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Sample records for human tissue kallikrein

  1. Differential interactions of human kallikrein-binding protein and alpha 1-antitrypsin with human tissue kallikrein.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L M; Chao, L; Mayfield, R K; Chao, J

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of a new kallikrein-binding protein in human serum and its activities were studied. Both the kallikrein-binding protein and alpha 1-antitrypsin form 92 kDa SDS-stable and heat-stable complexes with human tissue kallikrein. In non-SDS/PAGE, the mobility of these complexes differ. Complex-formation between kallikrein and the binding protein is inhibited by heparin, whereas that between kallikrein and alpha 1-antitrypsin is heparin-resistant. In normal or alpha 1-antitrypsin-deficient-serum, the amount of 92 kDa SDS-stable complex formed upon addition of kallikrein is not related to serum alpha 1-antitrypsin levels. The rate of complex-formation between kallikrein and the binding protein is 12 times higher than that between kallikrein and alpha 1-antitrypsin. Purified alpha 1-antitrypsin, which exhibits normal elastase binding, has a kallikrein-binding activity less than 5% of that of serum. Binding of tissue kallikrein in serum is not inhibited by increasing elastase concentrations, and elastase binding in serum is not inhibited by excess tissue kallikrein. A specific monoclonal antibody to human alpha 1-antitrypsin does not bind to either 92 kDa endogenous or exogenous kallikrein complexes isolated from human serum. The studies demonstrate a new tissue kallikrein-binding protein, distinct from alpha 1-antitrypsin, is present in human serum. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2327990

  2. Direct gene delivery of human tissue kallikrein reduces blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C; Chao, L; Chao, J

    1995-01-01

    Hypertension is a multigene and multifactorial disorder affecting approximately 25% of the population. To demonstrate potential therapeutic effects of human tissue kallikrein in hypertension, spontaneously hypertensive rats were subjected to somatic gene therapy. Two human tissue kallikrein DNA constructs, one under the promoter control of the metallothionein metal response element and the other under the control of the Rous sarcoma virus 3'-LTR, were generated. We delivered naked DNA constructs into spontaneously hypertensive rats via intravenous injection. The expression of human tissue kallikrein in rats was identified in the heart, lung, and kidney by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction followed by Southern blot analysis and an ELISA specific for human tissue kallikrein. A single injection of both human kallikrein plasmid DNA constructs caused a sustained reduction of blood pressure which began 1 wk after injection and continued for 6 wk. A maximal effect of blood pressure reduction of 46 mmHg in rats was observed 2-3 wk after injection with kallikrein DNA as compared to rats with vector DNA (n = 6, P < 0.05). The hypotensive effect caused by somatic gene delivery of human tissue kallikrein in hypertensive rats is reversed by subcutaneous injection of aprotinin, a potent tissue kallikrein inhibitor. No antibodies to either human tissue kallikrein or kallikrein DNA were detected in rat sera after injection of the human kallikrein gene. These results show that direct gene delivery of human tissue kallikrein causes a sustained reduction in systolic blood pressure in genetically hypertensive rats and indicate that the feasibility of kallikrein gene therapy for treating human hypertension should be studied. Images PMID:7535795

  3. Tissue-specific expression and promoter analyses of the human tissue kallikrein gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, W; Wang, J; Chao, L; Chao, J

    1997-01-01

    The expression of the tissue kallikrein gene is tissue-specific and exhibits a complex pattern of transcriptional and post-translational regulation. Information concerning the mechanism of its tissue-specific expression has been limited owing to the lack of suitable cell lines for the expression study. We approached this problem by introducing human tissue kallikrein gene constructs into mouse embryos, creating transgenic lines carrying its coding sequence with varying lengths of the promoter region. One construct (PHK) contained 801 bp in the 5'-flanking region and two deletion constructs contained either 302 bp (D300) or 202 bp (D200) of the promoter region. The expression of human tissue kallikrein in these transgenic mice was monitored by Northern blot, reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by Southern blot, and radioimmunoassay. In all three lines, human tissue kallikrein was expressed predominantly in the pancreas and at lower levels in other tissues, including salivary gland, kidney and spleen. This pattern was similar to that of tissue kallikrein expression in human tissues. The D300 line has higher levels of transgene expression than the D200 and PHK lines. The results indicate that the 202 bp segment immediately upstream of the translation starting site is sufficient to direct a tissue-specific expression pattern of the human tissue kallikrein gene, and that regulatory elements might exist between -801 and -202. PMID:9224635

  4. Partial genetic deficiency in tissue kallikrein impairs adaptation to high potassium intake in humans.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Joana S; Blanchard, Anne; Curis, Emmanuel; Chambrey, Régine; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Azizi, Michel

    2013-12-01

    Inactivation of the tissue kallikrein gene in mice impairs renal handling of potassium due to enhanced H, K-ATPase activity, and induces hyperkalemia. We investigated whether the R53H loss-of-function polymorphism of the human tissue kallikrein gene affects renal potassium handling. In a crossover study, 30 R53R homozygous and 10 R53H heterozygous healthy males were randomly assigned to a low-sodium/high-potassium or a high-sodium/low-potassium diet to modulate tissue kallikrein synthesis. On the seventh day of each diet, participants were studied before and during a 2-h infusion of furosemide to stimulate distal potassium secretion. Urinary kallikrein activity was significantly lower in R53H than in R53R subjects on the low-sodium/high-potassium diet and was similarly reduced in both genotypes on high-sodium/low-potassium. Plasma potassium and renal potassium reabsorption were similar in both genotypes on an ad libitum sodium/potassium diet or after 7 days of a high-sodium/low-potassium diet. However, the median plasma potassium was significantly higher after 7 days of low-sodium/high-potassium diet in R53H than in R53R individuals. Urine potassium excretion and plasma aldosterone concentrations were similar. On the low-sodium/high-potassium diet, furosemide-induced decrease in plasma potassium was significantly larger in R53H than in R53R subjects. Thus, impaired tissue kallikrein stimulation by a low-sodium/high-potassium diet in R53H subjects with partial tissue kallikrein deficiency highlights an inappropriate renal adaptation to potassium load, consistent with experimental data in mice.

  5. Specificity of human tissue kallikrein towards substrates containing Phe-Phe pair of amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, D C; Chao, J; Chao, L; Juliano, M A; Juliano, L

    1999-01-01

    We have explored in detail the determinants of specificity for the hydrolysis by human tissue kallikrein (hK1) of substrates containing the Phe-Phe amino acid pair, after which hK1 cleaves kallistatin (human kallikrein-binding protein), a specific serpin for this protease, as well as somatostatin 1-14. Internally quenched fluorogenic peptides were synthesized with the general structure Abz-peptidyl-EDDnp [Abz, o-aminobenzoic acid; EDDnp, N-(2, 4-dinitrophenyl)ethylenediamine], based on the natural reactive-centre loop sequence of kallistatin from P9 to P'13, and the kinetic parameters of their hydrolysis by hK1 were determined. All these peptides were cleaved after the Phe-Phe pair. For comparison, we have also examined peptides containing the reactive-centre loop sequences of human protein-C inhibitor (PCI) and rat kallikrein-binding protein, which were hydrolysed after Phe-Arg and Leu-Lys bonds, respectively. Hybrid peptides containing kallistatin-PCI sequences showed that the efficiency of hK1 activity on the peptides containing kallistatin and PCI sequences depended on both the nature of the P1 amino acid as well as on residues at the P- and P'-sides. Moreover, we have made systematic modifications on the hydrophobic pair Phe-Phe, and on Lys and Ile at the P3 and P4 positions according to the peptide substrate, Abz-AIKFFSRQ-EDDnp. All together, we concluded that tissue kallikrein was very effective on short substrates that are cleaved after the Phe-Arg pair; however, hydrolysis after Phe-Phe or other hydrophobic pairs of amino acids was more restrictive, requiring additional enzyme-substrate interaction and/or particular substrate conformations. PMID:10191281

  6. Therapeutic modulation of tissue kallikrein expression.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Duncan J

    2016-12-01

    The kallikrein kinin system has cardioprotective actions and mediates in part the cardioprotection produced by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers. Additional approaches to exploit the cardioprotective effects of the kallikrein kinin system include the administration of tissue kallikrein and kinin receptor agonists. The renin inhibitor aliskiren was recently shown to increase cardiac tissue kallikrein expression and bradykinin levels, and to reduce myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury by bradykinin B2 receptor- and angiotensin AT2 receptor-mediated mechanisms. Thus, aliskiren represents a prototype drug for the modulation of tissue kallikrein expression for therapeutic benefit.

  7. Identification of a new tissue-kallikrein-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, J; Tillman, D M; Wang, M Y; Margolius, H S; Chao, L

    1986-01-01

    We have identified a tissue-kallikrein-binding protein in human serum and in the serum-free culture media from human lung fibroblasts (WI-38) and rodent neuroblastoma X glioma hybrid cells (NG108-15). Purified and 125I-labelled tissue kallikrein and human serum form an approximately 92,000-Mr SDS-stable complex. The relative quantity of this complex-formation is measured by densitometric scanning of autoradiograms. Complex-formation between tissue kallikrein and the serum binding protein was time-dependent and detectable after 5 min incubation at 37 degrees C, with half-maximal binding at 28 min. Binding of 125I-kallikrein to kallikrein-binding protein is temperature-dependent and can be inhibited by heparin or excess unlabelled tissue kallikrein but not by plasma kallikrein, collagenase, thrombin, urokinase, alpha 1-antitrypsin or kininogens. The kallikrein-binding protein is acid- and heat-labile, as pretreatment of sera at pH 3.0 or at 60 degrees C for 30 min diminishes complex-formation. However, the formed complexes are stable to acid or 1 M-hydroxylamine treatment and can only be partially dissociated with 10 mM-NaOH. When kallikrein was inhibited by the active-site-labelling reagents phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride or D-Phe-D-Phe-L-Arg-CH2Cl no complex-formation was observed. An endogenous approximately 92,000-Mr kallikrein-kallikrein-binding protein complex was isolated from normal human serum by using a human tissue kallikrein-agarose affinity column. These complexes were recognized by anti-(human tissue kallikrein) antibodies, but not by anti-alpha 1-antitrypsin serum, in Western-blot analyses. The results show that the kallikrein-binding protein is distinct from alpha 1-antitrypsin and is not identifiable with any of the well-characterized plasma proteinase inhibitors such as alpha 2-macroglobulin, inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor, C1-inactivator or antithrombin III. The functional role of this kallikrein-binding protein and its impact on kallikrein

  8. Recombinant avian adeno-associated virus-mediated oviduct-specific expression of recombinant human tissue kallikrein.

    PubMed

    Wang, A P; Sun, H C; Wang, J Y; Wang, Y J; Yuan, W F

    2008-04-01

    Human tissue kallikrein (hK1) plays an important role in regulation of blood pressure, electrolyte and glucose transport, and renal function. To evaluate the feasibility of viral vector-mediated expression of recombinant human tissue kallikrein (rhK1) in the egg white of laying hens, human tissue kallikrein gene (hKLK1) cDNA-expression cassette was subcloned into avian adeno-associated virus (AAAV) transfer vector pAITR and transfected into AAV-293 cells with AAAV helper vector pcDNA-ARC and adenovirus helper vector pHelper. The recombinant viral particles with a typical AAAV morphology and relatively high titer were generated and identified by PCR and electron microscopy. After 1 intravenous injection of each laying hen with 2 x 10(10) viral particles, oviduct-specific expression of hKLK1 cDNA was demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR. Secretion of rhK1 into the egg white was detected by enzymatic assay from d 2, reaching the highest level of 107 U/mL in wk 3, and lasted for more than 6 wk after injection. Western blotting showed that the oviduct-expressed rhK1 had the same molecular mass with the natural enzyme. These data suggest that rAAAV can mediate high level and long-lasting transgene expression in oviduct cells, and the established expression system is useful for production of other recombinant proteins.

  9. [Effects of human tissue kallikrein gene transfer on the migration of vascular smooth muscule cells].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-zhen; Xie, Liang-di; Zhu, Peng-li; Xu, Chang-sheng

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the effects of adenovirus-mediated human tissue kallikrein (Ad-hKLK1) gene transfer on platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-induced migration of vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats (VSMC(SHR)). A bicistronic recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-hKLK1) carrying the target hKLK1 gene and the reporter gene EGFP was constructed. VSMCs isolated from the thoracic aorta of male SHR were passaged, and the quiescent VSMC(SHR) in passages 3-6 seeded in 6-well plates were treated with Ad-hKLK1 and control virus. Human PDGF-BB or icatibant Hoe140, a BK B2 antagonistat, was used as the chemoattractant and placed in the bottom chamber of the Boyden chamber. The mRNA expressions of bradykinin B1 receptor and B2 receptor were detected by RT-PCR in VSMC(SHR). hKLK1 gene transfer significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced migration of VSMC(SHR), with the peak inhibition rate of 34.6% (P<0.001). PDGF-BB significantly increased the mRNA expression of B2 receptor but not B1 receptor in VSMC(SHR). hKLK1 gene transfer can inhibit the migration of VSMC(SHR) induced by PDGF-BB, and the inhibitory effects may be not mediated by bradykinin B2 receptor.

  10. Human Tissue Kallikrein Activity in Angiographically Documented Chronic Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Estêvão Lanna; Magalhães, Carolina Antunes; Belli, Karlyse Claudino; Mandil, Ari; Garcia, José Carlos Faria; Araújo, Rosanã Aparecida; Figueiredo, Amintas Fabiano de Souza; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-01-01

    Background Human tissue kallikrein (hK1) is a key enzyme in the kallikrein–kinin system (KKS). hK1-specific amidase activity is reduced in urine samples from hypertensive and heart failure (HF) patients. The pathophysiologic role of hK1 in coronary artery disease (CAD) remains unclear. Objective To evaluate hK1-specific amidase activity in the urine of CAD patients Methods Sixty-five individuals (18–75 years) who underwent cardiac catheterism (CATH) were included. Random midstream urine samples were collected immediately before CATH. Patients were classified in two groups according to the presence of coronary lesions: CAD (43 patients) and non-CAD (22 patients). hK1 amidase activity was estimated using the chromogenic substrate D-Val-Leu-Arg-Nan. Creatinine was determined using Jaffé’s method. Urinary hK1-specific amidase activity was expressed as µM/(min · mg creatinine) to correct for differences in urine flow rates. Results Urinary hK1-specific amidase activity levels were similar between CAD [0.146 µM/(min ·mg creatinine)] and non-CAD [0.189 µM/(min . mg creatinine)] patients (p = 0.803) and remained similar to values previously reported for hypertensive patients [0.210 µM/(min . mg creatinine)] and HF patients [0.104 µM/(min . mg creatinine)]. CAD severity and hypertension were not observed to significantly affect urinary hK1-specific amidase activity. Conclusion CAD patients had low levels of urinary hK1-specific amidase activity, suggesting that renal KKS activity may be reduced in patients with this disease. PMID:26351984

  11. Evaluation of human tissue kallikrein-related peptidases 6 and 10 expression in early gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Grin, Andrea; Samaan, Sara; Tripathi, Monika; Rotondo, Fabio; Kovacs, Kalman; Bassily, Mena N; Yousef, George M

    2015-04-01

    Kallikreins are a family of serine proteases that are linked to malignancy of different body organs with potential clinical utility as tumor markers. In this study, we investigated kallikrein-related peptidase 6 (KLK6) and KLK10 expression in early gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma and Barrett esophagus (BE) with and without dysplasia. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly increased KLK6 expression in early invasive cancer compared with dysplastic (P = .009) and nondysplastic BE (P = .0002). There was a stepwise expression increase from metaplasia to dysplasia and invasive tumors. Significantly higher KLK10 was seen in dysplastic lesions compared with metaplasia but not between dysplastic lesions and invasive cancers. KLK6 staining intensity was increased at the invasive front (P = .006), suggesting its role in tumor invasiveness. Neither KLK6 nor KLK10 was significantly associated with other prognostic markers, including depth of invasion, indicating their potential as independent biomarkers. Our results should be interpreted with caution due to limited sample size. There was a significant correlation between KLK6 and KLK10 expression both at the invasive front and within the main tumor, indicating a collaborative effect. We then compared KLK6 and KLK10 messenger RNA expression between metaplastic and cancerous tissues in an independent data set of esophageal carcinoma from The Cancer Genome Atlas. KLK6 and KLK10 may be useful markers and potential therapeutic targets in gastroesophageal junction tumors.

  12. Differences in substrate and inhibitor sequence specificity of human, mouse and rat tissue kallikreins.

    PubMed Central

    Fogaça, Sandro E; Melo, Robson L; Pimenta, Daniel C; Hosoi, Kazuo; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria A

    2004-01-01

    The kininogenase activities of mouse (mK1), rat (rK1) and human (hK1) tissue kallikreins were assayed with the bradykinin-containing synthetic peptides Abz-MTEMARRPPGFSPFRSVTVQNH2 (where Abz stands for o-aminobenzoyl) and Abz-MTSVIRRPPGFSPFRAPRV-NH2, which correspond to fragments Met374-Gln393 and Met375-Val393 of mouse and rat LMWKs (low-molecular-mass kininogens) with the addition of Abz. Bradykinin was released from these peptides by the mK1- and rK1-mediated hydrolysis of Arg-Arg and Arg-Ser (or Arg-Ala) peptide bonds. However, owing to preferential hydrolysis of Phe-Arg compared with the Arg-Ala bond in the peptide derived from rat LMWK, hK1 released bradykinin only from the mouse LMWK fragment and preferentially released des-[Arg9]bradykinin from the rat LMWK fragment (Abz-MTSVIRRPPGFSPFRAPRV-NH2). The formation of these hydrolysis products was examined in more detail by determining the kinetic parameters for the hydrolysis of synthetic, internally quenched fluorescent peptides containing six N- or C-terminal amino acids of bradykinin added to the five downstream or upstream residues of mouse and rat kininogens respectively. One of these peptides, Abz-GFSPFRAPRVQ-EDDnp (where EDDnp stands for ethylenediamine 2,4-dinitrophenyl), was preferentially hydrolysed at the Phe-Arg bond, confirming the potential des-[Arg9]bradykinin-releasing activity of hK1 on rat kininogen. The proline residue that is two residues upstream of bradykinin in rat kininogen is, in part, responsible for this pattern of hydrolysis, since the peptide Abz-GFSPFRASRVQ-EDDnp was preferentially cleaved at the Arg-Ala bond by hK1. Since this peptidase accepts the arginine or phenylalanine residue at its S1 subsite, this preference seems to be determined by the prime site of the substrates. These findings also suggested that the effects observed in rats overexpressing hK1 should consider the activation of B1 receptors by des-[Arg9]bradykinin. For further comparison, two short internally quenched

  13. Tissue kallikrein-modified human endothelial progenitor cell implantation improves cardiac function via enhanced activation of akt and increased angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuyu; Sheng, Zulong; Li, YeFei; Fu, Cong; Ma, Genshan; Liu, Naifeng; Chao, Julie; Chao, Lee

    2013-05-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been shown to enhance angiogenesis not only by incorporating into the vasculature but also by secreting cytokines, thereby serving as an ideal vehicle for gene transfer. As tissue kallikrein (TK) has pleiotropic effects in inhibiting apoptosis and oxidative stress, and promoting angiogenesis, we evaluated the salutary potential of kallikrein-modified human EPCs (hEPCs; Ad.hTK-hEPCs) after acute myocardial infarction (MI). We genetically modified hEPCs with a TK gene and evaluated cell survival, engraftment, revascularization, and functional improvement in a nude mouse left anterior descending ligation model. hEPCs were manipulated to overexpress the TK gene. In vitro, the antiapoptotic and paracrine effects were assessed under oxidative stress. TK protects hEPCs from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis via inhibition of activation of caspase-3 and -9, induction of Akt phosphorylation, and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor. In vivo, the Ad.hTK-hEPCs were transplanted after MI via intracardiac injection. The surviving cells were tracked after transplantation using near-infrared optical imaging. Left ventricular (LV) function was evaluated by transthoracic echocardiography. Capillary density was quantified using immunohistochemical staining. Engrafted Ad.hTK-hEPCs exhibited advanced protection against ischemia by increasing LV ejection fraction. Compared with Ad.Null-hEPCs, transplantation with Ad.hTK-hEPCs significantly decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis in association with increased retention of transplanted EPCs in the myocardium. Capillary density and arteriolar density in the infarct border zone was significantly higher in Ad.hTK-hEPC-transplanted mice than in Ad.Null-hEPC-treated mice. Transplanted hEPCs were clearly incorporated into CD31(+) capillaries. These results indicate that implantation of kallikrein-modified EPCs in the heart provides advanced benefits in protection against ischemia-induced MI by

  14. Human plasma kallikrein and tissue kallikrein binding to a substrate based on the reactive site of a factor Xa inhibitor isolated from Bauhinia ungulata seeds.

    PubMed

    Oliva, M L; Andrade, S A; Batista, I F; Sampaio, M U; Juliano, M; Fritz, H; Auerswald, E A; Sampaio, C A

    1999-12-01

    Kunitz type Bauhinia ungulata factor Xa inhibitor (BuXI) was purified from B. ungulata seeds. BuXI inactivates factor Xa and human plasma kallikrein (HuPK) with Ki values of 18.4 and 6.9 nM, respectively. However, Bauhinia variegata trypsin inhibitor (BvTI) which is 70% homologous to BuXI does not inhibit factor Xa and is less efficient on HuPK (Ki = 80 nM). The comparison between BuXI and BvTI reactive site structure indicates differences at Met59, Thr66 and Met67 residues. The hydrolysis rate of quenched fluorescence peptide substrates based on BuXI reactive site sequence, Abz-VMIAALPRTMFIQ-EDDnp (leading peptide), by HuPK and porcine pancreatic kallikrein (PoPK) is low, but hydrolysis is enhanced with Abz-VMIAALPRTMQ-EDDnp, derived from the leading peptide shortened by removing the dipeptide Phe-Ileu from the C-terminal portion, for HuPK (Km = 0.68 microM, k(cat)/Km = 1.3 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), and the shorter substrate Abz-LPRTMQ-EDDnp is better for PoPK (Km = 0.66 microM, k(cat)/Km = 2.2 x 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)). The contribution of substrate methionine residues to HuPK and PoPK hydrolysis differs from that observed with factor Xa. The determined Km and k(cat) values suggest that the substrates interact with kallikreins the same as an enzyme and inhibitor interacts to form complexes.

  15. Inhibitors of Kallikrein in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, David J.

    1972-01-01

    Human plasma was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration to determine which method would give the greatest number of clearly separable kallikrein inhibitory peaks. With G-200 gel filtration three peaks could be separated which were demonstrated to contain α2-macroglobulin, C1̄ inactivator, and α1-antitrypsin. No other kallikrein inhibitors could be identified. The fractions containing C1̄ inactivator and α2-macroglobulin appeared to be more effective against kallikrein than that containing α1-antitrypsin. A patient with hereditary angioneurotic edema was shown to have an abnormal C1̄ inactivator protein capable of interfering with kallikrein's biologic, but not its esterolytic activity. Heat-treated human plasma, a commonly used source of kininogen for experiments with kallikrein, was shown to have kallikrein inhibitory activity. PMID:4113391

  16. Tissue kallikrein proteolytic cascade pathways in normal physiology and cancer.

    PubMed

    Pampalakis, Georgios; Sotiropoulou, Georgia

    2007-09-01

    Human tissue kallikreins (KLKs or kallikrein-related peptidases) are a subgroup of extracellular serine proteases that act on a wide variety of physiological substrates, while they display aberrant expression patterns in certain types of cancer. Differential expression patterns lead to the exploitation of these proteins as new cancer biomarkers for hormone-dependent malignancies, in particular. The prostate-specific antigen or kallikrein-related peptidase 3 (PSA/KLK3) is an established tumor marker for the diagnosis and monitoring of prostate cancer. It is well documented that specific KLK genes are co-expressed in tissues and in various pathologies suggesting their participation in complex proteolytic cascades. Here, we review the currently established knowledge on the involvement of KLK proteolytic cascades in the regulation of physiological and pathological processes in prostate tissue and in skin. It is well established that the activity of KLKs is often regulated by auto-activation and subsequent autolytic internal cleavage leading to enzymatic inactivation, as well as by inhibitory serpins or by allosteric inhibition by zinc ions. Redistribution of zinc ions and alterations in their concentration due to physiological or pathological reasons activates specific KLKs initiating the kallikrein cascade(s). Recent studies on kallikrein substrate specificity allowed for the construction of a kallikrein interaction network involved in semen liquefaction and prostate cancer, as well as in skin pathologies, such as skin desquamation, psoriasis and cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the crosstalks between known proteolytic pathways and the kallikrein cascades, with emphasis on the activation of plasmin and its implications in prostate cancer. These findings may have clinical implications for the underlying molecular mechanism and management of cancer and other disorders in which KLK activity is elevated.

  17. Nucleotide sequence of cloned cDNA for human pancreatic kallikrein.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, D; Kitamura, N; Nakanishi, S

    1985-12-31

    Cloned cDNA sequences for human pancreatic kallikrein have been isolated and determined by molecular cloning and sequence analysis. The identity between human pancreatic and urinary kallikreins is indicated by the complete coincidence between the amino acid sequence deduced from the cloned cDNA sequence and that reported partially for urinary kallikrein. The active enzyme form of the human pancreatic kallikrein consists of 238 amino acids and is preceded by a signal peptide and a profragment of 24 amino acids. A sequence comparison of this with other mammalian kallikreins indicates that key amino acid residues required for both serine protease activity and kallikrein-like cleavage specificity are retained in the human sequence, and residues corresponding to some external loops of the kallikrein diverge from other kallikreins. Analyses by RNA blot hybridization, primer extension, and S1 nuclease mapping indicate that the pancreatic kallikrein mRNA is also expressed in the kidney and sublingual gland, suggesting the active synthesis of urinary kallikrein in these tissues. Furthermore, the tissue-specific regulation of the expression of the members of the human kallikrein gene family has been discussed.

  18. Leukocytic cell sources of airway tissue kallikrein

    PubMed Central

    Lauredo, Isabel T.; Forteza, Rosanna M.; Botvinnikova, Yelena; Abraham, William M.

    2008-01-01

    Lung tissue kallikrein (TK) is a serine proteinase that putatively plays a role in the pathophysiology of asthma by generating kallidin and bradykinin, mediators that contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness. In previous studies we observed biphasic increases in TK activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid following airway allergen challenge in allergic sheep. Although glandular TK is likely a major source of the initial increase in TK, the sources of the late increases in TK that are associated with the development of airway hyperresponsiveness may be dependent on activated resident and recruited inflammatory cells including alveolar macrophages (AMs) and neutrophils (PMNs). These cells increase concomitantly with the late increases in TK activity. To test this hypothesis, we obtained AMs from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and PMNs and monocytes (precursors of AMs) from sheep blood and determined whether these cells contained TK and whether these same cells could release TK upon activation. Using confocal microscopy, immunocytochemical techniques, and enzyme activity assays, we found that all three cell types contained and secreted TK. All three cell types demonstrated basal release of TK, which could be increased after stimulation with zymosan. In addition, PMNs also released TK in the presence of phorbol ester, suggesting multiple secretory pathways in these cells. Further-more, we showed that human monocytes also contain and secrete TK. We conclude that in the airways, monocytes, PMNs, and AMs may contribute to increased TK activity. Knowing the sources of TK in the airways could be important in understanding the mechanisms of inflammation that contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma and may help in the development of new therapies to control the disease. PMID:14660481

  19. Discovery of a new isomannide-based peptidomimetic synthetized by Ugi multicomponent reaction as human tissue kallikrein 1 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Barros, Thalita G; Santos, Jorge A N; de Souza, Bruno E G; Sodero, Ana Carolina R; de Souza, Alessandra M T; da Silva, Dayane P; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Pinheiro, Sergio; Dias, Luiza R S; Abrahim-Vieira, Bárbara; Puzer, Luciano; Muri, Estela M F

    2017-01-15

    Human kallikrein 1 (KLK1) is the most extensively studied member of this family and plays a major role in inflammation processes. From Ugi multicomponent reactions, isomannide-based peptidomimetic 10 and 13 where synthesized and showed low micromolar values of IC50 for KLK1 The most active compound (10) presented competitive mechanism, with three structural modifications important to interact with active site residues which corroborates its KLK1 inhibition. Finally, the most active compound also showed good ADMET profile, which indicates compound 10 as a potential hit in the search for new KLK1 inhibitors with low side effects.

  20. Identification, purification, and localization of tissue kallikrein in rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, W; Chen, L M; Woodley-Miller, C; Simson, J A; Chao, J

    1990-01-01

    A tissue kallikrein has been isolated from rat heart extracts by DEAE-Sepharose and aprotinin-affinity column chromatography. The purified cardiac enzyme has both N-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester esterolytic and kinin-releasing activities, and displays parallelism with standard curves in a kallikrein radioimmunoassay, indicating it to have immunological identity with tissue kallikrein. The enzyme is inhibited by aprotinin, antipain, leupeptin and by high concentrations of soybean trypsin inhibitor, but stimulated by lima-bean or ovomucoid trypsin inhibitor and low concentrations of soybean trypsin inhibitor. By using a specific monoclonal antibody to tissue kallikrein in Western blot as well as active-site labelling with [14C]di-isopropyl fluorophosphate, the cardiac enzyme was identified as a protein of 38 kDa, a molecular mass identical with that of tissue kallikrein. Immunocytochemistry at the electron-microscopic level localized this enzyme to the sarcoplasmic reticulum and granules of rat atrial myocytes. Two cardiac kallikrein precursors, (38 and 40 kDa) were identified from the translation in vitro of heart mRNA by immunoprecipitation and electrophoresis of [35S]methionine-labelled cell-free translation products. Kallikrein mRNA in the rat heart was also demonstrated by dot-blot analysis using a tissue kallikrein cDNA probe. These results indicate that the tissue kallikrein gene is expressed in the rat heart and that the purified enzyme is indistinguishable from tissue kallikrein with respect to enzymic and immunological characteristics. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2140256

  1. Cardiovascular abnormalities with normal blood pressure in tissue kallikrein-deficient mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneton, Pierre; Bloch-Faure, May; Hagege, Albert A.; Ruetten, Hartmut; Huang, Wei; Bergaya, Sonia; Ceiler, Debbie; Gehring, Doris; Martins, Isabelle; Salmon, Georges; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Nussberger, Jürg; Crozatier, Bertrand; Gasc, Jean-Marie; Heudes, Didier; Bruneval, Patrick; Doetschman, Tom; Ménard, Joël; Alhenc-Gelas, François

    2001-02-01

    Tissue kallikrein is a serine protease thought to be involved in the generation of bioactive peptide kinins in many organs like the kidneys, colon, salivary glands, pancreas, and blood vessels. Low renal synthesis and urinary excretion of tissue kallikrein have been repeatedly linked to hypertension in animals and humans, but the exact role of the protease in cardiovascular function has not been established largely because of the lack of specific inhibitors. This study demonstrates that mice lacking tissue kallikrein are unable to generate significant levels of kinins in most tissues and develop cardiovascular abnormalities early in adulthood despite normal blood pressure. The heart exhibits septum and posterior wall thinning and a tendency to dilatation resulting in reduced left ventricular mass. Cardiac function estimated in vivo and in vitro is decreased both under basal conditions and in response to βadrenergic stimulation. Furthermore, flow-induced vasodilatation is impaired in isolated perfused carotid arteries, which express, like the heart, low levels of the protease. These data show that tissue kallikrein is the main kinin-generating enzyme in vivo and that a functional kallikrein-kinin system is necessary for normal cardiac and arterial function in the mouse. They suggest that the kallikrein-kinin system could be involved in the development or progression of cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Tissue kallikrein activation of the epithelial Na channel

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ankit B.; Chao, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial Na Channels (ENaC) are responsible for the apical entry of Na+ in a number of different epithelia including the renal connecting tubule and cortical collecting duct. Proteolytic cleavage of γ-ENaC by serine proteases, including trypsin, furin, elastase, and prostasin, has been shown to increase channel activity. Here, we investigate the ability of another serine protease, tissue kallikrein, to regulate ENaC. We show that excretion of tissue kallikrein, which is secreted into the lumen of the connecting tubule, is stimulated following 5 days of a high-K+ or low-Na+ diet in rats. Urinary proteins reconstituted in a low-Na buffer activated amiloride-sensitive currents (INa) in ENaC-expressing oocytes, suggesting an endogenous urinary protease can activate ENaC. We next tested whether tissue kallikrein can directly cleave and activate ENaC. When rat ENaC-expressing oocytes were exposed to purified tissue kallikrein from rat urine (RTK), ENaC currents increased threefold in both the presence and absence of a soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). RTK and trypsin both decreased the apparent molecular mass of cleaved cell-surface γ-ENaC, while immunodepleted RTK produced no shift in apparent molecular mass, demonstrating the specificity of the tissue kallikrein. A decreased effect of RTK on Xenopus ENaC, which has variations in the putative prostasin cleavage sites in γ-ENaC, suggests these sites are important in RTK activation of ENaC. Mutating the prostasin site in mouse γ-ENaC (γRKRK186QQQQ) abolished ENaC activation and cleavage by RTK while wild-type mouse ENaC was activated and cleaved similar to that of the rat. We conclude that tissue kallikrein can be a physiologically relevant regulator of ENaC activity. PMID:22622459

  3. Tissue kallikrein promotes neovascularization and improves cardiac function by the Akt-glycogen synthase kinase-3β pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yu-Yu; Yin, Hang; Shen, Bo; Smith, Robert S.; Liu, Yuying; Gao, Lin; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Aims We investigated the role of the Akt-glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β signalling pathway in mediating the protective effects of tissue kallikrein on myocardial injury by promoting angiogenesis and blood flow in rats after myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and results Human tissue kallikrein gene in an adenoviral vector, with or without co-administration of dominant-negative Akt (Ad.DN-Akt) or constitutively active GSK-3β (Ad.GSK-3βS9A), was injected into rat myocardium after MI. The expression of recombinant human kallikrein in rat heart significantly improved cardiac function and reduced infarct size 10 days after gene delivery. Kallikrein administration significantly increased myocardial blood flow as well as capillary and arteriole densities in the infarcted myocardium. Kallikrein increased cardiac Akt and GSK-3β phosphorylation in conjunction with decreased GSK-3β activity and the upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). All of kallikrein’s effects on the myocardium were abrogated by Ad.DN-Akt and Ad.GSK-3βS9A. Moreover, in cultured human aortic endothelial cells, tissue kallikrein stimulated capillary tube formation and promoted cell migration; however, these effects were blocked by Ad.DN-Akt, Ad.GSK-3βS9A, icatibant (a kinin B2 receptor antagonist), Tki (a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor), and a neutralizing VEGF antibody. In addition, tissue kallikrein decreased GSK-3β activity via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway and enhanced VEGF and VEGFR-2 expression in endothelial cells. Conclusion These data provide the first direct evidence that tissue kallikrein protects against acute-phase MI by promoting neovascularization, restoring regional blood flow and improving cardiac function through the kinin B2 receptor-Akt-GSK-3β and VEGF signalling pathways. PMID:18689794

  4. Human kallikrein 5 as a novel prognostic biomarker for triple-negative breast cancer: tissue expression analysis and relationship with disease course.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Li, J Y; Yin, Q N; Yang, K; Dong, S N; Bai, L J; Liu, P; Tong, X W

    2015-08-14

    The purposes of this study were to analyze the expression and distribution of human kallikrein 5 (hK5) in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) tissues, to establish a standard operating procedure (SOP) for its immunohistochemical assay, and to evaluate the possibility of hK5 being a prognostic biomarker for TNBC. Recombinant hK5 protein and specific antibody were prepared, and the expression and distribution of hK5 in TNBC tissues were detected using immunohistochemistry. An SOP for immunohistochemical staining of hK5 in TNBC tissues was established to allow automatic staining under optimized conditions. The resulting images were digitized for evaluation and statistical analysis via a human scoring system. Our results showed that expression of hK5 protein could predict the progression of TNBC. Pearson's chi-square test results showed that high hK5 expression in tumor stromal cells was significantly correlated with distal metastasis (P = 0.039). A high staining score for lymphocyte infiltration in tumor stroma was significantly correlated with low histological grade of tumor (P = 0.025). Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses verified that the staining score for hK5 in tumor stromal cells may be a biomarker for poor prognosis in TNBC patients (univariate HR = 2.289, 95%CI = 1.362-3.848, P = 0.002; multivariate HR = 2.105, 95%CI = 1.189-3.727, P = 0.011). In conclusion, the expression level of hK5 in tumor stromal cells is a promising biomarker for poor prognosis in TNBC. Patients with high histological grade are more prone to distal metastasis and aggressive tumor progression.

  5. Expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and human glandular kallikrein 2 (hK2) in ileum and other extraprostatic tissues.

    PubMed

    Olsson, A Yvonne; Bjartell, Anders; Lilja, Hans; Lundwall, Ake

    2005-01-10

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a widely used marker for prostate cancer. In the literature, there are reports of nonprostatic expression of PSA that potentially can affect early diagnosis. However, the results are scattered and inconclusive, which motivated us to conduct a more comprehensive study of the tissue distribution of PSA and the closely related protein human glandular kallikrein 2 (hK2). RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were used to detect expression of both PSA and hK2 in secretory epithelial cells of trachea, thyroid gland, mammary gland, salivary gland, jejunum, ileum, epididymis, seminal vesicle and urethra, as well as in Leydig cells, pancreatic exocrine glands and epidermis. Immunometric measurements revealed that the concentration of PSA in nonprostatic tissues represents less than 1% of the amount in normal prostate. Pronounced expression of PSA was detected in the Paneth cells in ileum, which prompted us to compare functional parameters of PSA in ileum and prostate. We found that in homogenates from these 2 tissues, PSA manifested equivalent amidolytic activity and capacity to form complexes with protease inhibitors in blood in vitro. Thus, PSA released from sources other than the prostate may add to the plasma pool of this protein, but given the lower levels detected from those sites, it is unlikely that nonprostatic PSA normally can interfere with the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Nevertheless, this risk should not be neglected as it may be of clinical significance under certain circumstances. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the International Journal of Cancer website at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0020-7136/suppmat/index.html.

  6. Identification and characterization of a tissue kallikrein in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Shimojo, N; Chao, J; Chao, L; Margolius, H S; Mayfield, R K

    1987-01-01

    A tissue kallikrein was purified from rat skeletal muscle. Characterization of the enzyme showed that it has alpha-N-tosyl-L-arginine methylesterase activity and releases kinin from purified bovine low-Mr kininogen substrate. The pH optimum (9.0) of its esterase activity and the profile of inhibition by serine-proteinase inhibitors are identical with those of purified RUK (rat urinary kallikrein). Skeletal-muscle kallikrein also behaved identically with urinary kallikrein in a radioimmunoassay using a polyclonal anti-RUK antiserum. On Western-blot analysis, rat muscle kallikrein was recognized by affinity-purified monoclonal anti-kallikrein antibody at a position similar to that of RUK (Mr 38,000). Immunoreactive-kallikrein levels were measured in skeletal muscles which have different fibre types. The soleus, a slow-contracting muscle with high mitochondrial oxidative-enzyme activity, had higher kallikrein content than did the extensor digitorum longus or gastrocnemius, both fast-contracting muscles with low oxidative-enzyme activity. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes reduced muscle weights, but did not alter the level of kallikrein (pg/mg of protein) in skeletal muscle, suggesting that insulin is not a regulator of kallikrein in this tissue. Although the role of kallikrein in skeletal muscle is unknown, its localization and activity in relation to muscle functions and disease can now be studied. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3311022

  7. Tissue kallikrein synthesis and its modification by testosterone or low dietary sodium.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D H; Chao, J; Margolius, H S

    1984-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure the relative rate of rat tissue kallikrein synthesis which employs a specific antiserum raised against a purified rat urinary kallikrein. Incorporation of [35S]methionine into kallikrein and protein 20 min after intraperitoneal injection was measured in submaxillary gland, pancreas, kidney and descending colon. Kallikrein content was measured with a direct radioimmunoassay, and kallikrein-specific incorporation of [35S]methionine measured after immunoprecipitation. Kallikrein specific radioactivity (c.p.m./mg of enzyme) was about 100-fold greater than that in total protein in both kidney and colon. In contrast, in pancreas the incorporation into the enzyme was only 5-fold higher than into protein, and in submaxillary gland the incorporation was equivalent. Measured as kallikrein-specific radioactivity relative to total protein radioactivity incorporated in 20 min, kallikrein represents 0.18% of total protein synthesis in the kidney, 0.34% in the pancreas, 0.41% in the colon, but 7.29% in the submaxillary gland. Dietary Na+ restriction increased the relative rate of kallikrein synthesis 1.8-fold in the kidney without a comparable effect in submaxillary gland. In contrast, testosterone increased the relative rate of synthesis 2.3-fold in submaxillary gland, but decreased it in kidney. The data show that endogenous kallikrein synthesis differs markedly in various tissues, and that interventions which are known to change kallikrein content or excretion also change the relative rate of enzyme synthesis. PMID:6561955

  8. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human kallikrein 7, a serine protease of the multigene kallikrein family

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Israel S.; Ständker, Ludger; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Romero, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Human kallikreins are a group of serine proteases of high sequence homology whose genes are grouped as a single cluster at chromosome 19. Although the physiological roles of kallikreins are generally still unknown, members of the kallikrein family have been clearly implicated in pathological situations such as cancer and psoriasis. Human kallikrein 7 (hK7) has been shown to be involved in pathological keratinization, psoriasis and ovarian cancer. In order to gain insight into the molecular structure of this protein, hK7 was crystallized after recombinant production in its folded and active form using a periplasmic secretion vector in Escherichia coli. The crystals belonged to the rhombohedral space group H32 and diffracted to 2.8 Å. The phase problem was solved by molecular replacement using the mouse kallikrein-related protein neuropsin. Completion of the model and structure refinement are under way. PMID:17671364

  9. Involvement of DDAH/ADMA/NOS/cGMP and COX-2/PTGIS/cAMP Pathways in Human Tissue Kallikrein 1 Protecting Erectile Function in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhe; Rao, Ke; Wang, Tao; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Shaogang; Liu, Jihong; Wang, Daowen

    2017-01-01

    Our previous studies had reported that Human Tissue Kallikrein 1 (hKLK1) preserved erectile function in aged transgenic rats, while the detailed mechanism of hKLK1 protecting erectile function in aged rats through activation of cGMP and cAMP was not mentioned. To explore the latent mechanism, male wild-type Sprague-Dawley rats (WTR) and transgenic rats harboring the hKLK1 gene (TGR) were fed to 4 and 18 months old and divided into four groups: young WTR (yWTR) as the control, aged WTR (aWTR), aged TGR (aTGR) and aged TGRs with HOE140 (aTGRH). Erectile function of all rats was evaluated by cavernous nerve electrostimulation method and measured by the ratio of intracavernous pressure/ mean arterial pressure (ICP/MAP) in rats. Expression levels of cAMP and cGMP were assessed, and related signaling pathways were detected by western blot, immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Our experiment results showed erectile function of the aWTR group and aTGRH group was lower compared with those of other two groups. Also, expression levels of cAMP and cGMP were significantly lower than those of other two groups. Moreover, expressions of related signaling pathways including DDAH/ADMA/NOS/cGMP and COX-2/PTGIS/cAMP were also downregulated in the corpus cavernosum of rats in aWTR group. Our finding revealed hKLK1 played a protective role in age-related ED. The DDAH/ADMA/NOS/cGMP and COX-2/PTGIS/cAMP pathways that were linked to the mechanism hKLK1 could increase the levels of cGMP and cAMP, which might provide novel therapy targets for age-related ED. PMID:28103290

  10. Reduced corporal fibrosis to protect erectile function by inhibiting the Rho-kinase/LIM-kinase/cofilin pathway in the aged transgenic rat harboring human tissue kallikrein 1

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Kai; Luan, Yang; Wang, Tao; Zhuan, Li; Rao, Ke; Wang, Shao-Gang; Ye, Zhang-Qun; Liu, Ji-Hong; Wang, Dao-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that erectile function was preserved in aged transgenic rats (TGR) harboring the human tissue kallikrein 1 (hKLK1), while the molecular level of hKLK1 on corporal fibrosis to inhibit age-related erectile dysfunction (ED) is poorly understood. Male wild-type Sprague-Dawley rats (WTR) and TGR harboring the hKLK1 gene were fed to 4- or 18-month-old and divided into three groups: young WTR (yWTR) as the control, aged WTR (aWTR), and aged TGR (aTGR). Erectile function of all rats was assessed by cavernous nerve electrostimulation method. Masson's trichrome staining was used to evaluate corporal fibrosis in the corpus cavernosum. We found that the erectile function of rats in the aWTR group was significantly lower than that of other two groups. Masson's trichrome staining revealed that compared with those of the yWTR and aTGR groups, the ratio of smooth muscle cell (SMC)/collagen (C) was significantly lower in the aWTR group. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis were performed, and results demonstrated that expression of α-SMA was lower, while expressions of transforming growth factor-β 1 (TGF-β1), RhoA, ROCK1, p-MYPT1, p-LIMK2, and p-cofilin were higher in the aWTR group compared with those in other two groups. However, LIMK2 and cofilin expressions did not differ among three groups. Taken together, these results indicated that the RhoA/ROCK1/LIMK/cofilin pathway may be involved in the corporal fibrosis caused by advanced age, and hKLK1 may reduce this corporal fibrosis by inhibiting the activation of this pathway to ameliorate age-related ED. PMID:27678468

  11. Increased circulating levels of tissue kallikrein in systemic sclerosis correlate with microvascular involvement

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, A; Distler, O; Milia, A; Emanueli, C; Ibba-Manneschi, L; Guiducci, S; Conforti, M; Generini, S; Pignone, A; Gay, S; Madeddu, P; Matucci-Cerinic, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: In systemic sclerosis (SSc) the lack of an angiogenic response to hypoxia may be due to inappropriate synthesis of angiogenic and angiostatic factors. Tissue kallikrein (t-kallikrein), regulating the kallikrein-kinin system and acting on the microcirculation, is a potent angiogenic agent, and kallistatin is its natural inhibitor. Objective: To evaluate, in patients with SSc, t-kallikrein and kallistatin levels and their correlation with clinical features and measures of microvascular involvement. Patients and methods: Serum levels of t-kallikrein and kallistatin (ELISA) and t-kallikrein skin expression (immunohistochemistry) were studied in patients with SSc, and evaluated for subset (dSSc or lSSc), clinical and immunological features, and microvascular involvement (ulcers, telangiectasias, nailfold videocapillaroscopy). Results: Circulating levels of t-kallikrein were higher in SSc than in controls (p<0.001). T-kallikrein did not differ between lSSc and dSSc, although it was higher in lSSc than in controls (p<0.001).T-kallikrein levels were higher in patients with early and active capillaroscopic pattern than in those with late pattern (p = 0.019 and 0.023). Patients with giant capillaries and capillary microhaemorrhages had higher t-kallikrein concentrations than patients with architectural derangement (p = 0.04). No differences in kallistatin levels were detected between patients with SSc and controls, or between lSSc and dSSc. In early SSc skin, the presence of t-kallikrein was found in endothelial and in perivascular inflammatory cells, while no staining in skin of advanced SSc was detected. Conclusion: T-kallikrein levels are increased in patients with SSc, particularly in lSSc, and are associated with early and active capillaroscopic patterns. T-kallikrein may play a part in SSc microvascular changes. PMID:15708892

  12. Structural studies of human urinary kallikrein (urokallikrein).

    PubMed

    ole-MoiYoi, O K; Spragg, J; Austen, K F

    1979-07-01

    Human urinary kallikrein (urokallikrein) has been purified by affinity chromatography with aprotinin coupled to CH-Sepharose and by gel filtration. The isolation procedure, which was performed under mild conditions, was completed in a 36-hr period and yielded an overall recovery of more than 75% and a purification of 1727-fold. Homogeneity of the urokallikrein was demonstrated by three criteria: the coincidence of the stained protein band and functional urokallikrein in duplicate gels after alkaline disc gel electrophoresis; the appearance of a single stained band of molecular weight 48,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of reduced and unreduced enzyme; and the finding of a single amino-terminal residue, namely alanine after dansylation and acid hydrolysis of purified enzyme. The Km of urokallikrein on N alpha-p-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester was 400 microM, and the Vmax was 194 mumol/min per mg of protein, which is higher than that observed with any previous preparations. The molecular weight of 48,700 determined on gel filtration and the molecular weight of 48,000 observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are in good agreement with the molecular weight of 48,213 calculated from the amino acid composition. The finding of a molecular weight higher than those previously reported, namely 27,000-43,500, the increased functional activity on tosylarginine methyl ester, and the detection of a single amino-terminal residue are consistent with the isolation of a more native protein by the procedure described in this paper.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human kallikrein 7, a serine protease of the multigene kallikrein family

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández, Israel S.; Ständker, Ludger; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Romero, Antonio

    2007-08-01

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant human kallikrein 7, directly synthesized in the active form in E. coli, is described. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution from native crystals. Human kallikreins are a group of serine proteases of high sequence homology whose genes are grouped as a single cluster at chromosome 19. Although the physiological roles of kallikreins are generally still unknown, members of the kallikrein family have been clearly implicated in pathological situations such as cancer and psoriasis. Human kallikrein 7 (hK7) has been shown to be involved in pathological keratinization, psoriasis and ovarian cancer. In order to gain insight into the molecular structure of this protein, hK7 was crystallized after recombinant production in its folded and active form using a periplasmic secretion vector in Escherichia coli. The crystals belonged to the rhombohedral space group H32 and diffracted to 2.8 Å. The phase problem was solved by molecular replacement using the mouse kallikrein-related protein neuropsin. Completion of the model and structure refinement are under way.

  14. Human plasma kallikrein-kinin system: Physiological and biochemical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, J.W.; Shariat-Madar, z

    2016-01-01

    The plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) plays a critical role in human physiology. The KKS encompasses coagulation factor XII (FXII), the complex of prekallikrein (PK) and high molecular weight kininogen (HK). The conversion of plasma to kallikrein by the activated FXII and in response to numerous different stimuli leads to the generation of bradykinin (BK) and activated HK (HKa, an antiangiogenic peptide). BK is a proinflammatory peptide, a pain mediator and potent vasodilator, leading to robust accumulation of fluid in the interstitium. Systemic production of BK, HKa with the interplay between BK bound-BK receptors and the soluble form of HKa are key to angiogenesis and hemodynamics. KKS has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammation, hypertension, endotoxemia, and coagulopathy. In all these cases increased BK levels is the hallmark. In some cases, the persistent production of BK due to the deficiency of the blood protein C1-inhibitor, which controls FXII, is detrimental to the survival of the patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE). In others, the inability of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to degrade BK leads to elevated BK levels and edema in patients on ACE inhibitors. Thus, the mechanisms that interfere with BK liberation or degradation would lead to blood pressure dysfunction. In contrast, anti-kallikrein treatment could have adverse effects in hemodynamic changes induced by vasoconstrictor agents. Genetic models of kallikrein deficiency are needed to evaluate the quantitative role of kallikrein and to validate whether strategies designed to activate or inhibit kallikrein may be important for regulating whole-body BK sensitivity. PMID:19689262

  15. Gingipains of Porphyromonas gingivalis Affect the Stability and Function of Serine Protease Inhibitor of Kazal-type 6 (SPINK6), a Tissue Inhibitor of Human Kallikreins.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Karolina; Kalinska, Magdalena; Bochenska, Oliwia; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Wu, Zhihong; Fischer, Jan; Falkowski, Katherine; Sasiadek, Laura; Bielecka, Ewa; Potempa, Barbara; Kozik, Andrzej; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz

    2016-09-02

    Periodontitis, a chronic inflammation driven by dysbiotic subgingival bacterial flora, is linked on clinical levels to the development of a number of systemic diseases and to the development of oral and gastric tract tumors. A key pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis, secretes gingipains, cysteine proteases implicated as the main factors in the development of periodontitis. Here we hypothesize that gingipains may be linked to systemic pathologies through the deregulation of kallikrein-like proteinase (KLK) family members. KLKs are implicated in cancer development and are clinically utilized as tumor progression markers. In tissues, KLK activity is strictly controlled by a limited number of tissue-specific inhibitors, including SPINK6, an inhibitor of these proteases in skin and oral epithelium. Here we identify gingipains as the only P. gingivalis proteases responsible for SPINK6 degradation. We further show that gingipains, even at low nanomolar concentrations, cleaved SPINK6 in concentration- and time-dependent manner. The proteolysis was accompanied by loss of inhibition against KLK13. We also mapped the cleavage by Arg-specific gingipains to the reactive site loop of the SPINK6 inhibitor. Moreover, we identified a significant fraction of SPINK6-sensitive proteases in healthy saliva and confirmed the ability of gingipains to inactivate SPINK6 under ex vivo conditions. Finally, we demonstrate the double-edge action of gingipains, which, in addition, can activate KLKs because of gingipain K-mediated proteolytic processing of the zymogenic proform of KLK13. Altogether, the results indicate the potential of P. gingivalis to disrupt the control system of KLKs, providing a possible mechanistic link between periodontal disease and tumor development. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Tissue kallikrein permits early renal adaptation to potassium load.

    PubMed

    El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Houillier, Pascal; Picard, Nicolas; Sohet, Fabien; Wootla, Bharath; Bloch-Faure, May; Leviel, Françoise; Cheval, Lydie; Frische, Sebastian; Meneton, Pierre; Eladari, Dominique; Chambrey, Régine

    2010-07-27

    Tissue kallikrein (TK) is a serine protease synthetized in renal tubular cells located upstream from the collecting duct where renal potassium balance is regulated. Because secretion of TK is promoted by K+ intake, we hypothesized that this enzyme might regulate plasma K+ concentration ([K+]). We showed in wild-type mice that renal K+ and TK excretion increase in parallel after a single meal, representing an acute K+ load, whereas aldosterone secretion is not modified. Using aldosterone synthase-deficient mice, we confirmed that the control of TK secretion is aldosterone-independent. Mice with TK gene disruption (TK-/-) were used to assess the impact of the enzyme on plasma [K+]. A single large feeding did not lead to any significant change in plasma [K+] in TK+/+, whereas TK-/- mice became hyperkalemic. We next examined the impact of TK disruption on K+ transport in isolated cortical collecting ducts (CCDs) microperfused in vitro. We found that CCDs isolated from TK-/- mice exhibit net transepithelial K+ absorption because of abnormal activation of the colonic H+,K+-ATPase in the intercalated cells. Finally, in CCDs isolated from TK-/- mice and microperfused in vitro, the addition of TK to the perfusate but not to the peritubular bath caused a 70% inhibition of H+,K+-ATPase activity. In conclusion, we have identified the serine protease TK as a unique kalliuretic factor that protects against hyperkalemia after a dietary K+ load.

  17. Androgens act synergistically to enhance estrogen-induced upregulation of human tissue kallikreins 10, 11, and 14 in breast cancer cells via a membrane bound androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2008-04-01

    The regulation of gene expression by steroid hormones plays an important role in the normal development and function of many organs, as well as in the pathogenesis of endocrine-related cancers, especially breast cancer. However, clinical data suggest that combined testosterone and estrogen treatments on post-menopausal women increase the risk of breast cancer. Experiments have shown that many, if not all kallikreins are under steroid hormone regulation in breast cancer cell lines. Their implication as prognostic and diagnostic markers has also been well-documented. Thus, we investigated the effect of combined hormone stimulation with androgens and 17beta-estradiol on the ductal caricinoma cell line BT474. This cell line has been shown to be sensitive to both, androgens (secreting PSA) and estrogens (secreting a number of kallikreins including KLK10, 11, and KLK14). We found that PSA expression was downregulated upon combined hormone stimulation, confirming reports that estrogen can antagonize and block the activity of the androgen receptor. Upon analysis of estrogen-sensitive kallikreins 10, 11, and 14, all showed to be synergistically enhanced in their expression three- to fourfold, upon joint hormone treatment versus individual hormone stimulation. The enhancement is dependent upon the action of androgens as treatment with the androgen receptor antagonist cyproterone actetate normalized the expression of KLK10, 11, and KLK14 to estrogen-stimulation levels. The synergistic effects between estrogens and androgens on estrogen-sensitive genes may have implications on the role of the kallikreins in associated risk of breast cancer and progression.

  18. Human kallikrein 11: a new biomarker of prostate and ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Okui, Akira; Mitsui, Shinichii; Luo, Liu-Ying; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Grass, Linda; Nakamura, Terukazu; Howarth, David J C; Yamaguchi, Nozomi

    2002-01-01

    Human kallikrein 11 (hK11) is a putative serine protease of the human kallikrein gene family. Currently, no methods are available for measuring hK11 in biological fluids and tissues. Our aim was to develop immunological reagents and assays for measuring hK11 and examine if the concentration of this kallikrein is altered in disease states. We produced recombinant hK11 protein in a baculovirus system and used it to develop monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against hK11. We then developed an immunofluorometric procedure for measuring hK11 in biological fluids and tissue extracts with high sensitivity and specificity. We further quantified hK11 in various biological fluids and in serum of patients with various cancers. The hK11 immunofluorometric assay is highly sensitive (detection limit, 0.1 microg/l) and specific (no detectable cross-reactivity for other homologous kallikreins). We established the tissue expression pattern of hK11 at the protein level and found the highest levels in the prostate, followed by stomach, trachea, skin, and colon. We have immunohistochemically localized hK11 in epithelial cells of various organs. We further detected hK11 in amniotic fluid, milk of lactating women, cerebrospinal fluid, follicular fluid, and breast cancer cytosols. However, highest levels were seen in prostatic tissue extracts and seminal plasma. hK11 in seminal plasma and prostatic extracts is present at approximately 300-fold lower levels than prostate-specific antigen and at approximately the same levels as hK2. hK11 expression in breast cancer cell lines is up-regulated by estradiol. Elevated serum levels of hK11 were found in 70% of women with ovarian cancer and in 60% of men with prostate cancer. This is the first reported immunological assay for hK11. Analysis of this biomarker in serum may aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of ovarian and prostatic carcinoma.

  19. Studies on the prekallikrein (kallikreinogen)—kallikrein enzyme system of human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Colman, Robert W.; Mattler, Lawrence; Sherry, Sol

    1969-01-01

    Evidence is presented in this paper that the kaolin-activated arginine esterase of plasma is related to plasma kallikrein activity. Such a relationship is based on studies that (1) establish a constant ratio of esterase activity on various synthetic substrates for the kaolin-activated arginine esterase, purified kallikrein(s), and preparations obtained during the fractionation procedure; (2) exclude other known plasma and tissue arginine esterases; (3) confirm the requirement for factor XII in the activation of the enzyme precursor; and (4) show similarities in behavior between the plasma esterase and purified kallikrein(s) toward a variety of inhibitors. Based on this probable identification, evidence is provided that the concentration of active factor XII determines the rate of activation of plasma kallikreinogen, and that the activation may be blocked by polybrene. Once activated, plasma kallikrein is rapidly inactivated by the naturally occurring plasma inhibitor, but the inhibition is incomplete. Acid or chloroform treatment of plasma rapidly inactivates the plasma inhibitor without affecting the concentration of plasma kallikreinogen. Another plasma arginine esterase with properties suggestive of permeability factor is activated by factor XII in the presence of synthetic substrates, but only at low ionic strength. The data suggest that this enzyme is closely related to plasma kallikrein and that it arises from a common precursor. PMID:4237065

  20. Tissue kallikrein deficiency, insulin resistance, and diabetes in mouse and man.

    PubMed

    Potier, Louis; Waeckel, Ludovic; Fumeron, Fréderic; Bodin, Sophie; Fysekidis, Marinos; Chollet, Catherine; Bellili, Naima; Bonnet, Fabrice; Gusto, Gaëlle; Velho, Gilberto; Marre, Michel; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Roussel, Ronan; Bouby, Nadine

    2014-05-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system has been suggested to participate in the control of glucose metabolism. Its role and the role of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme, a major kinin-inactivating enzyme, are however the subject of debate. We have evaluated the consequence of deficiency in tissue kallikrein (TK), the main kinin-forming enzyme, on the development of insulin resistance and diabetes in mice and man. Mice with inactivation of the TK gene were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 3 months, or crossed with obese, leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice to generate double ob/ob-TK-deficient mutants. In man, a loss-of-function polymorphism of the TK gene (R53H) was studied in a large general population cohort tested for insulin resistance, the DESIR study (4843 participants, 9 year follow-up). Mice deficient in TK gained less weight on the HFD than their WT littermates. Fasting glucose level was increased and responses to glucose (GTT) and insulin (ITT) tolerance tests were altered at 10 and 16 weeks on the HFD compared with standard on the diet, but TK deficiency had no influence on these parameters. Likewise, ob-TK⁻/⁻ mice had similar GTT and ITT responses to those of ob-TK⁺/⁺ mice. TK deficiency had no effect on blood pressure in either model. In humans, changes over time in BMI, fasting plasma glucose, insulinemia, and blood pressure were not influenced by the defective 53H-coding TK allele. The incidence of diabetes was not influenced by this allele. These data do not support a role for the TK-kinin system, protective or deleterious, in the development of insulin resistance and diabetes.

  1. Differential expression of a human kallikrein 5 (KLK5) splice variant in ovarian and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kurlender, Lisa; Yousef, George M; Memari, Nader; Robb, John-Desmond; Michael, Iacovos P; Borgoño, Carla; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Stephan, Carsten; Jung, Klaus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2004-01-01

    The presence of more than one mRNA form is common among kallikrein genes. We identified an mRNA transcript of the human kallikrein gene 5 (KLK5), denoted KLK5 splice variant 1 (KLK5-SV1). This variant has a different 5'-splice site, but encodes the same protein as the classical KLK5 transcript. RT-PCR analysis of this variant transcript expression in 29 human tissues indicated highest expression in the cervix, salivary gland, kidney, mammary gland, and skin. Comparative analysis of the expression levels of KLK5-SV1, another splice variant named KLK5 splice variant 2 (KLK5-SV2), and the classical KLK5 form showed that out of all three mRNA transcripts, the classical form is predominantly expressed (found in more tissues and at higher expression levels) followed by KLK5-SV1. KLK5-SV1 is expressed at high levels in ovarian, pancreatic, breast and prostate cancer cell lines. KLK5-SV1 was also found to be expressed in 9/10 ovarian cancer tissues, but it was not found in one normal ovarian tissue tested. Hormonal regulation experiments suggest that KLK5-SV1 is regulated by steroid hormones in the BT-474 breast cancer cell line. Furthermore, this variant had significantly higher expression in normal prostate tissues compared to their matched cancer tissue counterparts. KLK5-SV1 may have clinical utility in various malignancies and should be further explored as a potential new biomarker for prostate and ovarian cancer.

  2. Human kallikrein 5: a potential novel serum biomarker for breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yousef, George M; Polymeris, Mary-Ellen; Grass, Linda; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Chan, Pak-Cheung; Scorilas, Andreas; Borgoño, Carla; Harbeck, Nadia; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Dorn, Julia; Schmitt, Manfred; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2003-07-15

    The kallikrein family is a group of 15 serine protease genes clustered on chromosome 19q13.4. Human kallikrein (hK) gene 5 (KLK5) is a member of this family and encodes for a secreted serine protease (hK5). KLK5 was shown to be differentially expressed at the mRNA level in breast and ovarian cancer. Until now, detection of hK5 protein in either biological fluids or tissues has not been described due to lack of suitable reagents and methods. The aim of this study was to develop immunological reagents and a sensitive and specific fluorometric immunoassay (ELISA) for hK5, to examine the presence of hK5 in human tissues and biological fluids, and to study the possible clinical utility of hK5 as a biomarker for endocrine-related malignancies. Recombinant hK5 protein was produced and purified using a Pichia pastoris yeast expression system. The protein was used as an immunogen to generate mouse and rabbit polyclonal anti-hK5 antibodies. A sandwich-type microplate immunoassay (ELISA) was developed using these antibodies, coupled with a time-resolved fluorometric detection technique. The ELISA assay was then used to measure hK5 in various biological fluids, tissue extracts, and serum samples from normal individuals and patients with various malignancies. The hK5 ELISA immunoassay has a lower detection limit of 0.1 micro g/liter, is specific for hK5, and has no cross-reactivity with other homologous kallikreins. The dynamic range is 0.1-25 micro g/liter, and within-run and between-run coefficients of variation within this range are <10%. hK5 is found in many tissues, with the highest expression levels seen in the skin, breast, salivary gland, and esophagus. hK5 is present at relatively high levels in milk of lactating women. Whereas the levels of hK5 are almost undetectable in serum of normal individuals (male and female) and patients with diverse malignancies, higher concentrations were found in a proportion of patients with ovarian (69%) and breast (49%) cancer. High

  3. Sequential cleavage of proinsulin by human pancreatic kallikrein and a human pancreatic kininase

    PubMed Central

    ole-MoiYoi, Onesmo; Seldin, David C.; Spragg, Jocelyn; Pinkus, Geraldine S.; Austen, K. Frank

    1979-01-01

    A pancreatic endopeptidase localized to the β-cells of the pancreas by immunohistochemical techniques has been purified to homogeneity by following its functional and antigenic characteristics as a glandular kallikrein (EC 3.4.21.8). The enzyme gave a single stained band on alkaline disc gel electrophoresis which corresponded in location with the kinin-generating activity eluted from a replicate gel, was of 54,000 molecular weight by gel filtration, was devoid of caseinolytic activity, elicited a monospecific antiserum in a rabbit, and gave a line of complete identity with a single constituent in pancreatic extract, crude urine, and purified urokallikrein when analyzed with monospecific antibody to urokallikrein. The pancreatic glandular kallikrein generated three cleavage products of increasing anodal mobility from bovine and porcine proinsulin, and the presence of pancreatic kininase or bovine carboxypeptidase B increased the quantity of these products. Although the conversion products did not correspond to diarginyl- and monoarginylinsulin, the product of intermediate mobility was also obtained when proinsulin was treated with a low concentration of trypsin in the presence of kininase. The most rapidly migrating product did correspond to desalanylinsulin in the reference standard. Kininase alone had no action on proinsulin, and aprotinin prevented cleavage by kallikrein alone or in combination with kininase. Although the chemical structure of the proinsulin cleavage products has not been established, human pancreatic kallikrein is considered a putative activator of proinsulin because of its location in the β-cell, its preferential action on proinsulin and kininogen as compared to azocasein, and its capacity to generate insulin intermediate products that are further modified by human pancreatic kininase or bovine carboxypeptidase B. Images PMID:386342

  4. Human kallikrein 14: a new potential biomarker for ovarian and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Borgoño, Carla A; Grass, Linda; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Yousef, George M; Petraki, Constantina D; Howarth, David H C; Fracchioli, Stefano; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2003-12-15

    Human kallikrein gene 14 (KLK14) is a recently discovered member of the tissue kallikrein family of secreted serine proteases, which includes hK3/prostate-specific antigen, the best cancer biomarker to date. Given that KLK14 is hormonally regulated, differentially expressed in endocrine-related cancers, and a prognostic marker for breast and ovarian cancer at the mRNA level, we hypothesize that its encoded protein, hK14, like hK3/prostate-specific antigen, may constitute a new biomarker for endocrine-related malignancies. The objective of this study was to generate immunological reagents for hK14, to develop an ELISA and immunohistochemical techniques to study its expression in normal and cancerous tissues and biological fluids. Recombinant hK14 was produced in Pichia pastoris, purified by affinity chromatography, and injected into mice and rabbits for polyclonal antibody generation. Using the mouse and rabbit antisera, a sandwich-type immunofluorometric ELISA and immunohistochemical methodologies were developed for hK14. The ELISA was sensitive (detection limit of 0.1 micro g/liter), specific for hK14, linear from 0 to 20 micro g/liter with between-run and within-run coefficients of variation of <10%. hK14 was quantified in human tissue extracts and biological fluids. Highest levels were observed in the breast, skin, prostate, seminal plasma, and amniotic fluid, with almost undetectable levels in normal serum. hK14 concentration was higher in 40% of ovarian cancer tissues compared with normal ovarian tissues. Serum hK14 levels were elevated in a proportion of patients with ovarian (65%) and breast (40%) cancers. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated strong cytoplasmic staining of hK14 by the epithelial cells of normal and malignant skin, ovary, breast, and testis. In conclusion, we report the first ELISA and immunohistochemical assays for hK14 and describe its distribution in tissues and biological fluids. Our preliminary data indicate that hK14 is a potential

  5. Human glandular kallikrein in breast milk, amniotic fluid, and breast cyst fluid.

    PubMed

    Magklara, A; Scorilas, A; López-Otín, C; Vizoso, F; Ruibal, A; Diamandis, E P

    1999-10-01

    Human glandular kallikrein (hK2) belongs to the serine protease family of enzymes and has high sequence homology with prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The physiological role of hK2 has not as yet been determined, but there is evidence that it can regulate the proteolytic activity of PSA through processing and activating pro-PSA, an inactive precursor. Thus, it is conceivable that these two secreted proteins may coexist in biological fluids. Currently, hK2 is considered an androgen-regulated and prostate-specific protein. Recently, it has been demonstrated that hK2 is expressed in the breast cancer cell line T-47D after stimulation by steroid hormones, and we reported that hK2 can be detected in a subset of breast tumor extracts. These data suggest that hK2 may be expressed in tissues other than the prostate, such as those in which PSA has already been detected. Because hK2 is a secreted protein, it may be present in various biological fluids. We analyzed milk samples from lactating women, amniotic fluid from pregnant women, and breast cyst fluid from patients with gross breast cystic disease, using a highly sensitive and specific immunoassay for hK2. hK2 was present in all three biological fluids. We suggest that the female breast may produce hK2 and provide evidence that hK2 may have value as an additional marker for the discrimination between type I and type II breast cysts. The female breast produces hK2 in addition to PSA. More studies are necessary to establish the role of this kallikrein in nondiseased breast, gross breast cystic disease, and breast cancer.

