could serve as an unique source of physiologically functional OX40L. The fact that HTLV-1+ T cell lines simultaneously also express high levels of OX40 suggested a potential limitation. Results Results of our studies showed that HTLV-1+ T cell lines bound exogenous OX40 but not OX40L, indicating that HTLV-1+ T cell lines express an active form of OX40L but an inactive form of OX40. Anti-OX40 non-blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb), but not blocking mAb, stained HTLV-1+ T cell lines, suggesting that the OX40 might be saturated with endogenous OX40L. Functionality of the OX40L was confirmed by the fact that a paraformaldehyde (PFA)-fixed HTLV-1+ T cell lines inhibited the infection of autologous activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with R5 HIV-1 which was reversed by either anti-OX40L blocking mAb or a mixture of neutralizing mAbs against CCR5-binding β-chemokines. Conclusions Altogether, these results demonstrated that autologous T cell lines immortalized by HTLV-1 can be utilized as a conventional source of physiologically functional OX40L. PMID:24238037

  14. Expression of FAP-1 (Fas-associated phosphatase) and resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis in T cell lines derived from human T cell leukemia virus type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis patients.

    PubMed

    Arai, M; Kannagi, M; Matsuoka, M; Sato, T; Yamamoto, N; Fujii, M

    1998-02-10

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-I) is the etiologic agent of HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) with an autoimmune condition. We examined the sensitivity of HTLV-I-infected T cell lines to Fas-mediated apoptosis, which plays a critical role in the elimination of self-reactive T cells. Among 13 human T-cell lines, all 4 HAM-derived T cell lines and 4 of 6 non-HAM/HTLV-I T cell lines were resistant to apoptosis induced by anti-Fas antibody, whereas only 1 of 3 uninfected cell lines was resistant to apoptosis. The cell lines resistant to apoptosis expressed the viral tax gene and/or the cellular FAP-1 (Fas-associated phosphatase) gene, both of which inhibit Fas-mediated apoptosis in T cell lines. Although Tax is a transcriptional activator of a number of cellular genes, the expression of Tax in a T cell line did not induce the expression of FAP-1, suggesting that these two antiapoptotic proteins independently function in HTLV-I-infected cells. Seven of 10 HTLV-I-infected cell lines, compared with only 1 of 3 virus-negative cell lines, expressed FAP-1. All four HAM cell lines expressed the FAP-1 gene, and its level in these cells was higher than in other T cell lines. Our results suggest that virus-infected T cells escape Fas-mediated immune surveillance by the function of Tax and FAP-1, and this escape may be involved in the autoimmune condition observed in HAM/TSP patients.

  15. Calcium ionophoretic and apoptotic effects of ferutinin in the human Jurkat T-cell line.

    PubMed

    Macho, Antonio; Blanco-Molina, Magdalena; Spagliardi, Paola; Appendino, Giovanni; Bremner, Paul; Heinrich, Michael; Fiebich, Bernd L; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-09-01

    We have investigated the ionophoretic and apoptotic properties of the daucane sesquiterpene ferutinin and three related compounds, ferutidin, 2-alpha-hydroxyferutidin and teferin, all isolated from various species of plants from the genus Ferula. Ferutinin induced a biphasic elevation of intracellular Ca2+ in the leukemia T-cell line, Jurkat. First, a rapid calcium peak was observed and inhibited by BAPTA-AM. This initial calcium mobilization was followed by a sustained elevation, mediated by the entry of extracellular calcium through L-type calcium channels and sensitive to inhibition by EGTA. Moreover, ferutinin-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells, and this event was preceded, in a cyclosporine-A sensitive manner, by a loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsim) and by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species. Ferutinin-induced DNA fragmentation was mediated by a caspase-3-dependent pathway, and was initiated independently of any specific phase of the cell cycle. The evaluation of ferutinin analogs in calcium mobilization and apoptosis assays showed strict structure-activity relationships, with p-hydroxylation of the benzoyl moiety being requested for activity.

  16. Increasing cellular uptake of mesoporous silica nanoparticles in human embryonic kidney cell line 293T cells by using Lipofectamine 2000.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiandong; Teng, Zhaogang; Tian, Ying; Fang, Tian; Ma, Jie; Sun, Jin; Zhu, Feipeng; Wu, Jinrong; Wang, Xin; Yang, Nannan; Zhou, Xiaojun; Yun, Shifeng; Lu, Guangming

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are ideal nanocarriers that have recently gained attention in important bioapplications such as drug, gene, and protein delivery. The efficacy of endocytosis greatly affects the biological functions of MSNs. In the present study, we investigated the effect of cationic liposomes of Lipofectamine 2000 on cellular uptake of MSNs and the cytotoxicity of cationic liposomes combining with MSNs both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, mesoporous silica nanoparticles with an average diameter of 130 nm and negative surface charge were synthesized and characterized. The possible role of Lipofectamine 2000 in cellular uptake of MSNs was evaluated in human embryonic kidney cell line 293T cells by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis. The toxicities of liposomes combining with MSNs were tested in vitro via cell apoptosis assay and MTT cell viability assay, and in vivo by histological examination of six organs of mice after intravenous injection. The endocytosis efficiency of MSNs in human embryonic kidney 293T cells was greatly increased using Lipofectamine 2000 compared with controls (P < 0.001). No apparent in vitro or in vivo cytotoxicity was found for Lipofectamine 2000 combining with MSNs. Our data indicate that cationic liposomes of Lipofectamine 2000 has the potential to greatly increase cellular uptake of MSNs with negative surface charge in human renal 293T cells without apparent toxicity.

  17. Characterization of a soluble suppressor of human B cell immunoglobulin biosynthesis produced by a continuous human suppressor T cell line

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    A human suppressor T cell maintained in long-term culture with conditioned medium containing interleukin 2 elaborates a suppressor factor(s) that specifically inhibits human polyclonal B cell immunoglobulin biosynthesis. This soluble immune suppressor supernate of immunoglobulin production (CTC-SISS-B) shares a number of features with the previously described suppressive mediator elaborated by concanavalin A-activated human peripheral T cells (SISS-B) including: (a) the inhibition by a noncytotoxic mechanism, (b) the suppression of immunoglobulin biosynthesis either through direct action on the B cell or indirect action via the monocyte, (c) the loss of inhibition in the presence of the monosaccharide L-rhamnose, (d) the elaboration by cells irradiated with 500 ro 2,000 rad, and (e) molecular weights of 60,000-- 90,000. Furthermore, the suppression by this mediator appears to be specific for B cell immunoglobulin production in that CTC-SISS B has no effect on T cell proliferation to mitogens, antigens, an allogeneic cells or on T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. These data indicate that one possible mechanism of suppressor T cell inhibition of human immunoglobulin production is via the generation of a lectinlike suppressor lymphokine that interacts with defined saccharide determinants on the cell surface of either the B cell or monocyte. PMID:6454754

  18. A Human Embryonic Kidney 293T Cell Line Mutated at the Golgi α-Mannosidase II Locus*

    PubMed Central

    Crispin, Max; Chang, Veronica T.; Harvey, David J.; Dwek, Raymond A.; Evans, Edward J.; Stuart, David I.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Lord, J. Michael; Spooner, Robert A.; Davis, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    Disruption of Golgi α-mannosidase II activity can result in type II congenital dyserythropoietic anemia and induce lupus-like autoimmunity in mice. Here, we isolated a mutant human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cell line called Lec36, which displays sensitivity to ricin that lies between the parental HEK 293T cells, in which the secreted and membrane-expressed proteins are dominated by complex-type glycosylation, and 293S Lec1 cells, which produce only oligomannose-type N-linked glycans. Stem cell marker 19A was transiently expressed in the HEK 293T Lec36 cells and in parental HEK 293T cells with and without the potent Golgi α-mannosidase II inhibitor, swainsonine. Negative ion nano-electrospray ionization mass spectra of the 19A N-linked glycans from HEK 293T Lec36 and swainsonine-treated HEK 293T cells were qualitatively indistinguishable and, as shown by collision-induced dissociation spectra, were dominated by hybrid-type glycosylation. Nucleotide sequencing revealed mutations in each allele of MAN2A1, the gene encoding Golgi α-mannosidase II: a point mutation that mapped to the active site was found in one allele, and an in-frame deletion of 12 nucleotides was found in the other allele. Expression of the wild type but not the mutant MAN2A1 alleles in Lec36 cells restored processing of the 19A reporter glycoprotein to complex-type glycosylation. The Lec36 cell line will be useful for expressing therapeutic glycoproteins with hybrid-type glycans and as a sensitive host for detecting mutations in human MAN2A1 causing type II congenital dyserythropoietic anemia. PMID:19465480

  19. Selective killing of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I-transformed cell lines by a damavaricin Fc derivative.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Yamamoto, N; Nomoto, K; Sasaki, K; Onodera, K

    1989-05-01

    n-Pentyl ether of damavaricin Fc (n-pentyl DvFc) preferentially killed human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I)-transformed cell lines. The mechanism of action of the drug was investigated using MT-4 cells. Cytotoxic action was diminished by the removal of n-pentyl DvFc from the culture or by the addition of sulfhydryl compounds such as 2-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol. The killing activity of n-pentyl DvFc was also diminished by membrane-acting agents including quinidine and diphenylhydantoin. Influx and subsequent efflux of Ca2+ were observed when either HTLV-I infected (MT-4 cells) or uninfected cells were treated with n-pentyl DvFc. An efflux of K+ was observed in HTLV-I infected MT-4 cells immediately after the exposure of the cells to n-pentyl DvFc. The K+ efflux, however, was not observed in the uninfected T cells. n-Pentyl DvFc seems to act primarily on the cell surface of MT-4 cells, leading to the perturbation of membrane function. The restoration of cell growth, however, is critically dependent on the presence of dithiothreitol and 2-mercaptoethanol, implying a role for a free sulfhydryl group in the killing activity.

  20. Mycobacterium ulcerans mycolactone interferes with adhesion, migration and proliferation of primary human keratinocytes and HaCaT cell line.

    PubMed

    Graziola, Francesca; Colombo, Elena; Tiberio, Rossana; Leigheb, Giorgio; Bozzo, Chiarella

    2017-04-01

    The pathogenicity of Mycobacterium ulcerans (Buruli ulcer) is closely associated with the secretion of exotoxin mycolactone. The cytotoxicity of mycolactone has been linked to its apoptogenic activity. We explored if low mycolactone concentrations, which are not able to induce apoptosis, can influence other essential activities on two primary human keratinocyte populations, keratinocyte stem cells (KSC) and transit amplifying cells (TAC), and on a human keratinocyte line, HaCaT. We demonstrated that 0.01 and 0.1 ng/ml mycolactone A/B are not able to induce apoptosis in primary human keratinocytes, but interfere with KSC wound repair. Moreover, the same toxin concentrations reduce cell proliferation of KSC and TAC and their ability to adhere to type IV collagen. HaCaT cells are more resistant to the toxin; nevertheless, they show a delayed woud repair when treated with 1 and 10 ng/ml mycolactone A/B. Moreover, these sub-apoptotic concentrations affect their ability to proliferate and adhere to collagen IV. Wound healing is a complex mechanism, which occurs "in vivo" as the outcome of many co-ordinated events. Sub-apoptotic mycolactone concentrations can affect essential mechanisms, which are required to achieve wound repair, such as adhesion, migration and proliferation of human keratinocytes.

  1. Alteration of cytoskeletal molecules in a human T cell line caused by continuous exposure to chrysotile asbestos.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Megumi; Chen, Ying; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Hiratsuka, Jun-Ichi; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Kimura, Yoshinobu; Otsuki, Takemi

    2013-09-01

    Among the various biological effects of asbestos such as fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis, we have been focusing on the immunological effects becausesilica (SiO(2)) and asbestos chemically is a mineral silicate of silica. Observations of the effects of asbestos on CD4+ T cells showed reduction of CXCR3 chemokine receptor and reduced capacity of interferon γ production. In particular, use of theHTLV-1 immortalized human T cell line, MT-2, and cDNA array analysis have helped to identify the modification of CXCR3. We investigated alteration of protein expression among MT-2 original cells that had no contact with asbestos, and six chrysotile-continuously exposed independent sublines using ProteinChip and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) assays. Further confirmation of the changes in protein expression due to asbestos exposure was obtained after the 2DGE method indicated protein modification of β-actin. β-actin was upregulated in mRNA, as were the levels of protein expression and phosphorylation. Moreover, a binding assay between cells and chrysotile showed that various molecules related to the cytoskeleton such as vimentin, myosin-9 and tubulin-β2, as well as β-actin, exhibited enhanced bindings in asbestos-exposed cells. The overall findings indicate that the cell surface cytoskeleton may play an important role in inducing the cellular changes caused by asbestos in immune cells, since fibers are not incorporated to the cells and how the alterations of cytoskeleton determined cell destiny to cause the reduction of tumor immunity is important to consider the biological effects of asbestos. Further studies to target several cytoskeleton-related molecules associated with the effects of asbestos will result in a better understanding of the immunological effects of asbestos and support the development of chemo-prevention to recover anti-tumor immunity in asbestos-exposed patients.

  2. A human T-cell line with inducible production of interleukins 5 and 4. A model for studies of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mordvinov, V A; Peroni, S E; De Boer, M L; Kees, U R; Sanderson, C J

    1999-08-31

    The production of interleukin-5 (IL5) and interleukin-4 (IL4) by activated T-cells is important in the pathogenesis of helminth infections and allergy. Human Jurkat cells express IL4 but one of the main factors restricting studies of human IL5 expression has been the lack of human T-cell lines which express significant levels of IL5 in an inducible fashion. We report that the human T-cell leukemia cell line (PER-117), previously shown to produce IL2, also produces IL5 and IL4, and is a useful model for the study of the regulation of IL5 and IL4 gene expression. We show that expression of IL5 and IL4 mRNAs in PER-117 cells is stimulation dependent. IL5 and IL4 reporter constructs are also transiently expressed in these cells in an inducible fashion. IL5 production in the PER-117 cell line can be activated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate alone and further enhanced by calcium ionophore A23187, cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate or anti-CD28 antibodies. The conditions used to stimulate the PER-117 cells determined whether IL5 production was inhibited by cyclosporin A or dexamethasone. These data indicate that the PER-117 cell line is a model to study signal transduction and transcriptional activation of the human IL5 gene in human T-cells.

  3. Murine leukemia virus vector integration favors promoter regions and regional hot spots in a human T-cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukahara, Tomonori; Agawa, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Sayori; Matsuda, Mizuho; Ueno, Shuichi; Yamashita, Yuki; Yamada, Koichiro; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kojima, Katsuhiko; Takeshita, Toshikazu . E-mail: takesit@sch.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp

    2006-07-07

    Genomic analysis of integration will be important in evaluating the safety of human gene therapy with retroviral vectors. Here, we investigated MLV vector integration sites in human T-cells, since they are amenable to gene transfer studies, and have been used therapeutically in clinical trials. We mapped 340 MLV vector integration sites in the infected human T-cell clones we established. The data showed that MLV preferred integration near the transcription start sites ({+-}5 kb), near CpG islands ({+-}1 kb), and within the first intron of RefSeq genes. We also identified MLV integration hot spots that contained three or more integrations within a 100 kb region. RT-PCR revealed that mRNA-levels of T-cell clones that contained MLV integrations near transcription start sites or introns were dysregulated compared to the uninfected cells. These studies help define the profile of MLV integration in T-cells and the risks associated with MLV-based gene therapy.

  4. Products from human mast cell line cells enhance the production of interferon-γ by CD8+ and CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    De Pater-Huijsen, Francina L; De Riemer, Mariëlle J; Reijneke, Richard M R; Pompen, Marjolein; Lutter, René; Jansen, Henk M; Out, Theo A

    2002-01-01

    In patients with allergic asthma, T-cell cytokines are implicated in the regulation of the local inflammation in the airways. The ability of sensitized mast cells to release mediators and cytokines early upon allergen stimulation makes them important candidates for local immunoregulation. We have studied the effects of human mast cells on T cells with the use of the human mast cell line HMC-1. We showed that activated human mast cells or their soluble products induced and enhanced the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production by T cells up to about 60-fold. The production of interleukin (IL)-4 was hardly affected and that of IL-5 was slightly enhanced. The enhancement of IFN-γ production was induced both in polyclonal CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and in CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones. Further characterization of the factors involved demonstrated a molecular mass above 30 000. Our results implicate that by this mechanism mast cells may account for a negative feedback system locally down-regulating allergen-induced T helper 2 responses via IFN-γ production by the T cells. PMID:11972627

  5. Products from human mast cell line cells enhance the production of interferon-gamma by CD8+ and CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    de Pater-Huijsen, Francina L; de Riemer, MariElle J; Reijneke, Richard M R; Pompen, Marjolein; Lutter, René; Jansen, Henk M; Out, Theo A

    2002-05-01

    In patients with allergic asthma, T-cell cytokines are implicated in the regulation of the local inflammation in the airways. The ability of sensitized mast cells to release mediators and cytokines early upon allergen stimulation makes them important candidates for local immunoregulation. We have studied the effects of human mast cells on T cells with the use of the human mast cell line HMC-1. We showed that activated human mast cells or their soluble products induced and enhanced the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production by T cells up to about 60-fold. The production of interleukin (IL)-4 was hardly affected and that of IL-5 was slightly enhanced. The enhancement of IFN-gamma production was induced both in polyclonal CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and in CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones. Further characterization of the factors involved demonstrated a molecular mass above 30 000. Our results implicate that by this mechanism mast cells may account for a negative feedback system locally down-regulating allergen-induced T helper 2 responses via IFN-gamma production by the T cells.

  6. Microgravity modifies protein kinase C isoform translocation in the human monocytic cell line U937 and human peripheral blood T-cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Jason P.; Gaubert, Francois; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Schmitt, Didier; Hashemi, B. B. (Principal Investigator); Hughes-Fulford, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Individual protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms fulfill distinct roles in the regulation of the commitment to differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in both monocytes and T-cells. The human monocyte like cell line U937 and T-cells were exposed to microgravity, during spaceflight and the translocation (a critical step in PKC signaling) of individual isoforms to cell particulate fraction examined. PKC activating phorbol esters induced a rapid translocation of several PKC isoforms to the particulate fraction of U937 monocytes under terrestrial gravity (1 g) conditions in the laboratory. In microgravity, the translocation of PKC beta II, delta, and epsilon in response to phorbol esters was reduced in microgravity compared to 1 g, but was enhanced in weak hypergravity (1.4 g). All isoforms showed a net increase in particulate PKC following phorbol ester stimulation, except PKC delta which showed a net decrease in microgravity. In T-cells, phorbol ester induced translocation of PKC delta was reduced in microgravity, compared to 1 g, while PKC beta II translocation was not significantly different at the two g-levels. These data show that microgravity differentially alters the translocation of individual PKC isoforms in monocytes and T-cells, thus providing a partial explanation for the modifications previously observed in the activation of these cell types under microgravity.

  7. Microgravity modifies protein kinase C isoform translocation in the human monocytic cell line U937 and human peripheral blood T-cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Jason P.; Gaubert, Francois; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Schmitt, Didier; Hashemi, B. B. (Principal Investigator); Hughes-Fulford, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Individual protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms fulfill distinct roles in the regulation of the commitment to differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in both monocytes and T-cells. The human monocyte like cell line U937 and T-cells were exposed to microgravity, during spaceflight and the translocation (a critical step in PKC signaling) of individual isoforms to cell particulate fraction examined. PKC activating phorbol esters induced a rapid translocation of several PKC isoforms to the particulate fraction of U937 monocytes under terrestrial gravity (1 g) conditions in the laboratory. In microgravity, the translocation of PKC beta II, delta, and epsilon in response to phorbol esters was reduced in microgravity compared to 1 g, but was enhanced in weak hypergravity (1.4 g). All isoforms showed a net increase in particulate PKC following phorbol ester stimulation, except PKC delta which showed a net decrease in microgravity. In T-cells, phorbol ester induced translocation of PKC delta was reduced in microgravity, compared to 1 g, while PKC beta II translocation was not significantly different at the two g-levels. These data show that microgravity differentially alters the translocation of individual PKC isoforms in monocytes and T-cells, thus providing a partial explanation for the modifications previously observed in the activation of these cell types under microgravity.

  8. Adult T-cell leukemia: antigen in an ATL cell line and detection of antibodies to the antigen in human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Hinuma, Y; Nagata, K; Hanaoka, M; Nakai, M; Matsumoto, T; Kinoshita, K I; Shirakawa, S; Miyoshi, I

    1981-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence of certain human sera demonstrated an antigen(s) in the cytoplasm of 1--5% of the cells of a T-cell line, MT-1, from a patient with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), which is endemic in southwestern Japan. The antigen was not detected in other human lymphoid cell lines, including six T-cell lines, seven B-cell lines, and four non-T non-B cell lines. The antigen did not show cross antigenicity with that of herpesviruses, including Epstein--Barr virus, herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, varicella-zoster virus, herpesvirus saimiri, and Marek disease virus. The proportion of antigen-bearing cells was increased by a factor of approximately 5 on culture in the presence of 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine. Antibodies against the antigen in MT-1 cells were found in all 44 patients with ATL examined and in 32 of 40 patients with malignant T-cell lymphomas (most of them had diseases similar to ATL except that leukemic cells were not found in the peripheral blood). The antibodies were also detected in 26% of the healthy adults examined from ATL-endemic areas but in only a few of those examined from ATL-non-endemic areas. On electron microscopy, extracellular type C virus particles were detected in pelleted MT-1 cells cultured in the presence of 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine. Images PMID:7031654

  9. Epigenetic Silencing of the Human 18 kDa Translocator Protein in a T Cell Leukemia Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Ryan J; Kam, Winnie Wai-Ying; Liu, Guo-Jun; Banati, Richard B

    2017-02-01

    The mitochondrial membrane 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is constitutively expressed in most organs, most abundantly in hormonal tissue and cells of mononuclear phagocyte lineage, while in the brain, TSPO expression is induced in the wake of injury, inflammation, and neurodegeneration. Increased TSPO expression is also prominent in several cancerous tissues where it appears to correlate with the degree of malignancy. Currently, TSPO is thus actively investigated as a generic biomarker for disease activity and a therapeutic target for a wide range of diseases. In this study, we report a Jurkat human T cell leukemia cell line that has only trace expression of TSPO mRNA. Through the use of bisulphite genomic sequencing, we show that the Jurkat TSPO promoter is highly methylated except for CpG sites that are adjacent to the transcription start site. Control measurements in HEK-293, HeLa, and U87-MG cells with high TSPO mRNA expression showed low levels of TSPO promoter methylation. Demethylation with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) caused a dose-dependent increase in TSPO mRNA with a corresponding demethylation of the TSPO promoter in Jurkat cells. Treating HeLa and U87-MG cells with 5-aza-dC caused no change in the level of TSPO mRNA. These observations confirm the epigenetic regulation of TSPO and suggest it to be a more common mechanism by which the differential expression of TSPO in various cell types and in health and disease may be explained.

  10. Investigation of deregulated genes of Notch signaling pathway in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines and clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Paryan, Mahdi; Mohammadi-Yeganeh, Samira; Samiee, Siamak Mirab; Soleimani, Masoud; Arefian, Ehsan; Azadmanesh, Keyhan; Poopak, Behzad; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Karimipoor, Morteza; Mahdian, Reza

    2013-10-01

    In diagnostic research challenges, quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) has been widely utilized in gene expression analysis because of its sensitivity, accuracy, reproducibility, and most importantly, quantitativeness. Real-time PCR base kits are wildly applicable in cancer signaling pathways, especially in cancer investigations. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a type of leukemia that is more common in older children and teenagers. Deregulation of the Notch signaling pathway promotes proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of the lymphoblastic T cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Notch signaling activation on the expression of target genes using real-time QPCR and further use this method in clinical examination after validation. Two T-ALL cell lines, Jurkat and Molt-4, were used as models for activation of the Notch signaling via over-expression of the Notch1 intracellular domain. Expression analysis was performed for six downstream target genes (NCSTN, APH1, PSEN1, ADAM17, NOTCH1 and C-MYC) which play critical roles in the Notch signaling pathway. The results showed significant difference in the expression of target genes in the deregulated Notch signaling pathway. These results were also verified in 12 clinical samples bearing over-expression of the Notch signaling pathway. Identification of such downstream Notch target genes, which have not been studied inclusively, provides insights into the mechanisms of the Notch function in T cell leukemia, and may help identify novel diagnoses and therapeutic targets in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  11. Establishment of hybridomas producing cancer specific human antibodies from B cell line derived from PBL of a patient with adult T cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, T; Ichikawa, A; Katakura, Y; Teruya, K; Yoshida, T; Kikuchi, M; Kamei, M; Hashizume, S; Shirahata, S

    2001-07-01

    Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is a malignant disease characterized by tumorous proliferation of CD4(+) T cells infected with retrovirus human T cell leukemia virus Type-I (HTLV-I) and concurs with an autoimmune disease and cancer due to attenuated immune response. In this study, we established ATL patient derived B-cell line TM-1 producing cancer-specific IgM antibodies, and further characterized its antigen specificity by establishing hybridomas fused with human-mouse origin hetero-myeloma cell line RF-S1. We established three hybridoma cell lines termed 2E12, 3E9, and 3E10, which continuously secreted human IgM antibodies. Immunohistochemical staining of formalin-fixed tissue section using antibodies secreted from these hybridomas showed that these antibodies specifically recognized tumor sites of human colon adenocarcinomas. Antibody produced from hybridoma 3E9 bound to some of leukemic cell lines, but not to normal human PBL, which was evidenced by the flow cytometric analysis, indicating that antibody produced from 3E9 recognizes cell surface antigen specifically expressed in the leukemic cells.

  12. NKG2D- and T-cell receptor-dependent lysis of malignant glioma cell lines by human γδ T cells: Modulation by temozolomide and A disintegrin and metalloproteases 10 and 17 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chitadze, Guranda; Lettau, Marcus; Luecke, Stefanie; Wang, Ting; Janssen, Ottmar; Fürst, Daniel; Mytilineos, Joannis; Wesch, Daniela; Oberg, Hans-Heinrich; Held-Feindt, Janka; Kabelitz, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The interaction of the MHC class I-related chain molecules A and B (MICA and MICB) and UL-16 binding protein (ULBP) family members expressed on tumor cells with the corresponding NKG2D receptor triggers cytotoxic effector functions in NK cells and γδ T cells. However, as a mechanism of tumor immune escape, NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs) can be released from the cell surface. In this study, we investigated the NKG2DL system in different human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, the most lethal brain tumor in adults. Flow cytometric analysis and ELISA revealed that despite the expression of various NKG2DLs only ULBP2 is released as a soluble protein via the proteolytic activity of “a disintegrin and metalloproteases” (ADAM) 10 and 17. Moreover, we report that temozolomide (TMZ), a chemotherapeutic agent in clinical use for the treatment of GBM, increases the cell surface expression of NKG2DLs and sensitizes GBM cells to γδ T cell-mediated lysis. Both NKG2D and the T-cell receptor (TCR) are involved. The cytotoxic activity of γδ T cells toward GBM cells is strongly enhanced in a TCR-dependent manner by stimulation with pyrophosphate antigens. These data clearly demonstrate the complexity of mechanisms regulating NKG2DL expression in GBM cells and further show that treatment with TMZ can increase the immunogenicity of GBM. Thus, TMZ might enhance the potential of the adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded γδ T cells for the treatment of malignant glioblastoma. PMID:27141377

  13. Photoaffinity antigens for human gammadelta T cells.

    PubMed

    Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Liu, Xiao-hui; Lee, Hoi K; Song, Yongcheng; Distefano, Mark D; Oldfield, Eric; Prestwich, Glenn D; Morita, Craig T

    2008-12-01

    Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells comprise the major subset of peripheral blood gammadelta T cells in humans and expand during infections by recognizing small nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphates. These molecules include (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl-pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a microbial isoprenoid intermediate, and isopentenyl pyrophosphate, an endogenous isoprenoid intermediate. Recognition of these nonpeptide Ags is mediated by the Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cell Ag receptor. Several findings suggest that prenyl pyrophosphates are presented by an Ag-presenting molecule: contact between T cells and APC is required, the Ags do not bind the Vgamma2Vdelta2 TCR directly, and Ag recognition is abrogated by TCR mutations in CDRs distant from the putative Ag recognition site. Identification of the putative Ag-presenting molecule, however, has been hindered by the inability to achieve stable association of nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphate Ags with the presenting molecule. In this study, we show that photoaffinity analogues of HMBPP, meta/para-benzophenone-(methylene)-prenyl pyrophosphates (m/p-BZ-(C)-C(5)-OPP), can crosslink to the surface of tumor cell lines and be presented as Ags to gammadelta T cells. Mutant tumor cell lines lacking MHC class I, MHC class II, beta(2)-microglobulin, and CD1, as well as tumor cell lines from a variety of tissues and individuals, will all crosslink to and present m-BZ-C(5)-OPP. Finally, pulsing of BZ-(C)-C(5)-OPP is inhibited by isopentenyl pyrophosphate and an inactive analog, suggesting that they bind to the same molecule. Taken together, these results suggest that nonpeptide Ags are presented by a novel-Ag-presenting molecule that is widely distributed and nonpolymorphic, but not classical MHC class I, MHC class II, or CD1.

  14. Activation of endogenous c-fos proto-oncogene expression by human T-cell leukemia virus type I-encoded p40 sup tax protein in the human T-cell line, Jurkat

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Kinya; Ohtani, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Masataka; Sugamura, Kazuo )

    1989-08-01

    The authors examined the ability of the trans-acting factor p40{sup tax} of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I), which is thought to be a crucial molecule in T-cell transformation by HTLV-I, to activate expression of a set of endogenous cellular genes related to T-cell proliferation. For this purpose, they established a subclone (JPX-9) of Jurkat cells that was stably transfected with an expression plasmid containing the p40{sup tax} gene, whose expression is definitively dependent on heavy-metal ions. Expression of the interleukin-2 receptor {alpha} chain in JPX-9 cells was induced in response to the induction of p40{sup tax} expression, as has been demonstrated by others in transient transfection experiments with Jurkat cells. In addition, they found that significant enhancement of expression of the nuclear proto-oncogene c-fos was closely associated with expression of p40{sup tax}. Continuous enhancement in the level of c-fos mRNA was observed in the presence of p40{sup tax}. These results suggest that (i) in addition to the interleukin-2-interleukin-2 receptor system, cellular genes such as c-fos, which regulate normal T-cell growth, are also activated directly or indirectly by p40{sup tax} and (ii) p40{sup tax}-induced modulation of gene expression plays a crucial role in T-cell transformation by HTLV-I.

  15. Human CD4+ T Cell Response to Human Herpesvirus 6

    PubMed Central

    Nastke, Maria-D.; Becerra, Aniuska; Yin, Liusong; Dominguez-Amorocho, Omar; Gibson, Laura; Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Following primary infection, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) establishes a persistent infection for life. HHV-6 reactivation has been associated with transplant rejection, delayed engraftment, encephalitis, muscular dystrophy, and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. The poor understanding of the targets and outcome of the cellular immune response to HHV-6 makes it difficult to outline the role of HHV-6 in human disease. To fill in this gap, we characterized CD4 T cell responses to HHV-6 using peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and T cell lines generated from healthy donors. CD4+ T cells responding to HHV-6 in peripheral blood were observed at frequencies below 0.1% of total T cells but could be expanded easily in vitro. Analysis of cytokines in supernatants of PBMC and T cell cultures challenged with HHV-6 preparations indicated that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were appropriate markers of the HHV-6 cellular response. Eleven CD4+ T cell epitopes, all but one derived from abundant virion components, were identified. The response was highly cross-reactive between HHV-6A and HHV-6B variants. Seven of the CD4+ T cell epitopes do not share significant homologies with other known human pathogens, including the closely related human viruses human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramers generated with these epitopes were able to detect HHV-6-specific T cell populations. These findings provide a window into the immune response to HHV-6 and provide a basis for tracking HHV-6 cellular immune responses. PMID:22357271

  16. Radiation-induced interphase death observed in human T-cell lymphoma cells established as a nude mouse tumor line

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, T.; Yoshida, S.; Miyamoto, T. )

    1990-08-01

    Interphase death of cells occurs physiologically in healthy animal tissues as well as in tissues pathologically injured by radiation or drugs. An active self-destruction process has been found to play a major role in the interphase death of highly radiosensitive cells. However, the mechanism of this radiation-induced interphase death in human lymphoma has not yet been studied in detail. In the present study, we examined a lymphoma derived from a child lymphoblastic lymphoma bearing CD1, CD4, and CD8 antigens and established in nude mice. Low-dose x-irradiation of this lymphoma induced interphase cell death with characteristic morphological and biological changes of an active self-destruction process, i.e., changes in cell surface appearance seen using scanning electron microscopy and nuclear fragmentation accompanied with an increase in free DNA. The process was proved to require protein synthesis. It was concluded that the radiosensitivity of this T-cell lymphoma of common thymic type is mainly due to the occurrence of the active self-destruction process.

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 NL4-3 replication in four T-cell lines: rate and efficiency of entry, a major determinant of permissiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, K K; Fernandez-Larsson, R; Zinkus, D M; Robinson, H L

    1991-01-01

    Single-cycle infections have been used to study the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) life cycle in CD4+ T-cell lines that differ in their permissiveness for infection. In single-cycle infections of highly permissive C8166 cells, 50% of the infectious units escaped being blocked by a monoclonal antibody against the virus binding site on CD4 (leu3a) within 30 min. In contrast, 50% of the infectious units for three less permissive cell lines (H9, A3.01, and Jurkat) required 4 h to escape the leu3a block. Entry was also more efficient in the highly permissive cells, with NL4-3 stocks having three times more infectious units for C8166 cells than for H9, A3.01, or Jurkat cells. Postentry steps up through reverse transcription required approximately 3.5 h in each of the cell lines. The times lapsing between reverse transcription and the expression of reverse transcripts ranged from 17 to 25 h in the different cell lines. Virus production per cell was also similar in the different cell lines (within 1.5-fold of each other). These results indicate that a major determinant of the permissiveness of growing T cells for HIV-1 is the rate and efficiency of virus entry. PMID:1674969

  18. Exposure to human alveolar lining fluid enhances Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a CD8(+) T-cell-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Moliva, J I; Hossfeld, A P; Canan, C H; Dwivedi, V; Wewers, M D; Beamer, G; Turner, J; Torrelles, J B

    2017-09-20

    Current tuberculosis (TB) treatments include chemotherapy and preventative vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). In humans, however, BCG vaccination fails to fully protect against pulmonary TB. Few studies have considered the impact of the human lung mucosa (alveolar lining fluid (ALF)), which modifies the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) cell wall, revealing alternate antigenic epitopes on the bacterium surface that alter its pathogenicity. We hypothesized that ALF-induced modification of BCG would induce better protection against aerosol infection with M.tb. Here we vaccinated mice with ALF-exposed BCG, mimicking the mycobacterial cell surface properties that would be present in the lung during M.tb infection. ALF-exposed BCG-vaccinated mice were more effective at reducing M.tb bacterial burden in the lung and spleen, and had reduced lung inflammation at late stages of M.tb infection. Improved BCG efficacy was associated with increased numbers of memory CD8(+) T cells, and CD8(+) T cells with the potential to produce interferon-γ in the lung in response to M.tb challenge. Depletion studies confirmed an essential role for CD8(+) T cells in controlling M.tb bacterial burden. We conclude that ALF modifications to the M.tb cell wall in vivo are relevant in the context of vaccine design.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 20 September 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2017.80.

  19. Telomere attrition and chromosome instability via downregulation of TRF2 contributes to arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis of human T-Cell leukemia cell line molt-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yangwen; Zhang, Weifang; Liu, Junqing; Ni, Wanmao; Xu, Weilai; Jin, Jie; Qian, Wenbin

    2007-08-01

    Overexpression of human telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2), which may play an important role in the fate of cancer cells, has been observed in adult T-cell leukemia. Previous reports have shown that the inhibition of TRF2 results in the apoptosis of cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that arsenic trioxide (As2O3) induced in vitro growth inhibition and/or apoptosis of human T-cell leukemia cell line Molt-4 in a caspase-independent manner. Telomerase activity was not inhibited, although the level of the reverse transcriptase subunit of the human telomerase gene (hTERT) mRNA expression was down regulated during the early times and then recovered to the level found in untreated controls about 48 hours after treatment with As2O3. Furthermore, a remarkable telomere shortening related to exposure of As2O3 was observed in 50 population doubling. Inc ontrast, the alteration of telomere length did not occur after exposure to higher concentration of As2O3 (10 microM) for 24 hours and 48 hours, respectively, suggesting that the shortening of telomeres induced by As2O3 is dependent of a series of cell division cycles. Chromosomal analysis showed that As2O3 exposure caused chromosomal end-to-end fusion in human T-cell leukemia cells while downregulation of TRF2 was observed. Finally, the inhibition of TRF2 protein expression and the sensitivity to As2O3 in a panel of leukemia cell lines were checked. The data revealed that inhibition of TRF2 rendered leukemia cells more susceptible to As2O3. In conclusion, the downregulation of TRF2 by As2O3 contribute to chromosomal end-to-end fusion, and apoptosis in leukemia cells, suggesting that TRF2 could be an attractive target for new therapies of leukemia.

  20. T cell-replacing factor- (TRF) induced IgG secretion in a human B blastoid cell line and demonstration of acceptors for TRF.

    PubMed

    Muraguchi, A; Kishimoto, T; Miki, Y; Kuritani, T; Kaieda, T; Yoshizaki, K; Yamamura, Y

    1981-08-01

    IgG-secretion was induced in a human B blastoid cell line, CESS, by the addition of partially purified T cell-derived helper factor(s) (TRF), which had been obtained from PHA-stimulated human T cells. The number of IgG-producing cells in CESS cells reached its maximal level (10% of total cells) within 48 hr after the addition of TRF. TRF did not affect the proliferation of CESS cells and the block of cell proliferation with hydroxyurea did not inhibit the increase of IgG-producing cells, showing that TRF induced IgG-production in CESS cells without any requirement of cell division. TRF activity was completely removed by CESS cells but TCGF-activity in the same preparation was not absorbed with CESS cells. On the other hand, TCGF-dependent human killer cells absorbed TCGF activity but not TRF activity in the same preparation. The binding of 125I-labeled factor(s) on CESS cells was also demonstrated. These results showed the presence of acceptors for TRF on the surface of CESS cells and this cell line will provide useful means for the chemical characterization of acceptors and for the study of the mechanisms of the signal transmission through acceptors.

  1. Human fetal retinal pigment epithelium induces apoptosis in human T-cell line Jurkat which is independent from its expression of TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Farrokh-Siar, Lili; Rezai, Kourous A; Palmer, Ellen M; van Seventer, Jean; Hamann, Kimm J; Rajadurai, Henrietta; Patel, Samir C; Ernest, J Terry; van Seventer, Gijs A

    2002-03-01

    To evaluate whether human fetal retinal pigment epithelial (HFRPE) cells express TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand). The role of TRAIL in HFRPE induced apoptosis was evaluated. Pure cultures of HFRPE cells were isolated. The expression of TRAIL protein and mRNA in non-activated and IFN-gamma activated HFRPE cells was evaluated with RT-PCR. The role of TRAIL in HFRPE induced apoptosis was assessed by incubating HFRPE cells with human T-cell leukemia line Jurkat (Jkt) in the presence or absence of neutralizing TRAIL antibodies. Cultures were pulsed with [(3)H]-thymidine to measure Jkt cell proliferation. The role of TRAIL was further examined by western blott evaluating the cleavage of caspases 8 and 10 in Jkt cells after their incubation with HFRPE cells. HFRPE cells expressed TRAIL mRNA. The expression of TRAIL mRNA and protein was up-regulated by IFN-gamma activation. However, anti-TRAIL antibodies were not able to prevent the HFRPE induced suppression of Jkt cell proliferation. The caspases 8 and 10 were also not cleaved in Jkt cells after their incubation with IFN-gamma activated HFRPE cells. Although HFRPE cells express TRAIL and its expression is upregulated by IFN-gamma activation, TRAIL is not involved in HFRPE induced apoptosis in Jkt cells. Currently the role of TRAIL in HFRPE cells is under investigation.

  2. Quantitative model of antibody- and soluble CD4-mediated neutralization of primary isolates and T-cell line-adapted strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P J; Moore, J P

    1996-01-01

    Primary isolates (PI) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considerably less sensitive than T-cell line-adapted strains to neutralization by soluble CD4 and by most cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies to the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein, as well as by postinfection and postvaccination sera (J. P. Moore and D. D. Ho, AIDS 9 [suppl. A]:5117-5136, 1995). We developed a quantitative model to explain the neutralization resistance of PI. The factors incorporated into the model are the dissociation constants for the binding of the neutralizing agent to native Env oligomers, the number of outer Env molecules on the viral surface (which decreases by shedding), and the minimum number of Env molecules required for attachment and fusion. We conclude that modest differences in all these factors can, when combined, explain a relative neutralization resistance of PI versus T-cell line-adapted strains that sometimes amounts to several orders of magnitude. The hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is due to the reduction below a minimum number of the Env molecules on a virion available for attachment and fusion is at odds with single- and few-hit neutralization theories. Our analysis of these ideas favors the hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is instead a competitive blocking of interactions with cellular factors, including adsorption receptors. PMID:8648701

  3. CD161-expressing human T cells.

    PubMed

    Fergusson, Joannah R; Fleming, Vicki M; Klenerman, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Expression of the Natural Killer cell receptor CD161 has recently been identified on a subset of T cells, including both CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T cells. Expression of this molecule within the adult circulation is restricted to those T cells with a memory phenotype. However, the distinct properties of these T cell populations is yet to be fully determined, although expression of CD161 has been related to the secretion of interleukin-17, and therefore to a type 17 phenotype. Recent studies have aimed to determine both the origin of these cells and the significance of CD161 expression as either a marker of specific cell types or as an effector and regulator of lymphocyte function, and hence to characterize the role of these CD161+ cells within a variety of human diseases in which they have been implicated.

  4. Expression of Ley antigen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected human T cell lines and in peripheral lymphocytes of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex (ARC)

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Ley determinant (Fuc alpha 1----2Gal beta 1----4[Fuc alpha 1---- 3]GlcNAc beta 1----R) defined by mAb BM-1 is highly expressed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected T cell lines and in CD3+ peripheral mature T cells of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or with AIDS-related complex (ARC). Ley expression increased greatly in the CD3+ population in the advanced stage of AIDS when the CD4+ population decreased greatly. Six other carbohydrate antigens tested by their respective mAbs were not detected in these same cells. None of the carbohydrate antigens tested by the seven mAbs used in this study were found in noninfected T cell lines and in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes. PMID:3258005

  5. Herpesvirus saimiri transformed T cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells restimulate identical antigen-specific human T cell clones.

    PubMed

    Daubenberger, C A; Nickel, B; Hübner, B; Siegler, U; Meinl, E; Pluschke, G

    2001-08-01

    Panels of human antigen-specific T cell clones (TCC) have been established by limiting dilution using Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) subtype C transformed T cells as antigen presenting cells (APC). They showed antigen-specific proliferation when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), HVS-transformed T cells and Epstein Barr Virus transformed lymphoblastoid B cell lines (EBV-LCL) were used as APC. All T cell clones were CD4+ and HLA class II restricted. For a detailed analysis, two panels of T cell clones specific for an epitope located in the N-terminus of the Merozoite Surface Protein 1 (MSP-1) of Plasmodium falciparum were established from the same founder T cell line using either PBMC or HVS-transformed T cells as APC. TCR analysis of the two panels of TCC demonstrated that the same founder cells could be propagated in both culture systems. Furthermore, no difference in the cytokine expression pattern or antigen processing and co-stimulatory requirements was observed between TCC established on PBMC or HVS-transformed T cells. Based on the finding that HVS-transformed T cells can replace PBMC as APC for isolation and propagation of antigen-specific TCC, a protocol was developed and successfully executed, which allows to establish and maintain vaccine-specific T cell clones from 20 ml of blood. This method might be particularly significant in clinical trials of immune intervention strategies.

  6. Failure in activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax in non-hematopoietic cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mizukoshi, Terumi; Komori, Hideyuki; Mizuguchi, Mariko; Abdelaziz, Hussein; Hara, Toshifumi; Higuchi, Masaya; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Ohara, Yoshiro; Funato, Noriko; Fujii, Masahiro; Nakamura, Masataka

    2013-09-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax (Tax1) plays crucial roles in leukemogenesis in part through activation of NF-κB. In this study, we demonstrated that Tax1 activated an NF-κB binding (gpκB) site of the gp34/OX40 ligand gene in a cell type-dependent manner. Our examination showed that the gpκΒ site and authentic NF-κB (IgκB) site were activated by Tax1 in hematopoietic cell lines. Non-hematopoietic cell lines including hepatoma and fibroblast cell lines were not permissive to Tax1-mediated activation of the gpκB site, while the IgκB site was activated in those cells in association with binding of RelB. However RelA binding was not observed in the gpκB and IgκB sites. Our results suggest that HTLV-1 Tax1 fails to activate the canonical pathway of NF-κB in non-hematopoietic cell lines. Cell type-dependent activation of NF-κB by Tax1 could be associated with pathogenesis by HTLV-1 infection. - Highlights: • HTLV-1 Tax1 does not activate RelA of NF-κB in non-hematopoietic cell lines. • Tax1 activates the NF-κB non-canonical pathway in non-hematopoietic cell lines. • Tax1 does not induce RelA nuclear translocation in those cell lines, unlike TNFα. • The OX40L promoter κB site is activated by ectopic, but not endogenous, RelA.

  7. Identification of TL-Om1, an Adult T-Cell Leukemia (ATL) Cell Line, as Reference Material for Quantitative PCR for Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Okuma, Kazu; Yamagishi, Makoto; Yamochi, Tadanori; Firouzi, Sanaz; Momose, Haruka; Mizukami, Takuo; Takizawa, Kazuya; Araki, Kumiko; Sugamura, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) is useful for measuring the amount of integrated HTLV-1 proviral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Many laboratories in Japan have developed different HTLV-1 qPCR methods. However, when six independent laboratories analyzed the proviral load of the same samples, there was a 5-fold difference in their results. To standardize HTLV-1 qPCR, preparation of a well-defined reference material is needed. We analyzed the integrated HTLV-1 genome and the internal control (IC) genes of TL-Om1, a cell line derived from adult T-cell leukemia, to confirm its suitability as a reference material for HTLV-1 qPCR. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that HTLV-1 provirus was monoclonally integrated in chromosome 1 at the site of 1p13 in the TL-Om1 genome. HTLV-1 proviral genome was not transferred from TL-Om1 to an uninfected T-cell line, suggesting that the HTLV-1 proviral copy number in TL-Om1 cells is stable. To determine the copy number of HTLV-1 provirus and IC genes in TL-Om1 cells, we used FISH, digital PCR, and qPCR. HTLV-1 copy numbers obtained by these three methods were similar, suggesting that their results were accurate. Also, the ratio of the copy number of HTLV-1 provirus to one of the IC genes, RNase P, was consistent for all three methods. These findings indicate that TL-Om1 cells are an appropriate reference material for HTLV-1 qPCR. PMID:25502533

  8. Identification of TL-Om1, an adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cell line, as reference material for quantitative PCR for human T-lymphotropic virus 1.

    PubMed

    Kuramitsu, Madoka; Okuma, Kazu; Yamagishi, Makoto; Yamochi, Tadanori; Firouzi, Sanaz; Momose, Haruka; Mizukami, Takuo; Takizawa, Kazuya; Araki, Kumiko; Sugamura, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Watanabe, Toshiki; Hamaguchi, Isao

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) is useful for measuring the amount of integrated HTLV-1 proviral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Many laboratories in Japan have developed different HTLV-1 qPCR methods. However, when six independent laboratories analyzed the proviral load of the same samples, there was a 5-fold difference in their results. To standardize HTLV-1 qPCR, preparation of a well-defined reference material is needed. We analyzed the integrated HTLV-1 genome and the internal control (IC) genes of TL-Om1, a cell line derived from adult T-cell leukemia, to confirm its suitability as a reference material for HTLV-1 qPCR. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that HTLV-1 provirus was monoclonally integrated in chromosome 1 at the site of 1p13 in the TL-Om1 genome. HTLV-1 proviral genome was not transferred from TL-Om1 to an uninfected T-cell line, suggesting that the HTLV-1 proviral copy number in TL-Om1 cells is stable. To determine the copy number of HTLV-1 provirus and IC genes in TL-Om1 cells, we used FISH, digital PCR, and qPCR. HTLV-1 copy numbers obtained by these three methods were similar, suggesting that their results were accurate. Also, the ratio of the copy number of HTLV-1 provirus to one of the IC genes, RNase P, was consistent for all three methods. These findings indicate that TL-Om1 cells are an appropriate reference material for HTLV-1 qPCR. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Molecular analysis of TCRB and ABL in a t(7; 9)-containing cell line (SUP-T3) from a human T-cell leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C.A.; Rubin, C.M.; Le Beau, M.M.; Kaminer, L.S.; Smith, S.D.; Rowley, J.D.; Diaz, M.O.

    1987-01-01

    A translocation between chromosomes 7 and 9, t(7;9), has been described in cell lines derived from the malignant cells of children with acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma. The cytogenetic analysis of one such cell line, SUP-T3, demonstrates that the breakpoints on chromosomes 7 and 9 lie within bands q36 and q34, respectively, corresponding to the location of the gene encoding the ..beta.. chain of the T-cell receptor, TCRB, and the gene homologous to the transforming gene of the Abelson murine leukemia virus, ABL. The authors investigated the role of these genes in the t(7;9). In situ chromosomal hybridization of TCRB and ABL probes to metaphase cells from SUP-T3 demonstrated that ABL is translocated from chromosome 9 to 7 and that all or part of TCRB is translocated from chromosome 7 to 9. Southern blot analysis revealed that both TCRB alleles were rearranged; however, it could not be determined whether the translocation breakpoint lies within this gene. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blot analysis were used to examine more than 500 kilobases on the ABL locus; they concluded that there are no rearrangements within 250 kb in either direction of the sequences homologous to v-abl. These results indicate that, in SUP-T3, the breakpoint on chromosome 9 lies proximal to ABL and the break results in no apparent alteration of the ABL protein. They therefore hypothesize that another gene of chromosome 9, at band q34, plays a role in this translocation. This study also demonstrates that pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is a powerful new tool for the analysis of human chromosomal translocations.

  10. Pushing the frontiers of T-cell vaccines: accurate measurement of human T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Saade, Fadi; Gorski, Stacey Ann; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2012-12-01

    There is a need for novel approaches to tackle major vaccine challenges such as malaria, tuberculosis and HIV, among others. Success will require vaccines able to induce a cytotoxic T-cell response--a deficiency of most current vaccine approaches. The successful development of T-cell vaccines faces many hurdles, not least being the lack of consensus on a standardized T-cell assay format able to be used as a correlate of vaccine efficacy. Hence, there remains a need for reproducible measures of T-cell immunity proven in human clinical trials to correlate with vaccine protection. The T-cell equivalent of a neutralizing antibody assay would greatly accelerate the development and commercialization of T-cell vaccines. Recent advances have seen a plethora of new T-cell assays become available, including some like cytometry by time-of-flight with extreme multiparameter T-cell phenotyping capability. However, whether it is historic thymidine-based proliferation assays or sophisticated new cytometry assays, each assay has its relative advantages and disadvantages, and relatively few of these assays have yet to be validated in large-scale human vaccine trials. This review examines the current range of T-cell assays and assesses their suitability for use in human vaccine trials. Should one or more of these assays be accepted as an agreed surrogate of T-cell protection by a regulatory agency, this would significantly accelerate the development of T-cell vaccines.

  11. The Orphan Seven-Transmembrane Receptor Apj Supports the Entry of Primary T-Cell-Line-Tropic and Dualtropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hyeryun; Farzan, Michael; Konkel, Miriam; Martin, Kathleen; Sun, Ying; Marcon, Luisa; Cayabyab, Mark; Berman, Michael; Dorf, Martin E.; Gerard, Norma; Gerard, Craig; Sodroski, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters target cells by sequential binding to CD4 and specific seven-transmembrane-segment (7TMS) coreceptors. Viruses use the chemokine receptor CCR5 as a coreceptor in the early, asymptomatic stages of HIV-1 infection but can adapt to the use of other receptors such as CXCR4 and CCR3 as the infection proceeds. Here we identify one such coreceptor, Apj, which supported the efficient entry of several primary T-cell-line tropic (T-tropic) and dualtropic HIV-1 isolates and the simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac316. Another 7TMS protein, CCR9, supported the less efficient entry of one primary T-tropic isolate. mRNAs for both receptors were present in phytohemagglutinin- and interleukin-2-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Apj and CCR9 share with other coreceptors for HIV-1 and SIV an N-terminal region rich in aromatic and acidic residues. These results highlight properties common to 7TMS proteins that can function as HIV-1 coreceptors, and they may contribute to an understanding of viral evolution in infected individuals. PMID:9621075

  12. Characterization of the EBV/C3d receptor on the human Jurkat T cell line: evidence for a novel transcript.

    PubMed

    Sinha, S K; Todd, S C; Hedrick, J A; Speiser, C L; Lambris, J D; Tsoukas, C D

    1993-06-15

    EBV is a human herpes virus that causes mononucleosis and is associated with various tumors. EBV infects cells via the CR2 that was previously thought to be expressed only on the surface of B cells and certain epithelial cells. Recent findings in our laboratory and those of others, however, have shown that the EBV receptor is also present on T cells. Our study shows that Jurkat human T cells have a molecule that reacts with both anti-CR2 antibodies and the third component of complement, C3. Furthermore, the data indicate that this molecule binds EBV detected by incubation with biotin-conjugated virus and streptavidin phycoerythrin. Viral binding is specific, as it is inhibited by nonconjugated virus, with anti-CR2 antibodies, and with an antibody reactive with the glycoprotein (gp350) that EBV uses to bind CR2. In addition, EBV variably infects Jurkat cells as demonstrated by the presence of transcripts of Epstein Barr nuclear Ag (EBNA-1) using the polymerase chain reaction. Immunoprecipitation experiments with anti-CR2 antibodies and SDS-PAGE analysis reveal a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 155 kDa which is higher than the one seen in B cells. The size of this molecule is reduced to 119 kDa upon endoglycosidase F treatment. Northern blot analysis of Jurkat poly(A)+ RNA shows a transcript of 4.7 kb upon probing with the B cell CR2 cDNA. This size is consistent with that of B cell CR2 mRNA. Two cDNA clones were identified upon screening of a Jurkat cell cDNA library with the B cell CR2 cDNA. One of the clones possesses an identical nucleotide sequence to the one corresponding to B cell CR2, whereas the other represents a differentially spliced transcript which lacks the exon 8b of B cell CR2. Analysis of Jurkat and Raji mRNA by PCR demonstrated the presence of this novel splice variant in both cell lines.

  13. Natural antibodies to the human T cell lymphoma virus in patients with cutaneous T cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Sera from patients with cutaneous T cell lymphoma and leukemia were screened for the presence of natural antibody to the human T cell lymphoma (leukemia) virus, HTLVCR, using a solid-phase radioimmunoassay. Sera from two patients, including patient CR, from whose cultured T lymphoblastic cell line (HUT102), the retrovirus HTLVCR was isolated, reacted specifically with proteins of HTLVCR. Serum from patient CR also reacted specifically with proteins of HTLVMB, an independent but highly related retroviral isolate from a patient with Sezary T cell leukemia. The specificity for HTLVCR proteins was demonstrated by solid-phase immunocompetition assays and competition radioimmunoprecipitation assays. Analysis of radioimmunoprecipitates indicated that the natural antibodies were directed against HTLVCR core proteins with molecular weights of 24,000 and 19,000 (p24 and p19). Whereas the serum reactivities for HTLVCR proteins were shown to be highly specific, additional reactivities seen against proteins of animal retroviruses including GaLV, SSV, FeLV, and BaEV were clearly shown not to be viral specific but rather were due to reactivity with cellular antigens contaminating the viral preparations or with related antigens present in fetal calf serum. These results demonstrating natural antibodies to HTLVCR provide the first evidence for a specific antibody response to a retrovirus in humans. PMID:6973601

  14. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View

    PubMed Central

    Macallan, Derek C.; Borghans, José A. M.; Asquith, Becca

    2017-01-01

    Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:28165397

  15. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View.

    PubMed

    Macallan, Derek C; Borghans, José A M; Asquith, Becca

    2017-02-04

    Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy.

  16. Efficient Gene Editing in Primary Human T Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yvonne Y

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in T-cell therapy for cancer, viral infections, and autoimmune diseases highlight the broad therapeutic potential of T-cell engineering. However, site-specific genetic manipulation in primary human T cells remains challenging. Two recent studies describe efficient genome editing in T cells using CRISPR and TALEN approaches.

  17. T Cell Receptor-induced Activation and Apoptosis In Cycling Human T Cells Occur throughout the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Karas, Michael; Zaks, Tal Z.; JL, Liu; LeRoith, Derek

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have found conflicting associations between susceptibility to activation-induced cell death and the cell cycle in T cells. However, most of the studies used potentially toxic pharmacological agents for cell cycle synchronization. A panel of human melanoma tumor-reactive T cell lines, a CD8+ HER-2/neu-reactive T cell clone, and the leukemic T cell line Jurkat were separated by centrifugal elutriation. Fractions enriched for the G0–G1, S, and G2–M phases of the cell cycle were assayed for T cell receptor-mediated activation as measured by intracellular Ca2+ flux, cytolytic recognition of tumor targets, and induction of Fas ligand mRNA. Susceptibility to apoptosis induced by recombinant Fas ligand and activation-induced cell death were also studied. None of the parameters studied was specific to a certain phase of the cell cycle, leading us to conclude that in nontransformed human T cells, both activation and apoptosis through T cell receptor activation can occur in all phases of the cell cycle. PMID:10588669

  18. Production of a monoclonal antibody to a membrane antigen of human T-cell leukaemia virus (HTLV1/ATLV)-infected cell lines from a systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patient: serological analyses for HTLV1 infections in SLE patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, A; Katamine, S; Fukuda, T; Mine, M; Ikari, N; Kanazawa, H; Matsunaga, M; Eguchi, K; Nagataki, S

    1985-01-01

    Human T-cell leukaemia virus (HTLV1/ATLV), which causes adult T cell leukaemia (ATL), is an infectious, lymphotrophic retrovirus unique for humans. The present study was undertaken to determine whether HTLV1 had any pathogenetic role for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The incidence of antibodies to ATL cell-associated antigens (ATLA) in sera from patients with SLE and other collagen diseases was investigated by an indirect immunofluorescent cytoplasmic staining of an HTLV1-infected cell line (MT-1). A radioimmunoassay was also performed to detect antibodies to HTLV1 protein and crude membrane fraction derived from an HTLV1-producing cell line MT-2. Furthermore, an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cell line (ES-1) was constructed from an SLE patient, which produced a monoclonal antibody (IgG, lambda) reactive to an HTLV1-related cell-membrane antigen expressed on MT-1 and MT-2 cells. The specific reactivity of the monoclonal antibody was analysed by an indirect immunofluorescent cell-membrane staining and a microcytotoxicity test. The incidence of anti-ATLA antibodies was not different among SLE and other collagen diseases. The monoclonal antibody produced by ES-1 stained and killed HTLV1-infected cell lines specifically, but did not react with other human lymphoid cell lines. This monoclonal antibody failed to react with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), mitogen-induced T cell blasts, and iododeoxyuridine-treated T cells from SLE patients. Thus, a possible role of HTLV1 in the aetiology of SLE was not established. PMID:2998659

  19. Glutathione metabolism in the HaCaT cell line as a model for the detoxification of the model sensitisers 2,4-dinitrohalobenzenes in human skin.

    PubMed

    Jacquoilleot, Sandrine; Sheffield, David; Olayanju, Adedamola; Sison-Young, Rowena; Kitteringham, Neil R; Naisbitt, Dean J; Aleksic, Maja

    2015-08-19

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most prominent antioxidant in cells and the co-factor of an important set of enzymes involved in the skin metabolic clearance system, glutathione S-transferases (GST). Here, we describe an LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy) method to measure GSH and its disulfide form (GSSG) in HaCaT cells and a 3D Reconstructed Human Epidermis (RHE) model. In our assay, the basal level of GSH in both systems was in the low nmol/mg soluble protein range, while the level of GSSG was systematically below our limit of quantification (0.1 μM). We found that 2,4-dinitrohalobenzenes deplete the GSH present in HaCaT cells within the first hour of exposure, in a dose dependent manner. The level of GSH in HaCaT cells treated with a single non-toxic dose of 10 μM of dinitrohalobenzene was also shown to increase after two hours. While cells treated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB) and 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB) repleted GSH to levels similar to untreated control cells within 24h, 1-bromo-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNBB) seemed to prevent such a repletion and appeared to be the most toxic compound in all assays. A mathematical modelling of experimental results was performed to further rationalise the differences observed between test chemicals. For this purpose the biological phenomena observed were simplified into two sequential events: the initial depletion of the GSH stock after chemical treatment followed by the repletion of the GSH once the chemical was cleared. Activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway was observed with all compounds within two hours, and at concentrations less than 10 μM. These data show that GSH depletion and repletion occur rapidly in skin cells and emphasize the importance of conducting kinetic studies when performing in vitro experiments exploring skin sensitization.

