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Sample records for human tracheal smooth

  1. Anisotropic properties of tracheal smooth muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Sarma, P A; Pidaparti, R M; Meiss, R A

    2003-04-01

    The anisotropic (directional-dependent) properties of contracting tracheal smooth muscle tissue are estimated from a computational model based on the experimental data of length-dependent stiffness. The area changes are obtained at different muscle lengths from experiments in which stimulated muscle undergoes unrestricted shortening. Then, through an interative process, the anisotropic properties are estimated by matching the area changes obtained from the finite element analysis to those derived from the experiments. The results obtained indicate that the anisotropy ratio (longitudinal stiffness to transverse stiffness) is about 4 when the smooth muscle undergoes 70% strain shortening, indicating that the transverse stiffness reduces as the longitudinal stiffness increases. It was found through a sensitivity analysis from the simulation model that the longitudinal stiffness and the in-plane shear modulus are not very sensitive as compared to major Poisson's ratio to the area changes of the muscle tissue. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Menthol inhibiting parasympathetic function of tracheal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsing-Won; Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chao, Pin-Zhir; Lee, Fei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Menthol is used as a constituent of food and drink, tobacco and cosmetics nowadays. This cold receptor agonist has been used as a nasal inhalation solution in the daily life. The effect of menthol on nasal mucosa in vivo is well known; however, the effect of the drug on tracheal smooth muscle has been rarely explored. Therefore, during administration of the drug for nasal symptoms, it might also affect the trachea via oral intake or inhalation. We used our preparation to test the effectiveness of menthol on isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle. A 5 mm long portion of rat trachea was submersed in 30 ml Krebs solution in a muscle bath at 37ºC. Changes in tracheal contractility in response to the application of a parasympathetic mimetic agent were measured using a transducer connected to a Pentium III computer equipped with polygraph software. The following assessments of menthol were performed: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10-6 M methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic; (3) effect of the drug on electrically induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. Results indicated that addition of a parasympathetic mimetic to the incubation medium caused the trachea to contract in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of menthol at doses of 10-5 M or above elicited a relaxation response to 10-6 M methacholine-induced contraction. Menthol could also inhibit electrical field stimulation (EFS) induced spike contraction. However, it alone had a minimal effect on the basal tension of trachea as the concentration increased. We concluded that the degree of drug-induced tracheal contraction or relaxation was dose-dependent. In addition, this study indicated that high concentrations of menthol might actually inhibit parasympathetic function of the trachea. PMID:27994497

  3. Viscoelastic Properties of Human Tracheal Tissues.

    PubMed

    Safshekan, Farzaneh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Abdouss, Majid; Shadmehr, Mohammad B

    2017-01-01

    The physiological performance of trachea is highly dependent on its mechanical behavior, and therefore, the mechanical properties of its components. Mechanical characterization of trachea is key to succeed in new treatments such as tissue engineering, which requires the utilization of scaffolds which are mechanically compatible with the native human trachea. In this study, after isolating human trachea samples from brain-dead cases and proper storage, we assessed the viscoelastic properties of tracheal cartilage, smooth muscle, and connective tissue based on stress relaxation tests (at 5% and 10% strains for cartilage and 20%, 30%, and 40% for smooth muscle and connective tissue). After investigation of viscoelastic linearity, constitutive models including Prony series for linear viscoelasticity and quasi-linear viscoelastic, modified superposition, and Schapery models for nonlinear viscoelasticity were fitted to the experimental data to find the best model for each tissue. We also investigated the effect of age on the viscoelastic behavior of tracheal tissues. Based on the results, all three tissues exhibited a (nonsignificant) decrease in relaxation rate with increasing the strain, indicating viscoelastic nonlinearity which was most evident for cartilage and with the least effect for connective tissue. The three-term Prony model was selected for describing the linear viscoelasticity. Among different models, the modified superposition model was best able to capture the relaxation behavior of the three tracheal components. We observed a general (but not significant) stiffening of tracheal cartilage and connective tissue with aging. No change in the stress relaxation percentage with aging was observed. The results of this study may be useful in the design and fabrication of tracheal tissue engineering scaffolds.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide induces VCAM-1 expression and neutrophil adhesion to human tracheal smooth muscle cells: Involvement of Src/EGFR/PI3-K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.-N.; Luo, S.-F.; Wu, C.-B.; Lin, C.-C.; Yang, C.-M.

    2008-04-15

    In our previous study, LPS has been shown to induce vascular cell adhesion molecule-1(VCAM-1) expression through MAPKs and NF-{kappa}B in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs). In addition to these pathways, the non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src), EGF receptor (EGFR), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to be implicated in the expression of several inflammatory target proteins. Here, we reported that LPS-induced up-regulation of VCAM-1 enhanced the adhesion of neutrophils onto HTSMC monolayer, which was inhibited by LY294002 and wortmannin. LPS stimulated phosphorylation of protein tyrosine kinases including Src, PYK2, and EGFR, which were further confirmed using specific anti-phospho-Src, PYK2, or EGFR Ab, respectively, revealed by Western blotting. LPS-stimulated Src, PYK2, EGFR, and Akt phosphorylation and VCAM-1 expression were attenuated by the inhibitors of Src (PP1), EGFR (AG1478), PI3-K (LY294002 and wortmannin), and Akt (SH-5), respectively, or transfection with siRNAs of Src or Akt and shRNA of p110. LPS-induced VCAM-1 expression was also blocked by pretreatment with curcumin (a p300 inhibitor) or transfection with p300 siRNA. LPS-stimulated Akt activation translocated into nucleus and associated with p300 and VCAM-1 promoter region was further confirmed by immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. This association of Akt and p300 to VCAM-1 promoter was inhibited by pretreatment with PP1, AG1478, wortmannin, and SH-5. LPS-induced p300 activation enhanced VCAM-1 promoter activity and VCAM-1 mRNA expression. These results suggested that in HTSMCs, Akt phosphorylation mediated through transactivation of Src/PYK2/EGFR promoted the transcriptional p300 activity and eventually led to VCAM-1 expression induced by LPS.

  5. Endothelin-1 induces VCAM-1 expression-mediated inflammation via receptor tyrosine kinases and Elk/p300 in human tracheal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Lin, Wei-Ning; Hou, Wei-Chen; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2015-08-01

    The elevated level of endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage of patients with severe asthma, acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and sepsis. ET-1 may affect vessel tone together with lung physiology and pathology. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is one kind of adhesion molecules participating in the process of polymorphonuclear leukocyte transmigration and regulating the occurrence and amplification of tissue inflammation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ET-1-mediated expression of VCAM-1 on human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) were largely unknown. Here we reported that ET-1 stimulated expression of VCAM-1 gene on HTSMCs, which was blocked by pretreatment with the inhibitors of ET receptors, Src, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), AKT, MEK1/2, and p300, suggesting the participation of these signaling components in ET-1-regulated HTSMC responses. Furthermore, transfection with small-interfering RNA (siRNA) of Src, AKT, p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), or p300 downregulated the respective proteins and significantly attenuated ET-1-induced VCAM-1 expression. ET-1 also stimulated phosphorylation of Src, EGFR, PDGFR, AKT, p42/p44 MAPK, and Elk-1 and acetylation of histone H4 on HTSMCs. Immunoprecipitation assay showed the association between Elk-1 and p300 in the nucleus. Adhesion assay revealed that the adhesion of THP-1 to HTSMCs challenged with ET-1 was increased, which was attenuated by the inhibitors of ET receptors, Src, MMPs, EGFR, PDGFR, PI3K, AKT, p42/p44 MAPK, and p300. Taken together, these data suggested that ET-1 promotes occurrence and amplification of pathology-related airway inflammation via enhancing VCAM-1 expression in an ET receptor/Src/MMP/EGFR, PDGFR/PI3K/AKT/p42/p44 MAPK/Elk-1/p300 pathway in HTSMCs.

  6. Substance P Regulates Environmental Tobacco Smoke-Enhanced Tracheal Smooth Muscle Responsiveness in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lan; Wu, Zhong-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is an environmental trigger that leads to airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in susceptible individuals and animals, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Substance P (SP) release from sensory nerve fibers has been linked to AHR. The present experiments characterize the role of SP in tracheal smooth muscle on ETS-increased airway responses. The mice were exposed to either sidestream tobacco smoke (SS), a surrogate to ETS, or filtered air (FA) for 1 day or 5 consecutive days. Contractions of tracheal smooth muscle to SP and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were not significantly altered in 1 of day SS-exposed mice. However, 5 of days SS exposure significantly increased airway smooth muscle contractions to SP and EFS. Administration of CP-99994, an antagonist of the neurokinin (NK)1 receptor, attenuates the SS exposure-enhanced tracheal smooth muscle responses to EFS. Furthermore, the immunohistochemistry showed that SP nerve fibers were increased in tracheal smooth muscle after 5 of days SS exposure. These results suggest that the increased SP production may contribute to SS-enhanced smooth muscle responsiveness in mice trachea. PMID:22927867

  7. Theophylline attenuates Ca2+ sensitivity and modulates BK channels in porcine tracheal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ise, Shinji; Nishimura, Junji; Hirano, Katsuya; Hara, Nobuyuki; Kanaide, Hideo

    2003-01-01

    Theophylline, a nonselective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has long been regarded as a major bronchodilator in the treatment of human asthma. Using front-surface fluorometry with fura-2 and α-toxin permeabilization, the effects of theophylline on intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), tension development and Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus were investigated in porcine tracheal smooth muscle strips. Application of theophylline induced a relaxation without a significant decrease in [Ca2+]i when strips were precontracted by 40 mM K+ depolarization, while theophylline significantly decreased both [Ca2+]i and tension induced by carbachol. The effects of theophylline on the increases in [Ca2+]i and tension induced by carbachol were significantly inhibited by iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, theophylline significantly attenuated carbachol-induced transient increases in tension development, while it did not affect carbachol-induced transient increase in [Ca2+]i. The [Ca2+]i–force relationship, which was determined by cumulative applications of extracellular Ca2+ (0–5 mM) during 40 mM K+ depolarization, was significantly shifted to the right by theophylline. In α-toxin permeabilized strips, theophylline significantly increased the EC50 value of [Ca2+]i for contraction and enhanced the effect of cAMP, but not of cGMP. These results indicate that theophylline induces relaxation of the porcine tracheal smooth muscle through an activation of BK channels, and a resultant decrease in [Ca2+]i and an attenuation of Ca2+ sensitivity, presumably through the action of cAMP. PMID:14517178

  8. Activity of guanylyl cyclase activators on the reaction of tracheal smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Glaza, Izabela; Szadujkis-Szadurski, Leszek; Szadujkis-Szadurski, Rafał; Gajdus, Marta; Rzepka, Alicja; Gurtowska, Natalia

    2011-08-05

    The subject of the study compare the influences of YC-1 guanylyl cyclase activator with ODQ guanylyl cyclase inhibitor on the tracheal smooth muscle contraction induced by carbachol. The study specified the influence of increasing concentrations of soluble guanylyl cyclase activators YC-1 and 8Br cGMP on the reaction of tracheal smooth muscle contraction released by carbachol. The author also examined the effect of increasing concentrations of soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ on the concentration-effect curves for carbachol. Testing was conducted on an isolated trachea of both sexes of Wistar rats with weight ranging between 350 g and 450 g. Tracheas were prepared in accordance with the Akcasu (1959) method in Szadujkis-Szadurski (1996) modification. Concentration-effect curves were determined with the use of cumulated concentration method, in accordance with the van Rossum method (1963) in Kenakin (2006) modification. According to conducted testing, activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase with the use of YC-1 and 8Br cGMP caused reduced reaction of the tracheal smooth muscle with carbachol on average to 80%. Comparing concentration-effect curves for carbachol before and after the use of 8Br cGMP, similar results were obtained for those released by YC-1. On the other hand, increasing concentrations of guanylyl cyclase inhibitor - ODQ cause shift of curves to the left, decrease of EC(50) value and an increase of maximum reaction to carbachol. Carbachol, depending on concentration, causes tracheal smooth muscle contraction. According to testing, we can confirm that activation of guanylyl cyclase leads to reduction of the reaction of tracheal smooth muscle to carbachol on average up to 80%

  9. Activation of ROS/NF-{kappa}B and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM kinase II are necessary for VCAM-1 induction in IL-1{beta}-treated human tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, S.-F.; Chang, C.-C.; Lee, I-T.; Lee, C.-W.; Lin, W.-N.; Lin, C.-C.; Yang, C.-M.

    2009-05-15

    Histone acetylation regulated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) plays a critical role in the expression of inflammatory genes, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Oxidative processes have been shown to induce VCAM-1 expression. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying IL-1{beta}-induced VCAM-1 expression in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs). Our results showed that IL-1{beta} enhanced HTSMCs-monocyte adhesion through up-regulation of VCAM-1, which was inhibited by pretreatment with selective inhibitors of PKC{alpha} (Goe6976), c-Src (PP1), NADPH oxidase [diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and apocynin (APO)], intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA/AM), PI-PLC (U73122), CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II (KN62), p300 (garcinol), NF-{kappa}B (Bay11-7082), HDAC (trichostatin A), and ROS scavenger [N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC)] or transfection with siRNAs of MyD88, PKC{alpha}, Src, p47{sup phox}, p300, and HDAC4. Moreover, IL-1{beta} stimulated NF-{kappa}B and CaMKII phosphorylation through MyD88-dependent PI-PLC/PKC{alpha}/c-Src/ROS and PI-PLC/Ca{sup 2+}/CaM pathways, respectively. Activation of NF-{kappa}B and CaMKII may eventually lead to the acetylation of histone residues and phosphorylation of histone deacetylases. These findings suggested that IL-1{beta} induced VCAM-1 expression via these multiple signaling pathways in HTSMCs. Blockade of these pathways may reduce monocyte adhesion via VCAM-1 suppression and attenuation of the inflammatory responses in airway diseases.

  10. Activation of ROS/NF-kappaB and Ca2+/CaM kinase II are necessary for VCAM-1 induction in IL-1beta-treated human tracheal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shue-Fen; Chang, Chia-Chi; Lee, I-Ta; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lin, Wei-Ning; Lin, Chih-Chung; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2009-05-15

    Histone acetylation regulated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) plays a critical role in the expression of inflammatory genes, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Oxidative processes have been shown to induce VCAM-1 expression. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying IL-1beta-induced VCAM-1 expression in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs). Our results showed that IL-1beta enhanced HTSMCs-monocyte adhesion through up-regulation of VCAM-1, which was inhibited by pretreatment with selective inhibitors of PKCalpha (Gö6976), c-Src (PP1), NADPH oxidase [diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and apocynin (APO)], intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA/AM), PI-PLC (U73122), CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II (KN62), p300 (garcinol), NF-kappaB (Bay11-7082), HDAC (trichostatin A), and ROS scavenger [N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC)] or transfection with siRNAs of MyD88, PKCalpha, Src, p47(phox), p300, and HDAC4. Moreover, IL-1beta stimulated NF-kappaB and CaMKII phosphorylation through MyD88-dependent PI-PLC/PKCalpha/c-Src/ROS and PI-PLC/Ca2+/CaM pathways, respectively. Activation of NF-kappaB and CaMKII may eventually lead to the acetylation of histone residues and phosphorylation of histone deacetylases. These findings suggested that IL-1beta induced VCAM-1 expression via these multiple signaling pathways in HTSMCs. Blockade of these pathways may reduce monocyte adhesion via VCAM-1 suppression and attenuation of the inflammatory responses in airway diseases.

  11. Correlation of tracheal smooth muscle function with structure and protein expression during early development.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Aaron B; Cooke, Peter H; Driska, Steven P; Wolfson, Marla R; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2007-05-01

    With increased survival of premature infants, understanding the impact of development on airway function and structure is imperative. Airway smooth muscle plays a primary role in the modulation of airway function. The purpose of this study is to correlate the functional maturation of airway smooth muscle during the perinatal period with structural alterations at the cellular, ultrastructural, and molecular levels. Length-tension and dose-response analyses were performed on tracheal rings acquired from preterm and term newborn lambs. Subsequent structural analyses included isolated airway smooth muscle cell length, electron microscopy, and myosin heavy chain isoform expression measurements. Functionally the compliance, contractility, and agonist sensitivity of the tracheal rings matured during preterm to term development. Structurally, isolated cell lengths and electron microscopic ultrastructure were not significantly altered during perinatal development. However, expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms increased significantly across the age range analyzed, correlating with the maturational increase in smooth muscle contractility. In conclusion, the developmental alterations in tracheal function appear due, in part, to enhanced smooth muscle myosin heavy chain expression. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhances neutrophil adhesiveness: induction of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 via activation of Akt and CaM kinase II and modifications of histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase 4 in human tracheal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lin, Chih-Chung; Luo, Shue-Fen; Lee, Hui-Chun; Lee, I-Ta; Aird, William C; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2008-05-01

    Up-regulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) involves adhesions between both circulating and resident leukocytes and the human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) during airway inflammatory reaction. We have demonstrated previously that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced VCAM-1 expression is regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor-kappaB, and p300 activation in HTSMCs. In addition to this pathway, phosphorylation of Akt and CaM kinase II has been implicated in histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) activation. Here, we investigated whether these different mechanisms participated in TNF-alpha-induced VCAM-1 expression and enhanced neutrophil adhesion. TNF-alpha significantly increased HTSMC-neutrophil adhesions, and this effect was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1 on the HTSMCs and was blocked by the selective inhibitors of Src [4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine (PP1)], epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR; 4-(3'-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxy-quinazoline, (AG1478)], phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) [2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-1(4H)-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride(LY294002) and wortmannin],calcium[1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester; BAPTA-AM], phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PLC) [1-[6-[[17beta-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U73122)], protein kinase C (PKC) [12-(2-cyanoethyl)-6,7,12, 13-tetrahydro-13-methyl-5-oxo-5H-indolo(2,3-a)pyrrolo(3,4-c)-carbazole (Gö6976), rottlerin, and 3-1-[3-(amidinothio)propyl-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl) maleimide (bisindolylmaleimide IX) (Ro 31-8220)], CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II [(8R(*),9S(*),11S(*))-(-)-9-hydroxy-9-methoxycarbonyl-8-methyl-14-n-propoxy-2,3,9, 10-tetrahydro-8,11-epoxy, 1H,8H, 11H-2,7b,11a-triazadibenzo[a,g]cycloocta[cde]trinden-1-one (KT5926) and 1-[N,O-bis(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl

  13. Red wine polyphenolic compounds inhibit tracheal smooth muscle contraction during allergen-induced hyperreactivity of the airways.

    PubMed

    Franova, Sona; Nosalova, Gabriela; Pechanova, Olga; Sutovska, Martina

    2007-05-01

    The aims of the study were to investigate the short and long-term effects of Provinol (red wine polyphenolic compounds) on tracheal smooth muscle reactivity using an in-vitro model of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in guinea-pig trachea, and to evaluate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the bronchodilatory effect of Provinol. The amplitude of tracheal smooth muscle contraction in response to mediators of bronchoconstriction - histamine (10 nM-1 mM), acetylcholine (10 nM-1 mM) and to allergen (ovalbumin 10(-5)-10(-3) g mL(-1)) was used as a parameter of tracheal smooth muscle reactivity. To test the short-term effects of Provinol, isolated tracheal strips were pre-treated for 30 min with Provinol (10(-4) mg mL(-1)) alone or in combination with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10(-6) mol L(-1)). To test the long-term effects of Provinol, isolated tracheal strips were prepared from guinea pigs that had been treated for 14 days with Provinol (20 mg kg(-1) per day) alone or in combination with L-NAME (40 mg kg(-1) per day). Incubation of tracheal smooth muscle with Provinol decreased the amplitude of contraction in response to ovalbumin, histamine and acetylcholine. The non-selective NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME partially abolished the effect of Provinol on acetylcholine and ovalbumin-induced but not histamine-induced bronchoconstriction. A similar profile was observed after 14 days' oral administration of Provinol. In conclusion, Provinol inhibited the allergen- and spasmogen-induced contraction of tracheal smooth muscle in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs via a mechanism that was mediated at least partially through the metabolism of NO.

  14. Inhibition of tracheal smooth muscle contraction and myosin phosphorylation by ryanodine

    SciTech Connect

    Gerthoffer, W.T.; Murphey, K.A.; Khoyi, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that muscarinic activation of airway smooth muscle in low Ca++ solutions increases myosin phosphorylation without increasing tension. Blocking Ca++ influx reduced phosphorylation, but not to basal levels. It was proposed that release of intracellular Ca++ contributed to dissociation of phosphorylation and contraction. To test this hypothesis the effects of ryanodine were studied under similar conditions. Ryanodine (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) antagonized caffeine-induced contraction of canine tracheal smooth muscle. Ryanodine also reduced carbachol-induced contractions and carbachol-induced myosin phosphorylation. The effect of ryanodine on potassium and serotonin-induced contractions was also investigated to test for a nonspecific inhibitory effect. In contrast to the effect on carbachol responses, ryanodine (10(-5) M) potentiated the contractile response to low concentrations of serotonin and potassium, but had no effect on the maximum response to either stimulant. Carbachol (10(-6) M) and ryanodine (10(-5) M) both significantly decreased /sup 45/Ca++ content of tracheal muscle. The effect of ryanodine and carbachol together on /sup 45/Ca++ content was not greater than either drug alone suggesting that ryanodine reduces the caffeine and carbachol responses by depleting releaseable Ca++ stores. Ryanodine significantly reduced Ca++-induced contraction and myosin phosphorylation in carbachol-stimulated muscle, suggesting that some of the Ca++ responsible for elevated phosphorylation is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  15. Relaxation of tracheal smooth muscle independent on functional epithelium cells induced by lidocaine, bupivacaine and isomers in rats.

    PubMed

    Lautner, Roberto Q; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Sudo, Roberto T

    2009-05-21

    Lidocaine is a local anesthetic which has been used to protect spasm reaction during tracheal intubation and bronchoscopy. We compared the potency of lidocaine, bupivacaine (RS(+/-)-bupivacaine) and isomers (S(-)-bupivacaine and R(+)-bupivacaine) to promote relaxation of tracheal smooth muscle. Relaxation of airways smooth muscle can be dependent on the release of relaxing factors by epithelium such as prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO). Possible mechanisms involved in the tracheal smooth muscle relaxation induced by these local anesthetics were evaluated in preparation in which the epithelium layer was intact or denuded. Bupivacaine and its isomers were approximately six to eleven-fold more potent than lidocaine to promote relaxation on acetylcholine-induced contraction in tracheal rings. The concentration of lidocaine, RS(+/-)-bupivacaine, S(-)-bupivacaine and R(+)-bupivacaine necessary to produce a 50% reduction of maximal contraction to acetylcholine (IC(50)) in tracheal rings with intact epithelium was 1.25+/-0.01, 0.11+/-0.01, 0.15+/-0.01, 0.19+/-0.01 mM, respectively. Removal of epithelium or exposure to N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, indomethacin did not alter the IC(50). However, calcium influx of depolarized tracheal smooth muscle was inhibited by lidocaine, bupivacaine and isomers. S(-)-bupivacaine reduced by 78.8+/-7.4% the calcium influx followed by RS(+/-)-bupivacaine (41.8+/-6.7%) and R(+)-bupivacaine (25.6+/-9.5%). In conclusion, local anesthetic action was stereoselective and partially dependent on blockade of Ca(2+) influx to muscular cells. The isomer S(-)-bupivacaine is more potent and less toxic which could represent a valuable clinical advantage to use as broncholitic agent.

  16. Leukotriene D4 receptor-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoinositide and mobilization of calcium in sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mong, S.; Miller, J.; Wu, H.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    A sheep tracheal smooth muscle primary culture cell system was developed to characterize leukotriene D4 (LTD4) receptor-mediated biochemical and pharmacological effects. (/sup 3/H)LTD4 binding to the enriched plasma membrane receptor was specific, stereoselective and saturable. LTE4 and high affinity receptor antagonists bound to the receptors with a rank-order potency that was expected from previous smooth muscle contraction studies. In the (/sup 3/H)myoinositol labeled cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-trisphosphate was rapid and the induction of biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-monophosphate by LTs was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited specifically by a receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. In the fura-2 loaded smooth muscle cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced transient intracellular Ca++ mobilization. The fura-2/Ca++ transient was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited by receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. These results suggest that the cultured sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells have plasma membrane receptors for LTD4. These receptors were coupled to a phospholipase C that, when activated by agonists, induced hydrolysis of inositol containing phospholipids. The hydrolysis products, e.g. diacylglycerol and inositol-trisphosphate, may serve as intracellular messengers that trigger or contribute to the contractile effect in sheep tracheal smooth muscle.

  17. Mechanism of soman-induced contractions in canine tracheal smooth muscle. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, M.; Moore, D.H.; Filbert, M.G.

    1992-12-31

    The actions of the irreversible organophosphorus cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor soman were investigated on canine trachea smooth muscle in vitro. Concentrations of soman > or - 1 nM increased the amplitude and decay of contractions elicited by electric field stimulation. The effect on decay showed a marked dependence on stimulation frequency, undergoing a 2.4-fold increase between 3 and 60 Hz. Soman also potentiated tensions due to bath applied acetylcholine (ACh). Little or no potentiation was observed for contractions elicited by carbamylcholine, an agonist that is not hydrolyzed by ChE. Concentration of soman > or - 3 nM led to the appearance of sustained contractures. These contractures developed with a delayed onset and were well correlated with ChE activity. Alkylation of muscarinic receptors by propylbenzilylcholine mustard antagonized the actions of soman on both spontaneous and electrically-evoked muscle contractions. The results are consistent with a mechanism in which the toxic actions of soman are mediated by accumulation of neurally-released ACh secondary to inhibition of ChE activity. An important factor in this accumulation is suggested to be the buffering effect of the muscarinic receptors on the efflux of ACh from the neuroeffector junction. Tracheal smooth muscle, Cholinesterase inhibitors, Muscarinic receptor, Soman, Organophosphate.

  18. Role of intracellular pH in relaxation of porcine tracheal smooth muscle by respiratory gases.

    PubMed

    Croxton, T L; Lande, B; Hirshman, C A

    1995-02-01

    Hypercapnia and hypoxia both relax airway smooth muscle, but the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. Because hypercapnia and hypoxia can each decrease intracellular pH (pHi) and acidosis can inhibit Ca2+ channels, we hypothesized that decreased pHi mediates relaxation of trachealis muscle by each of these respiratory gases. To examine the relationship between pHi and tone, we measured isometric tension, bath pH, and fluorescence intensity (540 nm) in porcine tracheal smooth muscle strips loaded with 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein and excited alternately with 440- and 500-nm light. Strips equilibrated in Krebs-Henseleit solution bubbled with 95% O2-5% CO2 were contracted with carbachol and then relaxed with either 95% N2-5% CO2 or 93% O2-7% CO2. The ratio of fluorescence intensity at 500 nm to 440 nm was calibrated vs. pHi with use of nigericin. Baseline pHi was 7.19 +/- 0.03 (n = 13). Hypoxia decreased active tension by approximately 60% but did not change pHi. Hypercapnia induced decreases in tension that were associated with substantial decreases in pHi. Thus, decreased pHi does not mediate hypoxic relaxation, but the relaxation during physiologically relevant increases in CO2 concentration is associated with significant cellular acidification.

  19. Human turbinate mesenchymal stromal cell sheets with bellows graft for rapid tracheal epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Hun; Park, Ju Young; Nam, Inn-Chul; Hwang, Se-Hwan; Kim, Choung-Soo; Jung, Jin Woo; Jang, Jinah; Lee, Hyungseok; Choi, Yeongjin; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-10-01

    Rapid functional epithelial regeneration on the luminal surface is essential when using artificial tracheal grafts to repair tracheal defects. In this study, we imposed human turbinate mesenchymal stromal cell (hTMSC) sheets for tracheal epithelial regeneration, and then assessed their potential as a new clinical cell source. In vitro, hTMSCs sheets showed high capacity to differentiate into tracheal epithelium. We fabricated a poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) tracheal graft by indirect three-dimensional (3D) printing technique and created a composite construct by transplanting the hTMSC sheets to its luminal surface of the tracheal graft, then applied this tissue-engineered tracheal graft to non-circumferential tracheal reconstruction in a rabbit model. 4 weeks after implantation, the luminal surface of tissue-engineered tracheal graft was covered by a mature and highly-ciliated epithelium, whereas tracheal grafts without hTMSC sheets were covered by only a thin, immature epithelium. Therefore, hTMSC sheets on the luminal surface of a tissue-engineered tracheal graft can accelerate the tracheal epithelial regeneration, and the tissue-engineered tracheal graft with hTMSC sheets provides a useful clinical alternative for tracheal epithelial regeneration.

  20. Contractile force and intracellular Ca2+ during relaxation of canine tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gunst, S J; Bandyopadhyay, S

    1989-08-01

    Muscle strips loaded with the Ca2+ indicator aequorin were studied in vitro to determine the effects of inhibitory stimuli on force and cytosolic free Ca2+. In muscles contracted isometrically with acetylcholine (ACh), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), carbachol, decreases in muscle force caused by isoproterenol (10(-5) M) or forskolin (10(-5) M) were accompanied by proportional decreases in aequorin luminescence. A similar relationship between decreases in muscle force and aequorin luminescence was observed when muscles were relaxed by stimulating Na+-K+-ATPase activity. These results suggest that the Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile proteins was not decreased during adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent relaxation. However, aequorin luminescence did not decrease when muscles contracted by K+ depolarization were relaxed with isoproterenol. Incubation of muscles in forskolin depressed increases in both force and aequorin luminescence in response to 5-HT or ACh. Incubation of muscles in isoproterenol had a similar effect on responses to 5-HT but depressed increases in force without depressing increases in luminescence in response to ACh. Results indicate that under most conditions the reduction of cytosolic Ca2+ plays an important role in the cAMP-dependent relaxation of canine tracheal smooth muscle.

  1. Hydro-ethanolic Extract of Portulaca oleracea Affects Beta-adrenoceptors of Guinea Pig Tracheal Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Hashemzehi, Milad; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Askari, Vahid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Thestimulatory effect of the extract of Portulaca oleracea (P. olerace) on β-adrenoceptor of tracheal smooth muscle was examined.To examine β-adrenoceptor stimulatory effect, concentration response curve to isoprenaline was obtained in pre-contracted tracheal smooth muscle in the presence of three concentrations of aqueous-ethanolic extract, propranolol, and saline. Values of EC50 (the effective concentration of isoprenaline, causing 50% of maximum response) and dose ratio-1(CR-1) were measured. This effect was tested innon-incubated tracheal smooth muscle (group 1) and incubated tissues with chlorpheniramine (group 2). Concentration-response curves to isoprenaline in the presence of two higher concentrations of the extract in group 1 and all three concentrations in group 2 showed leftward shifts compared to isoprenaline curves produced in the presence of saline in both groups. EC50 obtained in the presence of propranolol was significantly higher than that of saline in both groups of experiments (p<0.05 for both cases). However, the EC50 obtained in the presence of two higher concentrations of the extract in group 1 and lower concentration in group 2 were non-significantly but those obtained of medium and high extract concentrations in the group 2 were significantly (p<0.05 for both cases)lower than those of saline. The values of (CR-1) obtained in the presence of all concentrations of the extract in groups1 and 2 were significantly lower than that of propranolol (p<0.05 to p<0.001).The results indicated a stimulatory effect of the P. olerace extract on ß 2-adrenoceptors of tracheal smooth muscle. PMID:28243284

  2. Novel relaxant effects of RPL554 on guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle contractility

    PubMed Central

    Venkatasamy, R

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose We investigated the effectiveness of RPL554, a dual PDE3 and 4 enzyme inhibitor, on airway smooth muscle relaxation and compared it with that induced by salbutamol, ipratropium bromide, glycopyrrolate or their combination on bronchomotor tone induced by different spasmogenic agents. Experimental Approach Guinea pig tracheal preparations were suspended under 1 g tension in Krebs–Henseleit solution maintained at 37°C and aerated with 95% O2/5% CO2 and incubated in the presence of indomethacin (5 μM). Relaxation induced by cumulative concentrations of muscarinic receptor antagonists (ipratropium bromide or glycopyrrolate), β2‐adrenoceptor agonists (salbutamol or formoterol), PDE3 inhibitors (cilostamide, cilostazol or siguazodan) or a PDE4 inhibitor (roflumilast) was evaluated in comparison with RPL554. Maximal relaxation was calculated (% Emax papaverine) and expressed as mean ± SEM. Key Results Bronchomotor tone induced by the various spasmogens was reduced by the different bronchodilators to varying degrees. RPL554 (10‐300 μM) caused near maximum relaxation irrespective of the spasmogen examined, whereas the efficacy of the other relaxant agents varied according to the contractile stimulus used. During the evaluation of potential synergistic interactions between bronchodilators, RPL554 proved superior to salbutamol when either was combined with muscarinic receptor antagonists. Conclusions and implications RPL554 produced near maximal relaxation of highly contracted respiratory smooth muscle and provided additional relaxation compared with that produced by other clinically used bronchodilator drugs. This suggests that RPL554 has the potential to produce additional beneficial bronchodilation over and above that of maximal clinical doses of standard bronchodilators in highly constricted airways of patients. PMID:27174172

  3. Intracellular calcium in canine cultured tracheal smooth muscle cells is regulated by M3 muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, C. M.; Yo, Y. L.; Wang, Y. Y.

    1993-01-01

    1. The regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) during exposure to carbachol was measured directly in canine cultured tracheal smooth muscle cells (TSMCs) loaded with fura-2. Stimulation of muscarinic cholinoceptors (muscarinic AChRs) by carbachol produced a dose-dependent rise in [Ca2+]i which was followed by a stable plateau phase. The EC50 values of carbachol for the peak and sustained plateau responses were 0.34 and 0.33 microM, respectively. 2. Atropine (10 microM) prevented all the responses to carbachol, and when added during a response to carbachol, significantly, but not completely decreased [Ca2+]i within 5 s. Therefore, the changes in [Ca2+]i by carbachol were mediated through the muscarinic AChRs. 3. AF-DX 116 (a selective M2 antagonist) and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP, a selective M3 antagonist) inhibited the carbachol-stimulated increase in [Ca2+]i with pKB values of 6.4 and 9.4, respectively, corresponding to low affinity for AF-DX 119 and high affinity for 4-DAMP in antagonizing this response. 4. The plateau elevation of [Ca2+]i was dependent on the presence of external Ca2+. Removal of Ca2+ by the addition of 2 mM EGTA caused the [Ca2+]i to decline rapidly to the resting level. In the absence of external Ca2+, only an initial transient peak of [Ca2+]i was seen which then declined to the resting level; the sustained elevation of [Ca2+]i could then be evoked by the addition of Ca2+ (1.8 mM) in the continued presence of carbachol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8298822

  4. Biochemical characterization of a V-ATPase of tracheal smooth muscle plasma membrane fraction.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, G; Lippo de Bécemberg, I; Gonzalez de Alfonzo, R; Alfonzo, M J

    1996-07-25

    A biochemical characterization of a Mg(2+)-ATPase activity associated with a plasma membrane fraction isolated from airway (tracheal) smooth muscle was performed. This enzyme is an integral part of the membrane remaining tightly bound after 0.6 M KCl extraction. This enzyme activity showed a cold inactivation in the presence of ATP and Mg2+. Also, this Mg(2+)-ATPase was stimulated by monovalent anions being Cl-, the best anion for such stimulation, even though Br- and I- were good substitutes and F- was ineffective. This Cl--stimulated activity showed a powerful nucleosidetriphosphatase activity having the following divalent cation specificity: Mg2+ > Mn2+ > Ca2+, where Zn2+ and Fe2+ were ineffective. This ATPase activity was not inhibited by ouabain oligomycin C and vanadate indicating that neither P- or F-ATPases were associated with this enzyme activity. However, the existence of a V-ATPase was shown by the significant inhibition causes by bafilomycin A1. Additionally, this V-ATPase seems to be coupled to Cl- conductor because duramycin inhibited this ATPase activity. The presence of a H+ pump associated to this V-ATPase was shown indirectly, through the stimulatory effect produced by uncouplers such as FCCP and 1799, which were able to produce significant stimulation of this V-ATPase indicating the existence of a H(+)-ATPase. Finally, the immunodetection of a 72 kDa polypeptide using a specific antibody against the A subunit (72 kDa) of V-ATPase from chromaffin granule demonstrated the presence of a V-ATPase in this plasma membrane fraction.

  5. Co-axial bioassay of a smooth muscle relaxant factor released from guinea-pig tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, L B; Paterson, J W; Goldie, R G

    1989-01-01

    -oxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibitor BW 755C (150 microM) and the leukotriene receptor antagonist FPL 55712 (10 microM) each failed significantly to alter EpDRF-mediated relaxation of vascular smooth muscle suggesting that EpDRF is not a prostanoid. Platelet activating factor (Pat) failed to cause relaxation of endothelium-denuded rat aorta, indicating that this mediator was also not EpDRF. 7. EpDRF was also released from human bronchial segments. 8. This study provides direct evidence for the release of an EpDRF from non-diseased airway tissue and further suggests that healthy airway reactivity to spasmogens is modulated by the release of an endogenous protective, spasmolytic substance. The bronchial hyperreactivity of asthma may be partly caused by attenuated production of such an inhibitory signal.

  6. A review of the relaxant effect of various medicinal plants on tracheal smooth muscle, their possible mechanism(s) and potency.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Farzaneh; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-12-04

    The therapeutic effects of the medicinal plants described in the current review on obstructive pulmonary diseases have found mention in ancient Iranian medical texts and in traditional folk medicine. These effects are attributed to their bronchodilatory activity, which relaxes the smooth muscles of the airway. Therefore, in the present review, the relaxant effects of various extracts, fractions and constituents of medicinal plants on tracheal smooth muscle are reviewed in light of their therapeutic effects on obstructive pulmonary diseases. The online literature was searched using Medline, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Google Scholar, Web of Science and SID (for articles written in Persian). Moreover, local books on ethnopharmacology from 1918 to 2014 were searched with keywords such as tracheal smooth muscle, airway smooth muscle, relaxant effect, bronchodilatory effect and related mechanisms to identify studies on the relaxant effects of medicinal plants on tracheal smooth muscle and the possible mechanism(s) of these effects. All studied plants showed significant relaxant effects on tracheal smooth muscle, which were similar or superior to the effect of theophylline at the used concentrations. According to the results, most of these plants also showed an inhibitory effect on muscarinic and histamine (H1) receptors, whereas some plants showed more pronounced stimulatory effects on the beta-adrenergic receptor. Some of the studied plants also showed inhibitory effects on calcium and potassium channels. The present article reviewed the relaxant effects of several medicinal plants on tracheal smooth muscle, which were comparable or superior to the effect of theophylline at the studied concentration. The possible mechanisms of the relaxant effects of the studied medicinal plants and a comparison of these effects were also reviewed. This review presents the fractions and constituents of plants with potent relaxant effects on tracheal smooth muscle, which can be used

  7. Protective effects of anisodamine on cigarette smoke extract-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and tracheal contractility

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guang-Ni; Yang, Kai; Xu, Zu-Peng; Zhu, Liang; Hou, Li-Na; Qi, Hong; Chen, Hong-Zhuan Cui, Yong-Yao

    2012-07-01

    Anisodamine, an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), has been used therapeutically to improve smooth muscle function, including microvascular, intestinal and airway spasms. Our previous studies have revealed that airway hyper-reactivity could be prevented by anisodamine. However, whether anisodamine prevents smoking-induced airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation remained unclear. In this study, a primary culture of rat ASM cells was used to evaluate an ASM phenotype through the ability of the cells to proliferate and express contractile proteins in response to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and intervention of anisodamine. Our results showed that CSE resulted in an increase in cyclin D1 expression concomitant with the G0/G1-to-S phase transition, and high expression of M2 and M3. Functional studies showed that tracheal hyper-contractility accompanied contractile marker α-SMA high-expression. These changes, which occur only after CSE stimulation, were prevented and reversed by anisodamine, and CSE-induced cyclin D1 expression was significantly inhibited by anisodamine and the specific inhibitor U0126, BAY11-7082 and LY294002. Thus, we concluded that the protective and reversal effects and mechanism of anisodamine on CSE-induced events might involve, at least partially, the ERK, Akt and NF-κB signaling pathways associated with cyclin D1 via mAChRs. Our study validated that anisodamine intervention on ASM cells may contribute to anti-remodeling properties other than bronchodilation. -- Highlights: ► CSE induces tracheal cell proliferation, hyper-contractility and α-SMA expression. ► Anisodamine reverses CSE-induced tracheal hyper-contractility and cell proliferation. ► ERK, PI3K, and NF-κB pathways and cyclin D1 contribute to the reversal effect.

  8. The effect of hydro-ethanolic extract of Achillea millefolium on muscarinic receptors of guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Feizpour, Azadeh; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Byrami, Goltaj; Golamnezhad, Zahra; Shafei, Mohammad Naser

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate one possible mechanism for the observed relaxant effect of A. millefolium (Achillea millefolium), in the present study the inhibitory effect of the extract of this plant on muscarinic receptors was examined. Materials and Methods: The effects of three concentrations of aqueous-ethanolic extract, 10 nM atropine, and saline on muscarinic receptors were tested in three conditions: In non incubated tracheal smooth muscle (group 1), tracheal chain incubated with propranolol and chlorpheniramine (group 2), and the one incubated with propranolol (group 3). Results: The EC50 obtained in the presence of all three concentrations of the extract were significantly higher compared to saline in groups 2 and 3 (P < 0.001and P < 0.01 in group 2 and 3 respectively). The EC50 obtained in the presence of all concentrations of the extract in group 2 were significantly improved compared to groups 1 and 3 (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001). The maximum responses to methacholine in presence of only the higher concentration of the extract (0.8mg/ml) was significantly lower than that of saline in groups 1 (P < 0.05). There was neither significant difference between slopes of methacholine-response curves obtained in the presence of different concentrations of the extract and that of saline nor between the three groups. The values of (CR-1), obtained in the presence of all concentrations of the extract, were significantly lower compared to atropine in the first group but were not significantly different in other groups. The values of (CR-1) obtained in the presence of all concentrations of the extract were significantly improved in groups 2, compared to groups 1 and 3 (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001). Conclusion: These results showed an inhibitory effect for the extract of A. millefolium on muscarinic receptors of tracheal smooth muscle. A histamine (H1) receptor blockade was also suggested for the extract. PMID:23543621

  9. The effect of hydro-ethanolic extract of Achillea millefolium on muscarinic receptors of guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Feizpour, Azadeh; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Byrami, Goltaj; Golamnezhad, Zahra; Shafei, Mohammad Naser

    2013-01-01

    To investigate one possible mechanism for the observed relaxant effect of A. millefolium (Achillea millefolium), in the present study the inhibitory effect of the extract of this plant on muscarinic receptors was examined. The effects of three concentrations of aqueous-ethanolic extract, 10 nM atropine, and saline on muscarinic receptors were tested in three conditions: In non incubated tracheal smooth muscle (group 1), tracheal chain incubated with propranolol and chlorpheniramine (group 2), and the one incubated with propranolol (group 3). The EC₅₀ obtained in the presence of all three concentrations of the extract were significantly higher compared to saline in groups 2 and 3 (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01 in group 2 and 3 respectively). The EC₅₀ obtained in the presence of all concentrations of the extract in group 2 were significantly improved compared to groups 1 and 3 (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001). The maximum responses to methacholine in presence of only the higher concentration of the extract (0.8 mg/ml) was significantly lower than that of saline in groups 1 (P < 0.05). There was neither significant difference between slopes of methacholine-response curves obtained in the presence of different concentrations of the extract and that of saline nor between the three groups. The values of (CR-1), obtained in the presence of all concentrations of the extract, were significantly lower compared to atropine in the first group but were not significantly different in other groups. The values of (CR-1) obtained in the presence of all concentrations of the extract were significantly improved in groups 2, compared to groups 1 and 3 (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001). These results showed an inhibitory effect for the extract of A. millefolium on muscarinic receptors of tracheal smooth muscle. A histamine (H₁) receptor blockade was also suggested for the extract.

  10. Theophylline and cAMP inhibit lysophosphatidic acid-induced hyperresponsiveness of bovine tracheal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Jiro; Oike, Masahiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ito, Yushi

    2003-01-01

    We have established an in vitro model of airway hyperresponsiveness, using a bovine tracheal smooth muscle cell (BTSMC)-embedded collagen gel lattice. When the gel was pretreated with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which activates the small G protein RhoA, ATP- and high K+ solution-induced gel contraction was significantly augmented. This was not due to the modulation of Ca2+ mobilizing properties, since ATP- and high K+-induced Ca2+ transients were not significantly different between control and LPA-treated BTSMC. Y-27632, an inhibitor of Rho-kinase, suppressed the LPA-induced augmentation of gel contraction, whereas it did not inhibit the contraction of control gels. Theophylline (> 1 μm) reversed the LPA-induced augmentation of gel contraction, whereas it inhibited control gel contraction only with a very high concentration (100 μm). We confirmed that theophylline increased the intracellular concentration of cAMP ([cAMP]i) in BTSMC. Elevation of [cAMP]i with dibutyryl cAMP or forskolin also reversed the LPA-induced augmentation of gel contraction. Furthermore, theophylline, as well as dibutyryl cAMP and forskolin, suppressed the LPA-induced membrane translocation of RhoA, indicating that they prevented airway hyperresponsiveness by inhibiting RhoA. We conclude from these results that theophylline inhibits LPA-induced, RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated hyperresponsiveness of tracheal smooth muscle cells due to the accumulation of cAMP. PMID:12679373

  11. Antispasmodic effect of Mentha piperita essential oil on tracheal smooth muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Albertina Antonielly Sydney; Soares, Pedro Marcos Gomes; de Almeida, Arisa Nara Saldanha; Maia, Alana Rufino; de Souza, Emmanuel Prata; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio

    2010-07-20

    Mentha piperita is a plant popularly known in Brazil as "hortelã-pimenta" whose essential oil is used in folk medicine for its anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, expectorant actions and anti-congestive. Here, it was investigated the effect of Mentha piperita essential oil (peppermint oil) in rat tracheal rings along with its mechanism of action. Tracheal tissue from male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were used. Peppermint oil was added in cumulative concentrations [1-300 microg/ml] to the tissue basal tonus or pre-contracted by carbachol [10 microM] at 10 min intervals, incubated or not with indomethacin [10 microM], L-N-metyl-nitro-arginine [100 microM], hexamethonium [500 microM], or tetraethylammonium [5 mM]. Peppermint oil [100 and 300 microg/ml] inhibited the contractions induced by carbachol, which was reversed by indomethacin, L-N-metyl-nitro-arginine and hexamethonium, but not by tetraethylammonium. These data suggest the participation of prostaglandin E(2), nitric oxide and autonomic ganglions in the peppermint oil relaxant effect and may be correlated with its popular use in respiratory diseases. Peppermint oil exhibited antispasmodic activity on rat trachea involving prostaglandins and nitric oxide synthase. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Carbocisteine inhibits rhinovirus infection in human tracheal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, H; Yamaya, M; Sasaki, T; Inoue, D; Nakayama, K; Yamada, M; Asada, M; Yoshida, M; Suzuki, T; Nishimura, H; Sasaki, H

    2006-07-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of a mucolytic drug, carbocisteine, on rhinovirus (RV) infection in the airways. Human tracheal epithelial cells were infected with a major-group RV, RV14. RV14 infection increased virus titres and the cytokine content of supernatants. Carbocisteine reduced supernatant virus titres, the amount of RV14 RNA in cells, cell susceptibility to RV infection and supernatant cytokine concentrations, including interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, after RV14 infection. Carbocisteine reduced the expression of mRNA encoding intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, the receptor for the major group of RVs. It also reduced the supernatant concentration of a soluble form of ICAM-1, the number and fluorescence intensity of acidic endosomes in the cells before RV infection, and nuclear factor-kappaB activation by RV14. Carbocisteine also reduced the supernatant virus titres of the minor group RV, RV2, although carbocisteine did not reduce the expression of mRNA encoding a low density lipoprotein receptor, the receptor for RV2. These results suggest that carbocisteine inhibits rhinovirus 2 infection by blocking rhinovirus RNA entry into the endosomes, and inhibits rhinovirus 14 infection by the same mechanism as well as by reducing intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels. Carbocisteine may modulate airway inflammation by reducing the production of cytokines in rhinovirus infection.

  13. An Apical-Membrane Chloride Channel in Human Tracheal Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.

    1986-06-01

    The mechanism of chloride transport by airway epithelia has been of substantial interest because airway and sweat gland-duct epithelia are chloride-impermeable in cystic fibrosis. The decreased chloride permeability prevents normal secretion by the airway epithelium, thereby interfering with mucociliary clearance and contributing to the morbidity and mortality of the disease. Because chloride secretion depends on and is regulated by chloride conductance in the apical cell membrane, the patch-clamp technique was used to directly examine single-channel currents in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelium. The cells contained an anion-selective channel that was not strongly voltage-gated or regulated by calcium in cell-free patches. The channel was also blocked by analogs of carboxylic acid that decrease apical chloride conductance in intact epithelia. When attached to the cell, the channel was activated by isoproterenol, although the channel was also observed to open spontaneously. However, in some cases, the channel was only observed after the patch was excised from the cell. These results suggest that this channel is responsible for the apical chloride conductance in airway epithelia.

  14. Mounier-Kuhn syndrome: a case of tracheal smooth muscle remodeling.

    PubMed

    Cook, Daniel P; Adam, Ryan J; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H; Eberlein, Michael; Klesney-Tait, Julia A; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Meyerholz, David K; Stoltz, David A

    2017-02-01

    Mounier-Kuhn syndrome is a rare clinical disorder characterized by tracheobronchial dilation and recurrent lower respiratory tract infections. While the etiology of the disease remains unknown, histopathological analysis of Mounier-Kuhn airways demonstrates that the disease is, in part, characterized by cellular changes in airway smooth muscle.

  15. Mechanisms of relaxant activity of the nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator BAY 41-2272 in rat tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Toque, Haroldo A; Mónica, Fabíola Z T; Morganti, Rafael P; De Nucci, Gilberto; Antunes, Edson

    2010-10-25

    The soluble guanylyl cyclase is expressed in airway smooth muscle, and agents that stimulate this enzyme activity cause airway smooth muscle relaxation and bronchodilation. The compound 5-Cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl]-pyrimidin-4-ylamine (BAY 41-2272) is a potent nitric oxide (NO)-independent soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator, but little is known about its effects in airway smooth muscle. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the relaxations of rat tracheal smooth muscle induced by BAY 41-2272. Tracheal rings were mounted in 10-ml organ baths for isometric force recording. BAY 41-2272 concentration-dependently relaxed carbachol-precontracted tracheal rings (pEC(50)=6.68+/-0.14). Prior incubation with the NO synthesis inhibitor l-NAME (100 microM) or the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (10 microM) caused significant rightward shifts in the concentration-response curves to BAY 41-2272. Sodium nitroprusside caused concentration-dependent relaxations, which were greatly potentiated by BAY 41-2272 and completely inhibited by ODQ. In addition, BAY 41-2272 shifted to the right the tracheal contractile responses to either carbachol (0.01-1 microM) or electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1-32 Hz). BAY 41-2272 (1 microM) also caused a marked rightward shift and decreased the maximal contractile responses to extracellular CaCl2, and such effect was not modified by pretreatment with ODQ. In addition, BAY 41-2272 (up to 1 microM) significantly increased the cGMP levels, and that was abolished by ODQ. Our results indicate that BAY 41-2272 causes cGMP-dependent rat tracheal smooth muscle relaxations in a synergistic fashion with exogenous NO. BAY 41-2272 has also an additional mechanism independently of soluble guanylyl cyclase activation possibly involving Ca(2+) entry blockade. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Muscarinic receptors: evidence for a nonuniform distribution in tracheal smooth muscle and exocrine glands

    SciTech Connect

    Basbaum, C.B.; Grillo, M.A.; Widdicombe, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    Muscarinic receptor distribution in smooth muscle, exocrine glands, and epithelium of the ferret trachea was determined using (3H)propylbenzilylcholine mustard ((3H)PrBCM) binding and autoradiography. Specific, atropine-sensitive (3H)PrBCM binding was quantified autoradiographically in the trachealis muscle (approximately 21 binding sites/microns2), surface epithelium (approximately 6 binding sites/microns2), and submucosal glands (approximately 5 binding sites/microns2). Serous and mucous cells in the glands did not differ in receptor density. Binding sites on gland and epithelial cells were associated with basolateral membranes. In the trachealis muscle, a gradient in receptor density was observed, with outer layers of muscle containing 3 to 10 times more receptors per unit area than inner layers. Receptor distribution in both glands and muscle paralleled the distribution of cholinergic axons. However, at the light microscope level, there was no evidence for the presence of receptor ''hot spots'' related to the position of individual axons. The parallelism in the distribution of axons and receptors suggests the possibility of neural control of the genesis and/or maintenance of receptor distribution in these tissues.