  6. Kallikreins - the melting pot of activity and function

    PubMed Central

    Kalinska, Magdalena; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Kantyka, Tomasz; Potempa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The human tissue kallikrein and kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs), encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome, are secreted serine proteases with diverse expression patterns and physiological roles. Because of the broad spectrum of processes that are modulated by kallikreins, these proteases are the subject of extensive investigations. This review brings together basic information about the biochemical properties affecting enzymatic activity, with highlights on post-translational modifications, especially glycosylation. Additionally, we present the current state of knowledge regarding the physiological functions of KLKs in major human organs and outline recent discoveries pertinent to the involvement of kallikreins in cell signaling and in viral infections. Despite the current depth of knowledge of these enzymes, many questions regarding the roles of kallikreins in health and disease remain unanswered. PMID:26408415

  7. Expression and bioregulation of the kallikrein-related peptidases family in the human neutrophil.

    PubMed

    Lizama, Alejandro J; Andrade, Yessica; Colivoro, Patricio; Sarmiento, Jose; Matus, Carola E; Gonzalez, Carlos B; Bhoola, Kanti D; Ehrenfeld, Pamela; Figueroa, Carlos D

    2015-08-01

    The family of kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) has been identified in a variety of immunolabeled human tissue sections, but no previous study has experimentally confirmed their presence in the human neutrophil. We have investigated the expression and bioregulation of particular KLKs in the human neutrophil and, in addition, examined whether stimulation by a kinin B(1) receptor (B1R) agonist or fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLP) induces their secretion. Western blot analysis of neutrophil homogenates indicated that the MM of the KLKs ranged from 27 to 50 kDa. RT-PCR showed that blood neutrophils expressed only KLK1, KLK4, KLK10, KLK13, KLK14 and KLK15 mRNAs, whereas the non-differentiated HL-60 cells expressed most of them, with exception of KLK3 and KLK7. Nevertheless, mRNAs for KLK2, KLK5, KLK6 and KLK9 that were previously undetectable appeared after challenging with a mixture of cytokines. Both kinin B(1)R agonist and fMLP induced secretion of KLK1, KLK6, KLK10, KLK13 and KLK14 into the culture medium in similar amounts, whereas the B(1)R agonist caused the release of lower amounts of KLK2, KLK4 and KLK5. When secreted, the differing proteolytic activity of KLKs provides the human neutrophil with a multifunctional enzymatic capacity supporting a new dimension for its role in human disorders of diverse etiology. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Kinetic peculiarities of human tissue kallikrein: 1--substrate activation in the catalyzed hydrolysis of H-D-valyl-L-leucyl-L-arginine 4-nitroanilide and H-D-valyl-L-leucyl-L-lysine 4-nitroanilide; 2--substrate inhibition in the catalyzed hydrolysis of N alpha-p-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Marinez O; Miranda, Tânia L S; Maia, Caroline N; Bittar, Eustáquio R; Santoro, Marcelo M; Figueiredo, Amintas F S

    2002-04-01

    Hydrolysis of D-valyl-L-leucyl-L-lysine 4-nitroanilide (1), D-valyl-L-leucyl-L-arginine 4-nitroanilide (2), and N alpha-p-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (3) by human tissue kallikrein was studied throughout a wide range of substrate concentrations. At low substrate concentrations, the hydrolysis followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics but, at higher substrate concentrations, a deviation from Michaelis-Menten behavior was observed. With the nitroanilides, a significant increase in hydrolysis rates was observed, while with the ester, a significant decrease in hydrolysis rates was observed. The results for substrates (1) and (3) can be accounted for by a model based on the hypothesis that a second substrate molecule binds to the ES complex to produce a more active or an inactive SES complex. The deviation observed for substrate (2) can be explained as a bimolecular reaction between the enzyme-substrate complex and a free substrate molecule.

  9. Cardiac function and remodeling is attenuated in transgenic rats expressing the human kallikrein-1 gene after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Koch, Matthias; Spillmann, Frank; Dendorfer, Andreas; Westermann, Dirk; Altmann, Christine; Sahabi, Merdad; Linthout, Sophie Van; Bader, Michael; Walther, Thomas; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2006-11-21

    Bradykinin coronary outflow, left ventricular performance and left ventricular dimensions of transgenic rats harboring the human tissue kallikrein-1 gene TGR(hKLK1) were investigated under basal and ischemic conditions. Bradykinin content in the coronary outflow of buffer-perfused, isolated hearts of controls and TGR(hKLK1) was measured by specific radioimmunoassay before and after global ischemia. Left ventricular function and left ventricular dimensions were determined in vivo using a tip catheter and echocardiography 6 days and 3 weeks after induction of myocardial infarction. Left ventricular type I collagen mRNA expression was analyzed by RNase protection assay. Compared to controls, basal bradykinin outflow was 3.5 fold increased in TGR(hKLK1). Ischemia induced an increase of bradykinin coronary outflow in controls but did not induce a further increase in TGR(hKLK1). However, despite similar unchanged infarction sizes, left ventricular function and remodeling improved in TGR(hKLK1) after myocardial infarction, indicated by an increase in left ventricular pressure (+34%; P<0.05), contractility (dp/dt max. +25%; P<0.05), and in ejection fraction (+20%; P<0.05) as well as by a reduction in left ventricular enddiastolic pressure (-49%, P<0.05), left ventricular enddiastolic diameter (-20%, P<0.05), and collagen mRNA expression (-15%, P<0.05) compared to controls. A chronically activated transgenic kallikrein kinin system with expression of human kallikrein-1 gene counteracts the progression of left ventricular contractile dysfunction after experimental myocardial infarction. Further studies have to show whether these results can be caused by other therapeutically options. Long acting bradykinin receptor agonists might be an alternative option to improve ischemic heart disease.

  10. Immunofluorometric assay of human kallikrein 6 (zyme/protease M/neurosin) and preliminary clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Diamandis, E P; Yousef, G M; Soosaipillai, A R; Grass, L; Porter, A; Little, S; Sotiropoulou, G

    2000-07-01

    The human kallikrein gene family has contributed the best prostatic biomarkers currently available, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and human glandular kallikrein 2 (hK2). Recently, new members of the human kallikrein gene family have been identified. One new member is the KLK6 gene, encoding for human kallikrein 6 (hK6), which is also known as zyme/protease M/neurosin. In this paper, we describe development of antibodies and a sensitive immunofluorometric procedure for hK6 protein. Recombinant hK6 protein was used as immunogen to develop polyclonal antibodies in rabbits and mice. These antibodies were used to develop a sandwich-type time-resolved immunofluorometric procedure for hK6. The newly developed hK6 immunofluorometric assay has a detection limit of 0.5 microg/L and upper concentration range of 200 microg/L. The assay is highly specific (no detectable cross-reactivity from PSA and hK2) and was used to quantify hK6 protein in various biologic fluids. Highest concentrations of hK6 were found in milk of lactating women, cerebral spinal fluid, nipple aspirate fluid, and breast cyst fluid. hK6 was also detected in male and female serum, in the majority of seminal plasmas and in a small fraction of amniotic fluids and breast tumor cytosols. hK6 was not detectable in urine. Chromatographic studies indicated that hK6 is present in these biologic fluids in its free, 30-kDa form. This is the first reported sensitive immunofluorometric procedure for quantifying hK6 protein. hK6 is a secreted proteolytic enzyme that is found at high levels in cerebrospinal fluid and all breast secretions. This assay will facilitate further studies to examine the possible application of hK6 in diagnostics, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Human kallikrein 4 signal peptide induces cytotoxic T cell responses in healthy donors and prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Ray; Woods, Katherine; D'Rozario, Rachael; Prue, Rebecca; Vari, Frank; Hardy, Melinda Y; Dong, Ying; Clements, Judith A; Hart, Derek N J; Radford, Kristen J

    2012-02-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising new treatment for patients with advanced prostate and ovarian cancer, but its application is limited by the lack of suitable target antigens that are recognized by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Human kallikrein 4 (KLK4) is a member of the kallikrein family of serine proteases that is significantly overexpressed in malignant versus healthy prostate and ovarian tissue, making it an attractive target for immunotherapy. We identified a naturally processed, HLA-A*0201-restricted peptide epitope within the signal sequence region of KLK4 that induced CTL responses in vitro in most healthy donors and prostate cancer patients tested. These CTL lysed HLA-A*0201+ KLK4 + cell lines and KLK4 mRNA-transfected monocyte-derived dendritic cells. CTL specific for the HLA-A*0201-restricted KLK4 peptide were more readily expanded to a higher frequency in vitro compared to the known HLA-A*0201-restricted epitopes from prostate cancer antigens; prostate-specific antigen (PSA), prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP). These data demonstrate that KLK4 is an immunogenic molecule capable of inducing CTL responses and identify it as an attractive target for prostate and ovarian cancer immunotherapy.

  12. Characterization of the kallikrein-kinin system, metalloproteinases, and their tissue inhibitors in the in-stent restenosis after peripheral percutaneous angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maurício S; Dellalibera-Joviliano, Renata; Becari, Christiane; Teixeira, Felipe Roberti; Araujo, Paula Vasconcelos; Piccinato, Carlos E; Campos, Cesar Presto; Evora, Paulo Roberto B; Joviliano, Edwaldo E

    2014-05-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) has several direct and indirect effects on cells and cellular mediators involved in the inflammatory process. Studies about inflammation on percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent (PTA/stent) to treat peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in humans are scarce. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are calcium-dependent zinc-containing endopeptidases expressed in various cells and tissues such as fibroblasts, inflammatory cells, and, smooth muscle cells. Changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) take place in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular pathologies. MMPs and their inhibitors (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases [TIMPs]) are crucial in ECM remodeling in both physiologic and pathologic conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the KKS and the MMP metabolism, which are important mediators that may contribute to tissue repair, in the process of arterial restenosis due to intimal hyperplasia in the femoropopliteal segment with the aim of developing new interventions. Thirty-nine consecutive patients were selected (regardless of ethnic group, age, or sex) for revascularization, who underwent PTA/stent of the femoropopliteal segment. Twenty-five patients with the same clinical characteristics who were scheduled for diagnostic angiography but not subjected to PTA/nitinol stent were also selected. The concentrations in blood of total and kininogen fractions were evaluated using immunoenzymatic methods. Plasma kallikrein was evaluated by the colorimetric method. Tissue kallikrein was evaluated by the spectrophotometric method. The activity of kininase II was measured by fluorometric analysis. Quantification of MMPs was performed by zymography, which is an electrophoresis technique, and TIMPs were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Among the 31 patients who completed the survey, there were 10 cases of angiographically defined restenosis of >50%, and 21 cases without restenosis. There was an

  13. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane–specific antibody–induced nephritis in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M.; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J.; Chung, Sharon A.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Gilkeson, Gary G.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Kim, Il; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that may be responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family, which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms, some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and lupus. PMID:19307730

  14. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane-specific antibody-induced nephritis in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J; Chung, Sharon A; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T; Gregersen, Peter K; Gilkeson, Gary G; Kimberly, Robert P; Vyse, Timothy J; Kim, Il; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B; Criswell, Lindsey A; Wakeland, Edward K; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-04-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that maybe responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family,which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms,some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and lupus.

  15. Human kallikrein 6 activity is regulated via an autoproteolytic mechanism of activation/inactivation.

    PubMed

    Bayés, Alex; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Ventura, Salvador; Vendrell, Josep; Aviles, Francesc X; Sotiropoulou, Georgia

    2004-06-01

    Human kallikrein 6 (protease M/zyme/neurosin) is a serine protease that has been suggested to be a serum biomarker for ovarian cancer and may also be involved in pathologies of the CNS. The precursor form of human kallikrein 6 (pro-hK6) was overexpressed in Pichia pastoris and found to be autoprocessed to an active but unstable mature enzyme that subsequently yielded the inactive, self-cleavage product, hK6 (D81-K244). Site-directed mutagenesis was used to investigate the basis for the intrinsic catalytic activity and the activation mechanism of pro-hK6. A single substitution R80 --> Q stabilized the activity of the mature enzyme, while substitution of the active site serine (S197 --> A) resulted in complete loss of hK6 proteolytic activity and facilitated protein production. Our data suggest that the enzymatic activity of hK6 is regulated by an autoactivation/autoinactivation mechanism. Mature hK6 displayed a trypsin-like activity against synthetic substrates and human plasminogen was identified as a putative physiological substrate for hK6, as specific cleavage at the plasminogen internal bond S460-V461 resulted in the generation of angiostatin, an endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis and metastatic growth.

  16. Role of tissue kallikrein-kininogen-kinin pathways in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jagdish N

    2006-04-01

    All the components of the kallikrein-kinin system are located in the cardiac muscle, and its deficiency may lead to cardiac dysfunction. In recent years, numerous observations obtained from clinical and experimental models of diabetes, hypertension, cardiac failure, ischemia, myocardial infarction and left ventricular hypertrophy have suggested that the reduced activity of the local kallikrein-kinin system may be instrumental for the induction of cardiovascular-related diseases. The cardioprotective property of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors is primarily mediated via kinin-releasing pathway, which may cause regression of the left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive situations. The ability of kallikrein gene delivery to produce a wide spectrum of beneficial effects makes it an excellent candidate in treating hypertension, cardiovascular and renal diseases. In addition, stable kinin agonists may also be available in the future as therapeutic agents for cardiovascular and renal disorders.

  17. Human kallikrein 10 expression in surgically removed human pituitary corticotroph adenomas: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Di Meo, Ashley; Rotondo, Fabio; Kovacs, Kalman; Cusimano, Michael D; Syro, Luis V; Di Ieva, Antonio; Diamandis, Eleftheros P; Yousef, George M

    2015-07-01

    Human kallikrein 10 (hk10), a secreted serine protease, was reported to function as a tumor suppressor. hK10 immunoexpression has been demonstrated in lactrotrophs and corticotrophs of the nontumorous human adenohypophysis. In the present study, for the first time we report hK10 immunoexpression in various surgically removed corticotroph adenoma subtypes. Specimens were fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin. Immunostaining was performed using the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method with an hK10-specific rabbit polyclonal antibody. Results showed that the endocrinologically active adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing pituitary tumors and the silent subtypes were immunopositve for hK10. Intensity of staining varied between the different subtypes. Intensity was lowest in the silent subtypes (silent corticotroph subtypes 1 and 2) compared with nontumorous human adenohypophysial corticotrophs, whereas the endocrinologically active subtypes (ACTH-secreting adenomas, corticotroph carcinomas, Crooke cell adenomas, Crooke cell carcinomas), showed the highest hK10 immunoexpression. Immunopositivity in the nuclei of the ACTH-secreting adenomas and carcinomas, as well as dual cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of hK10 in some of the secreting tumor types was an intriguing finding. Immunoexpression of hK10 in the ACTH-secreting tumors as well as in the Crooke cell tumors was significantly increased when compared with the nonfunctioning tumors and in the corticotrophs of nontumorous pituitaries.

  18. Decreased expression of kallikrein-related peptidase 13: possible contribution to metastasis of human oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishige, Shunsaku; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Ogoshi, Kenji; Saito, Yasuhiro; Usukura, Katsuya; Yokoe, Hidetaka; Kouzu, Yukinao; Koike, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Ogawara, Katsunori; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2014-07-01

    The human kallikrein-related peptidase family is comprised of 15 serine protease genes on chromosome 19q13.4. Our previous microarray analyses showed that the gene kallikrein-related peptidase 13 (KLK13) was down-regulated in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines. We evaluated the expression status of KLK13 in primary OSCCs and performed functional molecular experiments in OSCC cell lines. In 102 primary tumors studied, KLK13 expression significantly (P < 0.05) decreased compared with matched normal counterparts. Interestingly, KLK13-negative cases correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with regional lymph node metastasis. In vitro, cells overexpressing KLK13 (oeKLK13) had decreased invasiveness and motility and up-regulation of adhesion molecules (E-cadherin, α-catenin, β-catenin, junction plakoglobin, plakophilin4, desmocollin2, desmoglein3, and desmoplakin) compared with control cells. A rescue experiment that transfected oeKLK13 cells with siRNA against KLK13 restored invasiveness and migration activities with down-regulated adhesion molecules. Based on our results, we concluded that KLK13 may play an important role in regulating cellular migration and invasiveness, making the loss of KLK13 a potential biomarker for early detection of lymph node metastasis in OSCCs.

  19. Kallikrein-8 Proteolytically Processes Human Papillomaviruses in the Extracellular Space To Facilitate Entry into Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Carla; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Vogeley, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entry of human papillomaviruses into host cells is a complex process. It involves conformational changes at the cell surface, receptor switching, internalization by a novel endocytic mechanism, uncoating in endosomes, trafficking of a subviral complex to the Golgi complex, and nuclear entry during mitosis. Here, we addressed how the stabilizing contacts in the capsid of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) may be reversed to allow uncoating of the viral genome. Using biochemical and cell-biological analyses, we determined that the major capsid protein L1 underwent proteolytic cleavage during entry. In addition to a dispensable cathepsin-mediated proteolysis that occurred likely after removal of capsomers from the subviral complex in endosomes, at least two further proteolytic cleavages of L1 were observed, one of which was independent of the low-pH environment of endosomes. This cleavage occurred extracellularly. Further analysis showed that the responsible protease was the secreted trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein-8 (KLK8) involved in epidermal homeostasis and wound healing. Required for infection, the cleavage was facilitated by prior interaction of viral particles with heparan sulfate proteoglycans. KLK8-mediated cleavage was crucial for further conformational changes exposing an important epitope of the minor capsid protein L2. Occurring independently of cyclophilins and of furin that mediate L2 exposure, KLK8-mediated cleavage of L1 likely facilitated access to L2, located in the capsid lumen, and potentially uncoating. Since HPV6 and HPV18 also required KLK8 for entry, we propose that the KLK8-dependent entry step is conserved. IMPORTANCE Our analysis of the proteolytic processing of incoming HPV16, an etiological agent of cervical cancer, demonstrated that the capsid is cleaved extracellularly by a serine protease active during wound healing and that this cleavage was crucial for infection. The cleavage of L1 is one of at least four structural

  20. Kallikrein-8 Proteolytically Processes Human Papillomaviruses in the Extracellular Space To Facilitate Entry into Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Carla; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Vogeley, Christian; Schelhaas, Mario

    2015-07-01

    The entry of human papillomaviruses into host cells is a complex process. It involves conformational changes at the cell surface, receptor switching, internalization by a novel endocytic mechanism, uncoating in endosomes, trafficking of a subviral complex to the Golgi complex, and nuclear entry during mitosis. Here, we addressed how the stabilizing contacts in the capsid of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) may be reversed to allow uncoating of the viral genome. Using biochemical and cell-biological analyses, we determined that the major capsid protein L1 underwent proteolytic cleavage during entry. In addition to a dispensable cathepsin-mediated proteolysis that occurred likely after removal of capsomers from the subviral complex in endosomes, at least two further proteolytic cleavages of L1 were observed, one of which was independent of the low-pH environment of endosomes. This cleavage occurred extracellularly. Further analysis showed that the responsible protease was the secreted trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein-8 (KLK8) involved in epidermal homeostasis and wound healing. Required for infection, the cleavage was facilitated by prior interaction of viral particles with heparan sulfate proteoglycans. KLK8-mediated cleavage was crucial for further conformational changes exposing an important epitope of the minor capsid protein L2. Occurring independently of cyclophilins and of furin that mediate L2 exposure, KLK8-mediated cleavage of L1 likely facilitated access to L2, located in the capsid lumen, and potentially uncoating. Since HPV6 and HPV18 also required KLK8 for entry, we propose that the KLK8-dependent entry step is conserved. Our analysis of the proteolytic processing of incoming HPV16, an etiological agent of cervical cancer, demonstrated that the capsid is cleaved extracellularly by a serine protease active during wound healing and that this cleavage was crucial for infection. The cleavage of L1 is one of at least four structural alterations that

  1. Plasma kallikrein mediates brain hemorrhage and edema caused by tissue plasminogen activator therapy in mice after stroke.

    PubMed

    Simão, Fabrício; Ustunkaya, Tuna; Clermont, Allen C; Feener, Edward P

    2017-04-20

    Thrombolytic therapy using tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in acute stroke is associated with increased risks of cerebral hemorrhagic transformation and angioedema. Although plasma kallikrein (PKal) has been implicated in contributing to both hematoma expansion and thrombosis in stroke, its role in the complications associated with the therapeutic use of tPA in stroke is not yet available. We investigated the effects of tPA on plasma prekallikrein (PPK) activation and the role of PKal on cerebral outcomes in a murine thrombotic stroke model treated with tPA. We show that tPA increases PKal activity in vitro in both murine and human plasma, via a factor XII (FXII)-dependent mechanism. Intravenous administration of tPA increased circulating PKal activity in mice. In mice with thrombotic occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, tPA administration increased brain hemorrhage transformation, infarct volume, and edema. These adverse effects of tPA were ameliorated in PPK (Klkb1)-deficient and FXII-deficient mice and in wild-type (WT) mice pretreated with a PKal inhibitor prior to tPA. tPA-induced brain hemisphere reperfusion after photothrombolic middle cerebral artery occlusion was increased in Klkb1(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. In addition, PKal inhibition reduced matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity in brain following stroke and tPA therapy. These data demonstrate that tPA activates PPK in plasma and PKal inhibition reduces cerebral complications associated with tPA-mediated thrombolysis in stroke. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. A genetically engineered human Kunitz protease inhibitor with increased kallikrein inhibition in an ovine model of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Ohri, S K; Parratt, R; White, T; Becket, J; Brannan, J J; Hunt, B J; Taylor, K M

    2001-05-01

    A recombinant human serine protease inhibitor known as Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) wild type has functional similarities to the bovine Kunitz inhibitor, aprotinin, and had shown a potential to reduce bleeding in an ovine model of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The aim of this study was to assess KPI-185, a modification of KPI-wild type that differs from KPI-wild type in two amino acid residues and which enhances anti-kallikrein activity in a further double-blind, randomized study in an ovine model of CPB, and to compare with our previous study of KPI-wild type and aprotinin in the same ovine model. Post-operative drain losses and subjective assessment of wound 'dryness' showed no significant differences between KPI-185 and KPI-wild type, despite the significant enhancement of kallikrein inhibition using KPI-185 seen in serial kallikrein inhibition assays. These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that kallikrein inhibition is not the major mechanism by which Kunitz inhibitors such as aprotinin reduce perioperative bleeding.

  3. Tissue Kallikrein Inhibitors Based on the Sunflower Trypsin Inhibitor Scaffold – A Potential Therapeutic Intervention for Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenjie; Kinsler, Veronica A.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue kallikreins (KLKs), in particular KLK5, 7 and 14 are the major serine proteases in the skin responsible for skin shedding and activation of inflammatory cell signaling. In the normal skin, their activities are controlled by an endogenous protein protease inhibitor encoded by the SPINK5 gene. Loss-of-function mutations in SPINK5 leads to enhanced skin kallikrein activities and cause the skin disease Netherton Syndrome (NS). We have been developing inhibitors based on the Sunflower Trypsin Inhibitor 1 (SFTI-1) scaffold, a 14 amino acids head-to-tail bicyclic peptide with a disulfide bond. To optimize a previously reported SFTI-1 analogue (I10H), we made five analogues with additional substitutions, two of which showed improved inhibition. We then combined those substitutions and discovered a variant (Analogue 6) that displayed dual inhibition of KLK5 (tryptic) and KLK7 (chymotryptic). Analogue 6 attained a tenfold increase in KLK5 inhibition potency with an Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) Kd of 20nM. Furthermore, it selectively inhibits KLK5 and KLK14 over seven other serine proteases. Its biological function was ascertained by full suppression of KLK5-induced Protease-Activated Receptor 2 (PAR-2) dependent intracellular calcium mobilization and postponement of Interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion in cell model. Moreover, Analogue 6 permeates through the cornified layer of in vitro organotypic skin equivalent culture and inhibits protease activities therein, providing a potential drug lead for the treatment of NS. PMID:27824929

  4. Tissue Kallikrein Inhibitors Based on the Sunflower Trypsin Inhibitor Scaffold - A Potential Therapeutic Intervention for Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjie; Kinsler, Veronica A; Macmillan, Derek; Di, Wei-Li

    2016-01-01

    Tissue kallikreins (KLKs), in particular KLK5, 7 and 14 are the major serine proteases in the skin responsible for skin shedding and activation of inflammatory cell signaling. In the normal skin, their activities are controlled by an endogenous protein protease inhibitor encoded by the SPINK5 gene. Loss-of-function mutations in SPINK5 leads to enhanced skin kallikrein activities and cause the skin disease Netherton Syndrome (NS). We have been developing inhibitors based on the Sunflower Trypsin Inhibitor 1 (SFTI-1) scaffold, a 14 amino acids head-to-tail bicyclic peptide with a disulfide bond. To optimize a previously reported SFTI-1 analogue (I10H), we made five analogues with additional substitutions, two of which showed improved inhibition. We then combined those substitutions and discovered a variant (Analogue 6) that displayed dual inhibition of KLK5 (tryptic) and KLK7 (chymotryptic). Analogue 6 attained a tenfold increase in KLK5 inhibition potency with an Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) Kd of 20nM. Furthermore, it selectively inhibits KLK5 and KLK14 over seven other serine proteases. Its biological function was ascertained by full suppression of KLK5-induced Protease-Activated Receptor 2 (PAR-2) dependent intracellular calcium mobilization and postponement of Interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion in cell model. Moreover, Analogue 6 permeates through the cornified layer of in vitro organotypic skin equivalent culture and inhibits protease activities therein, providing a potential drug lead for the treatment of NS.

  5. Exogenous kallikrein protects against diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjuan; Yang, Yeping; Liu, Yemei; Lu, Xiaolan; Guo, Shizhe; Wu, Meng; Wang, Meng; Yan, Linling; Wang, Qinghua; Zhao, Xiaolong; Tong, Xian; Hu, Ji; Li, Yiming; Hu, Renming; Stanton, Robert C; Zhang, Zhaoyun

    2016-11-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system has been shown to be involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy, but specific mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we determined the renal-protective role of exogenous pancreatic kallikrein in diabetic mice and studied potential mechanisms in db/db type 2 diabetic and streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. After the onset of diabetes, mice were treated with either pancreatic kallikrein (db/db+kallikrein, streptozotocin+kallikrein) or saline (db/db+saline, streptozotocin+saline) for 16 weeks, while another group of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice received the same treatment after onset of albuminuria (streptozotocin'+kallikrein, streptozotocin'+saline). Db/m littermates or wild type mice were used as non-diabetic controls. Pancreatic kallikrein had no effects on body weight, blood glucose and blood pressure, but significantly reduced albuminuria among all three groups. Pathological analysis showed that exogenous kallikrein decreased the thickness of the glomerular basement membrane, protected against the effacement of foot process, the loss of endothelial fenestrae, and prevented the loss of podocytes in diabetic mice. Renal fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative stress were reduced in kallikrein-treated mice compared to diabetic controls. The expression of kininogen1, tissue kallikrein, kinin B1 and B2 receptors were all increased in the kallikrein-treated compared to saline-treated mice. Thus, exogenous pancreatic kallikrein both prevented and ameliorated diabetic nephropathy, which may be mediated by activating the kallikrein-kinin system.

  6. Kallikrein-related Peptidase 5 Functions in Proteolytic Processing of Profilaggrin in Cultured Human Keratinocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Sakabe, Jun-ichi; Yamamoto, Mami; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Motoyama, Akira; Ohta, Isao; Tatsuno, Kazuki; Ito, Taisuke; Kabashima, Kenji; Hibino, Toshihiko; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2013-01-01

    Filaggrin protein is synthesized in the stratum granulosum of the skin and contributes to the formation of the human skin barrier. Profilaggrin is cleaved by proteolytic enzymes and converted to functional filaggrin, but its processing mechanism remains not fully elucidated. Kallikrein-related peptidase 5 (KLK5) is a major serine protease found in the skin, which is secreted from lamellar granules following its expression in the stratum granulosum and activated in the extracellular space of the stratum corneum. Here, we searched for profilaggrin-processing protease(s) by partial purification of epidermal extracts and found KLK5 as a possible candidate. We used high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry to show that KLK5 cleaves profilaggrin. Furthermore, based on a proximity ligation assay, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy analysis, we reveal that KLK5 and profilaggrin co-localize in the stratum granulosum in human epidermis. KLK5 knockdown in normal cultured human epidermal keratinocytes resulted in higher levels of profilaggrin, indicating that KLK5 potentially functions in profilaggrin cleavage. PMID:23629652

  7. Is Human Kallikrein 11 in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated Chemoradiotherapy Associated with Survival?

    PubMed

    Unal, Dilek; Eroglu, Celalettin; Tasdemir, Arzu; Karaman, Hatice; Kurtul, Neslihan; Oguz, Arzu; Goksu, Sema Sezgin; Kaplan, Bunyamin

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of human kallikreins (hKs) in human cancers has been reported and several hKs are promising biomarkers of various cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of hK11 expression in patients with non-metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study included 44 patients with NSCLC. hK11 expression was determined by immunohistochemical staining. The estimation of disease-free and overall survival by Kaplan-Meier was 11 months and 17 months, respectively. The estimation of overall survival by Kaplan-Meier was significantly higher in patients with hK11 strongly positive (2+) than in those with hK11 weakly positive (1+) (20 months vs. 11 months, p=0.032). Although not statistically different, the estimation of disease-free survival by Kaplan-Meier was higher in patients with hK11 strongly positive (2+) than in those with hK11 weakly positive (1+) (12 months vs. 9 months, p=0.113). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the overall survival rates were significantly associated with response to chemoradiotherapy and the degree of staining with hK11. The stronger hK11 expression in NSCLC appears to be associated with better survival rates. hK11 may be a prognostic biomarker of NSCLC.

  8. Is Human Kallikrein 11 in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated Chemoradiotherapy Associated with Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Dilek; Eroglu, Celalettin; Tasdemir, Arzu; Karaman, Hatice; Kurtul, Neslihan; Oguz, Arzu; Goksu, Sema Sezgin; Kaplan, Bunyamin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Involvement of human kallikreins (hKs) in human cancers has been reported and several hKs are promising biomarkers of various cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of hK11 expression in patients with non-metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and Methods The study included 44 patients with NSCLC. hK11 expression was determined by immunohistochemical staining. Results The estimation of disease-free and overall survival by Kaplan-Meier was 11 months and 17 months, respectively. The estimation of overall survival by Kaplan-Meier was significantly higher in patients with hK11 strongly positive (2+) than in those with hK11 weakly positive (1+) (20 months vs. 11 months, p=0.032). Although not statistically different, the estimation of disease-free survival by Kaplan-Meier was higher in patients with hK11 strongly positive (2+) than in those with hK11 weakly positive (1+) (12 months vs. 9 months, p=0.113). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the overall survival rates were significantly associated with response to chemoradiotherapy and the degree of staining with hK11. Conclusion The stronger hK11 expression in NSCLC appears to be associated with better survival rates. hK11 may be a prognostic biomarker of NSCLC. PMID:25779361

  9. Attenuated kallikrein-related peptidase activity disrupts desquamation and leads to stratum corneum thickening in human skin equivalent models.

    PubMed

    McGovern, J A; Meinert, C; de Veer, S J; Hollier, B G; Parker, T J; Upton, Z

    2017-01-01

    Epidermal homeostasis is maintained through the balance between keratinocyte proliferation, differentiation and desquamation; however, human skin equivalent (HSE) models are known to differentiate excessively. In native tissue, proteases such as kallikrein-related peptidase (KLK) 5 and KLK7 cleave the extracellular components of corneodesmosomes; proteins corneodesmosin, desmocollin 1 and desmoglein 1, loosening the cellular connections and enabling desquamation. The actions of KLK7 are tightly controlled by protease inhibitors, skin-derived antileucoproteinase (SKALP) and lymphoepithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor (LEKTI), which also inhibits KLK5, localizing protease activity to the stratum corneum. To investigate the mechanisms that inhibit the desquamation cascade in HSE models. Human skin tissue and HSE models were investigated using gene microarray, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis to examine key components of the desquamation pathway. To elucidate proteolytic activity in HSEs and native skin, in situ and gel zymography was performed. Histological analysis indicated that HSE models form a well-organized epidermis, yet develop an excessively thick and compact stratum corneum. Gene microarray analysis revealed that the desquamation cascade was dysregulated in HSE models and this was confirmed using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot indicated overexpression of LEKTI and SKALP in HSEs. Although KLK7 was also highly expressed in HSEs, zymography indicated that protease activation and activity was lower than in native skin. These findings demonstrate that stratum corneum thickening is due to inhibited KLK5 and KLK7 activation and a subsequent lack of corneodesmosome degradation in the HSE model epidermis. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. The human kallikrein 10 promoter contains a functional retinoid response element.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Musheng; Zhang, Ying; Bhat, Ishfaq; Wazer, David E; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2006-06-01

    Human kallikrein 10 (hK10) protein is expressed in normal breast but is significantly downregulated in a majority of invasive breast cancers. Thus, understanding how hK10 expression is regulated is of substantial significance. In this study, we analyzed the promoter region of hK10 using a website software (TRANSFAC 3.0), which predicted three possible retinoic acid response elements (RAREs), RARE1 at -1041 (TGACCTCGTGATCC), RARE2 at -859 (TGACCTCCTATGA) and RARE3 at -765 (TGACCTCCTGTGA), each with a half-site of a canonical sequence (TGACCT; reverse complement AGGTCA). Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and nucleotide competition analysis, as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation of the native hK10 promoter, we demonstrated specific binding of RXR only to RARE1. The functional importance of RARE in the hK10 promoter was demonstrated by retinoid induction of hk10 promoter-reporters; furthermore, mutation of RARE1 but not of RARE2 or RARE3 abolished the induction of the reporter. Finally, we demonstrated the induction of hK10 mRNA and protein expression upon retinoid treatment of cells. In view of the correlation of the downregulation of hK10 mRNA and protein with breast cancer progression, these findings suggest a potential approach to restore hK10 expression in cancer patients.

  11. Quantification of Human Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Biological Fluids by Multiplatform Targeted Mass Spectrometry Assays *

    PubMed Central

    Karakosta, Theano D.; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Batruch, Ihor

    2016-01-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of 15 secreted serine proteases encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome. KLKs are involved in coordination of numerous physiological functions including regulation of blood pressure, neuronal plasticity, skin desquamation, and semen liquefaction, and thus represent promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Until now, quantification of KLKs in biological and clinical samples was accomplished by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Here, we developed multiplex targeted mass spectrometry assays for the simultaneous quantification of all 15 KLKs. Proteotypic peptides for each KLK were carefully selected based on experimental data and multiplexed in single assays. Performance of assays was evaluated using three different mass spectrometry platforms including triple quadrupole, quadrupole-ion trap, and quadrupole-orbitrap instruments. Heavy isotope-labeled synthetic peptides with a quantifying tag were used for absolute quantification of KLKs in sweat, cervico-vaginal fluid, seminal plasma, and blood serum, with limits of detection ranging from 5 to 500 ng/ml. Analytical performance of assays was evaluated by measuring endogenous KLKs in relevant biological fluids, and results were compared with selected ELISAs. The multiplex targeted proteomic assays were demonstrated to be accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific alternatives to antibody-based assays. Finally, KLK4, a highly prostate-specific protein and a speculated biomarker of prostate cancer, was unambiguously detected and quantified by immunoenrichment-SRM assay in seminal plasma and blood serum samples from individuals with confirmed prostate cancer and negative biopsy. Mass spectrometry revealed exclusively the presence of a secreted isoform and thus unequivocally resolved earlier disputes about KLK4 identity in seminal plasma. Measurements of KLK4 in either 41 seminal plasma or 58 blood serum samples

  12. Kallikrein/kinin protects against myocardial apoptosis after ischemia/reperfusion via Akt-glycogen synthase kinase-3 and Akt-Bad.14-3-3 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2005-03-04

    Our previous study has shown that human tissue kallikrein protected against ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial injury. In the present study, we investigated the protective role of local kallikrein gene delivery in ischemia/reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and its signaling mechanisms in promoting cardiomyocyte survival. Adenovirus carrying the human tissue kallikrein gene was delivered locally into the heart using a catheter-based technique. Expression and localization of recombinant human kallikrein in rat myocardium after gene transfer were determined immunohistochemically. Kallikrein gene delivery markedly reduced reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis identified by both in situ nick end-labeling and DNA fragmentation. Delivery of the kallikrein gene increased phosphorylation of Src, Akt, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta, and Bad(Ser-136) but reduced caspase-3 activation in rat myocardium after reperfusion. The protective effect of kallikrein on apoptosis and its signaling mediators was blocked by icatibant and dominant-negative Akt, indicating a kinin B2 receptor-Akt-mediated event. Similarly, kinin or transduction of kallikrein in cultured cardiomyocytes promoted cell viability and attenuated apoptosis induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation. The effect of kallikrein on cardiomyocyte survival was blocked by dominant-negative Akt and a constitutively active mutant of GSK-3beta, but it was facilitated by constitutively active Akt, catalytically inactive GSK-3beta, lithium, and caspase-3 inhibitor. Moreover, kallikrein promoted Bad.14-3-3 complex formation and inhibited Akt-GSK-3beta-dependent activation of caspase-3, whereas caspase-3 administration caused reduction of the Bad.14-3-3 complex, indicating an interaction between Akt-GSK-caspase-3 and Akt-Bad.14-3-3 signaling pathways. In conclusion, kallikrein/kinin protects against cardiomyocyte apoptosis in vivo and in vitro via Akt-Bad.14-3-3 and Akt-GSK-3beta-caspase-3 signaling pathways.

  13. Misfolded proteins activate Factor XII in humans, leading to kallikrein formation without initiating coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Coen; Govers-Riemslag, José W.P.; Bouma, Barend; Schiks, Bettina; Hazenberg, Bouke P.C.; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Hammarström, Per; ten Cate, Hugo; de Groot, Philip G.; Bouma, Bonno N.; Gebbink, Martijn F.B.G.

    2008-01-01

    When blood is exposed to negatively charged surface materials such as glass, an enzymatic cascade known as the contact system becomes activated. This cascade is initiated by autoactivation of Factor XII and leads to both coagulation (via Factor XI) and an inflammatory response (via the kallikrein-kinin system). However, while Factor XII is important for coagulation in vitro, it is not important for physiological hemostasis, so the physiological role of the contact system remains elusive. Using patient blood samples and isolated proteins, we identified a novel class of Factor XII activators. Factor XII was activated by misfolded protein aggregates that formed by denaturation or by surface adsorption, which specifically led to the activation of the kallikrein-kinin system without inducing coagulation. Consistent with this, we found that Factor XII, but not Factor XI, was activated and kallikrein was formed in blood from patients with systemic amyloidosis, a disease marked by the accumulation and deposition of misfolded plasma proteins. These results show that the kallikrein-kinin system can be activated by Factor XII, in a process separate from the coagulation cascade, and point to a protective role for Factor XII following activation by misfolded protein aggregates. PMID:18725990

  14. Highly sensitive automated chemiluminometric assay for measuring free human glandular kallikrein-2.

    PubMed

    Klee, G G; Goodmanson, M K; Jacobsen, S J; Young, C Y; Finlay, J A; Rittenhouse, H G; Wolfert, R L; Tindall, D J

    1999-06-01

    Human glandular kallikrein (hK2) is a serine protease that has 79% amino acid identity with prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Both free hK2 and hK2 complexed to alpha1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) are present in the blood in low concentrations. We wished to measure hK2 in serum with limited contribution from hK2-ACT for the results. We developed an automated assay for hK2 with use of a select pair of monoclonal antibodies. The prototype assay was implemented on a Beckman Coulter ACCESS(R) analyzer. The detection limit of the assay was 1.5 ng/L, the "functional sensitivity" (day-to-day CV <15%) was <4 ng/L, cross-reactivity with PSA and PSA-ACT was negligible, and cross-reactivity with hK2-ACT was 2%. After surgical removal of prostate glands, serum hK2 was <7 ng/L and was <15 ng/L in most healthy women. The median serum concentration of hK2 in healthy men without prostate cancer was 26 ng/L. The median concentration of hK2 was 72 ng/L for men having prostate cancer with lower Gleason scores compared with 116 ng/L for men with more advanced cancer. The concentration of hK2 correlated weakly with PSA, with the mean hK2 concentrations generally 30- to 80-fold lower than PSA concentrations. The availability of a robust, high sensitivity automated assay for hK2 should facilitate further investigations of the role of hK2 measurements in the management of patients with prostate disease.

  15. Kallikrein-related peptidase-6 (KLK6) mRNA expression is an independent prognostic tissue biomarker of poor disease-free and overall survival in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Spyridon; Alexopoulou, Dimitra K; Kontos, Christos K; Scorilas, Andreas; Papadopoulos, Iordanis N

    2014-05-01

    Members of the family of tissue kallikrein and kallikrein-related peptidases possess important prognostic value in cancer. Moreover, the oncogenic role of kallikrein-related peptidase-6 (KLK6) in colorectal cancer has been well documented so far. This study investigated the prognostic value of KLK6 mRNA expression as a molecular tissue biomarker in colorectal adenocarcinoma. For this purpose, KLK6 mRNA expression was studied in 110 primary colorectal adenocarcinomas and 39 paired noncancerous colorectal specimens. A dramatic upregulation of KLK6 mRNA expression was observed in colorectal tumors. KLK6 mRNA overexpression was associated with high depth of tumor invasion, presence of distant metastases, and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage of patients. Furthermore, KLK6 mRNA expression was shown to predict poor disease-free and overall survival independently of patient gender, age, tumor size, location, histological subtype, grade, venous invasion, lymphatic invasion, TNM stage, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy treatment. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that colorectal adenocarcinoma patients with negative regional lymph nodes (N0) and those without distant metastases (M0) harboring KLK6 mRNA-positive colorectal tumors tended to relapse and die earlier than N0 and M0 patients with KLK6 mRNA-negative colorectal adenocarcinoma. Thus, KLK6 mRNA expression could be considered as an independent, unfavorable molecular prognostic biomarker in colorectal adenocarcinoma, with additional prognostic value in patients without regional or distant metastases.

  16. Regulation of acid-sensing ion channel 1a function by tissue kallikrein may be through channel cleavage.

    PubMed

    Su, Jingjing; Tang, Yuping; Liu, Ling; Zhou, Houguang; Dong, Qiang

    2011-02-18

    Recently, we have demonstrated that serine protease tissue kallikrein (TK) can protect cortical neurons against ischemia-acidosis/reperfusion-induced injury, and that this effect might be mediated by acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). However, little is known about how TK regulates the function of ASICs. Here we provided evidence that the regulation of ASIC1a function by TK was probably correlated with its cleavage. High concentration of TK (3μM) partially cleaved the extracellular loop of ASIC1a, followed by a marked decrease of LDH release and an increase of cell survival at pH 6.2. Pretreatment with a protease inhibitor aprotinin inhibited the cleavage of ASIC1a and prevented functional regulation by TK. However, the cleavage of ASIC2a, which was not functionally modified by TK, was not observed. Therefore, we propose that the limited proteolysis of extracellular loop within ASIC1a might be one of the potential regulatory mechanisms of ASIC1a function by TK. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tissue kallikrein induces SH-SY5Y cell proliferation via epidermal growth factor receptor and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zhengyu; Yang, Qi; Cui, Mei; Liu, Yanping; Wang, Tao; Zhao, Hong; Dong, Qiang

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • TK promotes EGFR phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells. • TK activates ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells. • TK mediates SH-SY5Y cell proliferation via EGFR and ERK1/2 pathway. - Abstract: Tissue kallikrein (TK) is well known to take most of its biological functions through bradykinin receptors. In the present study, we found a novel signaling pathway mediated by TK through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in human SH-SY5Y cells. We discovered that TK facilitated the activation of EGFR, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and p38 cascade. Interestingly, not p38 but ERK1/2 phosphorylation was severely compromised in cells depleted of EGFR. Nevertheless, impairment of signaling of ERK1/2 seemed not to be restricted to EGFR phosphorylation. We also observed that TK stimulation could induce SH-SY5Y cell proliferation, which was reduced by EGFR down-regulation or ERK1/2 inhibitor. Overall, our findings provided convincing evidence that TK could mediate cell proliferation via EGFR and ERK1/2 pathway in vitro.

  18. Tissue Kallikrein Reverses Insulin Resistance and Attenuates Nephropathy in Diabetic Rats by Activation of PI3 kinase/Akt and AMPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Gang; Deng, Juanjuan; Wang, Tao; Zhao, Chunxia; Xu, Xizheng; Wang, Peihua; Voltz, James W.; Edin, Matthew L.; Xiao, Xiao; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie; Zhang, Xin A.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Wang, Dao Wen

    2007-01-01

    We previously reported that intravenous delivery of the human tissue kallikrein (HK) gene reduced blood pressure and plasma insulin levels in fructose-induced hypertensive rats with insulin resistance. In the current study, we evaluated the potential of a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector expressing the HK cDNA (rAAV·HK) as a sole, long term therapy to correct insulin resistance and prevent renal damage in streptozotocin-induced type-2 diabetic rats. Administration of streptozotocin in conjunction with a high fat diet induced systemic hypertension, diabetes and renal damage in rats. Delivery of rAAV·HK resulted in a long-term reduction in blood pressure, and fasting plasma insulin was significantly lower in the rAAV·HK group than in the control group. The expression of PI3-kinase p110 catalytic subunit, and the levels of phosphorylation at residue Thr-308 of Akt, insulin receptor B and AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPK) were significantly decreased in organs from diabetic animals. These changes were significantly attenuated following rAAV-mediated HK gene therapy. Moreover, rAAV·HK significantly decreased urinary microalbumin excretion, improved creatinine clearance and increased urinary osmolarity. HK gene therapy also attenuated diabetic renal damage as assessed by histology. Together, these findings demonstrate that rAAV·HK delivery can efficiently attenuate hypertension, insulin resistance and diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. PMID:17272402

  19. Quantification of Human Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Biological Fluids by Multiplatform Targeted Mass Spectrometry Assays.

    PubMed

    Karakosta, Theano D; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P

    2016-09-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of 15 secreted serine proteases encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome. KLKs are involved in coordination of numerous physiological functions including regulation of blood pressure, neuronal plasticity, skin desquamation, and semen liquefaction, and thus represent promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Until now, quantification of KLKs in biological and clinical samples was accomplished by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Here, we developed multiplex targeted mass spectrometry assays for the simultaneous quantification of all 15 KLKs. Proteotypic peptides for each KLK were carefully selected based on experimental data and multiplexed in single assays. Performance of assays was evaluated using three different mass spectrometry platforms including triple quadrupole, quadrupole-ion trap, and quadrupole-orbitrap instruments. Heavy isotope-labeled synthetic peptides with a quantifying tag were used for absolute quantification of KLKs in sweat, cervico-vaginal fluid, seminal plasma, and blood serum, with limits of detection ranging from 5 to 500 ng/ml. Analytical performance of assays was evaluated by measuring endogenous KLKs in relevant biological fluids, and results were compared with selected ELISAs. The multiplex targeted proteomic assays were demonstrated to be accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific alternatives to antibody-based assays. Finally, KLK4, a highly prostate-specific protein and a speculated biomarker of prostate cancer, was unambiguously detected and quantified by immunoenrichment-SRM assay in seminal plasma and blood serum samples from individuals with confirmed prostate cancer and negative biopsy. Mass spectrometry revealed exclusively the presence of a secreted isoform and thus unequivocally resolved earlier disputes about KLK4 identity in seminal plasma. Measurements of KLK4 in either 41 seminal plasma or 58 blood serum samples

  20. Synthetic peptides and fluorogenic substrates related to the reactive site sequence of Kunitz-type inhibitors isolated from Bauhinia: interaction with human plasma kallikrein.

    PubMed

    Oliva, M L; Santomauro-Vaz, E M; Andrade, S A; Juliano, M A; Pott, V J; Sampaio, M U; Sampaio, C A

    2001-01-01

    We have previously described Kunitz-type serine proteinase inhibitors purified from Bauhinia seeds. Human plasma kallikrein shows different susceptibility to those inhibitors. In this communication, we describe the interaction of human plasma kallikrein with fluorogenic and non-fluorogenic peptides based on the Bauhinia inhibitors' reactive site. The hydrolysis of the substrate based on the B. variegata inhibitor reactive site sequence, Abz-VVISALPRSVFIQ-EDDnp (Km 1.42 microM, kcat 0.06 s(-1), and kcat/Km 4.23 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)), is more favorable than that of Abz-VMIAALPRTMFIQ-EDDnp, related to the B. ungulata sequence (Km 0.43 microM, kcat 0.00017 s(-1), and kcat/Km 3.9 x 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)). Human plasma kallikrein does not hydrolyze the substrates Abz-RPGLPVRFESPL-EDDnp and Abz-FESPLRINIIKE-EDDnp based on the B. bauhinioides inhibitor reactive site sequence, the most effective inhibitor of the enzyme. These peptides are competitive inhibitors with Ki values in the nM range. The synthetic peptide containing 19 amino acids based on the B. bauhinioides inhibitor reactive site (RPGLPVRFESPL) is poorly cleaved by kallikrein. The given substrates are highly specific for trypsin and chymotrypsin hydrolysis. Other serine proteinases such as factor Xa, factor XII, thrombin and plasmin do not hydrolyze B. bauhinioides inhibitor related substrates.

  1. Identification and characterization of KLK14, a novel kallikrein serine protease gene located on human chromosome 19q13.4 and expressed in prostate and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hooper, J D; Bui, L T; Rae, F K; Harvey, T J; Myers, S A; Ashworth, L K; Clements, J A

    2001-04-01

    The kallikreins are a subfamily of serine proteases encoded in human, mouse, and rat by highly conserved tightly clustered multigene families. Here we report the identification and characterization of KLK14, a novel kallikrein gene located within the human kallikrein locus at 19q13.4. KLK14 is approximately 5.4 kb in length spanning seven exons and, by Northern blot analysis, transcribes two alternative transcripts present only in prostate (1.5 kb) and skeletal muscle (1.9 kb). The protein product, K14, predicted to be a 251-amino-acid secreted serine protease with trypsin-like substrate specificity, is translated in vitro with a molecular mass of approximately 31 kDa. In situ hybridization revealed that, in prostate, KLK14 is expressed by both benign and malignant glandular epithelial cells, thus exhibiting an expression pattern similar to that of two other prostatic kallikreins, KLK2 and KLK3, which encode K2 and prostate-specific antigen, respectively. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  2. Clearance and metabolism of glandular kallikrein in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Rabito, S.F.; Seto, M.; Maitra, S.R.; Carretero, O.A.

    1985-06-01

    This study was undertaken to characterize the clearance of circulating rat glandular kallikrein and to determine the contribution of various organs and the urinary excretion to the removal of glandular kallikrein from the bloodstream. The authors injected either active /sup 125/I-kallikrein or kallikrein inactivated with phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (/sup 125/I-PMSF-kallikrein) intravenously into intact or nephrectomized rats and then studied the disappearance rate of trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-precipitable radioactivity from the circulation. Inactivation by PMSF markedly reduced the binding of kallikrein to plasma protease inhibitors. The removal rate of the acid-precipitable radioactivity fit a biexponential curve for both active and inactive kallikrein. In the intact rats approximately 50% of the radioactivity was removed from the circulation 30 min after the injection of active /sup 125/I-kallikrein. Removal of the kidneys did not significantly affect the clearance of active kallikrein. On the other hand, inactive /sup 125/I-PMSF-kallikrein was removed from blood faster than active /sup 125/I-kallikrein in normal animals. Approximately 50% of the radioactivity was removed from the circulation 8 min after the injection, and the half-life of inactive /sup 125/I-PMSF-kallikrein was markedly prolonged by bilateral nephrectomy. Active /sup 125/I-kallikrein was taken up by tissues, particularly the liver and the kidney. In urine, less than 2% of the radioactivity was excreted in 60 min as TCA-precipitable material. The authors concluded that glandular kallikrein is cleared rapidly from the circulation of the rat, probably in the form of a complex with a plasma protease inhibitor.

  3. A novel signaling pathway of tissue kallikrein in promoting keratinocyte migration: Activation of proteinase-activated receptor 1 and epidermal growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Lin; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2010-02-01

    Biological functions of tissue kallikrein (TK, KLK1) are mainly mediated by kinin generation and subsequent kinin B2 receptor activation. In this study, we investigated the potential role of TK and its signaling pathways in cultured human keratinocyte migration and in a rat skin wound healing model. Herein, we show that TK promoted cell migration and proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Inactive TK or kinin had no significant effect on cell migration. Interestingly, cell migration induced by active TK was not blocked by icatibant or L-NAME, indicating an event independent of kinin B2 receptor and nitric oxide formation. TK's stimulatory effect on cell migration was inhibited by small interfering RNA for proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR{sub 1}), and by PAR{sub 1} inhibitor. TK-induced migration was associated with increased phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which was blocked by inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC), Src, EGFR and ERK. TK-induced cell migration and EGFR phosphorylation were blocked by metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor, heparin, and antibodies against EGFR external domain, heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) and amphiregulin (AR). Local application of TK promoted skin wound healing in rats, whereas icatibant and EGFR inhibitor blocked TK's effect. Skin wound healing was further delayed by aprotinin and neutralizing TK antibody. This study demonstrates a novel role of TK in skin wound healing and uncovers new signaling pathways mediated by TK in promoting keratinocyte migration through activation of the PAR{sub 1}-PKC-Src-MMP pathway and HB-EGF/AR shedding-dependent EGFR transactivation.

  4. Spatio-temporal expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 and tissue kallikrein in uteroplacental units of the pregnant guinea-pig (Cavia porcellus)

    PubMed Central

    Corthorn, Jenny; Rey, Sergio; Chacón, Cecilia; Valdés, Gloria

    2007-01-01

    Background In humans trophoblast invasion and vascular remodeling are critical to determine the fate of pregnancy. Since guinea-pigs share with women an extensive migration of the trophoblasts through the decidua and uterine arteries, and a haemomonochorial placenta, this species was used to evaluate the spatio-temporal expression of three enzymes that have been associated to trophoblast invasion, MMP-2, MMP-9 and tissue kallikrein (K1). Methods Uteroplacental units were collected from early to term pregnancy. MMP-2, MMP-9 and K1 were analysed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were assessed by gelatin zymography. Results Immunoreactive MMP-2, MMP-9 and K1 were detected in the subplacenta, interlobar and labyrinthine placenta, syncytial sprouts and syncytial streamers throughout pregnancy. In late pregnancy, perivascular or intramural trophoblasts expressed the three enzymes. The intensity of the signal in syncytial streamers was increased in mid and late pregnancy for MMP-2, decreased in late pregnancy for MMP-9, and remained stable for K1. Western blots of placental homogenates at days 20, 40 and 60 of pregnancy identified bands with the molecular weights of MMP-2, MMP-9 and K1. MMP-2 expression remained constant throughout gestation. In contrast, MMP-9 and K1 attained their highest expression during midgestation. Placental homogenates of 20, 40 and 60 days yielded bands of gelatinase activity that were compatible with MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. ProMMP-2 and MMP-9 activities did not vary along pregnancy, while MMP-2 and MMP-9 increased at 40 and 40–60 days respectively. Conclusion The spatio-temporal expression of MMPs and K1 supports a relevant role of these proteins in trophoblast invasion, vascular remodeling and placental angiogenesis, and suggests a functional association between K1 and MMP-9 activation. PMID:17605824

  5. A Single Glycan at the 99-Loop of Human Kallikrein-related Peptidase 2 Regulates Activation and Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shihui; Skala, Wolfgang; Magdolen, Viktor; Briza, Peter; Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver; Kellermann, Josef; Brandstetter, Hans; Goettig, Peter

    2016-01-08

    Human kallikrein-related peptidase 2 (KLK2) is a key serine protease in semen liquefaction and prostate cancer together with KLK3/prostate-specific antigen. In order to decipher the function of its potential N-glycosylation site, we produced pro-KLK2 in Leishmania tarentolae cells and compared it with its non-glycosylated counterpart from Escherichia coli expression. Mass spectrometry revealed that Asn-95 carries a core glycan, consisting of two GlcNAc and three hexoses. Autocatalytic activation was retarded in glyco-pro-KLK2, whereas the activated glyco-form exhibited an increased proteolytic resistance. The specificity patterns obtained by the PICS (proteomic identification of protease cleavage sites) method are similar for both KLK2 variants, with a major preference for P1-Arg. However, glycosylation changes the enzymatic activity of KLK2 in a drastically substrate-dependent manner. Although glyco-KLK2 has a considerably lower catalytic efficiency than glycan-free KLK2 toward peptidic substrates with P2-Phe, the situation was reverted toward protein substrates, such as glyco-pro-KLK2 itself. These findings can be rationalized by the glycan-carrying 99-loop that prefers to cover the active site like a lid. By contrast, the non-glycosylated 99-loop seems to favor a wide open conformation, which mostly increases the apparent affinity for the substrates (i.e. by a reduction of Km). Also, the cleavage pattern and kinetics in autolytic inactivation of both KLK2 variants can be explained by a shift of the target sites due to the presence of the glycan. These striking effects of glycosylation pave the way to a deeper understanding of kallikrein-related peptidase biology and pathology.

  6. Kallikrein-Related Peptidase 5 Contributes to H3N2 Influenza Virus Infection in Human Lungs.

    PubMed

    Magnen, Mélia; Gueugnon, Fabien; Guillon, Antoine; Baranek, Thomas; Thibault, Virginie C; Petit-Courty, Agnès; de Veer, Simon J; Harris, Jonathan; Humbles, Alison A; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Courty, Yves

    2017-08-15

    Hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus must be activated by proteolysis before the virus can become infectious. Previous studies indicated that HA cleavage is driven by membrane-bound or extracellular serine proteases in the respiratory tract. However, there is still uncertainty as to which proteases are critical for activating HAs of seasonal influenza A viruses (IAVs) in humans. This study focuses on human KLK1 and KLK5, 2 of the 15 serine proteases known as the kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs). We find that their mRNA expression in primary human bronchial cells is stimulated by IAV infection. Both enzymes cleaved recombinant HA from several strains of the H1 and/or H3 virus subtype in vitro, but only KLK5 promoted the infectivity of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) and A/Scotland/20/74 (H3N2) virions in MDCK cells. We assessed the ability of treated viruses to initiate influenza in mice. The nasal instillation of only the KLK5-treated virus resulted in weight loss and lethal outcomes. The secretion of this protease in the human lower respiratory tract is enhanced during influenza. Moreover, we show that pretreatment of airway secretions with a KLK5-selective inhibitor significantly reduced the activation of influenza A/Scotland/20/74 virions, providing further evidence of its importance. Differently, increased KLK1 secretion appeared to be associated with the recruitment of inflammatory cells in human airways regardless of the origin of inflammation. Thus, our findings point to the involvement of KLK5 in the proteolytic activation and spread of seasonal influenza viruses in humans.IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause acute infection of the respiratory tract that affects millions of people during seasonal outbreaks every year. Cleavage of the hemagglutinin precursor by host proteases is a critical step in the life cycle of these viruses. Consequently, host proteases that activate HA can be considered promising targets for the development of new antivirals

  7. Micro-RNA analysis of renal biopsies in human lupus nephritis demonstrates up-regulated miR-422a driving reduction of kallikrein-related peptidase 4.

    PubMed

    Krasoudaki, Eleni; Banos, Aggelos; Stagakis, Elias; Loupasakis, Konstantinos; Drakos, Elias; Sinatkas, Vaios; Zampoulaki, Amalia; Papagianni, Aikaterini; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Bertsias, George K

    2016-10-01

    Aberrancies in gene expression in immune effector cells and in end-organs are implicated in lupus pathogenesis. To gain insights into the mechanisms of tissue injury, we profiled the expression of micro-RNAs in inflammatory kidney lesions of human lupus nephritis (LN). Kidney specimens were from patients with active proliferative, membranous or mixed LN and unaffected control tissue. Micro-RNAs were quantified by TaqMan Low Density Arrays. Bioinformatics was employed to predict gene targets, gene networks and perturbed signaling pathways. Results were validated by transfection studies (luciferase assay, real-time PCR) and in murine LN. Protein expression was determined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Twenty-four micro-RNAs were dysregulated (9 up-regulated, 15 down-regulated) in human LN compared with control renal tissue. Their predicted gene targets participated in pathways associated with TGF-β, kinases, NF-κB, HNF4A, Wnt/β-catenin, STAT3 and IL-4. miR-422a showed the highest upregulation (17-fold) in active LN and correlated with fibrinoid necrosis lesions (β = 0.63, P = 0.002). In transfection studies, miR-422a was found to directly target kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4) mRNA. Concordantly, KLK4 mRNA was significantly reduced in the kidneys of human and murine LN and correlated inversely with miR-422a levels. Immunohistochemistry confirmed reduced KLK4 protein expression in renal mesangial and tubular epithelial cells in human and murine LN. KLK4, a serine esterase with putative renoprotective properties, is down-regulated by miR-422a in LN kidney suggesting that, in addition to immune activation, local factors may be implicated in the disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors affecting the secretion of submandibular salivary kallikrein in cats.

    PubMed

    Garrett, J R; Smith, R E; Kyriacou, K; Kidd, A; Liao, J

    1987-07-01

    Glandular kallikrein has been assessed in submandibular saliva, homogenates and plasma by the fluorimetric substrate D-Val-Leu-Arg-7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin (AFC) and histochemically in tissue sections by the 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide (MNA) analogue. Nerve stimulation was used to produce salivary secretion. Parasympathetic saliva contained low concentrations of kallikrein, independently of any circulating catecholamines from the adrenals. Sympathetic saliva contained very high concentrations of kallikrein; the amounts in individual drops rapidly reached a peak then declined gradually. Adrenergic blocking drugs during mixed parasympathetic and sympathetic stimulation showed that beta-adrenergic effects normally increase the secretion of kallikrein in response to the alpha-adrenergic influence from sympathetic nerve impulses. Small amounts of a glandular kallikrein-like activity are present in the plasma. Effluent blood from the submandibular gland before, during and after stimulation of either nerve gave no indication that submandibular kallikrein passes from the glandular compartment to the blood under conditions of unobstructed salivary flow. Excision of the chorda tympani indicated that parasympathetic nerve impulses are required for the normal resynthesis of submandibular kallikrein. The secretion of salivary kallikrein is essentially an exocrine function but its role in the saliva remains obscure. The results suggest that sudden mobilization of kallikrein may occur at times into the saliva and that a separate population of adrenergic axons, under separate central control, may pass to the striated ducts specially for this purpose.

  9. Plasma half-life and organ uptake ratio of radiolabeled glandular kallikrein in control and nephrectomized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K.; Iwata, T.; Kokubu, T.