  20. Induction of lysosomal and plasma membrane-bound sialidases in human T-cells via T-cell receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Zhang, Ji; Bian, Hong; Wu, Ping; Kuvelkar, Reshma; Kung, Ted T; Crawley, Yvette; Egan, Robert W; Billah, M Motasim

    2004-01-01

    Among the three isoenzymes of neuraminidase (Neu) or sialidase, Neu-1 has been suggested to be induced by cell activation and to be involved in IL (interleukin)-4 biosynthesis in murine T-cells. In the present study, we found that antigen-induced airway eosinophilia, a typical response dependent on Th2 (T-helper cell type 2) cytokines, as well as mRNA expression of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4, are suppressed in Neu-1-deficient mice, thereby demonstrating the in vivo role of murine Neu-1 in regulation of Th2 cytokines. To elucidate the roles of various sialidases in human T-cell activation, we investigated their tissue distribution, gene induction and function. Neu-1 is the predominant isoenzyme at the mRNA level in most tissues and cells in both mice and humans, including T-cells. T-cells also have significant levels of Neu-3 mRNAs, albeit much lower than those of Neu-1, whereas the levels of Neu-2 mRNAs are minimal. In human T-cells, both Neu-1 and Neu-3 mRNAs are significantly induced by T-cell-receptor stimulation, as is sialidase activity against 4-methylumbelliferyl- N -acetylneuramic acid (a substrate for both Neu-1 and Neu-3) and the ganglioside G(D1a) [NeuAcalpha2-3Galbeta1-3GalNAcbeta1-4(NeuAcalpha2-3)Galbeta1-4Glcbeta1-cer] (a substrate for Neu-3, but not for Neu-1). The expression of the two sialidase genes may be under differential regulation. Western blot analysis and enzymic comparison with recombinant sialidases have revealed that Neu-3 is induced as a major isoform in activated cells. The induction of Neu-1 and Neu-3 in T-cells is unique. In human monocytes and neutrophils stimulated with various agents, the only observation of sialidase induction has been by IL-1 in neutrophils. Functionally, a major difference has been observed in Jurkat T-cell lines over-expressing Neu-1- and Neu-3. Upon T-cell receptor stimulation, IL-2, interferon-gamma, IL-4 and IL-13 are induced in the Neu-1 line, whereas in the Neu-3 line the same cytokines are induced

  1. Induction of lysosomal and plasma membrane-bound sialidases in human T-cells via T-cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zhang, Ji; Bian, Hong; Wu, Ping; Kuvelkar, Reshma; Kung, Ted T; Crawley, Yvette; Egan, Robert W; Billah, M Motasim

    2004-06-01

    Among the three isoenzymes of neuraminidase (Neu) or sialidase, Neu-1 has been suggested to be induced by cell activation and to be involved in IL (interleukin)-4 biosynthesis in murine T-cells. In the present study, we found that antigen-induced airway eosinophilia, a typical response dependent on Th2 (T-helper cell type 2) cytokines, as well as mRNA expression of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4, are suppressed in Neu-1-deficient mice, thereby demonstrating the in vivo role of murine Neu-1 in regulation of Th2 cytokines. To elucidate the roles of various sialidases in human T-cell activation, we investigated their tissue distribution, gene induction and function. Neu-1 is the predominant isoenzyme at the mRNA level in most tissues and cells in both mice and humans, including T-cells. T-cells also have significant levels of Neu-3 mRNAs, albeit much lower than those of Neu-1, whereas the levels of Neu-2 mRNAs are minimal. In human T-cells, both Neu-1 and Neu-3 mRNAs are significantly induced by T-cell-receptor stimulation, as is sialidase activity against 4-methylumbelliferyl- N -acetylneuramic acid (a substrate for both Neu-1 and Neu-3) and the ganglioside G(D1a) [NeuAcalpha2-3Galbeta1-3GalNAcbeta1-4(NeuAcalpha2-3)Galbeta1-4Glcbeta1-cer] (a substrate for Neu-3, but not for Neu-1). The expression of the two sialidase genes may be under differential regulation. Western blot analysis and enzymic comparison with recombinant sialidases have revealed that Neu-3 is induced as a major isoform in activated cells. The induction of Neu-1 and Neu-3 in T-cells is unique. In human monocytes and neutrophils stimulated with various agents, the only observation of sialidase induction has been by IL-1 in neutrophils. Functionally, a major difference has been observed in Jurkat T-cell lines over-expressing Neu-1- and Neu-3. Upon T-cell receptor stimulation, IL-2, interferon-gamma, IL-4 and IL-13 are induced in the Neu-1 line, whereas in the Neu-3 line the same cytokines are induced

  2. T CELL REPLICATIVE SENESCENCE IN HUMAN AGING

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jennifer P.; Effros, Rita B.

    2013-01-01

    The decline of the immune system appears to be an intractable consequence of aging, leading to increased susceptibility to infections, reduced effectiveness of vaccination and higher incidences of many diseases including osteoporosis and cancer in the elderly. These outcomes can be attributed, at least in part, to a phenomenon known as T cell replicative senescence, a terminal state characterized by dysregulated immune function, loss of the CD28 costimulatory molecule, shortened telomeres and elevated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Senescent CD8 T cells, which accumulate in the elderly, have been shown to frequently bear antigen specificity against cytomegalovirus (CMV), suggesting that this common and persistent infection may drive immune senescence and result in functional and phenotypic changes to the T cell repertoire. Senescent T cells have also been identified in patients with certain cancers, autoimmune diseases and chronic infections, such as HIV. This review discusses the in vivo and in vitro evidence for the contribution of CD8 T cell replicative senescence to a plethora of age-related pathologies and a few possible therapeutic avenues to delay or prevent this differentiative end-state in T cells. The age-associated remodeling of the immune system, through accumulation of senescent T cells has far-reaching consequences on the individual and society alike, for the current healthcare system needs to meet the urgent demands of the increasing proportions of the elderly in the US and abroad. PMID:23061726

  3. Optimization of methods for the genetic modification of human T cells.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Mahmood Y; Vacaflores, Aldo; Houtman, Jon Cd

    2015-11-01

    CD4(+) T cells are not only critical in the fight against parasitic, bacterial and viral infections, but are also involved in many autoimmune and pathological disorders. Studies of protein function in human T cells are confined to techniques such as RNA interference (RNAi) owing to ethical reasons and relative simplicity of these methods. However, introduction of RNAi or genes into primary human T cells is often hampered by toxic effects from transfection or transduction methods that yield cell numbers inadequate for downstream assays. Additionally, the efficiency of recombinant DNA expression is frequently low because of multiple factors including efficacy of the method and strength of the targeting RNAs. Here, we describe detailed protocols that will aid in the study of primary human CD4(+) T cells. First, we describe a method for development of effective microRNA/shRNAs using available online algorithms. Second, we illustrate an optimized protocol for high efficacy retroviral or lentiviral transduction of human T-cell lines. Importantly, we demonstrate that activated primary human CD4(+) T cells can be transduced efficiently with lentiviruses, with a highly activated population of T cells receiving the largest number of copies of integrated DNA. We also illustrate a method for efficient lentiviral transduction of hard-to-transduce un-activated primary human CD4(+) T cells. These protocols will significantly assist in understanding the activation and function of human T cells and will ultimately aid in the development or improvement of current drugs that target human CD4(+) T cells.

  4. Optimization of Methods for the Genetic Modification of Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Mahmood Y.; Vacaflores, Aldo; Houtman, Jon C.D.

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are critical in the fight against parasitic, bacterial, and viral infections, but are also involved in many autoimmune and pathological disorders. Studies of protein function in human T cells are confined to techniques such as RNAi due to ethical reasons and relative simplicity of these methods. However, introduction of RNAi or genes into primary human T cells is often hampered by toxic effects from transfection or transduction methods that yield cell numbers inadequate for downstream assays. Additionally, the efficiency of recombinant DNA expression is frequently low due to multiple factors including efficacy of the method and strength of the targeting RNAs. Here, we describe detailed protocols that will aid in the study of primary human CD4+ T cells. First, we describe a method for development of effective microRNA/shRNAs using available online algorithms. Second, we illustrate an optimized protocol for high efficacy retroviral or lentiviral transduction of human T cell lines. Importantly, we demonstrate that activated primary human CD4+ T cells can be transduced efficiently with lentiviruses, with a highly activated population of T cells receiving the largest number of copies of integrated DNA. We also illustrate a method for efficient lentiviral transduction of hard-to-transduce un-activated primary human CD4+ T cells. These protocols will significantly assist in understanding the activation and function of human T cells and will ultimately aid in the development or improvement of current drugs that target human CD4+ T cells. PMID:26027856

  5. Failure to detect human T-lymphotropic virus type-I proviral DNA in cell lines and tissues from patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Vowels, B R; Benoit, B M; Rook, A H; Lessin, S R

    1996-09-01

    Previous molecular studies investigating the presence of HTLV-I proviral DNA in cell lines and tissue samples of patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) have reported a detection rate ranging from 0-92%. Despite the lack of epidemiologic data linking HTLV-I infection with CTCL, the molecular data still invite speculation regarding the precise role of HTLV-I in the pathogenesis of CTCL. To determine the detection rate of HTLV-I proviral DNA among CTCL patients referred to our medical center, we analyzed Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cell lines established from peripheral blood of seven CTCL patients and 43 tissue samples from 22 patients with different stages of disease. Genomic DNA was polymerase chain reaction-amplified with primers within the HTLV-I tax gene region. Amplification products were probed with nested oligonucleotide probes by Southern blot analysis. No HTLV-I proviral sequences were detected in the samples (0/50). Using HTLV-I/II pol primers, no HTLV-I pol gene sequences were detected. In tissues from one patient, HTLV-II pol and tax gene sequences were detected; however, HTLV-II proviral integration was not detected by Southern blot analysis of the genomic DNA. Our data suggest: (i) HTLV-I does not appear to be a primary etiologic agent in CTCL; and (ii) HTLV-II pol and tax gene sequences can be detected in a minority of CTCL patients, but this does not necessarily imply an etiologic role.

  6. Cutting Edge: Human Latency-Associated Peptide+ T Cells: A Novel Regulatory T Cell Subset

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Roopali; Farez, Mauricio F.; Wang, Yue; Kozoriz, Deneen; Quintana, Francisco J.; Weiner, Howard L.

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Several molecules including TGF-β have been linked to the function and differentiation of Tregs. In this study, we describe a unique population of T cells expressing a membrane bound form of TGF-β, the latency-associated peptide (LAP), and having regulatory properties in human peripheral blood. These CD4+LAP+ T cells lack Foxp3 but express TGF-βR type II and the activation marker CD69. CD4+LAP+ T cells are hypoproliferative compared with CD4+LAP− T cells, secrete IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TGF-β upon activation, and exhibit TGF-β– and IL-10–dependent suppressive activity in vitro. The in vitro activation of CD4+LAP− T cells results in the generation of LAP+ Tregs, which is further amplified by IL-8. In conclusion, we have characterized a novel population of human LAP+ Tregs that is different from classic CD4+Foxp3+CD25high natural Tregs. PMID:20368276

  7. Generation of an immortalized human CD4+ T cell clone inhibiting tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Pecher, G; Harnack, U; Günther, M; Hummel, M; Fichtner, I; Schenk, J A

    2001-05-18

    Tumor antigen-specific T cell clones represent a useful tool in tumor immunology; however, their long-term culture is limited. To generate an immortalized cytotoxic T cell clone against the human tumor antigen mucin, we exposed a previously generated T cell culture to Herpesvirus saimiri. We obtained an immortalized human CD4+ T cell clone, termed SITAM. Clonality of these cells was shown by analysis of the alpha/beta-T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire. Cytolytic activity was demonstrated against several mucin-expressing tumor cell lines and could not be detected against non-mucin-expressing cells. SITAM cells maintained their features stably for 2 years. Furthermore, growth of the tumor cell line Capan-2 in NOD/SCID mice was inhibited when SITAM cells were coinjected subcutaneously with tumor cells. SITAM cells provide an unlimited source of clonal T cells for analysis of tumor recognition and may be of help in TCR-targeted immunotherapy. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  8. Induction of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis by T-cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Rozenszajn, L A; Muellenberg-Coulombre, C; Gery, I; el-Saied, M; Kuwabara, T; Mochizuki, M; Lando, Z; Nussenblatt, R B

    1986-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis was induced in genetically susceptible Lewis rats by passive transfer of T-lymphocyte cell lines from long-term cultures primed against soluble retinal antigen (S-Ag). A continuous T-cell line was established from non-adherent lymph node cells of S-Ag-immunized Lewis rats. The lymphoid cells were propagated in vitro by serially restimulating them with S-Ag in the presence of irradiated syngeneic spleen cells and expanding them in IL-2-containing media. The cell lines exhibited markers specific for T lymphocytes and the majority had the helper phenotype. When naïve rats were inoculated intravenously with anti S-Ag T-cell lines re-exposed to the antigen prior to injection, they developed uveoretinitis with both clinical and histological characteristics in half the time required by S-Ag to induce the disease by active immunization. The rats exhibited a delayed hypersensitivity skin reaction towards S-Ag. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3485569

  9. Small amino acid changes in the V3 hypervariable region of gp120 can affect the T-cell-line and macrophage tropism of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Shioda, T; Levy, J A; Cheng-Mayer, C

    1992-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains display a high degree of heterogeneity in their biological properties that correlate with in vivo pathogenesis of the virus. We previously demonstrated that overlapping regions encompassing the third hypervariable domain (V3), within the envelope glycoprotein gp120 determine the tropisms of HIV-1 for T-cell lines and primary macrophages. Studies with mutant viruses carrying one or more amino acid substitutions in the V3 loop have now identified this hypervariable domain as a major determinant for these cellular host range properties. Three to five amino acid changes in this domain, but rarely a single amino acid substitution, can confer macrophage tropism and alter T-cell-line tropism. These findings emphasize the effect on cell tropism of small amino acid differences in the viral envelope and suggest that the overall conformation of the V3 loop plays the major role in determining the ability of HIV-1 to infect T-cell lines and primary macrophages. PMID:1409653

  10. CD1 and mycobacterial lipids activate human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Moody, D. Branch

    2014-01-01

    Summary For decades, proteins were thought to be the sole or at least the dominant source of antigens for T cells. Studies in the 1990s demonstrated that CD1 proteins and mycobacterial lipids form specific targets of human αβ T cells. The molecular basis by which T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize CD1-lipid complexes is now well understood. Many types of mycobacterial lipids function as antigens in the CD1 system, and new studies done with CD1 tetramers identify T-cell populations in the blood of tuberculosis patients. In human populations, a fundamental difference between the CD1 and major histocompatibility complex systems is that all humans express nearly identical CD1 proteins. Correspondingly, human CD1 responsive T cells show evidence of conserved TCRs. In addition to natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells), conserved TCRs define other subsets of human T cells, including germline-encoded mycolyl-reactive (GEM) T cells. The simple immunogenetics of the CD1 system and new investigative tools to measure T-cell responses in humans now creates a situation in which known lipid antigens can be developed as immunodiagnostic and immunotherapeutic reagents for tuberculosis disease. PMID:25703557

  11. Human skin cells support thymus-independent T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rachael A.; Yamanaka, Kei-ichi; Bai, Mei; Dowgiert, Rebecca; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    Thymic tissue has previously been considered a requirement for the generation of a functional and diverse population of human T cells. We report that fibroblasts and keratinocytes from human skin arrayed on a synthetic 3-dimensional matrix support the development of functional human T cells from hematopoietic precursor cells in the absence of thymic tissue. Newly generated T cells contained T cell receptor excision circles, possessed a diverse T cell repertoire, and were functionally mature and tolerant to self MHC, indicating successful completion of positive and negative selection. Skin cell cultures expressed the AIRE, Foxn1, and Hoxa3 transcription factors and a panel of autoantigens. Skin and bone marrow biopsies can thus be used to generate de novo functional and diverse T cell populations for potential therapeutic use in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:16224538

  12. Vaccinia Virus Inhibits T Cell Receptor–Dependent Responses by Human γδ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haishan; Deetz, Carl O.; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Cairo, Cristiana; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Propp, Nadia; Salvato, Maria S.; Shao, Yiming; Pauza, C. David

    2008-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an effective vaccine and vector but has evolved multiple mechanisms for evading host immunity. We characterized the interactions of VV (TianTan and New York City Board of Health strains) with human γδ T cells because of the role they play in immune control of this virus. Exposure to VV failed to trigger proliferative responses in γδ T cells from unprimed individuals, but it was an unexpected finding that VV blocked responses to model antigens by the Vγ2Vδ2 T cell subset. Infectious or ultraviolet light–inactivated VV inhibited proliferative Vγ2Vδ2 T cell responses to phosphoantigens and tumor cells, prevented cytolysis of Daudi B cells, and reduced cytokine production. Inhibiting Vγ2Vδ2 T cells may be a mechanism for evading host immunity and increasing VV virulence. Increased VV replication or expression in the absence of γδ T cell responses might contribute to its potency as a vaccine against poxvirus and recombinant antigens. PMID:17152007

  13. Vaccinia virus inhibits T cell receptor-dependent responses by human gammadelta T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Haishan; Deetz, Carl O; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Cairo, Cristiana; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Propp, Nadia; Salvato, Maria S; Shao, Yiming; Pauza, C David

    2007-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an effective vaccine and vector but has evolved multiple mechanisms for evading host immunity. We characterized the interactions of VV (TianTan and New York City Board of Health strains) with human gammadelta T cells because of the role they play in immune control of this virus. Exposure to VV failed to trigger proliferative responses in gammadelta T cells from unprimed individuals, but it was an unexpected finding that VV blocked responses to model antigens by the Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cell subset. Infectious or ultraviolet light-inactivated VV inhibited proliferative Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cell responses to phosphoantigens and tumor cells, prevented cytolysis of Daudi B cells, and reduced cytokine production. Inhibiting Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells may be a mechanism for evading host immunity and increasing VV virulence. Increased VV replication or expression in the absence of gammadelta T cell responses might contribute to its potency as a vaccine against poxvirus and recombinant antigens.

  14. Apoptosis in a Fas-resistant, T-cell receptor-sensitive human leukaemic T-cell clone.

    PubMed Central

    Delehanty, L L; Payne, J A; Farrow, S N; Brown, R; Champion, B R

    1997-01-01

    The Fas (CD95) antigen plays a key role in regulating T-cell activation and survival. We have generated a Fas-resistant subclone of the human T-cell leukaemia line, H9, which is still able to undergo apoptosis in response to T-cell receptor ligation. Molecular analyses revealed that resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis was due to a heterozygous mutation in the death domain of the Fas gene which generates a stop codon, and thus encodes a truncated Fas molecule. Fas ligation was able to induce apoptosis in the presence of cycloheximide, indicating that the mutant Fas molecule retained some signalling capability, which is death-domain independent. These cells will provide a useful tool for dissecting the complexities of Fas signalling pathways. Images Figure 5 PMID:9155645

  15. Human retrovirus in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sugamura, K; Hinuma, Y

    1985-03-01

    In this review Kazuo Sugamura and Yorio Hinuma summarize developments in studies on the human retrovirus associated with a unique human T-cell malignancy, adult T-cell leukemia; they also discuss the possible mechanisms of retrovirus-induced leukemogenesis. Copyright © 1985. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Photoaffinity antigens for human γδ T cells1

    PubMed Central

    Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Liu, Xiao-hui; Lee, Hoi K.; Song, Yongcheng; Distefano, Mark D.; Oldfield, Eric; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Morita, Craig T.

    2009-01-01

    Vγ2Vδ2 T cells comprise the major subset of peripheral blood γ δ T cells in humans and expand during infections by recognizing small, nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphates. These molecules include (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl-pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a microbial isoprenoid intermediate, and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), an endogenous isoprenoid intermediate. Recognition of these nonpeptide antigens is mediated by the Vγ2Vδ2 T cell antigen receptor (TCR). Several findings suggest that prenyl pyrophosphates are presented by an antigen presenting molecule: contact between T cells and APCs is required; the antigens do not bind the Vγ2Vδ2 TCR directly; and antigen recognition is abrogated by TCR mutations in CDRs distant from the putative antigen recognition site. Identification of the putative antigen presenting molecule, however, has been hindered by the inability to achieve stable association of nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphate antigens with the presenting molecule. In this study, we show that photoaffinity analogs of HMBPP, meta/para-benzophenone-(methylene)-prenyl pyrophosphates (m/p-BZ-(C)-C5-OPP), can cross-link to the surface of tumor cell lines and be presented as antigens to γ δ T cells. Mutant tumor cell lines lacking MHC class I, MHC class II, β2-microglobulin, and CD1, as well as tumor cell lines from a variety of tissues and individuals, will all crosslink to and present m-BZ-C5-OPP. Finally, pulsing of BZ-(C)-C5-OPP is inhibited by IPP and an inactive analog, suggesting that they bind to the same molecule. Taken together, these results suggest that nonpeptide antigens are presented by a novel antigen presenting molecule that is widely distributed, non-polymorphic, but not classical MHC class I, MHC class II, or CD1. This is an author-produced version of a manuscript accepted for publication in The Journal of Immunology (The JI). The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. (AAI), publisher of The JI, holds the copyright to this manuscript

  17. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein represses the expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor in T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Takachi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takahashi-Yoshita, Manami; Higuchi, Masaya; Obata, Miki; Mishima, Yukio; Okuda, Shujiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Matsuoka, Masao; Saitoh, Akihiko; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), which is an aggressive form of T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 oncoproteins, Tax and HBZ, play crucial roles in the immortalization of T-cells and/or leukemogenesis by dysregulating the cellular functions in the host. Recent studies show that HTLV-1-infected T-cells have reduced expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor protein. In the present study, we explored whether Tax and/or HBZ play a role in downregulating BCL11B in HTLV-1-infected T-cells. Lentiviral transduction of Tax in a human T-cell line repressed the expression of BCL11B at both the protein and mRNA levels, whereas the transduction of HBZ had little effect on the expression. Tax mutants with a decreased activity for the NF-κB, CREB or PDZ protein pathways still showed a reduced expression of the BCL11B protein, thereby implicating a different function of Tax in BCL11B downregulation. In addition, the HTLV-2 Tax2 protein reduced the BCL11B protein expression in T-cells. Seven HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, including three ATL-derived cell lines, showed reduced BCL11B mRNA and protein expression relative to an uninfected T-cell line, and the greatest reductions were in the cells expressing Tax. Collectively, these results indicate that Tax is responsible for suppressing BCL11B protein expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells; Tax-mediated repression of BCL11B is another mechanism that Tax uses to promote oncogenesis of HTLV-1-infected T-cells. PMID:25613934

  18. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein represses the expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor in T-cells.

    PubMed

    Takachi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takahashi-Yoshita, Manami; Higuchi, Masaya; Obata, Miki; Mishima, Yukio; Okuda, Shujiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Matsuoka, Masao; Saitoh, Akihiko; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), which is an aggressive form of T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 oncoproteins, Tax and HBZ, play crucial roles in the immortalization of T-cells and/or leukemogenesis by dysregulating the cellular functions in the host. Recent studies show that HTLV-1-infected T-cells have reduced expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor protein. In the present study, we explored whether Tax and/or HBZ play a role in downregulating BCL11B in HTLV-1-infected T-cells. Lentiviral transduction of Tax in a human T-cell line repressed the expression of BCL11B at both the protein and mRNA levels, whereas the transduction of HBZ had little effect on the expression. Tax mutants with a decreased activity for the NF-κB, CREB or PDZ protein pathways still showed a reduced expression of the BCL11B protein, thereby implicating a different function of Tax in BCL11B downregulation. In addition, the HTLV-2 Tax2 protein reduced the BCL11B protein expression in T-cells. Seven HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, including three ATL-derived cell lines, showed reduced BCL11B mRNA and protein expression relative to an uninfected T-cell line, and the greatest reductions were in the cells expressing Tax. Collectively, these results indicate that Tax is responsible for suppressing BCL11B protein expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells; Tax-mediated repression of BCL11B is another mechanism that Tax uses to promote oncogenesis of HTLV-1-infected T-cells.

  19. MERTK as negative regulator of human T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cabezón, Raquel; Carrera-Silva, E. Antonio; Flórez-Grau, Georgina; Errasti, Andrea E.; Calderón-Gómez, Elisabeth; Lozano, Juan José; España, Carolina; Ricart, Elena; Panés, Julián; Rothlin, Carla Vanina; Benítez-Ribas, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis whether MERTK, which is up-regulated in human DCs treated with immunosuppressive agents, is directly involved in modulating T cell activation. MERTK is a member of the TAM family and contributes to regulating innate immune response to ACs by inhibiting DC activation in animal models. However, whether MERTK interacts directly with T cells has not been addressed. Here, we show that MERTK is highly expressed on dex-induced human tol-DCs and participates in their tolerogenic effect. Neutralization of MERTK in allogenic MLR, as well as autologous DC–T cell cultures, leads to increased T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production. Additionally, we identify a previously unrecognized noncell-autonomous regulatory function of MERTK expressed on DCs. Mer-Fc protein, used to mimic MERTK on DCs, suppresses naïve and antigen-specific memory T cell activation. This mechanism is mediated by the neutralization of the MERTK ligand PROS1. We find that MERTK and PROS1 are expressed in human T cells upon TCR activation and drive an autocrine proproliferative mechanism. Collectively, these results suggest that MERTK on DCs controls T cell activation and expansion through the competition for PROS1 interaction with MERTK in the T cells. In conclusion, this report identified MERTK as a potent suppressor of T cell response. PMID:25624460

  20. T-cell proliferation and forkhead box P3 expression in human T cells are dependent on T-cell density: physics of a confined space?

    PubMed

    Bernardo, David; Al-Hassi, Hafid O; Mann, Elizabeth R; Tee, Cheng T; Murugananthan, Aravinth U; Peake, Simon T C; Hart, Ailsa L; Knight, Stella C

    2012-03-01

    T-cell proliferation rates in vitro depend on factors including initial T-cell number, dose of stimulus, culture time, and available physical space. The role of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) in the identification of T cells with a regulatory phenotype remains controversial in humans. Through 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester labeling of human T cells and subsequent culture of different numbers of T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC), we studied proliferative T-cell responses and FoxP3 expression in divided T cells. T-cell proliferation rates depended on initial T-cell/APC numbers. Proliferation rates decreased when high initial T-cell numbers were increased. FoxP3 expression was expressed exclusively in virtually all divided T cells cultured at high T-cell densities, irrespective of their CD4 nature or cytokine content, and was coexpressed with T-bet. However, when T cells were cultured on larger surfaces or at lower initial numbers, FoxP3 expression was not induced in divided T cells, even when most of the cells had undergone cell division. FoxP3(+) T cells generated at high cell densities did not elicit a suppressive phenotype and FoxP3 expression was subsequently lost in time when the stimulus was removed. Therefore, caution should be observed in the use of FoxP3 expression to identify regulatory T cells in humans because its expression may be only a consequence of activation status in a restricted environment.

  1. Multiple sclerosis and human T-cell lymphotropic retroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Defreitas, Elaine C.; Harper, Mary E.; Sandberg-Wollheim, Magnhild; Sheremata, William A.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Saxinger, Carl W.; Feinberg, Mark B.; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Gallo, Robert C.

    1985-11-01

    A combination of different types of data suggests that some multiple sclerosis patients respond immunologically to, and have cerebrospinal T cells containing, a retrovirus that is related to, but distinct from, the three types of human T-cell lymphotropic viruses. The role of this virus in multiple sclerosis is uncertain.

  2. Plasticity of Human CD4 T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Alfen, Johanna Sophie; Kastirr, Ilko; Gruarin, Paola; De Simone, Marco; Pagani, Massimiliano; Abrignani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to a variety of different pathogens, which induce tailored immune responses and consequently generate highly diverse populations of pathogen-specific T cells. CD4+ T cells have a central role in adaptive immunity, since they provide essential help for both cytotoxic T cell- and antibody-mediated responses. In addition, CD4+ regulatory T cells are required to maintain self-tolerance and to inhibit immune responses that could damage the host. Initially, two subsets of CD4+ helper T cells were identified that secrete characteristic effector cytokines and mediate responses against different types of pathogens, i.e., IFN-γ secreting Th1 cells that fight intracellular pathogens, and IL-4 producing Th2 cells that target extracellular parasites. It is now well established that this dichotomy is insufficient to describe the complexity of CD4+ T cell differentiation, and in particular the human CD4 compartment contains a myriad of T cell subsets with characteristic capacities to produce cytokines and to home to involved tissues. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that these T cell subsets are not all terminally differentiated cells, but that the majority is plastic and that in particular central memory T cells can acquire different properties and functions in secondary immune responses. In addition, there is compelling evidence that helper T cells can acquire regulatory functions upon chronic stimulation in inflamed tissues. The plasticity of antigen-experienced human T cell subsets is highly relevant for translational medicine, since it opens new perspectives for immune-modulatory therapies for chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. PMID:25566245

  3. T-cell clones in human trichinellosis: Evidence for a mixed Th1/Th2 response.

    PubMed

    Della Bella, C; Benagiano, M; De Gennaro, M; Gomez-Morales, M A; Ludovisi, A; D'Elios, S; Luchi, S; Pozio, E; D'Elios, M M; Bruschi, F

    2017-03-01

    In humans, studies on the cellular immune response against Trichinella are scarce. Aim of this study was to characterize the cytokine profile of T cells specific for Trichinella britovi in trichinellosis patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained from five patients involved in a trichinellosis outbreak caused by T. britovi, which occurred in 2013 in Tuscany (Italy). All the patients resulted positive for Trichinella-specific IgG, IgE and presented eosinophilia. T cells were investigated for their proliferation to excretory/secretory antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (TsES) and for their cytokine profile. A total of 284 CD4+ and 42 CD8+ T-cell clones were obtained from the TsES-specific T-cell lines from PBMC. All T-cell clones proliferated in response to mitogen. Of the 284 CD4+ T-cell clones generated from TsES-specific T-cell lines, 135 (47%) proliferated significantly to TsES; 26% CD8+ T-cell clones showed proliferation to TsES. In the series of the 135 TsES-specific CD4+ clones, 51% expressed a Th2 profile, 30% a Th0 and 19% Th1. In the series of the 11 TsES-specific CD8+ T-cell clones, 18% were Tc2, 45% Tc0 and 36% Tc1. In human trichinellosis, the cellular immune response is, during the chronic phase, mixed Th1/Th2.

  4. Substrate rigidity regulates human T cell activation and proliferation.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Roddy S; Hao, Xueli; Shen, Keyue; Bashour, Keenan; Akimova, Tatiana; Hancock, Wayne W; Kam, Lance C; Milone, Michael C

    2012-08-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cultured T cells holds promise for the treatment of cancer and infectious disease. Ligands immobilized on surfaces fabricated from hard materials such as polystyrene plastic are commonly employed for T cell culture. The mechanical properties of a culture surface can influence the adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells and fibroblasts. We therefore explored the impact of culture substrate stiffness on the ex vivo activation and expansion of human T cells. We describe a simple system for the stimulation of the TCR/CD3 complex and the CD28 receptor using substrates with variable rigidity manufactured from poly(dimethylsiloxane), a biocompatible silicone elastomer. We show that softer (Young's Modulus [E] < 100 kPa) substrates stimulate an average 4-fold greater IL-2 production and ex vivo proliferation of human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells compared with stiffer substrates (E > 2 MPa). Mixed peripheral blood T cells cultured on the stiffer substrates also demonstrate a trend (nonsignificant) toward a greater proportion of CD62L(neg), effector-differentiated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Naive CD4(+) T cells expanded on softer substrates yield an average 3-fold greater proportion of IFN-γ-producing Th1-like cells. These results reveal that the rigidity of the substrate used to immobilize T cell stimulatory ligands is an important and previously unrecognized parameter influencing T cell activation, proliferation, and Th differentiation. Substrate rigidity should therefore be a consideration in the development of T cell culture systems as well as when interpreting results of T cell activation based upon solid-phase immobilization of TCR/CD3 and CD28 ligands.

  5. Substrate rigidity regulates human T cell activation and proliferation1

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Roddy S.; Hao, Xueli; Shen, Keyue; Bashour, Keenan; Akimova, Tatiana; Hancock, Wayne W.; Kam, Lance; Milone, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cultured T cells holds promise for the treatment of cancer and infectious disease. Ligands immobilized on surfaces fabricated from hard materials such as polystyrene plastic are commonly employed for T cell culture. The mechanical properties of a culture surface can influence the adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells and fibroblasts. We therefore explored the impact of culture substrate stiffness on the ex vivo activation and expansion of human T cells. We describe a simple system for the stimulation of the TCR/CD3 complex and the CD28 receptor using substrates with variable rigidity manufactured from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a biocompatible silicone elastomer. We show that softer (Young’s Modulus [E] < 100 kPa) substrates stimulate an average 4-fold greater IL-2 production and ex vivo proliferation of human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells compared with stiffer substrates (E >2 MPa). Mixed peripheral blood T cells cultured on the stiffer substrates also demonstrate a trend (non-significant) towards a greater proportion of CD62Lneg, effector-differentiated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Naïve CD4+ T cells expanded on softer substrates yield an average 3-fold greater proportion of IFN-γ producing TH1-like cells. These results reveal that the rigidity of the substrate used to immobilize T cell stimulatory ligands is an important and previously unrecognized parameter influencing T cell activation, proliferation and TH differentiation. Substrate rigidity should therefore be a consideration in the development of T cell culture systems as well as when interpreting results of T cell activation based upon solid-phase immobilization of TCR/CD3 and CD28 ligands. PMID:22732590

  6. Human autoreactive T cells recognize CD1b and phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Van Rhijn, Ildiko; van Berlo, Twan; Hilmenyuk, Tamara; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Wolf, Benjamin J.; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Uldrich, Adam P.; Napolitani, Giorgio; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Altman, John D.; Willemsen, Peter; Huang, Shouxiong; Rossjohn, Jamie; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Brenner, Michael B.; Godfrey, Dale I.; Moody, D. Branch

    2016-01-01

    In contrast with the common detection of T cells that recognize MHC, CD1a, CD1c, or CD1d proteins, CD1b autoreactive T cells have been difficult to isolate in humans. Here we report the development of polyvalent complexes of CD1b proteins and carbohydrate backbones (dextramers) and their use in identifying CD1b autoreactive T cells from human donors. Activation is mediated by αβ T-cell receptors (TCRs) binding to CD1b-phospholipid complexes, which is sufficient to activate autoreactive responses to CD1b-expressing cells. Using mass spectrometry and T-cell responses to scan through the major classes of phospholipids, we identified phosphatidylglycerol (PG) as the immunodominant lipid antigen. T cells did not discriminate the chemical differences that distinguish mammalian PG from bacterial PG. Whereas most models of T-cell recognition emphasize TCR discrimination of differing self and foreign structures, CD1b autoreactive T cells recognize lipids with dual self and foreign origin. PG is rare in the cellular membranes that carry CD1b proteins. However, bacteria and mitochondria are rich in PG, so these data point to a more general mechanism of immune detection of infection- or stress-associated lipids. PMID:26621732

  7. Two distinct T-cell receptor alpha-chain transcripts in a rabbit T-cell line: implications for allelic exclusion in T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Marche, P N; Kindt, T J

    1986-01-01

    Information relevant to allelic exclusion in T cells has been obtained by a study of cDNA clones corresponding to alpha-chain genes of the T-cell receptor in the rabbit T-cell line RL-5. One clone contains a variable-joining-constant (VJC) sequence encoding a complete alpha chain of the T-cell receptor. A second has an identical constant region and includes a distinct variable-joining (VJ) sequence. However, a single-base deletion in the variable region places the remainder of the second transcript out-of-phase and appears to be the product of a rearrangement involving a variable region of the T-cell receptor alpha-chain pseudogene. Presence of two variable-joining-constant (VJC) transcripts in the same cell line indicates that alpha-chain gene rearrangement is not affected by transcription of a complete alpha-chain mRNA and suggests that steps after mRNA synthesis are involved in the allelic exclusion process for alpha-chain genes. Comparison of rabbit alpha-chain sequences with those of man and mouse revealed interspecies conservation in constant and variable regions. Genomic Southern blot analyses using a rabbit constant region of the T-cell receptor alpha-chain probe revealed the presence of a single constant region gene. Hybridization with variable region probes defined two distinct multigenic subfamilies. Homology between certain rabbit and murine variable regions of the T-cell receptor alpha-chain sequences suggests that the existence of subfamilies predated divergence of these species. Images PMID:3485798

  8. T cells display mitochondria hyperpolarization in human type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Chernatynskaya, Anna V; Li, Jian-Wei; Kimbrell, Matthew R; Cassidy, Richard J; Perry, Daniel J; Muir, Andrew B; Atkinson, Mark A; Brusko, Todd M; Mathews, Clayton E

    2017-09-07

    T lymphocytes constitute a major effector cell population in autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Despite essential functions of mitochondria in regulating activation, proliferation, and apoptosis of T cells, little is known regarding T cell metabolism in the progression of human type 1 diabetes. In this study, we report, using two independent cohorts, that T cells from patients with type 1 diabetes exhibited mitochondrial inner-membrane hyperpolarization (MHP). Increased MHP was a general phenotype observed in T cell subsets irrespective of prior antigen exposure, and was not correlated with HbA1C levels, subject age, or duration of diabetes. Elevated T cell MHP was not detected in subjects with type 2 diabetes. T cell MHP was associated with increased activation-induced IFNγ production, and activation-induced IFNγ was linked to mitochondria-specific ROS production. T cells from subjects with type 1 diabetes also exhibited lower intracellular ATP levels. In conclusion, intrinsic mitochondrial dysfunction observed in type 1 diabetes alters mitochondrial ATP and IFNγ production; the latter is correlated with ROS generation. These changes impact T cell bioenergetics and function.

  9. VISTA is an immune checkpoint molecule for human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lines, J. Louise; Sempere, Lorenzo F.; Wang, Li; Pantazi, Eirini; Mak, Justin; O’Connell, Samuel; Ceeraz, Sabrina; Suriawinata, Arief A.; Yan, Shaofeng; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Noelle, Randolph

    2014-01-01

    VISTA is a potent negative regulator of T cell function that is expressed on hematopoietic cells and leukocytes. VISTA levels are heightened within the tumor microenvironment where its blockade can enhance anti-tumor immune responses in mice. In humans, blockade of the related PD-1 pathway has shown great potential in clinical immunotherapy trials. Here we report the structure of human VISTA and examine its function in lymphocyte negative regulation in cancer. VISTA is expressed predominantly within the hematopoietic compartment with highest expression within the myeloid lineage. VISTA-Ig suppressed proliferation of T cells but not B cells, blunted production of T cell cytokines and activation markers. Our results establish VISTA as a negative checkpoint regulator that suppresses T cell activation, induces Foxp3 expression and is highly expressed within the tumor microenvironment. By analogy to PD-1 and PD-L1 blockade, VISTA blockade may offer an immunotherapeutic strategy for human cancer. PMID:24691993

  10. Establishment and characterization of 10 cell lines derived from patients with adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, H; Esumi, H; Miwa, M; Shimoyama, M; Minato, K; Tobinai, K; Hirose, M; Watanabe, S; Inada, N; Kinoshita, K; Kamihira, S; Ichimaru, M; Sugimura, T

    1983-01-01

    By using human T-cell growth factor (TCGF), 10 cell lines were established from tissue samples of 10 patients with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Three cell lines were adapted to growth in medium lacking TCGF. The surface markers of all cell lines were characteristic of inducer/helper T cells, i.e., OKT3+, OKT4+, OKT6-, OKT8-, OKIa1+, and human Lyt2+ and Lyt3+, except that one cell line was OKT3-. The expression of the viral antigen was examined during establishment of 8 of the 10 cell lines. The viral antigen was not expressed in leukemic cells before cultivation. In 5 lines, the viral antigen was detected by immunofluorescent staining after a short period of cultivation. However, 3 cell lines, ATL-6A, ATL-9Y, and ATL-1K did not express the viral antigen during short-term culture: the ATL-6A and ATL-9Y cell lines became positive for the viral antigen after 5 and 2 months of cultivation, respectively; the ATL-1K cell line remained antigen-negative throughout a culture period of 13 months. Southern blot hybridization assay showed that all of the cell lines, including the viral antigen-negative ATL-1K cell line, contained the viral genome. Thus, the retrovirus was associated with all 10 cell lines established from ATL patients, but there was a heterogeneity in the expression time of the retroviral antigen in leukemic cells maintained in vitro. Our findings suggested that the expression of the viral antigen was not required for maintenance of the leukemic state in vivo and for growth of leukemic cells in vitro. Images PMID:6193528

  11. Human CD4+ central and effector memory T cells produce IL-21: effect on cytokine-driven proliferation of CD4+ T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Tadashi; Rahman, Mizanur; Nara, Hidetoshi; Araki, Akemi; Makabe, Koki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Kumagai, Izumi; Kudo, Toshio; Ishii, Naoto; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Asao, Hironobu

    2007-10-01

    IL-21 regulates certain functions of T cells, B cells, NK cells and dendritic cells. Although activated CD4(+) T cells produce IL-21, data identifying the specific CD4(+) T cell subsets that produce IL-21 are conflicting. In a previous study, mouse IL-21 message was detected in T(H)2, whereas human IL-21 (hIL-21) message was found in both T(H)1 and follicular helper T cells. To identify the IL-21-secreting cell populations in human, we established a hybridoma cell line producing an anti-hIL-21 mAb. Intracellular hIL-21-staining experiments showed that hIL-21 was mainly expressed in activated CD4(+) central memory T cells and in activated CD4(+) effector memory T cells, but not in activated CD4(+) naive T cells. Moreover, IL-21 was produced upon activation by some IFN-gamma-producing T(H)1-polarized cells and some IL-17-producing T(H)17-polarized cells, but not by IL-4-producing T(H)2-polarized cells. These results suggest that specific CD4(+) T cell populations produce IL-21. In the functional analysis, we found that IL-21 significantly enhanced the cytokine-driven proliferation of CD4(+) helper T cells synergistically with IL-7 and IL-15 without T cell activation stimuli. Taken together, IL-21 produced from CD4(+) memory T cells may have a supportive role in the maintenance of CD4(+) T cell subsets.

  12. Human CD4low CD25high regulatory T cells indiscriminately kill autologous activated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bryl, Ewa; Daca, Agnieszka; Jóźwik, Agnieszka; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2009-01-01

    The interest of the scientific community in regulatory CD4+ T cells has reached an enormously high level. Common agreement is that they inhibit not only the proliferation of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, but also the activities of natural killer cells and macrophages. However, very important issues concerning actual mechanism(s) and specificity of the action of regulatory T cells (Tregs) upon responder cells are still unsolved or vague. The best known marker for Tregs is the expression of transcription factor FoxP3, widely used for their enumeration. It is known that FoxP3 inhibits cytokine production so the most probable action of Tregs is direct. However, FoxP3 expression cannot be used for functional studies in humans. Therefore we identified human peripheral blood Tregs as a distinct, very well-defined population of peripheral blood T cells with reduced CD4 and high CD25 expression (CD4low CD25high), which fulfils the current phenotypic criteria identifying the Tregs by simultaneously expressing high amounts of FoxP3. We conclude that the definition of a CD4low CD25high phenotype is enough to unambiguously detect and study the regulatory function of these cells. On the functional level, the CD4low Tregs are able to non-specifically suppress the proliferation of autologous, previously polyclonally activated CD4+ and CD4− lymphocytes and to kill them by direct contact, probably utilizing intracellular granzyme B and perforin. PMID:19016909

  13. Human CD4low CD25high regulatory T cells indiscriminately kill autologous activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Bryl, Ewa; Daca, Agnieszka; Jóźwik, Agnieszka; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2009-09-01

    The interest of the scientific community in regulatory CD4(+) T cells has reached an enormously high level. Common agreement is that they inhibit not only the proliferation of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, but also the activities of natural killer cells and macrophages. However, very important issues concerning actual mechanism(s) and specificity of the action of regulatory T cells (Tregs) upon responder cells are still unsolved or vague. The best known marker for Tregs is the expression of transcription factor FoxP3, widely used for their enumeration. It is known that FoxP3 inhibits cytokine production so the most probable action of Tregs is direct. However, FoxP3 expression cannot be used for functional studies in humans. Therefore we identified human peripheral blood Tregs as a distinct, very well-defined population of peripheral blood T cells with reduced CD4 and high CD25 expression (CD4(low) CD25(high)), which fulfils the current phenotypic criteria identifying the Tregs by simultaneously expressing high amounts of FoxP3. We conclude that the definition of a CD4(low) CD25(high) phenotype is enough to unambiguously detect and study the regulatory function of these cells. On the functional level, the CD4(low) Tregs are able to non-specifically suppress the proliferation of autologous, previously polyclonally activated CD4(+) and CD4(-) lymphocytes and to kill them by direct contact, probably utilizing intracellular granzyme B and perforin.

  14. Impact of Exogenous Galectin-9 on Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lhuillier, Claire; Barjon, Clément; Niki, Toshiro; Gelin, Aurore; Praz, Françoise; Morales, Olivier; Souquere, Sylvie; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Wei, Ming; Dellis, Olivier; Busson, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-9 (gal-9) is a multifunctional β-galactoside-binding lectin, frequently released in the extracellular medium, where it acts as a pleiotropic immune modulator. Despite its overall immunosuppressive effects, a recent study has reported bimodal action of gal-9 on human resting blood T cells with apoptosis occurring in the majority of them, followed by a wave of activation and expansion of Th1 cells in the surviving population. Our knowledge of the signaling events triggered by exogenous gal-9 in T cells remains limited. One of these events is cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) release reported in some murine and human T cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of Ca2+ mobilization to apoptotic and nonapoptotic effects of exogenous gal-9 in human T cells. We found that the T cell receptor (TCR)-CD3 complex and the Lck kinase were required for Ca2+ mobilization but not for apoptosis induction in Jurkat cells. These data were confirmed in human CD4+ T cells from peripheral blood as follows: a specific Lck chemical inhibitor abrogated Ca2+ mobilization but not apoptosis induction. Moreover, Lck activity was also required for the production of Th1-type cytokines, i.e. interleukin-2 and interferon-γ, which resulted from gal-9 stimulation in peripheral CD4+ T cells. These findings indicate that gal-9 acts on T cells by two distinct pathways as follows: one mimicking antigen-specific activation of the TCR with a mandatory contribution of proximal elements of the TCR complex, especially Lck, and another resulting in apoptosis that is independent of this complex. PMID:25947381

  15. T-cell responses to dengue virus in humans.

    PubMed

    Kurane, Ichiro; Matsutani, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A

    2011-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Dengue virus infection induces specific CD4+CD8- and CD8+CD4- T cells in humans. In primary infection, T-cell responses to DENV are serotype cross-reactive, but the highest response is to the serotype that caused the infection. The epitopes recognized by DENV-specific T cells are located in most of the structural and non-structural proteins, but NS3 is the protein that is most dominantly recognized. In patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) caused by secondary DENV infection, T cells are highly activated in vivo. These highly activated T cells are DENV-specific and oligoclonal. Multiple kinds of lymphokines are produced by the activated T cells, and it has been hypothesized that these lymphokines are responsible for induction of plasma leakage, one of the most characteristic features of DHF. Thus, T-cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of DHF and in the recovery from DENV infection.

  16. Effector Vγ9Vδ2 T cells dominate the human fetal γδ T-cell repertoire.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Tanya; Brouwer, Margreet; Gosselin, Françoise; Tassignon, Joël; Leo, Oberdan; Donner, Catherine; Marchant, Arnaud; Vermijlen, David

    2015-02-10

    γδ T cells are unconventional T cells recognizing antigens via their γδ T-cell receptor (TCR) in a way that is fundamentally different from conventional αβ T cells. γδ T cells usually are divided into subsets according the type of Vγ and/or Vδ chain they express in their TCR. T cells expressing the TCR containing the γ-chain variable region 9 and the δ-chain variable region 2 (Vγ9Vδ2 T cells) are the predominant γδ T-cell subset in human adult peripheral blood. The current thought is that this predominance is the result of the postnatal expansion of cells expressing particular complementary-determining region 3 (CDR3) in response to encounters with microbes, especially those generating phosphoantigens derived from the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway of isoprenoid synthesis. However, here we show that, rather than requiring postnatal microbial exposure, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are the predominant blood subset in the second-trimester fetus, whereas Vδ1(+) and Vδ3(+) γδ T cells are present only at low frequencies at this gestational time. Fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are phosphoantigen responsive and display very limited diversity in the CDR3 of the Vγ9 chain gene, where a germline-encoded sequence accounts for >50% of all sequences, in association with a prototypic CDR3δ2. Furthermore, these fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are functionally preprogrammed (e.g., IFN-γ and granzymes-A/K), with properties of rapidly activatable innatelike T cells. Thus, enrichment for phosphoantigen-responsive effector T cells has occurred within the fetus before postnatal microbial exposure. These various characteristics have been linked in the mouse to the action of selecting elements and would establish a much stronger parallel between human and murine γδ T cells than is usually articulated.

  17. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I tax in the development of cutaneous T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zucker-Franklin, D

    2001-09-01

    Although it has been well established that the human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in regions of the world where this virus is endemic, its role in the pathogenesis of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) in the Western world has been less well established. Most patients with CTCL are negative for antibodies to the structural proteins of HTLV-I, and thus a causative role for this virus is usually dismissed. However, the Tax sequence of HTLV-I has been found in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of practically all patients with CTCL. Such patients express Tax mRNA and have antibodies to p40Tax, the protein encoded by this sequence. Sequence analysis of a 159-bp region of Tax extracted from CTCL cells proved to be homologous with the same region prepared from a cell line infected with prototypic HTLV-I. By in situ PCR, Tax has been demonstrated in the lymphocytes infiltrating the skin as well as in the keratinocytes of such patients. Apart from the pathophysiologic and clinical interest of these studies, these observations may have therapeutic implications. In vitro, the proliferation of HTLV-I-transformed cells can be inhibited by antisense to HTLV-I Tax. Since Tax has not been identified in the normal human genome, antisense to Tax deserves serious consideration as a treatment modality for patients whose cells have been demonstrated to harborTax.

  19. P53 mutation in acute T cell lymphoblastic leukemia is of somatic origin and is stable during establishment of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yeargin, J; Cheng, J; Yu, A L; Gjerset, R; Bogart, M; Haas, M

    1993-01-01

    Samples donated by patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) were screened for mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Peripheral blood cells of T-ALL relapse patient H.A. were found to possess a heterozygous point mutation at codon 175 of the p53 gene. To determine whether this was an inherited mutation, a B cell line (HABL) was established. Leukemic T cell lines (HATL) were concurrently established by growing peripheral blood leukemic T cells at low oxygen tension in medium supplemented with IGF-I. Previously we had shown that > 60% of leukemic T cell lines possessed mutations in the p53 gene (Cheng, J., and M. Hass. 1990. Mol. Cell. Biol. 10:5502), mutations that might have originated with the donor's leukemic cells, or might have been induced during establishment of the cell lines. To answer whether establishment of the HATL lines was associated with the induction of p53 mutations, cDNAs of the HATL and HABL lines were sequenced. The HATL lines retained the same heterozygous p53 mutation that was present in the patient's leukemic cells. The HABL line lacked p53 mutations. Immunoprecipitation with specific anti-p53 antibodies showed that HATL cells produced p53 proteins of mutant and wild type immunophenotype, while the HABL line synthesized only wild-type p53 protein. The HATL cells had an abnormal karyotype, while the HABL cells possessed a normal diploid karyotype. These experiments suggest that (a) p53 mutation occurred in the leukemic cells of relapse T-ALL patient HA; (b) the mutation was of somatic rather than hereditary origin; (c) the mutation was leukemia associated; and (d) establishment of human leukemia cell lines needs not be associated with in vitro induction of p53 mutations. It may be significant that patient HA belonged to a category of relapse T-ALL patients in whom a second remission could not be induced. Images PMID:8486778

  20. A journey with T cells, primate/human retroviruses and other persisting human T-cell tropic viruses.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Robert C

    2003-12-01

    A study of the growth of primate/human T cells led to mechanisms for temporary laboratory culture of these cells (discovery of interleukin-2) and also their continuous culture (by immortalization after infection with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 or 2 (HTLV-1 or 2)). Cultures of lymphocytes also led us to isolate five persisting T-tropic viruses: 1. the Hall's Island strain of gibbon ape leukemia virus, 2. HTLV-1, 3. HTLV-2, 4. human immunodeficiency virus and 5. human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6). This report is a brief synopsis of the discoveries of the first human retroviruses, the HTLV.

  1. Single-Cell RNA Sequencing of Human T Cells.

    PubMed

    Villani, Alexandra-Chloé; Shekhar, Karthik

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how populations of human T cells leverage cellular heterogeneity, plasticity, and diversity to achieve a wide range of functional flexibility, particularly during dynamic processes such as development, differentiation, and antigenic response, is a core challenge that is well suited for single-cell analysis. Hypothesis-free evaluation of cellular states and subpopulations by transcriptional profiling of single T cells can identify relationships that may be obscured by targeted approaches such as FACS sorting on cell-surface antigens, or bulk expression analysis. While this approach is relevant to all cell types, it is of particular interest in the study of T cells for which classical phenotypic criteria are now viewed as insufficient for distinguishing different T cell subtypes and transitional states, and defining the changes associated with dysfunctional T cell states in autoimmunity and tumor-related exhaustion. This unit describes a protocol to generate single-cell transcriptomic libraries of human blood CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and also introduces the basic bioinformatic steps to process the resulting sequence data for further computational analysis. We show how cellular subpopulations can be identified from transcriptional data, and derive characteristic gene expression signatures that distinguish these states. We believe single-cell RNA-seq is a powerful technique to study the cellular heterogeneity in complex tissues, a paradigm that will be of great value for the immune system.

  2. Suppressive effects of tumor cell-derived 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine on human T cells.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Frederik C; Singer, Katrin; Poller, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Luise; Strobl, Carolin D; Limm, Katharina; Ritter, Axel P; Gottfried, Eva; Völkl, Simon; Jacobs, Benedikt; Peter, Katrin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Dettmer, Katja; Oefner, Peter J; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Kreutz, Marina P; Aigner, Michael; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment represents one of the main obstacles for immunotherapy of cancer. The tumor milieu is among others shaped by tumor metabolites such as 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Increased intratumoral MTA levels result from a lack of the MTA-catabolizing enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in tumor cells and are found in various tumor entities. Here, we demonstrate that MTA suppresses proliferation, activation, differentiation, and effector function of antigen-specific T cells without eliciting cell death. Conversely, if MTA is added to highly activated T cells, MTA exerts cytotoxic effects on T cells. We identified the Akt pathway, a critical signal pathway for T cell activation, as a target of MTA, while, for example, p38 remained unaffected. Next, we provide evidence that MTA exerts its immunosuppressive effects by interfering with protein methylation in T cells. To confirm the relevance of the suppressive effects of exogenously added MTA on human T cells, we used an MTAP-deficient tumor cell-line that was stably transfected with the MTAP-coding sequence. We observed that T cells stimulated with MTAP-transfected tumor cells revealed a higher proliferative capacity compared to T cells stimulated with Mock-transfected cells. In conclusion, our findings reveal a novel immune evasion strategy of human tumor cells that could be of interest for therapeutic targeting.

  3. Activation of human T cells in hypertension: Studies of Humanized Mice and Hypertensive Humans

    PubMed Central

    Itani, Hana A.; McMaster, William G.; Saleh, Mohamed A.; Nazarewicz, Rafal R.; Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P.; Kaszuba, Anna; Konior, Anna; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Norlander, Allison E.; Chen, Wei; Bonami, Rachel H.; Marshall, Andrew F.; Poffenberger, Greg; Weyand, Cornelia M.; Madhur, Meena S.; Moore, Daniel J.; Harrison, David G.; Guzik, Tomasz J.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence supports an important role for T cells in the genesis of hypertension. Because this work has predominantly been performed in experimental animals, we sought to determine whether human T cells are activated in hypertension. We employed a humanized mouse model in which the murine immune system is replaced by the human immune system. Angiotensin II increased systolic pressure to 162 mm Hg vs. 116 mm Hg for sham treated animals. Flow cytometry of thoracic lymph nodes, thoracic aorta and kidney revealed increased infiltration of human leukocytes (CD45+) and T lymphocytes (CD3+ and CD4+) in response to angiotensin II infusion. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the memory T cells (CD3+/CD45RO+) in the aortas and lymph nodes. Prevention of hypertension using hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide prevented the accumulation of T cells in these tissues. Studies of isolated human T cells and monocytes indicated that angiotensin II had no direct effect on cytokine production by T cells or the ability of dendritic cells to drive T cell proliferation. We also observed an increase in circulating IL-17A producing CD4+ T cells and both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that produce IFN-γ in hypertensive compared to normotensive humans. Thus, human T cells become activated and invade critical end-organ tissues in response to hypertension in a humanized mouse model. This response likely reflects the hypertensive milieu encountered in vivo and is not a direct effect of the hormone angiotensin II. PMID:27217403

  4. Epigenetic regulation of CIITA expression in human T-cells.

    PubMed

    van Eggermond, Marja C J A; Boom, Daniël R; Klous, Petra; Schooten, Erik; Marquez, Victor E; Wierda, Rutger J; Holling, Tjadine M; van den Elsen, Peter J

    2011-11-15

    In humans, T-cells accomplish expression of MHC-II molecules through induction of CIITA upon activation. Here we show that CIITA promoter accessibility in T-cells is epigenetically regulated. In unstimulated T-cells, CIITA-PIII chromatin displays relative high levels of repressive histone methylation marks (3Me-K27-H3 and 3Me-K20-H4) and low levels of acetylated histones H3 (Ac-H3) and H4 (Ac-H4). These repressive histone marks are replaced by histone methylation marks associated with transcriptional active genes (3Me-K4-H3) and high levels of Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 in activated T-cells. This is associated with concomitant recruitment of RNA polymerase II. In T-leukemia cells, devoid of CIITA expression, similar repressive histone methylation marks and low levels of acetylated histone H3 correlated with lack of CIITA expression. This in contrast to CIITA expressing T-lymphoma cells, which display high levels of Ac-H3 and 3Me-K4-H3, and relative low levels of the 3Me-K27-H3 and 3Me-K20-H4 marks. Of interest was the observation that the levels of histone acetylation and methylation modifications in histones H3 and H4 were also noted in chromatin of the downstream CIITA-PIV promoter as well as the upstream CIITA-PI and CIITA-PII promoters both in normal T-cells and in malignant T-cells. Together our data show that CIITA chromatin in T-cells expressing CIITA display similar histone acetylation and methylation characteristics associated with an open chromatin structure. The opposite is true for T-cells lacking CIITA expression, which display histone modifications characteristic of condensed chromatin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. CD8+ T cell immunity against human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Rossey, Iebe; Sedeyn, Koen; De Baets, Sarah; Schepens, Bert; Saelens, Xavier

    2014-10-21

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) was first discovered in the 1950s, but despite decades of research, a licensed vaccine against it is not available. Epidemiological studies indicate that antibodies directed against the fusion protein (F) partially correlate with protection. In addition, an F-specific monoclonal antibody is licensed as a prophylactic treatment in children who are at high risk of developing complications following HRSV infection. Therefore, most HRSV-oriented vaccination strategies focus on inducing a humoral immune response against F. In the quest for the development of a safe HRSV vaccine, the induction of a T cell immune response has received a lot less attention. T cell immunity directed against HRSV has not been associated unequivocally with protection against HRSV and CD4(+) T helper cell responses may even worsen disease due to HRSV. However, many studies support a protective role for CD8(+) T cells in clearance of HRSV from the lungs. In this review we highlight the clinical and experimental evidence in favor of a CD8(+) T lymphocyte-based vaccination strategy to protect against HRSV. First, we describe how T cell responses and T cell memory are induced in the lungs upon respiratory viral infection. HRSV has evolved mechanisms that hamper CD8(+) T cell priming and effector functions. We appraise the information on HRSV-specific CD8(+) T cell immunity gained from laboratory mouse studies, taking into account the advantages and limitations of this animal model and, where possible, the accordance with clinical evidence. Finally, we focus on recent efforts to develop T cell based vaccines against HRSV.

  6. Cloning and expression of cDNA for a human Gal(beta1-3)GalNAc alpha2,3-sialyltransferase from the CEM T-cell line.

    PubMed

    Giordanengo, V; Bannwarth, S; Laffont, C; Van Miegem, V; Harduin-Lepers, A; Delannoy, P; Lefebvre, J C

    1997-07-15

    Complementary DNA encoding a human Gal(beta1-3)GalNAc alpha2,3-sialyltransferase type II (hST3Gal II) was cloned from a CEM T-cell cDNA library using a 23-base oligonucleotide probe. The sequence of this probe was established on the basis of a slightly divergent sialylmotif L that was obtained by polymerase chain reaction with degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on the conserved sialylmotif L of mammalian Gal(beta1-3)GalNAc alpha2,3-sialyltransferases. It was thus confirmed that a short oligonucleotide probe may be sensitive and highly specific. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of hST3Gal II show, respectively, 56.3% and 49.3% similarity to hST3Gal I [Kitagawa, H. & Paulson, J. C. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 17872-17878] and 88.1% and 93.7% similarity to murine ST3Gal II [Lee, Y. C., Kojima, N., Wada, E., Kurosawa, N., Nakaoka, T., Hamamoto, T. & Tsuji, S. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 10028-10033]. hST3Gal II mRNA was highly expressed in heart, liver, skeletal muscle and various lymphoid tissues but not in brain and kidney. A soluble form of hST3Gal II expressed in COS-7 cells was tested in vitro for substrate specificity and kinetic properties. Asialofetuin and asialo-bovine submaxillary mucin appeared better substrates for hST3Gal II than for its murine counterpart as previously reported [Kojima, N., Lee, Y.-C., Hamamoto, T., Kurosawa, N. & Tsuji, S. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 5772-5776]. In previous studies, we have shown hyposialylation of O-glycans attached to two major lymphocyte CD43 and CD45 cell surface molecules in human-immunodeficiency-virus-1(HIV-1)-infected T-cell lines. Since comparable levels of hST3Gal I and hST3Gal II mRNA and enzymatic activity were observed in parental and HIV-1-infected CEM T-cell lysates, the sialylation defect associated with HIV infection of this cell line is probably due to a mechanism different from a simple altered catalytic activity of these sialyltransferases.

  7. The effects of ethidium bromide induced loss of mitochondrial DNA on mitochondrial phenotype and ultrastructure in a human leukemia T-cell line (MOLT-4 cells).