  17. Increased TGF-β: a drawback of tracheal occlusion in human and experimental congenital diaphragmatic hernia?

    PubMed

    Vuckovic, Aline; Herber-Jonat, Susanne; Flemmer, Andreas W; Ruehl, Ina M; Votino, Carmela; Segers, Valérie; Benachi, Alexandra; Martinovic, Jelena; Nowakowska, Dorota; Dzieniecka, Monika; Jani, Jacques C

    2016-02-15

    Survivors of severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) present significant respiratory morbidity despite lung growth induced by fetal tracheal occlusion (TO). We hypothesized that the underlying mechanisms would involve changes in lung extracellular matrix and dysregulated transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathway, a key player in lung development and repair. Pulmonary expression of TGF-β signaling components, downstream effectors, and extracellular matrix targets were evaluated in CDH neonates who died between birth and the first few weeks of life after prenatal conservative management or TO, and in rabbit pups that were prenatally randomized for surgical CDH and TO vs. sham operation. Before tissue harvesting, lung tissue mechanics in rabbits was measured using the constant-phase model during the first 30 min of life. Human CDH and control fetal lungs were also collected from midterm onwards. Human and experimental CDH did not affect TGF-β/Smad2/3 expression and activity. In human and rabbit CDH lungs, TO upregulated TGF-β transcripts. Analysis of downstream pathways indicated increased Rho-associated kinases to the detriment of Smad2/3 activation. After TO, subtle accumulation of collagen and α-smooth muscle actin within alveolar walls was detected in rabbit pups and human CDH lungs with short-term mechanical ventilation. Despite TO-induced lung growth, mediocre lung tissue mechanics in the rabbit model was associated with increased transcription of extracellular matrix components. These results suggest that prenatal TO increases TGF-β/Rho kinase pathway, myofibroblast differentiation, and matrix deposition in neonatal rabbit and human CDH lungs. Whether this might influence postnatal development of sustainably ventilated lungs remains to be determined. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. cAMP generation inhibits inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate binding in rabbit tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Schramm, C M; Chuang, S T; Grunstein, M M

    1995-11-01

    Agonist-induced airway contraction involves the generation and subsequent binding of the phosphoinositide-derived second messenger, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3], to its Ca(2+)-mobilizing intracellular receptor. To the extent that regulatory cross-talk is known to exist between different signal transduction pathways, the present study examined whether activation of the adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway induces altered binding of Ins(1,4,5)P3 to its receptor in membrane homogenates of rabbit tracheal smooth muscle (TSM). In control TSM, monophasic binding curves provided mean +/- SE values for Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor density (Bmax) and binding affinity (Kd) amounting to 940 +/- 43 fmol/mg protein and 10.7 +/- 1.2 nM, respectively. Relative to control, binding of [3H]Ins(1,4,5)P3 was significantly reduced in paired TSM separately treated with isoproterenol, forskolin, or dibutyryl-cAMP. Ins(1,4,5)P3 binding was inhibited to a level averaging 60% of control binding by maximal concentrations of each agonist, an effect attributed to a reduction in Ins(1,4,5)P3 binding sites rather than altered ligand affinity. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that activation of the cAMP-dependent signaling pathway is associated with inhibition of Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor binding and implicate a novel mechanism of action of beta-adrenergic agents in preventing and/or reversing airway contraction.

  19. Regulation of H1-receptor coupling and H1-receptor mRNA by histamine in bovine tracheal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pype, J L; Dupont, L J; Mak, J C W; Barnes, P J; Verleden, G M

    1998-01-01

    Pretreatment of bovine tracheal smooth muscle (BTSM) with histamine (1–100 μM, 1 h) induced a concentration-dependent desensitization of the contractile response to subsequently administered histamine, with a reduction of the maximum response of 72±8% (n=5) following pre-exposure to 100 μM histamine. In contrast, concentration-response curves to the muscarinic agonist, methacholine were not affected following histamine pretreatment, indicating a homologous desensitization. Furthermore, concentration-response curves to NaF, a G-protein activator, were not altered following histamine pre-incubation.The histamine H1-receptor (H1R) desensitization could be antagonized by mepyramine (an H1-receptor antagonist, 1 μM) but not by cimetidine (an H2-receptor antagonist, 10 μM), indicating that the desensitization occurred via stimulation of histamine H1-receptors, without evidence for the involvement of histamine H2-receptors.Indomethacin (10 μM) did not block the H1R desensitization, suggesting no involvement of prostaglandins. Furthermore, histamine pre-incubation in calcium free medium still induced a functional uncoupling of H1R.GF 109203X, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, and H-7, a non-selective kinase inhibitor, did not antagonize the homologous H1R desensitization.The steady-state level of H1R mRNA, assessed by Northern blot analysis, was not affected by prolonged histamine exposure (100 μM, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 16 and 24 h).These results suggest that histamine induces desensitization of the H1R at the level of the receptor protein, which involves a mechanism independent of PKC, PKA, PKG and calcium influx, suggesting the involvement of a receptor-specific kinase. PMID:9535029

  20. Phosphotidylinositol turnover in vascular, uterine, fundal, and tracheal smooth muscle: effect of serotonin (5HT)

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.L.; Wittenauer, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    In brain, platelets, and aorta, 5HT has been reported to increase phosphotidylinositol turnover, an effect linked to 5HT/sub 2/ receptors. The authors examined the effect of 5HT on /sup 3/H-inositol-1-phosphate (/sup 3/H-I-P) in tissues possessing 5HT/sub 2/ receptors that mediate contraction to 5HT (rat jugular vein, aorta, uterus and guinea pig trachea) and in a tissue in which contraction to 5HT is not mediated by 5HT/sub 2/ receptors (rat stomach fundus). Tissues were incubated (37/sup 0/C, 95% O/sub 2/, 5% CO/sub 2/) with /sup 3/H-inositol (90 min), washed, LiCl/sub 2/ (10 mM) and 5HT added for 90 min, extracted, and /sup 3/H-I-P eluted from a Dowex-1 column. Basal /sup 3/H-I-P was 10-fold higher in the uterus than in the other tissues. 5HT (10/sup -6/-10/sup -4/M) increased /sup 3/H-I-P in the jugular vein, aorta, and uterus but not in the trachea or fundus. Maximum increase was greatest in the jugular vein (8-fold) with an ED/sub 50/ of 0.4 ..mu..M 5HT. The selective 5HT/sub 2/ receptor blocker, LY53857 (10/sup -8/M) antagonized the increase in /sup 3/H-I-P by 5HT in the jugular vein, aorta and uterus. Pargyline (10/sup -5/M) added to the trachea and fundus did not unmask an effect of 5HT (10/sup -4/M). These data suggest that (1) the jugular vein produced the most sensitive response to 5HT-induced increases in /sup 3/H-I-P, (2) increases in /sup 3/H-I-P by 5HT in smooth muscle may be linked to 5HT/sub 2/ receptors and (3) activation of 5HT/sub 2/ receptors as occurred in the trachea will not always increase /sup 3/H-I-P.

  1. Interleukin(IL)-1 Regulates Ozone-enhanced Tracheal Smooth Muscle Responsiveness by Increasing Substance P (SP) Production in Intrinsic Airway Neurons of Ferret

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z.-X.; Barker, J. S.; Batchelor, T. P.; Dey, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to ozone induces airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) mediated partly by SP released from nerve terminals of intrinsic airway neurons. Our recent studies showed that IL-1, an important multifunctional proinflammatory cytokine, increases synthesis and release of SP from intrinsic airway neurons. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible involvement of endogenous IL-1 in modulating neural responses associated with ozone-enhanced airway responsiveness. Ferrets were exposed to 2 ppm ozone or filtered air for 3 hrs. IL-1 in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was significantly increased in ozone-exposed animals and responses of tracheal smooth muscle to methacholine (MCh) and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were elevated significantly. Both the SP nerve fiber density in tracheal smooth muscle and the number of SP-containing neurons in airway ganglia were significantly increased following ozone exposure. Pretreatment with IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1 Ra) significantly diminished ozone-enhanced airway responses to EFS as well as ozone-increased SP in the airway. To selectively investigate intrinsic airway neurons, segments of ferret trachea were maintained in culture conditions for 24 hrs to eliminate extrinsic contributions from sensory nerves. The segments were then exposed to 2 ppm ozone in vitro for 3 hrs. The changes of ozone-induced airway responses to MCh and EFS, and the SP levels in airway neurons paralleled those observed with in vivo ozone exposure. The ozone-enhanced airway responses and neuronal SP levels were inhibited by pretreatment with IL-1 Ra. These findings show that IL-1 is released during ozone exposure enhances airway responsiveness by modulating SP expression in airway neurons. PMID:18718561

  2. Mechanisms of relaxant action of a crude hexane extract of Gnaphalium liebmannii in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mendoza, María Elena; Torres, Gabriela; Arrieta, Jesús; Aguilar, Abigail; Castillo-Henkel, Carlos; Navarrete, Andrés

    2007-04-20

    We investigated the mechanisms of action of Gnaphalium liebmannii which is used as a folk medicine in México for treating various respiratory diseases such as gripe, fever, asthma, cough, cold, bronchitis, expectorating, and bronchial affections. The tension changes of guinea pig tracheal segments were isometrically recorder on a polygraph. Hexane extract of Gnaphalium liebmannii was the most active relaxant extract (IC(30)=54.23+/-19.79 microg/mL with 99.5+/-3.2 % of relaxation), followed by dichloromethane extract (IC(30)=120.22+/-5.27 microg/mL) and methanol extract (IC(30)=190.25+/-30.02 microg/mL). Hexane extract produced a parallel rightward shift of the concentration-response curve of carbachol in a competitive manner (pA(2)=-2.4), but did not modify the concentration-response curves for histamine. The relaxant effect of hexane extract of Gnaphalium liebmannii was unaffected by the presence of propranolol (3x10(-6)M) or glibenclamide (10 microM). However hexane extract produced a leftward shifts of the concentration-response curve of forskolin (10(-8) to 10(-3)M), nitroprusside (10(-10) to 10(-6)M), isoproterenol (3x10(-10) to 3x10(-5)M) and aminophylline (10(-11) to 10(-2)M). The above results suggest that Gnaphalium liebmannii induce relaxation of the tracheal muscle, probably via phosphodiesterase inhibition. The bronchodilator effect of Gnaphalium liebmannii might explain in part their traditional use as anti-asthmatic remedy.

  3. First robotic tracheal intubations in humans using the Kepler intubation system.

    PubMed

    Hemmerling, T M; Taddei, R; Wehbe, M; Zaouter, C; Cyr, S; Morse, J

    2012-06-01

    Intubation is one of the most important anaesthetic skills. We developed a robotic intubation system (Kepler intubation system, KIS) for oral tracheal intubation. In this pilot study, 12 patients were enrolled after approval of the local Ethics board and written informed consent. The KIS consists of four main components: a ThrustMaster T.Flight Hotas X joystick (Guillemot Inc., New York, NY, USA), a JACO robotic arm (Kinova Rehab, Montreal, QC, Canada), a Pentax AWS video laryngoscope (Ambu A/S, Ballerup, Denmark), and a software control system. The joystick allows simulation of the wrist or arm movements of a human operator. The success rate of intubation and intubation times were measured. Eleven men and one woman aged 66 yr were included in this study. Intubation was successful in all but one patient using KIS at a total time of [median (inter-quartile range; range)] 93 (87, 109; 76, 153) s; in one patient, fogging of the video laryngoscope prevented intubation using KIS. We present the first human testing of a robotic intubation system for oral tracheal intubation. The success rate was high at 91%. Future studies are needed to assess the performance and safety of such a system.

  4. Measurement of human surfactant protein-B turnover in vivo from tracheal aspirates using targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Tomazela, Daniela M; Patterson, Bruce W; Hanson, Elizabeth; Spence, Kimberly L; Kanion, Tiffany B; Salinger, David H; Vicini, Paolo; Barret, Hugh; Heins, Hillary B; Cole, F Sessions; Hamvas, Aaron; MacCoss, Michael J

    2010-03-15

    We describe a method to measure protein synthesis and catabolism in humans without prior purification and use the method to measure the turnover of surfactant protein-B (SP-B). SP-B, a lung-specific, hydrophobic protein essential for fetal-neonatal respiratory transition, is present in only picomolar quantities in tracheal aspirate samples and difficult to isolate for dynamic turnover studies using traditional in vivo tracer techniques. Using infusion of [5,5,5-(2)H(3)] leucine and a targeted proteomics method, we measured both the quantity and kinetics of SP-B tryptic peptides in tracheal aspirate samples of symptomatic newborn infants. The fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of SP-B measured using the most abundant proteolytic fragment, a 10 amino acid peptide from the carboxy-terminus of proSP-B (SPTGEWLPR), from the circulating leucine pool was 0.035 +/- 0.005 h(-1), and the fractional catabolic rate was 0.044 +/- 0.003 h(-1). This technique permits high-throughput and sensitive measurement of turnover of low abundance proteins with minimal sample preparation.

  5. Measurement of human surfactant protein-B turnover in vivo from tracheal aspirates using targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Tomazela, Daniela; Patterson, Bruce W.; Hanson, Elizabeth; Spence, Kimberly L.; Kanion, Tiffany B.; Salinger, David H.; Vicini, Paolo; Barret, Hugh; Heins, Hillary B.; Cole, F. Sessions; Hamvas, Aaron; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method to measure protein synthesis and catabolism in humans without prior purification and use the method to measure the turnover of surfactant protein-B (SP-B). SP-B, a lung-specific, hydrophobic protein essential for fetal-neonatal respiratory transition, is present in only picomolar quantities in tracheal aspirate samples and difficult to isolate for dynamic turnover studies using traditional in vivo tracer techniques. Using infusion of [5,5,5-2H3] leucine and a targeted proteomics method, we measured both the quantity and kinetics of SP-B tryptic peptides in tracheal aspirate samples of symptomatic newborn infants. The fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of SP-B measured using the most abundant proteolytic fragment, a 10 amino acid peptide from the carboxy-terminus of proSP-B (SPTGEWLPR), from the circulating leucine pool was 0.035±0.005 hr−1 and fractional catabolic rate was 0.044±0.003 hr−1. This technique permits high-throughput, sensitive measurement of turnover of low abundance proteins with minimal sample preparation. PMID:20178338

  6. Carbachol induces a rapid and sustained hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositide in bovine tracheal smooth muscle measurements of the mass of polyphosphoinositides, 1,2-diacylglycerol, and phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Takuwa, Y; Takuwa, N; Rasmussen, H

    1986-11-05

    The effects of carbachol on polyphosphoinositides and 1,2-diacylglycerol metabolism were investigated in bovine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring both lipid mass and the turnover of [3H]inositol-labeled phosphoinositides. Carbachol induces a rapid reduction in the mass of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate and a rapid increase in the mass of 1,2-diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. These changes in lipid mass are sustained for at least 60 min. The level of phosphatidylinositol shows a delayed and progressive decrease during a 60-min period of carbachol stimulation. The addition of atropine reverses these responses completely. Carbachol stimulates a rapid loss in [3H]inositol radioactivity from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate associated with production of [3H]inositol trisphosphate. The carbachol-induced change in the mass of phosphoinositides and phosphatidic acid is not affected by removal of extracellular Ca2+ and does not appear to be secondary to an increase in intracellular Ca2+. These results indicate that carbachol causes phospholipase C-mediated polyphosphoinositide breakdown, resulting in the production of inositol trisphosphate and a sustained increase in the actual content of 1,2-diacylglycerol. These results strongly suggest that carbachol-induced contraction is mediated by the hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides with the resulting generation of two messengers: inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and 1,2-diacylglycerol.

  7. Carbachol induces a rapid and sustained hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositide in bovine tracheal smooth muscle measurements of the mass of polyphosphoinositides, 1,2-diacylglycerol, and phosphatidic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Takuwa, Y.; Takuwa, N.; Rasmussen, H.

    1986-11-05

    The effects of carbachol on polyphosphoinositides and 1,2-diacylglycerol metabolism were investigated in bovine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring both lipid mass and the turnover of (/sup 3/H)inositol-labeled phosphoinositides. Carbachol induces a rapid reduction in the mass of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate and a rapid increase in the mass of 1,2-diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. These changes in lipid mass are sustained for at least 60 min. The level of phosphatidylinositol shows a delayed and progressive decrease during a 60-min period of carbachol stimulation. The addition of atropine reverses these responses completely. Carbachol stimulates a rapid loss in (/sup 3/H)inositol radioactivity from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate associated with production of (/sup 3/H)inositol trisphosphate. The carbachol-induced change in the mass of phosphoinositides and phosphatidic acid is not affected by removal of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ and does not appear to be secondary to an increase in intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. These results indicate that carbachol causes phospholipase C-mediated polyphosphoinositide breakdown, resulting in the production of inositol trisphosphate and a sustained increase in the actual content of 1,2-diacylglycerol. These results strongly suggest that carbachol-induced contraction is mediated by the hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides with the resulting generation of two messengers: inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and 1,2-diacylglycerol.

  8. Immortalization of primary human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Reyes, N; Halbert, C L; Smith, P P; Benditt, E P; McDougall, J K

    1992-01-01

    Primary human aortic and myometrial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were immortalized using an amphotropic recombinant retroviral construct containing the E6 and E7 open reading frames (ORFs) of human papillomavirus type 16. The SMCs expressing the E6/E7 ORFs have considerably elevated growth rates when compared with nonimmortalized control cells and show no signs of senescence with long-term passage. The first SMC line derived in this study has been maintained in continuous tissue culture for greater than 1 year (greater than 180 population doublings). The immortalized SMCs have decreased cell size and decreased content of muscle-specific alpha-actin filaments as determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Southern blot analysis has demonstrated the stable integration of the E6/E7 ORFs in the retrovirally infected cells, and radioimmunoprecipitation has confirmed the continued expression of the E6 and E7 genes. Cytogenetic studies of the SMC lines have revealed essentially diploid populations except for the myometrial clonal line, which became aneuploid at late passage (greater than 125 doublings). These cell lines were not tumorigenic in nude mice. Images PMID:1311088

  9. Role of extracellular Na+, Ca2+-activated Cl- channels and BK channels in the contraction of Ca2+ store-depleted tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Romero-Méndez, Catalina; Algara-Suárez, Paola; Sánchez-Armass, Sergio; Mandeville, Peter B; Meza, Ulises; Espinosa-Tanguma, Ricardo

    2009-07-01

    1. In the present study, we investigated the series of events involved in the contraction of tracheal smooth muscle induced by the re-addition of Ca(2+) in an in vitro experimental model in which Ca(2+) stores had been depleted and their refilling had been blocked by thapsigargin. 2. Mean (+/-SEM) contraction was diminished by: (i) inhibitors of store-operated calcium channels (SOCC), namely 100 micromol/L SKF-96365 and 100 micromol/L 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl) imidazole (to 66.3 +/- 4.4 and 41.3 +/- 5.2% of control, respectively); (ii) inhibitors of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels Ca(V)1.2 channels, namely 1 micromol/L nifedipine and 10 micromol/L verapamil (to 86.2 +/- 3.4 and 76.9 +/- 5.9% of control, respectively); and (iii) 20 micromol/L niflumic acid, a non-selective inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels (to 41.1 +/- 9.8% of control). In contrast, contraction was increased 2.3-fold by 100 nmol/L iberiotoxin, a blocker of the large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels. 3. Furthermore, contraction was significantly inhibited when Na(+) in the bathing solution was replaced by N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG(+)) to 39.9 +/- 7.2% of control, but not when it was replaced by Li(+) (114.5 +/- 24.4% of control). In addition, when Na(+) had been replaced by NMDG(+), contractions were further inhibited by both nifedipine and niflumic acid (to 3.0 +/- 1.8 and 24.4 +/- 8.1% of control, respectively). Nifedipine also reduced contractions when Na(+) had been replaced by Li(+) (to 10.7 +/- 3.4% to control), the niflumic acid had no effect (116.0 +/- 4.5% of control). 4. In conclusion, the data of the present study demonstrate the roles of SOCC, BK channels and Ca(V)1.2 channels in the contractions induced by the re-addition of Ca(2+) to the solution bathing guinea-pig tracheal rings under conditions of Ca(2+)-depleted sarcoplasmic reticulum and inhibition of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase. The contractions were highly dependent on extracellular

  10. Orthotopic tracheal transplantation using human bronchus: an original xenotransplant model of obliterative airway disorder.

    PubMed

    Guihaire, Julien; Itagaki, Ryo; Stubbendorff, Mandy; Hua, Xiaoqin; Deuse, Tobias; Ullrich, Sebastian; Fadel, Elie; Dorfmüller, Peter; Robbins, Robert C; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Schumacher, Udo; Schrepfer, Sonja

    2016-12-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) is a main cause of allograft dysfunction and mortality after lung transplantation (LTx). A better understanding of BOS pathogenesis is needed to overcome this treatment-refractory complication. Orthotopic tracheal transplantation using human bronchus was performed in Brown Norway (BN) and nude (RNU) rats. Allografts were recovered in both strains at Day 7 (BN7 , n = 6; RNU7 , n = 7) or Day 28 (BN28 , n = 6; RNU28 , n = 6). Immune response of the host against the bronchial graft was assessed. Human samples from BOS patients were used to compare with the histological features of the animal model. Obstruction of the allograft lumen associated with significant infiltration of CD3+ and CD68+ cells was observed in the BN group on Day 28. Immune response from type 1 T-helper cells against the tracheal xenograft was higher in BN animals compared to nude animals on Days 7 and 28 (P < 0.001 and P = 0.035). Xenoreactive antibodies were significantly higher at Day 7 (IgM) and Day 28 (IgG) in the BN group compared to RNU (respectively, 37.6 ± 6.5 vs. 5.8 ± 0.7 mean fluorescence, P = 0.039; and 22.4 ± 3.8 vs. 6.9 ± 1.6 mean fluorescence, P = 0.011). Immunocompetent animals showed a higher infiltration of S100A4+ cells inside the bronchial wall after 28 days, associated with cartilage damage ranging from invasion to complete destruction. In vitro expression of S100A4 by human fibroblasts was higher when stimulated by mononuclear cells (MNCs) from BN rats than from RNU (2.9 ± 0.1 vs. 2.4 ± 0.1 mean fluorescence intensity, P = 0.005). Similarly, S100A4 was highly expressed in response to human MNCs compared to stimulation by T-cell-depleted human MNCs (4.3 ± 0.2 vs. 2.7 ± 0.1 mean fluorescence intensity, P < 0.001). Obliterative bronchiolitis has been induced in a new xenotransplant model in which chronic airway obstruction was associated with immune activation against the xenograft. Cartilage infiltration by S100A4+ cells might be

  11. Characterization of human tracheal epithelial cells transformed by an origin-defective simian virus 40.

    PubMed Central

    Gruenert, D C; Basbaum, C B; Welsh, M J; Li, M; Finkbeiner, W E; Nadel, J A

    1988-01-01

    To facilitate understanding of the mechanisms underlying pulmonary diseases, including lung cancer and cystic fibrosis, we have transformed and characterized cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells. Cells were transfected by calcium phosphate precipitation with a plasmid containing a replication-defective simian virus 40 (SV40) genome. Colonies of cells with enhanced growth potential were isolated and analyzed for transformation- and epithelial-specific characteristics. Precrisis cells were observed to express the SV40 large tumor antigen, produce cytokeratins, have microvilli, and form tight junctions. After crisis, cells continued to express the SV40 large tumor antigen as well as epithelial-specific cytokeratins and to display the apical membrane microvilli. Apical membrane Cl channels were opened in postcrisis cells exposed to 50 microM forskolin. These channels showed electrical properties similar to those observed in primary cultures. The postcrisis cells have been in culture for greater than 250 generations and are potentially "immortal." In addition to providing a useful in vitro model for the study of ion transport by human airway epithelial cells, the cells can be used to examine stages of neoplastic progression. Images PMID:2457904

  12. l-carbocisteine inhibits respiratory syncytial virus infection in human tracheal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Asada, Masanori; Yoshida, Motoki; Hatachi, Yukimasa; Sasaki, Takahiko; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Deng, Xue; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2012-01-15

    To examine the effects of l-carbocisteine on airway infection with respiratory syncytial (RS) virus, human tracheal epithelial cells were pretreated with l-carbocisteine and infected with RS virus. Viral titer, virus RNA, and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, including interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6, increased with time after infection. l-carbocisteine reduced the viral titer in the supernatant fluids, the amount of RS virus RNA, RS virus infection susceptibility, and the concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by virus infection. l-carbocisteine reduced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, an RS virus receptor, on the cells. However, l-carbocisteine had no effects on the expression of heparan sulfate, a glycosaminoglycan that binds to the RS virus attachment protein, or on the amount of intracellular activated-RhoA, isoform A of the Ras-homologous family, that binds to the RS virus fusion protein. These findings suggest that l-carbocisteine may inhibit RS virus infection by reducing the expression of ICAM-1. It may also modulate airway inflammation during RS virus infection.

  13. Ambroxol inhibits rhinovirus infection in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Mutsuo; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Nadine, Lusamba Kalonji; Ota, Chiharu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Nagatomi, Ryoichi

    2014-04-01

    The mucolytic drug ambroxol hydrochloride reduces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the frequency of exacerbation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the inhibitory effects of ambroxol on rhinovirus infection, the major cause of COPD exacerbations, have not been studied. We examined the effects of ambroxol on type 14 rhinovirus (RV14) infection, a major RV group, in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells. RV14 infection increased virus titers and cytokine content in the supernatants and RV14 RNA in the cells. Ambroxol (100 nM) reduced RV14 titers and cytokine concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 in the supernatants and RV14 RNA in the cells after RV14 infection, in addition to reducing susceptibility to RV14 infection. Ambroxol also reduced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), the receptor for RV14, and the number of acidic endosomes from which RV14 RNA enters the cytoplasm. In addition, ambroxol reduced the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the nucleus. These results suggest that ambroxol inhibits RV14 infection partly by reducing ICAM-1 and acidic endosomes via the inhibition of NF-κB activation. Ambroxol may modulate airway inflammation by reducing the production of cytokines in rhinovirus infection.

  14. 21 CFR 868.5730 - Tracheal tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal tube. 868.5730 Section 868.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5730 Tracheal tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube is...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5730 - Tracheal tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal tube. 868.5730 Section 868.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5730 Tracheal tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube is...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5730 - Tracheal tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube. 868.5730 Section 868.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5730 Tracheal tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube is...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5730 - Tracheal tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal tube. 868.5730 Section 868.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5730 Tracheal tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube is...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5730 - Tracheal tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal tube. 868.5730 Section 868.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5730 Tracheal tube. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube is...

  19. Relaxant effects of NKH477, a new water-soluble forskolin derivative, on guinea-pig tracheal smooth muscle: the role of Ca2+-activated K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Satake, K; Takagi, K; Kodama, I; Honjo, H; Toyama, J; Shibata, S

    1998-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the bronchorelaxant action of NKH477, a newly developed water-soluble forskolin derivative, were investigated in guinea-pig isolated tracheal smooth muscle. In muscles precontracted with 3 μM histamine, NKH477 (1 nM–1 μM) caused a concentration-dependent decrease of isometric tension, resulting in a complete relaxation at 300 nM. The EC50 for the relaxation was 32.6±4.3 nM (n=6). In the presence of 30 or 90 nM iberiotoxin (IbTX), a selective blocker of the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channel, the relaxing action of NKH477 on the histamine-induced contraction was inhibited, giving rise to a parallel shift of the concentration-response curves; the EC50 of NKH477 was increased to 131.4±20.4 nM at 30 nM IbTX (n=4), and 125.3±12.2 nM at 90 nM IbTX (n=4). Pretreatment of muscles with 30 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA) caused a similar rightward shift of the concentration-response curve to NKH477 with an increase of the EC50 to 139.8±18.4 nM (n=5). In contrast, the relaxing action of NKH477 was unaffected by 10 μM glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker, or by 100 nM apamin, a blocker of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels. In muscles pretreated with 1 μM nifedipine, a blocker of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (VDC), 30–90 nM IbTX did not affect the relaxant effects of NKH477 on the histamine-induced contraction. In muscles precontracted by a K+-rich (40 mM) solution, NKH477 caused only minimal relaxation (19.8±1.7%, n=4) even at the highest concentration (1 μM). In experiments to measure the ratio of fura-2 fluorescence signals (R340/380) as an index of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), the application of 100 nM NKH477 or 200 nM isoprenaline to the preparation precontracted by 3 μM histamine resulted in a decrease in [Ca2+]i in association with a decrease in tension. The reduction of [Ca2+]i and tension by NKH477 was 47.0±5.6% and 62.8±7

  20. [Electrophysiology and calcium signalling in human bronchial smooth muscle].

    PubMed

    Marthan, R; Hyvelin, J M; Roux, E; Savineau, J P

    1999-01-01

    Recently, cells isolated from airways have been used to characterize precisely the electrophysiological properties of this smooth muscle and to describe the changes in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) occurring upon agonist stimulation. Although most studies have produced consistent results in terms of types of ion channel and pathways of calcium signalling implicated in the mechanical activity of airways, there are differences according to (i) the site along the bronchial tree (trachea vs. bronchi); (ii) the proliferating status of the cells (freshly isolated vs. cultured) and (iii) the species (human vs. animals). With regard to the electrophysiological properties of airway smooth muscle, the contribution to [Ca2+]i rise of Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels depends on the balance between depolarization related to non-specific cation channel and/or chloride channel activation and hyperpolarization related to activation of a variety of potassium channels. Most of the above-mentioned channels appear to be controlled, directly or indirectly, by agonists in human bronchial smooth muscle. With regard to calcium signalling, the pattern of agonist-induced [Ca2+]i responses, the so-called [Ca2+]i oscillations, has been observed recently in freshly isolated airway smooth muscle cells. The role and the calcium sources involved in these oscillations in human bronchial smooth muscle are currently being investigated.

  1. Analysis of tracheal noise of forced human expiration according to clinical experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenbaum, V. I.; Pochekutova, I. A.

    2004-09-01

    The analysis of tracheal noise of forced expiration is one of the promising methods for the diagnosis of bronchial patency disorders, which are a sign of such widespread diseases as bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive bronchitis. The aim of this study is the verification and refinement of the acoustic model of forced expiration (Korenbaum et al., 1998) on the basis of a statistical analysis of clinical experimental data. A sample of 127 volunteers (from 18 to 74 years old) is used as an experimental statistical model: 34 persons suffering from bronchial asthma, 21 persons suffering from chronic obstructive bronchitis, 29 healthy persons, and 43 persons liable to developing the aforementioned diseases. The following parameters are analyzed: the total duration of noise of forced expiration at the trachea, the duration of wheeze of forced expiration with frequencies from 400 to 600 Hz, and the presence of narrowband high-frequency (over 600 700 Hz) spectral components at the end of forced expiration and during the whole expiration process. Reliable differences in the parameters of tracheal noise are revealed in the groups under study. The high prognostic value (a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 86%) of the parameters of tracheal noise of forced expiration, which were suggested a priori as the diagnostic parameters on the basis of the acoustic model (Korenbaum et al., 1998), indirectly confirms the adequacy of this model. The biomechanical-pathophysiological interpretation of the occurrence of acoustic deviations in the experimental sample groups provides an opportunity to relate the parameters of tracheal noise of forced expiration to the degree of mechanical nonuniformity of the lungs.

  2. Engineered cartilaginous tubes for tracheal tissue replacement via self-assembly and fusion of human mesenchymal stem cell constructs

    PubMed Central

    Dikina, Anna D.; Strobel, Hannah A.; Lai, Bradley P.; Rolle, Marsha W.; Alsberg, Eben

    2015-01-01

    There is a critical need to engineer a neotrachea because currently there are no long-term treatments for tracheal stenoses affecting large portions of the airway. In this work, a modular tracheal tissue replacement strategy was developed. High-cell density, scaffold-free human mesenchymal stem cell-derived cartilaginous rings and tubes were successfully generated through employment of custom designed culture wells and a ring-to-tube assembly system. Furthermore, incorporation of transforming growth factor-β1-delivering gelatin microspheres into the engineered tissues enhanced chondrogenesis with regard to tissue size and matrix production and distribution in the ring- and tube-shaped constructs, as well as luminal rigidity of the tubes. Importantly, all engineered tissues had similar or improved biomechanical properties compared to rat tracheas, which suggests they could be transplanted in a small animal model for airway defects. The modular, bottom up approach used to grow stem cell-based cartilaginous tubes in this report is a promising platform to engineer complex organs (e.g., trachea), with control over tissue size and geometry, and has the potential to be used to generate autologous tissue implants for human clinical applications. PMID:25818451

  3. Engineered cartilaginous tubes for tracheal tissue replacement via self-assembly and fusion of human mesenchymal stem cell constructs.

    PubMed

    Dikina, Anna D; Strobel, Hannah A; Lai, Bradley P; Rolle, Marsha W; Alsberg, Eben

    2015-06-01

    There is a critical need to engineer a neotrachea because currently there are no long-term treatments for tracheal stenoses affecting large portions of the airway. In this work, a modular tracheal tissue replacement strategy was developed. High-cell density, scaffold-free human mesenchymal stem cell-derived cartilaginous rings and tubes were successfully generated through employment of custom designed culture wells and a ring-to-tube assembly system. Furthermore, incorporation of transforming growth factor-β1-delivering gelatin microspheres into the engineered tissues enhanced chondrogenesis with regard to tissue size and matrix production and distribution in the ring- and tube-shaped constructs, as well as luminal rigidity of the tubes. Importantly, all engineered tissues had similar or improved biomechanical properties compared to rat tracheas, which suggests they could be transplanted into a small animal model for airway defects. The modular, bottom up approach used to grow stem cell-based cartilaginous tubes in this report is a promising platform to engineer complex organs (e.g., trachea), with control over tissue size and geometry, and has the potential to be used to generate autologous tissue implants for human clinical applications.

  4. Inhibitory action of relaxin on human cervical smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Norström, A; Bryman, I; Wiqvist, N; Sahni, S; Lindblom, B

    1984-09-01

    The influence of purified porcine relaxin on contractility of human cervical smooth muscle was investigated in vitro. Strips of cervical tissue were obtained by needle biopsy from pregnant and nonpregnant women and were mounted in a superfused organ chamber for isometric measurement of contractile activity. Relaxin (0.005-25 micrograms/ml) inhibited the spontaneous contractions in cervical strips from 18% of nonpregnant, 68% of early pregnant, and in 100% of term pregnant women. These results indicate that relaxin has an inhibitory action on cervical smooth muscle and that this effect is more constantly detected as pregnancy proceeds.

  5. Drosophila awd, the homolog of human nm23, regulates FGF receptor levels and functions synergistically with shi/dynamin during tracheal development.

    PubMed

    Dammai, Vincent; Adryan, Boris; Lavenburg, Kim R; Hsu, Tien

    2003-11-15

    Human nm23 has been implicated in suppression of metastasis in various cancers, but the underlying mechanism of such activity has not been fully understood. Using Drosophila tracheal system as a genetic model, we examined the function of the Drosophila homolog of nm23, the awd gene, in cell migration. We show that loss of Drosophila awd results in dysregulated tracheal cell motility. This phenotype can be suppressed by reducing the dosage of the chemotactic FGF receptor (FGFR) homolog, breathless (btl), indicating that btl and awd are functionally antagonists. In addition, mutants of shi/dynamin show similar tracheal phenotypes as in awd and exacerbate those in awd mutant, suggesting defects in vesicle-mediated turnover of FGFR in the awd mutant. Consistent with this, Btl-GFP chimera expressed from a cognate btl promoter-driven system accumulate at high levels on tracheal cell membrane of awd mutants as well as in awd RNA duplex-treated cultured cells. Thus, we propose that awd regulates tracheal cell motility by modulating the FGFR levels, through a dynamin-mediated pathway.

  6. [Case of perioperative tracheal laceration by electrocautery].

    PubMed

    Ariyama, Jun; Nakamura, China; Nakagawa, Hideyuki; Imanishi, Hirokazu; Mieda, Tsutomu; Terao, Kazuhisa; Kitamura, Akira

    2013-12-01

    Although tracheal laceration during surgical procedure is a rare complication, it can be life-threating. Its immediate recognition and treatment are important. A 72-year-old man with aortic valve regurgitation was scheduled for aortic valve replacement. At anesthetic induction an endotracheal tube was smoothly inserted and the tidal volume was set at 500 ml with ventilator rate of 12 min-1. After electrocautery maneuver of the upper sterna region, end-tidal carbon-oxide curve suddenly became flat. Immediately after the completion of median sternotomy air bubble was seen in the surgical field. An 8-mm longitudinal tracheal laceration at the fourth tracheal cartilage was identified. The tracheal laceration was repaired with interrupted suture and the mediastinal tissue was used to cover the suture line. Air leaks were no longer present. After surgical repair, the aortic valve replacement was performed. The postoperative courses of both tracheal laceration repair and aortic valve replacement were uneventful.

  7. Nuclear fusion-independent smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells induced by a smooth muscle environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Jack, Gregory S; Rao, Nagesh; Zuk, Patricia; Ignarro, Louis J; Wu, Benjamin; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2012-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells hASC have been isolated and were shown to have multilineage differentiation capacity. Although both plasticity and cell fusion have been suggested as mechanisms for cell differentiation in vivo, the effect of the local in vivo environment on the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells has not been evaluated. We previously reported the in vitro capacity of smooth muscle differentiation of these cells. In this study, we evaluate the effect of an in vivo smooth muscle environment in the differentiation of hASC. We studied this by two experimental designs: (a) in vivo evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation of hASC injected into a smooth muscle environment and (b) in vitro evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation capacity of hASC exposed to bladder smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate a time-dependent differentiation of hASC into mature smooth muscle cells when these cells are injected into the smooth musculature of the urinary bladder. Similar findings were seen when the cells were cocultured in vitro with primary bladder smooth muscle cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated that microenvironment cues rather than nuclear fusion are responsible for this differentiation. We conclude that cell plasticity is present in hASCs, and their differentiation is accomplished in the absence of nuclear fusion. Copyright © 2011 AlphaMed Press.

  8. Acute lung injury after tracheal instillation of acidified soya-based or Enfalac formula or human breast milk in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chin, C; Lerman, J; Endo, J

    1999-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the severity of the acute lung injury after tracheal instillation of acidified soya-based or Enfalac infant formula, or human breast milk (HBM) in anesthetized rabbits. Alveolar-arterial oxygen tension gradient (A-aDO2) and dynamic compliance were measured before (baseline) and hourly for four hours after tracheal instillation of 0.8 ml x kg(-1) soya-based or Enfalac infant formula or HBM (all acidified to pH 1.8 with hydrochloric acid) or no fluid (control) in 24 anesthetized and tracheotomized adult rabbits. The A-aDO2, the difference between alveolar and arterial oxygen tensions, was corrected for barometric pressure and carbon dioxide tension. Dynamic compliance was the ratio of the expired tidal volume to the peak inspiratory airway pressure, normalized to body weight. Baseline A-aDO2 and dynamic compliance were similar among the four groups. In the control rabbits, A-aDO2 remained unchanged throughout the four hours, whereas mean A-aDO2 increased 180 mm Hg in the soya-based group (P < 0.0025) and 350 and 275 mm Hg in the Enfalac and HBM groups respectively (P < 0.0002). The order of the A-aDO2 post-instillation was Enfalac approximately/= HBM > soya > control (P < 0.0002). Dynamic compliance decreased 10-12% in the control rabbits during the four post-instillation measurements compared with baseline (P < 0.033), decreased 20% in the soya-based group (P < 0.0002) and 40-50% in the Enfalac and HBM groups (P < 0.0002). The severity of the acute lung injury after intratracheal instillation of infant feeds in a volume of 0.8 ml x kg(-1) and at pH 1.8 in rabbits depends in part, on the type of feed: Enfalac approximately/= HBM > soya > control.

  9. Relaxant action mechanism of berberine identified as the active principle of Argemone ochroleuca Sweet in guinea-pig tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mendoza, María Elena; Castillo-Henkel, Carlos; Navarrete, Andrés

    2008-02-01

    In this study we investigated the relaxant effect of the aerial parts of Argemone ochroleuca (Papaveraceae), which is used in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of various respiratory diseases such as cough, bronchitis and asthma. The alkaloid berberine was identified as one of the active relaxant principles (EC50 = 118.50 +/-3.91 microM) in the dichloromethane extract of A. ochroleuca (EC50 = 78.03 +/- 2.15 microg mL(-1) with 95.12 +/- 3.56% of relaxation). Berberine concentration-dependently relaxed the carbachol-induced precontractions but not histamine- or KCl-induced precontraction. The relaxant effect of berberine was unaffected by the presence of propranolol (3 microM), glibenclamide (10 microM) or ODQ (10microM). However, 2', 5'-dideoxyadenosine (10 microM) blocked the log concentration-response curves of berberine. On the other hand, berberine produced a leftward shift of the log concentration-response curves of isoproterenol, forskolin and nitroprusside. Additionally, berberine produced a parallel rightward shift of the concentration-response curve of carbachol in a competitive manner with a pA2 of 3.87 +/- 0.045. The above results suggest that the relaxant effect of berberine on tracheal muscle is due to its antagonistic effect on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

  10. Experimental model of human corpus cavernosum smooth muscle relaxation.

    PubMed

    Regadas, Rommel P; Moraes, Maria E A; Mesquita, Francisco J C; Cerqueira, Joao B G; Gonzaga-Silva, Lucio F

    2010-01-01

    To describe a technique for en bloc harvesting of the corpus cavernosum, cavernous artery and urethra from transplant organ donors and contraction-relaxation experiments with corpus cavernosum smooth muscle. The corpus cavernosum was dissected to the point of attachment with the crus penis. A 3 cm segment (corpus cavernosum and urethra) was isolated and placed in ice-cold sterile transportation buffer. Under magnification, the cavernous artery was dissected. Thus, 2 cm fragments of cavernous artery and corpus cavernosum were obtained. Strips measuring 3 x 3 x 8 mm(3) were then mounted vertically in an isolated organ bath device. Contractions were measured isometrically with a Narco-Biosystems force displacement transducer (model F-60, Narco-Biosystems, Houston, TX, USA) and recorded on a 4-channel Narco-Biosystems desk model polygraph. Phenylephrine (1 microM) was used to induce tonic contractions in the corpus cavernosum (3-5 g tension) and cavernous artery (0.5-1 g tension) until reaching a plateau. After precontraction, smooth muscle relaxants were used to produce relaxation-response curves (10(-12) M to 10(-4) M). Sodium nitroprusside was used as a relaxation control. The harvesting technique and the smooth muscle contraction-relaxation model described in this study were shown to be useful instruments in the search for new drugs for the treatment of human erectile dysfunction.

  11. Transdifferentiation of human endothelial progenitors into smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, HaYeun; Atchison, Leigh; Chen, Zaozao; Chakraborty, Syandan; Jung, Youngmee; Truskey, George A; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W

    2016-04-01

    Access to smooth muscle cells (SMC) would create opportunities for tissue engineering, drug testing, and disease modeling. Herein we report the direct conversion of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) by induced expression of MYOCD. The EPC undergo a cytoskeletal rearrangement resembling that of mesenchymal cells within 3 days post initiation of MYOCD expression. By day 7, the reprogrammed cells show upregulation of smooth muscle markers ACTA2, MYH11, and TAGLN by qRT-PCR and ACTA2 and MYH11 expression by immunofluorescence. By two weeks, they resemble umbilical artery SMC in microarray gene expression analysis. The iSMC, in contrast to EPC control, show calcium transients in response to phenylephrine stimulation and a contractility an order of magnitude higher than that of EPC as determined by traction force microscopy. Tissue-engineered blood vessels constructed using iSMC show functionality with respect to flow- and drug-mediated vasodilation and vasoconstriction.

  12. Morphological study of tracheal shape in donkeys with and without tracheal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Powell, R J; du Toit, N; Burden, F A; Dixon, P M

    2010-03-01

    There is limited information on the gross tracheal morphology of donkeys with or without tracheal abnormalities. To: 1) examine the morphology of tracheas of donkeys with and without clinical and/or post mortem evidence of tracheal obstruction; 2) record the cross-sectional dimensions and shapes of tracheal rings at fixed sites; and 3) document prevalence, sites and characteristics of detected tracheal abnormalities. The tracheas of 75, predominantly aged (median age 30 years, range 7-48 years) donkeys that died or were subjected to euthanasia on humane grounds were examined. Five had severe dyspnoea due to tracheal obstruction (with intercurrent lung disease in 3), while 7 had post mortem evidence of severe tracheal airway obstruction. Every 5th tracheal ring was dissected free and the inner and outer vertical and transverse dimensions and cross sectional areas were measured. Each dissected ring was photographed and the shape of the trachea was classified as normal or, in one of 6 abnormal grades, according to the type and degree of structural abnormality present. The tracheas had a mean of 43 (range 34-50) tracheal rings that tended to be more oval in shape in the distal cervical region. Only 31.2% of rings examined had a circular to oval shape. Dorso-ventral flattening was present in 0.9% of tracheal rings, dorsal ligament separation in 24.4%, slight cartilage deformity in 26.0%, moderate cartilage deformity in 10.4%, marked cartilage deformity in 1.9% and miscellaneous other abnormalities in 4.9% of tracheal rings. The 12 donkeys with ante or post mortem evidence of tracheal obstruction had significantly increased tracheal abnormality grade in comparison to the remaining donkeys. Structural tracheal abnormalities are present in most old donkeys, but generally do not cause clinical problems in these sedentary animals unless intercurrent pulmonary disease is present.

  13. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and rat colon smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gómez, A; Martos, F; Bellido, I; Marquez, E; Garcia, A J; Pavia, J; Sanchez de la Cuesta, F

    1992-06-09

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and rat colon smooth muscle homogenates were characterized with [3H]N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS) by ligand binding studies. [3H]NMS saturation experiments show the existence of a homogeneous population of non-interacting binding sites with similar affinity (KD values of 1.38 +/- 0.20 nM in human colon smooth muscle and 1.48 +/- 0.47 nM in rat colon smooth muscle) and with Hill slopes close to unity in both samples of tissue. However, a significant (P less than 0.01) increase in muscarinic receptor density (Bmax) is found in human colon (29.9 +/- 2.9 fmol/mg protein) compared with rat colon (17.2 +/- 1.5 fmol/mg protein). Inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by non-labelled compounds shows the following order in human colon: atropine greater than AF-DX 116 greater than pirenzepine. Whereas in rat colon the rank order obtained is atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Atropine and pirenzepine bind to a homogeneous population of binding sites, although pirenzepine shows higher affinity to bind to the sites present in rat colon (Ki = 1.08 +/- 0.08 microM) than those in human colon (Ki = 1.74 +/- 0.02 microM) (P less than 0.05). Similarly, IC50 values obtained in AF-DX 116 competition experiments were significantly different (P less than 0.01) in human colon (IC50 = 1.69 +/- 0.37 microM) than in rat colon (IC50 = 3.78 +/- 0.75 microM). Unlike atropine and pirenzepine, the inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by AF-DX 116 did not yield a simple mass-action binding curve (nH less than 1, P less than 0.01) suggesting the presence of more than one subtype of muscarinic receptor in both species. Computer analysis of these curves with a two binding site model suggests the presence of two populations of receptor. The apparent Ki1 value for the high affinity binding site is 0.49 +/- 0.07 microM for human colon smooth muscle and 0.33 +/- 0.05 microM for rat colon smooth muscle. The apparent Ki2 for the low affinity binding site is 8

  14. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  15. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  16. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  17. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  18. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  19. Endodermal Wnt signaling is required for tracheal cartilage formation.

    PubMed

    Snowball, John; Ambalavanan, Manoj; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Sinner, Debora

    2015-09-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia is a common congenital defect in which the walls of the trachea and bronchi lack of adequate cartilage required for support of the airways. Deletion of Wls, a cargo receptor mediating Wnt ligand secretion, in the embryonic endoderm using ShhCre mice inhibited formation of tracheal-bronchial cartilaginous rings. The normal dorsal-ventral patterning of tracheal mesenchyme was lost. Smooth muscle cells, identified by Acta2 staining, were aberrantly located in ventral mesenchyme of the trachea, normally the region of Sox9 expression in cartilage progenitors. Wnt/β-catenin activity, indicated by Axin2 LacZ reporter, was decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wls(f/f);Shh(Cre/+) embryos. Proliferation of chondroblasts was decreased and reciprocally, proliferation of smooth muscle cells was increased in Wls(f/f);Shh(Cre/+) tracheal tissue. Expression of Tbx4, Tbx5, Msx1 and Msx2, known to mediate cartilage and muscle patterning, were decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wls(f/f);Shh(Cre/+) embryos. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that Wnt7b and Wnt5a, expressed by the epithelium of developing trachea, and active Wnt/β-catenin signaling are required for tracheal chondrogenesis before formation of mesenchymal condensations. In conclusion, Wnt ligands produced by the tracheal epithelium pattern the tracheal mesenchyme via modulation of gene expression and cell proliferation required for proper tracheal cartilage and smooth muscle differentiation.

  20. Endodermal Wnt signaling is required for tracheal cartilage formation

    PubMed Central

    Snowball, John; Ambalavanan, Manoj; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Sinner, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia is a common congenital defect in which the walls of the trachea and bronchi lack of adequate cartilage required for support of the airways. Deletion of Wls, a cargo receptor mediating Wnt ligand secretion, in the embryonic endoderm using ShhCre mice inhibited formation of tracheal-bronchial cartilaginous rings. The normal dorsal-ventral patterning of tracheal mesenchyme was lost. Smooth muscle cells, identified by Acta2 staining, were aberrantly located in ventral mesenchyme of the trachea, normally the region of Sox9 expression in cartilage progenitors. Wnt/β-catenin activity, indicated by Axin2 LacZ reporter, was decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ embryos. Proliferation of chondroblasts was decreased and reciprocally, proliferation of smooth muscle cells was increased in Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ tracheal tissue. Expression of Tbx4, Tbx5, Msx1 and Msx2, known to mediate cartilage and muscle patterning, were decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ embryos. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that Wnt7b and Wnt5a, expressed by the epithelium of developing trachea, and active Wnt/β-catenin signaling are required for tracheal chondrogenesis before formation of mesenchymal condensations. In conclusion, Wnt ligands produced by the tracheal epithelium pattern the tracheal mesenchyme via modulation of gene expression and cell proliferation required for proper tracheal cartilage and smooth muscle differentiation. PMID:26093309

  1. Evaluations of thyme extract effects in human normal bronchial and tracheal epithelial cell lines and in human lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Marinelli; Romilde, Iannarelli; Beatrice, Morelli Maria; Matteo, Valisi; Giovanna, Nicotra; Consuelo, Amantini; Claudio, Cardinali; Giorgio, Santoni; Filippo, Maggi; Massimo, Nabissi

    2016-08-25

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) is used traditionally to prepare herbal remedies possessing expectorant, mucolytic, antitussive and antispasmodic properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a standardized hydroalcoholic extract of thyme on primary human airway (bronchial/tracheal) epithelial cell lines in a model of lung inflammation induced by LPS. In addition, the effects of thyme extract on human lung cancer cell line (H460) were analysed. Thyme extract showed significant anti-inflammatory properties by reducing the NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p52 transcription factors protein levels followed by the decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta and IL-8), and Muc5ac secretion in human normal bronchial and tracheal epithelial cells. Moreover, the extract showed cytotoxic effects on H460 cancer cells, modulated the release of IL-1 beta, IL-8 and down-regulated NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p52 proteins. Taken together, these results substantiated the traditional uses of thyme in the treatment of respiratory diseases. Thyme extract might be an effective treatment of chronic diseases based on inflammatory processes when hypersecretion of mucus overwhelms the ciliary clearance and obstructs airways, causing morbidity and mortality. Moreover thyme extract, evaluated in H460 lung cancer cell line, demonstrated to induce cell cytotoxicity in addition to reduce inflammatory cell signals.