    1986-01-01

    The purified rat urinary kallikrein was radiolabeled by lactoperoxidase method and by chloramine T method. Plasma half-life of radiolabeled kallikrein was 5.06 +/- 0.59 (n = 5) min in control rats and 5.24 +/- 0.42 (n = 5) min in nephrectomized rats. There was no difference between two groups. From autoradiogram, main metabolic organs of radiolabeled kallikrein were liver, kidney and spleen. Total uptake of radiolabeled kallikrein in ech organ was the highest in liver (73.2%). The uptake per g tissue of radiolabeled kallikrein in each organ was high in liver (33.0%), kidney (31.4%) and spleen (21.1%). These results suggest that the active kallikrein is metabolized mainly in the liver, and kidney is not so an important organ to metabolize or to eliminate the active kallikrein in plasma. In order to clarify the mode of existence of active kallikrein in plasma, the following experiment was done by using disc gel electrophoresis. Radioactive profile of radiolabeled kallikrein showed one peak (Rf = 1.0), but radiolabeled kallikrein mixed with rat plasma showed two peaks, that is small peak (Rf = 1.0), and main peak (RF = 0.5). The most of radiolabeled kallikrein was bound to plasma protein and only five per cent was in free form. Furthermore, the binding of radiolabeled kallikrein to plasma protein was interfered by the addition of active kallikrein. These results suggest the possibility of existence of kallikrein binding protein in plasma.

  10. In vitro cleavage by asbestos fibers of the fifth component of human complement through free-radical generation and kallikrein activation.

    PubMed

    Governa, M; Amati, M; Valentino, M; Visonà, I; Fubini, B; Botta, G C; Volpe, A R; Carmignani, M

    2000-04-14

    Chrysotile and crocidolite fibers incubated in normal human plasma (NHP) generated from the C5 component of complement C5a-type fragments that stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) chemotaxis. Absorption of NHP with antiserum against C5a totally abolished neutrophil chemotactic activity. Asbestos fibers also produced C5a small peptides in the presence of ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether) N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) but not ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Activation of C5 was significantly inhibited when asbestos fibers were pretreated with iron chelators such as sodium dithionite (DTN), deferoxamine (DFX), or ascorbate (AA). Concentration-related inhibition of C5 activation was also observed when asbestos fibers were added concurrently to plasma in the presence of DFX, 1,3-dimethyl-2-thiourea (DMTU), a strong hydroxyl scavenger, or aprotinin (APR), a specific protease inhibitor. Further, chrysotile and crocidolite significantly increased plasma kallikrein activity. Data demonstrate that asbestos-induced C5 activation plays a role in inflammatory reactions characteristic of asbestosis through mechanisms involving iron ions, hydroxyl radicals, and oxidized C5-ike fragments. The ferrous ions present at the asbestos fiber surface trigger this activation and catalyze, via Fenton reaction, the production of hydroxyl radicals, which in turn convert native C5 to an oxidized C5-like form. This product is then cleaved by kallikrein, activated by the same asbestos fibers, yielding an oxidized C5a with the same functional properties as C5a.

  11. Kallikrein-8 inhibition attenuates Alzheimer's disease pathology in mice.

    PubMed

    Herring, Arne; Münster, Yvonne; Akkaya, Tamer; Moghaddam, Sahar; Deinsberger, Katharina; Meyer, Jakob; Zahel, Julia; Sanchez-Mendoza, Eduardo; Wang, Yachao; Hermann, Dirk M; Arzberger, Thomas; Teuber-Hanselmann, Sarah; Keyvani, Kathy

    2016-12-01

    Memory loss and increased anxiety are clinical hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Kallikrein-8 is a protease implicated in memory acquisition and anxiety, and its mRNA is known to be up-regulated in AD-affected human hippocampus. Therefore, an involvement of Kallikrein-8 in Alzheimer's pathogenesis is conceivable but remains to be proved. We determined the cerebral expression of Kallikrein-8 mRNA and protein during the course of AD in patients and in transgenic mice and tested the impact of Kallikrein-8 inhibition on AD-related pathology in mice and in primary glial cells. Kallikrein-8 mRNA and protein were up-regulated in both species at incipient stages of AD. Kallikrein-8 inhibition impeded amyloidogenic amyloid-precursor-protein processing, facilitated amyloid β (Aβ) clearance across the blood-brain-barrier, boosted autophagy, reduced Aβ load and tau pathology, enhanced neuroplasticity, reversed molecular signatures of anxiety, and ultimately improved memory and reduced fear. Kallikrein-8 is a promising new therapeutic target against AD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genome-wide protein QTL mapping identifies human plasma kallikrein as a post-translational regulator of serum uPAR levels

    PubMed Central

    Portelli, Michael A.; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Stewart, Ceri E.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Nieuwenhuis, Maartje A.; Vonk, Judith M.; Nurnberg, Peter; Altmuller, Janine; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Wardlaw, Andrew J.; Parker, Stuart G.; Connolly, Martin J.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Sayers, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The soluble cleaved urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (scuPAR) is a circulating protein detected in multiple diseases, including various cancers, cardiovascular disease, and kidney disease, where elevated levels of scuPAR have been associated with worsening prognosis and increased disease aggressiveness. We aimed to identify novel genetic and biomolecular mechanisms regulating scuPAR levels. Elevated serum scuPAR levels were identified in asthma (n=514) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; n=219) cohorts when compared to controls (n=96). In these cohorts, a genome-wide association study of serum scuPAR levels identified a human plasma kallikrein gene (KLKB1) promoter polymorphism (rs4253238) associated with serum scuPAR levels in a control/asthma population (P=1.17×10−7), which was also observed in a COPD population (combined P=5.04×10−12). Using a fluorescent assay, we demonstrated that serum KLKB1 enzymatic activity was driven by rs4253238 and is inverse to scuPAR levels. Biochemical analysis identified that KLKB1 cleaves scuPAR and negates scuPAR's effects on primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) in vitro. Chymotrypsin was used as a proproteolytic control, while basal HBECs were used as a control to define scuPAR-driven effects. In summary, we reveal a novel post-translational regulatory mechanism for scuPAR using a hypothesis-free approach with implications for multiple human diseases.—Portelli, M. A., Siedlinski, M., Stewart, C. E., Postma, D. S., Nieuwenhuis, M. A., Vonk, J. M., Nurnberg, P., Altmuller, J., Moffatt, M. F., Wardlaw, A. J., Parker, S. G., Connolly, M. J., Koppelman, G. H., Sayers, I. Genome-wide protein QTL mapping identifies human plasma kallikrein as a post-translational regulator of serum uPAR levels. PMID:24249636

  13. Abnormal regulation of renal kallikrein in experimental diabetes. Effects of insulin on prokallikrein synthesis and activation.

    PubMed Central

    Jaffa, A A; Miller, D H; Bailey, G S; Chao, J; Margolius, H S; Mayfield, R K

    1987-01-01

    The effects of streptozotocin (STZ) diabetes and insulin on regulation of renal kallikrein were studied in the rat. 1 and 2 wk after STZ injection, diabetic rats had reduced renal levels and urinary excretion of active kallikrein. Tissue and urinary prokallikrein levels were unchanged, but the rate of renal prokallikrein synthesis relative to total protein synthesis was reduced 30-45% in diabetic rats. Treatment of diabetic rats with insulin prevented or reversed the fall in tissue level and excretion rate of active kallikrein and normalized prokallikrein synthesis rate. To further examine insulin's effects, nondiabetic rats were treated with escalating insulin doses to produce hyperinsulinemia. In these rats, renal active kallikrein increased. Although renal prokallikrein was not increased significantly by hyperinsulinemia, its synthesis was increased. As this was accompanied by proportionally increased total protein synthesis, relative kallikrein synthesis rate was not changed. Excretion of active kallikrein was unchanged, but prokallikrein excretion was markedly reduced. Therefore, increased tissue active kallikrein seen with hyperinsulinemia can be explained not only by increased synthesis but also by retention and increased activation of renal prokallikrein. These studies show that STZ diabetes produces an impairment in renal kallikrein synthesis and suggest that this disease state also impairs renal prokallikrein activation. The findings also suggest that insulin modulates renal kallikrein production, activation, and excretion. Images PMID:3316279

  14. Expression and characterization of rat kallikrein-binding protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, J X; Chao, L; Zhou, G; Chao, J

    1993-01-01

    Rat kallikrein-binding protein is a novel serine-proteinase inhibitor that forms a covalent complex with tissue kallikrein. We have purified rat kallikrein-binding protein and cloned the cDNA and the gene encoding rat kallikrein-binding protein [Chao, Chai, Chen, Xiong, Chao, Woodley-Miller, Wang, Lu and Chao (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 16394-16401; Chai, Ma, Murray, Chao and Chao (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 16029-16036]. In the present study, we have expressed rat kallikrein-binding protein in Escherichia coli with a T7-polymerase/promoter expression system. A high level of expression was detected by an e.l.i.s.a. with an average of 24.2 mg of recombinant rat kallikrein-binding protein per 1 of culture. The recombinant protein appeared as a major protein in a crude extract of Escherichia coli on SDS/PAGE. It showed a molecular mass of 43 kDa and was recognized by polyclonal antibody to the native rat kallikrein-binding protein in Western-blot analysis. The recombinant rat kallikrein-binding protein has been purified to apparent homogeneity by DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B, hydroxyapatite Bio-Gel HPHT and Mono P 5/5 column chromatography. The purified recombinant rat kallikrein-binding protein showed immunological identity with the native rat kallikrein-binding protein purified from rat serum, in a specific e.l.i.s.a. To confirm the fidelity of the expression, the N-terminal ten amino acids of the recombinant rat kallikrein-binding protein were sequenced and were shown to match perfectly with those of the native rat kallikrein-binding protein. The purified recombinant rat kallikrein-binding protein formed SDS- and heat-stable complexes with rat tissue kallikrein (rK1) and T-kininogenase (rK10) in vitro, but not with other enzymes in the rat kallikrein gene family, such as tonin (rK2) and S3 protein (rK9), which indicates enzyme-specific binding. The properties of the recombinant rat kallikrein-binding protein including its size, charge, complex formation with target enzymes

  15. Genome-wide protein QTL mapping identifies human plasma kallikrein as a post-translational regulator of serum uPAR levels.

    PubMed

    Portelli, Michael A; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Stewart, Ceri E; Postma, Dirkje S; Nieuwenhuis, Maartje A; Vonk, Judith M; Nurnberg, Peter; Altmuller, Janine; Moffatt, Miriam F; Wardlaw, Andrew J; Parker, Stuart G; Connolly, Martin J; Koppelman, Gerard H; Sayers, Ian

    2014-02-01

    The soluble cleaved urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (scuPAR) is a circulating protein detected in multiple diseases, including various cancers, cardiovascular disease, and kidney disease, where elevated levels of scuPAR have been associated with worsening prognosis and increased disease aggressiveness. We aimed to identify novel genetic and biomolecular mechanisms regulating scuPAR levels. Elevated serum scuPAR levels were identified in asthma (n=514) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; n=219) cohorts when compared to controls (n=96). In these cohorts, a genome-wide association study of serum scuPAR levels identified a human plasma kallikrein gene (KLKB1) promoter polymorphism (rs4253238) associated with serum scuPAR levels in a control/asthma population (P=1.17 × 10(-7)), which was also observed in a COPD population (combined P=5.04 × 10(-12)). Using a fluorescent assay, we demonstrated that serum KLKB1 enzymatic activity was driven by rs4253238 and is inverse to scuPAR levels. Biochemical analysis identified that KLKB1 cleaves scuPAR and negates scuPAR's effects on primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) in vitro. Chymotrypsin was used as a proproteolytic control, while basal HBECs were used as a control to define scuPAR-driven effects. In summary, we reveal a novel post-translational regulatory mechanism for scuPAR using a hypothesis-free approach with implications for multiple human diseases.

  16. Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) and the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Filippou, Panagiota S; Karagiannis, George S; Musrap, Natasha; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2016-08-01

    The kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) represent the largest family of serine proteases within the human genome and are expressed in various tissues. Although they regulate several important physiological functions, KLKs have also been implicated in numerous pathophysiological processes, including cancer. Growing evidence describing the deregulation of KLK expression and secretion, as well as activation in various malignancies, has uncovered their potential as mediators of cancer progression, biomarkers of disease and as candidate therapeutic targets. The diversity of signalling pathways and proteolytic cascades involving KLKs and their downstream targets appears to affect cancer biology through multiple mechanisms, including those related to the hallmarks of cancer. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the importance of KLK-driven molecular pathways in relation to cancer cell traits associated with the hallmarks of cancer and to highlight their potential in personalized therapeutics.

  17. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and docking studies of PAR2-AP-derived pseudopeptides as inhibitors of kallikrein 5 and 6.

    PubMed

    Severino, Beatrice; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Corvino, Angela; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Santagada, Vincenzo; Assis, Diego Magno; Oliveira, Juliana R; Juliano, Luiz; Manganelli, Serena; Benfenati, Emilio; Frecentese, Francesco; Perissutti, Elisa; Juliano, Maria Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    A series of protease activated receptor 2 activating peptide (PAR2-AP) derivatives (1-15) were designed and synthesized. The obtained compounds were tested on a panel of human kallikreins (hKLK1, hKLK2, hKLK5, hKLK6, and hKLK7) and were found completely inactive toward hKLK1, hKLK2, and hKLK7. Aiming to investigate the mode of interaction between the most interesting compounds and the selected hKLKs, docking studies were performed. The described compounds distinguish the different human tissue kallikreins with compounds 1 and 5 as the best hKLK5 and hKLK6 inhibitors, respectively.

  18. Activity of human kallikrein-related peptidase 6 (KLK6) on substrates containing sequences of basic amino acids. Is it a processing protease?

    PubMed

    Silva, Roberta N; Oliveira, Lilian C G; Parise, Carolina B; Oliveira, Juliana R; Severino, Beatrice; Corvino, Angela; di Vaio, Paola; Temussi, Piero A; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Santagada, Vincenzo; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria A

    2017-05-01

    Human kallikrein 6 (KLK6) is highly expressed in the central nervous system and with elevated level in demyelinating disease. KLK6 has a very restricted specificity for arginine (R) and hydrolyses myelin basic protein, protein activator receptors and human ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits. Here we report a previously unreported activity of KLK6 on peptides containing clusters of basic amino acids, as in synthetic fluorogenic peptidyl-Arg-7-amino-4-carbamoylmethylcoumarin (peptidyl-ACC) peptides and FRET peptides in the format of Abz-peptidyl-Q-EDDnp (where Abz=ortho-aminobenzoic acid and Q-EDDnp=glutaminyl-N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) ethylenediamine), in which pairs or sequences of basic amino acids (R or K) were introduced. Surprisingly, KLK6 hydrolyzed the fluorogenic peptides Bz-A-R(↓)R-ACC and Z-R(↓)R-MCA between the two R groups, resulting in non-fluorescent products. FRET peptides containing furin processing sequences of human MMP-14, nerve growth factor (NGF), Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and Neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) were cleaved by KLK6 at the same position expected by furin. Finally, KLK6 cleaved FRET peptides derived from human proenkephalin after the KR, the more frequent basic residues flanking enkephalins in human proenkephalin sequence. This result suggests the ability of KLK6 to release enkephalin from proenkephalin precursors and resembles furin a canonical processing proteolytic enzyme. Molecular models of peptides were built into the KLK6 structure and the marked preference of the cut between the two R of the examined peptides was related to the extended conformation of the substrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Kallikrein-related Peptidase-8 (KLK8) Is an Active Serine Protease in Human Epidermis and Sweat and Is Involved in a Skin Barrier Proteolytic Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, Azza; Amodeo, Vanessa; Smith, Christopher R.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2011-01-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidase-8 (KLK8) is a relatively uncharacterized epidermal protease. Although proposed to regulate skin-barrier desquamation and recovery, the catalytic activity of KLK8 was never demonstrated in human epidermis, and its regulators and targets remain unknown. Herein, we elucidated for the first time KLK8 activity in human non-palmoplantar stratum corneum and sweat ex vivo. The majority of stratum corneum and sweat KLK8 was catalytically active, displaying optimal activity at pH 8.5 and considerable activity at pH 5. We also showed that KLK8 is a keratinocyte-specific protease, not secreted by human melanocytes or dermal fibroblasts. KLK8 secretion increased significantly upon calcium induction of terminal keratinocyte differentiation, suggesting an active role for this protease in upper epidermis. Potential activators, regulators, and targets of KLK8 activity were identified by in vitro kinetic assays using pro-KLK8 and mature KLK8 recombinant proteins produced in Pichia pastoris. Mature KLK8 activity was enhanced by calcium and magnesium ions and attenuated by zinc ions and by autocleavage after Arg164. Upon screening KLK8 cleavage of a library of FRET-quenched peptides, trypsin-like specificity was observed with the highest preference for (R/K)(S/T)(A/V) at P1-P1′-P2′. We also demonstrated that KLK5 and lysyl endopeptidase activate latent pro-KLK8, whereas active KLK8 targets pro-KLK11, pro-KLK1, and LL-37 antimicrobial peptide activation in vitro. Together, our data identify KLK8 as a new active serine protease in human stratum corneum and sweat, and we propose regulators and targets that augment its involvement in a skin barrier proteolytic cascade. The implications of KLK8 elevation and hyperactivity in desquamatory and inflammatory skin disease conditions remain to be studied. PMID:20940292

  20. The kallikrein gene 5 splice variant 2 is a new biomarker for breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yousef, George M; White, Nicole M A; Kurlender, Lisa; Michael, Iacovos; Memari, Nader; Robb, John-Desmond; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Stephan, Carsten; Jung, Klaus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2004-01-01

    The presence of more than one mRNA form for the same gene is common among kallikreins, and many of the kallikrein splice variants may hold significant clinical value. The human kallikrein gene 5 (KLK5) is a member of the human kallikrein gene family of serine proteases on chromosome 19q13.4. KLK5 has been shown to be differentially expressed in a variety of endocrine tumors including ovarian, breast and prostate cancer. Utilizing Expressed Sequence Tag database analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, we identified a new alternatively spliced form of KLK5(KLK5-splice variant 2, KLK5-SV2). This variant mRNA is 1,438 bp in length; formed of 195 bp of 5' untranslated region, 882 bp of protein coding sequence and a 3' untranslated region of 326 nucleotides. KLK5-SV2 has 7 exons, the first 2 of which are untranslated, and 6 intervening introns. KLK5-SV2 is different from the classic form of the KLK5 mRNA in its 5' untranslated region, where the first 5' untranslated exon of the classic form is split into 2 exons with an intervening intron of 135 nucleotides. KLK5-SV2 is expressed in a variety of tissues, with higher expression levels in the mammary gland, cervix, salivary gland and trachea. The steroid hormone receptor-positive breast cancer cell line BT-474 was used to examine the effect of different steroids on the expression levels of KLK5-SV2. Expression levels were significantly higher after stimulation with androgens, but not estrogens, progestins, aldosterone or corticosteroids. While relatively high levels of expression were found in all 10 normal breast tissues examined, no expression was detected in 16 breast cancer tissues, and expression was significantly lower than normal in the remaining 4 cancers. Expression levels comparable to normal were found in only 1 breast cancer cell line. Weak to no expression was detected in 3 other breast cancer cell lines. KLK5-SV2 was not detectable in any of the 10 normal ovarian tissues examined. It was

  1. A Highly Sensitive Porous Silicon (P-Si)-Based Human Kallikrein 2 (hK2) Immunoassay Platform toward Accurate Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Wook; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Kim, Soyoun; Jeong, Ok Chan; Lilja, Hans; Laurell, Thomas; Maeda, Mizuo

    2015-01-01

    Levels of total human kallikrein 2 (hK2), a protein involved the pathology of prostate cancer (PCa), could be used as a biomarker to aid in the diagnosis of this disease. In this study, we report on a porous silicon antibody immunoassay platform for the detection of serum levels of total hK2. The surface of porous silicon has a 3-dimensional macro- and nanoporous structure, which offers a large binding capacity for capturing probe molecules. The tailored pore size of the porous silicon also allows efficient immobilization of antibodies by surface adsorption, and does not require chemical immobilization. Monoclonal hK2 capture antibody (6B7) was dispensed onto P-Si chip using a piezoelectric dispenser. In total 13 × 13 arrays (169 spots) were spotted on the chip with its single spot volume of 300 pL. For an optimization of capture antibody condition, we firstly performed an immunoassay of the P-Si microarray under a titration series of hK2 in pure buffer (PBS) at three different antibody densities (75, 100 and 145 µg/mL). The best performance of the microarray platform was seen at 100 µg/mL of the capture antibody concentration (LOD was 100 fg/mL). The platform then was subsequently evaluated for a titration series of serum-spiked hK2 samples. The developed platform utilizes only 15 µL of serum per test and the total assay time is about 3 h, including immobilization of the capture antibody. The detection limit of the hK2 assay was 100 fg/mL in PBS buffer and 1 pg/mL in serum with a dynamic range of 106 (10−4 to 102 ng/mL). PMID:26007739

  2. A Highly Sensitive Porous Silicon (P-Si)-Based Human Kallikrein 2 (hK2) Immunoassay Platform toward Accurate Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Wook; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Kim, Soyoun; Jeong, Ok Chan; Lilja, Hans; Laurell, Thomas; Maeda, Mizuo

    2015-05-22

    Levels of total human kallikrein 2 (hK2), a protein involved the pathology of prostate cancer (PCa), could be used as a biomarker to aid in the diagnosis of this disease. In this study, we report on a porous silicon antibody immunoassay platform for the detection of serum levels of total hK2. The surface of porous silicon has a 3-dimensional macro- and nanoporous structure, which offers a large binding capacity for capturing probe molecules. The tailored pore size of the porous silicon also allows efficient immobilization of antibodies by surface adsorption, and does not require chemical immobilization. Monoclonal hK2 capture antibody (6B7) was dispensed onto P-Si chip using a piezoelectric dispenser. In total 13 × 13 arrays (169 spots) were spotted on the chip with its single spot volume of 300 pL. For an optimization of capture antibody condition, we firstly performed an immunoassay of the P-Si microarray under a titration series of hK2 in pure buffer (PBS) at three different antibody densities (75, 100 and 145 µg/mL). The best performance of the microarray platform was seen at 100 µg/mL of the capture antibody concentration (LOD was 100 fg/mL). The platform then was subsequently evaluated for a titration series of serum-spiked hK2 samples. The developed platform utilizes only 15 µL of serum per test and the total assay time is about 3 h, including immobilization of the capture antibody. The detection limit of the hK2 assay was 100 fg/mL in PBS buffer and 1 pg/mL in serum with a dynamic range of 106 (10(-4) to 10(2) ng/mL).

  3. [Human brown adipose tissue].

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Kirsi A; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    Adult humans have heat-producing and energy-consuming brown adipose tissue in the clavicular region of the neck. There are two types of brown adipose cells, the so-called classic and beige adipose cells. Brown adipose cells produce heat by means of uncoupler protein 1 (UCP1) from fatty acids and sugar. By applying positron emission tomography (PET) measuring the utilization of sugar, the metabolism of brown fat has been shown to multiply in the cold, presumably influencing energy consumption. Active brown fat is most likely present in young adults, persons of normal weight and women, least likely in obese persons.

  4. Detecting kallikrein proteolytic activity with peptide-quantum dot nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Breger, Joyce C; Sapsford, Kim E; Ganek, Jessica; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H; Medintz, Igor L

    2014-07-23

    Contamination and adulterants in both naturally derived and synthetic drugs pose a serious threat to the worldwide medical community. Developing rapid and sensitive sensors/devices to detect these hazards is thus a continuing need. We describe a hydrophilic semiconductor quantum dot (QD)-peptide Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) nanosensor for monitoring the activity of kallikrein, a key proteolytic enzyme functioning at the initiation of the blood clotting cascade. Kallikrein is also activated by the presence of an oversulfated contaminant recently found in preparations of the drug heparin. Quantitatively monitoring the activity of this enzyme within a nanosensor format has proven challenging because of inherent steric and kinetic considerations. Our sensor is designed around a central QD donor platform which displays controlled ratios of a modular peptidyl substrate. This peptide, in turn, sequentially expresses a terminal oligohistidine motif that mediates the rapid self-assembly of peptides to the QD surface, a linker-spacer sequence to extend the peptide away from the QD surface, a kallikrein recognized-cleavage site, and terminates in an acceptor dye-labeling site. Hydrophilic QDs prepared with compact, zwitterionic surface coatings were first evaluated for their ability to self-assemble the dye-labeled peptide substrates. An optimized two-step protocol was then utilized where high concentrations of peptide were initially digested with purified human kallikrein and samples collected at distinct time points were subsequently diluted into QD-containing solutions for assaying. This sensor provided a quantitative FRET-based readout for monitoring kallikrein activity and comparison to a calibration curve allowed estimation of the relevant Michaelis-Menten kinetic descriptors. The results further suggest that almost any protease should be amenable to a QD-based FRET assay format with appropriate design considerations.

  5. The relationship between kallikrein and water excretion and the conditional relationship between kallikrein and sodium excretion.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, I H; Ward, P E

    1975-01-01

    1. The renal kallikrein-kinin system has previously been linked with renal control of sodium and water excretion. The present investigations were carried out to examine more closely these relationships. 2. In physiological studies with rabbits, urinary kallikrein was measured by a modification of the [3-H]TAME method. 3. With rabbits on free sodium and water intake, urinary kallikrein was positively correlated with both sodium and water excretion. Kallikrein excretion was also negatively correlated with urinary osmolality. 4. In rabbits on chronic high and low sodium diets, urinary kallikrein was positively correlated with urinary volume but not with sodium excretion. 5. In rabbits held to a constant fluid intake but with sodium intake changed, urinary kallikrein was not correlated with sodium excretion. 6. These results indicate that the positive correlation of kallikrein excretion with sodium excretion under conditions of free sodium and water intake may be only secondary to the positive relationship of kallikrein excretion with urinary volume. 7. The results of the present investigations do not support the hypothesis that the renal kallikrein-kinin system is necessarily involved in renal control of sodium excretion under normal conditions but it is where a change in sodium intake leads to a change in fluid intake and consequently of urinary volume. 8. In the above experiments, urinary kallikrein was always positively correlated with urinary volume and negatively correlated with urinary osmolality. This may indicate a functional relationship between renal kallikrein and water excretion. PMID:1133793

  6. Kallikrein-related peptidases in prostate, breast, and ovarian cancers: from pathobiology to clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Avgeris, Margaritis; Mavridis, Konstantinos; Scorilas, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Tissue kallikrein (KLK1) and kallikrein-related peptidases (KLK2-15) comprise a family of 15 highly conserved secreted serine proteases with similar structural characteristics and a wide spectrum of functional properties. Both gene expression and protein activity of KLKs are rigorously controlled at various levels via diverse mechanisms, including extensive steroid hormone regulation, to exert their broad physiological role. Nevertheless, deregulated expression, secretion, and function of KLK family members has been observed in several pathological conditions and, particularly, in endocrine-related human malignancies, including those of the prostate, breast, and ovary. The cancer-related abnormal activity of KLKs upon substrates such as growth factors, cell adhesion molecules, cell surface receptors, and extracellular matrix proteins facilitate both tumorigenesis and disease progression to the advanced stages. The well-documented relationship between KLK status and the clinical outcome of cancer patients has led to their identification as promising diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment response monitoring biomarkers for these complex disease entities. The main objective of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge concerning the role of KLKs in prostate, breast, and ovarian cancers and to highlight their continually evolving biomarker capabilities that can provide significant benefits for the management of cancer patients.

  7. [Therapy of male fertility disorders with kallikrein].

    PubMed

    Schill, W B

    1976-11-26

    An overview of the use of kallikrein to treat male sterility is presented. Kallikrein was shown to increase sperm motility in both in vivo and in vitro studies. The vitality and longevity of the sperm are also enhanced. These effects are due to the stimulation of the intracellular concentration of cyclical adenosonemonophosphates in the sperm. Quinine receptors on the sperm surface are assumed to be the mechanism responsible for the kallikrein effect. Kallikrein stimulates spermal penetration of cervical mucus by about 80% and causes a significant increase in total sperm output 3 months from the beginning of treatment. After 2 months of use, kallikrein leads to an increase in the number of normally formed spermatozoa in the ejaculate. Kallikrein is indicated in cases of asthenospermia and oligozoospermia, in some cases of teratozoospermia, in cases of the vegetative-functional congestion syndrome desecribed by Hoffmann, and is recommended in cases of testicular parenchyme damage involving tubulus function. Parenteral administration involves 40 KE (1KE=8mcg) thrice weekly, oral administration 300-600 KE daily. Kallikrein is added directly to the ejaculate in instrumental insemination in cases of therapy-resistant decrease in motility associated with asthenospermia or oligozoospermia. Concentrations of 5 KE per ml ejaculate are used in such cases. Chronic infection, especially in the genital area, and the incidence of dizziness during therapy are contraindications to kellikrein use.

  8. Human Tissue Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  9. Detection of active kallikrein in induced blister fluids of hereditary angioedema patients

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Six suction-induced blister fluids obtained from five patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE) contained active kallikrein, whereas only two blister fluids obtained from eight normal volunteers contained small amounts of this activity. Kallikrein was present in large amounts of HAE blister fluids as assessed by its ability to liberate smooth- muscle-contracting activity from purified high molecular weight kininogen. It was inhibited by purified antibodies specific for plasma prekallikrein and also by purified C1 inhibitor, but not by antibodies specific for C1s. These observations suggest that activation of the Hageman-factor-dependent pathways occurs in the tissues of HAE patients, and once generated, active kallikrein persists in these tissues. PMID:6902743

  10. Kallikrein 5-Mediated Inflammation in Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Two, Aimee M.

    2014-01-01

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory condition of facial skin estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans. Although the pathogenesis of rosacea is not fully understood, recent evidence in vitro as well as in vivo has supported the role of increased levels of the trypsin-like serine protease, kallikrein 5, in initiating an augmented inflammatory response in rosacea. The increase in the quantity and magnitude of biological activity of kallikrein 5 leads to production of greater quantities of cathelicidin (LL-37), an antimicrobial peptide associated with increases in innate cutaneous inflammation, vasodilation, and vascular proliferation, all of which are characteristic features of rosacea. In this article, the authors review the literature supporting the role of kallikrein 5 in the pathophysiology of rosacea, including how therapeutic interventions modulate the effects of kallikrein 5, thus providing further support for this pathophysiological model that at least partially explains many of the clinical features of cutaneous rosacea. PMID:24563692

  11. Detection of High Grade Prostate Cancer among PLCO Participants Using a Prespecified 4-Kallikrein Marker Panel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eric H; Andriole, Gerald L; Crawford, E David; Sjoberg, Daniel D; Assel, Melissa; Vickers, Andrew J; Lilja, Hans

    2017-04-01

    We assessed the performance of a 4-kallikrein panel with and without microseminoprotein-β to predict high grade (Gleason 7+/Gleason Grade Group 2+) prostate cancer on biopsy in a multiethnic cohort from PLCO (Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial). Levels of free, intact, total prostate specific antigen, human kallikrein-2 and microseminoprotein-β were measured while blinded to outcomes in cryopreserved serum from men in the intervention arm of PLCO. Marker levels of 946 men, of whom 100 were African American, were incorporated into a prespecified statistical model to predict high grade prostate cancer on biopsy. The detection of high grade prostate cancer in 94 men (10%) was enhanced by the 4-kallikrein panel with an AUC of 0.79 compared to 0.73 for PCPTRC (Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial Risk Calculator), representing a 0.060 increase (95% CI 0.032-0.088, p <0.01). Additionally, the AUC increased from 0.79 to 0.81 when microseminoprotein-β was added to the 4-kallikrein panel. In African American men, the 4-kallikrein panel model also enhanced high grade prostate cancer detection over that of prostate specific antigen (AUC 0.80 vs 0.67). As an illustration of clinical implications, using 1 cutoff point for biopsy (6% risk of high grade prostate cancer) with the 4-kallikrein panel model would have eliminated unnecessary biopsies in 420 per 1,000 men (42%) while detecting high grade prostate cancer in 83 of 93 (88%). In a multiethnic United States population, the 4-kallikrein panel demonstrated improved risk discrimination for high grade prostate cancer over conventional clinical variables (age, prostate specific antigen and digital rectal examination) as well as PCPTRC. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. RELEASE OF KALLIKREIN FROM GUINEA PIG LUNG DURING ANAPHYLAXIS

    PubMed Central

    Jonasson, O.; Becker, E. L.

    1966-01-01

    An antigen-antibody reaction occurring in the perfused sensitized guinea pig lung, has been demonstrated to release kallikrein, a proteolytic enzyme related to the formation of kinins. This lung kallikrein is similar to plasma kallikrein in all properties studied, including susceptibility to the same inhibitors, electrophoretic mobility, and heterogeneity in molecular size. The release of kallikrein during anaphylaxis in the guinea pig lung occurs in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetate. Perfusion of ellagic acid into nonsensitized lungs will also release kallikrein, presumably through activation of Hageman factor. On the basis of these findings the hypothesis is suggested that the kallikrein in perfused lung activated by the antigen-antibody reaction is, in fact, plasma kallikrein. It is further suggested that activation of such kallikrein by the antigen-antibody reaction proceeds through Hageman factor. PMID:5937059

  13. Characterization of human tissue carnosinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lenney, J F; Peppers, S C; Kucera-Orallo, C M; George, R P

    1985-01-01

    Human tissue carnosinase (EC 3.4.13.3) had optimum activity at pH9.5 and was a cysteine peptidase, being activated by dithiothreitol and inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. By optimizing assay conditions, the activity per g of tissue was increased 10-fold compared with values in the literature. The enzyme was present in every human tissue assayed and was entirely different from serum carnosinase. Highly purified tissue carnosinase had a broader specificity than hog kidney carnosinase. Although tissue carnosinase was very strongly inhibited by bestatin, it did not hydrolyse tripeptides, and thus appears to be a dipeptidase rather than an aminopeptidase. It had a relative molecular mass of 90 000, an isoelectric point of 5.6, and a Km value of 10 mM-carnosine. Two forms of kidney and brain carnosinase were separated by high-resolution anion-exchange chromatography, although only one form was detected by various electrophoretic methods. Homocarnosinase and Mn2+-independent carnosinase were not detected in human tissues, although these enzymes are present in rat and hog kidney. PMID:4026801

  14. Tissue Engineered Human Skin Equivalents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B.

    2012-01-01

    Human skin not only serves as an important barrier against the penetration of exogenous substances into the body, but also provides a potential avenue for the transport of functional active drugs/reagents/ingredients into the skin (topical delivery) and/or the body (transdermal delivery). In the past three decades, research and development in human skin equivalents have advanced in parallel with those in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The human skin equivalents are used commercially as clinical skin substitutes and as models for permeation and toxicity screening. Several academic laboratories have developed their own human skin equivalent models and applied these models for studying skin permeation, corrosivity and irritation, compound toxicity, biochemistry, metabolism and cellular pharmacology. Various aspects of the state of the art of human skin equivalents are reviewed and discussed. PMID:24300178

  15. Tissue engineering a human phalanx.

    PubMed

    Landis, W J; Chubinskaya, S; Tokui, T; Wada, Y; Isogai, N; Jacquet, R

    2016-03-21

    A principal purpose of tissue engineering is the augmentation, repair or replacement of diseased or injured human tissue. This study was undertaken to determine whether human biopsies as a cell source could be utilized for successful engineering of human phalanges consisting of both bone and cartilage. This paper reports the use of cadaveric human chondrocytes and periosteum as a model for the development of phalanx constructs. Two factors, osteogenic protein-1 [OP-1/bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7)], alone or combined with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), were examined for their potential enhancement of chondrocytes and their secreted extracellular matrices. Design of the study included culture of chondrocytes and periosteum on biodegradable polyglycolic acid (PGA) and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds and subsequent implantation in athymic nu/nu (nude) mice for 5, 20, 40 and 60 weeks. Engineered constructs retrieved from mice were characterized with regard to genotype and phenotype as a function of developmental (implantation) time. Assessments included gross observation, X-ray radiography or microcomputed tomography, histology and gene expression. The resulting data showed that human cell-scaffold constructs could be successfully developed over 60 weeks, despite variability in donor age. Cartilage formation of the distal phalanx models enhanced with both OP-1 and IGF-1 yielded more cells and extracellular matrix (collagen and proteoglycans) than control chondrocytes without added factors. Summary data demonstrated that human distal phalanx models utilizing cadaveric chondrocytes and periosteum were successfully fabricated and OP-1 and OP-1/IGF-1 accelerated construct development and mineralization. The results suggest that similar engineering and transplantation of human autologous tissues in patients are clinically feasible. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Purification and preliminary characterization of a plasma kallikrein inhibitor isolated from sea hares Aplysia dactylomela Rang, 1828.

    PubMed

    González, Y; Araujo, M S; Oliva, M L V; Sampaio, C A M; Chávez, M A

    2004-02-01

    An inhibitor active against pancreatic trypsin was found in the crude extract from the sea hares Aplysia dactylomelaRang, 1828. A stronger inhibitory activity against human plasma kallikrein was detectable after treating this extract at 60 degrees C, for 30 min. The plasma kallikrein inhibitor (AdKI) purification was achieved by acetone fractionation (80%) v/v, ion-exchange chromatography on Mono Q column and gel filtration chromatography on Superdex 75 column (FPLC system). By the latter a molecular mass of 2900 Da was estimated. The purified inhibitor strongly inhibits human plasma kallikrein with a K(i) value of 2.2 x 10(-10)M, while human plasmin and pancreatic trypsin were inhibited with K(i) values of 1.8 x 10(-9) and 4.7 x 10(-9)M, respectively. Chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, pancreatic kallikrein and thrombin are not inhibited. The effect of AdKI on plasma kallikrein was confirmed by the prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time, using a clotting time assay. The inhibitor did not affect prothrombin time or thrombin time. AdKi is a more specific inhibitor than other serine proteinase inhibitors from marine invertebrates.

  17. Evidence for Environmental Familiality of Kallikrein Excretion in Utah Kindreds

    PubMed Central

    Dadone, Mary M.; Williams, Roger R.; Ash, K. Owen; Smith, Jean B.; Anderton, Douglas L.

    1986-01-01

    In investigating the role of urinary kallikrein in the pathophysiology of hypertension, we measured 12-hour kallikrein excretion in 1,100 persons in 68 Utah kindreds. The kallikrein excretion was statistically adjusted to account for variations in body size and urine output. Adjusted kallikrein excretion was greater in youths than in adults and correlated with potassium excretion and sodium excretion in persons with normal blood pressure. It was decreased in normotensive subjects with strong family histories of stroke and hypertension, but was not significantly different in adults with hypertension. Adjusted kallikrein excretion was correlated between pairs of siblings, parent-offspring pairs and spouses. Our results indicate that kallikrein excretion is a familial variable, with the familiality due more to shared environmental than genetic factors. PMID:3636040

  18. Radiation Effect on Human Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Cruz, Angela; Bors, Karen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence of human cancer following exposure of an epidemiologic population to any agent causing genetic damage is a difficult task. To an approximation, this is because the uncertainty of uniform exposure to the damaging agent, and the uncertainty of uniform processing of that damage within a complex set of biological variables, degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event within clinically normal individuals. This situation begs the need for alternate controlled experimental models that are predictive for the development of human cancer following exposures to agents causing genetic damage. Such models historically have not been of substantial proven value. It is more recently encouraging, however, that developments in molecular and cell biology have led to an expanded knowledge of human carcinogenesis, and of molecular markers associated with that process. It is therefore appropriate to consider new laboratory models developed to accomodate that expanded knowledge in order to assess the cancer risks associated with exposures to genotoxic agents. When ionizing radiation of space is the genotoxic agent, then a series of additional considerations for human cancer risk assessment must also be applied. These include the dose of radiation absorbed by tissue at different locations in the body, the quality of the absorbed radiation, the rate at which absorbed dose accumulates in tissue, the way in which absorbed dose is measured and calculated, and the alterations in incident radiation caused by shielding materials. It is clear that human cancer risk assessment for damage caused by ionizing radiation is a multidisciplinary responsibility, and that within this responsibility no single discipline can hold disproportionate sway if a risk assessment model of radiation-induced human cancer is to be developed that has proven value. Biomolecular and cellular markers from the work reported here are considered

  19. Radiation Effect on Human Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Cruz, Angela; Bors, Karen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence of human cancer following exposure of an epidemiologic population to any agent causing genetic damage is a difficult task. To an approximation, this is because the uncertainty of uniform exposure to the damaging agent, and the uncertainty of uniform processing of that damage within a complex set of biological variables, degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event within clinically normal individuals. This situation begs the need for alternate controlled experimental models that are predictive for the development of human cancer following exposures to agents causing genetic damage. Such models historically have not been of substantial proven value. It is more recently encouraging, however, that developments in molecular and cell biology have led to an expanded knowledge of human carcinogenesis, and of molecular markers associated with that process. It is therefore appropriate to consider new laboratory models developed to accomodate that expanded knowledge in order to assess the cancer risks associated with exposures to genotoxic agents. When ionizing radiation of space is the genotoxic agent, then a series of additional considerations for human cancer risk assessment must also be applied. These include the dose of radiation absorbed by tissue at different locations in the body, the quality of the absorbed radiation, the rate at which absorbed dose accumulates in tissue, the way in which absorbed dose is measured and calculated, and the alterations in incident radiation caused by shielding materials. It is clear that human cancer risk assessment for damage caused by ionizing radiation is a multidisciplinary responsibility, and that within this responsibility no single discipline can hold disproportionate sway if a risk assessment model of radiation-induced human cancer is to be developed that has proven value. Biomolecular and cellular markers from the work reported here are considered

  20. Microbiota of Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Urbaniak, Camilla; Cummins, Joanne; Brackstone, Muriel; Macklaim, Jean M.; Gloor, Gregory B.; Baban, Chwanrow K.; Scott, Leslie; O'Hanlon, Deidre M.; Burton, Jeremy P.; Francis, Kevin P.; Tangney, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a greater appreciation for the microbes inhabiting human body sites has emerged. In the female mammary gland, milk has been shown to contain bacterial species, ostensibly reaching the ducts from the skin. We decided to investigate whether there is a microbiome within the mammary tissue. Using 16S rRNA sequencing and culture, we analyzed breast tissue from 81 women with and without cancer in Canada and Ireland. A diverse population of bacteria was detected within tissue collected from sites all around the breast in women aged 18 to 90, not all of whom had a history of lactation. The principal phylum was Proteobacteria. The most abundant taxa in the Canadian samples were Bacillus (11.4%), Acinetobacter (10.0%), Enterobacteriaceae (8.3%), Pseudomonas (6.5%), Staphylococcus (6.5%), Propionibacterium (5.8%), Comamonadaceae (5.7%), Gammaproteobacteria (5.0%), and Prevotella (5.0%). In the Irish samples the most abundant taxa were Enterobacteriaceae (30.8%), Staphylococcus (12.7%), Listeria welshimeri (12.1%), Propionibacterium (10.1%), and Pseudomonas (5.3%). None of the subjects had signs or symptoms of infection, but the presence of viable bacteria was confirmed in some samples by culture. The extent to which these organisms play a role in health or disease remains to be determined. PMID:24610844

  1. Proteomic analysis reveals alterations in the renal kallikrein pathway during hypoxia-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thongboonkerd, Visith; Gozal, Evelyne; Sachleben, Leroy R; Arthur, John M; Pierce, William M; Cai, Jian; Chao, Julie; Bader, Michael; Pesquero, Joao B; Gozal, David; Klein, Jon B

    2002-09-20

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), a disorder characterized by episodic hypoxia (EH) during sleep, is associated with systemic hypertension. We used proteomic analysis to examine differences in rat kidney protein expression during EH, and their potential relationship to EH-induced hypertension. Young male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to either EH or sustained hypoxia (SH) for 14 (EH14/SH14) and 30 (EH30/SH30) days. Mean arterial blood pressure was significantly increased only in EH30 (p < 0.0002). Kidney proteins were resolved by two-dimensional-PAGE and were identified by MALDI-MS. Renal expression of kallistatin, a potent vasodilator, was down-regulated in all animals. Expression of alpha-1-antitrypsin, an inhibitor of kallikrein activation, was up-regulated in EH but down-regulated in SH. Western blotting showed significant elevation of B(2)-bradykinin receptor expression in all normotensive animals but remained unchanged in hypertensive animals. Proteins relevant to vascular hypertrophy, such as smooth muscle myosin and protein-disulfide isomerase were up-regulated in EH30 but were down-regulated in SH30. These data indicate that EH induces changes in renal protein expression consistent with impairment of vasodilation mediated by the kallikrein-kallistatin pathway and vascular hypertrophy. In contrast, SH-induced changes suggest the kallikrein- and bradykinin-mediated compensatory mechanisms for prevention of hypertension and vascular remodeling. To test the hypothesis suggested by the proteomic data, we measured the effect of EH on blood pressure in transgenic hKLK1 rats that overexpress human kallikrein. Transgenic hKLK1 animals were protected from EH-induced hypertension. We conclude that EH-induced hypertension may result, at least in part, from altered regulation of the renal kallikrein system.

  2. Natural and synthetic inhibitors of kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs)

    PubMed Central

    Goettig, Peter; Magdolen, Viktor; Brandstetter, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Including the true tissue kallikrein KLK1, kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) represent a family of fifteen mammalian serine proteases. While the physiological roles of several KLKs have been at least partially elucidated, their activation and regulation remain largely unclear. This obscurity may be related to the fact that a given KLK fulfills many different tasks in diverse fetal and adult tissues, and consequently, the timescale of some of their physiological actions varies significantly. To date, a variety of endogenous inhibitors that target distinct KLKs have been identified. Among them are the attenuating Zn2+ ions, active site-directed proteinaceous inhibitors, such as serpins and the Kazal-type inhibitors, or the huge, unspecific compartment forming α2-macroglobulin. Failure of these inhibitory systems can lead to certain pathophysiological conditions. One of the most prominent examples is the Netherton syndrome, which is caused by dysfunctional domains of the Kazal-type inhibitor LEKTI-1 which fail to appropriately regulate KLKs in the skin. Small synthetic inhibitory compounds and natural polypeptidic exogenous inhibitors have been widely employed to characterize the activity and substrate specificity of KLKs and to further investigate their structures and biophysical properties. Overall, this knowledge leads not only to a better understanding of the physiological tasks of KLKs, but is also a strong fundament for the synthesis of small compound drugs and engineered biomolecules for pharmaceutical approaches. In several types of cancer, KLKs have been found to be overexpressed, which makes them clinically relevant biomarkers for prognosis and monitoring. Thus, down regulation of excessive KLK activity in cancer and in skin diseases by small inhibitor compounds may represent attractive therapeutical approaches. PMID:20615447

  3. Plasma Kallikrein Promotes Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation and Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle through Direct Activation of Protease-activated Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Rany T.; Keum, Joo-Seob; Lee, Mi-Hye; Wang, Bing; Gooz, Monika; Luttrell, Deirdre K.; Luttrell, Louis M.; Jaffa, Ayad A.

    2010-01-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system, along with the interlocking renin-angiotensin system, is a key regulator of vascular contractility and injury response. The principal effectors of the kallikrein-kinin system are plasma and tissue kallikreins, proteases that cleave high molecular weight kininogen to produce bradykinin. Most of the cellular actions of kallikrein (KK) are thought to be mediated by bradykinin, which acts via G protein-coupled B1 and B2 bradykinin receptors on VSMCs and endothelial cells. Here, we find that primary aortic vascular smooth muscle but not endothelial cells possess the ability to activate plasma prekallikrein. Surprisingly, exposing VSMCs to prekallikrein leads to activation of the ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade via a mechanism that requires kallikrein activity but does not involve bradykinin receptors. In transfected HEK293 cells, we find that plasma kallikrein directly activates G protein-coupled protease-activated receptors (PARs) 1 and 2, which possess consensus kallikrein cleavage sites, but not PAR4. In vascular smooth muscles, KK stimulates ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) 17 activity via a PAR1/2 receptor-dependent mechanism, leading sequentially to release of the endogenous ADAM17 substrates, amphiregulin and tumor necrosis factor-α, metalloprotease-dependent transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors, and metalloprotease and epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent ERK1/2 activation. These results suggest a novel mechanism of bradykinin-independent kallikrein action that may contribute to the regulation of vascular responses in pathophysiologic states, such as diabetes mellitus. PMID:20826789

  4. Plasma Kallikrein Inhibitors in Cardiovascular Disease: An Innovative Therapeutic Approach.

    PubMed

    Kolte, Dhaval; Shariat-Madar, Zia

    2016-01-01

    Plasma prekallikrein is the liver-derived precursor of the trypsin-like serine protease plasma kallikrein, and circulates in plasma bound to high molecular weight kininogen. Plasma prekallikrein is activated to plasma kallikrein by activated factor XII or prolylcarboxypeptidase. Plasma kallikrein regulates the activity of multiple proteolytic cascades in the cardiovascular system such as the intrinsic pathway of coagulation, the kallikrein-kinin system, the fibrinolytic system, the renin-angiotensin system, and the complement pathways. As such, plasma kallikrein plays a central role in the pathogenesis of thrombosis, inflammation, and blood pressure regulation. Under physiological conditions, plasma kallikrein serves as a cardioprotective enzyme. However, its increased plasma concentration or hyperactivity perpetuates cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this article, we review the biochemistry and cell biology of plasma kallikrein and summarize data from preclinical and clinical studies that have established important functions of this serine protease in CVD states. Finally, we propose plasma kallikrein inhibitors as a novel class of drugs with potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of CVDs.

  5. TiO2 nanoparticles tested in a novel screening whole human blood model of toxicity trigger adverse activation of the kallikrein system at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ekstrand-Hammarström, Barbro; Hong, Jaan; Davoodpour, Padideh; Sandholm, Kerstin; Ekdahl, Kristina N; Bucht, Anders; Nilsson, Bo

    2015-05-01

    There is a compelling need to understand and assess the toxicity of industrially produced nanoparticles (NPs). In order to appreciate the long-term effects of NPs, sensitive human-based screening tests that comprehensively map the NP properties are needed to detect possible toxic mechanisms. Animal models can only be used in a limited number of test applications and are subject to ethical concerns, and the interpretation of experiments in animals is also distorted by the species differences. Here, we present a novel easy-to-perform highly sensitive whole-blood model using fresh non-anticoagulated human blood, which most justly reflects complex biological cross talks in a human system. As a demonstrator of the tests versatility, we evaluated the toxicity of TiO2 NPs that are widely used in various applications and otherwise considered to have relatively low toxic properties. We show that TiO2 NPs at very low concentrations (50 ng/mL) induce strong activation of the contact system, which in this model elicits thromboinflammation. These data are in line with the finding of components of the contact system in the protein corona of the TiO2 NPs after exposure to blood. The contact system activation may lead to both thrombotic reactions and generation of bradykinin, thereby representing fuel for chronic inflammation in vivo and potentially long-term risk of autoimmunity, arteriosclerosis and cancer. These results support the notion that this novel whole-blood model represents an important contribution to testing of NP toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Copy Number Variants in the Kallikrein Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Pernilla; Säll, Torbjörn; Bjartell, Anders; Johansson, Anna M.; Lilja, Hans; Halldén, Christer

    2013-01-01

    The kallikrein gene family (KLK1-KLK15) is the largest contiguous group of protease genes within the human genome and is associated with both risk and outcome of cancer and other diseases. We searched for copy number variants in all KLK genes using quantitative PCR analysis and analysis of inheritance patterns of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Two deletions were identified: one 2235-bp deletion in KLK9 present in 1.2% of alleles, and one 3394-bp deletion in KLK15 present in 4.0% of alleles. Each deletion eliminated one complete exon and created out-of-frame coding that eliminated the catalytic triad of the resulting truncated gene product, which therefore likely is a non-functional protein. Deletion breakpoints identified by DNA sequencing located the KLK9 deletion breakpoint to a long interspersed element (LINE) repeated sequence, while the deletion in KLK15 is located in a single copy sequence. To search for an association between each deletion and risk of prostate cancer (PC), we analyzed a cohort of 667 biopsied men (266 PC cases and 401 men with no evidence of PC at biopsy) using short deletion-specific PCR assays. There was no association between evidence of PC in this cohort and the presence of either gene deletion. Haplotyping revealed a single origin of each deletion, with most recent common ancestor estimates of 3000-8000 and 6000-14 000 years for the deletions in KLK9 and KLK15, respectively. The presence of the deletions on the same haplotypes in 1000 Genomes data of both European and African populations indicate an early origin of both deletions. The old age in combination with homozygous presence of loss-of-function variants suggests that some kallikrein-related peptidases have non-essential functions. PMID:23894413

  7. Involvement of Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Normal and Pathologic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Ana Carolina B.; da Cunha, Bianca Rodrigues; Henrique, Tiago; Tajara, Eloiza H.

    2015-01-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a subgroup of serine proteases that participate in proteolytic pathways and control protein levels in normal physiology as well as in several pathological conditions. Their complex network of stimulatory and inhibitory interactions may induce inflammatory and immune responses and contribute to the neoplastic phenotype through the regulation of several cellular processes, such as proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion. This family of proteases, which includes one of the most useful cancer biomarkers, kallikrein-related peptidase 3 or PSA, also has a protective effect against cancer promoting apoptosis or counteracting angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Therefore, they represent attractive therapeutic targets and may have important applications in clinical oncology. Despite being intensively studied, many gaps in our knowledge on several molecular aspects of KLK functions still exist. This review aims to summarize recent data on their involvement in different processes related to health and disease, in particular those directly or indirectly linked to the neoplastic process. PMID:26783378

  8. Human dignity and human tissue: a meaningful ethical relationship?

    PubMed

    Kirchhoffer, David G; Dierickx, Kris

    2011-09-01

    Human dignity has long been used as a foundational principle in policy documents and ethical guidelines intended to govern various forms of biomedical research. Despite the vast amount of literature concerning human dignity and embryonic tissues, the majority of biomedical research uses non-embryonic human tissue. Therefore, this contribution addresses a notable lacuna in the literature: the relationship, if any, between human dignity and human tissue. This paper first elaborates a multidimensional understanding of human dignity that overcomes many of the shortcomings associated with the use of human dignity in other ethical debates. Second, it discusses the relationship between such an understanding of human dignity and 'non-embryonic' human tissue. Finally, it considers the implications of this relationship for biomedical research and practice involving human tissue. The contribution demonstrates that while human tissue cannot be said to have human dignity, human dignity is nevertheless implicated by human tissue, making what is done with human tissue and how it is done worthy of moral consideration.

  9. Inhibition of vascular permeability by antisense-mediated inhibition of plasma kallikrein and coagulation factor 12.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Gourab; Revenko, Alexey S; Crosby, Jeffrey R; May, Chris; Gao, Dacao; Zhao, Chenguang; Monia, Brett P; MacLeod, A Robert

    2013-06-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent, acute, and painful episodes of swelling involving multiple tissues. Deficiency or malfunction of the serine protease inhibitor C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) results in HAE types 1 and 2, respectively, whereas mutations in coagulation factor 12 (f12) have been associated with HAE type 3. C1-INH is the primary inhibitor of multiple plasma cascade pathways known to be altered in HAE patients, including the complement, fibrinolytic, coagulation, and kinin-kallikrein pathways. We have selectively inhibited several components of both the kinin-kallikrein system and the coagulation cascades with potent and selective antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to investigate their relative contributions to vascular permeability. We have also developed ASO inhibitors of C1-INH and characterized their effects on vascular permeability in mice as an inducible model of HAE. Our studies demonstrate that ASO-mediated reduction in C1-INH plasma levels results in increased vascular permeability and that inhibition of proteases of the kinin-kallikrein system, either f12 or prekallikrein (PKK) reverse the effects of C1-INH depletion with similar effects on both basal and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor-induced permeability. In contrast, inhibition of coagulation factors 11 (f11) or 7 (f7) had no effect. These results suggest that the vascular defects observed in C1-INH deficiency are dependent on the kinin-kallikrein system proteases f12 and PKK, and not mediated through the coagulation pathways. In addition, our results highlight a novel therapeutic modality that can potentially be employed prophylactically to prevent attacks in HAE patients.

  10. Pre-stimulation of the kallikrein system in cisplatin-induced acute renal injury: An approach to renoprotection

    SciTech Connect

    Aburto, Andrés; Barría, Agustín; Cárdenas, Areli; Carpio, Daniel; Figueroa, Carlos D.; Burgos, Maria E.; Ardiles, Leopoldo

    2014-10-15

    Antineoplastic treatment with cisplatin is frequently complicated by nephrotoxicity. Although oxidative stress may be involved, the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for renal damage have not been completely clarified. In order to investigate the role of the renal kinin system in this condition, a group of rats was submitted to high potassium diet to stimulate the synthesis and excretion of tissue kallikrein 1 (rKLK1) previous to an intraperitoneal injection of 7 mg/kg cisplatin. A significant reduction in lipoperoxidation, evidenced by urinary excretion of malondialdehyde and renal immunostaining of hidroxy-nonenal, was accompanied by a decline in apoptosis. Coincident with these findings we observed a reduction in the expression of renal KIM-1 suggesting that renoprotection may be occurring. Stimulation or indemnity of the renal kinin system deserves to be evaluated as a complementary pharmacological measure to diminish cisplatin nephrotoxicity. - Highlights: • Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced-renal damage have not been completely clarified. • Cisplatin induces oxidative stress and apoptosis. • The renal kallikrein-kinin system is protective in experimental acute renal damage. • Kallikrein stimulation reduces oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by cisplatin. • Protection of the kallikrein-kinin system may reduce cisplatin toxicity.

  11. Accumulation of α-synuclein in dementia with Lewy bodies is associated with decline in the α-synuclein-degrading enzymes kallikrein-6 and calpain-1.

    PubMed

    Miners, J Scott; Renfrew, Ruth; Swirski, Marta; Love, Seth

    2014-12-05

    Kallikrein-6 and calpain-1 are amongst a small group of proteases that degrade α-synuclein. We have explored the possibility that reduction in the level or activity of these enzymes contributes to the accumulation of α-synuclein in Lewy body diseases. We measured calpain-1 activity by fluorogenic activity assay, kallikrein-6 level by sandwich ELISA, and levels of α-synuclein and α-synuclein phosphorylated at serine 129 (α-synuclein-P129), in post-mortem brain tissue in pure dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, n=12), Alzheimer's disease (AD, n=20) and age-matched controls (n=19). Calpain-1 activity was significantly reduced in DLB within the cingulate and parahippocampal cortex, regions with highest α-synuclein and α-synuclein-P129 load, and correlated inversely with the levels of α-synuclein and α-synuclein-P129. Calpain-1 was unaltered in the thalamus and frontal cortex, regions with less α-synuclein pathology. Kallikrein-6 level was reduced in the cingulate cortex in the DLB cohort, and correlated inversely with α-synuclein and α-synuclein-P129. Kallikrein-6 was also reduced in DLB in the thalamus but not in relation to α-synuclein or α-synuclein-P129 load and was unaltered in the frontal and parahippocampal cortex. In SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing wild-type α-synuclein there was partial co-localisation of kallikrein-6 and calpain-1 with α-synuclein, and siRNA-mediated knock-down of kallikrein-6 and calpain-1 increased the amount of α-synuclein in cell lysates. Our results indicate that reductions in kallikrein-6 and calpain-1 may contribute to the accumulation of α-synuclein in DLB.

  12. Plasma kallikrein enhances platelet aggregation response by subthreshold doses of ADP.

    PubMed

    Ottaiano, Tatiana F; Andrade, Sheila S; de Oliveira, Cleide; Silva, Mariana C C; Buri, Marcus V; Juliano, Maria A; Girão, Manoel J B C; Sampaio, Misako U; Schmaier, Alvin H; Wlodawer, Alexander; Maffei, Francisco H A; Oliva, Maria Luiza V

    2017-04-01

    Human plasma kallikrein (huPK) potentiates platelet responses to subthreshold doses of ADP, although huPK itself, does not induce platelet aggregation. In the present investigation, we observe that huPK pretreatment of platelets potentiates ADP-induced platelet activation by prior proteolysis of the G-protein-coupled receptor PAR-1. The potentiation of ADP-induced platelet activation by huPK is mediated by the integrin αIIbβ3 through interactions with the KGD/KGE sequence motif in huPK. Integrin αIIbβ3 is a cofactor for huPK binding to platelets to support PAR-1 hydrolysis that contributes to activation of the ADP signaling pathway. This activation pathway leads to phosphorylation of Src, AktS(473), ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK, and to Ca(2+) release. The effect of huPK is blocked by specific antagonists of PAR-1 (SCH 19197) and αIIbβ3 (abciximab) and by synthetic peptides comprising the KGD and KGE sequence motifs of huPK. Further, recombinant plasma kallikrein inhibitor, rBbKI, also blocks this entire mechanism. These results suggest a new function for huPK. Formation of plasma kallikrein lowers the threshold for ADP-induced platelet activation. The present observations are consistent with the notion that plasma kallikrein promotes vascular disease and thrombosis in the intravascular compartment and its inhibition may ameliorate cardiovascular disease and thrombosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  13. Humanized mice and tissue transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Laurie L; Shultz, Leonard D.; Greiner, Dale L; Brehm, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular pathways that control immune responses, particularly immunomodulatory molecules that control the extent and duration of an immune response, have led to new approaches in the field of transplantation immunology to induce allograft survival. These molecular pathways are being defined precisely in murine models, and are now being translated into clinical practice. However, many of the newly available drugs are human-specific reagents and furthermore, there exist many species-specific differences between mouse and human immune systems. Recent advances in the development of humanized mice, i.e., immunodeficient mice engrafted with functional human immune systems, have led to the availability of a small animal model for the study of human immune responses. Humanized mice represent an important pre-clinical model system for evaluation of new drugs as well as identification of the mechanisms underlying human allograft rejection without putting patients at risk. This review highlights recent advances in the development of humanized mice and their use as pre-clinical models for the study of human allograft responses. PMID:26588186

  14. Tissue Specificity of Human Disease Module

    PubMed Central

    Kitsak, Maksim; Sharma, Amitabh; Menche, Jörg; Guney, Emre; Ghiassian, Susan Dina; Loscalzo, Joseph; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    Genes carrying mutations associated with genetic diseases are present in all human cells; yet, clinical manifestations of genetic diseases are usually highly tissue-specific. Although some disease genes are expressed only in selected tissues, the expression patterns of disease genes alone cannot explain the observed tissue specificity of human diseases. Here we hypothesize that for a disease to manifest itself in a particular tissue, a whole functional subnetwork of genes (disease module) needs to be expressed in that tissue. Driven by this hypothesis, we conducted a systematic study of the expression patterns of disease genes within the human interactome. We find that genes expressed in a specific tissue tend to be localized in the same neighborhood of the interactome. By contrast, genes expressed in different tissues are segregated in distinct network neighborhoods. Most important, we show that it is the integrity and the completeness of the expression of the disease module that determines disease manifestation in selected tissues. This approach allows us to construct a disease-tissue network that confirms known and predicts unexpected disease-tissue associations. PMID:27748412

  15. Grating-based tomography of human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Mehlin, Andrea; Herzen, Julia; Lang, Sabrina; Holme, Margaret; Zanette, Irene; Hieber, Simone; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weitkamp, Timm

    2012-07-01

    The development of therapies to improve our health requires a detailed knowledge on the anatomy of soft tissues from the human body down to the cellular level. Grating-based phase contrast micro computed tomography using synchrotron radiation provides a sensitivity, which allows visualizing micrometer size anatomical features in soft tissue without applying any contrast agent. We show phase contrast tomography data of human brain, tumor vessels and constricted arteries from the beamline ID 19 (ESRF) and urethral tissue from the beamline W2 (HASYLAB/DESY) with micrometer resolution. Here, we demonstrate that anatomical features can be identified within brain tissue as well known from histology. Using human urethral tissue, the application of two photon energies is compared. Tumor vessels thicker than 20 μm can be perfectly segmented. The morphology of coronary arteries can be better extracted in formalin than after paraffin embedding.

  16. NCI’s Cooperative Human Tissue Network

    Cancer.gov

    Quality biospecimens are a foundational resource for cancer research. One of NCI’s longest running biospecimen programs is the Cooperative Human Tissue Network, a resource mainly for basic discovery and early translational research.

  17. Melanin content of hamster tissues, human tissues, and various melanomas

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, K.P.; Fairchild, R.G.; Slatkin, D.N.; Greenberg, D.; Packer, S.; Atkins, H.L.; Hannon, S.J.

    1981-02-01

    Melanin content (percentage by weight) was determined in both pigmented and nonpigmented tissues of Syrian golden hamsters bearing Greene melanoma. Melanin content was also measured in various other melanoma models (B-16 in C57 mice, Harding-Passey in BALB/c mice, and KHDD in C3H mice) and in nine human melanomas, as well as in selected normal tissues. The purpose was to evaluate the possible efficacy of chlorpromazine, which is known to bind to melanin, as a vehicle for boron transport in neutron capture therapy. Successful therapy would depend upon selective uptake and absolute concentration of borated compounds in tumors; these parameters will in turn depend upon melanin concentration in melanomas and nonpigmented ''background'' tissues. Hamster whole eyes, hamster melanomas, and other well-pigmented animal melanomas were found to contain 0.3 to 0.8% melanin by weight, whereas human melanomas varied from 0.1 to 0.9% (average, 0.35%). Other tissues, with the exception of skin, were lower in content by a factor of greater than or equal to30. Melanin pigment was extracted from tissues, and the melanin content was determined spectrophotometrically. Measurements were found to be sensitive to the presence of other proteins. Previous procedures for isolating and quantifying melanin often neglected the importance of removing proteins and other interfering nonmelanic substances.