    PubMed

    Armand, Ray; Channon, Jacqueline Y; Kintner, Jennifer; White, Kristina A; Miselis, Kristin A; Perez, Raymond P; Lewis, Lionel D

    2004-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA-deficient (rho(0)) cells were generated following a 26-day incubation of MOLT-4 lymphoblastoid T cells in ethidium bromide (3,8-diamino-5-ethyl-6-phenylphenanthridinium bromide). The absence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the resultant MOLT-4 rho(0) cells was confirmed by Southern analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). MOLT-4 rho(0) cells proliferated more slowly than parental cells (wild type) and produced significantly more lactate (approximately fourfold increase; P < 0.001) with concomitantly reduced oxygen consumption (12.3% vs. 100%; P < 0.001) compared with the wild type. MOLT-4 rho(0) cells also showed reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity and a reduced cytochrome c oxidase/citrate synthase activity ratio compared to parental wild-type MOLT-4 cells (P < 10(-11)). Electron microscopy showed elongated mitochondria with parallel cristae in MOLT-4 cells although the mitochondria in MOLT-4 rho(0) cells appeared enlarged, some were vacuolated with either an absent or a grossly distorted cristae pattern. Vital staining with 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) was used to image mitochondria in intact cells and study mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Deltapsi(m)). Flow cytometry using JC-1 indicated that MOLT-4 rho(0) had a lower Deltapsi(m) than MOLT-4. Sodium fluoride (an inhibitor of the glycolytic pathway) at a concentration of 20 mM further reduced the Deltapsi(m) in MOLT-4-rho(0) cells. This data suggested that a glycolytic pathway product, possibly ATP, was required for the maintenance of Deltapsi(m) in MOLT-4 rho(0) cells.

  8. Measuring T cell receptor and T cell gene expression diversity in antigen-responsive human CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Eugster, Anne; Lindner, Annett; Heninger, Anne-Kristin; Wilhelm, Carmen; Dietz, Sevina; Catani, Mara; Ziegler, Anette-G; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2013-12-31

    T cells have diversity in TCR, epitope recognition, and cytokine production, and can be used for immune monitoring. Furthermore, clonal expansion of TCR families in disease may provide opportunities for TCR-directed therapies. We developed methodology for sequencing expressed genes of TCR alpha and beta chains from single cells and applied this to vaccine (tetanus-toxoid)-responsive CD4(+) T cells. TCR alpha and beta chains were both successfully sequenced in 1309 (43%) of 3038 CD4(+) T cells yielding 677 different receptors. TRAV and TRBV gene usage differed between tetanus-toxoid-responsive and non-responsive cells (p=0.004 and 0.0002), and there was extensive TCR diversity in tetanus-toxoid-responsive cells within individuals. Identical TCRs could be recovered in different samples from the same subject: TCRs identified after booster vaccination were frequent in pre-booster memory T cells (31% of pre-booster TCR), and also identified in pre-booster vaccination naïve cells (6.5%). No TCR was shared between subjects, but tetanus toxoid-responsive cells sharing one of their TCR chains were observed within and between subjects. Coupling single-cell gene expression profiling to TCR sequencing revealed examples of distinct cytokine profiles in cells bearing identical TCR. Novel molecular methodology demonstrates extensive diversity of Ag-responsive CD4(+) T cells within and between individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Human T-cell leukemia-lymphoma virus (HTLV) is in T but not B lymphocytes from a patient with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gallo, R C; Mann, D; Broder, S; Ruscetti, F W; Maeda, M; Kalyanaraman, V S; Robert-Guroff, M; Reitz, M S

    1982-09-01

    A human type C retrovirus, designated HTLV, previously was isolated from or identified in some patients with leukemias and lymphomas of mature T lymphocytes. HTLV is genetically and serologically distinct from any known animal retroviruses. The absence of HTLV proviral sequences in DNA from normal humans showed that HTLV is not a ubiquitous endogenous (germ-line transmitted) virus of humans. Antibodies to HTLV core proteins have been identified in some people with T-cell neoplasias and are particularly prevalent in Japanese with adult T-cell leukemia, suggesting that HTLV is acquired horizontally. However, it was possible that HTLV is transmitted through the germ line of some (possibly rare) families and is then expressed in the HTLV- positive malignancies. An opportunity to study this question was provided by the development of several T-cell lines and a B-cell provided by the development of several T-cell lines and a B-cell line from one HTLV-positive patient with a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Here we report that HTLV proteins or nucleic acids (or both) are found in three independently derived T-cell lines, all shown by HLA typing to have originated from the patient. In contrast, the B-cell line, the identity of which was also ascertained by HLA typing, contained no detectable HTLV protein, RNA, or proviral DNA. Because the sensitivity of the latter assay is more than sufficient to detect one proviral equivalent per haploid genome, the results indicate that HTLV was not transmitted to this patient through the germ line but rather was acquired by infection.

  10. Peridinin, a carotenoid, inhibits proliferation and survival of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Chie; Jomori, Takahiro; Tanaka, Junichi; Senba, Masachika; Mori, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes either adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) or chronic inflammatory disorders such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. These diseases are not curable as yet; therefore new agents for treatment and prevention are needed. Carotenoids are natural plant compounds with anti-carcinogenic activities. Peridinin is one of the most abundant carotenoids found in nature. Based on a series of past experiments, here we investigated the effects of peridinin extracted from Okinawan coral Isis hippuris on the proliferation and survival of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. The results of water-soluble tetrazolium-8 assay indicated that peridinin dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation and viability of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. Flow cytometry showed that low concentration of peridinin induced cell cycle arrest at G1 phase, while higher concentration induced apoptosis. Peridinin caused cleavage of caspase-3, -8 and -9. Peridinin significantly reduced the expression of G1 cell cycle regulators, including cyclin D1, cyclin D2, CDK4, CDK6 and c-Myc, and anti-apoptotic proteins, including survivin, XIAP and Bcl-2, in a dose-dependent manner. Peridinin suppressed DNA binding of NF-κB. Peridinin inhibited phosphorylation of IκBα, RelA, Akt and p70 S6 kinase, and reduced protein expression level of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1. Thus, peridinin exerts its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects by suppressing NF-κB and Akt signaling in HTLV-1-infected T cells. Peridinin also reduced tumor growth in mice harboring ATL xenograft tumors. The results suggested that peridinin is a potentially suitable therapeutic agent against HTLV-1-associated diseases.

  11. T cells and adaptive immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Jasenosky, Luke D; Scriba, Thomas J; Hanekom, Willem A; Goldfeld, Anne E

    2015-03-01

    The adaptive immune response mediated by T cells is critical for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infection in humans. However, the M. tuberculosis antigens and host T-cell responses that are required for an effective adaptive immune response to M. tuberculosis infection are yet to be defined. Here, we review recent findings on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses to M. tuberculosis infection and examine the roles of distinct M. tuberculosis-specific T-cell subsets in control of de novo and latent M. tuberculosis infection, and in the evolution of T-cell immunity to M. tuberculosis in response to tuberculosis treatment. In addition, we discuss recent studies that elucidate aspects of M. tuberculosis-specific adaptive immunity during human immunodeficiency virus co-infection and summarize recent findings from vaccine trials that provide insight into effective adaptive immune responses to M. tuberculosis infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Inter-Relationship between Low-Dose Hyper-Radiosensitivity and Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in the Human T98G Glioma and the Epithelial HaCaT Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel

    2016-02-01

    Over the past several years, investigations in both low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and increased radioresistance have been a focus of radiation oncology and biology research, since both conditions occur primarily in tumor cell lines. There has been significant progress in elucidating their signaling pathways, however uncertainties exist when they are studied together with radiation-induced bystander effects. Therefore, the aim of this work was to further investigate this relationship using the T98G glioma and HaCaT cell lines. T98G glioma cells have demonstrated a strong transition from hyper-radiosensitivity to induced radioresistance, and HaCaT cells do not show low-dose hypersensitivity. Both cell lines were paired using a mix-and-match protocol, which involved growing nonirradiated cells in culture media from irradiated cells and covering all possible combinations between them. The end points analyzed were clonogenic cell survival and live calcium measurements through the cellular membrane. Our data demonstrated that T98G cells produced bystander signals that decreased the survival of both reporter T98G and HaCaT cells. The bystander effect occurred only when T98G cells were exposed to doses below 1 Gy, which was corroborated by the induction of calcium fluxes. However, when bystander signals originated from HaCaT cells, the survival fraction increased in reporter T98G cells while it decreased in HaCaT cells. Moreover, the corresponding calcium data showed no calcium fluxes in T98G cells, while HaCaT cells displayed a biphasic calcium profile. In conclusion, our findings indicate a possible link between low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and bystander effects. This relationship varies depending on which cell line functions as the source of bystander signals. This further suggests that the bystander mechanisms are more complex than previously expected and caution should be taken when extrapolating bystander results across all cell lines and all radiation doses.

  13. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer.

  14. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones

    PubMed Central

    Theaker, Sarah M.; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J.; Cole, David K.; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K.; Dolton, Garry

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8+ or CD4+ polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein–Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  15. Contribution of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells to anti-viral T cell response in humans.

    PubMed

    Sandalova, Elena; Laccabue, Diletta; Boni, Carolina; Tan, Anthony T; Fink, Katja; Ooi, Eng Eong; Chua, Robert; Shafaeddin Schreve, Bahar; Ferrari, Carlo; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2010-08-19

    Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 12 with Dengue, 12 with Influenza, 3 with Adenovirus infection and 3 with fevers of unknown etiology. Virus-specific (EBV, HCMV, Influenza) pentamer+ and total CD8 T cells were analyzed for activation (CD38/HLA-DR), proliferation (Ki-67/Bcl-2(low)) and cytokine production. We observed that all acute viral infections trigger an expansion of activated/proliferating CD8 T cells, which differs in size depending on the infection but is invariably inflated by CD8 T cells specific for persistent herpesviruses (HCMV/EBV). CD8 T cells specific for other non-related non persistent viral infection (i.e. Influenza) were not activated. IL-15, which is produced during acute viral infections, is the likely contributing mechanism driving the selective activation of herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells. In addition we were able to show that herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells displayed an increased ability to produce the anti-viral cytokine interferon-gamma during the acute phase of heterologous viral infection. Taken together, these data demonstrated that activated herpesvirus specific CD8 T cells inflate the activated/proliferating CD8 T cells population present during acute viral infections in human and can contribute to the heterologous anti-viral T cell response.

  16. Isolation and characterization of a syncytium-inducing, macrophage/T-cell line-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolate that readily infects chimpanzee cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, R; Hoggan, M D; Broscius, C; Englund, G; Theodore, T S; Buckler-White, A; Arthur, L O; Israel, Z; Schultz, A; Lane, H C

    1995-01-01

    Fresh human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates from patients with AIDS were screened for infectivity in chimpanzee peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to identify strains potentially able to generate high virus loads in an inoculated animal. Only 3 of 23 isolates obtained were infectious in chimpanzee cells. Of these three, only one (HIV-1DH12) was able to initiate a productive infection in PBMC samples from all 25 chimpanzees tested. HIV-1DH12 tissue culture infections were characterized by extremely rapid replication kinetics, profound cytopathicity, and tropism for chimp and human PBMC, primary human macrophage, and several human T-cell lines. An infection was established within 1 week of inoculating a chimpanzee with 50 50% tissue culture infective doses of HIV-1DH12; cell-free virus was recovered from the plasma at weeks 1, 2, and 4 and was associated with the development of lymphadenopathy. Virus loads during the primary infection and at 6 months postinoculation were comparable to those reported in HIV-1-seropositive individuals. PMID:7769705

  17. Functional heterogeneity of human effector CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Takata, Hiroshi; Naruto, Takuya; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2012-02-09

    Effector CD8(+) T cells are believed to be terminally differentiated cells having cytotoxic activity and the ability to produce effector cytokines such as INF-γ and TNF-α. We investigated the difference between CXCR1(+) and CXCR1(-) subsets of human effector CD27(-)CD28(-)CD8(+) T cells. The subsets expressed cytolytic molecules similarly and exerted substantial cytolytic activity, whereas only the CXCR1(-) subset had IL-2 productivity and self-proliferative activity and was more resistant to cell death than the CXCR1(+) subset. These differences were explained by the specific up-regulation of CAMK4, SPRY2, and IL-7R in the CXCR1(-) subset and that of pro-apoptotic death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) in the CXCR1(+) subset. The IL-2 producers were more frequently found in the IL-7R(+) subset of the CXCR1(-) effector CD8(+) T cells than in the IL-7R(-) subset. IL-7/IL-7R signaling promoted cell survival only in the CXCR1(-) subset. The present study has highlighted a novel subset of effector CD8(+) T cells producing IL-2 and suggests the importance of this subset in the homeostasis of effector CD8(+) T cells.

  18. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by allosensitized human T cells

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Peripheral human T cells, isolated by sheep erythrocyte-rosette formation and density centrifugation, were highly cytotoxic to both Ab- coated autologous lymphocytes and antibody (Ab)-coated chicken erythrocytes when stimulated in mixed lymphocyte culture, but were not lytic when freshly purified, or when unstimulated in 6-day culture. Allosensitized T cells were shown to effect this activity by a specific effector-target cell interaction dependent on Ab, as indicated by: (a) induction of killing by Ab to target cells not lysed in the absence of Ab. (b) inhibition of Ab-dependent killing by aggregated Ig. The mechanism by which allosensitized T cells effect antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity is discussed. PMID:146728

  19. Human Peripheral CD4+ Vδ1+ γδT Cells Can Develop into αβT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Hendrik; Welker, Christian; Sterk, Marco; Haarer, Jan; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Handgretinger, Rupert; Schilbach, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The lifelong generation of αβT cells enables us to continuously build immunity against pathogens and malignancies despite the loss of thymic function with age. Homeostatic proliferation of post-thymic naïve and memory T cells and their transition into effector and long-lived memory cells balance the decreasing output of naïve T cells, and recent research suggests that also αβT-cell development independent from the thymus may occur. However, the sites and mechanisms of extrathymic T-cell development are not yet understood in detail. γδT cells represent a small fraction of the overall T-cell pool, and are endowed with tremendous phenotypic and functional plasticity. γδT cells that express the Vδ1 gene segment are a minor population in human peripheral blood but predominate in epithelial (and inflamed) tissues. Here, we characterize a CD4+ peripheral Vδ1+ γδT-cell subpopulation that expresses stem-cell and progenitor markers and is able to develop into functional αβT cells ex vivo in a simple culture system and in vivo. The route taken by this process resembles thymic T-cell development. However, it involves the re-organization of the Vδ1+ γδTCR into the αβTCR as a consequence of TCR-γ chain downregulation and the expression of surface Vδ1+Vβ+ TCR components, which we believe function as surrogate pre-TCR. This transdifferentiation process is readily detectable in vivo in inflamed tissue. Our study provides a conceptual framework for extrathymic T-cell development and opens up a new vista in immunology that requires adaptive immune responses in infection, autoimmunity, and cancer to be reconsidered. PMID:25709606

  20. Monocyte:T-cell interaction regulates human T-cell activation through a CD28/CD46 crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Charron, Lauren; Doctrinal, Axelle; Ni Choileain, Siobhan; Astier, Anne L

    2015-10-01

    T-cell activation requires engagement of the T-cell receptor and of at least one costimulatory molecule. The key role of CD28 in inducing T-cell activation was reported several decades ago and the molecular mechanisms involved have now been well described. The complement regulator CD46 also acts as a costimulatory molecule for T cells but, in contrast to CD28, has the ability to drive T-cell differentiation from producing some IFNγ to secreting some potent anti-inflammatory IL-10, acquiring a so-called Type I regulatory phenotype (Tr1). Proteolytic cleavage of CD46 occurs upon costimulation and is important for T-cell activation and IL-10 production. The observation that CD46 cleavage was reduced when PBMCs were costimulated compared with purified CD4(+) T cells led us to hypothesize that interactions between different cell types within the PBMCs were able to modulate the CD46 pathway. We show that CD46 downregulation is also reduced when CD4(+) T cells are cocultured with autologous monocytes. Indeed, monocyte: T-cell cocultures impaired CD46-mediated T-cell differentiation and coactivation, by reducing downregulation of surface CD46, lowering induction of the early activation marker CD69, as well as reducing the levels of IL-10 secretion. Blocking of CD86 could partly restore CD69 expression and cytokine secretion, demonstrating that the CD28: CD86 pathway regulates CD46 activation. Direct concomitant ligation of CD28 and CD46 on CD4(+) T cells also modulated CD46 expression and regulated cytokine production. These data identify a crosstalk between two main costimulatory pathways and provide novel insights into the regulation of human T-cell activation.

  1. Identification of Chlamydia trachomatis antigens by use of murine T-cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, P R; Stephens, R S

    1992-01-01

    Chlamydia-specific short-term T-cell lines were used in conjunction with immunoblot techniques to examine Chlamydia trachomatis proteins for T-cell-stimulatory activity. This study was undertaken because of the known role of T cells in the resolution and pathogenesis of chlamydial infections. Therefore, determination of which chlamydial proteins are T-cell antigens and whether they evoke protective immunity or contribute to immunopathology is crucial. Immune lymph node cells were stimulated with whole chlamydial organism (elementary body) to derive predominantly CD4+ T-cell lines. Proteins from the elementary body and the outer membrane and cloned proteins were examined for antigenicity with these T-cell lines in a proliferation assay. Although a majority of the elementary body protein fractions were positive in this assay, only four of the outer membrane fractions were stimulatory. The cloned major outer membrane protein and outer membrane protein 2 were stimulatory in the assay and may account for the reactivity in three of the four positive outer membrane fractions. The C. trachomatis heat shock protein 60, examined because of its putative role in causing delayed-type hypersensitivity, was found to stimulate the CD4+ T cells. This approach with short-term T-cell lines with polyclonal reactivity was sensitive and specific in identifying chlamydial proteins as T-cell antigens. Images PMID:1398973

  2. JEG-3 Trophoblast Cells Producing Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Promote Conversion of Human CD4+FOXP3- T Cells into CD4+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells and Foster T Cell Suppressive Activity.

    PubMed

    Poloski, Eileen; Oettel, Anika; Ehrentraut, Stefanie; Luley, Lydia; Costa, Serban Dan; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia; Schumacher, Anne

    2016-03-09

    The pregnancy hormone human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) reportedly modulates innate and adaptive immune responses and contributes thereby to fetal survival. More precisely, hCG has been shown to support human Treg cell homing into the fetal-maternal interface and enhance number and function of Treg cells in murine pregnancy. Here, we aimed to study whether hCG and hCG-producing human trophoblast cell lines induce Treg cells from CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells and promote T cell suppressive activity. CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells were isolated from peripheral blood of normal pregnant women and cultured in the presence of hCG-producing (JEG-3, HTR-8) and non-producing (SWAN-71) cell lines. To confirm the participation of hCG in Treg cell conversion, the experiments were performed in the presence of anti-hCG and additional experiments were run with recombinant or urine-purified hCG. After culture the number of CD4(+)FOXP3(+) Treg cells as well as the suppressive capacity of total T cells was assessed. hCG-producing JEG-3 cells as well as recombinant and urine-purified hCG induced CD4(+)FOXP3(+) Treg cells from CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells. Blockage of hCG impaired Treg cell induction. Moreover, hCG-producing JEG-3 cells increased suppressive activity of CD4(+)FOXP3(-) T cells through an antigen-independent pathway. Our results propose another mechanism through which hCG modulates the female immune system during pregnancy in favor of the fetus.

  3. Effector Vγ9Vδ2 T cells dominate the human fetal γδ T-cell repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Dimova, Tanya; Brouwer, Margreet; Gosselin, Françoise; Tassignon, Joël; Leo, Oberdan; Donner, Catherine; Marchant, Arnaud; Vermijlen, David

    2015-01-01

    γδ T cells are unconventional T cells recognizing antigens via their γδ T-cell receptor (TCR) in a way that is fundamentally different from conventional αβ T cells. γδ T cells usually are divided into subsets according the type of Vγ and/or Vδ chain they express in their TCR. T cells expressing the TCR containing the γ-chain variable region 9 and the δ-chain variable region 2 (Vγ9Vδ2 T cells) are the predominant γδ T-cell subset in human adult peripheral blood. The current thought is that this predominance is the result of the postnatal expansion of cells expressing particular complementary-determining region 3 (CDR3) in response to encounters with microbes, especially those generating phosphoantigens derived from the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway of isoprenoid synthesis. However, here we show that, rather than requiring postnatal microbial exposure, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are the predominant blood subset in the second-trimester fetus, whereas Vδ1+ and Vδ3+ γδ T cells are present only at low frequencies at this gestational time. Fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are phosphoantigen responsive and display very limited diversity in the CDR3 of the Vγ9 chain gene, where a germline-encoded sequence accounts for >50% of all sequences, in association with a prototypic CDR3δ2. Furthermore, these fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are functionally preprogrammed (e.g., IFN-γ and granzymes-A/K), with properties of rapidly activatable innatelike T cells. Thus, enrichment for phosphoantigen-responsive effector T cells has occurred within the fetus before postnatal microbial exposure. These various characteristics have been linked in the mouse to the action of selecting elements and would establish a much stronger parallel between human and murine γδ T cells than is usually articulated. PMID:25617367

  4. The human T cell receptor alpha variable (TRAV) genes.

    PubMed

    Scaviner, D; Lefranc, M P

    2000-01-01

    'Human T Cell Receptor Alpha Variable (TRAV) Genes', the eighth report of the 'IMGT Locus in Focus' section, comprises four tables: (1) 'Number of human germline TRAV genes at 14q11 and potential repertoire'; (2) 'Human germline TRAV genes at 14q11'; (3) 'Human TRAV allele table', and (4) 'Correspondence between the different human TRAV gene nomenclatures'. These tables are available at the IMGT Marie-Paule page of IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics database (http://imgt.cines.fr:8104) created by Marie-Paule Lefranc, Université Montpellier II, CNRS, France. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Spontaneous release of a factor with properties of T cell growth factor from a continuous line of primate tumor T cells.

    PubMed

    Rabin, H; Hopkins, R F; Ruscetti, F W; Neubauer, R H; Brown, R L; Kawakami, T G

    1981-11-01

    A continuous lymphoid cell line had been previously established from a gibbon with spontaneous lymphosarcoma. This cell line, designated as MLA144, when tested after several years in culture was shown to release spontaneously a factor biologically and biochemically similar to human T cell growth factor (TCGF). Conditioned media (CM) from MLA144 cells support growth and DNA synthesis of T cells from humans, several other species of primates, and also from mice and rabbits. The activity in the MLA144 CM is resistant to 60 degrees C and to low and high pH, has a m.w., as determined by gel filtration, of 21,500, elutes from DEAE-cellulose at 0.04 to 0.06 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.6, and has an isoelectric point of about 6.45. Surface-marker analysis of MLA144 cells by rosetting techniques indicates that they are T cells lacking in the receptor for the Fc portion of IgG. The release of TCGF by MLA144 cells should have practical value in terms of ease of TCGF production and should be of great help in the facilitation of studies on the cell biology and molecular biology of TCGF production.

  6. Activation requirements and responses to TLR ligands in human CD4+ T cells: comparison of two T cell isolation techniques.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Christina L; Thomas, Jeremy J; Rojas, Roxana E

    2009-05-15

    Direct regulation of T cell function by microbial ligands through Toll-like receptors (TLR) is an emerging area of T cell biology. Currently either immunomagnetic cell sorting (IMACS) or fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), are utilized to isolate T-cell subsets for such studies. However, it is unknown to what extent differences in T cell purity between these isolation techniques influence T cell functional assays. We compared the purity, response to mitogen, activation requirements, and response to TLR ligands between human CD4(+) T cells isolated either by IMACS (IMACS-CD4(+)) or by IMACS followed by FACS (IMACS/FACS-CD4(+)). As expected, IMACS-CD4(+) were less pure than IMACS/FACS-CD4(+) (92.5%+/-1.4% versus 99.7%+/-0.2%, respectively). Consequently, IMACS-CD4(+) proliferated and produced cytokines in response to mitogen alone and had lower activation requirements compared to IMACS/FACS-CD4(+). In addition IMACS-CD4(+) but not IMACS/FACS-CD4(+) responses were upregulated by the TLR-4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). On the other hand, TLR-2 and TLR-5 engagement induced costimulation in both IMACS-CD4(+) and highly purified IMACS-/FACS-CD4(+). Altogether these results indicate that small differences in cell purity can significantly alter T cell responses to TLR ligands. This study stresses the importance of a stringent purification method when investigating the role of microbial ligands in T cell function.

  7. Downregulation of proapoptotic Bim augments IL-2-independent T-cell transformation by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, immortalizes and transforms primary human T cells in vitro in both an interleukin (IL)-2-dependent and IL-2-independent manner. Expression of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax transforms the growth of the mouse T-cell line CTLL-2 from being IL-2-dependent to IL-2-independent. Withdrawal of IL-2 from normal activated T cells induces apoptosis, which is mediated through the inducible expression of several proapoptotic proteins, including Bim. In this study, we found that Tax protects IL-2-depleted T cells against Bim-induced apoptosis. Withdrawal of IL-2 from CTLL-2 cells induced a prominent increase in the level of Bim protein in CTLL-2 cells, but not in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells. This inhibition of Bim in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells was mediated by two mechanisms: downregulation of Bim mRNA and posttranscriptional reduction of Bim protein. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also inhibited IL-2 depletion–induced expression of Bim, however, this decrease in Bim protein expression was not due to downregulation of Bim mRNA, thus indicating that Bim mRNA downregulation in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 occurs only after long-term expression of Tax. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also induced Erk activation, however, this was not involved in the reduction of Bim protein. Knockdown of Bim expression in CTLL-2 cells augmented Tax-induced IL-2-independent transformation. HTLV-1 infection of human T cells also reduced their levels of Bim protein, and restoring Bim expression in HTLV-1-infected cells reduced their proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that Tax-induced downregulation of Bim in HTLV-1-infected T cells promotes their IL-2-independent growth, thereby supporting the persistence of HTLV-1 infection in vivo. PMID:25175936

  8. Downregulation of proapoptotic Bim augments IL-2-independent T-cell transformation by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, immortalizes and transforms primary human T cells in vitro in both an interleukin (IL)-2-dependent and IL-2-independent manner. Expression of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax transforms the growth of the mouse T-cell line CTLL-2 from being IL-2-dependent to IL-2-independent. Withdrawal of IL-2 from normal activated T cells induces apoptosis, which is mediated through the inducible expression of several proapoptotic proteins, including Bim. In this study, we found that Tax protects IL-2-depleted T cells against Bim-induced apoptosis. Withdrawal of IL-2 from CTLL-2 cells induced a prominent increase in the level of Bim protein in CTLL-2 cells, but not in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells. This inhibition of Bim in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells was mediated by two mechanisms: downregulation of Bim mRNA and posttranscriptional reduction of Bim protein. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also inhibited IL-2 depletion-induced expression of Bim, however, this decrease in Bim protein expression was not due to downregulation of Bim mRNA, thus indicating that Bim mRNA downregulation in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 occurs only after long-term expression of Tax. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also induced Erk activation, however, this was not involved in the reduction of Bim protein. Knockdown of Bim expression in CTLL-2 cells augmented Tax-induced IL-2-independent transformation. HTLV-1 infection of human T cells also reduced their levels of Bim protein, and restoring Bim expression in HTLV-1-infected cells reduced their proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that Tax-induced downregulation of Bim in HTLV-1-infected T cells promotes their IL-2-independent growth, thereby supporting the persistence of HTLV-1 infection in vivo.

  9. Activation of Human T Cells in Hypertension: Studies of Humanized Mice and Hypertensive Humans.

    PubMed

    Itani, Hana A; McMaster, William G; Saleh, Mohamed A; Nazarewicz, Rafal R; Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P; Kaszuba, Anna M; Konior, Anna; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Norlander, Allison E; Chen, Wei; Bonami, Rachel H; Marshall, Andrew F; Poffenberger, Greg; Weyand, Cornelia M; Madhur, Meena S; Moore, Daniel J; Harrison, David G; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence supports an important role for T cells in the genesis of hypertension. Because this work has predominantly been performed in experimental animals, we sought to determine whether human T cells are activated in hypertension. We used a humanized mouse model in which the murine immune system is replaced by the human immune system. Angiotensin II increased systolic pressure to 162 versus 116 mm Hg for sham-treated animals. Flow cytometry of thoracic lymph nodes, thoracic aorta, and kidney revealed increased infiltration of human leukocytes (CD45(+)) and T lymphocytes (CD3(+) and CD4(+)) in response to angiotensin II infusion. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the memory T cells (CD3(+)/CD45RO(+)) in the aortas and lymph nodes. Prevention of hypertension using hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide prevented the accumulation of T cells in these tissues. Studies of isolated human T cells and monocytes indicated that angiotensin II had no direct effect on cytokine production by T cells or the ability of dendritic cells to drive T-cell proliferation. We also observed an increase in circulating interleukin-17A producing CD4(+) T cells and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that produce interferon-γ in hypertensive compared with normotensive humans. Thus, human T cells become activated and invade critical end-organ tissues in response to hypertension in a humanized mouse model. This response likely reflects the hypertensive milieu encountered in vivo and is not a direct effect of the hormone angiotensin II. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Development and characterization of Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine T-cell lines and clones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepe, George S., Jr.; Smith, James G.; Denman, David; Bullock, Ward E.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Several Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine cloned T-cell lines (TCLs) were isolated from spleens of C57BL/6 mice immunized with viable H. capsulatum yeast cells, using the methodology of Kimoto and Fathman (1980). These T-cells were characterized phenotypically as Thy-1.2(+) Lyt-1(+) L3T4(+) Lyt-2(-), that is, as the helper/inducer phenotype. The cloned T cells proliferate in response to histoplasmin and, in some cases, to heterologous fungal anigens. Upon injection of mice with the antigen, the T-cells mediate local delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and, after stimulation, release regulatory lymphokines.

  11. Development and characterization of Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine T-cell lines and clones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepe, George S., Jr.; Smith, James G.; Denman, David; Bullock, Ward E.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Several Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine cloned T-cell lines (TCLs) were isolated from spleens of C57BL/6 mice immunized with viable H. capsulatum yeast cells, using the methodology of Kimoto and Fathman (1980). These T-cells were characterized phenotypically as Thy-1.2(+) Lyt-1(+) L3T4(+) Lyt-2(-), that is, as the helper/inducer phenotype. The cloned T cells proliferate in response to histoplasmin and, in some cases, to heterologous fungal anigens. Upon injection of mice with the antigen, the T-cells mediate local delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and, after stimulation, release regulatory lymphokines.

  12. Antigen-specific T-cell lines transfer protective immunity against Trichinella spiralis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Riedlinger, J; Grencis, R K; Wakelin, D

    1986-01-01

    T-cell lines specific for infective muscle larvae antigens of the intestinal nematode Trichinella spiralis have been generated in vitro. These antigen-specific T-cell lines express the L3T4+ Ly2- phenotype and secrete the lymphokines IL-2, IL-3 and gamma-IFN. They are stable in culture for up to 15 weeks and are protective when adoptively transferred into naive recipients. As few as 2 x 10(5) T. spiralis-specific tract. In addition, intestinal mastocytosis and peripheral blood eosinophilia were accelerated after adoptive transfer of T. spiralis-specific T-cell lines. PMID:2423438

  13. Isolation of mouse T-cell lymphoma lines from different long-term interleukin 2-dependent cultures.

    PubMed

    Giglia, J S; Ovak, G M; Yoshida, M A; Twist, C J; Jeffery, A R; Pauly, J L

    1985-10-01

    A number of different biological properties have been ascribed to the hormone-like protein interleukin 2 (IL-2). However, the most salient feature of this lymphokine is its ability to sustain the long-term proliferation of T-cells from humans and mice. Reported herein are the results of studies demonstrating the isolation of growth factor-independent cell lines from the long-term IL-2-dependent murine T-cell line CTLL-2 that is used frequently as the source of target cells in IL-2 bioassays. Sustained log-phase growth of these T-cells in vitro has been achieved using Petri dishes of polymethylpentene; growth could not be sustained in similar dishes of glass, untreated polystyrene, polystyrene that had been treated for cell culture, or polycarbonate. The IL-2-independent line grew as a T-cell lymphoma when injected i.p. into pristane-treated, but not untreated, syngeneic C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, cells from the IL-2 parental line CTLL-2 did not grow in vivo. Characterization of the IL-2-independent lines propagated in vitro (denoted as line CEC) or in vivo (denoted as line CEP) demonstrated that they retained their dependency for 2-mercaptoethanol and expressed phenotypic profiles of their parental line CTLL-2 (Thy 1.2+, Lyt-1-; Lyt-2-). Isolation of an IL-2-independent T-cell lymphoma from a CTLL-2 line obtained from another investigator using a protocol that has proven reproducible under carefully controlled laboratory conditions and defined phenotypic traits of the syngeneic T-cell isolates provided evidence that the tumors were not a cross-culture contaminant arising as a result of a laboratory accident. Moreover, karyotypic analysis using a quinacrine:Hoechst banding technique revealed similar marker chromosomes in the IL-2-dependent and -independent lines. IL-2-independent lines have also been established from the IL-2-dependent murine T-cell line CT-6. Accordingly, the results of these studies suggest that, during prolonged cultivation that has included

  14. CD4 T cell activation by B cells in human Leishmania (Viannia) infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An effective adaptive immune response requires activation of specific CD4 T cells. The capacity of B cells to activate CD4 T cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) has not been evaluated. Methods CD4 T cell activation by B cells of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients was evaluated by culture of PBMCs or purified B cells and CD4 T cells with Leishmania panamensis antigens. CD4 T cell and B cell activation markers were evaluated by flow cytometry and 13 cytokines were measured in supernatants with a bead-based capture assay. The effect of Leishmania antigens on BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin was evaluated in the Ramos human B cell line by targeting the antigen with anti-IgM-biotin and anti-biotin-ovalbumin-FITC. Results Culture of PBMCs from cutaneous leishmaniasis patients with Leishmania antigens resulted in upregulation of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 as well as increased frequency of CD25hiCD127- cells among CD4 T cells. Concomitantly, B cells upregulated the costimulatory molecule CD86. These changes were not observed in PBMCs from healthy subjects, indicating participation of Leishmania-specific lymphocytes expanded in vivo. Purified B cells from these patients, when interacting with purified CD4 T cells and Leishmania antigens, were capable of inducing significant increases in CD25 and CD69 expression and CD25hiCD127- frequency in CD4 T cells. These changes were associated with upregulation of CD86 in B cells. Comparison of changes in CD4 T cell activation parameters between PBMC and B cell/CD4 T cell cultures showed no statistically significant differences; further, significant secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-13 was induced in both types of cultures. Additionally, culture with Leishmania antigens enhanced BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin in Ramos human B cells. Conclusions The capacity of B cells specific for Leishmania antigens in peripheral blood of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients to

  15. Healthy Human T-Cell Responses to Aspergillus fumigatus Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Neelkamal; Staab, Janet F.; Marr, Kieren A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with both invasive and allergic pulmonary diseases, in different hosts. The organism is inhaled as a spore, which, if not cleared from the airway, germinates into hyphal morphotypes that are responsible for tissue invasion and resultant inflammation. Hyphae secrete multiple products that function as antigens, evoking both a protective (TH1–TH17) and destructive allergic (TH2) immunity. How Aspergillus allergens (Asp f proteins) participate in the development of allergic sensitization is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine whether Asp f proteins are strictly associated with TH2 responses, or represent soluble hyphal products recognized by healthy hosts, human T cell responses to crude and recombinant products were characterized by ELISPOT. While responses (number of spots producing IFN-γ, IL-4 or IL-17) to crude hyphal antigen preparations were weak, responses to recombinant Asp f proteins were higher. Recombinant allergens stimulated cells to produce IFN-γ more so than IL-4 or IL-17. Volunteers exhibited a diverse CD4+ and CD8+ T cell antigen recognition profile, with prominent CD4 TH1-responses to Asp f3 (a putative peroxismal membrane protein), Asp f9/16 (cell wall glucanase), Asp f11 (cyclophilin type peptidyl-prolyl isomerase) and Asp f22 (enolase). Strong IFN-γ responses were reproduced in most subjects tested over 6 month intervals. Conclusions Products secreted after conidial germination into hyphae are differentially recognized by protective T cells in healthy, non-atopic individuals. Defining the specificity of the human T cell repertoire, and identifying factors that govern early responses may allow for development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for both invasive and allergic Aspergillus diseases. PMID:20174463

  16. Equivalent T cell epitope promiscuity in ecologically diverse human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Kirsten E; Swaminathan, Harish; Copin, Richard; Lun, Desmond S; Ernst, Joel D

    2013-01-01

    The HLA (human leukocyte antigen) molecules that present pathogen-derived epitopes to T cells are highly diverse. Correspondingly, many pathogens such as HIV evolve epitope variants in order to evade immune recognition. In contrast, another persistent human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has highly conserved epitope sequences. This raises the question whether there is also a difference in the ability of these pathogens' epitopes to bind diverse HLA alleles, referred to as an epitope's binding promiscuity. To address this question, we compared the in silico HLA binding promiscuity of T cell epitopes from pathogens with distinct infection strategies and outcomes of human exposure. We used computer algorithms to predict the binding affinity of experimentally-verified microbial epitope peptides to diverse HLA-DR, HLA-A and HLA-B alleles. We then analyzed binding promiscuity of epitopes derived from HIV and M. tuberculosis. We also analyzed promiscuity of epitopes from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is known to exhibit epitope diversity, and epitopes of Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium tetani toxins, as these bacteria do not depend on human hosts for their survival or replication, and their toxin antigens are highly immunogenic human vaccines. We found that B. anthracis and C. tetani epitopes were the most promiscuous of the group that we analyzed. However, there was no consistent difference or trend in promiscuity in epitopes contained in HIV, M. tuberculosis, and S. pyogenes. Our results show that human pathogens with distinct immune evasion strategies and epitope diversities exhibit equivalent levels of T cell epitope promiscuity. These results indicate that differences in epitope promiscuity do not account for the observed differences in epitope variation and conservation.

  17. Equivalent T Cell Epitope Promiscuity in Ecologically Diverse Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Kirsten E.; Swaminathan, Harish; Copin, Richard; Lun, Desmond S.; Ernst, Joel D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The HLA (human leukocyte antigen) molecules that present pathogen-derived epitopes to T cells are highly diverse. Correspondingly, many pathogens such as HIV evolve epitope variants in order to evade immune recognition. In contrast, another persistent human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has highly conserved epitope sequences. This raises the question whether there is also a difference in the ability of these pathogens’ epitopes to bind diverse HLA alleles, referred to as an epitope’s binding promiscuity. To address this question, we compared the in silico HLA binding promiscuity of T cell epitopes from pathogens with distinct infection strategies and outcomes of human exposure. Methods We used computer algorithms to predict the binding affinity of experimentally-verified microbial epitope peptides to diverse HLA-DR, HLA-A and HLA-B alleles. We then analyzed binding promiscuity of epitopes derived from HIV and M. tuberculosis. We also analyzed promiscuity of epitopes from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is known to exhibit epitope diversity, and epitopes of Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium tetani toxins, as these bacteria do not depend on human hosts for their survival or replication, and their toxin antigens are highly immunogenic human vaccines. Results We found that B. anthracis and C. tetani epitopes were the most promiscuous of the group that we analyzed. However, there was no consistent difference or trend in promiscuity in epitopes contained in HIV, M. tuberculosis, and S. pyogenes. Conclusions Our results show that human pathogens with distinct immune evasion strategies and epitope diversities exhibit equivalent levels of T cell epitope promiscuity. These results indicate that differences in epitope promiscuity do not account for the observed differences in epitope variation and conservation. PMID:23951341

  18. Activated Human T Cells Express Alternative mRNA Transcripts Encoding a Secreted Form of RANKL

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, NC; Alexander, KA; Manning, CA; Karmakar, S; Wang, JF; Weyand, CM; Pettit, AR; Gravallese, EM

    2013-01-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB -ligand (RANKL), encoded by the gene TNFSF11, is required for osteoclastogenesis, and its expression is upregulated in pathologic bone loss. Transcript variants of TNFSF11 mRNA have been described that encode a membrane-bound and a putative secreted form of RANKL. We identify a TNFSF11 transcript variant that extends the originally identified transcript encoding secreted RANKL. We demonstrate that this TNFSF11 transcript variant is expressed by the human osteosarcoma cell line, Saos-2, and by both primary human T cells and Jurkat T cells. Of relevance to the production of RANKL in pathologic bone loss, expression of this secreted TNFSF11 transcript is upregulated in Jurkat T cells and primary human T cells upon activation. Furthermore, this transcript can be translated and secreted in Jurkat T cells in vitro and is able to support osteoclast differentiation. Our data highlight the complexity of the TNFSF11 genomic locus and demonstrate the potential for the expression of alternate mRNA transcripts encoding membrane-bound and secreted forms of RANKL. Implications of alternate mRNA transcripts encoding different RANKL protein isoforms should be carefully considered and specifically examined in future studies, particularly those implicating RANKL in pathologic bone loss. PMID:23698708

  19. Biochemical identification of a mutated human melanoma antigen recognized by CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Pieper, R; Christian, R E; Gonzales, M I; Nishimura, M I; Gupta, G; Settlage, R E; Shabanowitz, J; Rosenberg, S A; Hunt, D F; Topalian, S L

    1999-03-01

    CD4(+) T cells play a critical role in generating and maintaining immune responses against pathogens and alloantigens, and evidence suggests an important role for them in antitumor immunity as well. Although major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted human CD4(+) T cells with specific antitumor reactivities have been described, no standard method exists for cloning the recognized tumor-associated antigen (Ag). In this study, biochemical protein purification methods were used in conjunction with novel mass spectrometry sequencing techniques and molecular cloning to isolate a unique melanoma Ag recognized by a CD4(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) line. The HLA-DRbeta1*0101-restricted Ag was determined to be a mutated glycolytic enzyme, triosephosphate isomerase (TPI). A C to T mutation identified by cDNA sequencing caused a Thr to Ile conversion in TPI, which could be detected in a tryptic digest of tumor-derived TPI by mass spectrometry. The Thr to Ile conversion created a neoepitope whose T cell stimulatory activity was enhanced at least 5 logs compared with the wild-type peptide. Analysis of T cell recognition of serially truncated peptides suggested that the mutated amino acid residue was a T cell receptor contact. Defining human tumor Ag recognized by T helper cells may provide important clues to designing more effective immunotherapies for cancer.

  20. Biochemical Identification of a Mutated Human Melanoma Antigen Recognized by CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pieper, Rembert; Christian, Robert E.; Gonzales, Monica I.; Nishimura, Michael I.; Gupta, Gaorav; Settlage, Robert E.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hunt, Donald F.; Topalian, Suzanne L.

    1999-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a critical role in generating and maintaining immune responses against pathogens and alloantigens, and evidence suggests an important role for them in antitumor immunity as well. Although major histocompatibility complex class II–restricted human CD4+ T cells with specific antitumor reactivities have been described, no standard method exists for cloning the recognized tumor-associated antigen (Ag). In this study, biochemical protein purification methods were used in conjunction with novel mass spectrometry sequencing techniques and molecular cloning to isolate a unique melanoma Ag recognized by a CD4+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) line. The HLA-DRβ1*0101–restricted Ag was determined to be a mutated glycolytic enzyme, triosephosphate isomerase (TPI). A C to T mutation identified by cDNA sequencing caused a Thr to Ile conversion in TPI, which could be detected in a tryptic digest of tumor-derived TPI by mass spectrometry. The Thr to Ile conversion created a neoepitope whose T cell stimulatory activity was enhanced at least 5 logs compared with the wild-type peptide. Analysis of T cell recognition of serially truncated peptides suggested that the mutated amino acid residue was a T cell receptor contact. Defining human tumor Ag recognized by T helper cells may provide important clues to designing more effective immunotherapies for cancer. PMID:10049939

  1. A cytoplasmic activator of DNA replication is involved in signal transduction in antigen-specific T cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wong, R L; Clark, R B; Gutowski, J K; Katz, M E; Fresa, K L; Cohen, S

    1990-05-01

    Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from T cell lines undergoing antigen-specific, interleukin-2 (IL-2)-dependent proliferation were tested for their ability to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. A tetanus toxoid (TET)-specific T cell line, established from peripheral blood of a normal human volunteer, was stimulated in the presence of relevant antigen and 1 unit/ml IL-2. Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from these cells were capable of inducing DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts to induce DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei correlated positively with the degree of proliferation induced in these cells. In contrast, incubation of this T cell line in the absence of antigen failed to induce proliferation and cytoplasmic extracts prepared from these cells induced little to no DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The factor present in the cytoplasm of T cells stimulated with relevant antigen in the presence of IL-2 is similar, if not identical, to a factor which we have previously demonstrated in cytoplasmic extracts prepared from transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines and from mitogenically stimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This factor, which we have called activator of DNA replication (ADR) is a heat-labile protein, and is inactivated by treatment with protease inhibitors, including aprotinin. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts from T cells undergoing antigen-specific, IL-2-dependent proliferation to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei was markedly inhibited in the presence of aprotinin, providing strong evidence that a cytoplasmic activator of DNA replication, ADR, is involved in the signal transduction process for antigen-specific, IL-2-dependent T cell proliferation. ADR may represent a common intracellular mediator of DNA synthesis in activated and transformed lymphocytes.

  2. Regulation of Human Helper T Cell Subset Differentiation by Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of Th1 and Th2 cells in the late 80’s, the family of effector CD4+ helper T (Th) cell subsets has expanded. The differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells is largely determined when they interact with dendritic cells in lymphoid organs, and cytokines play a major role in the regulation of Th differentiation in the early stages. Recent studies show that the developmental mechanism of certain Th subsets is not fully shared between mice and humans. Here we will review recent discoveries on the roles of cytokines in the regulation of Th differentiation in humans, and discuss the differences between mice and humans in the developmental mechanisms of several Th subsets, including Th17 cells and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. We propose that the differentiation of human Th subsets is largely regulated by the three cytokines, IL-12, IL-23, and TGF-β. PMID:25879814

  3. Heterosubtypic T-Cell Immunity to Influenza in Humans: Challenges for Universal T-Cell Influenza Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Saranya

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) remains a significant global health issue causing annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic human infections with highly pathogenic avian or swine influenza viruses. Current inactivated and live vaccines are the mainstay of the public health response to influenza, although vaccine efficacy is lower against antigenically distinct viral strains. The first pandemic of the twenty-first century underlined the urgent need to develop new vaccines capable of protecting against a broad range of influenza strains. Such “universal” influenza vaccines are based on the idea of heterosubtypic immunity, wherein immune responses to epitopes conserved across IAV strains can confer protection against subsequent infection and disease. T-cells recognizing conserved antigens are a key contributor in reducing viral load and limiting disease severity during heterosubtypic infection in animal models. Recent studies undertaken during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic provided key insights into the role of cross-reactive T-cells in mediating heterosubtypic protection in humans. This review focuses on human influenza to discuss the epidemiological observations that underpin cross-protective immunity, the role of T-cells as key players in mediating heterosubtypic immunity including recent data from natural history cohort studies and the ongoing clinical development of T-cell-inducing universal influenza vaccines. The challenges and knowledge gaps for developing vaccines to generate long-lived protective T-cell responses is discussed. PMID:27242800

  4. Tumor-specific delivery of biologics by a novel T-cell line HOZOT.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Teppei; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Takeuchi, Makoto; Otani, Takeshi; Nakamura, Shuji; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Umeda, Yuzo; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2016-11-30

    "Cell-in-cell" denotes an invasive phenotype in which one cell actively internalizes in another. The novel human T-cell line HOZOT, established from human umbilical cord blood, was shown to penetrate a variety of human cancer cells but not normal cells. Oncolytic viruses are emerging as biological therapies for human cancers; however, efficient viral delivery is limited by a lack of tumor-specific homing and presence of pre-existing or therapy-induced neutralizing antibodies. Here, we report a new, intriguing approach using HOZOT cells to transmit biologics such as oncolytic viruses into human cancer cells by cell-in-cell invasion. HOZOT cells were successfully loaded via human CD46 antigen with an attenuated adenovirus containing the fiber protein of adenovirus serotype 35 (OBP-401/F35), in which the telomerase promoter regulates viral replication. OBP-401/F35-loaded HOZOT cells were efficiently internalized into human cancer cells and exhibited tumor-specific killing by release of viruses, even in the presence of anti-viral neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, intraperitoneal administration of HOZOT cells loaded with OBP-401/F35 significantly suppressed peritoneally disseminated tumor growth in mice. This unique cell-in-cell property provides a platform for selective delivery of biologics into human cancer cells, which has important implications for the treatment of human cancers.

  5. Tumor-specific delivery of biologics by a novel T-cell line HOZOT

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Teppei; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Takeuchi, Makoto; Otani, Takeshi; Nakamura, Shuji; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Umeda, Yuzo; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    “Cell-in-cell” denotes an invasive phenotype in which one cell actively internalizes in another. The novel human T-cell line HOZOT, established from human umbilical cord blood, was shown to penetrate a variety of human cancer cells but not normal cells. Oncolytic viruses are emerging as biological therapies for human cancers; however, efficient viral delivery is limited by a lack of tumor-specific homing and presence of pre-existing or therapy-induced neutralizing antibodies. Here, we report a new, intriguing approach using HOZOT cells to transmit biologics such as oncolytic viruses into human cancer cells by cell-in-cell invasion. HOZOT cells were successfully loaded via human CD46 antigen with an attenuated adenovirus containing the fiber protein of adenovirus serotype 35 (OBP-401/F35), in which the telomerase promoter regulates viral replication. OBP-401/F35–loaded HOZOT cells were efficiently internalized into human cancer cells and exhibited tumor-specific killing by release of viruses, even in the presence of anti-viral neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, intraperitoneal administration of HOZOT cells loaded with OBP-401/F35 significantly suppressed peritoneally disseminated tumor growth in mice. This unique cell-in-cell property provides a platform for selective delivery of biologics into human cancer cells, which has important implications for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:27901098

  6. Dual-purpose sample trap for on-line strong cation-exchange chromatography/reversed-phase liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry for shotgun proteomics. Application to the human Jurkat T-cell proteome.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dukjin; Nam, Hyungwook; Kim, Yu-Sam; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2005-04-08

    A dual-purpose sample-trapping column is introduced for the capacity enhancement of proteome analysis in on-line two-dimensional nanoflow liquid chromatography (strong cation-exchange chromatography followed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography) and tandem mass spectrometry. A home-made dual trap is prepared by sequentially packing C18 reversed-phase (RP) particles and SCX resin in a silica capillary tubing (1.5 cm x 200 microm I.D. for SCX, 0.7 cm x 200 microm for RP) ended with a home-made frit and is connected to a nanoflow column having a pulled tip treated with an end frit. Without having a separate fraction collection and concentration process, digested peptide mixtures were loaded directly in the SCX part of the dual trap, and the SCX separation of peptides was performed with a salt step elution initiated by injecting only 8 microL of NH4HCO3 solution from the autosampler to the dual trap. The fractionated peptides at each salt step were directly transferred to the RP trap packed right next to the SCX part for desalting, and a nanoflow LC-MS-MS run was followed. During the sample loading-SCX fractionation-desalting, flow direction was set to bypass the analytical column to prevent contamination. The entire 2D-LC separation and MS-MS analysis were automated. Evaluation of the technique was made with an injection of 15 microg peptide mixtures from human Jurkat T-cell proteome, and the total seven salt step cycles followed by each RPLC run resulted in an identification of 681 proteins.

  7. Fully human CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors for T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Sommermeyer, D; Hill, T; Shamah, S M; Salter, A I; Chen, Y; Mohler, K M; Riddell, S R

    2017-03-21

    Impressive results have been achieved by adoptively transferring T-cells expressing CD19-specific CARs with binding domains from murine mAbs to treat B-cell malignancies. T-cell mediated immune responses specific for peptides from the murine scFv antigen-binding domain of the CAR can develop in patients and result in premature elimination of CAR T-cells increasing the risk of tumor relapse. As fully human scFv might reduce immunogenicity, we generated CD19-specific human scFvs with similar binding characteristics as the murine FMC63-derived scFv using human Ab/DNA libraries. CARs were constructed in various formats from several scFvs and used to transduce primary human T-cells. The resulting CD19-CAR T-cells were specifically activated by CD19-positive tumor cell lines and primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, and eliminated human lymphoma xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Certain fully human CAR constructs were superior to the FMC63-CAR, which is widely used in clinical trials. Imaging of cell surface distribution of the human CARs revealed no evidence of clustering without target cell engagement, and tonic signaling was not observed. To further reduce potential immunogenicity of the CARs, we also modified the fusion sites between different CAR components. The described fully human CARs for a validated clinical target may reduce immune rejection compared with murine-based CARs.Leukemia advance online publication, 21 March 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.57.

  8. Aggressive adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma: the tip of the iceberg of the hidden human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection burden in nonendemic countries.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Lerma, Ingrid; Caballero, Estrella; Palacio, Carlos; Garcia-Patos, Vicente

    2013-04-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma has only rarely been reported in Europe. We aimed to determine the clinical characteristics and outcome of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma patients in a nonendemic country. Cases of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma managed at Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain were reviewed. Information on the foreign population living in Spain, according to country of origin, was obtained using official published data from the National Statistics Institute. Three patients were diagnosed with adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma between 2003 and 2010. Two cases were of the acute subtype and one case of the lymphoma subtype. Two patients were female and the mean age at presentation was 41.3 years. Patients originated from three different countries. The characteristics of the attended patients include widespread enlargement of the lymph nodes, a variety of multiple extranodal involvements, bone marrow infiltration, and a high incidence of infections including latent parasitic infections. Prototypic adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma presenting with high white cell counts, flower cells, and hypercalcemia was not observed. Regarding therapy, one patient received chemotherapy alone and two subjects combined first-line therapy including antiviral drugs. Of the three patients, two are dead (mean survival time 6 months) and one has been lost to follow-up. We estimate that at least 15,000 people living in Spain are infected with human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma is a heterogeneous disease that often presents without distinguishing or prototypical features. A high index of clinical suspicion is essential for diagnosis. Several epidemiological differences have been observed in different countries. Today, HTLV-1 infection is highly underdiagnosed.

  9. Human rgr: transforming activity and alteration in T-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Peter; Kassin, Ezra; Hernandez-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Diaz, Roberto; Inghirami, Giorgio; Pellicer, Angel

    2002-08-01

    We have previously identified the oncogene rgr (ralGDS related) in DNA derived from a rabbit squamous cell carcinoma. Here we describe the identification of the human orthologue of the rabbit rgr gene termed hrgr (human ralGDS related). Four alternatively spliced full-length hrgr transcripts were isolated from normal human testes and liver libraries. Truncation of hrgr confers transforming ability to its cDNA. Using a RT-PCR assay we have been able to detect the expression of an abnormally truncated transcript in several human T-cell lymphoma lines, and in fresh tissue samples of patients with T-cell malignancies. In the DHL cell line, an Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) line, a DNA rearrangement was detected within the hrgr gene region. We propose that these T-cell lymphomas, at least in part, owe their malignant phenotypes to genetic alterations of the hrgr gene. These findings also raise the possibility that mutations in the hrgr gene are involved in other malignancies.

  10. Cutaneous manifestations of human T cell leukemia virus type I infection in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R M; Leno, M; Hubbard, B S; Kindt, T J

    1996-03-01

    Skin diseases ranging from infective dermatitis to cutaneous lymphoma have been associated with human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV) type I. A generalized exfoliative papillated dermatopathy occurred in a rabbit 20 months into a course of chronic HTLV-I infection. Biopsies revealed epidermotropic T cell infiltrates, including Sezary-like cells, that resulted in a pattern mimicking cutaneous T cell lymphoma. HTLV-I was isolated from affected skin, and virus expression was detected in cutaneous cultures. Sezary-like cells also occurred in circulation. Interleukin-2-independent lymphocyte cultures, established from blood exhibiting elevated CD8 T cell levels and CD25 expression, had polyclonal integration of provirus. The findings are similar to those in evolving adult T cell leukemia lymphoma and may represent a prelymphomatous change. The cutaneous lymphoproliferative lesion resulted from HTLV-I infection and further establishes the New Zealand White rabbit inoculated with the RH/K34 cell line as a suitable model for investigation of HTLV-I pathogenesis.

  11. Dissecting human T cell responses against Bordetella species

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    To identify the minimal structures that may be important for the creation of a synthetic and/or recombinant vaccine against whooping cough, human T cell clones were obtained against Bordetella antigens. Cloned peripheral blood T lymphocytes from an immune donor were grown in IL-2 and tested for proliferation in response to inactivated Bordetella species (B. pertussis, B. parapertussis, and B. bronchiseptica) and mutants deficient for the expression of virulence- associated antigens. All the T cell clones obtained were CD4+8- and recognized specifically the Bordetella antigens when presented by autologous B cells. On the basis of the responsiveness to the whole inactivated bacteria, it was possible to cluster the 12 clones obtained into four groups with the following specificity: (1) filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA); (2) B. pertussis-specific antigens; (3) virulence- associated Bordetella-specific antigens; and (4) nonvirulence- associated Bordetella-specific antigens. Using two new B. pertussis deletion mutants, clone 6 (representative of cluster 1) was found to recognize the COOH terminus of FHA. Furthermore, three out of four clones of cluster 3 were specifically stimulated by the soluble 69-kD protein from the outer membrane of B. pertussis. Surprisingly, none of the twelve clones obtained by stimulation in vitro with whole inactivated bacteria recognized pertussis toxin (PT), which is believed to be the most important protein to be included in an acellular vaccine. However, when a new generation of clones was obtained using soluble PT as the in vitro stimulus, it was observed that 11 clones of this group recognized this antigen. Thus, PT does not seem to be the most representative antigen on the whole inactivated bacteria, although T cell memory against PT exists in a donor who had the disease several years ago. PMID:2902185

  12. The genomic landscape of histone modifications in human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Tae-Young; Cuddapah, Suresh; Cui, Kairong; Zhao, Keji

    2006-01-01

    To understand the molecular basis that supports the dynamic gene expression programs unique to T cells, we investigated the genomic landscape of activating histone modifications, including histone H3 K9/K14 diacetylation (H3K9acK14ac), H3 K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), and the repressive histone modification H3 K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) in primary human T cells. We show that H3K9acK14ac and H3K4me3 are associated with active genes required for T cell function and development, whereas H3K27me3 is associated with silent genes that are involved in development in other cell types. Unexpectedly, we find that 3,330 gene promoters are associated with all of these histone modifications. The gene expression levels are correlated with both the absolute and relative levels of the activating H3K4me3 and the repressive H3K27me3 modifications. Our data reveal that rapidly inducible genes are associated with the H3 acetylation and H3K4me3 modifications, suggesting they assume a chromatin structure poised for activation. In addition, we identified a subpopulation of chromatin regions that are associated with high levels of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 but low levels of H3K9acK14ac. Therefore, these regions have a distinctive chromatin modification pattern and thus may represent a distinct class of chromatin domains. PMID:17043231

  13. Tax protein-induced expression of antiapoptotic Bfl-1 protein contributes to survival of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected T-cells.

    PubMed

    Macaire, Héloïse; Riquet, Aurélien; Moncollin, Vincent; Biémont-Trescol, Marie-Claude; Duc Dodon, Madeleine; Hermine, Olivier; Debaud, Anne-Laure; Mahieux, Renaud; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Pierre, Marlène; Gazzolo, Louis; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Valentin, Hélène

    2012-06-15

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). ATLL is a severe malignancy with no effective treatment. HTLV-1 regulatory proteins Tax and HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ) play a major role in ATLL development, by interfering with cellular functions such as CD4(+) T-cell survival. In this study, we observed that the expression of Bfl-1, an antiapoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family, is restricted to HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines and to T-cells expressing both Tax and HBZ proteins. We showed that Tax-induced bfl-1 transcription through the canonical NF-κB pathway. Moreover, we demonstrated that Tax cooperated with c-Jun or JunD, but not JunB, transcription factors of the AP-1 family to stimulate bfl-1 gene activation. By contrast, HBZ inhibited c-Jun-induced bfl-1 gene activation, whereas it increased JunD-induced bfl-1 gene activation. We identified one NF-κB, targeted by RelA, c-Rel, RelB, p105/p50, and p100/p52, and two AP-1, targeted by both c-Jun and JunD, binding sites in the bfl-1 promoter of T-cells expressing both Tax and HBZ. Analyzing the potential role of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins in HTLV-1-infected T-cell survival, we demonstrated that these cells are differentially sensitive to silencing of Bfl-1, Bcl-x(L), and Bcl-2. Indeed, both Bfl-1 and Bcl-x(L) knockdowns decreased the survival of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, although no cell death was observed after Bcl-2 knockdown. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Bfl-1 knockdown sensitizes HTLV-1-infected T-cells to ABT-737 or etoposide treatment. Our results directly implicate Bfl-1 and Bcl-x(L) in HTLV-1-infected T-cell survival and suggest that both Bfl-1 and Bcl-x(L) represent potential therapeutic targets for ATLL treatment.

  14. Induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity by the T cell line specific to bacterial peptidoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuki, M.; Kakimoto, K.; Kawata, S.; Kotani, S.; Koga, T.

    1987-12-01

    A T cell line specific for the chemically well-defined peptidoglycan of bacterial cell wall, disaccharide tetrapeptide, was established from Lewis rats immunized with the antigen covalently linked to the autologous rat serum albumin. The antigen specificity was examined with various analogues or derivatives of the peptidoglycan. The cell line was reactive to analogues with the COOH-terminal D-amino acid, but least reactive to those with L-amino acid as COOH terminus. Transferring of the T cell line into X-irradiated normal Lewis rats induced delayed-type hypersensitivity in an antigen specific manner.