  2. Effects of lubiprostone on human uterine smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cuppoletti, John; Malinowska, Danuta H; Chakrabarti, Jayati; Ueno, Ryuji

    2008-06-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid derivative and member of a new class of compounds called prostones, locally activates ClC-2 Cl(-) channels without activation of prostaglandin receptors. The present study was specifically designed to test and compare lubiprostone and prostaglandin effects at the cellular level using human uterine smooth muscle cells. Effects on [Ca(2+)](i), membrane potential and [cAMP](i) in human uterine smooth muscle cells were measured. 10 nM lubiprostone significantly decreased [Ca(2+)](i) from 188 to 27 nM, which was unaffected by 100 nM SC-51322, a prostaglandin EP receptor antagonist. In contrast 10nM PGE(2) and PGE(1) both increased [Ca(2+)](i) 3-5-fold which was blocked by SC-51322. Similarly, lubiprostone and prostaglandins had opposite/different effects on membrane potential and [cAMP](i). Lubiprostone caused SC-51322-insensitive membrane hyperpolarization and no effect on [cAMP](i). PGE(2) and PGE(1) both caused SC-51322-sensitive membrane depolarization and increased [cAMP](i). Lubiprostone has fundamentally different cellular effects from prostaglandins that are not mediated by EP receptors.

  3. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Smooth Pursuit in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencer, Rebekka; Trillenberg, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements enable us to focus our eyes on moving objects by utilizing well-established mechanisms of visual motion processing, sensorimotor transformation and cognition. Novel smooth pursuit tasks and quantitative measurement techniques can help unravel the different smooth pursuit components and complex neural systems involved…

  4. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Smooth Pursuit in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencer, Rebekka; Trillenberg, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements enable us to focus our eyes on moving objects by utilizing well-established mechanisms of visual motion processing, sensorimotor transformation and cognition. Novel smooth pursuit tasks and quantitative measurement techniques can help unravel the different smooth pursuit components and complex neural systems involved…

  5. Effect of KC399, a newly synthesized K+ channel opener, on acetylcholine-induced electrical and mechanical activities in rabbit tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, K.; Nabata, H.; Kuriyama, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Itoh, T.

    1995-01-01

    1. Effects of KC399, an opener of ATP-sensitive K+ channels were investigated on membrane potential, isometric force and intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) mobilization induced by acetylcholine (ACh) in smooth muscle from the rabbit trachea. 2. In these smooth muscle cells, ACh (0.1 and 1 microM) depolarized the membrane in a concentration-dependent manner, KC399 (1-100 nM) hyperpolarized the membrane whether in the presence or absence of ACh. When the concentration of ACh was increased, the absolute values of the membrane potential induced by the maximum concentration of KC399 were less negative. 3. ACh (0.1 to 10 microM) concentration-dependently produced a phasic, followed by a tonic increase in both [Ca2+]i and force. KC399 (above 3 nM) lowered the resting [Ca2+]i and attenuated the ACh-induced phasic and tonic increases in [Ca2+]i and force, in a concentration-dependent manner. The magnitude of the inhibition was greater for the ACh-induced tonic responses than for the phasic ones. Nicardipine (0.3 microM), a blocker of the L-type Ca2+ channel, attenuated the ACh-induced tonic, but not phasic, increases in [Ca2+]i and force. KC399 further attenuated the ACh-induced tonic responses in the presence of nicardipine. 4. In beta-escin-skinned strips, Ca2+ (0.3-10 microM) produced a contraction in a concentration-dependent manner. KC399 (0.1 microM) had no effect on the Ca(2+)-force relationship in the presence or absence of ATP with GTP. However, at a very high concentration (1 microM), this agent slightly shifted the relationship to the right and attenuated the maximum Ca(2+)-induced contraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8564210

  6. Innervation of extraocular pulley smooth muscle in monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Demer, J L; Poukens, V; Miller, J M; Micevych, P

    1997-08-01

    Soft pulleys stabilize paths and determine pulling directions of the extraocular muscles (EOMs). This study was conducted to characterize innervation of smooth muscles (SMs) supporting these pulleys. Cadaveric human and monkey orbits were step and serially sectioned for histochemical and immunohistochemical staining. Before perfusion, the superior cervical ganglia of one monkey had been injected with the anterograde tracer Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinin (PHA-L). Immunoperoxidase staining to human SM alpha-actin confirmed pulley SM. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were used to demonstrate PHA-L, tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine beta-hydroxylase, phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and synaptophysin. The NADPH-diaphorase reaction was also used as a marker for NOS and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) reaction for acetylcholine. Pulleys, consisting of collagen and elastin sleeves supported by connective tissue containing SM, were observed around rectus muscles of humans and monkeys. The human and monkey SM was richly innervated. Axons terminating in motor end plates within SM bundles were immunoreactive to PHA-L, tyrosine hydroxylase, and dopamine beta-hydroxylase, but not phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase, indicating innervation of pulley SM from the superior cervical ganglion by projections using norepinephrine. Smaller axons and motor end plates were also demonstrated in SM, using NADPH-diaphorase and NOS immunoreactivity, indicating nitroxidergic innervation, and using AchE, indicating cholinergic parasympathetic innervation. The pterygopalatine and, to a lesser extent, the ciliary ganglia, but not the Edinger-Westphal nucleus, contained cells immunoreactive to NOS, suggesting that nitroxidergic innervation to pulley SM is mainly from the pterygopalatine ganglion. The SM suspensions of human and monkey EOM pulleys are similar and receive rich innervation involving multiple neurotransmitters. These complex

  7. TGF-β antagonist attenuates fibrosis but not luminal narrowing in experimental tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Antón-Pacheco, Juan L; Usategui, Alicia; Martínez, Iván; García-Herrero, Carmen M; Gamez, Antonio P; Grau, Montserrat; Martínez, Ana M; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L; Pablos, José L

    2017-03-01

    Acquired tracheal stenosis (ATS) is an unusual disease often secondary to prolonged mechanical trauma. Acquired tracheal stenosis pathogenesis involves inflammation and subsequent fibrosis with narrowing of the tracheal lumen. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β) represents a pivotal factor in most fibrotic processes, and therefore a potential target in this context. The aim of this study is to analyze the role of TGF-β as a target for anti-fibrotic interventions in tracheal stenosis. Human stenotic tracheobronchial tissues from patients with benign airway stenosis and normal controls from pneumonectomy specimens were analyzed. Tracheal stenosis was induced in adult NZ rabbits by a circumferential thermal injury to the mucosa during open surgery and re-anastomosis. Rabbits were treated postoperatively with a peritracheal collagen sponge containing a TGF-β peptide antagonist (p17) or vehicle. Fibrosis was determined by Masson's trichrome staining, and smooth muscle cell α-actin(+) (α-SMA(+) Confirm accuracy.) myofibroblasts, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and p-Smad2/3 expression by immunohistochemistry. Human and rabbit stenotic tissues showed extensive submucosal fibrosis, characterized by significantly increased α-SMA(+) myofibroblasts and CTGF expression. In human stenotic lesions, increased p-Smad2/3(+) nuclei were also observed. p17 treatment significantly reduced the fibrotic thickness, as well as the density of α-SMA(+) myofibroblasts and CTGF(+) cells in rabbit stenotic lesions, but failed to improve the luminal area. ATS is characterized by a TGF-β dependent fibrotic process, but reduction of the fibrotic component by TGF-β1 antagonist therapy was not sufficient to improve tracheal narrowing, suggesting that fibrosis may not be the main contributor to luminal stenosis. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:561-567, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Heparin inhibits human coronary artery smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Minami, M; Kano, H; Mandal, A K; Yoshikawa, J

    1998-09-01

    Heparin, an anticoagulant, has been shown to reduce neointimal proliferation and restenosis following vascular injury in experimental studies, but the clinical trials of heparin in coronary balloon angioplasty have been negative. The current study, therefore, examined the effect of heparin on basal or stimulated migration by serum and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB in cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) by Boyden's chamber method. In addition, the reversibility of the heparin effect on human coronary artery SMC migration was examined. Fetal calf serum (FCS) and PDGF-BB stimulated SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner. Heparin in moderate to high concentration (10 to 100 U/mL) exhibited concentration-related inhibition of FCS- and PDGF-BB-stimulated SMC migration; however, a low concentration (1 U/mL) of heparin had no inhibitory effects. Heparin also had weak inhibitory effects on nonstimulated SMC migration. The SMCs that were exposed to a high concentration (100 U/mL) of heparin for 6 hours were capable of migrating after a short lag period of removal of heparin from the culture medium. These SMCs also showed recovery of responses to FCS and PDGF-BB by migrating significantly greater than the nonstimulated level. Furthermore, heparin-containing medium did not contain detached cells. These results indicate that heparin inhibits human coronary artery SMC migration, especially when stimulated by FCS or PDGF-BB, and that this inhibitory effect of heparin is reversible and not simply a function of killing cells.

  9. Neurophysiology and neuroanatomy of smooth pursuit in humans.

    PubMed

    Lencer, Rebekka; Trillenberg, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements enable us to focus our eyes on moving objects by utilizing well-established mechanisms of visual motion processing, sensorimotor transformation and cognition. Novel smooth pursuit tasks and quantitative measurement techniques can help unravel the different smooth pursuit components and complex neural systems involved in its control. The maintenance of smooth pursuit is driven by a combination of the prediction of target velocity and visual feedback about performance quality, thus a combination of retinal and extraretinal information that has to be integrated in various networks. Different models of smooth pursuit with specific in- and output parameters have been developed for a better understanding of the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms and to make quantitative predictions that can be tested in experiments. Functional brain imaging and neurophysiological studies have defined motion sensitive visual area V5, frontal (FEF) and supplementary (SEF) eye fields as core cortical smooth pursuit regions. In addition, a dense neural network is involved in the adjustment of an optimal smooth pursuit response by integrating also extraretinal information. These networks facilitate interaction of the smooth pursuit system with multiple other visual and non-visual sensorimotor systems on the cortical and subcortical level. Future studies with fMRI advanced techniques (e.g., event-related fMRI) promise to provide an insight into how smooth pursuit eye movements are linked to specific brain activation. Applying this approach to neurological and also mental illness can reveal distinct disturbances within neural networks being present in these disorders and also the impact of medication on this circuitry.

  10. Lubiprostone stimulates secretion from tracheal submucosal glands of sheep, pigs, and humans.

    PubMed

    Joo, N S; Wine, J J; Cuthbert, A W

    2009-05-01

    Lubiprostone, a putative ClC-2 chloride channel opener, has been investigated for its effects on airway epithelia (tracheas). Lubiprostone is shown to increase submucosal gland secretion in pigs, sheep, and humans and to increase short-circuit current (SCC) in the surface epithelium of pigs and sheep. Use of appropriate blocking agents and ion-substitution experiments shows anion secretion is the driving force for fluid formation in both glands and surface epithelium. From SCC concentration-response relations, it is shown that for apical lubiprostone K(d) = 10.5 nM with a Hill slope of 1.08, suggesting a single type of binding site and, from the speed of the response, close to the apical surface, confirmed the rapid blockade by Cd ions. Responses to lubiprostone were reversible and repeatable, responses being significantly larger with ventral compared with dorsal epithelium. Submucosal gland secretion rates following basolateral lubiprostone were, respectively, 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8 nl gl(-1) min(-1) in humans, sheep, and pigs. These rates dwarf any contribution surface secretion adds to the accumulation of surface liquid under the influence of lubiprostone. Lubiprostone stimulated gland secretion in two out of four human cystic fibrosis (CF) tissues and in two of three disease controls, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (COPD/IPF), but in neither type of tissue was the increase significant. Lubiprostone was able to increase gland secretion rates in normal human tissue in the continuing presence of a high forskolin concentration. Lubiprostone had no spasmogenic activity on trachealis muscle, making it a potential agent for increasing airway secretion that may have therapeutic utility.

  11. Cultures of human tracheal gland cells of mucous or serous phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Zlock, Lorna T.; Mehdi, Irum

    2009-01-01

    There are two main epithelial cell types in the secretory tubules of mammalian glands: serous and mucous. The former is believed to secrete predominantly water and antimicrobials, the latter mucins. Primary cultures of human airway gland epithelium have been available for almost 20 yr, but they are poorly differentiated and lack clear features of either serous or mucous cells. In this study, by varying growth supports and media, we have produced cultures from human airway glands that in terms of their ultrastructure and secretory products resemble either mucous or serous cells. Of four types of porous-bottomed insert tested, polycarbonate filters (Transwells) most strongly promoted the mucous phenotype. Coupled with the addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF), this growth support produced “mucous” cells that contained the large electron-lucent granules characteristic of native mucous cells, but lacked the small electron-dense granules characteristic of serous cells. Furthermore, they showed high levels of mucin secretion and low levels of release of lactoferrin and lysozyme (markers of native serous cells). By contrast, growth on polyethylene terephthalate filters (Cyclopore) in medium lacking EGF produced “serous” cells in which small electron-dense granules replaced the electron-lucent ones, and the cells had high levels of lactoferrin and lysozyme but low levels of mucins. Measurements of transepithelial resistance and short-circuit current showed that both “serous” and “mucous” cell cultures possessed tight junctions, had become polarized, and were actively secreting Cl. PMID:19998060

  12. Association of Oversized Tracheal Tubes and Cuff Overinsufflation With Postintubation Tracheal Ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Sudhoff, Tobias H.; Seidl, Rainer O.; Estel, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Postintubation tracheal ruptures (PTR) are rare but cause severe complications. Our objective was to investigate the tracheal pattern of injury resulting from cuff inflation of the tracheal tube, to study the two main factors responsible for PTR (cuff overinsufflation and inapplicable tube sizes), and to explain the context, why small women are particularly susceptible to PTR. Methods Experimental study performed on 28 fresh human laryngotracheal specimens (16 males, 12 females) within 24 hours post autopsy. Artificial ventilation was simulated by using an underwater construction and a standard tracheal tube. Tube sizes were selected according to our previously published nomogram. Tracheal lesions were detected visually and tracheal diameters measured. The influence of body size, sex difference and appropriate tube size were investigated according to patient height. Results In all 28 cases, the typical tracheal lesion pattern was a longitudinal median rupture of the posterior trachea. Appropriate tube sizes according to body size caused PTR with significantly higher cuff pressure when compared with oversized tubes. An increased risk of PTR was found in shorter patients, when oversized tubes were used. Sex difference did not have any significant influence. Conclusion This experimental model provides information about tracheal patterns in PTR for the first time. The model confirms by experiment the observations of case series in PTR patients, and therefore emphasizes the importance of correct tube size selection according to patient height. This minimizes the risk of PTR, especially in shorter patients, who have an increased risk of PTR when oversized tubes are used. PMID:26622963

  13. TNFα decreases mitochondrial movement in human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Delmotte, Philippe; Zavaletta, Vanessa A; Thompson, Michael A; Prakash, Y S; Sieck, Gary C

    2017-07-01

    In airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, excitation-contraction coupling is accomplished via a cascade of events that connect an elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) with cross-bridge attachment and ATP-consuming mechanical work. Excitation-energy coupling is mediated by linkage of the elevation of [Ca(2+)]cyt to an increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration, which in turn stimulates ATP production. Proximity of mitochondria to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and plasma membrane is thought to be an important mechanism to facilitate mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. In this regard, mitochondrial movement in ASM cells may be key in establishing proximity. Mitochondria also move where ATP or Ca(2+) buffering is needed. Mitochondrial movement is mediated through interactions with the Miro-Milton molecular complex, which couples mitochondria to kinesin motors at microtubules. We examined mitochondrial movement in human ASM cells and hypothesized that, at basal [Ca(2+)]cyt levels, mitochondrial movement is necessary to establish proximity of mitochondria to the SR and that, during the transient increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt induced by agonist stimulation, mitochondrial movement is reduced, thereby promoting transient mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. We further hypothesized that airway inflammation disrupts basal mitochondrial movement via a reduction in Miro and Milton expression, thereby disrupting the ability of mitochondria to establish proximity to the SR and, thus, reducing transient mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake during agonist activation. The reduced proximity of mitochondria to the SR may affect establishment of transient "hot spots" of higher [Ca(2+)]cyt at the sites of SR Ca(2+) release that are necessary for mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake via the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Involvement of MAPKs, NF-{kappa}B and p300 co-activator in IL-1{beta}-induced cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} expression in canine tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, S.-F.; Lin, C.-C.; Chen, H.-C.; Lin, W.-N.; Lee, I-T.; Lee, C.-W.; Hsiao, L.-D.; Yang, C.-M.

    2008-11-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}) plays a pivotal role in mediating agonist-induced arachidonic acid release for prostaglandin (PG) synthesis during stimulation with interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}). However, the mechanisms underlying IL-1{beta}-induced cPLA{sub 2} expression and PGE{sub 2} synthesis by canine tracheal smooth muscle cells (CTSMCs) have not been defined. IL-1{beta} induced cPLA{sub 2} protein and mRNA expression, PGE{sub 2} production, and phosphorylation of p42/p44 MAPK, p38 MAPK (ATF{sub 2}), and JNK (c-Jun) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, determined by Western blotting, RT-PCR, and ELISA, which was attenuated by the inhibitors of MEK1/2 (U0126), p38 MAPK (SB202190), and JNK (SP600125), or transfection with dominant negative mutants of MEK1/2, p38, and JNK, respectively. Furthermore, IL-1{beta}-induced cPLA{sub 2} expression and PGE{sub 2} synthesis was inhibited by a selective NF-{kappa}B inhibitor (helenalin) or transfection with dominant negative mutants of NF-{kappa}B inducing kinase (NIK), I{kappa}B kinase (IKK)-{alpha}, and IKK-{beta}. Consistently, IL-1{beta} stimulated both I{kappa}B-{alpha} degradation and NF-{kappa}B translocation into nucleus in these cells. NF-{kappa}B translocation was blocked by helenalin, but not by U0126, SB202190, and SP600125. MAPKs together with NF-{kappa}B-activated p300 recruited to cPLA{sub 2} promoter thus facilitating the binding of NF-{kappa}B to cPLA{sub 2} promoter region and expression of cPLA{sub 2} mRNA. IL-1{beta}-induced cPLA{sub 2} expression and PGE{sub 2} production was inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating the involvement of transcriptional and translational events in these responses. These results suggest that in CTSMCs, IL-1{beta}-induced cPLA{sub 2} expression and PGE{sub 2} synthesis was independently mediated through activation of MAPKs and NF-{kappa}B pathways and was connected to p300 recruitment and activation.

  15. Regional and species differences in glyburide-sensitive K+ channels in airway smooth muscles as estimated from actions of KC 128 and levcromakalim.

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, K; Yoshida, S; Imagawa, J; Nabata, H; Kuriyama, H

    1994-01-01

    1. The purpose of the present experiments was to elucidate the differences in actions of two K+ channel openers, KC 128 and levcromakalim, on the carbachol-induced contraction, membrane potential and 86Rb+ efflux of the dog tracheal and bronchial smooth muscles. Furthermore, we compared the effects of these agents on guinea-pig and human airway smooth muscles. 2. In the dog tracheal and bronchial smooth muscle tissues, levcromakalim induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of the carbachol-induced contraction. The IC50 values were 0.35 microM (pIC50: 6.46 +/- 0.10, n = 9) and 0.55 microM (pIC50: 6.26 +/- 0.07, n = 5), respectively. KC 128 relaxed bronchial smooth muscles precontracted by carbachol with an IC50 value of 0.19 microM (pIC50: 6.73 +/- 0.10, n = 7). However, KC 128 had almost no effect on the contraction evoked by carbachol in the trachea (IC50 > 10 microM). The relaxations induced by levcromakalim and KC 128 were antagonized by glyburide (0.03-1 microM) but not by charybdotoxin (100 nM). 3. Levcromakalim (1 microM) hyperpolarized the membrane of both dog tracheal and bronchial smooth muscle cells, whereas KC 128 (1 microM) hyperpolarized the membrane of bronchial but not of tracheal smooth muscle cells. 4. Levcromakalim (10 microM) increased 86Rb+ efflux rate from both tracheal and bronchial smooth muscle tissues but KC 128 (10 microM) increased 86Rb+ efflux rate only from bronchial and not tracheal smooth muscle tissues. Glyburide (1 microM) prevented the hyperpolarization and the 86Rb+ efflux induced by these agents at the same concentration as observed for mechanical responses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7858882

  16. Regulation of human airway smooth muscle cell migration and relevance to asthma.

    PubMed

    Salter, Brittany; Pray, Cara; Radford, Katherine; Martin, James G; Nair, Parameswaran

    2017-08-16

    Airway remodelling is an important feature of asthma pathogenesis. A key structural change inherent in airway remodelling is increased airway smooth muscle mass. There is emerging evidence to suggest that the migration of airway smooth muscle cells may contribute to cellular hyperplasia, and thus increased airway smooth muscle mass. The precise source of these cells remains unknown. Increased airway smooth muscle mass may be collectively due to airway infiltration of myofibroblasts, neighbouring airway smooth muscle cells in the bundle, or circulating hemopoietic progenitor cells. However, the relative contribution of each cell type is not well understood. In addition, although many studies have identified pro and anti-migratory agents of airway smooth muscle cells, whether these agents can impact airway remodelling in the context of human asthma, remains to be elucidated. As such, further research is required to determine the exact mechanism behind airway smooth muscle cell migration within the airways, how much this contributes to airway smooth muscle mass in asthma, and whether attenuating this migration may provide a therapeutic avenue for asthma. In this review article, we will discuss the current evidence with respect to the regulation of airway smooth muscle cell migration in asthma.

  17. Airway epithelium stimulates smooth muscle proliferation.

    PubMed

    Malavia, Nikita K; Raub, Christopher B; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Panettieri, Reynold A; George, Steven C

    2009-09-01

    Communication between the airway epithelium and stroma is evident during embryogenesis, and both epithelial shedding and increased smooth muscle proliferation are features of airway remodeling. Hence, we hypothesized that after injury the airway epithelium could modulate airway smooth muscle proliferation. Fully differentiated primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells at an air-liquid interface were co-cultured with serum-deprived normal primary human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM) using commercially available Transwells. In some co-cultures, the NHBE were repeatedly (x4) scrape-injured. An in vivo model of tracheal injury consisted of gently denuding the tracheal epithelium (x3) of a rabbit over 5 days and then examining the trachea by histology 3 days after the last injury. Our results show that HASM cell number increases 2.5-fold in the presence of NHBE, and 4.3-fold in the presence of injured NHBE compared with HASM alone after 8 days of in vitro co-culture. In addition, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and, more markedly, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 concentration increased in co-culture correlating with enhanced HASM growth. Inhibiting MMP-9 release significantly attenuated the NHBE-dependent HASM proliferation in co-culture. In vivo, the injured rabbit trachea demonstrated proliferation in the smooth muscle (trachealis) region and significant MMP-9 staining, which was absent in the uninjured control. The airway epithelium modulates smooth muscle cell proliferation via a mechanism that involves secretion of soluble mediators including potential smooth muscle mitogens such as IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1, but also through a novel MMP-9-dependent mechanism.

  18. Left heart structures in human neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia and the effect of fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Luciane Alves da; Byrne, Francesca A; Keller, Roberta L; Miniati, Doug; Brook, Michael M; Silverman, Norman H; Moon-Grady, Anita J

    2014-01-01

    Small left heart structures are observed in fetuses with left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Fetoscopic tracheal occlusion (FETO) in mid-gestation promotes lung growth in fetuses with CDH, however cardiac effects of FETO are poorly described. We studied the effects of FETO on cardiac structure size at birth, hypothesizing that left heart structures would be larger in neonates who had undergone fetal intervention. We performed retrospective measurements of atrioventricular and semilunar valve and pulmonary artery diameters, ventricular lengths, left ventricular end-diastolic volume indexed (LVEDVi) to body surface area. 35 patients were studied (9 FETO, 26 controls). All fetuses had liver herniation and a lung-to-head ratio <1 at fetal presentation. At birth the intervention group had larger LVEDVi (16.8 vs. 12.76 ml/m(2), p < 0.05), LV length Z-score (-2.05 vs. -4, p < 0.01), LV:RV length ratio (1.43 vs. 1.04, p < 0.05), LPA diameter Z-score (+1.71 vs. -1.04, p < 0.05), and better growth of aortic valve (-2.18 FETO, -3.3 controls, p < 0.01). There was a trend toward higher LV output in the FETO group. Left heart structures and LPA were larger postnatally in patients with CDH who underwent FETO than in those who did not. Hemodynamic alterations are introduced with tracheal occlusion that are associated with alterations in ventricular loading and may influence growth. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Tracheal malignant melanoma: successful outcome with tracheal resection.

    PubMed

    Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Minamoto, Helio; Junqueira, Jader J M; Falzoni, Roberto; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2008-07-01

    Primary tracheal malignant melanomas are uncommon neoplasms: only five cases have been reported. Different therapeutic approaches are described, with a short life expectancy observed. We report a case of a young woman with a primary tracheal malignant melanoma who underwent complete tracheal resection and is free of disease 4 years after surgical treatment.

  20. SREBP inhibits VEGF expression in human smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyama, Koka; Fukumoto, Shinya . E-mail: sfukumoto@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Koyama, Hidenori; Emoto, Masanori; Shimano, Hitoshi; Maemura, Koji; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2006-03-31

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are transcription factors that regulate expression of genes encoding enzymes for lipid biosynthesis. SREBPs are activated by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Statins have been also reported to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Therefore, we hypothesized that SREBPs are involved in statin-mediated regulation of VEGF production in VSMCs. SREBP1 was robustly expressed, and was activated by atorvastatin in VSMCs, as demonstrated by increased levels of the mature nuclear form of SREBP1, and increased promoter activities of a reporter containing sterol regulatory elements by atorvastatin. Moreover, overexpression of SREBP1a dose-dependently suppressed VEGF promoter activity. Site-specific mutation or deletion of the proximal Sp1 sites reduced the inhibitory effects of SREBP1a on VEGF promoter activity. These data demonstrated that SREBP1, activated by atorvastatin, suppressed VEGF expression through the indirect interaction with the proximal tandem Sp1 sites in VSMCs.

  1. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R.; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E.; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E.; Cima, Robert R.; Larson, David W.; Dozois, Eric J.; Kline, Crystal F.; Mohler, Peter J.; Beyder, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na+ current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na+ current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na+ currents (−1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na+ peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na+ current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na+ current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine. PMID:26185330

  2. Smooth muscle in the wall of the developing human urinary bladder and urethra.

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, S A; Gosling, J A

    1983-01-01

    A series of human fetal and neonatal specimens ranging in age from the second month of intrauterine development to 4 1/2 years after birth has been examined using histological and histochemical techniques. In both sexes histologically differentiated smooth muscle cells were evident in the bladder wall from the 52 mm crown-rump length stage onwards--urethral smooth muscle was not distinguishable until 119 mm crown-rump length. In addition to relatively late differentiation, urethral smooth muscle was histochemically distinct from the urinary bladder detrusor muscle. Sex differences in the arrangement and innervation of smooth muscle in the proximal urethra have also been observed, and these findings lend support to the presence of a pre-prostatic urethra sphincter. It seems likely that this sphincter acts principally to prevent reflux of ejaculate into the bladder during seminal emission. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:6654742

  3. Differential regulation of smooth muscle markers in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hegner, Björn; Weber, Manfred; Dragun, Duska; Schulze-Lohoff, Eckhard

    2005-06-01

    To study smooth-muscle differentiation and de-differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been shown to enter the circulation and to contribute to vascular repair and atherosclerosis. Human MSCs from bone marrow were cultured with 20% fetal calf serum (FCS) or with 10% FCS and various concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Expression of smooth muscle markers was determined by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. For signalling studies, involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was tested by treatment with rapamycin. MSCs cultured with 20% FCS acquired a smooth muscle-like appearance and expressed the smooth muscle (sm) markers sm-alpha-actin, desmin, sm-calponin and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). DMSO induced a spindle-like morphology with marked reduction of stress fibers. As judged by Western blot analysis, treatment with 2.5% DMSO strongly downregulated expression of sm-calponin (-85%), short MLCK (-98%) and sm-alpha-actin expression (-51%). Reduced calponin expression was detected by day 2 of treatment with 0.5-2.5% DMSO. After withdrawal of DMSO, MSCs regained high expression of sm-calponin. Treatment with 6 nmol/l rapamycin partly antagonized the effect of DMSO, indicating the involvement of mTOR in regulation of the smooth muscle phenotype of MSCs. DMSO strongly downregulates the smooth muscle markers sm-calponin, short MLCK and sm-alpha-actin in human MSCs, indicating a transition from a smooth muscle-like phenotype to an undifferentiated state by an mTOR-dependent mechanism. Regulating the phenotype of human MSCs may be of relevance for novel therapeutic approaches in atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia after vascular injury.

  4. Primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma and tracheal tumors during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abike, Faruk; Bingol, Banu; Temizkan, Osman; Dunder, Ilkkan; Kilic, Gokhan Sami; Cetin, Guven; Gundogdu, Cem

    2011-01-01

    Cancer complicates approximately 0.1% of all pregnancies. Primary tracheal carcinoma is one of very rarely seen tumors and the rate of its being seen makes up approximately % 0.2 of all tumors of respiratory tract. The patient, 28 years old, who has 28-weeks-pregnant, was diagnosed with primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma. Patient was made operation as thoracotomy and tracheal tumor was removed at the 28th week of pregnancy. Patient was delivered with sectio abdominale at the 39th week of pregnancy. Primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma is very rarely seen tumors and it is the first tracheal ACC with pregnancy case in literature to have been detected and surgically treated during pregnancy. We discussed primary tracheal adenocystic carcinoma and tracheal tumors during pregnancy with literature. PMID:22066040

  5. Effects of artificial tracheal fixation on tracheal epithelial regeneration and prevention of tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nakaegawa, Yuta; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Tada, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Ryo; Takezawa, Toshiaki; Nakamura, Tatsuo; Omori, Koichi

    2017-06-01

    Tight fixation of the artificial trachea is important for epithelialization and tracheal stenosis. The authors have developed an artificial trachea and have used it for tracheal reconstruction. Although various studies on tracheal reconstruction have been conducted, no studies have examined the effect of artificial tracheal fixation on tracheal stenosis and regeneration. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of artificial tracheal fixation. Preliminary animal experiment. Artificial tracheae were implanted into rabbits with partial tracheal defects. Tracheal stenosis and regeneration of the tracheal epithelium on the artificial tracheae were evaluated by endoscopic examination, scanning electron microscopic analysis, and histological examination. The artificial tracheae fixed to the tracheal defects were classified into three groups (0-point, 4-point, and 8-point) by the number of fixation points. At 14 and 28 days post-implantation, the luminal surface of the implantation area was mostly covered with epithelium in all fixation groups. However, a small amount of granulation tissue was observed in the 0-point fixation group at 14 days post-implantation. Moreover, tracheal stenosis did not occur in the 8-point fixation group, but stenosis was detected in the other groups.

  6. Three-Dimensional Human Bronchial-Tracheal Epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies (TLAs) as Hosts for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-CoV Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suderman, M. T.; McCarthy, M.; Mossell, E.; Watts, D. M.; Peters, C. J.; Shope, R.; Goodwin, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) tissue-like assembly (TLA) of human bronchial-tracheal mesenchymal (HBTC) cells with an overlay of human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells was constructed using a NASA Bioreactor to survey the infectivity of SARS-CoV. This TLA was inoculated with a low passage number Urbani strain of SARS-CoV. At selected intervals over a 10-day period, media and cell aliquots of the 3-D TLA were harvested for viral titer assay and for light and electron microscopy examination. All viral titer assays were negative in both BEAS-2B two-dimensional monolayer and TLA. Light microscopy immunohistochemistry demonstrated antigen-antibody reactivity with anti-SARS-CoV polyclonal antibody to spike and nuclear proteins on cell membranes and cytoplasm. Coronavirus Group 2 cross-reactivity was demonstrated by positive reaction to anti-FIPV 1 and anti-FIPV 1 and 2 antibodies. TLA examination by transmission electron microscopy indicated increasing cytoplasmic vacuolation with numerous electron-dense bodies measuring 45 to 270 nm from days 4 through 10. There was no evidence of membrane blebbing, membrane duplication, or fragmentation of organelles in the TLAs. However, progressive disruption of endoplasmic reticulum was observed throughout the cells. Antibody response to SARS-CoV specific spike and nucleocapsid glycoproteins, cross-reactivity with FIPV antibodies, and the cytoplasmic pathology suggests this HBTE TLA model is permissive to SARS-CoV infection.

  7. Model emulates human smooth pursuit system producing zero-latency target tracking.

    PubMed

    Bahill, A T; McDonald, J D

    1983-01-01

    Humans can overcome the 150 ms time delay of the smooth pursuit eye movement system and track smoothly moving visual targets with zero-latency. Our target-selective adaptive control model can also overcome an inherent time delay and produce zero-latency tracking. No other model or man-made system can do this. Our model is physically realizable and physiologically realistic. The technique used in our model should be useful for analyzing other time-delay systems, such as man-machine systems and robots.

  8. [Vascular smooth muscle cells from human umbilical artery undergo osteoblast differentiation and calcification in vitro].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong Ping; Sun, Ming Shu; Qian, Jia Qi; Ni, Zhao Hui

    2008-04-01

    To research if the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from human umbilical artery undergo osteoblast differentiation spontaneously in vitro. The growth curve of vascular smooth muscle cells from human umbilical artery was obtained by MTT method. The course of multicell nodule formation spontaneously by VSMCs was observed morphologically. The apoptosis of VSMCs in the nodules was detected by Hoechst 33258 and TUNEL methods respectively. The expression of alkaline phosphotase in the nodules was detected by immunohistochemical method. And the calcification was studied with transmission electron microscope and by alizarin red S respectively. We found that the umbilical artery smooth muscle cells confluenced after 7 days of passage and exhibited typical "hill and valley" pattern under light microscope. The cells grew into aggregation and formed nodules at the "hill" region with culture-time prolongation. After 4-5 weeks culture, these nodules built up and calcified spontaneously. We also found alkaline phosphotase expression and apoptosis of VSMCs in these nodules at the same time. We conclude that the vascular smooth muscle cells from human umbilical artery just like from aortic artery can undergo osteoblast differentiation spontaneously in vitro, and apoptosis participate this procedure probably.

  9. Smooth versus Textured Surfaces: Feature-Based Category Selectivity in Human Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tootell, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In fMRI studies, human lateral occipital (LO) cortex is thought to respond selectively to images of objects, compared with nonobjects. However, it remains unresolved whether all objects evoke equivalent levels of activity in LO, and, if not, which image features produce stronger activation. Here, we used an unbiased parametric texture model to predict preferred versus nonpreferred stimuli in LO. Observation and psychophysical results showed that predicted preferred stimuli (both objects and nonobjects) had smooth (rather than textured) surfaces. These predictions were confirmed using fMRI, for objects and nonobjects. Similar preferences were also found in the fusiform face area (FFA). Consistent with this: (1) FFA and LO responded more strongly to nonfreckled (smooth) faces, compared with otherwise identical freckled (textured) faces; and (2) strong functional connections were found between LO and FFA. Thus, LO and FFA may be part of an information-processing stream distinguished by feature-based category selectivity (smooth > textured). PMID:27699206

  10. Influence of micropattern width on differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Tomoko; Wang, Xinlong; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, various approaches have been taken to generate functional muscle tissue by tissue engineering. However, in vitro methods to generate smooth muscle with physiologically aligned structure remains limited. In order to mimic the in vivo highly organized structure of smooth muscle cells, we used micropatterning technology for engineering parallel aligned cells. In this study, a gradient micropattern of different width of cell-adhesive polystyrene stripes (5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000μm) was prepared and the effects of micropattern width on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) orientation, morphology and smooth muscle cell differentiation were investigated. The width of micropattern stripes showed obvious effect on cell orientation, morphology and smooth muscle cell differentiation. The cells showed higher degree of orientation when the micropattern stripes became narrower. Higher expression of calponin and smooth muscle actin was observed among the narrow micropatterns ranging from 200μm to 20μm, compared to the non-patterned area and wide micropattern areas which showed similar levels of expression.

  11. A new paradigm for the role of smooth muscle cells in the human cervix.

    PubMed

    Vink, Joy Y; Qin, Sisi; Brock, Clifton O; Zork, Noelia M; Feltovich, Helen M; Chen, Xiaowei; Urie, Paul; Myers, Kristin M; Hall, Timothy J; Wapner, Ronald; Kitajewski, Jan K; Shawber, Carrie J; Gallos, George

    2016-10-01

    Premature cervical remodeling resulting in spontaneous preterm birth may begin with premature failure or relaxation at the internal os (termed "funneling"). To date, we do not understand why the internal os fails or why funneling occurs in some cases of premature cervical remodeling. Although the human cervix is thought to be mostly collagen with minimal cellular content, cervical smooth muscle cells are present in the cervix and can cause cervical tissue contractility. To understand why the internal os relaxes or why funneling occurs in some cases of premature cervical remodeling, we sought to evaluate cervical smooth muscle cell content and distribution throughout human cervix and correlate if cervical smooth muscle organization influences regional cervical tissue contractility. Using institutional review board-approved protocols, nonpregnant women <50 years old undergoing hysterectomy for benign indications were consented. Cervical tissue from the internal and external os were immunostained for smooth muscle cell markers (α-smooth muscle actin, smooth muscle protein 22 calponin) and contraction-associated proteins (connexin 43, cyclooxygenase-2, oxytocin receptor). To evaluate cervical smooth muscle cell morphology throughout the entire cervix, whole cervical slices were obtained from the internal os, midcervix, and external os and immunostained with smooth muscle actin. To correlate tissue structure with function, whole slices from the internal and external os were stimulated to contract with 1 μmol/L of oxytocin in organ baths. In separate samples, we tested if the cervix responds to a common tocolytic, nifedipine. Cervical slices from the internal os were treated with oxytocin alone or oxytocin + increasing doses of nifedipine to generate a dose response and half maximal inhibitory concentration. Student t test was used where appropriate. Cervical tissue was collected from 41 women. Immunohistochemistry showed cervical smooth muscle cells at the internal

  12. Ventilatory responses to hypoxia nullify hypoxic tracheal constriction in awake dogs.

    PubMed

    Sorkness, R L; Vidruk, E H

    1986-10-01

    Three awake dogs with chronic tracheostomies were used to study the effects of hypoxia (12% O2) on tracheal smooth muscle tone. Pressure changes within a water-filled cuff in an isolated portion of the cervical trachea reflected changes in tracheal tone. During spontaneous ventilation, hypoxia produced hyperventilation, but no significant change in tracheal tone. If hypocapnia was prevented with inspired CO2 during hypoxia, one of three dogs increased tracheal tone, and all dogs increased ventilation beyond that measured with hypoxia alone. When the awake dogs were ventilated mechanically to prevent changes in ventilation, hypoxia always increased tracheal tone. We made independent changes in ventilation and CO2 similar to the spontaneous responses to hypoxia to test these effects on tracheal tone. When the dogs were ventilated mechanically first with 2% CO2, and then with no CO2, the resulting drop in end-tidal CO2 always decreased tone. When the tidal volume on the ventilator was increased under hyperoxic, isocapnic conditions, tracheal tone always decreased. We conclude that the normal ventilatory response to hypoxia opposes the bronchoconstrictor effect of hypoxia, resulting in no net change in tracheal smooth muscle tone.

  13. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Tracheal replacement with an aortic autograft.

    PubMed

    Azorin, Jacques F; Bertin, Francois; Martinod, Emmanuel; Laskar, Marc

    2006-02-01

    Tracheal replacement after extensive resection remains a challenge for the thoracic surgeon. We propose an innovative solution: the use of an aortic autograft. After an experimental work on animals with aortic autografts and allografts [Martinod E, Seguin A, Pfeuty K, Fornes P, Kambouchner M, Azorin JF, Carpentier AF. Long-term evaluation of the replacement of the trachea with an autologous aortic graft. Ann Thorac Surg 2003;75(5):1572-8; Martinod E, Seguin A, Holder-Espinasse M, Kambouchner M, Duterque-Coquillaud M, Azorin JF, Carpentier AF. Tracheal regeneration following tracheal replacement with an allogenic aorta. Ann Thorac Surg 2005;79(3):942-8], we present the first human case of long tracheal replacement with an aortic autograft. In this case we replaced 7 cm of a tumoral trachea using an aortic infra-renal autograft supported by a silicone stent. The early postoperative course was uneventful. The stent was removed at three months. The patient died at six months from an acute pulmonary infection without any sign of anastomosis leakage or graft rupture. A new field of clinical study has to be investigated.

  15. Smooth Brucella strains invade and replicate in human lung epithelial cells without inducing cell death.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2009-04-01

    Inhalation is a common route for Brucella infection. We investigated whether Brucella species can invade and replicate within alveolar(A549) and bronchial (Calu-6 and 16HBE14o-) human epithelial cells. The number of adherent and intracellular bacteria was higher for rough strains (Brucella canis and Brucella abortus RB51) than for smooth strains (B. abortus 2308 and Brucella suis 1330). Only smooth strains exhibited efficient intracellular replication (1.5-3.5 log increase at 24 h p.i.). A B. abortus mutant with defective expression of the type IV secretion system did not replicate. B. abortus internalization was inhibited by specific inhibitors of microfilaments, microtubules and PI3-kinase activity. As assessed with fluorescent probes, B. abortus infection did not affect the viability of A549 and 16HBE14o- cells, but increased the percentage of injured cells (both strains) and dead cells (RB51) in Calu-6 cultures. LDH levels were increased in supernatants of Calu-6 and 16HBE14o- cells infected with B. abortus RB51, and to a lower extent in Calu-6 infected with B. abortus 2308. No apoptosis was detected by TUNEL upon infection with smooth or rough B. abortus. This study shows that smooth brucellae can infect and replicate in human respiratory epithelial cells inducing minimal or null cytotoxicity. (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Endoscopic laser reshaping of rabbit tracheal cartilage: preliminary investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Walter; Lam, Anthony; Protsenko, Dmitry; Wong, Brian J.

    2005-04-01

    Background: Tracheal cartilage deformities due to trauma, prolonged endotracheal intubation or infection are difficult to correct. Current treatment options such as dilation, laser ablation, stent placement, and segmental resection are only temporary or carry significant risks. The objectives of this project were to design and test a laser activated endotracheal stent system that can actively modify the geometry of tracheal cartilage, leading to permanent retention of a new and desirable tracheal geometry. Methods: Ex vivo rabbit tracheal cartilage (simulating human neonate trachea) were irradiated with an Er: Glass laser, (λ= 1.54um, 0.5W-2.5W, 1 sec to 5 sec). Shape change and gross thermal injury were assessed visually to determine the best laser power parameters for reshaping. A rigid endoscopic telescope and hollow bronchoscope were used to record endoscopic images. The stent was constructed from nitinol wire, shaped into a zigzag configuration. An ex vivo testing apparatus was also constructed. Results: The best laser power parameter to produce shape change was 1 W for 6-7 seconds. At this setting, there was significant shape change with only minimal thermal injury to the tracheal mucosa, as assessed by visual inspection. The bronchoscopy system functioned adequately during testing in the ex vivo testing apparatus. Conclusion: We have successfully designed instrumentation and created the capability to endoscopically reshape tracheal cartilage in an ex vivo rabbit model. The results obtained in ex vivo tracheal cartilage indicated that reshaping using Er: Glass laser can be accomplished.

  17. Galectin‑3 induces the phenotype transformation of human vascular smooth muscle cells via the canonical Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lei; Chen, Kan; Cao, Jiatian; Han, Zhihua; Wang, Yue; Gao, Lin; Fan, Yuqi; Wang, Changqian

    2017-06-01

    Galectin‑3, a galactoside‑binding protein, is highly expressed in carotid plaques and plays an important role in the atherosclerotic lesions. The phenotype transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells is the basic pathological change of atherosclerosis. This study investigated the effects of exogenous galectin‑3 on the function and phenotype transformation of human umbilical vascular smooth muscle cells (HUSMC). In this study, we treated vascular smooth muscle cells with recombinant galectin‑3 and tested its effect on cell proliferation, migration, and phenotype transformation. Our results showed that exogenous galectin‑3 promoted human umbilical vascular smooth muscle cells (HUSMC) proliferation and migration. Exogenous galectin‑3 enhanced the expression of the smooth muscle synthetic protein osteopontin, smooth muscle contractile proteins calponin and smooth muscle α‑actin. The galectin‑3‑induced change in cell phenotype was associated with the activation of canonical Wnt signaling, as measured by β‑catenin axin2 and cyclin D1 expression. β‑catenin inhibition by small interfering RNA reduced cell proliferation, decreased cell motility, and blocked galectin‑3‑induced phenotype transformation of human umbilical vascular smooth muscle cells (HUSMC). Our data suggest galectin‑3 promotes the phenotype transformation of human umbilical vascular smooth muscle cells (HUSMC) by activating Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway.

  18. Tachyphylaxis to beta-adrenoceptor agonists in human bronchial smooth muscle: studies in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C; Conolly, M E

    1980-01-01

    In studies on human isolated peripheral airway smooth muscle; 1 A concentration dependent beta-adrenoceptor tachyphylaxis was observed to isoprenaline. 2 Cross desensitization to other beta-adrenoceptor agonists was demonstrated. 3 The desensitization was reversible with time. Hydrocortisone appeared to accelerate the recovery from the desensitized state. Low concentration isoprenaline (10(-9) mol l-1) prevented recovery whereas cyclohexamide 1.8 x 10(-4) mol l-1 had no noticeable effect on recovery. Continued occupancy of the receptor appears to prevent recovery. The recovery from the desensitized state does not apparently require synthesis of new proteins. 4 Bronchial wall cyclic AMP response to isoprenaline was attenuated after isoprenaline induced desensitization whereas total phosphodiesterase activity of bronchial wall was not altered by desensitization. Thus by exclusion the adenylate cyclase receptor complex may be altered in human peripheral airway smooth muscle beta-adrenoceptor tachyphylaxis. PMID:6108126

  19. Assays for in vitro monitoring of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell migration.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Migration of human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells contributes to vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis. Evidence also indicates that, in part, migration of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells may contribute to airway remodeling associated with asthma. Here we describe migration of VSM and ASM cells in vitro using Transwell or Boyden chamber assays. Because dissecting signaling mechanisms regulating cell migration requires molecular approaches, our protocol also describes how to assess migration of transfected VSM and ASM cells. Transwell or Boyden chamber assays can be completed in approximately 8 h and include plating of serum-deprived VSM or ASM cell suspension on membrane precoated with collagen, migration of cells toward chemotactic gradient and visual (Transwell) or digital (Boyden chamber) analysis of membrane. Although the Transwell assay is easy, the Boyden chamber assay requires hands-on experience; however, both assays are reliable cell-based approaches providing valuable information on how chemotactic and inflammatory factors modulate VSM and ASM migration.

  20. Differential Effect of Zoledronic Acid on Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Albadawi, Hassan; Haurani, Mounir J.; Oklu, Rahmi; Trubiano, Jordan P.; Laub, Peter J.; Yoo, Hyung-Jin; Watkins, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The activation of human vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, adhesion and migration is essential for intimal hyperplasia formation. These experiments were designed to test whether Zoledronic Acid (ZA) would modulate indices of human smooth muscle cell activation, exert differential effects on proliferating vs. quiescent cells and determine whether these effects were dependent on GTPase binding proteins prenylation. ZA was chosen for testing in these experiments because it is clinically used in humans with cancer, and has been shown to modulate rat smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration. Methods Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC) were cultured under either proliferating or growth arrest (quiescent) conditions in the presence or absence of ZA for 48 hours, whereupon the effect of ZA on HASMC proliferation, cellular viability, metabolic activity and membrane integrity were compared. In addition, the effect of ZA on adhesion and migration were assessed in proliferating cells. The effect of increased concentration of ZA on the mevalonate pathway and genomic/cellular stress related poly ADP Ribose polymerase (PARP) enzyme activity were assessed using the relative prenylation of Rap-1A/B protein and the formation of poly ADP- ribosylated proteins (PAR) respectively. Results There was a dose dependent inhibition of cellular proliferation, adhesion and migration following ZA treatment. ZA treatment decreased indices of cellular viability and significantly increased membrane injury in proliferating vs. quiescent cells. This was correlated with the appearance of unprenylated Rap-1A protein and dose dependent down regulation of PARP activity. Conclusions These data suggest that ZA is effective in inhibiting HASMC proliferation, adhesion and migration which coincide with the appearance of unprenylated RAP-1A/B protein, thereby suggesting that the mevalonate pathway may play a role in the inhibition of HASMC activation. PMID:23164362

  1. Surgical Skin Markers Impair Human Saphenous Vein Graft Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    EAGLE, SUSAN; BROPHY, COLLEEN M.; KOMALAVILAS, PADMINI; HOCKING, KYLE; PUTUMBAKA, GOWTHAMI; OSGOOD, MICHAEL; SEXTON, KEVIN; LEACCHE, MARZIA; CHEUNG-FLYNN, JOYCE

    2012-01-01

    Marking human saphenous vein graft (HSV) with a surgical skin marker to prevent twisting on implantation is a common practice in peripheral and coronary artery bypass procedures. This study is designed to examine the effects of surgical skin markers on the HSV smooth muscle and endothelial functional responses. De-identified HSV remnants were collected during peripheral and coronary artery bypass procedures. Physiologic responses of the HSV were measured using a muscle bath. Veins that were marked with surgical skin markers intraoperatively generated significantly less contractile force to depolarizing KCl (110 mM) and receptor-mediated contractile agonists than unmarked HSV, suggesting that surgical skin markers impaired HSV smooth muscle contractility. To directly access the effects of chemical components in the surgical skin markers, unmarked HSV was exposed to isopropyl alcohol (a solvent commonly used in surgical skin markers) or methylene blue (a dye). Smooth muscle contractility was significantly reduced by isopropyl alcohol and methylene blue. Endothelial-dependent relaxation to carbachol was significantly reduced after exposure to surgical skin markers. Our data demonstrated that marking HSV with surgical skin markers reduces smooth muscle and endothelial functional viability. PMID:21944360

  2. Macrophages and smooth muscle cells express lipoprotein lipase in human and rabbit atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, S; Lipton, B A; Rosenfeld, M E; Goldberg, I J; Steinberg, D; Witztum, J L

    1991-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL; EC 3.1.1.34) may promote atherogenesis by producing remnant lipoproteins on the endothelial surface and by acting on lipoproteins in the artery wall. In vitro, smooth muscle cells and macrophages synthesize LPL, but in human carotid lesions only a few smooth muscle cells were reported to contain LPL protein. Endothelial cells do not synthesize LPL in vitro, but in normal arteries intense immunostaining for LPL is present on the endothelium. We used Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and immunocytochemistry of human and rabbit arteries to determine cellular distribution and the site of the synthesis of LPL in atherosclerotic lesions. Northern blot analysis showed that LPL mRNA was detectable in macrophage-derived foam cells isolated from arterial lesions of "ballooned" cholesterol-fed rabbits. In situ hybridization studies of atherosclerotic lesions with an antisense riboprobe showed a strong hybridization signal for LPL mRNA in some, but not all, lesion macrophages, which were mostly located in the subendothelial and edge areas of the lesions. Also, some smooth muscle cells in lesion areas also expressed LPL mRNA. Immunocytochemistry of frozen sections of rabbit lesions with a monoclonal antibody to human milk LPL showed intense staining for LPL protein in macrophage-rich intimal lesions. The results suggest that lesion macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells express LPL mRNA and protein. Some smooth muscle cells in the lesion areas also synthesize LPL. These data are consistent with an important role for LPL in atherogenesis. Images PMID:1719546

  3. Long-term expression of human adenosine deaminase in vascular smooth muscle cells of rats: A model for gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, C.M.; Miller, A.D. ); Clowes, M.M.; Osborne, W.R.A.; Clowes, A.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  4. Comparison of human bronchiolar smooth muscle responsiveness in vitro with histological signs of inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    de Jongste, J C; Mons, H; Van Strik, R; Bonta, I L; Kerrebijn, K F

    1987-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the hypothesis that chronic inflammation is associated with increased sensitivity or contractility of human airway smooth muscle. Bronchiolar strips from 30 patients, 12 of whom had chronic bronchitis, were examined in the organ bath for their responses to histamine, methacholine, and leukotriene (LT) C4. The same airways were also studied histologically and small airway disease was quantified by subjective grading of the degree of inflammatory cell infiltration, smooth muscle hypertrophy, fibrosis, and goblet cell hyperplasia. The degree of small airway disease varied widely among patients both with and without chronic bronchitis. Multiple regression analysis failed to show increased sensitivity (-log EC50) to histamine, methacholine, or LTC4 in relation to small airway disease. In contrast, the only significant correlations found were between a decreased -log EC50 to histamine and methacholine and an increased small airway disease score. Contractile responses (Tmax) to histamine and methacholine in peripheral airways tended to be higher in patients with chronic bronchitis than in those without. Tmax was not related to small airway disease scores. These results suggest that chronic airway inflammation does not cause in vitro hyperresponsiveness of human small airway smooth muscle. Images PMID:3321543

  5. Evidence against vasoactive intestinal polypeptide as the relaxant neurotransmitter in human cavernosal smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, R. S.; Powell, P. H.; Zar, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The putative role of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) as the relaxant neurotransmitter in human cavernosal smooth muscle has been studied in isolated tissue preparations. 2. Consistent neurogenic relaxations were evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS; 2-64 pulses/train, 0.8 ms pulse duration, 10 Hz). VIP (0.1-3 microM) relaxed cavernosal smooth muscle in a dose-dependent fashion. Relaxant responses to both EFS and VIP were reduced in tissue from impotent men. 3. Neurogenic relaxant responses were not diminished in the presence of the VIP-inactivating peptidase, alpha-chymotrypsin (alpha-CT, 2 units ml-1). In contrast VIP-induced relaxations were completely abolished. 4. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by NG-nitro-L-arginine (30 microM), and of guanylate cyclase by methylene blue (50 microM) caused highly significant reductions of neurogenic relaxant responses whereas VIP-evoked relaxations were unaffected. 5. It is concluded that VIP-evoked relaxations are not mediated by the NO-guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) pathway and that VIP release is not essential for neurogenic relaxation of human cavernosal smooth muscle. VIP does not therefore act as the major relaxant neurotransmitter in this tissue. PMID:8095418

  6. Otilonium bromide inhibits calcium entry through L-type calcium channels in human intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Strege, P R; Evangelista, S; Lyford, G L; Sarr, M G; Farrugia, G

    2004-04-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is used as an intestinal antispasmodic. The mechanism of action of OB is not completely understood. As Ca(2+) entry into intestinal smooth muscle is required to trigger contractile activity, our hypothesis was that OB blocked Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels. Our aim was to determine the effects of OB on Ca(2+), Na(+) and K(+) ion channels in human jejunal circular smooth muscle cells and on L-type Ca(2+) channels expressed heterologously in HEK293 cells. Whole cell currents were recorded using standard patch clamp techniques. Otilonium bromide (0.09-9 micromol L(-1)) was used as this reproduced clinical intracellular concentrations. In human circular smooth muscle cells, OB inhibited L-type Ca(2+) current by 25% at 0.9 micromol L(-1) and 90% at 9 micromol L(-1). Otilonium bromide had no effect on Na(+) or K(+) currents. In HEK293 cells, 1 micromol L(-1) OB significantly inhibited the expressed L-type Ca(2+) channels. Truncation of the alpha(1C) subunit C and N termini did not block the inhibitory effects of OB. Otilonium bromide inhibited Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) at concentrations similar to intestinal tissue levels. This effect may underlie the observed muscle relaxant effects of the drug.