  18. Variation in alternative splicing across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gene; Holste, Dirk; Kreiman, Gabriel; Burge, Christopher B

    2004-01-01

    Background Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is widely used by higher eukaryotes to generate different protein isoforms in specific cell or tissue types. To compare AS events across human tissues, we analyzed the splicing patterns of genomically aligned expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from libraries of cDNAs from different tissues. Results Controlling for differences in EST coverage among tissues, we found that the brain and testis had the highest levels of exon skipping. The most pronounced differences between tissues were seen for the frequencies of alternative 3' splice site and alternative 5' splice site usage, which were about 50 to 100% higher in the liver than in any other human tissue studied. Quantifying differences in splice junction usage, the brain, pancreas, liver and the peripheral nervous system had the most distinctive patterns of AS. Analysis of available microarray expression data showed that the liver had the most divergent pattern of expression of serine-arginine protein and heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein genes compared to the other human tissues studied, possibly contributing to the unusually high frequency of alternative splice site usage seen in liver. Sequence motifs enriched in alternative exons in genes expressed in the brain, testis and liver suggest specific splicing factors that may be important in AS regulation in these tissues. Conclusions This study distinguishes the human brain, testis and liver as having unusually high levels of AS, highlights differences in the types of AS occurring commonly in different tissues, and identifies candidate cis-regulatory elements and trans-acting factors likely to have important roles in tissue-specific AS in human cells. PMID:15461793

  19. Human histocultures (tissue explants) in retrovirology

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Anush; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Summary Viral pathogenesis is studied predominantly in cultures of primary isolated cells or cell lines. Many retroviruses efficiently replicate only in activated cells. Therefore, in order to become efficient viral producers cells should be artificially activated, a procedure which significantly changes cell physiology. However, for many viral diseases, like HIV-1 and other retroviruses’ diseases, critical pathogenic events occur in tissues and cell isolation from their native microenvironment prevents single cell cultures from faithfully reflecting important aspects of cell-cell and cell-pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture. Tissue explants (histocultures) that retain tissue cytoarchitecture and many aspects of cell-cell interactions more faithfully represent in vivo tissue features. Human histocultures constitute an adequate model for studying viral pathogenesis under controlled laboratory conditions. Protocols for various human histocultures as applied to study retroviral pathogenesis, in particular of HIV-1, have been refined by our laboratory and are described in the present publication. Human histocultures of human tonsils and lymph nodes, as well as of recto-sigmoid and cervico-vaginal tissues can be used to study viral transmission, pathogenesis and as a pre-clinical platform for antivirals evaluation. PMID:24158827

  20. Inhibiting Plasma Kallikrein for Hereditary Angioedema Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Aleena; Busse, Paula; Shennak, Mustafa; Lumry, William; Davis-Lorton, Mark; Wedner, Henry J; Jacobs, Joshua; Baker, James; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Lockey, Richard; Li, H Henry; Craig, Timothy; Cicardi, Marco; Riedl, Marc; Al-Ghazawi, Ahmad; Soo, Carolyn; Iarrobino, Ryan; Sexton, Daniel J; TenHoor, Christopher; Kenniston, Jon A; Faucette, Ryan; Still, J Gordon; Kushner, Harvey; Mensah, Robert; Stevens, Chris; Biedenkapp, Joseph C; Chyung, Yung; Adelman, Burt

    2017-02-23

    Hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency is characterized by recurrent, unpredictable swelling episodes caused by uncontrolled plasma kallikrein generation and excessive bradykinin release resulting from cleavage of high-molecular-weight kininogen. Lanadelumab (DX-2930) is a new kallikrein inhibitor with the potential for prophylactic treatment of hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency. We conducted a phase 1b, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-ascending-dose trial. Patients with hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either lanadelumab (24 patients) or placebo (13 patients), in two administrations 14 days apart. Patients assigned to lanadelumab were enrolled in sequential dose groups: total dose of 30 mg (4 patients), 100 mg (4 patients), 300 mg (5 patients), or 400 mg (11 patients). The pharmacodynamic profile of lanadelumab was assessed by measurement of plasma levels of cleaved high-molecular-weight kininogen, and efficacy was assessed by the rate of attacks of angioedema during a prespecified period (day 8 to day 50) in the 300-mg and 400-mg groups as compared with the placebo group. No discontinuations occurred because of adverse events, serious adverse events, or deaths in patients who received lanadelumab. The most common adverse events that emerged during treatment were attacks of angioedema, injection-site pain, and headache. Dose-proportional increases in serum concentrations of lanadelumab were observed; the mean elimination half-life was approximately 2 weeks. Lanadelumab at a dose of 300 mg or 400 mg reduced cleavage of high-molecular-weight kininogen in plasma from patients with hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency to levels approaching that from patients without the disorder. From day 8 to day 50, the 300-mg and 400-mg groups had 100% and 88% fewer attacks, respectively, than the placebo group. All patients in the 300-mg group and

  1. Accumulation of perfluoroalkyl substances in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Francisca; Nadal, Martí; Navarro-Ortega, Alícia; Fàbrega, Francesc; Domingo, José L; Barceló, Damià; Farré, Marinella

    2013-09-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are environmental pollutants with an important bioaccumulation potential. However, their metabolism and distribution in humans are not well studied. In this study, the concentrations of 21 PFASs were analyzed in 99 samples of autopsy tissues (brain, liver, lung, bone, and kidney) from subjects who had been living in Tarragona (Catalonia, Spain). The samples were analyzed by solvent extraction and online purification by turbulent flow and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The occurrence of PFASs was confirmed in all human tissues. Although PFASs accumulation followed particular trends depending on the specific tissue, some similarities were found. In kidney and lung, perfluorobutanoic acid was the most frequent compound, and at highest concentrations (median values: 263 and 807ng/g in kidney and lung, respectively). In liver and brain, perfluorohexanoic acid showed the maximum levels (median: 68.3 and 141ng/g, respectively), while perfluorooctanoic acid was the most contributively in bone (median: 20.9ng/g). Lung tissues accumulated the highest concentration of PFASs. However, perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and perfluorooctanoic acid were more prevalent in liver and bone, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the accumulation of different PFASs in samples of various human tissues from the same subjects is here reported for the very first time. The current results may be of high importance for the validation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, which are being developed for humans. However, further studies on the distribution of the same compounds in the human body are still required.

  2. Humanized mice with ectopic artificial liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alice A; Thomas, David K; Ong, Luvena L; Schwartz, Robert E; Golub, Todd R; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2011-07-19

    "Humanized" mice offer a window into aspects of human physiology that are otherwise inaccessible. The best available methods for liver humanization rely on cell transplantation into immunodeficient mice with liver injury but these methods have not gained widespread use due to the duration and variability of hepatocyte repopulation. In light of the significant progress that has been achieved in clinical cell transplantation through tissue engineering, we sought to develop a humanized mouse model based on the facile and ectopic implantation of a tissue-engineered human liver. These human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs) stabilize the function of cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes through juxtacrine and paracrine signals in polymeric scaffolds. In contrast to current methods, HEALs can be efficiently established in immunocompetent mice with normal liver function. Mice transplanted with HEALs exhibit humanized liver functions persistent for weeks, including synthesis of human proteins, human drug metabolism, drug-drug interaction, and drug-induced liver injury. Here, mice with HEALs are used to predict the disproportionate metabolism and toxicity of "major" human metabolites using multiple routes of administration and monitoring. These advances may enable manufacturing of reproducible in vivo models for diverse drug development and research applications.

  3. [Human lung connective tissue in postnatal ontogeny].

    PubMed

    Kasimtsev, A A; Nikolaev, V G

    1993-01-01

    Changes of the connective tissue structures, appearing during all postnatal ontogenesis stages were studied in 147 human lung specimens of different age groups (from newborns up to 82-year-olds). Qualitative and quantitative composition of connective tissue structures changes with the age which leads to the lateral aggregation of the fibers and growth of the general mass of the connective tissue. Heterochronia of the age variability manifestations in different regions of the lung framework was demonstrated. The original age transformations of connective tissue structures are characteristic for the basal lung regions. With the exception of perivasal connective tissue, similar changes in the region of the lung apexes appear 3-5 years later. This gives an opportunity to distinguish three anatomic zones in the lungs in an apico-basal direction, characterising the local nature of the age changes manifestations.

  4. Urinary kallikrein activity of workers exposed to lead.

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo, P; Porcelli, G; Cecchetti, G; Salimei, E; Iannaccone, A

    1978-01-01

    Two groups of men of different age ranges and with the same period of lead exposure were selected for study in a recently opened car-battery factory. Two other groups of age-matched men, not exposed to heavy metals in their work, were used as controls. Morning urines were collected from control and exposed groups for determination of urinary kallikrein activity, urinary delta-amino-levulinic acid (ALA) and lead levels. The environmental lead levels and the urinary ALA and lead values indicated that exposure in the factory was not heavy. The older group of lead-exposed workers showed greatly reduced urinary kallikrein activity compared with that of the age-matched controls. In contrast, the younger group did not show any significant alteration in urinary kallikrein excretion. PMID:698136

  5. Viscoelastic Properties of Human Tracheal Tissues.

    PubMed

    Safshekan, Farzaneh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Abdouss, Majid; Shadmehr, Mohammad B

    2017-01-01

    The physiological performance of trachea is highly dependent on its mechanical behavior, and therefore, the mechanical properties of its components. Mechanical characterization of trachea is key to succeed in new treatments such as tissue engineering, which requires the utilization of scaffolds which are mechanically compatible with the native human trachea. In this study, after isolating human trachea samples from brain-dead cases and proper storage, we assessed the viscoelastic properties of tracheal cartilage, smooth muscle, and connective tissue based on stress relaxation tests (at 5% and 10% strains for cartilage and 20%, 30%, and 40% for smooth muscle and connective tissue). After investigation of viscoelastic linearity, constitutive models including Prony series for linear viscoelasticity and quasi-linear viscoelastic, modified superposition, and Schapery models for nonlinear viscoelasticity were fitted to the experimental data to find the best model for each tissue. We also investigated the effect of age on the viscoelastic behavior of tracheal tissues. Based on the results, all three tissues exhibited a (nonsignificant) decrease in relaxation rate with increasing the strain, indicating viscoelastic nonlinearity which was most evident for cartilage and with the least effect for connective tissue. The three-term Prony model was selected for describing the linear viscoelasticity. Among different models, the modified superposition model was best able to capture the relaxation behavior of the three tracheal components. We observed a general (but not significant) stiffening of tracheal cartilage and connective tissue with aging. No change in the stress relaxation percentage with aging was observed. The results of this study may be useful in the design and fabrication of tracheal tissue engineering scaffolds.

  6. Kallikrein-related peptidase 8 is expressed in myocardium and induces cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Buqing; Yu, Qing; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Zhiping; Cong, Binghai; Du, Jiankui; Lu, Jianqiang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Ni, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The tissue kallikrein-related peptidase family (KLK) is a group of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like serine proteases that share a similar homology to parent tissue kallikrein (KLK1). KLK1 is identified in heart and has anti-hypertrophic effects. However, whether other KLK family members play a role in regulating cardiac function remains unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time that KLK8 was expressed in myocardium. KLK8 expression was upregulated in left ventricle of cardiac hypertrophy models. Both intra-cardiac adenovirus-mediated and transgenic-mediated KLK8 overexpression led to cardiac hypertrophy in vivo. In primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, KLK8 knockdown inhibited phenylephrine (PE)-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas KLK8 overexpression promoted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via a serine protease activity-dependent but kinin receptor-independent pathway. KLK8 overexpression increased epidermal growth factor (EGF) production, which was blocked by the inhibitors of serine protease. EGF receptor (EGFR) antagonist and EGFR knockdown reversed the hypertrophy induced by KLK8 overexpression. KLK8-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was also significantly decreased by blocking the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) or PAR2 pathway. Our data suggest that KLK8 may promote cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through EGF signaling- and PARs-dependent but a kinin receptor-independent pathway. It is implied that different KLK family members can subtly regulate cardiac function and remodeling. PMID:26823023

  7. Three Dimension Filamentous Human Cardiac Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen; Koo, Sangmo; Finnegan, Micaela A.; Loskill, Peter; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Marks, Natalie C.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2013-01-01

    A human in vitro cardiac tissue model would be a significant advancement for understanding, studying, and developing new strategies for treating cardiac arrhythmias and related cardiovascular diseases. We developed an in vitro model of three-dimensional (3D) human cardiac tissue by populating synthetic filamentous matrices with cardiomyocytes derived from healthy wild-type volunteer (WT) and patient-specific long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CMs) to mimic the condensed and aligned human ventricular myocardium. Using such a highly controllable cardiac model, we studied the contractility malfunctions associated with the electrophysiological consequences of LQT3 and their response to a panel of drugs. By varying the stiffness of filamentous matrices, LQT3 iPS-CMs exhibited different level of contractility abnormality and susceptibility to drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24268663

  8. Effect of Kallikrein 4 Loss on Enamel Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Charles E.; Richardson, Amelia S.; Hu, Yuanyuan; Bartlett, John D.; Hu, Jan C-C.; Simmer, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Enamel formation depends on a triad of tissue-specific matrix proteins (amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin) to help initiate and stabilize progressively elongating, thin mineral ribbons of hydroxyapatite formed during an appositional growth phase. Subsequently, these proteins are eradicated to facilitate lateral expansion of the hydroxyapatite crystallites. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in enamel mineralization occurring in mice unable to produce kallikrein 4 (Klk4), a proteinase associated with terminal extracellular degradation of matrix proteins during the maturation stage. Mice lacking functional matrix metalloproteinase 20 (Mmp20), a proteinase associated with early cleavage of matrix proteins during the secretory stage, were also analyzed as a frame of reference. The results indicated that mice lacking Klk4 produce enamel that is normal in thickness and overall organization in terms of layers and rod/inter-rod structure, but there is a developmental defect in enamel rods where they first form near the dentinoenamel junction. Mineralization is normal up to early maturation after which the enamel both retains and gains additional proteins and is unable to mature beyond 85% mineral by weight. The outmost enamel is hard, but inner regions are soft and contain much more protein than normal. The rate of mineral acquisition overall is lower by 25%. Mice lacking functional Mmp20 produce enamel that is thin and structurally abnormal. Relatively high amounts of protein remain throughout maturation, but the enamel is able to change from 67 to 75% mineral by weight during maturation. These findings reaffirm the importance of secreted proteinases to enamel mineral acquisition. PMID:21454549

  9. Frequency domain optical tomography in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuqi; Wang, Yao; Pei, Yaling; Zhu, Wenwu; Hu, Jenhun; Barbour, Randall L.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, a reconstruction algorithm for frequency-domain optical tomography in human tissue is presented. A fast and efficient multigrid finite difference (MGFD) method is adopted as a forward solver to obtain the simulated detector responses and the required imaging operator. The solutions obtained form MGFD method for 3D problems with weakly discontinuous cocoefficients are compared with analyzed solutions to determine the accuracy of the numerical method. Simultaneous reconstruction of both absorption and scattering coefficients for tissue-like media is accomplished by solving a perturbation equation using the Born approximation. This solution is obtained by a conjugate gradient descent method with Tikhonov regularization. Two examples are given to show the quality of the reconstruction results. Both involve the examination of anatomically accurate optical models of tissue derived from segmented 3D magnetic resonance images to which have been assigned optical coefficients to the designated tissue types. One is a map of a female breast containing two small 'added pathologies', such as tumors. The other is a map of the brain containing a 'local bleeding' area, representing a hemorrhage. The reconstruction results show that the algorithm is computationally practical and can yield qualitatively correct geometry of the objects embedded in the simulated human tissue. Acceptable results are obtaiend even when 10% noise is present in the data.

  10. Beta adrenergic receptors in human cavernous tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Dhabuwala, C.B.; Ramakrishna, C.V.; Anderson, G.F.

    1985-04-01

    Beta adrenergic receptor binding was performed with /sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol on human cavernous tissue membrane fractions from normal tissue and transsexual procedures obtained postoperatively, as well as from postmortem sources. Isotherm binding studies on normal fresh tissues indicated that the receptor density was 9.1 fmoles/mg. with a KD of 23 pM. Tissue stored at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours, then at 4C in saline solution for 19 to 20 hours before freezing showed no significant changes in receptor density or affinity, and provided evidence for the stability of postmortem tissue obtained within the same time period. Beta receptor density of 2 cavernous preparations from transsexual procedures was not significantly different from normal control tissues, and showed that high concentrations of estrogen received by these patients had no effect on beta adrenergic receptor density. Displacement of /sup 125/iodocyanopindolol by 5 beta adrenergic agents demonstrated that 1-propranolol had the greatest affinity followed by ICI 118,551, zinterol, metoprolol and practolol. When the results of these displacement studies were subjected to Scatfit, non- linear regression line analysis, a single binding site was described. Based on the relative potency of the selective beta adrenergic agents it appears that these receptors were of the beta 2 subtype.

  11. The role of glandular kallikrein in the formation of a salivary proline-rich protein A by cleavage of a single bond in salivary protein C.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, R S; Madapallimattam, G; Bennick, A

    1983-01-01

    An enzyme was purified from human parotid saliva that can cleave a single arginine-glycine peptide bond between residues 106 and 107 in human salivary proline-rich protein C, hereby giving rise to another proline-rich protein A, which is also found in saliva. The enzyme was purified 2400-fold. It cleaved salivary protein C at the rate of 59 micrograms of protein/h per microgram of enzyme and had amino acid composition, molecular weight and inhibition characteristics similar to those reported for human salivary kallikrein. Confirmation that the enzyme was kallikrein was demonstrated by its kinin-generating ability. Histochemical evidence indicates that a post-synthetic cleavage of protein C by kallikrein would have to take place during passage of saliva through the secretory ducts. In secreted saliva, cleavage of salivary protein C can only be observed after 72 h incubation. In addition, there is no effect of salivary flow rate on the relative amounts of proteins A and C in saliva. On the basis of the experimental observations, it is proposed that in vivo it is unlikely that kallikrein secreted from ductal cells plays a significant role in converting protein C into protein A. PMID:6553499

  12. Coordinated steroid hormone-dependent and independent expression of multiple kallikreins in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2007-03-01

    The regulation of gene expression by steroid hormones plays an important role in the normal development and function of many organs, as well in the pathogenesis of endocrine-related cancers. Previous experiments have shown that many kallikrein genes are under steroid hormone regulation in breast cancer cell lines. We here examine the coordinated expression of multiple kallikrein genes in several breast cancer cell lines after steroid hormone stimulation. Breast cancer cell lines were treated with various steroid hormones and kallikrein (KLK/hK) expression of hK3 (prostate-specific antigen, PSA), hK5, hK6, hK7, hK8, hK10, hK11, hK13, and hK14 was analyzed at the RNA level via RT-PCR and at the protein level by immunofluorometric ELISA assays. We identified several distinct hK hormone-dependent and hormone-independent expression patterns. Hormone-specific modulation of expression was seen for several kallikreins in BT-474, MCF-7, and T-47D cell lines. hK6 was specifically up-regulated upon estradiol treatment in all three cell lines whereas PSA expression was induced by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and norgestrel stimulation in BT-474 and T-47D. hK10, hK11, hK13, and hK14 were specifically up-regulated by DHT in T-47D and by estradiol in BT-474 cells. Bioinformatic analysis of upstream proximal promoter sequences for these hKs did not identify any recognizable hormone-response elements (HREs), suggesting that the coordinated activation of these four hKs represents a unique expression "cassette", utilizing a common hormone-dependent mechanism. We conclude that groups of human hKs are coordinately expressed in a steroid hormone-dependent manner. Our data supports clinical observations linking expression of multiple hKs with breast cancer prognosis.

  13. Alpha-dispersion in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimnes, Sverre; Martinsen, Ørjan G.

    2010-04-01

    Beta dispersion is found in living tissue in the kilohertz - megahertz range and is caused by the cellular structure of biological materials with low frequency properties caused by cell membranes. Alpha dispersion is found in the hertz range and the causes are not so well known. Alpha dispersions are the first to disappear when tissue dies. Tissue data have often been based upon excised specimen from animals and are therefore not necessarily representative for human tissue alpha dispersions. Here we present data obtained with non-invasive skin surface electrodes for different segments of the living human body. We found alpha dispersions in all cases; the ankle-wrist results had the smallest. Large alpha dispersions were found where the distance between the electrodes and muscle masses was small, e.g. on the calf. Further studies on electrode technique and reciprocity, electrode positioning, statistical variations, gender, age and bodily constitutions are necessary in order to reveal more about the alpha dispersion, its appearance and disappearance.

  14. A kallikrein-like serine protease in prostatic fluid cleaves the predominant seminal vesicle protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lilja, H

    1985-01-01

    A 33-kD glycoprotein, known as the "prostate-specific antigen," was purified to homogeneity from human seminal plasma. The prostatic protein was identified as a serine protease, and its NH2-terminal sequence strongly suggests that it belongs to the family of glandular kallikreins. The structural protein of human seminal coagulum, the predominant protein in seminal vesicle secretion, was rapidly cleaved by the prostatic enzyme, which suggests that this seminal vesicle protein may serve as the physiological substrate for the protease. The prostatic enzyme hydrolyzed arginine- and lysine-containing substrates with a distinct preference for the former. All synthetic substrates tested were poor substrates for the enzyme. Synthetic Factor XIa substrate (pyro-glutamyl-prolyl-arginine-p-nitroanilide), and the synthetic kallikrein substrate (H-D-prolyl-phenylalanyl-arginine-p-nitroanilide) were hydrolyzed with maximum specific activities at 23 degrees C of 79 and 34 nmol/min per mg and Km values of 1.0 and 0.45 mM, respectively. Synthetic substrates for plasmin, chymotrypsin, and elastase were either not hydrolyzed by the enzyme at all, or only hydrolyzed very slowly. Images PMID:3902893

  15. Immunoreactive glandular kallikrein in rat plasma: a radioimmunoassay for its determination

    SciTech Connect

    Rabito, S.F.; Scicli, A.G.; Kher, V.; Carretero, O.A.

    1982-04-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) has been developed to measure immunoreactive glandular kallikrein in rat plasma. To prevent the binding of radioactive kallikrein to plasma inhibitors, /sup 125/I-kallikrein was inactivated with phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), a procedure that maintained /sup 125/I-kallikrein immunoreactivity. Different volumes of plasma displaced /sup 125/I-PMSF-kallikrein in a parallel fashion to the kallikrein standard curve. The sensitivity of the RIA was 200 pg, and the recovery of nonradioactive active kallikrein added to plasma was 58.7%. The concentration of immunoreactive glandular kallikrein in normal rat plasma averaged 47.1 +/- 1.7 (SE) ng/ml. Bilateral nephrectomy caused a threefold increase in circulating glandular kallikrein (50 +/- 2.7 to 167 +/- 7 ng/ml; P < 0.001). Removal of the submandibular and sublingual glands signficantly decreased its concentration from 52 +/- 2.3 to 34 +/- 1.6 ng/ml (P < 0.001). Immunoreactive glandular kallikrein was higher in the submandibular gland vein than in arterial blood (venous; 94 +/- 10.5; arterial: 64 +/- 6.3 ng/ml; P < 0.05) and was lower in the renal venous blood (venous: 44 +/- 2.2; arterial: 53 +/- 2.6 ng/ml; P < 0.05). In conclusion, this study shows that the use of /sup 125/I-PMSF-kallikrein as tracer prevents the interference in the RIA caused by plasma protease inhibitors. It also indicates that the submandibular gland is an important source of the immunoreactive glandular kallikrein in rat plasma and that the kidney probably participates in its metabolism. Glandular kallikrein released by the submandibular gland into the circulation may participate in regulating local blood flow before it is inactivated by plasma inhibitors.

  16. Rheological characterization of human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Budday, S; Sommer, G; Haybaeck, J; Steinmann, P; Holzapfel, G A; Kuhl, E

    2017-09-15

    The rheology of ultrasoft materials like the human brain is highly sensitive to regional and temporal variations and to the type of loading. While recent experiments have shaped our understanding of the time-independent, hyperelastic response of human brain tissue, its time-dependent behavior under various loading conditions remains insufficiently understood. Here we combine cyclic and relaxation testing under multiple loading conditions, shear, compression, and tension, to understand the rheology of four different regions of the human brain, the cortex, the basal ganglia, the corona radiata, and the corpus callosum. We establish a family of finite viscoelastic Ogden-type models and calibrate their parameters simultaneously for all loading conditions. We show that the model with only one viscoelastic mode and a constant viscosity captures the essential features of brain tissue: nonlinearity, pre-conditioning, hysteresis, and tension-compression asymmetry. With stiffnesses and time constants of μ∞=0.7kPa, μ1=2.0kPa, and τ1=9.7s in the gray matter cortex and μ∞=0.3kPa, μ1=0.9kPa and τ1=14.9s in the white matter corona radiata combined with negative parameters α∞ and α1, this five-parameter model naturally accounts for pre-conditioning and tissue softening. Increasing the number of viscoelastic modes improves the agreement between model and experiment, especially across the entire relaxation regime. Strikingly, two cycles of pre-conditioning decrease the gray matter stiffness by up to a factor three, while the white matter stiffness remains almost identical. These new insights allow us to better understand the rheology of different brain regions under mixed loading conditions. Our family of finite viscoelastic Ogden-type models for human brain tissue is simple to integrate into standard nonlinear finite element packages. Our simultaneous parameter identification of multiple loading modes can inform computational simulations under physiological conditions

  17. Tissue microarray profiling in human heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lal, Sean; Nguyen, Lisa; Tezone, Rhenan; Ponten, Fredrik; Odeberg, Jacob; Li, Amy; Dos Remedios, Cristobal

    2016-09-01

    Tissue MicroArrays (TMAs) are a versatile tool for high-throughput protein screening, allowing qualitative analysis of a large number of samples on a single slide. We have developed a customizable TMA system that uniquely utilizes cryopreserved human cardiac samples from both heart failure and donor patients to produce formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Confirmatory upstream or downstream molecular studies can then be performed on the same (biobanked) cryopreserved tissue. In a pilot study, we applied our TMAs to screen for the expression of four-and-a-half LIM-domain 2 (FHL2), a member of the four-and-a-half LIM family. This protein has been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure in a variety of animal models. While FHL2 is abundant in the heart, not much is known about its expression in human heart failure. For this purpose, we generated an affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal anti-human FHL2 antibody. Our TMAs allowed high-throughput profiling of FHL2 protein using qualitative and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry that proved complementary to Western blot analysis. We demonstrated a significant relative reduction in FHL2 protein expression across different forms of human heart failure. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The Kallikrein Inhibitor from Bauhinia bauhinioides (BbKI) shows antithrombotic properties in venous and arterial thrombosis models.

    PubMed

    Brito, Marlon V; de Oliveira, Cleide; Salu, Bruno R; Andrade, Sonia A; Malloy, Paula M D; Sato, Ana C; Vicente, Cristina P; Sampaio, Misako U; Maffei, Francisco H A; Oliva, Maria Luiza V

    2014-05-01

    The Bauhinia bauhinioides Kallikrein Inhibitor (BbKI) is a Kunitz-type serine peptidase inhibitor of plant origin that has been shown to impair the viability of some tumor cells and to feature a potent inhibitory activity against human and rat plasma kallikrein (Kiapp 2.4 nmol/L and 5.2 nmol/L, respectively). This inhibitory activity is possibly responsible for an effect on hemostasis by prolonging activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). Because the association between cancer and thrombosis is well established, we evaluated the possible antithrombotic activity of this protein in venous and arterial thrombosis models. Vein thrombosis was studied in the vena cava ligature model in Wistar rats, and arterial thrombosis in the photochemical induced endothelium lesion model in the carotid artery of C57 black 6 mice. BbKI at a concentration of 2.0 mg/kg reduced the venous thrombus weight by 65% in treated rats in comparison to rats in the control group. The inhibitor prolonged the time for total artery occlusion in the carotid artery model mice indicating that this potent plasma kallikrein inhibitor prevented thrombosis.

  19. UWB pulse propagation into human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnaro, Marta; Pittella, Erika; Pisa, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    In this paper the propagation of a UWB pulse into a layered model of the human body is studied to characterize absorption and reflection of the UWB signal due to the different body tissues. Several time behaviours for the incident UWB pulse are considered and compared with reference to the feasibility of breath and heartbeat activity monitoring. Results show that if the UWB source is placed far from the human body, the reflection coming from the interface between air and skin can be used to detect the respiratory activity. On the contrary, if the UWB source is placed close to the human body, a small reflection due to the interface between the posterior lung wall and the bone, which is well distanced in time from the reflections due to the first layers of the body model, can be used to detect lung and heart changes associated with the cardio-respiratory activity.

  20. Bone tissue engineering with human stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of extensive bone defects requires autologous bone grafting or implantation of bone substitute materials. An attractive alternative has been to engineer fully viable, biological bone grafts in vitro by culturing osteogenic cells within three-dimensional scaffolds, under conditions supporting bone formation. Such grafts could be used for implantation, but also as physiologically relevant models in basic and translational studies of bone development, disease and drug discovery. A source of human cells that can be derived in large numbers from a small initial harvest and predictably differentiated into bone forming cells is critically important for engineering human bone grafts. We discuss the characteristics and limitations of various types of human embryonic and adult stem cells, and their utility for bone tissue engineering. PMID:20637059

  1. Mechanical characterization of human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Budday, S; Sommer, G; Birkl, C; Langkammer, C; Haybaeck, J; Kohnert, J; Bauer, M; Paulsen, F; Steinmann, P; Kuhl, E; Holzapfel, G A

    2017-01-15

    Mechanics are increasingly recognized to play an important role in modulating brain form and function. Computational simulations are a powerful tool to predict the mechanical behavior of the human brain in health and disease. The success of these simulations depends critically on the underlying constitutive model and on the reliable identification of its material parameters. Thus, there is an urgent need to thoroughly characterize the mechanical behavior of brain tissue and to identify mathematical models that capture the tissue response under arbitrary loading conditions. However, most constitutive models have only been calibrated for a single loading mode. Here, we perform a sequence of multiple loading modes on the same human brain specimen - simple shear in two orthogonal directions, compression, and tension - and characterize the loading-mode specific regional and directional behavior. We complement these three individual tests by combined multiaxial compression/tension-shear tests and discuss effects of conditioning and hysteresis. To explore to which extent the macrostructural response is a result of the underlying microstructural architecture, we supplement our biomechanical tests with diffusion tensor imaging and histology. We show that the heterogeneous microstructure leads to a regional but not directional dependence of the mechanical properties. Our experiments confirm that human brain tissue is nonlinear and viscoelastic, with a pronounced compression-tension asymmetry. Using our measurements, we compare the performance of five common constitutive models, neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin, Demiray, Gent, and Ogden, and show that only the isotropic modified one-term Ogden model is capable of representing the hyperelastic behavior under combined shear, compression, and tension loadings: with a shear modulus of 0.4-1.4kPa and a negative nonlinearity parameter it captures the compression-tension asymmetry and the increase in shear stress under superimposed

  2. Sorption studies of human keratinized tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, G. K.; Martinsen, Ø. G.; Grimnes, Sverre

    2010-04-01

    Water content is known to be the most important single parameter for keratinized tissue to remain its vital functions. In that sense, a general knowledge of the water binding properties is of great interest, and a reliable measurement setup must be found. Also, revealing the sorption properties of human keratinized tissues is vital towards a calibration of susceptance based skin hydration measurements that already is an important diagnostic tool in clinical dermatology, and we will see that any hysteresis will complicate such a calibration further. In this study we investigated the sorption properties of keratinized tissues such as human epidermal stratum corneum (SC), hair and nail. The study was performed under controlled environmental conditions with a dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) instrument, and the water uptake of the keratinized test samples was measured as the relative humidity in the ambient air was altered step-wisely. In this study, vital and characteristic water sorption properties such as the isotherm, relative water uptake, and hysteresis were investigated and will be discussed.

  3. Human Nasopharyngeal-Associated Lymphoreticular Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Boyaka, Prosper N.; Wright, Peter F.; Marinaro, Mariarosaria; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Johnson, Joyce E.; Gonzales, Ricardo A.; Ikizler, Mine R.; Werkhaven, Jay A.; Jackson, Raymond J.; Fujihashi, Kohtaro; Di Fabio, Simonetta; Staats, Herman F.; McGhee, Jerry R.

    2000-01-01

    Subepithelial and intraepithelial lymphocytes of human adenoids and tonsils were characterized and directly compared to determine the potential contribution of these tissues to mucosal and systemic immune responses. The distribution of T and B cell subsets, cytokine patterns, and antibody (Ab) isotype profiles were similar for adenoids and tonsils. Both tissues contained predominantly B cells (∼65%), approximately 5% macrophages, and 30% CD3+ T cells. The T cells were primarily of the CD4+ subset (∼80%). Tonsillar intraepithelial lymphocytes were also enriched in B cells. The analysis of dispersed cells revealed a higher frequency of cells secreting IgG than IgA and the predominant Ig subclass profiles were IgG1 > IgG3 and IgA1 > IgA2, respectively. In situ analysis also revealed higher numbers of IgG- than IgA-positive cells. These IgG-positive cells were present in the epithelium and in the subepithelial zones of both tonsils and adenoids. Mitogen-triggered T cells from tonsils and adenoids produced both Th1- and Th2-type cytokines, clearly exhibiting their pluripotentiality for support of cell-mediated and Ab responses. Interestingly, antigen-specific T cells produced interferon-γ and lower levels of interleukin-5. These results suggest that adenoids and tonsils of the nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoreticular tissues represent a distinct component of the mucosal-associated lymphoreticular tissues with features of both systemic and mucosal compartments. PMID:11106575

  4. A new type of lectin discovered in a fish, flathead (Platycephalus indicus), suggests an alternative functional role for mammalian plasma kallikrein*

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Okamoto, Masaki; Ono, Miyuki; Suetake, Hiroaki; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Osamu; Suzuki, Yuzuru; Watanabe, Tasuku

    2011-01-01

    A skin mucus lectin exhibiting a homodimeric structure and an S–S bond between subunits of ∼40 kDa was purified from flathead Platycephalus indicus (Scorpaeniformes). This lectin, named FHL (FlatHead Lectin), exhibited mannose-specific activity in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Although FHL showed no homology to any previously reported lectins, it did exhibit ∼20% identity to previously discovered plasma kallikreins and coagulation factor XIs of mammals and Xenopus laevis. These known proteins are serine proteases and play pivotal roles in the kinin-generating system or the blood coagulation pathway. However, alignment analysis revealed that while FHL lacked a serine protease domain, it was homologous to the heavy-chain domain of plasma kallikreins and coagulation factor XI therefore suggesting that FHL is not an enzyme but rather a novel animal lectin. On the basis of this finding, we investigated the lectin activity of human plasma kallikrein and revealed that it could indeed act as a lectin. Other genes homologous to FHL were also found in the genome databases of some fish species, but not in mammals. In contrast, plasma kallikreins and coagulation factor XI have yet to be identified in fish. The present findings suggest that these mammalian enzymes may have originally emerged as a lectin and may have evolved into molecules with protease activity after separation from common ancestors. PMID:21613239

  5. Osseous differentiation of human fat tissue grafts: From tissue engineering to tissue differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bondarava, Maryna; Cattaneo, Chiara; Ren, Bin; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Jansson, Volkmar; Müller, Peter E.; Betz, Oliver B.

    2017-01-01

    Conventional bone tissue engineering approaches require isolation and in vitro propagation of autologous cells, followed by seeding on a variety of scaffolds. Those protracted procedures impede the clinical applications. Here we report the transdifferentiation of human fat tissue fragments retrieved from subcutaneous fat into tissue with bone characteristics in vitro without prior cell isolation and propagation. 3D collagen-I cultures of human fat tissue were cultivated either in growth medium or in osteogenic medium (OM) with or without addition of Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) BMP-2, BMP-7 or BMP-9. Ca2+ depositions were observed after two weeks of osteogenic induction which visibly increased when either type of BMP was added. mRNA levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OCN) increased when cultured in OM alone but addition of BMP-2, BMP-7 or BMP-9 caused significantly higher expression levels of ALP and OCN. Immunofluorescent staining for OCN, osteopontin and sclerostin supported the observed real-time-PCR data. BMP-9 was the most effective osteogenic inducer in this system. Our findings reveal that tissue regeneration can be remarkably simplified by omitting prior cell isolation and propagation, therefore removing significant obstacles on the way to clinical applications of much needed regeneration treatments. PMID:28054585

  6. Hippocampus and epilepsy: findings from human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Huberfeld, Gilles; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Miles, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Surgical removal of the epileptogenic zone provides an effective therapy for several epileptic syndromes. This surgery offers the opportunity to study pathological activity in living human tissue for pharmacoresistant partial epilepsy syndromes including (1) temporal lobe epilepsies with hippocampal sclerosis, (2) cortical dysplasias, (3) epilepsies associated with tumors and (4) developmental malformations. Slices of tissue from patient with these syndromes retain functional neuronal networks and may generate epileptic activities. The properties of cells in this tissue may not be greatly changed, but excitatory synaptic transmission is often enhanced and GABAergic inhibition is preserved. Typically epileptic activity is not generated spontaneously by the neocortex, whether dysplastic or not, but can be induced by convulsants. The initiation of ictal discharges in neocortex depends on both GABAergic signaling and increased extracellular potassium. In contrast, a spontaneous interictal-like activity is generated by tissues from patients with temporal lobe epilepsies associated with hippocampal sclerosis. This activity is initiated, not in the hippocampus but in the subiculum an output region which projects to the entorhinal cortex. Interictal events seem to be triggered by GABAergic cells which paradoxically excite about 20% of subicular pyramidal cells while simultaneously inhibiting the majority. Interictal discharges thus depend on both GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling. The depolarizing effects of GABA depend on a pathological elevation in levels of chloride in some subicular cells, similar to those of developmentally immature cells. Such defect is caused by a perturbed expression of the cotransporters regulating intracellular chloride concentration, the importer NKCC1 and the extruder KCC2. Blockade of NKCC1 actions by the diuretic bumetanide, restores intracellular chloride and thus hyperpolarizing GABAergic actions so suppressing interictal activity. PMID

  7. Kinins produced from bovine colostrum by kallikrein and saliva

    PubMed Central

    Guth, Paul S.

    1959-01-01

    Substances capable of stimulating smooth muscle are produced on the incubation of bovine colostrum with urinary kallikrein or calf saliva. These substances, called urine- and saliva-colostrokinin, have been differentiated from kallidin, substance A and similar smooth muscle activating agents. Saliva-colostrokinin is likely to be formed in the suckling calf. Further, as colostrum became milk, the ability to form colostrokinin diminished. A function for saliva-colostrokinin in the newborn is suggested. PMID:13830444

  8. The reconstruction and analysis of tissue specific human metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tong; Ma, Hong-Wu; Zhao, Xue-Ming; Goryanin, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Human tissues have distinct biological functions. Many proteins/enzymes are known to be expressed only in specific tissues and therefore the metabolic networks in various tissues are different. Though high quality global human metabolic networks and metabolic networks for certain tissues such as liver have already been studied, a systematic study of tissue specific metabolic networks for all main tissues is still missing. In this work, we reconstruct the tissue specific metabolic networks for 15 main tissues in human based on the previously reconstructed Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network (EHMN). The tissue information is firstly obtained for enzymes from Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and UniprotKB databases and transfers to reactions through the enzyme-reaction relationships in EHMN. As our knowledge of tissue distribution of proteins is still very limited, we replenish the tissue information of the metabolic network based on network connectivity analysis and thorough examination of the literature. Finally, about 80% of proteins and reactions in EHMN are determined to be in at least one of the 15 tissues. To validate the quality of the tissue specific network, the brain specific metabolic network is taken as an example for functional module analysis and the results reveal that the function of the brain metabolic network is closely related with its function as the centre of the human nervous system. The tissue specific human metabolic networks are available at .

  9. Coefficient of Friction of Human Corneal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Tawnya; Aeschlimann, Rudolf; Tosatti, Samuele; Toubouti, Youssef; Kakkassery, Joseph; Osborn Lorenz, Katherine

    2015-09-01

    A novel property evaluation methodology was used to determine the elusive value for the human corneal coefficient of friction (CoF). Using a microtribometer on 28 fresh human donor corneas with intact epithelia, the CoF was determined in 4 test solutions (≥5 corneas/solution): tear-mimicking solution (TMS) in borate-buffered saline (TMS-PS), TMS in phosphate-buffered saline (TMS-PBS), TMS with HEPES-buffered saline (TMS-HEPES), and tear-like fluid in PBS (TLF-PBS). Mean (SD) CoF values ranged from 0.006 to 0.015 and were 0.013 (0.010) in TMS-PS, 0.006 (0.003) in TMS-PBS, 0.014 (0.005) in TMS-HEPES, and 0.015 (0.009) in TLF-PBS. Statistically significant differences were shown for TMS-PBS versus TLF (P = 0.0424) and TMS-PBS versus TMS-HEPES (P = 0.0179), but not for TMS-PBS versus TMS-PS (P = 0.2389). Successful measurement of the fresh human corneal tissue CoF was demonstrated, with values differing in the evaluated buffer solutions, within this limited sample size.

  10. Ethnic variation in kallikrein expression in nipple aspirate fluid.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Edward R; Welch, Tamara; Magklara, Angeliki; Klein, Gary; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2002-08-20

    Socioeconomic factors cannot entirely explain why black women have an earlier age of breast cancer onset and higher mortality rates, stage for stage, than whites. We and others have shown that prostate-specific antigen [PSA, also known as human kallikrein (hK) 3] is a marker of breast as well as prostate cancer, that hK2 and hK3 are highly homologous at the DNA and protein level and that the level of progesterone, which appears to upregulate hK3, is influenced by ethnicity. We hypothesized that nipple aspiration fluid (NAF) hK2 and hK3 levels are (i) lower in black than white women; (ii) independently associated with breast cancer; (iii) influenced by menopausal status; and (iv) in combination are more informative about whether a woman has breast cancer than either marker alone. NAF was assayed for hK2 and hK3, and the results were stratified by ethnicity, presence or absence of cancer and menopausal status. Statistical analysis was then performed. When stratified by ethnicity, hK2 (p = 0.003) and hK3 (p = 0.027) levels in blacks were lower than in whites. hK2 was lower in premenopausal black than in white subjects, regardless of cancer status. Overall, hK2, hK3 and the ratio hK2/hK3 were lower in subjects with breast cancer than in normal subjects. hK3 was lower in postmenopausal women with breast cancer, regardless of ethnicity. hK2 and hK3 levels were higher in pre- than in postmenopausal whites. Using logistic regression and considering hK2, hK3, hK2/hK3 and ethnicity, hK3 was significantly associated with breast cancer in both pre- (p < 0.001) and postmenopausal women (p = 0.023). In conclusion, whereas hK2, hK3, hK2/hK3 and ethnicity are each significantly associated with breast cancer bivariately, after entering the strongest predictor, hK3, into a logistic regression model, no other variable accounted for additional variation, although this observation is preliminary due to the limited number of black subjects in the study. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Variation in tissue outcome of ovine and human engineered heart valve constructs: relevance for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    van Geemen, Daphne; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Grootzwagers, Leonie G M; Soekhradj-Soechit, R Sarita; Riem Vis, Paul W; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2012-01-01

    Clinical application of tissue engineered heart valves requires precise control of the tissue culture process to predict tissue composition and mechanical properties prior to implantation, and to understand the variation in tissue outcome. To this end we investigated cellular phenotype and tissue properties of ovine (n = 8) and human (n = 7) tissue engineered heart valve constructs to quantify variations in tissue outcome within species, study the differences between species and determine possible indicators of tissue outcome. Tissue constructs consisted of polyglycolic acid/poly-4-hydroxybutyrate scaffolds, seeded with myofibroblasts obtained from the jugular vein (sheep) or the saphenous vein (from humans undergoing cardiac surgery) and cultured under static conditions. Prior to seeding, protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, nonmuscle myosin heavy chain and heat shock protein 47 were determined to identify differences at an early stage of the tissue engineering process. After 4 weeks of culture, tissue composition and mechanical properties were quantified as indicators of tissue outcome. After 4 weeks of tissue culture, tissue properties of all ovine constructs were comparable, while there was a larger variation in the properties of the human constructs, especially the elastic modulus and collagen content. In addition, ovine constructs differed in composition from the human constructs. An increased number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells before seeding was correlated with the collagen content in the engineered heart valve constructs. Moreover, tissue stiffness increased with increasing collagen content. The results suggest that the culture process of ovine tissues can be controlled, whereas the mechanical properties, and hence functionality, of tissues originating from human material are more difficult to control. On-line evaluation of tissue properties during culture or more early cellular markers to predict the properties of autologous

  12. Kallikrein 1 is overexpressed by astrocytes in the hippocampus of patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, associated with hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simões, Priscila Santos Rodrigues; Perosa, Sandra Regina; Arganãraz, Gustavo Adolfo; Yacubian, Elza Márcia; Carrete, Henrique; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Varella, Pedro Paulo Vasconcellos; Santiago, Joselita Ferreira Carvalho; Canzian, Mauro; Silva, Jose Antonio; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Amado, Débora; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Mazzacoratti, Maria da Graça Naffah

    2011-03-01

    Kallikrein 1 (hK1) is a tissue enzyme responsible for kinin release in inflammatory cascade. This study was delineated to study the distribution and the co-localization of hK1 and kinin B1 and B2 receptors with glial and/or neuronal proteins markers, in the hippocampus of patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, associated with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS), comparing with control tissues. Hippocampal levels of KLK1 mRNA were also measured. hK1, kinin B1 and B2 receptors, NeuN and GFAP were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy and KLK1 mRNA was quantified with real time PCR. Increased expression of hK1 by astrocytes co-localized with GFAP was found, contrasting with kinin B1 and B2 receptors, which were co-localized with NeuN in the sclerotic hippocampus. In addition, KLK1 mRNA was also up-regulated in same tissues. These data suggest an overexpression of kallikrein-kinin system and a neuron-glia interaction in the inflammatory process present in refractory TLE-HS.

  13. 2010 Great Lakes Human Health Fish Tissue Study Fish Tissue Data Dictionary

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Office of Science and Technology (OST) is providing the fish tissue results from the 2010 Great Lakes Human Health Fish Tissue Study (GLHHFTS). This document includes the “data dictionary” for Mercury, PFC, PBDE and PCBs.

  14. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  15. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  16. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED...

  17. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED...

  18. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED...

  19. Enoxacin penetration into human prostatic tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, M G; Roy, R; Lessard, C; Foucault, P

    1988-01-01

    Concurrent enoxacin concentrations in serum and prostatic tissue were determined in 14 patients. The mean ratios of enoxacin concentration in tissue over concentration in serum were 1.4 +/- 0.2 (standard error of the mean). The levels in serum and prostatic tissue were above the MICs for most urinary pathogens. PMID:3196004

  20. Hormone Receptor Expression in Human Fascial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fede, C.; Albertin, G.; Petrelli, L.; Sfriso, M.M.; Biz, C.; De Caro, R.

    2016-01-01

    Many epidemiologic, clinical, and experimental findings point to sex differences in myofascial pain in view of the fact that adult women tend to have more myofascial problems with respect to men. It is possible that one of the stimuli to sensitization of fascial nociceptors could come from hormonal factors such as estrogen and relaxin, that are involved in extracellular matrix and collagen remodeling and thus contribute to functions of myofascial tissue. Immunohistochemical and molecular investigations (real-time PCR analysis) of relaxin receptor 1 (RXFP1) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) localization were carried out on samples of human fascia collected from 8 volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery (all females, between 42 and 70 yrs, divided into pre- and post-menopausal groups), and in fibroblasts isolated from deep fascia, to examine both protein and RNA expression levels. We can assume that the two sex hormone receptors analyzed are expressed in all the human fascial districts examined and in fascial fibroblasts culture cells, to a lesser degree in the post-menopausal with respect to the pre-menopausal women. Hormone receptor expression was concentrated in the fibroblasts, and RXFP1 was also evident in blood vessels and nerves. Our results are the first demonstrating that the fibroblasts located within different districts of the muscular fasciae express sex hormone receptors and can help to explain the link between hormonal factors and myofascial pain. It is known, in fact, that estrogen and relaxin play a key role in extracellular matrix remodeling by inhibiting fibrosis and inflammatory activities, both important factors affecting fascial stiffness and sensitization of fascial nociceptors. PMID:28076930

  1. Transcriptome reveals the overexpression of a kallikrein gene cluster (KLK1/3/7/8/12) in the Tibetans with high altitude-associated polycythemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang; Gesang, Luobu; Dan, Zeng; Gusang, Lamu

    2017-01-01

    High altitude-associated polycythemia (HAPC) is a very common disease. However, it the disease is still unmanageable and the related molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. In the present study, we aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of HAPC using transcriptome analysis. Transcriptome analysis was conducted in 3 pairs of gastric mucosa tissues from patients with HAPC and healthy residents at a similar altitude. Endoscopy and histopathological analyses were used to examine the injury to gastric tissues. Molecular remodeling was performed for the interaction between different KLK members and cholesterol. HAPC was found to lead to morphological changes and pathological damage to the gastric mucosa of patients. A total of 10,304 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified. Among these genes, 4,941 DEGs were upregulated, while 5,363 DEGs were downregulated in the patients with HAPC (fold change ≥2, P<0.01 and FDR <0.01). In particular, the kallikrein gene cluster (KLK1/3/7/8/12) was upregulated >17-fold. All the members had high-score binding cholesterol, particularly for the polymers of KLK7. The kallikrein gene cluster (KLK1/3/7/8/12) is on chromosome 19q13.3–13.4. The elevated levels of KLK1, KLK3, KLK7, KLK8 and KLK12 may be closely associated with the hypertension, inflammation, obesity and other gastric injuries associated with polycythemia. The interaction of KLKs and cholesterol maybe play an important role in the development of hypertension. The findings of the present study revealed that HAPC induces gastric injury by upregulating the kallikrein gene cluster (KLK1/3/7/8/12), which can bind cholesterol and result in kallikrein hypertension. These findings provide some basic information for understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for HAPC and HAPC-related diseases. PMID:28000848

  2. A kallikrein-targeting RNA aptamer inhibits the intrinsic pathway of coagulation and reduces bradykinin release.

    PubMed

    Steen Burrell, K-A; Layzer, J; Sullenger, B A

    2017-09-01

    Essentials Kallikrein amplifies contact activation and is a potential target for preventing thrombosis. We developed and characterized a kallikrein aptamer using convergent evolution and kinetic assays. Kall1-T4 prolongs intrinsic clotting time by inhibiting factor XIIa-mediated prekallikrein activation. Kall1-T4 decreases high-molecular-weight kininogen cleavage and bradykinin release. Background Plasma kallikrein is a serine protease that plays an integral role in many biological processes, including coagulation, inflammation, and fibrinolysis. The main function of kallikrein in coagulation is the amplification of activated factor XII (FXIIa) production, which ultimately leads to thrombin generation and fibrin clot formation. Kallikrein is generated by FXIIa-mediated cleavage of the zymogen prekallikrein, which is usually complexed with the non-enzymatic cofactor high molecular weight kininogen (HK). HK also serves as a substrate for kallikrein to generate the proinflammatory peptide bradykinin (BK). Interestingly, prekallikrein-deficient mice are protected from thrombotic events while retaining normal hemostatic capacity. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of kallikrein may provide a safer alternative to traditional anticoagulants with anti-inflammatory benefits. Objectives To isolate and characterize an RNA aptamer that binds to and inhibits plasma kallikrein, and to elucidate its mechanism of action. Methods and Results Using convergent Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX), we isolated an RNA aptamer that targets kallikrein. This aptamer, Kall1-T4, specifically binds to both prekallikrein and kallikrein with similar subnanomolar binding affinities, and dose-dependently prolongs fibrin clot formation in an activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) coagulation assay. In a purified in vitro system, Kall1-T4 inhibits the reciprocal activation of prekallikrein and FXII primarily by reducing the rate of FXIIa-mediated prekallikrein

  3. Seroprevalence of human T lymphtropic virus (HTLV) among tissue donors in Iranian tissue bank.

    PubMed

    Arjmand, Babak; Aghayan, Seyed Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Parisa; Farzanehkhah, Mohammad; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohamadjavad; Niknam, Mohamad Hossein; Jafarian, Ali; Arjmand, Farzin; Jebelly far, Soheyla

    2009-08-01

    Iranian Tissue Bank prepares a wide range of human tissue homografts such as; heart valve, bone, skin, amniotic membrane and other tissues for different clinical applications. The purpose of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of HTLV in tissue donors. About 1,548 tissue donors were studied during a 5-years period by ELISA assays. HTLV(1,2)-antibodies were tested for all of donors with other tests upon American Association of Tissue Banks (AATB) standards. About 25 (1.61%) out of 1,548 tissue donors were HTLV positive that 17 donors were male and 8 were female (female/male ratio was approximately 47%). Regarding to the prevalence of HTLV among tissue donors and importance of cell and tissue safety and quality assurance, we recommend that all blood, cell and tissue banks should be involved both routine serological methods and other complementary tests such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis of HTLV.

  4. The use of animal tissues alongside human tissue: Cultural and ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kaw, Anu; Jones, D Gareth; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and research facilities often use cadaveric material alongside animal tissues, although there appear to be differences in the way we handle, treat, and dispose of human cadaveric material compared to animal tissue. This study sought to analyze cultural and ethical considerations and provides policy recommendations on the use of animal tissues alongside human tissue. The status of human and animal remains and the respect because of human and animal tissues were compared and analyzed from ethical, legal, and cultural perspectives. The use of animal organs and tissues is carried out within the context of understanding human anatomy and function. Consequently, the interests of human donors are to be pre-eminent in any policies that are enunciated, so that if any donors find the presence of animal remains unacceptable, the latter should not be employed. The major differences appear to lie in differences in our perceptions of their respective intrinsic and instrumental values. Animals are considered to have lesser intrinsic value and greater instrumental value than humans. These differences stem from the role played by culture and ethical considerations, and are manifested in the resulting legal frameworks. In light of this discussion, six policy recommendations are proposed, encompassing the nature of consent, respect for animal tissues as well as human remains, and appropriate separation of both sets of tissues in preparation and display.

  5. Successful cryopreservation of human ovarian cortex tissues using supercooling.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Hisashi; Zhang, Yue; Mihara, Makoto; Sato, Chifumi

    2012-01-01

    The development of new method to cryopreserve human ovarian cortex tissues without damage is needed for the improvement of quality of life (QOL) of female cancer patients. Here we show novel cryopreservation method of human ovarian cortex tissues by using supercooling (S.C.) procedure. Our method will be helpful in order to preserve fertility of female cancer patients.

  6. Response of Human Prostate Tissue to Hypofractionated Ionizing Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    hypofractionated ionizing radiation. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas C. Sroka, M.D., Ph.D...April 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Response of human prostate tissue to hypofractionated ionizing radiation. 5b. GRANT NUMBER...of this proposal was to determine the differences in radiobiological response of human prostate tissue to conventional and hypofractionated

  7. Successful cryopreservation of human ovarian cortex tissues using supercooling

    PubMed Central

    Moriguchi, Hisashi; Zhang, Yue; Mihara, Makoto; Sato, Chifumi

    2012-01-01

    The development of new method to cryopreserve human ovarian cortex tissues without damage is needed for the improvement of quality of life (QOL) of female cancer patients. Here we show novel cryopreservation method of human ovarian cortex tissues by using supercooling (S.C.) procedure. Our method will be helpful in order to preserve fertility of female cancer patients. PMID:22844578

  8. Response of Human Prostate Tissue to Hypofractionated Ionizing Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Summary01-07-2011 Response of Human Prostate Tissue to Hypofractionated Ionizing Radiation Dr. Thomas Sroka University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85719 The aim...of this proposal is to determine the differences in radiobiological response of human prostate tissue to conventional and hypofractionated ...conventional and hypofractionated ionizing radiation. Data generated in the first year of study has shown that normal prostate tissue and prostate

  9. Fundamentals of gas phase plasmas for treatment of human tissue.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Mark J; Babaeva, Natalia Yu

    2011-01-01

    The use of gas phase plasmas for treating human tissue is at the intersection of two disciplines - plasma physics and engineering, and medicine. In this paper, a primer will be provided for the medical practitioner on the fundamentals of generating gas phase plasmas at atmospheric pressure in air for the treatment of human tissue. The mechanisms for gas phase plasmas interacting with tissue and biological fluids will also be discussed using results from computer modeling.

  10. [The kallikrein-kinin system of blood in hypertensive crises in hot climate].

    PubMed

    Malaia, L T; Berkelieva, S Ch; Berkeliev, M B; Soltanova, I B

    1991-06-01

    The values of depressive humoral factors drastically decrease in healthy subjects and patients with hypertensive disease running with crisis in the areas of hot climate in summer. After arresting hypertensive crises, the levels of kallikreinogen, kallikrein, kininogen increase. In the crises, there is a significant inverse correlation between the blood pressure and blood kallikrein and kininogen concentrations. The values of kallikrein-kinin system components clearly characterize the clinical status of patients with hypertensive disease running with crisis and are of predictive value for clarification of the body's protective reserves.

  11. Predicting DNA methylation level across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Baoshan; Wilker, Elissa H.; Willis-Owen, Saffron A. G.; Byun, Hyang-Min; Wong, Kenny C. C.; Motta, Valeria; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Schwartz, Joel; Cookson, William O. C. M.; Khabbaz, Kamal; Mittleman, Murray A.; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Liang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Differences in methylation across tissues are critical to cell differentiation and are key to understanding the role of epigenetics in complex diseases. In this investigation, we found that locus-specific methylation differences between tissues are highly consistent across individuals. We developed a novel statistical model to predict locus-specific methylation in target tissue based on methylation in surrogate tissue. The method was evaluated in publicly available data and in two studies using the latest IlluminaBeadChips: a childhood asthma study with methylation measured in both peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and lymphoblastoid cell lines; and a study of postoperative atrial fibrillation with methylation in PBL, atrium and artery. We found that our method can greatly improve accuracy of cross-tissue prediction at CpG sites that are variable in the target tissue [R2 increases from 0.38 (original R2 between tissues) to 0.89 for PBL-to-artery prediction; from 0.39 to 0.95 for PBL-to-atrium; and from 0.81 to 0.98 for lymphoblastoid cell line-to-PBL based on cross-validation, and confirmed using cross-study prediction]. An extended model with multiple CpGs further improved performance. Our results suggest that large-scale epidemiology studies using easy-to-access surrogate tissues (e.g. blood) could be recalibrated to improve understanding of epigenetics in hard-to-access tissues (e.g. atrium) and might enable non-invasive disease screening using epigenetic profiles. PMID:24445802

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Levels of Human Spinal Tissues.

    PubMed

    Harris, Liam; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2017-09-06

    .: Systematic Review. .: The aim of this study was to investigate, quantify, compare and compile the various mesenchymal stem cell tissue sources within human spinal tissues to act as a compendium for clinical and research application. .: Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in academic and clinical understanding of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Previously limited to cells isolated from bone marrow, the past decade has illicited the characterization and isolation of human MSCs from adipose, bone marrow, synovium, muscle, periosteum, peripheral blood, umbilical cord, placenta and numerous other tissues. As researchers explore practical applications of cells in these tissues, the absolute levels of MSCs in specific spinal tissue will be critical to guide future research. .: The PubMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for articles relating to the harvest, characterization, isolation and quantification of human mesenchymal stem cells from spinal tissues. Selected articles were examined for relevant data, categorized according to type of spinal tissue, and when possible, standardized to facilitate comparisons between sites. .: Human mesenchymal stem cell levels varied widely between spinal tissues. Yields for Intervertebral disc demonstrated roughly 5% of viable cells to be positive for MSC surface markers. Cartilage endplate cells yielded 18,500- 61,875 cells/ 0.8 mm thick sample of cartilage end plate. Ligamentum flavum yielded 250,000- 500,000 cells per gram of tissue. Annulus fibrosus FACS treatment found 29% of cells positive for MSC marker Stro-1. Nucleus pulposus yielded mean tissue samples of 40,584-234,137 MSCs/gram of tissue. .: Numerous tissues within and surrounding the spine represent a consistent and reliable source for the harvest and isolation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Among the tissues of the spine, the annulus fibrosus and ligamentum flavum each offer considerable levels of mesenchymal stem cells, and may

  13. Brown adipose tissue as an anti-obesity tissue in humans.

    PubMed

    Chechi, K; Nedergaard, J; Richard, D

    2014-02-01

    During the 11th Stock Conference held in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, world-leading experts came together to present and discuss recent developments made in the field of brown adipose tissue biology. Owing to the vast capacity of brown adipose tissue for burning food energy in the process of thermogenesis, and due to demonstrations of its presence in adult humans, there is tremendous interest in targeting brown adipose tissue as an anti-obesity tissue in humans. However, the future of such therapeutic approaches relies on our understanding of the origin, development, recruitment, activation and regulation of brown adipose tissue in humans. As reviewed here, the 11th Stock Conference was organized around these themes to discuss the recent progress made in each aspect, to identify gaps in our current understanding and to further provide a common groundwork that could support collaborative efforts aimed at a future therapy for obesity, based on brown adipose tissue thermogenesis.

  14. The use of functional human tissues in drug development.

    PubMed

    Bunton, David

    2011-02-01

    Fresh, functional human tissues have long been considered the closest possible model of human in vivo function and can be used to measure a wide range of pharmacological responses. Despite this, relatively little drug development is conducted using fresh human tissue because of the logistical and ethical difficulties surrounding the availability of tissue and practicalities of experimental work. Most tests of drug activity require a living test system comprising cells, tissues or whole organisms. In some instances, "living" (fresh) human tissues have the potential to reduce or replace animal tests through superior prediction of drug safety and efficacy. Before functional human tissue tests become a routine part of drug development, two factors must co-exist. Firstly, organisations such as Biopta must continue to create compelling evidence that human tissues are more predictive than alternative models; such evidence will drive demand from the pharmaceutical industry for human tissue-based tests. Secondly, the vast number of tissues and organs residual to surgery or unsuitable for transplant must be routinely consented for medical research and made available to all researchers in an equitable and timely manner. This requires a concerted effort throughout the NHS and consistent demand as well as financial support from researchers, particularly within industry. It is our view that the next 5-10 years will generate compelling evidence of the value of functional human tissue-based tests and recognition that more efficient use of residual or non-transplantable tissues and organs is an urgent priority for the development of new medicines.

  15. Decellularized extracellular matrix derived from human adipose tissue as a potential scaffold for allograft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Suk; Kim, Beob Soo; Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Jae Dong; Choi, Young Chan; Yang, Hyun-Jin; Park, Kinam; Lee, Hee Young; Cho, Yong Woo

    2011-06-01

    Decellularized tissues composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been clinically used to support the regeneration of various human tissues and organs. Most decellularized tissues so far have been derived from animals or cadavers. Therefore, despite the many advantages of decellularized tissue, there are concerns about the potential for immunogenicity and the possible presence of infectious agents. Herein, we present a biomaterial composed of ECM derived from human adipose tissue, the most prevalent, expendable, and safely harvested tissue in the human body. The ECM was extracted by successive physical, chemical, and enzymatic treatments of human adipose tissue isolated by liposuction. Cellular components including nucleic acids were effectively removed without significant disruption of the morphology or structure of the ECM. Major ECM components were quantified, including acid/pepsin-soluble collagen, sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), and soluble elastin. In an in vivo experiment using mice, the decellularized ECM graft exhibited good compatibility to surrounding tissues. Overall results suggest that the decellularized ECM containing biological and chemical cues of native human ECM could be an ideal scaffold material not only for autologous but also for allograft tissue engineering.

  16. Expression and distribution of endocan in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S M; Zuo, L; Zhou, Q; Gui, S Y; Shi, R; Wu, Q; Wei, W; Wang, Y

    2012-04-01

    Endocan is a novel human endothelial cell specific molecule. Its expression is regulated by cytokines and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The distribution of endocan in normal human tissues, however, remains unclear. We examined the expression of endocan in normal human tissue using immunohistochemical stains. Endocan was expressed in actively proliferative or neogeneic tissues and cells such as glandular tissues, endothelium of neovasculature, bronchial epithelium, germinal centers of lymph nodes etc. Endocan was not present in silent or resting tissues or cells such as endothelium of great arteries and spleen etc. Our findings suggest that endocan may act as a marker for angiogenesis or oncogenesis and could be regarded as a candidate gene for inflammatory tissue, neoplasia, tumor development and metastasis. The expression level of endocan may assist early diagnosis and prognosis of some tumors.

  17. Macrophages modulate engineered human tissues for enhanced vascularization and healing

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Kara L.; Freytes, Donald O.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering is increasingly based on recapitulating human physiology, through integration of biological principles into engineering designs. In spite of all progress in engineering functional human tissues, we are just beginning to develop effective methods for establishing blood perfusion and controlling the inflammatory factors following implantation into the host. Functional vasculature largely determines tissue survival and function in vivo. The inflammatory response is a major regulator of vascularization and overall functionality of engineered tissues, through the activity of different types of macrophages and the cytokines they secrete. We discuss cell-scaffold-bioreactor systems for harnessing the inflammatory response for enhanced tissue vascularization and healing. To this end, inert scaffolds that have been considered for many decades a “gold standard” in regenerative medicine are beginning to be replaced by a new generation of “smart” tissue engineering systems designed to actively mediate tissue survival and function. PMID:25331098

  18. Diagnose human colonic tissues by terahertz near-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua; Ma, Shihua; Wu, Xiumei; Yang, Wenxing; Zhao, Tian

    2015-03-01

    Based on a terahertz (THz) pipe-based near-field imaging system, we demonstrate the capability of THz imaging to diagnose freshly surgically excised human colonic tissues. Through THz near-field scanning the absorbance of the colonic tissues, the acquired images can clearly distinguish cancerous tissues from healthy tissues fast and automatically without pathological hematoxylin and eosin stain diagnosis. A statistical study on 58 specimens (20 healthy tissues and 38 tissues with tumor) from 31 patients (mean age: 59 years; range: 46 to 79 years) shows that the corresponding diagnostic sensitivity and specificity on colonic tissues are both 100%. Due to its capability to perform quantitative analysis, our study indicates the potential of the THz pipe-based near-field imaging for future automation on human tumor pathological examinations.