  15. Characterization of human T cells reactive with the Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen (MAM): generation of a monoclonal antibody against V beta 17, the T cell receptor gene product expressed by a large fraction of MAM-reactive human T cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    While all known microbial superantigens are mitogenic for human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), the functional response induced by Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen (MAM) is unique in that MAM stimulation of PBL consistently results in T cell-dependent B cell activation characterized by polyclonal IgM and IgG production. These immunostimulatory effects of MAM on the humoral arm of the human immune system warranted a more precise characterization of MAM-reactive human T cells. Using an uncloned MAM reactive human T cell line as immunogen, we have generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (termed C1) specific for the T cell receptor V beta gene expressed by the major fraction of MAM- reactive human T cells, V beta 17. In addition, a V beta 17- MAM- reactive T cell population exists, assessed by MAM, induced T cell proliferation and cytotoxic T cell activity. mAb C1 will be useful in characterizing the functional properties of V beta 17+ T cells and their potential role in autoimmune disease. PMID:1833503

  16. Analysis of self-antigen specificity of islet-infiltrating T cells from human donors with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Babon, Jenny Aurielle B; DeNicola, Megan E; Blodgett, David M; Crèvecoeur, Inne; Buttrick, Thomas S; Maehr, René; Bottino, Rita; Naji, Ali; Kaddis, John; Elyaman, Wassim; James, Eddie A; Haliyur, Rachana; Brissova, Marcela; Overbergh, Lut; Mathieu, Chantal; Delong, Thomas; Haskins, Kathryn; Pugliese, Alberto; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Mathews, Clayton; Atkinson, Mark A; Powers, Alvin C; Harlan, David M; Kent, Sally C

    2016-12-01

    A major therapeutic goal for type 1 diabetes (T1D) is to induce autoantigen-specific tolerance of T cells. This could suppress autoimmunity in those at risk for the development of T1D, as well as in those with established disease who receive islet replacement or regeneration therapy. Because functional studies of human autoreactive T cell responses have been limited largely to peripheral blood-derived T cells, it is unclear how representative the peripheral T cell repertoire is of T cells infiltrating the islets. Our knowledge of the insulitic T cell repertoire is derived from histological and immunohistochemical analyses of insulitis, the identification of autoreactive CD8(+) T cells in situ, in islets of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2(+) donors and isolation and identification of DQ8 and DQ2-DQ8 heterodimer-restricted, proinsulin-reactive CD4(+) T cells grown from islets of a single donor with T1D. Here we present an analysis of 50 of a total of 236 CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell lines grown from individual handpicked islets or clones directly sorted from handpicked, dispersed islets from nine donors with T1D. Seventeen of these T cell lines and clones reacted to a broad range of studied native islet antigens and to post-translationally modified peptides. These studies demonstrate the existence of a variety of islet-infiltrating, islet-autoantigen reactive T cells in individuals with T1D, and these data have implications for the design of successful immunotherapies.

  17. Analysis of self-antigen specificity of islet-infiltrating T cells from human donors with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Babon, Jenny Aurielle B; DeNicola, Megan E; Blodgett, David M; Crèvecoeur, Inne; Buttrick, Thomas S; Maehr, René; Bottino, Rita; Naji, Ali; Kaddis, John; Elyaman, Wassim; James, Eddie A; Haliyur, Rachana; Brissova, Marcela; Overbergh, Lut; Mathieu, Chantal; Delong, Thomas; Haskins, Kathryn; Pugliese, Alberto; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Mathews, Clayton; Atkinson, Mark A; Powers, Alvin C; Harlan, David M; Kent, Sally C

    2016-01-01

    A major therapeutic goal for type 1 diabetes (T1D) is to induce autoantigen-specific tolerance of T cells. This could suppress autoimmunity in those at risk for the development of T1D, as well as in those with established disease who receive islet replacement or regeneration therapy. Because functional studies of human autoreactive T cell responses have been limited largely to peripheral blood–derived T cells1–3, it is unclear how representative the peripheral T cell repertoire is of T cells infiltrating the islets. Our knowledge of the insulitic T cell repertoire is derived from histological and immunohistochemical analyses of insulitis4–8, the identification of autoreactive CD8+ T cells in situ, in islets of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2+ donors9 and isolation and identification of DQ8 and DQ2–DQ8 heterodimer–restricted, proinsulin-reactive CD4+ T cells grown from islets of a single donor with T1D10. Here we present an analysis of 50 of a total of 236 CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines grown from individual handpicked islets or clones directly sorted from handpicked, dispersed islets from nine donors with T1D. Seventeen of these T cell lines and clones reacted to a broad range of studied native islet antigens and to post-translationally modified peptides. These studies demonstrate the existence of a variety of islet-infiltrating, islet-autoantigen reactive T cells in individuals with T1D, and these data have implications for the design of successful immunotherapies. PMID:27798614

  18. Transduction of human T cells with a novel T-cell receptor confers anti-HCV reactivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Yeuying; Moxley, Kelly M; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Hughes, Michael G; Liu, Tongxin; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Rosen, Hugo R; Nishimura, Michael I

    2010-07-29

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is a major public health concern, with no effective vaccines currently available and 3% of the world's population being infected. Despite the existence of both B- and T-cell immunity in HCV-infected patients, chronic viral infection and HCV-related malignancies progress. Here we report the identification of a novel HCV TCR from an HLA-A2-restricted, HCV NS3:1073-1081-reactive CTL clone isolated from a patient with chronic HCV infection. We characterized this HCV TCR by expressing it in human T cells and analyzed the function of the resulting HCV TCR-transduced cells. Our results indicate that both the HCV TCR-transduced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells recognized the HCV NS3:1073-1081 peptide-loaded targets and HCV(+) hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC) in a polyfunctional manner with cytokine (IFN-gamma, IL-2, and TNF-alpha) production as well as cytotoxicity. Tumor cell recognition by HCV TCR transduced CD8(-) Jurkat cells and CD4(+) PBL-derived T cells indicated this TCR was CD8-independent, a property consistent with other high affinity TCRs. HCV TCR-transduced T cells may be promising for the treatment of patients with chronic HCV infections.

  19. Transduction of Human T Cells with a Novel T-Cell Receptor Confers Anti-HCV Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Yeuying; Moxley, Kelly M.; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Hughes, Michael G.; Liu, Tongxin; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Rosen, Hugo R.; Nishimura, Michael I.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is a major public health concern, with no effective vaccines currently available and 3% of the world's population being infected. Despite the existence of both B- and T-cell immunity in HCV-infected patients, chronic viral infection and HCV-related malignancies progress. Here we report the identification of a novel HCV TCR from an HLA-A2-restricted, HCV NS3:1073–1081-reactive CTL clone isolated from a patient with chronic HCV infection. We characterized this HCV TCR by expressing it in human T cells and analyzed the function of the resulting HCV TCR-transduced cells. Our results indicate that both the HCV TCR-transduced CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognized the HCV NS3:1073–1081 peptide-loaded targets and HCV+ hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC) in a polyfunctional manner with cytokine (IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α) production as well as cytotoxicity. Tumor cell recognition by HCV TCR transduced CD8− Jurkat cells and CD4+ PBL-derived T cells indicated this TCR was CD8-independent, a property consistent with other high affinity TCRs. HCV TCR-transduced T cells may be promising for the treatment of patients with chronic HCV infections. PMID:20686664

  20. Clinical trials for human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I-associated peripheral T-cell lymphoma in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tobinai, Kensei

    2010-04-01

    The most common subtype of T-/natural killer (NK) cell lymphoma in Japan is adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL), which is associated with the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1). The investigators in Japan have conducted several clinical trials on multi-agent chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation for patients with ATL. They have also initiated several new clinical trials with a number of agents: an anti-CCR4 antibody, KW-0761; forodesine, a purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor; and lenalidomide, an immunomodulatory agent. Clinical trials with pralatrexate, a folate analog, and denileukin diftitox, an immunoconjugate, are under discussion for patients with ATL and peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL).

  1. Alterations in cytotoxic and helper T cell function after infection of T cell clones with human T cell leukemia virus, type I.

    PubMed Central

    Yarchoan, R; Guo, H G; Reitz, M; Maluish, A; Mitsuya, H; Broder, S

    1986-01-01

    HTLV-I is a transforming human retrovirus that is an etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma. To investigate the effects of this virus on T cell functions, two OKT3+, OKT4+, OKT8- cytotoxic clones (8.7 and 8.8) specific for allogeneic cells bearing DPw2, a class II histocompatibility antigen, were studied before and after infection with HTLV-I. The clones retained cytotoxic function for up to 70 d after exposure to HTLV-I, even without subsequent antigenic stimulation, but then lost their cytotoxic activity. Prior to infection with HTLV-I, clone 8.8 also lysed OKT3 hybridoma cells; after infection, cytotoxic activity against these OKT3-antibody bearing cells was lost in parallel with the loss of activity against DPw2-bearing target cells. In addition, expression of T3 surface antigen by HTLV-I-infected 8.8 cells was decreased at a time when they lost their cytotoxic activity, possibly contributing to the loss of cytotoxic function. Finally, clone 8.8 could provide help for nonspecific IgG production by autologous B cells when stimulated with irradiated DPw2-bearing non-T cells. After infection with HTLV-I, this helper function became independent of DPw2-stimulation and persisted even when the cytotoxic activity was lost. An OKT4+ T cell clone thus could simultaneously manifest both cytotoxic and helper T cell activities, and these activities were differentially affected after HTLV-I infection. Images PMID:3009545

  2. The Nrf2 activator tBHQ inhibits T cell activation of primary human CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Turley, Alexandra E.; Zagorski, Joseph W.; Rockwell, Cheryl E.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates a battery of antioxidant, detoxification, and cell stress genes. It is activated by oxidative stress and a number of exogenous compounds, one of which is tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), a widely used food preservative. Nrf2 modulates immune responses in numerous rodent models of inflammation, but its effects on human immune cells are not well characterized. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the effects of the Nrf2 activator tBHQ on early events of T cell activation in primary human cells. Treatment with tBHQ induced mRNA expression of the Nrf2 target genes HMOX-1, GCLC, and NQO1, and also increased NRF2 mRNA expression, albeit to a lesser extent than the other target genes. tBHQ decreased production of the cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ at both the protein and mRNA levels after stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to an even greater extent in isolated CD4 T cells. Likewise, tBHQ decreased induction of CD25 and CD69 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and this decrease was even more marked in isolated CD4 T cells. In addition, tBHQ inhibited induction of NFκB DNA binding in anti-CD3/anti-CD28-activated PBMCs. Collectively, these data suggest that tBHQ inhibits activation of primary human CD4 T cells, which correlates with activation of Nrf2 and inhibition of NFκB DNA binding. Although these studies suggest the food additive tBHQ negatively impacts T cell activation, further studies will be needed to fully elucidate the effect of tBHQ on human immune response. PMID:25484350

  3. The Nrf2 activator tBHQ inhibits T cell activation of primary human CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Turley, Alexandra E; Zagorski, Joseph W; Rockwell, Cheryl E

    2015-02-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates a battery of antioxidant, detoxification, and cell stress genes. It is activated by oxidative stress and a number of exogenous compounds, one of which is tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), a widely used food preservative. Nrf2 modulates immune responses in numerous rodent models of inflammation, but its effects on human immune cells are not well characterized. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the effects of the Nrf2 activator tBHQ on early events of T cell activation in primary human cells. Treatment with tBHQ induced mRNA expression of the Nrf2 target genes HMOX-1, GCLC, and NQO1, and also increased NRF2 mRNA expression, albeit to a lesser extent than the other target genes. tBHQ decreased production of the cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ at both the protein and mRNA levels after stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to an even greater extent in isolated CD4 T cells. Likewise, tBHQ decreased induction of CD25 and CD69 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and this decrease was even more marked in isolated CD4 T cells. In addition, tBHQ inhibited induction of NFκB DNA binding in anti-CD3/anti-CD28-activated PBMCs. Collectively, these data suggest that tBHQ inhibits activation of primary human CD4 T cells, which correlates with activation of Nrf2 and inhibition of NFκB DNA binding. Although these studies suggest the food additive tBHQ negatively impacts T cell activation, further studies will be needed to fully elucidate the effect of tBHQ on human immune responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  5. Accumulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA in T cells: results of multiple infection events.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, H L; Zinkus, D M

    1990-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA synthesis was followed in a CD4+ line of T cells (C8166) grown in the presence or absence of a monoclonal antibody to CD4 that blocks infection By 48 h after infection, cultures grown in the presence of the antibody contained approximately 4 copies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA per cell, whereas those grown in the absence of the antibody contained approximately 80 copies of viral DNA per cell. Most of the viral DNA in cultures grown in the absence of the antibody was present in a broad smear of apparently incomplete viral sequences. In cultures grown in the presence or absence of the antibody, the 9.6-kilobase linear duplex of viral DNA appeared to undergo integration within 24 h of its appearance. These results demonstrate that T cells accumulate unintegrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA as a result of multiple virions entering cells. Images PMID:2398529

  6. The Transcription Factor Hobit Identifies Human Cytotoxic CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oja, Anna E.; Vieira Braga, Felipe A.; Remmerswaal, Ester B. M.; Kragten, Natasja A. M.; Hertoghs, Kirsten M. L.; Zuo, Jianmin; Moss, Paul A.; van Lier, René A. W.; van Gisbergen, Klaas P. J. M.; Hombrink, Pleun

    2017-01-01

    The T cell lineage is commonly divided into CD4-expressing helper T cells that polarize immune responses through cytokine secretion and CD8-expressing cytotoxic T cells that eliminate infected target cells by virtue of the release of cytotoxic molecules. Recently, a population of CD4+ T cells that conforms to the phenotype of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells has received increased recognition. These cytotoxic CD4+ T cells display constitutive expression of granzyme B and perforin at the protein level and mediate HLA class II-dependent killing of target cells. In humans, this cytotoxic profile is found within the human cytomegalovirus (hCMV)-specific, but not within the influenza- or Epstein–Barr virus-specific CD4+ T cell populations, suggesting that, in particular, hCMV infection induces the formation of cytotoxic CD4+ T cells. We have previously described that the transcription factor Homolog of Blimp-1 in T cells (Hobit) is specifically upregulated in CD45RA+ effector CD8+ T cells that arise after hCMV infection. Here, we describe the expression pattern of Hobit in human CD4+ T cells. We found Hobit expression in cytotoxic CD4+ T cells and accumulation of Hobit+ CD4+ T cells after primary hCMV infection. The Hobit+ CD4+ T cells displayed highly overlapping characteristics with Hobit+ CD8+ T cells, including the expression of cytotoxic molecules, T-bet, and CX3CR1. Interestingly, γδ+ T cells that arise after hCMV infection also upregulate Hobit expression and display a similar effector phenotype as cytotoxic CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These findings suggest a shared differentiation pathway in CD4+, CD8+, and γδ+ T cells that may involve Hobit-driven acquisition of long-lived cytotoxic effector function. PMID:28392788

  7. T-cell receptor usage by melanoma-specific clonal and highly oligoclonal tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte lines.

    PubMed Central

    Shilyansky, J; Nishimura, M I; Yannelli, J R; Kawakami, Y; Jacknin, L S; Charmley, P; Rosenberg, S A

    1994-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) obtained from human melanomas can specifically lyse autologous tumor in vitro and mediate tumor regression in vivo. To develop more effective therapeutic reagents and to further understand the T-cell response to tumors, the diversity of T-cell receptors (TCRs) involved in melanoma antigen recognition has been studied. The TCR variable (V) genes, joining (J) segments, and N diversity regions used by five clonal lines and one highly oligoclonal, melanoma-specific, CD8+ TIL line were examined utilizing PCR amplification with V gene subfamily-specific primers and anchor PCR. The TIL lysed multiple allogeneic melanomas expressing matched surface major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. TCR analysis confirmed the clonal nature of the TIL lines; however, the TCR repertoire was diverse. Even among the three HLA-A2 restricted TIL (TIL 1200, TIL F2-2, and TIL-5), no common V gene usage was found. Comparison of the third complementarity-determining regions of the TCRs from the HLA-A2 restricted TIL revealed no homology. Results presented here identify T-cell clonotypes that recognize epitopes on highly prevalent, shared melanoma tumor-associated antigens presented in the context of HLA-B55, HLA-A1, and HLA-A2. These T cells and the antigens they recognize represent important components for the design of new immunotherapies for patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:7511820

  8. Adaptive human regulatory T cells: myth or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Chatenoud, Lucienne; Bach, Jean-François

    2006-01-01

    It is now well established that a distinct subset of T lymphocytes is essential for downregulating immune responses to both endogenous (self) and exogenous antigens. These Tregs are CD4+ and express high levels of CD25 (the α chain of the IL-2 receptor) and the transcription factor Foxp3. The mechanisms determining the lifespan, homeostasis, and in vivo generation of these Tregs are still ill defined. A study by Vukmanovic-Stejic et al. in this issue of the JCI shows that in humans, Tregs are present throughout life but that despite their high throughput, they are short lived (see the related article beginning on page 2423). It is thus unlikely that all CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Tregs are generated as a separate lineage in the thymus. The authors propose that during adulthood, Tregs essentially emerge at the periphery from the memory T cell pool. PMID:16955134

  9. Selective Expansion of Memory CD4+ T cells By Mitogenic Human CD28 Generates Inflammatory Cytokines and Regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manisha; Basu, Sreemanti; Camell, Christina; Couturier, Jacob; Nudelman, Rodolfo J.; Medina, Miguel A.; Rodgers, John R.; Lewis, Dorothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Co-stimulatory signals are important for development of effector and regulatory T cells. In this case, CD28 signaling is usually considered inert in the absence of signaling through the TCR. By contrast, mitogenic rat CD28 mAbs reportedly expand regulatory T cells without TCR stimulation. We found that a commercially available human CD28 mAb (ANC28) stimulated PBMCs without TCR co-ligation or cross-linking; ANC28 selectively expanded CD4+CD25+FoxP3−(T effector) and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ (Treg) cells. ANC28 stimulated the CD45RO+ CD4+ (memory) population whereas CD45RA+CD4+ (naïve) cells did not respond. ANC28 also induced inflammatory cytokines. Treg induced by ANC28 retain the Treg phenotype longer than did co-stimulated Treg. Treg induced by ANC28 suppressed CD25− T cells through a contact-dependent mechanism. Purity influenced the response of CD4+CD25+ cells because bead-purified CD4+CD25+ cells (85–90% pure) responded strongly to ANC28, whereas 98% pure FACS-sorted CD4+CD25 bright (T-reg) did not respond. Purified CD4+CD25int cells responded similarly to the bead-purified CD4+CD25+ cells. Thus, pre-activated CD4+ T cells (CD25int) respond to ANC28 rather than Treg (CD25bright). The ability of ANC28 to expand both effectors producing inflammatory cytokines as well as suppressive regulatory T cells might be useful for ex vivo expansion of therapeutic T cells. PMID:18446791

  10. Regulatory T Cell Effect on CD8(+) T Cell Responses to Human Herpesvirus 8 Infection and Development of Kaposi's Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Lepone, Lauren M; Rappocciolo, Giovanna; Piazza, Paolo A; Campbell, Diana M; Jenkins, Frank J; Rinaldo, Charles R

    2017-03-02

    We assessed CD8(+) T cell reactivity to human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8; Kaposi's sarcoma [KS]-associated herpesvirus) and the role of CD4(+)CD25(hi)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study who did or did not develop KS. There were similarly low CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ responses to MHC class I-restricted epitopes of HHV-8 lytic and latent proteins over 5.7 years before KS in participants who developed KS compared to those who did not. T cell reactivity to HHV-8 antigens was low relative to responses to a combination of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and influenza A virus (CEF) peptide epitopes, and dominant HIV peptide epitopes. There was no change in %Treg in the HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did not develop KS, whereas there was a significant increase in %Treg in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who developed KS beginning 1.8 years before development of KS. Removal of Treg enhanced HHV-8-specific T cell responses in HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected participants who did or did not develop KS, with a similar pattern observed in response to CEF and HIV peptides. Thus, long-term, low levels of anti-HHV-8 CD8(+) T cell reactivity were present in both HHV-8- and HIV-coinfected men who did and did not develop KS. This was related to moderately enhanced Treg function.

  11. cDNA cloning and sequence of MAL, a hydrophobic protein associated with human T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, M A; Weissman, S M

    1987-01-01

    We have isolated a human cDNA that is expressed in the intermediate and late stages of T-cell differentiation. The cDNA encodes a highly hydrophobic protein, termed MAL, that lacks a hydrophobic leader peptide sequence and contains four potential transmembrane domains separated by short hydrophilic segments. The predicted configuration of the MAL protein resembles the structure of integral proteins that form pores or channels in the plasma membrane and that are believed to act as transporters of water-soluble molecules and ions across the lipid bilayer. The presence of MAL mRNA in a panel of T-cell lines that express both the T-cell receptor and the T11 antigen suggests that MAL may be involved in membrane signaling in T cells activated via either T11 or T-cell receptor pathways. Images PMID:3494249

  12. Identification and Phylogeny of the First T Cell Epitope Identified from a Human Gut Bacteroides Species.

    PubMed

    Perez-Muñoz, Maria Elisa; Joglekar, Payal; Shen, Yi-Ju; Shen, Yi-Ji; Chang, Kuan Y; Peterson, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Host T cell reactivity toward gut bacterial epitopes has been recognized as part of disease pathogenesis. However, the specificity of T cells that recognize this vast number of epitopes has not yet been well described. After colonizing a C57BL/6J germ-free mouse with the human gut symbiotic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, we isolated a T cell that recognized these bacteria in vitro. Using this T cell, we mapped the first known non-carbohydrate T cell epitope within the phylum Bacteroidetes. The T cell also reacted to two other additional Bacteroides species. We identified the peptide that stimulated the T cell by using a genetic approach. Genomic data from the epitope-positive and epitope-negative bacteria explain the cross-reactivity of the T cell to multiple species. This epitope degeneracy should shape our understanding of the T cell repertoire stimulated by the complex microbiome residing in the gastrointestinal tract in both healthy and disease states.

  13. Human self-reactive T cell clones expressing identical T cell receptor beta chains differ in their ability to recognize a cryptic self-epitope

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Recognition of self-antigens by T lymphocytes is a central event in autoimmunity. Understanding of the molecular interactions between T cell receptors (TCR) and self-epitopes may explain how T cells escape thymic education and initiate an autoimmune reaction. We have studied five human in vivo activated T cell clones specific for the region 535- 551 of human thyroid peroxidase (TPO) established from a Graves' patient. Three clones (37, 72, and 73) expressed identical TCR beta and alpha chains rearranging V beta 1.1 and V alpha 15.1, and were considered sister clones. Clone 43 differed from clone 37 and its sisters in the J alpha region only. Clone NP-7 expressed V beta 6.5 but rearranged two in-frame TCR alpha chain, both using the V alpha 22.1 segment. Fine epitope mapping using nested peptides showed that clones using identical TCR beta chains, identical V alpha, but a different J alpha recognized distinct, nonoverlapping epitopes in the TPO 535-551 region. This finding shows that a different J alpha region alone leads to a heterogeneous pattern of recognition. This indicates that the "restricted" TCR V region usage sometimes found in autoimmune diseases may not always correspond to identical epitope recognition. To confirm that clones 37 (and its sisters) and 43 recognize different epitopes, the T cell clones were stimulated with a TPO-transfected autologous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) cell line (TPO-EBV) that presents TPO epitopes afer endogenous processing. Only clone 37 and its sisters recognizes the TPO-EBV cell line, suggesting that the epitope recognized by clone 43 is not presented upon endogenous processing. We have shown that thyroid epithelial cells (TEC), the only cells that produce TPO, express HLA class II molecules in Graves' disease and can act as an antigen-presenting cells, presenting TPO after endogenous processing to autoantigen-reactive T cell clones. We tested, therefore, whether autologous TEC induced the same pattern of stimulation as TPO

  14. Suppressive effects of tumor cell-derived 5′-deoxy-5′-methylthioadenosine on human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Frederik C.; Singer, Katrin; Poller, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Luise; Strobl, Carolin D.; Limm, Katharina; Ritter, Axel P.; Gottfried, Eva; Völkl, Simon; Jacobs, Benedikt; Peter, Katrin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Dettmer, Katja; Oefner, Peter J.; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Kreutz, Marina P.; Aigner, Michael; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment represents one of the main obstacles for immunotherapy of cancer. The tumor milieu is among others shaped by tumor metabolites such as 5′-deoxy-5′-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Increased intratumoral MTA levels result from a lack of the MTA-catabolizing enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in tumor cells and are found in various tumor entities. Here, we demonstrate that MTA suppresses proliferation, activation, differentiation, and effector function of antigen-specific T cells without eliciting cell death. Conversely, if MTA is added to highly activated T cells, MTA exerts cytotoxic effects on T cells. We identified the Akt pathway, a critical signal pathway for T cell activation, as a target of MTA, while, for example, p38 remained unaffected. Next, we provide evidence that MTA exerts its immunosuppressive effects by interfering with protein methylation in T cells. To confirm the relevance of the suppressive effects of exogenously added MTA on human T cells, we used an MTAP-deficient tumor cell-line that was stably transfected with the MTAP-coding sequence. We observed that T cells stimulated with MTAP-transfected tumor cells revealed a higher proliferative capacity compared to T cells stimulated with Mock-transfected cells. In conclusion, our findings reveal a novel immune evasion strategy of human tumor cells that could be of interest for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27622058

  15. Photoprotection by Punica granatum seed oil nanoemulsion entrapping polyphenol-rich ethyl acetate fraction against UVB-induced DNA damage in human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cell line.

    PubMed

    Baccarin, Thaisa; Mitjans, Montserrat; Ramos, David; Lemos-Senna, Elenara; Vinardell, Maria Pilar

    2015-12-01

    There has been an increase in the use of botanicals as skin photoprotective agents. Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is well known for its high concentration of polyphenolic compounds and for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to analyze the photoprotection provided by P. granatum seed oil nanoemulsion entrapping the polyphenol-rich ethyl acetate fraction against UVB-induced DNA damage in the keratinocyte HaCaT cell line. For this purpose, HaCaT cells were pretreated for 1h with nanoemulsions in a serum-free medium and then irradiated with UVB (90-200 mJ/cm(2)) rays. Fluorescence microscopy analysis provided information about the cellular internalization of the nanodroplets. We also determined the in vitro SPF of the nanoemulsions and evaluated their phototoxicity using the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake Phototoxicity Test. The nanoemulsions were able to protect the cells' DNA against UVB-induced damage in a concentration dependent manner. Nanodroplets were internalized by the cells but a higher proportion was detected along the cell membrane. The SPF obtained (~25) depended on the concentration of the ethyl acetate fraction and pomegranate seed oil in the nanoemulsion. The photoprotective formulations were classified as non-phototoxic. In conclusion, nanoemulsions entrapping the polyphenol-rich ethyl acetate fraction show potential for use as a sunscreen product. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Human Th17 cells share major trafficking receptors with both polarized effector T cells and FOXP3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyung W; Lee, Jeeho; Hillsamer, Peter; Kim, Chang H

    2008-01-01

    It is a question of interest whether Th17 cells express trafficking receptors unique to this Th cell lineage and migrate specifically to certain tissue sites. We found several Th17 cell subsets at different developing stages in a human secondary lymphoid organ (tonsils) and adult, but not in neonatal, blood. These Th17 cell subsets include a novel in vivo-stimulated tonsil IL17+ T cell subset detected without any artificial stimulation in vitro. We investigated in depth the trafficking receptor phenotype of the Th17 cell subsets in tonsils and adult blood. The developing Th17 cells in tonsils highly expressed both Th1- (CCR2, CXCR3, CCR5, and CXCR6) and Th2-associated (CCR4) trafficking receptors. Moreover, Th17 cells share major non-lymphoid tissue trafficking receptors, such as CCR4, CCR5, CCR6, CXCR3, and CXCR6, with FOXP3+ T regulatory cells. In addition, many Th17 cells express homeostatic chemokine receptors (CD62L, CCR6, CCR7, CXCR4, and CXCR5) implicated in T cell migration to and within lymphoid tissues. Expression of CCR6 and CCR4 by some Th17 cells is not a feature unique to Th17 cells but shared with FOXP3+ T cells. Interestingly, the IL17+IFN-gamma+ Th17 cells have the features of both IL17-IFN-gamma+ Th1 and IL17+IFN-gamma- Th17 cells in expression of trafficking receptors. Taken together, our results revealed that Th17 cells are highly heterogeneous, in terms of trafficking receptors, and programmed to share major trafficking receptors with other T cell lineages. These findings have important implications in their distribution in the human body in relation to other regulatory T cell subsets.

  17. T cell responses to HLA-A*0201-restricted peptides derived from human alpha fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, L H; Meng, W S; Koh, A; Vollmer, C M; Ribas, A; Dissette, V B; Faull, K; Glaspy, J A; McBride, W H; Economou, J S

    2001-04-15

    alpha fetoprotein (AFP)-derived peptide epitopes can be recognized by human T cells in the context of MHC class I. We determined the identity of AFP-derived peptides, presented in the context of HLA-A*0201, that could be recognized by the human (h) T cell repertoire. We screened 74 peptides and identified 3 new AFP epitopes, hAFP(137-145), hAFP(158-166), and hAFP(325-334), in addition to the previously reported hAFP(542-550.) Each possesses two anchor residues and stabilized HLA-A*0201 on T2 cells in a concentration-dependent class I binding assay. The peptides were stable for 2-4 h in an off-kinetics assay. Each peptide induced peptide-specific T cells in vitro from several normal HLA-A*0201 donors. Importantly, these hAFP peptide-specific T cells also were capable of recognizing HLA-A*0201(+)/AFP(+) tumor cells in both cytotoxicity assays and IFN-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assays. The immunogenicity of each peptide was tested in vivo with HLA-A*0201/K(b)-transgenic mice. After immunization with each peptide emulsified in CFA, draining lymph node cells produced IFN-gamma on recognition of cells stably transfected with hAFP. Furthermore, AFP peptide-specific T cells could be identified in the spleens of mice immunized with dendritic cells transduced with an AFP-expressing adenovirus (AdVhAFP). Three of four AFP peptides could be identified by mass spectrometric analysis of surface peptides from an HLA-A*0201 human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line. Thus, compelling immunological and physiochemical evidence is presented that at least four hAFP-derived epitopes are naturally processed and presented in the context of class I, are immunogenic, and represent potential targets for hepatocellular carcinoma immunotherapy.

  18. T Cell Coinhibition and Immunotherapy in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Janakiram, Murali; Abadi, Yael M.; Sparano, Joseph A.; Zang, Xingxing

    2014-01-01

    Costimulation and coinhibition generated by the B7 family and their receptor CD28 family have key roles in regulating T lymphocyte activation and tolerance. These pathways are very attractive therapeutic targets for human cancers including breast cancer. Gene polymorphisms of B7x (B7-H4/B7S1), PD-1 (CD279), and CTLA-4 (CD152) are associated with increased risk of developing breast cancer although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In human breast cancer microenvironment, up-regulation of coinhibitory B7/CD28 members B7x, B7-H3 (CD276), and PD-L1 (B7-H1/CD274) on tumor cells as well as PD-1 and PD-L1 on tumor-infiltrating immune cells are emerging as immune evasion pathways. Chemotherapy can affect the expression of these molecules, and therefore may dampen the immune response against breast cancer. Immunotherapy targeting T cell coinhibition as monotherapy or combined with standard therapies are in early stages of clinical development, but hold great promise for treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:23114578

  19. Memory regulatory T cells reside in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez Rodriguez, Robert; Pauli, Mariela L.; Neuhaus, Isaac M.; Yu, Siegrid S.; Arron, Sarah T.; Harris, Hobart W.; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Anthony, Bryan A.; Sverdrup, Francis M.; Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth; MacKenzie, Tippi C.; Johnson, David S.; Meyer, Everett H.; Löhr, Andrea; Hsu, Andro; Koo, John; Liao, Wilson; Gupta, Rishu; Debbaneh, Maya G.; Butler, Daniel; Huynh, Monica; Levin, Ethan C.; Leon, Argentina; Hoffman, William Y.; McGrath, Mary H.; Alvarado, Michael D.; Ludwig, Connor H.; Truong, Hong-An; Maurano, Megan M.; Gratz, Iris K.; Abbas, Abul K.; Rosenblum, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are characterized by expression of the transcription factor Foxp3, are a dynamic and heterogeneous population of cells that control immune responses and prevent autoimmunity. We recently identified a subset of Tregs in murine skin with properties typical of memory cells and defined this population as memory Tregs (mTregs). Due to the importance of these cells in regulating tissue inflammation in mice, we analyzed this cell population in humans and found that almost all Tregs in normal skin had an activated memory phenotype. Compared with mTregs in peripheral blood, cutaneous mTregs had unique cell surface marker expression and cytokine production. In normal human skin, mTregs preferentially localized to hair follicles and were more abundant in skin with high hair density. Sequence comparison of TCRs from conventional memory T helper cells and mTregs isolated from skin revealed little homology between the two cell populations, suggesting that they recognize different antigens. Under steady-state conditions, mTregs were nonmigratory and relatively unresponsive; however, in inflamed skin from psoriasis patients, mTregs expanded, were highly proliferative, and produced low levels of IL-17. Taken together, these results identify a subset of Tregs that stably resides in human skin and suggest that these cells are qualitatively defective in inflammatory skin disease. PMID:24509084

  20. Memory regulatory T cells reside in human skin.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Rodriguez, Robert; Pauli, Mariela L; Neuhaus, Isaac M; Yu, Siegrid S; Arron, Sarah T; Harris, Hobart W; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Anthony, Bryan A; Sverdrup, Francis M; Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth; MacKenzie, Tippi C; Johnson, David S; Meyer, Everett H; Löhr, Andrea; Hsu, Andro; Koo, John; Liao, Wilson; Gupta, Rishu; Debbaneh, Maya G; Butler, Daniel; Huynh, Monica; Levin, Ethan C; Leon, Argentina; Hoffman, William Y; McGrath, Mary H; Alvarado, Michael D; Ludwig, Connor H; Truong, Hong-An; Maurano, Megan M; Gratz, Iris K; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2014-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are characterized by expression of the transcription factor Foxp3, are a dynamic and heterogeneous population of cells that control immune responses and prevent autoimmunity. We recently identified a subset of Tregs in murine skin with properties typical of memory cells and defined this population as memory Tregs (mTregs). Due to the importance of these cells in regulating tissue inflammation in mice, we analyzed this cell population in humans and found that almost all Tregs in normal skin had an activated memory phenotype. Compared with mTregs in peripheral blood, cutaneous mTregs had unique cell surface marker expression and cytokine production. In normal human skin, mTregs preferentially localized to hair follicles and were more abundant in skin with high hair density. Sequence comparison of TCRs from conventional memory T helper cells and mTregs isolated from skin revealed little homology between the two cell populations, suggesting that they recognize different antigens. Under steady-state conditions, mTregs were nonmigratory and relatively unresponsive; however, in inflamed skin from psoriasis patients, mTregs expanded, were highly proliferative, and produced low levels of IL-17. Taken together, these results identify a subset of Tregs that stably resides in human skin and suggest that these cells are qualitatively defective in inflammatory skin disease.

  1. Avidity of human T cell receptor engineered CD4+ T cells drives T-helper differentiation fate

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Patrick; Kim, Yong Chan; Pratt, Kathleen P.; Scott, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The role of the T cell receptor (TCR) in antigen recognition and activation of T lymphocytes is well established. However, how the TCR affects T-helper differentiation/skewing is less well understood, particularly for human CD4+ (CD4) T cell subsets. Here we investigate the role of TCR specific antigen avidity in differentiation and maintenance of human Th1, Th2 and Th17 subsets. Two human TCRs, both specific for the same peptide antigen but with different avidities, were cloned and expressed in human CD4 T cells. These TCR engineered cells were then stimulated with specific antigen in unskewed and T-helper skewed conditions. We show that TCR avidity can control the percentage of IL-4 and IFN-γ co-expression in unskewed TCR engineered cells, that effector function can be maintained in a TCR avidity-dependent manner in skewed TCR engineered cells, and that increased TCR avidity can accelerate Th1 skewing of TCR engineered cells. PMID:26653006

  2. Aberrant activation of the interleukin-2 autocrine loop through the nuclear factor of activated T cells by nonleukemogenic human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 but not by leukemogenic type 1 virus.

    PubMed

    Niinuma, Akiko; Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Oie, Masayasu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Gejyo, Fumitake; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Xie, Li; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2005-09-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) but not HTLV-2 is associated with adult T-cell leukemia. We found that HTLV-2 Tax2 protein stimulated reporter gene expression regulated by the interleukin (IL)-2 promoter through the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) in a human T-cell line (Jurkat). However, the activity of HTLV-1 Tax1 was minimal in this system. T-cell lines immortalized by HTLV-2 but not HTLV-1 constitutively exhibited activated NFAT in the nucleus and constitutively expressed IL-2 mRNA. Cyclosporine A, an inhibitor of NFAT activation, abrogated the induction of IL-2 mRNA in HTLV-2-immortalized T-cell lines and concomitantly inhibited cell growth. This growth inhibition was rescued by the addition of IL-2 to the culture. Furthermore, anti-IL-2 receptor antibodies significantly reduced the proliferation of HTLV-2-infected T-cell lines but not that of HTLV-1-infected cells. Our results suggest that Tax2 activates an IL-2 autocrine loop mediated through NFAT that supports the growth of HTLV-2-infected cells under low-IL-2 conditions. This mechanism would be especially important in vivo, where this autocrine mechanism establishes a nonleukemogenic life-long HTLV-2 infection. The results also suggest that differences in long-term cytokine production between HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infection are another factor for the differences in pathogenesis.

  3. Exploiting the Innate Antitumor Activity of Human Gamma-Delta T-Cells for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Manassas, Vir- that the majority of ex vivo, expanded, apoptosis resistant ginia) and the normal human keratinocyte cell line HaCat ŗ ’y-T cells expressed...provided the HaCat cell line . Blood, 102: 200, 2003 10. Ottones, F., Liautard, J., Gross, A., Rabenoelina, F., Liautard, REFERENCES J. P. and Favero...against human prostate cancer cell lines . Purpose and scope: The aims of this project are, 1) to more precisely characterize the extent and breadth

  4. Human mast cells costimulate T cells through a CD28-independent interaction.

    PubMed

    Suurmond, Jolien; Dorjée, Annemarie L; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells are innate immune cells usually residing in peripheral tissues, where they are likely to activate T-cell responses. Similar to other myeloid immune cells, mast cells can function as antigen-presenting cells. However, little is known about the capacity of human mast cells to costimulate CD4(+) T cells. Here, we studied the T-cell stimulatory potential of human mast cells. Peripheral blood derived mast cells were generated and cocultured with isolated CD4(+) T cells. In the presence of T-cell receptor triggering using anti-CD3, mast cells promoted strong proliferation of T cells, which was two- to fivefold stronger than the "T-cell promoting capacity" of monocytes. The interplay between mast cells and T cells was dependent on cell-cell contact, suggesting that costimulatory molecules on the mast cell surface are responsible for the effect. However, in contrast to monocytes, the T-cell costimulation by mast cells was independent of the classical costimulatory molecule CD28, or that of OX40L, ICOSL, or LIGHT. Our data show that mast cells can costimulate human CD4(+) T cells to induce strong T-cell proliferation, but that therapies aiming at disrupting the interaction of CD28 and B7 molecules do not inhibit mast cell mediated T-cell activation.

  5. Tissue reservoirs of antiviral T cell immunity in persistent human CMV infection

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Claire L.; Thome, Joseph J.C.; Igarashi, Suzu

    2017-01-01

    T cell responses to viruses are initiated and maintained in tissue sites; however, knowledge of human antiviral T cells is largely derived from blood. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) persists in most humans, requires T cell immunity to control, yet tissue immune responses remain undefined. Here, we investigated human CMV-specific T cells, virus persistence and CMV-associated T cell homeostasis in blood, lymphoid, mucosal and secretory tissues of 44 CMV seropositive and 28 seronegative donors. CMV-specific T cells were maintained in distinct distribution patterns, highest in blood, bone marrow (BM), or lymph nodes (LN), with the frequency and function in blood distinct from tissues. CMV genomes were detected predominantly in lung and also in spleen, BM, blood and LN. High frequencies of activated CMV-specific T cells were found in blood and BM samples with low virus detection, whereas in lung, CMV-specific T cells were present along with detectable virus. In LNs, CMV-specific T cells exhibited quiescent phenotypes independent of virus. Overall, T cell differentiation was enhanced in sites of viral persistence with age. Together, our results suggest tissue T cell reservoirs for CMV control shaped by both viral and tissue-intrinsic factors, with global effects on homeostasis of tissue T cells over the lifespan. PMID:28130404

  6. Involvement of the interleukin 4 pathway in the generation of functional gamma delta T cells from human pro-T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, A; Sánchez, M J; de la Pompa, J L; Toribio, M L; Kroemer, G; Martínez-A, C

    1991-01-01

    We have used the technique of in situ hybridization to investigate the transcription of genes encoding the CD3 complex and the lymphokine interleukin 4 (IL-4) by human pro-T cells--i.e., cells that phenotypically resemble those T-cell precursors that colonize the thymus during early intrathymic development. CD1-2-3-4-7+8-45+ pro-T cells isolated from postnatal thymi via immunoselection with a panel of specific monoclonal antibodies are already committed to the T-cell lineage because most of them transcribe the genes encoding the delta and epsilon chains of the CD3 complex. About half of such pro-T cells synthesize IL-4 mRNA in the absence of any exogenous stimulation. Upon culture with IL-4, pro-T cells extensively proliferate and differentiate into functionally competent, mature gamma delta T cells expressing a T-cell receptor repertoire similar to that of gamma delta T cells that can be found in postnatal thymus. The IL-4 response of pro-T cells is not mediated by induction of the interleukin 2 (IL-2)-IL-2 receptor pathway and, unlike IL-2-driven T-cell differentiation, does not require the presence of stromal cells. Taken altogether, these findings suggest that an autocrine IL-4-mediated pathway might be implicated in early thymocyte differentiation--namely, in the generation of T cells bearing the gamma delta T-cell receptor. Images PMID:1881911

  7. Early exposure to interleukin-21 limits rapidly generated anti-Epstein-Barr virus T-cell line differentiation.

    PubMed

    Orio, Julie; Carli, Cédric; Janelle, Valérie; Giroux, Martin; Taillefer, Julie; Goupil, Mathieu; Richaud, Manon; Roy, Denis-Claude; Delisle, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    The adoptive transfer of ex vivo-expanded Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific T-cell lines is an attractive strategy to treat EBV-related neoplasms. Current evidence suggests that for adoptive immunotherapy in general, clinical responses are superior if the transferred cells have not reached a late or terminal effector differentiation phenotype before infusion. The cytokine interleukin (IL)-21 has shown great promise at limiting late T-cell differentiation in vitro, but this remains to be demonstrated in anti-viral T-cell lines. We adapted a clinically validated protocol to rapidly generate EBV-specific T-cell lines in 12 to 14 days and tested whether the addition of IL-21 at the initiation of the culture would affect T-cell expansion and differentiation. We generated clinical-scale EBV-restricted T-cell line expansion with balanced T-cell subset ratios. The addition of IL-21 at the beginning of the culture decreased both T-cell expansion and effector memory T-cell accumulation, with a relative increase in less-differentiated T cells. Within CD4 T-cell subsets, exogenous IL-21 was notably associated with the cell surface expression of CD27 and high KLF2 transcript levels, further arguing for a role of IL-21 in the control of late T-cell differentiation. Our results show that IL-21 has profound effects on T-cell differentiation in a rapid T-cell line generation protocol and as such should be further explored as a novel approach to program anti-viral T cells with features associated with early differentiation and optimal therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Human T Cell Crosstalk Is Induced by Tumor Membrane Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Uzana, Ronny; Eisenberg, Galit; Merims, Sharon; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Pato, Aviad; Yefenof, Eitan; Engelstein, Roni; Peretz, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC). Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+T-APCs). We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1) Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2) Fratricide (killing) of CD8+T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response. PMID:25671577

  9. Polyfunctional and IFN-γ monofunctional human CD4+ T cell populations are molecularly distinct

    PubMed Central

    Burel, Julie G.; Apte, Simon H.; Groves, Penny L.; McCarthy, James S.; Doolan, Denise L.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogen-specific polyfunctional T cell responses have been associated with favorable clinical outcomes, but it is not known whether molecular differences exist between polyfunctional and monofunctional cytokine-producing T cells. Here, we report that polyfunctional CD4+ T cells induced during Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) blood-stage infection in humans have a unique transcriptomic profile compared with IFN-γ monofunctional CD4+ T cells and, thus, are molecularly distinct. The 14-gene signature revealed in P. falciparum–reactive polyfunctional T cells is associated with cytokine signaling and lymphocyte chemotaxis, and systems biology analysis identified IL-27 as an upstream regulator of the polyfunctional gene signature. Importantly, the polyfunctional gene signature is largely conserved in Influenza-reactive polyfunctional CD4+ T cells, suggesting that polyfunctional T cells have core characteristics independent of pathogen specificity. This study provides the first evidence to our knowledge that consistent molecular differences exist between polyfunctional and monofunctional CD4+ T cells. PMID:28194431

  10. Identification of CD112R as a novel checkpoint for human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Alessandro; Schulick, Alexander C.; Chen, Wei; Koenig, Michelle R.; Byers, Joshua T.; Yao, Sheng; Bevers, Shaun

    2016-01-01

    T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT) and CD226 emerge as a novel T cell cosignaling pathway in which CD226 and TIGIT serve as costimulatory and coinhibitory receptors, respectively, for the ligands CD155 and CD112. In this study, we describe CD112R, a member of poliovirus receptor–like proteins, as a new coinhibitory receptor for human T cells. CD112R is preferentially expressed on T cells and inhibits T cell receptor–mediated signals. We further identify that CD112, widely expressed on antigen-presenting cells and tumor cells, is the ligand for CD112R with high affinity. CD112R competes with CD226 to bind to CD112. Disrupting the CD112R–CD112 interaction enhances human T cell response. Our experiments identify CD112R as a novel checkpoint for human T cells via interaction with CD112. PMID:26755705

  11. [Study on transient infection of T cell lines by M tropic HIV-1 strains].

    PubMed

    Cao, S; Shao, Y; Jiang, Y

    1999-06-30

    To reveal the mechanism of transient infection of T cell by HIV-1 isolates of early stages from Yunnan and Xinjiang, China. We made these viruses pass on CXCR4 expressing T cell lines and CCR5 expressing U937 cell line. After having observed the biological phenotype, we analyzed sequences of env gene to find genetic mutations of the strains, and used heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) to show the complexity of the virus groups. Sequence analysis indicated that these viruses are M tropic, NSI strains, correlating with their phenotype; they mutated largely through T cell passage, all showed sequence characteristics deviating from M tropic/NSI to different extents. HMA results indicated the complexity of virus groups was low at the very beginning of the passage and kept high later. We concluded that these viruses tried mutating to different directions to adapt the T cell line but all failed. Although env gene correlates with cell tropism, coreceptor usage and HIV syncytium inducing, it may have relationship with the whole genome, whether these phenotypes are present or not. The results imply that there is no T tropic/SI strain in the M topic/NSI virus pool in early infection, it is generated later following continued infection in vivo.

  12. Chronic Human Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi Drives CD4+ T Cells to Immune Senescence1

    PubMed Central

    Albareda, María Cecilia; Olivera, Gabriela Carina; Laucella, Susana A.; Alvarez, María Gabriela; Fernandez, Esteban Rodrigo; Lococo, Bruno; Viotti, Rodolfo; Tarleton, Rick L.; Postan, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Previously we found that the frequency of IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells specific for Trypanosoma cruzi inversely correlates with disease severity in chronic human Chagas disease along with low levels of IL-2-secreting CD8+ T cells in all clinical stages. This impairment of the parasite-specific T cell responses was associated with phenotypic features of immune senescence of the CD8+ T cell compartment. These data prompted us to address the question of whether the CD4+ T cell compartment also experiences signs of exhaustion. Thus, we performed a functional and phenotypical characterization of T. cruzi-specific and overall CD4+ T cells in chronically infected subjects with different degrees of cardiac dysfunction. The results show an inverse association between disease severity and the frequency of T. cruzi-specific IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells. The high expression of CD27 and CD28 with a relative low expression of CD57 found on CD4+IFN-γ + T cells suggests that the effector T cell pool in chronic T. cruzi infection includes a high proportion of newly recruited T cells, but a low frequency of long-term memory cells. The total CD4+ T cell compartment shows signs of senescence and later stages of differentiation associated with more severe stages of the disease. These findings support the hypothesis that long-term T. cruzi infection in humans might exhaust long-lived memory T cells. PMID:19692645

  13. The role of human T-cell lymphotropic viruses (HTLV-I and II) in cutaneous T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Zucker-Franklin, D; Pancake, B A

    1994-09-01

    Although an association between the human T cell lymphotropic viruses (HTLV-I and II) and cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) has long been suspected, only a minor fraction of patients with this disease have antibodies to the viral structural proteins. However, the consistent finding of HTLV-like particles in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from such patients has prompted a continued effort to find evidence linking the virus to this disease. Capitalizing on the increased sensitivity afforded by combining PCR amplification with detection by Southern blot hybridization, it became possible to demonstrate HTLV tax and/or pol proviral sequences in freshly isolated PBMC of most patients with mycosis fungoides. These observations suggest a possible role of the virus in the pathogenesis of CTCL, and may impact on diagnostic and therapeutic measures in the future.

  14. ROCKing cytokine secretion balance in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Waksal, Samuel D

    2015-04-01

    Balanced regulation of cytokine secretion in T cells is critical for maintenance of immune homeostasis and prevention of autoimmunity. The Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) 2 signaling pathway was previously shown to be involved in controlling of cellular movement and shape. However, recent work from our group and others has demonstrated a new and important role of ROCK2 in regulating cytokine secretion in T cells. We found that ROCK2 promotes pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17 and IL-21, whereas IL-2 and IL-10 secretion are negatively regulated by ROCK2 under Th17-skewing activation. Also, in disease, but not in steady state conditions, ROCK2 contributes to regulation of IFN-γ secretion in T cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients. Thus, ROCK2 signaling is a key pathway in modulation of T-cell mediated immune responses underscoring the therapeutic potential of targeted inhibition of ROCK2 in autoimmunity.

  15. Human T-cell receptor variable gene segment families

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Clark, S.P.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    Multiple DNA and protein sequence alignments have been constructed for the human T-cell receptor {alpha}/{delta}, {beta}, and {gamma} (TCRA/D, B, and G) variable (V) gene segments. The traditional classification into subfamilies was confirmed using a much larger pool of sequences. For each sequence, a name was derived which complies with the standard nomenclature. The traditional numbering of V gene segments in the order of their discovery was continued and changed when in conflict with names of other segments. By discriminating between alleles at the same locus versus genes from different loci, we were able to reduce the number of more than 150 different TCRBV sequences in the database to a repertoire of only 47 functional TCRBV gene segments. An extension of this analysis to the over 100 TCRAV sequences results in a predicted repertoire of 42 functional TCRAV gene segments. Our alignment revealed two residues that distinguish between the highly homologous V{delta} and V{alpha}, one at a site that in V{sub H} contacts the constant region, the other at the interface between immunoglobulin V{sub H} and V{sub L}. This site may be responsible for restricted pairing between certain V{delta} and V{gamma} chains. On the other hand, V{beta} and V{gamma} appear to be related by the fact that their CDR2 length is increased by four residues as compared with that of V{alpha}/{delta} peptides. 150 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Unconventional Human T Cells Accumulate at the Site of Infection in Response to Microbial Ligands and Induce Local Tissue Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liuzzi, Anna Rita; Kift-Morgan, Ann; Lopez-Anton, Melisa; Friberg, Ida M; Zhang, Jingjing; Brook, Amy C; Roberts, Gareth W; Donovan, Kieron L; Colmont, Chantal S; Toleman, Mark A; Bowen, Timothy; Johnson, David W; Topley, Nicholas; Moser, Bernhard; Fraser, Donald J; Eberl, Matthias

    2016-09-15

    The antimicrobial responsiveness and function of unconventional human T cells are poorly understood, with only limited access to relevant specimens from sites of infection. Peritonitis is a common and serious complication in individuals with end-stage kidney disease receiving peritoneal dialysis. By analyzing local and systemic immune responses in peritoneal dialysis patients presenting with acute bacterial peritonitis and monitoring individuals before and during defined infectious episodes, our data show that Vγ9/Vδ2(+) γδ T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells accumulate at the site of infection with organisms producing (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate and vitamin B2, respectively. Such unconventional human T cells are major producers of IFN-γ and TNF-α in response to these ligands that are shared by many microbial pathogens and affect the cells lining the peritoneal cavity by triggering local inflammation and inducing tissue remodeling with consequences for peritoneal membrane integrity. Our data uncover a crucial role for Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in bacterial infection and suggest that they represent a useful predictive marker for important clinical outcomes, which may inform future stratification and patient management. These findings are likely to be applicable to other acute infections where local activation of unconventional T cells contributes to the antimicrobial inflammatory response. Copyright © 2016 The Authors.

  17. Novel, in-natural-infection subdominant HIV-1 CD8+ T-cell epitopes revealed in human recipients of conserved-region T-cell vaccines.

    PubMed

    Borthwick, Nicola; Lin, Zhansong; Akahoshi, Tomohiro; Llano, Anuska; Silva-Arrieta, Sandra; Ahmed, Tina; Dorrell, Lucy; Brander, Christian; Murakoshi, Hayato; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Hanke, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Fine definition of targeted CD8+ T-cell epitopes and their human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I restriction informs iterative improvements of HIV-1 T-cell vaccine designs and may predict early vaccine success or failure. Here, lymphocytes from volunteers, who had received candidate HIVconsv vaccines expressing conserved sub-protein regions of HIV-1, were used to define the optimum-length target epitopes and their HLA restriction. In HIV-1-positive patients, CD8+ T-cell responses predominantly recognize immunodominant, but hypervariable and therefore less protective epitopes. The less variable, more protective epitopes in conserved regions are typically subdominant. Therefore, induction of strong responses to conserved regions by vaccination provides an opportunity to discover novel important epitopes. Cryopreserved lymphocytes from vaccine recipients were expanded by stimulation with 15-mer responder peptides for 10 days to establish short term-cell-line (STCL) effector cells. These were subjected to intracellular cytokine staining using serially truncated peptides and peptide-pulsed 721.221 cells expressing individual HLA class I alleles to define minimal epitope length and HLA restriction by stimulation of IFN-γ and TNF-α production and surface expression of CD107a. Using lymphocyte samples of 12 vaccine recipients, we defined 14 previously unreported optimal CD8+ T-cell HIV-1 epitopes and their four-digit HLA allele restriction (6 HLA-A, 7 HLA-B and 1 HLA-C alleles). Further 13 novel targets with incomplete information were revealed. The high rate of discovery of novel CD8+ T-cell effector epitopes warrants further epitope mining in recipients of the conserved-region vaccines in other populations and informs development of HIV-1/AIDS vaccines. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01151319.

  18. Selective retention of herpes simplex virus-specific T cells in latently infected human trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Verjans, Georges M. G. M.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; van Dun, Jessica M.; Poot, Angelique; Milikan, Johannes C.; Laman, Jon D.; Langerak, Anton W.; Kinchington, Paul R.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) results in lifelong latent infections of neurons in sensory ganglia such as the trigeminal ganglia (TG). It has been postulated that T cells retained in TG inhibit reactivation of latent virus. The acquisition of TG specimens of individuals within hours after death offered the unique opportunity to characterize the phenotype and specificity of TG-resident T cells in humans. High numbers of activated CD8+ T cells expressing a late effector memory phenotype were found to reside in latently infected TG. The T cell infiltrate was oligoclonal, and T cells selectively clustered around HSV-1 but not VZV latently infected neurons. Neuronal damage was not observed despite granzyme B expression by the neuron-interacting CD8+ T cells. The TG-resident T cells, mainly CD8+ T cells, were directed against HSV-1 and not to VZV, despite neuronal expression of VZV proteins. The results implicate that herpesvirus latency in human TG is associated with a local, persistent T cell response, comprising activated late effector memory CD8+ T cells that appear to control HSV-1 latency by noncytolytic pathways. In contrast, T cells do not seem to be directly involved in controlling VZV latency in human TG. PMID:17360672

  19. Interleukins 7 and 15 Maintain Human T Cell Proliferative Capacity through STAT5 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Adam; Kaur, Mandeep; Iliopoulou, Bettina P.; Phennicie, Ryan; Hanson, Amanda; Chen, Jianzhu

    2016-01-01

    T lymphocytes require signals from self-peptides and cytokines, most notably interleukins 7 and 15 (IL-7, IL-15), for survival. While mouse T cells die rapidly if IL-7 or IL-15 is withdrawn, human T cells can survive prolonged withdrawal of IL-7 and IL-15. Here we show that IL-7 and IL-15 are required to maintain human T cell proliferative capacity through the STAT5 signaling pathway. T cells from humanized mice proliferate better if stimulated in the presence of human IL-7 or IL-15 or if T cells are exposed to human IL-7 or IL-15 in mice. Freshly isolated T cells from human peripheral blood lose proliferative capacity if cultured for 24 hours in the absence of IL-7 or IL-15. We further show that phosphorylation of STAT5 correlates with proliferation and inhibition of STAT5 reduces proliferation. These results reveal a novel role of IL-7 and IL-15 in maintaining human T cell function, provide an explanation for T cell dysfunction in humanized mice, and have significant implications for in vitro studies with human T cells. PMID:27855183

  20. IL-7 enhances thymic human T cell development in "human immune system" Rag2-/-IL-2Rgammac-/- mice without affecting peripheral T cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    van Lent, Anja U; Dontje, Wendy; Nagasawa, Maho; Siamari, Rachida; Bakker, Arjen Q; Pouw, Stephan M; Maijoor, Kelly A; Weijer, Kees; Cornelissen, Jan J; Blom, Bianca; Di Santo, James P; Spits, Hergen; Legrand, Nicolas

    2009-12-15

    IL-7 is a central cytokine in the development of hematopoietic cells, although interspecies discrepancies have been reported. By coculturing human postnatal thymus hematopoietic progenitors and OP9-huDL1 stromal cells, we found that murine IL-7 is approximately 100-fold less potent than human IL-7 for supporting human T cell development in vitro. We investigated the role of human IL-7 in newborn BALB/c Rag2(-/-)gamma(c)(-/-) mice transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) as an in vivo model of human hematopoiesis using three approaches to improve IL-7 signaling: administration of human IL-7, ectopic expression of human IL-7 by the transplanted human HSC, or enforced expression of a murine/human chimeric IL-7 receptor binding murine IL-7. We show that premature IL-7 signaling at the HSC stage, before entrance in the thymus, impeded T cell development, whereas increased intrathymic IL-7 signaling significantly enhanced the maintenance of immature thymocytes. Increased thymopoiesis was also observed when we transplanted BCL-2- or BCL-x(L)-transduced human HSC. Homeostasis of peripheral mature T cells in this humanized mouse model was not improved by any of these strategies. Overall, our results provide evidence for an important role of IL-7 in human T cell development in vivo and highlight the notion that IL-7 availability is but one of many signals that condition peripheral T cell homeostasis.

  1. Co-culture of healthy human keratinocytes and T-cells promotes keratinocyte chemokine production and RORγt-positive IL-17 producing T-cell populations.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jorieke H; Tjabringa, Geuranne S; Fasse, Esther; de Oliveira, Vivian L; Schalkwijk, Joost; Koenen, Hans J P M; Joosten, Irma

    2013-01-01

    Both keratinocytes and T-cells are crucial players in cutaneous immune responses. We hypothesized that direct interactions between keratinocytes and T-cell subsets could shape the nature or strength of the local immune response. We investigated direct interactions between keratinocytes and T-cell subsets, focused on keratinocyte chemokine production and T-cell phenotype and cytokine production. A newly developed in vitro serum free co-culture model using primary keratinocytes and T-cells subsets from healthy human donors was used. Keratinocyte chemokine production was analyzed with luminex, T-cell phenotype and cytokine production were analyzed with flow cytometry. Our data show that upon co-culture with CD4(pos) or CD8(pos) T-cells primary human keratinocytes increased production of functionally active chemokines CCL2, CCL20 and CXCL10 and that regulatory T-cells did not regulate keratinocyte chemokine production. Next to that, we found that keratinocytes skewed CD4(pos) and CD8(pos) T-cell populations toward an IL-17(pos) CCR6(pos) RORγt(pos) phenotype in a cell-cell contact independent manner, and that Treg were able to decrease the absolute number of IL-17 producing T-cells in keratinocyte/T-cell co-cultures. Correspondingly, freshly isolated skin-derived T-cell populations contained relatively high percentages of IL-17(pos) cells. We provide evidence that keratinocyte/T-cell communication may regulate leukocyte influx in the skin, and that keratinocytes enrich T-cell populations for Th17/Tc17 cells. Accumulation of Th17/Tc17 cells, but not chemokine production, appears under the control of regulatory T-cells. Dysregulation of these processes may well contribute to the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Differential depletion of total T cells and regulatory T cells and prolonged allotransplant survival in CD3Ɛ humanized mice treated with polyclonal anti human thymocyte globulin

    PubMed Central

    Buszko, Maja; Cardini, Benno; Oberhuber, Rupert; Oberhuber, Lukas; Jakic, Bojana; Beierfuss, Anja; Wick, Georg; Cappellano, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Thymoglobulin (ATG) is a polyclonal rabbit antibody against human thymocytes used as a T cell-depleting agent to prevent or treat allotransplant rejection. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of low dose ATG treatment exclusively on T cells using a humanized BALB/c human CD3Ɛ transgenic mouse model expressing both human and murine T cell receptors (TCR). Mice received a single intravenous (i.v.) injection of ATG. Blood and peripheral lymphoid organs were obtained after different time points. We found a significant T cell depletion in this mouse model. In addition, regulatory T cells (Tregs) proved to be less sensitive to depletion than the rest of T cells and the Treg:non-Treg ratio was therefore increased. Finally, we also investigated the effect of ATG in a heterotopic allogenic murine model of heart transplantation. Survival and transplant function were significantly prolonged in ATG-treated mice. In conclusion, we showed (a) an immunosuppressive effect of ATG in this humanized mouse model which is exclusively mediated by reactivity against human CD3Ɛ; (b) provided evidence for a relative resistance of Tregs against this regimen; and (c) demonstrated the immunomodulatory effect of ATG under these experimental circumstances by prolongation of heart allograft survival. PMID:28257450

  3. Retargeting Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus to Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Dillon; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Barber, Glen N

    2015-12-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is an aggressive cancer of CD4/CD25(+) T lymphocytes, the etiological agent of which is human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATL is highly refractory to current therapies, making the development of new treatments a high priority. Oncolytic viruses such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) are being considered as anticancer agents since they readily infect transformed cells compared to normal cells, the former appearing to exhibit defective innate immune responses. Here, we have evaluated the efficacy and safety of a recombinant VSV that has been retargeted to specifically infect and replicate in transformed CD4(+) cells. This was achieved by replacing the single VSV glycoprotein (G) with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 to create a hybrid fusion protein, gp160G. The resultant virus, VSV-gp160G, was found to only target cells expressing CD4 and retained robust oncolytic activity against HTLV-1 actuated ATL cells. VSV-gp160G was further noted to be highly attenuated and did not replicate efficiently in or induce significant cell death of primary CD4(+) T cells. Accordingly, VSV-gp160G did not elicit any evidence of neurotoxicity even in severely immunocompromised animals such as NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγ-c-null (NSG) mice. Importantly, VSV-gp160G effectively exerted potent oncolytic activity in patient-derived ATL transplanted into NSG mice and facilitated a significant survival benefit. Our data indicate that VSV-gp160G exerts potent oncolytic efficacy against CD4(+) malignant cells and either alone or in conjunction with established therapies may provide an effective treatment in patients displaying ATL. Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is a serious form of cancer with a high mortality rate. HTLV-1 infection is the etiological agent of ATL and, unfortunately, most patients succumb to the disease within a few years. Current treatment options have failed to significantly improve survival rate. In this study, we

  4. Retargeting Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus to Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Dillon; Ramos, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is an aggressive cancer of CD4/CD25+ T lymphocytes, the etiological agent of which is human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATL is highly refractory to current therapies, making the development of new treatments a high priority. Oncolytic viruses such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) are being considered as anticancer agents since they readily infect transformed cells compared to normal cells, the former appearing to exhibit defective innate immune responses. Here, we have evaluated the efficacy and safety of a recombinant VSV that has been retargeted to specifically infect and replicate in transformed CD4+ cells. This was achieved by replacing the single VSV glycoprotein (G) with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 to create a hybrid fusion protein, gp160G. The resultant virus, VSV-gp160G, was found to only target cells expressing CD4 and retained robust oncolytic activity against HTLV-1 actuated ATL cells. VSV-gp160G was further noted to be highly attenuated and did not replicate efficiently in or induce significant cell death of primary CD4+ T cells. Accordingly, VSV-gp160G did not elicit any evidence of neurotoxicity even in severely immunocompromised animals such as NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγ-c-null (NSG) mice. Importantly, VSV-gp160G effectively exerted potent oncolytic activity in patient-derived ATL transplanted into NSG mice and facilitated a significant survival benefit. Our data indicate that VSV-gp160G exerts potent oncolytic efficacy against CD4+ malignant cells and either alone or in conjunction with established therapies may provide an effective treatment in patients displaying ATL. IMPORTANCE Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is a serious form of cancer with a high mortality rate. HTLV-1 infection is the etiological agent of ATL and, unfortunately, most patients succumb to the disease within a few years. Current treatment options have failed to significantly improve survival rate. In

  5. Identification and clinical relevance of naturally occurring human CD8+HLA-DR+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Arruvito, Lourdes; Payaslián, Florencia; Baz, Plácida; Podhorzer, Ariel; Billordo, Ariel; Pandolfi, Julieta; Semeniuk, Guillermo; Arribalzaga, Eduardo; Fainboim, Leonardo

    2014-11-01

    The lack of responsiveness to self and non-self Ags is normally maintained by multiple mechanisms, including the suppressive activities of several T cell subsets. In this study, we show that CD8(+) T cells from both adult peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells constitutively expressing HLA-DR represent a natural human CD8(+) regulatory T cell subset. Their suppressive effect appears to be cell-to-cell contact dependent and may involve CTLA-4 signaling between neighboring T cells. These regulatory T cells can be expanded in vitro and exhibit a suppressive capacity similar to that observed in ex vivo CD8(+)HLA-DR(+) T cells. The high frequency of CD8(+)HLA-DR(+) T cells that we detected in patients with non-small cell lung cancer deserves further work to confirm their putative suppressor effect within the tumor.