  7. Premature birth is associated with not fully differentiated contractile smooth muscle cells in human umbilical artery.

    PubMed

    Roffino, S; Lamy, E; Foucault-Bertaud, A; Risso, F; Reboul, R; Tellier, E; Chareyre, C; Dignat-George, F; Simeoni, U; Charpiot, P

    2012-06-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) participate to the regulation of peripheral arterial resistance and blood pressure. To assume their function, SMCs differentiate throughout the normal vascular development from a synthetic phenotype towards a fully differentiated contractile phenotype by acquiring a repertoire of proteins involved in contraction. In human fetal muscular arteries and umbilical arteries (UAs), no data are available regarding the differentiation of SMCs during the last trimester of gestation. The objective of this study was to characterize the phenotype of SMCs during this gestation period in human UAs. We investigated the phenotype of SMCs in human UAs from very preterm (28-31 weeks of gestation), late preterm (32-35 weeks) and term (37-41 weeks) newborns using biochemical and immunohistochemical detection of α-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, smoothelin, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain. We found that the number of SMCs positive for smoothelin in UAs increased with gestational age. Western blot analysis revealed a higher content of smoothelin in term compared to very preterm UAs. These results show that SMCs in human UAs gradually acquire a fully differentiated contractile phenotype during the last trimester of gestation and thus that premature birth is associated with not fully differentiated contractile SMCs in human UAs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Altered Expression of Human Smooth Muscle Myosin Phosphatase Targeting (MYPT) Isovariants with Pregnancy and Labor.

    PubMed

    Lartey, Jon; Taggart, Julie; Robson, Stephen; Taggart, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light-chain phosphatase is a trimeric protein that hydrolyses phosphorylated myosin II light chains (MYLII) to cause relaxation in smooth muscle cells including those of the uterus. A major component of the phosphatase is the myosin targeting subunit (MYPT), which directs a catalytic subunit to dephosphorylate MYLII. There are 5 main MYPT family members (MYPT1 (PPP1R12A), MYPT2 (PPP1R12B), MYPT3 (PPP1R16A), myosin binding subunit 85 MBS85 (PPP1R12C) and TIMAP (TGF-beta-inhibited membrane-associated protein (PPP1R16B)). Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated smooth muscle relaxation has in part been attributed to activation of the phosphatase by PKG binding to a leucine zipper (LZ) dimerization domain located at the carboxyl-terminus of PPP1R12A. In animal studies, alternative splicing of PPP1R12A can lead to the inclusion of a 31-nucleotide exonic segment that generates a LZ negative (LZ-) isovariant rendering the phosphatase less sensitive to NO vasodilators and alterations in PPP1R12ALZ- and LZ+ expression have been linked to phenotypic changes in smooth muscle function. Moreover, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C, but not PPP1R16A or PPP1R16B, have the potential for LZ+/LZ- alternative splicing. Yet, by comparison to animal studies, the information on human MYPT genomic sequences/mRNA expressions is scant. As uterine smooth muscle undergoes substantial remodeling during pregnancy we were interested in establishing the patterns of expression of human MYPT isovariants during this process and also following labor onset as this could have important implications for determining successful pregnancy outcome. We used cross-species genome alignment, to infer putative human sequences not available in the public domain, and isovariant-specific quantitative PCR, to analyse the expression of mRNA encoding putative LZ+ and LZ- forms of PPP1R12A, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C as well as canonical PPP1R16A and PPP1R16B genes in human uterine smooth muscle from non-pregnant, pregnant and in

  9. Altered Expression of Human Smooth Muscle Myosin Phosphatase Targeting (MYPT) Isovariants with Pregnancy and Labor

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, Julie; Robson, Stephen; Taggart, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Myosin light-chain phosphatase is a trimeric protein that hydrolyses phosphorylated myosin II light chains (MYLII) to cause relaxation in smooth muscle cells including those of the uterus. A major component of the phosphatase is the myosin targeting subunit (MYPT), which directs a catalytic subunit to dephosphorylate MYLII. There are 5 main MYPT family members (MYPT1 (PPP1R12A), MYPT2 (PPP1R12B), MYPT3 (PPP1R16A), myosin binding subunit 85 MBS85 (PPP1R12C) and TIMAP (TGF-beta-inhibited membrane-associated protein (PPP1R16B)). Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated smooth muscle relaxation has in part been attributed to activation of the phosphatase by PKG binding to a leucine zipper (LZ) dimerization domain located at the carboxyl-terminus of PPP1R12A. In animal studies, alternative splicing of PPP1R12A can lead to the inclusion of a 31-nucleotide exonic segment that generates a LZ negative (LZ-) isovariant rendering the phosphatase less sensitive to NO vasodilators and alterations in PPP1R12ALZ- and LZ+ expression have been linked to phenotypic changes in smooth muscle function. Moreover, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C, but not PPP1R16A or PPP1R16B, have the potential for LZ+/LZ- alternative splicing. Yet, by comparison to animal studies, the information on human MYPT genomic sequences/mRNA expressions is scant. As uterine smooth muscle undergoes substantial remodeling during pregnancy we were interested in establishing the patterns of expression of human MYPT isovariants during this process and also following labor onset as this could have important implications for determining successful pregnancy outcome. Objectives We used cross-species genome alignment, to infer putative human sequences not available in the public domain, and isovariant-specific quantitative PCR, to analyse the expression of mRNA encoding putative LZ+ and LZ- forms of PPP1R12A, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C as well as canonical PPP1R16A and PPP1R16B genes in human uterine smooth muscle from non

  10. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L; Pedersen, Roger A; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-04-15

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening.

  11. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G.; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening. PMID:25813541

  12. Heparin fragments inhibit human vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, S.C.; Johnson, W.V.; Maciag, T.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have examined the effect of heparin on human abdominal aortic smooth muscle cell growth. Cell proliferation was inhibited by more than 90% at a concentration of 20 ..mu..g/ml in a 12 day growth assay using heparin from Sigma, Upjohn or Calbiochem. Additionally, 200 ..mu..g/ml Upjohn heparin inhibits /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by 50% in short term assays using serum or purified platelet-derived growth factor (25-100ng/ml) to initiate the cell cycle. Homogeneous size classes of heparin fragments were prepared by nitrous acid cleavage and BioGel P-10 filtration chromatography. Deca-, octa-, hexa-, tetra-, and di-saccharides inhibited proliferation by 90% at concentrations of 280, 320, 260, 180 and 100 ..mu..g/ml, respectively, in a 12 day growth assay. These data confirm the work of Castellot et.al. and extend the range of inhibitory fragments down to the tetra- and di-saccharide size. These data suggest, therefore, that di-saccharide subunit of heparin is sufficient to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. The authors are now examining the role of the anhydromannose moiety on the reducing end of the nitrous acid generated fragments as a possible mediator of heparin-induced inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase expression and activity in human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Elshaw, Shona R; Henderson, Neil; Knox, Alan J; Watson, Susan A; Buttle, David J; Johnson, Simon R

    2004-01-01

    Airway remodelling is a feature of chronic asthma comprising smooth muscle hypertrophy and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) breakdown ECM, are involved in tissue remodelling and have been implicated in airway remodelling. Although mesenchymal cells are an important source of MMPs, little data are available on airway smooth muscle (ASM) derived MMPs. We therefore investigated MMP and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) production and activity in human ASM cells.MMPs and TIMPs were examined using quantitative real-time RT–PCR, Western blotting, zymography and a quench fluorescence (QF) assay of total MMP activity.The most abundant MMPs were pro-MMP-2, pro- MMP-3, active MMP-3 and MT1-MMP. TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expression was low in cell lysates but high in conditioned medium. High TIMP secretion was confirmed by the ability of ASM-conditioned medium to inhibit recombinant MMP-2 in a QF assay. Thrombin increased MMP activity by activation of pro-MMP-2 independent of the conventional smooth muscle thrombin receptors PAR 1 and 4.In conclusion, ASM cells express pro-MMP-2, pro and active MMP-3, MMP-9 and MT1-MMP. Unstimulated cells secrete excess TIMP 1 and 2, preventing proteolytic activity. MMP-2 can be activated by thrombin which may contribute to airway remodelling. PMID:15265805

  14. Bioengineered internal anal sphincter derived from isolated human internal anal sphincter smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Somara, Sita; Gilmont, Robert R; Dennis, Robert G; Bitar, Khalil N

    2009-07-01

    The internal anal sphincter (IAS) is a specialized circular smooth muscle that maintains rectoanal continence. In vitro models are needed to study the pathophysiology of human IAS disorders. We bioengineered sphincteric rings from human IAS smooth muscle cells (SMC) and investigated their response to cholinergic stimulation as well as investigated whether protein kinase C (PKC) and Rho kinase signaling pathways remain functional. 3-Dimensional bioengineered ring (3DBR) model of the human IAS was constructed from isolated human IAS SMC obtained from surgery. Contractile properties and force generation in response to acetylcholine, PKC inhibitor calphostin-C, Rho/ROCK inhibitor Y-27632, permeable Rho/ROCK inhibitor c3-exoenzyme, and PKC activator PdBU was measured. The human IAS 3DBR has the essential characteristics of physiologically functional IAS; it generated a spontaneous myogenic basal tone, and the constructs were able to relax in response to relaxants and contract in response to contractile agents. The constructs generated dose-dependent force in response to acetylcholine. Basal tone was significantly reduced by calphostin-C but not with Y-27632. Acetylcholine-induced force generation was also significantly reduced by calphostin-C but not with Y-27632. PdBU generated force that was equal in magnitude to acetylcholine. Thus, calphostin-C inhibited PdBU-induced force generation, whereas Y-27632 and c3 exoenzyme did not. These data indicate that basal tone and acetylcholine-induced force generation depend on signaling through the PKC pathway in human IAS; PKC-mediated force generation is independent of the Rho/ROCK pathway. This human IAS 3DBR model can be used to study the pathophysiology associated with IAS malfunctions.

  15. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  16. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  17. An electrophysiological study of the smooth muscle of the human colon.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, D.

    1981-01-01

    Electrical recordings were made in vitro from preparations of human colonic smooth muscle from surgically resected specimens. The behaviour of the taenia consisted of regular spike action potentials based on a slow wave rhythm (22 +/- 5 c.p.m.), with tetanic contractions of the muscle. The actions of cholinergic drugs were studied and experiments performed to investigate the mechanism of the action potentials. The circular muscle produced clusters of spikes with solitary contractions. The differences between the two muscle layers may be of relevance to understanding the colonic electromyogram as recorded in vivo. PMID:7294682

  18. Remeshed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation of the mechanical behavior of human organs.

    PubMed

    Hieber, Simone E; Walther, Jens H; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2004-01-01

    In computer aided surgery the accurate simulation of the mechanical behavior of human organs is essential for the development of surgical simulators. In this paper we introduce particle based simulations of two different human organ materials modeled as linear viscoelastic solids. The constitutive equations for the material behavior are discretized using a particle approach based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method while the body surface is tracked using level sets. A key aspect of this approach is its flexibility which allows the simulation of complex time varying topologies with large deformations. The accuracy of the original formulation is significantly enhanced by using a particle reinitialization technique resulting in remeshed Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (rSPH). The mechanical parameters of the systems used in the simulations are derived from experimental measurements on human cadaver organs. We compare the mechanical behavior of liver- and kidney-like materials based on the dynamic simulations of a tensile test case. Moreover, we present a particle based reconstruction of the liver topology and its strain distribution under a small local load. Finally, we demonstrate a unified formulation of fluid structure interaction based on particle methods.

  19. Contribution of human smooth muscle cells to amyloid angiopathy in AL (light-chain) amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Vora, Moiz; Kevil, Christopher G; Herrera, Guillermo A

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis is a disease process that often compromises the peripheral vascular system and leads to systemic end-organ dysfunction. Although amyloid formation in vessel walls is a multifaceted process, the assembly of the native light chains (LCs) into amyloid fibrils is central to its pathogenesis. Recent evidence suggests that endocytosis and endolysosomal processing of immunoglobin LCs by host cells is essential to the formation of amyloid fibrils that are deposited in at least some tissues. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of vascular smooth muscle in amyloid angiopathy. Human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were grown on coverslips, four chamber glass slides, and growth factor-reduced Matrigel matrix in the presence of 10 µg/ml of ALs (λ and κ isotypes), nonamyloidogenic LCs, and culture medium (negative control) for 48 and 72 hours. Thereafter, a detailed light microscopic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural evaluation was conducted to verify amyloid deposition and characterize the role of SMCs in the formation of amyloid deposits in the various experimental conditions. Amyloid deposits were detected extracellulary as early as 48 hours after exposure of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to AL-LCs (amyloidogenic light chains) as confirmed by affinity to Congo red dye, thioflavin T fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. No amyloid was present in the cultures of SMCs treated with medium alone or nonamyloidogenic LCs. SMCs associated with amyloid deposits exhibited CD68, lysosome-associated membrane protein 1-1, and intracellular lambda light chain expression and only focal smooth muscle actin and muscle-specific actin positivity. Electron microscopy revealed these cells to have an expanded mature lysosomal compartment closely associated with deposits of newly formed amyloid fibrils. The interaction of amyloidogenic LCs with VSMCs is necessary for the formation of amyloid fibrils that are

  20. Mechanical Characterization and Constitutive Modeling of Human Trachea: Age and Gender Dependency.

    PubMed

    Safshekan, Farzaneh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Abdouss, Majid; Shadmehr, Mohammad B

    2016-06-08

    Tracheal disorders can usually reduce the free lumen diameter or wall stiffness, and hence limit airflow. Trachea tissue engineering seems a promising treatment for such disorders. The required mechanical compatibility of the prepared scaffold with native trachea necessitates investigation of the mechanical behavior of the human trachea. This study aimed at mechanical characterization of human tracheas and comparing the results based on age and gender. After isolating 30 human tracheas, samples of tracheal cartilage, smooth muscle, and connective tissue were subjected to uniaxial tension to obtain force-displacement curves and calculate stress-stretch data. Among several models, the Yeoh and Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic functions were best able to describe hyperelastic behavior of all three tracheal components. The mean value of the elastic modulus of human tracheal cartilage was calculated to be 16.92 ± 8.76 MPa. An overall tracheal stiffening with age was observed, with the most considerable difference in the case of cartilage. Consistently, we noticed some histological alterations in cartilage and connective tissue with aging, which may play a role in age-related tracheal stiffening. No considerable effect of gender on the mechanical behavior of tracheal components was observed. The results of this study can be applied in the design and fabrication of trachea tissue engineering scaffolds.

  1. Mechanical Characterization and Constitutive Modeling of Human Trachea: Age and Gender Dependency

    PubMed Central

    Safshekan, Farzaneh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Abdouss, Majid; Shadmehr, Mohammad B.

    2016-01-01

    Tracheal disorders can usually reduce the free lumen diameter or wall stiffness, and hence limit airflow. Trachea tissue engineering seems a promising treatment for such disorders. The required mechanical compatibility of the prepared scaffold with native trachea necessitates investigation of the mechanical behavior of the human trachea. This study aimed at mechanical characterization of human tracheas and comparing the results based on age and gender. After isolating 30 human tracheas, samples of tracheal cartilage, smooth muscle, and connective tissue were subjected to uniaxial tension to obtain force-displacement curves and calculate stress-stretch data. Among several models, the Yeoh and Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic functions were best able to describe hyperelastic behavior of all three tracheal components. The mean value of the elastic modulus of human tracheal cartilage was calculated to be 16.92 ± 8.76 MPa. An overall tracheal stiffening with age was observed, with the most considerable difference in the case of cartilage. Consistently, we noticed some histological alterations in cartilage and connective tissue with aging, which may play a role in age-related tracheal stiffening. No considerable effect of gender on the mechanical behavior of tracheal components was observed. The results of this study can be applied in the design and fabrication of trachea tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:28773579

  2. Prostanoid receptors mediating contraction in rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Root, James A; Davey, Dorren A; Af Forselles, Kerry J

    2015-12-15

    Selective prostaglandin EP1 antagonists have been suggested for the treatment of bladder dysfunction. This study assessed the contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes in human and non-human bladder in vitro. Classical tissue bath studies were conducted using bladder strips exposed to prostanoid agonists and antagonists. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contracted rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle strips (pEC50 7.91±0.06 (n=7), 6.40±0.13 (n=7), and 6.07±0.11 (n=5), respectively). The EP1 receptor antagonist, PF2907617 (300nM), caused a rightward shift of the PGE2 concentration-response curve in the rat bladder only (pKB 8.40±0.15, n=3). PGE2 responses in rat and macaque bladders, but not human, were antagonised by the EP3 antagonist CJ24979 (1µM). Sulprostone, a mixed EP1/EP3/FP receptor agonist, induced potent contractions of rat bladder muscle (pEC50 7.94±0.31, n=6). The FP receptor agonist, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), induced bladder contraction in all species tested, but with a lower potency in rat. The selective FP receptor agonist latanoprost caused potent contractions of macaque and human bladder strips only. SQ29548, a selective TP antagonist, and GW848687X, a mixed EP1/TP antagonist caused rightward shifts of the concentration-response curves to the selective TP agonist, U46619 (pKB estimates 8.53±0.07 and 7.56±0.06, n=3, respectively). Responses to U46619 were absent in rat preparations. These data suggest significant species differences exist in bladder contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes. We conclude that the EP1 subtype does not represent the best approach to the clinical treatment of bladder disorders targeting inhibition of smooth muscle contraction.

  3. Fiber optic tracheal detection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souhan, Brian E.; Nawn, Corinne D.; Shmel, Richard; Watts, Krista L.; Ingold, Kirk A.

    2017-02-01

    Poorly performed airway management procedures can lead to a wide variety of adverse events, such as laryngeal trauma, stenosis, cardiac arrest, hypoxemia, or death as in the case of failed airway management or intubation of the esophagus. Current methods for confirming tracheal placement, such as auscultation, direct visualization or capnography, may be subjective, compromised due to clinical presentation or require additional specialized equipment that is not always readily available during the procedure. Consequently, there exists a need for a non-visual detection mechanism for confirming successful airway placement that can give the provider rapid feedback during the procedure. Based upon our previously presented work characterizing the reflectance spectra of tracheal and esophageal tissue, we developed a fiber-optic prototype to detect the unique spectral characteristics of tracheal tissue. Device performance was tested by its ability to differentiate ex vivo samples of tracheal and esophageal tissue. Pig tissue samples were tested with the larynx, trachea and esophagus intact as well as excised and mounted on cork. The device positively detected tracheal tissue 18 out of 19 trials and 1 false positive out of 19 esophageal trials. Our proof of concept device shows great promise as a potential mechanism for rapid user feedback during airway management procedures to confirm tracheal placement. Ongoing studies will investigate device optimizations of the probe for more refined sensing and in vivo testing.

  4. H1- and H2-receptor characterization in the tracheal circulation of sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Webber, S. E.; Salonen, R. O.; Widdicombe, J. G.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of histamine, the specific H1-agonist SKF 71481-A2 and the H2-agonist dimaprit were examined on tracheal vascular resistance in sheep anaesthetized with pentobarbitone. Tracheal vascular resistance was determined by perfusing the cranial tracheal arteries at constant flows and measuring inflow pressures. Changes in tracheal smooth muscle tone were also measured. 2. Histamine and SKF 71481-A2 contracted the tracheal smooth muscle and this effect was blocked by the H1-antagonist mepyramine. Stimulation of H2-receptors with dimaprit had no effect on tracheal smooth muscle tone. 3. Histamine had a complex action on the tracheal vasculature producing either a triphasic change (early dilatation then constriction followed by late dilatation) or just a constriction. SKF 71481-A2 always produced a biphasic change in vascular resistance (dilatation followed by constriction). Dimaprit dilated the tracheal vasculature. 4. The late dilatation produced by histamine in some sheep was blocked by bilateral cervical vagotomy but the mechanism for this effect is not known. No other responses to histamine, SKF 71481-A2 or dimaprit were affected by vagotomy. 5. The vasoconstriction produced by histamine and SKF 71481-A2 was antagonized by mepyramine indicating a H1-receptor-mediated effect. Cimetidine had no effect on the vasoconstriction to histamine suggesting a lack of involvement of H2-receptors. 6. The vasodilatation produced by histamine and SKF 71481-A2 was also antagonized by mepyramine, again suggesting a H1-receptor-mediated action. Cimetidine had no effect on the vasodilator response to histamine indicating no involvement of H2-receptors in this response. 7. The dilator effect of dimaprit was antagonized by cimetidine suggesting this effect was mediated by H2-receptors. 8. We conclude that H1-receptors in the various parts of the sheep tracheal vasculature can cause increases and decreases in total tracheal vascular resistance; that H2-receptors decrease

  5. Expression of smooth muscle-specific proteins in myoepithelium and stromal myofibroblasts of normal and malignant human breast tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Lazard, D; Sastre, X; Frid, M G; Glukhova, M A; Thiery, J P; Koteliansky, V E

    1993-01-01

    The expression of several differentiation markers in normal human mammary gland myoepithelium and in certain stromal fibroblasts ("myofibroblasts") associated with breast carcinomas was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy of frozen sections. Several antibodies to smooth muscle-specific proteins (smooth muscle alpha-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chains, calponin, alpha 1-integrin, and high molecular weight caldesmon) and to epithelial-specific proteins (cytokeratins, E-cadherin, and desmoplakin) were used to show that myoepithelial cells concomitantly express epithelial and smooth muscle markers whereas adjacent luminal cells express only epithelial markers. The same antibodies were used to establish that stromal myofibroblasts exhibit smooth muscle phenotypic properties characterized by the expression of all the smooth muscle markers examined except for high molecular weight caldesmon. In addition, both myoepithelium and myofibroblasts show a significant degree of heterogeneity in smooth muscle protein expression. Thus, myoepithelial cells and stromal myofibroblasts are epithelial and mesenchymal cells, respectively, which coordinately express a set of smooth muscle markers while maintaining their specific original features. The dual nature of myoepithelial cells and the phenotypic transition of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts are examples of the plasticity of the differentiated cell phenotype. Images PMID:8430113

  6. Proteomic network analysis of human uterine smooth muscle in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Craig; Quilici, David R.; Schlauch, Karen A.; Buxton, Iain L. O.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in human uterine quiescence during gestation and the induction of labor at term or preterm are not completely known. Preterm delivery is associated with major morbidity and mortality and current efforts to prevent delivery until term are largely ineffective. Identification and semi-quantification of proteomic changes in uterine smooth muscle during pregnancy will allow for targeted research into how quiescence is maintained and what changes are associated with induction of labor. Examining preterm labor in this context will provide potential therapeutic targets for the management of preterm labor. We have recently performed two dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry on myometrial proteins isolated from pregnant patients in labor, pregnant patients not in labor, and pregnant patients in labor preterm. Using a conservative false discovery rate of 1% we have identified 2132 protein groups using this method and semi-quantitative spectral counting shows 201 proteins that have disparate levels of expression in preterm laboring samples. To our knowledge this is the first large scale proteomic study examining human uterine smooth muscle and this initial work has provided a target list for future experiments that can address how changing protein levels are involved in the induction of labor at term and preterm. PMID:26413312

  7. Pharmacological evidence for putative CCK1 receptor heterogeneity in human colon smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Morton, M F; Harper, E A; Tavares, I A; Shankley, N P

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacology of the cholecystokinin CCK1 receptors endogenously expressed in human gallbladder and human ascending colon smooth muscle tissue was compared using radioligand binding assays. Saturation analysis of the interaction between the radiolabelled, selective CCK1-receptor antagonist, [3H]-L-364,718, and enriched gastrointestinal tissue membranes suggested the presence of multiple binding sites in human colon but not human gallbladder. Competition studies, using a range of structurally diverse, CCK-receptor selective ligands provided further evidence for CCK1 receptor heterogeneity in human colon tissue (nH values significantly less than unity for SR27897=0.77±0.07, 2-NAP=0.73±0.03, YM220=0.70±0.09 and PD-134,308=0.83±0.01). Moreover, the competition data for SR27897, 2-NAP and YM220 were consistent with the interaction of these compounds at two binding sites. In contrast, in the human gallbladder assay, a single binding site model provided a good fit of the competition curve data obtained with all the CCK receptor selective compounds. The data obtained are consistent with the presence of a single CCK1 receptor binding site in the gallbladder but not in the colon. A two-site analysis of the colon data, indicated that one of the two sites was indistinguishable from that characterized in the gallbladder. The molecular basis of the apparent receptor heterogeneity in the colon remains to be established. PMID:12110612

  8. Anatomy of the human penis: the relationship of the architecture between skeletal and smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Geng-Long; Hsieh, Cheng-Hsing; Wen, Hsien-Sheng; Hsu, Wen-Long; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Chen, Shyh-Chyan; Tseng, Guo-Fang

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the anatomy of the ischiocavernosus muscle, bulbospongiosus muscle, and tunica albuginea and to determine their relationships to smooth muscle, which is a key element of penile sinusoids, we performed cadaveric dissection and histologic examinations of 35 adult human male cadavers. The tunica of the corpora cavernosa is a bilayered structure that can be divided into an inner circular layer and an outer longitudinal layer. The outer longitudinal layer is an incomplete coat that is absent between the 5-o'clock and 7-o'clock positions where 2 triangular ligamentous structures form. These structures, termed the ventral thickening, are a continuation of the anterior fibers of the left and right bulbospongiosus muscles. On the dorsal aspect, between the 1-o'clock and 11-o'clock positions, is a region called the dorsal thickening, a radiating aspect of the bilateral ischiocavernosus muscles. In the corpora cavernosa, skeletal muscle contains and supports smooth muscle, which is an essential element in the sinusoids. This relationship plays an important part in the blood vessels' ability to supply the blood to meet the requirements for erection, whereas in the corpus spongiosum, skeletal muscle partially entraps the smooth muscle to allow ejaculation when erect. In the glans penis, however, the distal ligament, a continuation of the outer longitudinal layer of the tunica, is arranged centrally and acts as a trunk of the glans penis. Without this strong ligament, the glans would be too weak to bear the buckling pressure generated during coitus. A significant difference exists in the thickness of the dorsal thickening, the ventral thickening, and the distal ligament between the potent and impotent groups (P < or =.01). Together, the anatomic relationships between skeletal muscle and smooth muscle within the human penis explain many physiologic phenomena, such as erection, ejaculation, the intracavernous pressure surge during ejaculation, and the pull

  9. Regulatory mechanism of human vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic transformation induced by NELIN

    PubMed Central

    PEI, CHANGAN; QIN, SHIYONG; WANG, MINGHAI; ZHANG, SHUGUANG

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disorders, including hypertension, atherosclerosis and restenosis, arise from dysregulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation, which can be controlled by regulatory factors. The present study investigated the regulatory mechanism of the phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs by NELIN in order to evaluate its potential as a preventive and therapeutic of vascular disorders. An in vitro model of NELIN-overexpressing VSMCs was prepared by transfection with a lentiviral (LV) vector (NELIN-VSMCs) and NELIN was slienced using an a lentiviral vector with small interfering (si)RNA in another group (LV-NELIN-siRNA-VSMCs). The effects of NELIN overexpression or knockdown on the phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs were observed, and its regulatory mechanism was studied. Compared with the control group, cells in the NELIN-VSMCs group presented a contractile phenotype with a significant increase of NELIN mRNA, NELIN protein, smooth muscle (SM)α-actin and total Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) protein expression. The intra-nuclear translocation of SMα-actin-serum response factor (SMα-actin-SRF) occurred in these cells simultaneously. Following exposure to Rho kinsase inhibitor Y-27632, SRF and SMα-actin expression decreased. However, cells in the LV-NELIN-siRNA-VSMCs group presented a synthetic phenotype, and the expression of NELIN mRNA, NELIN protein, SMα-actin protein and total RhoA protein was decreased. The occurrence of SRF extra-nuclear translocation was observed. In conclusion, the present study suggested that NELIN was able to activate regulatory factors of SMα-actin, RhoA and SRF successively in human VSMCs cultured in vitro. Furthermore, NELIN-induced phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs was regulated via the RhoA/SRF signaling pathway. The results of the present study provide a foundation for the use of NELIN in preventive and therapeutic treatment of vascular remodeling diseases, including varicosity and

  10. Activation properties of chemically skinned fibres from human isolated bronchial smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Savineau, J P; Marthan, R

    1994-01-01

    1. The contractile activation properties of human isolated bronchial smooth muscle were investigated using chemically (beta-escin) skinned strips. 2. Concentration-dependent contractions were induced by free ion concentrations of Ca2+ (0.5-3 microM), Sr2+ (2-200 microM) and Ba2+ (50-1000 microM). The resulting -log[cation]-tension relationships were fitted by sigmoidal curves with EC50 values (cation concentration required to produce half-maximal tension) and co-operativity factors (Hill coefficient, nH) of, respectively, 0.25 microM and 3.4 for Ca2+, 12 microM and 2.64 for Sr2+ and 100 microM and 1.73 for Ba2+. Maximal responses to Sr2+ and Ba2+ were 125.5 +/- 15.4 and 96 +/- 8.1% (n = 5) respectively of the maximum tension induced by Ca2+. 3. Trifluoperazine (5-100 microM), cyclic AMP (50-300 microM) and cyclic GMP (50-100 microM) each antagonized Ca2+ in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, okadaic acid (OA, 0.2-1 microM) potentiated Ca2+ and increased the maximum response to Ca2+ (+25 +/- 5.4%, n = 5, for 1 microM OA). 4. This study has demonstrated the high Ca2+ sensitivity of the activation mechanism of human isolated bronchial smooth muscle. It also suggests that control of the contractile machinery in the human bronchus involves processes of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The beta-escin-treated human bronchus may be a useful model for investigating the cellular basis of some pathophysiological processes such as bronchial hyper-responsiveness. PMID:8014904

  11. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  12. New laser tracheal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungemach, Josef; Foth, Hans-Jochen; Hoermann, Karl; Preponis, E.

    1996-09-01

    The complication of a laser induced tube fire during surgery was first published in 1979. The protection of tracheal tubes against ignition is necessary to enable a safe laser surgery of the upper airway. in an experimental study a new compound tube was tested: this tube had a higher laser resistance than a pure metal tube. The damage threshold of this tube was tested against the emission of various lasers as CO2. The metal tube was damaged within seconds at CO2 laser power densities of 103 W/cm2 whereas the damage threshold of the compound tube was 3.106 W/cm2. We compared the compound laser tube to the so far used metal tube in a prospective clinical trial in our department of ENT in patients undergoing CO2-laser surgery of the upper airway. 66 patients were included into the study: 33 received the compound tube, 33 the metal tube. During endotracheal intubation the handling of the compound tube was better. During laser surgery high airway pressures occured more often with the metal tube. Whereas kinking was the problem of the compound tubes. Destruction of cuffs occured in both groups but did not cause any complications. No tube or cuff fire was noticed.

  13. Bioengineering functional human sphincteric and non-sphincteric gastrointestinal smooth muscle constructs.

    PubMed

    Rego, Stephen L; Zakhem, Elie; Orlando, Giuseppe; Bitar, Khalil N

    2016-04-15

    Digestion and motility of luminal content through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are achieved by cooperation between distinct cell types. Much of the 3 dimensional (3D) in vitro modeling used to study the GI physiology and disease focus solely on epithelial cells and not smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs of the gut function either to propel and mix luminal contents (phasic; non-sphincteric) or to act as barriers to prevent the movement of luminal materials (tonic; sphincteric). Motility disorders including pyloric stenosis and chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO) affect sphincteric and non-sphincteric SMCs, respectively. Bioengineering offers a useful tool to develop functional GI tissue mimics that possess similar characteristics to native tissue. The objective of this study was to bioengineer 3D human pyloric sphincter and small intestinal (SI) constructs in vitro that recapitulate the contractile phenotypes of sphincteric and non-sphincteric human GI SMCs. Bioengineered 3D human pylorus and circular SI SMC constructs were developed and displayed a contractile phenotype. Constructs composed of human pylorus SMCs displayed tonic SMC characteristics, including generation of basal tone, at higher levels than SI SMC constructs which is similar to what is seen in native tissue. Both constructs contracted in response to potassium chloride (KCl) and acetylcholine (ACh) and relaxed in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These studies provide the first bioengineered human pylorus constructs that maintain a sphincteric phenotype. These bioengineered constructs provide appropriate models to study motility disorders of the gut or replacement tissues for various GI organs.

  14. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that KATP channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K(+) channels triggers K(+) efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca(2+)entry through closing voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. Intracellular Ca(2+) is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K(+) efflux decreases Ca(2+) influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a KATP channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective KATP channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt antagonize the proliferating and migrating effects of PDGF-BB on

  15. Little ROCK is a ROCK1 pseudogene expressed in human smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequencing of the human genome has identified numerous chromosome copy number additions and subtractions that include stable partial gene duplications and pseudogenes that when not properly annotated can interfere with genetic analysis. As an example of this problem, an evolutionary chromosome event in the primate ancestral chromosome 18 produced a partial duplication and inversion of rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK1 -18q11.1, 33 exons) in the subtelomeric region of the p arm of chromosome 18 detectable only in humans. ROCK1 and the partial gene copy, which the gene databases also currently call ROCK1, include non-unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Results Here, we characterize this partial gene copy of the human ROCK1, termed Little ROCK, located at 18p11.32. Little ROCK includes five exons, four of which share 99% identity with the terminal four exons of ROCK1 and one of which is unique to Little ROCK. In human while ROCK1 is expressed in many organs, Little ROCK expression is restricted to vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lines and organs rich in smooth muscle. The single nucleotide polymorphism database (dbSNP) lists multiple variants contained in the region shared by ROCK1 and Little ROCK. Using gene and cDNA sequence analysis we clarified the origins of two non-synonymous SNPs annotated in the genome to actually be fixed differences between the ROCK1 and the Little ROCK gene sequences. Two additional coding SNPs were valid polymorphisms selectively within Little ROCK. Little ROCK-Green Fluorescent fusion proteins were highly unstable and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in vitro. Conclusion In this report we have characterized Little ROCK (ROCK1P1), a human expressed pseudogene derived from partial duplication of ROCK1. The large number of pseudogenes in the human genome creates significant genetic diversity. Our findings emphasize the importance of taking into consideration pseudogenes in all candidate gene and

  16. Little ROCK is a ROCK1 pseudogene expressed in human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Montefusco, Maria Claudia; Merlo, Kristen; Bryan, Crystal D; Surks, Howard K; Reis, Steven E; Mendelsohn, Michael E; Huggins, Gordon S

    2010-04-14

    Sequencing of the human genome has identified numerous chromosome copy number additions and subtractions that include stable partial gene duplications and pseudogenes that when not properly annotated can interfere with genetic analysis. As an example of this problem, an evolutionary chromosome event in the primate ancestral chromosome 18 produced a partial duplication and inversion of rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK1 -18q11.1, 33 exons) in the subtelomeric region of the p arm of chromosome 18 detectable only in humans. ROCK1 and the partial gene copy, which the gene databases also currently call ROCK1, include non-unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Here, we characterize this partial gene copy of the human ROCK1, termed Little ROCK, located at 18p11.32. Little ROCK includes five exons, four of which share 99% identity with the terminal four exons of ROCK1 and one of which is unique to Little ROCK. In human while ROCK1 is expressed in many organs, Little ROCK expression is restricted to vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lines and organs rich in smooth muscle. The single nucleotide polymorphism database (dbSNP) lists multiple variants contained in the region shared by ROCK1 and Little ROCK. Using gene and cDNA sequence analysis we clarified the origins of two non-synonymous SNPs annotated in the genome to actually be fixed differences between the ROCK1 and the Little ROCK gene sequences. Two additional coding SNPs were valid polymorphisms selectively within Little ROCK. Little ROCK-Green Fluorescent fusion proteins were highly unstable and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in vitro. In this report we have characterized Little ROCK (ROCK1P1), a human expressed pseudogene derived from partial duplication of ROCK1. The large number of pseudogenes in the human genome creates significant genetic diversity. Our findings emphasize the importance of taking into consideration pseudogenes in all candidate gene and genome-wide association studies, as

  17. Differentiation of Human Induced-Pluripotent Stem Cells into Smooth-Muscle Cells: Two Novel Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Libang; Geng, Zhaohui; Nickel, Thomas; Johnson, Caitlin; Gao, Lin; Dutton, James; Hou, Cody; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Conventional protocols for differentiating human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can be inefficient and generally fail to yield cells with a specific SMC phenotype (i.e., contractile or synthetic SMCs). Here, we present two novel hiPSC-SMC differentiation protocols that yield SMCs with predominantly contractile or synthetic phenotypes. Flow cytometry analyses of smooth-muscle actin (SMA) expression indicated that ~45% of the cells obtained with each protocol assumed an SMC phenotype, and that the populations could be purified to ~95% via metabolic selection. Assessments of cellular mRNA and/or protein levels indicated that SMA, myosin heavy chain II, collagen 1, calponin, transgelin, connexin 43, and vimentin expression in the SMCs obtained via the Contractile SMC protocol and in SMCs differentiated via a traditional protocol were similar, while SMCs produced via the Sythetic SMC protocol expressed less calponin, more collagen 1, and more connexin 43. Differences were also observed in functional assessments of the two SMC populations: the two-dimensional surface area of Contractile SMCs declined more extensively (to 12% versus 44% of original size) in response to carbachol treatment, while quantification of cell migration and proliferation were greater in Synthetic SMCs. Collectively, these data demonstrate that our novel differentiation protocols can efficiently generate SMCs from hiPSCs. PMID:26771193

  18. Co-cultivation of human aortic smooth muscle cells with epicardial adipocytes affects their proliferation rate.

    PubMed

    Ždychová, J; Čejková, S; Králová Lesná, I; Králová, A; Malušková, J; Janoušek, L; Kazdová, L

    2014-01-01

    The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Adipocytes produce several bioactive paracrine substances that can affect the growth and migration of VSMCs. Our study focuses on the direct effect of the bioactive substances in conditioned media (CM) that was obtained by incubation with primary adipocyte-derived cell lines, including cell lines derived from both preadipocytes and from more mature cells, on the proliferation rate of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMCs). We used a Luminex assay to measure the adipokine content of the CM and showed that there was a higher concentration of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in renal preadipocyte-CM compared with the HAoSMC control (p<0.5). The addition of both renal preadipocyte- and epicardial adipocyte- CM resulted in the elevated production of vascular endothelial growth factor compared with the control HASoSMC CM (p<0.001). The adiponectin content in renal adipocyte-CM was increased compared to all the remaining adipocyte-CM (p<0.01). Moreover, the results showed a higher proliferation rate of HAoSMCs after co-culture with epicardial adipocyte-CM compared to the HAoSMC control (p<0.05). These results suggest that bioactive substances produced by adipocytes have a stimulatory effect on the proliferation of VSMCs.

  19. Intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling during the phenotypic journey of human coronary smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Eva; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Sobradillo, Diego; Rocher, Asunción; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells undergo phenotypic switches after damage which may contribute to proliferative disorders of the vessel wall. This process has been related to remodeling of Ca(2+) channels. We have tested the ability of cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) to return from a proliferative to a quiescent behavior and the contribution of intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling to the process. We found that cultured, early passage hCASMCs showed a high proliferation rate, sustained increases in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in response to angiotensin II, residual voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry, increased Stim1 and enhanced store-operated currents. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited store-operated Ca(2+) entry and abolished cell proliferation in a mitochondria-dependent manner. After a few passages, hCASMCs turned to a quiescent phenotype characterized by lack of proliferation, oscillatory Ca(2+) response to angiotensin II, increased Ca(2+) store content, enhanced voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry and Cav1.2 expression, and decreases in Stim1, store-operated current and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. We conclude that proliferating hCASMCs return to quiescence and this switch is associated to a remodeling of Ca(2+) channels and their control by subcellular organelles, thus providing a window of opportunity for targeting phenotype-specific Ca(2+) channels involved in proliferation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and structure integrity in chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shih-Chieh; Kuo, Pei-Yin; Chang, Ching-Fang; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Ho, Larry Low-Tone

    2006-06-01

    The expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA) by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) during chondrogenesis was investigated by the use of pellet culture. Undifferentiated hMSCs expressed low but detectable amounts of SMA and the addition of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) to the culture medium increased SMA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Differentiation in pellet culture was rapidly induced in the presence of TGF-beta1 and was accompanied by the development of annular layers at the surface of the pellet. These peripheral layers lacked expression of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen during early differentiation. Progress in differentiation increased the synthesis of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen and the expression of SMA in these layers. Double-staining for type II collagen and SMA by immunofluorescence demonstrated the differentiation of hMSCs into cells positive for these two proteins. The addition of cytochalasin D, a potent inhibitor of the polymerization of actin microfilaments, caused damage to the structural integrity and surface smoothness of the chondrogenic pellets. The SMA-positive cells in the peripheral layers of the chondrogenic pellets mimic those within the superficial layer of articular cartilage and are speculated to play a major role in cartilage development and maintenance.

  1. Receptor-based differences in human aortic smooth muscle cell membrane stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, H.; Kamm, R. D.; So, P. T.; Lee, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimuli with diverse molecular responses. The nature of the sensory mechanism involved in mechanotransduction is not known, but integrins may play an important role. The integrins are linked to both the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, suggesting that probing cells via integrins should yield different mechanical properties than probing cells via non-cytoskeleton-associated receptors. To test the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of a cell are dependent on the receptor on which the stress is applied, human aortic smooth muscle cells were plated, and magnetic beads, targeted either to the integrins via fibronectin or to the transferrin receptor by use of an IgG antibody, were attached to the cell surface. The resistance of the cell to deformation ("stiffness") was estimated by oscillating the magnetic beads at 1 Hz by use of single-pole magnetic tweezers at 2 different magnitudes. The ratio of bead displacements at different magnitudes was used to explore the mechanical properties of the cells. Cells stressed via the integrins required approximately 10-fold more force to obtain the same bead displacements as the cells stressed via the transferrin receptors. Cells stressed via integrins showed stiffening behavior as the force was increased, whereas this stiffening was significantly less for cells stressed via the transferrin receptor (P<0.001). Mechanical characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells depend on the receptor by which the stress is applied, with integrin-based linkages demonstrating cell-stiffening behavior.

  2. Receptor-based differences in human aortic smooth muscle cell membrane stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, H.; Kamm, R. D.; So, P. T.; Lee, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimuli with diverse molecular responses. The nature of the sensory mechanism involved in mechanotransduction is not known, but integrins may play an important role. The integrins are linked to both the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, suggesting that probing cells via integrins should yield different mechanical properties than probing cells via non-cytoskeleton-associated receptors. To test the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of a cell are dependent on the receptor on which the stress is applied, human aortic smooth muscle cells were plated, and magnetic beads, targeted either to the integrins via fibronectin or to the transferrin receptor by use of an IgG antibody, were attached to the cell surface. The resistance of the cell to deformation ("stiffness") was estimated by oscillating the magnetic beads at 1 Hz by use of single-pole magnetic tweezers at 2 different magnitudes. The ratio of bead displacements at different magnitudes was used to explore the mechanical properties of the cells. Cells stressed via the integrins required approximately 10-fold more force to obtain the same bead displacements as the cells stressed via the transferrin receptors. Cells stressed via integrins showed stiffening behavior as the force was increased, whereas this stiffening was significantly less for cells stressed via the transferrin receptor (P<0.001). Mechanical characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells depend on the receptor by which the stress is applied, with integrin-based linkages demonstrating cell-stiffening behavior.

  3. Heparin induces the expression of specific matrix proteins by human intestinal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, D.L.; Perr, H.; Graham, M.F.; Diegelmann, R.F.

    1986-03-01

    Human intestinal smooth muscle (HISM) cells have recently been identified as the major cell type responsible for stricture formation in Crohn's disease. Heparin, a sulfated glycosaminoglycan, has been shown to be a key modulator of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) growth both in vivo and in vitro and to affect the phenotypic expression of proteins made by VSMC. Heparin has also been shown to effect the growth of HISM cells and in this report the authors demonstrate that heparin also has very specific effects on proteins released by HISM cells in vitro. Examination of the proteins in the culture medium of heparin-treated HISM cells observed at 3 time points following sparse plating and proliferation revealed an increase in /sup 35/S-methionine-labeled 200, 37, and 35 kd proteins. A transient effect on a 48 kd protein was observed in substrate-attached material left on the culture dish after the cells were removed with EGTA. No effects on intracellular labeled proteins could be demonstrated. The protein phenotype of HISM cells exposed to heparin appears very similar to that observed in VSMC. The release of specific proteins following exposure to heparin does not appear to be species specific. This response to heparin may reflect a significant influence of this glycosaminoglycan on the phenotypic expression of these cells.

  4. Enhanced elastin synthesis and maturation in human vascular smooth muscle tissue derived from induced-pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eoh, Joon H; Shen, Nian; Burke, Jacqueline A; Hinderer, Svenja; Xia, Zhiyong; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Gerecht, Sharon

    2017-04-01

    Obtaining vascular smooth muscle tissue with mature, functional elastic fibers is a key obstacle in tissue-engineered blood vessels. Poor elastin secretion and organization leads to a loss of specialization in contractile smooth muscle cells, resulting in over proliferation and graft failure. In this study, human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were differentiated into early smooth muscle cells, seeded onto a hybrid poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate/poly (l-lactide) (PEGdma-PLA) scaffold and cultured in a bioreactor while exposed to pulsatile flow, towards maturation into contractile smooth muscle tissue. We evaluated the effects of pulsatile flow on cellular organization as well as elastin expression and assembly in the engineered tissue compared to a static control through immunohistochemistry, gene expression and functionality assays. We show that culturing under pulsatile flow resulted in organized and functional hiPSC derived smooth muscle tissue. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed hiPSC-smooth muscle tissue with robust, well-organized cells and elastic fibers and the supporting microfibril proteins necessary for elastic fiber assembly. Through qRT-PCR analysis, we found significantly increased expression of elastin, fibronectin, and collagen I, indicating the synthesis of necessary extracellular matrix components. Functionality assays revealed that hiPSC-smooth muscle tissue cultured in the bioreactor had an increased calcium signaling and contraction in response to a cholinergic agonist, significantly higher mature elastin content and improved mechanical properties in comparison to the static control. The findings presented here detail an effective approach to engineering elastic human vascular smooth muscle tissue with the functionality necessary for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Obtaining robust, mature elastic fibers is a key obstacle in tissue-engineered blood vessels. Human induced-pluripotent stem cells have

  5. Smooth enlargement of human standing sway by instability due to weak reaction floor and noise

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Tetsuro; Aoi, Shinya; Tomita, Nozomi; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Human quiet standing is accompanied by body sway. The amplitude of this body sway is known to be larger than would be predicted from simple noise effects, and sway characteristics are changed by neurological disorders. This large sway is thought to arise from nonlinear control with prolonged periods of no control (intermittent control), and a nonlinear control system of this kind has been predicted to exhibit bifurcation. The presence of stability-dependent transition enables dynamic reaction that depends on the stability of the environment, and can explain the change in sway characteristics that accompanies some neurological disorders. This research analyses the characteristics of a system model that induces transition, and discusses whether human standing reflects such a mechanism. In mathematical analysis of system models, (intermittent control-like) nonlinear control with integral control is shown to exhibit Hopf bifurcation. Moreover, from the analytical solution of the system model with noise, noise is shown to work to smooth the enlargement of sway around the bifurcation point. This solution is compared with measured human standing sway on floors with different stabilities. By quantitatively comparing the control parameters between human observation and model prediction, enlargement of sway is shown to appear as predicted by the model analysis. PMID:26909186

  6. Smooth Muscle-Like Cells Generated from Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Marker Gene Expression and Electrophysiological Competence Comparable to Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Juliane; Lutz, Katrin A.; Neumayer, Katharina M. H.; Klein, Gerd; Seeger, Tanja; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Wörgötter, Katharina; Schmid, Sandra; Kraushaar, Udo; Guenther, Elke; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Hart, Melanie L.

    2015-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentiated toward a smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype may provide an alternative for investigators interested in regenerating urinary tract organs such as the bladder where autologous smooth muscle cells cannot be used or are unavailable. In this study we measured the effects of good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant expansion followed by myogenic differentiation of human MSCs on the expression of a range of contractile (from early to late) myogenic markers in relation to the electrophysiological parameters to assess the functional role of the differentiated MSCs and found that differentiation of MSCs associated with electrophysiological competence comparable to bladder SMCs. Within 1–2 weeks of myogenic differentiation, differentiating MSCs significantly expressed alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA; ACTA2), transgelin (TAGLN), calponin (CNN1), and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC; MYH11) according to qRT-PCR and/or immunofluorescence and Western blot. Voltage-gated Na+ current levels also increased within the same time period following myogenic differentiation. In contrast to undifferentiated MSCs, differentiated MSCs and bladder SMCs exhibited elevated cytosolic Ca2+ transients in response to K+-induced depolarization and contracted in response to K+ indicating functional maturation of differentiated MSCs. Depolarization was suppressed by Cd2+, an inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. The expression of Na+-channels was pharmacologically identified as the Nav1.4 subtype, while the K+ and Ca2+ ion channels were identified by gene expression of KCNMA1, CACNA1C and CACNA1H which encode for the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel BKCa channels, Cav1.2 L-type Ca2+ channels and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels, respectively. This protocol may be used to differentiate adult MSCs into smooth muscle-like cells with an intermediate-to-late SMC contractile phenotype exhibiting voltage-gated ion channel

  7. The rhythmic expression of clock genes attenuated in human plaque-derived vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Changpo; Tang, Xiao; Zhu, Zhu; Liao, Xiaohong; Zhao, Ran; Fu, Weiguo; Chen, Bin; Jiang, Junhao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Daqiao

    2014-01-13

    Acute myocardial infarction and stroke are more likely to occur in the early morning. Circadian pacemakers are considered to be involved in the process. Many peripheral tissues and cells also contain clock systems. In this study, we examined whether the primary cultured human plaque-derived vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) process circadian rhythmicity; furthermore, we investigated the expression difference of clock genes between normal human carotid VSMCs and human plaque-derived VSMCs. Fifty-six human carotid plaques provided the atherosclerotic tissue, and 21 samples yielded viable cultured primary VSMCs. The normal carotid VSMCs were cultured from donors' normal carotids. The mRNA levels of the target genes were measured by Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). After serum shock, both types of cells showed clear circadian expressions of Bmal1, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, Per2, Per3 and Rev-erbα mRNA; meanwhile the Clock mRNA show a rhythmic expression in plaque-derived SMCs but not in normal carotid VSMCs. The expression levels of these main clock genes were significantly attenuated in human plaque-derived VSMCs compared with normal human carotid VSMCs. The rhythm of Bmal1 mRNA in plaque-derived VSMCs was changed. The present results demonstrate that the human plaque-derived VSMCs possess different circadian rhythmicity from that of normal carotid VSMCs. The rhythm changes of clock genes in plaque-derived VSMCs may be involved in the process of atherosclerosis and finally promote the rupture of plaque.