  19. High kallikrein-related peptidase 6 in non-small cell lung cancer cells: an indicator of tumour proliferation and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Nathalie, Heuzé-Vourc’h; Chris, Planque; Serge, Guyetant; Catherine, Coco; Benjamin, Brillet; Claire, Blechet; Christelle, Parent; Briollais, Laurent; Pascale, Reverdiau; Marie-Lise, Jourdan; Yves, Courty

    2009-01-01

    The human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLK) are serine proteases whose concentrations are often abnormal in common human malignancies and contribute to neoplastic progression through multifaceted roles. However, little attention has been paid to their synthesis and involvement in the development and dissemination of lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. We have analysed the production of KLK6 in normal lung and tumour tissues from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). KLK6 immunoreactivity was restricted to epithelial cells of the normal bronchi, but most of the cancer samples were moderately or highly immunoreactive, regardless of the histological subtype. In contrast, little or no KLK6 was detected in NSCLC cells. We have developed NSCLC lines expressing wild-type KLK6 in order to investigate the role of KLK6 in lung cancer biology, and analysed its impact on proliferation. Ectopic KLK6 dramatically enhanced NSCLC cell growth and KLK6-producing NSCLC cells had accelerated cell cycles, between the G1 and S phases. This was accompanied by a marked increase in cyclin E and decrease in p21. KLK6 production was also associated with enhanced synthesis of c-Myc, which is known to promote cell-cycle progression. Finally, examination of specimens from patients with NSCLC revealed that KLK6 mRNA is overexpressed in tumour tissue, and high KLK6 concentrations were associated with lower survival rates. We conclude that a high concentration of KLK6 is an indicator of tumour proliferation and an independent predictive factor in NSCLC. PMID:19426157

  20. High kallikrein-related peptidase 6 in non-small cell lung cancer cells: an indicator of tumour proliferation and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Nathalie, Heuzé-Vourc'h; Chris, Planque; Serge, Guyetant; Catherine, Coco; Benjamin, Brillet; Claire, Blechet; Christelle, Parent; Briollais, Laurent; Pascale, Reverdiau; Marie-Lise, Jourdan; Yves, Courty

    2009-09-01

    The human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLK) are serine proteases whose concentrations are often abnormal in common human malignancies and contribute to neoplastic progression through multifaceted roles. However, little attention has been paid to their synthesis and involvement in the development and dissemination of lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. We have analysed the production of KLK6 in normal lung and tumour tissues from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). KLK6 immunoreactivity was restricted to epithelial cells of the normal bronchi, but most of the cancer samples were moderately or highly immunoreactive, regardless of the histological subtype. In contrast, little or no KLK6 was detected in NSCLC cells. We have developed NSCLC lines expressing wild-type KLK6 in order to investigate the role of KLK6 in lung cancer biology, and analysed its impact on proliferation. Ectopic KLK6 dramatically enhanced NSCLC cell growth and KLK6-producing NSCLC cells had accelerated cell cycles, between the G1 and S phases. This was accompanied by a marked increase in cyclin E and decrease in p21. KLK6 production was also associated with enhanced synthesis of c-Myc, which is known to promote cell-cycle progression. Finally, examination of specimens from patients with NSCLC revealed that KLK6 mRNA is overexpressed in tumour tissue, and high KLK6 concentrations were associated with lower survival rates. We conclude that a high concentration of KLK6 is an indicator of tumour proliferation and an independent predictive factor in NSCLC.

  1. Depth-resolved fluorescence of human ectocervical tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-04-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence of normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within 120um depth were investigated utilizing a portable confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of all ectocervical tissue samples, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed, which created serious interference in seeking the correlation between tissue fluorescence and tissue pathology. While from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer, the measured NADH fluorescence induced by 355nm excitation and FAD fluorescence induced by 457nm excitation were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. The ratios between NADH over FAD fluorescence increased statistically in the CIN epithelial relative to the normal and HPV epithelia, which indicated increased metabolic activity in precancerous tissue. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  2. Transcriptomics resources of human tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Uhlén, Mathias; Hallström, Björn M; Lindskog, Cecilia; Mardinoglu, Adil; Pontén, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-04-04

    Quantifying the differential expression of genes in various human organs, tissues, and cell types is vital to understand human physiology and disease. Recently, several large-scale transcriptomics studies have analyzed the expression of protein-coding genes across tissues. These datasets provide a framework for defining the molecular constituents of the human body as well as for generating comprehensive lists of proteins expressed across tissues or in a tissue-restricted manner. Here, we review publicly available human transcriptome resources and discuss body-wide data from independent genome-wide transcriptome analyses of different tissues. Gene expression measurements from these independent datasets, generated using samples from fresh frozen surgical specimens and postmortem tissues, are consistent. Overall, the different genome-wide analyses support a distribution in which many proteins are found in all tissues and relatively few in a tissue-restricted manner. Moreover, we discuss the applications of publicly available omics data for building genome-scale metabolic models, used for analyzing cell and tissue functions both in physiological and in disease contexts.

  3. Natural Rubber Nanocomposite with Human-Tissue-Like Mechanical Characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murniati, Riri; Novita, Nanda; Sutisna; Wibowo, Edy; Iskandar, Ferry; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin

    2017-07-01

    The blends of synthetic rubber and natural rubber with nanosilica were prepared using a blending technique in presence of different filler volume fraction. The effect of filler on morphological and mechanical characteristics was studied. Utilization of human cadaver in means of medical study has been commonly used primarily as tools of medical teaching and training such as surgery. Nonetheless, human cadaver brought inevitable problems. So it is necessary to find a substitute material that can be used to replace cadavers. In orthopaedics, the materials that resemble in mechanical properties to biological tissues are elastomers such as natural rubber (latex) and synthetic rubber (polyurethanes, silicones). This substitution material needs to consider the potential of Indonesia to help the development of the nation. Indonesia is the second largest country producer of natural rubber in the world. This paper aims to contribute to adjusting the mechanical properties of tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) to the recommended range of biological tissue value and thus allow the development of phantoms with greater stability and similarity to human tissues. Repeatability for the phantom fabrication process was also explored. Characteristics were then compared to the control and mechanical characteristics of different human body part tissue. Nanosilica is the best filler to produce the best nanocomposite similarities with human tissue. We produced composites that approaching the properties of human internal tissues.

  4. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10−8) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas). PMID:26921406

  5. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-05-05

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10(-8)) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas).

  6. Kallikrein and Renin in the Membrane Fractions of the Rat Kidney.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-23

    and Renin _____ ___ i.;? - 2 SUMMARY Plasma membrane (P-H) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) enriched fractions were isolated from the homogenized rat...The inhibitor of proteases, p-methylsulfonylfluoride inhibited 77-80% all kallikrein preparations at 3 w*1 concentration . Activation of renin Renin ...fold although only at a concentration 5-10 times higher than used with kallikrein. The relative rate of activation of renin in the ER fraction was

  7. Plasma Kallikrein Mediates Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor–Induced Retinal Dysfunction and Thickening

    PubMed Central

    Clermont, Allen; Murugesan, Nivetha; Zhou, Qunfang; Kita, Takeshi; Robson, Peter A.; Rushbrooke, Louise J.; Evans, D. Michael; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Feener, Edward P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Plasma kallikrein is a serine protease and circulating component of inflammation, which exerts clinically significant effects on vasogenic edema. This study examines the role of plasma kallikrein in VEGF-induced retinal edema. Methods Intravitreal injections of VEGF and saline vehicle were performed in plasma prekallikrein–deficient (KLKB1−/−) and wild-type (WT) mice, and in both rats and mice receiving a selective plasma kallikrein inhibitor, VA999272. Retinal vascular permeability (RVP) and retinal thickness were measured by Evans blue permeation and optical coherence tomography, respectively. The retinal kallikrein kinin system was examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Retinal neovascularization was investigated in KLKB1−/− and WT mice subjected to oxygen-induced retinopathy. Results Vascular endothelial growth factor–induced RVP and retinal thickening were reduced in KLKB1−/− mice by 68% and 47%, respectively, compared to VEGF responses in WT mice. Plasma kallikrein also contributes to TNFα-induced retinal thickening, which was reduced by 52% in KLKB1−/− mice. Systemic administration of VA999272 reduced VEGF-induced retinal thickening by 57% (P < 0.001) in mice and 53% (P < 0.001) in rats, compared to vehicle-treated controls. Intravitreal injection of VEGF in WT mice increased plasma prekallikrein in the retina, which was diffusely distributed throughout the inner and outer retinal layers. Avascular and neovascular areas induced by oxygen-induced retinopathy were similar in WT and KLKB1−/− mice. Conclusions Vascular endothelial growth factor increases extravasation of plasma kallikrein into the retina, and plasma kallikrein is required for the full effects of VEGF on RVP and retinal thickening in rodents. Systemic plasma kallikrein inhibition may provide a therapeutic opportunity to treat VEGF-induced retina edema. PMID:27138737

  8. Kallikrein-like activity in nonpregnant and pregnant rat uterus, fetal membranes, placenta and amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Miatello, R M; Lama, M C; González, E S; Nolly, H L

    1992-01-01

    SBTI-resistant kininogenase activity was found in nonpregnant and pregnant rat uterus, placenta, amniotic fluid and fetal membranes. After trypsin treatment the kininogenase activity increased 2-3 fold. Total kininogenase (active plus inactive) was completely blocked by kallikrein antibodies. The physiological role of these kallikrein-like enzymes is unknown. It is speculated that these enzymes play a local role, perhaps in the processing of polypeptide hormones of through the release of kinins in the regulation of uterine blood flow.

  9. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  10. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  11. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  12. Bovine Leukemia Virus DNA in Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua Min; Jensen, Hanne M.; Choi, K. Yeon; Sun, Dejun; Nuovo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a deltaretrovirus, causes B-cell leukemia/lymphoma in cattle and is prevalent in herds globally. A previous finding of antibodies against BLV in humans led us to examine the possibility of human infection with BLV. We focused on breast tissue because, in cattle, BLV DNA and protein have been found to be more abundant in mammary epithelium than in lymphocytes. In human breast tissue specimens, we identified BLV DNA by using nested liquid-phase PCR and DNA sequencing. Variations from the bovine reference sequence were infrequent and limited to base substitutions. In situ PCR and immunohistochemical testing localized BLV to the secretory epithelium of the breast. Our finding of BLV in human tissues indicates a risk for the acquisition and proliferation of this virus in humans. Further research is needed to determine whether BLV may play a direct role in human disease. PMID:24750974

  13. Bovine leukemia virus DNA in human breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Buehring, Gertrude Case; Shen, Hua Min; Jensen, Hanne M; Choi, K Yeon; Sun, Dejun; Nuovo, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a deltaretrovirus, causes B-cell leukemia/lymphoma in cattle and is prevalent in herds globally. A previous finding of antibodies against BLV in humans led us to examine the possibility of human infection with BLV. We focused on breast tissue because, in cattle, BLV DNA and protein have been found to be more abundant in mammary epithelium than in lymphocytes. In human breast tissue specimens, we identified BLV DNA by using nested liquid-phase PCR and DNA sequencing. Variations from the bovine reference sequence were infrequent and limited to base substitutions. In situ PCR and immunohistochemical testing localized BLV to the secretory epithelium of the breast. Our finding of BLV in human tissues indicates a risk for the acquisition and proliferation of this virus in humans. Further research is needed to determine whether BLV may play a direct role in human disease.

  14. Hereditary Angioedema Therapy: Kallikrein Inhibition and Bradykinin Receptor Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Current strategies for the treatment of hereditary angioedema (HAE) include targeted inhibition or antagonism of the contact system, which is dysregulated in HAE patients by a C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency. Ecallantide, a plasma kallikrein inhibitor, and icatibant, a selective bradykinin-2 receptor antagonist, have recently been evaluated in clinical studies for the treatment of acute HAE attacks. Both drugs have demonstrated evidence of efficacy and safety in treating acute HAE episodes, with ecallantide approved for use in the United States and icatibant approved for use in Europe. As therapeutic options for HAE expand for both for prophylactic and acute treatment strategies, a number of patient-specific and drug-specific factors have emerged as important considerations when developing individualized HAE management plans. Optimization of HAE therapy will require further integration of new therapies into the current treatment paradigm. PMID:23282868

  15. Altered autophagy in human adipose tissues in obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Context: Autophagy is a housekeeping mechanism, involved in metabolic regulation and stress response, shown recently to regulate lipid droplets biogenesis/breakdown and adipose tissue phenotype. Objective: We hypothesized that in human obesity autophagy may be altered in adipose tissue in a fat d...

  16. Tissue-Based Imaging Model of Human Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Edward R.; Gonzalez, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We have developed a tissue-based model of the human trabecular meshwork (TM) using viable postmortem corneoscleral donor tissue. Two-photon microscopy is used to optically section and image deep in the tissue to analyze cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) within the original three-dimensional (3D) environment of the TM. Multimodal techniques, including autofluorescence (AF), second harmonic generation (SHG), intravital dye fluorescence, and epifluorescence, are combined to provide unique views of the tissue at the cellular and subcellular level. SHG and AF imaging are non-invasive tissue imaging techniques with potential for clinical application, which can be modeled in the system. We describe the following in the tissue-based model: analysis of live cellularity to determine tissue viability; characteristics of live cells based on intravital labeling; features and composition of the TM's structural ECM; localization of specific ECM proteins to regions such as basement membrane; in situ induction and expression of tissue markers characteristic of cultured TM cells relevant to glaucoma; analysis of TM actin and pharmacological effects; in situ visualization of TM, inner wall endothelium, and Schlemm's canal; and application of 3D reconstruction, modeling, and quantitative analysis to the TM. The human model represents a cost-effective use of valuable and scarce yet available human tissue that allows unique cell biology, pharmacology, and translational studies of the TM. PMID:24517246

  17. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    PubMed

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated.

  18. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  19. Distribution of arsenic in human tissues and milk.

    PubMed

    Dang, H S; Jaiswal, D D; Somasundaram, S

    1983-07-01

    Using neutron activation followed by radiochemical separations, the arsenic contents of various human tissues and milk were determined. The reliability of analysis was established by analysing a number of standard reference materials. The concentrations in different human tissues range from 1.6 ng As/g (fresh weight) in kidneys to 2140 ng As/g in hair. The mean arsenic levels are compared with those reported from other countries.

  20. Total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, N.; Harsas, W.; Marolt, R.S.; Morton, M.; Pollack, J.K.

    1988-12-01

    As far as the authors could ascertain only 4 well-documented analytical studies have been carried out in Australia determining the total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue. The latest of these studies was published over 16 years ago. Therefore it is timely and important to re-examine the total DDT and dieldrin concentration within the adipose tissue of the Australian population. The present investigation has analyzed 290 samples of human adipose tissue obtained from Westmead Hospital situated in an outer suburb of Sydney, New South Wales for their content of total DDT and dieldrin.

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudifar, Nastaran; Doran, Pauline M

    2015-01-01

    Human adult mesenchymal stem cells are present in fat tissue, which can be obtained using surgical procedures such as liposuction. The multilineage capacity of mesenchymal stem cells makes them very valuable for cell-based medical therapies. In this chapter, we describe how to isolate mesenchymal stem cells from human adult fat tissue, propagate the cells in culture, and cryopreserve the cells for tissue engineering applications. Flow cytometry methods are also described for identification and characterization of adipose-derived stem cells and for cell sorting.

  2. Vibrational Micro-Spectroscopy of Human Tissues Analysis: Review.

    PubMed

    Bunaciu, Andrei A; Hoang, Vu Dang; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2017-05-04

    Vibrational spectroscopy (Infrared (IR) and Raman) and, in particular, micro-spectroscopy and micro-spectroscopic imaging have been used to characterize developmental changes in tissues, to monitor these changes in cell cultures and to detect disease and drug-induced modifications. The conventional methods for biochemical and histophatological tissue characterization necessitate complex and "time-consuming" sample manipulations and the results are rarely quantifiable. The spectroscopy of molecular vibrations using mid-IR or Raman techniques has been applied to samples of human tissue. This article reviews the application of these vibrational spectroscopic techniques for analysis of biological tissue published between 2005 and 2015.

  3. Characterization of a simplified method of cryopreserving human parathyroid tissue.

    PubMed

    Saxe, A W; Gibson, G W; Kay, S

    1990-12-01

    Cryopreservation of human parathyroid tissue plays an important role in managing difficult parathyroid disease. It also can permit investigators to conduct experiments without dependence on the operating room schedule. Availability of cryopreservation has been limited by the perceived need for expensive, complex equipment. We adapted a simple method of freezing cell suspensions to freezing human parathyroid tissue. Vials containing human parathyroid in culture media, dimethylsulfoxide, and patient serum were placed in a plastic rack in a metal pan containing prechilled (4 degrees C) ethanol and placed in a -70 degrees C freezer. We compared viability (trypan blue dye exclusion by collagenase dispersed cells) of tissue frozen in this manner to that of tissue frozen in a programmable liquid nitrogen freezer at 1 degrees C per minute, a cooling rate recommended for human parathyroid tissue. The viability of 30 patients' samples cooled in liquid nitrogen (average length of storage 5 months) was 74% +/- 15% and that of 64 patients' samples cooled in ethanol (average length of storage 26 months) was 71% +/- 15%. Viability of 19 samples of fresh tissue was 79% +/- 10%. Neither method had a statistically significant correlation between length of storage and viability. Successful cryopreservation with simplified technology may expand the availability of parathyroid tissue to meet both clinical and investigative requirements.

  4. Efficient In Vitro Electropermeabilization of Reconstructed Human Dermal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Madi, Moinecha; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Gibot, Laure

    2015-10-01

    DNA electrotransfer is a successful technic for gene delivery. However, its use in clinical applications is limited since little is known about the mechanisms governing DNA electrotransfer in the complex environment occurring in a tissue. The objectives of this work were to investigate the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in that process. Tumor ECM composition was shown to modulate in vivo gene electrotransfer efficiency. In order to assess the effects of ECM composition and organization, as well as intercellular junctions and communication, in normal tissue response to electric pulses, we developed an innovative three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed human connective tissue model. 3D human dermal tissue was reconstructed in vitro by a tissue engineering approach and was representative of in vivo cell organization since cell-cell contacts were present as well as complex ECM. This human cell model presented multiple layers of primary dermal fibroblasts embedded in a native, collagen-rich ECM. This dermal tissue could become a useful tool to study skin DNA electrotransfer mechanisms. As proof of the concept, we show here that the cells within this standardized 3D tissue can be efficiently electropermeabilized by milliseconds electric pulses. We believe that a better comprehension of gene electrotransfer in such a model tissue would help improve electrogene therapy approaches such as the systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccination.

  5. Elevated homocysteine in human abdominal aortic aneurysmal tissues.

    PubMed

    Chan, Crystal Yin Tung; Cheng, Stephen Wing Keung

    2017-10-01

    An abnormally high level of homocysteine (Hcy) has been consistently observed in the blood of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. However, the expression of Hcy in human AAA tissues has not been investigated. In this study, the expression of Hcy in aneurysmal tissues from AAA patients ( n=30) was compared with non-aneurysmal tissues from organ donors ( n=31) by dot blotting and immunohistochemistry. A significantly higher expression of Hcy was observed in AAA than control tissues ( p<0.001). Furthermore, the associations of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism, detected by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism, with both AAA and tissue Hcy expression were evaluated. Our results showed MTHFR C677T polymorphism was not significantly associated with AAA or tissue Hcy expression. Lastly, the expression of Hcy in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which were isolated from human aortic tissues by explant culture, and their release to cultured media was investigated by dot blotting. The AAA VSMCs expressed and released a significantly higher level of Hcy than the control VSMCs ( p<0.001). In summary, our novel findings showed Hcy expression was abnormally elevated in human AAA tissues, which may not be dependent on MTHFR C677T polymorphism.

  6. Studies on kallikrein in the duct systems of the salivary glands of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Shnitka, †T. K.; Maranda, B.; Rodrigues, J. A. A.; Schachter, M.; Weinberg, J.

    1978-01-01

    By correlating immunofluorescence light microscopy with electron microscope studies and with kallikrein concentrations under various conditions, we have made the following observations and conclusions about kallikrein in the submandibular and other salivary glands. 1. In the submandibular gland, specific immunofluorescence to kallikrein was observed in the luminal region of the striated ducts particularly, but also in the outer epithelial cells of the stratified epithelial collecting ducts. Sympathetic nerve stimulation resulted in a reduction in intensity of specific fluorescence and in its increased localization towards the lumen. The nearly complete elimination of kallikrein from the gland by duct obstruction for four days resulted in complete disappearance of specific fluorescence in the gland. Prolonged parasympathetic nerve stimulation at frequencies which did not reduce the kallikrein concentration of the gland failed to alter the specific immunofluorescence despite copious secretion of saliva. Our results failed to reveal evidence of secretion of kallikrein either into or towards the interstitium of the gland. The luminal layer of stratified epithelial cells in the collecting ducts contained small secretory granules closely resembling those in the striated ducts. Our results are not conclusive, but do suggest that kallikrein is located in these granules whence it is secreted into the lumen of the duct. 2. The parotid gland was found to contain much lower concentrations of kallikrein than the submandibular gland. This finding was associated with the presence of far fewer striated ducts in the parotid gland. Otherwise, specific fluorescence and the response to sympathetic nerve stimulation was like that of the submandibular gland. Small secretory granules in the striated and collecting ducts resembled those of the submandibular gland. 3. The sublingual gland, like the parotid, had a low concentration of kallikrein and very few striated ducts. These ducts were

  7. Decellularization of human and porcine lung tissues for pulmonary tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, John D; Anfang, Rachel; Anandappa, Annabelle; Costa, Joseph; Javidfar, Jeffrey; Wobma, Holly M; Singh, Gopal; Freytes, Donald O; Bacchetta, Matthew D; Sonett, Joshua R; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-09-01

    The only definitive treatment for end-stage organ failure is orthotopic transplantation. Lung extracellular matrix (LECM) holds great potential as a scaffold for lung tissue engineering because it retains the complex architecture, biomechanics, and topologic specificity of the lung. Decellularization of human lungs rejected from transplantation could provide "ideal" biologic scaffolds for lung tissue engineering, but the availability of such lungs remains limited. The present study was designed to determine whether porcine lung could serve as a suitable substitute for human lung to study tissue engineering therapies. Human and porcine lungs were procured, sliced into sheets, and decellularized by three different methods. Compositional, ultrastructural, and biomechanical changes to the LECM were characterized. The suitability of LECM for cellular repopulation was evaluated by assessing the viability, growth, and metabolic activity of human lung fibroblasts, human small airway epithelial cells, and human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells over a period of 7 days. Decellularization with 3-[(3-Cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) showed the best maintenance of both human and porcine LECM, with similar retention of LECM proteins except for elastin. Human and porcine LECM supported the cultivation of pulmonary cells in a similar way, except that the human LECM was stiffer and resulted in higher metabolic activity of the cells than porcine LECM. Porcine lungs can be decellularized with CHAPS to produce LECM scaffolds with properties resembling those of human lungs, for pulmonary tissue engineering. We propose that porcine LECM can be an excellent screening platform for the envisioned human tissue engineering applications of decellularized lungs. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A family of hyperelastic models for human brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihai, L. Angela; Budday, Silvia; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Kuhl, Ellen; Goriely, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Experiments on brain samples under multiaxial loading have shown that human brain tissue is both extremely soft when compared to other biological tissues and characterized by a peculiar elastic response under combined shear and compression/tension: there is a significant increase in shear stress with increasing axial compression compared to a moderate increase with increasing axial tension. Recent studies have revealed that many widely used constitutive models for soft biological tissues fail to capture this characteristic response. Here, guided by experiments of human brain tissue, we develop a family of modeling approaches that capture the elasticity of brain tissue under varying simple shear superposed on varying axial stretch by exploiting key observations about the behavior of the nonlinear shear modulus, which can be obtained directly from the experimental data.

  9. Chemical Probes for Visualizing Intact Animal and Human Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hei Ming; Ng, Wai-Lung; Gentleman, Steve M; Wu, Wutian

    2017-06-22

    Newly developed tissue clearing techniques can be used to render intact tissues transparent. When combined with fluorescent labeling technologies and optical sectioning microscopy, this allows visualization of fine structure in three dimensions. Gene-transfection techniques have proved very useful in visualizing cellular structures in animal models, but they are not applicable to human brain tissue. Here, we discuss the characteristics of an ideal chemical fluorescent probe for use in brain and other cleared tissues, and offer a comprehensive overview of currently available chemical probes. We describe their working principles and compare their performance with the goal of simplifying probe selection for neuropathologists and stimulating probe development by chemists. We propose several approaches for the development of innovative chemical labeling methods which, when combined with tissue clearing, have the potential to revolutionize how we study the structure and function of the human brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nutritional regulation of lipid metabolism in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Coppack, S W; Patel, J N; Lawrence, V J

    2001-01-01

    Pfeiffer and colleagues years ago pointed out that different distributions and amounts of adipose tissue are associated with abnormalities of lipolysis and lipoprotein metabolism. Adipose tissue has several crucial roles including (i) mobilization from stores of fatty acids as an energy source, (ii) catabolism of lipoproteins such as very-low-density lipoprotein and (iii) synthesis and release of hormonal signals such as leptin and interleukin-6. These adipose tissue actions are crucially regulated by nutrition. The review considers the existence of metabolic pathways and modes of regulation within adipose tissue, and how such metabolic activity can be quantitated in humans. Nutrition can influence adipose tissue at several 'levels'. Firstly the level of obesity or malnutrition has important effects on many aspects of adipose tissue metabolism. Secondly short-term overfeeding, underfeeding and exercise have major impacts on adipose tissue behaviour. Lastly, specific nutrients are capable of regulating adipose tissue metabolism. Recently there have been considerable advances in understanding adipose tissue metabolism and in particular its regulation. This review discusses the behaviour of adipose tissue under various nutritional conditions. There is then a review of recent work examining the ways in which nutritional influences act via intra-cellular mechanisms, insulin and the sympathetic innervation of adipose tissue.

  11. Meeting report: human fetal tissue transplantation research panel.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D W; Stevenson, R E

    1989-01-01

    On September 14 through 16, 1988, a meeting on the use of human fetal tissue in transplantation was held at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda Maryland, USA. The meeting sponsored by NIH for the Human Fetal Tissue Transplantation Research Panel, a consultant group to the Advisory Committee to the Director. The consultant group was convened to deal with the scientific, judicial and moral questions associated with research involving transplantation of human fetal tissue obtained after induced abortions. The first day of the meeting was devoted to presentations addressing scientific issues. Included among the speakers was Dr. Lars Olson, Professor of Neurobiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, who described the use of transplanted human fetal tissue in the treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease and Dr. Eugene Redmond, Professor of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, who showed results of work with transplantation of tissue to correct induced Parkinson-like disease in monkeys. Other speakers addressed the present, past or potential use of fetal tissue in the treatment of diabetes, immune disorders, and other diseases, as well as the use of fetal cells in the production of biologicals. At the conclusion of the meeting the panel did not recommend that research be halted on fetal tissue within the context discussed, although the recommendation of the committee is not binding, and an additional assembly of the panel will probably occur before the final recommendation to an NIH advisory committee is made in November. Other meetings on this subject include a meeting on the use of fetal tissue sponsored by the American Association of Tissue Banks, March 6-7, 1989, in Washington D. C. (Crystal City) and a meeting June 10, 1989, the day before the annual meeting of the Tissue Culture Association, USA, in Orlando, Florida, on fetal cells and ownership of cultured cells and products derived from clinical specimens. Following are statements to the

  12. Interaction of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron with the kallikrein-kinin system.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Elizabeth C; Mörgelin, Matthias; Cooney, Jakki C; Frick, Inga-Maria

    2011-07-01

    Many bacterial pathogens interfere with the contact system (kallikrein-kinin system) in human plasma. Activation of this system has two consequences: cleavage of high-molecular-mass kininogen (HK) resulting in release of the potent proinflammatory peptide bradykinin, and initiation of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. In this study, two species of the Gram-negative anaerobic commensal organism Bacteroides, namely Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, were found to bind HK and fibrinogen, the major clotting protein, from human plasma as shown by immunoelectron microscopy and Western blot analysis. In addition, these Bacteroides species were capable of activating the contact system at its surface leading to a significant prolongation of the intrinsic coagulation time and also to the release of bradykinin. Members of the genus Bacteroides have been known to act as opportunistic pathogens outside the gut, with B. fragilis being the most common isolate from clinical infections, such as intra-abdominal abscesses and bacteraemia. The present results thus provide more insight into how Bacteroides species cause infection.

  13. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture...

  14. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture...

  15. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture...

  16. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture...

  17. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture...

  18. A New Antigen Retrieval Technique for Human Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Byne, William; Haroutunian, Vahram; García-Villanueva, Mercedes; Rábano, Alberto; García-Amado, María; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining of tissues is a powerful tool used to delineate the presence or absence of an antigen. During the last 30 years, antigen visualization in human brain tissue has been significantly limited by the masking effect of fixatives. In the present study, we have used a new method for antigen retrieval in formalin-fixed human brain tissue and examined the effectiveness of this protocol to reveal masked antigens in tissues with both short and long formalin fixation times. This new method, which is based on the use of citraconic acid, has not been previously utilized in brain tissue although it has been employed in various other tissues such as tonsil, ovary, skin, lymph node, stomach, breast, colon, lung and thymus. Thus, we reported here a novel method to carry out immunohistochemical studies in free-floating human brain sections. Since fixation of brain tissue specimens in formaldehyde is a commonly method used in brain banks, this new antigen retrieval method could facilitate immunohistochemical studies of brains with prolonged formalin fixation times. PMID:18852880

  19. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues

    PubMed Central

    Freud, Aharon G.; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34+CD45RA+ hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field. PMID:24661538

  20. Mechanized syringe homogenization of human and animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; Porter, Andrew C; Patel, Nisha C; Kurono, Sadamu; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Scofield, R Hal

    2004-06-01

    Tissue homogenization is a prerequisite to any fractionation schedule. A plethora of hands-on methods are available to homogenize tissues. Here we report a mechanized method for homogenizing animal and human tissues rapidly and easily. The Bio-Mixer 1200 (manufactured by Innovative Products, Inc., Oklahoma City, OK) utilizes the back-and-forth movement of two motor-driven disposable syringes, connected to each other through a three-way stopcock, to homogenize animal or human tissue. Using this method, we were able to homogenize human or mouse tissues (brain, liver, heart, and salivary glands) in 5 min. From sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric enzyme assay for prolidase, we have found that the homogenates obtained were as good or even better than that obtained used a manual glass-on-Teflon (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) homogenization protocol (all-glass tube and Teflon pestle). Use of the Bio-Mixer 1200 to homogenize animal or human tissue precludes the need to stay in the cold room as is the case with the other hands-on homogenization methods available, in addition to freeing up time for other experiments.

  1. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Freud, Aharon G; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34(+)CD45RA(+) hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field.

  2. The TissueNet v.2 database: A quantitative view of protein-protein interactions across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Omer; Barshir, Ruth; Sharon, Moran; Lerman, Eugene; Kirson, Binyamin F.; Hekselman, Idan; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the molecular interactions of human proteins within tissues is important for identifying their tissue-specific roles and for shedding light on tissue phenotypes. However, many protein–protein interactions (PPIs) have no tissue-contexts. The TissueNet database bridges this gap by associating experimentally-identified PPIs with human tissues that were shown to express both pair-mates. Users can select a protein and a tissue, and obtain a network view of the query protein and its tissue-associated PPIs. TissueNet v.2 is an updated version of the TissueNet database previously featured in NAR. It includes over 40 human tissues profiled via RNA-sequencing or protein-based assays. Users can select their preferred expression data source and interactively set the expression threshold for determining tissue-association. The output of TissueNet v.2 emphasizes qualitative and quantitative features of query proteins and their PPIs. The tissue-specificity view highlights tissue-specific and globally-expressed proteins, and the quantitative view highlights proteins that were differentially expressed in the selected tissue relative to all other tissues. Together, these views allow users to quickly assess the unique versus global functionality of query proteins. Thus, TissueNet v.2 offers an extensive, quantitative and user-friendly interface to study the roles of human proteins across tissues. TissueNet v.2 is available at http://netbio.bgu.ac.il/tissuenet. PMID:27899616

  3. Genetic effects on gene expression across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Battle, Alexis; Brown, Christopher D; Engelhardt, Barbara E; Montgomery, Stephen B

    2017-10-11

    Characterization of the molecular function of the human genome and its variation across individuals is essential for identifying the cellular mechanisms that underlie human genetic traits and diseases. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project aims to characterize variation in gene expression levels across individuals and diverse tissues of the human body, many of which are not easily accessible. Here we describe genetic effects on gene expression levels across 44 human tissues. We find that local genetic variation affects gene expression levels for the majority of genes, and we further identify inter-chromosomal genetic effects for 93 genes and 112 loci. On the basis of the identified genetic effects, we characterize patterns of tissue specificity, compare local and distal effects, and evaluate the functional properties of the genetic effects. We also demonstrate that multi-tissue, multi-individual data can be used to identify genes and pathways affected by human disease-associated variation, enabling a mechanistic interpretation of gene regulation and the genetic basis of disease.

  4. Predicting Tissue-Specific Enhancers in the Human Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2006-07-01

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals areencoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the originsof multi-cellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate generegulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate thiscode, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene expression profiling,vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding siteanalysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidatetissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategyto microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues andidentified 7,187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking geneexpression, the majority of which were located outside of knownpromoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novopredict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision inenhancer recognition ranging from 32 percent to 63 percent, and asensitivity of 47 percent. We used the sequence signatures identified bythis approach to assign tissue-specific predictions to ~;328,000human-mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. Byoverlapping these genome-wide predictions with a large in vivo dataset ofenhancers validated in transgenic mice, we confirmed our results with a28 percent sensitivity and 50 percent precision. These results indicatethe power of combining complementary genomic datasets as an initialcomputational foray into the global view of tissue-specific generegulation in vertebrates.

  5. Up-regulation and clinical significance of serine protease kallikrein 6 in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Tae; Song, Eun Young; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Kang, Min Ah; Kim, Jae Wha; Kim, Sang Jick; Yeom, Young Il; Kim, Joo Heon; Kim, Kyo Hyun; Lee, Hee Gu

    2011-06-15

    Kallikrein-related peptidase 6 (KLK6) encodes a trypsin-like serine protease that is up-regulated in several cancers, although the putative functions of KLK6 in cancer have not been elucidated. In the current study, overexpression of KLK6 was identified in colon cancer, and the possibility that KLK6 may be a suitable candidate as a tumor marker was examined. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript levels and protein up-regulation of KLK6 in colon cancer tissues was examined using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and clinicopathologic analyses. Cell proliferation, invasiveness, and antiapoptotic activity were determined in colon cancer cells that were transfected with small-interfering RNA (siRNA) of KLK6. KLK6 mRNA was up-regulated significantly in tumor tissues compared with nontumor regions. KLK6 protein was strongly expressed in adenocarcinomas but was not expressed in normal mucosa or in premalignant dysplastic lesions. Sera from patients with colon cancer revealed an increase in KLK6 secretion (0.25 μg/mL; P = .031) compared with noncancer cells (0.19 μg/mL). Clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical studies of 143 patients with colon cancer revealed a significant correlation between KLK6 expression and Dukes disease stage (P = .005). High KLK6 expression was associated significantly with shorter overall (P = .001) and recurrence-free survival (P = .001). The rates of proliferation and invasiveness were decreased by 50% in cells that were transfected with KLK6 siRNA. The overexpression of KLK6 led to decreased activity of the E-cadherin promoter. KLK6 was up-regulated significantly in tissues and sera from patients with colon cancer and was associated closely with a poor prognosis, suggesting that KLK6 may be used as a potential biomarker and a therapeutic target for colon cancer. Copyright © 2010 American Cancer Society.

  6. High and low mammographic density human breast tissues maintain histological differential in murine tissue engineering chambers.

    PubMed

    Chew, G L; Huang, D; Lin, S J; Huo, C; Blick, T; Henderson, M A; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Morrison, W A; Campbell, I G; Hopper, J L; Southey, M C; Haviv, I; Thompson, E W

    2012-08-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is the area of breast tissue that appears radiologically white on mammography. Although high MD is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, independent of BRCA1/2 mutation status, the molecular basis of high MD and its associated breast cancer risk is poorly understood. MD studies will benefit from an animal model, where hormonal, gene and drug perturbations on MD can be measured in a preclinical context. High and low MD tissues were selectively sampled by stereotactic biopsy from operative specimens of high-risk women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. The high and low MD tissues were transferred into separate vascularised biochambers in the groins of SCID mice. Chamber material was harvested after 6 weeks for histological analyses and immunohistochemistry for cytokeratins, vimentin and a human-specific mitochondrial antigen. Within-individual analysis was performed in replicate mice, eliminating confounding by age, body mass index and process-related factors, and comparisons were made to the parental human tissue. Maintenance of differential MD post-propagation was assessed radiographically. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the preservation of human glandular and stromal components in the murine biochambers, with maintenance of radiographic MD differential. Propagated high MD regions had higher stromal (p = 0.0002) and lower adipose (p = 0.0006) composition, reflecting the findings in the original human breast tissue, although glands appeared small and non-complex in both high and low MD groups. No significant differences were observed in glandular area (p = 0.4) or count (p = 0.4) between high and low MD biochamber tissues. Human mammary glandular and stromal tissues were viably maintained in murine biochambers, with preservation of differential radiographic density and histological features. Our study provides a murine model for future studies into the biomolecular basis of MD as a risk factor for breast cancer.

  7. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldo, E.; Martos, F.; Gomez, A.; Garcia, A.; Vigano, M.A.; Ladinsky, H.; Sanchez de La Cuesta, F.

    1988-01-01

    The affinities of selective, pirenzepine and AF-DX 116, and classical, N-methylscopolamine and atropine, muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists were investigated in displacement binding experiments with (/sup 3/H)Pirenzepine and (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine in membranes from human autoptic tissues (forebrain, cerebellum, atria, ventricle and submaxillary salivary glands). Affinity estimates of N-methylscopolamine and atropine indicated a non-selective profile. Pirenzepine showed differentiation between the M/sub 1/ neuronal receptor of the forebrain and the receptors in other tissues while AF-DX 116 clearly discriminated between muscarinic receptors of heart and glands. The results in human tissues confirm the previously described selectivity profiles of pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 in rat tissues. These findings thus reveal the presence also in man of three distinct muscarinic receptor subtypes: the neuronal M/sub 1/, the cardiac M/sub 2/ and the glandular M/sub 3/.

  8. Ethics, public policy, and human fetal tissue transplantation research.

    PubMed

    Childress, James F

    1991-06-01

    This article focuses on the deliberations of the National Institutes of Health Human Fetal Tissue Transplantation Research Panel in 1988. It explores various arguments for and against the use of fetal tissue for transplantation research, following elective abortion, and for and against the use of federal funds for such research. After examining the relevance of various positions on the moral status of the fetus and the morality of abortion, the article critically examines charges that such research, especially with federal funds, would involve complicity in the moral evil of abortion, would legitimate abortion practices, and would provide incentives for abortions. Finally, it considers whether the donation model is appropriate for the transfer of human fetal tissue and whether the woman who chooses to have an abortion is the apppropriate donor of the tissue.

  9. Photoacoustic characterization of human ovarian tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Andres; Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Sanders, Mary M.; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2010-02-01

    Ovarian cancer has a five-year survival rate of only 30%, which represents the highest mortality of all gynecologic cancers. The reason for that is that the current imaging techniques are not capable of detecting ovarian cancer early. Therefore, new imaging techniques, like photoacoustic imaging, that can provide functional and molecular contrasts are needed for improving the specificity of ovarian cancer detection and characterization. Using a coregistered photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system we have studied thirty-one human ovaries ex vivo, including normal and diseased. In order to compare the photoacoustic imaging results from all the ovaries, a new parameter using the RF data has been derived. The preliminary results show higher optical absorption for abnormal and malignant ovaries than for normal postmenopausal ones. To estimate the quantitative optical absorption properties of the ovaries, additional ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography images have been acquired. Good agreement between the two techniques has been observed. These results demonstrate the potential of a co-registered photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system for the diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  10. Large-scale discovery of enhancers from human heart tissue.

    PubMed

    May, Dalit; Blow, Matthew J; Kaplan, Tommy; McCulley, David J; Jensen, Brian C; Akiyama, Jennifer A; Holt, Amy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Shoukry, Malak; Wright, Crystal; Afzal, Veena; Simpson, Paul C; Rubin, Edward M; Black, Brian L; Bristow, James; Pennacchio, Len A; Visel, Axel

    2011-12-04

    Development and function of the human heart depend on the dynamic control of tissue-specific gene expression by distant-acting transcriptional enhancers. To generate an accurate genome-wide map of human heart enhancers, we used an epigenomic enhancer discovery approach and identified ∼6,200 candidate enhancer sequences directly from fetal and adult human heart tissue. Consistent with their predicted function, these elements were markedly enriched near genes implicated in heart development, function and disease. To further validate their in vivo enhancer activity, we tested 65 of these human sequences in a transgenic mouse enhancer assay and observed that 43 (66%) drove reproducible reporter gene expression in the heart. These results support the discovery of a genome-wide set of noncoding sequences highly enriched in human heart enhancers that is likely to facilitate downstream studies of the role of enhancers in development and pathological conditions of the heart.

  11. Infrared absorption spectra of human malignant tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skornyakov, I. V.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Butra, V. A.

    2008-05-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study the molecular structure of tissues from human organs removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material from breast, thyroid, and lung are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, a change occurs in the hydrogen bonds of protein macromolecules found in the tissue of the studied organs. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathology.

  12. Engineered human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies (TLAs) are produced in a rotating wall vessel (RWV) with microcarriers by coculturing mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (BTC) and bronchial epithelium cells (BEC). These TLAs display structural characteristics and express markers of in vivo respiratory epithelia. TLAs are useful for screening compounds active in lung tissues such as antiviral compounds, cystic fibrosis treatments, allergens, and cytotoxic compounds.

  13. An improved cryopreservation procedure for human fetal pancreas tissues.

    PubMed

    Shiogama, T; Mullen, Y; Klandorf, H; Terada, M; Clark, W R

    1987-11-01

    Improved viability and function of insulin-producing beta (B) cells of frozen-stored human fetal pancreatic tissue was obtained by a two-step method utilizing high concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Human fetal pancreata (14-23-week gestation) obtained from pathologic abortions were teased and cultured overnight. Prior to freezing the tissues were immersed in 0.9% saline containing 0.5 M DMSO for 30 min (room temperature) and then placed in 2.1 M DMSO on ice for 5 min. The tissues were frozen by the method previously developed in our laboratory and stored at -196 degrees C. The frozen-stored tissues were subsequently thawed at 24 degrees C and cultured overnight before viability testing. Viability and function of the B cells were assessed by several specific assay methods; glucose plus theophylline-induced insulin release during static incubation and perifusion, 3H-leucine incorporation into insulin, and insulin content of the tissue grown in athymic mice for 7 days. The response to glucose plus theophylline stimulation, measured on the frozen-thawed tissue one day after thawing, was 80% of the level measured in control tissue maintained in organ culture. Frozen-thawed tissues maintained in organ culture for 1 week responded comparably in the in vitro assay systems. The insulin content of frozen-thawed pancreatic tissue removed from athymic mice 1 week after transplantation was approximately 60% of the amount measured in the control grafts. These results demonstrate the utility of our procedure in the maintenance of the viability and function of frozen-stored human B cells both in culture and after transplantation.

  14. Solubility of Freon 22 in human blood and lung tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Varene, N.; Choukroun, M.L.; Marthan, R.; Varene, P.

    1989-05-01

    The solubility of Freon 22 in human blood and lung tissue was determined using the chromatographic method of Wagner et al. In normal human blood, the mean Bunsen coefficient of solubility (alpha B) was 0.804 cm3 STPD.cm-3.ATA-1 at 37 degrees C. It increased with hematocrit (Hct) according to the equation alpha B = 0.274 Hct + 0.691. Tissue homogenates were prepared from macroscopically normal lung pieces obtained at thoracotomy from eight patients undergoing resection for lung carcinoma. The Bunsen solubility coefficients were 0.537 +/- 0.068 and 0.635 +/- 0.091 in washed and unwashed lung, respectively. These values can be used in the determination of both cardiac output and pulmonary tissue volume in humans by use of the rebreathing technique.

  15. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  16. Advancing biomaterials of human origin for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterials have played an increasingly prominent role in the success of biomedical devices and in the development of tissue engineering, which seeks to unlock the regenerative potential innate to human tissues/organs in a state of deterioration and to restore or reestablish normal bodily function. Advances in our understanding of regenerative biomaterials and their roles in new tissue formation can potentially open a new frontier in the fast-growing field of regenerative medicine. Taking inspiration from the role and multi-component construction of native extracellular matrices (ECMs) for cell accommodation, the synthetic biomaterials produced today routinely incorporate biologically active components to define an artificial in vivo milieu with complex and dynamic interactions that foster and regulate stem cells, similar to the events occurring in a natural cellular microenvironment. The range and degree of biomaterial sophistication have also dramatically increased as more knowledge has accumulated through materials science, matrix biology and tissue engineering. However, achieving clinical translation and commercial success requires regenerative biomaterials to be not only efficacious and safe but also cost-effective and convenient for use and production. Utilizing biomaterials of human origin as building blocks for therapeutic purposes has provided a facilitated approach that closely mimics the critical aspects of natural tissue with regard to its physical and chemical properties for the orchestration of wound healing and tissue regeneration. In addition to directly using tissue transfers and transplants for repair, new applications of human-derived biomaterials are now focusing on the use of naturally occurring biomacromolecules, decellularized ECM scaffolds and autologous preparations rich in growth factors/non-expanded stem cells to either target acceleration/magnification of the body's own repair capacity or use nature's paradigms to create new tissues for

  17. Advancing biomaterials of human origin for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Liu, Xiaohua

    2016-02-01

    Biomaterials have played an increasingly prominent role in the success of biomedical devices and in the development of tissue engineering, which seeks to unlock the regenerative potential innate to human tissues/organs in a state of deterioration and to restore or reestablish normal bodily function. Advances in our understanding of regenerative biomaterials and their roles in new tissue formation can potentially open a new frontier in the fast-growing field of regenerative medicine. Taking inspiration from the role and multi-component construction of native extracellular matrices (ECMs) for cell accommodation, the synthetic biomaterials produced today routinely incorporate biologically active components to define an artificial in vivo milieu with complex and dynamic interactions that foster and regulate stem cells, similar to the events occurring in a natural cellular microenvironment. The range and degree of biomaterial sophistication have also dramatically increased as more knowledge has accumulated through materials science, matrix biology and tissue engineering. However, achieving clinical translation and commercial success requires regenerative biomaterials to be not only efficacious and safe but also cost-effective and convenient for use and production. Utilizing biomaterials of human origin as building blocks for therapeutic purposes has provided a facilitated approach that closely mimics the critical aspects of natural tissue with regard to its physical and chemical properties for the orchestration of wound healing and tissue regeneration. In addition to directly using tissue transfers and transplants for repair, new applications of human-derived biomaterials are now focusing on the use of naturally occurring biomacromolecules, decellularized ECM scaffolds and autologous preparations rich in growth factors/non-expanded stem cells to either target acceleration/magnification of the body's own repair capacity or use nature's paradigms to create new tissues for

  18. Glomus tissue in the vicinity of the human carotid sinus.

    PubMed Central

    Garfia, A

    1980-01-01

    Three of 60 cadavers have shown, in the adventitia or in the adipose tissue from the human carotid sinus region, small islands of tissue richly and typically vascularized and with nerve endings contacting cells like the tissue of the principal carotid body. In two of the cases such 'miniglomera' were single but in the third there were several all on the same side. A modified en bloc silver nitrate reduction stain was used to demonstrate the microvascular arrangements and the nerve endings by light microscopy of serial tangential sections of the carotid bifurcation. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7364653

  19. Kallikrein 6 regulates early CNS demyelination in a viral model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Scarisbrick, Isobel A; Yoon, Hyesook; Panos, Michael; Larson, Nadya; Blaber, Sachiko I; Blaber, Michael; Rodriguez, Moses

    2012-09-01

    Kallikrein 6 (Klk6) is a secreted serine protease that is elevated in active multiple sclerosis lesions and patient sera. To further evaluate the involvement of Klk6 in chronic progressive demyelinating disease, we determined its expression in the brain and spinal cord of SJL mice infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) and assessed the effects of Klk6-neutralizing antibodies on disease progression. Klk6 RNA expression was elevated in the brain and spinal cord by 7 days postinfection (dpi). Thereafter, Klk6 expression persisted primarily in the spinal cord reaching a peak of fivefold over controls at mid-chronic stages (60 dpi-120 dpi). Significant elevations in Klk6 RNA were also induced in splenocytes stimulated with viral capsid proteins in vitro and in activated human acute monocytic leukemia cells. Klk6-neutralizing antibodies reduced TMEV-driven brain and spinal cord pathology and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses when examined at early chronic time points (40 dpi). Reductions in spinal cord pathology included a decrease in activated monocytes/microglia and reductions in the loss of myelin basic protein (MBP). By 180 dpi, pathology scores no longer differed between groups. These findings point to regulatory activities for Klk6 in the development and progression of central nervous system (CNS) inflammation and demyelination that can be effectively targeted through the early chronic stages with neutralizing antibody.

  20. Transgenic kallikrein 5 mice reproduce major cutaneous and systemic hallmarks of Netherton syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Furio, Laetitia; de Veer, Simon; Jaillet, Madeleine; Briot, Anais; Robin, Aurelie; Deraison, Celine

    2014-01-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a severe genetic skin disease in which absence of a key protease inhibitor causes congenital exfoliative erythroderma, eczematous-like lesions, and atopic manifestations. Several proteases are overactive in NS, including kallikrein-related peptidase (KLK) 5, KLK7, and elastase-2 (ELA2), which are suggested to be part of a proteolytic cascade initiated by KLK5. To address the role of KLK5 in NS, we have generated a new transgenic murine model expressing human KLK5 in the granular layer of the epidermis (Tg-KLK5). Transgene expression resulted in increased proteolytic activity attributable to KLK5 and its downstream targets KLK7, KLK14, and ELA2. Tg-KLK5 mice developed an exfoliative erythroderma with scaling, growth delay, and hair abnormalities. The skin barrier was defective and the stratum corneum was detached through desmosomal cleavage. Importantly, Tg-KLK5 mice displayed cutaneous and systemic hallmarks of severe inflammation and allergy with pruritus. The skin showed enhanced expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, infiltration of immune cells, and markers of Th2/Th17/Th22 T cell responses. Moreover, serum IgE and Tslp levels were elevated. Our study identifies KLK5 as an important contributor to the NS proteolytic cascade and provides a new and viable model for the evaluation of future targeted therapies for NS or related diseases such as atopic dermatitis. PMID:24534191

  1. Effect of various concentrations of caffeine, pentoxifylline, and kallikrein on hyperactivation of frozen bovine semen.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Ibrahim A H; Danfour, Mohamed A; Galewan, Fatma A M; Dkhil, Mohamed A

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, pentoxifylline, and kallikrein are substances that affect the efficiency of sperms in the fertilization process; however, they have not been adequately studied. The present study aimed to examine the influence of caffeine, kallikrein, and pentoxifylline on sperm motility in bovine as well as investigate their optimum concentrations for increasing the movement of sperms in bovine. Frozen bovine sperms were thawed in universal IVF medium supplemented with 1, 5, and 10 mM caffeine or pentoxifylline or 1, 4, and 8 U/mL kallikrein and were then incubated for 30 min. Treated semen parameters were analyzed using a computer assisted semen analyzer (CASA). Data analysis showed that the mean values concerning progression and motility of sperm increased in caffeine and pentoxifylline treatments when compared with the kallikrein group. The obtained results revealed that kallikrein is not necessary for the improvement of bovine sperm motility. Additionally, our results revealed that 5 mM from caffeine was the best concentration added to the medium, followed by 1 or 5 mM from pentoxifylline. Therefore, it is concluded from the present study that caffeine has hyperactivation efficacy at 5 mM concentration compared to other treatments.

  2. Immunohistochemical characterization of FHIT expression in normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kujan, Omar; Abuderman, Abdulwahab; Al-Shawaf, Ahmad Zahi

    2016-01-01

    Background Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) is a tumor suppressor gene that is commonly inactivated in human tumors. Interestingly, the normal pattern of FHIT expression is largely unknown. Aim This study is aimed to characterize the expression of FHIT protein in normal human tissues. Materials and methods A total of 119 normal human tissue specimens were analyzed for the FHIT expression using immunohistochemistry technique. The inclusion criteria included: normal/inflammatory tissue with no evidence of cellular atypia. Results All studied specimens were stained positively with FHIT and showed either nuclear or cytoplasmic expression. Interestingly, the pattern of FHIT staining was similar among different specimens from each organ. FHIT is located predominantly in the nucleus, although cytoplasmic staining is also present in some cell types. Oral squamous epithelium, breast ductal epithelium, squamous and tubal metaplastic epithelium of the uterine cervix, esophageal squamous epithelium, salivary glands, and bronchial epithelia all strongly expressed the nuclear protein. In connective tissue, FHIT has shown strong cytoplasmic expression in histocytes including macrophages and dendritic cells, fibroblasts, and myofibroblasts. Conclusion Documentation of the pattern of FHIT expression in normal tissues will contribute to our understanding of the normal function of this protein and to interpretation of potentially altered FHIT expression in human tumors. PMID:28250975

  3. Biomechanical behavior of pericardial human tissue: a constitutive formulation.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Piero G; Pachera, Paola; Tiengo, Cesare; Natali, Arturo N

    2014-09-01

    This work aims to present a constitutive model suitable to interpret the biomechanical response of human pericardial tissues. The model is consistent with the need of describing large strains, anisotropy, almost incompressibility, and time-dependent effects. Attention is given to human pericardial tissue because of the increased interest in its application as a substitute in reconstructive surgery. Specific, even limited, experimental investigation has been performed on human samples taken from surgical grafts in order to verify the capability of the constitutive model in supplying a correct description of tissue mechanical response. Experimental data include uni-axial tensile tests and stress relaxation tests up to 300 s, developed along different directions of the tissue. The grafts tested show different mechanical characteristics for what concern the level of anisotropy of the tissue. The constitutive model proposed shows to adapt to the different configurations of the human pericardium grafts, as emerged by experimental data considered, and it is capable to describe the variability of the mechanical characteristics.

  4. Near Infrared Spectral Determination of Human Tissue pH.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    Continuous Tissue pH Monitory in the Human Fetus During Labor", Obstet . Gynecol ., 55:523, 1980. 23. [Lemer 82] Lemer, H., et al., "Measurement of Glucose...Umbilical Blood pH", Am. J. Obstet . Gynecol ., 128: 901-903, 1977. 38. [Weyer 85] Weyer, L G., "Near Infrared Spectroscopy of Organic Substances," Applied...Patterns and Tissue pH in the Human Fetus", Am. J. Obstet . Gynecol ., 134:685-690, 1979. 24 Appendix I An Estimation Extension of the FKNN Algorithm In

  5. Transepithelial Transport of PAMAM Dendrimers Across Isolated Human Intestinal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Dallin; Enda, Michael; Bond, Tanner; Moghaddam, Seyyed Pouya Hadipour; Conarton, Josh; Scaife, Courtney; Volckmann, Eric; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2015-11-02

    Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have shown transepithelial transport across intestinal epithelial barrier in rats and across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Caco-2 models innately lack mucous barriers, and rat isolated intestinal tissue has been shown to overestimate human permeability. This study is the first report of transport of PAMAM dendrimers across isolated human intestinal epithelium. It was observed that FITC labeled G4-NH2 and G3.5-COOH PAMAM dendrimers at 1 mM concentration do not have a statistically higher permeability compared to free FITC controls in isolated human jejunum and colonic tissues. Mannitol permeability was increased at 10 mM concentrations of G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 dendrimers. Significant histological changes in human colonic and jejunal tissues were observed at G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 concentrations of 10 mM implying that dose limiting toxicity may occur at similar concentrations in vivo. The permeability through human isolated intestinal tissue in this study was compared to previous rat and Caco-2 permeability data. This study implicates that PAMAM dendrimer oral drug delivery may be feasible, but it may be limited to highly potent drugs.

  6. Kinins— The Kallikrein-Kinin System and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kayashima, Yukako; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review The Kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) constitutes a complex multi-enzyme cascade that produces several bioactive kinin peptides and their derivatives including bradykinin. In addition to the classical notion of the KKS as a potent vasodilator and a mediator of inflammatory responses, recent studies suggest a link between the KKS and oxidative stress. A number of established mouse model with altered levels of KKS components opened the way to evaluate precise functions of the KKS. Here we review recent findings on the role of the KKS in cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney diseases, and discuss potential benefits of KKS activation in these diseases. Recent findings Deletion of both B1R and B2R in a diabetic mouse model exacerbates its renal phenotypes, suggesting that the KKS exerts protective effects on diabetic nephropathy by suppressing oxidative stress, presumably via nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PGs). Summary Accumulating evidence has highlighted the importance of the KKS as a protective system against oxidative stress and organ damage in the heart and kidney. The activation of the KKS by ACE inhibitors and vasopeptidase inhibitors is likely to be beneficial in senescence-associated cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney diseases. PMID:22048723

  7. The kallikrein-kinin system in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hirofumi; Sanford, Ryan B.; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the major cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Although the renin-angiotensin system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have a beneficial effect on diabetic nephropathy independently of their effects on blood pressure and plasma angiotensin II levels. This suggests that the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is also involved in the disease. To study the role of the KKS in diabetic nephropathy, mice lacking either the bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R) or the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) have been commonly used. However, because absence of either receptor causes enhanced expression of the other, it is difficult to determine the precise functions of each receptor. This difficulty has recently been overcome by comparing mice lacking both receptors with mice lacking each receptor. Deletion of both B1R and B2R reduces nitric oxide (NO) production and aggravates renal diabetic phenotypes, relevant to either lack of B1R or B2R, demonstrating that both B1R and B2R exert protective effects on diabetic nephropathy presumably via NO. Here, we review previous epidemiological and experimental studies, and discuss novel insights regarding the therapeutic implications of the importance of the KKS in averting diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22318421

  8. Discordance of DNA Methylation Variance Between two Accessible Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ruiwei; Jones, Meaghan J.; Chen, Edith; Neumann, Sarah M.; Fraser, Hunter B.; Miller, Gregory E.; Kobor, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Population epigenetic studies have been seeking to identify differences in DNA methylation between specific exposures, demographic factors, or diseases in accessible tissues, but relatively little is known about how inter-individual variability differs between these tissues. This study presents an analysis of DNA methylation differences between matched peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs) and buccal epithelial cells (BECs), the two most accessible tissues for population studies, in 998 promoter-located CpG sites. Specifically we compared probe-wise DNA methylation variance, and how this variance related to demographic factors across the two tissues. PBMCs had overall higher DNA methylation than BECs, and the two tissues tended to differ most at genomic regions of low CpG density. Furthermore, although both tissues showed appreciable probe-wise variability, the specific regions and magnitude of variability differed strongly between tissues. Lastly, through exploratory association analysis, we found indication of differential association of BEC and PBMC with demographic variables. The work presented here offers insight into variability of DNA methylation between individuals and across tissues and helps guide decisions on the suitability of buccal epithelial or peripheral mononuclear cells for the biological questions explored by epigenetic studies in human populations. PMID:25660083

  9. Cortisol in human tissues at different stages of life.

    PubMed

    Costa, A; Benedetto, C; Fabris, C; Giraudi, G F; Testori, O; Bertino, E; Marozio, L; Varvello, G; Arisio, R; Ariano, M; Emanuel, A

    1996-01-01

    Aim of the work was to measure the cortisol level in human tissues at different stages of life, by means of radioimmunoassay and by chromatography. Viable samples of 13 different tissues were obtained during surgical intervention from 30 to 70 years old patients of either sex. Mean tissue cortisol concentration was 78 +/- 35 ng/g, ranging from 20 +/- 10 ng/g in the thyroid to 124 +/- 76 ng/g in the kidney. Similar values were measured in the corresponding tissues from not decayed corpses, so that paired values could be mediated. However the pancreas, and corrupted autopsy tissues, gave nil or exceedingly high cortisol concentration values; in some cases, opposite extreme values were measured in different organs of the same body. Cortisol concentration was also measured in 11 sound different tissues of spontaneously aborted or stillbirth fetuses, between 16 and 36 weeks of gestation. Mean value was 63 +/- 27 ng/g, ranging from 30 +/- 25 ng/g in the liver to 104 +/- 52 ng/g in the lungs. Also in fetuses nil or exceedingly high cortisol values occurred in altered tissues. One hundred and fourteen samples of limbs and carcasses of 7 to 12 gestational weeks embryos, obtained from voluntary abortions, were also examined: 20% gave nil result, in the remaining mean cortisol concentration was 32 ng/g. In 33 samples of embryos' mixed viscera, RIA and chromatography gave unreliable exceedingly high values. The nil and the exceedingly high values measured in the altered autoptic tissue specimens were inconsistent with the cortisol blood level measured in the patients, as were those measured in embryonic tissues with the acknowledged blood and adrenals cortisol levels at that stage of life. Thus cortisol may be measured by RIA and by chromatography in sound tissues, while the values obtained in the pancreas, in corrupted tissues, and in embryonal viscera do not represent the hormonal milieu, but are likely artifacts due to impeachment of the diagnostic system.

  10. Inhaled cellulosic and plastic fibers found in human lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Pauly, J L; Stegmeier, S J; Allaart, H A; Cheney, R T; Zhang, P J; Mayer, A G; Streck, R J

    1998-05-01

    We report the results of studies undertaken to determine whether inhaled plant (i.e., cellulosic; e.g., cotton) and plastic (e.g., polyester) fibers are present in human lungs and, if so, whether inhaled fibers are also present in human lung cancers. Specimens of lung cancer of different histological types and adjacent nonneoplastic lung tissue were obtained from patients undergoing a lung resection for removal of a tumor. With the protection of a laminar flow hood and safeguards to prevent contamination by extraneous fibers, fresh, nonfixed, and nonstained samples of lung tissue were compressed between two glass microscope slides. Specimens in these dual slide chambers were examined with a microscope configured to permit viewing with white light, fluorescent light, polarizing light, and phase-contrast illumination. Near-term fetal bovine lungs and nonlung human tumors were used as controls. In contrast to the observations of these control tissues, morphologically heterogeneous fibers were seen repetitively in freshly excised human lung tissue using polarized light. Inhaled fibers were present in 83% of nonneoplastic lung specimens (n = 67/81) and in 97% of malignant lung specimens (n = 32/33). Thus, of the 114 human lung specimens examined, fibers were observed in 99 (87%). Examination of histopathology slides of lung tissue with polarized light confirmed the presence of inhaled cellulosic and plastic fibers. Of 160 surgical histopathology lung tissue slides, 17 were selected for critical examination; of these, fibers were identified in 13 slides. The inhalation of mineral (e.g., asbestos) fibers has been described by many investigators; we believe, however, that this is the first report of inhaled nonmineral (e.g., plant and plastic) fibers. These bioresistant and biopersistent cellulosic and plastic fibers are candidate agents contributing to the risk of lung cancer.

  11. Electrospun human keratin matrices as templates for tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sow, Wan Ting; Lui, Yuan Siang; Ng, Kee Woei

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of fabricating human hair keratin matrices through electrospinning and to evaluate the potential of these matrices for tissue regeneration. Keratin was extracted from human hair using Na2S and blended with poly(ethylene oxide) in the weight ratio of 60:1 for electrospinning. Physical morphology and chemical properties of the matrices were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Cell viability and morphology of murine and human fibroblasts cultured on the matrices were evaluated through the Live/Dead(®) assay and scanning electron microscopy. Electrospun keratin matrices were successfully produced without affecting the chemical conformation of keratin. Fibroblasts cultured on keratin matrices showed healthy morphology and penetration into matrices at day 7. Electrospun human hair keratin matrices provide a bioinductive and structural environment for cell growth and are thus attractive as alternative templates for tissue regeneration.

  12. Roles of kallikrein-2 biomarkers (free-hK2 and pro-hK2) for predicting prostate cancer progression-free survival.

    PubMed

    Guerrico, Anatilde Gonzalez; Hillman, David; Karnes, Jeffery; Davis, Brian; Gaston, Steven; Klee, George

    2017-01-01

    Free human kallikrein 2 (free-hK2) and hK2 pro-form (pro-hK2) have been found to be increased in tumor tissues and serum from patients with prostate cancer. We established semiautomatic assays for free-hK2 and pro-hK2 using a research version of the Beckman Coulter ACCESS2 system. Serum samples from a cohort of 189 men undergoing radical prostatectomy for known high-risk disease were assayed for Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA), free-PSA, free-hK2, and pro-hK2. Univariate Cox regression and multivariate models were used to predict both Gleason scores and progression-free survival (PFS). Free-hk2 levels ≥80 ng/L were predictive of both Gleason scores ≥7 (p = 0.04) and PFS (p = 0.03). PSA ≥8.0 µg/L also was predictive of PFS (p = 0.02). However, neither % free-PSA nor pro-hK2, when treated as continuous or cutoff variables were associated with Gleason score or PFS. Multivariable models showed that clinical stage T1c versus T2/T3, Gleason score ≥7, and PSA ≥8.0 µg/L or clinical stage T1c versus T2/T3, Gleason scores ≥7, and free-hK2 ≥80 ng/L were among the best models predicting PFS. Both free-hK2 and PSA in conjunction with clinical stage and Gleason score are good predictors of PFS in prostate cancer.

  13. Formation of tissue factor activity following incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein with plasma lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, T.; Kisiel, W. )

    1990-11-01

    Incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein (Apo-TF) with human plasma decreased the recalcified clotting time of this plasma in a time-and dose-dependent manner suggesting relipidation of the Apo-TF by plasma lipoproteins. Incubation of Apo-TF with purified preparations of human very low density, low density and high density lipoproteins resulted in tissue factor activity in a clotting assay. The order of effectiveness was VLDL greater than LDL much greater than HDL. Tissue factor activity generated by incubation of a fixed amount of Apo-TF with plasma lipoproteins was lipoprotein concentration-dependent and saturable. The association of Apo-TF with lipoprotein particles was supported by gel filtration studies in which {sup 125}I-Apo-TF coeluted with the plasma lipoprotein in the void volume of a Superose 6 column in the presence and absence of calcium ions. In addition, void-volume Apo-TF-lipoprotein fractions exhibited tissue factor activity. These results suggest that the factor VIII-bypassing activity of bovine Apo-TF observed in a canine hemophilic model may be due, in part, to its association with plasma lipoproteins and expression of functional tissue factor activity.

  14. Magnetic studies of iron-entities in human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ślawska-Waniewska, A.; Mosiniewicz-Szablewska, E.; Nedelko, N.; Gałązka-Friedman, J.; Friedman, A.

    2004-05-01

    Iron-entities in the human liver, brain and blood tissues have been investigated by means of EPR spectroscopy and magnetization measurements over the temperature range 4-300 K. The identification of the most typical forms of iron in the human body (i.e. isolated Fe-ions bonded in hemoglobin and transferrin as well as exchange coupled Fe-ions in nanosized ferritin cores) is presented.