  6. Prevention of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yoshimitsu, Makoto; White, Yohann; Arima, Naomichi

    2014-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a highly aggressive peripheral T-cell malignancy that develops after long-term chronic infection with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1). Despite the recent advances in chemotherapy, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT), and supportive care, the prognosis for patients with ATL is one of the poorest among hematological malignancies; overall survival (OS) at 3 years is only 24 % in the more aggressive subtypes of ATLL. HTLV-1 is a human retrovirus infecting approximately 10-20 million people worldwide, particularly in southern and southeastern Japan, the Caribbean, highlands of South America, Melanesia, and Equatorial Africa. Despite this high frequency of human infection, only 2-5 % of HTLV-1-infected individuals develop ATLL. Three major routes of viral transmission have been established: (1) mother-to-child transmission through breast-feeding; (2) sexual transmission, predominantly from men to women; and (3) cellular blood components. Multiple factors (e.g., virus, host cell, and immune factors) have been implicated in the development of ATLL, although the underlying mechanisms of leukemogenesis have not been fully elucidated. No preventive vaccine against HTLV-1 is currently available, and interrupting the well-recognized primary modes of HTLV-1 transmission is the mainstay of ATLL prevention. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission through the replacement of breast-feeding has been shown to have the most significant impact on the incidence of HTLV-1 infection, and public health policies should consider the risk of malnutrition, especially in developing countries where malnutrition is the significant cause of infant mortality.

  7. Purification and partial sequence analysis of human T-cell growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Robb, R J; Kutny, R M; Chowdhry, V

    1983-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody directed against human T-cell growth factor (TCGF) from the JURKAT cell line was used for affinity column purification of the factor. Bound TCGF was eluted nearly quantitatively at low pH, and the recovered factor appeared homogeneous by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The molecule is markedly hydrophobic, with a high content of leucine. A single NH2-terminal sequence of 36 residues was obtained by automated Edman degradation, further supporting the homogeneity of the material. Thus, significant quantities of purified TCGF have been prepared in a single step, making possible detailed analysis of its molecular structure and biological role. Images PMID:6604277

  8. Novel immunostimulatory effects of osteoclasts and macrophages on human γδ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pappalardo, Angela; Thompson, Keith

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely reported that T cells are capable of influencing osteoclast formation and bone remodelling, yet relatively little is known of the reciprocal effects of osteoclasts for affecting T cell function and/or activity. In this study we investigated the effects of human osteoclasts on the function of γδ T cells, a subset of non-CD4+ T cells implicated in a variety of inflammatory disease states. γδ T cells and CD4+ T cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and were co-cultured with autologous mature osteoclasts (generated by treatment with M-CSF and RANKL) before phenotypical and functional changes in the T cell populations were assessed. Macrophages, osteoclasts, and conditioned medium derived from macrophages or osteoclasts induced activation of γδ T cells, as determined by the expression of the early activation marker CD69. TNFα was a major mediator of this stimulatory effect on γδ T cells. Consistent with this stimulatory effect, osteoclasts augmented proliferation of IL-2-stimulated γδ T cells and also supported the survival of unstimulated γδ and CD4+ T cells, although these effects required co-culture with osteoclasts. Co-culture with osteoclasts also increased the proportion of γδ T cells producing IFNγ, but did not modulate IFNγ or IL-17 production by CD4+ T cells. We provide new insights into the in vitro interactions between human γδ T cells and osteoclasts/macrophages, and demonstrate that osteoclasts or their precursors are capable of influencing γδ T function both via the release of soluble factors and also through direct cell–cell interactions. PMID:25445456

  9. Novel immunostimulatory effects of osteoclasts and macrophages on human γδ T cells.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Angela; Thompson, Keith

    2015-02-01

    It has been widely reported that T cells are capable of influencing osteoclast formation and bone remodelling, yet relatively little is known of the reciprocal effects of osteoclasts for affecting T cell function and/or activity. In this study we investigated the effects of human osteoclasts on the function of γδ T cells, a subset of non-CD4(+) T cells implicated in a variety of inflammatory disease states. γδ T cells and CD4(+) T cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and were co-cultured with autologous mature osteoclasts (generated by treatment with M-CSF and RANKL) before phenotypical and functional changes in the T cell populations were assessed. Macrophages, osteoclasts, and conditioned medium derived from macrophages or osteoclasts induced activation of γδ T cells, as determined by the expression of the early activation marker CD69. TNFα was a major mediator of this stimulatory effect on γδ T cells. Consistent with this stimulatory effect, osteoclasts augmented proliferation of IL-2-stimulated γδ T cells and also supported the survival of unstimulated γδ and CD4(+) T cells, although these effects required co-culture with osteoclasts. Co-culture with osteoclasts also increased the proportion of γδ T cells producing IFNγ, but did not modulate IFNγ or IL-17 production by CD4(+) T cells. We provide new insights into the in vitro interactions between human γδ T cells and osteoclasts/macrophages, and demonstrate that osteoclasts or their precursors are capable of influencing γδ T function both via the release of soluble factors and also through direct cell-cell interactions.

  10. Human epidermal T cells predominantly belong to the lineage expressing alpha/beta T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The epidermis of clinically normal-appearing human skin harbors a phenotypically heterogeneous population of T lymphocytes (TCs), the majority of which are CD2+/CD3+/CD5+ "memory" cells, but in an unactivated state, and express the TCR-alpha/beta. In contrast to murine skin, only a very minor subpopulation of CD3+ cells in the human epidermis bears the TCR-gamma/delta. Epidermal TCs primarily are distributed along the rete ridges in the basal keratinocyte layer and are often in close apposition to Langerhans cells (LCs). These TCs were propagated from epidermal cell suspensions after stimulation with TC activating agents (Con A, rIL-1, rIL-2), then evaluated for phenotypic features and TCR diversity. Similar to the in situ situation, most were CD4-/CD8+/TCR-alpha/beta+. In addition, two cultures contained TCR- gamma/delta+ cells; one of these determined to be an adherent CD4-/CD8+ population. Epidermal TCs were significantly (p less than 0.0001) more abundant in the sole than in the other body regions examined (i.e., 40 vs. 7 CD3+ cells/linear centimeter of epidermis) and seemed to have a particular affinity for the acrosyringial epithelium of eccrine sweat ducts. Moreover, the sole usually contained a greater number of CD8+ relative to CD4+ TCs, whereas the epidermal CD4/CD8 ratio in the trunk and extremities was quite variable, although the trend also was towards a slightly larger percentage of CD8+ cells. Collectively, our data suggest that the volar epidermis has a unique microenvironment which is responsible for both the higher density of TCs, preferentially CD8+, and lower number of LCs. This study has not only provided evidence for significant regional variability in the human epidermal TC population of normal skin, but also strengthens the concept for skin-associated lymphoid tissues (SALT), whereby memory TCs recirculate back to the epidermis and interact with resident antigen-presenting cells (i.e., LC). PMID:2182763

  11. Antigenic Properties and Processing Requirements of 65-Kilodalton Mannoprotein, a Major Antigen Target of Anti-Candida Human T-Cell Response, as Disclosed by Specific Human T-Cell Clones

    PubMed Central

    Nisini, Roberto; Romagnoli, Giulia; Gomez, Maria Jesus; La Valle, Roberto; Torosantucci, Antonella; Mariotti, Sabrina; Teloni, Raffaela; Cassone, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    T-cell-mediated immunity is known to play a central role in the host response to Candida albicans. T-cell clones are useful tools for the exact identification of fungal T-cell epitopes and the processing requirements of C. albicans antigens. We isolated human T-cell clones from an HLA-DRB1*1101 healthy donor by using an antigenic extract (MP-F2) of the fungus. Specific clones were T-cell receptor α/β and CD4+/CD8− and showed a T-helper type 1 cytokine profile (production of gamma interferon and not interleukin-4). The large majority of these clones recognized both the natural (highly glycosylated) and the recombinant (nonglycosylated) 65-kDa mannoprotein (MP65), an MP-F2 minor constituent that was confirmed to be an immunodominant antigen of the human T-cell response. Surprisingly, most of the clones recognized two synthetic peptides of different MP65 regions. However, the peptides shared the amino acid motif IXSXIXXL, which may be envisaged as a motif sequence representing the minimal epitope recognized by these clones. Three clones recognized natural and pronase-treated MP65 but did not detect nonglycosylated, recombinant MP65 or the peptides, suggesting a possible role for polysaccharides in T-cell recognition of C. albicans. Finally, lymphoblastoid B-cell lines were efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC) for recombinant MP65 and peptides but failed to present natural, glycosylated antigens, suggesting that nonprofessional APC might be defective in processing highly glycosylated yeast proteins. In conclusion, this study provides the first characterization of C. albicans-specific human T-cell clones and provides new clues for the definition of the cellular immune response against C. albicans. PMID:11349037

  12. Human TCR-αβ+ CD4− CD8− T Cells Can Derive from CD8+ T Cells and Display an Inflammatory Effector Phenotype1

    PubMed Central

    Crispín, José C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2010-01-01

    The origin and function of human double negative (DN) TCR-αβ+ T cells is unknown. They are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus because they expand and accumulate in inflamed organs. In this study, we provide evidence that human TCR-αβ+ CD4− CD8− DN T cells can derive from activated CD8+ T cells. Freshly isolated TCR-αβ+ DN T cells display a distinct gene expression and cytokine production profile. DN cells isolated from peripheral blood as well as DN cells derived in vitro from CD8+ T cells produce a defined array of proinflammatory mediators that includes IL-1β, IL-17, IFN-γ, CXCL3, and CXCL2. These results indicate that, upon activation, CD8+ T cells have the capacity to acquire a distinct phenotype that grants them inflammatory capacity. PMID:19734235

  13. Restoration of Viral Immunity in Immunodeficient Humans by the Adoptive Transfer of T Cell Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddell, Stanley R.; Watanabe, Kathe S.; Goodrich, James M.; Li, Cheng R.; Agha, Mounzer E.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    1992-07-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells to establish immunity is an effective therapy for viral infections and tumors in animal models. The application of this approach to human disease would require the isolation and in vitro expansion of human antigen-specific T cells and evidence that such T cells persist and function in vivo after transfer. Cytomegalovirus-specific CD8^+ cytotoxic T cell (CTL) clones could be isolated from bone marrow donors, propagated in vitro, and adoptively transferred to immunodeficient bone marrow transplant recipients. No toxicity developed and the clones provided persistent reconstitution of CD8^+ cytomegalovirus-specific CTL responses.

  14. Engineered drug resistant γδ T cells kill glioblastoma cell lines during a chemotherapy challenge: a strategy for combining chemo- and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Lawrence S; Bowersock, Joscelyn; Dasgupta, Anindya; Gillespie, G Yancey; Su, Yun; Johnson, Austin; Spencer, H Trent

    2013-01-01

    Classical approaches to immunotherapy that show promise in some malignancies have generally been disappointing when applied to high-grade brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We recently showed that ex vivo expanded/activated γδ T cells recognize NKG2D ligands expressed on malignant glioma and are cytotoxic to glioma cell lines and primary GBM explants. In addition, γδ T cells extend survival and slow tumor progression when administered to immunodeficient mice with intracranial human glioma xenografts. We now show that temozolomide (TMZ), a principal chemotherapeutic agent used to treat GBM, increases the expression of stress-associated NKG2D ligands on TMZ-resistant glioma cells, potentially rendering them vulnerable to γδ T cell recognition and lysis. TMZ is also highly toxic to γδ T cells, however, and to overcome this cytotoxic effect γδ T cells were genetically modified using a lentiviral vector encoding the DNA repair enzyme O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) from the O(6)-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) cDNA, which confers resistance to TMZ. Genetic modification of γδ T cells did not alter their phenotype or their cytotoxicity against GBM target cells. Importantly, gene modified γδ T cells showed greater cytotoxicity to two TMZ resistant GBM cell lines, U373(TMZ-R) and SNB-19(TMZ-R) cells, in the presence of TMZ than unmodified cells, suggesting that TMZ exposed more receptors for γδ T cell-targeted lysis. Therefore, TMZ resistant γδ T cells can be generated without impairing their anti-tumor functions in the presence of high concentrations of TMZ. These results provide a mechanistic basis for combining chemotherapy and γδ T cell-based drug resistant cellular immunotherapy to treat GBM.

  15. Engineered Drug Resistant γδ T Cells Kill Glioblastoma Cell Lines during a Chemotherapy Challenge: A Strategy for Combining Chemo- and Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Lawrence S.; Bowersock, Joscelyn; Dasgupta, Anindya; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Su, Yun; Johnson, Austin; Spencer, H. Trent

    2013-01-01

    Classical approaches to immunotherapy that show promise in some malignancies have generally been disappointing when applied to high-grade brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We recently showed that ex vivo expanded/activated γδ T cells recognize NKG2D ligands expressed on malignant glioma and are cytotoxic to glioma cell lines and primary GBM explants. In addition, γδ T cells extend survival and slow tumor progression when administered to immunodeficient mice with intracranial human glioma xenografts. We now show that temozolomide (TMZ), a principal chemotherapeutic agent used to treat GBM, increases the expression of stress-associated NKG2D ligands on TMZ-resistant glioma cells, potentially rendering them vulnerable to γδ T cell recognition and lysis. TMZ is also highly toxic to γδ T cells, however, and to overcome this cytotoxic effect γδ T cells were genetically modified using a lentiviral vector encoding the DNA repair enzyme O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) from the O(6)-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) cDNA, which confers resistance to TMZ. Genetic modification of γδ T cells did not alter their phenotype or their cytotoxicity against GBM target cells. Importantly, gene modified γδ T cells showed greater cytotoxicity to two TMZ resistant GBM cell lines, U373TMZ-R and SNB-19TMZ-R cells, in the presence of TMZ than unmodified cells, suggesting that TMZ exposed more receptors for γδ T cell-targeted lysis. Therefore, TMZ resistant γδ T cells can be generated without impairing their anti-tumor functions in the presence of high concentrations of TMZ. These results provide a mechanistic basis for combining chemotherapy and γδ T cell-based drug resistant cellular immunotherapy to treat GBM. PMID:23326319

  16. Neonatal thymectomy reveals differentiation and plasticity within human naive T cells

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Theo; Delemarre, Eveline M.; Janssen, Willemijn J.M.; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Broen, Jasper C.; Tesselaar, Kiki; Borghans, Jose A.M.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.S.; Prakken, Berent J.; Mokry, Michal; Jansen, Nicolaas J.G.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of naive T cells is dependent on thymic output, but in adults, the naive T cell pool is primarily maintained by peripheral proliferation. Naive T cells have long been regarded as relatively quiescent cells; however, it was recently shown that IL-8 production is a signatory effector function of naive T cells, at least in newborns. How this functional signature relates to naive T cell dynamics and aging is unknown. Using a cohort of children and adolescents who underwent neonatal thymectomy, we demonstrate that the naive CD4+ T cell compartment in healthy humans is functionally heterogeneous and that this functional diversity is lost after neonatal thymectomy. Thymic tissue regeneration later in life resulted in functional restoration of the naive T cell compartment, implicating the thymus as having functional regenerative capacity. Together, these data shed further light on functional differentiation within the naive T cell compartment and the importance of the thymus in human naive T cell homeostasis and premature aging. In addition, these results affect and alter our current understanding on the identification of truly naive T cells and recent thymic emigrants. PMID:26901814

  17. Global Analysis of O-GlcNAc Glycoproteins in Activated Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Peder J.; Elias, Joshua E.

    2016-01-01

    T cell activation in response to Ag is largely regulated by protein posttranslational modifications. Although phosphorylation has been extensively characterized in T cells, much less is known about the glycosylation of serine/threonine residues by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc). Given that O-GlcNAc appears to regulate cell signaling pathways and protein activity similarly to phosphorylation, we performed a comprehensive analysis of O-GlcNAc during T cell activation to address the functional importance of this modification and to identify the modified proteins. Activation of T cells through the TCR resulted in a global elevation of O-GlcNAc levels and in the absence of O-GlcNAc, IL-2 production and proliferation were compromised. T cell activation also led to changes in the relative expression of O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) isoforms and accumulation of OGT at the immunological synapse of murine T cells. Using a glycoproteomics approach, we identified >200 O-GlcNAc proteins in human T cells. Many of the identified proteins had a functional relationship to RNA metabolism, and consistent with a connection between O-GlcNAc and RNA, inhibition of OGT impaired nascent RNA synthesis upon T cell activation. Overall, our studies provide a global analysis of O-GlcNAc dynamics during T cell activation and the first characterization, to our knowledge, of the O-GlcNAc glycoproteome in human T cells. PMID:27655845

  18. Effects of Ambient Fine Particles PM2.5 on Human HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiao; Kang, Zhihua; Jiang, Shuo; Zhao, Jinzhuo; Yan, Shuxian; Xu, Feng; Xu, Jinhua

    2017-01-01

    The current study was conducted to observe the effects of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) on human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) cells. The potential mechanism linking PM2.5 and skin was explored. HaCaT cells were cultured and then accessed in plate with PM2.5. Cell viability was tested by Cell Counting Kit-8. The mRNA and protein expression of Filaggrin, Loricrin, Involucrin, and Repetin were analyzed. The levels of Granulocyte-macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor, Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, Interleukin-1α, and Interleukin-8 were detected in the supernatant of the HaCaT cell with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Cell viability decreased with the increase in PM2.5. Compared with the control group, the protein expression of Filaggrin, Repetin, Involucrin, and Loricrin showed different expression patterns in PM2.5 treatment groups. The level of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin, Interleukin-1α, and Interleukin-8 significantly increased in the cells treated with PM2.5. Ambient PM2.5 may increase the risk of eczema and other skin diseases. The relative mechanism may be associated with the impairment of the skin barrier and the elevation of inflammatory responses. PMID:28085100

  19. Distribution and compartmentalization of human circulating and tissue-resident memory T cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Kubota, Masaru; Yudanin, Naomi; Turner, Damian; Camp, Philip; Thome, Joseph J. C.; Bickham, Kara L.; Lerner, Harvey; Goldstein, Michael; Sykes, Megan; Kato, Tomoaki; Farber, Donna L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Knowledge of human T cells derives chiefly from studies of peripheral blood, whereas their distribution and function in tissues remains largely unknown. Here, we present a unique analysis of human T cells in lymphoid and mucosal tissues obtained from individual organ donors, revealing tissue-intrinsic compartmentalization of naive, effector and memory subsets conserved between diverse individuals. Effector-memory CD4+ T cells producing IL-2 predominated in mucosal tissues and accumulated as central-memory subsets in lymphoid tissue, whereas CD8+ T cells were maintained as naïve subsets in lymphoid tissues and IFN-γ-producing effector-memory CD8+ T cells in mucosal sites. The T cell activation marker, CD69, was constitutively expressed by memory T cells in all tissues, distinguishing them from circulating subsets, with mucosal memory T cells exhibiting additional distinct phenotypic and functional properties. Our results provide an assessment of human T cell compartmentalization as a new baseline for understanding human adaptive immunity. PMID:23260195

  20. Human endothelial cells enhance human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in CD4+ T cells in a Nef-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaehyuk; Walker, Jason; Boichuk, Sergei; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy; Torpey, Nicholas; Pober, Jordan S; Alexander, Louis

    2005-01-01

    Infected CD4+ T cells are the primary sites of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in vivo. However, signals from professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells and macrophages, greatly enhance HIV-1 replication in T cells. Here, we report that in cocultures, vascular endothelial cells (ECs), which in humans can also serve as APCs, can enhance HIV-1 production of both CCR5- and CXCR4-utilizing strains approximately 50,000-fold. The observed HIV-1 replication enhancement conferred by ECs occurred only in memory CD4+ T cells, required expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules by the ECs, and could not be conferred by fixed ECs, all of which are consistent with a requirement for EC-mediated T-cell activation via T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Deletion of nef (Nef-) decreased HIV-1 production by approximately 100-fold in T cells cocultured with ECs but had no effect on virus production in T cells cocultured with professional APCs or fibroblasts induced to express MHC-II. Human ECs do not express B7 costimulators, but Nef- replication in CD4(+)-T-cell and EC cocultures could not be rescued by anti-CD28 antibody. ECs act in trans to enhance wild-type but not Nef- replication and facilitate enhanced wild-type replication in naive T cells when added to T-cell or B-lymphoblastoid cell cocultures, suggesting that ECs also provide a TCR-independent signal to infected T cells. Consistent with these in vitro observations, wild-type HIV-1 replicated 30- to 50-fold more than Nef- in human T cells infiltrating allogeneic human skin grafts on human huPBL-SCID/bg mice, an in vivo model of T-cell activation by ECs. Our studies suggest that ECs, which line the entire cardiovascular system and are, per force, in frequent contact with memory CD4+ T cells, provide signals to HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells to greatly enhance HIV-1 production in a Nef-dependent manner, a mechanism that could contribute to the

  1. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34+ human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary. PMID:27034390

  2. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34(+)human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary.

  3. Retargeting T cells to GD2 pentasaccharide on human tumors using bispecific humanized antibody

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Cheng, Ming; Guo, Hongfen; Chen, Yuedan; Huse, Morgan; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-disialoganglioside GD2 IgG antibodies have shown clinical efficacy in solid tumors that lack human leukocyte antigens (e.g. neuroblastoma) by relying on Fc-dependent cytotoxicity. However, there are pain side effects secondary to complement activation. T-cell retargeting bispecific antibodies (BsAb) also have clinical potential, but it is thus far only effective against liquid tumors. In this study, a fully humanized hu3F8-BsAb was developed, in which the anti-CD3 huOKT3 single chain Fv fragment (ScFv) was linked to the carboxyl end of the anti-GD2 hu3F8 IgG1 light chain, and was aglycosylated at N297 of Fc to prevent complement activation and cytokine storm. In vitro, hu3F8-BsAb activated T cells through classic immunological synapses, inducing GD2-specific tumor cytotoxicity at femtomolar EC50 with >105-fold selectivity over normal tissues, releasing Th1 cytokines (TNFα, IFNγ and IL2) when GD2(+) tumors were present. In separate murine neuroblastoma and melanoma xenograft models, intravenous hu3F8-BsAb activated T cells in situ and recruited intravenous T cells for tumor ablation, significantly prolonging survival from local recurrence or from metastatic disease. Hu3F8-BsAb, but not control BsAb, drove T cells and monocytes to infiltrate tumor stroma. These monocytes were necessary for sustained T-cell proliferation and/or survival and contributed significantly to the antitumor effect. The in vitro and in vivo antitumor properties of hu3F8-BsAb and its safety profile support its further clinical development as a cancer therapeutic, and provide the rationale for exploring aglycosylated IgG-scFv as a structural platform for retargeting human T cells. PMID:25542634

  4. Prostaglandin synthesis in human T cells: its partial inhibition by lectins and anti-CD3 antibodies as a possible step in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Aussel, C; Mary, D; Fehlmann, M

    1987-05-15

    The human leukemic T cell line Jurkat was used to study arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism. We demonstrated that Jurkat cells are able to convert AA into prostaglandins (PG) and thromboxanes. The presence of tritiated 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGE2, PGA2 (B2), and thromboxane B2 in the culture medium was shown either by thin-layer chromatography after a 4-hr incubation period of [3H]AA-prelabeled Jurkat cells or by using specific radioimmuno assays. PG synthesis was inhibited by both indomethacin and niflumic acid, two cyclooxygenase inhibitors. AA metabolism through the cyclooxygenase pathway was followed during T cell activation. T cells were activated by lectins or anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to trigger the T3-Ti complex and by 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) to mimic IL 1-dependent pathways. Our results show that lectins and anti-CD3 mAb both reduce the amount of PG released by the cells, whereas TPA did not. We confirmed that a combination of TPA and lectins or TPA and anti-CD3 mAb is necessary to obtain full activation of Jurkat cells if this event is monitored by using measurement of IL 2 synthesis. In addition, lectins and anti-CD3 mAb can be replaced by the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin or niflumic acid. Indeed, a combination of TPA and one of these two drugs induced maximal IL 2 synthesis. These results thus suggest that a reduction in PG synthesis might be a prerequisite to allow the cascade of events involved in T cell activation.

  5. Molecular basis of cross-reactivity among allergen-specific human T cells: T-cell receptor V alpha gene usage and epitope structure.

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, S S; Mohapatra, S; Yang, M; Ansari, A A; Parronchi, P; Maggi, E; Romagnani, S

    1994-01-01

    Cross-reactivities between the major grass pollen allergens, at the level of T-cell recognition was examined employing several Lolium perenne I (Lol p I)-specific human T-cell clones. Nine of these Lol p I-specific T-cell clones exhibited cross-recognition of the recombinant Poa pratensis IX (Poa p IX) allergen, rKBG7.2, indicating that these two major antigens of a grass pollen share T-cell epitopes. Furthermore, proliferative responses of two other T-cell clones demonstrated that individual allergens of diverse grass pollens also possess common T-cell epitopes. Examination of the T-cell receptor (TcR) V alpha genes of these T-cell clones indicated that these cloned cells utilized distinct J alpha genes and that nine out of 10 clones possessed V alpha 13 gene. Furthermore, sequence comparisons of several allergenic molecules indicated that this cross-reactivity may be due to the presence of epitope(s) with structure(s) similar to the major T-cell epitope of Poa p IX allergens. Taken together, these results suggest for the first time that the major grass pollen allergens share cross-reacting T-cell epitope(s), and that this cross-reactivity is due to the structural homologies among allergens and restricted usage of TcR V alpha genes. PMID:7510663

  6. Evaluating Human T-Cell Therapy of Cytomegalovirus Organ Disease in HLA-Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Simone; Klobuch, Sebastian; Podlech, Jürgen; Plachter, Bodo; Hoffmann, Petra; Renzaho, Angelique; Theobald, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can cause severe disease in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although preclinical research in murine models as well as clinical trials have provided 'proof of concept' for infection control by pre-emptive CD8 T-cell immunotherapy, there exists no predictive model to experimentally evaluate parameters that determine antiviral efficacy of human T cells in terms of virus control in functional organs, prevention of organ disease, and host survival benefit. We here introduce a novel mouse model for testing HCMV epitope-specific human T cells. The HCMV UL83/pp65-derived NLV-peptide was presented by transgenic HLA-A2.1 in the context of a lethal infection of NOD/SCID/IL-2rg-/- mice with a chimeric murine CMV, mCMV-NLV. Scenarios of HCMV-seropositive and -seronegative human T-cell donors were modeled by testing peptide-restimulated and T-cell receptor-transduced human T cells, respectively. Upon transfer, the T cells infiltrated host tissues in an epitope-specific manner, confining the infection to nodular inflammatory foci. This resulted in a significant reduction of viral load, diminished organ pathology, and prolonged survival. The model has thus proven its potential for a preclinical testing of the protective antiviral efficacy of HCMV epitope-specific human T cells in the evaluation of new approaches to an immunotherapy of CMV disease. PMID:26181057

  7. The BMP Pathway Participates in Human Naive CD4+ T Cell Activation and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Víctor G.; Sacedón, Rosa; Hidalgo, Laura; Valencia, Jaris; Fernández-Sevilla, Lidia M.; Hernández-López, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) form a group of secreted factors that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily. Among different roles in a number of immune cell types, BMPs are known to regulate T cell development within the thymus, although the role of BMP signaling in human mature T cells remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that canonical BMP signaling is necessary during two critical events that regulate the size and function of human naive CD4+ T cell population: activation and homeostasis. Upon stimulation via TCR, naive CD4+ T cells upregulate the expression of BMP ligands triggering canonical BMP signaling in CD25+ cells. Blockade of BMP signaling severely impairs CD4+ T cell proliferation after activation mainly through regulation of IL-2, since the addition of this cytokine recuperates normal T cell expansion after inhibition of BMP signaling. Similarly, activation of canonical BMP pathway is required for both the maintenance of cell survival and the homeostatic proliferation induced by IL-7, a key factor for T cell homeostasis. Moreover, upregulation of two critical receptors for T cell homeostasis, CXCR4 and CCR9, triggered by IL-7 is also abrogated in the absence of BMP signaling. Collectively, we describe important roles of the canonical BMP signaling in human naive CD4+ T cell activation and homeostasis that could be valuable for clinical application. PMID:26110906

  8. Human γδ T Cells Augment Antigen Presentation in Listeria Monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuli; Wang, Huaishan; Xu, Yi; Hu, Yu; Chen, Hui; Cui, Lianxian; Zhang, Jianmin; He, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Circulating γδ T cells in healthy individuals rapidly respond to bacterial and viral pathogens. Many studies have demonstrated that γδ T cells are activated and expanded by Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes), a foodborne bacterial pathogen with high fatality rates. However, the roles of γδ T cells during L. monocytogenes infection are not clear. In the present study, we characterized the morphological characteristics of phagocytosis in γδ T cells after L. monocytogenes infection using transmission electron microscopy. Results show activation markers including human leucocyte antigen DR (HLA–DR) and lymph node–homing receptor CCR7 on γδ T cells were upregulated after stimulation via L. monocytogenes. Significant proliferation and differentiation of primary αβ T cells was also observed after coculture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with γδ T cells anteriorly stimulated by L. monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes infection decreased the percentage of γδ T cells in mouse intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and increased MHC-II expression on the surface of γδ T cells in vivo. Our findings shed light on antigen presentation of γδ T cells during L. monocytogenes infection. PMID:27652377

  9. Human and Murine Clonal CD8+ T Cell Expansions Arise during Tuberculosis Because of TCR Selection

    PubMed Central

    Nunes-Alves, Cláudio; Booty, Matthew G.; Carpenter, Stephen M.; Rothchild, Alissa C.; Martin, Constance J.; Desjardins, Danielle; Steblenko, Katherine; Kløverpris, Henrik N.; Madansein, Rajhmun; Ramsuran, Duran; Leslie, Alasdair; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Behar, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    The immune system can recognize virtually any antigen, yet T cell responses against several pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, are restricted to a limited number of immunodominant epitopes. The host factors that affect immunodominance are incompletely understood. Whether immunodominant epitopes elicit protective CD8+ T cell responses or instead act as decoys to subvert immunity and allow pathogens to establish chronic infection is unknown. Here we show that anatomically distinct human granulomas contain clonally expanded CD8+ T cells with overlapping T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires. Similarly, the murine CD8+ T cell response against M. tuberculosis is dominated by TB10.44-11-specific T cells with extreme TCRβ bias. Using a retrogenic model of TB10.44-11-specific CD8+ T cells, we show that TCR dominance can arise because of competition between clonotypes driven by differences in affinity. Finally, we demonstrate that TB10.4-specific CD8+ T cells mediate protection against tuberculosis, which requires interferon-γ production and TAP1-dependent antigen presentation in vivo. Our study of how immunodominance, biased TCR repertoires, and protection are inter-related, provides a new way to measure the quality of T cell immunity, which if applied to vaccine evaluation, could enhance our understanding of how to elicit protective T cell immunity. PMID:25945999

  10. Major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted cytolytic activity of human T cells: analysis of precursor frequency and effector phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.S.; Thiele, D.L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1987-12-01

    The frequency and phenotype of human T cells that mediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted cytolysis were analyzed. T cell clones were generated by culturing adherent cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a density of 0.3 cell/well with phytohemagglutinin, recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), and irradiated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and/or Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. All of the 198 clones generated by this method were T cells (CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD4/sup +/ or CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD8/sup +/) that possessed potent lytic activity against K562, an erythroleukemia line sensitive to lysis by human natural killer cells, and Cur, a renal carcinoma cell line resistant to human natural killer activity. Cytolysis, measured by /sup 51/Cr release, was MHC-unrestricted, since the clones were able to lyse MHC class I or class II negative targets, as well as MHC class I and class II negative targets. Although the clones produced tissue necrosis factor/lymphotoxin-like molecules, lysis of Cur of K562 was not mediated by a soluble factor secreted by the clones. These data indicate that the capacity for MHC-unrestricted tumoricidal activity and expression of NKH1 and CD11b, but not CD 16, are properties common to all or nearly all human peripheral blood-derived T cell clones regardless of CD4 or CD8 phenotype.

  11. Inhibition of altered peptide ligand-mediated antagonism of human GAD65-responsive CD4+ T cells by non-antagonizable T cells.

    PubMed

    Gebe, John A; Masewicz, Susan A; Kochik, Sharon A; Reijonen, Helena; Nepom, Gerald T

    2004-12-01

    Altered peptide ligands derived from T cell-reactive self antigens have been shown to be protective therapeutic agents in animal models of autoimmunity. In this study we identified several altered peptide ligands derived from the type 1 diabetes-associated autoantigen human glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (hGAD65) epitope that were capable of antagonizing a subset of a panel of human CD4(+) GAD65 (555-567)-responsive T cell clones derived from a diabetic individual. While no altered peptide ligand was able to antagonize all six clones in the T cell panel, a single-substituted peptide of isoleucine to methionine at position 561, which resides at the TCR contact p5 position, was able to antagonize five out of the six hGAD65-responsive clones. In a mixed T cell culture system we observed that altered peptide ligand-mediated antagonism is inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the presence of non-antagonizable hGAD65 (555-567)-responsive T cells. From an analysis of the cytokines present in the mixed T cell cultures, interleukin-2 was sufficient to inhibit altered peptide ligand-induced antagonism. The inhibition of altered peptide ligand-mediated antagonism of self-antigen-responsive T cells by non-antagonizable T cells has implications in altered peptide ligand therapy where T cell antagonism is the goal.

  12. Antigen-Presenting Human γδ T Cells Promote Intestinal CD4(+) T Cell Expression of IL-22 and Mucosal Release of Calprotectin.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Christopher J; McCarthy, Neil E; Lindsay, James O; Stagg, Andrew J; Moser, Bernhard; Eberl, Matthias

    2017-03-22

    The cytokine IL-22 plays a critical role in mucosal barrier defense, but the mechanisms that promote IL-22 expression in the human intestine remain poorly understood. As human microbe-responsive Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells are abundant in the gut and recognize microbiota-associated metabolites, we assessed their potential to induce IL-22 expression by intestinal CD4(+) T cells. Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells with characteristics of APCs were generated from human blood and intestinal organ cultures, then cocultured with naive and memory CD4(+) T cells obtained from human blood or the colon. The potency of blood and intestinal γδ T-APCs was compared with that of monocytes and dendritic cells, by assessing CD4(+) T cell phenotypes and proliferation as well as cytokine and transcription factor profiles. Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells in human blood, colon, and terminal ileum acquired APC functions upon microbial activation in the presence of microenvironmental signals including IL-15, and were capable of polarizing both blood and colonic CD4(+) T cells toward distinct effector fates. Unlike monocytes or dendritic cells, gut-homing γδ T-APCs employed an IL-6 independent mechanism to stimulate CD4(+) T cell expression of IL-22 without upregulating IL-17. In human intestinal organ cultures, microbial activation of Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells promoted mucosal secretion of IL-22 and ICOSL/TNF-α-dependent release of the IL-22 inducible antimicrobial protein calprotectin without modulating IL-17 expression. In conclusion, human γδ T-APCs stimulate CD4(+) T cell responses distinct from those induced by myeloid APCs to promote local barrier defense via mucosal release of IL-22 and calprotectin. Targeting of γδ T-APC functions may lead to the development of novel gut-directed immunotherapies and vaccines.

  13. Antigen-Presenting Human γδ T Cells Promote Intestinal CD4+ T Cell Expression of IL-22 and Mucosal Release of Calprotectin

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Christopher J.; McCarthy, Neil E.; Lindsay, James O.; Moser, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The cytokine IL-22 plays a critical role in mucosal barrier defense, but the mechanisms that promote IL-22 expression in the human intestine remain poorly understood. As human microbe–responsive Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells are abundant in the gut and recognize microbiota-associated metabolites, we assessed their potential to induce IL-22 expression by intestinal CD4+ T cells. Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells with characteristics of APCs were generated from human blood and intestinal organ cultures, then cocultured with naive and memory CD4+ T cells obtained from human blood or the colon. The potency of blood and intestinal γδ T-APCs was compared with that of monocytes and dendritic cells, by assessing CD4+ T cell phenotypes and proliferation as well as cytokine and transcription factor profiles. Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells in human blood, colon, and terminal ileum acquired APC functions upon microbial activation in the presence of microenvironmental signals including IL-15, and were capable of polarizing both blood and colonic CD4+ T cells toward distinct effector fates. Unlike monocytes or dendritic cells, gut-homing γδ T-APCs employed an IL-6 independent mechanism to stimulate CD4+ T cell expression of IL-22 without upregulating IL-17. In human intestinal organ cultures, microbial activation of Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells promoted mucosal secretion of IL-22 and ICOSL/TNF-α–dependent release of the IL-22 inducible antimicrobial protein calprotectin without modulating IL-17 expression. In conclusion, human γδ T-APCs stimulate CD4+ T cell responses distinct from those induced by myeloid APCs to promote local barrier defense via mucosal release of IL-22 and calprotectin. Targeting of γδ T-APC functions may lead to the development of novel gut-directed immunotherapies and vaccines. PMID:28330898

  14. CTLA4 mediates antigen-specific apoptosis of human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gribben, J G; Freeman, G J; Boussiotis, V A; Rennert, P; Jellis, C L; Greenfield, E; Barber, M; Restivo, V A; Ke, X; Gray, G S

    1995-01-01

    The regulation of T cell-mediated immune responses requires a balance between amplification and generation of effector function and subsequent selective termination by clonal deletion. Although apoptosis of previously activated T cells can be induced by signaling of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, these molecules do not appear to regulate T-cell clonal deletion in an antigen-specific fashion. We demonstrate that cross-linking of the inducible T-cell surface molecule CTLA4 can mediate apoptosis of previously activated human T lymphocytes. This function appears to be antigen-restricted, since a concomitant signal T-cell receptor signal is required. Regulation of this pathway may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to delete antigen-specific activated T cells. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7846057

  15. Human CD4−8− T cells are a distinctive immunoregulatory subset

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mei-Chuan; Patel, Kalpesh; Taub, Dennis D.; Longo, Dan L.; Goetzl, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Human CD4−8− T cells are a minor subset quantitatively but potentially important in immunity because they are predominantly distributed at body surfaces, and their number and activities increase in autoimmune diseases and decrease with aging. Distinguishing characteristics of CD4−8− T cells are found to include a unique profile of cytokines, including Serpin E1, which is not generated by other T cells, MIF, and TGF-β. At 2–5% of the total in mixtures with CD4 + CD8 T cells, CD4−8− T cells enhance the generation of IFN-γ and IL-17 by up to 12- and 5-fold, respectively, without contributing either cytokine or affecting cytokine production by NK/NKT cells. CD4−8− T cell-derived MIF is their major enhancer and TGFβ their principal inhibitor of CD4 and CD8 T cell cytokine production. Decreases in CD4−8− T cell effects may diminish protective immunity in aging, whereas increases may augment the severity of autoimmune diseases.—Huang, M.-C., Patel, K., Taub, D. D., Longo, D. L., Goetzl, E. J. Human CD4−8− T cells are a distinctive immunoregulatory subset. PMID:20154266

  16. Evidence for a stepwise program of extrathymic T cell development within the human tonsil

    PubMed Central

    McClory, Susan; Hughes, Tiffany; Freud, Aharon G.; Briercheck, Edward L.; Martin, Chelsea; Trimboli, Anthony J.; Yu, Jianhua; Zhang, Xiaoli; Leone, Gustavo; Nuovo, Gerard; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of a broad repertoire of T cells, which is essential for effective immune function, occurs in the thymus. Although some data suggest that T cell development can occur extrathymically, many researchers remain skeptical that extrathymic T cell development has an important role in generating the T cell repertoire in healthy individuals. However, it may be important in the setting of poor thymic function or congenital deficit and in the context of autoimmunity, cancer, or regenerative medicine. Here, we report evidence that a stepwise program of T cell development occurs within the human tonsil. We identified 5 tonsillar T cell developmental intermediates: (a) CD34+CD38dimLin– cells, which resemble multipotent progenitors in the bone marrow and thymus; (b) more mature CD34+CD38brightLin– cells; (c) CD34+CD1a+CD11c– cells, which resemble committed T cell lineage precursors in the thymus; (d) CD34–CD1a+CD3–CD11c– cells, which resemble CD4+CD8+ double-positive T cells in the thymus; and (e) CD34–CD1a+CD3+CD11c– cells. The phenotype of each subset closely resembled that of its thymic counterpart. The last 4 populations expressed RAG1 and PTCRA, genes required for TCR rearrangement, and all 5 subsets were capable of ex vivo T cell differentiation. TdT+ cells found within the tonsillar fibrous scaffold expressed CD34 and/or CD1a, indicating that this distinct anatomic region contributes to pre–T cell development, as does the subcapsular region of the thymus. Thus, we provide evidence of a role for the human tonsil in a comprehensive program of extrathymic T cell development. PMID:22378041

  17. Involvement of the TCL5 gene on human chromosome 1 in T-cell leukemia and melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, L.R.; Kagan, J.; Christopher, G.; Kurtzberg, J.; Hershfield, M.S.; Nowell, P.C.; Croce, C.M. )

    1989-07-01

    The authors analyzed a t(1;14)(p32;q11) chromosomal translocation in a human lymphohemopoietic stem cell line derived from a patient with acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia. The chromosomal joining on the 1p+ chromosome occurred at the T-cell receptor {delta} diversity (D{delta}{sub 2}) segment, and the reciprocal chromosomal joining on the 14q-chromosome occurred at the T-cell {delta} diversity segment D{delta}{sub 1}. The involvement of {delta} diversity segments at the translocation junction suggests that the translocation occurred during an attempt at D{delta}{sub 1}-D{delta}{sub 2} joining in a stem cell. The segment of chromosome 1 at band p32, adjacent to the chromosomal breakpoint, encodes a transcriptional unit designated TCL5 (T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 5). The differential expression of the TCL5 RNA transcripts in this lymphohemopoietic stem cell line relative to several other T- and B-cell lines suggests that TCL5 gene expression is an integral event in the pathogenesis of the T-cell leukemia. Rearrangement of the TCL5 locus in a human melanoma cell line carrying a del(1p32) further implies that the TCL5 gene may play a role in malignant transformation.

  18. DOCK8 deficiency impairs CD8 T cell survival and function in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Katrina L.; Chan, Stephanie S.-Y.; Ma, Cindy S.; Fung, Ivan; Mei, Yan; Yabas, Mehmet; Tan, Andy; Arkwright, Peter D.; Al Suwairi, Wafaa; Lugo Reyes, Saul Oswaldo; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco A.; de la Luz Garcia-Cruz, Maria; Smart, Joanne M.; Picard, Capucine; Okada, Satoshi; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Lambe, Teresa; Cornall, Richard J.; Russell, Sarah; Oliaro, Jane; Tangye, Stuart G.; Bertram, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    In humans, DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome is characterized by severe cutaneous viral infections. Thus, CD8 T cell function may be compromised in the absence of DOCK8. In this study, by analyzing mutant mice and humans, we demonstrate a critical, intrinsic role for DOCK8 in peripheral CD8 T cell survival and function. DOCK8 mutation selectively diminished the abundance of circulating naive CD8 T cells in both species, and in DOCK8-deficient humans, most CD8 T cells displayed an exhausted CD45RA+CCR7− phenotype. Analyses in mice revealed the CD8 T cell abnormalities to be cell autonomous and primarily postthymic. DOCK8 mutant naive CD8 T cells had a shorter lifespan and, upon encounter with antigen on dendritic cells, exhibited poor LFA-1 synaptic polarization and a delay in the first cell division. Although DOCK8 mutant T cells underwent near-normal primary clonal expansion after primary infection with recombinant influenza virus in vivo, they showed greatly reduced memory cell persistence and recall. These findings highlight a key role for DOCK8 in the survival and function of human and mouse CD8 T cells. PMID:22006977

  19. Generation of mature T cells from human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in artificial thymic organoids

    PubMed Central

    Seet, Christopher S.; He, Chongbin; Bethune, Michael T.; Li, Suwen; Chick, Brent; Gschweng, Eric H.; Zhu, Yuhua; Kim, Kenneth; Kohn, Donald B.; Baltimore, David; Crooks, Gay M.; Montel-Hagen, Amélie

    2017-01-01

    Studies of human T cell development require robust model systems that recapitulate the full span of thymopoiesis, from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) through to mature T cells. Existing in vitro models induce T cell commitment from human HSPCs; however, differentiation into mature CD3+TCRab+ single positive (SP) CD8+ or CD4+ cells is limited. We describe here a serum-free, artificial thymic organoid (ATO) system that supports highly efficient and reproducible in vitro differentiation and positive selection of conventional human T cells from all sources of HSPCs. ATO-derived T cells exhibited mature naïve phenotypes, a diverse TCR repertoire, and TCR-dependent function. ATOs initiated with TCR-engineered HSPCs produced T cells with antigen specific cytotoxicity and near complete lack of endogenous TCR Vβ expression, consistent with allelic exclusion of Vβ loci. ATOs provide a robust tool for studying human T cell development and stem cell based approaches to engineered T cell therapies. PMID:28369043

  20. Human CD8+ T cells mediate protective immunity induced by a human malaria vaccine in human immune system mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangming; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Min; Funakoshi, Ryota; Sheetij, Dutta; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Crisanti, Andrea; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-08-31

    A number of studies have shown that CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in a mouse model. However, whether human CD8+ T cells play a role in protection against malaria remains unknown. We recently established human immune system (HIS) mice harboring functional human CD8+ T cells (HIS-CD8 mice) by transduction with HLA-A∗0201 and certain human cytokines using recombinant adeno-associated virus-based gene transfer technologies. These HIS-CD8 mice mount a potent, antigen-specific HLA-A∗0201-restricted human CD8+ T-cell response upon immunization with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a human malaria antigen, the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), termed AdPfCSP. In the present study, we challenged AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice with transgenic Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing full-length PfCSP and found that AdPfCSP-immunized (but not naïve) mice were protected against subsequent malaria challenge. The level of the HLA-A∗0201-restricted, PfCSP-specific human CD8+ T-cell response was closely correlated with the level of malaria protection. Furthermore, depletion of human CD8+ T cells from AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice almost completely abolished the anti-malaria immune response. Taken together, our data show that human CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in vivo.

  1. A Diverse Repertoire of CD4 T Cells Targets the Immediate-Early 1 Protein of Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Ameres, Stefanie; Liang, Xiaoling; Wiesner, Martina; Mautner, Josef; Moosmann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    T-cell responses to the immediate-early 1 (IE-1) protein of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are associated with protection from viral disease. Thus, IE-1 is a promising target for immunotherapy. CD8 T-cell responses to IE-1 are generally strong. In contrast, CD4 T-cell responses to IE-1 were described to be comparatively infrequent or undetectable in HCMV carriers, and information on their target epitopes and their function has been limited. To analyze the repertoire of IE-1-specific CD4 T cells, we expanded them from healthy donors with autologous IE-1-expressing mini-Epstein–Barr virus-transformed B-cell lines and established IE-1-specific CD4 T-cell clones. Clones from seven out of seven HCMV-positive donors recognized endogenously processed IE-1 epitopes restricted through HLA-DR, DQ, or DP. Three to seven IE-1 epitopes were recognized per donor. Cumulatively, about 27 different HLA/peptide class II complexes were recognized by 117 IE-1-specific clones. Our results suggest that a highly diversified repertoire of IE-1-specific CD4 T cells targeting multiple epitopes is usually present in healthy HCMV carriers. Therefore, multiepitope approaches to immunomonitoring and immunotherapy will make optimal use of this potentially important class of HCMV-specific effector cells. PMID:26635812

  2. Human T cell priming assay: depletion of peripheral blood lymphocytes in CD25(+) cells improves the in vitro detection of weak allergen-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Vocanson, Marc; Achachi, Amine; Mutez, Virginie; Cluzel-Tailhardat, Magalie; Varlet, Béatrice Le; Rozières, Aurore; Fournier, Philippe; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    To develop an in vitro assay that recapitulates the key event of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), that is the priming of effector T cells by hapten-presenting dendritic cells, and then allows for the sensitive detection of chemical allergens represents a major challenge. Classical human T cell priming assays (hTCPA) that have been developed in the past, using hapten-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) as antigen-presenting cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) as responding cells, were not efficient to prime T cells to common allergens with moderate/weak sensitizing properties. Recent progress in the understanding of the effector and regulatory mechanisms of ACD have shown that T cell priming requires efficient uptake of allergens by immunogenic DCs and that it is controlled by several subsets of regulatory cells including CD25(+) Tregs. We therefore analyzed various parameters involved in allergen-specific T cell activation in vitro and showed that priming of allergen-specific T cells is hampered by several subsets of immune cells comprising CD1a(neg) DCs, CD25(+) T cells, and CD56(+) regulatory cells.CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs prevented the in vitro T cell priming to moderate/weak allergens, and depletion of human PBLs in CD25(+) cells significantly increased specific T cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. CD56(+) cells exerted an additional control of T cell priming since co-depletion of both CD56(+) and CD25(+) cells improved the magnitude of chemical-specific T cell activation. Finally, CD1a(low) MDDCs were able to inhibit T cell activation obtained by allergen-pulsed CD1a(high) MDDC. Moreover, we showed that uptake by DC of allergen-encapsulated nanoparticles significantly increased their activation status and their ability to prompt specific T cell activation. Hence, by combining the different strategies, i.e., depletion of CD25(+) and CD56(+) cells, use of CD1a(high) MDDC, and nanoparticle encapsulation of allergens, it was

  3. In situ depletion of CD4+ T cells in human skin by Zanolimumab.

    PubMed

    Villadsen, L S; Skov, L; Dam, T N; Dagnaes-Hansen, F; Rygaard, J; Schuurman, J; Parren, P W H I; van de Winkel, J G J; Baadsgaard, O

    2007-02-01

    CD4(+) T cells, in activated or malignant form, are involved in a number of diseases including inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis, and T cell lymphomas such as the majority of cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL). Targeting CD4 with an antibody that inhibits and/or eliminates disease-driving T cells in situ may therefore be a useful approach in the treatment of inflammatory and malignant skin diseases. Depletion of CD4(+) T cells in intact inflamed human skin tissue by Zanolimumab, a fully human therapeutic monoclonal antibody (IgG1, kappa) against CD4, was studied in a human psoriasis xenograft mouse model. Zanolimumab treatment was shown to induce a significant reduction in the numbers of inflammatory mononuclear cells in upper dermis. This reduction in inflammatory mononuclear cells in situ was primarily due to a significant reduction in the numbers of skin-infiltrating CD4(+), but not CD8(+) CD3(+) T cells. The capacity of Zanolimumab to deplete the CD4(+) T cells in the skin may be of importance in diseases where CD4(+) T cells play a central role. Indeed, in a phase II clinical trial Zanolimumab has shown a dose-dependent clinical response in patients with CTCL and the antibody is currently in a phase III clinical trial for CTCL, a disease for which there is no safe and effective treatment available today.

  4. No evidence for dualism in function and receptors: PD-L2/B7-DC is an inhibitory regulator of human T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Pfistershammer, Katharina; Klauser, Christoph; Pickl, Winfried F; Stöckl, Johannes; Leitner, Judith; Zlabinger, Gerhard; Majdic, Otto; Steinberger, Peter

    2006-05-01

    The B7 family member programmed-death-1-ligand 2 (PD-L2/B7-DC) is a ligand for programmed-death-receptor 1 (PD-1), a receptor involved in negative regulation of T cell activation. Several independent studies have reported that PD-L2, however, can also potently costimulate murine T cells via an additional yet unidentified receptor. In this study, we evaluated the contribution of PD-L2 to the activation of human T cells using a novel system of engineered T cell stimulators that expresses membrane-bound anti-CD3 antibodies. Analyzing early activation markers, cytokine production and proliferation, we found PD-L2 to consistently inhibit T cell activation. PD-L2 inhibition affected CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and was not abrogated by costimulation via CD28. Blocking PD-1 reverted the inhibitory effect of PD-L2, demonstrating involvement of this pathway. In human T cells, we found no evidence for any of the costimulatory effects described for PD-L2 in murine systems. In line with our functional data that do not point to stimulatory PD-L2-ligands, we show that binding of PD-L2-immunoglobulin to activated human T cells is abrogated by PD-1 antibodies. Our results demonstrate that PD-L2 negatively regulates human T cell activation and thus might be a candidate molecule for immunotherapeutic approaches aimed to attenuate pathological immune responses.

  5. Presentation of an Immunodominant Immediate-Early CD8+ T Cell Epitope Resists Human Cytomegalovirus Immunoevasion

    PubMed Central

    Ameres, Stefanie; Mautner, Josef; Schlott, Fabian; Neuenhahn, Michael; Busch, Dirk H.; Plachter, Bodo; Moosmann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Control of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) depends on CD8+ T cell responses that are shaped by an individual's repertoire of MHC molecules. MHC class I presentation is modulated by a set of HCMV-encoded proteins. Here we show that HCMV immunoevasins differentially impair T cell recognition of epitopes from the same viral antigen, immediate-early 1 (IE-1), that are presented by different MHC class I allotypes. In the presence of immunoevasins, HLA-A- and HLA-B-restricted T cell clones were ineffective, but HLA-C*0702-restricted T cell clones recognized and killed infected cells. Resistance of HLA-C*0702 to viral immunoevasins US2 and US11 was mediated by the alpha3 domain and C-terminal region of the HLA heavy chain. In healthy donors, HLA-C*0702-restricted T cells dominated the T cell response to IE-1. The same HLA-C allotype specifically protected infected cells from attack by NK cells that expressed a corresponding HLA-C-specific KIR. Thus, allotype-specific viral immunoevasion allows HCMV to escape control by NK cells and HLA-A- and HLA-B-restricted T cells, while the virus becomes selectively vulnerable to an immunodominant population of HLA-C-restricted T cells. Our work identifies a T cell population that may be of particular efficiency in HCMV-specific immunotherapy. PMID:23717207

  6. Identification and Phylogeny of the First T Cell Epitope Identified from a Human Gut Bacteroides Species

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Muñoz, Maria Elisa; Joglekar, Payal; Shen, Yi-Ji; Chang, Kuan Y.; Peterson, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Host T cell reactivity toward gut bacterial epitopes has been recognized as part of disease pathogenesis. However, the specificity of T cells that recognize this vast number of epitopes has not yet been well described. After colonizing a C57BL/6J germ-free mouse with the human gut symbiotic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, we isolated a T cell that recognized these bacteria in vitro. Using this T cell, we mapped the first known non-carbohydrate T cell epitope within the phylum Bacteroidetes. The T cell also reacted to two other additional Bacteroides species. We identified the peptide that stimulated the T cell by using a genetic approach. Genomic data from the epitope-positive and epitope-negative bacteria explain the cross-reactivity of the T cell to multiple species. This epitope degeneracy should shape our understanding of the T cell repertoire stimulated by the complex microbiome residing in the gastrointestinal tract in both healthy and disease states. PMID:26637014

  7. Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type I Infection Among Female Sex Workers in Peru

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Human T cell lymphotropic vi ru5’ type I infection 5. FUNDING NUMBERS PR - V?44631051-29 6...SIGNIFICANT NUMB3ER OF PAGES WHICH DO NOT REPRODUCE LEGIBLY, 1 .4 4) 2 Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type I Infection amnong Female Sex Workers in Peru...suribodies to human i~nmwsuodskleuy ~virs, humsin T cell- lymphottopic viuzs type I (HTLV.X), Tmponeneo poflidim, C frackomoiis. berpee slitplex vsirus- typo

  8. The inhibitory effects of mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan and polysaccharides upon polyclonal and monoclonal human T cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, C; Mehlert, A; Lamb, J

    1988-01-01

    Lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was able to inhibit antigen induced T cell proliferation of human CD4+ T cell clones specific for influenza virus. The inhibitory effect was also present when peripheral human T cells were stimulated with crude mycobacterial antigen extracts. Non-specific T cell stimulation, i.e. IL-2, PHA and anti-CD3 antibodies coupled to beads, was not affected. The inhibitory property was also found when arabinomannan and arabinogalactan of mycobacterial origin were tested but not with other unrelated polysaccharides used as controls. The effect appears to be related to the processing of the antigen by the antigen-presenting cells, since it was evident when T cell clones were stimulated with whole virus, whereas stimulation with a synthetic peptide containing the relevant epitope was not inhibitable. PMID:3147152

  9. Human leucocyte antigen class I‐redirected anti‐tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, M. P.; Dolton, G. M.; Gerry, A. B.; Brewer, J. E.; Bennett, A. D.; Pumphrey, N. J.; Jakobsen, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary CD4+ T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour‐specific CD4+ T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low‐affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4+ T cells with tumour‐specific HLA class I‐restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co‐receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4+ cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing wild‐type and a range of affinity‐enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201‐restricted NY‐ESO‐1‐ and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4+ T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4+ T cells than CD8+ T cells. These results indicate that the CD4+ T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8+ T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. PMID:27324616

  10. Growth dynamics and cyclin expression in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Biskup, Edyta; Manfé, Valentina; Kamstrup, Maria R.; Gniadecki, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated cell growth dynamics and cyclins B1 and E expression in cell lines derived from mycosis fungoides (MyLa), Sézary syndrome (SeAx), and CD30+ lympho-proliferative diseases (Mac1, Mac2a, JK). Mac1 and Mac2a had the highest growth rate (doubling time 18–28 h, >90% cycling cells) whereas SeAx was proliferating slowly (doubling time 55 h, approximately 35% cycling cells). Expression of cyclin B1 correlated positively with doubling time whereas expression of cyclin E was unscheduled and constant across the investigated cell lines. All cell lines exhibited high expression of PCNA. Thus, we concluded that cyclin B1 could be used for rapid screening of cell proliferation in malignant lymphocytes derived from cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. PMID:25386244

  11. Recombinant Ad35 adenoviral proteins as potent modulators of human T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Joanne; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André; Astier, Anne L

    2015-01-01

    The protein CD46 protects cells from complement attack by regulating cleavage of C3b and C3d. CD46 also regulates the adaptive immune response by controlling T-cell activation and differentiation. Co-engagement of the T-cell receptor and CD46 notably drives T-cell differentiation by switching production of interferon-γ to secretion of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. This regulatory pathway is altered in several chronic inflammatory diseases, highlighting its key role for immune homeostasis. The manipulation of the CD46 pathway may therefore provide a powerful means to regulate immune responses. Herein, we investigated the effect of recombinant proteins derived from the fibre knob of the adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35) that uses CD46 as its entry receptor, on human T-cell activation. We compared the effects of Ad35K++, engineered to exhibit enhanced affinity to CD46, and of Ad35K−, mutated in the binding site for CD46. Ad35K++ profoundly affects T-cell activation by decreasing the levels of CD46 at the surface of primary T cells, and impairing T-cell co-activation, shown by decreased CD25 expression, reduced proliferation and lower secretion of interleukin-10 and interferon-γ. In contrast, Ad35K− acts a potent co-activator of T cells, enhancing T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. These data show that recombinant Ad35 proteins are potent modulators of human T-cell activation, and support their further development as potential drugs targeting T-cell responses. PMID:25251258

  12. Evidence for a stepwise program of extrathymic T cell development within the human tonsil.

    PubMed

    McClory, Susan; Hughes, Tiffany; Freud, Aharon G; Briercheck, Edward L; Martin, Chelsea; Trimboli, Anthony J; Yu, Jianhua; Zhang, Xiaoli; Leone, Gustavo; Nuovo, Gerard; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2012-04-01

    The development of a broad repertoire of T cells, which is essential for effective immune function, occurs in the thymus. Although some data suggest that T cell development can occur extrathymically, many researchers remain skeptical that extrathymic T cell development has an important role in generating the T cell repertoire in healthy individuals. However, it may be important in the setting of poor thymic function or congenital deficit and in the context of autoimmunity, cancer, or regenerative medicine. Here, we report evidence that a stepwise program of T cell development occurs within the human tonsil. We identified 5 tonsillar T cell developmental intermediates: (a) CD34⁺CD38dimLin⁻ cells, which resemble multipotent progenitors in the bone marrow and thymus; (b) more mature CD34⁺CD38brightLin⁻ cells; (c) CD34⁺CD1a⁺CD11c⁻ cells, which resemble committed T cell lineage precursors in the thymus; (d) CD34⁻CD1a⁺CD3⁻CD11c⁻ cells, which resemble CD4⁺CD8⁺ double-positive T cells in the thymus; and (e) CD34⁻CD1a⁺CD3⁺CD11c⁻ cells. The phenotype of each subset closely resembled that of its thymic counterpart. The last 4 populations expressed RAG1 and PTCRA, genes required for TCR rearrangement, and all 5 subsets were capable of ex vivo T cell differentiation. TdT⁺ cells found within the tonsillar fibrous scaffold expressed CD34 and/or CD1a, indicating that this distinct anatomic region contributes to pre-T cell development, as does the subcapsular region of the thymus. Thus, we provide evidence of a role for the human tonsil in a comprehensive program of extrathymic T cell development.