  8. Glycosaminoglycans and Glucose Prevent Apoptosis in 4-Methylumbelliferone-treated Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Vigetti, Davide; Rizzi, Manuela; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Karousou, Evgenia; Viola, Manuela; Clerici, Moira; Hascall, Vincent C.; Ramoni, Marco F.; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have a pivotal role in cardiovascular diseases and are responsible for hyaluronan (HA) deposition in thickening vessel walls. HA regulates SMC proliferation, migration, and inflammation, which accelerates neointima formation. We used the HA synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) to reduce HA production in human aortic SMCs and found a significant increase of apoptotic cells. Interestingly, the exogenous addition of HA together with 4-MU reduced apoptosis. A similar anti-apoptotic effect was observed also by adding other glycosaminoglycans and glucose to 4-MU-treated cells. Furthermore, the anti-apoptotic effect of HA was mediated by Toll-like receptor 4, CD44, and PI3K but not by ERK1/2. PMID:21768115

  9. Glycosaminoglycans and glucose prevent apoptosis in 4-methylumbelliferone-treated human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Vigetti, Davide; Rizzi, Manuela; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M; Karousou, Evgenia; Viola, Manuela; Clerici, Moira; Hascall, Vincent C; Ramoni, Marco F; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2011-10-07

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have a pivotal role in cardiovascular diseases and are responsible for hyaluronan (HA) deposition in thickening vessel walls. HA regulates SMC proliferation, migration, and inflammation, which accelerates neointima formation. We used the HA synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) to reduce HA production in human aortic SMCs and found a significant increase of apoptotic cells. Interestingly, the exogenous addition of HA together with 4-MU reduced apoptosis. A similar anti-apoptotic effect was observed also by adding other glycosaminoglycans and glucose to 4-MU-treated cells. Furthermore, the anti-apoptotic effect of HA was mediated by Toll-like receptor 4, CD44, and PI3K but not by ERK1/2.

  10. Smooth-muscle-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells support and augment cord-like structures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vo, Elaine; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Zha, Yuanting; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon

    2010-06-01

    Engineering vascularized tissue is crucial for its successful implantation, survival, and integration with the host tissue. Vascular smooth muscle cells (v-SMCs) provide physical support to the vasculature and aid in maintaining endothelial viability. In this study, we show an efficient derivation of v-SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and demonstrate their functionality and ability to support the vasculature in vitro. Human ESCs were differentiated in monolayers and supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Human ESC-derived smooth-muscle-like cells (SMLCs) were found to highly express specific smooth muscle cell (SMC) markers--including alpha-smooth muscle actin, calponin, SM22, and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain--to produce and secrete fibronectin and collagen, and to contract in response to carbachol. In vitro tubulogenesis assays revealed that these hESC-derived SMLCs interacted with human endothelial progenitor cell (EPCs) to form longer and thicker cord-like structures in vitro. We have demonstrated a simple protocol for the efficient derivation of highly purified SMLCs from hESCs. These in vitro functional SMLCs interacted with EPCs to support and augment capillary-like structures (CLSs), demonstrating the potential of hESCs as a cell source for therapeutic vascular tissue engineering.

  11. [mRNA-binding protein Human-antigen R regulates α-SMA expression in human bronchia smooth muscle cells].

    PubMed

    Yan, Di; Gu, Xianmin; Jiang, Shujuan; Wang, Yuhong

    2015-10-13

    To investigate the role of mRNA binding protein Human-antigen R (HuR) in the over-expression of α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) stimulated by Platelet-derived Growth Factor (PDGF) in cultured human bronchia smooth muscle cells. Human bronchia smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro were divided into 0, 6, 12 and 24 h groups according to the time of PDGF treatment. Total HuR protein and total α-SMA protein expression were detected by Western blot. Total HuR mRNA and total α-SMA mRNA level were determined by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. RNA interference technology was used to down-regulate HuR protein level to study the protective effect of HuR in PDGF-stimulated α-SMA protein expression. PDGF up-regulated the expression of HuR in a time-dependent manner. The relative expression levels of whole-cell HuR protein and mRNA in 0, 6, 12, 24 h groups were 0.23±0.09, 0.42±0.11, 0.93±0.21, 1.37±0.28; 1.00±0.00, 1.09±0.03, 1.16±0.03, 1.27±0.02 (all P<0.05). The relative expression levels of α-SMA protein and mRNA in 0, 6, 12, 24 h group also showed an increase trend marked in a time-dependent manner (1.03±0.08, 1.20±0.09, 1.39±0.11, 1.58±0.10; 1.00±0.00, 1.17±0.02, 1.23±0.02, 1.45±0.03; all P<0.05). Using RNA interference technology to down-regulate HuR protein level, there was a decrease in α-SMA protein expression. PDGF stimulation can increase the expression of HuR and α-SMA in the smooth muscle cells, and HuR protein is involved in the expression of α-SMA protein stimulated by PDGF.

  12. Effect of dexamethasone on voltage-gated Na+ channel in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Toshiaki; Jo, Taisuke; Meguro, Kentaro; Oonuma, Hitoshi; Ma, Ji; Kubota, Nami; Imuta, Hiroyuki; Takano, Haruhito; Iida, Haruko; Nagase, Takahide; Nagata, Taiji

    2008-06-06

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channel (I(Na)) encoded by SCN9A mRNA is expressed in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells. We investigated the effects of dexamethasone on I(Na), by using whole-cell voltage clamp techniques, reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Acute application of dexamethasone (10(-6) M) did not affect I(Na). However, the percentage of the cells with I(Na) was significantly less in cells pretreated with dexamethasone for 48 h, and the current-density of I(Na) adjusted by cell capacitance in cells with I(Na) was also decreased in cells treated with dexamethasone. RT-PCR analysis showed that alpha and beta subunits mRNA of I(Na) mainly consisted of SCN9A and SCN1beta, respectively. Treatment with dexamethasone for 24-48 h inhibited the expression of SCN9A mRNA. The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone was concentration-dependent, and was observed at a concentration higher than 0.1 nM. The effect of dexamethasone on SCN9A mRNA was not blocked by spironolactone, but inhibited by mifepristone. The inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on SCN9A mRNA could not be explained by the changes of the stabilization of mRNA measured by using actinomycin D. These results suggest that dexamethasone inhibited I(Na) encoded by SCN9A mRNA in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells by inhibiting the transcription via the glucocorticoid receptor.

  13. Effects of menthol on circular smooth muscle of human colon: analysis of the mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Amato, Antonella; Liotta, Rosa; Mulè, Flavia

    2014-10-05

    Menthol is the major constituent of peppermint oil, an herbal preparation commonly used to treat nausea, spasms during colonoscopy and irritable bowel disease. The mechanism responsible for its spasmolytic action remains unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects induced by menthol on the human distal colon mechanical activity in vitro and to analyze the mechanism of action. The spontaneous or evoked-contractions of the circular smooth muscle were recorded using vertical organ bath. Menthol (0.1 mM-30 mM) reduced, in a concentration-dependent manner, the amplitude of the spontaneous contractions without affecting the frequency and the resting basal tone. The inhibitory effect was not affected by 5-benzyloxytryptamine (1 μM), a transient receptor potential-melastatin8 channel antagonist, or tetrodotoxin (1 μM), a neural blocker, or 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (10 µM), inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive soluble guanylyl cyclase, or tetraethylammonium (10 mM), a blocker of potassium (K+)-channels. On the contrary, nifedipine (3 nM), a voltage-activated L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, significantly reduced the inhibitory menthol actions. Menthol also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner the contractile responses caused by exogenous application of Ca2+ (75-375 μM) in a Ca2+-free solution, or induced by potassium chloride (KCl; 40 mM). Moreover menthol (1-3 mM) strongly reduced the electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked atropine-sensitive contractions and the carbachol-contractile responses. The present results suggest that menthol induces spasmolytic effects in human colon circular muscle inhibiting directly the gastrointestinal smooth muscle contractility, through the block of Ca2+ influx through sarcolemma L-type Ca2+ channels.

  14. IL-22 modulates inflammatory properties of human primary aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gorzelak-Pabis, Paulina; Chałubiński, Maciej; Wojdan, Katarzyna; Łuczak, Emilia; Borowiec, Maciej; Broncel, Marlena

    2017-01-01

    IL-22 is expressed at barrier surfaces, which suggests its critical role in the maintenance of normal barrier homeostasis and tissue repair. IL-22 can both promote pathological inflammation and prevent the destruction of tissues. The functional outcomes of IL-22 on vascular smooth muscle cells, which are shown to regulate immune processes within the vascular wall and which are involved in certain pathologies, have not been analyzed. The effect of IL-22 on the expression of novel antiand pro-inflammatory and barrier disrupting cytokines, apoptosis and the expression of adhesive molecules in human primary aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC) was investigated. Human AoSMC were induced with IL-22 for 24 h in vitro. The influence of IL-22 on IL-35 subunits EBI3 and p35, IL-33, IFN-γ and VEGF mRNA expression in Ao-SMC were assessed using real-time PCR. Additionally, the surface expression of ICAM-1 and apoptosis of AoSMC were analyzed in the flow cytometer. IL-22 caused a 2- and 3-fold increase of mRNA expression of the EBI3 and p35 IL-35 subunits, and a 40% decrease of IL-33 mRNA expression in AoSMC. Additionally, IL-22 decreased ICAM-1 expression on the surface of AoSMC by 30%. However, IL-22 affected neither IFN-γ and VEGF mRNA expression in AoSMC nor their apoptosis and viability. Our data suggest that IL-22, which is released by Th22 and NK cells, may be an agent affecting the inflammatory response of AoSMC, and thus it may regulate immune homeostasis of the vascular wall.

  15. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, P; Park, C Y; Rothen-Rutishauser, B; Tsuda, A; Sager, T M; Molina, R M; Donaghey, T C; Alencar, A M; Kasahara, D I; Ericsson, T; Millet, E J; Swenson, J; Tschumperlin, D J; Butler, J P; Brain, J D; Fredberg, J J; Gehr, P; Zhou, E H

    2010-06-06

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40-100 nm and less than 44 microm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 microm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 microM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases.

  16. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) affects hyaluronan synthesis in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Viola, Manuela; Bartolini, Barbara; Vigetti, Davide; Karousou, Evgenia; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Wight, Thomas N; Hascall, Vincent C; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2013-10-11

    Thickening of the vessel in response to high low density lipoprotein(s) (LDL) levels is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, characterized by increased hyaluronan (HA) deposition in the neointima. Human native LDL trapped within the arterial wall undergoes modifications such as oxidation (oxLDL). The aim of our study is to elucidate the link between internalization of oxLDL and HA production in vitro, using human aortic smooth muscle cells. LDL were used at an effective protein concentration of 20-50 μg/ml, which allowed 80% cell viability. HA content in the medium of untreated cells was 28.9 ± 3.7 nmol HA-disaccharide/cell and increased after oxLDL treatment to 53.9 ± 5.6. OxLDL treatments doubled the transcripts of HA synthase HAS2 and HAS3. Accumulated HA stimulated migration of aortic smooth muscle cells and monocyte adhesiveness to extracellular matrix. The effects induced by oxLDL were inhibited by blocking LOX-1 scavenger receptor with a specific antibody (10 μg/ml). The cholesterol moiety of LDL has an important role in HA accumulation because cholesterol-free oxLDL failed to induce HA synthesis. Nevertheless, cholesterol-free oxLDL and unmodified cholesterol (20 μg/ml) induce only HAS3 transcription, whereas 22,oxysterol affects both HAS2 and HAS3. Moreover, HA deposition was associated with higher expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (CHOP and GRP78). Our data suggest that HA synthesis can be induced in response to specific oxidized sterol-related species delivered through oxLDL.

  17. Pharmacological evidence for putative CCK(1) receptor heterogeneity in human colon smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Morton, M F; Harper, E A; Tavares, I A; Shankley, N P

    2002-07-01

    1. The pharmacology of the cholecystokinin CCK(1) receptors endogenously expressed in human gallbladder and human ascending colon smooth muscle tissue was compared using radioligand binding assays. 2. Saturation analysis of the interaction between the radiolabelled, selective CCK(1)-receptor antagonist, [(3)H]-L-364,718, and enriched gastrointestinal tissue membranes suggested the presence of multiple binding sites in human colon but not human gallbladder. 3. Competition studies, using a range of structurally diverse, CCK-receptor selective ligands provided further evidence for CCK(1) receptor heterogeneity in human colon tissue (n(H) values significantly less than unity for SR27897=0.77+/-0.07, 2-NAP=0.73+/-0.03, YM220=0.70+/-0.09 and PD-134,308=0.83+/-0.01). Moreover, the competition data for SR27897, 2-NAP and YM220 were consistent with the interaction of these compounds at two binding sites. In contrast, in the human gallbladder assay, a single binding site model provided a good fit of the competition curve data obtained with all the CCK receptor selective compounds. 4. The data obtained are consistent with the presence of a single CCK(1) receptor binding site in the gallbladder but not in the colon. A two-site analysis of the colon data, indicated that one of the two sites was indistinguishable from that characterized in the gallbladder. The molecular basis of the apparent receptor heterogeneity in the colon remains to be established. British Journal of Pharmacology (2002) 136, 873-882

  18. SIRT1 is required for mitochondrial biogenesis reprogramming in hypoxic human pulmonary arteriolar smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengyun; Liu, Yan; Burns, Nana; Zhao, Ke-Seng; Song, Rui

    2017-03-22

    Although recent studies have reported that mitochondria are putative oxygen sensors underlying hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, little is known concerning the sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory program in pulmonary arteriolar smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) during hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). We investigated the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in human PASMCs during H/R. Human PASMCs were exposed to hypoxia of 24-48 h and reoxygenation of 24-48 h. The expression of SIRT1 was reduced in a time-dependent manner. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) expression was increased during hypoxia and decreased during reoxygenation, while the release of TFAM was increased in a time-dependent manner. Lentiviral overexpression of SIRT1 preserved SIRT3 deacetylase activity in human PASMCs exposed to H/R. Knockdown of PGC-1α suppressed the effect of SIRT1 on SIRT3 activity. Knockdown of SIRT3 abrogated SIRT1-mediated deacetylation of cyclophilin D (CyPD). Notably, knockdown of SIRT3 or PGC-1α suppressed the incremental effect of SIRT1 on mitochondrial TFAM, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and cellular ATP levels. Importantly, polydatin restored SIRT1 levels in human PASMCs exposed to H/R. Knockdown of SIRT1 suppressed the effect of polydatin on mitochondrial TFAM, mtDNA content and cellular ATP levels. In conclusion, SIRT1 expression is decreased in human PASMCs during H/R. TFAM expression in mitochondria is reduced and the release of TFAM is increased by H/R. PGC-1α/SIRT3/CyPD mediates the protective effect of SIRT1 on expression and release of TFAM and mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Polydatin improves mitochondrial biogenesis and function by enhancing SIRT1 expression in hypoxic human PASMCs.

  19. Endoscopic treatment of tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Lutz; Darwiche, Kaid

    2014-02-01

    For all cases of tracheal obstructions surgery should be considered first. Interventional endoscopic procedures can provide immediate relief. Intraluminally growing tumors can be resected with laser, argon-plasma coagulation, an electrosurgical knife or cryo-probe. Photodynamic therapy of smaller tracheal tumors can be curative. Narrowing from intramural tumor growth or wall destruction requires internal splinting with an airway stent. Scar strictures can be dilated with balloons but the biotrauma may stimulate new scarring. In benign strictures and malacias, tracheal stents should only be placed if all other methods are exhausted. Complications including stent migration, mucostasis, halitosis and granulation tissue development must be considered. Most important for a good outcome is a multidisciplinary approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tracheal Sounds Acquisition Using Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Bersain A.; Reljin, Natasa; Chon, Ki H.

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal sounds have received a lot of attention for estimating ventilation parameters in a non-invasive way. The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of extracting accurate airflow, and automating the detection of breath-phase onset and respiratory rates all directly from tracheal sounds acquired from an acoustic microphone connected to a smartphone. We employed the Samsung Galaxy S4 and iPhone 4s smartphones to acquire tracheal sounds from N = 9 healthy volunteers at airflows ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 L/s. We found that the amplitude of the smartphone-acquired sounds was highly correlated with the airflow from a spirometer, and similar to previously-published studies, we found that the increasing tracheal sounds' amplitude as flow increases follows a power law relationship. Acquired tracheal sounds were used for breath-phase onset detection and their onsets differed by only 52 ± 51 ms (mean ± SD) for Galaxy S4, and 51 ± 48 ms for iPhone 4s, when compared to those detected from the reference signal via the spirometer. Moreover, it was found that accurate respiratory rates (RR) can be obtained from tracheal sounds. The correlation index, bias and limits of agreement were r2 = 0.9693, 0.11 (−1.41 to 1.63) breaths-per-minute (bpm) for Galaxy S4, and r2 = 0.9672, 0.097 (–1.38 to 1.57) bpm for iPhone 4s, when compared to RR estimated from spirometry. Both smartphone devices performed similarly, as no statistically-significant differences were found. PMID:25196108

  1. Tracheal sounds acquisition using smartphones.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Bersain A; Reljin, Natasa; Chon, Ki H

    2014-07-30

    Tracheal sounds have received a lot of attention for estimating ventilation parameters in a non-invasive way. The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of extracting accurate airflow, and automating the detection of breath-phase onset and respiratory rates all directly from tracheal sounds acquired from an acoustic microphone connected to a smartphone. We employed the Samsung Galaxy S4 and iPhone 4s smartphones to acquire tracheal sounds from N = 9 healthy volunteers at airflows ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 L/s. We found that the amplitude of the smartphone-acquired sounds was highly correlated with the airflow from a spirometer, and similar to previously-published studies, we found that the increasing tracheal sounds' amplitude as flow increases follows a power law relationship. Acquired tracheal sounds were used for breath-phase onset detection and their onsets differed by only 52 ± 51 ms (mean ± SD) for Galaxy S4, and 51 ± 48 ms for iPhone 4s, when compared to those detected from the reference signal via the spirometer. Moreover, it was found that accurate respiratory rates (RR) can be obtained from tracheal sounds. The correlation index, bias and limits of agreement were r² = 0.9693, 0.11 (-1.41 to 1.63) breaths-per-minute (bpm) for Galaxy S4, and r² = 0.9672, 0.097 (-1.38 to 1.57) bpm for iPhone 4s, when compared to RR estimated from spirometry. Both smartphone devices performed similarly, as no statistically-significant differences were found.

  2. Expression and function of K(V)2-containing channels in human urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hristov, Kiril L; Chen, Muyan; Afeli, Serge A Y; Cheng, Qiuping; Rovner, Eric S; Petkov, Georgi V

    2012-06-01

    The functional role of the voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channels in human detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is largely unexplored. Here, we provide molecular, electrophysiological, and functional evidence for the expression of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and the electrically silent K(V)9.3 subunits in human DSM. Stromatoxin-1 (ScTx1), a selective inhibitor of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and K(V)4.2 homotetrameric channels and of K(V)2.1/9.3 heterotetrameric channels, was used to examine the role of these channels in human DSM function. Human DSM tissues were obtained during open bladder surgeries from patients without a history of overactive bladder. Freshly isolated human DSM cells were studied using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, live-cell Ca(2+) imaging, and the perforated whole cell patch-clamp technique. Isometric DSM tension recordings of human DSM isolated strips were conducted using tissue baths. RT-PCR experiments showed mRNA expression of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and K(V)9.3 (but not K(V)4.2) channel subunits in human isolated DSM cells. K(V)2.1 and K(V)2.2 protein expression was confirmed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Perforated whole cell patch-clamp experiments revealed that ScTx1 (100 nM) inhibited the amplitude of the voltage step-induced K(V) current in freshly isolated human DSM cells. ScTx1 (100 nM) significantly increased the intracellular Ca(2+) level in DSM cells. In human DSM isolated strips, ScTx1 (100 nM) increased the spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude and muscle force, and enhanced the amplitude of the electrical field stimulation-induced contractions within the range of 3.5-30 Hz stimulation frequencies. These findings reveal that ScTx1-sensitive K(V)2-containing channels are key regulators of human DSM excitability and contractility and may represent new targets for pharmacological or genetic intervention for bladder dysfunction.

  3. Transforming growth factor type beta specifically stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan in human adult arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J K; Hoshi, H; McKeehan, W L

    1987-01-01

    Myo-intimal proteoglycan metabolism is thought to be important in blood vessel homeostasis, blood clotting, atherogenesis, and atherosclerosis. Human platelet-derived transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) specifically stimulated synthesis of at least two types of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in nonproliferating human adult arterial smooth muscle cells in culture. Stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis by smooth muscle cell growth promoters (epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and heparin-binding growth factors) was less than 20% of that elicited by TGF-beta. TGF-beta neither significantly stimulated proliferation of quiescent smooth muscle cells nor inhibited proliferating cells. The extent of TGF-beta stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis was similar in both nonproliferating and growth-stimulated cells. TGF-beta, which is a reversible inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, had no comparable effect on endothelial cell proteoglycan synthesis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that TGF-beta is a cell-type-specific regulator of proteoglycan synthesis in human blood vessels and may contribute to the myo-intimal accumulation of proteoglycan in atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:3474655

  4. Radioisotope measurement of the velocity of tracheal mucus

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, K.J.; Palmer, D.W.; Beste, D.J.; Carl, G.A.; Belson, T.P.; Pelc, L.R.; Toohill, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    A radioisotope scanning technique for measuring the velocity of tracheal mucus has been developed utilizing a canine model. A solution of stannous phytate labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is introduced percutaneously into the lower trachea and the upward movement of the leading edge of the radioactivity is followed by repeat scanning at 2-minute intervals using a modified rectilinear scanner, thus allowing calculation of the velocity of the mucus. It is believed that this technique may be of value in studying the effect of experimentally induced tracheal injuries on mucus velocity. Possible applications of the technique for the study of the velocity of mucus in the human trachea are discussed.

  5. Human isolated bronchial smooth muscle contains functional ryanodine/caffeine-sensitive Ca-release channels.

    PubMed

    Hyvelin, J M; Martin, C; Roux, E; Marthan, R; Savineau, J P

    2000-08-01

    Human bronchial smooth muscle (HBSM) contraction is implicated in a variety of respiratory diseases, including asthma. Yet, the presence of an operative calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) mechanism, identified in various smooth muscles, has not been established in HBSM. We therefore studied Ca-releasing mechanisms in HBSM obtained at thoracotomy with special attention to ryanodine-sensitive receptor channels (RyRs). In freshly isolated bronchial myocytes, ryanodine (0.5 to 50 microM) and caffeine (1 to 25 mM) induced transient increases in the cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Higher ryanodine concentrations (> 100 microM) inhibited the caffeine-induced [Ca(2+)](i) response, which was also blocked in the presence of tetracaine (300 microM) or ruthenium red (200 microM), two potent CICR inhibitors. In HBSM strips, caffeine induced a transient contraction which, likewise, was inhibited by ryanodine and tetracaine. However, ryanodine (200 microM) modified neither the [Ca(2+)](i) response nor the contraction induced by K(+)-rich (110 mM) solution. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNase protection assay performed in HBSM have revealed the existence of mRNAs encoding only the type 3 RyR. We also characterized acetylcholine-induced [Ca(2+)](i) and contractile responses. None of these responses was altered by ryanodine or by tetracaine. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of functional RyRs in HBSM cells which, owing to the type of isoform or the amount of protein expressed, are not involved, under physiologic conditions, in depolarization- or agonist-induced contraction.

  6. Smoking and Female Sex: Independent Predictors of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stiffening

    PubMed Central

    Dinardo, Carla Luana; Santos, Hadassa Campos; Vaquero, André Ramos; Martelini, André Ricardo; Dallan, Luis Alberto Oliveira; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Krieger, José Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2015-01-01

    Aims Recent evidence shows the rigidity of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) contributes to vascular mechanics. Arterial rigidity is an independent cardiovascular risk factor whose associated modifications in VSMC viscoelasticity have never been investigated. This study’s objective was to evaluate if the arterial rigidity risk factors aging, African ancestry, female sex, smoking and diabetes mellitus are associated with VMSC stiffening in an experimental model using a human derived vascular smooth muscle primary cell line repository. Methods Eighty patients subjected to coronary artery bypass surgery were enrolled. VSMCs were extracted from internal thoracic artery fragments and mechanically evaluated using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry assay. The obtained mechanical variables were correlated with the clinical variables: age, gender, African ancestry, smoking and diabetes mellitus. Results The mechanical variables Gr, G’r and G”r had a normal distribution, demonstrating an inter-individual variability of VSMC viscoelasticity, which has never been reported before. Female sex and smoking were independently associated with VSMC stiffening: Gr (apparent cell stiffness) p = 0.022 and p = 0.018, R2 0.164; G’r (elastic modulus) p = 0.019 and p = 0.009, R2 0.184 and G”r (dissipative modulus) p = 0.011 and p = 0.66, R2 0.141. Conclusion Female sex and smoking are independent predictors of VSMC stiffening. This pro-rigidity effect represents an important element for understanding the vascular rigidity observed in post-menopausal females and smokers, as well as a potential therapeutic target to be explored in the future. There is a significant inter-individual variation of VSMC viscoelasticity, which is slightly modulated by clinical variables and probably relies on molecular factors. PMID:26661469

  7. Distinct Effects of Inorganic Phosphate on Cell Cycle and Apoptosis in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Rahabi-Layachi, Haifa; Ourouda, Roger; Boullier, Agnes; Massy, Ziad A; Amant, Carole

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is an essential nutrient to all living organisms. Nevertheless, hyperphosphatemia is now recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular events and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. To our knowledge, the mechanisms by which elevated Pi alters smooth muscle cell proliferation have been poorly addressed. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of Pi on cell cycle regulation and apoptosis in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMC). HAoSMC were treated with physiologic (1 mM) or high (2 and 3 mM) Pi concentrations. We showed that Pi not only decreased significantly cell viability (P < 0.001) but also induced apoptosis of HAoSMC. Moreover, Pi treatment blocked G1/S cell cycle progression by increasing cell number in G0/G1 phase up to 82.4 ± 3.4% for 3 mM vs 76.2 ± 3.1% for control (P < 0.01) while decreasing cell number in S phase. Accordingly, this was associated with a decrease protein expression of cyclin E and its associated CDK (CDK2), and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein. Moreover, we observed an increase of protein expression of cell cycle inhibitors p15, p21, and p27. Interestingly, we also found that induction of cell cycle arrest was partially dependent on phosphate uptake. Our results demonstrated that Pi reduced HAoSMC proliferation by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Indeed, we showed for the first time that Pi affected HAoSMC cell cycle by blocking G1/S progression. These findings would be useful for a better understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in vascular complications observed in CKD patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Phagocytosis and cytokine response to rough and smooth colony variants of Mycobacterium abscessus by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Bodil; Ridell, Malin; Wold, Agnes E

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a non-tuberculous mycobacteria able to cause opportunistic infections in selected patient groups. During the last decades it has emerged as a cause of chronic pulmonary infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). M. abscessus strains exhibit either smooth or rough colony morphology. Strains exhibiting the rough phenotype more often cause pulmonary infections in CF patients than did the smooth ones. Here, we examined phagocytosis and production of cytokines by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, in response to M. abscessus strains with smooth and rough colony phenotype. The rough isolates all formed multicellular cords, similar to what is observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Monocytes were generally unable to internalize these rough cord isolates, in contrast with the smooth ones. Furthermore, the rough M. abscessus strains induced a distinct cytokine profile differing from that induced by the smooth ones. Rough isolates induced significantly less IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor compared to smooth strains, but more IL-1β. Both varieties induced equal amounts of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-23, IL-6, IL-8 and equally little IL-12. The ability to withstand phagocytosis might be a virulence factor contributing to the capacity of rough M. abscessus strains to give persistent pulmonary infections. © 2012 The Authors APMIS © 2012 APMIS.

  9. [Effects of human tissue kallikrein gene transfer on the migration of vascular smooth muscule cells].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-zhen; Xie, Liang-di; Zhu, Peng-li; Xu, Chang-sheng

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the effects of adenovirus-mediated human tissue kallikrein (Ad-hKLK1) gene transfer on platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-induced migration of vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats (VSMC(SHR)). A bicistronic recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-hKLK1) carrying the target hKLK1 gene and the reporter gene EGFP was constructed. VSMCs isolated from the thoracic aorta of male SHR were passaged, and the quiescent VSMC(SHR) in passages 3-6 seeded in 6-well plates were treated with Ad-hKLK1 and control virus. Human PDGF-BB or icatibant Hoe140, a BK B2 antagonistat, was used as the chemoattractant and placed in the bottom chamber of the Boyden chamber. The mRNA expressions of bradykinin B1 receptor and B2 receptor were detected by RT-PCR in VSMC(SHR). hKLK1 gene transfer significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced migration of VSMC(SHR), with the peak inhibition rate of 34.6% (P<0.001). PDGF-BB significantly increased the mRNA expression of B2 receptor but not B1 receptor in VSMC(SHR). hKLK1 gene transfer can inhibit the migration of VSMC(SHR) induced by PDGF-BB, and the inhibitory effects may be not mediated by bradykinin B2 receptor.

  10. Monocyte-expressed urokinase regulates human vascular smooth muscle cell migration in a coculture model.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Angelika; Tkachuk, Sergey; Lutter, Steffen; Haller, Hermann; Dietz, Rainer; Lipp, Martin; Dumler, Inna

    2002-01-01

    Interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) with monocytes recruited to the arterial wall at a site of injury, with resultant modulation of VSMC growth and migration, are central to the development of vascular intimal thickening. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expressed by monocytes is a potent chemotactic factor for VSMC and might serve for the acceleration of vascular remodeling. In this report, we demonstrate that coculture of human VSMC with freshly isolated peripheral blood-derived human monocytes results in significant VSMC migration that increases during the coculture period. Accordingly, VSMC adhesion was inhibited with similar kinetics. VSMC proliferation, however, was not affected and remained at the same basal level during the whole period of coculture. The increase of VSMC migration in coculture was equivalent to the uPA-induced migration of monocultured VSMC and was blocked by addition into coculture of soluble uPAR (suPAR). Analysis of uPA and uPAR expression in cocultured cells demonstrated that monocytes are a major source of uPA, whose expression increases in coculture five-fold, whereas VSMC display an increased expression of cell surface-associated uPAR. These findings indicate that upregulated uPA production by monocytes following vascular injury acts most likely as an endogenous activator of VSMC migration contributing to the remodeling of vessel walls.

  11. Interaction between human monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Maeda, Y; Takahashi, M; Takizawa, T; Okada, M; Funayama, H; Shimada, K

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a major mitogen for vascular endothelial cells, was induced by a cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cell) were cocultured. VEGF levels in the coculture medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Northern blot analysis of VEGF mRNA was performed using a specific cDNA probe. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cell produce VEGF. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs for 24 h increased VEGF levels of the culture media, 8- and 10-fold relative to those of THP-1 cells and VSMCs alone, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that VEGF mRNA expression was induced in the cocultured cells and peaked after 12 h. Immunohistochemistry disclosed that both types of cell in the coculture produced VEGF. Separate coculture experiments revealed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to VEGF production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 antibody inhibited VEGF production by the coculture of THP-1 cells and VSMCs. A cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and VSMCs induced VEGF synthesis in both types of cell. An IL-6 mediated mechanism is at least partially involved in VEGF production by the cocultures. Local VEGF production induced by a monocyte-VSMC interaction may play an important role in atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  12. Monocyte prostaglandins inhibit procollagen secretion by human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for plaque stability.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, C; Proudfoot, D; Bowyer, D E

    1999-02-01

    Extracellular matrix remodelling occurs during atherosclerosis dictating the structure of the plaque and thus the resistance to rupture. Monocytes and macrophages are believed to play a role in this remodelling. In the present study, filter-separated co-culture has been used to study the effect of monocytes on procollagen turnover by human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In this system, freshly isolated human peripheral blood monocytes inhibited procollagen secretion from VSMC without affecting either degradation of procollagen, or DNA synthesis by the VSMC. Insertion of a 12 kDa dialysis membrane between the two cell types and treatment with indomethacin showed that the inhibitory factor was of low molecular weight and was cyclooxygenase-dependent. Pre-incubation of each cell type with indomethacin demonstrated that monocyte, but not VSMC cyclooxygenase was required. Thus, the inhibitory effect on procollagen secretion was due, most likely, to monocyte prostaglandins. Neither inhibition of thromboxane synthetase, nor blocking IL-1 activity, reduced the inhibitory activity. Addition of prostaglandins PGE1, PGE2 and PGF2alpha to VSMC cultures caused a reduction in procollagen secretion which was equivalent to, but was not additive with, the maximal effect achieved by monocytes. Monocytes and macrophages are a major source of prostaglandins and these molecules are likely to play an important role in collagen turnover within lesions.

  13. Fetal human airway smooth muscle cell production of leukocyte chemoattractants is differentially regulated by fluticasone.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Helen; Britt, Rodney D; Pabelick, Christine M; Prakash, Y S; Amrani, Yassine; Pandya, Hitesh C

    2015-12-01

    Adult human airway smooth muscle (ASM) produce cytokines involved in recruitment and survival of leukocytes within airway walls. Cytokine generation by adult ASM is glucocorticoid-sensitive. Whether developing lung ASM produces cytokines in a glucocorticoid-sensitive fashion is unknown. Cultured fetal human ASM cells stimulated with TNF-α (0-20 ng/ml) were incubated with TNF-α receptor-blocking antibodies, fluticasone (1 and 100 nm), or vehicle. Supernatants and cells were assayed for the production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein and glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation. CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein production by fetal ASM cell was significantly and dose-dependently following TNF-α treatment. Cytokine mRNA and protein production were effectively blocked by TNF-α R1 and R2 receptor neutralizing antibodies but variably inhibited by fluticasone. TNF-α-induced TNF-R1 and R2 receptor mRNA expression was only partially attenuated by fluticasone. Glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation at serine (Ser) 211 but not at Ser 226 was enhanced by fluticasone. Production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 by fetal ASM appears to involve pathways that are both qualitatively and mechanistically distinct to those described for adult ASM. The findings imply developing ASM has potential to recruit leukocyte into airways and, therefore, of relevance to childhood airway diseases.

  14. Fetal human airway smooth muscle cell production of leukocyte chemoattractants is differentially regulated by fluticasone

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Helen; Britt, Rodney D.; Pabelick, Christine M.; Prakash, Y.S.; Amrani, Yassine; Pandya, Hitesh C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adult human airway smooth muscle (ASM) produce cytokines involved in recruitment and survival of leukocytes within airway walls. Cytokine generation by adult ASM is glucocorticoid-sensitive. Whether developing lung ASM produces cytokines in a glucocorticoid-sensitive fashion is unknown. Methods Cultured fetal human ASM cells stimulated with TNF-α (0–20 ng/ml) were incubated with TNF-α receptor-blocking antibodies, fluticasone (1 and 100 nm), or vehicle. Supernatants and cells were assayed for the production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein and glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation. Results CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein production by fetal ASM cell was significantly and dose-dependently following TNF-α treatment. Cytokine mRNA and protein production were effectively blocked by TNF-α R1 and R2 receptor neutralizing antibodies but variably inhibited by fluticasone. TNF-α-induced TNF-R1 and R2 receptor mRNA expression was only partially attenuated by fluticasone. Glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation at serine (Ser) 211 but not at Ser 226 was enhanced by fluticasone. Conclusion Production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 by fetal ASM appears to involve pathways that are both qualitatively and mechanistically distinct to those described for adult ASM. The findings imply developing ASM has potential to recruit leukocyte into airways and, therefore, of relevance to childhood airway diseases. PMID:26331770

  15. Nitric oxide production by cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells: stimulation by fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Tilton, R. G.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1998-01-01

    This study demonstrated that exposure of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) to fluid flow resulted in nitric oxide (NO) production, monitored by nitrite and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production. A rapid burst in nitrite production rate was followed by a more gradual increase throughout the period of flow exposure. Neither the initial burst nor the prolonged nitrite production was dependent on the level of shear stress in the range of 1.1-25 dyn/cm2. Repeated exposure to shear stress after a 30-min static period restimulated nitrite production similar to the initial burst. Ca(2+)-calmodulin antagonists blocked the initial burst in nitrite release. An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocked nitrite production, indicating that changes in nitrite reflect NO production. Treatment with dexamethasone or cycloheximide had no effect on nitrite production. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms showed no immunoreactivity on Western blots, whereas monoclonal antibodies directed against the neuronal NOS gave specific products. These findings suggest that human aortic SMC express a constitutive neuronal NOS isoform, the enzymatic activity of which is modulated by flow.

  16. Dihydrotestosterone alters cyclooxygenase-2 levels in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Osterlund, Kristen L.; Handa, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Both protective and nonprotective effects of androgens on the cardiovascular system have been reported. Our previous studies show that the potent androgen receptor (AR) agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) increases levels of the vascular inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in rodent cerebral arteries independent of an inflammatory stimulus. Little is known about the effects of androgens on inflammation in human vascular tissues. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that DHT alters COX-2 levels in the absence and presence of induced inflammation in primary human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). Furthermore, we tested the ancillary hypothesis that DHT's effects on COX-2 levels are AR-dependent. Cells were treated with DHT (10 nM) or vehicle for 6 h in the presence or absence of LPS or IL-1β. Similar to previous observations in rodent arteries, in HCASMC, DHT alone increased COX-2 levels compared with vehicle. This effect of DHT was attenuated in the presence of the AR antagonist bicalutamide. Conversely, in the presence of LPS or IL-1β, increases in COX-2 were attenuated by cotreatment with DHT. Bicalutamide did not affect this response, suggesting that DHT-induced decreases in COX-2 levels occur independent of AR stimulation. Thus we conclude that DHT differentially influences COX-2 levels under physiological and pathophysiological conditions in HCASMC. This effect of DHT on COX-2 involves AR-dependent and- independent mechanisms, depending on the physiological state of the cell. PMID:20103743

  17. Nitric oxide production by cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells: stimulation by fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Tilton, R. G.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1998-01-01

    This study demonstrated that exposure of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) to fluid flow resulted in nitric oxide (NO) production, monitored by nitrite and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production. A rapid burst in nitrite production rate was followed by a more gradual increase throughout the period of flow exposure. Neither the initial burst nor the prolonged nitrite production was dependent on the level of shear stress in the range of 1.1-25 dyn/cm2. Repeated exposure to shear stress after a 30-min static period restimulated nitrite production similar to the initial burst. Ca(2+)-calmodulin antagonists blocked the initial burst in nitrite release. An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocked nitrite production, indicating that changes in nitrite reflect NO production. Treatment with dexamethasone or cycloheximide had no effect on nitrite production. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms showed no immunoreactivity on Western blots, whereas monoclonal antibodies directed against the neuronal NOS gave specific products. These findings suggest that human aortic SMC express a constitutive neuronal NOS isoform, the enzymatic activity of which is modulated by flow.

  18. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M.; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms, and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs) OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca2+ increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27540365

  19. Effects of valsartan on angiotensin II-induced migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Ohmori, K; Nozaki, S; Mizushige, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    2000-11-01

    The migration as well as proliferation of coronary artery medial smooth muscle cells (SMC) into the intima is proposed to be an important process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerosis. In the current study, we examined the effects of the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist valsartan on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced migration of cultured human coronary artery SMC using Boyden's chamber methods. Ang II significantly stimulated human coronary artery SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-6) and 10(-8) mol/l when cells of passage 4 to 6 were used. However, the migration response to Ang II was moderately decreased in cells of passage 10 to 12, and was markedly decreased in cells of passage 15 to 17, compared to that of passage 4 to 6. Ang II-induced migration was blocked by the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist valsartan in a concentration-dependent manner. By contrast, the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist PD 123319 did not affect Ang II-induced migration. Ang II modestly increased the cell number of human coronary artery SMC after a 24-h incubation. This increase in cell numbers was also clearly blocked by valsartan, but not by PD 123319. These results indicate that Ang II stimulates migration as well as proliferation via AT1 receptors in human coronary artery SMC when cells of passage 4 to 6 are used. Valsartan may prevent the progression of coronary atherosclerosis through an inhibition of Ang II-induced migration and proliferation in these cells, although in vivo evidence is lacking.

  20. TRPC3 regulates release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Pawan K; Thompson, Michael A; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Kiel, Alexander; Jerde, Calvin; Pabelick, Christina M; Singh, Brij B; Prakash, Y S

    2013-12-01

    Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances Ca(2+) signaling and cell proliferation in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), especially with inflammation. Human ASM also expresses BDNF, raising the potential for autocrine/paracrine effects. The mechanisms by which ASM BDNF secretion occurs are not known. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) regulate a variety of intracellular processes including store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE; including in ASM) and secretion of factors such as cytokines. In human ASM, we tested the hypothesis that TRPC3 regulates BDNF secretion. At baseline, intracellular BDNF was present, and BDNF secretion was detectable by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of cell supernatants or by real-time fluorescence imaging of cells transfected with GFP-BDNF vector. Exposure to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) (20ng/ml, 48h) or a mixture of allergens (ovalbumin, house dust mite, Alternaria, and Aspergillus extracts) significantly enhanced BDNF secretion and increased TRPC3 expression. TRPC3 knockdown (siRNA or inhibitor Pyr3; 10μM) blunted BDNF secretion, and prevented inflammation effects. Chelation of extracellular Ca(2+) (EGTA; 1mM) or intracellular Ca(2+) (BAPTA; 5μM) significantly reduced secreted BDNF, as did the knockdown of SOCE proteins STIM1 and Orai1 or plasma membrane caveolin-1. Functionally, secreted BDNF had autocrine effects suggested by phosphorylation of high-affinity tropomyosin-related kinase TrkB receptor, prevented by chelating extracellular BDNF with chimeric TrkB-Fc. These data emphasize the role of TRPC3 and Ca(2+) influx in the regulation of BDNF secretion by human ASM and the enhancing effects of inflammation. Given the BDNF effects on Ca(2+) and cell proliferation, BDNF secretion may contribute to altered airway structure and function in diseases such as asthma.

  1. Glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin activates nuclear factor-κB and activator protein-1 in cultured human aortic smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Concepción; Matesanz, Nuria; Nevado, Julián; Lafuente, Nuria; Cercas, Elena; Azcutia, Verónica; Vallejo, Susana; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F

    2003-01-01

    Diabetic vessels undergo structural changes that are linked to a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate cell signalling in the vasculature, where they can promote cell growth and activate redox-regulated transcription factors, like activator protein-1 (AP-1) or nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which are involved in remodelling and inflammation processes. Amadori adducts, formed through nonenzymatic glycosylation, can contribute to ROS formation in diabetes. In this study, we analysed whether Amadori-modified human oxyhaemoglobin, glycosylated at either normal (N-Hb) or elevated (E-Hb) levels, can induce cell growth and activate AP-1 and NF-κB in cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC). E-Hb (1 nM–1 μM), but not N-Hb, promoted a concentration-dependent increase in cell size from nanomolar concentrations, although it failed to stimulate HASMC proliferation. At 10 nM, E-Hb stimulated both AP-1 and NF-κB activity, as assessed by transient transfection, electromobility shift assays or immunofluorescence staining. The effects of E-Hb resembled those of the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). E-Hb enhanced intracellular superoxide anions content and its effects on HASMC were abolished by different ROS scavengers. In conclusion, E-Hb stimulates growth and activates AP-1 and NF-κB in human vascular smooth muscle by redox-sensitive pathways, thus suggesting a possible direct role for Amadori adducts in diabetic vasculopathy. PMID:14504138

  2. Tracheal allotransplantation after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Delaere, Pierre; Vranckx, Jan; Verleden, Geert; De Leyn, Paul; Van Raemdonck, Dirk

    2010-01-14

    Reconstruction of long-segment tracheal defects requires a vascularized allograft. We report successful tracheal allotransplantation after indirect revascularization of the graft in a heterotopic position. Immunosuppressive therapy was administered before the operation, and the tracheal allograft was wrapped in the recipient's forearm fascia. Once revascularization was achieved, the mucosal lining was replaced progressively with buccal mucosa from the recipient. At 4 months, the tracheal chimera was fully lined with mucosa, which consisted of respiratory epithelium from the donor and buccal mucosa from the recipient. After withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy, the tracheal allograft was moved to its correct anatomical position with an intact blood supply. No treatment-limiting adverse effects occurred.

  3. Assays for in vitro monitoring of proliferation of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Lim, Poay; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Eszterhas, Andrew; Panettieri, Reynold A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Vascular and airway remodeling, which are characterized by airway smooth muscle (ASM) and pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, contribute to the pathology of asthma, pulmonary hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis. To evaluate the proliferation of VSM and ASM cells in response to mitogens, we perform a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay. The proliferation protocol takes approximately 48 h and includes stimulating cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with agonists, labeling cells with [3H]thymidine and examining levels of [3H]thymidine incorporation by scintillation counting. Although using radiolabeled [3H]thymidine incorporation is a limitation, the greatest benefit of the assay is providing reliable and statistically significant data.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression in human vascular intimal smooth muscle cells detected by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Barath, P.; Fishbein, M. C.; Cao, J.; Berenson, J.; Helfant, R. H.; Forrester, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    We used immunohistochemistry to detect tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and in situ hybridization to detect TNF messenger RNA (mRNA) in the intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells and in the medial smooth muscle cells of human atherosclerotic arteries. Medial smooth muscle cells showed localization of immunoreactive TNF on the cell surface and did not express TNF mRNA. Conversely, in intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells, TNF was localized in the cytoplasm and TNF mRNA was expressed by in situ hybridization. Thus 89% of intimal cells were immunohistochemically positive for TNF, 96% of them were positive by in situ hybridization, and 76% were positive for the smooth muscle cell marker, HHF35. Our results suggest that intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells are mostly, but not exclusively, derived from smooth muscle cells. These cells express TNF, whereas the medial smooth muscle cells in the atherosclerotic human arteries do not. The expression of TNF by these mesenchymal-appearing cells may have implications regarding the evolution of the atherosclerotic plaque. Images Figure 1 to Figure 4 Figure 3 PMID:1698022

  5. Morbid obesity and tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Jay B; Lemmens, Harry J M; Brock-Utne, John G; Vierra, Mark; Saidman, Lawrence J

    2002-03-01

    The tracheas of obese patients may be more difficult to intubate than those of normal-weight patients. We studied 100 morbidly obese patients (body mass index >40 kg/m(2)) to identify which factors complicate direct laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Preoperative measurements (height, weight, neck circumference, width of mouth opening, sternomental distance, and thyromental distance) and Mallampati score were recorded. The view during direct laryngoscopy was graded, and the number of attempts at tracheal intubation was recorded. Neither absolute obesity nor body mass index was associated with intubation difficulties. Large neck circumference and high Mallampati score were the only predictors of potential intubation problems. Because in all but one patient the trachea was intubated successfully by direct laryngoscopy, the neck circumference that requires an intervention such as fiberoptic bronchoscopy to establish an airway remains unknown. We conclude that obesity alone is not predictive of tracheal intubation difficulties. In 100 morbidly obese patients, neither obesity nor body mass index predicted problems with tracheal intubation. However, a high Mallampati score (greater-than-or-equal to 3) and large neck circumference may increase the potential for difficult laryngoscopy and intubation.

  6. [Research progress of tracheal prosthesis in reconstructing trachea].

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Shi, Hongcan; Chen, Huimin

    2007-05-01

    To review the recent research progress of base and clinical application of tracheal replacement. Literature concerning tracheal prosthesis and the current achievements were extensively and comprehensively reviewed. Most tracheal lesions can be resected and achieve primary reconstruction, but the resectable length was limited. Tracheal replacement was an efficient and feasible way to substitute the defects resulting from extended resection. New techniques such as tissue engineering, tracheal transplantation, new tracheal prosthesis of biomaterials break fresh ground for the more rapid development of tracheal surgery.

  7. Effect of the endothelin family of peptides on human coronary artery smooth-muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    1998-01-01

    The migration of coronary artery medial smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) is one of the key events in the process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerotic lesions. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether any of the three isoforms of endothelin (ET), ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, or an intermediate form of ET, big ET-1, induces migration of human coronary artery SMCs, and to investigate the possible interaction of ET peptides and well-known migration-stimulatory factors, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB and angiotensin II (Ang II), on SMC migration by the Boyden's chamber method. None of the ET peptides alone induced SMC migration between 10(-9) and 10(-7) mol/L. In contrast, ET-1 and ET-2 significantly induced SMC migration in the presence of low concentrations of PDGF-BB (0.5 ng/mL) or Ang II (10(-9) mol/L), although ET-3 was less active (ET-1 = ET-2 > ET-3). In contrast, big ET-1 was without significant activity on PDGF-BB-or Ang II-induced SMC migration. The potentiation of SMC migration by ET peptides was clearly inhibited by the ETA receptor antagonist BG-123 in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that the ET family of peptides, especially ET-1 and ET-2, can induce human coronary artery SMC migration in combination with PDGF-BB or Ang II, probably via ETA receptors. Taken together with the finding that the concentrations of ET, PDGF-BB and Ang II are locally increased at sites of endothelial injury, this indicates that ET may be an initial stimulus for human coronary artery medial SMC recruitment during coronary atherosclerosis, possibly in combination with PDGF-BB or Ang II.

  8. Cell surface marker profiling of human tracheal basal cells reveals distinct subpopulations, identifies MST1/MSP as a mitogenic signal, and identifies new biomarkers for lung squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Van de Laar, Emily; Clifford, Monica; Hasenoeder, Stefan; Kim, Bo Ram; Wang, Dennis; Lee, Sharon; Paterson, Josh; Vu, Nancy M; Waddell, Thomas K; Keshavjee, Shaf; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Ailles, Laurie; Moghal, Nadeem

    2014-12-31

    The large airways of the lungs (trachea and bronchi) are lined with a pseudostratified mucociliary epithelium, which is maintained by stem cells/progenitors within the basal cell compartment. Alterations in basal cell behavior can contribute to large airway diseases including squamous cell carcinomas (SQCCs). Basal cells have traditionally been thought of as a uniform population defined by basolateral position, cuboidal cell shape, and expression of pan-basal cell lineage markers like KRT5 and TP63. While some evidence suggests that basal cells are not all functionally equivalent, few heterogeneously expressed markers have been identified to purify and study subpopulations. In addition, few signaling pathways have been identified that regulate their cell behavior. The goals of this work were to investigate tracheal basal cell diversity and to identify new signaling pathways that regulate basal cell behavior. We used flow cytometry (FACS) to profile cell surface marker expression at a single cell level in primary human tracheal basal cell cultures that maintain stem cell/progenitor activity. FACS results were validated with tissue staining, in silico comparisons with normal basal cell and lung cancer datasets, and an in vitro proliferation assay. We identified 105 surface markers, with 47 markers identifying potential subpopulations. These subpopulations generally fell into more (~ > 13%) or less abundant (~ < 6%) groups. Microarray gene expression profiling supported the heterogeneous expression of these markers in the total population, and immunostaining of large airway tissue suggested that some of these markers are relevant in vivo. 24 markers were enriched in lung SQCCs relative to adenocarcinomas, with four markers having prognostic significance in SQCCs. We also identified 33 signaling receptors, including the MST1R/RON growth factor receptor, whose ligand MST1/MSP was mitogenic for basal cells. This work provides the largest description to date of

  9. Human discrimination of visual direction of motion with and without smooth pursuit eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krukowski, Anton E.; Pirog, Kathleen A.; Beutter, Brent R.; Brooks, Kevin R.; Stone, Leland S.