  15. Translational neuropharmacology: the use of human isolated gastrointestinal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, GJ; Broad, J; Kung, V; Knowles, CH

    2013-01-01

    Translational sciences increasingly emphasize the measurement of functions in native human tissues. However, such studies must confront variations in patient age, gender, genetic background and disease. Here, these are discussed with reference to neuromuscular and neurosecretory functions of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Tissues are obtained after informed consent, in collaboration with surgeons (surgical techniques help minimize variables) and pathologists. Given the difficulties of directly recording from human myenteric neurones (embedded between muscle layers), enteric motor nerve functions are studied by measuring muscle contractions/relaxations evoked by electrical stimulation of intrinsic nerves; responses are regionally dependent, often involving cholinergic and nitrergic phenotypes. Enteric sensory functions can be studied by evoking the peristaltic reflex, involving enteric sensory and motor nerves, but this has rarely been achieved. As submucosal neurones are more accessible (after removing the mucosa), direct neuronal recordings are possible. Neurosecretory functions are studied by measuring changes in short-circuit current across the mucosa. For all experiments, basic questions must be addressed. Because tissues are from patients, what are the controls and the influence of disease? How long does it take before function fully recovers? What is the impact of age- and gender-related differences? What is the optimal sample size? Addressing these and other questions minimizes variability and raises the scientific credibility of human tissue research. Such studies also reduce animal use. Further, the many differences between animal and human GI functions also means that human tissue research must question the ethical validity of using strains of animals with unproved translational significance. Linked Article BJP published a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology in 2011. To view the articles in this themed issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10

  16. Transcriptome reveals the overexpression of a kallikrein gene cluster (KLK1/3/7/8/12) in the Tibetans with high altitude-associated polycythemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Gesang, Luobu; Dan, Zeng; Gusang, Lamu

    2017-02-01

    High altitude-associated polycythemia (HAPC) is a very common disease. However, it the disease is still unmanageable and the related molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. In the present study, we aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of HAPC using transcriptome analysis. Transcriptome analysis was conducted in 3 pairs of gastric mucosa tissues from patients with HAPC and healthy residents at a similar altitude. Endoscopy and histopathological analyses were used to examine the injury to gastric tissues. Molecular remodeling was performed for the interaction between different KLK members and cholesterol. HAPC was found to lead to morphological changes and pathological damage to the gastric mucosa of patients. A total of 10,304 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified. Among these genes, 4,941 DEGs were upregulated, while 5,363 DEGs were downregulated in the patients with HAPC (fold change ≥2, P<0.01 and FDR <0.01). In particular, the kallikrein gene cluster (KLK1/3/7/8/12) was upregulated >17-fold. All the members had high-score binding cholesterol, particularly for the polymers of KLK7. The kallikrein gene cluster (KLK1/3/7/8/12) is on chromosome 19q13.3-13.4. The elevated levels of KLK1, KLK3, KLK7, KLK8 and KLK12 may be closely associated with the hypertension, inflammation, obesity and other gastric injuries associated with polycythemia. The interaction of KLKs and cholesterol maybe play an important role in the development of hypertension. The findings of the present study revealed that HAPC induces gastric injury by upregulating the kallikrein gene cluster (KLK1/3/7/8/12), which can bind cholesterol and result in kallikrein hypertension. These findings provide some basic information for understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for HAPC and HAPC-related diseases.

  17. Microimaging FT-IR of oral cavity tumours. Part III: Cells, inoculated tissues and human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, C.; Ferraris, P.; Giorgini, E.; Pieramici, T.; Possati, L.; Rocchetti, R.; Rubini, C.; Sabbatini, S.; Tosi, G.; Mariggiò, M. A.; Lo Muzio, L.

    2007-05-01

    The biochemistry of healthy and tumour cell cultures, inoculated tissues and oral cavity tissues have been studied by FT-IR Microscopy with the aim to relate spectral patterns with microbiological and histopathological findings. 'Supervised' and 'unsupervised' procedures of data handling afforded a satisfactory degree of accordance between spectroscopic and the other two techniques. In particular, changes in frequency and intensity of proteins, connective and nucleic acids vibrational modes as well as the visualization of biochemical single wave number or band ratio images, allowed an evaluation of the pathological changes. The spectroscopic patterns of inoculated tissues resulted quite similar to human tissues; differences of both types of sections with cellular lines could be explained by the influence of the environment.

  18. Collagen in Human Tissues: Structure, Function, and Biomedical Implications from a Tissue Engineering Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Preethi; Prabhakaran, Molamma P.; Sireesha, Merum; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    The extracellular matrix is a complex biological structure encoded with various proteins, among which the collagen family is the most significant and abundant of all, contributing 30-35% of the whole-body protein. "Collagen" is a generic term for proteins that forms a triple-helical structure with three polypeptide chains, and around 29 types of collagen have been identified up to now. Although most of the members of the collagen family form such supramolecular structures, extensive diversity exists between each type of collagen. The diversity is not only based on the molecular assembly and supramolecular structures of collagen types but is also observed within its tissue distribution, function, and pathology. Collagens possess complex hierarchical structures and are present in various forms such as collagen fibrils (1.5-3.5 nm wide), collagen fibers (50-70 nm wide), and collagen bundles (150-250 nm wide), with distinct properties characteristic of each tissue providing elasticity to skin, softness of the cartilage, stiffness of the bone and tendon, transparency of the cornea, opaqueness of the sclera, etc. There exists an exclusive relation between the structural features of collagen in human tissues (such as the collagen composition, collagen fibril length and diameter, collagen distribution, and collagen fiber orientation) and its tissue-specific mechanical properties. In bone, a transverse collagen fiber orientation prevails in regions of higher compressive stress whereas longitudinally oriented collagen fibers correlate to higher tensile stress. The immense versatility of collagen compels a thorough understanding of the collagen types and this review discusses the major types of collagen found in different human tissues, highlighting their tissue-specific uniqueness based on their structure and mechanical function. The changes in collagen during a specific tissue damage or injury are discussed further, focusing on the many tissue engineering applications for

  19. Tissue distribution of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Jbilo, O.; Barteles, C.F.; Chatonnet, A.; Toutant, J.P.; Lockridge, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tissue distribution of human acetyicholinesterase and butyryicholinesterase messenger RNA. 1 Cholinesterase inhibitors occur naturally in the calabar bean (eserine), green potatoes (solanine), insect-resistant crab apples, the coca plant (cocaine) and snake venom (fasciculin). There are also synthetic cholinesterase inhibitors, for example man-made insecticides. These inhibitors inactivate acetyicholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase as well as other targets. From a study of the tissue distribution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase mRNA by Northern blot analysis, we have found the highest levels of butyrylcholinesterase mRNA in the liver and lungs, tissues known as the principal detoxication sites of the human body. These results indicate that butyrylcholinesterase may be a first line of defense against poisons that are eaten or inhaled.

  20. Arrhenius parameters for primary thermal injury in human tonsillar tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kathleen; Radabaugh, Rebecca; Coad, James E.

    2011-03-01

    Clinical implementation of a thermal therapy requires the ability to predict tissue injury following exposures to specific thermal histories. As part of an effort to develop a nonexcisional alternative to tonsillectomy, the degree of primary hyperthermic tissue injury in human tonsil was characterized. Fifteen fresh pediatric hypertrophic tonsillectomy specimens were sectioned and treated in a NIST-calibrated saline bath at temperatures of 40 to 70°C with hold times of one to seven minutes. The treated tissues were subsequently nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) stained to assess for thermal respiratory enzyme inactivation as a marker of cellular injury/death. The NBT stains were quantitatively image analyzed and used to calculate Arrhenius parameters for primary thermal injury in human tonsils.

  1. Plant-derived human collagen scaffolds for skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Willard, James J; Drexler, Jason W; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Shilo, Shani; Shoseyov, Oded; Powell, Heather M

    2013-07-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly formed using proteins extracted from animal tissues, such as bovine hide. Risks associated with the use of these materials include hypersensitivity and pathogenic contamination. Human-derived proteins lower the risk of hypersensitivity, but possess the risk of disease transmission. Methods engineering recombinant human proteins using plant material provide an alternate source of these materials without the risk of disease transmission or concerns regarding variability. To investigate the utility of plant-derived human collagen (PDHC) in the development of engineered skin (ES), PDHC and bovine hide collagen were formed into tissue engineering scaffolds using electrospinning or freeze-drying. Both raw materials were easily formed into two common scaffold types, electrospun nonwoven scaffolds and lyophilized sponges, with similar architectures. The processing time, however, was significantly lower with PDHC. PDHC scaffolds supported primary human cell attachment and proliferation at an equivalent or higher level than the bovine material. Interleukin-1 beta production was significantly lower when activated THP-1 macrophages where exposed to PDHC electrospun scaffolds compared to bovine collagen. Both materials promoted proper maturation and differentiation of ES. These data suggest that PDHC may provide a novel source of raw material for tissue engineering with low risk of allergic response or disease transmission.

  2. Plant-Derived Human Collagen Scaffolds for Skin Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Willard, James J.; Drexler, Jason W.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Shilo, Shani; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly formed using proteins extracted from animal tissues, such as bovine hide. Risks associated with the use of these materials include hypersensitivity and pathogenic contamination. Human-derived proteins lower the risk of hypersensitivity, but possess the risk of disease transmission. Methods engineering recombinant human proteins using plant material provide an alternate source of these materials without the risk of disease transmission or concerns regarding variability. To investigate the utility of plant-derived human collagen (PDHC) in the development of engineered skin (ES), PDHC and bovine hide collagen were formed into tissue engineering scaffolds using electrospinning or freeze-drying. Both raw materials were easily formed into two common scaffold types, electrospun nonwoven scaffolds and lyophilized sponges, with similar architectures. The processing time, however, was significantly lower with PDHC. PDHC scaffolds supported primary human cell attachment and proliferation at an equivalent or higher level than the bovine material. Interleukin-1 beta production was significantly lower when activated THP-1 macrophages where exposed to PDHC electrospun scaffolds compared to bovine collagen. Both materials promoted proper maturation and differentiation of ES. These data suggest that PDHC may provide a novel source of raw material for tissue engineering with low risk of allergic response or disease transmission. PMID:23298216

  3. Engineering musculoskeletal tissues with human embryonic germ cell derivatives.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Shyni; Hwang, Nathaniel S; Ferran, Angela; Hillel, Alexander; Theprungsirikul, Parnduangjai; Canver, Adam C; Zhang, Zijun; Gearhart, John; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2010-04-01

    The cells derived from differentiating embryoid bodies of human embryonic germ (hEG) cells express a broad spectrum of gene markers and have been induced toward ecto- and endodermal lineages. We describe here in vitro and in vivo differentiation of hEG-derived cells (LVEC line) toward mesenchymal tissues. The LVEC cells express many surface marker proteins characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells and differentiated into cartilage, bone, and fat. Homogenous hyaline cartilage was generated from cells after 63 population doublings. In vivo results demonstrate cell survival, differentiation, and tissue formation. The high proliferative capacity of hEG-derived cells and their ability to differentiate and form three-dimensional mesenchymal tissues without teratoma formation underscores their significant potential for regenerative medicine. The adopted coculture system also provides new insights into how a microenvironment comprised of extracellular and cellular components may be harnessed to generate hierarchically complex tissues from pluripotent cells.

  4. Method for characterizing viscoelasticity of human gluteal tissue.

    PubMed

    Then, C; Vogl, T J; Silber, G

    2012-04-30

    Characterizing compressive transient large deformation properties of biological tissue is becoming increasingly important in impact biomechanics and rehabilitation engineering, which includes devices interfacing with the human body and virtual surgical guidance simulation. Individual mechanical in vivo behaviour, specifically of human gluteal adipose and passive skeletal muscle tissue compressed with finite strain, has, however, been sparsely characterised. Employing a combined experimental and numerical approach, a method is presented to investigate the time-dependent properties of in vivo gluteal adipose and passive skeletal muscle tissue. Specifically, displacement-controlled ramp-and-hold indentation relaxation tests were performed and documented with magnetic resonance imaging. A time domain quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) formulation with Prony series valid for finite strains was used in conjunction with a hyperelastic model formulation for soft tissue constitutive model parameter identification and calibration of the relaxation test data. A finite element model of the indentation region was employed. Strong non-linear elastic but linear viscoelastic tissue material behaviour at finite strains was apparent for both adipose and passive skeletal muscle mechanical properties with orthogonal skin and transversal muscle fibre loading. Using a force-equilibrium assumption, the employed material model was well suited to fit the experimental data and derive viscoelastic model parameters by inverse finite element parameter estimation. An individual characterisation of in vivo gluteal adipose and muscle tissue could thus be established. Initial shear moduli were calculated from the long-term parameters for human gluteal skin/fat: G(∞,S/F)=1850 Pa and for cross-fibre gluteal muscle tissue: G(∞,M)=881 Pa. Instantaneous shear moduli were found at the employed ramp speed: G(0,S/F)=1920 Pa and G(0,M)=1032 Pa. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Human Breast Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Chellakkan Selvanesan; Babu, Somasundaram Dinesh; Radhakrishna, Selvi; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan; Sankar, Bhaskaran Ravi

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women in the world today. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of endopeptidases that can degrade extracellular matrix proteins and promote cell invasion and metastasis. MMPs are differentially expressed and their expressions are often associated with a poor prognosis for patients. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate and compare the expression of MMPs in different grades of human breast cancer tissues with normal breast tissues. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We collected 39 breast cancer samples (24 grade II and 15 grade III) along with 16 normal breast tissues from outside the tumor margin during cancer removal surgery. The samples were analysed for the expression of all known MMPs using real-time quantitative PCR. RESULTS: The results indicate that mRNA expressions of MMP-1, -9,-11,-15,-24 and -25 were upregulated in breast cancer tissues when compared to normal breast tissues. But, the mRNA expressions of MMP-10 and MMP-19 were downregulated in cancer tissue. In membrane associated MMPs like MMP-15 and MMP-24 we found a grade dependent increase of their mRNA expression. CONCLUSION: Our studies demonstrate that MMPs are differentially regulated in breast cancer tissues and they might play various roles in tumor invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Thus, MMPs are of immense value to be studied as diagnostic markers and drug target. PMID:23568046

  6. Assessment of permeation of lipoproteins in human carotid tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Syed, Saba H.; Leba, Michael; Morrisett, Joel D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in the United States. Specifically, atherosclerosis is an increasingly devastating contributor to the tally and has been found to be a byproduct of arterial permeability irregularities in regards to lipoprotein penetration. To further explore arterial physiology and molecular transport, the imaging technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was employed. With OCT, the permeation of glucose (MW = 180 Da), low density lipoprotein (LDL; MW = 2.1 × 106 Da), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; MW = 2.5 × 105 Da) in human carotid tissue was studied to determine the effect of different molecular characteristics on permeation in atherosclerotic tissues. The permeability rates calculated from the diffusion of the molecular agents into the abnormal carotid tissue samples is compared to those of normal, healthy tissue. The results show that in the abnormal tissue, the permeation of agents correlate to the size constraints. The larger molecules of LDL diffuse the slowest, while the smallest molecules of glucose diffuse the fastest. However, in normal tissue, LDL permeates at a faster rate than the other two agents, implying the existence of a transport mechanism that facilitates the passage of LDL molecules. These results highlight the capability of OCT as a sensitive and specific imaging technique as well as provide significant information to the understanding of atherosclerosis and its effect on tissue properties.

  7. Human cancers overexpress genes that are specific to a variety of normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, Joseph; Netanely, Dvir; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression data from three different kinds of samples: normal human tissues, human cancer cell lines, and leukemic cells from lymphoid and myeloid leukemia pediatric patients. We have searched for genes that are overexpressed in human cancer and also show specific patterns of tissue-dependent expression in normal tissues. Using the expression data of the normal tissues, we identified 4,346 genes with a high variability of expression and clustered these genes according to their relative expression level. Of 91 stable clusters obtained, 24 clusters included genes preferentially expressed either only in hematopoietic tissues or in hematopoietic and one to two other tissues; 28 clusters included genes preferentially expressed in various nonhematopoietic tissues such as neuronal, testis, liver, kidney, muscle, lung, pancreas, and placenta. Analysis of the expression levels of these two groups of genes in the human cancer cell lines and leukemias identified genes that were highly expressed in cancer cells but not in their normal counterparts and, thus, were overexpressed in the cancers. The different cancer cell lines and leukemias varied in the number and identity of these overexpressed genes. The results indicate that many genes that are overexpressed in human cancer cells are specific to a variety of normal tissues, including normal tissues other than those from which the cancer originated. It is suggested that this general property of cancer cells plays a major role in determining the behavior of the cancers, including their metastatic potential. PMID:16339305

  8. Functional Tissue Analysis Reveals Successful Cryopreservation of Human Osteoarthritic Synovium

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Marieke; Bennink, Miranda B.; van Lent, Peter L. E. M.; van der Kraan, Peter M.; Koenders, Marije I.; Thurlings, Rogier M.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease affecting cartilage and is the most common form of arthritis worldwide. One third of OA patients have severe synovitis and less than 10% have no evidence of synovitis. Moreover, synovitis is predictive for more severe disease progression. This offers a target for therapy but more research on the pathophysiological processes in the synovial tissue of these patients is needed. Functional studies performed with synovial tissue will be more approachable when this material, that becomes available by joint replacement surgery, can be stored for later use. We set out to determine the consequences of slow-freezing of human OA synovial tissue. Therefore, we validated a method that can be applied in every routine laboratory and performed a comparative study of five cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions. To determine possible deleterious cryopreservation-thaw effects on viability, the synovial tissue architecture, metabolic activity, RNA quality, expression of cryopreservation associated stress genes, and expression of OA characteristic disease genes was studied. Furthermore, the biological activity of the cryopreserved tissue was determined by measuring cytokine secretion induced by the TLR ligands lipopolysaccharides and Pam3Cys. Compared to non frozen synovium, no difference in cell and tissue morphology could be identified in the conditions using the CS10, standard and CryoSFM CPA solution for cryopreservation. However, we observed significantly lower preservation of tissue morphology with the Biofreeze and CS2 media. The other viability assays showed trends in the same direction but were not sensitive enough to detect significant differences between conditions. In all assays tested a clearly lower viability was detected in the condition in which synovium was frozen without CPA solution. This detailed analysis showed that OA synovial tissue explants can be cryopreserved while maintaining the morphology, viability and

  9. Profiling RNA editing in human tissues: towards the inosinome Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Ernesto; Manzari, Caterina; Mastropasqua, Francesca; Aiello, Italia; D’Erchia, Anna Maria; Pesole, Graziano

    2015-01-01

    Adenine to Inosine RNA editing is a widespread co- and post-transcriptional mechanism mediated by ADAR enzymes acting on double stranded RNA. It has a plethora of biological effects, appears to be particularly pervasive in humans with respect to other mammals, and is implicated in a number of diverse human pathologies. Here we present the first human inosinome atlas comprising 3,041,422 A-to-I events identified in six tissues from three healthy individuals. Matched directional total-RNA-Seq and whole genome sequence datasets were generated and analysed within a dedicated computational framework, also capable of detecting hyper-edited reads. Inosinome profiles are tissue specific and edited gene sets consistently show enrichment of genes involved in neurological disorders and cancer. Overall frequency of editing also varies, but is strongly correlated with ADAR expression levels. The inosinome database is available at: http://srv00.ibbe.cnr.it/editing/. PMID:26449202

  10. Enabling research with human embryonic and fetal tissue resources.

    PubMed

    Gerrelli, Dianne; Lisgo, Steven; Copp, Andrew J; Lindsay, Susan

    2015-09-15

    Congenital anomalies are a significant burden on human health. Understanding the developmental origins of such anomalies is key to developing potential therapies. The Human Developmental Biology Resource (HDBR), based in London and Newcastle, UK, was established to provide embryonic and fetal material for a variety of human studies ranging from single gene expression analysis to large-scale genomic/transcriptomic studies. Increasingly, HDBR material is enabling the derivation of stem cell lines and contributing towards developments in tissue engineering. Use of the HDBR and other fetal tissue resources discussed here will contribute to the long-term aims of understanding the causation and pathogenesis of congenital anomalies, and developing new methods for their treatment and prevention. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Enabling research with human embryonic and fetal tissue resources

    PubMed Central

    Gerrelli, Dianne; Lisgo, Steven; Copp, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Congenital anomalies are a significant burden on human health. Understanding the developmental origins of such anomalies is key to developing potential therapies. The Human Developmental Biology Resource (HDBR), based in London and Newcastle UK, was established to provide embryonic and fetal material for a variety of human studies ranging from single gene expression analysis to large scale genomic/transcriptomic studies. Increasingly HDBR material is enabling the derivation of stem cell lines and contributing towards developments in tissue engineering. Use of the HDBR and other fetal tissue resources discussed here will contribute to the long term aims of understanding the causation and pathogenesis of congenital anomalies, and developing new methods for their treatment and prevention. PMID:26395135

  12. Microwave dielectric measurements and tissue characteristics of the human brain: potential in localizing intracranial tissues.

    PubMed

    Axer, Hubertus; Grässel, David; Steinhauer, Matthias; Stöhr, Peter; John, Andreas; Coenen, Volker A; Jansen, Rolf H; von Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf

    2002-05-21

    This study describes the measurements of dielectric properties in the microwave range to differentiate various human central nervous structures. Using a vector network analyser transmission and reflection coefficients were measured from 500 MHz to 18 GHz in four human formalin fixed human brains. The positions of the electrodes were marked, and the tissue was histologically stained to visualize the myelo- and the cytoarchitecture as well as the nerve fibre orientation at the electrodes. The profiles of the transmission coefficients showed a characteristic minimum peak. In order to describe this peak, a mathematical function was fitted. Parameters derived from digital image processing were used to characterize the myelo- and cytoarchitecure of the tissue at the electrodes. A multiple regression model, with the frequency at the transmission peak minimum as a dependent variable and two tissue characteristics at the two electrodes as independent variables, showed a multiple regression coefficient of 0.765. A neural network model was able to estimate the frequency at the transmission peak minimum from the tissue characteristics at the electrode. The measurements of dielectric properties are well suited to differentiate distinct intracerebral structures. The method could be used for online monitoring of the needle's position during a stereotactic intervention in neurosurgery.

  13. Preclinical humanized mouse model with ectopic ovarian tissues

    PubMed Central

    FU, SHILONG; WANG, JUE; SUN, WU; XU, YI; ZHOU, XIAOYU; CHENG, WENJUN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish human ovarian stroma within the mouse subcutaneously, in order for the resulting stroma to serve as a useful preclinical tool to study the progression of human ovarian cancer in a humanized ovarian microenvironment. Normal human ovarian tissues were subcutaneously implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and then the implants were identified by immunohistochemistry. The implants became vascularized and retained their original morphology for about 4 weeks following implantation. Immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratin-7 confirmed the ovarian origin of the epithelial cells. CD34 staining demonstrated human-derived vessels. Positive estrogen receptor and partially-positive progesterone receptor staining indicated the estrogen and progesterone dependence of the implants. Only vascular pericytes expressed α-smooth muscle actin, indicating the normal ovarian origin of the xenografts. Human ovarian tissue successfully survived in SCID mice and retained its original properties. This humanized mouse model may be used as preclinical tool to investigate ovarian cancer. PMID:25120592

  14. Detection of renal tissue and urinary tract proteins in the human urine after space flight.

    PubMed

    Pastushkova, Lyudmila Kh; Kireev, Kirill S; Kononikhin, Alexey S; Tiys, Evgeny S; Popov, Igor A; Starodubtseva, Natalia L; Dobrokhotov, Igor V; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A; Larina, Irina M; Kolchanov, Nicolay A; Nikolaev, Evgeny N

    2013-01-01

    The urine protein composition samples of ten Russian cosmonauts (male, aged of 35 up to 51) performed long flight missions and varied from 169 up to 199 days on the International Space Station (ISS) were analyzed. As a control group, urine samples of six back-up cosmonauts were analyzed. We used proteomic techniques to obtain data and contemporary bioinformatics approaches to perform the analysis. From the total number of identified proteins (238) in our data set, 129 were associated with a known tissue origin. Preflight samples contained 92 tissue-specific proteins, samples obtained on Day 1 after landing had 90 such proteins, while Day 7 samples offered 95 tissue-specific proteins. Analysis showed that consistently present proteins in urine (under physiological conditions and after space flight) are cubilin, epidermal growth factor, kallikrein-1, kininogen-1, megalin, osteopontin, vitamin K-dependent protein Z, uromodulin. Variably present proteins consists of: Na(+)/K(+) ATPase subunit gamma, β-defensin-1, dipeptidyl peptidase 4, maltasa-glucoamilasa, cadherin-like protein, neutral endopeptidase and vascular cell adhesion protein 1. And only three renal proteins were related to the space flight factors. They were not found in the pre-flight samples and in the back-up cosmonaut urine, but were found in the urine samples after space flight: AFAM (afamin), AMPE (aminopeptidase A) and AQP2 (aquaporin-2). This data related with physiological readaptation of water-salt balance. The proteomic analysis of urine samples in different phases of space missions with bioinformation approach to protein identification provides new data relative to biomechemical mechanism of kidney functioning after space flight.

  15. Detection of Renal Tissue and Urinary Tract Proteins in the Human Urine after Space Flight

    PubMed Central

    Pastushkova, Lyudmila Kh.; Kireev, Kirill S.; Kononikhin, Alexey S.; Tiys, Evgeny S.; Popov, Igor A.; Starodubtseva, Natalia L.; Dobrokhotov, Igor V.; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A.; Larina, Irina M.; Kolchanov, Nicolay A.; Nikolaev, Evgeny N.

    2013-01-01

    The urine protein composition samples of ten Russian cosmonauts (male, aged of 35 up to 51) performed long flight missions and varied from 169 up to 199 days on the International Space Station (ISS) were analyzed. As a control group, urine samples of six back-up cosmonauts were analyzed. We used proteomic techniques to obtain data and contemporary bioinformatics approaches to perform the analysis. From the total number of identified proteins (238) in our data set, 129 were associated with a known tissue origin. Preflight samples contained 92 tissue-specific proteins, samples obtained on Day 1 after landing had 90 such proteins, while Day 7 samples offered 95 tissue-specific proteins. Analysis showed that consistently present proteins in urine (under physiological conditions and after space flight) are cubilin, epidermal growth factor, kallikrein-1, kininogen-1, megalin, osteopontin, vitamin K-dependent protein Z, uromodulin. Variably present proteins consists of: Na(+)/K(+) ATPase subunit gamma, β-defensin-1, dipeptidyl peptidase 4, maltasa-glucoamilasa, cadherin-like protein, neutral endopeptidase and vascular cell adhesion protein 1. And only three renal proteins were related to the space flight factors. They were not found in the pre-flight samples and in the back-up cosmonaut urine, but were found in the urine samples after space flight: AFAM (afamin), AMPE (aminopeptidase A) and AQP2 (aquaporin-2). This data related with physiological readaptation of water-salt balance. The proteomic analysis of urine samples in different phases of space missions with bioinformation approach to protein identification provides new data relative to biomechemical mechanism of kidney functioning after space flight. PMID:23967230

  16. Prognostic values of tissue factor and its alternatively splice transcripts in human gastric cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Chen, Lujun; Xu, Ting; Xu, Bin; Jiang, Jingting; Wu, Changping

    2017-08-08

    We have previously reported that the higher expression of TF in human esophageal cancer tissues was significantly associated with tumor invasion, intratumoral microvessel density and patients' postoperative prognoses. Besides its trans-membranous form, TF also has alternatively spliced transcripts. In the present study, the transcripts of the two TF isoforms, flTF and asTF, in human gastric cancer tissues were determined by real-time PCR, and the correlation between the expression of TF isoforms and patient's clinicopathological features was also analyzed. Our results showed that the relative mRNA expression levels of flTF and asTF in human gastric cancer tissues was significantly higher than those in normal tissues (P=0.035 and P=0.006, respectively). The relative mRNA expression level of asTF was significantly associated with age (P=0.018), meanwhile, we could not find that flTF or asTF expression level was correlated with any other characteristics of the patients, including gender, TNM stage, pathological grade, tumor size, histological type, or chemotherapy sensitivity. Univariate analysis demonstrated that the overall survival rate of gastric cancer patients with lower flTF or asTF expression level was greater than those with higher expression level (P=0.018 and =0.038, respectively). Multivariate COX model analysis also demonstrated that flTF expression (P=0.048) or asTF expression (P=0.002) could be used as independent prognostic predictors in human gastric cancer. Thus, both flTF and asTF mRNA expression levels in cancer tissues could be used as useful risk factors for evaluating the prognoses of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  17. Modeling of human artery tissue with probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Linfei; Chui, Chee-Kong; Fu, Yabo; Teo, Chee-Leong; Li, Yao

    2015-04-01

    Accurate modeling of biological soft tissue properties is vital for realistic medical simulation. Mechanical response of biological soft tissue always exhibits a strong variability due to the complex microstructure and different loading conditions. The inhomogeneity in human artery tissue is modeled with a computational probabilistic approach by assuming that the instantaneous stress at a specific strain varies according to normal distribution. Material parameters of the artery tissue which are modeled with a combined logarithmic and polynomial energy equation are represented by a statistical function with normal distribution. Mean and standard deviation of the material parameters are determined using genetic algorithm (GA) and inverse mean-value first-order second-moment (IMVFOSM) method, respectively. This nondeterministic approach was verified using computer simulation based on the Monte-Carlo (MC) method. Cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the MC simulation corresponds well with that of the experimental stress-strain data and the probabilistic approach is further validated using data from other studies. By taking into account the inhomogeneous mechanical properties of human biological tissue, the proposed method is suitable for realistic virtual simulation as well as an accurate computational approach for medical device validation.

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nef quasispecies in pathological tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, B M; Epstein, L G; Saito, Y; Chen, D; Sharer, L R; Anand, R

    1992-01-01

    The role of the nef gene in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is poorly understood. To provide a basis for studies on the role of nef in AIDS, we used targeted polymerase chain reaction amplification and DNA sequencing to determine the structure of nef genes in pathologic tissue from HIV-1-infected children and adults. We find that the nef reading frame is open in 92% of clones derived from both brain and lymphocytic tissue of children, suggesting that nef is expressed in these tissues. One HIV-1 clone, BRVA, obtained by coculture from the brain of an adult AIDS patient with progressive dementia, was previously shown to contain a duplicated region in nef. We show here that similar duplications are widespread in both adults and children with AIDS. However, coculture strongly selects against the broad spectrum of nef quasispecies found in tissue. These findings suggest functional selection for nef quasispecies in pathologic tissues during HIV-1 infection of the human host. Images PMID:1501274

  19. Near-infrared laser speckle imaging of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Robert Speer

    Current methods of breast cancer diagnostics (self-exam, clinical exam, x-ray mammography) fail to diagnose a significant number of cases while still in readily operable stages. This is especially true in younger women, where fibrotic tissue reduces the efficacy of x-ray mammography. Near infrared (NIR) laser photons pass diffusively through human tissue, creating a speckle pattern in a detector after transmission. The high and low intensity variations of the speckle have the appearance of random noise, but are not. The speckle pattern will have an intensity distribution that is informative about the scattering and absorption properties of the tissue that is imaged. Adaptations to the Los Alamos National Laboratory MCNP code are described that allow simulation of NIR laser transport through human tissue. A HeNe laser was used to create laser intensity patterns via transmission through homogeneous and non-homogeneous tissue phantoms. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to compare the cumulative distribution functions of the laser intensity patterns, and identify the presence of a non-homogeneity. Laser speckle techniques offer the ability to image tumors with few (<3) millimeter resolution without ionizing radiation dose.

  20. Somatic expression of LINE-1 elements in human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Belancio, Victoria P.; Roy-Engel, Astrid M.; Pochampally, Radhika R.; Deininger, Prescott

    2010-01-01

    LINE-1 expression damages host DNA via insertions and endonuclease-dependent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are highly toxic and mutagenic. The predominant tissue of LINE-1 expression has been considered to be the germ line. We show that both full-length and processed L1 transcripts are widespread in human somatic tissues and transformed cells, with significant variation in both L1 expression and L1 mRNA processing. This is the first demonstration that RNA processing is a major regulator of L1 activity. Many tissues also produce translatable spliced transcript (SpORF2). An Alu retrotransposition assay, COMET assays and 53BP1 foci staining show that the SpORF2 product can support functional ORF2 protein expression and can induce DNA damage in normal cells. Tests of the senescence-associated β-galactosidase expression suggest that expression of exogenous full-length L1, or the SpORF2 mRNA alone in human fibroblasts and adult stem cells triggers a senescence-like phenotype, which is one of the reported responses to DNA damage. In contrast to previous assumptions that L1 expression is germ line specific, the increased spectrum of tissues exposed to L1-associated damage suggests a role for L1 as an endogenous mutagen in somatic tissues. These findings have potential consequences for the whole organism in the form of cancer and mammalian aging. PMID:20215437

  1. Injury Response of Resected Human Brain Tissue In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Verwer, Ronald W H; Sluiter, Arja A; Balesar, Rawien A; Baaijen, Johannes C; de Witt Hamer, Philip C; Speijer, Dave; Li, Yichen; Swaab, Dick F

    2015-07-01

    Brain injury affects a significant number of people each year. Organotypic cultures from resected normal neocortical tissue provide unique opportunities to study the cellular and neuropathological consequences of severe injury of adult human brain tissue in vitro. The in vitro injuries caused by resection (interruption of the circulation) and aggravated by the preparation of slices (severed neuronal and glial processes and blood vessels) reflect the reaction of human brain tissue to severe injury. We investigated this process using immunocytochemical markers, reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Essential features were rapid shrinkage of neurons, loss of neuronal marker expression and proliferation of reactive cells that expressed Nestin and Vimentin. Also, microglia generally responded strongly, whereas the response of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes appeared to be more variable. Importantly, some reactive cells also expressed both microglia and astrocytic markers, thus confounding their origin. Comparison with post-mortem human brain tissue obtained at rapid autopsies suggested that the reactive process is not a consequence of epilepsy. © 2014 International Society of Neuropathology.

  2. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar Carter, Renata A.; Martin, Airton A.; Netto, Mario M.; Soares, Fernando A.

    2004-07-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been extensively studied as a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to provide information about the chemical and morphologic structure of tissue. Raman Spectroscpy is an inelastic scattering process that can provide a wealth of spectral features that can be related to the specific molecular structure of the sample. This article reports results of an in vitro study of the FT-Raman human breast tissue spectra. An Nd:YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman Spectrometer. The neoplastic human breast samples, both Fibroadenoma and ICD, were obtained during therapeutical routine medical procedures required by the primary disease, and the non-diseased human tissue was obtained in plastic surgery. No sample preparation was needed for the FT-Raman spectra collection. The FT-Raman spectra were recorded from normal, benign (Fibroadenomas) and malignant (IDC-Intraductal Carcinoma) samples, adding up 51 different areas. The main spectral differences of a typical FT-Raman spectra of a Normal (Non-diseased), Fibroadenoma, and Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) breast tissue at the interval of 600 to 1800cm-1, which may differentiate diagnostically the sample, were found in the bands of 1230 to 1295cm-1, 1440 to 1460 cm-1 and 1650 to 1680 cm-1, assigned to the vibrational bands of the carbohydrate-amide III, proteins and lipids, and carbohydrate-amide I, respectively.

  3. Spatial coherence in human tissue: implications for imaging and measurement

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Gianmarco; Trahey, Gregg; Dahl, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The spatial coherence properties of the signal backscattered by human tissue and measured by an ultrasound transducer array are investigated. Fourier acoustics are used to describe the propagation of ultrasound through a model of tissue that includes reverberation and random scatterering in the imaging plane. The theoretical development describes how the near-field tissue layer, transducer aperture properties, and reflectivity function at the focus reduce the spatial coherence of the imaging wave measured at the transducer surface. Simulations are used to propagate the acoustic field through a histologically characterized sample of the human abdomen and to validate the theoretical predictions. In vivo measurements performed with a diagnostic ultrasound scanner demonstrate that simulations and theory closely match the measured spatial coherence characteristics in the human body across the transducer array’s entire spatial extent. The theoretical framework and simulations are then used to describe the physics of spatial coherence imaging, a type of ultrasound imaging that measures coherence properties instead of echo brightness. The same echo data from an F/2 transducer was used to generate B-mode and short lag spatial coherence images. For an anechoic lesion at the focus the contrast to noise ratio is 1.21 for conventional B-mode imaging and 1.95 for spatial coherence imaging. It is shown that the contrast in spatial coherence imaging depends on the properties of the near-field tissue layer and the backscattering function in the focal plane. PMID:25474774

  4. Identification of rheological properties of human body surface tissue.

    PubMed

    Benevicius, Vincas; Gaidys, Rimvydas; Ostasevicius, Vytautas; Marozas, Vaidotas

    2014-04-11

    According to World Health Organization obesity is one of the greatest public health challenges of the 21st century. It has tripled since the 1980s and the numbers of those affected continue to rise at an alarming rate, especially among children. There are number of devices that act as a prevention measure to boost person's motivation for physical activity and its levels. The placement of these devices is not restricted thus the measurement errors that appear because of the body rheology, clothes, etc. cannot be eliminated. The main objective of this work is to introduce a tool that can be applied directly to process measured accelerations so human body surface tissue induced errors can be reduced. Both the modeling and experimental techniques are proposed to identify body tissue rheological properties and prelate them to body mass index. Multi-level computational model composed from measurement device model and human body surface tissue rheological model is developed. Human body surface tissue induced inaccuracies can increase the magnitude of measured accelerations up to 34% when accelerations of the magnitude of up to 27 m/s(2) are measured. Although the timeframe of those disruptions are short - up to 0.2 s - they still result in increased overall measurement error.

  5. Occurrence of human bocaviruses and parvovirus 4 in solid tissues.

    PubMed

    Norja, Päivi; Hedman, Lea; Kantola, Kalle; Kemppainen, Kaisa; Suvilehto, Jari; Pitkäranta, Anne; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Seppänen, Mikko; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria

    2012-08-01

    Human bocaviruses 1-4 (HBoV1-4) and parvovirus 4 (PARV4) are recently discovered human parvoviruses. HBoV1 is associated with respiratory infections of young children, while HBoV2-4 are enteric viruses. The clinical manifestations of PARV4 remain unknown. The objective of this study was to determine whether the DNAs of HBoV1-4 and PARV4 persist in human tissues long after primary infection. Biopsies of tonsillar tissue, skin, and synovia were examined for HBoV1-4 DNA and PARV4 DNA by PCR. Serum samples from the tissue donors were assayed for HBoV1 and PARV4 IgG and IgM antibodies. To obtain species-specific seroprevalences for HBoV1 and for HBoV2/3 combined, the sera were analyzed after virus-like particle (VLP) competition. While HBoV1 DNA was detected exclusively in the tonsillar tissues of 16/438 individuals (3.7%), all of them ≤8 years of age. HBoV2-4 and PARV4 DNAs were absent from all tissue types. HBoV1 IgG seroprevalence was 94.9%. No subject had HBoV1 or PARV4 IgM, nor did they have PARV4 IgG. The results indicate that HBoV1 DNA occurred in a small proportion of tonsils of young children after recent primary HBoV1 infection, but did not persist long in the other tissue types studied, unlike parvovirus B19 DNA. The results obtained by the PARV4 assays are in line with previous results on PARV4 epidemiology.

  6. Critical Role for PAR1 in Kallikrein 6-Mediated Oligodendrogliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Burda, Joshua E.; Radulovic, Maja; Yoon, Hyesook; Scarisbrick, Isobel A.

    2014-01-01

    Kallikrein 6 (Klk6) is a secreted serine protease preferentially expressed by oligodendroglia in CNS white matter. Elevated levels of Klk6 occur in actively demyelinating multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions and in cases of spinal cord injury (SCI), stroke and glioblastoma. Taken with recent evidence establishing Klk6 as a CNS-endogenous activator of protease-activated receptors (PARs), we hypothesized that Klk6 activates a subset of PARs to regulate oligodendrocyte physiology and potentially pathophysiology. Here, primary oligodendrocyte cultures derived from wild type or PAR1-deficient mice and the murine oligodendrocyte cell line, Oli-neu, were used to demonstrate that Klk6 mediates loss of oligodendrocyte processes and impedes morphological differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in a PAR1-dependent fashion. Comparable gliopathy was also elicited by the canonical PAR1 agonist, thrombin, as well as PAR1-activating peptides (PAR1-APs). Klk6 also exacerbated ATP-mediated oligodendrogliopathy in vitro, pointing to a potential role in augmenting excitotoxicity. In addition, Klk6 suppressed the expression of proteolipid protein (PLP) RNA in cultured oligodendrocytes by a mechanism involving PAR1-mediated Erk1/2 signaling. Microinjection of PAR1 agonists, including Klk6 or PAR1-APs, into the dorsal column white matter of PAR+/+ but not PAR−/− mice promoted vacuolating myelopathy and a loss of immunoreactivity for myelin basic protein (MBP) and CC-1+ oligodendrocytes. These results demonstrate a functional role for Klk6-PAR1 signaling in oligodendroglial pathophysiology and suggest that PAR1 or PAR1-agonists may represent new targets to moderate demyelination and to promote myelin regeneration in cases of CNS white matter injury or disease. PMID:23832758

  7. Effects of laser interaction with living human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanova, O. E.; Protasov, E. A.; Protasov, D. E.; Smirnova, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    With the help of a highly sensitive laser device with the wavelength λ = 0.808 pm, which is optimal for deep penetration of the radiation into biological tissues, the effects associated with the appearance of uncontrolled human infrasonic vibrations of different frequencies were investigated. It was established that the observed fluctuations are associated with the vascular system which is characterized by its own respiratory movements, occurring synchronously with the movements of the respiratory muscles, the operation of the heart muscle, and the effect of compression ischemia. The effect of “enlightenment” of a tissue is observed with stopping of blood flow in vessels by applying a tourniquet on the wrist.

  8. Structured illumination microscopy of autofluorescent aggregations in human tissue.

    PubMed

    Best, Gerrit; Amberger, Roman; Baddeley, David; Ach, Thomas; Dithmar, Stefan; Heintzmann, Rainer; Cremer, Christoph

    2011-06-01

    Sections from human eye tissue were analyzed with Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) using a specially designed microscope setup. In this microscope the structured illumination was generated with a Twyman-Green Interferometer. This SIM technique allowed us to acquire light-optical images of autofluorophore distributions in the tissue with previously unmatched optical resolution. In this work the unique setup of the microscope made possible the application of SIM with three different excitation wavelengths (488, 568 and 647 nm), thus enabling us to gather spectral information about the autofluorescence signal.

  9. Slow-freezing versus vitrification for human ovarian tissue cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Klocke, Silke; Bündgen, Nana; Köster, Frank; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula; Griesinger, Georg

    2015-02-01

    Ovarian tissue can be cryopreserved prior to chemotherapy using either the slow-freezing or the vitrification method; however, the data on the equality of the procedures are still conflicting. In this study, a comparison of the cryo-damage of human ovarian tissue induced by either vitrification or slow-freezing was performed. Ovarian tissue from 23 pre-menopausal patients was cryopreserved with either slow-freezing or vitrification. After thawing/warming, the tissue was histologically and immunohistochemically analyzed and cultured in vitro. During tissue culture the estradiol release was assessed. No significant difference was found in the proportion of high-quality follicles after thawing/warming in the slow-freezing and vitrification group, respectively (72.7 versus 66.7 %, p = 0.733). Estradiol secretion by the ovarian tissue was similar between groups during 18 days in vitro culture (area-under-the-curve 5,411 versus 13,102, p = 0.11). Addition of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate or Activin A to the culture medium did not alter estradiol release in both groups. The proportion of Activated Caspase-3 or 'Proliferating-Cell-Nuclear-Antigen' positive follicles at the end of the culture period was similar between slow-freezing and vitrification. Slow-freezing and vitrification result in similar morphological integrity after cryopreservation, a similar estradiol release in culture, and similar rates of follicular proliferation and apoptosis after culture.

  10. Engineering of human hepatic tissue with functional vascular networks.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Takanori; Koike, Naoto; Sekine, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Ryoji; Amiya, Takeru; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Although absolute organ shortage highlights the needs of alternative organ sources for regenerative medicine, the generation of a three-dimensional (3D) and complex vital organ, such as well-vascularized liver, remains a challenge. To this end, tissue engineering holds great promise; however, this approach is significantly limited by the failure of early vascularization in vivo after implantation. Here, we established a stable 3D in vitro pre-vascularization platform to generate human hepatic tissue after implantation in vivo. Human fetal liver cells (hFLCs) were mixed with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and were implanted into a collagen/fibronectin matrix composite that was used as a 3-D carrier. After a couple of days, the fluorescent HUVECs developed premature vascular networks in vitro, which were stabilized by hMSCs. The establishment of functional vessels inside the pre-vascularized constructs was proven using dextran infusion studies after implantation under a transparency cranial window. Furthermore, dynamic morphological changes during embryonic liver cell maturation were intravitaly quantified with high-resolution confocal microscope analysis. The engineered human hepatic tissue demonstrated multiple liver-specific features, both structural and functional. Our new techniques discussed here can be implemented in future clinical uses and industrial uses, such as drug testing.

  11. Natural killer cell distribution and trafficking in human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Few data are available regarding the recirculation of natural killer (NK) cells among human organs. Earlier studies have been often impaired by the use of markers then proved to be either not sufficiently specific for NK cells (e.g., CD57, CD56) or expressed only by subsets of NK cells (e.g., CD16). At the present, available data confirmed that human NK cells populate blood, lymphoid organs, lung, liver, uterus (during pregnancy), and gut. Several studies showed that NK cell homing appears to be subset-specific, as secondary lymphoid organs and probably several solid tissues are preferentially inhabited by CD56brightCD16neg/dull non-cytotoxic NK cells. Similar studies performed in the mouse model showed that lymph node and bone marrow are preferentially populated by CD11bdull NK cells while blood, spleen, and lung by CD27dull NK cells. Therefore, an important topic to be addressed in the human system is the contribution of factors that regulate NK cell tissue homing and egress, such as chemotactic receptors or homeostatic mechanisms. Here, we review the current knowledge on NK cell distribution in peripheral tissues and, based on recent acquisitions, we propose our view regarding the recirculation of NK cells in the human body. PMID:23230434

  12. Maresin conjugates in tissue regeneration biosynthesis enzymes in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Dalli, Jesmond; Vlasakov, Iliyan; Riley, Ian R.; Rodriguez, Ana R.; Spur, Bernd W.; Chiang, Nan; Serhan, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are central in coordinating immune responses, tissue repair, and regeneration, with different subtypes being associated with inflammation-initiating and proresolving actions. We recently identified a family of macrophage-derived proresolving and tissue regenerative molecules coined maresin conjugates in tissue regeneration (MCTR). Herein, using lipid mediator profiling we identified MCTR in human serum, lymph nodes, and plasma and investigated MCTR biosynthetic pathways in human macrophages. With human recombinant enzymes, primary cells, and enantiomerically pure compounds we found that the synthetic maresin epoxide intermediate 13S,14S-eMaR (13S,14S-epoxy- 4Z,7Z,9E,11E,16Z,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid) was converted to MCTR1 (13R-glutathionyl, 14S-hydroxy-4Z,7Z,9E,11E,13R,14S,16Z,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid) by LTC4S and GSTM4. Incubation of human macrophages with LTC4S inhibitors blocked LTC4 and increased resolvins and lipoxins. The conversion of MCTR1 to MCTR2 (13R-cysteinylglycinyl, 14S-hydroxy-4Z,7Z,9E,11E,13R,14S,16Z,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid) was catalyzed by γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in human macrophages. Biosynthesis of MCTR3 was mediated by dipeptidases that cleaved the cysteinyl-glycinyl bond of MCTR2 to give 13R-cysteinyl, 14S-hydroxy-4Z,7Z,9E,11E,13R,14S,16Z,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid. Of note, both GSTM4 and GGT enzymes displayed higher affinity to 13S,14S-eMaR and MCTR1 compared with their classic substrates in the cysteinyl leukotriene metabolome. Together these results establish the MCTR biosynthetic pathway and provide mechanisms in tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:27791009

  13. Soft tissues store and return mechanical energy in human running.

    PubMed

    Riddick, R C; Kuo, A D

    2016-02-08

    During human running, softer parts of the body may deform under load and dissipate mechanical energy. Although tissues such as the heel pad have been characterized individually, the aggregate work performed by all soft tissues during running is unknown. We therefore estimated the work performed by soft tissues (N=8 healthy adults) at running speeds ranging 2-5 m s(-1), computed as the difference between joint work performed on rigid segments, and whole-body estimates of work performed on the (non-rigid) body center of mass (COM) and peripheral to the COM. Soft tissues performed aggregate negative work, with magnitude increasing linearly with speed. The amount was about -19 J per stance phase at a nominal 3 m s(-1), accounting for more than 25% of stance phase negative work performed by the entire body. Fluctuations in soft tissue mechanical power over time resembled a damped oscillation starting at ground contact, with peak negative power comparable to that for the knee joint (about -500 W). Even the positive work from soft tissue rebound was significant, about 13 J per stance phase (about 17% of the positive work of the entire body). Assuming that the net dissipative work is offset by an equal amount of active, positive muscle work performed at 25% efficiency, soft tissue dissipation could account for about 29% of the net metabolic expenditure for running at 5 m s(-1). During running, soft tissue deformations dissipate mechanical energy that must be offset by active muscle work at non-negligible metabolic cost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fallout sup 3 H in human tissue at Akita, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Hisamatsu, S.; Takizawa, Y.; Itoh, M.; Ueno, K.; Katsumata, T.; Sakanoue, M. )

    1989-10-01

    The {sup 3}H concentration in Japanese human tissue samples is reported in this paper. Four brain, 10 liver, and nine lung samples from 11 cases were collected from Akita Prefecture in northern Japan from January to July 1986. The median of free-water {sup 3}H concentration was similar in these tissues and agreed well with the concentrations in the diet, including tap water. The median specific activity ratio of tissue-bound {sup 3}H to free-water {sup 3}H was 1.1 and was slightly lower than that in the diet. The specific activity ratio was also lower than that reported in the United States and significantly lower than in Italy.

  15. Vanadium in foods and in human body fluids and tissues.

    PubMed

    Byrne, A R; Kosta, L

    1978-07-01

    Using neutron activation analysis, vanadium was analysed in a range of foods, human body fluids and tissues. On the basis of these results and those of other workers, it was concluded that daily dietary intake amounts to some tens of micrograms. Analysis of body fluids (including milk, blood and excreta) and organs and tissues provided an estimate for the total body pool of vanadium in man of about 100 microgram. Vanadium was not detectable in blood and urine at the level of 0.3 ng/g, while low levels were found in muscle, fat, bone, teeth and other tissues. The relationship between dietary intake to pulmonary absorption is discussed in relation to the occurrence of vanadium in man-made air particulates. The very low levels found in milks and eggs suggest minimal vanadium requirements in growth. The findings are discussed in the light of previous results and also in relation to the possible essentiality of vanadium.

  16. An Introduction to The Royan Human Ovarian Tissue Bank

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, Naeimeh Sadat; Ebrahimi, Bita; Fathi, Rouhollah; Khodaverdi, Sepideh; Mehdizadeh Kashi, Abolfazl; Valojerdi, Mojtaba Rezazadeh

    2016-01-01

    From December 2000 until 2010, the researchers at Royan Institute conducted a wide range of investigations on ovarian tissue cryopreservation with the intent to provide fertility pres- ervation to cancer patients that were considered to be candidates for these services. In 2010, Royan Institute established the Royan Human Ovarian Tissue Bank as a subgroup of the Embryology Department. Since its inception, approximately 180 patients between the ages of 747 years have undergone consultations. Ovarian samples were cryopreserved from 47 patients (age: 7-35 years) diagnosed with cervical adenocarcinoma (n=9); breast carcinoma (n=7), Ewing’s sarcoma (n=7), opposite side ovarian tumor (n=7), endometrial adenocarci- noma (n=4), malignant colon tumors (n=3), as well as Hodgkin’s lymphoma, major thalas- semia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=1-2 patients for each disease). Additionally, two patients requested ovarian tissue transplantation after completion of their treatments. PMID:27441061

  17. Adipose tissue macrophages impair preadipocyte differentiation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li Fen; Craig, Colleen M.; Tolentino, Lorna L.; Choi, Okmi; Morton, John; Rivas, Homero; Cushman, Samuel W.; Engleman, Edgar G.; McLaughlin, Tracey

    2017-01-01

    Aim The physiologic mechanisms underlying the relationship between obesity and insulin resistance are not fully understood. Impaired adipocyte differentiation and localized inflammation characterize adipose tissue from obese, insulin-resistant humans. The directionality of this relationship is not known, however. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether adipose tissue inflammation is causally-related to impaired adipocyte differentiation. Methods Abdominal subcutaneous(SAT) and visceral(VAT) adipose tissue was obtained from 20 human participants undergoing bariatric surgery. Preadipocytes were isolated, and cultured in the presence or absence of CD14+ macrophages obtained from the same adipose tissue sample. Adipocyte differentiation was quantified after 14 days via immunofluorescence, Oil-Red O, and adipogenic gene expression. Cytokine secretion by mature adipocytes cultured with or without CD14+macrophages was quantified. Results Adipocyte differentiation was significantly lower in VAT than SAT by all measures (p<0.001). With macrophage removal, SAT preadipocyte differentiation increased significantly as measured by immunofluorescence and gene expression, whereas VAT preadipocyte differentiation was unchanged. Adipocyte-secreted proinflammatory cytokines were higher and adiponectin lower in media from VAT vs SAT: macrophage removal reduced inflammatory cytokine and increased adiponectin secretion from both SAT and VAT adipocytes. Differentiation of preadipocytes from SAT but not VAT correlated inversely with systemic insulin resistance. Conclusions The current results reveal that proinflammatory immune cells in human SAT are causally-related to impaired preadipocyte differentiation, which in turn is associated with systemic insulin resistance. In VAT, preadipocyte differentiation is poor even in the absence of tissue macrophages, pointing to inherent differences in fat storage potential between the two depots. PMID:28151993

  18. A map of human circular RNAs in clinically relevant tissues.

    PubMed

    Maass, Philipp G; Glažar, Petar; Memczak, Sebastian; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hollfinger, Irene; Schreyer, Luisa; Sauer, Aisha V; Toka, Okan; Aiuti, Alessandro; Luft, Friedrich C; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2017-08-25

    Cellular circular RNAs (circRNAs) are generated by head-to-tail splicing and are present in all multicellular organisms studied so far. Recently, circRNAs have emerged as a large class of RNA which can function as post-transcriptional regulators. It has also been shown that many circRNAs are tissue- and stage-specifically expressed. Moreover, the unusual stability and expression specificity make circRNAs important candidates for clinical biomarker research. Here, we present a circRNA expression resource of 20 human tissues highly relevant to disease-related research: vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), human umbilical vein cells (HUVECs), artery endothelial cells (HUAECs), atrium, vena cava, neutrophils, platelets, cerebral cortex, placenta, and samples from mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. In eight different samples from a single donor, we found highly tissue-specific circRNA expression. Circular-to-linear RNA ratios revealed that many circRNAs were expressed higher than their linear host transcripts. Among the 71 validated circRNAs, we noticed potential biomarkers. In adenosine deaminase-deficient, severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID) patients and in Wiskott-Aldrich-Syndrome (WAS) patients' samples, we found evidence for differential circRNA expression of genes that are involved in the molecular pathogenesis of both phenotypes. Our findings underscore the need to assess circRNAs in mechanisms of human disease. KEY MESSAGES: circRNA resource catalog of 20 clinically relevant tissues. circRNA expression is highly tissue-specific. circRNA transcripts are often more abundant than their linear host RNAs. circRNAs can be differentially expressed in disease-associated genes.

  19. A continuous fiber distribution material model for human cervical tissue.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kristin M; Hendon, Christine P; Gan, Yu; Yao, Wang; Yoshida, Kyoko; Fernandez, Michael; Vink, Joy; Wapner, Ronald J

    2015-06-25

    The uterine cervix during pregnancy is the vital mechanical barrier which resists compressive and tensile loads generated from a growing fetus. Premature cervical remodeling and softening is hypothesized to result in the shortening of the cervix, which is known to increase a woman׳s risk of preterm birth. To understand the role of cervical material properties in preventing preterm birth, we derive a cervical material model based on previous mechanical, biochemical and histological experiments conducted on nonpregnant and pregnant human hysterectomy cervical tissue samples. In this study we present a three-dimensional fiber composite model that captures the equilibrium material behavior of the tissue in tension and compression. Cervical tissue is modeled as a fibrous composite material, where a single family of preferentially aligned and continuously distributed collagen fibers are embedded in a compressible neo-Hookean ground substance. The total stress in the collagen solid network is calculated by integrating the fiber stresses. The shape of the fiber distribution is described by an ellipsoid where semi-principal axis lengths are fit to optical coherence tomography measurements. The composite material model is fit to averaged mechanical testing data from uni-axial compression and tension experiments, and averaged material parameters are reported for nonpregnant and term pregnant human cervical tissue. The model is then evaluated by investigating the stress and strain state of a uniform thick-walled cylinder under a compressive stress with collagen fibers preferentially aligned in the circumferential direction. This material modeling framework for the equilibrium behavior of human cervical tissue serves as a basis to determine the role of preferentially-aligned cervical collagen fibers in preventing cervical deformation during pregnancy.

  20. Engineering human neo-tendon tissue in vitro with human dermal fibroblasts under static mechanical strain.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dan; Liu, Wei; Xu, Feng; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Wen Jie; Cui, Lei; Cao, Yilin

    2009-12-01

    Proper cell source is one of the key issues for tendon engineering. Our previous study showed that dermal fibroblasts could be used to successfully engineer tendon in vivo and tenocytes could engineer neo-tendon in vitro with static strain. This study further investigated the possibility of engineering human neo-tendon tissue in vitro using dermal fibroblasts. Human dermal fibroblasts were seeded on polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers pre-fixed on a U-shape as a mechanical loading group, or simply cultured in a dish as a tension-free group. In addition, human tenocytes were also seeded on PGA fibers with tension as a comparison to human dermal fibroblasts. The results showed that human neo-tendon tissue could be generated using dermal fibroblasts during in vitro culture under static strain and the tissue structure became more mature with the increase of culture time. Longitudinally aligned collagen fibers and spindle shape cells were observed histologically and collagen fibril diameter and tensile strength increased with time and reached a peak at 14 weeks. In contrast, the dermal fibroblast-PGA constructs failed to form neo-tendon, but formed disorganized fibrous tissue in tension-free condition with significantly weaker strength and poor collagen fiber formation. Interestingly, neo-tendon tissues generated with human dermal fibroblasts were indistinguishable from the counterpart engineered with human tenocytes, which supports the viewpoint that human dermal fibroblasts is likely to replace tenocytes for future tendon graft development in vitro with dynamic mechanical loading in a bioreactor system.

  1. Best Practice BioBanking of Human Heart Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Sean; Li, Amy; Allen, David; Allen, Paul D; Bannon, Paul; Cartmill, Tim; Cooke, Roger; Farnsworth, Alan; Keogh, Anne; dos Remedios, Cristobal

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a guide to researchers who wish to establish a biobank. It also gives practical advice to investigators seeking access to samples of healthy or diseased human hearts. We begin with a brief history of the Sydney Heart Bank (SHB) from when it began in 1989, including the pivotal role played by the late Victor Chang. We discuss our standard operating procedures for tissue collection which include cryopreservation and the quality assurance needed to maintain the long-term molecular and cellular integrity of the samples. The SHB now contains about 16,000 heart samples derived from over 450 patients who underwent isotopic heart transplant procedures and from over 100 healthy organ donors. These enable us to provide samples from a wide range of categories of heart failure. So far, we have delivered heart samples to more than 50 laboratories over two decades, and we answer their most frequently asked questions. Other SHB services include the development of tissue microarrays (TMA). These enable end users to perform preliminary examinations of the expression and localisation of target molecules in diseased or aging donor hearts, all in a single section of the TMA. Finally, the processes involved in managing tissue requests from external users and logistics considerations for the shipment of human tissue are discussed in detail. PMID:26998172

  2. Smoking increases carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in human lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Goldman, R; Enewold, L; Pellizzari, E; Beach, J B; Bowman, E D; Krishnan, S S; Shields, P G

    2001-09-01

    Tobacco smoke is a major source of human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The concentration of PAHs in lung tissue would reflect an individual's dose, and its variation could perhaps reflect cancer risk. Eleven PAHs were measured in 70 lung tissue samples from cancer-free autopsy donors by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. There were 37 smokers and 33 nonsmokers as estimated by serum cotinine concentration. The sum of PAH concentrations was higher in smokers (P = 0.01), and there was a dose-response relationship for greater smoking (P < 0.01). Smoking increased the concentration of five PAHs including benzo(a)pyrene, which increased approximately 2-fold. The risk for increasing carcinogenic PAHs (odds ratio, 8.20; 95% confidence interval, 2.39-28.09) was 3-fold compared with noncarcinogenic PAHs (odds ratio, 2.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-9.12). A higher concentration of PAHs was detected in the lung tissue of males, although the estimated smoking was similar in males and females. Race was not associated with PAH concentrations overall, but PAH concentrations appeared to be higher in African-American males than in any other group. Age was weakly correlated with an increase in fluoranthene and pyrene. The measurement of PAHs in human lung tissue can be used to estimate the actual dose to the target organ.

  3. Expression of the Endocannabinoid Receptors in Human Fascial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fede, C.; Albertin, G.; Petrelli, L.; Sfriso, M.M.; Biz, C.; Caro, R. De; Stecco, C.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1) and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2) in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies) and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation. PMID:27349320

  4. Two types of brown adipose tissue in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lidell, Martin E; Betz, Matthias J; Enerbäck, Sven

    2014-01-01

    During the last years the existence of metabolically active brown adipose tissue in adult humans has been widely accepted by the research community. Its unique ability to dissipate chemical energy stored in triglycerides as heat makes it an attractive target for new drugs against obesity and its related diseases. Hence the tissue is now subject to intense research, the hypothesis being that an expansion and/or activation of the tissue is associated with a healthy metabolic phenotype. Animal studies provide evidence for the existence of at least two types of brown adipocytes. Apart from the classical brown adipocyte that is found primarily in the interscapular region where it constitutes a thermogenic organ, a second type of brown adipocyte, the so-called beige adipocyte, can appear within white adipose tissue depots. The fact that the two cell types develop from different precursors suggests that they might be recruited and stimulated by different cues and therefore represent two distinct targets for therapeutic intervention. The aim of this commentary is to discuss recent work addressing the question whether also humans possess two types of brown adipocytes and to highlight some issues when looking for molecular markers for such cells. PMID:24575372

  5. Best Practice BioBanking of Human Heart Tissue.

    PubMed

    Lal, Sean; Li, Amy; Allen, David; Allen, Paul D; Bannon, Paul; Cartmill, Tim; Cooke, Roger; Farnsworth, Alan; Keogh, Anne; Dos Remedios, Cristobal

    2015-12-01

    This review provides a guide to researchers who wish to establish a biobank. It also gives practical advice to investigators seeking access to samples of healthy or diseased human hearts. We begin with a brief history of the Sydney Heart Bank (SHB) from when it began in 1989, including the pivotal role played by the late Victor Chang. We discuss our standard operating procedures for tissue collection which include cryopreservation and the quality assurance needed to maintain the long-term molecular and cellular integrity of the samples. The SHB now contains about 16,000 heart samples derived from over 450 patients who underwent isotopic heart transplant procedures and from over 100 healthy organ donors. These enable us to provide samples from a wide range of categories of heart failure. So far, we have delivered heart samples to more than 50 laboratories over two decades, and we answer their most frequently asked questions. Other SHB services include the development of tissue microarrays (TMA). These enable end users to perform preliminary examinations of the expression and localisation of target molecules in diseased or aging donor hearts, all in a single section of the TMA. Finally, the processes involved in managing tissue requests from external users and logistics considerations for the shipment of human tissue are discussed in detail.

  6. Ultra-trace analysis of platinum in human tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Elisabeth; Hann, Stephan; Stingeder, Gerhard; Reiter, Christian

    2005-08-01

    Background levels of platinum were determined in human autopsy tissues taken from five individuals. The investigated specimens were lung, liver and kidney. Sample preparation involved microwave digestion followed by an open vessel treatment. Inductively-coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) was applied in combination with an ultrasonic nebulization/membrane desolvation system for sample introduction. Isotope dilution analysis was employed for accurate quantification of platinum. Excellent procedural detection limits (3 s validation) of 20, 20 and 34 pg g(-1) dry weight were obtained for lung, liver and kidney tissue, respectively. Due to the lack of appropriate biological reference material, road dust (BCR-723) was used for method validation. Platinum levels ranging between 0.03 and 1.42 ng g(-1) were determined in the investigated samples. The platinum concentrations observed in human lung tissue may reflect the increasing atmospheric background levels of platinum originating from car catalysts. The presence of platinum in kidney and liver tissue samples clearly indicates the bioavailability of the element.

  7. Human omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibit specific lipidomic signatures.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mariona; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Pamplona, Reinald; Ricart, Wifredo; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Despite their differential effects on human metabolic pathophysiology, the differences in omental and subcutaneous lipidomes are largely unknown. To explore this field, liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used for lipidome analyses of adipose tissue samples (visceral and subcutaneous) selected from a group of obese subjects (n=38). Transcriptomics and in vitro studies in adipocytes were used to confirm the pathways affected by location. The analyses revealed the existence of obesity-related specific lipidome signatures in each of these locations, attributed to selective enrichment of specific triglycerides, glycerophospholipids, and sphingolipids, because these were not observed in adipose tissues from nonobese individuals. The changes were compatible with subcutaneous enrichment in pathways involved in adipogenesis, triacylglyceride synthesis, and lipid droplet formation, as well as increased α-oxidation. Marked differences between omental and subcutaneous depots in obese individuals were seen in the association of lipid species with metabolic traits (body mass index and insulin sensitivity). Targeted studies also revealed increased cholesterol (Δ56%) and cholesterol epoxide (Δ34%) concentrations in omental adipose tissue. In view of the effects of cholesterol epoxide, which induced enhanced expression of adipocyte differentiation and α-oxidation genes in human omental adipocytes, a novel role for cholesterol epoxide as a signaling molecule for differentiation is proposed. In summary, in obesity, adipose tissue exhibits a location-specific differential lipid profile that may contribute to explaining part of its distinct pathogenic role.