  13. Grouping annotations on the subcellular layered interactome demonstrates enhanced autophagy activity in a recurrent experimental autoimmune uveitis T cell line.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiuzhi; Li, Jingbo; Shi, Dejing; Zhao, Yu; Dong, Yucui; Ju, Huanyu; Yang, Jinfeng; Sun, Jianhua; Li, Xia; Ren, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Human uveitis is a type of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that often shows relapse-remitting courses affecting multiple biological processes. As a cytoplasmic process, autophagy has been seen as an adaptive response to cell death and survival, yet the link between autophagy and T cell-mediated autoimmunity is not certain. In this study, based on the differentially expressed genes (GSE19652) between the recurrent versus monophasic T cell lines, whose adoptive transfer to susceptible animals may result in respective recurrent or monophasic uveitis, we proposed grouping annotations on a subcellular layered interactome framework to analyze the specific bioprocesses that are linked to the recurrence of T cell autoimmunity. That is, the subcellular layered interactome was established by the Cytoscape and Cerebral plugin based on differential expression, global interactome, and subcellular localization information. Then, the layered interactomes were grouping annotated by the ClueGO plugin based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. The analysis showed that significant bioprocesses with autophagy were orchestrated in the cytoplasmic layered interactome and that mTOR may have a regulatory role in it. Furthermore, by setting up recurrent and monophasic uveitis in Lewis rats, we confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that, in comparison to the monophasic disease, recurrent uveitis in vivo showed significantly increased autophagy activity and extended lymphocyte infiltration to the affected retina. In summary, our framework methodology is a useful tool to disclose specific bioprocesses and molecular targets that can be attributed to a certain disease. Our results indicated that targeted inhibition of autophagy pathways may perturb the recurrence of uveitis.

  14. Generation of functional CD8+ T Cells by human dendritic cells expressing glypican-3 epitopes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glypican 3 (GPC-3) is an oncofoetal protein that is expressed in most hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). Since it is a potential target for T cell immunotherapy, we investigated the generation of functional, GPC-3 specific T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods Dendritic cells (DC) were derived from adherent PBMC cultured at 37°C for 7 days in X-Vivo, 1% autologous plasma, and 800 u/ml GM-CSF plus 500 u/ml IL-4. Immature DC were transfected with 20 μg of in vitro synthesised GPC-3 mRNA by electroporation using the Easy-ject plus system (Equibio, UK) (300 V, 150 μF and 4 ms pulse time), or pulsed with peptide, and subsequently matured with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Six predicted GPC-3 peptide epitopes were synthesized using standard f-moc technology and tested for their binding affinity to HLA-A2.1 molecules using the cell line T2. Results DC transfected with GPC-3 mRNA but not control DC demonstrated strong intracellular staining for GPC-3 and in vitro generated interferon-gamma expressing T cells from autologous PBMC harvested from normal subjects. One peptide, GPC-3522-530 FLAELAYDL, fulfilled our criteria as a naturally processed, HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope: i) it showed high affinity binding to HLA-A2, in T2 cell binding assay; ii) it was generated by the MHC class I processing pathway in DC transfected with GPC-3 mRNA, and iii) HLA-A2 positive DC loaded with the peptide stimulated proliferation in autologous T cells and generated CTL that lysed HLA-A2 and GPC-3 positive target cells. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that electroporation of GPC-3 mRNA is an efficient method to load human monocyte-derived DC with antigen because in vitro they generated GPC-3-reactive T cells that were functional, as shown by interferon-gamma production. Furthermore, this study identified a novel naturally processed, HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope, GPC-3522-530 FLAELAYDL, which can be used to monitor HLA-A2

  15. Sleeping beauty system to redirect T-cell specificity for human applications.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Sourindra N; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Dawson, Margaret; Figliola, Matthew; Olivares, Simon; Rao, Pullavathi; Zhao, Yi Jue; Multani, Asha; Yang, Ge; Zhang, Ling; Crossland, Denise; Ang, Sonny; Torikai, Hiroki; Rabinovich, Brian; Lee, Dean A; Kebriaei, Partow; Hackett, Perry; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-02-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase DNA plasmid system is used to genetically modify cells for long-term transgene expression. We adapted the SB system for human application and generated T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for CD19. Electrotransfer of CD19-specific SB DNA plasmids in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and propagation on CD19 artificial antigen presenting cells was used to numerically expand CD3 T cells expressing CAR. By day 28 of coculture, >90% of expanded CD3 T cells expressed CAR. CAR T cells specifically killed CD19 target cells and consisted of subsets expressing biomarkers consistent with central memory, effector memory, and effector phenotypes. CAR T cells contracted numerically in the absence of the CD19 antigen, did not express SB11 transposase, and maintained a polyclonal TCR Vα and TCR Vβ repertoire. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that CAR T cells preserved the telomere length. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization showed CAR transposon integrated on average once per T-cell genome. CAR T cells in peripheral blood can be detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction at a sensitivity of 0.01%. These findings lay the groundwork as the basis of our first-in-human clinical trials of the nonviral SB system for the investigational treatment of CD19 B-cell malignancies (currently under 3 INDs: 14193, 14577, and 14739).

  16. NKG2D receptor regulates human effector T-cell cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Amorette

    2011-01-01

    Although innate immune signals shape the activation of naive T cells, it is unclear how innate signals influence effector T-cell function. This study determined the effects of stimulating the NKG2D receptor in conjunction with the TCR on human effector CD8+ T cells. Stimulation of CD8+ T cells through CD3 and NKG2D simultaneously or through a chimeric NKG2D receptor, which consists of NKG2D fused to the intracellular region of CD3ζ, activated β-catenin and increased expression of β-catenin–induced genes, whereas T cells stimulated through the TCR or a combination of the TCR and CD28 did not. Activation by TCR and NKG2D prevented expression and production of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10, IL-9, IL-13, and VEGF-α in a β-catenin– and PPARγ- dependent manner. NKG2D stimulation also modulated the cytokine secretion of T cells activated simultaneously through CD3 and CD28. These data indicate that activating CD8+ T cells through the NKG2D receptor along with the TCR modulates signal transduction and the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Thus, human effector T cells alter their function depending on which innate receptors are engaged in conjunction with the TCR complex. PMID:21518928

  17. Sleeping Beauty system to redirect T-cell specificity for human applications

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Sourindra; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Dawson, Margaret; Figliola, Matthew; Olivares, Simon; Rao, Pullavathi; Jue, Yi; Multani, Asha; Yang, Ge; Zhang, Ling; Kellar, Denise; Ang, Sonny; Torikai, Hiroki; Rabinovich, Brian; Lee, Dean A.; Kebriaei, Partow; Hackett, Perry; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2013-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase DNA plasmid system is used to genetically modify cells for long-term transgene expression. We adapted the SB system for human application and generated T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for CD19. Electro-transfer of CD19-specific SB DNA plasmids in PBMC and propagation on CD19+ artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) was used to numerically expand CD3+ T cells expressing CAR. By Day 28 of co-culture >90% of expanded CD3+ T cells expressed CAR. CAR+ T cells specifically killed CD19+ target cells and consisted of subsets expressing biomarkers consistent with central memory, ieffector memory, and effector phenotypes. CAR+ T cells contracted numerically in the absence of CD19 antigen, did not express SB11 transposase, and maintained a polyclonal TCRVα and TCRVβ repertoire. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (Q-FISH) revealed that CAR+ T cells preserved telomere length. Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) and FISH showed CAR transposon integrated on average once per T-cell genome. CAR+ T cells in peripheral blood can be detected by Q-PCR at a sensitivity of 0.01%. These findings lay the groundwork as the basis of our first-in-human clinical trials of the non-viral SB system for the investigational treatment of CD19+ B-cell malignancies (currently under three INDs #: 14193, 14577, and 14739). PMID:23377665

  18. Dual T cell- and B cell-intrinsic deficiency in humans with biallelic RLTPR mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Ma, Cindy S; Ling, Yun; Bousfiha, Aziz; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Jacquot, Serge; Payne, Kathryn; Crestani, Elena; Roncagalli, Romain; Belkadi, Aziz; Kerner, Gaspard; Lorenzo, Lazaro; Deswarte, Caroline; Chrabieh, Maya; Patin, Etienne; Vincent, Quentin B; Müller-Fleckenstein, Ingrid; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Ailal, Fatima; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Fraitag, Sylvie; Alyanakian, Marie-Alexandra; Leruez-Ville, Marianne; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne; Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Malissen, Marie; Malissen, Bernard; Abel, Laurent; Hovnanian, Alain; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Tangye, Stuart G; Béziat, Vivien; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-10-17

    Combined immunodeficiency (CID) refers to inborn errors of human T cells that also affect B cells because of the T cell deficit or an additional B cell-intrinsic deficit. In this study, we report six patients from three unrelated families with biallelic loss-of-function mutations in RLTPR, the mouse orthologue of which is essential for CD28 signaling. The patients have cutaneous and pulmonary allergy, as well as a variety of bacterial and fungal infectious diseases, including invasive tuberculosis and mucocutaneous candidiasis. Proportions of circulating regulatory T cells and memory CD4(+) T cells are reduced. Their CD4(+) T cells do not respond to CD28 stimulation. Their CD4(+) T cells exhibit a "Th2" cell bias ex vivo and when cultured in vitro, contrasting with the paucity of "Th1," "Th17," and T follicular helper cells. The patients also display few memory B cells and poor antibody responses. This B cell phenotype does not result solely from the T cell deficiency, as the patients' B cells fail to activate NF-κB upon B cell receptor (BCR) stimulation. Human RLTPR deficiency is a CID affecting at least the CD28-responsive pathway in T cells and the BCR-responsive pathway in B cells. © 2016 Wang et al.

  19. Neoplastic cells obtained from Hodgkin's disease function as accessory cells for mitogen-induced human T cell proliferative responses.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R I; Bates, S E; Bostick-Bruton, F; Tuteja, N; Diehl, V

    1984-05-01

    Purified human peripheral blood T cells that have been depleted of Ia-bearing cells and adherent cells do not proliferate in response to concanavalin A. The addition of as few as 1% radiated L428 tumor cells restores the proliferative capacity of the T cells. The L428 cell line is a long-term tissue culture line of Reed-Sternberg cells obtained from a patient with Hodgkin's disease. The proliferation of the T cells plus the L428 cells follows the same kinetics and has the same response to varying doses of mitogen as either unfractionated mononuclear leukocytes or purified T cells plus allogeneic adherent cells. The L428 cells are 30 times more potent as accessory cells than allogeneic adherent cells. The accessory cell function of the L428 cells is not blocked in cultures containing anti-Ia antibody. Neither supernatant from the L428 cell cultures nor human IL 1 replaces the accessory cells. The ability of the L428 cells to restore the proliferative capacity of purified T cells isolated from patients with active Hodgkin's disease was also studied. Patients with early stages of the disease had normal proliferative responses in the presence of the L428 accessory cells. However, the proliferative response of the poor prognosis, advanced-stage patients was reduced as compared to age- and sex-matched controls, supporting a deficit in their T cell function. The L428 tumor cells share many properties such as accessory cell function, morphology, and cell surface markers with the dendritic cells described in animal and human systems.

  20. Human CD3+ T-Cells with the Anti-ERBB2 Chimeric Antigen Receptor Exhibit Efficient Targeting and Induce Apoptosis in ERBB2 Overexpressing Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Munisvaradass, Rusheni; Kumar, Suresh; Govindasamy, Chandramohan; Alnumair, Khalid S; Mok, Pooi Ling

    2017-09-08

    Breast cancer is a common malignancy among women. The innate and adaptive immune responses failed to be activated owing to immune modulation in the tumour microenvironment. Decades of scientific study links the overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (ERBB2) antigen with aggressive tumours. The Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) coding for specific tumour-associated antigens could initiate intrinsic T-cell signalling, inducing T-cell activation, and cytotoxic activity without the need for major histocompatibility complex recognition. This renders CAR as a potentially universal immunotherapeutic option. Herein, we aimed to establish CAR in CD3+ T-cells, isolated from human peripheral blood mononucleated cells that could subsequently target and induce apoptosis in the ERBB2 overexpressing human breast cancer cell line, SKBR3. Constructed CAR was inserted into a lentiviral plasmid containing a green fluorescent protein tag and produced as lentiviral particles that were used to transduce activated T-cells. Transduced CAR-T cells were then primed with SKBR3 cells to evaluate their functionality. Results showed increased apoptosis in SKBR3 cells co-cultured with CAR-T cells compared to the control (non-transduced T-cells). This study demonstrates that CAR introduction helps overcome the innate limitations of native T-cells leading to cancer cell apoptosis. We recommend future studies should focus on in vivo cytotoxicity of CAR-T cells against ERBB2 expressing tumours.

  1. ETV6 mutations in early immature human T cell leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Haydu, J. Erika; Rigo, Isaura; Hadler, Michael; Tosello, Valeria; Della Gatta, Giusy; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Wiernik, Peter H.; Luger, Selina M.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Rue, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Early immature T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) account for ∼5–10% of pediatric T-ALLs and are associated with poor prognosis. However, the genetic defects that drive the biology of these tumors remain largely unknown. In this study, analysis of microarray gene expression signatures in adult T-ALL demonstrated a high prevalence of early immature leukemias and revealed a close relationship between these tumors and myeloid leukemias. Many adult immature T-ALLs harbored mutations in myeloid-specific oncogenes and tumor suppressors including IDH1, IDH2, DNMT3A, FLT3, and NRAS. Moreover, we identified ETV6 mutations as a novel genetic lesion uniquely present in immature adult T-ALL. Our results demonstrate that early immature adult T-ALL represents a heterogeneous category of leukemias characterized by the presence of overlapping myeloid and T-ALL characteristics, and highlight the potential role of ETV6 mutations in these tumors. PMID:22162831

  2. An animal model of adult T-cell leukemia: humanized mice with HTLV-1-specific immunity.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Kenta; Xun, Runze; Tei, Mami; Ueno, Takaharu; Tanaka, Masakazu; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-16

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is causally associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy with a poor prognosis. To elucidate ATL pathogenesis in vivo, a variety of animal models have been established; however, the mechanisms driving this disorder remain poorly understood due to deficiencies in each of these animal models. Here, we report a novel HTLV-1-infected humanized mouse model generated by intra-bone marrow injection of human CD133(+) stem cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγc null (NOG) mice (IBMI-huNOG mice). Upon infection, the number of CD4(+) human T cells in the periphery increased rapidly, and atypical lymphocytes with lobulated nuclei resembling ATL-specific flower cells were observed 4 to 5 months after infection. Proliferation was seen in both CD25(-) and CD25(+) CD4 T cells with identical proviral integration sites; however, a limited number of CD25(+)-infected T-cell clones eventually dominated, indicating an association between clonal selection of infected T cells and expression of CD25. Additionally, HTLV-1-specific adaptive immune responses were induced in infected mice and might be involved in the control of HTLV-1-infected cells. Thus, the HTLV-1-infected IBMI-huNOG mouse model successfully recapitulated the development of ATL and may serve as an important tool for investigating in vivo mechanisms of ATL leukemogenesis and evaluating anti-ATL drug and vaccine candidates.

  3. Antibacterial effect of human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lisheng; Kamath, Arati; Das, Hiranmoy; Li, Lin; Bukowski, Jack F.

    2001-01-01

    Vγ2Vδ2 cells, a class of T cells found only in primates, are reactive to nonpeptide organophosphate and alkylamine antigens secreted by bacteria and parasites. These cells make up 2-5% percent of human peripheral blood T cells but expand to make up 8–60% of peripheral blood T cells during bacterial and parasitic infections. We show here, using a chimeric severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse (hu-SCID) model, that human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells mediate resistance to extracellular gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Morganella morganii) bacteria, as assessed by survival, body weight, bacterial loads, and histopathology. Surprisingly, this bacterial resistance was evident 1 day after infection, and bacteria were cleared well before γδ T cell expansion was detected 6 days after infection. Decreased resistance in Vδ2 T cell–depleted hu-SCID mice correlated with decreased serum IFN-γ titers. Intravenous treatment of infected, reconstituted hu-SCID mice with pamidronate, a human Vγ2Vδ2 T cell–specific aminobisphosphonate antigen, markedly increased the in vivo antibacterial effect of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. Therefore, this large pool of antigen-specific, yet immediately reactive memory human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells is likely to be an important mediator of resistance against extracellular bacterial infection and may bridge the gap between innate and acquired immunity. PMID:11696580

  4. The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Rex regulatory protein exhibits an impaired functionality in human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hamaia, S; Cassé, H; Gazzolo, L; Duc Dodon, M

    1997-01-01

    The Rex protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) intervenes in the posttranscriptional regulation of proviral gene expression. Its binding to the Rex response element (XRE) present in the 3' long terminal repeat ensures the coordinate cytoplasmic accumulation of spliced and unspliced forms of viral messengers. Consequently, synthesis of viral structural and enzymatic proteins is strictly dependent on the Rex posttranscriptional activity. Here we report that synthesis of HTLV-1 envelope glycoproteins by Jurkat T cells could be detected only when they were regulated in a Rex-independent manner. Indeed, Jurkat T cells transfected with a Rex-dependent env expression vector (encompassing both the env and pX open reading frames) do not produce significant levels of envelope glycoproteins despite the production of significant amounts of Rex protein. The analysis of levels and distribution patterns of the unspliced env and of the singly spliced tax/rex transcripts suggests that the failure in envelope glycoprotein synthesis may be ascribed to a deficiency of Rex in mediating the nucleocytoplasmic transport of unspliced env RNAs in these cells. Furthermore, despite the synthesis of regulatory proteins, HTLV-1 structural proteins were not detected in Jurkat T cells transfected with an HTLV-1 infectious provirus. Conversely, and as expected, structural proteins were produced by Jurkat cells transfected by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infectious provirus. This phenotype appeared to be linked to a specific dysfunction of Rex, since the functionally equivalent Rev protein of HIV-1 was shown to be fully efficient in promoting the synthesis of HTLV-1 envelope glycoproteins in Jurkat cells. Therefore, it seems likely that the block to Rex function in these lymphoblastoid T cells is determined by inefficient Rex-XRE interactions. These observations suggest that the acquisition of this Rex-deficient phenotype by in vivo-infected HTLV-1 T cells may

  5. Transformation of human T-cell clones by Herpesvirus saimiri: intact antigen recognition by autonomously growing myelin basic protein-specific T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, F; Meinl, E; Drexler, K; Czlonkowska, A; Huber, S; Fickenscher, H; Müller-Fleckenstein, I; Fleckenstein, B; Wekerle, H; Hohlfeld, R

    1993-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri has recently been shown to immortalize human T cells. It was unknown, however, whether Herpesvirus saimiri transformation affects T-cell receptor (TCR) expression and signal transduction. In the present study, we have transformed CD4+ human T-cell clones specific for human myelin basic protein. The transformed T cells were grown in interleukin 2 and divided in the absence of antigen and antigen-presenting cells. They retained the membrane phenotype of activated T cells and secreted the cytokines interferon gamma and lymphotoxin, but interleukin 4 was not detected. Further, the transformed T cells continued to express the original TCR as demonstrated by TCR variable-region-V beta-specific monoclonal antibodies and TCR sequencing. Antigen-specific recognition and signal transduction by the TCR were demonstrated by myelin-basic-protein-induced HLA-DR-restricted secretion of interferon gamma and lymphotoxin and by myelin-basic-protein-specific proliferation. Antigen specificity and reactivity have been maintained for > 1 year after transformation. Transformation with Herpesvirus saimiri now allows the production of virtually unlimited numbers of (auto)antigen-specific T cells expressing functional TCR and a stable membrane phenotype. This technology will facilitate studies of the pathogenesis of putative autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, and may be of help in TCR-targeted immunotherapy. PMID:7504291

  6. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) A*1101-Restricted Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific T-cell Receptor Gene Transfer to Target Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong; Parsonage, Greg; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Machado, Lee R; James, Christine H; Salman, Asmaa; Searle, Peter F; Hui, Edwin P; Chan, Anthony T C; Lee, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Infusing virus-specific T cells is effective treatment for rare Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated posttransplant lymphomas, and more limited success has been reported using this approach to treat a far more common EBV-associated malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, current approaches using EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines to reactivate EBV-specific T cells for infusion take 2 to 3 months of in vitro culture and favor outgrowth of T cells targeting viral antigens expressed within EBV(+) lymphomas, but not in NPC. Here, we explore T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer to rapidly and reliably generate T cells specific for the NPC-associated viral protein LMP2. We cloned a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A*1101-restricted TCR, which would be widely applicable because 40% of NPC patients carry this HLA allele. Studying both the wild-type and modified forms, we have optimized expression of the TCR and demonstrated high-avidity antigen-specific function (proliferation, cytotoxicity, and cytokine release) in both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. The engineered T cells also inhibited LMP2(+) epithelial tumor growth in a mouse model. Furthermore, transduced T cells from patients with advanced NPC lysed LMP2-expressing NPC cell lines. Using this approach, within a few days large numbers of high-avidity LMP2-specific T cells can be generated reliably to treat NPC, thus providing an ideal clinical setting to test TCR gene transfer without the risk of autoimmunity through targeting self-antigens.

  7. T-Cell Receptor/CD28 Engagement When Combined with Prostaglandin E2 Treatment Leads to Potent Activation of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Dumais, Nancy; Paré, Marie-Ève; Mercier, Simon; Bounou, Salim; Marriot, Susan J.; Barbeau, Benoit; Tremblay, Michel J.

    2003-01-01

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is characterized by long latency periods, indicating that viral gene expression is under tight control. There is presently little information available regarding the nature of extracellular stimuli that can transactivate the regulatory elements of HTLV-1 (i.e., long terminal repeat [LTR]). To gain insight into the biological importance of externally induced activation pathways in virus gene expression, primary and established T cells were transfected with HTLV-1-based reporter gene vectors and then were treated with agents that cross-linked the T-cell receptor (TCR) or the costimulatory CD28 molecule with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). We demonstrated that a potent induction of HTLV-1 LTR-driven reporter gene activity was seen only when the three agents were used in combination. Interestingly, similar observations were made when using C91/PL, a cell line that carries integrated HTLV-1 proviral DNA. This TCR-CD28-PGE2-mediated increase in virus transcription was dependent on protein kinase A activation and induction of the cAMP response element binding protein. Experiments with a mutated reporter construct further revealed the importance of the Tax-responsive elements in the HTLV-1 LTR in the observed up regulation of virus gene expression when TCR/CD28 engagement was combined with PGE2 treatment. The protein tyrosine kinases p56lck and the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 were all found to be involved in TCR-CD28-PGE2-directed increase in HTLV-1 LTR activity. This study presents new information on the possible mechanisms underlying reactivation of this retrovirus. PMID:14512564

  8. T-cell receptor/CD28 engagement when combined with prostaglandin E2 treatment leads to potent activation of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Dumais, Nancy; Paré, Marie-Eve; Mercier, Simon; Bounou, Salim; Marriot, Susan J; Barbeau, Benoit; Tremblay, Michel J

    2003-10-01

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is characterized by long latency periods, indicating that viral gene expression is under tight control. There is presently little information available regarding the nature of extracellular stimuli that can transactivate the regulatory elements of HTLV-1 (i.e., long terminal repeat [LTR]). To gain insight into the biological importance of externally induced activation pathways in virus gene expression, primary and established T cells were transfected with HTLV-1-based reporter gene vectors and then were treated with agents that cross-linked the T-cell receptor (TCR) or the costimulatory CD28 molecule with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). We demonstrated that a potent induction of HTLV-1 LTR-driven reporter gene activity was seen only when the three agents were used in combination. Interestingly, similar observations were made when using C91/PL, a cell line that carries integrated HTLV-1 proviral DNA. This TCR-CD28-PGE(2)-mediated increase in virus transcription was dependent on protein kinase A activation and induction of the cAMP response element binding protein. Experiments with a mutated reporter construct further revealed the importance of the Tax-responsive elements in the HTLV-1 LTR in the observed up regulation of virus gene expression when TCR/CD28 engagement was combined with PGE(2) treatment. The protein tyrosine kinases p56(lck) and the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 were all found to be involved in TCR-CD28-PGE(2)-directed increase in HTLV-1 LTR activity. This study presents new information on the possible mechanisms underlying reactivation of this retrovirus.

  9. Multifactorial T-cell hypofunction that is reversible can limit the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor-transduced human T cells in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Moon, Edmund K; Wang, Liang-Chuan; Dolfi, Douglas V; Wilson, Caleph B; Ranganathan, Raghuveer; Sun, Jing; Kapoor, Veena; Scholler, John; Puré, Ellen; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H; Riley, James L; Wherry, E John; Albelda, Steven M

    2014-08-15

    Immunotherapy using vaccines or adoptively transferred tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is limited by T-cell functional inactivation within the solid tumor microenvironment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a similar tumor-induced inhibition occurred with genetically modified cytotoxic T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) targeting tumor-associated antigens. Human T cells expressing CAR targeting mesothelin or fibroblast activation protein and containing CD3ζ and 4-1BB cytoplasmic domains were intravenously injected into immunodeficient mice bearing large, established human mesothelin-expressing flank tumors. CAR TILs were isolated from tumors at various time points and evaluated for effector functions and status of inhibitory pathways. CAR T cells were able to traffic into tumors with varying efficiency and proliferate. They were able to slow tumor growth, but did not cause regressions or cures. The CAR TILs underwent rapid loss of functional activity that limited their therapeutic efficacy. This hypofunction was reversible when the T cells were isolated away from the tumor. The cause of the hypofunction seemed to be multifactorial and was associated with upregulation of intrinsic T-cell inhibitory enzymes (diacylglycerol kinase and SHP-1) and the expression of surface inhibitory receptors (PD1, LAG3, TIM3, and 2B4). Advanced-generation human CAR T cells are reversibly inactivated within the solid tumor microenvironment of some tumors by multiple mechanisms. The model described here will be an important tool for testing T cell-based strategies or systemic approaches to overcome this tumor-induced inhibition. Our results suggest that PD1 pathway antagonism may augment human CAR T-cell function. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Prior Dengue virus exposure shapes T cell immunity to Zika virus in humans.

    PubMed

    Grifoni, Alba; Pham, John; Sidney, John; O'Rourke, Patrick H; Paul, Sinu; Peters, Bjoern; Martini, Sheridan R; de Silva, Aruna D; Ricciardi, Michael J; Magnani, Diogo M; Silveira, Cassia G T; Maestri, Alvino; Costa, Priscilla R; de-Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria; de Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal; Damasco, Paulo Vieira; Phillips, Elizabeth; Mallal, Simon; de Silva, Aravinda M; Collins, Matthew; Durbin, Anna; Diehl, Sean A; Cerpas, Cristhiam; Balmaseda, Angel; Kuan, Guillermina; Coloma, Josefina; Harris, Eva; Crowe, James E; Stone, Mars; Norris, Phillip J; Busch, Michael; Vivanco-Cid, Hector; Cox, Josephine; Graham, Barney S; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Turtle, Lance; Solomon, Tom; Kallas, Esper G; Watkins, David I; Weiskopf, Daniela; Sette, Alessandro

    2017-10-04

    While progress has been made in characterizing humoral immunity to Zika virus (ZIKV) in humans, little is known regarding the corresponding T cell responses to ZIKV. Here we investigate the kinetics and viral epitopes targeted by T cells responding to ZIKV and address the critical question of whether pre-existing dengue virus (DENV) T cell immunity modulates these responses. We find that memory T cell responses elicited by prior infection with DENV or vaccination with Tetravalent Dengue Attenuated Vaccines (TDLAV) recognize ZIKV-derived peptides. This cross-reactivity is explained by the sequence similarity of the two viruses, as the ZIKV peptides recognized by DENV-elicited memory T cells are identical or highly conserved in DENV and ZIKV. DENV exposure prior to ZIKV infection also influences the timing and magnitude of the T cell response. ZIKV-reactive T cells in the acute phase of infection are detected earlier and in greater magnitude in DENV-immune patients. Conversely, the frequency of ZIKV-reactive T cells continues to rise in the convalescent phase in DENV-naive donors, but declines in DENV pre-exposed donors, compatible with more efficient control of ZIKV replication and/or clearance of ZIKV antigen. The quality of responses is also influenced by previous DENV exposure, and ZIKV-specific CD8 T cells form DENV pre-exposed donors selectively up-regulated granzyme B and PD1, as compared to DENV-naïve donors. Finally, we discovered that ZIKV structural proteins (E, prM and C) are major targets of both the CD4 and CD8 T cell responses, whereas DENV T cell epitopes are found primarily in nonstructural proteins.IMPORTANCE The issue of potential ZIKV and DENV cross-reactivity and how pre-existing DENV T cell immunity modulates ZIKA T cell responses is of great relevance as the two viruses often co-circulate and ZIKA virus has been spreading in geographical regions where DENV is endemic or hyper-endemic. Our data show that memory T cell responses elicited by

  11. Gamma Interferon Secretion by Human Vγ2Vδ2 T Cells after Stimulation with Antibody against the T-Cell Receptor plus the Toll-Like Receptor 2 Agonist Pam3Cys

    PubMed Central

    Deetz, Carl O.; Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Propp, Nadia A.; Cairo, Cristiana; Tikhonov, Illia; Pauza, C. David

    2006-01-01

    Circulating Vγ2Vδ2 T-cell populations in healthy human beings are poised for rapid responses to bacterial or viral pathogens. We asked whether Vγ2Vδ2 T cells use the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family to recognize pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules and to regulate cell functions. Analysis of expanded Vγ2Vδ2 T-cell lines showed the abundant presence of TLR2 mRNA, implying that these receptors are important for cell differentiation or function. However, multiple efforts to detect TLR2 protein on the cell surface or in cytoplasmic compartments gave inconsistent results. Functional assays confirmed that human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells could respond to the TLR2 agonist (S)-(2,3-bis(palmitoyloxy)-(2RS)-propyl)-N-palmitoyl-(R)-Cys-(S)-Ser(S)-Lys4-OH trihydrochloride (Pam3Cys), but the response required coincident stimulation through the γδ T-cell receptor (TCR). Dually stimulated cells produced higher levels of cytoplasmic or cell-free gamma interferon and showed increased expression of the lysosome-associated membrane protein CD107a on the cell surface. A functional TLR2 that requires coincident TCR stimulation may increase the initial potency of Vγ2Vδ2 T-cell responses at the site of infection and promote the rapid development of subsequent acquired antipathogen immunity. PMID:16861636

  12. Gamma interferon secretion by human Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells after stimulation with antibody against the T-cell receptor plus the Toll-Like receptor 2 agonist Pam3Cys.

    PubMed

    Deetz, Carl O; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Propp, Nadia A; Cairo, Cristiana; Tikhonov, Illia; Pauza, C David

    2006-08-01

    Circulating Vgamma2Vdelta2 T-cell populations in healthy human beings are poised for rapid responses to bacterial or viral pathogens. We asked whether Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells use the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family to recognize pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules and to regulate cell functions. Analysis of expanded Vgamma2Vdelta2 T-cell lines showed the abundant presence of TLR2 mRNA, implying that these receptors are important for cell differentiation or function. However, multiple efforts to detect TLR2 protein on the cell surface or in cytoplasmic compartments gave inconsistent results. Functional assays confirmed that human Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells could respond to the TLR2 agonist (S)-(2,3-bis(palmitoyloxy)-(2RS)-propyl)-N-palmitoyl-(R)-Cys-(S)-Ser(S)-Lys4-OH trihydrochloride (Pam3Cys), but the response required coincident stimulation through the gammadelta T-cell receptor (TCR). Dually stimulated cells produced higher levels of cytoplasmic or cell-free gamma interferon and showed increased expression of the lysosome-associated membrane protein CD107a on the cell surface. A functional TLR2 that requires coincident TCR stimulation may increase the initial potency of Vgamma2Vdelta2 T-cell responses at the site of infection and promote the rapid development of subsequent acquired antipathogen immunity.

  13. Human CD4- 8- T cells are a distinctive immunoregulatory subset.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei-Chuan; Patel, Kalpesh; Taub, Dennis D; Longo, Dan L; Goetzl, Edward J

    2010-07-01

    Human CD4(-)8(-) T cells are a minor subset quantitatively but potentially important in immunity because they are predominantly distributed at body surfaces, and their number and activities increase in autoimmune diseases and decrease with aging. Distinguishing characteristics of CD4(-)8(-) T cells are found to include a unique profile of cytokines, including Serpin E1, which is not generated by other T cells, MIF, and TGF-beta. At 2-5% of the total in mixtures with CD4 + CD8 T cells, CD4(-)8(-) T cells enhance the generation of IFN-gamma and IL-17 by up to 12- and 5-fold, respectively, without contributing either cytokine or affecting cytokine production by NK/NKT cells. CD4(-)8(-) T cell-derived MIF is their major enhancer and TGFbeta their principal inhibitor of CD4 and CD8 T cell cytokine production. Decreases in CD4(-)8(-) T cell effects may diminish protective immunity in aging, whereas increases may augment the severity of autoimmune diseases.

  14. T cell responses to human platelet antigen–1a involve a unique form of indirect allorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Ahlen, Maria Therese; Husebekk, Anne; Killie, Ida Løken; Skogen, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a pregnancy-related condition caused by maternal antibodies binding an alloantigen on fetal platelets. In most cases the alloantigen is formed by a single amino acid, integrin β3 Leu33, referred to as human platelet antigen–1a (HPA-1a). Production of anti–HPA-1a antibodies likely depends on CD4+ T cells that recognize the same alloantigen in complex with the HLA-DRA/DRB3*01:01 molecule. While this complex is well characterized, T cell recognition of it is not. Here, to examine the nature of antigen recognition by HPA-1a–specific T cells, we assayed native and synthetic variants of the integrin β3 peptide antigen for binding to DRA/DRB3*01:01-positive antigen-presenting cells and for T cell activation. We found that HPA-1a–specific T cells recognize non-allogeneic integrin β3 residues anchored to DRA/DRB3*01:01 by the allogeneic Leu33, which itself is not directly recognized by these T cells. Furthermore, these T cell responses are diverse, with different T cells depending on different residues for recognition. This represents a unique form of indirect allorecognition in which a non-allogeneic peptide sequence becomes immunogenic by stable anchoring to MHC by an allogeneic residue. PMID:27699233

  15. TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 expression in human CD4+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Hayley G.; Roostalu, Urmas; Walter, Gina J.; Gullick, Nicola J.; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Roberts, Ceri A.; Sumner, Jonathan; Baeten, Dominique L.; Gerwien, Jens G.; Cope, Andrew P.; Geissmann, Frederic; Kirkham, Bruce W.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2014-02-01

    IL-17+ CD4+ T (Th17) cells contribute to the pathogenesis of several human inflammatory diseases. Here we demonstrate that TNF inhibitor (TNFi) drugs induce the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. TNFi-mediated induction of IL-10 in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells is Treg-/Foxp3-independent, requires IL-10 and is overcome by IL-1β. TNFi-exposed IL-17+ CD4+ T cells are molecularly and functionally distinct, with a unique gene signature characterized by expression of IL10 and IKZF3 (encoding Aiolos). We show that Aiolos binds conserved regions in the IL10 locus in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, IKZF3 and IL10 expression levels correlate in primary CD4+ T cells and Aiolos overexpression is sufficient to drive IL10 in these cells. Our data demonstrate that TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including Th17 cells and suggest a role for the transcription factor Aiolos in the regulation of IL-10 in CD4+ T cells.

  16. Human CD4+ T cells require exogenous cystine for glutathione and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Levring, Trine B; Kongsbak, Martin; Rode, Anna K O; Woetmann, Anders; Ødum, Niels; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Geisler, Carsten

    2015-09-08

    Adaptive immune responses require activation and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. Whereas early T cell activation is independent of exogenous cystine (Cys2), T cell proliferation is dependent of Cys2. However, the exact roles of Cys2 in T cell proliferation still need to be determined. The aim of this study was to elucidate why activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 in order to proliferate. We activated purified naïve human CD4+ T cells and found that glutathione (GSH) levels and DNA synthesis were dependent on Cys2 and increased in parallel with increasing concentrations of Cys2. Vice-versa, the GSH synthesis inhibitor L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) and inhibition of Cys2 uptake with glutamate inhibited GSH and DNA synthesis in parallel. We further found that thioredoxin (Trx) can partly substitute for GSH during DNA synthesis. Finally, we show that GSH or Trx is required for the activity of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the enzyme responsible for generation of the deoxyribonucleotide DNA building blocks. In conclusion, we show that activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 to proliferate and that this is partly explained by the fact that Cys2 is required for production of GSH, which in turn is required for optimal RNR-mediated deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and DNA replication.

  17. RAGE Expression in Human T Cells: A Link between Environmental Factors and Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Akirav, Eitan M.; Preston-Hurlburt, Paula; Garyu, Justin; Henegariu, Octavian; Clynes, Raphael; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Herold, Kevan C.

    2012-01-01

    The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) is a scavenger ligand that binds glycated endproducts as well as molecules released during cell death such as S100b and HMGB1. RAGE is expressed on antigen presenting cells where it may participate in activation of innate immune responses but its role in adaptive human immune responses has not been described. We have found that RAGE is expressed intracellularly in human T cells following TCR activation but constitutively on T cells from patients with diabetes. The levels of RAGE on T cells from patients with diabetes are not related to the level of glucose control. It co-localizes to the endosomes. Its expression increases in activated T cells from healthy control subjects but bystander cells also express RAGE after stimulation of the antigen specific T cells. RAGE ligands enhance RAGE expression. In patients with T1D, the level of RAGE expression decreases with T cell activation. RAGE+ T cells express higher levels of IL-17A, CD107a, and IL-5 than RAGE− cells from the same individual with T1D. Our studies have identified the expression of RAGE on adaptive immune cells and a role for this receptor and its ligands in modulating human immune responses. PMID:22509345

  18. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine candidates using human CD4+ T-cells expression cloning.

    PubMed

    Coler, Rhea N; Dillon, Davin C; Skeiky, Yasir A W; Kahn, Maria; Orme, Ian M; Lobet, Yves; Reed, Steven G; Alderson, Mark R

    2009-01-07

    To identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens as candidates for a subunit vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), we have employed a CD4+ T-cell expression screening method. Mtb-specific CD4+ T-cell lines from nine healthy PPD positive donors were stimulated with different antigenic substrates including autologous dendritic cells (DC) infected with Mtb, or cultured with culture filtrate proteins (CFP), and purified protein derivative of Mtb (PPD). These lines were used to screen a genomic Mtb library expressed in Escherichia coli and processed and presented by autologous DC. This screening led to the recovery of numerous T-cell antigens, including both novel and previously described antigens. One of these novel antigens, referred to as Mtb9.8 (Rv0287), was recognized by multiple T-cell lines, stimulated with either Mtb-infected DC or CFP. Using the mouse and guinea pig models of TB, high levels of IFN-gamma were produced, and solid protection from Mtb challenge was observed following immunization with Mtb9.8 formulated in either AS02A or AS01B Adjuvant Systems. These results demonstrate that T-cell screening of the Mtb genome can be used to identify CD4+ T-cell antigens that are candidates for vaccine development.

  19. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine candidates using human CD4+ T-cells expression cloning

    PubMed Central

    Coler, Rhea N.; Dillon, Davin C.; Skeiky, Yasir A. W.; Kahn, Maria; Orme, Ian M.; Lobet, Yves; Reed, Steven G.; Alderson, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    To identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens as candidates for a subunit vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), we have employed a CD4+ T-cell expression screening method. Mtb-specific CD4+ T-cell lines from nine healthy PPD positive donors were stimulated with different antigenic substrates including autologous dendritic cells (DC) infected with Mtb, culture filtrate proteins (CFP), and purified protein derivative of Mtb (PPD). These lines were used to screen a genomic Mtb library expressed in Escherichia coli and processed and presented by autologous DC. This screening led to the recovery of numerous T-cell antigens, including both novel and previously described antigens. One of these novel antigens, referred to as Mtb9.8 (Rv0287), was recognized by multiple T-cell lines, stimulated with either Mtb-infected DC or CFP. Using the mouse and guinea pig models of TB, high levels of IFN-γ were produced, and solid protection from Mtb challenge was observed following immunization with Mtb9.8 formulated in either AS02A or AS01B Adjuvant Systems. These results demonstrate that T-cell screening of the Mtb genome can be used to identify CD4+ T-cell antigens that are candidates for vaccine development. PMID:19000730

  20. Human CD4 T cell epitopes selective for Vaccinia versus Variola virus.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alicia; Besse, Aurore; Favry, Emmanuel; Imbert, Gilles; Tanchou, Valérie; Castelli, Florence Anne; Maillere, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Due to the high degree of sequence identity between Orthopoxvirus species, the specific B and T cell responses raised against these viruses are largely cross-reactive and poorly selective. We therefore searched for CD4 T cell epitopes present in the conserved parts of the Vaccinia genome (VACV) but absent from Variola viruses (VARV), with a view to identifying immunogenic sequences selective for VACV. We identified three long peptide fragments from the B7R, B10R and E7R proteins by in silico comparisons of the poxvirus genomes, and evaluated the recognition of these fragments by VACV-specific T cell lines derived from healthy donors. For the 12 CD4 T cell epitopes identified, we assessed their binding to common HLA-DR allotypes and their capacity to induce peptide-specific CD4 T-cell lines. Four peptides from B7R and B10R displayed a broad binding specificity for HLA-DR molecules and induced multiple T cell lines from healthy donors. Besides their absence from VARV, the two B10R peptide sequences were mutated in the Cowpox virus and completely absent from the Monkeypox genome. This work contributes to the development of differential diagnosis of poxvirus infections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural similarity between Fc receptors and T cell receptors. Expression of the gamma-subunit of Fc epsilon RI in human T cells, natural killer cells and thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Vivier, E; Rochet, N; Kochan, J P; Presky, D H; Schlossman, S F; Anderson, P

    1991-12-15

    The TCR complex is composed of a clonotypic heterodimer (Ti alpha:beta or gamma:delta) noncovalently associated with the CD3 complex (gamma, delta, and epsilon), and with one or more disulfide-linked dimers whose components are designated zeta and eta. zeta and eta are alternative transcripts of a common gene and are structurally related to the gamma-subunit of the FcR for IgE expressed on mast cells and basophils (Fc epsilon RI). Recent evidence suggests that gamma can also be expressed in natural killer cells and in a murine cytotoxic T cell line, CTLL. Because zeta, eta, and gamma have the potential to join together to form disulfide linked homo- and heterodimers, it has been postulated that alternative dimeric forms composed of these zeta-related subunits might subserve unique signal transducing functions in hematopoietic cells. We have used mAb reactive with zeta and gamma to systematically examine the expression of these zeta-related dimers in human T cells, NK cells, and thymocytes. Our results show that each cell type expresses characteristic combinations of zeta-related homo- and hetero-dimers, and are therefore consistent with the possibility that these subunits contribute to the functional heterogeneity of lymphocyte subsets.

  2. LGIT In Vitro Latency Model in Primary and T Cell Lines to Test HIV-1 Reactivation Compounds.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ulrike; Takahashi, Mayumi; Rossi, John J; Burnett, John C

    2016-01-01

    Persistent latent HIV-1 reservoirs pose a major barrier for combinatorial antiretroviral therapy (cART) to achieve eradication of the virus. A variety of mechanisms likely contribute to HIV-1 persistence, including establishment of post-integration latency in resting CD4+ T-lymphocytes, the proliferation of these latently infected cells, and the induced or spontaneous reactivation of latent virus. To elucidate the mechanisms of latency and to investigate therapeutic strategies for reactivating and purging the latent reservoir, investigators have developed in vitro models of HIV-1 latency using primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes and CD4+ T-cell lines. Several types of in vitro latency models range from replication-competent to single-round, replication-deficient viruses exhibiting different degrees of viral genomic deletion. Working under the hypothesis that HIV-1 post-integration latency is directly linked to HIV-1 promoter activity, which can be obscured by additional proteins expressed during replication, we focus here on the creation of latently infected primary human T-cells and cell lines through the single-round, replication deficient HIV-1 LGIT model. In this model the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the HIV-1 virus drives a cassette of GFP-IRES-Tat that allows testing of reactivating components and initiates a positive feedback loop through Tat expression.

  3. [Glycoprotein D (5-23) specific Th2-T-cell line induces HSV-1 keratitis].

    PubMed

    Heiligenhaus, A; Jayaraman, S; Soukiasian, S; Dorf, M; Foster, C S

    1995-08-01

    BALB/c inbred Igh-1-disparate mice exhibit different susceptibility to the development of HSV-1 stromal keratitis (HSK), which may be due to the differential immune regulation. CD4+ T lymphocytes may be critical for the disease induction. A T-cell line (CD4+, T-cell receptor V beta 8+, interleukin-4+) specific for the N-terminal amino acids 5-23 of glycoprotein D from HSV-1 [gD(5-23)] was established from HSK susceptible C.AL-20 mice. HSK-resistant C.B-17 mice, and HSK-susceptible BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with cells (5 x 10(5)/mouse) alone or combined with HSV-1 corneal inoculation (10(5) PFU, KOS strain). Control groups were injected with HSV-antigen-unrelated cells (PPD specific), or were only HSV-1 infected. Migration of the adoptively transferred gD(5-23) Th2 cells was analyzed by histology, by immunohistochemistry and by cell membrane labelling (PKH26). The transfer of gD(5-23) cells accelerated the disease onset (day 2, compared to day 7 without cells). The transfer of gD(5-23) cells increased the incidence of HSK (BALB/c 100%, C.B-17 20%) compared to mice that were only infected with HSV-1 (BALB/c 75%, C.B-17 0%). Keratitis was more severe in mice injected with gD(5-23) cells. In contrast, the transfer of PPD-specific cells did not influence the disease patterns. Mice injected with gD(5-23) cells and not inoculated with HSV-1 did not develop keratitis. The results suggest that CD4+ MHC class II, V beta 8+, IL-4 expressing T-cells (T helper 2) may be important for the induction of HSK.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Genomic organization of the human T-cell receptor variable {alpha} (TCRAV) gene cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Ibberson, M.R.; Copier, J.P.; So, A.K.

    1995-07-20

    A long-range physical map of the human T-cell receptor variable {alpha} (TCRAV) locus was produced using 23 V{alpha} subgroup-specific probes. Linkage disequilibrium across the locus was also studied using polymorphic TCRAV markers. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to map V{alpha} gene segments onto one SfiI fragment of 500 kb and two of 200 kb using DNA from peripheral blood neutrophils. PCR and conventional Southern techniques on Jurkat, CEM, and H9 T-cell lines were used to establish the 5{prime} to 3{prime} order of the gene segments and the relative positions of V{alpha} gene segments on the SfiI fragments. The linkage disequilibrium study used single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis to genotype 100 normal caucasoid subjects for TCRAV5S1, V6S1, V8S1, V17S1, and V21S1 polymorphisms. Strong linkage disequilibrium was detected between V5S1 and V8S1, in concordance with the physical map. This new information will be useful for future studies of genetic variation at the TCRAV locus, its role in the shaping of the TCR repertoire, and its possible contribution to autoimmune diseases. 46 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Alpha Interferon and HIV Infection Cause Activation of Human T Cells in NSG-BLT Mice

    PubMed Central

    Long, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    The development of small animal models for the study of HIV transmission is important for evaluation of HIV prophylaxis and disease pathogenesis. In humanized bone marrow-liver-thymus (BLT) mice, hematopoiesis is reconstituted by implantation of human fetal liver and thymus tissue (Thy/Liv) plus intravenous injection of autologous liver-derived hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPC). This results in reconstitution of human leukocytes in the mouse peripheral blood, lymphoid organs, and mucosal sites. NOD-scid interleukin-2 receptor-negative (IL-2Rγ−/−) (NSG)-BLT mice were inoculated intravaginally with HIV and were monitored for plasma viremia by a branched DNA assay 4 weeks later. T-cell activation was determined by expression of CD38 and HLA-DR on human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in mouse peripheral blood at the time of inoculation and 4 weeks later. Additional BLT mice were treated with human alpha interferon 2b (IFN-α2b) (intron A) and assessed for T-cell activation. Productive HIV infection in BLT mice was associated with T-cell activation (increases in CD38 mean fluorescence intensity and both the frequency and absolute number of CD38+ HLA-DR+ T cells) that correlated strongly with plasma viral load and was most pronounced in the CD8+ T-cell compartment. This T-cell activation phenotype was recapitulated in NSG-BLT mice treated with intron A. HIV susceptibility correlated with the number of HSPC injected, yet a number of mice receiving the Thy/Liv implant alone, with no HSPC injection, were also susceptible to intravaginal HIV. These results are consistent with studies linking T-cell activation to progressive disease in humans and lend support for the use of NSG-BLT mice in studies of HIV pathogenesis. PMID:22238321

  6. Engraftment of human central memory-derived effector CD8+ T cells in immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuli; Berger, Carolina; Wong, ChingLam W.; Forman, Stephen J.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2011-01-01

    In clinical trials of adoptive T-cell therapy, the persistence of transferred cells correlates with therapeutic efficacy. However, properties of human T cells that enable their persistence in vivo are poorly understood, and model systems that enable investigation of the fate of human effector T cells (TE) have not been described. Here, we analyzed the engraftment of adoptively transferred human cytomegalovirus pp65-specific CD8+ TE cells derived from purified CD45RO+CD62L+ central memory (TCM) or CD45RO+CD62L− effector memory (TEM) precursors in an immunodeficient mouse model. The engraftment of TCM-derived effector cells (TCM/E) was dependent on human interleukin-15, and superior in magnitude and duration to TEM-derived effector cells (TEM/E). T-cell receptor Vβ analysis of persisting cells demonstrated that CD8+ TCM/E engraftment was polyclonal, suggesting that the ability to engraft is a general feature of TCM/E. CD8+ TEM/E proliferated extensively after transfer but underwent rapid apoptosis. In contrast, TCM/E were less prone to apoptosis and established a persistent reservoir of functional T cells in vivo characterized by higher CD28 expression. These studies predict that human CD8+ effector T cells derived from TCM precursors may be preferred for adoptive therapy based on superior engraftment fitness. PMID:21123821

  7. Rapid, efficient functional characterization and recovery of HIV-specific human CD8+ T cells using microengraving

    PubMed Central

    Varadarajan, Navin; Kwon, Douglas S.; Law, Kenneth M.; Ogunniyi, Adebola O.; Anahtar, Melis N.; Richter, James M.; Walker, Bruce D.; Love, J. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The nature of certain clinical samples (tissue biopsies, fluids) or the subjects themselves (pediatric subjects, neonates) often constrain the number of cells available to evaluate the breadth of functional T-cell responses to infections or therapeutic interventions. The methods most commonly used to assess this functional diversity ex vivo and to recover specific cells to expand in vitro usually require more than 106 cells. Here we present a process to identify antigen-specific responses efficiently ex vivo from 104–105 single cells from blood or mucosal tissues using dense arrays of subnanoliter wells. The approach combines on-chip imaging cytometry with a technique for capturing secreted proteins—called “microengraving”—to enumerate antigen-specific responses by single T cells in a manner comparable to conventional assays such as ELISpot and intracellular cytokine staining. Unlike those assays, however, the individual cells identified can be recovered readily by micromanipulation for further characterization in vitro. Applying this method to assess HIV-specific T-cell responses demonstrates that it is possible to establish clonal CD8+ T-cell lines that represent the most abundant specificities present in circulation using 100- to 1,000-fold fewer cells than traditional approaches require and without extensive genotypic analysis a priori. This rapid (<24 h), efficient, and inexpensive process should improve the comparative study of human T-cell immunology across ages and anatomic compartments. PMID:22355106

  8. Cytotoxicity of arctigenin and matairesinol against the T-cell lymphoma cell line CCRF-CEM.

    PubMed

    Su, Shan; Cheng, Xinlai; Wink, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Arctigenin and matairesinol possess a diversity of bioactivities. Here we investigated the cytotoxicity of arctigenin and matairesinol against a T-cell lymphoma cell line CCRF-CEM and the underlying mechanisms that have not been explored before. The cytotoxic activity was investigated using MTT assay. The cell cycle arrest and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation were determined by flow cytometric analysis. The apoptosis induction was assessed using Annexin V/Propidium Iodide assay. The gene quantification analysis was measured through real-time polymerase chain reaction. Arctigenin and matairesinol exhibited significant antiproliferative activity against CCRF-CEM cells after 72 h treatment with IC50 values of 1.21 ± 0.15 μm and 4.27 ± 0.41 μm, respectively. In addition, both lignans arrest CCRF-CEM cells in the S phase. Furthermore, they could induce apoptosis in CCRF-CEM cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Interestingly, the lignans differentially regulated the expression of several key genes involved in apoptosis pathways, including Bax, Bad and caspase-9. Moreover, both lignans could increase ROS levels in CCRF-CEM cells. Our study provides an insight into the potential of arctigenin and matairesinol as good candidates for the development of novel agents against T-cell lymphoma. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. A Combined Omics Approach to Generate the Surface Atlas of Human Naive CD4+ T Cells during Early T-Cell Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Graessel, Anke; Hauck, Stefanie M; von Toerne, Christine; Kloppmann, Edda; Goldberg, Tatyana; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schindler, Michael; Knapp, Bettina; Krause, Linda; Dietz, Katharina; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Suttner, Kathrin

    2015-08-01

    Naive CD4(+) T cells are the common precursors of multiple effector and memory T-cell subsets and possess a high plasticity in terms of differentiation potential. This stem-cell-like character is important for cell therapies aiming at regeneration of specific immunity. Cell surface proteins are crucial for recognition and response to signals mediated by other cells or environmental changes. Knowledge of cell surface proteins of human naive CD4(+) T cells and their changes during the early phase of T-cell activation is urgently needed for a guided differentiation of naive T cells and may support the selection of pluripotent cells for cell therapy. Periodate oxidation and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation technology was applied with subsequent quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem MS to generate a data set describing the surface proteome of primary human naive CD4(+) T cells and to monitor dynamic changes during the early phase of activation. This led to the identification of 173 N-glycosylated surface proteins. To independently confirm the proteomic data set and to analyze the cell surface by an alternative technique a systematic phenotypic expression analysis of surface antigens via flow cytometry was performed. This screening expanded the previous data set, resulting in 229 surface proteins, which were expressed on naive unstimulated and activated CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we generated a surface expression atlas based on transcriptome data, experimental annotation, and predicted subcellular localization, and correlated the proteomics result with this transcriptional data set. This extensive surface atlas provides an overall naive CD4(+) T cell surface resource and will enable future studies aiming at a deeper understanding of mechanisms of T-cell biology allowing the identification of novel immune targets usable for the development of therapeutic treatments. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. A Combined Omics Approach to Generate the Surface Atlas of Human Naive CD4+ T Cells during Early T-Cell Receptor Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Graessel, Anke; Hauck, Stefanie M.; von Toerne, Christine; Kloppmann, Edda; Goldberg, Tatyana; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schindler, Michael; Knapp, Bettina; Krause, Linda; Dietz, Katharina; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B.; Suttner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Naive CD4+ T cells are the common precursors of multiple effector and memory T-cell subsets and possess a high plasticity in terms of differentiation potential. This stem-cell-like character is important for cell therapies aiming at regeneration of specific immunity. Cell surface proteins are crucial for recognition and response to signals mediated by other cells or environmental changes. Knowledge of cell surface proteins of human naive CD4+ T cells and their changes during the early phase of T-cell activation is urgently needed for a guided differentiation of naive T cells and may support the selection of pluripotent cells for cell therapy. Periodate oxidation and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation technology was applied with subsequent quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem MS to generate a data set describing the surface proteome of primary human naive CD4+ T cells and to monitor dynamic changes during the early phase of activation. This led to the identification of 173 N-glycosylated surface proteins. To independently confirm the proteomic data set and to analyze the cell surface by an alternative technique a systematic phenotypic expression analysis of surface antigens via flow cytometry was performed. This screening expanded the previous data set, resulting in 229 surface proteins, which were expressed on naive unstimulated and activated CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, we generated a surface expression atlas based on transcriptome data, experimental annotation, and predicted subcellular localization, and correlated the proteomics result with this transcriptional data set. This extensive surface atlas provides an overall naive CD4+ T cell surface resource and will enable future studies aiming at a deeper understanding of mechanisms of T-cell biology allowing the identification of novel immune targets usable for the development of therapeutic treatments. PMID:25991687

  11. Linking the T cell receptor to the single cell transcriptome in antigen-specific human T cells.

    PubMed

    Eltahla, Auda A; Rizzetto, Simone; Pirozyan, Mehdi R; Betz-Stablein, Brigid D; Venturi, Vanessa; Kedzierska, Katherine; Lloyd, Andrew R; Bull, Rowena A; Luciani, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneity of T cells is a hallmark of a successful adaptive immune response, harnessing the vast diversity of antigen-specific T cells into a coordinated evolution of effector and memory outcomes. The T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is highly diverse to account for the highly heterogeneous antigenic world. During the response to a virus multiple individual clones of antigen specific CD8+ (Ag-specific) T cells can be identified against a single epitope and multiple epitopes are recognised. Advances in single-cell technologies have provided the potential to study Ag-specific T cell heterogeneity at both surface phenotype and transcriptome levels, thereby allowing investigation of the diversity within the same apparent sub-population. We propose a new method (VDJPuzzle) to reconstruct the native TCRαβ from single cell RNA-seq data of Ag-specific T cells and then to link these with the gene expression profile of individual cells. We applied this method using rare Ag-specific T cells isolated from peripheral blood of a subject who cleared hepatitis C virus infection. We successfully reconstructed productive TCRαβ in 56 of a total of 63 cells (89%), with double α and double β in 18, and 7% respectively, and double TCRαβ in 2 cells. The method was validated via standard single cell PCR sequencing of the TCR. We demonstrate that single-cell transcriptome analysis can successfully distinguish Ag-specific T cell populations sorted directly from resting memory cells in peripheral blood and sorted after ex vivo stimulation. This approach allows a detailed analysis of the TCR diversity and its relationship with the transcriptional profile of different clones.

  12. ArtinM Mediates Murine T Cell Activation and Induces Cell Death in Jurkat Human Leukemic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Brito, Patrícia Kellen Martins; Gonçalves, Thiago Eleutério; Vendruscolo, Patrícia Edivânia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The recognition of cell surface glycans by lectins may be critical for the innate and adaptive immune responses. ArtinM, a d-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, activates antigen-presenting cells by recognizing TLR2 N-glycans and induces Th1 immunity. We recently demonstrated that ArtinM stimulated CD4+ T cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we further studied the effects of ArtinM on adaptive immune cells. We showed that ArtinM activates murine CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, augmenting their positivity for CD25, CD69, and CD95 and showed higher interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production. The CD4+ T cells exhibited increased T-bet expression in response to ArtinM, and IL-2 production by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depended on the recognition of CD3εγ-chain glycans by ArtinM. The ArtinM effect on aberrantly-glycosylated neoplastic lymphocytes was studied in Jurkat T cells, in which ArtinM induced IL-2, IFN-γ, and IL-1β production, but decreased cell viability and growth. A higher frequency of AnnexinV- and propidium iodide-stained cells demonstrated the induction of Jurkat T cells apoptosis by ArtinM, and this apoptotic response was reduced by caspases and protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The ArtinM effects on murine T cells corroborated with the immunomodulatory property of lectin, whereas the promotion of Jurkat T cells apoptosis may reflect a potential applicability of ArtinM in novel strategies for treating lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:28665310

  13. Expression Cloning of an Immunodominant Family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens Using Human Cd4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, Mark R.; Bement, Teresa; Day, Craig H.; Zhu, Liqing; Molesh, David; Skeiky, Yasir A. W.; Coler, Rhea; Lewinsohn, David M.; Reed, Steven G.; Dillon, Davin C.