    2003-01-01

    It has long been known that ocular pursuit of a moving target has a major influence on its perceived speed (Aubert, 1886; Fleischl, 1882). However, little is known about the effect of smooth pursuit on the perception of target direction. Here we compare the precision of human visual-direction judgments under two oculomotor conditions (pursuit vs. fixation). We also examine the impact of stimulus duration (200 ms vs. 800 ms) and absolute direction (cardinal vs. oblique). Our main finding is that direction discrimination thresholds in the fixation and pursuit conditions are indistinguishable. Furthermore, the two oculomotor conditions showed oblique effects of similar magnitudes. These data suggest that the neural direction signals supporting perception are the same with or without pursuit, despite remarkably different retinal stimulation. During fixation, the stimulus information is restricted to large, purely peripheral retinal motion, while during steady-state pursuit, the stimulus information consists of small, unreliable foveal retinal motion and a large efference-copy signal. A parsimonious explanation of our findings is that the signal limiting the precision of direction judgments is a neural estimate of target motion in head-centered (or world-centered) coordinates (i.e., a combined retinal and eye motion signal) as found in the medial superior temporal area (MST), and not simply an estimate of retinal motion as found in the middle temporal area (MT).

  10. On the Visual Input Driving Human Smooth-Pursuit Eye Movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Beutter, Brent R.; Lorenceau, Jean

    1996-01-01

    Current computational models of smooth-pursuit eye movements assume that the primary visual input is local retinal-image motion (often referred to as retinal slip). However, we show that humans can pursue object motion with considerable accuracy, even in the presence of conflicting local image motion. This finding indicates that the visual cortical area(s) controlling pursuit must be able to perform a spatio-temporal integration of local image motion into a signal related to object motion. We also provide evidence that the object-motion signal that drives pursuit is related to the signal that supports perception. We conclude that current models of pursuit should be modified to include a visual input that encodes perceived object motion and not merely retinal image motion. Finally, our findings suggest that the measurement of eye movements can be used to monitor visual perception, with particular value in applied settings as this non-intrusive approach would not require interrupting ongoing work or training.

  11. Modeling the human development index and the percentage of poor people using quantile smoothing splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyani, Sri; Andriyana, Yudhie; Sudartianto

    2017-03-01

    Mean regression is a statistical method to explain the relationship between the response variable and the predictor variable based on the central tendency of the data (mean) of the response variable. The parameter estimation in mean regression (with Ordinary Least Square or OLS) generates a problem if we apply it to the data with a symmetric, fat-tailed, or containing outlier. Hence, an alternative method is necessary to be used to that kind of data, for example quantile regression method. The quantile regression is a robust technique to the outlier. This model can explain the relationship between the response variable and the predictor variable, not only on the central tendency of the data (median) but also on various quantile, in order to obtain complete information about that relationship. In this study, a quantile regression is developed with a nonparametric approach such as smoothing spline. Nonparametric approach is used if the prespecification model is difficult to determine, the relation between two variables follow the unknown function. We will apply that proposed method to poverty data. Here, we want to estimate the Percentage of Poor People as the response variable involving the Human Development Index (HDI) as the predictor variable.

  12. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of human smooth muscle cells in bioengineered tissue scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackmann, Christian; Esguerra, Maricris; Olausson, Daniel; Delbro, Dick; Krettek, Alexandra; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2011-02-01

    The integration of living, human smooth muscle cells in biosynthesized cellulose scaffolds was monitored by nonlinear microscopy toward contractile artificial blood vessels. Combined coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was applied for studies of the cell interaction with the biopolymer network. CARS microscopy probing CH2-groups at 2845 cm-1 permitted three-dimensional imaging of the cells with high contrast for lipid-rich intracellular structures. SHG microscopy visualized the fibers of the cellulose scaffold, together with a small signal obtained from the cytoplasmic myosin of the muscle cells. From the overlay images we conclude a close interaction between cells and cellulose fibers. We followed the cell migration into the three-dimensional structure, illustrating that while the cells submerge into the scaffold they extrude filopodia on top of the surface. A comparison between compact and porous scaffolds reveals a migration depth of <10 μm for the former, whereas the porous type shows cells further submerged into the cellulose. Thus, the scaffold architecture determines the degree of cell integration. We conclude that the unique ability of nonlinear microscopy to visualize the three-dimensional composition of living, soft matter makes it an ideal instrument within tissue engineering.

  13. Human discrimination of visual direction of motion with and without smooth pursuit eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krukowski, Anton E.; Pirog, Kathleen A.; Beutter, Brent R.; Brooks, Kevin R.; Stone, Leland S.

    2003-01-01

    It has long been known that ocular pursuit of a moving target has a major influence on its perceived speed (Aubert, 1886; Fleischl, 1882). However, little is known about the effect of smooth pursuit on the perception of target direction. Here we compare the precision of human visual-direction judgments under two oculomotor conditions (pursuit vs. fixation). We also examine the impact of stimulus duration (200 ms vs. 800 ms) and absolute direction (cardinal vs. oblique). Our main finding is that direction discrimination thresholds in the fixation and pursuit conditions are indistinguishable. Furthermore, the two oculomotor conditions showed oblique effects of similar magnitudes. These data suggest that the neural direction signals supporting perception are the same with or without pursuit, despite remarkably different retinal stimulation. During fixation, the stimulus information is restricted to large, purely peripheral retinal motion, while during steady-state pursuit, the stimulus information consists of small, unreliable foveal retinal motion and a large efference-copy signal. A parsimonious explanation of our findings is that the signal limiting the precision of direction judgments is a neural estimate of target motion in head-centered (or world-centered) coordinates (i.e., a combined retinal and eye motion signal) as found in the medial superior temporal area (MST), and not simply an estimate of retinal motion as found in the middle temporal area (MT).

  14. Transcriptional profiling of human smooth muscle cells infected with gingipain and fimbriae mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Boxi; Sirsjö, Allan; Khalaf, Hazem; Bengtsson, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is considered to be involved in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the role of different virulence factors produced by P. gingivalis in this process is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional profiling of human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs) infected with wild type, gingipain mutants or fimbriae mutants of P. gingivalis. AoSMCs were exposed to wild type (W50 and 381), gingipain mutants (E8 and K1A), or fimbriae mutants (DPG-3 and KRX-178) of P. gingivalis. We observed that wild type P. gingivalis changes the expression of a considerable larger number of genes in AoSMCs compare to gingipain and fimbriae mutants, respectively. The results from pathway analysis revealed that the common differentially expressed genes for AoSMCs infected by 3 different wild type P. gingivalis strains were enriched in pathways of cancer, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and MAPK signaling pathway. Disease ontology analysis showed that various strains of P. gingivalis were associated with different disease profilings. Our results suggest that gingipains and fimbriae, especially arginine-specific gingipain, produced by P. gingivalis play important roles in the association between periodontitis and other inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26907358

  15. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  16. Cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction in human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Kiel, Alexander; Freeman, Michelle; Delmotte, Philippe; Thompson, Michael; Vassallo, Robert; Sieck, Gary C; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2014-05-01

    The balance between mitochondrial fission and fusion is crucial for mitochondria to perform its normal cellular functions. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS) disrupts this balance and enhances mitochondrial dysfunction in the airway. In nonasthmatic human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, CS extract (CSE) induced mitochondrial fragmentation and damages their networked morphology in a concentration-dependent fashion, via increased expression of mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and decreased fusion protein mitofusin (Mfn) 2. CSE effects on Drp1 vs. Mfn2 and mitochondrial network morphology involved reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt), protein kinase C (PKC) and proteasome pathways, as well as transcriptional regulation via factors such as NF-κB and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2. Inhibiting Drp1 prevented CSE effects on mitochondrial networks and ROS generation, whereas blocking Mfn2 had the opposite, detrimental effect. In ASM from asmatic patients, mitochondria exhibited substantial morphological defects at baseline and showed increased Drp1 but decreased Mfn2 expression, with exacerbating effects of CSE. Overall, these results highlight the importance of mitochondrial networks and their regulation in the context of cellular changes induced by insults such as inflammation (as in asthma) or CS. Altered mitochondrial fission/fusion proteins have a further potential to influence parameters such as ROS and cell proliferation and apoptosis relevant to airway diseases.

  17. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  18. Bioengineering functional human aortic vascular smooth-muscle strips in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Louise; Khait, Luda; Welsh, Michael J; Birla, Ravi

    2008-07-01

    The contraction and relaxation of VSM (vascular smooth muscle) are responsible for the maintenance of vascular tone, which is a major determinant of blood pressure. However, the molecular events leading to the contraction and relaxation of VSM are poorly understood. The development of three-dimensional bioengineered tissues provides an opportunity to investigate the molecular events controlling vascular tone in vitro. In the present study we used fibrin-gel casting to bioengineer functional VSM strips from primary human aortic VSM cells. Our bioengineered VSM strips are functionally similar to VSM in vivo and remained viable in culture for up to 5 weeks. VSM strips demonstrate spontaneous basal tone and can generate an active force (contraction) of up to 85.2 microN on stimulation with phenylephrine. Bioengineered VSM strips exhibited Ca(2+)-dependent contraction and calcium-independent relaxation. The development of functional bioengineered VSM tissue provides a new in vitro model system that can be used to investigate the molecular events controlling vascular tone.

  19. Effects of cigarette smoke extract on human airway smooth muscle cells in COPD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Ge, Qi; Tjin, Gavin; Alkhouri, Hatem; Deng, Linghong; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Adcock, Ian; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje; Burgess, Janette K; Black, Judith L; Oliver, Brian G G

    2014-09-01

    We hypothesised that the response to cigarette smoke in airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells from smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) would be intrinsically different from smokers without COPD, producing greater pro-inflammatory mediators and factors relating to airway remodelling. ASM cells were obtained from smokers with or without COPD, and then stimulated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) or transforming growth factor-β1. The production of chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by ELISA, and the deposition of collagens by extracellular matrix ELISA. The effects of CSE on cell attachment and wound healing were measured by toluidine blue attachment and cell tracker green wound healing assays. CSE increased the release of CXCL8 and CXCL1 from human ASM cells, and cells from smokers with COPD produced more CSE-induced CXCL1. The production of MMP-1, -3 and -10, and the deposition of collagen VIII alpha 1 (COL8A1) were increased by CSE, especially in the COPD group which had higher production of MMP-1 and deposition of COL8A1. CSE decreased ASM cell attachment and wound healing in the COPD group only. ASM cells from smokers with COPD were more sensitive to CSE stimulation, which may explain, in part, why some smokers develop COPD.

  20. Physiological effects of androgens on human vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Nheu, Lina; Nazareth, Lester; Xu, Guo-Ying; Xiao, Fu-Ying; Luo, Rui-Zhi; Komesaroff, Paul; Ling, Shanhong

    2011-12-20

    Androgenic hormones are associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, although the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study examines the impact of androgens on the physiology of human vascular endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) in culture. Cells were incubated with testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) at various physiological concentrations (5-50 nM) in the present or absence of an androgen receptor (AR) blocker flutamide (100 nM). Cell growth and death, DNA and collagen synthesis, and gene protein expression were assessed. It was shown that: (1) DHEA protected EC from superoxide injury via AR-independent mechanisms; (2) testosterone induced DNA synthesis and growth in EC via an AR-independent manner with activation of ERK1/2 activity; (3) DHT inhibited DNA synthesis and growth in EC in an AR-dependent manner; (4) testosterone and DHT enhanced ERK1/2 activation and proliferation in SMC via AR-independent and -dependent pathways, respectively; and (5) these androgens did not significantly affect collagen synthesis in SMC. We conclude that androgens possess multiple effects on vascular cells via either AR-dependent or -independent mechanisms. Testosterone and DHEA may be "beneficial" in preventing atherosclerosis by improving EC growth and survival; in contrast, stimulation of VSMC proliferation by testosterone and DHT is potentially "harmful". The relationship of these in vitro effects by androgens to in vivo vascular function and atherogenesis needs to be further clarified. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vitamin D attenuates cytokine-induced remodeling in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Faksh, Arij; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Chu, Vivian; Pandya, Hitesh C; Amrani, Yassine; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-06-01

    Asthma in the pediatric population remains a significant contributor to morbidity and increasing healthcare costs. Vitamin D3 insufficiency and deficiency have been associated with development of asthma. Recent studies in models of adult airway diseases suggest that the bioactive Vitamin D3 metabolite, calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ; 1,25(OH)2 D3 ), modulates responses to inflammation; however, this concept has not been explored in developing airways in the context of pediatric asthma. We used human fetal airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells as a model of the early postnatal airway to explore how calcitriol modulates remodeling induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Cells were pre-treated with calcitriol and then exposed to TNFα or TGFβ for up to 72 h. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and cell proliferation were assessed. Calcitriol attenuated TNFα enhancement of MMP-9 expression and activity. Additionally, calcitriol attenuated TNFα and TGFβ-induced collagen III expression and deposition, and separately, inhibited proliferation of fetal ASM cells induced by either inflammatory mediator. Analysis of signaling pathways suggested that calcitriol effects in fetal ASM involve ERK signaling, but not other major inflammatory pathways. Overall, our data demonstrate that calcitriol can blunt multiple effects of TNFα and TGFβ in developing airway, and point to a potentially novel approach to alleviating structural changes in inflammatory airway diseases of childhood.

  2. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived vascular smooth muscle cells: differentiation and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Ayoubi, Sohrab; Sheikh, Søren P; Eskildsen, Tilde V

    2017-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of death worldwide and current treatment strategies have limited effect of disease progression. It would be desirable to have better models to study developmental and pathological processes and model vascular diseases in laboratory settings. To this end, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have generated great enthusiasm, and have been a driving force for development of novel strategies in drug discovery and regenerative cell-therapy for the last decade. Hence, investigating the mechanisms underlying the differentiation of hiPSCs into specialized cell types such as cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) may lead to a better understanding of developmental cardiovascular processes and potentiate progress of safe autologous regenerative therapies in pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the latest trends on differentiation protocols of hiPSC-derived VSMCs and their potential application in vascular research and regenerative therapy. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction in human airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Kiel, Alexander; Freeman, Michelle; Delmotte, Philippe; Thompson, Michael; Vassallo, Robert; Sieck, Gary C.; Pabelick, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    The balance between mitochondrial fission and fusion is crucial for mitochondria to perform its normal cellular functions. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS) disrupts this balance and enhances mitochondrial dysfunction in the airway. In nonasthmatic human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, CS extract (CSE) induced mitochondrial fragmentation and damages their networked morphology in a concentration-dependent fashion, via increased expression of mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and decreased fusion protein mitofusin (Mfn) 2. CSE effects on Drp1 vs. Mfn2 and mitochondrial network morphology involved reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt), protein kinase C (PKC) and proteasome pathways, as well as transcriptional regulation via factors such as NF-κB and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2. Inhibiting Drp1 prevented CSE effects on mitochondrial networks and ROS generation, whereas blocking Mfn2 had the opposite, detrimental effect. In ASM from asmatic patients, mitochondria exhibited substantial morphological defects at baseline and showed increased Drp1 but decreased Mfn2 expression, with exacerbating effects of CSE. Overall, these results highlight the importance of mitochondrial networks and their regulation in the context of cellular changes induced by insults such as inflammation (as in asthma) or CS. Altered mitochondrial fission/fusion proteins have a further potential to influence parameters such as ROS and cell proliferation and apoptosis relevant to airway diseases. PMID:24610934

  4. A critical role of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in human telomerase reverse transcriptase induction by resveratrol in aortic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peixin; Riordan, Sean M.; Heruth, Daniel P.; Grigoryev, Dmitry N.; Zhang, Li Qin; Ye, Shui Qing

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the predominant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and contributes to a considerably more severe outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in red wine, is a caloric restriction mimetic with potential anti-aging properties which has emerged as a beneficial nutraceutical for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although resveratrol is widely consumed as a nutritional supplement, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated fully. Here, we report that resveratrol activates human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), SIRT4 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in human aortic smooth muscle cells. Similar observations were obtained in resveratrol treated C57BL/6J mouse heart and liver tissues. Resverotrol can also augment telomerase activity in both human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and A549 cells. Blocking NAMPT and SIRT4 expression prevents induction of hTERT in human aortic smooth muscle cells while overexpression of NAMPT elevates the telomerase activity induced by resveratrol in A549 cells. Together, these results identify a NAMPT-SIRT4-hTERT axis as a novel mechanism by which resveratrol may affect the anti-aging process in human aortic smooth muscle cells, mouse hearts and other cells. These findings enrich our understanding of the positive effects of resveratrol in human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25926556

  5. Systemic overexpression of matricellular protein CCN1 exacerbates obliterative bronchiolitis in mouse tracheal allografts.

    PubMed

    Raissadati, Alireza; Nykänen, Antti I; Tuuminen, Raimo; Syrjälä, Simo O; Krebs, Rainer; Arnaudova, Ralica; Rouvinen, Eeva; Wang, Xiaomin; Poller, Wolfgang; Lemström, Karl B

    2015-12-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) involves airway epithelial detachment, fibroproliferation, and inflammation, resulting in chronic rejection and transplant failure. Cysteine-rich 61 (CCN1) is an integrin receptor antagonist with a context-dependent role in inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes. We used a mouse tracheal OB model to investigate the role of CCN1 in the development of lung allograft OB. C57Bl/6 mice received a systemic injection of CCN1-expressing adenoviral vectors 2 days prior to subcutaneous implantation of tracheal allografts from major MHC-mismatched BALB/c mice. We treated another group of tracheal allograft recipients with cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide to dissect the role of αvβ3-integrin signaling in mediating CCN1 effects in tracheal allografts. Allografts were removed 4 weeks after transplantation and analyzed for luminal occlusion, inflammation, and vasculogenesis. CCN1 overexpression induced luminal occlusion (P < 0.05), fibroproliferation, and smooth muscle cell proliferation (P < 0.05). Selective activation of αvβ3-integrin receptor failed to mimic the actions of CCN1, and blocking failed to inhibit the effects of CCN1 in tracheal allografts. In conclusion, CCN1 exacerbates tracheal OB by enhancing fibroproliferation via an αvβ3-integrin-independent pathway. Further experiments are required to uncover its potentially harmful role in the development of OB after lung transplantation.

  6. Scanning electron-microscopic evaluation of cuff shoulders in pediatric tracheal tubes.

    PubMed

    Moehrlen, Ueli; Ziegler, Urs; Weiss, Markus

    2008-03-01

    Technical and conceptual shortcomings of cuffed pediatric tracheal tubes have been pointed out in the past, all representing a potential risk for mucosal damage of the pediatric airway. In this study, cuffed pediatric tracheal tubes from different manufacturers were investigated with regard to the cuff shoulder design using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cuffed pediatric tracheal tubes with the smallest internal diameter available were ordered from five manufacturers. SEM scans were performed from the tube shaft - cuff shoulder - tube cuff assembly and from the cuff shoulder alone. Each investigation was repeated in four samples of each tube brand. In addition, thickness of cuff membrane was measured. Major differences were found among the cuff shoulders investigated ranging from smooth transitions, softened borders to very sharp steps. There was also considerable difference in the thickness among the cuff membranes between the different tube brands ranging from 18 microm in polyurethane cuffs up to 90 microm in polyvinylchloride cuffs. Because the gap between the outer tracheal tube and the internal mucosal layer of the pediatric airway is often very narrow, some of the observed irregularities have the potential to injure the airway mucosa in pediatric patients, particularly during long-term use and firm fit of the tracheal tube in the airway. As cuffed tubes are increasingly used in small children, the observed irregularities in some tracheal tube brands may need to be improved and their safety should be proved by the manufacturers.

  7. Idiopathic tracheal stenosis: a clinicopathologic study of 63 cases and comparison of the pathology with chondromalacia.

    PubMed

    Mark, Eugene J; Meng, Fanqing; Kradin, Richard L; Mathisen, Douglas J; Matsubara, Osamu

    2008-08-01

    Tracheal stenosis in adults usually is the result of mechanical injuries either from direct trauma or intubation. Rarely do cases develop in patients without such a precedent history, and there are few reports of the pathology of idiopathic tracheal stenosis (ITS). We reviewed clinicopathologically, 63 tracheal resections for tracheal stenosis in patients who had no antecedent explanation for their stenosis. We contrasted these 63 cases with 34 cases of tracheal stenosis owing to chondromalacia (CM) after mechanical injury. All 63 cases occurred in females, with a mean age of 49 years. The most common symptom was dyspnea on exertion. The average duration of symptoms was greater than 2 years. One-third of the patients gave a history of gastroesophageal reflux. All but one of the cases occurred in the subglottic region and/or upper one-third of the trachea. Pathologically, most cases showed extensive keloidal fibrosis and dilation of mucus glands, a finding that was not obvious in most cases of CM. ITS has relatively normal cartilage with smooth inner and outer perichondrium, whereas CM has extensive degeneration of cartilage with irregular border of inner perichondrium observable at shirt sleeve magnification. Immunohistochemical staining for estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor was positive in fibroblasts cells in most cases. ITS is a rare disease and restricted to females. It may represent some form of fibromatosis. ITS can be distinguished histologically from CM in tracheal resection specimens in most cases.

  8. Inhibition of human arterial smooth muscle cell growth by human monocyte/macrophages: a co-culture study.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, D; Fitzsimmons, C; Torzewski, J; Bowyer, D E

    1999-07-01

    Monocyte/macrophages produce a variety of substances which may influence the function of smooth muscle cells (SMC). During atherogenesis, macrophages are thought to modulate SMC migration, proliferation and synthesis of extracellular matrix. Such modulation is the balance between stimulatory and inhibitory influences. Thus, for example, our earlier studies have shown that macrophages not only secrete mitogens, but also produce small molecular weight inhibitors of SMC proliferation. In the present study, we have used a co-culture system in which human monocyte/macrophages were separated from human arterial SMC (hSMC) by a filter with the optional addition of a 12 kDa cut-off dialysis membrane, in order to assess their effect on hSMC growth. We have found that human peripheral blood-derived monocytes produced a substance of < 12 kDa that inhibited hSMC growth in the co-culture system. The monocyte-derived factor causing this effect was completely blocked by indomethacin, indicating that growth-inhibitory factors produced by the monocytes were cyclooxygenase products. We have shown that PGE1 and PGE2 inhibit hSMC growth, making them likely candidates for the effector molecules released from monocytes in our co-culture system.

  9. Pharmacological effects of peptides on tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, J; Couture, R; Caranikas, S; Regoli, D

    1982-01-01

    Peptide and non-peptide agents were tested for their stimulatory or inhibitory effects on circular strips of guinea pig isolated tracheae. Substance P, eledoisin, physalaemin, neurotensin, angiotensin, histamine and carbachol were found to contract, while noradrenaline, dopamine, bradykinin, nucleotides (AMP, ADP, ATP) and prostaglandins (PGE1, PGE2, PGA2) induced concentration-dependent relaxations of tracheae contracted with substance P or carbachol. Indomethacin (2.8 X 10(-6) M) significantly potentiated the effect of substance P and blocked that of bradykinin. The contractions to substance P of tissues treated with indomethacin were not modified by atropine, methysergide, diphenhydramine, cimetidine, propranolol, phentolamine, [Leu8]-ATII, [Leu8]-des-Arg9-bradykinin, naloxone and baclofen. The order of potency of C-terminal fragments of substance P was: hexa(6-11) greater than hepta(5-11) greater than substance P greater than = octa(4-11). It is concluded that the guinea pig isolated trachea is a pharmacological preparation sensitive to numerous agents and useful for studying structure-activity relationship and the mechanism of cellular action of several peptides, particularly substance P.

  10. Lipoprotein(a) Promotes Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Dedifferentiation in Atherosclerotic Lesions of Human Apo(a) Transgenic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Unoki, Hiroyuki; Sun, Huijun; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Marcovina, Santica; Shikama, Hisataka; Watanabe, Teruo; Fan, Jianglin

    2002-01-01

    Elevated plasma lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels constitute an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism underlying Lp(a) atherogenicity is unclear. Recently, we demonstrated that Lp(a) may potentially be proatherogenic in transgenic rabbits expressing human apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)]. In this study, we further investigated atherosclerotic lesions of transgenic rabbits by morphometry and immunohistochemistry. On a cholesterol diet, human apo(a) transgenic rabbits had more extensive atherosclerotic lesions of the aorta, carotid artery, iliac artery, and coronary artery than did nontransgenic littermate rabbits as defined by increased intimal lesion area. Enhanced lesion development in transgenic rabbits was characterized by increased accumulation of smooth muscle cells, that was often associated with the Lp(a) deposition. To explore the possibility that Lp(a) may be involved in the smooth-muscle cell phenotypic modulation, we stained the lesions using a panel of monoclonal antibodies against smooth-muscle myosin heavy-chain isoforms (SM1, SM2, and SMemb) and basic transcriptional element binding protein-2 (BTEB2). We found that a large number of smooth muscle cells located in the apo(a)-containing areas of transgenic rabbits were positive for SMemb and BTEB2, suggesting that these smooth muscle cells were either immature or in the state of activation. In addition, transgenic rabbits showed delayed fibrinolytic activity accompanied by increased plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. We conclude that Lp(a) may enhance the lesion development by mediating smooth muscle cell proliferation and dedifferentiation possibly because of impaired fibrinolytic activity. PMID:11786416

  11. Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Vascular Progenitor Cells Capable of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Katherine L; Obrtlikova, Petra; Alvarez, Diego F; King, Judy A; Keirstead, Susan A; Allred, Jeremy R; Kaufman, Dan S

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous studies have demonstrated development of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as separate cell lineages derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We demonstrate CD34+ cells isolated from differentiated hESCs function as vascular progenitor cells capable of producing both ECs and SMCs. These studies better define the developmental origin and reveal the relationship between these two cell types, as well as provide a more complete biological characterization. MATERIALS AND METHODS hESCs are co-cultured on M2-10B4 stromal cells or Wnt1 expressing M2-10B4 for 13–15 days to generate a CD34+ cell population. These cells are isolated using a magnetic antibody separation kit and cultured on fibronectin coated dishes in EC medium. To induce SMC differentiation, culture medium is changed and a morphological and phenotypic change occurs within 24–48 hours. RESULTS CD34+ vascular progenitor cells give rise to ECs and SMCs. The two populations express respective cell specific transcripts and proteins, exhibit intracellular calcium in response to various agonists, and form robust tube-like structures when co-cultured in Matrigel. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured under SMC conditions do not exhibit a change in phenotype or genotype. Wnt1 overexpressing stromal cells produced an increased number of progenitor cells. CONCLUSIONS The ability to generate large numbers of ECs and SMCs from a single vascular progenitor cell population is promising for therapeutic use to treat a variety of diseased and ischemic conditions. The step-wise differentiation outlined here is an efficient, reproducible method with potential for large scale cultures suitable for clinical applications. PMID:20067819

  12. BKCa channel regulates calcium oscillations induced by alpha-2-macroglobulin in human myometrial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wakle-Prabagaran, Monali; Lorca, Ramón A.; Ma, Xiaofeng; Stamnes, Susan J.; Amazu, Chinwendu; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Hyrc, Krzysztof L.; Wright, Michael E.; England, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    The large-conductance, voltage-gated, calcium (Ca2+)-activated potassium channel (BKCa) plays an important role in regulating Ca2+ signaling and is implicated in the maintenance of uterine quiescence during pregnancy. We used immunopurification and mass spectrometry to identify proteins that interact with BKCa in myometrium samples from term pregnant (≥37 wk gestation) women. From this screen, we identified alpha-2-macroglobulin (α2M). We then used immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot and the proximity ligation assay to confirm the interaction between BKCa and both α2M and its receptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), in cultured primary human myometrial smooth muscle cells (hMSMCs). Single-channel electrophysiological recordings in the cell-attached configuration demonstrated that activated α2M (α2M*) increased the open probability of BKCa in an oscillatory pattern in hMSMCs. Furthermore, α2M* caused intracellular levels of Ca2+ to oscillate in oxytocin-primed hMSMCs. The initiation of oscillations required an interaction between α2M* and LRP1. By using Ca2+-free medium and inhibitors of various Ca2+ signaling pathways, we demonstrated that the oscillations required entry of extracellular Ca2+ through store-operated Ca2+ channels. Finally, we found that the specific BKCa blocker paxilline inhibited the oscillations, whereas the channel opener NS11021 increased the rate of these oscillations. These data demonstrate that α2M* and LRP1 modulate the BKCa channel in human myometrium and that BKCa and its immunomodulatory interacting partners regulate Ca2+ dynamics in hMSMCs during pregnancy. PMID:27044074

  13. Heterogeneity of smooth muscle cells in atheromatous plaque of human aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Babaev, V. R.; Bobryshev, Y. V.; Stenina, O. V.; Tararak, E. M.; Gabbiani, G.

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the expression of cytoskeletal proteins and the ultrastructure of cells in normal intima and atheromatous plaque of human aorta. It has been established, using double-labeling immunofluorescence, that smooth muscle cells (SMC) in normal aortic intima contain myosin, vimentin, and alpha-actin but do not react with antibodies against desmin. In contrast, 7 of 28 atherosclerotic plaques contained many cells expressing desmin in addition to the other cytoskeletal proteins characteristic of normal intima SMC. These cells were localized predominantly in the plaque cap and had the ultrastructural features of modulated SMC, ie, well-developed endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Besides, some cells in the 13 atherosclerotic plaques proved to be myosin, alpha actin, and desmin negative but contained vimentin and actin as revealed by fluorescent phalloidin. These cells were found in the immediate proximity of atheromatous material and reacted with a monoclonal antibody specific to SMC surface protein (11G10) but not with monoclonal anti-muscle actin (HHF35) and anti-macrophage (HAM56) antibodies. Electron microscopy of this plaque zone revealed that the cytoplasm of these cells was filled with rough endoplasmic reticulum and a developed Golgi complex. At the same time, a certain proportion of cells in this region retained morphologic features of differentiated SMC such as the presence of a basal lamina and myofilament bundles. The revealed peculiarities of cytoskeletal protein expression and the ultrastructure of cells in human aortic atherosclerotic plaques may be explained by a phenotypic modulation of vascular SMC. Images Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2190471

  14. The human uterine smooth muscle S-nitrosoproteome fingerprint in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Craig; Quilici, David R; Schlauch, Karen A; Buxton, Iain L O

    2013-10-15

    Molecular mechanisms involved in uterine quiescence during gestation and those responsible for induction of labor at term are incompletely known. More than 10% of babies born worldwide are premature and 1,000,000 die annually. Preterm labor results in preterm delivery in 50% of cases in the United States explaining 75% of fetal morbidity and mortality. There is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment to prevent preterm delivery. Nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of human uterine smooth muscle is independent of global elevation of cGMP following activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. S-nitrosation is a likely mechanism to explain cGMP-independent relaxation to nitric oxide and may reveal S-nitrosated proteins as new therapeutic targets for the treatment of preterm labor. Employing S-nitrosoglutathione as an nitric oxide donor, we identified 110 proteins that are S-nitrosated in 1 or more states of human pregnancy. Using area under the curve of extracted ion chromatograms as well as normalized spectral counts to quantify relative expression levels for 62 of these proteins, we show that 26 proteins demonstrate statistically significant S-nitrosation differences in myometrium from spontaneously laboring preterm patients compared with nonlaboring patients. We identified proteins that were up-S-nitrosated as well as proteins that were down-S-nitrosated in preterm laboring tissues. Identification and relative quantification of the S-nitrosoproteome provide a fingerprint of proteins that can form the basis of hypothesis-directed efforts to understand the regulation of uterine contraction-relaxation and the development of new treatment for preterm labor.

  15. The human uterine smooth muscle S-nitrosoproteome fingerprint in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Craig; Quilici, David R.; Schlauch, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in uterine quiescence during gestation and those responsible for induction of labor at term are incompletely known. More than 10% of babies born worldwide are premature and 1,000,000 die annually. Preterm labor results in preterm delivery in 50% of cases in the United States explaining 75% of fetal morbidity and mortality. There is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment to prevent preterm delivery. Nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of human uterine smooth muscle is independent of global elevation of cGMP following activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. S-nitrosation is a likely mechanism to explain cGMP-independent relaxation to nitric oxide and may reveal S-nitrosated proteins as new therapeutic targets for the treatment of preterm labor. Employing S-nitrosoglutathione as an nitric oxide donor, we identified 110 proteins that are S-nitrosated in 1 or more states of human pregnancy. Using area under the curve of extracted ion chromatograms as well as normalized spectral counts to quantify relative expression levels for 62 of these proteins, we show that 26 proteins demonstrate statistically significant S-nitrosation differences in myometrium from spontaneously laboring preterm patients compared with nonlaboring patients. We identified proteins that were up-S-nitrosated as well as proteins that were down-S-nitrosated in preterm laboring tissues. Identification and relative quantification of the S-nitrosoproteome provide a fingerprint of proteins that can form the basis of hypothesis-directed efforts to understand the regulation of uterine contraction-relaxation and the development of new treatment for preterm labor. PMID:23948706

  16. Tracheal microaspiration in adult cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ledson, M J; Wilson, G E; Tran, J; Walshaw, M J

    1998-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) has been implicated in the aetiology of lung disease. Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have a high incidence of GOR symptoms with demonstrable episodes of oesophageal acidification. We studied 24-hour ambulatory tracheal and oesophageal pH in 11 CF patients with GOR symptoms to identify any episodes of tracheal acidification and define their temporal relation to oesophageal reflux and respiratory symptoms. 8 patients had evidence of significant GOR (DeMeester score mean 58; range 17-107) and in 6 it was gross (DeMeester score > 30). 4 patients had tracheal acidification (defined as tracheal pH < 5.5): all had greatly raised DeMeester scores. Two patterns of lowered tracheal pH were seen: a gradual drift downwards of tracheal pH to < 5.5 which recovered slowly, and an acute fall in tracheal pH to < 5.5 with rapid recovery. Only one patient had a fall in peak expiratory flow in conjunction with a decline in tracheal pH, and no association was found between the presence of tracheal microaspiration and pulmonary function. We conclude that tracheal acidification occurs in adult CF patients with GOR.

  17. Smooth Muscle Progenitor Cells Derived From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Induce Histologic Changes in Injured Urethral Sphincter.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhui; Wen, Yan; Wang, Zhe; Wei, Yi; Wani, Prachi; Green, Morgaine; Swaminathan, Ganesh; Ramamurthi, Anand; Pera, Renee Reijo; Chen, Bertha

    2016-12-01

    : Data suggest that myoblasts from various sources, including bone marrow, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, can restore muscle function in patients with urinary incontinence. Animal data have indicated that these progenitor cells exert mostly a paracrine effect on the native tissues rather than cell regeneration. Limited knowledge is available on the in vivo effect of human stem cells or muscle progenitors on injured muscles. We examined in vivo integration of smooth muscle progenitor cells (pSMCs) derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). pSMCs were derived from a human embryonic stem cell line (H9-ESCs) and two induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines. pSMCs were injected periurethrally into urethral injury rat models (2 × 10(6) cells per rat) or intramuscularly into severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Histologic and quantitative image analysis revealed that the urethras in pSMC-treated rats contained abundant elastic fibers and thicker muscle layers compared with the control rats. Western blot confirmed increased elastin/collagen III content in the urethra and bladder of the H9-pSMC-treated rats compared with controls. iPSC-pSMC treatment also showed similar trends in elastin and collagen III. Human elastin gene expression was not detectable in rodent tissues, suggesting that the extracellular matrix synthesis resulted from the native rodent tissues rather than from the implanted human cells. Immunofluorescence staining and in vivo bioluminescence imaging confirmed long-term engraftment of pSMCs into the host urethra and the persistence of the smooth muscle phenotype. Taken together, the data suggest that hPSC-derived pSMCs facilitate restoration of urethral sphincter function by direct smooth muscle cell regeneration and by inducing native tissue elastin/collagen III remodeling. The present study provides evidence that a pure population of human smooth muscle progenitor cells (pSMCs) derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) (human

  18. Overloading human aortic smooth muscle cells with low density lipoprotein-cholesteryl esters reproduces features of atherosclerosis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, J L; Anderson, R G; Buja, L M; Basu, S K; Brown, M S

    1977-01-01

    Human aortic smooth muscle cells accumulate only small amounts of cholesteryl esters in tissue culture, even when incubated for prolonged periods with high levels of plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL). This failure to overaccumulate LDL-cholesteryl esters is due to an LDL-mediated feedback suppression of the activity of the cell surface LDL receptor, a regulatory action that limits the rate at which the cells take up LDL. This regulatory system can be bypassed by incubating smooth muscle cells with LDL that has been given a strong positive charge by covalent linkage with N,N-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine (DMPA-LDL). The unregulated uptake of DMPA-LDL produces a massive deposition of cholesteryl esters in the form of inclusions within the cell. These inclusions take up lipid stains and exhibit positive birefringence with formée crosses that are typical of liquid crystals of cholesteryl esters. By electron microscopy, the cholesteryl ester inclusions appear as homogeneous gray cytoplasmic lipid droplets. The current studies demonstrate that the unregulated uptake of LDL-cholesteryl esters by human aortic smooth muscle cells can reproduce in vitro the major biochemical and morphological alterations that occur within smooth muscle cells in vivo during the process of atherosclerosis. Images PMID:193874

  19. Expression of myosin isoforms in the smooth muscle of human corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Koi, P T; Milhoua, P M; Monrose, V; Melman, A; DiSanto, M E

    2007-01-01

    The molecular interaction between smooth muscle (SM) myosin and actin in the corpus cavernosum (CC) determines the erectile state of the penis. A key mechanism regulating this interaction and subsequent development and maintenance of force is alternative splicing of SM myosin heavy chain (MHC) and 17 kDa essential SM myosin light chain (MLC) pre-mRNAs. Our aim was to examine the relative SM myosin isoform composition in human CC. Tissue samples were obtained from 18 patients with erectile dysfunction (ED), Peyronie's disease, or both. One specimen was obtained during a transgender operation. Patients then were stratified according to presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ED, or Peyronie's disease, as well as failure of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors and history of previous pelvic or penile surgeries, radiation, or both. Our results revealed that all human CC samples expressed only the SM-A isoform. There was a predominance of SM2 isoform mRNA relative to SM1 across all samples, with a mean of 63.8%, which correlated with protein analysis by gel electrophoresis. A statistically significant difference was found between patients who had undergone previous pelvic surgery, radiation, or both and those who did not. The ratio of LC(17b) to LC(17a) was approximately 1:1 for all patients, with a mean of 48.9% LC(17b). Statistical difference was seen in the relative ratio of LC(17b) to LC(17a) among the group who failed conservative therapy with PDE5 inhibitors compared with all others. In conclusion, we determined the SM myosin isoform composition of human CC and present for the first time differences in relative myosin isoform expression among patients with several risk factors contributing to their cause of ED. Our data reflect the fact that alternative splicing events in the MHC and 17 kDa MLC pre-mRNA may be a possible molecular mechanism involved in the altered contractility of the CCSM in patients with ED.

  20. Pharmacological evidence for a novel cysteinyl-leukotriene receptor subtype in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Walch, Laurence; Norel, Xavier; Bäck, Magnus; Gascard, Jean-Pierre; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Brink, Charles

    2002-01-01

    To characterize the cysteinyl-leukotriene receptors (CysLT receptors) in isolated human pulmonary arteries, ring preparations were contracted with leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and leukotriene D4 (LTD4) in either the absence or presence of the selective CysLT1 receptor antagonists, ICI 198615, MK 571 or the dual CysLT1/CysLT2 receptor antagonist, BAY u9773. Since the contractions induced by the cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cysLTs) in intact preparations failed to attain a plateau response over the concentration range studied, the endothelium was removed and the tissue treated continuously with indomethacin (Rubbed+INDO). In these latter preparations, the pEC50 for LTC4 and LTD4 were not significantly different (7.61±0.07, n=20 and 7.96±0.09, n=22, respectively). However, the LTC4 and LTD4 contractions were markedly potentiated when compared with data from intact tissues. Leukotriene E4 (LTE4) did not contract human isolated pulmonary arterial preparations. In addition, treatment of preparations with LTE4 (1 μM; 30 min) did not modify either the LTC4 or LTD4 contractions. Treatment of preparations with the S-conjugated glutathione (S-hexyl-GSH; 100 μM, 30 min), an inhibitor of the metabolism of LTC4 to LTD4, did not modify LTC4 contractions. The pEC50 values for LTC4 were significantly reduced by treatment of the preparations with either ICI 198615, MK 571 or BAY u9773 and the pKB values were: 7.20, 7.02 and 6.26, respectively. In contrast, these antagonists did not modify the LTD4 pEC50 values. These findings suggest the presence of two CysLT receptors on human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle. A CysLT1 receptor with a low affinity for CysLT1 antagonists and a novel CysLT receptor subtype, both responsible for vasoconstriction. Activation of this latter receptor by LTC4 and LTD4 induced a contractile response which was resistant to the selective CysLT1 antagonists (ICI 198615 and MK 571) as well as the non-selective (CysLT1/CysLT2) antagonist, BAY u9773. PMID

  1. Pharmacologic characterization of the oxytocin receptor in human uterine smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Atsuo; Tsukada, Junko; Tomura, Yuichi; Wada, Koh-ichi; Kusayama, Toshiyuki; Ishii, Noe; Yatsu, Takeyuki; Uchida, Wataru; Tanaka, Akihiro

    2000-01-01

    [3H]-oxytocin was used to characterize the oxytocin receptor found in human uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC). Specific binding of [3H]-oxytocin to USMC plasma membranes was dependent upon time, temperature and membrane protein concentration. Scatchard plot analysis of equilibrium binding data revealed the existence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites with an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.76 nM and a maximum receptor density (Bmax) of 153 fmol mg−1 protein. The Hill coefficient (nH) did not differ significantly from unity, suggesting binding to homogenous, non-interacting receptor populations. Competitive inhibition of [3H]-oxytocin binding showed that oxytocin and vasopressin (AVP) receptor agonists and antagonists displaced [3H]-oxytocin in a concentration-dependent manner. The order of potencies for peptide agonists and antagonists was: oxytocin>[Asu1,6]-oxytocin>AVP= atosiban>d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)AVP>[Thr4,Gly7]-oxytocin>dDAVP, and for nonpeptide antagonists was: L-371257>YM087>SR 49059>OPC-21268>SR 121463A>OPC-31260. Oxytocin significantly induced concentration-dependent increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and hyperplasia in USMC. The oxytocin receptor antagonists, atosiban and L-371257, potently and concentration-dependently inhibited oxytocin-induced [Ca2+]i increase and hyperplasia. In contrast, the V1A receptor selective antagonist, SR 49059, and the V2 receptor selective antagonist, SR 121463A, did not potently inhibit oxytocin-induced [Ca2+]i increase and hyperplasia. The potency order of antagonists in inhibiting oxytocin-induced [Ca2+]i increase and hyperplasia was similar to that observed in radioligand binding assays. In conclusion, these data provide evidence that the high-affinity [3H]-oxytocin binding site found in human USMC is a functional oxytocin receptor coupled to [Ca2+]i increase and cell growth. Thus human USMC may prove to be a valuable tool in further investigation of the

  2. Early Transcriptomic Response to LDL and oxLDL in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Damián-Zamacona, Salvador; Toledo-Ibelles, Paola; Ibarra-Abundis, Mabel Z.; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Macedo-Alcibia, Karla Paola; Delgado–Coello, Blanca; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Although nowadays it is well known that the human transcriptome can importantly vary according to external or environmental condition, the reflection of this concept when studying oxidative stress and its direct relationship with gene expression profiling during the process of atherogenesis has not been thoroughly achieved. Objective The ability to analyze genome-wide gene expression through transcriptomics has shown that the genome responds dynamically to diverse stimuli. Here, we describe the transcriptome of human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMC) stimulated by native and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (nLDL and oxLDL respectively), with the aim of assessing the early molecular changes that induce a response in this cell type resulting in a transcriptomic transformation. This expression has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic plaques in vivo and in vitro, particularly in the light of the oxidative modification hypothesis of atherosclerosis. Approach and Results Total RNA was isolated with TRIzol reagent (Life Technologies) and quality estimated using an Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer. The transcriptome of hVSMC under different experimental conditions (1,5 and 24 hours for nLDL and oxLDL) was obtained using the GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST (Affymetrix) designed to measure gene expression of 28,869 well-annotated genes. A fixed fold-change cut-off corresponding to ± 2 was used to identify genes exhibiting the most significant variation and statistical significance (P< 0.05), and 8 genes validated by qPCR using Taqman probes. Conclusions 10 molecular processes were significantly affected in hVSMC: Apoptosis and cell cycle, extracellular matrix remodeling, DNA repair, cholesterol efflux, cGMP biosynthesis, endocytic mechanisms, calcium homeostasis, redox balance, membrane trafficking and finally, the immune response to inflammation. The evidence we present supporting the hypothesis for the involvement of oxidative modification of several processes and

  3. [Modern diagnostics of tracheal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Müller, A

    2004-06-01

    Numerous new modalities in computertomography (CT), in particular Multislice-Spiral-CT and Virtual Endoscopy, and novel developments in endoscopy and spirometry gave us reason to review the current state of the art in diagnostics of tracheal stenosis (TS). This review evaluates the literature of the last decade regarding new trends and methods in diagnostics of tracheal stenosis. Pros and cons are discussed, and the future trends are highlighted. Spiral-CT scans at collimated slices of < or = 3 mm, PITCH < or = 1.5 and a segmentation level of - 350 HE permit a valid measurement of tracheal lumina. The flow-volume-plot is still the most important investigation to evaluate respiratory function in TS. Peak-Flow-Meters are suitable for patient self monitoring. The selective estimation of the TS related airway resistance using in situ measurements and numerical flow simulation studies are likely to reach importance in future. The ability to obtain exact measures from endoscopic recordings using EndoScan serves quality control in endoscopy. An objective comparison of different treatments becomes possible. Endosonography and methods for in-vitro tissue analysis (Optical Coherence Tomography) are more focused on the early diagnosis of malignant lesions. The Synopsis of endoscopy, CT-scan and spirometry provides the highest diagnostic accuracy today.

  4. Regional differences of energetics, mechanics, and kinetics of myosin cross-bridge in human ureter smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Vargiu, Romina; Perinu, Anna; Tintrup, Frank; Broccia, Francesca; Lisa, Antonello De

    2015-01-01

    This study provides information about baseline mechanical properties of the entire muscle and the molecular contractile mechanism in human ureter smooth muscle and proposed to investigate if changes in mechanical motor performance in different regions of isolated human ureter are attributable to differences in myosin crossbridge interactions. Classic mechanical, contraction and energetic parameters derived from the tension-velocity relationship were studied in ureteral smooth muscle strips oriented longitudinally and circularly from abdominal and pelvic human ureter parts. By applying of Huxley's mathematical model we calculated the total working crossbridge number per mm(2) (Ψ), elementary force per single crossbridge (Π0), duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment 1/f1 and detachment 1/g2 and peak mechanical efficiency (Eff.max). Abdominal longitudinal smooth muscle strips exhibited significantly higher maximum isometric tension and faster maximum unloaded shortening velocity compared to pelvic ones. Contractile differences were associated with significantly higher crossbridge number per mm(2). Abdominal longitudinal muscle strips showed a lower duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment and detachment and higher peak mechanical efficiency than pelvic ones. Such data suggest that the abdominal human ureter showed better mechanical motor performance mainly related to a higher crossbridge number and crossbridge kinetics differences. Such results were more evident in the longitudinal rather than in the circular layer.

  5. Nanonet force microscopy for measuring forces in single smooth muscle cells of the human aorta.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alexander; Chan, Patrick; Sheets, Kevin; Apperson, Matthew; Delaughter, Christopher; Gleason, Thomas G; Phillippi, Julie A; Nain, Amrinder

    2017-07-07

    A number of innovative methods exist to measure cell-matrix adhesive forces, but they have yet to accurately describe and quantify the intricate interplay of a cell and its fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM). In cardiovascular pathologies, such as aortic aneurysm, new knowledge on the involvement of cell-matrix forces could lead to elucidation of disease mechanisms. To better understand this dynamics, we measured primary human aortic single smooth muscle cell (SMC) forces using nanonet force microscopy in both inside-out (I-O intrinsic contractility) and outside-in (O-I external perturbation) modes. For SMC populations, we measured the I-O and O-I forces to be 12.9 ± 1.0 and 57.9 ± 2.5 nN, respectively. Exposure of cells to oxidative stress conditions caused a force decrease of 57 and 48% in I-O and O-I modes, respectively, and an increase in migration rate by 2.5-fold. Finally, in O-I mode, we cyclically perturbed cells at constant strain of varying duration to simulate in vivo conditions of the cardiac cycle and found that I-O forces decrease with increasing duration and O-I forces decreased by half at shorter cycle times. Thus our findings highlight the need to study forces exerted and felt by cells simultaneously to comprehensively understand force modulation in cardiovascular disease. © 2017 Hall et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  6. Sex-specific pharmacological modulation of autophagic process in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Campesi, Ilaria; Occhioni, Stefano; Capobianco, Giampiero; Fois, Marco; Montella, Andrea; Dessole, Salvatore; Franconi, Flavia

    2016-11-01

    Sex has largely been neglected in cell studies. Therefore, we investigated the occurrence of sexual dimorphism in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). In particular, we investigated the existence of sex differences in basal and in drug-induced autophagy, a process involved in cardiovascular diseases. HUASMCs were isolated from healthy and normal weight male and female newborns (MHUASMCs and FHUASMCs, respectively). Expression of the primary molecules involved in the autophagic process [beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)], and PmTOR were detected using western blotting in basal conditions, after serum starvation, rapamycin and verapamil treatments. The level of constitutive autophagy, measured as the LC3II/I ratio, was similar in male and female HUASMCs in the basal condition. Serum starvation promoted autophagy in both cell types, but the increase was more pronounced in FHUASMCs, while 250nM rapamycin induced autophagy only in female cells. Moreover, the level of verapamil-induced autophagy was not different between the two sexes. Notably, in the basal condition, Beclin-1 was more elevated in MHUASMCs than in FHUASMCs, and the difference disappeared after serum starvation and exposure to rapamycin. After exposure to verapamil, the differences in Beclin-1 increased, with more elevated expression levels in female cells. PmTor did not differ in basal conditions, but it was significantly down-regulated by starvation only in FHUASMCs and by rapamycin both in male and female cells. Finally, a strong negative correlation was observed between the newborn's weight and basal autophagy in female cells and between the newborn's weight and the LC3II/I ratio in male verapamil-treated cells. These results indicate that sex-differences begin in utero, are parameter-specific and drug specific suggesting that HUASMCs are a suitable model for the screening of drugs and to study the influence of sex. The sex differences in the autophagy

  7. Calcium Phosphate Crystals from Uremic Serum Promote Osteogenic Differentiation in Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaorong; Zhang, Lin; Ni, Zhaohui; Qian, Jiaqi; Fang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Recent study demonstrated that calcium phosphate (CaP) crystals isolated from high phosphate medium were a key contributor to arterial calcification. The present study further investigated the effects of CaP crystals induced by uremic serum on calcification of human aortic smooth muscle cells. This may provide a new insight for the development of uremic cardiovascular calcification. We tested the effects of uremic serum or normal serum on cell calcification. Calcification was visualized by staining and calcium deposition quantified. Expression of various bone-calcifying genes was detected by real-time PCR, and protein levels were quantified by western blotting or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Pyrophosphate was used to investigate the effects of CaP crystals' inhibition. Finally, CaP crystals were separated from uremic serum to determine its specific pro-calcification effects. Uremic serum incubation resulted in progressively increased calcification staining and increased calcium deposition in HASMCs after 4, 8 and 12 days (P vs 0 day <0.001 for all). Compared to cells incubated in control serum, uremic serum significantly induced the mRNA expression of bone morphogenetic factor-2, osteopontin and RUNX2, and increased their protein levels as well (P < 0.05 for all). Inhibition of CaP crystals with pyrophosphate incubation prevented calcium deposition and bone-calcifying gene over-expression increased by uremic serum. CaP crystals, rather than the rest of uremic serum, were responsible for these effects. Uremic serum accelerates arterial calcification by mediating osteogenic differentiation. This effect might be mainly attributed to the CaP crystal content.