  8. Different activation patterns in the plasma kallikrein-kinin and complement systems during coronary bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Kongsgaard, U E; Smith-Erichsen, N; Geiran, O; Amundsen, E; Mollnes, T E; Garred, P

    1989-07-01

    Components of the plasma kallikrein-kinin and complement systems were determined in patients undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Spontaneous kallikrein activity (KK), plasma prekallikrein (PKK), functional kallikrein inhibition capacity (KKI), C3 activation products (C3-act), and the terminal complement complex (TCC) were measured. A marked, transitory increase in KK and a decrease in PKK were found prior to cardiopulmonary bypass just after heparin injection. An additional decline in PKK and KKI during bypass with a return to near control levels in the postoperative period was observed. C3-act increased in all patients during bypass, reaching a peak value at wound closure. The TCC concentration also increased significantly during cardiopulmonary bypass, returned to control levels in the early postoperative period, and then increased again in the late postoperative period. It is concluded that activation of the kallikrein-kinin system started after injection of heparin, prior to cardiopulmonary bypass. Activation of both the initial and the terminal complement cascade, however, started only after onset of cardiopulmonary bypass.

  9. Composition of MRI phantom equivalent to human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Hirokazu; Kuroda, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Koichi; Yoshida, Atsushi; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Kawasaki, Shoji; Shibuya, Koichi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2005-10-15

    We previously developed two new MRI phantoms (called the CAG phantom and the CAGN phantom), with T1 and T2 relaxation times equivalent to those of any human tissue at 1.5 T. The conductivity of the CAGN phantom is equivalent to that of most types of human tissue in the frequency range of 1 to 130 MHz. In this paper, the relaxation times of human tissues are summarized, and the composition of the corresponding phantoms are provided in table form. The ingredients of these phantoms are carrageenan as the gelling agent, GdCl{sub 3} as a T1 modifier, agarose as a T2 modifier, NaCl (CAGN phantom only) as a conductivity modifier, NaN{sub 3} as an antiseptic, and distilled water. The phantoms have T1 values of 202-1904 ms and T2 values of 38-423 ms when the concentrations of GdCl{sub 3} and agarose are varied from 0-140 {mu}mol/kg, and 0%-1.6%, respectively, and the CAGN phantom has a conductivity of 0.27-1.26 S/m when the NaCl concentration is varied from 0%-0.7%. These phantoms have sufficient strength to replicate a torso without the use of reinforcing agents, and can be cut by a knife into any shape. We anticipate the CAGN phantom to be highly useful and practical for MRI and hyperthermia-related research.

  10. Regulatory roles of microRNAs in human dental tissues.

    PubMed

    Sehic, Amer; Tulek, Amela; Khuu, Cuong; Nirvani, Minou; Sand, Lars Peter; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2017-01-05

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, non-coding RNAs that provide an efficient pathway for regulation of gene expression at a post-transcriptional level. Tooth development is regulated by a complex network of cell-cell signaling during all steps of organogenesis. Most of the congenital dental defects in humans are caused by mutations in genes involved in developmental regulatory networks. Whereas the developmental morphological stages of the tooth development already are thoroughly documented, the implicated genetic network is still under investigation. The involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of tooth genetic network was suggested for the first time in 2008. MiRNAs regulate tooth morphogenesis by fine-tuning the signaling networks. Unique groups of miRNAs are expressed in dental epithelium compared with mesenchyme, as well as in molars compared with incisors. The present review focuses on the current state of knowledge on the expression and function of miRNAs in human dental tissues, including teeth and the surrounding structures. Herein, we show that miRNAs exhibit specific roles in human dental tissues and are involved in gingival and periodontal disease, tooth movement and eruption, dental pulp physiology including repair and regeneration, differentiation of dental cells, and enamel mineralization. In light of similarities between the tooth development and other organs originating from the epithelium, further understanding of miRNAs` function in dental tissues may have wide biological relevance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Terahertz spectroscopic investigation of human gastric normal and tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dibo; Li, Xian; Cai, Jinhui; Ma, Yehao; Kang, Xusheng; Huang, Pingjie; Zhang, Guangxin

    2014-09-01

    Human dehydrated normal and cancerous gastric tissues were measured using transmission time-domain terahertz spectroscopy. Based on the obtained terahertz absorption spectra, the contrasts between the two kinds of tissue were investigated and techniques for automatic identification of cancerous tissue were studied. Distinctive differences were demonstrated in both the shape and amplitude of the absorption spectra between normal and tumor tissue. Additionally, some spectral features in the range of 0.2~0.5 THz and 1~1.5 THz were revealed for all cancerous gastric tissues. To systematically achieve the identification of gastric cancer, principal component analysis combined with t-test was used to extract valuable information indicating the best distinction between the two types. Two clustering approaches, K-means and support vector machine (SVM), were then performed to classify the processed terahertz data into normal and cancerous groups. SVM presented a satisfactory result with less false classification cases. The results of this study implicate the potential of the terahertz technique to detect gastric cancer. The applied data analysis methodology provides a suggestion for automatic discrimination of terahertz spectra in other applications.

  12. FTIR protein secondary structure analysis of human ascending aortic tissues.

    PubMed

    Bonnier, Franck; Rubin, Sylvain; Debelle, Laurent; Ventéo, Lydie; Pluot, Michel; Baehrel, Bernard; Manfait, Michel; Sockalingum, Ganesh D

    2008-08-01

    The advent of moderate dilatations in ascending aortas is often accompanied by structural modifications of the main components of the aortic tissue, elastin and collagen. In this study, we have undertaken an approach based on FTIR microscopy coupled to a curve-fitting procedure to analyze secondary structure modifications in these proteins in human normal and pathological aortic tissues. We found that the outcome of the aortic pathology is strongly influenced by these proteins, which are abundant in the media of the aortic wall, and that the advent of an aortic dilatation is generally accompanied by a decrease of parallel beta-sheet structures. Elastin, essentially composed of beta-sheet structures, seems to be directly related to these changes and therefore indicative of the elastic alteration of the aortic wall. Conventional microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy were used to compare FTIR microscopy results with the organization of the elastic fibers present in the tissues. This in-vitro study on 6 patients (three normal and three pathologic), suggests that such a spectroscopic marker, specific to aneurismal tissue characterization, could be important information for surgeons who face the dilemma of moderate aortic tissue dilatation of the ascending aortas.

  13. Streamlined bioreactor-based production of human cartilage tissues.

    PubMed

    Tonnarelli, B; Santoro, R; Adelaide Asnaghi, M; Wendt, D

    2016-05-27

    Engineered tissue grafts have been manufactured using methods based predominantly on traditional labour-intensive manual benchtop techniques. These methods impart significant regulatory and economic challenges, hindering the successful translation of engineered tissue products to the clinic. Alternatively, bioreactor-based production systems have the potential to overcome such limitations. In this work, we present an innovative manufacturing approach to engineer cartilage tissue within a single bioreactor system, starting from freshly isolated human primary chondrocytes, through the generation of cartilaginous tissue grafts. The limited number of primary chondrocytes that can be isolated from a small clinically-sized cartilage biopsy could be seeded and extensively expanded directly within a 3D scaffold in our perfusion bioreactor (5.4 ± 0.9 doublings in 2 weeks), bypassing conventional 2D expansion in flasks. Chondrocytes expanded in 3D scaffolds better maintained a chondrogenic phenotype than chondrocytes expanded on plastic flasks (collagen type II mRNA, 18-fold; Sox-9, 11-fold). After this "3D expansion" phase, bioreactor culture conditions were changed to subsequently support chondrogenic differentiation for two weeks. Engineered tissues based on 3D-expanded chondrocytes were more cartilaginous than tissues generated from chondrocytes previously expanded in flasks. We then demonstrated that this streamlined bioreactor-based process could be adapted to effectively generate up-scaled cartilage grafts in a size with clinical relevance (50 mm diameter). Streamlined and robust tissue engineering processes, as the one described here, may be key for the future manufacturing of grafts for clinical applications, as they facilitate the establishment of compact and closed bioreactor-based production systems, with minimal automation requirements, lower operating costs, and increased compliance to regulatory guidelines.

  14. DNA methylation age of human tissues and cell types

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is not yet known whether DNA methylation levels can be used to accurately predict age across a broad spectrum of human tissues and cell types, nor whether the resulting age prediction is a biologically meaningful measure. Results I developed a multi-tissue predictor of age that allows one to estimate the DNA methylation age of most tissues and cell types. The predictor, which is freely available, was developed using 8,000 samples from 82 Illumina DNA methylation array datasets, encompassing 51 healthy tissues and cell types. I found that DNA methylation age has the following properties: first, it is close to zero for embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells; second, it correlates with cell passage number; third, it gives rise to a highly heritable measure of age acceleration; and, fourth, it is applicable to chimpanzee tissues. Analysis of 6,000 cancer samples from 32 datasets showed that all of the considered 20 cancer types exhibit significant age acceleration, with an average of 36 years. Low age-acceleration of cancer tissue is associated with a high number of somatic mutations and TP53 mutations, while mutations in steroid receptors greatly accelerate DNA methylation age in breast cancer. Finally, I characterize the 353 CpG sites that together form an aging clock in terms of chromatin states and tissue variance. Conclusions I propose that DNA methylation age measures the cumulative effect of an epigenetic maintenance system. This novel epigenetic clock can be used to address a host of questions in developmental biology, cancer and aging research. PMID:24138928

  15. Expression cartography of human tissues using self organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Henry; Löffler, Markus; von Bergen, Martin; Binder, Hans

    2011-07-27

    Parallel high-throughput microarray and sequencing experiments produce vast quantities of multidimensional data which must be arranged and analyzed in a concerted way. One approach to addressing this challenge is the machine learning technique known as self organizing maps (SOMs). SOMs enable a parallel sample- and gene-centered view of genomic data combined with strong visualization and second-level analysis capabilities. The paper aims at bridging the gap between the potency of SOM-machine learning to reduce dimension of high-dimensional data on one hand and practical applications with special emphasis on gene expression analysis on the other hand. The method was applied to generate a SOM characterizing the whole genome expression profiles of 67 healthy human tissues selected from ten tissue categories (adipose, endocrine, homeostasis, digestion, exocrine, epithelium, sexual reproduction, muscle, immune system and nervous tissues). SOM mapping reduces the dimension of expression data from ten of thousands of genes to a few thousand metagenes, each representing a minicluster of co-regulated single genes. Tissue-specific and common properties shared between groups of tissues emerge as a handful of localized spots in the tissue maps collecting groups of co-regulated and co-expressed metagenes. The functional context of the spots was discovered using overrepresentation analysis with respect to pre-defined gene sets of known functional impact. We found that tissue related spots typically contain enriched populations of genes related to specific molecular processes in the respective tissue. Analysis techniques normally used at the gene-level such as two-way hierarchical clustering are better represented and provide better signal-to-noise ratios if applied to the metagenes. Metagene-based clustering analyses aggregate the tissues broadly into three clusters containing nervous, immune system and the remaining tissues. The SOM technique provides a more intuitive and

  16. Expression cartography of human tissues using self organizing maps

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Parallel high-throughput microarray and sequencing experiments produce vast quantities of multidimensional data which must be arranged and analyzed in a concerted way. One approach to addressing this challenge is the machine learning technique known as self organizing maps (SOMs). SOMs enable a parallel sample- and gene-centered view of genomic data combined with strong visualization and second-level analysis capabilities. The paper aims at bridging the gap between the potency of SOM-machine learning to reduce dimension of high-dimensional data on one hand and practical applications with special emphasis on gene expression analysis on the other hand. Results The method was applied to generate a SOM characterizing the whole genome expression profiles of 67 healthy human tissues selected from ten tissue categories (adipose, endocrine, homeostasis, digestion, exocrine, epithelium, sexual reproduction, muscle, immune system and nervous tissues). SOM mapping reduces the dimension of expression data from ten of thousands of genes to a few thousand metagenes, each representing a minicluster of co-regulated single genes. Tissue-specific and common properties shared between groups of tissues emerge as a handful of localized spots in the tissue maps collecting groups of co-regulated and co-expressed metagenes. The functional context of the spots was discovered using overrepresentation analysis with respect to pre-defined gene sets of known functional impact. We found that tissue related spots typically contain enriched populations of genes related to specific molecular processes in the respective tissue. Analysis techniques normally used at the gene-level such as two-way hierarchical clustering are better represented and provide better signal-to-noise ratios if applied to the metagenes. Metagene-based clustering analyses aggregate the tissues broadly into three clusters containing nervous, immune system and the remaining tissues. Conclusions The SOM technique

  17. The kallikrein-kinin-system in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and its role in tumour survival, invasion, migration and response to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Beck, Carolin; Piontek, Guido; Haug, Anna; Bas, Murat; Knopf, Andreas; Stark, Thomas; Mißlbeck, Martin; Rudelius, Martina; Reiter, Rudolf; Brandstetter, Markus; Pickhard, Anja

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the kallikrein-kinin-system in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and its implication on tumour survival, invasion, migration and response to radiotherapy. The expression of BKB2R was studied in a series of 180 tumour samples to determine the functional significance of BKB2R in HNSCC. Additionally, four different HNSCC cell lines were treated with an irradiation dose of 8Gy following bradykinin receptor stimulation or blockage. Tumour cell survival was tested using a colony formation assay. The invasive potential of tumour cells was assessed using Matrigel invasion chambers, the cells' ability to migrate was determined with a wound-healing assay. To examine the biochemical activation of BKB2R, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream pathways, western blot analyses were conducted. Immunohistochemistry revealed an over-expression of BKB2R in HNSCC tumour cells in comparison to normal peritumoural tissue. Blocking the BKB2R at irradiated tumour cells led to a reduced response to radiotherapy of tumour cells and led to an activation of the EGFR and its downstream pathways, known mediators of tumour cell survival, migration and invasion. Bradykinin stimulation also resulted in a better tumour cell survival, but these effects were achieved via an EGFR-independent signalling. Our results demonstrate that the kallikrein-kinin-system is involved in survival, invasion and migration of HNSCC cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Human pyridoxal phosphatase. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young Min; Kim, Dae Won; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Won, Moo Ho; Baek, Nam-In; Moon, Byung Jo; Choi, Soo Young; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2003-12-12

    Pyridoxal phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate. A human brain cDNA clone was identified to the PLP phosphatase on the basis of peptide sequences obtained previously. The cDNA predicts a 296-amino acid protein with a calculated Mr of 31698. The open reading frame is encoded by two exons located on human chromosome 22q12.3, and the exon-intron junction contains the GT/AG consensus splice site. In addition, a full-length mouse PLP phosphatase cDNA of 1978 bp was also isolated. Mouse enzyme encodes a protein of 292 amino acids with Mr of 31512, and it is localized on chromosome 15.E1. Human and mouse PLP phosphatase share 93% identity in protein sequence. A BLAST search revealed the existence of putative proteins in organism ranging from bacteria to mammals. Catalytically active human PLP phosphatase was expressed in Escherichia coli, and characteristics of the recombinant enzyme were similar to those of erythrocyte enzyme. The recombinant enzyme displayed Km and kcat values for pyridoxal of 2.5 microM and 1.52 s(-1), respectively. Human PLP phosphatase mRNA is differentially expressed in a tissue-specific manner. A single mRNA transcript of 2.1 kb was detected in all human tissues examined and was highly abundant in the brain. Obtaining the molecular properties for the human PLP phosphatase may provide new direction for investigating metabolic pathway involving vitamin B6.

  19. Elastic, permeability and swelling properties of human intervertebral disc tissues: A benchmark for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Daniel H; Jacobs, Nathan T; DeLucca, John F; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-06-27

    The aim of functional tissue engineering is to repair and replace tissues that have a biomechanical function, i.e., connective orthopaedic tissues. To do this, it is necessary to have accurate benchmarks for the elastic, permeability, and swelling (i.e., biphasic-swelling) properties of native tissues. However, in the case of the intervertebral disc, the biphasic-swelling properties of individual tissues reported in the literature exhibit great variation and even span several orders of magnitude. This variation is probably caused by differences in the testing protocols and the constitutive models used to analyze the data. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure the human lumbar disc annulus fibrosus (AF), nucleus pulposus (NP), and cartilaginous endplates (CEP) biphasic-swelling properties using a consistent experimental protocol and analyses. The testing protocol was composed of a swelling period followed by multiple confined compression ramps. To analyze the confined compression data, the tissues were modeled using a biphasic-swelling model, which augments the standard biphasic model through the addition of a deformation-dependent osmotic pressure term. This model allows considering the swelling deformations and the contribution of osmotic pressure in the analysis of the experimental data. The swelling stretch was not different between the disc regions (AF: 1.28±0.16; NP: 1.73±0.74; CEP: 1.29±0.26), with a total average of 1.42. The aggregate modulus (Ha) of the extra-fibrillar matrix was higher in the CEP (390kPa) compared to the NP (100kPa) or AF (30kPa). The permeability was very different across tissue regions, with the AF permeability (64 E(-16)m(4)/Ns) higher than the NP and CEP (~5.5 E(-16)m(4)/Ns). Additionally, a normalized time-constant (3000s) for the stress relaxation was similar for all the disc tissues. The properties measured in this study are important as benchmarks for tissue engineering and for modeling the disc's mechanical

  20. Relevance and safety of telomerase for human tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Rebecca Y.; Blum, Juliana L.; Hearn, Bevin; Lebow, Benjamin; Niklason, Laura E.

    2006-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds the promise of replacing damaged or diseased tissues and organs. The use of autologous donor cells is often not feasible because of the limited replicative lifespan of cells, particularly those derived from elderly patients. Proliferative arrest can be overcome by the ectopic expression of telomerase via human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene transfection. To study the efficacy and safety of this potentially valuable technology, we used differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and vascular tissue engineering as a model system. Although we previously demonstrated that vessels engineered with telomerase-expressing SMC had improved mechanics over those grown with control cells, it is critical to assess the phenotypic impact of telomerase expression in donor cells, because telomerase up-regulation is observed in >95% of human malignancies. To study the impact of telomerase in tissue engineering, expression of hTERT was retrovirally induced in SMC from eight elderly patients and one young donor. In hTERT SMC, significant lifespan extension beyond that of control was achieved without population doubling time acceleration. Karyotype changes were seen in both control and hTERT SMC but were not clonal nor representative of cancerous change. hTERT cells also failed to show evidence of neoplastic transformation in functional assays of tumorigenicity. In addition, the impact of donor age on cellular behavior, particularly the synthetic capability of SMC, was not affected by hTERT expression. Hence, this tissue engineering model system highlights the impact of donor age on cellular synthetic function that appears to be independent of lifespan extension by hTERT. PMID:16477025

  1. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Human Tissue Interactomes Reveals Factors Leading to Tissue-Specific Manifestation of Hereditary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barshir, Ruth; Shwartz, Omer; Smoly, Ilan Y.; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2014-01-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The resulting tissue interaction networks (interactomes) shared a large fraction of their proteins and PPIs, and only a small fraction of them were tissue-specific. Applying this resource to hereditary diseases, we first show that most of the disease-causing genes are widely expressed across tissues, yet, enigmatically, cause disease phenotypes in few tissues only. Upon testing for factors that could lead to tissue-specific vulnerability, we find that disease-causing genes tend to have elevated transcript levels and increased number of tissue-specific PPIs in their disease tissues compared to unaffected tissues. We demonstrate through several examples that these tissue-specific PPIs can highlight disease mechanisms, and thus, owing to their small number, provide a powerful filter for interrogating disease etiologies. As two thirds of the hereditary diseases are associated with these factors, comparative tissue analysis offers a meaningful and efficient framework for enhancing the understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary diseases. PMID:24921629

  3. Immunolocalization of lymphatic vessels in human fetal knee joint tissues.

    PubMed

    Melrose, James; Little, Christopher B

    2010-08-01

    We immunolocalized lymphatic and vascular blood vessels in 12- and 14-week-old human fetal knee joint tissues using a polyclonal antibody to a lymphatic vascular endothelium specific hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1) and a monoclonal antibody to podoplanin (mAb D2-40). A number of lymphatic vessels were identified in the stratified connective tissues surrounding the cartilaginous knee joint femoral and tibial rudiments. These tissues also contained small vascular vessels with entrapped red blood cells which were imaged using Nomarsky DIC microscopy. Neither vascular nor lymphatic vessels were present in the knee joint cartilaginous rudiments. The menisci in 12-week-old fetal knees were incompletely demarcated from the adjacent tibial and femoral cartilaginous rudiments which was consistent with the ongoing joint cavitation process at the femoral-tibial junction. At 14 weeks of age the menisci were independent structural entities; they contained a major central blood vessel containing red blood cells and numerous communicating vessels at the base of the menisci but no lymphatic vessels. In contrast to the 12-week-old menisci, the 14-week meniscal rudiments contained abundant CD-31 and CD-34 positive but no lymphatic vessels. Isolated 14-week-old meniscal cells also were stained with the CD-31 and CD 34 antibodies; CD-68 +ve cells, also abundant in the 14-week-old menisci, were detectable to a far lesser degree in the 12-week menisci and were totally absent from the femoral and tibial rudiments. The distribution of lymphatic vessels and tissue macrophages in the fetal joint tissues was consistent with their roles in the clearance of metabolic waste and extracellular matrix breakdown products arising from the rapidly remodelling knee joint tissues.

  4. RNA Extraction from Animal and Human's Cancerous Tissues: Does Tissue Matter?

    PubMed

    Samadani, Ali Akbar; Nikbakhsh, Novin; Fattahi, Sadegh; Pourbagher, Roghayeh; Aghajanpour Mir, Seyyed Mohsen; Mousavi Kani, Narges; Abedian, Zeinab; Akhavan-Niaki, Haleh

    2015-01-01

    The reliability of gene expression profiling, based technologies and methods to find transcriptional differences representative of the original samples is influenced by the quality of the extracted RNA. Hence, RNA extraction is the first step to investigate the gene expression and its function. Consequently, the quality of extracted RNA is really significant. Correspondingly, this research was accomplished to optimize the RNA extraction methods and compare the amounts of tissue or quality of tissue. Relatively, the cancerous tissue of human stomach in fresh and frozen conditions and also the mouse fresh tissue were studied. Some factors like the amount of samples, efficacy differences of diverse extraction buffers (TriPure, Trizol) and also the efficacy of b-mercaptoethanol were compared and investigated. The results indicated that the less amount (1-2 mg) compared to other amounts (2-5 mg, 5-15 mg) yielded the best quality and the RNA bands (5S, 18S, 28S) were observed perfectly. Relatively, comparing and measuring some kinds of buffers (Trizol, TriPure) indicated no difference in RNA extraction quality. The last investigated factor was the effect of b- mercaptoethanol which was used along with TriPure to remove the RNAse. Conclusively, no effective impression was observed.

  5. Brown adipose tissue as a therapeutic target for human obesity.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masayuki

    2013-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is the major site of sympathetically activated adaptive thermogenesis during cold exposure and after spontaneous hyperphagia, thereby controlling whole-body energy expenditure and body fat. Recent radionuclide studies have demonstrated the existence of metabolically active BAT in healthy adult humans. Human BAT is activated by acute cold exposure, being positively correlated to cold-induced increases in energy expenditure. The metabolic activity of BAT is lower in older and obese individuals. The inverse relationship between the BAT activity and body fatness suggests that BAT, because of its energy dissipating activity, is protective against body fat accumulation. In fact, either repeated cold exposure or daily ingestion of some food ingredients acting on transient receptor potential channels recruited BAT in association with increased energy expenditure and decreased body fat even in individuals with low BAT activities before the treatment. Thus, BAT is a promising therapeutic target for combating human obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  6. Human brown adipose tissue: regulation and anti-obesity potential.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is the site of sympathetically activated adaptive thermognenesis during cold exposure and after hyperphagia, thereby controlling whole-body energy expenditure (EE) and body fat. Radionuclide imaging studies have demonstrated that adult humans have metabolically active BAT composed of mainly beige/brite adipocytes, recently identified brown-like adipocytes. The inverse relationship between the BAT activity and body fatness suggests that BAT is, because of its energy dissipating activity, protective against body fat accumulation in humans as it is in small rodents. In fact, either repeated cold exposure or daily ingestion of some food ingredients acting on transient receptor potential channels recruits BAT in parallel with increased EE and decreased body fat. In addition to the sympathetic nervous system, several endocrine factors are also shown to recruit BAT. Thus, BAT is a promising therapeutic target for combating human obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  7. Brown adipose tissue in humans: therapeutic potential to combat obesity.

    PubMed

    Carey, Andrew L; Kingwell, Bronwyn A

    2013-10-01

    Harnessing the considerable capacity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to consume energy was first proposed as a potential target to control obesity nearly 40years ago. The plausibility of this approach was, however, questioned due to the prevailing view that BAT was either not present or not functional in adult humans. Recent definitive identification of functional BAT in adult humans as well as a number of important advances in the understanding of BAT biology has reignited interest in BAT as an anti-obesity target. Proof-of-concept evidence demonstrating drug-induced BAT activation provides an important foundation for development of targeted pharmacological approaches with clinical application. This review considers evidence from both human and relevant animal studies to determine whether harnessing BAT for the treatment of obesity via pharmacological intervention is a realistic goal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Establishment of novel prediction system of intestinal absorption in humans using human intestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Masateru; Toguchi, Hajime; Nishibayashi, Toru; Higaki, Kazutaka; Sugita, Akira; Koganei, Kazutaka; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Kitazume, Mina T; Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Sato, Toshiro; Okamoto, Susumu; Kanai, Takanori; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a novel prediction system of drug absorption in humans by utilizing human intestinal tissues. Based on the transport index (TI), a newly defined parameter, calculated by taking account of the change in drug concentrations because of precipitation on the apical side and the amounts accumulated in the tissue and transported to the basal side, the absorbability of drugs in rank order as well as the fraction of dose absorbed (Fa) in humans were estimated. Human intestinal tissues taken from ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease patients were mounted in a mini-Ussing chamber and transport studies were performed to evaluate the permeation of drugs, including FD-4, a very low permeable marker, atenolol, a low permeable marker, and metoprolol, a high permeable marker. Although apparent permeability coefficients calculated by the conventional equation did not reflect human Fa values for FD-4, atenolol, and metoprolol, TI values were well correlated with Fa values, which are described by 100 · [1 - e (- f · (TI - α)) ]. Based on this equation, Fa values in humans for other test drugs were predicted successfully, indicating that our new system utilizing human intestinal tissues would be valuable for predicting oral drug absorption in humans.

  9. Characterization of Leukocyte Formin FMNL1 Expression in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Heuser, Vanina D.; Iljin, Kristiina; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Carpén, Olli

    2014-01-01

    Formins are cytoskeleton regulating proteins characterized by a common FH2 structural domain. As key players in the assembly of actin filaments, formins direct dynamic cytoskeletal processes that influence cell shape, movement and adhesion. The large number of formin genes, fifteen in the human, suggests distinct tasks and expression patterns for individual family members, in addition to overlapping functions. Several formins have been associated with invasive cell properties in experimental models, linking them to cancer biology. One example is FMNL1, which is considered to be a leukocyte formin and is known to be overexpressed in lymphomas. Studies on FMNL1 and many other formins have been hampered by a lack of research tools, especially antibodies suitable for staining paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissues. Here we characterize, using bioinformatics tools and a validated antibody, the expression pattern of FMNL1 in human tissues and study its subcellular distribution. Our results indicate that FMNL1 expression is not restricted to hematopoietic tissues and that neoexpression of FMNL1 can be seen in epithelial cancer. PMID:24700756

  10. An immunohistochemical assay on human tissue using a human primary antibody.

    PubMed

    Peuscher, Anne; Gassler, Nikolaus; Schneider, Ursula; Thom, Pascal; Rasche, Stefan; Spiegel, Holger; Schillberg, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Non human antibodies administered to human patients often generate anti-antibody responses, leading in extreme cases to anaphylactic shock. Completely human antibodies are therefore favored over their murine, chimeric and humanized counterparts. However, the accurate evaluation of human antibodies on human tissue samples cannot be achieved using indirect immunohistochemical methods because of endogenous immunoglobulins that are co-detected by the secondary antibodies. Direct detection is often used instead, but this lacks the signal amplification conferred by the secondary antibody and is therefore less sensitive. We developed a simple fluorescence-based indirect immunohistochemical method that allows human primary antibodies bound specifically to their target antigens in human tissue samples to be detected clearly and without interfering background staining. This approach involves a biotinylated human primary antibody (H10(Biotin)) and Cy3-conjugated streptavidin (Strep(Cy3)). We tested the protocol using a human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) specific IgG1 (H10). We identified an exposure time threshold that allowed the elimination of low Strep(Cy3) background staining, yet achieved sufficient signal amplification to make our approach four times more sensitive than comparable direct immunohistochemical procedures. The principle of this indirect immunohistochemical assay should be transferable to other species allowing the specific and sensitive detection of any primary antibody on homologous tissues.

  11. Fucosyltransferase activities in human pancreatic tissue: comparative study between cancer tissues and established tumoral cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mas, E; Pasqualini, E; Caillol, N; El Battari, A; Crotte, C; Lombardo, D; Sadoulet, M O

    1998-06-01

    Human pancreatic cancer is characterized by an alteration in fucose-containing surface blood group antigens such as H antigen, Lewis b, Lewis y, and sialyl-Lewis. These carbohydrate determinants can be synthesized by sequential action of alpha(2,3) sialyltransferases or alpha(1,2) fucosyltransferases (Fuc-T) and alpha(1,3/1,4) fucosyltransferases on (poly)N-acetyllactosamine chains. Therefore, the expression and the function of seven fucosyltransferases were investigated in normal and cancer pancreatic tissues and in four pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Transcripts of FUT1, FUT2, FUT3, FUT4, FUT5, and FUT7 were detected by RT-PCR in carcinoma cell lines as well as in normal and tumoral tissues. Interestingly, the FUT6 message was only detected in tumoral tissues. Analysis of the acceptor substrate specificity for fucosyltransferases indicated that alpha(1,2) Fuc-T, alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, and alpha(1,4) Fuc-T were expressed in microsome preparations of all tissues as demonstrated by fucose incorporation into phenyl beta-d-galactoside, 2'-fucosyllactose, N-acetyllactosamine, 3'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, and lacto-N-biose. However, these fucosyltransferase activities varied between tissues. A substantial decrease of alpha(1,2) Fuc-T activity was observed in tumoral tissues and cell lines compared to normal tissues. Conversely, the activity of alpha(1,4) Fuc-T, which generates Lewis a and sialyl-Lewis a structures, and that of alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, able to generate a lactodifucotetraose structure, were very important in SOJ-6 and BxPC-3 cell lines. These increases correlated with an enhanced expression of Lewis a, sialyl-Lewis a, and Lewis y on the cell surface. The activity of alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, which participates in the synthesis of the sialyl-Lewis x structure, was not significantly modified in cell lines compared to normal tissues. However, the sialyl-Lewis x antigen was expressed preferentially on the surface of SOJ-6 and BxPC-3 cell lines but was not detected on Panc-1

  12. A novel SCID mouse model for studying spontaneous metastasis of human lung cancer to human tissue.

    PubMed

    Teraoka, S; Kyoizumi, S; Seyama, T; Yamakido, M; Akiyama, M

    1995-05-01

    We established a novel severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model for the study of human lung cancer metastasis to human lung. Implantation of both human fetal and adult lung tissue into mammary fat pads of SCID mice showed a 100% rate of engraftment, but only fetal lung implants revealed normal morphology of human lung tissue. Using these chimeric mice, we analyzed human lung cancer metastasis to both mouse and human lungs by subcutaneous inoculation of human squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma cell lines into the mice. In 60 to 70% of SCID mice injected with human-lung squamous-cell carcinoma, RERF-LC-AI, cancer cells were found to have metastasized to both mouse lungs and human fetal lung implants but not to human adult lung implants 80 days after cancer inoculation. Furthermore, human-lung adenocarcinoma cells, RERF-LC-KJ, metastasized to the human lung implants within 90 days in about 40% of SCID mice, whereas there were no metastases to the lungs of the mice. These results demonstrate the potential of this model for the in vivo study of human lung cancer metastasis.

  13. Analysis of the scattering performance of human retinal tissue layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dan; Gao, Zhisan; Ye, Haishui; Yuan, Qun

    2017-02-01

    Human retina is different from other ocular tissues, such as cornea, crystalline lens and vitreous because of high scattering performance. As an anisotropic tissue, we cannot neglect its impact on the polarization state of the scattered light. In this paper, Mie scattering and radiative transfer theory are applied to analyze the polarization state of backscattered light from four types of retinal tissues, including neural retina, retinal pigment epithelial (RPE), choroid and sclera. The results show that the most backscattered zones in different depths have almost the same electrical fields of Jones vector, which represents the polarization state of light, whether neural retina layer is under normal incidence or oblique incidence. Very little change occurs in the polarization of backscattered light compared to that of the incident light. Polarization distribution of backward scattered light from neural retina layer doesn't make apparent effects on polarization phase shifting in spectral domain OCT because its thickness is far less than photon mean free path, while other retinal tissues do not meet this rule.

  14. Mitogenic activation of human prostate-derived fibromuscular stromal cells by bradykinin

    PubMed Central

    Walden, Paul D; Lefkowitz, Gary K; Ittmann, Michael; Lepor, Herbert; Monaco, Marie E

    1999-01-01

    Biologically active kinin peptides are released from precursor kininogens by kallikreins. Kinins act on kinin receptors to mediate diverse biological functions including smooth muscle contraction, inflammation, pain and mitogenicity. All components of the kallikrein-kinin system exist in human male genital secretions suggesting that these molecules participate in physiological and pathophysiological genitourinary function. The objective of this study was to assess the consequences of kinin action on prostate cells.Primary cultures of prostate secretory epithelial (PE) and prostate fibromuscular stromal (PS) cells were established from human prostate tissue. Transcripts encoding both the human B1 and B2 bradykinin receptor subtypes were detected in human prostate transition-zone tissue and in cultured cells by RT–PCR. In receptor binding assays, the B1 subtype predominated on PE cell membranes and the B2 subtype predominated on PS cell membranes. In PS cells, but not in PE cells, BK induced significant inositol phosphate accumulation and [3H]-thymidine uptake. These responses were mediated through the B2 receptor subtype.The use of signal transduction inhibitors indicated that mitogenic activation by BK occurred through both protein kinase C (PKC) and protein tyrosine kinase dependent mechanisms. PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) produced maximal [3H]-thymidine uptake by PS cells, resulted in cell elongation and caused the α-actin fibres present in PS smooth muscle cells to became organized into parallel arrays along the length of the elongated cells.In summary, the prostate contains a functional kallikrein-kinin system, which could be significant in physiological and pathophysiological prostate function. PMID:10369476

  15. Characterization of human myoblast cultures for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Stern-Straeter, Jens; Bran, Gregor; Riedel, Frank; Sauter, Alexander; Hörmann, Karl; Goessler, Ulrich Reinhart

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue engineering, a promising specialty, aims at the reconstruction of skeletal muscle loss. In vitro tissue engineering attempts to achieve this goal by creating differentiated, functional muscle tissue through a process in which stem cells are extracted from the patient, e.g. by muscle biopsies, expanded and differentiated in a controlled environment, and subsequently re-implanted. A prerequisite for this undertaking is the ability to cultivate and differentiate human skeletal muscle cell cultures. Evidently, optimal culture conditions must be investigated for later clinical utilization. We therefore analysed the proliferation of human cells in different environments and evaluated the differentiation potential of different culture media. It was shown that human myoblasts have a higher rate of proliferation in the alamarBlue assay when cultured on gelatin-coated culture flasks rather than polystyrene-coated flasks. We also demonstrated that myoblasts treated with a culture medium with a high concentration of growth factors [growth medium (GM)] showed a higher proliferation compared to cultures treated with a culture medium with lower amounts of growth factors [differentiation medium (DM)]. Differentiation of human myoblast cell cultures treated with GM and DM was analysed until day 16 and myogenesis was verified by expression of MyoD, myogenin, alpha-sarcomeric actin and myosin heavy chain by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical staining for desmin, Myf-5 and alpha-sarcomeric actin was performed to verify the myogenic phenotype of extracted satellite cells and to prove the maturation of cells. Cultures treated with DM showed positive staining for alpha-sarcomeric actin. Notably, markers of differentiation were also detected in cultures treated with GM, but there was no formation of myotubes. In the enzymatic assay of creatine phosphokinase, cultures treated with DM showed a higher activity, evidencing a higher degree of differentiation

  16. Trace elements in human body fluids and tissues.

    PubMed

    Versieck, J

    1985-01-01

    Published figures for trace element concentrations in body fluids and tissues of apparently healthy subjects are widely divergent. For a considerable time, the apparent disparities were readily ascribed to biological sources of variation such as age, sex, dietary habits, physiological conditions, environmental exposure, geographical circumstances, or similar influences. Growing evidence, however, suggests that this interpretation may be seriously questioned in numerous instances. First, values obtained in reference materials leave no doubt that some previous studies must have been subject to gross analytical inaccuracies. Second, it has now been thoroughly documented that inadequate sample collection and manipulation may drastically distort the intrinsic trace element content of biological matrices. This review scrutinizes data reported by a number of investigators. In an effort to settle the currently flourishing confusion, critically selected reference values are set forth for trace element levels in human blood plasma or serum, packed blood cells, urine, lung, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle tissue.

  17. Computational model of soft tissues in the human upper airway.

    PubMed

    Pelteret, J-P V; Reddy, B D

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element model of the tongue and surrounding soft tissues with potential application to the study of sleep apnoea and of linguistics and speech therapy. The anatomical data was obtained from the Visible Human Project, and the underlying histological data was also extracted and incorporated into the model. Hyperelastic constitutive models were used to describe the material behaviour, and material incompressibility was accounted for. An active Hill three-element muscle model was used to represent the muscular tissue of the tongue. The neural stimulus for each muscle group was determined through the use of a genetic algorithm-based neural control model. The fundamental behaviour of the tongue under gravitational and breathing-induced loading is investigated. It is demonstrated that, when a time-dependent loading is applied to the tongue, the neural model is able to control the position of the tongue and produce a physiologically realistic response for the genioglossus.

  18. Diversity of lipid mediators in human adipose tissue depots

    PubMed Central

    Clària, Joan; Nguyen, Binh T.; Madenci, Arin L.; Ozaki, C. Keith

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a heterogeneous organ with remarkable variations in fat cell metabolism depending on the anatomical location. However, the pattern and distribution of bioactive lipid mediators between different fat depots and their relationships in complex diseases have not been investigated. Using LC-MS/MS-based metabolo-lipidomics, here we report that human subcutaneous (SC) adipose tissues possess a range of specialized proresolving mediators (SPM) including resolvin (Rv) D1, RvD2, protectin (PD) 1, lipoxin (LX) A4, and the monohydroxy biosynthetic pathway markers of RvD1 and PD1 (17-HDHA), RvE1 (18-HEPE), and maresin 1 (14-HDHA). The “classic” eicosanoids prostaglandin (PG) E2, PGD2, PGF2α, leukotriene (LT) B4, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), 12-HETE, and 15-HETE were also identified in SC fat. SC fat from patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD) exhibited a marked deficit in PD1 and 17-HDHA levels. Compared with SC, perivascular adipose tissue displayed higher SPM levels, suggesting an enhanced resolution capacity in this fat depot. In addition, augmented levels of eicosanoids and SPM were observed in SC fat surrounding foot wounds. Notably, the profile of SC PGF2α differed significantly when patients were grouped by body mass index (BMI). In the case of peri-wound SC fat, BMI negatively correlated with PGE2. In this tissue, proresolving mediators RvD2 and LXA4 were identified in lower levels than the proinflammatory LTB4. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a diverse distribution of bioactive lipid mediators depending on the localization of human fat depots and uncover a specific SPM pattern closely associated with PVD. PMID:23364264

  19. Characteristics of tissue-engineered cartilage from human auricular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Stephen S; Jin, Hong Ryul; Chi, David H; Taylor, Ray S

    2004-05-01

    This study was done to define the mechanical and histological properties of tissue-engineered cartilage (TEC) derived from human chondrocytes and to compare these findings with those of native cartilage. Chondrocytes were obtained from 10 human auricular cartilages and seeded onto a biodegradable template of polyglycolic acid and poly L-lactic acid. Each template was shaped into a 1 cm x 2 cm rectangle. The templates were implanted in athymic mice for 8 weeks. Eight human auricular cartilages were used for comparison. Mechanical analysis with a tensile testing device provided values of ultimate tensile strength (UTS), stiffness, and resilience. Statistical analysis was performed with the Student's t-test. Histological assessment was done with hematoxylin-eosin staining along with other special stains. The TEC had UTS of 2.07 MPa, stiffness of 3.7 MPa, and resilience of 0.37 J/m3. The control specimens had UTS of 2.18 MPa, stiffness of 5.11 MPa, and resilience of 0.42 J/m3. No statistical difference was found between the experimental and control groups for each of the three parameters. Histological analysis showed mature cartilage with characteristic collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and elastin in the TEC. The neo-cartilage showed slightly smaller size and more irregular distribution of chondrocytes and unique fibrous capsule formation with peripheral infiltration of fibrous tissue. This study showed that the mechanical qualities of TEC from human chondrocytes are similar to those of native auricular cartilage. It suggests that the engineered cartilage from human chondrocytes may have sufficient strength and durability for clinical uses. The histological findings revealed some differences with neo-cartilage.

  20. Use of different derivatives of D-Val-Leu-Arg for studying kallikrein activities in cat submandibular glands and saliva.

    PubMed

    Garrett, J R; Kidd, A; Kyriacou, K; Smith, R E

    1985-07-01

    Glandular kallikrein shows a special selectivity for D-Val-Leu-Arg-4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide in comparison with other potential oligopeptide substrates and it provides a useful histochemical substrate, although the reaction may not always be specific. However, in cat submandibular saliva, a biochemical assay using the closely related D-Val-Leu-Arg-7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin (AFC) as substrate, which affords more sensitive detection, showed that soya bean trypsin inhibitor causes no inhibition. This indicates that there are unlikely to be contaminating enzymes competing for the substrate in this body fluid. Support for this observation has been gained by the useful new enzyme overlay membrane technique for fluorescent assessment of reactive bands of enzymes after isoelectric focusing, using membranes of cellulose acetate impregnated with D-Val-Leu-Arg-AFC. Comparison of results after isoelectric focusing of purified cat submandibular kallikrein with samples of cat submandibular saliva confirmed that the substrate is monospecific for kallikrein in saliva of the cat. This knowledge has enabled us to start assessing the dynamics of the secretion of kallikrein by the gland. Testing individual drops of saliva has shown that an amazingly rapid mobilization of kallikrein occurs in high concentrations on sympathetic nerve stimulation. The corresponding oligopeptide-based inhibitor D-Val-Leu-Arg-chloromethyl ketone was found to be strongly inhibitory of the amidase reaction by kallikrein but showed a low specificity for kallikrein. Nevertheless, its effects have been tested in vivo by the intravascular route and it caused an increase in the resting salivary vascular resistance whether administered close-arterially or intravenously. Thus, it would seem that a kallikrein-like protease does influence the background tone in the vessels and the source of this enzyme is thought to be mast cells.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Human Tissue-Engineered Adipose Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Proulx, Maryse; Aubin, Kim; Lagueux, Jean; Audet, Pierre; Auger, Michèle

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) substitutes are being developed to answer the strong demand in reconstructive surgery. To facilitate the validation of their functional performance in vivo, and to avoid resorting to excessive number of animals, it is crucial at this stage to develop biomedical imaging methodologies, enabling the follow-up of reconstructed AT substitutes. Until now, biomedical imaging of AT substitutes has scarcely been reported in the literature. Therefore, the optimal parameters enabling good resolution, appropriate contrast, and graft delineation, as well as blood perfusion validation, must be studied and reported. In this study, human adipose substitutes produced from adipose-derived stem/stromal cells using the self-assembly approach of tissue engineering were implanted into athymic mice. The fate of the reconstructed AT substitutes implanted in vivo was successfully followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is the imaging modality of choice for visualizing soft ATs. T1-weighted images allowed clear delineation of the grafts, followed by volume integration. The magnetic resonance (MR) signal of reconstructed AT was studied in vitro by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). This confirmed the presence of a strong triglyceride peak of short longitudinal proton relaxation time (T1) values (200±53 ms) in reconstructed AT substitutes (total T1=813±76 ms), which establishes a clear signal difference between adjacent muscle, connective tissue, and native fat (total T1 ∼300 ms). Graft volume retention was followed up to 6 weeks after implantation, revealing a gradual resorption rate averaging at 44% of initial substitute's volume. In addition, vascular perfusion measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI confirmed the graft's vascularization postimplantation (14 and 21 days after grafting). Histological analysis of the grafted tissues revealed the persistence of numerous adipocytes without evidence of cysts or tissue necrosis. This study

  2. Polyethylene glycol enhanced refolding of the recombinant human tissue transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, A; Fésüs, L

    2001-02-01

    Tissue transglutaminase forms cross-links between lysine and glutamine side-chains of polypeptide chains in a Ca2+-dependent reaction; its structural basis is still not clarified. In this study, we demonstrate that the refolding of the human recombinant enzyme molecule to its catalytically active form from inclusion bodies needs the presence of a helper material with higher molecular mass, but only in the initiation phase. Ca2+ and nucleotides are ascribed as affector molecules also in the early phase of structural reconstitution. Two optimal concentrations of polyethylene glycol and a relatively long time scale for the evolution of the final structure were identified. The optimized refolding procedure is reported.

  3. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue. 1270.43 Section 1270.43 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Inspection of Tissue Establishments § 1270.43...

  4. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue. 1270.43 Section 1270.43 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Inspection of Tissue Establishments § 1270.43...

  5. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue. 1270.43 Section 1270.43 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Inspection of Tissue Establishments § 1270.43 Retention...

  6. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue. 1270.43 Section 1270.43 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Inspection of Tissue Establishments § 1270.43 Retention...

  7. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue. 1270.43 Section 1270.43 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Inspection of Tissue Establishments § 1270.43 Retention...

  8. Cardiomyocyte clusters derived from human embryonic stem cells share similarities with human heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Asp, Julia; Steel, Daniella; Jonsson, Marianne; Améen, Caroline; Dahlenborg, Kerstin; Jeppsson, Anders; Lindahl, Anders; Sartipy, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Cardiotoxicity testing is a key activity in the pharmaceutical industry in order to detect detrimental effects of new drugs. A reliable human in vitro model would both be beneficial in selection of lead compounds and be important for reducing animal experimentation. However, the human heart is a complex organ composed of many distinct types of cardiomyocytes, but cardiomyocyte clusters (CMCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells could be an option for a cellular model. Data on functional properties of CMCs demonstrate similarities to their in vivo analogues in human. However, development of an in vitro model requires a more thorough comparison of CMCs to human heart tissue. Therefore, we directly compared individually isolated CMCs to human fetal, neonatal, adult atrial and ventricular heart tissues. Real-time qPCR analysis of mRNA levels and protein staining of ion channels and cardiac markers showed in general a similar expression pattern in CMCs and human heart. Moreover, a significant decrease in beat frequency was noted after addition of Zatebradine, a blocker to I(f) involved in regulation of spontaneous contraction in CMCs. The results underscore the similarities of CMCs to human cardiac tissue, and further support establishment of novel cardiotoxicity assays based on the CMCs in drug discovery.

  9. Tissue engineered humanized bone supports human hematopoiesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Boris M; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Nowlan, Bianca; Barbier, Valerie; Thibaudeau, Laure; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Hooper, John D; Loessner, Daniela; Clements, Judith A; Russell, Pamela J; Pettit, Allison R; Winkler, Ingrid G; Levesque, Jean-Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Advances in tissue-engineering have resulted in a versatile tool-box to specifically design a tailored microenvironment for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in order to study diseases that develop within this setting. However, most current in vivo models fail to recapitulate the biological processes seen in humans. Here we describe a highly reproducible method to engineer humanized bone constructs that are able to recapitulate the morphological features and biological functions of the HSC niches. Ectopic implantation of biodegradable composite scaffolds cultured for 4 weeks with human mesenchymal progenitor cells and loaded with rhBMP-7 resulted in the development of a chimeric bone organ including a large number of human mesenchymal cells which were shown to be metabolically active and capable of establishing a humanized microenvironment supportive of the homing and maintenance of human HSCs. A syngeneic mouse-to-mouse transplantation assay was used to prove the functionality of the tissue-engineered ossicles. We predict that the ability to tissue engineer a morphologically intact and functional large-volume bone organ with a humanized bone marrow compartment will help to further elucidate physiological or pathological interactions between human HSCs and their native niches. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Protocol for Collecting Human Cardiac Tissue for Research

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Cheavar A.; Haynes, Premi; Campbell, Stuart G.; Chung, Charles; Mitov, Mihail I.; Dennis, Donna; Bonnell, Mark R.; Hoopes, Charles W.; Guglin, Maya; Campbell, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript describes a protocol at the University of Kentucky that allows a translational research team to collect human myocardium that can be used for biological research. We have gained a great deal of practical experience since we started this protocol in 2008, and we hope that other groups might be able to learn from our endeavors. To date, we have procured ~4000 samples from ~230 patients. The tissue that we collect comes from organ donors and from patients who are receiving a heart transplant or a ventricular assist device because they have heart failure. We begin our manuscript by describing the importance of human samples in cardiac research. Subsequently, we describe the process for obtaining consent from patients, the cost of running the protocol, and some of the issues and practical difficulties that we have encountered. We conclude with some suggestions for other researchers who may be considering starting a similar protocol. PMID:28042604

  11. Fracture of Human Femur Tissue Monitored by Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, Dimitrios. G.; Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Boulpaep, Frans; Polyzos, Demosthenes; van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2015-01-01

    The study describes the acoustic emission (AE) activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis). The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure. PMID:25763648

  12. Rolling the Human Amnion to Engineer Laminated Vascular Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Amensag, Salma

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease and the limited availability of suitable autologous transplant vessels for coronary and peripheral bypass surgeries is a significant clinical problem. A great deal of progress has been made over recent years to develop biodegradable materials with the potential to remodel and regenerate vascular tissues. However, the creation of functional biological scaffolds capable of withstanding vascular stress within a clinically relevant time frame has proved to be a challenging proposition. As an alternative approach, we report the use of a multilaminate rolling approach using the human amnion to generate a tubular construct for blood vessel regeneration. The human amniotic membrane was decellularized by agitation in 0.03% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate to generate an immune compliant material. The adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) and human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) was assessed to determine initial binding and biocompatibility (monocultures). Extended cultures were either assessed as flat membranes, or rolled to form concentric multilayered conduits. Results showed positive EC adhesion and a progressive repopulation by SMC. Functional changes in SMC gene expression and the constructs' bulk mechanical properties were concomitant with vessel remodeling as assessed over a 40-day culture period. A significant advantage with this approach is the ability to rapidly produce a cell-dense construct with an extracellular matrix similar in architecture and composition to natural vessels. The capacity to control physical parameters such as vessel diameter, wall thickness, shape, and length are critical to match vessel compliance and tailor vessel specifications to distinct anatomical locations. As such, this approach opens new avenues in a range of tissue regenerative applications that may have a much wider clinical impact. PMID:22616610

  13. Rolling the human amnion to engineer laminated vascular tissues.

    PubMed

    Amensag, Salma; McFetridge, Peter S

    2012-11-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease and the limited availability of suitable autologous transplant vessels for coronary and peripheral bypass surgeries is a significant clinical problem. A great deal of progress has been made over recent years to develop biodegradable materials with the potential to remodel and regenerate vascular tissues. However, the creation of functional biological scaffolds capable of withstanding vascular stress within a clinically relevant time frame has proved to be a challenging proposition. As an alternative approach, we report the use of a multilaminate rolling approach using the human amnion to generate a tubular construct for blood vessel regeneration. The human amniotic membrane was decellularized by agitation in 0.03% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate to generate an immune compliant material. The adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) and human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) was assessed to determine initial binding and biocompatibility (monocultures). Extended cultures were either assessed as flat membranes, or rolled to form concentric multilayered conduits. Results showed positive EC adhesion and a progressive repopulation by SMC. Functional changes in SMC gene expression and the constructs' bulk mechanical properties were concomitant with vessel remodeling as assessed over a 40-day culture period. A significant advantage with this approach is the ability to rapidly produce a cell-dense construct with an extracellular matrix similar in architecture and composition to natural vessels. The capacity to control physical parameters such as vessel diameter, wall thickness, shape, and length are critical to match vessel compliance and tailor vessel specifications to distinct anatomical locations. As such, this approach opens new avenues in a range of tissue regenerative applications that may have a much wider clinical impact.

  14. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Courtney A.; Smiley, Beth L.; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  15. Human papillomavirus detection in paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Tanzi, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Silvia; Frati, Elena R; Amicizia, Daniela; Martinelli, Marianna; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Brisigotti, Maria Pia; Colzani, Daniela; Fasoli, Ester; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Panatto, Donatella; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a well-recognized aetiological role in the development of cervical cancer and other anogenital tumours. Recently, an association between colorectal cancer and HPV infection has been suggested, although this is still controversial. This study aimed at detecting and characterizing HPV infection in 57 paired biopsies from colorectal cancers and adjacent intact tissues using a degenerate PCR approach. All amplified fragments were genotyped by means of sequencing. Overall, HPV prevalence was 12.3 %. In particular, 15.8 % of tumour tissues and 8.8 % of non-cancerous tissue samples were HPV DNA-positive. Of these samples, 85.7 % were genotyped successfully, with 41.7 % of sequences identifying four genotypes of the HR (high oncogenic risk) clade Group 1; the remaining 58.3 % of HPV-genotyped specimens had an unclassified β-HPV. Examining additional cases and analysing whole genomes will help to outline the significance of these findings.

  16. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Powell, Courtney A; Smiley, Beth L; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H

    2002-11-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  17. Developmental changes in purine phosphoribosyltransferases in human and rat tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, A; Harkness, R A

    1976-01-01

    1. The hypoxanthine/guanine and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activities in a wide variety of human tissues were studied during their growth and development from foetal life onward. A wide range of activities develop after birth, with especially high values in the central nervous system and testes. 2. Postnatal development of hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase was also defined in the rat. Although there were increases in the central nervous system and testes, there was also a rise in activity in the liver, which was less marked in man. 3. A sensitive radiochemical assay method, using dTTP to inhibit 5'-nucleotidase activity, suitable for tissue extracts, was developed. 4. No definite evidence of the existence of tissue-specific isoenzymes of hypoxanthine/guanine or adenine phosphoribosyltransferase was found. Hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase in testes, however, had a significantly different thermal-denaturation rate constant. 5. The findings are discussed in an attempt to relate activity of hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase to biological function. Growth as well as some developmental changes appear to be related to increase in the activity of this enzyme. PMID:1016239

  18. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Courtney A.; Smiley, Beth L.; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  19. Proteogenomic Analysis of Human Chromosome 9-Encoded Genes from Human Samples and Lung Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jung-Mo; Kim, Min-Sik; Kim, Yong-In; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Lee, Sun Hee; Paik, Young-Ki; Pandey, Akhilesh; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2014-01-01

    The Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) was recently initiated as an international collaborative effort. Our team adopted chromosome 9 (Chr 9) and performed a bioinformatics and proteogenomic analysis to catalog Chr 9-encoded proteins from normal tissues, lung cancer cell lines and lung cancer tissues. Approximately 74.7% of the Chr 9 genes of the human genome were identified, which included approximately 28% of missing proteins (46 of 162) on Chr 9 compared with the list of missing proteins from the neXtProt master table (2013-09). In addition, we performed a comparative proteomics analysis between normal lung and lung cancer tissues. Based on the data analysis, 15 proteins from Chr 9 were detected only in lung cancer tissues. Finally, we conducted a proteogenomic analysis to discover Chr 9-residing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and mutations described in the COSMIC cancer mutation database. We identified 21 SNPs and 4 mutations containing peptides on Chr 9 from normal human cells/tissues and lung cancer cell lines, respectively. In summary, this study provides valuable information of the human proteome for the scientific community as part of C-HPP. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD. PMID:24274035

  20. The PAXgene® Tissue System Preserves Phosphoproteins in Human Tissue Specimens and Enables Comprehensive Protein Biomarker Research

    PubMed Central

    Gündisch, Sibylle; Schott, Christina; Wolff, Claudia; Tran, Kai; Beese, Christian; Viertler, Christian; Zatloukal, Kurt; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Precise quantitation of protein biomarkers in clinical tissue specimens is a prerequisite for accurate and effective diagnosis, prognosis, and personalized medicine. Although progress is being made, protein analysis from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues is still challenging. In previous reports, we showed that the novel formalin-free tissue preservation technology, the PAXgene Tissue System, allows the extraction of intact and immunoreactive proteins from PAXgene-fixed and paraffin-embedded (PFPE) tissues. In the current study, we focused on the analysis of phosphoproteins and the applicability of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to the analysis of a variety of malignant and non-malignant human tissues. Using western blot analysis, we found that phosphoproteins are quantitatively preserved in PFPE tissues, and signal intensities are comparable to that in paired, frozen tissues. Furthermore, proteins extracted from PFPE samples are suitable for 2D-PAGE and can be quantified by ELISA specific for denatured proteins. In summary, the PAXgene Tissue System reliably preserves phosphoproteins in human tissue samples, even after prolonged fixation or stabilization times, and is compatible with methods for protein analysis such as 2D-PAGE and ELISA. We conclude that the PAXgene Tissue System has the potential to serve as a versatile tissue fixative for modern pathology. PMID:23555997

  1. The mirror RNA expression pattern in human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bythwood, Tameka N.; Xu, Wei; Li, Wenzhi; Rao, Weinian; Li, Qiling; Xue, Xue; Richards, Jendai; Ma, Li; Song, Qing

    2017-01-01

    It has been realized in recent years that non-coding RNAs are playing important roles in genome functions and human diseases. Here we developed a new technology and observed a new pattern of gene expression. We observed that over 72% of RNAs in human genome are expressed in forward-reverse pairs, just like mirror images of each other between forward expression and reverse expression; the overview showed that it cannot be simply described as transcript overlapping, so we designated it as mirror expression. Furthermore, we found that the mirror expression is gene-specific and tissue-specific, and less common in the proximal promoter regions. The size of the shadows varies between different genes, different tissues and different classes. The shadow expression is most significant in the Alu element, it was also observed among L1, Simple Repeats and LTR elements, but rare in other repeats such as low-complexity, LINE/L2, DNA and MIRs. Although there is no evidence yet about the relationship of this mirror pattern and double-strand RNA (dsRNA), this new striking pattern provides a new clue and a new direction to unveil the role of RNAs in the genome functions and diseases.

  2. Tissue engineered human tracheas for in vivo implantation.

    PubMed

    Baiguera, Silvia; Jungebluth, Phillip; Burns, Alan; Mavilia, Carmelo; Haag, Johannes; De Coppi, Paolo; Macchiarini, Paolo

    2010-12-01

    Two years ago we performed the first clinical successful transplantation of a fully tissue engineered trachea. Despite the clinically positive outcome, the graft production took almost 3 months, a not feasible period of time for patients with the need of an urgent transplantation. We have then improved decellularization process and herein, for the first time, we completely describe and characterize the obtainment of human tracheal bioactive supports. Histological and molecular biology analysis demonstrated that all cellular components and nuclear material were removed and quantitative PCR confirmed it. SEM analysis revealed that the decellularized matrices retained the hierarchical structures of native trachea, and biomechanical tests showed that decellularization approach did not led to any influence on tracheal morphological and mechanical properties. Moreover immunohistological staining showed the preservation of angiogenic factors and angiogenic assays demonstrated that acellular human tracheal scaffolds exert an in vitro chemo-active action and induce strong in vivo angiogenic response (CAM analysis). We are now able to obtained, in a short and clinically useful time (approximately 3 weeks), a bioengineered trachea that is structurally and mechanically similar to native trachea, which exert chemotactive and pro-angiogenic properties and which could be successfully used for clinical tissue engineered airway clinical replacements.

  3. Distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Dinjens, W N; ten Kate, J; van der Linden, E P; Wijnen, J T; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1989-12-01

    The normal distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human body was investigated quantitatively by ADCP-specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) and qualitatively by immunohistochemistry. In these studies we used a specific rabbit anti-human ADCP antiserum. In all 19 investigated tissues, except erythrocytes, ADCP was found by RIA in the soluble and membrane fractions. From all tissues the membrane fractions contained more ADCP (expressed per mg protein) than the soluble fractions. High membrane ADCP concentrations were found in skin, renal cortex, gastrointestinal tract, and prostate. Immunoperoxidase staining confirmed the predominant membrane-associated localization of the protein. In serous sweat glands, convoluted tubules of renal cortex, bile canaliculi, gastrointestinal tract, lung, pancreas, prostate gland, salivary gland, gallbladder, mammary gland, and uterus, ADCP immunoreactivity was found confined to the luminal membranes of the epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that ADCP is present predominantly in exocrine glands and absorptive epithelia. The localization of ADCP at the secretory or absorptive apex of the cells suggests that the function of ADCP is related to the secretory and/or absorptive process.

  4. Quantification of human body fat tissue percentage by MRI.

    PubMed

    Müller, Hans-Peter; Raudies, Florian; Unrath, Alexander; Neumann, Heiko; Ludolph, Albert C; Kassubek, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The MRI-based evaluation of the quantity and regional distribution of adipose tissue is one objective measure in the investigation of obesity. The aim of this article was to report a comprehensive and automatic analytical method for the determination of the volumes of subcutaneous fat tissue (SFT) and visceral fat tissue (VFT) in either the whole human body or selected slices or regions of interest. Using an MRI protocol in an examination position that was convenient for volunteers and patients with severe diseases, 22 healthy subjects were examined. The software platform was able to merge MRI scans of several body regions acquired in separate acquisitions. Through a cascade of image processing steps, SFT and VFT volumes were calculated. Whole-body SFT and VFT distributions, as well as fat distributions of defined body slices, were analysed in detail. Complete three-dimensional datasets were analysed in a reproducible manner with as few operator-dependent interventions as possible. In order to determine the SFT volume, the ARTIS (Adapted Rendering for Tissue Intensity Segmentation) algorithm was introduced. The advantage of the ARTIS algorithm was the delineation of SFT volumes in regions in which standard region grow techniques fail. Using the ARTIS algorithm, an automatic SFT volume detection was feasible. MRI data analysis was able to determine SFT and VFT volume percentages using new analytical strategies. With the techniques described, it was possible to detect changes in SFT and VFT percentages of the whole body and selected regions. The techniques presented in this study are likely to be of use in obesity-related investigations, as well as in the examination of longitudinal changes in weight during various medical conditions.

  5. Immunodetection of Human LINE-1 Expression in Cultured Cells and Human Tissues.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reema; Rodić, Nemanja; Burns, Kathleen H; Taylor, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) is the only active protein-coding retrotransposon in humans. It is not expressed in somatic tissue but is aberrantly expressed in a wide variety of human cancers. ORF1p protein is the most robust indicator of LINE-1 expression; the protein accumulates in large quantities in cellular cytoplasm. Recently, monoclonal antibodies have allowed more complete characterizations of ORF1p expression and indicated potential for developing ORF1p as a clinical biomarker. Here, we describe a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for human LINE-1 ORF1p and its application in immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry of both cells and human tissues. We also describe detection of tagged LINE-1 ORF2p via immunofluorescence. These general methods may be readily adapted to use with many other proteins and antibodies.

  6. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Benso, Maria P; Rivero-Gutierrez, Belen; Lopez-Minguez, Jesus; Anzola, Andrea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Madrid, Juan A; Lujan, Juan A; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Scheer, Frank A J L; Garaulet, Marta

    2016-09-01

    In humans, insulin sensitivity varies according to time of day, with decreased values in the evening and at night. Mechanisms responsible for the diurnal variation in insulin sensitivity are unclear. We investigated whether human adipose tissue (AT) expresses intrinsic circadian rhythms in insulin sensitivity that could contribute to this phenomenon. Subcutaneous and visceral AT biopsies were obtained from extremely obese participants (body mass index, 41.8 ± 6.3 kg/m(2); 46 ± 11 y) during gastric-bypass surgery. To assess the rhythm in insulin signaling, AKT phosphorylation was determined every 4 h over 24 h in vitro in response to different insulin concentrations (0, 1, 10, and 100 nM). Data revealed that subcutaneous AT exhibited robust circadian rhythms in insulin signaling (P < 0.00001). Insulin sensitivity reached its maximum (acrophase) around noon, being 54% higher than during midnight (P = 0.009). The amplitude of the rhythm was positively correlated with in vivo sleep duration (r = 0.53; P = 0.023) and negatively correlated with in vivo bedtime (r = -0.54; P = 0.020). No circadian rhythms were detected in visceral AT (P = 0.643). Here, we demonstrate the relevance of the time of the day for how sensitive AT is to the effects of insulin. Subcutaneous AT shows an endogenous circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity that could provide an underlying mechanism for the daily rhythm in systemic insulin sensitivity.-Carrasco-Benso, M. P., Rivero-Gutierrez, B., Lopez-Minguez, J., Anzola, A., Diez-Noguera, A., Madrid, J. A., Lujan, J. A., Martínez-Augustin, O., Scheer, F. A. J. L., Garaulet, M. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

  7. Investigation of normal human skin tissue and acupuncture points of human skin tissue using fiberoptical FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Angelique L.; Bruch, Reinhard F.; Afanasyeva, Natalia I.; Kolyakov, Sergei F.; Butvina, Leonid N.; Ma, Lixing

    1998-06-01

    An innovative spectroscopic diagnostic method has been developed for investigation of different regions of normal human skin tissue. This new method is a combination of Fourier transform IR fiberoptic evanescent wave (FTIR-FEW) spectroscopy and fiber optic techniques for the middle IR (MIR) wavelength range. The fiber optical sensors we have used are characterized by low optical losses and high flexibility for remote analysis. Our fiber optical accessories and method allows for direct interaction of the skin tissue with the fiber probe and can be utilized with a diversity of standard commercial Fourier transform spectrometers. The FTIR-FEW technique, using nontoxic unclad fibers in the attenuated total reflection regime, is suitable for noninvasive, fast, sensitive investigations of normal skin in vivo for various medical diagnostics applications including studies of acupuncture points. Here we present the first data on IR spectra of skin tissue in vivo for normal skin and several acupuncture points in the range of 1300 to 1800 cm-1 and 2600 to 4000 cm-1.