    2000-01-01

    Development of a subunit vaccine for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is likely to be dependent on the identification of T cell antigens that induce strong proliferation and interferon γ production from healthy purified protein derivative (PPD)+ donors. We have developed a sensitive and rapid technique for screening an Mtb genomic library expressed in Escherichia coli using Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells. Using this technique, we identified a family of highly related Mtb antigens. The gene of one family member encodes a 9.9-kD antigen, termed Mtb9.9A. Recombinant Mtb9.9A protein, expressed and purified from E. coli, elicited strong T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from PPD+ but not PPD− individuals. Southern blot analysis and examination of the Mtb genome sequence revealed a family of highly related genes. A T cell line from a PPD+ donor that failed to react with recombinant Mtb9.9A recognized one of the other family members, Mtb9.9C. Synthetic peptides were used to map the T cell epitope recognized by this line, and revealed a single amino acid substitution in this region when compared with Mtb9.9A. The direct identification of antigens using T cells from immune donors will undoubtedly be critical for the development of vaccines to several intracellular pathogens. PMID:10662800

  14. Hobit and human effector T-cell differentiation: The beginning of a long journey.

    PubMed

    Braun, Julian; Frentsch, Marco; Thiel, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Besides growing plants, eating a lot, and drinking beer, Tolkien's Hobbits enjoy maintaining a quiet state. Regarding the latter, the name chosen for a recently discovered transcription factor seems to be unintentionally appropriate. The zinc finger protein ZNF683 was originally named "Hobit" for Homolog of Blimp-1 in T cells. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Braga et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 2945-2958] demonstrate that in humans, Hobit is almost exclusively expressed in effector T cells, in particular in quiescent and long-lived effector-type CD8(+) T cells. Hobit may initially appear as another "player" in the quest for transcription factors guiding T-cell differentiation; the discoveries of T-bet, Eomes, Blimp-1, and others have significantly contributed to our understanding of how this process is tightly regulated. However, Hobit may be special--the currently available results suggest substantial differences in Hobit's regulatory functions between mice and humans, such as expression patterns and IFN-γ regulation. And it may turn out that Hobit's function in human T cells is highly adapted to lifelong, periodic challenges with varying, physiological doses of pathogens. Thus, the new study about Hobit in human T cells may be the beginning of a long journey. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Human CD8+ T Cells in Asthma: Possible Pathways and Roles for NK-Like Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Olga; Fonseca, Ana Mafalda; Taborda-Barata, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Asthma affects approximately 300 million people worldwide and is the most common chronic lung disease, which usually is associated with bronchial inflammation. Most research has focused upon the role of CD4+ T cells, and relatively few studies have addressed the phenotypic and functional roles of CD8+ T cell types and subtypes. Human NK-like CD8+ T cells may involve cells that have been described as CD8+CD28−, CD8+CD28−CD57+, CD8+CD27−, or CD8+ effector memory (TEM) cells, among other. However, most of the data that are available regarding these various cell types were obtained in murine models did not thoroughly characterize these cells with phenotypically or functionally or did not involve asthma-related settings. Nevertheless, one may conceptualize three principal roles for human NK-like CD8+ T cells in asthma: disease-promoting, regulatory, and/or tissue repair. Although evidence for some of these roles is scarce, it is possible to extrapolate some data from overlapping or related CD8+ T cell phenotypes, with caution. Clearly, further research is warranted, namely in terms of thorough functional and phenotypic characterization of human NK-like CD8+ T cells in human asthma of varying severity. PMID:28066445

  16. Immunological identification of human T cells intracranially and tracing of neuronal projections by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kornguth, S.; Turski, P.; Perman, W.; Kalinke, T.; Reale, R.; Schultz, R.

    1986-05-01

    This report describes the preparation and utilization of paramagnetically labelled proteins to trace neural projections in vivo, and to distinguish between human T cells and bovine T cells implanted into canine brain. The proteins are covalently coupled to the chelator (DTPA), then labelled with gadolinium and visualized in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Gadolinium labelled horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was injected into the auditory cortex of adult cats (1-7 ..mu..1 containing 50 ..mu..g HRP per ..mu..1) and 48-72 hours later the brain was imaged by MRI. The HRP was labelled with an average of 20 DTPA per HRP. MRI unambiguously identified the HRP injection sites and the sites of neural projections in the medical geniculate body (MGB). MGB localization of HRP-Gd was confirmed histologically demonstrating that MRI can distinguish between paramagnetically labelled protein and local environment effects in the brain (i.e. gray vs white matter). Two monoclonal antibodies against human T cells were labelled with gadolinium. The distinguished by MRI, human from bovine T cells implanted into canine brains (each implant contained 10 million cells in 40 ..mu..1). The T1 weighted and calculated images readily identified the human T cells as a lesion of <4 mm while the bovine T cells did not yield a significant MRI signal. The ratio of DTPA to protein during the coupling procedure, affects the formation of protein aggregates by crosslinking.

  17. Expression and regulation of Schlafen (SLFN) family members in primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells

    PubMed Central

    Puck, Alexander; Aigner, Regina; Modak, Madhura; Cejka, Petra; Blaas, Dieter; Stöckl, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Schlafen (SLFN/Slfn) family members have been investigated for their involvement in fundamental cellular processes including growth regulation, differentiation and control of viral replication. However, most research has been focused on the characterization of Slfns within the murine system or in human cell lines. Since little is known about SLFNs in primary human immune cells, we set out to analyze the expression and regulation of the six human SLFN genes in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and T cells. Comparison of SLFN gene expression across these three cell types showed high mRNA expression of SLFN11 in monocytes and moDCs and high SLFN5 expression in T cells, indicating functional importance within these cell types. Differentiation of monocytes to moDCs leads to the gradual upregulation of SLFN12L and SLFN13 while SLFN12 levels were decreased by differentiation stimuli. Stimulation of moDCs via human rhinovirus, lipopolysaccharide, or IFN-α lead to strong upregulation of SLFN gene expression, while peptidoglycan poorly stimulated regulation of both SLFNs and the classical interferon-stimulated gene MxA. T cell activation was found to downregulate the expression of SLFN5, SLFN12 and SLFN12L, which was reversible upon addition of exogenous IFN-α. In conclusion, we demonstrate, that SLFN gene upregulation is mainly dependent on autocrine type I interferon signaling in primary human immune cells. Rapid decrease of SLFN expression levels following T cell receptor stimulation indicates a role of SLFNs in the regulation of human T cell quiescence. PMID:26623250

  18. Expression and regulation of Schlafen (SLFN) family members in primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, Alexander; Aigner, Regina; Modak, Madhura; Cejka, Petra; Blaas, Dieter; Stöckl, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Schlafen (SLFN/Slfn) family members have been investigated for their involvement in fundamental cellular processes including growth regulation, differentiation and control of viral replication. However, most research has been focused on the characterization of Slfns within the murine system or in human cell lines. Since little is known about SLFNs in primary human immune cells, we set out to analyze the expression and regulation of the six human SLFN genes in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and T cells. Comparison of SLFN gene expression across these three cell types showed high mRNA expression of SLFN11 in monocytes and moDCs and high SLFN5 expression in T cells, indicating functional importance within these cell types. Differentiation of monocytes to moDCs leads to the gradual upregulation of SLFN12L and SLFN13 while SLFN12 levels were decreased by differentiation stimuli. Stimulation of moDCs via human rhinovirus, lipopolysaccharide, or IFN-α lead to strong upregulation of SLFN gene expression, while peptidoglycan poorly stimulated regulation of both SLFNs and the classical interferon-stimulated gene MxA. T cell activation was found to downregulate the expression of SLFN5, SLFN12 and SLFN12L, which was reversible upon addition of exogenous IFN-α. In conclusion, we demonstrate, that SLFN gene upregulation is mainly dependent on autocrine type I interferon signaling in primary human immune cells. Rapid decrease of SLFN expression levels following T cell receptor stimulation indicates a role of SLFNs in the regulation of human T cell quiescence.

  19. Immunoevasive Pericytes From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Preferentially Modulate Induction of Allogeneic Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Domev, Hagit; Milkov, Irina; Dar, Ayelet

    2014-01-01

    Isolated microvessel-residing pericytes and pericytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) exhibit mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics and therapeutic properties. Despite growing interest in pericyte-based stem cell therapy, their immunogenicity and immunomodulatory effects on nonactivated T cells are still poorly defined, in particular those of vasculogenic hPSC pericytes. We found that tissue-embedded and unstimulated cultured hPSC- or tissue-derived pericytes constitutively expressed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and the inhibitory programmed cell death-ligand 1/2 (PD-L1/2) molecules but not MHC class II or CD80/CD86 costimulatory molecules. Pretreatment with inflammatory mediators failed to induce an antigen-presenting cell-like phenotype in stimulated pericytes. CD146+ pericytes from hPSCs did not induce activation and proliferation of allogeneic resting T cells independent of interferon (IFN)-γ prestimulation, similarly to pericytes from human brain or placenta. Instead, pericytes mediated a significant increase in the frequency of allogeneic CD25highFoxP3+ regulatory T cells when cocultured with nonactivated peripheral blood T cells. Furthermore, when peripheral blood CD25high regulatory T cells (Tregs) were depleted from isolated CD3+ T cells, pericytes preferentially induced de novo formation of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+CD127−, suppressive regulatory T cells. Constitutive expression of PD-L1/2 and secretion of transforming growth factor-β by hPSC pericytes directly regulated generation of pericyte-induced Tregs. Pericytes cotransplanted into immunodeficient mice with allogeneic CD25− T cells maintained a nonimmunogenic phenotype and mediated the development of functional regulatory T cells. Together, these findings reveal a novel feature of pericyte-mediated immunomodulation distinguished from immunosuppression, shared by native tissue pericytes and hPSC pericytes, and support the notion that pericytes can be applied for

  20. Hepatitis C Virus-Specific T Cell Receptor mRNA-Engineered Human T Cells: Impact of Antigen Specificity on Functional Properties.

    PubMed

    Balasiddaiah, Anangi; Davanian, Haleh; Aleman, Soo; Pasetto, Anna; Frelin, Lars; Sällberg, Matti; Lohmann, Volker; Koh, Sarene; Bertoletti, Antonio; Chen, Margaret

    2017-05-01

    Therapy with genetically modified autologous T cells has shown great promise in cancer therapy. For an efficient control of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, cytotoxic T cells (CTL) are pivotal, but persistence of activated T cells may lead to liver toxicity. Here, anti-HCV T cell receptors (TCRs) recognizing the HCV nonstructural (NS) NS3 or NS5 viral peptide target were examined by mRNA transfection of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) derived from healthy donors as well as chronically infected HCV patients. Immunological analysis shows that while the CTLs expressing the NS5-specific TCR reduced HCV RNA replication by a noncytotoxic mechanism, the NS3-specific TCR-redirected CTLs were polyfunctional and inhibited HCV RNA replication through antigen-specific cytotoxicity. Transcriptome signatures from these two types of CTL responses revealed uniquely expressed gene clusters upon encountering hepatoma target cells presenting endogenously expressed HCV proteins. The NS3 TCR induced a rapid expression of apoptotic signaling pathways and formation of embryonic gene clusters, whereas the NS5A TCR activation induced extended proliferative and metabolic pathways as the HCV target cells survived. Our results provide detailed insights into basic HCV T cell immunology and have clinical relevance for redirecting T cells to target virally infected hepatoma cells.IMPORTANCE Due to the protective ability of HCV-specific T cells and the hepatotoxic potential that they possess, there is a great need for the understanding of the functional aspects of HCV-specific T cells. To circumvent the low level of precursor frequency in patients, we engineered primary CD8(+) T cells by mRNA TCR vectors to confer HCV specificity to new T cells. HCV TCRs that differ in antigen specificity and polyfunctionality were examined. mRNA TCR engineering of peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy donors or chronically infected HCV patients resulted in strikingly high levels of HCV TCR

  1. Immune response of human propagated gammadelta-T-cells to neuroblastoma recommend the Vdelta1+ subset for gammadelta-T-cell-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schilbach, Karin; Frommer, Klaus; Meier, Sybille; Handgretinger, Rupert; Eyrich, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Human peripheral gammadelta-T-cells are able to induce cytolysis of neuroblastoma (Nb) tumor cells. Besides innate effector functions against infected cells and tumors, gammadelta-T-cells are involved in T-helper 1/T-helper 2 (TH1/TH2) differentiation of alphabeta-T-cells. However, as different gammadelta-T-cell subsets vary considerably in their functional properties, the aim of the present study was to define repertoires of cytokines, chemokines, and angiogenic factors of in vitro expanded Vdelta1+ and Vdelta2+ T cells in response to Nb. After short-term culture, both subsets released TH1 [interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-gamma, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, TNF-beta)] and TH2 cytokines (IL-4, -5, -6, -10, -13, Vdelta1 also transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, chemokines (I-309, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1-3, regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted), ILs (IL-1, -8, -15), cytokines (leptin) as well as angiogenic growth factors [angiogenin (ANG), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I]. These molecules were expressed at higher levels in Vdelta2+ than Vdelta1+ T cells. Nb challenge changed protein expression. TH2 cytokine and IFN-gamma release was blocked in both gammadelta-T-cell subsets. In Vdelta2 gammadelta-T-cells, TH1 cytokines were down-regulated and tumor growth-promoting factors (ANG, VEGF, EGF, and IGF-I) were strongly up-regulated. In contrast, Vdelta1+ gammadelta-T-cells stopped the release of tumor-supportive factors and tolerogenic TGF-beta, and strongly up-regulated TNF-alpha, TNF-beta, MCP-1 and -2 and maintained their IL-2 production. In summary, our data show that after being challenged with Nb cells, propagated Vdelta1+ rather than Vdelta2+ T cells support antitumor responses by secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, in contrast to other cell types, Vdelta1+ T cells do not sustain a growth-promoting or tolerogenic

  2. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Marson, Alexander

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.

  3. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    DOE PAGES

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; ...

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9more » RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.« less

  4. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E; Haliburton, Genevieve E; Ye, Chun J; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Doudna, Jennifer A; Marson, Alexander

    2015-08-18

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently "knock out" genes and "knock in" targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4(+) T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ∼40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ∼20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.

  5. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Marson, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ∼40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ∼20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells. PMID:26216948

  6. Rapid and reliable generation of invariant natural killer T-cell lines in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Asako; Cohen, Nadia; Brigl, Manfred; Brennan, Patrick J; Besra, Gurdal S; Brenner, Michael B

    2009-01-01

    Several tools have proved useful in the study of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, including CD1d-deficient mice, Jα281-deficient mice, synthetic lipid antigens and antigen-loaded CD1d tetramers. However, the generation and examination of long-term primary murine iNKT cell lines in vitro has been challenging. Here, we show the rapid generation of iNKT cell lines from splenic iNKT cells of Vα14 T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic (Tg) mice. These purified iNKT cells were stimulated by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) loaded with α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) and cultured with interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-7. iNKT cells proliferated dramatically, and the cell number exhibited a 100-fold increase within 2 weeks and a 105-fold increase in 8 weeks after repeated stimulation with αGalCer. The iNKT cell lines consisted of iNKT cells expressing Vβ chains including Vβ8.1/8.2, Vβ14, Vβ10, Vβ6 and Vβ7, and responded to stimulation with αGalCer presented both by BMDCs and by plate-bound CD1d. In addition, the iNKT cell lines produced interferon (IFN)-γ when activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN)-stimulated BMDCs. Further, we show that iNKT cell lines produced cytokines in response to microbial antigens. In summary, high-yield iNKT cell lines were generated very rapidly and robustly expanded, and these iNKT cells responded to both TCR and cytokine stimulation in vitro. Given the desire to study primary iNKT cells for many purposes, these iNKT cell lines should provide an important tool for the study of iNKT cell subsets, antigen and TCR specificity, activation, inactivation and effector functions. PMID:20067532

  7. Assessment of immunosuppressive activity of human mesenchymal stem cells using murine antigen specific CD4 and CD8 T cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Cristina; Lo Surdo, Jessica; Bauer, Steven R; Wei, Cheng-Hong

    2013-10-22

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immunosuppressive activity. They do not induce allospecific T cell responses, making them promising tools for reducing the severity of graft versus host disease (GVHD) as well as treating various immune diseases. Currently, there is a need in the MSC field to develop a robust in vitro bioassay which can characterize the immunosuppressive function of MSCs. Murine clonal CD4 and CD8 T cells were stimulated with cognate peptide antigen and antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the absence or presence of human MSCs, different aspects of T cell activation were monitored and analyzed using flow cytometry, real time RT-PCR and cytokine measurement. Human MSCs (hMSCs) can alter multiple aspects of murine T cell activation induced by stimulation with specific antigen, including: reduced proliferation, inhibited or stimulated cell surface marker expression (CD25, CD69, CD44 and CD62L), inhibited mRNA expression of transcription factors (T-bet and GATA-3) and decreased cytokine expression (interferon-gamma, interleukin-10). Disappearance of activation-induced cluster formation and decreased apoptosis of CD8 T cells were also observed. Moreover, the effects are specific to MSCs; incubating the T cells with non-MSC control cell lines had no effect on T cell proliferation and activation. Clonal murine T cells can be used to measure, characterize, and quantify the in vitro immunosuppressive activity of human MSCs, representing a promising approach to improve bioassays for immunosuppression.

  8. Assessment of immunosuppressive activity of human mesenchymal stem cells using murine antigen specific CD4 and CD8 T cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immunosuppressive activity. They do not induce allospecific T cell responses, making them promising tools for reducing the severity of graft versus host disease (GVHD) as well as treating various immune diseases. Currently, there is a need in the MSC field to develop a robust in vitro bioassay which can characterize the immunosuppressive function of MSCs. Methods Murine clonal CD4 and CD8 T cells were stimulated with cognate peptide antigen and antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the absence or presence of human MSCs, different aspects of T cell activation were monitored and analyzed using flow cytometery, real time RT-PCR and cytokine measurement. Results Human MSCs (hMSCs) can alter multiple aspects of murine T cell activation induced by stimulation with specific antigen, including: reduced proliferation, inhibited or stimulated cell surface marker expression (CD25, CD69, CD44 and CD62L), inhibited mRNA expression of transcription factors (T-bet and GATA-3) and decreased cytokine expression (interferon-gamma, interleukin-10). Disappearance of activation-induced cluster formation and decreased apoptosis of CD8 T cells were also observed. Moreover, the effects are specific to MSCs; incubating the T cells with non-MSC control cell lines had no effect on T cell proliferation and activation. Conclusions Clonal murine T cells can be used to measure, characterize, and quantify the in vitro immunosuppressive activity of human MSCs, representing a promising approach to improve bioassays for immunosuppression. PMID:24406271

  9. Alteration of CD44 expression in HIV type 1-infected T cell lines.

    PubMed

    Giordanengo, V; Limouse, M; Doglio, A; Lesimple, J; Lefebvre, J C

    1996-11-20

    CD44 is known to interfere in HIV replication and to participate in many physiological processes such as lymphocyte binding to high endothelial venules of lymphoid tissue, lymph nodes, and mucosal endothelium. The T cell lines MOLT-4 and CEM, and CEM subclones were infected with the HIV-1 LAI strain and monitored for the expression of CD44 during the course of chronic virus production until the infected cells were at the stage of latent infection. The levels of CD44 protein expression were quantified using cell surface immunostaining and biotinylation. The maturation of CD44 molecules was evaluated by metabolic sulforadiolabeling and CD44 mRNA was visualized by Northern blot analysis. We show a downmodulation of CD44 expression in infected T cell lines and subclones. This phenomenon was most evident at the stage of latent infection. Then, CD44 molecules were undetectable at both the protein and mRNA levels in latently infected CEM cells and CEM subclones. In addition, the 97-kDa standard CD44 isoform showed a shift upward, while detectable during the stage of chronic virus production. In latently infected MOLT-4 cells, the CD44 protein levels were dramatically decreased; CD44 mRNA was detected, but the sizes differed from the mRNA in uninfected cells. Since CD44 is known to regulate in part lymphocyte homing and HIV replication, the alterations that were observed in the expression of this molecule could interfere with the particular homing of HIV-infected cells and/or viral latency.

  10. Human memory CD8 T cell effector potential is epigenetically preserved during in vivo homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Abdelsamed, Hossam A; Moustaki, Ardiana; Fan, Yiping; Dogra, Pranay; Ghoneim, Hazem E; Zebley, Caitlin C; Triplett, Brandon M; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Youngblood, Ben

    2017-06-05

    Antigen-independent homeostasis of memory CD8 T cells is vital for sustaining long-lived T cell-mediated immunity. In this study, we report that maintenance of human memory CD8 T cell effector potential during in vitro and in vivo homeostatic proliferation is coupled to preservation of acquired DNA methylation programs. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing of primary human naive, short-lived effector memory (TEM), and longer-lived central memory (TCM) and stem cell memory (TSCM) CD8 T cells identified effector molecules with demethylated promoters and poised for expression. Effector-loci demethylation was heritably preserved during IL-7- and IL-15-mediated in vitro cell proliferation. Conversely, cytokine-driven proliferation of TCM and TSCM memory cells resulted in phenotypic conversion into TEM cells and was coupled to increased methylation of the CCR7 and Tcf7 loci. Furthermore, haploidentical donor memory CD8 T cells undergoing in vivo proliferation in lymphodepleted recipients also maintained their effector-associated demethylated status but acquired TEM-associated programs. These data demonstrate that effector-associated epigenetic programs are preserved during cytokine-driven subset interconversion of human memory CD8 T cells. © 2017 Abdelsamed et al.

  11. Selective manipulation of the human T-cell receptor repertoire expressed by thymocytes in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Merkenschlager, M; Fisher, A G

    1992-01-01

    A recently described organ culture system for human thymocytes is shown to support the generation of a diverse T-cell receptor repertoire in vitro: thymocytes of the alpha beta lineage, including representatives of the V beta families 5.2/5.3, 6.7, and 8, accounted for the majority of T-cell receptor-positive cells throughout a 3-week culture period. Thymocytes bearing gamma delta receptors were also identified, particularly among the CD4 CD8 double-negative subset. The T-cell receptor repertoire expressed in organ culture responded to experimental manipulation with staphylococcal enterotoxins. Staphylococcal enterotoxin D (a powerful activator of human peripheral T cells expressing V beta 5.2/5.3 receptors) caused a marked reduction of V beta 5.2/5.3 expression, as determined with the V beta-specific antibody 42/1C1. Evidence is presented that this loss of V beta 5.2/5.3 expression resulted from the selective deletion of activated thymocytes by apoptosis, in concert with T-cell receptor modulation. These effects of staphylococcal enterotoxin D were specific (since staphylococcal enterotoxin E did not influence V beta 5.2/5.3 expression) and V beta-selective (since expression of V beta 6.7 remained unaffected by staphylococcal enterotoxin D). On the basis of these observations, we suggest that thymic organ culture provides a powerful approach to study the generation of the human T-cell repertoire. Images PMID:1584760

  12. Human skin is protected by four functionally and phenotypically discrete populations of resident and recirculating memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rei; Gehad, Ahmed; Yang, Chao; Campbell, Laura; Teague, Jessica E.; Schlapbach, Christoph; Elco, Christopher; Huang, Victor; Matos, Tiago R.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Clark, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    The skin of an adult human contains approximately 20 billion memory T cells. Epithelial barrier tissues are infiltrated by a combination of resident and recirculating T cells in mice but the relative proportions and functional activities of resident versus recirculating T cells have not been evaluated in human skin. We discriminated resident from recirculating T cells in human engrafted mice and lymphoma patients using alemtuzumab, a medication that depletes recirculating T cells from skin, and then analyzed these T cell populations in healthy human skin. All non-recirculating resident memory T cells (TRM) expressed CD69, but the majority were CD4+, CD103− and located in the dermis, in contrast to studies in mice. Both CD4+ and CD8+ CD103+ TRM were enriched in the epidermis, had potent effector functions and had a limited proliferative capacity compared to CD103− TRM. TRM of both types had more potent effector functions than recirculating T cells. Induction of CD103 on human T cells was enhanced by keratinocyte contact, depended on TGFβ and was independent of T cell keratinocyte adhesive interactions. We observed two distinct populations of recirculating T cells, CCR7+/L-selectin+ central memory T cells (TCM) and CCR7+/L-selectin− T cells, which we term migratory memory T cells (TMM). Circulating skin-tropic TMM were intermediate in cytokine production between TCM and effector memory T cells. In patients with cutaneous T cell lymphoma, malignant TCM and TMM induced distinct inflammatory skin lesions and TMM were depleted more slowly from skin after alemtuzumab, suggesting TMM may recirculate more slowly. In summary, human skin is protected by four functionally distinct populations of T cells, two resident and two recirculating, with differing territories of migration and distinct functional activities. PMID:25787765

  13. Efficient Transduction of Human and Rhesus Macaque Primary T Cells by a Modified Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Based Lentiviral Vector.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Xue, Jing; Wang, Weiming; Liu, Lihong; Ye, Chaobaihui; Cong, Zhe; Kimata, Jason T; Qin, Chuan; Zhou, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vectors efficiently transduce genes to human, but not rhesus, primary T cells and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The poor transduction of HIV-1 vectors to rhesus cells is mainly due to species-specific restriction factors such as rhesus TRIM5α. Previously, several strategies to modify HIV-1 vectors were developed to overcome rhesus TRIM5α restriction. While the modified HIV-1 vectors efficiently transduce rhesus HSCs, they remain suboptimal for rhesus primary T cells. Recently, HIV-1 variants that encode combinations of LNEIE mutations in capsid (CA) protein and SIVmac239 Vif were found to replicate efficiently in rhesus primary T cells. Thus, the present study tested whether HIV-1 vectors packaged by a packaging construct containing these CA substitutions could efficiently transduce both human and rhesus primary CD4 T cells. To accomplish this, LNEIE mutations were made in the packaging construct CEMΔ8.9, and recombinant HIV-1 vectors packaged by Δ8.9 WT or Δ8.9 LNEIE were generated. Transduction rates, CA stability, and vector integration in CEMss-CCR5 and CEMss-CCR5-rhTRIM5α/green fluorescent protein cells, as well as transduction rates in human and rhesus primary CD4 T cells by Δ8.9 WT or Δ8.9 LNEIE-packaged HIV-1 vectors, were compared. Finally, the influence of rhesus TRIM5α variations in transduction rates to primary CD4 T cells from a cohort of 37 Chinese rhesus macaques was studied. While it maintains efficient transduction for human T-cell line and primary CD4 T cells, Δ8.9 LNEIE-packaged HIV-1 vector overcomes rhesus TRIM5α-mediated CA degradation, resulting in significantly higher transduction efficiency of rhesus primary CD4 T cells than Δ8.9 WT-packaged HIV-1 vector. Rhesus TRIM5α variations strongly influence transduction efficiency of rhesus primary CD4 T cells by both Δ8.9 WT or Δ8.9 LNEIE-packaged HIV-1 vectors. Thus, it is concluded that Δ8.9 LNEIE-packaged HIV-1

  14. Invariant natural killer T cells: front line fighters in the war against pathogenic microbes.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Catherine M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2016-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells constitute a unique subset of innate-like T cells that have been shown to have crucial roles in a variety of immune responses. iNKT cells are characterized by their expression of both NK cell markers and an invariant T cell receptor (TCR) α chain, which recognizes glycolipids presented by the MHC class I-like molecule CD1d. Despite having a limited antigen repertoire, the iNKT cell response can be very complex, and participate in both protective and harmful immune responses. The protective role of these cells against a variety of pathogens has been particularly well documented. Through the use of these pathogen models, our knowledge of the breadth of the iNKT cell response has been expanded. Specific iNKT cell antigens have been isolated from several different bacteria, from which iNKT cells are critical for protection in mouse models. These responses can be generated by direct, CD1d-mediated activation, or indirect, cytokine-mediated activation, or a combination of the two. This can lead to secretion of a variety of different Th1, Th2, or Th17 cytokines, which differentially impact the downstream immune response against these pathogens. This critical role is emphasized by the conservation of these cells between mice and humans, warranting further investigation into how iNKT cells participate in protective immune responses, with the ultimate goal of harnessing their potential for treatment.

  15. NOTCH is a key regulator of human T-cell acute leukemia initiating cell activity.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Florence; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Gerby, Bastien; Rouyez, Marie-Christine; Calvo, Julien; Fontenay, Michaéla; Boissel, Nicolas; Dombret, Hervé; Baruchel, André; Landman-Parker, Judith; Roméo, Paul-Henri; Ballerini, Paola; Pflumio, Françoise

    2009-02-19

    Understanding the pathways that regulate the human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) initiating cells (T-LiC) activity has been hampered by the lack of biologic assays in which this human disease can be studied. Here we show that coculture of primary human T-ALL with a mouse stromal cell line expressing the NOTCH ligand delta-like-1 (DL1) reproducibly allowed maintenance of T-LiC and long-term growth of blast cells. Human T-ALL mutated or not on the NOTCH receptor required sustained activation of the NOTCH pathway via receptor/ligand interaction for growth and T-LiC activity. On the reverse, inhibition of the NOTCH pathway during primary cultures abolished in vitro cell growth and in vivo T-LiC activity. Altogether, these results demonstrate the major role of the NOTCH pathway activation in human T-ALL development and in the maintenance of leukemia-initiating cells.

  16. Double-Negative αβ T Cells Are Early Responders to AKI and Are Found in Human Kidney.

    PubMed

    Martina, Maria N; Noel, Sanjeev; Saxena, Ankit; Bandapalle, Samatha; Majithia, Richa; Jie, Chunfa; Arend, Lois J; Allaf, Mohamad E; Rabb, Hamid; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A

    2016-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major cause of AKI, and previous studies established important roles for conventional CD4(+) T cells, natural killer T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in AKI pathogenesis. We recently identified CD4(-)CD8(-) (double-negative; DN) T cells as an important subset of αβ T cell receptor-positive cells residing in mouse kidney. However, little is known about the pathophysiologic functions of kidney DN T cells. In this study, we phenotypically and functionally characterized murine kidney DN T cells in the steady state and in response to IRI. Unlike CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, DN T cells in the steady state expressed high levels of CD69, CD28, and CD40L; differentially expressed IL-27 and IL-10 anti-inflammatory cytokines; spontaneously proliferated at a very high rate; and suppressed in vitro proliferation of activated CD4(+) T cells. Within the first 3-24 hours after IRI, kidney DN T cells expanded significantly and upregulated expression of IL-10. In adoptive transfer experiments, DN T cells significantly protected recipients from AKI by an IL-10-dependent mechanism. DN T cells also made up a large fraction of the T cell compartment in human kidneys. Our results indicate that DN T cells are an important subset of the resident αβ(+) T cell population in the mammalian kidney and are early responders to AKI that have anti-inflammatory properties.

  17. Antibody-Independent Function of Human B Cells Contributes to Antifungal T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Rezk, Ayman; Li, Hulun; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Prat, Alexandre; Bar-Or, Amit

    2017-04-15

    Fungal infections (e.g., Candida albicans) can manifest as serious medical illnesses, especially in the elderly and immune-compromised hosts. T cells are important for Candida control. Whether and how B cells are involved in antifungal immunity has been less clear. Although patients with agammaglobulinemia exhibit normal antifungal immunity, increased fungal infections are reported following B cell-depleting therapy, together pointing to Ab-independent roles of B cells in controlling such infections. To test how human B cells may contribute to fungal-associated human T cell responses, we developed a novel Ag-specific human T cell/B cell in vitro coculture system and found that human B cells could induce C. albicans-associated, MHC class II-restricted responses of naive T cells. Activated B cells significantly enhanced C. albicans-mediated Th1 and Th17 T cell responses, which were both strongly induced by CD80/CD86 costimulation. IL-6(+)GM-CSF(+) B cells were the major responding B cell subpopulation to C. albicans and provided efficient costimulatory signals to the T cells. In vivo B cell depletion in humans resulted in reduced C. albicans-associated T responses. Of note, the decreased Th17, but not Th1, responses could be reversed by soluble factors from B cells prior to depletion, in an IL-6-dependent manner. Taken together, our results implicate an Ab-independent cytokine-defined B cell role in human antifungal T cell responses. These findings may be particularly relevant given the prospects of chronic B cell depletion therapy use in lymphoma and autoimmune disease, as patients age and are exposed to serial combination therapies.

  18. CD8low CD100− T Cells Identify a Novel CD8 T Cell Subset Associated with Viral Control during Human Hantaan Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bei; Ma, Ying; Zhang, Yusi; Zhang, Chunmei; Yi, Jing; Zhuang, Ran; Yu, Haitao; Yang, Angang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaan virus (HTNV) infection can cause a severe lethal hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in humans. CD8+ T cells play a critical role in combating HTNV infections. However, the contributions of different CD8+ T cell subsets to the immune response against viral infection are poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel subset of CD8+ T cells characterized by the CD8low CD100− phenotype in HFRS patients. The CD8low CD100− subset accounted for a median of 14.3% of the total CD8+ T cells in early phase of HFRS, and this percentage subsequently declined in the late phase of infection, whereas this subset was absent in healthy controls. Furthermore, the CD8low CD100− cells were associated with high activation and expressed high levels of cytolytic effector molecules and exhibited a distinct expression profile of effector CD8+ T cells (CCR7+/− CD45RA− CD127high CD27int CD28low CD62L−). When stimulated with specific HTNV nucleocapsid protein-derived peptide pools, most responding CD8+ cells (gamma interferon [IFN-γ] positive and/or tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] positive) were CD8low CD100− cells. The frequency of CD8low CD100− cells among HTNV-specific CD8+ T cells was higher in milder cases than in more severe cases. Importantly, the proportion of the CD8low CD100− subset among CD8+ T cells in early phase of HFRS was negatively correlated with the HTNV viral load, suggesting that CD8low CD100− cells may be associated with viral clearance. The contraction of the CD8low CD100− subset in late phase of infection may be related to the consistently high expression levels of PD-1. These results may provide new insights into our understanding of CD8+ T cell-mediated protective immunity as well as immune homeostasis after HTNV infection in humans. IMPORTANCE CD8+ T cells play important roles in the antiviral immune response. We found that the proportion of CD8low CD100− cells among CD8+ T cells from HFRS patients was

  19. Introduction of exogenous T-cell receptors into human hematopoietic progenitors results in exclusion of endogenous T-cell receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Vatakis, Dimitrios N; Arumugam, Balamurugan; Kim, Sohn G; Bristol, Gregory; Yang, Otto; Zack, Jerome A

    2013-05-01

    Current tumor immunotherapy approaches include the genetic modification of peripheral T cells to express tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs). The approach, tested in melanoma, has led to some limited success of tumor regression in patients. Yet, the introduction of exogenous TCRs into mature T cells entails an underlying risk; the generation of autoreactive clones due to potential TCR mispairing, and the lack of effective negative selection, as these peripheral cells do not undergo thymic selection following introduction of the exogenous TCR. We have successfully generated MART-1-specific CD8 T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) in a humanized mouse model. The advantages of this approach include a long-term source of antigen specific T cells and proper T-cell selection due to thymopoiesis following expression of the TCR. In this report, we examine the molecular processes occurring on endogenous TCR expression and demonstrate that this approach results in exclusive cell surface expression of the newly introduced TCR, and the exclusion of endogenous TCR cell surface expression. This suggests that this stem cell based approach can provide a potentially safer approach for anticancer immunotherapy due to the involvement of thymic selection.

  20. Introduction of Exogenous T-cell Receptors Into Human Hematopoietic Progenitors Results in Exclusion of Endogenous T-cell Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vatakis, Dimitrios N; Arumugam, Balamurugan; Kim, Sohn G; Bristol, Gregory; Yang, Otto; Zack, Jerome A

    2013-01-01

    Current tumor immunotherapy approaches include the genetic modification of peripheral T cells to express tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs). The approach, tested in melanoma, has led to some limited success of tumor regression in patients. Yet, the introduction of exogenous TCRs into mature T cells entails an underlying risk; the generation of autoreactive clones due to potential TCR mispairing, and the lack of effective negative selection, as these peripheral cells do not undergo thymic selection following introduction of the exogenous TCR. We have successfully generated MART-1–specific CD8 T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) in a humanized mouse model. The advantages of this approach include a long-term source of antigen specific T cells and proper T-cell selection due to thymopoiesis following expression of the TCR. In this report, we examine the molecular processes occurring on endogenous TCR expression and demonstrate that this approach results in exclusive cell surface expression of the newly introduced TCR, and the exclusion of endogenous TCR cell surface expression. This suggests that this stem cell based approach can provide a potentially safer approach for anticancer immunotherapy due to the involvement of thymic selection. PMID:23481324

  1. Human Zika infection induces a reduction of IFN-γ producing CD4 T-cells and a parallel expansion of effector Vδ2 T-cells.

    PubMed

    Cimini, Eleonora; Castilletti, Concetta; Sacchi, Alessandra; Casetti, Rita; Bordoni, Veronica; Romanelli, Antonella; Turchi, Federica; Martini, Federico; Tumino, Nicola; Nicastri, Emanuele; Corpolongo, Angela; Di Caro, Antonino; Kobinger, Gary; Zumla, Alimuddin; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Agrati, Chiara

    2017-07-24

    The definition of the immunological response to Zika (ZIKV) infection in humans represents a key issue to identify protective profile useful for vaccine development and for pathogenesis studies. No data are available on the cellular immune response in the acute phase of human ZIKV infection, and its role in the protection and/or pathogenesis needs to be clarified. We studied and compared the phenotype and functionality of T-cells in patients with acute ZIKV and Dengue viral (DENV) infections. A significant activation of T-cells was observed during both ZIKV and DENV infections. ZIKV infection was characterized by a CD4 T cell differentiation toward effector cells and by a lower frequency of IFN-γ producing CD4 T cells. Moreover, a substantial expansion of CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T-cell subset expressing Vδ2 TCR was specifically observed in ZIKV patients. Vδ2 T cells presented a terminally differentiated profile, expressed granzyme B and maintained their ability to produce IFN-γ. These findings provide new knowledge on the immune response profile during self-limited infection that may help in vaccine efficacy definition, and in identifying possible immuno-pathogenetic mechanisms of severe infection.

  2. Human Epidermal Langerhans Cells Maintain Immune Homeostasis in Skin by Activating Skin Resident Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seneschal, Julien; Clark, Rachael A.; Gehad, Ahmed; Baecher-Allan, Clare M.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that the skin of a normal individual contains 10-20 billion resident memory T cells ( which include various T helper, T cytotoxic, and T regulatory subsets, that are poised to respond to environmental antigens. Using only autologous human tissues, we report that both in vitro and in vivo, resting epidermal Langerhan cells (LC) selectively and specifically induced the activation and proliferation of skin resident regulatory T cells (Treg), a minor subset of skin resident memory T cells. In the presence of foreign pathogen, however, the same LC activated and induced proliferation of effector memory T (Tem) cells and limited Treg cells activation. These underappreciated properties of LC: namely maintenance of tolerance in normal skin, and activation of protective skin resident memory T cells upon infectious challenge, help clarify the role of LC in skin. PMID:22560445

  3. Human natural killer cell committed thymocytes and their relation to the T cell lineage

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that mature natural killer (NK) cells can be grown from human triple negative (TN; CD3-, CD4-, CD8-) thymocytes, suggesting that a common NK/T cell precursor exists within the thymus that can give rise to both NK cells and T cells under appropriate conditions. In the present study, we have investigated human fetal and postnatal thymus to determine whether NK cells and their precursors exist within this tissue and whether NK cells can be distinguished from T cell progenitors. Based on the surface expression of CD56 (an NK cell-associated antigen) and CD5 (a T cell-associated antigen), three phenotypically distinctive populations of TN thymocytes were identified. CD56+, CD5-; CD56-, CD5-, and CD56-, CD5+. The CD56+, CD5- population of TN thymocytes, although displaying a low cytolytic function against NK sensitive tumor cell targets, were similar in antigenic phenotype to fetal liver NK cells, gave rise to NK cell clones, and were unable to generate T cells in mouse fetal thymic organ cultures (mFTOC). This population of thymocytes represents a relatively mature population of lineage-committed NK cells. The CD56-, CD5- population of TN thymocytes were similar to thymic NK cells in antigenic phenotype and NK cell clonogenic potential. Clones derived from this population of TN thymocytes acquired CD56 surface expression and NK cell cytolytic function. CD56-, CD5- TN thymocytes thus contain a novel population of NK cell-committed precursors. The CD56-, CD5- population of TN thymocytes also contains a small percentage of CD34+ cells, which demonstrate no in vitro clonogenic potential, but possess T cell reconstituting capabilities in mFTOC. The majority of TN thymocytes do not express CD56, but coexpress CD34 and CD5. These CD56- , CD5+, CD34+ cells demonstrate no NK or T cell clonogenic potential, but are extremely efficient in repopulating mFTOC and differentiating into CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ T cells. The results of this investigation have

  4. Chloroquine inhibits human CD4+ T-cell activation by AP-1 signaling modulation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ralf L. J.; Jutz, Sabrina; Goldhahn, Katrin; Witzeneder, Nadine; Gerner, Marlene C.; Trapin, Doris; Greiner, Georg; Hoermann, Gregor; Steiner, Guenter; Pickl, Winfried F.; Burgmann, Heinz; Steinberger, Peter; Ratzinger, Franz; Schmetterer, Klaus G.

    2017-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is widely used as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic for rheumatic diseases. Although its modes of action on the innate immune system are well described, there is still insufficient knowledge about its direct effects on the adaptive immune system. Thus, we evaluated the influence of CQ on activation parameters of human CD4+ T-cells. CQ directly suppressed proliferation, metabolic activity and cytokine secretion of T-cells following anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activation. In contrast, CQ showed no effect on up-regulation of T-cell activation markers. CQ inhibited activation of all T helper cell subsets, although IL-4 and IL-13 secretion by Th2 cells were less influenced compared to other Th-specific cytokines. Up to 10 μM, CQ did not reduce cell viability, suggesting specific suppressive effects on T-cells. These properties of CQ were fully reversible in re-stimulation experiments. Analyses of intracellular signaling showed that CQ specifically inhibited autophagic flux and additionally activation of AP-1 by reducing phosphorylation of c-JUN. This effect was mediated by inhibition of JNK catalytic activity. In summary, we characterized selective and reversible immunomodulatory effects of CQ on human CD4+ T-cells. These findings provide new insights into the biological actions of JNK/AP-1 signaling in T-cells and may help to expand the therapeutic spectrum of CQ. PMID:28169350

  5. CD161 defines a transcriptional and functional phenotype across distinct human T cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Fergusson, Joannah R; Smith, Kira E; Fleming, Vicki M; Rajoriya, Neil; Newell, Evan W; Simmons, Ruth; Marchi, Emanuele; Björkander, Sophia; Kang, Yu-Hoi; Swadling, Leo; Kurioka, Ayako; Sahgal, Natasha; Lockstone, Helen; Baban, Dilair; Freeman, Gordon J; Sverremark-Ekström, Eva; Davis, Mark M; Davenport, Miles P; Venturi, Vanessa; Ussher, James E; Willberg, Christian B; Klenerman, Paul

    2014-11-06

    The C-type lectin CD161 is expressed by a large proportion of human T lymphocytes of all lineages, including a population known as mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. To understand whether different T cell subsets expressing CD161 have similar properties, we examined these populations in parallel using mass cytometry and mRNA microarray approaches. The analysis identified a conserved CD161++/MAIT cell transcriptional signature enriched in CD161+CD8+ T cells, which can be extended to CD161+ CD4+ and CD161+TCRγδ+ T cells. Furthermore, this led to the identification of a shared innate-like, TCR-independent response to interleukin (IL)-12 plus IL-18 by different CD161-expressing T cell populations. This response was independent of regulation by CD161, which acted as a costimulatory molecule in the context of T cell receptor stimulation. Expression of CD161 hence identifies a transcriptional and functional phenotype, shared across human T lymphocytes and independent of both T cell receptor (TCR) expression and cell lineage. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mazliah, Damián; Albareda, María C.; Alvarez, María G.; Lococo, Bruno; Bertocchi, Graciela L.; Petti, Marcos; Viotti, Rodolfo J.; Laucella, Susana A.

    2012-01-01

    Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza (Flu) virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23049532

  7. Human CD4+ T-cell repertoire of responses to influenza A virus hemagglutinin after recent natural infection.

    PubMed Central

    Gelder, C M; Welsh, K I; Faith, A; Lamb, J R; Askonas, B A

    1995-01-01

    The human CD4+ T-cell repertoire of responses to hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus A/Beijing/32/92 was examined 3 to 6 months after natural infection by using a panel of 16-mer peptides overlapping by 11 residues. Short-term CD4+ T-cell lines were derived by using full-length HAs of virus A/Beijing/32/92 from 12 unrelated, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II haplotyped adults with a history of influenza in November and December 1993 and from 6 adults with no history of influenza during the preceding 4 years but who responded to HA. In contrast to recent murine studies, the human CD4+ T-cell repertoire of responses was dominated by the recognition of highly conserved epitopes. The HA2 subunit, widely regarded as nonimmunogenic, induced strong responses in every donor. This resulted in functional cross-reactivity among influenza A viruses. Our study included one pair of unrelated donors expressing identical HLA DRB1 and DQB1 alleles and two pairs of donors sharing low-resolution MHC class II types. These pairs responded to identical peptides; furthermore, clearly identifiable patterns of response were seen in donors sharing single class II haplotypes, irrespective of the presence of other alleles and exposure history. Two conserved regions which induced responses in 17 of 18 donors were identified (residues 295 to 328 and 407 to 442). Possible implications for cross-reactive T-cell vaccines are discussed. PMID:7494256

  8. Interaction between human mature adipocytes and lymphocytes induces T-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Poloni, Antonella; Maurizi, Giulia; Ciarlantini, Marco; Medici, Martina; Mattiucci, Domenico; Mancini, Stefania; Maurizi, Angela; Falconi, Massimo; Olivieri, Attilio; Leoni, Pietro

    2015-09-01

    Adipose tissue is a critical organ that plays a major role in energy balance regulation and the immune response through intricate signals. We report on the inter-relation between mature adipocytes and lymphocytes in terms of adipocyte-derived T-cell chemo-attractants and adipocyte metabolic effects on lymphocytes. During the culture time, mature adipocytes changed their structural and functional properties into de-differentiated cells. Isolated mature adipocytes expressed significantly higher levels of CIITA, major histocompatibility complex II (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-DR) and costimulatory signal molecule CD80 compared with adipocytes after the de-differentiation process. Moreover, human leukocyte antigen-G, which may prevent the immune responses of mesenchymal stromal cells, was expressed at lower level in mature adipocytes compared with de-differentiated adipocytes. In line with these molecular data, functional results showed different immunoregulatory properties between adipocytes before and after the de-differentiation process. Mature adipocytes stimulated the proliferation of total lymphocytes and immunoselected cell populations CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ in a direct contact-dependent way that involved the major histocompatibility complex I and II pathways. Moreover, adipocytes secreted potential chemo-attractant factors, but data showed that adipocyte-derived culture medium was not sufficient to activate lymphocyte proliferation, suggesting that a direct contact between adipocytes and immune cells was needed. However, specific mature adipocyte cytokines enhanced lymphocyte proliferation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. In conclusion, cross-talk occurs between adipocytes and lymphocytes within adipose tissue involving T-cell chemo-attraction by mature adipocytes. Our findings, together with current observations in the field, provide a rationale to identify adipocyte-lymphocyte cross-talk that instigates adipose inflammation. Copyright © 2015 International

  9. Secretion of the human T cell leukemia virus type I transactivator protein tax.

    PubMed

    Alefantis, Timothy; Mostoller, Kate; Jain, Pooja; Harhaj, Edward; Grant, Christian; Wigdahl, Brian

    2005-04-29

    Human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-I protein Tax is well known as a transcriptional transactivator and inducer of cellular transformation. However, it is also known that extracellular Tax induces the production and release of cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6, which have adverse effects on cells of the central nervous system. The cellular process by which Tax exits the cell into the extracellular environment is currently unknown. In most cell types, Tax has been shown to localize primarily to the nucleus. However, Tax has also been found to accumulate in the cytoplasm. The results contained herein begin to characterize the process of Tax secretion from the cell. Specifically, cytoplasmic Tax was demonstrated to localize to organelles associated with the cellular secretory process including the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex. Additionally, it was demonstrated that full-length Tax was secreted from both baby hamster kidney cells and a human kidney tumor cell line, suggesting that Tax enters the secretory pathway in a leaderless manner. Tax secretion was partially inhibited by brefeldin A, suggesting that Tax migrated from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex. In addition, combined treatment of Tax-transfected BHK-21 cells with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin resulted in a small increase in the amount of Tax secreted, suggesting that a fraction of cytoplasmic Tax was present in the regulated secretory pathway. These studies begin to provide a link between Tax localization to the cytoplasm, the detection of Tax in the extracellular environment, its possible role as an extracellular effector molecule, and a potential role in neurodegenerative disease associated with HTLV-I infection.

  10. Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench modulates human T-cell cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fabiana N; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Lin, Hong; Lau, Clara B S; Kennelly, Edward J; Cassileth, Barrie R; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2014-03-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the composition of a neutral and weakly acidic water-soluble extract from Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench (EchNWA) previously shown to modify murine influenza infection, and to assess immunomodulatory effects on human T-cells. EchNWA extract from fresh aerial parts was extracted with water, ethanolic precipitation, and size-exclusion chromatography. The chemical profile of EchNWA was characterized by chromatography (size-exclusion, HPLC, GC-MS), and small molecule fingerprint analysis performed by HPLC-PDA. Jurkat T-cells at high and low cell density were pretreated or not with doses of EchNWA, followed by activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin (PMA+I). Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon gamma (IFNg) cytokine secretions were measured by multi-cytokine luminex technology. Results showed that EchNWA contains 80% polysaccharides, predominantly a 10kDa entity; phenolic compounds, cynarin, cichoric and caftaric acids, but no detectable alkylamides. Cytokine production required stimulation and was lower after PMA+I activation in high-density compared to low-density conditions. EchNWA mediated a strong dose-dependent enhancement of high-density T-cell production of IL-2 and IFNg response to PMA+I. EchNWA alone did not stimulate T-cells. EchNWA enhanced mean fluorescence intensity of IL-2 in Jurkat T-cells activated by PMA+1 or ionomycin alone. Conversely EchNWA mediated modest but significant suppression of IFNg response and reduced the percentage of CD25+ T-cells under low-density conditions. Conclusions are that EchNWA polysaccharides, but not phenolic compounds have dose-related adjuvant effects on human T-cell cytokine responses characterized by enhancing and suppressive effects that are regulated by T-cell density.

  11. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection

    PubMed Central

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells. PMID:27031961

  12. Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench modulates human T-cell cytokine response☆

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fabiana N.; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Lin, Hong; Lau, Clara B.S.; Kennelly, Edward J.; Cassileth, Barrie R.; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the composition of a neutral and weakly acidic water-soluble extract from Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench (EchNWA) previously shown to modify murine influenza infection, and to assess immunomodulatory effects on human T-cells. EchNWA extract from fresh aerial parts was extracted with water, ethanolic precipitation, and size-exclusion chromatography. The chemical profile of EchNWA was characterized by chromatography (size-exclusion, HPLC, GC–MS), and small molecule finger-print analysis performed by HPLC–PDA. Jurkat T-cells at high and low cell density were pretreated or not with doses of EchNWA, followed by activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin (PMA+I). Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon gamma (IFNg) cytokine secretions were measured by multi-cytokine luminex technology. Results showed that EchNWA contains 80% polysaccharides, predominantly a 10 kDa entity; phenolic compounds, cynarin, cichoric and caftaric acids, but no detectable alkylamides. Cytokine production required stimulation and was lower after PMA+I activation in high-density compared to low-density conditions. EchNWA mediated a strong dose-dependent enhancement of high-density T-cell production of IL-2 and IFNg response to PMA+I. EchNWA alone did not stimulate T-cells. EchNWA enhanced mean fluorescence intensity of IL-2 in Jurkat T-cells activated by PMA+1 or ionomycin alone. Conversely EchNWA mediated modest but significant suppression of IFNg response and reduced the percentage of CD25+ T-cells under low-density conditions. Conclusions are that EchNWA polysaccharides, but not phenolic compounds have dose-related adjuvant effects on human T-cell cytokine responses characterized by enhancing and suppressive effects that are regulated by T-cell density. PMID:24434371

  13. Longitudinal characterization of dysfunctional T cell-activation during human acute Ebola infection.

    PubMed

    Agrati, C; Castilletti, C; Casetti, R; Sacchi, A; Falasca, L; Turchi, F; Tumino, N; Bordoni, V; Cimini, E; Viola, D; Lalle, E; Bordi, L; Lanini, S; Martini, F; Nicastri, E; Petrosillo, N; Puro, V; Piacentini, M; Di Caro, A; Kobinger, G P; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2016-03-31

    Data on immune responses during human Ebola virus disease (EVD) are scanty, due to limitations imposed by biosafety requirements and logistics. A sustained activation of T-cells was recently described but functional studies during the acute phase of human EVD are still missing. Aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetics and functionality of T-cell subsets, as well as the expression of activation, autophagy, apoptosis and exhaustion markers during the acute phase of EVD until recovery. Two EVD patients admitted to the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Lazzaro Spallanzani, were sampled sequentially from soon after symptom onset until recovery and analyzed by flow cytometry and ELISpot assay. An early and sustained decrease of CD4 T-cells was seen in both patients, with an inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio that was reverted during the recovery period. In parallel with the CD4 T-cell depletion, a massive T-cell activation occurred and was associated with autophagic/apoptotic phenotype, enhanced expression of the exhaustion marker PD-1 and impaired IFN-gamma production. The immunological impairment was accompanied by EBV reactivation. The association of an early and sustained dysfunctional T-cell activation in parallel to an overall CD4 T-cell decline may represent a previously unknown critical point of Ebola virus (EBOV)-induced immune subversion. The recent observation of late occurrence of EBOV-associated neurological disease highlights the importance to monitor the immuno-competence recovery at discharge as a tool to evaluate the risk of late sequelae associated with resumption of EBOV replication. Further studies are required to define the molecular mechanisms of EVD-driven activation/exhaustion and depletion of T-cells.

  14. Metabolic Engineering of Salmonella Vaccine Bacteria to Boost Human Vγ2Vδ2 T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Workalemahu, Grefachew; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Nada, Mohanad H.; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Jones, Bradley D.; Jin, Chenggang; Morita, Craig T.

    2014-01-01

    Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells monitor isoprenoid metabolism by recognizing foreign (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a metabolite in the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway used by most eubacteria and apicomplexan parasites, and self isopentenyl pyrophosphate, a metabolite in the mevalonate pathway used by humans. Whereas microbial infections elicit prolonged expansion of memory Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, immunization with prenyl pyrophosphates or aminobisphosphonates elicit short-term Vγ2Vδ2 expansion with rapid anergy and deletion upon subsequent immunizations. We hypothesized that a live, attenuated bacterial vaccine that overproduces HMBPP would elicit long lasting Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity by mimicking a natural infection. Therefore, we metabolically engineered the avirulent aroA− Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 strain by deleting the gene for LytB (the downstream enzyme from HMBPP) and functionally complementing for this loss with genes encoding mevalonate pathway enzymes. LytB− Salmonella SL7207 had high HMBPP levels, infected human cells as efficiently as the wild-type bacteria, and stimulated large ex vivo expansions of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells from human donors. Importantly, vaccination of a rhesus monkey with live lytB− Salmonella SL7207 stimulated a prolonged expansion of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells without significant side effects or anergy induction. These studies provide proof-of-principle that metabolic engineering can be used to derive live bacterial vaccines that boost Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity. Similar engineering of metabolic pathways to produce lipid Ags or B vitamin metabolite Ags could be used to derive live bacterial vaccine for other unconventional T cells that recognize nonpeptide Ags. PMID:24943221

  15. Metabolic engineering of Salmonella vaccine bacteria to boost human Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Workalemahu, Grefachew; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Nada, Mohanad H; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Jones, Bradley D; Jin, Chenggang; Morita, Craig T

    2014-07-15

    Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells monitor isoprenoid metabolism by recognizing foreign (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a metabolite in the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway used by most eubacteria and apicomplexan parasites, and self isopentenyl pyrophosphate, a metabolite in the mevalonate pathway used by humans. Whereas microbial infections elicit prolonged expansion of memory Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, immunization with prenyl pyrophosphates or aminobisphosphonates elicit short-term Vγ2Vδ2 expansion with rapid anergy and deletion upon subsequent immunizations. We hypothesized that a live, attenuated bacterial vaccine that overproduces HMBPP would elicit long-lasting Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity by mimicking a natural infection. Therefore, we metabolically engineered the avirulent aroA(-) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL7207 strain by deleting the gene for LytB (the downstream enzyme from HMBPP) and functionally complementing for this loss with genes encoding mevalonate pathway enzymes. LytB(-) Salmonella SL7207 had high HMBPP levels, infected human cells as efficiently as did the wild-type bacteria, and stimulated large ex vivo expansions of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells from human donors. Importantly, vaccination of a rhesus monkey with live lytB(-) Salmonella SL7207 stimulated a prolonged expansion of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells without significant side effects or anergy induction. These studies provide proof-of-principle that metabolic engineering can be used to derive live bacterial vaccines that boost Vγ2Vδ2 T cell immunity. Similar engineering of metabolic pathways to produce lipid Ags or B vitamin metabolite Ags could be used to derive live bacterial vaccine for other unconventional T cells that recognize nonpeptide Ags.

  16. Blockade of Programmed Death 1 Augments the Ability of Human T Cells Engineered to Target NY-ESO-1 to Control Tumor Growth after Adoptive Transfer.

    PubMed

    Moon, Edmund K; Ranganathan, Raghuveer; Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Kim, Soyeon; Newick, Kheng; O'Brien, Shaun; Lo, Albert; Liu, Xiaojun; Zhao, Yangbing; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-01-15

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) become hypofunctional, although the mechanisms are not clear. Our goal was to generate a model of human tumor-induced TIL hypofunction to study mechanisms and to test anti-human therapeutics. We transduced human T cells with a published, optimized T-cell receptor (TCR) that is directed to a peptide within the cancer testis antigen, NY-ESO-1. After demonstrating antigen-specific in vitro activity, these cells were used to target a human lung cancer line that expressed NY-ESO-1 in the appropriate HLA context growing in immunodeficient mice. The ability of anti-PD1 antibody to augment efficacy was tested. Injection of transgenic T cells had some antitumor activity, but did not eliminate the tumors. The injected T cells became profoundly hypofunctional accompanied by upregulation of PD1, Tim3, and Lag3 with coexpression of multiple inhibitory receptors in a high percentage of cells. This model allowed us to test reagents targeted specifically to human T cells. We found that injections of an anti-PD1 antibody in combination with T cells led to decreased TIL hypofunction and augmented the efficacy of the adoptively transferred T cells. This model offers a platform for preclinical testing of adjuvant immunotherapeutics targeted to human T cells prior to transition to the bedside. Because the model employs engineering of human T cells with a TCR clone instead of a CAR, it allows for study of the biology of tumor-reactive TILs that signal through an endogenous TCR. The lessons learned from TCR-engineered TILs can thus be applied to tumor-reactive TILs. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Engineering human peripheral blood stem cell grafts that are depleted of naïve T cells and retain functional pathogen-specific memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Marie; Heimfeld, Shelly; Jones, Lori A; Turtle, Cameron; Krause, Diane; Riddell, Stanley R; Shlomchik, Warren

    2014-05-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a frequent major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Approaches that selectively deplete T cells that cause GVHD from allogeneic stem cell grafts and preserve T cells specific for pathogens may improve HCT outcomes. It has been hypothesized that the majority of T cells that can cause GVHD reside within the naïve T cell (TN) subset, and previous studies performed in mouse models and with human cells in vitro support this hypothesis. As a prelude to translating these findings to the clinic, we developed and evaluated a novel 2-step clinically compliant procedure for manipulating peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) to remove TN, preserve CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells, and provide for a fixed dose of memory T cells (TM) that includes T cells with specificity for common opportunistic pathogens encountered after HCT. Our studies demonstrate effective and reproducible performance of the immunomagnetic cell selection procedure for depleting TN. Moreover, after cell processing, the CD45RA-depleted PBSC products are enriched for CD4(+) and CD8(+) TM with a central memory phenotype and contain TM cells that are capable of proliferating and producing effector cytokines in response to opportunistic pathogens. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transition of late-stage effector T cells to CD27+ CD28+ tumor-reactive effector memory T cells in humans after adoptive cell transfer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Daniel J.; Dudley, Mark E.; Robbins, Paul F.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    In humans, the pathways of memory T-cell differentiation remain poorly defined. Recently, adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of tumor-reactive T lymphocytes to metastatic melanoma patients after nonmyeloablative chemotherapy has resulted in persistence of functional, tumor-reactive lymphocytes, regression of disease, and induction of melanocyte-directed autoimmunity in some responding patients. In the current study, longitudinal phenotypic analysis was performed on melanoma antigen–specific CD8+ T cells during their transition from in vitro cultured effector cells to long-term persistent memory cells following ACT to 6 responding patients. Tumor-reactive T cells used for therapy were generally late-stage effector cells with a CD27Lo CD28Lo CD45RA− CD62 ligand− (CD62L−) CC chemokine receptor 7− (CCR7−) interleukin-7 receptor αLo (IL-7RαLo) phenotype. After transfer, rapid up-regulation and continued expression of IL-7Rα in vivo suggested an important role for IL-7R in immediate and long-term T-cell survival. Although the tumor antigen–specific T-cell population contracted between 1 and 4 weeks after transfer, stable numbers of CD27+ CD28+ tumor-reactive T cells were maintained, demonstrating their contribution to the development of long-term, melanoma-reactive memory CD8+ T cells in vivo. At 2 months after transfer, melanoma-reactive T cells persisted at high levels and displayed an effector memory phenotype, including a CD27+ CD28+ CD62L− CCR7− profile, which may explain in part their ability to mediate tumor destruction. PMID:15345595

  19. Human ovarian tumor ascites fluids rapidly and reversibly inhibit T cell receptor-induced NF-κB and NFAT signaling in tumor-associated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R.; Loyall, Jenni L.; Lehman, Heather K.; Barnas, Jennifer L.; Minderman, Hans; O’Loughlin, Kieran L.; Wallace, Paul K.; George, Thaddeus C.; Peng, Peng; Kelleher, Raymond J.; Odunsi, Kunle; Bankert, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Human memory T cells present in ovarian tumor ascites fluids fail to respond normally to stimulation via the T cell receptor (TCR). This immunosuppression is manifested by decreases in NF-κB and NFAT activation, IFN-γ production, and cell proliferation in response to TCR stimulation with immobilized antibodies to CD3 and CD28. The anergy of the tumor-associated T cells (TATs) is mediated by soluble factors present in ovarian tumor ascites fluids. The non-responsiveness of the T cells is quickly reversed when the cells are assayed in the absence of the ascites fluid, and is rapidly reestablished when a cell-free ascites fluid is added back to the T cells. Based upon the observed normal phosphorylation patterns of the TCR proximal signaling molecules, the inhibition of NF-κB, and NFAT activation in response to TCR stimulation, as well as the ability of the diacylglycerol analog PMA and the ionophore ionomycin to bypass the ascites fluid-induced TCR signaling arrest, the site of the arrest in the activation cascade appears to be at or just upstream of PLC-γ. An identical TCR signaling arrest pattern was observed when T cells derived from normal donor peripheral blood were incubated with either malignant or nonmalignant (cirrhotic) ascites fluids. The immunosuppressive activity of ascites fluids reported here suggests that soluble factors acting directly or indirectly upon T cells present within tumors contribute to the anergy that has previously been observed in T cells derived from malignant and nonmalignant inflammatory microenvironments. The soluble immunosuppressive factors represent potential therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer. PMID:23882159

  20. Human T-cells recognise N-terminally Fmoc-modified peptide.

    PubMed

    Mannering, Stuart I; Purcell, Anthony W; Honeyman, Margo C; McCluskey, James; Harrison, Leonard C

    2003-09-08

    We aimed to generate T-cell clones specific for human pre-proinsulin. An HLA DQ8, CD4+ T-cell clone that recognised a 10mer (C65-A9) peptide from pre-proinsulin was isolated. Further analysis revealed that the clone responded neither to recombinant proinsulin nor to re-synthesised C65-A9 peptide. Analysis of the original peptide revealed minor contamination (<0.5%) with an N-terminal Fmoc adduct. This peptide was synthesised and shown to stimulate the clone. Thus, Fmoc-modified peptides, which are common contaminants in synthetic peptides, can stimulate human CD4+ T-cells. This finding has important implications for the use of synthetic peptides in screening and epitope mapping studies and their use as vaccines in humans.