  8. A phospholipase Cγ1-activated pathway regulates transcription in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Irene; Mascall, Keith S; Ramos, Joe W; Nixon, Graeme F

    2011-06-01

    Growth factor-induced repression of smooth muscle (SM) cell marker genes is an integral part of vascular SM (VSM) cell proliferation. This is partly regulated via translocation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) to the nucleus which activates the transcription factor Elk-1. The mediators involved in ERK1/2 nuclear translocation in VSM cells are unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the mechanisms which regulate growth factor-induced nuclear translocation of ERK1/2 and gene expression in VSM cells. In cultured human VSM cells, phospholipase C (PLC)γ1 expression was required for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced ERK1/2 nuclear translocation, Elk-1 phosphorylation, and subsequent repression of SM α-actin gene expression. The mechanisms of a role for PLCγ1 in ERK1/2 nuclear localization were further examined by investigating interacting proteins. The ERK1/2-binding phosphoprotein, protein enriched in astrocytes-15 (PEA-15), was phosphorylated by PDGF and this phosphorylation required activation of PLCγ1. In cells pre-treated with PEA-15 siRNA, ERK1/2 distribution significantly increased in the nucleus and resulted in decreased SM α-actin expression and increased VSM cell proliferation. Overexpression of PEA-15 increased ERK1/2 localization in the cytoplasm. The regulatory role of PEA-15 phosphorylation was assessed. In VSM cells overexpressing a non-phosphorylatable form of PEA-15, PDGF-induced ERK1/2 nuclear localization was inhibited. These results suggest that PEA-15 phosphorylation by PLCγ1 is required for PDGF-induced ERK1/2 nuclear translocation. This represents an important level of phenotypic control by directly affecting Elk-1-dependent transcription and ultimately SM cell marker protein expression in VSM cells.

  9. Experimental evidence and mathematical modeling of thermal effects on human colonic smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Altomare, A; Gizzi, A; Guarino, M P L; Loppini, A; Cocca, S; Dipaola, M; Alloni, R; Cicala, M; Filippi, S

    2014-07-01

    It has been shown, in animal models, that gastrointestinal tract (GIT) motility is influenced by temperature; nevertheless, the basic mechanism governing thermal GIT smooth muscle responses has not been fully investigated. Studies based on physiologically tuned mathematical models have predicted that thermal inhomogeneity may induce an electrochemical destabilization of peristaltic activity. In the present study, the effect of thermal cooling on human colonic muscle strip (HCMS) contractility was studied. HCMSs were obtained from disease-free margins of resected segments for cancer. After removal of the mucosa and serosa layers, strips were mounted in separate chambers. After 30 min, spontaneous contractions developed, which were measured using force displacement transducers. Temperature was changed every hour (37, 34, and 31°C). The effect of cooling was analyzed on mean contractile activity, oscillation amplitude, frequency, and contraction to ACh (10(-5) M). At 37°C, HCMSs developed a stable phasic contraction (~0.02 Hz) with a significant ACh-elicited mean contractile response (31% and 22% compared with baseline in the circular and longitudinal axis, respectively). At a lower bath temperature, higher mean contractile amplitude was observed, and it increased in the presence of ACh (78% and 43% higher than the basal tone in the circular and longitudinal axis, respectively, at 31°C). A simplified thermochemomechanical model was tuned on experimental data characterizing the stress state coupling the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration to tissue temperature. In conclusion, acute thermal cooling affects colonic muscular function. Further studies are needed to establish the exact mechanisms involved to better understand clinical consequences of hypothermia on intestinal contractile activity.

  10. Keratose Hydrogels Promote Vascular Smooth Muscle Differentiation from C-kit Positive Human Cardiac Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Benjamin T; Simmons, Jamelle; Chen, Miao; Fan, Huimin; Barron, Catherine; Liu, Zhongmin; Van Dyke, Mark; He, Jia-Qiang

    2017-03-28

    Stem cell-based therapies have demonstrated great potential for the treatment of cardiac diseases, e.g., myocardial infarction; however, low cell viability, low retention/engraftment, and uncontrollable in vivo differentiation after transplantation are still major limitations, which lead low therapeutic efficiency. Biomaterials provide a promising solution to overcome these issues due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, low/non-immunogenicity, and low/non-cytotoxicity. The present study aims to investigate the impacts of Keratose (KOS) hydrogel biomaterial on cellular viability, proliferation, and differentiation of c-kit+ human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs). Briefly, hCSCs were cultured on both KOS hydrogel-coated dishes and regular tissue culture dishes (Blank control). Cell viability, stemness, proliferation, cellular morphology, and cardiac lineage differentiation were compared between KOS hydrogel and the Blank control at different time points. We found that KOS hydrogel is effective in maintaining hCSCs without any observable toxic effects, although cell size and proliferation rate appeared smaller on the KOS hydrogel compared to the Blank control. To our surprise, KOS hydrogel significantly promoted vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation (~72%), while on the Blank control dishes, most of the hCSCs (~78%) became cardiomyocytes. Further, we also observed "endothelial cell tube-like" microstructures formed by differentiated VSMCs only on KOS hydrogel, suggesting a potential capability of the hCSC-derived VSMCs for in vitro angiogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to discover the preferred differentiation of hCSCs toward VSMCs on KOS hydrogel. The underlying mechanism remains unknown. This innovative methodology may offer a new approach to generate a robust number of VSMCs simply by culturing hCSCs on KOS hydrogel, and the resulting VSMCs may be used in animal studies and clinical trials in

  11. Soluble guanylate cyclase modulators blunt hyperoxia effects on calcium responses of developing human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Thompson, Michael A; Kuipers, Ine; Stewart, Alecia; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thu, James; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-09-15

    Exposure to moderate hyperoxia in prematurity contributes to subsequent airway dysfunction and increases the risk of developing recurrent wheeze and asthma. The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)-cyclic GMP (cGMP) axis modulates airway tone by regulating airway smooth muscle (ASM) intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) and contractility. However, the effects of hyperoxia on this axis in the context of Ca(2+)/contractility are not known. In developing human ASM, we explored the effects of novel drugs that activate sGC independent of NO on alleviating hyperoxia (50% oxygen)-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) responses to bronchoconstrictor agonists. Treatment with BAY 41-2272 (sGC stimulator) and BAY 60-2770 (sGC activator) increased cGMP levels during exposure to 50% O2. Although 50% O2 did not alter sGCα1 or sGCβ1 expression, BAY 60-2770 did increase sGCβ1 expression. BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 blunted Ca(2+) responses to histamine in cells exposed to 50% O2. The effects of BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 were reversed by protein kinase G inhibition. These novel data demonstrate that BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 stimulate production of cGMP and blunt hyperoxia-induced increases in Ca(2+) responses in developing ASM. Accordingly, sGC stimulators/activators may be a useful therapeutic strategy in improving bronchodilation in preterm infants.

  12. Mechanical stretch is a highly selective regulator of gene expression in human bladder smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Adam, Rosalyn M; Eaton, Samuel H; Estrada, Carlos; Nimgaonkar, Ashish; Shih, Shu-Ching; Smith, Lois E H; Kohane, Isaac S; Bägli, Darius; Freeman, Michael R

    2004-12-15

    Application of mechanical stimuli has been shown to alter gene expression in bladder smooth muscle cells (SMC). To date, only a limited number of "stretch-responsive" genes in this cell type have been reported. We employed oligonucleotide arrays to identify stretch-sensitive genes in primary culture human bladder SMC subjected to repetitive mechanical stimulation for 4 h. Differential gene expression between stretched and nonstretched cells was assessed using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM). Expression of 20 out of 11,731 expressed genes ( approximately 0.17%) was altered >2-fold following stretch, with 19 genes induced and one gene (FGF-9) repressed. Using real-time RT-PCR, we tested independently the responsiveness of 15 genes to stretch and to platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), another hypertrophic stimulus for bladder SMC. In response to both stimuli, expression of 13 genes increased, 1 gene (FGF-9) decreased, and 1 gene was unchanged. Six transcripts (HB-EGF, BMP-2, COX-2, LIF, PAR-2, and FGF-9) were evaluated using an ex vivo rat model of bladder distension. HB-EGF, BMP-2, COX-2, LIF, and PAR-2 increased with bladder stretch ex vivo, whereas FGF-9 decreased, consistent with expression changes observed in vitro. In silico analysis of microarray data using the FIRED algorithm identified c-jun, AP-1, ATF-2, and neurofibromin-1 (NF-1) as potential transcriptional mediators of stretch signals. Furthermore, the promoters of 9 of 13 stretch-responsive genes contained AP-1 binding sites. These observations identify stretch as a highly selective regulator of gene expression in bladder SMC. Moreover, they suggest that mechanical and growth factor signals converge on common transcriptional regulators that include members of the AP-1 family.

  13. [Effects of arsenic trioxide on human coronary smooth muscle cells: experiment in vitro].

    PubMed

    Luan, Tian-Zhu; Fu, Song-Bin; Zhou, Li-Jun; Li, Wei-Min; Huang, Yong-Lin

    2009-01-13

    To study the apoptotic effects of arsenic trioxide on human coronary smooth muscle cells (HCSMCs). HCSMCs were cultured and randomly divided into 5 groups to be treated by arsenic trioxide of the concentrations 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 micromol/L for 48 h. Cell growth curve was drawn by MTT method. DNA electrophoresis was used to observe the apoptosis. Western blotting was conducted to examine the protein expression of Bax, an apoptosis-promoting gene, and Bcl-2, an apoptosis-inhibiting gene. Other HCSMCs were cultured with 4.0 micromol/L arsenic trioxide for 48 h, then transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the ultra-structure and TUNEL was used to detect the percentage of apoptotic cells. HCSMCs not treated with arsenic trioxide were used as control group. Arsenic trioxide of different concentrations inhibited the proliferation of HCSMCs dose and time-dependently. When the concentration of arsenic trioxide was 5.0 micromol/L the number of living cells was (4.41 +/- 0.10) x 10(5)/ml, significantly lower than that of the control group [(30.11 +/- 0.93) x 10(5)/ml, P < 0.05]. Apoptosis bodies were observed under the transmission electron microscope. DNA electrophoresis showed hazy ladders, especially when the concentrations were 3.0 - 4.0 micromol/L. When the concentration was 5.0 micromol/L the number of necrotic cells increased remarkably and apoptosis became less significant. TUNEL showed that the apoptotic cells increased from 16.0% +/- 3.1% to 38.7% +/- 2.7% (P < 0.05). MTT test showed that arsenic trioxide decreased the absorbance of HCSMCs dose and time-dependently. Western blotting showed that the Bcl-2 expression was decreased and the expression of Bax increased after treatment of arsenic trioxide. Arsenic trioxide exerts an apoptotic effect on HCSMCs.

  14. Concerted upregulation of CLP36 and smooth muscle actin protein expression in human endometrium during decidualization.

    PubMed

    Miehe, Ulrich; Neumaier-Wagner, Peruka; Kadyrov, Mamed; Goyal, Pankaj; Alfer, Joachim; Rath, Werner; Huppertz, Berthold

    2005-01-01

    The human endometrium prepares for implantation of the blastocyst by reorganization of its whole cellular network. Endometrial stroma cells change their phenotype starting around the 23rd day of the menstrual cycle. These predecidual stroma cells first appear next to spiral arteries, and after implantation these cells further differentiate into decidual stroma cells. The phenotypical changes in these cells during decidualization are characterized by distinct changes in the actin filaments and filament-related proteins such as alpha-actinin. The carboxy-terminal LIM domain protein with a molecular weight of 36 kDa (CLP36) is a cytoskeletal component that has been shown to associate with contractile actin filaments and to bind to alpha-actinin supporting a role for CLP36 in cytoskeletal reorganization and signal transduction by binding to signaling proteins. The expression patterns of CLP36, alpha-actinin and actin were studied in endometrial stroma cells from different stages of the menstrual cycle and in decidual stroma cells from the 6th week of gestation until the end of pregnancy. During the menstrual cycle, CLP36 is only expressed in the luminal and glandular epithelium but not in endometrial stroma cells. During decidualization and throughout pregnancy, a parallel upregulation of CLP36 and smooth muscle actin, an early marker of decidualization in the baboon, was observed in endometrial decidual cells. Since both proteins maintain a high expression level throughout pregnancy, a role of both proteins is suggested in the stabilization of the cytoskeleton of these cells that come into close contact with invading trophoblast cells.

  15. Gas Exchange Models for a Flexible Insect Tracheal System.

    PubMed

    Simelane, S M; Abelman, S; Duncan, F D

    2016-06-01

    In this paper two models for movement of respiratory gases in the insect trachea are presented. One model considers the tracheal system as a single flexible compartment while the other model considers the trachea as a single flexible compartment with gas exchange. This work represents an extension of Ben-Tal's work on compartmental gas exchange in human lungs and is applied to the insect tracheal system. The purpose of the work is to study nonlinear phenomena seen in the insect respiratory system. It is assumed that the flow inside the trachea is laminar, and that the air inside the chamber behaves as an ideal gas. Further, with the isothermal assumption, the expressions for the tracheal partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide, rate of volume change, and the rates of change of oxygen concentration and carbon dioxide concentration are derived. The effects of some flow parameters such as diffusion capacities, reaction rates and air concentrations on net flow are studied. Numerical simulations of the tracheal flow characteristics are performed. The models developed provide a mathematical framework to further investigate gas exchange in insects.

  16. Decreased vascular smooth muscle cell density in medial degeneration of human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    López-Candales, A.; Holmes, D. R.; Liao, S.; Scott, M. J.; Wickline, S. A.; Thompson, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are characterized by structural deterioration of the aortic wall leading to progressive aortic dilatation and eventual rupture. The histopathological changes in AAAs are particularly evident within the elastic media, which is normally dominated by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To determine whether a decrease in vascular SMCs contributes to medial degeneration, we measured SMC density in 21 normal and pathological human abdominal aortic tissue specimens using immunohistochemistry for alpha-SMC actin and direct cell counts (medial SMCs per high-power field (HPF)). Medial SMC density was not significantly different between normal aorta (n = 5; 199.5 +/- 14.9 SMCs/HPF) and atherosclerotic occlusive disease (n = 6; 176.4 +/- 13.9 SMCs/HPF), but it was reduced by 74% in AAA (n = 10; 50.9 +/- 6.1 SMCs/HPF; P < 0.01 versus normal aorta). Light and electron microscopy revealed no evidence of overt cellular necrosis, but SMCs in AAAs exhibited ultrastructural changes consistent with apoptosis. Using in situ end-labeling (ISEL) of fragmented DNA to detect apoptotic cells, up to 30% of aortic wall cells were ISEL positive in AAAs. By double-labeling techniques, many of these cells were alpha-actin-positive SMCs distributed throughout the degenerative media. In contrast, ISEL-positive cells were observed only within the intimal plaque in atherosclerotic occlusive disease. The amount of p53 protein detected by immunoblotting was increased nearly fourfold in AAA compared with normal aorta and atherosclerotic occlusive disease (P < 0.01), and immunoreactive p53 was localized to lymphocytes and residual SMCs in the aneurysm wall. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays a substantial amount of p53 mRNA expression was observed in AAAs. These results demonstrate that medial SMC density is significantly decreased in human AAA tissues associated with evidence of SMC apoptosis and increased production of p53, a potential

  17. Distribution of phenotypically disparate myocyte subpopulations in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Halayko, Andrew J; Stelmack, Gerald L; Yamasaki, Akira; McNeill, Karol; Unruh, Helmut; Rector, Edward

    2005-01-01

    Phenotype and functional heterogeneity of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells in vitro is well known, but there is limited understanding of these features in vivo. We tested whether ASM is composed of myocyte subsets differing in contractile phenotype marker expression. We used flow cytometry to compare smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (smMHC) and smooth muscle-alpha-actin (sm-alpha-actin) abundance in myocytes dispersed from canine trachealis. Based on immunofluorescent intensity and light scatter characteristics (forward and 90 degrees side scatter), 2 subgroups were identified and isolated. Immunoblotting confirmed smMHC and sm-alpha-actin were 10- and 5-fold greater, respectively, in large, elongate myocytes that comprised approximately 60% of total cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed similar phenotype heterogeneity in human bronchial smooth muscle. Canine tracheal myocyte subpopulations isolated by flow cytometry were used to seed primary subcultures. Proliferation of subcultures established with myocytes exhibiting low levels of smMHC and sm-alpha-actin was approximately 2 x faster than subcultures established with ASM cells with a high marker protein content. These studies demonstrate broad phenotypic heterogeneity of myocytes in normal ASM tissue that is maintained in cell culture, as demonstrated by divergent proliferative capacity. The distinct roles of these subgroups could be a key determinant of normal and pathological lung development and biology.

  18. Human motion perception and smooth eye movements show similar directional biases for elongated apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, B. R.; Stone, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye-movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical, suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  19. Human motion perception and smooth eye movements show similar directional biases for elongated apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, B. R.; Stone, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye-movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical, suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  20. Human Motion Perception and Smooth Eye Movements Show Similar Directional Biases for Elongated Apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, Brent R.; Stone, Leland S.

    1997-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  1. Human Motion Perception and Smooth Eye Movements Show Similar Directional Biases for Elongated Apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, Brent R.; Stone, Leland S.

    1997-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  2. Differential effects of blinks on horizontal saccade and smooth pursuit initiation in humans.

    PubMed

    Rambold, Holger; El Baz, Ieman; Helmchen, Christoph

    2004-06-01

    Blinks executed during eye movements affect kinetic eye movement parameters, e.g., peak velocity of saccades is decreased, their duration is increased, but their amplitude is not altered. This effect is mainly explained by the decreased activity of premotor neurons in the brainstem: omni-pause neurons (OPN) in the nucleus raphe interpositus. Previous studies examined the immediate effect of blinks directly on eye movements but not their effect when they are elicited several hundred milliseconds before the eye movements. In order to address this question we tested blinks elicited before the target onset of saccades and pursuit and compared the results to the gap effect: if a fixation light is extinguished for several hundred milliseconds, the reaction time (latency) for subsequent saccades or smooth pursuit eye movements is decreased. Monocular eye and lid movements were recorded in nine healthy subjects using the scleral search-coil system. Laser stimuli were front-projected onto a tangent screen in front of the subjects. Horizontal step-ramp smooth pursuit of 20 deg/s was elicited in one session, or 5 deg horizontal visually guided saccades in another experimental session. In one-third of the trials (smooth pursuit or saccades) the fixation light was extinguished for 200 ms before stimulus onset (gap condition), and in another third of the trials reflexive blinks were elicited by a short airpuff before the stimulus onset (blink condition). The last third of the trials served as controls (control condition). Stimulus direction and the three conditions were randomized for saccades and smooth pursuit separately. The latency of the step-ramp smooth pursuit in the blink condition was found to be decreased by 10 ms, which was less than in the gap condition (38 ms). However, the initial acceleration and steady-state velocity of smooth pursuit did not differ in the three conditions. In contrast, the latency of the saccades in the gap condition was decreased by 39 ms, but

  3. The Drosophila SRF homolog is expressed in a subset of tracheal cells and maps within a genomic region required for tracheal development.

    PubMed

    Affolter, M; Montagne, J; Walldorf, U; Groppe, J; Kloter, U; LaRosa, M; Gehring, W J

    1994-04-01

    The Drosophila homolog of the vertebrate serum response factor (SRF) was isolated by low stringency hybridization. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the Drosophila SRF homolog (DSRF) codes for a protein that displays 93% sequence identity with human SRF in the MADS domain, the region required for DNA binding, dimerization and interaction with accessory factors. The DSRF gene is expressed during several phases of embryonic development. In the egg, both the RNA and the protein are maternal in origin and slowly decrease in amount during gastrulation. After germ band retraction, high levels of zygotic expression are observed in a distinct subset of peripheral tracheal cells distributed throughout the embryo. Many of these cells are at the tip of tracheal branches and are in direct contact with the target tissues. The DSRF gene was mapped to position 60C on the second chromosome, and overlapping deficiencies which remove the gene were identified. Analysis of tracheal development in embryos carrying these deletions revealed a degeneration of most of the major branches of the tracheal system. Although the initial migration of tracheal cells was not affected in those deficient embryos, many tracheal cells appeared not to maintain their correct position and continued to migrate. Thus, the DSRF gene might play a role in the proper formation and maintenance of the trachea.

  4. Correlation Between Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure and Tracheal Wall Pressure Using Air and Saline Filled Cuffs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-31

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2017-0004 Correlation Between Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure and Tracheal Wall Pressure Using Air - and Saline-Filled... Air Force Research Laboratory 711th Human Performance Wing U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Aeromedical Research Department 2510 Fifth...Correlation Between Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure and Tracheal Wall Pressure Using Air - and Saline-Filled Cuffs 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-14

  5. Iptakalim influences the proliferation and apoptosis of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, QINGLIN; YAN, XIAOPEI; KONG, HUI; XIE, WEIPING; WANG, HONG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of an ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel opener iptakalim (IPT) on the proliferation and apoptosis of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs), and examine the potential value of IPT to hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) at a cellular level. HPASMCs were divided into the control, ET-1, ET-1+IPT and ET-1+IPT+glibenclamide (GLI) groups. GLI was administered 30 min prior to ET-1 and IPT. The 4 groups were incubated with corresponding reagents for 24 h. Cell viability was evaluated using a CCK-8 assay, cell proliferation by 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assay, and cell apoptosis via the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, i.e., Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) using western blotting. We incubated HPASMCs with varying concentrations of ET-1 for 24, 48 and 72 h, and found that cell survival rate was increased in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05) rather than in a time-dependent manner (P>0.05). After co-incubation of HPASMCs with varying concentrations of IPT and ET-1 for 24 h, the cell survival rate was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The cell survival rate in the IPT+ET-1 group was significantly lower than that in the ET-1 group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1 group were higher than those in the control group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was lower than the control group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1+IPT group were lower than those in the ET-1 group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was higher than that in the ET-1 group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1+IPT+GLI group were higher than those in the ET-1+IPT group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was lower than that in the ET-1+IPT group (P<0.05). In conclusion, IPT inhibited ET-1-induced HPASMC proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. Thus, it may play an

  6. The purinergic component of human bladder smooth muscle cells’ proliferation and contraction under physiological stretch

    SciTech Connect

    Wazir, Romel; Luo, De-Yi; Tian, Ye; Yue, Xuan; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •Stretch induces proliferation and contraction. •Optimum applied stretch in vitro is 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively. •Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 is upregulated after application of stretch. •P2X2 is possibly more susceptible to stretch related changes. •Purinoceptors functioning may explain conditions with atropine resistance. -- Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether cyclic stretch induces proliferation and contraction of human smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs), mediated by P2X purinoceptor 1 and 2 and the signal transduction mechanisms of this process. Methods: HBSMCs were seeded on silicone membrane and stretched under varying parameters; (equibiaxial elongation: 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%), (Frequency: 0.05 Hz, 0.1 Hz, 0.2 Hz, 0.5 Hz, 1 Hz). 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine assay was employed for proliferative studies. Contractility of the cells was determined using collagen gel contraction assay. After optimal physiological stretch was established; P2X1 and P2X2 were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot. Specificity of purinoceptors was maintained by employing specific inhibitors; (NF023 for P2X1, and A317491for P2X2), in some experiments. Results: Optimum proliferation and contractility were observed at 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively, applied at a frequency of 0.1 Hz; At 5% stretch, proliferation increased from 0.837 ± 0.026 (control) to 1.462 ± 0.023%, p < 0.05. Mean contraction at 10% stretching increased from 31.7 ± 2.3%, (control) to 78.28 ±1.45%, p < 0.05. Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 was upregulated after application of stretch. Inhibition had effects on proliferation (1.232 ± 0.051, p < 0.05 NF023) and (1.302 ± 0.021, p < 0.05 A314791) while contractility was markedly reduced (68.24 ± 2.31, p < 0.05 NF023) and (73.2 ± 2.87, p < 0.05 A314791). These findings shows that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent proliferative and contractile modulation of HBSMCs in

  7. Free Fatty Acid Palmitate Impairs the Vitality and Function of Cultured Human Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oberbach, Andreas; Schlichting, Nadine; Heinrich, Marco; Till, Holger; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Neuhaus, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Background Incidence of urinary tract infections is elevated in patients with diabetes mellitus. Those patients show increased levels of the saturated free fatty acid palmitate. As recently shown metabolic alterations induced by palmitate include production and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukine-6 (IL-6) in cultured human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC). Here we studied the influence of palmitate on vital cell properties, for example, regulation of cell proliferation, mitochondrial enzyme activity and antioxidant capacity in hBSMC, and analyzed the involvement of major cytokine signaling pathways. Methodology/Principal Findings HBSMC cultures were set up from bladder tissue of patients undergoing cystectomy and stimulated with palmitate. We analyzed cell proliferation, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and antioxidant capacity by ELISA and confocal immunofluorescence. In signal transduction inhibition experiments we evaluated the involvement of NF-κB, JAK/STAT, MEK1, PI3K, and JNK in major cytokine signaling pathway regulation. We found: (i) palmitate decreased cell proliferation, increased mitochondrial enzyme activity and antioxidant capacity; (ii) direct inhibition of cytokine receptor by AG490 even more strongly suppressed cell proliferation in palmitate-stimulated cells, while counteracting palmitate-induced increase of antioxidant capacity; (iii) in contrast knockdown of the STAT3 inhibitor SOCS3 increased cell proliferation and antioxidant capacity; (iv) further downstream JAK/STAT3 signaling cascade the inhibition of PI3K or JNK enhanced palmitate induced suppression of cell proliferation; (v) increase of mitochondrial enzyme activity by palmitate was enhanced by inhibition of PI3K but counteracted by inhibition of MEK1. Conclusions/Significance Saturated free fatty acids (e.g., palmitate) cause massive alterations in vital cell functions of cultured hBSMC involving distinct major cytokine signaling pathways. Thereby, certain

  8. Integration of proteomic and transcriptomic profiles identifies a novel PDGF-MYC network in human smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) has been implicated in the proliferation, migration and synthetic activities of smooth muscle cells that characterize physiologic and pathologic tissue remodeling in hollow organs. However, neither the molecular basis of PDGFR-regulated signaling webs, nor the extent to which specific components within these networks could be exploited for therapeutic benefit has been fully elucidated. Results Expression profiling and quantitative proteomics analysis of PDGF-treated primary human bladder smooth muscle cells identified 1,695 genes and 241 proteins as differentially expressed versus non-treated cells. Analysis of gene expression data revealed MYC, JUN, EGR1, MYB, RUNX1, as the transcription factors most significantly networked with up-regulated genes. Forty targets were significantly altered at both the mRNA and protein levels. Proliferation, migration and angiogenesis were the biological processes most significantly associated with this signature, and MYC was the most highly networked master regulator. Alterations in master regulators and gene targets were validated in PDGF-stimulated smooth muscle cells in vitro and in a model of bladder injury in vivo. Pharmacologic inhibition of MYC and JUN confirmed their role in SMC proliferation and migration. Network analysis identified the diaphanous-related formin 3 as a novel PDGF target regulated by MYC and JUN, which was necessary for PDGF-stimulated lamellipodium formation. Conclusions These findings provide the first systems-level analysis of the PDGF-regulated transcriptome and proteome in normal smooth muscle cells. The analyses revealed an extensive cohort of PDGF-dependent biological processes and connected key transcriptional effectors to their regulation, significantly expanding current knowledge of PDGF-stimulated signaling cascades. These observations also implicate MYC as a novel target for pharmacological intervention in fibroproliferative expansion of

  9. Oxytocin receptors expressed and coupled to Ca2+ signalling in a human vascular smooth muscle cell line.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, H; Hirasawa, A; Horie, K; Saita, Y; Iida, E; Honda, K; Tsujimoto, G

    1996-03-01

    1. In a human vascular smooth muscle cell line (HVSMC), binding experiments with [3H]-arginine8-vasopressin (AVP) have shown the existence of a homogeneous population of binding sites with affinity (Kd value) of 0.65 nM and a maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) of 122 fmol mg-1 protein. 2. Nonlabelled compounds compete for [3H]-AVP binding in the HVSMC membrane with an order of potency of oxytocin > lyspressin > or = AVP > Thr4, Gly7-oxytocin > (beta-mercapto-beta-beta-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl-O-Me Tyr2, Arg8) vasopressin > desmopressin > OPC21268 > OPC31260. This order was markedly different from that observed in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (A10), a well-established V1A receptor system. 3. In HVSMC both oxytocin and AVP increased inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) production and [Ca2+]i response, but the efficacy of the responses was greater for oxytocin than AVP. 4. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay detected only oxytocin receptor but not V1A or V2 receptors in HVSMC, whereas only V1A receptors were found in A10 cells. 5. In conclusion, in HVSMC only oxytocin receptors are expressed among the vasopressin receptor family, and they coupled to phosphatidyl inositol (PI) turnover/Ca2+ signalling. This unexpected observation should provide new insight into the functional role of the oxytocin receptor in a human vascular smooth muscle cell line.

  10. H2 Receptor-Mediated Relaxation of Circular Smooth Muscle in Human Gastric Corpus: the Role of Nitric Oxide (NO).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eok; Kim, Dae Hoon; Kim, Young Chul; Han, Joung-Ho; Choi, Woong; Kim, Chan Hyung; Jeong, Hye Won; Park, Seon-Mee; Yun, Sei Jin; Choi, Song-Yi; Sung, Rohyun; Kim, Young Ho; Yoo, Ra Young; Sun, Park Hee; Kim, Heon; Song, Young-Jin; Xu, Wen-Xie; Yun, Hyo-Yung; Lee, Sang Jin

    2014-10-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of histamine on gastric motility and its specific receptor in the circular smooth muscle of the human gastric corpus. Histamine mainly produced tonic relaxation in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner, although histamine enhanced contractility in a minor portion of tissues tested. Histamine-induced tonic relaxation was nerve-insensitive because pretreatment with nerve blockers cocktail (NBC) did not inhibit relaxation. Additionally, K(+) channel blockers, such as tetraethylammonium (TEA), apamin (APA), and glibenclamide (Glib), had no effect. However, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo (4,3-A) quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), did inhibit histamine-induced tonic relaxation. In particular, histamine-induced tonic relaxation was converted to tonic contraction by pretreatment with L-NAME. Ranitidine, the H2 receptor blocker, inhibited histamine-induced tonic relaxation. These findings suggest that histamine produced relaxation in circular smooth muscle of human gastric smooth muscle through H2 receptor and NO/sGC pathways.

  11. Characterization of the EP receptor types that mediate longitudinal smooth muscle contraction of human colon, mouse colon and mouse ileum.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, S E; Smith, J E; Borman, R A; Cox, H M

    2011-08-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ) is an inflammatory mediator implicated in several gastrointestinal pathologies that affect normal intestinal transit. The aim was to establish the contribution of the four EP receptor types (EP(1-4) ), in human colon, that mediate PGE(2) -induced longitudinal smooth muscle contraction. Changes in isometric muscle tension of human colon, mouse colon and mouse ileum were measured in organ baths in response to receptor-specific agonists and antagonists. In addition, lidocaine was used to block neurogenic activity to investigate whether EP receptors were pre- or post-junctional. PGE(2) contracted longitudinal muscle from human and mouse colon and mouse ileum. These contractions were inhibited by the EP(1) receptor antagonist, EP(1) A in human colon, whereas a combination of EP(1) A and the EP(3) antagonist, L798106 inhibited agonist responses in both mouse preparations. The EP(3) agonist, sulprostone also increased muscle tension in both mouse tissues, and these responses were inhibited by lidocaine in the colon but not in the ileum. Although PGE(2) consistently contracted all three muscle preparations, butaprost decreased tension by activating smooth muscle EP(2) receptors in both colonic tissues. Alternatively, in mouse ileum, butaprost responses were lidocaine-sensitive, suggesting that it was activating prejunctional EP(2) receptors on inhibitory motor neurons. Conversely, EP(4) receptors were not functional in all the intestinal muscle preparations tested. PGE(2) -induced contraction of longitudinal smooth muscle is mediated by EP(1) receptors in human colon and by a combination of EP(1) and EP(3) receptors in mouse intestine, whereas EP(2) receptors modulate relaxation in all three preparations. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Basally activated nonselective cation currents regulate the resting membrane potential in human and monkey colonic smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Laura; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Lowe, Vanessa; Zheng, Haifeng; Peri, Lauren; Ro, Seungil; Sanders, Kenton M.

    2011-01-01

    Resting membrane potential (RMP) plays an important role in determining the basal excitability of gastrointestinal smooth muscle. The RMP in colonic muscles is significantly less negative than the equilibrium potential of K+, suggesting that it is regulated not only by K+ conductances but by inward conductances such as Na+ and/or Ca2+. We investigated the contribution of nonselective cation channels (NSCC) to the RMP in human and monkey colonic smooth muscle cells (SMC) using voltage- and current-clamp techniques. Qualitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed to examine potential molecular candidates for these channels among the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily. Spontaneous transient inward currents and holding currents were recorded in human and monkey SMC. Replacement of extracellular Na+ with equimolar tetraethylammonium or Ca2+ with Mn2+ inhibited basally activated nonselective cation currents. Trivalent cations inhibited these channels. Under current clamp, replacement of extracellular Na+ with N-methyl-d-glucamine or addition of trivalent cations caused hyperpolarization. Three unitary conductances of NSCC were observed in human and monkey colonic SMC. Molecular candidates for basally active NSCC were TRPC1, C3, C4, C7, M2, M4, M6, M7, V1, and V2 in human and monkey SMC. Comparison of the biophysical properties of these TRP channels with basally active NSCC (bINSCC) suggests that TRPM4 and specific TRPC heteromultimer combinations may underlie the three single-channel conductances of bINSCC. In conclusion, these findings suggest that basally activated NSCC contribute to the RMP in human and monkey colonic SMC and therefore may play an important role in determining basal excitability of colonic smooth muscle. PMID:21566016

  13. Protective effect of high-dose montelukast on salbutamol-induced homologous desensitisation in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Fogli, Stefano; Stefanelli, Fabio; Martelli, Alma; Daniele, Simona; Testai, Lara; Calderone, Vincenzo; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Martini, Claudia; Breschi, Maria Cristina

    2013-12-01

    Montelukast (MK) is a potent cysteinyl-leukotriene receptor antagonist that causes dose-related improvements in chronic asthma. We sought to determine whether MK was able to prevent salbutamol-induced tolerance in airway smooth muscle. Homologous β2-adrenoceptor desensitisation models were established in guinea-pigs and in human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC) by chronic salbutamol administration. Characterisation tools included measurement of the response of tracheal smooth muscle tissues to salbutamol, analysis of gene expression and receptor trafficking, evaluation of intracellular cAMP levels and phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in human bronchial smooth muscle cells. Salbutamol-induced β2-adrenoceptor desensitisation was characterised by β2-agonist hyporesponsiveness (-30%, p < 0.001) in desensitised tracheal smooth muscle, as compared to controls. MK, given intraperitoneally at 5 mg/kg/day for 6 consecutive days, completely restored tissue responsiveness to salbutamol. Prolonged salbutamol treatment significantly decreased cAMP synthesis, induced a complete removal of the β2-adrenoceptor from plasma membrane with a parallel increase in the cytosol and increased PDE4D5 gene transcription and PDE activity in human bronchial smooth muscle cells. In homologously desensitised BSMC, MK 30 μM for 24 h was able to prevent salbutamol subsensitivity and such an effect was associated with inhibition of salbutamol-induced PDE4 activity and restoration of membrane β2-adrenoceptor expression and function. These findings suggest the presence of a favourable interaction between MK and β2-adrenoceptor agonists that might improve the therapeutic index of bronchodilators in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

  14. CD16⁺ monocytes with smooth muscle cell characteristics are reduced in human renal chronic transplant dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Boersema, M; van den Born, J C; van Ark, J; Harms, G; Seelen, M A; van Dijk, M C R F; van Goor, H; Navis, G J; Popa, E R; Hillebrands, J L

    2015-05-01

    In chronic transplant dysfunction (CTD), persistent (allo)immune-mediated inflammation eventually leads to tissue remodeling including neointima formation in intragraft arteries. We previously showed that recipient-derived neointimal α-SMA(+) smooth muscle-like cells are present in human renal allografts with CTD. Human PBMC contain myeloid cells capable of differentiating into α-SMA(+) cells in vitro; the phenotype of the ancestral subset is as yet unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether monocyte subsets contain cells with smooth muscle-like cell differentiation capacity and whether CTD in renal transplant recipients is associated with a shift in these monocyte subsets. To accomplish this goal, monocyte subsets from healthy controls were sorted based on CD14 and CD16 expression to investigate gene expression levels of mesenchymal markers α-SMA and SM22α. CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes displayed increased α-SMA and SM22α mRNA expression compared with CD14(++)/CD16(-) monocytes, suggesting increased differentiation potential toward smooth muscle-like cells. Flow cytometry revealed that in non-CTD transplant recipients the percentage of CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes was reduced, with an even further reduction in patients with CTD. To determine a potential correlation between CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes and α-SMA(+) cell outgrowth potential in vitro, PBMC of healthy controls and transplant recipients with and without CTD were cultured under fibrotic culture conditions, and indeed a significant correlation (p=0.0002, r=0.62) was observed. Finally, double staining for α-SMA and CD16 revealed presence of α-SMA(+)CD16(+) cells in kidney explants from CTD patients, albeit at very low numbers. Our data represent evidence that, compared to CD14(++)CD16(-) monocytes, CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes have an increased expression of smooth muscle cell-associated genes. This monocyte subpopulation is reduced in renal transplant patients with CTD, possibly due to selective

  15. Tracheal remodelling in response to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Centanin, Lazaro; Gorr, Thomas A.; Wappner, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    The insect tracheal system is a continuous tubular network that ramifies into progressively thinner branches to provide air directly to every organ and tissue throughout the body. During embryogenesis the basic architecture of the tracheal system develops in a stereotypical and genetically controlled manner. Later, in larval stages, the tracheal system becomes plastic, and adapts to particular oxygen needs of the different tissues of the body. Oxygen sensing is mediated by specific prolyl-4-hydroxylases that regulate protein stability of the alpha subunit of oxygen-responsive transcription factors from the HIF family. Tracheal cells are exquisitely sensitive to oxygen levels, modulating the expression of hypoxia-inducible proteins that mediate sprouting of tracheal branches in direction to oxygen-deprived tissues. PMID:19482033

  16. Optical metabolic imaging for monitoring tracheal health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharick, Joe T.; Gil, Daniel A.; Choma, Michael A.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-04-01

    The health of the tracheal mucosa and submucosa is a vital yet poorly understood component of critical care medicine, and a minimally-invasive method is needed to monitor tracheal health in patients. Of particular interest are the ciliated cells of the tracheal epithelium that move mucus away from the lungs and prevent respiratory infection. Optical metabolic imaging (OMI) allows cellular-level measurement of metabolism, and is a compelling method for assessing tracheal health because ciliary motor proteins require ATP to function. In this pilot study, we apply multiphoton imaging of the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H and FAD to the mucosa and submucosa of ex vivo mouse trachea. We demonstrate the feasibility and potential diagnostic utility of these measurements for assessing tracheal health and pathophysiology at the single-cell level.

  17. Cell-to-cell contact of human monocytes with infected arterial smooth-muscle cells enhances growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Puolakkainen, Mirja; Campbell, Lee Ann; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Richards, Theresa; Patton, Dorothy L; Kuo, Cho-Chou

    2003-02-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae can infect arterial cells. It has been shown that coculture of human monocytes (U937) and endothelial cells promotes infection of C. pneumoniae in endothelial cells and that the enhancement was mediated by a soluble factor (insulin-like growth factor 2) secreted by monocytes. In this study, it is shown that coculture of monocytes with C. pneumoniae enhances infection of C. pneumoniae in arterial smooth-muscle cells 5.3-fold at a monocyte-to-smooth-muscle cell ratio of 5. However, unlike endothelial cells, no enhancement was observed if monocytes were placed in cell culture inserts or if conditioned medium from monocyte cultures was used, which suggests that cell-to-cell contact is critical. The addition of mannose 6-phosphate or octyl glucoside, a nonionic detergent containing a sugar group, to cocultures inhibited the enhancement. These findings suggest that the monocyte-smooth-muscle cell interaction may be mediated by mannose 6-phosphate receptors present on monocytes.

  18. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 activates NADPH oxidase to increase endoplasmic reticulum stress and human coronary artery smooth muscle cell calcification.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Marcel; Johnson, Rebecca C; Handy, Diane E; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A

    2011-09-30

    Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) increases oxidant stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress to stimulate differentiation of osteoblasts; however, the role of these signaling pathways in the transition of smooth muscle cells to a calcifying osteoblast-like phenotype remains incompletely characterized. We, therefore, treated human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCSMC) with BMP-2 (100ng/mL) and found an increase in NADPH oxidase activity and oxidant stress that occurred via activation of the bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 and Smad 1 signaling. BMP-2-mediated oxidant stress also increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress demonstrated by increased expression of GRP78, phospho-IRE1α, and the transcription factor XBP1. Analysis of a 1kb segment of the Runx2 promoter revealed an XBP1 binding site; electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that XBP1 bound to the Runx2 promoter at this site in BMP-2-treated HCSMC. Inhibition of oxidant stress or ER stress decreased Runx2 expression, intracellular calcium deposition, and mineralization of BMP-2-treated HCSMC. Thus, in HCSMC, BMP-2 increases oxidant stress and ER stress to increase Runx2 expression and promote vascular smooth muscle cell calcification. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hyperphosphatemia induces cellular senescence in human aorta smooth muscle cells through integrin linked kinase (ILK) up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Troyano, Nuria; Nogal, María Del; Mora, Inés; Diaz-Naves, Manuel; Lopez-Carrillo, Natalia; Sosa, Patricia; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego; Olmos, Gemma; Ruiz-Torres, María P

    2015-12-01

    Aging is conditioned by genetic and environmental factors. Hyperphosphatemia is related to some pathologies, affecting to vascular cells behavior. This work analyze whether high concentration of extracellular phosphate induces vascular smooth muscle cells senescence, exploring the intracellular mechanisms and highlighting the in vivo relevance of this phenomenon. Human aortic smooth muscle cells treated with β-Glycerophosphate (BGP, 10mM) suffered cellular senescence by increasing p53, p21 and p16 expression and the senescence associated β-galactosidase activity. In parallel, BGP induced ILK overexpression, dependent on the IGF-1 receptor activation, and oxidative stress. Down-regulating ILK expression prevented BGP-induced senescence and oxidative stress. Aortic rings from young rats treated with 10mM BGP for 48h, showed increased p53, p16 and ILK expression and SA-β-gal activity. Seven/eight nephrectomized rats feeding a hyperphosphatemic diet and fifteenth- month old mice showed hyperphosphatemia and aortic ILK, p53 and p16 expression. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high extracellular concentration of phosphate induced senescence in cultured smooth muscle through the activation of IGF-1 receptor and ILK overexpression and provided solid evidences for the in vivo relevance of these results since aged animals showed high levels of serum phosphate linked to increased expression of ILK and senescence genes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Human coronary artery smooth muscle cell response to a novel PLA textile/fibrin gel composite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Gundy, Sarah; Manning, Grainne; O'Connell, Enda; Ellä, Ville; Harwoko, Marvi Sri; Rochev, Yuri; Smith, Terry; Barron, Valerie

    2008-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential of fibrin as a cell carrier for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. Unfortunately, fibrin exhibits poor mechanical properties. One method of addressing this issue is to incorporate a textile in fibrin to provide structural support. However, it is first necessary to develop a deeper understanding of the effect of the textile on cell response. In this study, the cytotoxicity of a polylactic acid (PLA) warp-knit textile was assessed with human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). Subsequently, quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was employed to examine the gene expression of HCASMC embedded in fibrin with and without the textile. Five genes were examined over a 3-week period: smooth muscle alpha-actin (SMalphaA), myosin heavy chain 11 smooth muscle (SM1/SM2), calponin, myosin heavy chain 10 non-muscle (SMemb) and collagen. Additionally, a microarray analysis was performed to examine a wider range of genes. The knitting process did not adversely affect the cell response; there was no dramatic change in cell number or metabolic rate compared to the negative control. After 3 weeks, there was no significant difference in gene expression, except for a slight decrease of 10% in SMemb in the fibrin with textile. After 3 weeks, there were no obvious cytotoxic effects observed as a result of the knitting process and the gene expression profile did not appear to be altered in the presence of the mesh in the fibrin gel.

  1. First-line tracheal resection and primary anastomosis for postintubation tracheal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, AM; Soliman, S; Shoukry, T; El-Nori, AA; El-Bawab, HY

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tracheal stenosis following intubation is the most common indication for tracheal resection and reconstruction. Endoscopic dilation is almost always associated with recurrence. This study investigated first-line surgical resection and anastomosis performed in fit patients presenting with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Methods Between February 2011 and November 2014, a prospective study was performed involving patients who underwent first-line tracheal resection and primary anastomosis after presenting with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Results A total of 30 patients (20 male) were operated on. The median age was 23.5 years (range: 13–77 years). Seventeen patients (56.7%) had had previous endoscopic tracheal dilation, four (13.3%) had had tracheal stents inserted prior to surgery and one (3.3%) had undergone previous tracheal resection. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had had a tracheostomy. Eight patients (26.7%) had had no previous tracheal interventions. The median time of intubation in those developing tracheal stenosis was 20.5 days (range: 0–45 days). The median length of hospital stay was 10.5 days (range: 7–21 days). The success rate for anastomoses was 96.7% (29/30). One patient needed a permanent tracheostomy. The in-hospital mortality rate was 3.3%: 1 patient died from a chest infection 21 days after surgery. There was no mortality or morbidity in the group undergoing first-line surgery for de novo tracheal lesions. Conclusions First-line tracheal resection with primary anastomosis is a safe option for the treatment of tracheal stenosis following intubation and obviates the need for repeated dilations. Endoscopic dilation should be reserved for those patients with significant co-morbidities or as a temporary measure in non-equipped centres. PMID:27138847

  2. Reconstruction of tracheal wall defect with a mesh patch of nickel-titanium shape-memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jia-Sheng; Cui, Peng-Cheng; Gao, Peng-Fei; Nan, Hou; Liu, Zhi; Sun, Yong-Zhu

    2011-03-01

    We explored the feasibility of reconstructing tracheal wall defects with a mesh patch fashioned from a nickel-titanium shape-memory alloy. A tracheal wall defect was first constructed surgically by resecting the anterior half of the tracheal wall between the second and sixth tracheal rings. The defect was reconstructed in 8 experimental animals by replacing the resected tracheal mucosa and tracheal cartilage with a pedicle skin flap, which was then enclosed in the mesh patch. In 4 control animals, only a pedicle skin flap with strap muscles was used in the reconstruction procedure. The performance of the animals was observed after surgery. At the end of the experiments, the reconstructed segment was harvested for anatomic evaluation. In the experimental group, 1 animal died 5 days after the operation. Endoscopic and anatomic examination of the 7 animals that survived the observation period showed that the reconstructed trachea was stable, with sufficient airway space for breathing. All 4 control animals died after the operation. After observing successful completion of this operation in animals, we successfully used this method to repair a tracheal wall defect in a human victim of a traffic accident. Tracheal defects can be successfully reconstructed by use of a mesh patch of nickel-titanium shape-memory alloy as an extraluminal stent--a method that avoids complications associated with intraluminal stents.

  3. New stent surface materials: the impact of polymer-dependent interactions of human endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and platelets.

    PubMed

    Busch, Raila; Strohbach, Anne; Rethfeldt, Stefanie; Walz, Simon; Busch, Mathias; Petersen, Svea; Felix, Stephan; Sternberg, Katrin

    2014-02-01

    Despite the development of new coronary stent technologies, in-stent restenosis and stent thrombosis are still clinically relevant. Interactions of blood and tissue cells with the implanted material may represent an important cause of these side effects. We hypothesize material-dependent interaction of blood and tissue cells. The aim of this study is accordingly to investigate the impact of vascular endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and platelets with various biodegradable polymers to identify a stent coating or platform material that demonstrates excellent endothelial-cell-supportive and non-thrombogenic properties. Human umbilical venous endothelial cells, human coronary arterial endothelial cells and human coronary arterial smooth muscle cells were cultivated on the surfaces of two established biostable polymers used for drug-eluting stents, namely poly(ethylene-co-vinylacetate) (PEVA) and poly(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA). We compared these polymers to new biodegradable polyesters poly(l-lactide) (PLLA), poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB)), poly(4-hydroxybutyrate) (P(4HB)) and a polymeric blend of PLLA/P(4HB) in a ratio of 78/22% (w/w). Biocompatibility tests were performed under static and dynamic conditions. Measurement of cell proliferation, viability, glycocalix width, eNOS and PECAM-1 mRNA expression revealed strong material dependency among the six polymer samples investigated. Only the polymeric blend of PLLA/P(4HB) achieved excellent endothelial markers of biocompatibility. Data show that PLLA and P(4HB) tend to a more thrombotic response, whereas the polymer blend is characterized by a lower thrombotic potential. These data demonstrate material-dependent endothelialization, smooth muscle cell growth and thrombogenicity. Although polymers such as PEVA and PBMA are already commonly used for vascular implants, they did not sufficiently meet the criteria for biocompatibility. The investigated biodegradable polymeric blend PLLA/P(4HB) evidently represents a

  4. 21 CFR 868.5790 - Tracheal tube stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal tube stylet. 868.5790 Section 868.5790...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5790 Tracheal tube stylet. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube stylet is a device used temporarily to make rigid a flexible tracheal tube to...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5790 - Tracheal tube stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal tube stylet. 868.5790 Section 868.5790...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5790 Tracheal tube stylet. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube stylet is a device used temporarily to make rigid a flexible tracheal tube to...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5790 - Tracheal tube stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube stylet. 868.5790 Section 868.5790...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5790 Tracheal tube stylet. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube stylet is a device used temporarily to make rigid a flexible tracheal tube to...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5790 - Tracheal tube stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal tube stylet. 868.5790 Section 868.5790...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5790 Tracheal tube stylet. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube stylet is a device used temporarily to make rigid a flexible tracheal tube to...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5790 - Tracheal tube stylet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal tube stylet. 868.5790 Section 868.5790...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5790 Tracheal tube stylet. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube stylet is a device used temporarily to make rigid a flexible tracheal tube to...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  14. [A 2-month-old child with complex tracheal hypoplasia].

    PubMed

    De Cloedt, L; Papadopoulos, J; Corouge, P; Khalil, T; Van Laer, P

    2013-12-01

    We describe the case of a 2-month-old child with complex tracheal hypoplasia with bilateral bronchial hypoplasia and left pulmonary hypoplasia. Tracheal hypoplasia is complex when it is associated with critical stenosis, cricoid stenosis, bronchial hypoplasia, tracheal bronchus, or esophageal atresia with severe tracheomalacia. Slide tracheoplasty is the gold standard treatment for the complex tracheal hypoplasia.

  15. Pentax-airway scope for tracheal intubation breaks through the limitation of neck motion in an ankylosing spondylitis patient wearing halo vest--a case report.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei-Chun; Jimmy-Ong; Lee, Chia-Ling; Lan, Cing-Hong; Chen, Tsung-Ying; Lai, Hsien-Yong

    2010-12-01

    The Airway Scope (AWS) provides better glottic view than the conventional direct laryngoscopy in tracheal intubation. With it, the endotracheal tube can be more easily inserted into the tracheal lumen easily. We hereby presented a 24-year-old ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patient wearing a halo vest who was successfully intubated for undergoing cervical spine surgery involving C1 and C2 under general anesthesia. Pre-operative airway assessment revealed that he was a case of difficult intubation. An AWS was used for oral tracheal intubation which was achieved smoothly in the first attempt. AWS can be an alternative device for airway management in a patient wearing halo vest.