  8. Prostate tissue stiffness as measured with a resonance sensor system: a study on silicone and human prostate tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jalkanen, Ville; Andersson, Britt M; Bergh, Anders; Ljungberg, Börje; Lindahl, Olof A

    2006-07-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men in Europe and in the USA. Some prostate tumours are stiffer than the surrounding normal tissue, and it could therefore be of interest to measure prostate tissue stiffness. Resonance sensor technology based on piezoelectric resonance detects variations in tissue stiffness due to a change in the resonance frequency. An impression-controlled resonance sensor system was used to detect stiffness in silicone rubber and in human prostate tissue in vitro using two parameters, both combinations of frequency change and force. Variations in silicone rubber stiffness due to the mixing ratio of the two components could be detected (p<0.05) using both parameters. Measurements on prostate tissue showed that there existed a statistically significant (MANOVA test, p<0.001) reproducible difference between tumour tissue (n=13) and normal healthy tissue (n=98) when studying a multivariate parameter set. Both the tumour tissue and normal tissue groups had variations within them, which were assumed to be related to differences in tissue composition. Other sources of error could be uneven surfaces and different levels of dehydration for the prostates. Our results indicated that the resonance sensor could be used to detect stiffness variations in silicone and in human prostate tissue in vitro. This is promising for the development of a future diagnostic tool for prostate cancer.

  9. Hemoglobin enhances tissue factor expression on human malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, F A; Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Meyer, T; Biggerstaff, J; Desai, H; Francis, J L

    2001-04-01

    Tissue Factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that complexes with factor VII/activated factor VII to initiate blood coagulation. TF may be expressed on the surface of various cells including monocytes and endothelial cells. Over-expression of TF in human tumor cell lines promotes metastasis. We recently showed that hemoglobin (Hb) forms a specific complex with TF purified from human malignant melanoma cells and enhances its procoagulant activity (PCA). To further study this interaction, we examined the effect of Hb on the expression of TF on human malignant (TF+) cells and KG1 myeloid leukemia (TF-) cells. Human melanoma A375 and J82 bladder carcinoma cells, which express TF at moderate and relatively high levels, respectively, were incubated with varying concentrations (0-1.5 mg/ml) of Hb. After washing, cells were analyzed for Hb binding and TF expression using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Hb bound to the cells in a concentration-dependent manner, and increased both TF expression and PCA. The human A375 malignant melanoma cells incubated with Hb (1 mg/ml) expressed up to six times more TF antigen than cells without Hb. This increase in TF expression and PCA of intact cells incubated with Hb was significantly inhibited by cycloheximide at a concentration of 10 microg/ml (P < 0.01). An increase in total cellular TF antigen content was demonstrated by specific immunoassay. In contrast, Hb (5 mg/ml) did not induce TF expression and PCA on KG1 cells as determined by flow cytometry and TF (FXAA) activity. We conclude that Hb specifically binds to TF-bearing malignant cells and increases their PCA. This effect seems to be at least partly due to de novo synthesis of TF and increased surface expression. However, the exact mechanism by which Hb binds and upregulates TF expression remains to be determined.

  10. Emerging clinical importance of the cancer biomarkers kallikrein-related peptidases (KLK) in female and male reproductive organ malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Manfred; Magdolen, Viktor; Yang, Feng; Kiechle, Marion; Bayani, Jane; Yousef, George M.; Scorilas, Andreas; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.; Dorn, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor tissue-associated KLKs (kallikrein-related peptidases) are clinically important biomarkers that may allow prognosis of the cancer disease and/or prediction of response/failure of cancer patients to cancer-directed drugs. Regarding the female/male reproductive tract, remarkably, all of the fifteen KLKs are expressed in the normal prostate, breast, cervix uteri, and the testis, whereas the uterus/endometrium and the ovary are expressing a limited number of KLKs only. Conclusions Most of the information regarding elevated expression of KLKs in tumor-affected organs is available for ovarian cancer; depicting them as valuable biomarkers in the cancerous phenotype. In contrast, for breast cancer, a series of KLKs was found to be downregulated. However, in breast cancer, KLK4 is elevated which is also true for ovarian and prostate cancer. In such cases, selective synthetic KLK inhibitors that aim at blocking the proteolytic activities of certain KLKs may serve as future candidate therapeutic drugs to interfere with tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:24294176

  11. A Novel Antithrombotic Mechanism Mediated by the Receptors of the Kallikrein/Kinin and Renin–Angiotensin Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schmaier, Alvin H.

    2016-01-01

    The contact activation (CAS) and kallikrein/kinin (KKS) systems regulate thrombosis risk in two ways. First, the CAS influences contact activation-induced factor XI activation and thrombin formation through the hemostatic cascade. Second, prekallikrein (PK) and bradykinin of the KKS regulate expression of three vessel wall G-protein-coupled receptors, the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R), angiotensin receptor 2, and Mas to influence prostacyclin formation. The degree of intravascular prostacyclin formation inversely regulates intravascular thrombosis risk. A 1.5- to 2-fold increase in prostacyclin, as seen in PK deficiency, increases vessel wall Sirt1 and KLF4 to downregulate vessel wall tissue factor which alone is sufficient to lengthen induced thrombosis times. A twofold to threefold increase in prostacyclin, as seen the B2R-deficient mouse, delays thrombosis and produces a selective platelet function defect of reduced GPVI activation and platelet spreading. Regulation of CAS and KKS protein expression has a profound influence on thrombosis-generating mechanisms in the intravascular compartment. PMID:27965959

  12. Resonance Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, M.; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, W.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to the beneficial effects of carotenoid antioxidants in the human body. Several studies, for example, support the protective role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the prevention of age-related eye diseases. If present in high concentrations in the macular region of the retina, lutein and zeaxanthin provide pigmentation in this most light sensitive retinal spot, and as a result of light filtering and/or antioxidant action, delay the onset of macular degeneration with increasing age. Other carotenoids, such as lycopene and beta-carotene, play an important role as well in the protection of skin from UV and short-wavelength visible radiation. Lutein and lycopene may also have protective function for cardiovascular health, and lycopene may play a role in the prevention of prostate cancer. Motivated by the growing importance of carotenoids in health and disease, and recognizing the lack of any accepted noninvasive technology for the detection of carotenoids in living human tissue, we explore resonance Raman spectroscopy as a novel approach for noninvasive, laser optical carotenoid detection. We review the main results achieved recently with the Raman detection approach. Initially we applied the method to the detection of macular carotenoid pigments, and more recently to the detection of carotenoids in human skin and mucosal tissues. Using skin carotenoid Raman instruments, we measure the carotenoid response from the stratum corneum layer of the palm of the hand for a population of 1375 subjects and develope a portable skin Raman scanner for field studies. These experiments reveal that carotenoids are a good indicator of antioxidant status. They show that people with high oxidative stress, like smokers, and subjects with high sunlight exposure, in general, have reduced skin carotenoid levels, independent of their dietary carotenoid consumption. We find the Raman technique to be precise, specific, sensitive, and well suitable for clinical as well as

  13. Resonance Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human tissue.

    PubMed

    Ermakov, Igor V; Sharifzadeh, M; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, W

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to the beneficial effects of carotenoid antioxidants in the human body. Several studies, for example, support the protective role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the prevention of age-related eye diseases. If present in high concentrations in the macular region of the retina, lutein and zeaxanthin provide pigmentation in this most light sensitive retinal spot, and as a result of light filtering and/or antioxidant action, delay the onset of macular degeneration with increasing age. Other carotenoids, such as lycopene and beta-carotene, play an important role as well in the protection of skin from UV and short-wavelength visible radiation. Lutein and lycopene may also have protective function for cardiovascular health, and lycopene may play a role in the prevention of prostate cancer. Motivated by the growing importance of carotenoids in health and disease, and recognizing the lack of any accepted noninvasive technology for the detection of carotenoids in living human tissue, we explore resonance Raman spectroscopy as a novel approach for noninvasive, laser optical carotenoid detection. We review the main results achieved recently with the Raman detection approach. Initially we applied the method to the detection of macular carotenoid pigments, and more recently to the detection of carotenoids in human skin and mucosal tissues. Using skin carotenoid Raman instruments, we measure the carotenoid response from the stratum corneum layer of the palm of the hand for a population of 1375 subjects and develop a portable skin Raman scanner for field studies. These experiments reveal that carotenoids are a good indicator of antioxidant status. They show that people with high oxidative stress, like smokers, and subjects with high sunlight exposure, in general, have reduced skin carotenoid levels, independent of their dietary carotenoid consumption. We find the Raman technique to be precise, specific, sensitive, and well suitable for clinical as well as

  14. Structure of BbKI, a disulfide-free plasma kallikrein inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dongwen; Hansen, Daiane; Shabalin, Ivan G; Gustchina, Alla; Vieira, Debora F; de Brito, Marlon V; Araújo, Ana Paula U; Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    A serine protease inhibitor from Bauhinia bauhinioides (BbKI) belongs to the Kunitz family of plant inhibitors, which are common in plant seeds. BbKI does not contain any disulfides, unlike most other members of this family. It is a potent inhibitor of plasma kallikrein, in addition to other serine proteases, and thus exhibits antithrombotic activity. A high-resolution crystal structure of recombinantly expressed BbKI was determined (at 1.4 Å resolution) and was compared with the structures of other members of the family. Modeling of a complex of BbKI with plasma kallikrein indicates that changes in the local structure of the reactive loop that includes the specificity-determining Arg64 are necessary in order to explain the tight binding. An R64A mutant of BbKI was found to be a weaker inhibitor of plasma kallikrein, but was much more potent against plasmin, suggesting that this mutant may be useful for preventing the breakup of fibrin and maintaining clot stability, thus preventing excessive bleeding.

  15. Structure of BbKI, a disulfide-free plasma kallikrein inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dongwen; Hansen, Daiane; Shabalin, Ivan G.; Gustchina, Alla; Vieira, Debora F.; de Brito, Marlon V.; Araújo, Ana Paula U.; Oliva, Maria Luiza V.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    A serine protease inhibitor from Bauhinia bauhinioides (BbKI) belongs to the Kunitz family of plant inhibitors, which are common in plant seeds. BbKI does not contain any disulfides, unlike most other members of this family. It is a potent inhibitor of plasma kallikrein, in addition to other serine proteases, and thus exhibits antithrombotic activity. A high-resolution crystal structure of recombinantly expressed BbKI was determined (at 1.4 Å resolution) and was compared with the structures of other members of the family. Modeling of a complex of BbKI with plasma kallikrein indicates that changes in the local structure of the reactive loop that includes the specificity-determining Arg64 are necessary in order to explain the tight binding. An R64A mutant of BbKI was found to be a weaker inhibitor of plasma kallikrein, but was much more potent against plasmin, suggesting that this mutant may be useful for preventing the breakup of fibrin and maintaining clot stability, thus preventing excessive bleeding. PMID:26249699

  16. Kallikrein generates angiotensin II but not bradykinin in the plasma of the urodele, Amphiuma tridactylum.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J M; Yano, K

    1995-03-01

    Incubation of heat-denatured plasma from the urodele, Amphiuma tridactylum (three-toed amphiuma) or from the anurans Rana ridibunda (European green frog) and Rana catesbeiana (American bullfrog) with either glass beads, porcine pancreatic kallikrein or trypsin did not generate bradykinin-like immunoreactivity. However, peptides were generated in kallikrein-treated amphiuma plasma that contracted vascular rings from the bullfrog systemic arch and had a spasmogenic action on the bullfrog urinary bladder. These peptides which were not generated in trypsin-treated plasma, were purified to homogeneity by reverse-phase HPLC and their primary structures established as: Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Val-His-Pro-Phe ([Asp1,Val5]angiotensin II) and Asn-Arg-Val-Tyr-Val-His-Pro-Phe ([Asn1,Val5]angiotensin II). Incubation of synthetic [Asn1,Val5]angiotensin II with amphiuma plasma resulted in deamidation to [Asp1,Val5]angiotensin II. The data suggest, therefore that amphiuma plasma contains an L-asparagine amidohydrolase (asparaginase), as previously described for the eel. Although bradykinin-related peptides have been isolated from frog skin, this study provides evidence tha the kallikrein-kinin system may be absent from the blood of amphibia.

  17. Laser hard tissue interactions: energy transmission through human dental tissue using a holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1995-05-01

    Laser energy transmission through hard tissue was investigated using a pulsed Holmium:YAG laser (2.12 micrometers wavelength). The surface of extracted human dental tissue, 200 micrometers to 700 micrometers in thickness, was irradiated by a laser beam of various fluences between 3 J/cm2 to 28 J/cm2. The transmitted energy through different dentinal components of the tooth was measured. For the mature teeth, the region of the dentinoenamel junction showed the least transmission and the coronal the most; the difference between the two regions could be as large as 20%. The unerupted or young teeth revealed the opposite transmission characteristics. Repeated laser treatment revealed an enhanced transmissibility and the transmitted energy reached a plateau after certain irradiation exposure. Also studied were the effects of various media on the dental transmissibility. For example, surface application of a smear layer of unfilled resin did not change the transmissibility but appeared to slow down the temperature build-up. Visible surface damage -- a yellow or a white spot on the treatment site -- appeared when the fluence reached beyond 20 J/cm2. SEM samples revealed three different surface structural changes: melting with tubule closures, surface removal with tubule exposures, and surface cracking with crater formation, depending on the level of irradiation.

  18. New dimensions in tissue engineering: possible models for human physiology.

    PubMed

    Baar, Keith

    2005-11-01

    Tissue engineering is a discipline of great promise. In some areas, such as the cornea, tissues engineered in the laboratory are already in clinical use. In other areas, where the tissue architecture is more complex, there are a number of obstacles to manoeuvre before clinically relevant tissues can be produced. However, even in areas where clinically relevant tissues are decades away, the tissues being produced at the moment provide powerful new models to aid the understanding of complex physiological processes. This article provides a personal view of the role of tissue engineering in advancing our understanding of physiology, with specific attention being paid to musculoskeletal tissues.

  19. Sexual Dimorphism in Clock Genes Expression in Human Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Abellán, P.; Madrid, J. A.; Luján, J. A.; Frutos, M. D.; González, R.; Martínez-Augustín, O.; de Medina, F. Sánchez; Ordovás, J. M.; Garaulet, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to investigate whether sex-related differences exist in the adipocyte expression of clock genes from subcutaneous abdominal and visceral fat depots in severely obese patients. Methods We investigated 16 morbidly obese patients, eight men and eight women (mean age 45±20 years; mean BMI 46±6 kg/m2), undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. Biopsies were taken as paired samples [subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue (AT)] at the beginning of the surgical process at 11:00 h in the morning. Metabolic syndrome features such as waist circumference, plasma glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were also studied. The expression of clock genes (PER2, BMAL1, and CRY1) was measured by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results Gene expression was significantly higher in women than in men for the three genes studied in both ATs (P<0.05). In visceral fat, these differences were more marked. (P<0.001). Western blot analysis partially confirmed these results since statistical differences were observed for PER2 in both ATs and for CRY1 in subcutaneous adipose tissue. There were no differences in BMAL1 protein expression. Interestingly, clock gene expression level was correlated with LDL-C and HDL-C (P<0.05). Moreover, we found significant associations with body fat mass in women and with age in men. Conclusions Clock genes expression is sex dependent in human adipose tissue from morbidly obese subjects and correlates to a decreased in metabolic syndrome-related traits. These preliminary results make necessary to go deep into the knowledge of the molecular basis of the sexual dimorphism in chronobiology. PMID:22081238

  20. ANTIGEN-ANTIBODY REACTIONS IN ALLERGIC HUMAN TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Ben Z.

    1960-01-01

    Skin sensitizing human antibodies were conjugated with various fluorescent dyes without significant loss in their ability to combine with specific antigen in vitro. A biopsy of the skin site challenged with egg albumin in a patient sensitive to this antigen could be stained specifically by the fluorescent reagins. The epithelial cells of the epidermis, sweat glands, hair follicles, and sebaceous glands in such a challenged site showed specific staining. In addition to the epithelial cells, the most intense staining was in macrophages and in pericapillary cells. The endothelium of the small blood vessels stained less intensely. Fibrous tissue bundles were specifically stained. The immunologic staining with the conjugated reagins was similar to but more intense than that obtained with conjugated rabbit anti-egg albumin globulins. PMID:13739590

  1. Validation of qualitative test for phosphine gas in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Raina, Anupuma; Shrivastava, H C; Mathur, Nitin; Dogra, T D

    2003-08-01

    Phosphine has been known to science since the birth of modern chemistry. WHO reports that the technical product usually has a foul odour, like "fishy" or "garlicky" because of the presence of substituted phosphines and diphosphine (P2H4). Many medico-legal autopsy cases have been reported positive for aluminium phosphide even though there was neither any suspicion of consuming aluminium phosphide nor any clinical findings, postmortem findings or circumstantial evidences. The present study was carried out to validate the qualitative test, presently applied in many laboratories for testing phosphine. It was observed that 65% of human tissues in saturated solution of common salt show positivity for phosphine gas on the first day of autopsy.

  2. Organochlorine pesticides and PCBs in human adipose tissues in Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwicki, J.K.; Goralczyk, K. )

    1994-03-01

    Most of the persistent organochlorine (OC) pesticides, excluding lindane, were banned in Poland in 1975/76. The first restrictions concerning the use and marketing of lindane (gamma-HCH) became effective in 1980 and were gradually extended until it's agricultural use was ultimately banned in 1989. Unfortunately, there are no detailed data on the use and release of PCBs to the environment in Poland. The former studies showed that in the late seventies the concentrations of OC pesticides and their metabolites in men reached considerable high levels. Despite of the restrictions or bans of these pesticides in most of the countries of the temperate climate, they still circulate in various food chains and eventually concentrate in man. Many authors claim an uneven distribution of the OC compounds in the population and report different levels in men and women and also some relations between OC compounds levels in fat tissues and age. Environmental contamination also plays an important role in the magnitude of OC compounds levels in man. The aim of this paper is to present the actual concentrations of HCB, p,p[prime]-DDT, p,p[prime]-DDE, isomers of HCH (alpha, beta, gamma), and PCBs in human adipose tissues particularly regarding age and sex as possible factors influencing the levels of these compounds and to contribute to the general discussion on the distribution patterns of the organochlorine compounds in the population. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Engineering bone tissue substitutes from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Marcos-Campos, Iván; Kahler, David John; Alsalman, Dana; Shang, Linshan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Marolt, Darja

    2013-05-21

    Congenital defects, trauma, and disease can compromise the integrity and functionality of the skeletal system to the extent requiring implantation of bone grafts. Engineering of viable bone substitutes that can be personalized to meet specific clinical needs represents a promising therapeutic alternative. The aim of our study was to evaluate the utility of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for bone tissue engineering. We first induced three hiPSC lines with different tissue and reprogramming backgrounds into the mesenchymal lineages and used a combination of differentiation assays, surface antigen profiling, and global gene expression analysis to identify the lines exhibiting strong osteogenic differentiation potential. We then engineered functional bone substitutes by culturing hiPSC-derived mesenchymal progenitors on osteoconductive scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors and confirmed their phenotype stability in a subcutaneous implantation model for 12 wk. Molecular analysis confirmed that the maturation of bone substitutes in perfusion bioreactors results in global repression of cell proliferation and an increased expression of lineage-specific genes. These results pave the way for growing patient-specific bone substitutes for reconstructive treatments of the skeletal system and for constructing qualified experimental models of development and disease.

  4. Characterization of proopiomelanocortin transcripts in human nonpituitary tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lacaze-Masmonteil, T.; De Keyzer, Y.; Luton, J.P.; Kahn, A.; Bertagna, X.

    1987-10-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC), the precursor to adrenocorticotropic hormone and other related peptides, was originally identified in the corticotropic cell. Recent evidence shows that POMC products are also normally present in a variety of nonpituitary tissues. To investigate this phenomenon in humans the authors looked for the presence and characteristics of POMC transcripts in various adult tissues. Blot hybridization analysis of normal adrenal, thymus, and testis RNAs revealed a small RNA species approximately 400 nucleotides shorter than the 1200-nucleotide pituitary species. Primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping studies showed that this small RNA lacked exon 1 and exon 2 of the gene, and it corresponded to a set of at least six molecules starting 41 to 162 nucleotides downstream from the 5' end of exon 3. These RNAs appear to result from heterogeneous transcription initiation sites presumably under the control of GC box promoter sequences located in the 3' end of intron 2. They cannot encode a complete POMC molecule, and the only truncated POMC molecules that could be translated would lack a signal peptide necessary for membrane translocation and precursor processing. The use of highly sensitive S1 nuclease mapping techniques with uniformly labeled single-stranded DNA probes allowed the detection of a small but definite amount of the normal, 1200-nucleotide, mRNA species. It is suggested that it is this POMC mRNA that is responsible for the local production of all the POMC peptides.

  5. Magnesium degradation products: effects on tissue and human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Seitz, J-M; Eifler, R; Bach, Fr-W; Maier, H J

    2014-10-01

    Owing to their mechanical properties, metallic materials present a promising solution in the field of resorbable implants. The magnesium metabolism in humans differs depending on its introduction. The natural, oral administration of magnesium via, for example, food, essentially leads to an intracellular enrichment of Mg(2+) . In contrast, introducing magnesium-rich substances or implants into the tissue results in a different decomposition behavior. Here, exposing magnesium to artificial body electrolytes resulted in the formation of the following products: magnesium hydroxide, magnesium oxide, and magnesium chloride, as well as calcium and magnesium apatites. Moreover, it can be assumed that Mg(2+) , OH(-) ions, and gaseous hydrogen are also present and result from the reaction for magnesium in an aqueous environment. With the aid of physiological metabolic processes, the organism succeeds in either excreting the above mentioned products or integrating them into the natural metabolic process. Only a burst release of these products is to be considered a problem. A multitude of general tissue effects and responses from the Mg's degradation products is considered within this review, which is not targeting specific implant classes. Furthermore, common alloying elements of magnesium and their hazardous potential in vivo are taken into account.

  6. Photobiomodulation in human muscle tissue: an advantage in sports performance?

    PubMed

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-12-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) describes the use of red or near-infrared (NIR) light to stimulate, heal, and regenerate damaged tissue. Both preconditioning (light delivered to muscles before exercise) and PBM applied after exercise can increase sports performance in athletes. This review covers the effects of PBM on human muscle tissue in clinical trials in volunteers related to sports performance and in athletes. The parameters used were categorized into those with positive effects or no effects on muscle performance and recovery. Randomized controlled trials and case-control studies in both healthy trained and untrained participants, and elite athletes were retrieved from MEDLINE up to 2016. Performance metrics included fatigue, number of repetitions, torque, hypertrophy; measures of muscle damage and recovery such as creatine kinase and delayed onset muscle soreness. Searches retrieved 533 studies, of which 46 were included in the review (n = 1045 participants). Studies used single laser probes, cluster of laser diodes, LED clusters, mixed clusters (lasers and LEDs), and flexible LED arrays. Both red, NIR, and red/NIR mixtures were used. PBM can increase muscle mass gained after training, and decrease inflammation and oxidative stress in muscle biopsies. We raise the question of whether PBM should be permitted in athletic competition by international regulatory authorities.

  7. Distribution of cystinosin-LKG in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Taranta, Anna; Petrini, Stefania; Citti, Arianna; Boldrini, Renata; Corallini, Serena; Bellomo, Francesco; Levtchenko, Elena; Emma, Francesco

    2012-08-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is multisystemic progressive disorder caused by mutations of CTNS gene that encodes for the lysosomal cystine co-transporter cystinosin, and for a less abundant isoform termed cystinosin-LKG, which is expressed in not only lysosomes but also other cell compartments. To overcome the absence of high-quality antibodies against cystinosin, we have obtained a rabbit antiserum against cystinosin-LKG and have analyzed in human tissues the expression of the two known cystinosin isoforms by RT-PCR, and the expression of cystinosin-LKG by immunohistochemistry. In most tissues, CTNS-LKG represents 5-20 % of CTNS transcripts, with the exception of the testis that expresses both isoforms in equal proportions. Cystinosin-LKG was found to be highly expressed in renal tubular cells, pancreatic islets of Langerhans, Leydig cells of the testis, mucoserous glands of the bronchial wall, melanocytes and keratinocytes. These results are parallel with many features of cystinosis, such as early onset Fanconi syndrome, male infertility, diabetes mellitus and hypopigmentation. Intermediate expression levels were of the LKG isoform observed in the gastro-intestinal tract and thyroid glands; low levels of expression were observed in the brain, skeletal and cardiac muscles.

  8. Endogenous ways to stimulate brown adipose tissue in humans.

    PubMed

    Broeders, Evie; Bouvy, Nicole D; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2015-03-01

    Obesity is the result of disequilibrium between energy intake and energy expenditure (EE). Successful long-term weight loss is difficult to achieve with current strategies for the correction of this caloric imbalance. Non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a possible therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of obesity and associated metabolic diseases. In recent years, more knowledge about the function and stimulation of bat has been obtained. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is currently seen as the main effector for brown fat function. Also, interplay between the thyroid axis and SNS plays an important role in BAT thermogenesis. Almost daily new pathways for the induction of BAT thermogenesis and 'browning' of white adipose tissue (WAT) are identified. Especially the activation of BAT via endogenous pathways has received strong scientific attention. Here we will discuss the relevance of several pathways in activating BAT and their implications for the treatment of obesity. In this review we will focus on the discussion of the most promising endocrine and paracrine pathways to stimulate BAT, by factors and pathways that naturally occur in the human body.

  9. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    PubMed Central

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  10. Volume Expansion of Tissue Engineered Human Nasal Septal Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Reuther, Marsha S; Briggs, Kristen K; Neuman, Monica K; Masuda, Koichi; Sah, Robert L; Watson, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Importance Cartilaginous craniofacial defects range in size and autologous cartilaginous tissue is preferred for repair of these defects. Therefore, it is important to have the ability to produce large size cartilaginous constructs for repair of cartilaginous abnormalities. Objectives To produce autologous human septal neocartilage constructs substantially larger in size than previously produced constructs To demonstrate that volume expanded neocartilage constructs possess comparable histological and biochemical properties to standard size constructs To show that volume expanded neocartilage constructs retain similar biomechanical properties to standard size constructs Design Prospective, basic science Setting Laboratory Participants The study used remnant human septal specimens removed during routine surgery at the University of California, San Diego Medical Center or San Diego Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Cartilage from a total of 8 donors was collected. Main Outcomes Measured Human septal chondrocytes from 8 donors were used to create 12mm and 24mm neocartilage constructs. These were cultured for a total of 10 weeks. Photo documentation, histological, biochemical, and biomechanical properties were measured and compared. Results The 24mm diameter constructs were qualitatively similar to the 12mm constructs. They possessed adequate strength and durability to be manually manipulated. Histological analysis of the constructs demonstrated similar staining patterns in standard and volume expanded constructs. Proliferation, as measured by DNA content, was similar in 24mm and 12mm constructs. Additionally, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and total collagen content did not significantly differ between the two construct sizes. Biomechanical analysis of the 24mm and 12mm constructs demonstrated comparable compressive and tensile properties. Conclusion and Relevance Volume expanded human septal neocartilage constructs are qualitatively and histologically similar to standard 12mm

  11. Genomic Instability and Copy-Number Heterogeneity of Chromosome 19q, Including the Kallikrein Locus, in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Bayani, Jane; Marrano, Paula; Graham, Cassandra; Zheng, Yingye; Li, Lin; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Lassus, Heini; Butzow, Ralf; Squire, Jeremy A.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2011-01-01

    Many tissue kallikrein (KLK) genes and proteins are candidate diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers for ovarian cancer (OCa). We previously demonstrated that the KLK locus (19q13.3/4) is subject to copy-number gains and structural rearrangements in a pilot study of cell lines and ovarian cancer primary tissues, shown to overexpress KLK gene family members. To determine the overall frequency of genomic instability and copy-number changes, a retrospective study was conducted using formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues. Eighty-one chemotherapy naïve serous OCas were examined using 3-colour fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to identify structural and numerical changes on 19q, including the KLK locus; in addition to immunohistochemistry (IHC) for KLK6, which has been shown to be overexpressed in OCa. The KLK locus was subject to copy-number changes in ~83% of cases: net gain in 51%, net loss in 30% and amplified in 2%; and found to be chromosomally unstable (p<0.001). All cases showed a wide range of immuoreactivity for KLK6 by IHC. Although no strong correlation could be found with copy number, the latter was contributing factor to the observed KLK6 protein overexpression. Moreover, univariate and multivariate analyses showed an association between the net loss of the KLK locus with longer disease-free survival. Interestingly, FISH analyses indicated that chromosome 19q was subject to structural rearrangement in 62% of cases and was significantly correlated to tumor grade (p<0.001). We conclude that numerical and structural aberrations of chromosome 19q, affect genes including the KLK gene members, may contributing to ovarian carcinoma progression and aggressiveness. PMID:20800559

  12. Full-field bulge test for planar anisotropic tissues: part I--experimental methods applied to human skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Tonge, Theresa K; Atlan, Lorre S; Voo, Liming M; Nguyen, Thao D

    2013-04-01

    The nonlinear anisotropic properties of human skin tissue were investigated using bulge testing. Full-field displacement data were obtained during testing of human skin tissues procured from the lower back of post-mortem human subjects using 3-D digital image correlation. To measure anisotropy, the dominant fiber direction of the tissue was determined from the deformed geometry of the specimen. Local strains and stress resultants were calculated along both the dominant fiber direction and the perpendicular direction. Variation in anisotropy and stiffness was observed between specimens. The use of stress resultants rather than the membrane stress approximation accounted for bending effects, which are significant for a thick nonlinear tissue. Of the six specimens tested, it was observed that specimens from older donors exhibited a stiffer and more isotropic response than those from younger donors. It was seen that the mechanical response of the tissue was negligibly impacted by preconditioning or the ambient humidity. The methods presented in this work for skin tissue are sufficiently general to be applied to other planar tissues, such as pericardium, gastrointestinal tissue, and fetal membranes. The stress resultant-stretch relations will be used in a companion paper to obtain material parameters for a nonlinear anisotropic hyperelastic model.

  13. Viral inactivation of human bone tissue using supercritical fluid extraction.

    PubMed

    Fages, J; Poirier, B; Barbier, Y; Frayssinet, P; Joffret, M L; Majewski, W; Bonel, G; Larzul, D

    1998-01-01

    A new bone tissue process using supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extraction (SFE) has been evaluated for its ability to inactivate or eliminate viruses. Four viruses, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), Sindbis virus, polio Sabin type I virus, and pseudorabies virus (PRV), were exposed to four different processing steps. In addition to supercritical CO2, hydrogen peroxide, sodium hydroxide, and ethanol treatments were evaluated. The mean cumulated reduction factors (log10) for the four viruses exposed to these four steps were > 14.2 for HIV-1, > 18.2 for Sindbis virus, > 24.4 for poliovirus, and > 17.6 for PRV. The mean reduction factors obtained by the supercritical fluid extraction alone were > 4.0, > 4.3, > 6.6, and > 4.0, respectively. These results demonstrate that the SFE process is effective in inactivating viruses on human femoral heads, and provides a level of inactivation similar to that obtained by traditional cleaning methods. It is proposed that CO2 SFE be incorporated as a routine step in the processing of bone allografts for transplantation either to replace or supplement existing procedures.

  14. Translational issues for human corneal endothelial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Soh, Yu Qiang; Peh, Gary S L; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2017-09-01

    Corneal endothelial disorders collectively represent a significant healthcare burden in most developed nations, and corneal transplantation is currently the only treatment available for patients with poor visual acuity and corneal blindness secondary to endothelial failure. Although vision in these patients can be restored by transplantation, the global demand for donor human corneas is far in excess of what can be provided for by eye banks around the world, and this deficit is set to increase with an ageing global population. As such, there has been a pressing need to explore novel and more sustainable options for the treatment of corneal endothelial diseases. In recent years, significant progress has been made not only in the development of corneal endothelial cell culture techniques, but also in the exploration of various translational strategies. Considered together, we are now much closer to attaining success in the treatment of corneal endothelial diseases via a cell-based, tissue-engineering approach. The aim of this review article is to provide an update of the translational issues currently facing human corneal endothelial cell therapy. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Human epithelial tissue culture study on restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Forster, András; Ungvári, Krisztina; Györgyey, Ágnes; Kukovecz, Ákos; Turzó, Kinga; Nagy, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Health condition of the gingival tissues contacting the surfaces of fixed prostheses is a result of multiple etiologic factors. The aim of the investigation discussed here was to evaluate the attachment and proliferation rate of cultured human epithelial cells on three commonly used restorative materials under in vitro conditions. Morphological and chemical structure of polished lithium-disilicate (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Germany), yttrium modified zirconium dioxide (5-TEC ICE Zirkon Translucent, Zirkonzahn GmbH Srl, Germany) and cobalt chromium alloy (Remanium star, Dentaurum GmbH & Co. KG, Germany) discs were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Human epithelial cells harvested and cultured from one donor, were applied to investigate cell attachment (24h observation) and proliferation (72h observation) via dimethylthiazol-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and AlamarBlue(®) (AB) assays on control surface (cell-culture plate) and on the restorative materials (n=3×20 specimens/material). SEM and AFM revealed typical morphology and roughness features for the materials. Zirconia presented significantly higher Ra value. EDS confirmed typical elements on the investigated restorative materials: lithium-disilicate (Si, O); Zirconia (Zi, Y, O); CoCr (Co, Cr, W). All surfaces except CoCr exhibited significant cell proliferation according to MTT and AB assays after 72h compared to 24h. Among the restorative materials, CoCr samples showed the highest cell attachment as indicated by MTT assay. AB results showed that attachment and proliferation of human epithelial cells is supported more on lithium-disilicate. Both assays indicated the lowest value for zirconia. The results indicate that the restorative materials examined are equally suitable for subgingival restorations. Lithium-disilicate exhibited the best biocompatibility. The examined materials are indicated for use

  16. Brown Adipose Tissue and Seasonal Variation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Au-Yong, Iain T.H.; Thorn, Natasha; Ganatra, Rakesh; Perkins, Alan C.; Symonds, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is present in adult humans where it may be important in the prevention of obesity, although the main factors regulating its abundance are not well established. BAT demonstrates seasonal variation relating to ambient temperature and photoperiod in mammals. The objective of our study was therefore to determine whether seasonal variation in BAT activity in humans was more closely related to the prevailing photoperiod or temperature. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 3,614 consecutive patients who underwent positron emission tomography followed by computed tomography scans. The presence and location of BAT depots were documented and correlated with monthly changes in photoperiod and ambient temperature. RESULTS BAT activity was demonstrated in 167 (4.6%) scans. BAT was demonstrated in 52/724 scans (7.2%) in winter compared with 27/1,067 (2.5%) in summer months (P < 0.00001, χ2 test). Monthly changes in the occurrence of BAT were more closely related to differences in photoperiod (r2 = 0.876) rather than ambient temperature (r2 = 0.696). Individuals with serial scans also demonstrated strong seasonal variation in BAT activity (average standardized uptake value [SUVmax] 1.5 in July and 9.4 in January). BAT was also more common in female patients (female: n = 107, 7.2%; male: n = 60, 2.8%; P < 0.00001, χ2 test). CONCLUSIONS Our study demonstrates a very strong seasonal variation in the presence of BAT. This effect is more closely associated with photoperiod than ambient temperature, suggesting a previously undescribed mechanism for mediating BAT function in humans that could now potentially be recruited for the prevention or reversal of obesity. PMID:19696186

  17. Activation of the fibrinolytic, coagulation and plasma kallikrein-kinin systems during and after open heart surgery in children.

    PubMed

    Saatvedt, K; Lindberg, H; Michelsen, S; Pedersen, T; Geiran, O R

    1995-07-01

    Activation of the fibrinolytic, coagulation and plasma kallikrein-kinin systems may be responsible for some of the coagulation disorders and inflammatory sequelae seen after extracorporeal circulation. The activation pattern of these systems was studied in 10 children undergoing open heart surgery with extracorporeal circulation. Blood samples were drawn serially before, during and up to 48 h after surgery. The heparin injection induced a significant elevation of plasmin (PL) (p < 0.05) which stayed elevated during extracorporeal circulation. Antiplasmin (AP) values were reduced at wound closure, while the levels were significantly elevated 48 h postoperatively (p < 0.05). alpha 2-antiplasmin-plasmin (APP) increased significantly perioperatively peaking 10 min after the initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass (p < 0.05). The coagulation markers thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) and the prothrombin fragment F1 & 2 increased significantly, peaking at wound closure and at termination of bypass respectively (p < 0.05). Plasma kallikrein (KK) values increased significantly with subsequent decreased levels of prekallikrein (PKK) and kallikrein inhibitor (KKI) after heparin injection. The KK level stayed elevated during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The proenzyme functional inhibition index (PFI index), defined as the sum of deviations from the control values for proenzyme and functional inhibition values of the coagulation, fibrinolytic and plasma kallikrein-kinin systems, correlated significantly to the duration of cardiopulmonary bypass (p < 0.05). We conclude that open heart surgery in children activates the fibrinolytic, coagulation and plasma kallikrein-kinin systems.

  18. Effect of metoprolol on 24-hour urinary excretion of adrenal steroids and kallikrein in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Fritschka, E.; Gotzen, R.; Kittler, R.; Schöneshöfer, M.

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of fifteen patients with essential hypertension over four weeks using the beta 1-adrenoceptor blocking agent, metoprolol, resulted in a decrease in 24 h urinary excretion of kallikrein and aldosterone along with a decrease in plasma renin activity. There was no significant change in 24 h excretion rates of the free adrenal steroids deoxycorticosterone, 18-OH-deoxycorticosterone, corticosterone, cortisol or 18-OH-corticosterone during treatment, which were not significantly different from excretion rates of normal males, thus excluding inhibitory effects of adrenal steroids on urinary kallikrein activity. A positive correlation was found between plasma renin activity and urinary excretion of kallikrein during the control period and after 2 weeks on metoprolol, supporting the assumption of a preserved link between the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the renal excretion of kallikrein in these patients. The decrease in kallikrein excretion during beta 1-adrenoceptor blockade in patients with essential hypertension may be explained by a reduction in sympathetic tone and by reduced activity of the renin-aldosterone system. PMID:6367871

  19. Human adipose tissue contains erythroid progenitors expressing fetal hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Amparo; Carbonell-Uberos, Francisco; Marín, Severiano; Miñana, María Dolores

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the origin of hematopoietic progenitors contained in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of human adipose tissue. METHODS: Tissue samples obtained from lipectomies were subjected to enzymatic digestion with collagenase to obtain a single-cell suspension. The centrifuged cell pellet, termed SVF, was separated immunomagnetically into CD45+ and CD45- cells and cultured in serum-free medium containing hematopoietic cytokines. The freshly isolated and cultured cells were evaluated to determine their ability to form hematopoietic colony-forming units in clonogenic assays and for the expression of certain hematopoietic transcription factors by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction; the gene expression level was compared to that in CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells from cord blood (CB) and adult peripheral blood (PB). To characterize erythroid progenitors, burst-forming units-erythroid (BFU-E) were developed in a semisolid medium under different culture conditions, and the hemoglobin composition and globin gene expression in the erythroid colonies were determined. RESULTS: The transcription factors SCL/TAL1, RUNX1, RUNX2 and GATA2 were expressed in both the CD45+ and CD45- SVF populations; however, in contrast to our observations in the CD34+ cells from CB and adult PB, GATA1 was not detected. Nevertheless, GATA1 could be detected in the SVF cells after seven days in culture, whereas its expression was upregulated in the CB CD34+ cells. The analysis of BFU-E-derived colonies revealed that virtually all erythroid cells produced by SVF cells expressed fetal hemoglobin, and the γ-globin mRNA levels ranged between those obtained in the adult- and neonatal-derived erythroid cells. Moreover, the SVF-derived erythroid cells synthesized similar levels of α- and β-globin mRNA, whereas the α-globin transcript levels were consistently higher those of β-globin in the cells derived from CB or PB CD34+ cells. Furthermore, although the cellular

  20. A chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocol for use in whole human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Haim, Yulia; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Bashari, Dana; Rudich, Assaf

    2013-11-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) has become a central method when studying in vivo protein-DNA interactions, with the major challenge being the hope to capture "authentic" interactions. While ChIP protocols have been optimized for use with specific cell types and tissues including adipose tissue-derived cells, a working ChIP protocol addressing the challenges imposed by fresh whole human adipose tissue has not been described. Utilizing human paired omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue obtained during elective abdominal surgeries, we have carefully identified and optimized individual steps in the ChIP protocol employed directly on fresh tissue fragments. We describe a complete working protocol for using ChIP on whole adipose tissue fragments. Specific steps required adaptation of the ChIP protocol to human whole adipose tissue. In particular, a cross-linking step was performed directly on fresh small tissue fragments. Nuclei were isolated before releasing chromatin, allowing better management of fat content; a sonication protocol to obtain fragmented chromatin was optimized. We also demonstrate the high sensitivity of immunoprecipitated chromatin from adipose tissue to freezing. In conclusion, we describe the development of a ChIP protocol optimized for use in studying whole human adipose tissue, providing solutions for the unique challenges imposed by this tissue. Unraveling protein-DNA interaction in whole human adipose tissue will likely contribute to elucidating molecular pathways contributing to common human diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  1. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; van Eeden, Stephan F.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Sin, Don D.; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Paré, Peter D.; Bossé, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408) and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282). Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05), respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05). Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival observed in statin

  2. Status quo of management of the human tissue banks in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ching-Pang; Chou, Szu-Cheng; Chen, Ying-Hua; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Ming-Shin

    2017-03-01

    As the technologies associated with transplantation and biological tissue engineering continue to advance, human cells and tissues form an integral part to the practice of regenerative medicine. The patient's use of tissues entails the risk of introducing, transmitting and spreading communicable diseases. To prevent such risk and to ensure that the human organs, tissues and cells remain intact and functional after being handled and processed, the transplanted tissues must be subject to good management standards through all stages of collection, screening, processing, storage and distribution as the safety of the users is of the utmost importance. On February 2009, the government of Taiwan promulgated the Regulations for Administration on Human Organ Bank that requires all human tissues banks to adhere to the Good Tissue Practice for Human Organ, Tissue and Cell in terms of establishment and operation in order to cope with the international management trend and the development and management need of the domestic industry. Six years have passed since the law became effective. This article seeks to introduce the current management mechanism and status quo of management of human tissue banks in Taiwan. We also conducted statistical analysis of the data relating to the tissue banks to identify potential risks and the room for improvement. The study concludes that human tissue banks in Taiwan are on the right track with their management practice, leading to a state of steady development and progress.

  3. A humanized IKBKAP transgenic mouse models a tissue specific human splicing defect

    PubMed Central

    Hims, Matthew M.; Shetty, Ranjit S.; Pickel, James; Mull, James; Leyne, Maire; Liu, Lijuan; Gusella, James F.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.

    2007-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a severe hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy, and all patients with FD have a splice mutation in the IKBKAP gene. The FD splice mutation results in variable, tissue-specific skipping of exon 20 in IKBKAP mRNA, which leads to reduced IKAP protein levels. The development of therapies for FD will require suitable mouse models for preclinical studies. In this study, we report the generation and characterization of a mouse model carrying the complete human IKBKAP locus with the FD IVS20+6T>C splice mutation. We show that the mutant IKBKAP transgene is mis-spliced in this model in a tissue specific manner that replicates the pattern seen in FD patient tissues. Creation of this humanized mouse is the first step towards development of a complex phenotypic model of FD. These transgenic mice are an ideal model system for testing the effectiveness of therapeutic agents that target the mis-splicing defect. Lastly, these mice will permit direct studies of tissue-specific splicing and the identification of regulatory factors that play a role in complex gene expression. PMID:17644305

  4. A humanized IKBKAP transgenic mouse models a tissue-specific human splicing defect.

    PubMed

    Hims, Matthew M; Shetty, Ranjit S; Pickel, James; Mull, James; Leyne, Maire; Liu, Lijuan; Gusella, James F; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2007-09-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a severe hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy, and all patients with FD have a splice mutation in the IKBKAP gene. The FD splice mutation results in variable, tissue-specific skipping of exon 20 in IKBKAP mRNA, which leads to reduced IKAP protein levels. The development of therapies for FD will require suitable mouse models for preclinical studies. In this study, we report the generation and characterization of a mouse model carrying the complete human IKBKAP locus with the FD IVS20+6T-->C splice mutation. We show that the mutant IKBKAP transgene is misspliced in this model in a tissue-specific manner that replicates the pattern seen in FD patient tissues. Creation of this humanized mouse is the first step toward development of a complex phenotypic model of FD. These transgenic mice are an ideal model system for testing the effectiveness of therapeutic agents that target the missplicing defect. Last, these mice will permit direct studies of tissue-specific splicing and the identification of regulatory factors that play a role in complex gene expression.

  5. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues.

    PubMed

    Baran, Yael; Subramaniam, Meena; Biton, Anne; Tukiainen, Taru; Tsang, Emily K; Rivas, Manuel A; Pirinen, Matti; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Smith, Kevin S; Kukurba, Kim R; Zhang, Rui; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G; Urbanek, Cydney; Li, Jin Billy; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R; Burchard, Esteban G; Seibold, Max A; MacArthur, Daniel G; Montgomery, Stephen B; Zaitlen, Noah A; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-07-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important regulatory mechanism that silences one of the parental copies of a gene. To systematically characterize this phenomenon, we analyze tissue specificity of imprinting from allelic expression data in 1582 primary tissue samples from 178 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We characterize imprinting in 42 genes, including both novel and previously identified genes. Tissue specificity of imprinting is widespread, and gender-specific effects are revealed in a small number of genes in muscle with stronger imprinting in males. IGF2 shows maternal expression in the brain instead of the canonical paternal expression elsewhere. Imprinting appears to have only a subtle impact on tissue-specific expression levels, with genes lacking a systematic expression difference between tissues with imprinted and biallelic expression. In summary, our systematic characterization of imprinting in adult tissues highlights variation in imprinting between genes, individuals, and tissues. © 2015 Baran et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Yael; Subramaniam, Meena; Biton, Anne; Tukiainen, Taru; Tsang, Emily K.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Pirinen, Matti; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Smith, Kevin S.; Kukurba, Kim R.; Zhang, Rui; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G.; Urbanek, Cydney; Li, Jin Billy; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Seibold, Max A.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Zaitlen, Noah A.; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important regulatory mechanism that silences one of the parental copies of a gene. To systematically characterize this phenomenon, we analyze tissue specificity of imprinting from allelic expression data in 1582 primary tissue samples from 178 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We characterize imprinting in 42 genes, including both novel and previously identified genes. Tissue specificity of imprinting is widespread, and gender-specific effects are revealed in a small number of genes in muscle with stronger imprinting in males. IGF2 shows maternal expression in the brain instead of the canonical paternal expression elsewhere. Imprinting appears to have only a subtle impact on tissue-specific expression levels, with genes lacking a systematic expression difference between tissues with imprinted and biallelic expression. In summary, our systematic characterization of imprinting in adult tissues highlights variation in imprinting between genes, individuals, and tissues. PMID:25953952

  7. Commodification of human tissue: implications for feminist and development ethics.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, Donna

    2002-05-01

    One effect of late capitalism--the commodification of practically everything--is to knock down the Chinese walls between the natural and productive realms, to use a Marxist framework. Women's labour in egg extraction and 'surrogate' motherhood might then be seen as what it is, labour which produces something of value. But this does not necessarily mean that women will benefit from the commodification of practically everything, in either North or South. In the newly developing biotechnologies involving stem cells, the reverse is more likely, particular given the the shortage in the North of the egg donors who will be increasingly necessary to therapeutic cloning. Although most of the ethical debate has focused on the status of the embryo, this is to define ethics with no reference to global or gender justice. There has been little or no debate about possible exploitation of women, particularly of ovum donors from the South. Countries of the South without national ethics committees or guidelines may be particularly vulnerable: although there is increasing awareness of the susceptibility of poorer countries to abuses in research ethics, very little has been written about how they might be affected by the enormously profitable new technologies exploiting human tissue. Even in the UK, although the new Medical Research Council guidelines make a good deal of the 'gift relationship', what they are actually about is commodification. If donors believe they are demonstrating altruism, but biotechnology firms and researchers use the discourse of commodity and profit, we have not 'incomplete commodification' but complete commodification with a plausibly human face.

  8. LAP degradation product reflects plasma kallikrein-dependent TGF-β activation in patients with hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hara, Mitsuko; Kirita, Akiko; Kondo, Wakako; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Nagatsuma, Keisuke; Dohmae, Naoshi; Ogawa, Shinji; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Friedman, Scott L; Rifkin, Daniel B; Kojima, Soichi

    2014-01-01

    Byproducts of cytokine activation are sometimes useful as surrogate biomarkers for monitoring cytokine generation in patients. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β plays a pivotal role in pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. TGF-β is produced as part of an inactive latent complex, in which the cytokine is trapped by its propeptide, the latency-associated protein (LAP). Therefore, to exert its biological activity, TGF-β must be released from the latent complex. Several proteases activate latent TGF-β by cutting LAP. We previously reported that Camostat Mesilate, a broad spectrum protease inhibitor, which is especially potent at inhibiting plasma kallikrein (PLK), prevented liver fibrosis in the porcine serum-induced liver fibrosis model in rats. We suggested that PLK may work as an activator of latent TGF-β during the pathogenesis of liver diseases in the animal models. However, it remained to be elucidated whether this activation mechanism also functions in fibrotic liver in patients. Here, we report that PLK cleaves LAP between R(58) and L(59) residues. We have produced monoclonal antibodies against two degradation products of LAP (LAP-DP) by PLK, and we have used these specific antibodies to immunostain LAP-DP in liver tissues from both fibrotic animals and patients. The N-terminal side LAP-DP ending at R(58) (R(58) LAP-DP) was detected in liver tissues, while the C-terminal side LAP-DP beginning at L(59) (L(59) LAP-DP) was not detectable. The R(58) LAP-DP was seen mostly in α-smooth muscle actin-positive activated stellate cells. These data suggest for the first time that the occurrence of a PLK-dependent TGF-β activation reaction in patients and indicates that the LAP-DP may be useful as a surrogate marker reflecting PLK-dependent TGF-β activation in fibrotic liver both in animal models and in patients.

  9. Wave dispersion and attenuation on human femur tissue.

    PubMed

    Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Boulpaep, Frans; van Hemelrijck, Danny; Aggelis, Dimitrios G

    2014-08-15

    Cortical bone is a highly heterogeneous material at the microscale and has one of the most complex structures among materials. Application of elastic wave techniques to this material is thus very challenging. In such media the initial excitation energy goes into the formation of elastic waves of different modes. Due to "dispersion", these modes tend to separate according to the velocities of the frequency components. This work demonstrates elastic wave measurements on human femur specimens. The aim of the study is to measure parameters like wave velocity, dispersion and attenuation by using broadband acoustic emission sensors. First, four sensors were placed at small intervals on the surface of the bone to record the response after pencil lead break excitations. Next, the results were compared to measurements on a bulk steel block which does not exhibit heterogeneity at the same wave lengths. It can be concluded that the microstructure of the tissue imposes a dispersive behavior for frequencies below 1 MHz and care should be taken for interpretation of the signals. Of particular interest are waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, since in the next stage of research the bone specimens will be fractured with concurrent monitoring of acoustic emission.

  10. Investigation of RF transmission properties of human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werber, D.; Schwentner, A.; Biebl, E. M.

    2006-09-01

    RF transmission properties of human tissues were investigated in the frequency range from 50 MHz to 1 GHz. This work was motivated by the increasing interest in communication links between medically active implants and external interrogator units. We investigated theoretically and experimentally the transmission loss between an implant and an external interrogator unit. We assumed that due to the size of the implant a maximum area of only 1 cm2 is available for the printed circuit antenna. The size of the external interrogator antenna is less restricted. The maximum depth of the implant beneath the surface of the body was assumed to be 10 cm. For the simulations we took the dielectric properties of skin, fat and muscle as published in the literature. For the measurements, an artificial muscle dielectric proposed in the literature was used consisting mainly of a mixture of water, sugar and salt. In simulation and measurements the reactive part of the impedance of the antennas was compensated numerically. In simulations and measurements we obtained a transmission loss between 30 dB around 100 MHz and 65 dB around 900 MHz.

  11. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration.

  12. High-Resolution NMR Studies of Human Tissue Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzio, Kristin M.; Watt, Eric D.; Boettcher, John M.; Gajsiewicz, Joshua M.; Morrissey, James H.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-01-01

    In normal hemostasis, the blood clotting cascade is initiated when factor VIIa (fVIIa, other clotting factors are named similarly) binds to the integral membrane protein, human tissue factor (TF). The TF/fVIIa complex in turn activates fX and fIX, eventually concluding with clot formation. Several X-ray crystal structures of the soluble extracellular domain of TF (sTF) exist; however, these structures are missing electron density in functionally relevant regions of the protein. In this context, NMR can provide complementary structural information as well as dynamic insights into enzyme activity. The resolution and sensitivity for NMR studies are greatly enhanced by the ability to prepare multiple milligrams of protein with various isotopic labeling patterns. Here, we demonstrate high-yield production of several isotopically labeled forms of recombinant sTF, allowing for high-resolution NMR studies both in the solid and solution state. We also report solution NMR spectra at sub-mM concentrations of sTF, ensuring the presence of dispersed monomer, as well as the first solid-state NMR spectra of sTF. Our improved sample preparation and precipitation conditions have enabled the acquisition of multidimensional NMR data sets for TF chemical shift assignment and provide a benchmark for TF structure elucidation. PMID:27657719

  13. Measurement of elastic wave dispersion on human femur tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strantza, M.; Louis, O.; Polyzos, D.; Boulpaep, F.; Van Hemelrijck, D.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2014-03-01

    Cortical bone is one of the most complex heterogeneous media exhibiting strong wave dispersion. In such media when a burst of energy goes into the formation of elastic waves the different modes tend to separate according to the velocities of the frequency components as usually occurs in waveguides. In this study human femur specimens were subjected to elastic wave measurements. The main objective of the study is using broadband acoustic emission sensors to measure parameters like wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Additionally, waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, are also examined relatively to the propagation distance as a preparation for acoustic emission monitoring during fracture. To do so, four sensors were placed at adjacent positions on the surface of the cortical bone in order to record the transient response after pencil lead break excitation. The results are compared to similar measurements on a bulk metal piece which does not exhibit heterogeneity at the scale of the propagating wave lengths. It is shown that the microstructure of the tissue imposes a dispersive behavior for frequencies below 1 MHz and care should be taken for interpretation of the signals.

  14. Evaluation of immunohistochemical staining for glucagon in human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Gurlo, Tatyana; Butler, Peter C; Butler, Alexandra E

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence (IF) staining techniques are important diagnostic tools of anatomic pathology in the clinical setting and widely used analytical tools in research laboratories. In diabetes research, they are routinely used for the assessment of beta- and alpha-cell mass, for assessment of endocrine cell distribution within the pancreas, for evaluation of islet composition and islet morphology. Here, we present the evaluation of IHC techniques for the detection of alpha-cells in human pancreatic tissue. We compared the Horse Radish Peroxidase (HRP)-based method utilizing DAB Peroxidase Substrate to the Alkaline Phosphatase (AP)-based method utilizing Vector Red substrate. We conclude that HRP-DAB staining is a robust and reliable method for detection of alpha-cells using either rabbit polyclonal or mouse monoclonal anti-glucagon antibodies. However, AP-Vector Red staining should be used with caution, because it is affected by the dehydration with ethanol and toluene preceding the mounting of slides with Permount mounting medium. When AP-Vector Red is a preferable method for alpha-cell labeling, slides should be mounted using aqueous mounting medium or, alternatively, they could be air-dried before permanent mounting.

  15. Low Energy Defibrillation in Human Cardiac Tissue: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Stuart W.; Plank, Gernot; Biktasheva, Irina V.; Biktashev, Vadim N.

    2009-01-01

    We aim to assess the effectiveness of feedback-controlled resonant drift pacing as a method for low energy defibrillation. Antitachycardia pacing is the only low energy defibrillation approach to have gained clinical significance, but it is still suboptimal. Low energy defibrillation would avoid adverse side effects associated with high voltage shocks and allow the application of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy, in cases where such therapy is not tolerated today. We present results of computer simulations of a bidomain model of cardiac tissue with human atrial ionic kinetics. Reentry was initiated and low energy shocks were applied with the same period as the reentry, using feedback to maintain resonance. We demonstrate that such stimulation can move the core of reentrant patterns, in the direction that depends on the location of the electrodes and the time delay in the feedback. Termination of reentry is achieved with shock strength one-order-of-magnitude weaker than in conventional single-shock defibrillation. We conclude that resonant drift pacing can terminate reentry at a fraction of the shock strength currently used for defibrillation and can potentially work where antitachycardia pacing fails, due to the feedback mechanisms. Success depends on a number of details that these numerical simulations have uncovered. PMID:19217854

  16. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Substantial Tissue Specificity in Human Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gu, Weidong; Ni, Buqing; Sun, Haoliang; Yu, Tong; Gu, Wanjun; Chen, Liang; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionary roles in transcriptome identification and quantification of different types of tissues and cells in many organisms. Although numerous RNA-seq data derived from many types of human tissues and cell lines, little is known on the transcriptome repertoire of human aortic valve. In this study, we sequenced the total RNA prepared from two calcified human aortic valves and reported the whole transcriptome of human aortic valve. Integrating RNA-seq data of 13 human tissues from Human Body Map 2 Project, we constructed a transcriptome repertoire of human tissues, including 19,505 protein-coding genes and 4,948 long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Among them, 263 lincRNAs were identified as novel noncoding transcripts in our data. By comparing transcriptome data among different human tissues, we observed substantial tissue specificity of RNA transcripts, both protein-coding genes and lincRNAs, in human aortic valve. Further analysis revealed that aortic valve-specific lincRNAs were more likely to be recently derived from repetitive elements in the primate lineage, but were less likely to be conserved at the nucleotide level. Expression profiling analysis showed significant lower expression levels of aortic valve-specific protein-coding genes and lincRNA genes, when compared with genes that were universally expressed in various tissues. Isoform-level expression analysis also showed that a majority of mRNA genes had a major isoform expressed in the human aortic valve. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative transcriptome analysis between human aortic valve and other human tissues. Our results are helpful to understand the transcriptome diversity of human tissues and the underlying mechanisms that drive tissue specificity of protein-coding genes and lincRNAs in human aortic valve. PMID:27493474

  17. Characterization of RNA isolated from eighteen different human tissues: results from a rapid human autopsy program.

    PubMed

    Walker, Douglas G; Whetzel, Alexis M; Serrano, Geidy; Sue, Lucia I; Lue, Lih-Fen; Beach, Thomas G

    2016-09-01

    Many factors affect the integrity of messenger RNA from human autopsy tissues including postmortem interval (PMI) between death and tissue preservation and the pre-mortem agonal and disease states. In this communication, we describe RNA isolation and characterization of 389 samples from 18 different tissues from elderly donors who were participants in a rapid whole-body autopsy program located in Sun City, Arizona ( www.brainandbodydonationprogram.org ). Most tissues were collected within a PMI of 2-6 h (median 3.15 h; N = 455), but for this study, tissue from cases with longer PMIs (1.25-29.25 h) were included. RNA quality was assessed by RNA integrity number (RIN) and total yield (ng RNA/mg tissue). RIN correlated with PMI for heart (r = -0.531, p = 0.009) and liver (r = -558, p = 0.0017), while RNA yield correlated with PMI for colon (r = -485, p = 0.016) and skin (r = -0.460, p = 0.031). RNAs with the lowest integrity were from skin and cervix where 22.7 and 31.4 % of samples respectively failed to produce intact RNA; by contrast all samples from esophagus, lymph node, jejunum, lung, stomach, submandibular gland and kidney produced RNA with measurable RINs. Expression levels in heart RNA of 4 common housekeeping normalization genes showed significant correlations of Ct values with RIN, but only one gene, glyceraldehyde-3 phosphate dehydrogenase, showed a correlation of Ct with PMI. There were no correlations between RIN values obtained for liver, adrenal, cervix, esophagus and lymph node and those obtained from corresponding brain samples. We show that high quality RNA can be produced from most human autopsy tissues, though with significant differences between tissues and donors. The RNA stability and yield did not depend solely on PMI; other undetermined factors are involved, but these do not include the age of the donor.

  18. Xenotransplantation Models to Study the Effects of Toxicants on Human Fetal Tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Spade, Daniel J.; McDonnell, Elizabeth V.; Heger, Nicholas E.; Sanders, Jennifer A.; Saffarini, Camelia M.; Gruppuso, Philip A.; De Paepe, Monique E.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases that manifest throughout the lifetime are influenced by factors affecting fetal development. Fetal exposure to xenobiotics, in particular, may influence the development of adult diseases. Established animal models provide systems for characterizing both developmental biology and developmental toxicology. However, animal model systems do not allow researchers to assess the mechanistic effects of toxicants on developing human tissue. Human fetal tissue xenotransplantation models have recently been implemented to provide human-relevant mechanistic data on the many tissue-level functions that may be affected by fetal exposure to toxicants. This review describes the development of human fetal tissue xenotransplant models for testis, prostate, lung, liver, and adipose tissue, aimed at studying the effects of xenobiotics on tissue development, including implications for testicular dysgenesis, prostate disease, lung disease, and metabolic syndrome. The mechanistic data obtained from these models can complement data from epidemiology, traditional animal models, and in vitro studies to quantify the risks of toxicant exposures during human development. PMID:25477288

  19. Patents on Technologies of Human Tissue and Organ Regeneration from Pluripotent Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Xuejun H; Teng, Yang D; Moore, Dennis A; Snyder, Evan Y

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are genetically stable with unlimited expansion ability and unrestricted plasticity, proffering a pluripotent reservoir for in vitro derivation of a large supply of disease-targeted human somatic cells that are restricted to the lineage in need of repair. There is a large healthcare need to develop hESC-based therapeutic solutions to provide optimal regeneration and reconstruction treatment options for the damaged or lost tissue or organ that have been lacking. In spite of controversy surrounding the ownership of hESCs, the number of patent applications related to hESCs is growing rapidly. This review gives an overview of different patent applications on technologies of derivation, maintenance, differentiation, and manipulation of hESCs for therapies. Many of the published patent applications have been based on previously established methods in the animal systems and multi-lineage inclination of pluripotent cells through spontaneous germ-layer differentiation. Innovative human stem cell technologies that are safe and effective for human tissue and organ regeneration in the clinical setting remain to be developed. Our overall view on the current patent situation of hESC technologies suggests a trend towards hESC patent filings on novel therapeutic strategies of direct control and modulation of hESC pluripotent fate, particularly in a 3-dimensional context, when deriving clinically-relevant lineages for regenerative therapies. PMID:23355961

  20. [Tissue engineering and construction of human skin in vitro].

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco

    2007-09-01

    Tissue engineering is the new science that has come to make possible the growth of new organ tissue from small fragments of healthy tissue, thus partially or totally restoring the lost functions of ill tissues or organs, as shown by the achievements made with the culture of skin, cornea or cartilage. Thus far, this new science is able to ensure the recovery of lost functions and, doubtlessly, in a near future will be capable of developing tissues and organs not unlike natural ones. In our laboratory we have began the development of tissue engineering techniques for the successful construction of in vitro skin with the aim at mid term of producing cornea and cartilage. In a first clinical trial, these techniques were applied in the treatment of chronic skin lesions and the advantages and reach of these new tools were demonstrated for the effective solution of problems with would otherwise not be easily solved through the use of conventional treatments.

  1. Terahertz pulsed imaging of freshly excised human colonic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Caroline B.; Fitzgerald, Anthony; Reese, George; Goldin, Robert; Tekkis, Paris; O'Kelly, P. S.; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma; Gibson, Adam P.; Wallace, Vincent P.

    2011-07-01

    We present the results from a feasibility study which measures properties in the terahertz frequency range of excised cancerous, dysplastic and healthy colonic tissues from 30 patients. We compare their absorption and refractive index spectra to identify trends which may enable different tissue types to be distinguished. In addition, we present statistical models based on variations between up to 17 parameters calculated from the reflected time and frequency domain signals of all the measured tissues. These models produce a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 77% in distinguishing between healthy and all diseased tissues and a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 71% in distinguishing between dysplastic and healthy tissues. The contrast between the tissue types was supported by histological staining studies which showed an increased vascularity in regions of increased terahertz absorption.

  2. The impact on histopathology practice of new human tissue legislation in the UK.

    PubMed

    Underwood, J C E

    2006-09-01

    The undisclosed or unauthorized retention of tissue from autopsies in the UK and elsewhere has caused considerable public concern and much distress to some families. Histopathologists involved in these cases have also been discomfited. These events have exposed deficiencies in prevailing legislation, principally in the Human Tissue Act 1961 and the Coroners Rules 1984. New human tissue legislation comes into force in the UK in September 2006. The Human Tissue Act 2004 and the Human Tissue (Scotland) Act 2006 make it unlawful to remove, store and use tissue from the dead without appropriate authority. The Human Tissue Act 2004, which does not apply in Scotland, also prohibits the removal, storage and use of tissue from living individuals for purposes specified in the Act unless appropriate consent has been obtained. The Coroners (Amendment) Rules 2005, which came into force in June 2005, introduced new arrangements for dealing with the retention of tissue from bodies undergoing coroner's autopsies. This new legislative regime is intended to create a climate in which pathologists, patients and the public can have confidence that tissue is used appropriately and, when necessary, with proper authority or valid consent. However, other than in Scotland, there may be unintended consequences arising from restrictions on archiving, for audit and diagnostic review, tissue samples from coronial autopsies.

  3. Glypican 3 expression in human nonneoplastic, preneoplastic, and neoplastic tissues: a tissue microarray analysis of 4,387 tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Baumhoer, Daniel; Tornillo, Luigi; Stadlmann, Sylvia; Roncalli, Massimo; Diamantis, Eva Karamitopoulou; Terracciano, Luigi M

    2008-06-01

    Several studies have shown that glypican 3 (GPC3) could be a useful diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and for differentiating HCC from nonneoplastic and preneoplastic liver disease. To systematically investigate the epidemiology of GPC3 expression in the liver and in other organs and tissues, we used tissue microarray technology comprising 4,387 tissue samples from 139 tumor categories and 36 nonneoplastic and preneoplastic tissue types. The immunohistoche