  1. Impact of nicotine on the interplay between human periodontal ligament cells and CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xin; Liu, Ying-Feng; Wong, Yong; Wu, Li-Zheng; Tan, Ling; Liu, Fen; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Periodontitis is a common infectious disease associated with destruction of periodontal ligaments and alveolar bones. CD4(+) T cell-mediated immune response is involved in the progression of periodontitis. Tobacco consumption increases the risk of periodontal disease. However, the impact of nicotine on the interaction between human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and CD4(+) T cells remains unrevealed. Our study aims to investigate the effect of nicotine on PDL cells and the cocultured CD4(+) T cells. The PDL cell cultures were established by explants from healthy individuals, exposed to nicotine or α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX), and incubated solely or in combination with CD4(+) T cells. Afterwards, cell viability, secreted cytokines, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were evaluated. In monoculture of PDL cells, nicotine dramatically repressed cell viability and increased apoptosis. Meanwhile, α-BTX largely reversed the nicotine-induced apoptosis and increased viability of PDL cells. Compared with the monoculture, MMP-1, MMP-3, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-21 in supernatant of cocultures were markedly elevated after treatment with nicotine. Moreover, α-BTX significantly attenuated nicotine-triggered production of these components either in mono- or co-cultures. In addition, PDL cell-derived CXCL12 following nicotine treatment recruited CD4(+) T cells. Above all, nicotine deteriorated periodontitis partially by promoting PDL cell-CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory response and matrix degradation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Human CD4+ T Cell Epitopes from Vaccinia Virus Induced by Vaccination or Infection

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio; Strug, Iwona; Nastke, Maria-Dorothea; Baker, Stephen P; Stern, Lawrence J

    2007-01-01

    Despite the importance of vaccinia virus in basic and applied immunology, our knowledge of the human immune response directed against this virus is very limited. CD4+ T cell responses are an important component of immunity induced by current vaccinia-based vaccines, and likely will be required for new subunit vaccine approaches, but to date vaccinia-specific CD4+ T cell responses have been poorly characterized, and CD4+ T cell epitopes have been reported only recently. Classical approaches used to identify T cell epitopes are not practical for large genomes like vaccinia. We developed and validated a highly efficient computational approach that combines prediction of class II MHC-peptide binding activity with prediction of antigen processing and presentation. Using this approach and screening only 36 peptides, we identified 25 epitopes recognized by T cells from vaccinia-immune individuals. Although the predictions were made for HLA-DR1, eight of the peptides were recognized by donors of multiple haplotypes. T cell responses were observed in samples of peripheral blood obtained many years after primary vaccination, and were amplified after booster immunization. Peptides recognized by multiple donors are highly conserved across the poxvirus family, including variola, the causative agent of smallpox, and may be useful in development of a new generation of smallpox vaccines and in the analysis of the immune response elicited to vaccinia virus. Moreover, the epitope identification approach developed here should find application to other large-genome pathogens. PMID:17937498

  3. Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei B21060 Suppresses Human T-Cell Proliferation▿

    PubMed Central

    Peluso, Ilaria; Fina, Daniele; Caruso, Roberta; Stolfi, Carmine; Caprioli, Flavio; Fantini, Massimo Claudio; Caspani, Giorgio; Grossi, Enzo; Di Iorio, Laura; Paone, Francesco Maria; Pallone, Francesco; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that probiotics are beneficial in T-cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. The molecular mechanism by which probiotics work remains elusive, but accumulating evidence indicates that probiotics can modulate immune cell responses. Since T cells express receptors for bacterial products or components, we examined whether different strains of lactobacilli directly regulate the functions of human T cells. CD4+ T cells were isolated from blood and intestinal lamina propria (LP) of normal individuals and patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Mononuclear cells were also isolated from Peyer's patches. Cells were activated with anti-CD3/CD2/CD28 in the presence or absence of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei B21060, L. paracasei subsp. paracasei F19, or L. casei subsp. casei DG. Cell proliferation and death, Foxp3, intracellular pH, and cytokine production were evaluated by flow cytometry. We showed that L. paracasei subsp. paracasei B21060 but neither L. paracasei subsp. paracasei F19 nor L. casei subsp. casei DG inhibited blood CD4+ T-cell growth. This effect was associated with no change in cell survival, expression of Foxp3, or production of gamma interferon, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and IL-10. L. paracasei subsp. paracasei B21060-mediated blockade of CD4+ T-cell proliferation required a viable bacterium and was associated with decreased MCT-1 expression and low intracellular pH. L. paracasei subsp. paracasei B21060 also inhibited the growth of Peyer's patch mononuclear cells, normal lymphocytes, and IBD CD4+ LP lymphocytes without affecting cytokine production. The data show that L. paracasei subsp. paracasei B21060 blocks T-cell growth, thus suggesting a mechanism by which these probiotics could interfere with T-cell-driven immune responses. PMID:17242060

  4. Extrathymic T cell differentiation in the human intestine early in life.

    PubMed

    Howie, D; Spencer, J; DeLord, D; Pitzalis, C; Wathen, N C; Dogan, A; Akbar, A; MacDonald, T T

    1998-12-01

    It is clear from experimental studies in mice that T cell maturation can occur outside the thymus, especially in the intestine. There is little sound evidence so far that extrathymic T cell maturation occurs to any significant extent in human gut, and, postnatally, there is abundant evidence that the gut mucosa is an immune effector organ. Here, we describe a large population of T lymphocytes in human fetal intestinal mucosa that are proliferating (Ki67+) in the absence of foreign Ag (CD3+, Ki67+ lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL) 22 +/- 1.8% and CD3+, Ki67+ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) 9.1 +/- 1.4%), that express the T cell activation markers CD103, HLA-DR, and L-selectin(low), and that express mRNA transcripts for pre-TCR-alpha. There is also a substantial proportion of CD7+ LPLs that do not express CD3 (CD3-7+, 14 +/- 7% of all LPLs) in the fetal gut that may be differentiating into CD3+ cells. Rearranged TCR-beta transcripts of fetal LPLs, IELs, and paired blood lymphocytes were cloned and sequenced, and virtually no overlap of clonality was observed between blood and intestine, suggesting that gut T cells may not be derived from the blood. In addition, 30 days after engraftment of SCID mice with fetal intestine, CD3-7+ cells, proliferating T cells, and pre-TCR-alpha transcripts were abundant, and there is a threefold increase in CD3+ IELs. These data show that in the human intestine before birth a population of precursor T cells exists that may be differentiating into mature T cells in situ.

  5. Functional Signatures of Human CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Prezzemolo, Teresa; Guggino, Giuliana; La Manna, Marco Pio; Di Liberto, Diana; Dieli, Francesco; Caccamo, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    mechanisms could contribute to control Mtb infection, as upon activation, CD8 T cells release cytokines or cytotoxic molecules, which cause apoptosis of target cells. Taken together, the balance of the immune response in the control of infection and possibly bacterial eradication is important in understanding whether the host immune response will be appropriate in contrasting the infection or not, and, consequently, the inability of the immune response, will determine the dissemination and the transmission of bacilli to new subjects. In conclusion, the recent highlights on the role of different functional signatures of T cell subsets in the immune response toward Mtb infection will be discerned in this review, in order to summarize what is known about the immune response in human TB. In particular, we will discuss the role of CD4 and CD8 T cells in contrasting the advance of the intracellular pathogen in already infected people or the progression to active disease in subjects with latent infection. All the information will be aimed at increasing the knowledge of this complex disease in order to improve diagnosis, prognosis, drug treatment, and vaccination.

  6. Interleukin-21 (IL-21) synergizes with IL-2 to enhance T-cell receptor-induced human T-cell proliferation and counteracts IL-2/transforming growth factor-β-induced regulatory T-cell development

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Baranello, Cinzia; Fanelli, Mara; Fossati, Marco; Catzola, Valentina; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a mainstay for current immunotherapeutic protocols but its usefulness in patients is reduced by severe toxicities and because IL-2 facilitates regulatory T (Treg) cell development. IL-21 is a type I cytokine acting as a potent T-cell co-mitogen but less efficient than IL-2 in sustaining T-cell proliferation. Using various in vitro models for T-cell receptor (TCR)-dependent human T-cell proliferation, we found that IL-21 synergized with IL-2 to make CD4+ and CD8+ T cells attain a level of expansion that was impossible to obtain with IL-2 alone. Synergy was mostly evident in naive CD4+ cells. IL-2 and tumour-released transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) are the main environmental cues that cooperate in Treg cell induction in tumour patients. Interleukin-21 hampered Treg cell expansion induced by IL-2/TGF-β combination in naive CD4+ cells by facilitating non-Treg over Treg cell proliferation from the early phases of cell activation. Conversely, IL-21 did not modulate the conversion of naive activated CD4+ cells into Treg cells in the absence of cell division. Treg cell reduction was related to persistent activation of Stat3, a negative regulator of Treg cells associated with down-modulation of IL-2/TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of Smad2/3, a positive regulator of Treg cells. In contrast to previous studies, IL-21 was completely ineffective in counteracting the suppressive activity of Treg cells on naive and memory, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Present data provide proof-of-concept for evaluating a combinatorial approach that would reduce the IL-2 needed to sustain T-cell proliferation efficiently, thereby reducing toxicity and controlling a tolerizing mechanism responsible for the contraction of the T-cell response. PMID:23278180

  7. Activation of Notch1 promotes development of human CD8(+) single positive T cells in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Haji, Yoichi; Suzuki, Makiko; Moriya, Kunihiko; So, Takanori; Hozumi, Katsuto; Mizuma, Masamichi; Unno, Michiaki; Ishii, Naoto

    2014-05-02

    Notch1 mutations are found in more than 50% of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. However, the functions of Notch1 for human T cell development and leukemogenesis are not well understood. To examine the role of Notch1, human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which had been transduced with a constitutively active form of Notch1 (ICN1), were transplanted into severely immunodeficient NOD/Shi-scid-IL2rγ(null) (NOG) mice. We found that the great majority of the ICN1-expressing hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow expressed surface markers for T cells, such as CD3, CD4, and CD8, and that this T cell development was independent of the thymus. Accordingly, phenotypically mature CD8(+) single positive (SP) T cells were observed in the spleen. Furthermore, T-ALL developed in one NOG recipient mouse out of 26 that had been secondary transferred with the T cells developed in the first NOG mice. These results indicate that Notch1 signaling in HSCs promotes CD8(+) SP T cell development, and that T cell leukemogenesis may require additional oncogenic factors other than Notch1 activation.

  8. Allorestricted cytotoxic T cells specific for human CD45 show potent antileukemic activity.

    PubMed

    Amrolia, Persis J; Reid, Steven D; Gao, Liquan; Schultheis, Beate; Dotti, Gianpietro; Brenner, Malcolm K; Melo, Junia V; Goldman, John M; Stauss, Hans J

    2003-02-01

    Recent advances have made haploidentical transplantation for leukemia feasible, but the rigorous T-cell depletion used contributes to the high relapse rates observed. We have attempted to improve the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect by generating allorestricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) directed against human CD45. Such CTLs should recognize patient hematopoietic cells including leukemia, enhancing donor cell engraftment and improving the GVL effect, but they should not recognize host nonhematopoietic tissues or donor cells from the graft. Using the T2 binding assay, 4 CD45-derived peptides were found to bind HLA-A2 molecules. These peptides were used to generate cytotoxic T-cell lines from HLA-A2(-) donors by sequential stimulation with peptide-pulsed HLA-A2(+) stimulators, and the lines obtained were screened for peptide-specific cytotoxicity. Using one of these peptides (P1218), it was possible to generate peptide-specific, allorestricted CTLs in 3 of 7 responders. P1218-specific CTL lines show potent cytotoxicity against hematopoietic cell lines coexpressing HLA-A2 and CD45 but not CD45 loss variants. Studies with stable transfectants of 293 cells demonstrated recognition by P1218-specific CTLs of endogenously expressed CD45. Likewise P1218-specific CTLs recognized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HLA-A2(+) patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and leukemic blasts in HLA-A2(+) patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but they were unable to lyse HLA-A2(+) fibroblasts or HLA-A2(-) normal PBMCs. Coculture of CD34(+) PBMCs and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) with P1218-specific CTL significantly inhibited colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage (CFU-GM) formation in HLA-A2(+) healthy controls and CML patients but resulted in no significant inhibition in HLA-A2(-) healthy controls. These studies demonstrate that P1218-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) have potent activity against leukemic progenitors and suggest that

  9. Low CD4/CD8 T-Cell Ratio Associated with Inflammatory Arthropathy in Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Tax Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohsugi, Takeo; Kumasaka, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) can cause an aggressive malignancy known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) as well as inflammatory diseases such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). A transgenic mouse that expresses HTLV-1 Tax also develops T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and an inflammatory arthropathy that resembles rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to identify the primary T-cell subsets involved in the development of arthropathy in Tax transgenic mice. Principal Findings By 24 months of age, Tax transgenic mice developed severe arthropathy with a cumulative incidence of 22.8%. The pathological findings of arthropathy in Tax transgenic mice were similar to those seen in human rheumatoid arthritis or mouse models of rheumatoid arthritis, with synovial proliferation and a positive rheumatoid factor. Before the onset of spontaneous arthropathy, young and old Tax transgenic mice were not sensitive to collagen and did not develop arthritis after immunization with type II collagen. The arthropathic Tax transgenic mice showed a significantly decreased proportion of splenic CD4+ T cells, whereas the proportion of splenic CD8+ T cells was increased. Regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) were significantly decreased and CD8+ T cells that expressed the chemokine receptor CCR4 (CD8+CCR4+) were significantly increased in arthropathic Tax transgenic mice. The expression of tax mRNA was strong in the spleen and joints of arthropathic mice, with a 40-fold increase compared with healthy transgenic mice. Conclusions Our findings reveal that Tax transgenic mice develop rheumatoid-like arthritis with proliferating synovial cells in the joints; however, the proportion of different splenic T-cell subsets in these mice was completely different from other commonly used animal models of rheumatoid arthritis. The crucial T-cell subsets in arthropathic Tax transgenic mice appear to resemble those in HAM/TSP patients

  10. Enforced IL-10 Expression Confers Type 1 Regulatory T Cell (Tr1) Phenotype and Function to Human CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Andolfi, Grazia; Fousteri, Georgia; Rossetti, Maura; Magnani, Chiara F; Jofra, Tatiana; Locafaro, Grazia; Bondanza, Attilio; Gregori, Silvia; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are an inducible subset of CD4+ Tr cells characterized by high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 production and regulatory properties. Several protocols to generate human Tr1 cells have been developed in vitro. However, the resulting population includes a significant fraction of contaminating non-Tr1 cells, representing a major bottleneck for clinical application of Tr1 cell therapy. We generated an homogeneous IL-10–producing Tr1 cell population by transducing human CD4+ T cells with a bidirectional lentiviral vector (LV) encoding for human IL-10 and the marker gene, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which are independently coexpressed. The resulting GFP+ LV-IL-10–transduced human CD4+ T (CD4LV-IL-10) cells expressed, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) activation, high levels of IL-10 and concomitant low levels of IL-4, and markers associated with IL-10. Moreover, CD4LV-IL-10 T cells displayed typical Tr1 features: the anergic phenotype, the IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β dependent suppression of allogeneic T-cell responses, and the ability to suppress in a cell-to-cell contact independent manner in vitro. CD4LV-IL-10 T cells were able to control xeno graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), demonstrating their suppressive function in vivo. These results show that constitutive over-expression of IL-10 in human CD4+ T cells leads to a stable cell population that recapitulates the phenotype and function of Tr1 cells. PMID:22692497

  11. Enforced IL-10 Expression Confers Type 1 Regulatory T Cell (Tr1) Phenotype and Function to Human CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Andolfi, Grazia; Fousteri, Georgia; Rossetti, Maura; Magnani, Chiara F; Jofra, Tatiana; Locafaro, Grazia; Bondanza, Attilio; Gregori, Silvia; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2012-09-01

    Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are an inducible subset of CD4(+) Tr cells characterized by high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 production and regulatory properties. Several protocols to generate human Tr1 cells have been developed in vitro. However, the resulting population includes a significant fraction of contaminating non-Tr1 cells, representing a major bottleneck for clinical application of Tr1 cell therapy. We generated an homogeneous IL-10-producing Tr1 cell population by transducing human CD4(+) T cells with a bidirectional lentiviral vector (LV) encoding for human IL-10 and the marker gene, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which are independently coexpressed. The resulting GFP(+) LV-IL-10-transduced human CD4(+) T (CD4(LV-IL-10)) cells expressed, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) activation, high levels of IL-10 and concomitant low levels of IL-4, and markers associated with IL-10. Moreover, CD4(LV-IL-10) T cells displayed typical Tr1 features: the anergic phenotype, the IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β dependent suppression of allogeneic T-cell responses, and the ability to suppress in a cell-to-cell contact independent manner in vitro. CD4(LV-IL-10) T cells were able to control xeno graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), demonstrating their suppressive function in vivo. These results show that constitutive over-expression of IL-10 in human CD4(+) T cells leads to a stable cell population that recapitulates the phenotype and function of Tr1 cells.

  12. Enforced IL-10 expression confers type 1 regulatory T cell (Tr1) phenotype and function to human CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Andolfi, Grazia; Fousteri, Georgia; Rossetti, Maura; Magnani, Chiara F; Jofra, Tatiana; Locafaro, Grazia; Bondanza, Attilio; Gregori, Silvia; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2012-09-01

    Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are an inducible subset of CD4(+) Tr cells characterized by high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 production and regulatory properties. Several protocols to generate human Tr1 cells have been developed in vitro. However, the resulting population includes a significant fraction of contaminating non-Tr1 cells, representing a major bottleneck for clinical application of Tr1 cell therapy. We generated an homogeneous IL-10-producing Tr1 cell population by transducing human CD4(+) T cells with a bidirectional lentiviral vector (LV) encoding for human IL-10 and the marker gene, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which are independently coexpressed. The resulting GFP(+) LV-IL-10-transduced human CD4(+) T (CD4(LV-IL-10)) cells expressed, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) activation, high levels of IL-10 and concomitant low levels of IL-4, and markers associated with IL-10. Moreover, CD4(LV-IL-10) T cells displayed typical Tr1 features: the anergic phenotype, the IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β dependent suppression of allogeneic T-cell responses, and the ability to suppress in a cell-to-cell contact independent manner in vitro. CD4(LV-IL-10) T cells were able to control xeno graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), demonstrating their suppressive function in vivo. These results show that constitutive over-expression of IL-10 in human CD4(+) T cells leads to a stable cell population that recapitulates the phenotype and function of Tr1 cells.

  13. Elevated cyclic AMP levels in T lymphocytes transformed by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Kress, Andrea K; Schneider, Grit; Pichler, Klemens; Kalmer, Martina; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Grassmann, Ralph

    2010-09-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the cause of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), transforms CD4(+) T cells to permanent growth through its transactivator Tax. HTLV-1-transformed cells share phenotypic properties with memory and regulatory T cells (T-reg). Murine T-reg-mediated suppression employs elevated cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels as a key regulator. This led us to determine cAMP levels in HTLV-1-transformed cells. We found elevated cAMP concentrations as a consistent feature of all HTLV-1-transformed cell lines, including in vitro-HTLV-1-transformed, Tax-transformed, and patient-derived cells. In transformed cells with conditional Tax expression, high cAMP levels coincided with the presence of Tax but were lost without it. However, transient ectopic expression of Tax alone was not sufficient to induce cAMP. We found specific downregulation of the cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase 3B (PDE3B) in HTLV-1-transformed cells, which was independent of Tax in transient expression experiments. This is in line with the notion that PDE3B transcripts and cAMP levels are inversely correlated. Overexpression of PDE3B led to a decrease of cAMP in HTLV-1-transformed cells. Decreased expression of PDE3B was associated with inhibitory histone modifications at the PDE3B promoter and the PDE3B locus. In summary, Tax transformation and its continuous expression contribute to elevated cAMP levels, which may be regulated through PDE3B suppression. This shows that HTLV-1-transformed cells assume biological features of long-lived T-cell populations that potentially contribute to viral persistence.

  14. Comparative proteomics of exosomes secreted by tumoral Jurkat T cells and normal human T cell blasts unravels a potential tumorigenic role for valosin-containing protein

    PubMed Central

    Sanclemente, Manuel; Iturralde, María; Naval, Javier; Alava, María Angeles; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Thierse, Hermann-Josef; Anel, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We have previously characterized that FasL and Apo2L/TRAIL are stored in their bioactive form inside human T cell blasts in intraluminal vesicles present in multivesicular bodies. These vesicles are rapidly released to the supernatant in the form of exosomes upon re-activation of T cells. In this study we have compared for the first time proteomics of exosomes produced by normal human T cell blasts with those produced by tumoral Jurkat cells, with the objective of identify proteins associated with tumoral exosomes that could have a previously unrecognized role in malignancy. We have identified 359 and 418 proteins in exosomes from T cell blasts and Jurkat cells, respectively. Interestingly, only 145 (around a 40%) are common. The major proteins in both cases are actin and tubulin isoforms and the common interaction nodes correspond to these cytoskeleton and related proteins, as well as to ribosomal and mRNA granule proteins. We detected 14 membrane proteins that were especially enriched in exosomes from Jurkat cells as compared with T cell blasts. The most abundant of these proteins was valosin-containing protein (VCP), a membrane ATPase involved in ER homeostasis and ubiquitination. In this work, we also show that leukemic cells are more sensitive to cell death induced by the VCP inhibitor DBeQ than normal T cells. Furthermore, VCP inhibition prevents functional exosome secretion only in Jurkat cells, but not in T cell blasts. These results suggest VCP targeting as a new selective pathway to exploit in cancer treatment to prevent tumoral exosome secretion. PMID:27086912

  15. Comparative proteomics of exosomes secreted by tumoral Jurkat T cells and normal human T cell blasts unravels a potential tumorigenic role for valosin-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Bosque, Alberto; Dietz, Lisa; Gallego-Lleyda, Ana; Sanclemente, Manuel; Iturralde, María; Naval, Javier; Alava, María Angeles; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Thierse, Hermann-Josef; Anel, Alberto

    2016-05-17

    We have previously characterized that FasL and Apo2L/TRAIL are stored in their bioactive form inside human T cell blasts in intraluminal vesicles present in multivesicular bodies. These vesicles are rapidly released to the supernatant in the form of exosomes upon re-activation of T cells. In this study we have compared for the first time proteomics of exosomes produced by normal human T cell blasts with those produced by tumoral Jurkat cells, with the objective of identify proteins associated with tumoral exosomes that could have a previously unrecognized role in malignancy. We have identified 359 and 418 proteins in exosomes from T cell blasts and Jurkat cells, respectively. Interestingly, only 145 (around a 40%) are common. The major proteins in both cases are actin and tubulin isoforms and the common interaction nodes correspond to these cytoskeleton and related proteins, as well as to ribosomal and mRNA granule proteins. We detected 14 membrane proteins that were especially enriched in exosomes from Jurkat cells as compared with T cell blasts. The most abundant of these proteins was valosin-containing protein (VCP), a membrane ATPase involved in ER homeostasis and ubiquitination. In this work, we also show that leukemic cells are more sensitive to cell death induced by the VCP inhibitor DBeQ than normal T cells. Furthermore, VCP inhibition prevents functional exosome secretion only in Jurkat cells, but not in T cell blasts. These results suggest VCP targeting as a new selective pathway to exploit in cancer treatment to prevent tumoral exosome secretion.

  16. Endogenous antigen presentation by autoantigen-transfected Epstein-Barr virus-lymphoblastoid cells. I. Generation of human thyroid peroxidase-reactive T cells and their T cell receptor repertoire.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, A; Magnusson, R P; Kendler, D L; Concepcion, E; Ben-Nun, A; Davies, T F

    1993-01-01

    To develop a model for endogenous thyroid autoantigen presentation, we transfected EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (EBV-LCL), established from patients with autoimmune thyroid disease and normal controls, with cDNA for the human thyroid autoantigen thyroid peroxidase (hTPO). hTPO-antigen presentation to patient peripheral blood T cells was demonstrated after stimulation in vitro for 7 d with irradiated hTPO-transfected or untransfected autologous EBV-LCL. Anti-hTPO-reactive T cells were subsequently cloned in the presence of irradiated, autologous hTPO-transfected EBV-LCL and IL-2.10 T cell-cloned lines exhibited specific hTPO-induced proliferation (stimulation indices of 2.1-7.9) towards autologous hTPO-transfected EBV-LCL, and were subjected to human T cell receptor (hTCR) V gene analysis, using the PCR for the detection of V alpha and V beta hTcR gene families. The results indicated a preferential use of hTCR V alpha 1 and/or V alpha 3 in 9 of the 10 lines. In contrast, hTCR V beta gene family use was more variable. These data demonstrate a model for the endogenous presentation of human thyroid peroxidase in the absence of other thyroid specific antigens. The high frequency of antigen-specific T cells obtained from PBMC using this technique will facilitate further studies at both the functional and hTCR V gene level. Images PMID:7682574

  17. Neuroimmunological aspects of human T cell leukemia virus type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mineki

    2014-04-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a human retrovirus etiologically associated with adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Only approximately 0.25-4 % of infected individuals develop HAM/TSP; the majority of infected individuals remain lifelong asymptomatic carriers. Recent data suggest that immunological aspects of host-virus interactions might play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of HAM/TSP. This review outlines and discusses the current understanding, ongoing developments, and future perspectives of HAM/TSP research.

  18. Genomic organization of the human T-cell antigen-receptor alpha/delta locus.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, K; Hata, S; Devlin, P; Roncarolo, M G; De Vries, J E; Spits, H; Strominger, J L; Krangel, M S

    1988-11-01

    Two clusters of overlapping cosmid clones comprising about 100 kilobases (kb) at the human T-cell antigen-receptor alpha/delta locus were isolated from a genomic library. The structure of the germ-line V delta 1 variable gene segment was determined. V delta 1 is located 8.5 kb downstream of the V alpha 13.1 gene segment, and both V segments are arranged in the same transcriptional orientation. The V alpha 17.1 segment is located between V delta 1 and the D delta, J delta, C delta region (containing the diversity, joining, and constant gene segments). Thus, V delta and V alpha segments are interspersed along the chromosome. The germ-line organization of the D delta 2, J delta 1, and J delta 2 segments was determined. Linkage of C delta to the J alpha region was established by identification of J alpha segments within 20 kb downstream of C delta. The organization of the locus was also analyzed by field-inversion gel electrophoresis. The unrearranged V delta 1 and D delta, J delta, C delta regions are quite distant from each other, apparently separated by a minimum of 175-180 kb.

  19. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-07-11

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4⁺ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo.

  20. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A.; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4+ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo. PMID:27409630

  1. MHC II tetramers visualize human CD4+ T cell responses to Epstein–Barr virus infection and demonstrate atypical kinetics of the nuclear antigen EBNA1 response

    PubMed Central

    Long, Heather M.; Chagoury, Odette L.; Leese, Alison M.; Ryan, Gordon B.; James, Eddie; Morton, Laura T.; Abbott, Rachel J.M.; Sabbah, Shereen; Kwok, William

    2013-01-01

    Virus-specific CD4+ T cells are key orchestrators of host responses to viral infection yet, compared with their CD8+ T cell counterparts, remain poorly characterized at the single cell level. Here we use nine MHC II–epitope peptide tetramers to visualize human CD4+ T cell responses to Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis (IM), a disease associated with large virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses. We find that, while not approaching virus-specific CD8+ T cell expansions in magnitude, activated CD4+ T cells specific for epitopes in the latent antigen EBNA2 and four lytic cycle antigens are detected at high frequencies in acute IM blood. They then fall rapidly to values typical of life-long virus carriage where most tetramer-positive cells display conventional memory markers but some, unexpectedly, revert to a naive-like phenotype. In contrast CD4+ T cell responses to EBNA1 epitopes are greatly delayed in IM patients, in line with the well-known but hitherto unexplained delay in EBNA1 IgG antibody responses. We present evidence from an in vitro system that may explain these unusual kinetics. Unlike other EBNAs and lytic cycle proteins, EBNA1 is not naturally released from EBV-infected cells as a source of antigen for CD4+ T cell priming. PMID:23569328

  2. MHC II tetramers visualize human CD4+ T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus infection and demonstrate atypical kinetics of the nuclear antigen EBNA1 response.

    PubMed

    Long, Heather M; Chagoury, Odette L; Leese, Alison M; Ryan, Gordon B; James, Eddie; Morton, Laura T; Abbott, Rachel J M; Sabbah, Shereen; Kwok, William; Rickinson, Alan B

    2013-05-06

    Virus-specific CD4(+) T cells are key orchestrators of host responses to viral infection yet, compared with their CD8(+) T cell counterparts, remain poorly characterized at the single cell level. Here we use nine MHC II-epitope peptide tetramers to visualize human CD4(+) T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis (IM), a disease associated with large virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. We find that, while not approaching virus-specific CD8(+) T cell expansions in magnitude, activated CD4(+) T cells specific for epitopes in the latent antigen EBNA2 and four lytic cycle antigens are detected at high frequencies in acute IM blood. They then fall rapidly to values typical of life-long virus carriage where most tetramer-positive cells display conventional memory markers but some, unexpectedly, revert to a naive-like phenotype. In contrast CD4(+) T cell responses to EBNA1 epitopes are greatly delayed in IM patients, in line with the well-known but hitherto unexplained delay in EBNA1 IgG antibody responses. We present evidence from an in vitro system that may explain these unusual kinetics. Unlike other EBNAs and lytic cycle proteins, EBNA1 is not naturally released from EBV-infected cells as a source of antigen for CD4(+) T cell priming.

  3. Cancer immunotherapy using CAR-T cells: from the research bench to the assembly line.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Silva, Diogo; Ramos, Carlos A

    2017-09-27

    The focus of cancer treatment has recently shifted towards targeted therapies, including immunotherapy, which allow better individualization of care and are hoped to increase the probability of success for patients. Specifically, T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs; CAR-T cells) have generated exciting results. Recent clinical successes with this cutting-edge therapy have helped to push CAR-T cells towards approval for wider use. However, several limitations need to be addressed before the widespread use of CAR-T cells as a standard treatment. Here, we will give a succinct background on adoptive T-cell therapy, followed by a brief overview of the structure of CARs, how they are introduced into T cells, and how CAR-T cell expansion and selection is achieved in vitro. We will discuss some of the challenges in CAR design, as well as the difficulties that arise in large-scale CAR-T cell manufacture that will need to be addressed to achieve successful commercialization of this type of cell therapy. Finally, we will discuss developments already on the horizon. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Human skin is protected by four functionally and phenotypically discrete populations of resident and recirculating memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Rei; Gehad, Ahmed; Yang, Chao; Scott, Laura L; Teague, Jessica E; Schlapbach, Christoph; Elco, Christopher P; Huang, Victor; Matos, Tiago R; Kupper, Thomas S; Clark, Rachael A

    2015-03-18

    The skin of an adult human contains about 20 billion memory T cells. Epithelial barrier tissues are infiltrated by a combination of resident and recirculating T cells in mice, but the relative proportions and functional activities of resident versus recirculating T cells have not been evaluated in human skin. We discriminated resident from recirculating T cells in human-engrafted mice and lymphoma patients using alemtuzumab, a medication that depletes recirculating T cells from skin, and then analyzed these T cell populations in healthy human skin. All nonrecirculating resident memory T cells (TRM) expressed CD69, but most were CD4(+), CD103(-), and located in the dermis, in contrast to studies in mice. Both CD4(+) and CD8(+) CD103(+) TRM were enriched in the epidermis, had potent effector functions, and had a limited proliferative capacity compared to CD103(-) TRM. TRM of both types had more potent effector functions than recirculating T cells. We observed two distinct populations of recirculating T cells, CCR7(+)/L-selectin(+) central memory T cells (TCM) and CCR7(+)/L-selectin(-) T cells, which we term migratory memory T cells (TMM). Circulating skin-tropic TMM were intermediate in cytokine production between TCM and effector memory T cells. In patients with cutaneous T cell lymphoma, malignant TCM and TMM induced distinct inflammatory skin lesions, and TMM were depleted more slowly from skin after alemtuzumab, suggesting that TMM may recirculate more slowly. In summary, human skin is protected by four functionally distinct populations of T cells, two resident and two recirculating, with differing territories of migration and distinct functional activities. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Complexity of the primary genetic response to mitogenic activation of human T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zipfel, P.F.; Siebenlist, U. ); Irving, S.G.; Kelly, K. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors describe the isolation and characterization of more than 60 novel cDNA clones that constitute part of the immediate genetic response to resting human peripheral blood T cells after mitogen activation. This primary response was highly complex, both in the absolute number of inducible genes and in the diversity of regulation. Although most of the genes expressed in activated T cells were shared with the activation response of normal human fibroblasts, a significant number were more restricted in tissue specificity and thus likely encode or effect the differentiated functions of activated T cells. The activatable genes could be further differentiated on the basis of kinetics of induction, response to cycloheximide, and sensitivity to the immunosuppressive drug cylcosporin A. It is of note that cyclosporin A inhibited the expression of more than 10 inducible genes, which suggests that this drug has a broad genetic mechanism of action.

  6. Identification of putative human T cell receptor delta complementary DNA clones

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, S.; Brenner, M.B.; Krangel, M.S.

    1987-10-30

    A novel T cell receptor (TCR) subunit termed TCR delta, associated with TCY ..gamma.. and CD3 polypeptides, were recently found on a subpopulation of human T lymphocytes. T cell-specific complementary DNA clones present in a human TCR..gamma..delta T cell complementary DNA library were obtained and characterized in order to identify candidate clones encoding TCR delta. One cross-hybridizing group of clones detected transcripts that are expressed in lymphocytes bearing TCR ..gamma..delta but not in other T lymphocytes and are encoded by genes that are rearranged in TCR ..gamma..delta lymphocytes but deleted in other T lymphocytes. Their sequences indicate homology to the variable, joining, and constant elements of other TCR and immunoglobulin genes. These characteristics are strong evidence that the complementary DNA clones encode TCR delta.

  7. Hormone Conjugated with Antibody to CD3 Mediates Cytotoxic T Cell Lysis of Human Melanoma Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Margaret Ann; Nussbaum, Samuel R.; Eisen, Herman N.

    1988-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes can be activated by antibodies to their antigen-specific receptor complex (TCR-CD3) to destroy target cells, regardless of the specificity of the cytotoxic T cells. A novel hormone-antibody conjugate, consisting of an analog of melanocyte-stimulating hormone chemically coupled to a monoclonal antibody to CD3, the invariant component of the T cell receptor complex, was used to target human melanoma cells for destruction by human cytotoxic T lymphocytes that bear no specificity for the tumor cells. As targeting components of such anti-CD3 conjugates, hormones or growth factors are expected to prove more effective than antibodies to tumor-associated antigens in focusing the destructive activity of cytotoxic T cells on tumor target cells.

  8. Chemical proteomic map of dimethyl fumarate–sensitive cysteines in primary human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Megan M.; Xie, Jiji; Zaro, Balyn W.; Backus, Keriann M.; Altman, Amnon; Teijaro, John R.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an electrophilic drug that is used to treat autoimmune conditions, including multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. The mechanism of action of DMF is unclear, but may involve the covalent modification of proteins or DMF serving as a pro-drug that is converted to monomethyl fumarate (MMF). Here, we found that DMF, but not MMF, blocked the activation of primary human and mouse T cells. Using a quantitative, site-specific chemical proteomic platform, we determined the DMF-sensitivity of > 2400 cysteine residues in human T cells. Cysteines sensitive to DMF, but not MMF, were identified in several proteins with established biochemical or genetic links to T cell function, including protein kinase C θ (PKCθ). Furthermore, DMF blocked the association of PKCθ with the costimulatory receptor CD28 by perturbing a CXXC motif in the C2 domain of this kinase. Mutation of these DMF-sensitive cysteines also impaired PKCθ-CD28 interactions and T cell activation, designating the C2 domain of PKCθ as a key functional, electrophile-sensing module important for T cell biology. PMID:27625306

  9. Autoreactive T cells in a partially humanized murine model of T1D.

    PubMed

    Gebe, John A; Falk, Ben; Unrath, Kellee; Nepom, Gerald T

    2007-04-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) and insulin are implicated as target antigens in the pathogenesis of human diabetes through correlative measurements of humoral and cellular reactivity to them in diabetics and at-risk diabetic individuals. Recently, an age-dependent loss of tolerance to one of several naturally processed epitopes of GAD65 (555-567) has been observed to precede diabetes in diabetes-prone mice transgenic for diabetes-correlated human class II genes. Extended studies in these mice (RIP-B7/DR0404) now show that tolerance is maintained to another DR4-restricted naturally processed region within GAD65. While tolerance is lost to GAD65 (555-567) in B7/DR0404 mice prior to diabetes, these mice remain T cell-tolerant to GAD65 (273-286). Prediabetes loss of tolerance to GAD65 (555-567) has now been shown to correlate with an impaired response to exogenous glucose in an intraperitoneal (i.p.) glucose tolerance test. In addition, these mice exhibit a T cell response to insulin A(6-21) at the hyperglycemic state. Investigating a possible cause-and-effect relationship between T cell reactivity to GAD65 and diabetes pathogenesis, GAD65 (555-567) T cell receptor (TcR) transgenic mice have been generated and future work is aimed at understanding the importance of T cell GAD65 reactivity and its role in diabetes progression.

  10. Low dose antigen promotes induction of FOXP3 in human CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Long, S. Alice; Rieck, Mary; Tatum, Megan; Bollyky, Paul L.; Wu, Rebecca P.; Muller, Isabelle; Ho, Jhon-Chun; Shilling, Heather G.; Buckner, Jane H.

    2011-01-01

    Low antigen dose promotes induction and persistence of Treg in mice, yet few studies have addressed the role of antigen dose in the induction of adaptive CD4+FOXP3+ Treg in humans. To this end, we examined the level of FOXP3 expression in human CD4+CD25− T cells upon activation with autologous antigen presenting cells and varying doses of peptide. Antigen specific T cells expressing FOXP3 were identified by flow cytometry using MHC Class II tetramer (Tmr). We found an inverse relationship between antigen dose and the frequency of FOXP3+ cells for both foreign and self antigen specific T cells. Through studies of FOXP3 locus demethylation and helios expression, we determined that variation in the frequency of Tmr+FOXP3+ T cells was not due to expansion of natural Treg, but instead, we found that induction, proliferation and persistence of FOXP3+ cells was similar in high and low dose cultures whereas proliferation of FOXP3− T cells was favored in high antigen dose cultures. The frequency of FOXP3+ cells positively correlated with suppressive function, indicative of adaptive Treg generation. The frequency of FOXP3+ cells were maintained with IL-2, but not upon re-stimulation with antigen. Together, these data suggest that low antigen dose favors the transient generation of human antigen specific adaptive Treg over the proliferation of antigen specific FOXP3- effector T cells. These adaptive Treg could function to reduce ongoing inflammatory responses and promote low dose tolerance in humans, especially when antigen exposure and tolerance is transient. PMID:21865550

  11. Norovirus-Specific Memory T Cell Responses in Adult Human Donors

    PubMed Central

    Malm, Maria; Tamminen, Kirsi; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in people of all ages worldwide. NoV-specific serum antibodies which block the binding of NoV virus-like particles (VLPs) to the cell receptors have been thoroughly investigated. In contrast, only a few publications are available on the NoV capsid VP1 protein-specific T cell responses in humans naturally infected with the virus. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of eight healthy adult human donors previously exposed to NoV were stimulated with purified VLPs derived from NoV GII.4-1999, GII.4-2012 (Sydney), and GI.3, and IFN-γ production was measured by an ELISPOT assay. In addition, 76 overlapping synthetic peptides spanning the entire 539-amino acid sequence of GII.4 VP1 were pooled into two-dimensional matrices and used to identify putative T cell epitopes. Seven of the eight subjects produced IFN-γ in response to the peptides and five subjects produced IFN-γ in response to the VLPs of the same origin. In general, stronger T cell responses were induced with the peptides in each donor compared to the VLPs. A CD8+ T cell epitope in the shell domain of the VP1 (134SPSQVTMFPHIIVDVRQL151) was identified in two subjects, both having human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A∗02:01 allele. To our knowledge, this is the first report using synthetic peptides to study NoV-specific T cell responses in human subjects and identify T cell epitopes. PMID:27752254

  12. Genetically modified T cells targeting interleukin-11 receptor α-chain kill human osteosarcoma cells and induce the regression of established osteosarcoma lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gangxiong; Yu, Ling; Cooper, Laurence Jn; Hollomon, Mario; Huls, Helen; Kleinerman, Eugenie S

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of osteosarcoma pulmonary metastases remains a challenge. T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), which recognizes a tumor-associated antigen, have shown activity against hematopoietic malignancies in clinical trials, but this requires the identification of a specific receptor on the tumor cell. In the current study, we found that interleukin (IL)-11Rα was selectively expressed on 14 of 16 osteosarcoma patients' lung metastases and four different human osteosarcoma cell lines, indicating that IL-11Rα may be a novel target for CAR-specific T-cell therapy. IL-11Rα expression was absent or low in normal organ tissues, with the exception of the gastrointestinal tract. IL-11Rα-CAR-specific T cells were obtained by non-viral gene transfer of Sleeping Beauty DNA plasmids and selectively expanded ex vivo using artificial antigen-presenting cells derived from IL-11Rα + K562 cells genetically modified to coexpress T-cell costimulatory molecules. IL-11Rα-CAR(+) T cells killed all four osteosarcoma cell lines in vitro; cytotoxicity correlated with the level of IL-11Rα expression on the tumor cells. Intravenous injection of IL-11Rα-CAR(+) T cells into mice resulted in the regression of osteosarcoma pulmonary metastases with no organ toxicity. Together, the data suggest that IL-11Rα-CAR T cells may represent a new therapy for patients with osteosarcoma pulmonary metastases. ©2011 AACR.

  13. Interaction of the pertussis toxin peptide containing residues 30-42 with DR1 and the T-cell receptors of 12 human T-cell clones.

    PubMed Central

    De Magistris, M T; Di Tommaso, A; Domenighini, M; Censini, S; Tagliabue, A; Oksenberg, J R; Steinman, L; Judd, A K; O'Sullivan, D; Rappuoli, R

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of the immunodominant pertussis toxin peptide containing residues 30-42 (p30-42) with soluble DR1 molecules and the T-cell receptor (TCR) of 12 DR1-restricted human T-cell clones has been analyzed. Peptide analogues of p30-42 containing single alanine substitutions were used in DR1-binding and T-cell proliferation assays to identify the major histocompatibility complex and TCR contact residues. Each T-cell clone was found to recognize p30-42 with a different fine specificity. However, a common core comprising amino acids 33-39 was found to be important for stimulation of all T-cell clones. Within this core two residues, Leu33 and Leu36, interact with the DR1 molecule, whereas Asp34, His35, Thr37, and Arg39 are important for TCR recognition in most of the clones. Computer modeling of the structure of p30-42 showed that an alpha-helical conformation is compatible with the experimental data. The analysis of TCR rearrangement revealed that the peptide was recognized by T-cell clones expressing different variable region alpha (V alpha) and variable region beta (V beta) chains, although a preferential use of V alpha 8-V beta 13 and V alpha 11-V beta 18 combinations was found in clones from the same donor. Understanding the details of the interaction of antigenic peptides with the major histocompatibility complex and TCR molecules should provide the theoretical basis to design T-cell epitopes and obtain more immunogenic vaccines. Images PMID:1313575

  14. Tax Protein-induced Expression of Antiapoptotic Bfl-1 Protein Contributes to Survival of Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected T-cells*♦

    PubMed Central

    Macaire, Héloïse; Riquet, Aurélien; Moncollin, Vincent; Biémont-Trescol, Marie-Claude; Duc Dodon, Madeleine; Hermine, Olivier; Debaud, Anne-Laure; Mahieux, Renaud; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Pierre, Marlène; Gazzolo, Louis; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Valentin, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). ATLL is a severe malignancy with no effective treatment. HTLV-1 regulatory proteins Tax and HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ) play a major role in ATLL development, by interfering with cellular functions such as CD4+ T-cell survival. In this study, we observed that the expression of Bfl-1, an antiapoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family, is restricted to HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines and to T-cells expressing both Tax and HBZ proteins. We showed that Tax-induced bfl-1 transcription through the canonical NF-κB pathway. Moreover, we demonstrated that Tax cooperated with c-Jun or JunD, but not JunB, transcription factors of the AP-1 family to stimulate bfl-1 gene activation. By contrast, HBZ inhibited c-Jun-induced bfl-1 gene activation, whereas it increased JunD-induced bfl-1 gene activation. We identified one NF-κB, targeted by RelA, c-Rel, RelB, p105/p50, and p100/p52, and two AP-1, targeted by both c-Jun and JunD, binding sites in the bfl-1 promoter of T-cells expressing both Tax and HBZ. Analyzing the potential role of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins in HTLV-1-infected T-cell survival, we demonstrated that these cells are differentially sensitive to silencing of Bfl-1, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-2. Indeed, both Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL knockdowns decreased the survival of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, although no cell death was observed after Bcl-2 knockdown. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Bfl-1 knockdown sensitizes HTLV-1-infected T-cells to ABT-737 or etoposide treatment. Our results directly implicate Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL in HTLV-1-infected T-cell survival and suggest that both Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL represent potential therapeutic targets for ATLL treatment. PMID:22553204

  15. Plumbagin exerts an immunosuppressive effect on human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Kyoung Jun; Lee, Yura; Kim, Soon Ae; Kim, Jiyeon

    2016-04-22

    Of the hematological disorders typified by poor prognoses and survival rates, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is one of the most commonly diagnosed. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents, the treatment options for this cancer remain limited. In this manuscript, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of plumbagin, mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and inhibition of NF-κB signaling; the human T-ALL MOLT-4 cell line was used as our experimental system. Plumbagin is a natural, plant derived compound, which exerts an anti-proliferative activity against many types of human cancer. Our experiments confirm that plumbagin induces a caspase-dependent apoptosis of MOLT-4 cells, with no significant cytotoxicity seen for normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Plumbagin also inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p65, and the transcription of NF-κB target genes. Our results now show that plumbagin is a potent inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and suppressor of T-ALL cell proliferation.

  16. Expanded Human Blood-Derived γδT Cells Display Potent Antigen-Presentation Functions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohd Wajid A.; Curbishley, Stuart M.; Chen, Hung-Chang; Thomas, Andrew D.; Pircher, Hanspeter; Mavilio, Domenico; Steven, Neil M.; Eberl, Matthias; Moser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based immunotherapy strategies target tumors directly (via cytolytic effector cells) or aim at mobilizing endogenous anti-tumor immunity. The latter approach includes dendritic cells (DC) most frequently in the form of in vitro cultured peripheral blood monocytes-derived DC. Human blood γδT cells are selective for a single class of non-peptide agonists (“phosphoantigens”) and develop into potent antigen-presenting cells (APC), termed γδT-APC within 1–3 days of in vitro culture. Availability of large numbers of γδT-APC would be advantageous for use as a novel cellular vaccine. We here report optimal γδT cell expansion (>107 cells/ml blood) when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy individuals and melanoma patients were stimulated with zoledronate and then cultured for 14 days in the presence of IL-2 and IL-15, yielding γδT cell cultures of variable purity (77 ± 21 and 56 ± 26%, respectively). They resembled effector memory αβT (TEM) cells and retained full functionality as assessed by in vitro tumor cell killing as well as secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα) and cell proliferation in response to stimulation with phosphoantigens. Importantly, day 14 γδT cells expressed numerous APC-related cell surface markers and, in agreement, displayed potent in vitro APC functions. Day 14 γδT cells from PBMC of patients with cancer were equally effective as their counterparts derived from blood of healthy individuals and triggered potent CD8+ αβT cell responses following processing and cross-presentation of simple (influenza M1) and complex (tuberculin purified protein derivative) protein antigens. Of note, and in clear contrast to peripheral blood γδT cells, the ability of day 14 γδT cells to trigger antigen-specific αβT cell responses did not depend on re-stimulation. We conclude that day 14 γδT cell cultures provide a convenient source of autologous APC for use in immunotherapy of patients

  17. Identification of melanoma-reactive CD4+ T cell subsets from Human Melanoma Draining Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei; Graor, Hallie; Yan, Lu; Kim, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that melanoma draining lymph node (MDLN) samples from stage III patients contained both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that can be readily expanded to mediate tumor cell apoptosis in vitro and improve survival in mice bearing human melanoma xenografts. In this study, we investigated whether MDLN T cells contain melanoma-reactive CD4+ T cell compartment and what they are. In order to test this, we performed multi-parametric (11-color and 6-color) FACS analyses to monitor phenotypic and functional property of CD4+ T cells in response to melanoma cell antigen re-exposure. Our results have demonstrated that the antigen re-exposure could result in a generation of CD4+CCR7+CD62L+CD27− T cell subsets with various effector cell-like properties. Within the CD4+CCR7+CD62L+CD27− T cell compartment, in response to antigen re-exposure, some of the cells expressed significantly up-regulated CD40L and/or CXCR5, and some of them expressed significantly up-regulated IL-2 and/or TNF-α. This may suggest the existence of melanoma reactive CD4+ “effector-precursor” cells within the expanded MDLN cells and their differentiation into various effector lineages in response to antigen re-stimulation. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that effective adoptive cellular immunotherapy (ACI) maybe enhanced by antigen specific CD4+ T cells. Therefore, results of this study may significantly benefit innovative design of ACI that can potentially mediate enhanced and durable clinical responses. PMID:26641258

  18. Differentiation of human B lymphocyte subpopulations induced by an alloreactive helper T-cell clone

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.J.; Hummell, D.S.; Lawton, A.R.

    1988-07-01

    We have used cloned alloreactive helper T cells to determine if direct T cell-B cell interaction can induce differentiation of human peripheral blood B cells which do not respond to pokeweed mitogen (PWM). T-cell clone 2F8 was derived from a one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction. 2F8 cells are T3+T4+T8-IL-2R+ and proliferate in response to irradiated stimulator cells, but not autologous cells, in the absence of exogenous interleukin-2. 2F8 cells provide allospecific help for polyclonal proliferation and differentiation of B cells in the absence of any other stimulus. The magnitude of this response is comparable to that of the response of the same B cells to PWM and fresh autologous T cells. 2F8 cells could also provide nonspecific help for unrelated donor B cells in the presence of PWM, with no requirement for costimulation by irradiated stimulator cells. Allospecific stimulation of B cells was completely inhibited by antibodies to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) framework determinants and was abrogated by 1000-rad irradiation. Cloned 2F8 T cells stimulated differentiation of both small, high-density B cells and larger B cells, generating up to 30% plasma cells with either fraction. B cells forming rosettes with mouse erythrocytes were also induced to differentiate by the helper T cell clone. As found previously, neither small, high-density B cells nor mouse rosette+ B cells responded well to PWM. Direct interaction with allospecific T cells induces differentiation of a broader spectrum of B cells than soluble growth and differentiation factors in conjunction with polyclonal activators such as PWM and protein A containing staphylococci.

  19. Activated human B lymphocytes express three CTLA-4 counterreceptors that costimulate T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Boussiotis, V A; Freeman, G J; Gribben, J G; Daley, J; Gray, G; Nadler, L M

    1993-01-01

    Signaling via the T-cell receptor complex is necessary but not sufficient to induce antigen-specific T lymphocytes to expand clonally. To proliferate, T cells must receive one or more costimulatory signals provided by antigen presenting cells (APCs). One such critical costimulatory signal is delivered by the CD28/CTLA-4 counterreceptor, B7, expressed on APCs. B7 costimulation induces CD28 signaling, resulting in interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion, and T-cell proliferation. Conversely, T-cell receptor signaling in the absence of B7 costimulation results in induction of antigen-specific tolerance. Here, we show that activated human B lymphocytes express two additional CTLA-4 counterreceptors also capable of providing T-cell costimulation. At 24 hr postactivation, B cells express a CTLA-4 counterreceptor not recognized by anti-B7 or -BB-1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which induces detectable IL-2 secretion and T-cell proliferation. At 48 and 72 hr postactivation, B cells express both B7 and a third CTLA-4 counterreceptor identified by the anti-BB-1 mAb. BB-1 appears to be a molecule distinct from B7 by its expression on B7- cells and its capacity to induce T cells to proliferate without significant accumulation of IL-2. As observed for B7, costimulatory signals mediated by these alternative CTLA-4/CD28 counterreceptors are likely to be essential for generation of an immune response and their absence may result in antigen-specific tolerance. We propose the following terminology for these CTLA-4 counterreceptors: (i) B7, B7-1; (ii) early CTLA-4 binding counterreceptor, B7-2; and (iii) BB-1, B7-3. PMID:7504293

  20. Chimeric NKG2D CAR-Expressing T Cell-Mediated Attack of Human Ovarian Cancer Is Enhanced by Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Song, De-Gang; Ye, Qunrui; Santoro, Stephen; Fang, Chongyun; Best, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Abstract NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs) are widely expressed on ovarian cancers to various degrees, making them attractive targets for immunotherapy. Here, we applied a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) approach for the targeting of NKG2DLs expressed on human ovarian cancer cells and evaluated the impact of pharmacological upregulation of NKG2DLs on immune recognition. Various NKG2DLs, including MICA/B and ULBP-1, -2, -3, and -4, were expressed at various levels on the surface of all established ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian cancer samples tested. To redirect human T cells against NKG2DLs, an NKG2DL-specific CAR was generated by fusing the extracellular domain of the NKG2D receptor to the 4-1BB costimulatory and CD3-ζ chain signaling domains. In vitro expansion of chimeric NKG2D CAR T cells was delayed compared with untransduced T cells and control CAR T cells; the likely result of fratricide among activated T cells expressing NKG2DLs. However, NKG2D CAR T cells did expand and were selectively enriched during prolonged culture. In coculture, CD4+ and CD8+ NKG2D CAR T cells specifically recognized and killed NKG2DL-expressing ovarian cancer cell lines but not NKG2DL-negative cells. Notably, pretreatment of ovarian cancer cells expressing moderate to low levels of NKG2DLs with the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium valproate (VPA) upregulated NKG2DL cell surface expression and consequently enhanced their immune recognition by chimeric NKG2D CAR T cells. Our results demonstrate that VPA-induced upregulation of NKG2DL expression enhances the immune recognition of ovarian cancer cells by engineered NKG2D CAR T cells, and rationalizes the use of VPA in combination with NKG2DL-targeted immunotherapy in ovarian cancer. PMID:23297870

  1. Chimeric NKG2D CAR-expressing T cell-mediated attack of human ovarian cancer is enhanced by histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Song, De-Gang; Ye, Qunrui; Santoro, Stephen; Fang, Chongyun; Best, Andrew; Powell, Daniel J

    2013-03-01

    NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs) are widely expressed on ovarian cancers to various degrees, making them attractive targets for immunotherapy. Here, we applied a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) approach for the targeting of NKG2DLs expressed on human ovarian cancer cells and evaluated the impact of pharmacological upregulation of NKG2DLs on immune recognition. Various NKG2DLs, including MICA/B and ULBP-1, -2, -3, and -4, were expressed at various levels on the surface of all established ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian cancer samples tested. To redirect human T cells against NKG2DLs, an NKG2DL-specific CAR was generated by fusing the extracellular domain of the NKG2D receptor to the 4-1BB costimulatory and CD3-ζ chain signaling domains. In vitro expansion of chimeric NKG2D CAR T cells was delayed compared with untransduced T cells and control CAR T cells; the likely result of fratricide among activated T cells expressing NKG2DLs. However, NKG2D CAR T cells did expand and were selectively enriched during prolonged culture. In coculture, CD4(+) and CD8(+) NKG2D CAR T cells specifically recognized and killed NKG2DL-expressing ovarian cancer cell lines but not NKG2DL-negative cells. Notably, pretreatment of ovarian cancer cells expressing moderate to low levels of NKG2DLs with the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium valproate (VPA) upregulated NKG2DL cell surface expression and consequently enhanced their immune recognition by chimeric NKG2D CAR T cells. Our results demonstrate that VPA-induced upregulation of NKG2DL expression enhances the immune recognition of ovarian cancer cells by engineered NKG2D CAR T cells, and rationalizes the use of VPA in combination with NKG2DL-targeted immunotherapy in ovarian cancer.

  2. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) Suppresses the Effects of Glycerol Monolaurate (GML) on Human T Cell Activation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Michael S.; Houtman, Jon C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol monolaurate (GML) is a monoglyceride with well characterized anti-microbial properties. Because of these properties, GML is widely used in food, cosmetics, and personal care products and currently being tested as a therapeutic for menstrual associated toxic shock syndrome, superficial wound infections, and HIV transmission. Recently, we have described that GML potently suppresses select T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling events, leading to reduced human T cell effector functions. However, how soluble host factors present in the blood and at sites of infection affect GML-mediated human T cell suppression is unknown. In this study, we have characterized how human serum albumin (HSA) affects GML-induced inhibition of human T cells. We found that HSA and other serum albumins bind to 12 carbon acyl side chain of GML at low micromolar affinities and restores the TCR-induced formation of LAT, PLC-γ1, and AKT microclusters at the plasma membrane. Additionally, HSA reverses GML mediated inhibition of AKT phosphorylation and partially restores cytokine production in GML treated cells. Our data reveal that HSA, one of the most abundant proteins in the human serum and at sites of infections, potently reverses the suppression of human T cells by GML. This suggests that GML-driven human T cell suppression depends upon the local tissue environment, with albumin concentration being a major determinant of GML function. PMID:27764189

  3. Interleukin-21 Receptor Gene Induction in Human T Cells Is Mediated by T-Cell Receptor-Induced Sp1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zheng; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo; Xue, Hai-Hui; Liu, Hong; Zhao, Keji; Leonard, Warren J.

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin-21 (IL-21) plays important roles in regulating the immune response. IL-21 receptor (IL-21R) mRNA is expressed at a low level in human resting T cells but is rapidly induced by mitogenic stimulation. We now investigate the basis for IL21R gene regulation in T cells. We found that the −80 to −20 region critically regulates IL-21R promoter activity and corresponds to a major DNase I-hypersensitive site. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, DNA affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Sp1 binds to this region in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, mutation of the Sp1 motif markedly reduced IL-21R promoter activity, and Sp1 small interfering RNAs effectively diminished IL-21R expression in activated T cells. Interestingly, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation, T cells increased IL-21R expression and Sp1 protein levels while decreasing Sp1 phosphorylation. Moreover, phosphatase inhibitors that increased phosphorylation of Sp1 diminished IL-21R transcription. These data indicate that TCR-induced IL-21R expression is driven by TCR-mediated augmentation of Sp1 protein levels and may partly depend on the dephosphorylation of Sp1. PMID:16260592

  4. Abundant tax protein expression in CD4+ T cells infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is prevented by cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hanon, E; Hall, S; Taylor, G P; Saito, M; Davis, R; Tanaka, Y; Usuku, K; Osame, M; Weber, J N; Bangham, C R

    2000-02-15

    The role of the cellular immune response in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) infection is not fully understood. A persistently activated cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to HTLV-I is found in the majority of infected individuals. However, it remains unclear whether this CTL response is protective or causes tissue damage. In addition, several observations paradoxically suggest that HTLV-I is transcriptionally silent in most infected cells and, therefore, not detectable by virus-specific CTLs. With the use of a new flow cytometric procedure, we show here that a high proportion of naturally infected CD4+ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) (between 10% and 80%) are capable of expressing Tax, the immunodominant target antigen recognized by virus-specific CTLs. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence that autologous CD8+ T cells rapidly kill CD4+ cells naturally infected with HTLV-I and expressing Tax in vitro by a perforin-dependent mechanism. Consistent with these observations, we observed a significant negative correlation between the frequency of Tax(11-19)-specific CD8+ T cells and the percentage of CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood of patients infected with HTLV-I. Those results are in accordance with the view that virus-specific CTLs participate in a highly efficient immune surveillance mechanism that persistently destroys Tax-expressing HTLV-I-infected CD4+ T cells in vivo. (Blood. 2000;95:1386-1392)

  5. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of defective human T-cell leukemia virus type I proviral genomes in leukemic cells of patients with adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Korber, B; Okayama, A; Donnelly, R; Tachibana, N; Essex, M

    1991-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia, and the clonally derived leukemic cells all contain proviral genomes. Polymerase chain reaction with a variety of primers which span the HTLV-I genome was used to determine that a significant fraction of patients (at least 32%) carry deleted viral genomes in their leukemic cells. The pX region of the HTLV-I genome encoding the regulatory genes tax and rex was preferentially retained. The fact that the tax coding region was retained provides supporting evidence that the tax protein contributes to leukemogenesis in vivo. The reasonably high fraction of patients with adult T-cell leukemia carrying deleted genomes in their tumor cells suggests that the deletions have a role in leukemogenesis. Images PMID:1895396

  6. Naturally developing memory T cell xenoreactivity to swine antigens in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hartig, C V; Haller, G W; Sachs, D H; Kuhlenschmidt, S; Heeger, P S

    2000-03-01

    Naturally developing xenospecific Abs are well-documented barriers to xenograft transplantation in humans, but whether analogous xenoreactive T cell immunity develops is no