  16. Ultrasound-guided fetal tracheal occlusion.

    PubMed

    Fauza, Dario O; Barnewolt, Carol; Brown, Stephen D; Jennings, Russell W

    2002-03-01

    This study was aimed at examining the feasibility of fetal tracheal occlusion guided exclusively by ultrasonography and at establishing the technical principles of this procedure based on current instrumentation and ultrasound technology. Time-dated pregnant ewes underwent a small laparotomy and partial uterine exposure. Under real-time ultrasound guidance, a steerable guide wire was fed into the fetal tracheal lumen. An 8F catheter then was fed around the guide wire into the trachea. This was followed by intratracheal placement of a 2F coaxial angiographic catheter, connected to a detachable silicone balloon at its extremity, which then was inflated with saline and delivered locally. Euthanasia was performed at term. Complete tracheal occlusion was achieved in all fetuses (n = 7) intraoperatively. Operating time needed for tracheal occlusion, once access to the amniotic cavity was established, varied widely, but could be as short 1 minute. Tracheal lumen dimensions outgrew balloon diameter in 57.1% of fetuses (4 of 7), resulting in balloon dislodgment in those animals. No balloon rupture was observed. (1) Accurate access to the fetal trachea and local delivery of an occlusive detachable silicone balloon are consistently feasible exclusively under real-time ultrasound guidance with commercially available instrumentation. (2) Balloon dimensions are determining factors of displacement risk and must be selected carefully before tracheal delivery. Ultrasound-guided fetal tracheal occlusion may be a preferable alternative to surgical intervention for treatment of fetal pulmonary hypoplasia. Copyright 2002 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  17. Sonographic detection of tracheal or esophageal intubation: A cadaver study

    PubMed Central

    Tejesh, CA; Manjunath, AC; Shivakumar, S; Vinayak, PS; Yatish, B; Geetha, CR

    2016-01-01

    Background: The correct position of the endotracheal tube is confirmed by various modalities, most of which are not entirely reliable. Ultrasound is now increasingly available to anesthesiologists in the operating theater and is an attractive alternative. To investigate the usefulness of sonography in identifying the correct tracheal tube position in human cadavers. Materials and Methods: Endotracheal tubes placed randomly into trachea or esophagus was identified with a linear ultrasound probe placed transversely just above the suprasternal notch by a single anesthesiologist. Results: Of the 100 intubations performed at random, 99 were correctly identified to give a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 97.9%. Conclusion: Sonography is a useful technique to identify correct position of the tracheal tube. PMID:27375387

  18. Anaesthetic management in thoracoscopic distal tracheal resection.

    PubMed

    Acosta Martínez, J; Beato López, J; Domínguez Blanco, A; López Romero, J L; López Villalobos, J L

    2017-03-01

    Surgical resection of tracheal tumours, especially distal tracheal tumours, is a challenge for the anaesthesiologists involved, mainly due to difficulties in ensuring adequate control of the airway and ventilation. We report the case of a patient undergoing tracheal resection and anastomosis by VATS, emphasizing the anaesthetic management. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Surface Smoothness on Inertial Particle Deposition in Human Nasal Models

    PubMed Central

    Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Kimbell, Julia S.

    2010-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of inertial particle deposition have not compared well with data from nasal replicas due to effects of surface texture and the resolution of tomographic images. To study effects of geometric differences between CFD models and nasal replicas, nasal CFD models with different levels of surface smoothness were reconstructed from the same MRI data used to construct the nasal replica used by Kelly et al. (2004) [Aerosol Sci. Technol. 38:1063–1071]. One CFD model in particular was reconstructed without any surface smoothing to preserve the detailed topology present in the nasal replica. Steady-state inspiratory airflow and Lagrangian particle tracking were simulated using Fluent software. Particle deposition estimates from the smoother models under-predicted nasal deposition from replica casts, which was consistent with previous findings. These discrepancies were overcome by including surface artifacts that were not present in the reduced models and by plotting deposition efficiency versus the Stokes number, where the characteristic diameter was defined in terms of the pressure-flow relationship to account for changes in airflow resistance due to wall roughness. These results indicate that even slight geometric differences have significant effects on nasal deposition and that this information should be taken into account when comparing particle deposition data from CFD models with experimental data from nasal replica casts. PMID:21339833

  20. Effects of Surface Smoothness on Inertial Particle Deposition in Human Nasal Models.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Jeffry D; Garcia, Guilherme J M; Kimbell, Julia S

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of inertial particle deposition have not compared well with data from nasal replicas due to effects of surface texture and the resolution of tomographic images. To study effects of geometric differences between CFD models and nasal replicas, nasal CFD models with different levels of surface smoothness were reconstructed from the same MRI data used to construct the nasal replica used by Kelly et al. (2004) [Aerosol Sci. Technol. 38:1063-1071]. One CFD model in particular was reconstructed without any surface smoothing to preserve the detailed topology present in the nasal replica. Steady-state inspiratory airflow and Lagrangian particle tracking were simulated using Fluent software. Particle deposition estimates from the smoother models under-predicted nasal deposition from replica casts, which was consistent with previous findings. These discrepancies were overcome by including surface artifacts that were not present in the reduced models and by plotting deposition efficiency versus the Stokes number, where the characteristic diameter was defined in terms of the pressure-flow relationship to account for changes in airflow resistance due to wall roughness. These results indicate that even slight geometric differences have significant effects on nasal deposition and that this information should be taken into account when comparing particle deposition data from CFD models with experimental data from nasal replica casts.

  1. PKC-DEPENDENT REGULATION OF Kv7.5 CHANNELS BY THE BRONCHOCONSTRICTOR HISTAMINE IN HUMAN AIRWAY SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS.

    PubMed

    Haick, Jennifer M; Brueggemann, Lioubov I; Cribbs, Leanne L; Denning, Mitchell F; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Byron, Kenneth L

    2017-03-10

    Kv7 potassium channels have recently been found to be expressed and functionally important for relaxation of airway smooth muscle. Previous research suggests that native Kv7 currents are inhibited following treatment of freshly isolated airway smooth muscle cells with bronchoconstrictor agonists, and in intact airways inhibition of Kv7 channels is sufficient to induce bronchiolar constriction. However, the mechanism by which Kv7 currents are inhibited by bronchoconstrictor agonists has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, native Kv7 currents in cultured human trachealis smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) were observed to be inhibited upon treatment with histamine; inhibition of Kv7 currents was associated with membrane depolarization and an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt). The latter response was inhibited by verapamil, a blocker of L-type voltage sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs). Protein kinase C (PKC) has been implicated as a mediator of bronchoconstrictor actions, though the targets of PKC are not clearly established. We found that histamine treatment significantly and dose-dependently suppressed currents through overexpressed wild-type human Kv7.5 (hKv7.5) channels in cultured HTSMCs, and this effect was inhibited by the PKC inhibitor Ro-31-8220 (3 µM). The PKC-dependent suppression of hKv7.5 currents corresponded with a PKC-dependent increase in hKv7.5 channel phosphorylation. Knocking down or inhibiting PKCα, or mutating hKv7.5 serine 441 to alanine, abolished the inhibitory effects of histamine on hKv7.5 currents. These findings provide the first evidence linking PKC activation to suppression of Kv7 currents, membrane depolarization, and Ca2+ influx via L-type VSCCs as a mechanism for histamine-induced bronchoconstriction.

  2. The role of K⁺ conductances in regulating membrane excitability in human gastric corpus smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Ko, Eun-Ju; Ahn, Ki Duck; Kim, Sung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-04-01

    Changes in resting membrane potential (RMP) regulate membrane excitability. K(+) conductance(s) are one of the main factors in regulating RMP. The functional role of K(+) conductances has not been studied the in human gastric corpus smooth muscles (HGCS). To examine the role of K(+) channels in regulation of RMP in HGCS we employed microelectrode recordings, patch-clamp, and molecular approaches. Tetraethylammonium and charybdotoxin did not affect the RMP, suggesting that BK channels are not involved in regulating RMP. Apamin, a selective small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (SK) blocker, did not show a significant effect on the membrane excitability. 4-Aminopyridine, a Kv channel blocker, caused depolarization and increased the duration of slow wave potentials. 4-Aminopyridine also inhibited a delayed rectifying K(+) current in isolated smooth muscle cells. End-product RT-PCR gel detected Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 in human gastric corpus muscles. Glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (KATP) blocker, did not induce depolarization, but nicorandil, a KATP opener, hyperpolarized HGCS, suggesting that KATP are expressed but not basally activated. Kir6.2 transcript, a pore-forming subunit of KATP was expressed in HGCS. A low concentration of Ba(2+), a Kir blocker, induced strong depolarization. Interestingly, Ba(2+)-sensitive currents were minimally expressed in isolated smooth muscle cells under whole-cell patch configuration. KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) transcript was expressed in HGCS. Unique K(+) conductances regulate the RMP in HGCS. Delayed and inwardly rectifying K(+) channels are the main candidates in regulating membrane excitability in HGCS. With the development of cell dispersion techniques of interstitial cells, the cell-specific functional significance will require further analysis.

  3. Functional expression of γ-amino butyric acid transporter 2 in human and guinea pig airway epithelium and smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Sarah; Gallos, George; Yim, Peter D; Xu, Dingbang; Sonett, Joshua R; Panettieri, Reynold A; Gerthoffer, William; Emala, Charles W

    2011-08-01

    γ-Amino butyric acid (GABA) is a primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and is classically released by fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane or by egress via GABA transporters (GATs). Recently, a GABAergic system comprised of GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors has been identified on airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells that regulate mucus secretion and contractile tone of airway smooth muscle (ASM). In addition, the enzyme that synthesizes GABA, glutamic acid decarboxylase, has been identified in airway epithelial cells; however, the mechanism(s) by which this synthesized GABA is released from epithelial intracellular stores is unknown. We questioned whether any of the four known isoforms of GATs are functionally expressed in ASM or epithelial cells. We detected mRNA and protein expression of GAT2 and -4, and isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase in native and cultured human ASM and epithelial cells. In contrast, mRNA encoding vesicular GAT (VGAT), the neuronal GABA transporter, was not detected. Functional inhibition of (3)H-GABA uptake was demonstrated using GAT2 and GAT4/betaine-GABA transporter 1 (BGT1) inhibitors in both human ASM and epithelial cells. These results demonstrate that two isoforms of GATs, but not VGAT, are expressed in both airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells. They also provide a mechanism by which locally synthesized GABA can be released from these cells into the airway to activate GABA(A) channels and GABA(B) receptors, with subsequent autocrine and/or paracrine signaling effects on airway epithelium and ASM.

  4. [Effect of oxymatrine on vascular calcification of humans umbilical vein smooth muscle cells and its underlying mechanism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiumei; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Minghao; Liu, Shuang; Li, Guizhong; Cao, Jun

    2012-04-01

    To observe the effect of oxymatrine (OMT) on calcification of humans umbilical vein smooth muscle cells and its underlying mechanism. Human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (HUSMCs) were calcified by beta-giycerophos-phosphate (beta-GP) and then divided into 6 groups: the control group, the calcification group, the pure OMT group, and lower, middle and higher-dosage OMT groups. Cell calcification were observed by Von Kossa staining, calcium content in HUSMCs were determined by the colorimetric method, the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in HUSMCs were determined by phenyl diphosphate-2-sodium, the osteocalcin (OC) level in HUSMCs were determined by radioimmunossay, the transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) level in HUSMC culture medium and the content changes in psmad2/3 and smad2/3 were determined by the ELISA method, and the expression of Core binding factor alpha1 (Cbfalpha1) protein in HUSMCs were determined by western blot method. Compared with the control group, the calcification group showed a great number of black granules among the smooth muscle cells and significant increase in the content of calcium and OC and the activity of ALP; OMT intervention can decrease the content of calcium, OC, TGF-beta1, psmad2/3 and Cbfalpha1 and the activity of ALP. And high-dosage OMT group had better effect than middle and low-dosage groups. OMT can effectively inhibit beta-GP-induced HUSMC calcification and its effect on reducing TGF-beta1, psmad2/3 and Cbfalpha1 may be one of its mechanisms in inhibiting HVSMC calcification.

  5. Antagonists of the TMEM16A Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Modulate Airway Smooth Muscle Tone and Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, Jennifer; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose; Bernstein, Kyra; Barajas, Matthew B.; Zhang, Yi; Kumar, Satish; Sharma, Pawan K.; Gallos, George; Emala, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Perioperative bronchospasm refractory to β-agonists continues to challenge anesthesiologists and intensivists. The TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel modulates airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction. We hypothesized that TMEM16A antagonists would relax ASM contraction by modulating membrane potential and calcium flux. Methods Human ASM, guinea pig tracheal rings or mouse peripheral airways were contracted with acetylcholine (Ach) or leukotriene D4 (LTD4) and then treated with the TMEM16A antagonists: benzbromarone, T16Ainh-A01, MONNA or B25. In separate studies, guinea pig tracheal rings were contracted with Ach and then exposed to increasing concentrations of isoproterenol (0.01nM-10μM) ± benzbromarone. Plasma membrane potential and intracellular calcium concentrations were measured in human ASM cells. Results Benzbromarone was the most potent TMEM16A antagonist tested for relaxing an Ach-induced contraction in guinea pig tracheal rings (n=6). Further studies were done to investigate benzbromarone’s clinical utility. In human ASM, benzbromarone relaxed either an acetylcholine- or LTD4-induced contraction (n=8). Benzbromarone was also effective in relaxing peripheral airways (n=9) and potentiating relaxation by β-agonists (n=5–10). In cellular mechanistic studies, benzbromarone hyperpolarized human ASM cells (n=9–12) and attenuated intracellular calcium flux from both the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum (n=6–12). Conclusions TMEM16A antagonists work synergistically with β-agonists and through a novel pathway of interrupting ion flux both at the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum to acutely relax human airway smooth muscle. PMID:26181339

  6. Butyrate stimulates the growth of human intestinal smooth muscle cells by activation of Yes-Associated Protein.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li-Na; Yan, Jun-Kai; Xiao, Yong-Tao; Wen, Jie; Zhang, Tian; Zhou, Ke-Jun; Wang, Yang; Cai, Wei

    2017-08-23

    Intestinal smooth muscle cells play a critical role in the remodeling of intestinal structure and functional adaptation after bowel resection. Recent studies have shown that supplementation of butyrate (Bu) contributes to the compensatory expansion of a muscular layer of the residual intestine in a rodent model of short-bowel syndrome (SBS). However, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we found that the growth of human intestinal smooth muscle cells (HISMCs) was significantly stimulated by Bu via activation of Yes-Associated Protein (YAP). Incubation with 0.5 mM Bu induced a distinct proliferative effect on HISMCs, as indicated by the promotion of cell cycle progression and increased DNA replication. Notably, YAP silencing by RNA interference or its specific inhibitor significantly abolished the proliferative effect of Bu on HISMCs. Furthermore, Bu induced YAP expression and enhanced the translocation of YAP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, which led to changes in the expression of mitogenesis genes, including TEAD1, TEAD4, CTGF and Cyr61. These results provide evidence that Bu stimulates the growth of human intestinal muscle cells by activation of YAP, which may be a potential treatment for improving intestinal adaptation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Minimally modified low density lipoprotein induces monocyte chemotactic protein 1 in human endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, S.D.; Berliner, J.A.; Valente, A.J.; Territo, M.C.; Navab, M.; Parhami, F.; Gerrity, R.; Schwartz, C.J.; Fogelman, A.M.

    1990-07-01

    After exposure to low density lipoprotein (LDL) that had been minimally modified by oxidation (MM-LDL), human endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) cultured separately or together produced 2- to 3-fold more monocyte chemotactic activity than did control cells or cells exposed to freshly isolated LDL. This increase in monocyte chemotactic activity was paralleled by increases in mRNA levels for a monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) that is constitutively produced by the human glioma U-105MG cell line. Antibody that had been prepared against cultured baboon smooth muscle cell chemotactic factor (anti-SMCF) did not inhibit monocyte migration induced by the potent bacterial chemotactic factor f-Met-Leu-Phe. However, anti-SMCF completely inhibited the monocyte chemotactic activity found in the media of U-105MG cells, EC, and SMC before and after exposure to MM-LDL. Moreover, monocyte migration into the subendothelial space of a coculture of EC and SMC that had been exposed to MM-LDL was completely inhibited by anti-SMCF. Anti-SMCF specifically immunoprecipitated 10-kDa and 12.5-kDa proteins from EC. Incorporation of (35S)methionine into the immunoprecipitated proteins paralleled the monocyte chemotactic activity found in the medium of MM-LDL stimulated EC and the levels of MCP-1 mRNA found in the EC. We conclude that SMCF is in fact MCP-1 and MCP-1 is induced by MM-LDL.

  8. Tracheal mucormycosis pneumonia: a rare clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Mohindra, Satyawati; Gupta, Bhumika; Gupta, Karan; Bal, Amanjit

    2014-11-01

    This article reports an unusual case of tracheal mucormycosis following H1N1 pneumonia and reviews previously reported cases. A 40-y-old female with a 5-y history of diabetes mellitus, adequately controlled by oral hypoglycemic agents, developed tracheal mucormycosis after successful treatment for H1N1 pneumonia. The condition was diagnosed during workup for decannulation due to subglottic and upper tracheal obstruction by necrotic chewing gum-like tissue and cartilage. The patient was managed successfully by treatment with amphotericin B and surgical intervention in the form of laryngofissure and Montgomery tube placement. A review of the literature revealed only 5 previously reported cases of tracheal mucormycosis. A high degree of suspicion, early endoscopy and biopsy, histopathological evidence of the infection, and early institution of therapy are the keys to successful outcome.

  9. The Impact of Vitamin D on Asthmatic Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sannette C.; Fischer, Kimberly D.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic heterogeneous disorder, which involves airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway remodeling. The airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundle regulates the broncho-motor tone and plays a critical role in AHR as well as orchestrating inflammation. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to increased severity and exacerbations of symptoms in asthmatic patients. It has been shown to modulate both immune and structural cells, including ASM cells, in inflammatory diseases. Given that current asthma therapies have not been successful in reversing airway remodeling, vitamin D supplementation as a potential therapeutic option has gained a great deal of attention. Here, we highlight the potential immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D in regulating ASM function and airway inflammation in bronchial asthma. PMID:26634624

  10. The Function of Vascular Smooth Muscle Phosphodiesterase III is Preserved in Healthy Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Elvebak, Rachel L.; Eisenach, John H.; Joyner, Michael J.; Nicholson, Wayne T.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Phosphodiesterase (PDE) III is an enzyme in vascular smooth muscle that metabolizes cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Milrinone inhibits PDE III, increasing the availability of cAMP. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which is regulated by nitric oxide (NO), also inhibits PDE III. The endothelial NO component of prostacyclin (PGI2)‐mediated vasodilation is reduced in aging. This study investigated if PGI2‐mediated vasodilation during concomitant inhibition of endothelial NO and smooth muscle PDE III is affected by healthy aging. PDE III was inhibited with milrinone in 10 older subjects and 10 young matched controls while simultaneously infusing NG‐monomethyl‐l‐arginine acetate (l‐NMMA) to remove the confounding inhibitory effects of cGMP on PDE III. Incremental doses of PGI2 and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were administered to the brachial artery during separate trials. l‐NMMA decreased baseline blood flow similarly, and the addition of milrinone increased baseline blood flow similarly in both groups. The forearm blood flow responses to PGI2 were similar between groups (younger: 7.62 ± 0.72; older: 6.88 ± 0.81 mL•dL−1 FAV•min−1 at the highest dose of PGI2). SNP responses were also similar. This study suggests that the vasodilator pathway associated with PDE III function, the bioavailability of cAMP, and the interaction with cGMP may be preserved in healthy aging. Clin Trans Sci 2010; Volume 3: 239–242. PMID:21500398

  11. Comparing supportive properties of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), PLGA/collagen and human amniotic membrane for human urothelial and smooth muscle cells engineering.

    PubMed

    Sharifiaghdas, Farzaneh; Naji, Mohammad; Sarhangnejad, Reza; Rajabi-Zeleti, Sareh; Mirzadeh, Hamid; Zandi, Mojgan; Saeed, Mahdi

    2014-07-08

    To compare human urothelial and smooth muscle cells attachment and proliferation using three different matrices; poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), PLGA/collagen and human amniotic membrane (hAM). Human urothelial and smooth muscle cells were cultured and examined for expression of urothelium (pancytokeratin and uroplakin III) and smooth muscle cells [desmin and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)] markers. Cells were cultured on three scaffolds; PLGA, PLGA/collagen and hAM. Thereafter, they were analyzed for cell growth on days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 after seeding by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Scaffolds were fixed and processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunohistochemistry against their cell specific markers after 7 and 14 days of culture. MTT assay results revealed that collagen has improved cell attachment features of PLGA and led to significant increase of MTT signal in PLGA/collagen compared to PLGA (P < .001) and hAM (P < .001). hAM was a weaker matrix for both cell types as demonstrated in MTT assay and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. SEM micrographs showed normal phenotype and distribution on PLGA and PLGA/collagen. In the same line, cells formed a well-developed layer either on PLGA or PLGA/collagen, which maintained expression of their corresponding markers. Our findings demonstrated significant improvement of cell attachment and growth achieved by collagen coating (PLGA/collagen) compared to PLGA and hAM. hAM despite of its natural entity was a weaker matrix for bladder engineering purposes.

  12. Specific high-affinity binding of high density lipoproteins to cultured human skin fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Biesbroeck, R; Oram, J F; Albers, J J; Bierman, E L

    1983-03-01

    Binding of human high density lipoproteins (HDL, d = 1.063-1.21) to cultured human fibroblasts and human arterial smooth muscle cells was studied using HDL subjected to heparin-agarose affinity chromatography to remove apoprotein (apo) E and B. Saturation curves for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL showed at least two components: low-affinity nonsaturable binding and high-affinity binding that saturated at approximately 20 micrograms HDL protein/ml. Scatchard analysis of high-affinity binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts yielded plots that were significantly linear, indicative of a single class of binding sites. Saturation curves for binding of both 125I-HDL3 (d = 1.125-1.21) and apo E-free 125I-HDL to low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-negative fibroblasts also showed high-affinity binding that yielded linear Scatchard plots. On a total protein basis, HDL2 (d = 1.063-1.10), HDL3 and very high density lipoproteins (VHDL, d = 1.21-1.25) competed as effectively as apo E-free HDL for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts. Also, HDL2, HDL3, and VHDL competed similarly for binding of 125I-HDL3 to LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. In contrast, LDL was a weak competitor for HDL binding. These results indicate that both human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells possess specific high affinity HDL binding sites. As indicated by enhanced LDL binding and degradation and increased sterol synthesis, apo E-free HDL3 promoted cholesterol efflux from fibroblasts. These effects also saturated at HDL3 concentrations of 20 micrograms/ml, suggesting that promotion of cholesterol efflux by HDL is mediated by binding to the high-affinity cell surface sites.

  13. Cholesterol crystallization in human atherosclerosis is triggered in smooth muscle cells during the transition from fatty streak to fibroatheroma.

    PubMed

    Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît; Vo, Sophie; Bayles, Richard; Ferrière, Stephen; Ladjal, Hayette; Toumi, Sondes; Deschildre, Catherine; Ollivier, Véronique; Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that in addition to being major constituents of the atheromatous core, solid cholesterol crystals (CCs) promote atherosclerotic lesion development and rupture by causing mechanical damage and exerting cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory effects. These findings suggest that targeting CCs might represent a therapeutic strategy for plaque stabilization. However, little is known about how cholesterol crystallization is initiated in human atherothrombotic disease. Here, we investigated these mechanisms. We performed a thorough immunohistological analysis of non-embedded, minimally processed human aortic tissues, combining polarized light and fluorescence microscopy. We found that CC formation was initiated during the fatty streak to fibroatheroma transition in tight association with the death of intralesional smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Cholesterol-loaded human SMCs were capable of producing CCs in vitro, a process that was enhanced by type I collagen and by inhibition of autophagy and cholesterol esterification. The fibrous transition, which was characterized by increased type I collagen expression, was associated with changes in the expression of autophagy and cholesterol flux-related genes, including a decrease in the autophagic adapter p62 and an increase in the cholesterol intracellular transporter Niemann-Pick C1. Collagen was identified as a potent inducer of these changes in SMCs. Collagen-induced changes in cholesterol metabolism and autophagy flux in smooth muscle foam cells at the fibrolipid transition likely contribute to initiate cholesterol crystallization in human atherosclerosis. Also, our data are in support of a protective role of autophagy against CC formation. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-04-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with (3H) glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques.

  15. Chondrodysplasia punctata presenting with tracheal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Claudia; Nassar, Michel N; Goebel, Debora; Rutter, Michael J

    2017-02-01

    Chondrodysplasia punctata is a group of congenital bone and cartilage disorders characterized by erratic calcification during development. Laryngeal and tracheal calcification and subsequent stenosis, while being reported in several cases of chondrodysplasia punctata, are not frequent findings and there are no proposed management techniques. We describe here a case of an infant with chondrodysplasia punctata associated to tracheal stenosis that was successfully treated with balloon dilation, and with long term follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel effect of 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborate through inhibition of calcium sensitization induced by Rho kinase activation in human detrusor smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Shahab, Nouval; Kajioka, Shunichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Hayashi, Maya; Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Kazuyuki; Takeda, Masahiro; Masuda, Noriyuki; Naito, Seiji

    2013-05-15

    Since the introduction of 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborate (2-APB) as a membrane permeable modulator of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate receptors, subsequent studies have revealed additional actions of this chemical on multiple Ca(2+)-permeable ionic channels in the plasma membrane. However, no reports have yet examined 2-APB as a modulator targeting contractile machinery in smooth muscle, independent of Ca(2+) mobilization, namely Ca(2+) sensitization. Here, we assessed whether or not 2-APB affects intracellular signaling pathways of Ca(2+) sensitization for contraction using α-toxin permeabilized human detrusor smooth muscle. Although contractions were induced by application of Ca(2+)-containing bath solutions, 2-APB had little effect on contractions induced by 1 µM Ca(2+) alone but significantly reversed the carbachol-induced augmentation of Ca(2+)-induced contraction in the presence of guanosine triphosphate (carbachol-induced Ca(2+) sensitization). The rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 and protein kinase C inhibitor GF-109203X also reversed the carbachol-mediated Ca(2+) sensitization. Additional application of 2-APB caused a small but significant further attenuation of the contraction in the presence of GF-109203X but not in the presence of Y-27632. Like carbachol, the rho kinase activator; sphingosylphosphorylcholine, protein kinase C activator; phorbol 12,13 dibutyrate, and myosin light chain phosphatase inhibitor; calyculin-A all induced Ca(2+) sensitization. However, the inhibitory activity of 2-APB was limited with sphingosylphosphorylcholine-induced Ca(2+) sensitization. This study revealed a novel inhibitory effect of 2-APB on smooth muscle contractility through inhibition of the rho kinase pathway.

  17. Human bronchial smooth muscle cells express adenylyl cyclase isoforms 2, 4, and 6 in distinct membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Bogard, Amy S; Xu, Congfeng; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2011-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (AC) are important regulators of airway smooth muscle function, because β-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists stimulate AC activity and increase airway diameter. We assessed expression of AC isoforms in human bronchial smooth muscle cells (hBSMC). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses detected expression of AC2, AC4, and AC6. Forskolin-stimulated AC activity in membranes from hBSMC displayed Ca(2+)-inhibited and G(βγ)-stimulated AC activity, consistent with expression of AC6, AC2, and AC4. Isoproterenol-stimulated AC activity was inhibited by Ca(2+) but unaltered by G(βγ), whereas butaprost-stimulated AC activity was stimulated by G(βγ) but unaffected by Ca(2+) addition. Using sucrose density centrifugation to isolate lipid raft fractions, we found that only AC6 localized in lipid raft fractions, whereas AC2 and AC4 localized in nonraft fractions. Immunoisolation of caveolae using caveolin-1 antibodies yielded Ca(2+)-inhibited AC activity (consistent with AC6 expression), whereas the nonprecipitated material displayed G(βγ)-stimulated AC activity (consistent with expression of AC2 and/or AC4). Overexpression of AC6 enhanced cAMP production in response to isoproterenol and beraprost but did not increase responses to prostaglandin E(2) or butaprost. β(2)AR, but not prostanoid EP(2) or EP(4) receptors, colocalized with AC5/6 in lipid raft fractions. Thus, particular G protein-coupled receptors couple to discreet AC isoforms based, in part, on their colocalization in membrane microdomains. These different cAMP signaling compartments in airway smooth muscle cells are responsive to different hormones and neurotransmitters and can be regulated by different coincident signals such as Ca(2+) and G(βγ).

  18. Cyclic peptide *CRRETAWAC* attenuates fibronectin-induced cytokine secretion of human airway smooth muscle cells by inhibiting FAK and p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Chu, Mengdi; Ji, Jiani; Cao, Wenhao; Zhang, Huojun; Meng, Dan; Xie, Bangruan; Xu, Shuyun

    2017-10-01

    α5β1 integrin is highly expressed in airway smooth muscle cells and mediate the adhesion of airway smooth muscle cells to fibronectin to regulate airway remodelling in asthma. This study aimed to investigate the effects of synthetic cyclic peptide *CRRETAWAC* on fibronectin-induced cytokine secretion of airway smooth muscle cells and the underlying mechanism. Human airway smooth muscle cells were isolated and treated with fibronectin, IL-13, *CRRETAWAC* peptide, α5β1 integrin-blocking antibody, FAK inhibitor or p38 MAPK inhibitor. The transcription and secretion of eotaxin-1 and RANTES were detected by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. The phosphorylation of FAK and MAPKs including p38, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 was detected by Western blot analysis. The transcription and secretion of eotaxin-1 and RANTES increased in airway smooth muscle cells cultured in fibronectin-coated plates. However, α5β1 integrin-blocking antibody, *CRRETAWAC* peptide, FAK inhibitor or p38 MAPK inhibitor significantly reduced mRNA levels and the secretion of eotaxin-1 and RANTES in airway smooth muscle cells cultured in fibronectin-coated plates. In addition, the phosphorylation of FAK and p38 MAPK was significantly increased in airway smooth muscle cells cultured in fibronectin-coated plates compared to the cells cultured in uncoated plates and was significantly reduced in airway smooth muscle cells treated with *CRRETAWAC* peptide. Fibronectin induces cytokine synthesis and secretion of airway smooth muscle cells. Peptide *CRRETAWAC* antagonizes fibronectin-induced cytokine synthesis and secretion of airway smooth muscle cells via the inhibition of FAK and p38 MAPK, and is a potential agent for the therapy of asthma. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  19. Lipocalin-2 Promotes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Proliferation by Augmenting Intracellular Iron in Human Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoliang; Liu, Shenghua; Wang, Li; Meng, Liukun; Cui, Chuanjue; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Ma, Ning; Wei, Yingjie

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, a feature of many conditions associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH), is increasingly recognized as a common response to promote proliferation in the walls of pulmonary arteries. Increased expression of Lipocalin-2 in PH led us to test the hypothesis that Lipocalin-2, a protein known to sequester iron and regulate it intracellularly, might facilitate the ER stress and proliferation in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). In this study, we observed greatly increased Lcn2 expression accompanied with increased ATF6 cleavage in a standard rat model of pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline. In cultured human PASMCs, Lcn2 significantly promoted ER stress (determined by augmented cleavage and nuclear localization of ATF6, up-regulated transcription of GRP78 and NOGO, increased expression of SOD2, and mild augmented mitochondrial membrane potential) and proliferation (assessed by Ki67 staining and BrdU incorporation). Lcn2 promoted ER stress accompanied with augmented intracellular iron levels in human PASMCs. Treatment human PASMCs with FeSO4 induced the similar ER stress and proliferation response and iron chelator (deferoxamine) abrogated the ER stress and proliferation induced by Lcn2 in cultured human PASMCs. In conclusion, Lcn2 significantly promoted human PASMC ER stress and proliferation by augmenting intracellular iron. The up-regulation of Lcn2 probably involved in the pathogenesis and progression of PH. PMID:28255266

  20. Differential expression of the keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) and KGF receptor genes in human vascular smooth muscle cells and arteries.

    PubMed

    Winkles, J A; Alberts, G F; Chedid, M; Taylor, W G; DeMartino, S; Rubin, J S

    1997-12-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a secreted member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of heparin-binding proteins. Studies reported to date indicate that it functions primarily as an important paracrine mediator of epithelial cell growth and differentiation. KGF appears to act via binding to a specific FGF receptor-2 isoform generated by an alternative splicing mechanism. To determine whether KGF may play a role in vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) biology, we investigated KGF and KGF receptor gene expression in human SMC cultured in vitro as well as in several human nonatherosclerotic artery and atheroma specimens. KGF mRNA but not KGF receptor mRNA was expressed by SMCs, as determined by Northern blot hybridization analysis or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays, respectively. Additional experiments demonstrated that 1) human SMCs produce and secrete mitogenically active KGF and that 2) the cytokine interleukin-1 increases KGF mRNA and protein levels in human SMCs. We also found that KGF transcripts but not KGF receptor transcripts were expressed in control and atherosclerotic human arteries. Taken together, these results indicate that KGF is unlikely to be involved in SMC growth regulation unless it can function intracellularly or interact with a presently unidentified KGF receptor.

  1. G-Protein-Coupled Receptor 35 Mediates Human Saphenous Vein Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration and Endothelial Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, Jennifer E.; Mackenzie, Amanda E.; Divorty, Nina; Clarke, Carolyn; Delles, Christian; Milligan, Graeme; Nicklin, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation is central to neointima formation in vein graft failure following coronary artery bypass. However, there are currently no pharmacological interventions that prevent vein graft failure through intimal occlusion. It is hence a therapeutic target. Here, we investigated the contribution of GPR35 to human VSMC and endothelial cell (EC) migration, using a scratch-wound assay, and also the contribution to proliferation, using MTS and BrdU assays, in in vitro models using recently characterized human GPR35 ortholog-selective small-molecule agonists and antagonists. Real-time PCR studies showed GPR35 to be robustly expressed in human VSMCs and ECs. Stimulation of GPR35, with either the human-selective agonist pamoic acid or the reference agonist zaprinast, promoted VSMC migration in the scratch-wound assay. These effects were blocked by coincubation with either of the human GPR35-specific antagonists, CID-2745687 or ML-145. These GPR35-mediated effects were produced by inducing alterations in the actin cytoskeleton via the Rho A/Rho kinase signaling axis. Additionally, the agonist ligands stimulated a proliferative response in ECs. These studies highlight the potential that small molecules that stimulate or block GPR35 activity can modulate vascular proliferation and migration. These data propose GPR35 as a translational therapeutic target in vascular remodeling. PMID:27064272

  2. Lipocalin-2 Promotes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Proliferation by Augmenting Intracellular Iron in Human Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoliang; Liu, Shenghua; Wang, Li; Meng, Liukun; Cui, Chuanjue; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Ma, Ning; Wei, Yingjie

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, a feature of many conditions associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH), is increasingly recognized as a common response to promote proliferation in the walls of pulmonary arteries. Increased expression of Lipocalin-2 in PH led us to test the hypothesis that Lipocalin-2, a protein known to sequester iron and regulate it intracellularly, might facilitate the ER stress and proliferation in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). In this study, we observed greatly increased Lcn2 expression accompanied with increased ATF6 cleavage in a standard rat model of pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline. In cultured human PASMCs, Lcn2 significantly promoted ER stress (determined by augmented cleavage and nuclear localization of ATF6, up-regulated transcription of GRP78 and NOGO, increased expression of SOD2, and mild augmented mitochondrial membrane potential) and proliferation (assessed by Ki67 staining and BrdU incorporation). Lcn2 promoted ER stress accompanied with augmented intracellular iron levels in human PASMCs. Treatment human PASMCs with FeSO4 induced the similar ER stress and proliferation response and iron chelator (deferoxamine) abrogated the ER stress and proliferation induced by Lcn2 in cultured human PASMCs. In conclusion, Lcn2 significantly promoted human PASMC ER stress and proliferation by augmenting intracellular iron. The up-regulation of Lcn2 probably involved in the pathogenesis and progression of PH.

  3. The nuclear receptor NOR-1/NR4A3 regulates the multifunctional glycoprotein vitronectin in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Martí-Pàmies, Ingrid; Cañes, Laia; Alonso, Judith; Rodríguez, Cristina; Martínez-González, José

    2017-10-01

    The nuclear receptor NOR-1 (NR4A3) has recently been involved in the regulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins associated with neointimal thickening and the vascular control of hemostasis. We sought to find as-yet unidentified NOR-1 target genes in human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). An in silico analysis identified putative NOR-1 response elements in the proximal promoter region of several genes encoding for ECM proteins, including vitronectin (VTN). Lentiviral overexpression of NOR-1 strongly increased VTN mRNA and protein levels, whereas NOR-1 silencing significantly reduced VTN expression. Deletion and site-directed mutagenesis studies, as well as EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation, identified the NBRE(-202/-195) site in the VTN promoter as an essential element for NOR-1 responsiveness. Furthermore, NOR-1 and VTN colocalized in VSMCs in human atherosclerotic lesions. VTN levels were increased in cell supernatants from VSMCs that overexpress NOR-1. Cell supernatants from VSMCs overexpressing NOR-1 induced cell migration to a greater extent than supernatants from control cells, and this effect was attenuated when cell supernatants were preincubated with anti-VTN blocking antibodies or VTN was silenced in supernatant-generating cells. These results indicate that VTN is a target of NOR-1 and suggest that this multifunctional glycoprotein may participate in vascular responses mediated by this nuclear receptor.-Martí-Pàmies, I., Cañes, L., Alonso, J., Rodríguez, C., Martínez-González, J. The nuclear receptor NOR-1/NR4A3 regulates the multifunctional glycoprotein vitronectin in human vascular smooth muscle cells. © FASEB.

  4. A novel inhibitory effect of oxazol-5-one compounds on ROCKII signaling in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghabkari, Abdulhameed; Deng, Jing-Ti; McDonald, Paul C; Dedhar, Shoukat; Alshehri, Mana; Walsh, Michael P; MacDonald, Justin A

    2016-08-30

    The selectivity of (4Z)-2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl)-4-(pyridin-3-ylmethylidene)-1,3-oxazol-5-one (DI) for zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) was previously described by in silico computational modeling, screening a large panel of kinases, and determining the inhibition efficacy. Our assessment of DI revealed another target, the Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 2 (ROCKII). In vitro studies showed DI to be a competitive inhibitor of ROCKII (Ki, 132 nM with respect to ATP). This finding was supported by in silico molecular surface docking of DI with the ROCKII ATP-binding pocket. Time course analysis of myosin regulatory light chain (LC20) phosphorylation catalyzed by ROCKII in vitro revealed a significant decrease upon treatment with DI. ROCKII signaling was investigated in situ in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). ROCKII down-regulation using siRNA revealed several potential substrates involved in smooth muscle contraction (e.g., LC20, Par-4, MYPT1) and actin cytoskeletal dynamics (cofilin). The application of DI to CASMCs attenuated LC20, Par-4, LIMK, and cofilin phosphorylations. Notably, cofilin phosphorylation was not significantly decreased with a novel ZIPK selective inhibitor (HS-38). In addition, CASMCs treated with DI underwent cytoskeletal changes that were associated with diminution of cofilin phosphorylation. We conclude that DI is not selective for ZIPK and is a potent inhibitor of ROCKII.

  5. Grape seed procyanidin b2 inhibits human aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration induced by advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qian; Li, Bao-ying; Gao, Hai-qing; Zhang, Jian-hua; Wang, Jun-fu; Yu, Fei; Yin, Mei; Zhang, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Advanced glycation end product (AGE)-induced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is vital to the progression of diabetic vasculopathy. A grape seed procyanidin extract has been reported to possess anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties and to display a significant cardiovascular protective effect, but little is know about the underlying mechanism. The objective of this present study was to determine whether GSPB2 (grape seed procyanidin B2), which is a dimeric procyanidin and more biologically active, could inhibit AGE-induced VSMC proliferation by affecting the production of ubiquitin COOH-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCH-L1), the degradation of IκB-α and nuclear translocation of NF-κB in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Our data show that GSPB2 preincubation markedly inhibited AGE-induced proliferation and migration of HASMCs in a dose-dependent manner and upregulated the protein level of UCH-L1. Further studies revealed that the GSPB2 pretreatment markedly attenuated the degradation of IκB-α and nuclear translocation of NF-κB by modulating ubiquitination of IκB-α in AGE-exposed HASMCs. These results collectively suggest that AGE-induced HASMC proliferation and migration was suppressed by GSPB2 through regulating UCH-L1 and ubiquitination of IκB-α. GSPB2 may therefore have therapeutic potential in preventing and treating vascular complications of diabetes mellitus.

  6. Inhibitory effects of Akebia quinata ethanol extract on TNF-α-mediated vascular inflammation in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun Jung; Sung, Yoon Young; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2013-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. The expression of adhesion molecules in aortic smooth muscle cells facilitates the accumulation of transmigrated leukocytes within the atherosclerotic vascular wall. The stem of Akebia quinata (A. quinata) has previously been used as a crude drug for treating urinary disorders and inflammatory disease in Korea, China and Japan. In the present study, we investigated the effect of an A. quinata ethanol extract (AQEE) on the expression of adhesion molecules and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX‑2) in tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)-induced human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). The results of the present study demonstrated that AQEE attenuated intercellular adhesion molecule 1, E‑selectin and COX‑2 expression in TNF‑α-stimulated HASMCs and inhibited THP-1 cell adhesion to activated HASMCs. Furthermore, AQEE suppressed the TNF‑α induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and reduced nuclear factor κB (NF-κB; p65) nuclear translocation. The present study demonstrated that AQEE possesses anti‑inflammatory properties and regulates TNF-α-induced expression of adhesion molecules by inhibition of the p38 MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathway.

  7. Matrix proteins associated with bone calcification are present in human vascular smooth muscle cells grown in vitro.

    PubMed

    Severson, A R; Ingram, R T; Fitzpatrick, L A

    1995-12-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are composed of cellular elements that have migrated from the vessel lumen and wall to form the cellular component of the developing plaque. The cellular elements are influenced by various growth-regulatory molecules, cytokines, chemoattractants, and vasoregulatory molecules that regulate the synthesis of the extracellular matrix composing the plaque. Because vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) constitute the major cellular elements of the atherosclerotic plaque and are thought to be responsible for the extracellular matrix that becomes calcified in mature plaques, immunostaining for collagenous and noncollagenous proteins typically associated with bone matrix was conducted on VSMC grown in vitro. VSMC obtained from human aorta were grown in chambers on glass slides and immunostained for procollagen type I, bone sialoprotein, osteonectin, osteocalcin, osteopontin, decorin, and biglycan. VSMC demonstrated an intense staining for procollagen type I, and a moderately intense staining for the noncollagenous proteins, bone sialoprotein and osteonectin, two proteins closely associated with bone mineralization. Minimal immunostaining was noted for osteocalcin, osteopontin, decorin, and biglycan. The presence in VSMC of collagenous and noncollagenous proteins associated with bone mineralization suggest that the smooth muscle cells in the developing atherosclerotic plaque play an important role in the deposition of the extracellular matrix involved in calcification of developing lesions.

  8. Chrysin inhibits human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yun-Shi; Feng, Gan-Zhu; Du, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disease characterized by an increased mass of airway smooth muscle (ASM). Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid, has been shown to exert multiple biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and anti-oxidant effects, as well as the potency to ameliorate asthma in animal models. The objective of the present study was to identify the underlying mechanism of the therapeutic effects of chrysin. The impact of chrysin on basal and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced proliferation and apoptosis of human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) was investigated. Furthermore, the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signaling pathway was evaluated in HASMCs. The results revealed that chrysin significantly inhibited basal as well as PDGF-induced HASMC proliferation, most likely through the suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. However, chrysin did not significantly reduce PDGF-induced apoptosis of HASMCs. The present study indicated that chrysin may be a promising medication for controlling airway remodeling and clinical manifestations of asthma.

  9. A novel inhibitory effect of oxazol-5-one compounds on ROCKII signaling in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghabkari, Abdulhameed; Deng, Jing-Ti; McDonald, Paul C.; Dedhar, Shoukat; Alshehri, Mana; Walsh, Michael P.; MacDonald, Justin A.

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of (4Z)-2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl)-4-(pyridin-3-ylmethylidene)-1,3-oxazol-5-one (DI) for zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) was previously described by in silico computational modeling, screening a large panel of kinases, and determining the inhibition efficacy. Our assessment of DI revealed another target, the Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 2 (ROCKII). In vitro studies showed DI to be a competitive inhibitor of ROCKII (Ki, 132 nM with respect to ATP). This finding was supported by in silico molecular surface docking of DI with the ROCKII ATP-binding pocket. Time course analysis of myosin regulatory light chain (LC20) phosphorylation catalyzed by ROCKII in vitro revealed a significant decrease upon treatment with DI. ROCKII signaling was investigated in situ in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). ROCKII down-regulation using siRNA revealed several potential substrates involved in smooth muscle contraction (e.g., LC20, Par-4, MYPT1) and actin cytoskeletal dynamics (cofilin). The application of DI to CASMCs attenuated LC20, Par-4, LIMK, and cofilin phosphorylations. Notably, cofilin phosphorylation was not significantly decreased with a novel ZIPK selective inhibitor (HS-38). In addition, CASMCs treated with DI underwent cytoskeletal changes that were associated with diminution of cofilin phosphorylation. We conclude that DI is not selective for ZIPK and is a potent inhibitor of ROCKII. PMID:27573465

  10. Oncostatin M Promotes Osteoblastic Differentiation of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Through JAK3-STAT3 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kakutani, Yoshinori; Shioi, Atsushi; Shoji, Tetsuo; Okazaki, Hirokazu; Koyama, Hidenori; Emoto, Masanori; Inaba, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    Vascular calcification is a clinically significant component of atherosclerosis and arises from chronic vascular inflammation. Oncostatin M (OSM) derived from plaque macrophages may contribute to the development of atherosclerotic calcification. Here, we investigated the stimulatory effects of OSM on osteoblastic differentiation of human vascular smooth muscle cells (HVSMC) derived from various arteries including umbilical artery, aorta, and coronary artery and its signaling pathway. Osteoblastic differentiation was induced by exposure of HVSMC to osteogenic differentiation medium (ODM) (10% fetal bovine serum, 0.1 μM dexamethasone, 10 mM β-glycerophosphate and 50 μg/ml ascorbic acid 2-phosphate in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium [DMEM]). OSM significantly increased alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity and matrix mineralization in HVSMC from all sources. Osteoblast marker genes such as ALP and Runx2 were also up-regulated by OSM in these cells. OSM treatment induced activation of STAT3 in HVSMC from umbilical artery as evidenced by immunoblot. Moreover, not only a JAK3 inhibitor, WHI-P154, but also knockdown of JAK3 by siRNA prevented the OSM-induced ALP activity and matrix mineralization in umbilical artery HVSMC. On the other hand, silencing of STAT3 almost completely suppressed OSM-induced ALP expression and matrix mineralization in HVSMC from all sources. These data suggest that OSM promotes osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells through JAK3/STAT3 pathway and may contribute to the development of atherosclerotic calcification.

  11. The anti-ageing hormone klotho induces Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defences in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Maltese, Giuseppe; Psefteli, Paraskevi-Maria; Rizzo, Benedetta; Srivastava, Salil; Gnudi, Luigi; Mann, Giovanni E; Siow, Richard C M

    2017-03-01

    Vascular ageing in conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes and chronic kidney disease, is associated with the activation of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) and diminished expression of antioxidant defences mediated by the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The anti-ageing hormone klotho promotes longevity and protects against cardiovascular and renal diseases. Klotho has been shown to activate Nrf2 and attenuate oxidative damage in neuronal cells, however, the mechanisms by which it protects against vascular smooth muscle cell VSMC dysfunction elicited by Angiotensin II (AngII) remain to be elucidated. AngII contributes to vascular ageing and atherogenesis by enhancing VSMC oxidative stress, senescence and apoptosis. This study demonstrates that soluble klotho (1 nM, 24 hrs) significantly induces expression of Nrf2 and the antioxidant enzymes haeme oxygenase (HO-1) and peroxiredoxin-1 (Prx-1) and enhances glutathione levels in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC). Silencing of Nrf2 attenuated the induction of HO-1 and Prx-1 expression by soluble klotho. Furthermore, soluble klotho protected against AngII-mediated HASMC apoptosis and senescence via activation of Nrf2. Thus, our findings highlight a novel Nrf2-mediated mechanism underlying the protective actions of soluble klotho in HAMSC. Targeting klotho may thus represent a therapeutic strategy against VSMC dysfunction and cardiovascular ageing.

  12. Tyk2 mediates effects of urokinase on human vascular smooth muscle cell growth.

    PubMed

    Patecki, Margret; von Schaewen, Markus; Tkachuk, Sergey; Jerke, Uwe; Dietz, Rainer; Dumler, Inna; Kusch, Angelika

    2007-08-03

    The urokinase (uPA)/uPA receptor (uPAR) system plays a role in the response of the vessel wall to injury, presumably by modulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functional behaviour. The Jak/Stat signaling pathway has been implicated to mediate the uPA/uPAR-directed cell migration and proliferation in VSMC. We have therefore investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms, which remained not completely understood. In particular, we aimed at identification of the kinase involved in the signaling cascade leading to Stat1 phosphorylation by uPA and its impact on VSMC growth. We performed expression in VSMC of kinase-deficient mutant forms of the Janus kinases Jak1 and Tyk2 and used different cell culture models imitating the response to vascular injury. We provide evidence that Tyk2, but not Jak1, mediates uPA-induced Stat1 phosphorylation and VSMC growth inhibition and suggest a novel function for Tyk2 as an important modulator of the uPA-directed VSMC functional behaviour at the place of injury.

  13. Biphasic responses of human vascular smooth muscle cells to magnesium ion

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium-based alloys are promising in biodegradable cardiovascular stent applications. The degradation products of magnesium stents may have significant impacts on the surrounding vascular cells. However, knowledge on the interactions between magnesium ion and vascular cells at the molecular and cellular levels is still largely missing. Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of restenosis and wound healing after stent implantation. This study evaluated the short-term effects of extracellular magnesium ion (Mg2+) on the cellular behaviors of SMCs. Cellular responses to Mg2+ were biphasic and in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations (10 mM) of Mg2+ increased cell viability, cell proliferation rate, cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell migration rate, and actin expression. In contrast, higher concentrations (40–60 mM) of Mg2+ had deleterious effects on cells. Gene expression analysis revealed that Mg2+ altered the expressions of genes mostly related to cell adhesion, cell injury, angiogenesis, inflammation, coagulation, and cell growth. Finding from this study provides some valuable information on SMC responses toward magnesium ions at the cellular and molecular levels, and guidance for future controlled release of magnesium from the stent material. PMID:26402437

  14. Biphasic responses of human vascular smooth muscle cells to magnesium ion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-02-01

    Magnesium-based alloys are promising in biodegradable cardiovascular stent applications. The degradation products of magnesium stents may have significant impacts on the surrounding vascular cells. However, knowledge on the interactions between magnesium ion and vascular cells at the molecular and cellular levels is still largely missing. Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of restenosis and wound healing after stent implantation. This study evaluated the short-term effects of extracellular magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) on the cellular behaviors of SMCs. Cellular responses to Mg(2+) were biphasic and in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations (10 mM) of Mg(2+) increased cell viability, cell proliferation rate, cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell migration rate, and actin expression. In contrast, higher concentrations (40-60 mM) of Mg(2+) had deleterious effects on cells. Gene expression analysis revealed that Mg(2+) altered the expressions of genes mostly related to cell adhesion, cell injury, angiogenesis, inflammation, coagulation, and cell growth. Finding from this study provides some valuable information on SMC responses toward magnesium ions at the cellular and molecular levels, and guidance for future controlled release of magnesium from the stent material. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Tyk2 mediates effects of urokinase on human vascular smooth muscle cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Patecki, Margret; Schaewen, Markus von; Tkachuk, Sergey; Jerke, Uwe; Dietz, Rainer; Dumler, Inna; Kusch, Angelika . E-mail: angelika.kusch@charite.de

    2007-08-03

    The urokinase (uPA)/uPA receptor (uPAR) system plays a role in the response of the vessel wall to injury, presumably by modulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functional behaviour. The Jak/Stat signaling pathway has been implicated to mediate the uPA/uPAR-directed cell migration and proliferation in VSMC. We have therefore investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms, which remained not completely understood. In particular, we aimed at identification of the kinase involved in the signaling cascade leading to Stat1 phosphorylation by uPA and its impact on VSMC growth. We performed expression in VSMC of kinase-deficient mutant forms of the Janus kinases Jak1 and Tyk2 and used different cell culture models imitating the response to vascular injury. We provide evidence that Tyk2, but not Jak1, mediates uPA-induced Stat1 phosphorylation and VSMC growth inhibition and suggest a novel function for Tyk2 as an important modulator of the uPA-directed VSMC functional behaviour at the place of injury.

  16. Ultrastructure of tubular smooth endoplasmic reticulum aggregates in human metaphase II oocytes and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Sá, Rosália; Cunha, Mariana; Silva, Joaquina; Luís, Ana; Oliveira, Cristiano; Teixeira da Silva, José; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário

    2011-07-01

    To compare demographic, embryologic, pregnancy, and newborn outcomes after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles with or without mature oocytes (metaphase II [MII]) showing visible aggregates of tubular smooth endoplasmic reticulum (aSERT) and to describe the ultrastructure of this dysmorphism. Retrospective study. Private fertility center and university cell biology and genetics departments. There were 721 ICSI cycles, 520 carrying morphologically normal MII (control group) and 60 containing aSERT-MII (study group). None. Embryologic and clinical and live birth outcomes, including malformations and ultrastructural characterization of aSERT-MII. Compared with the control group there was a significant decrease in the fertilization, embryo cleavage, and blastocyst rates in the study group. The only child born after transfer of embryos derived from aSERT-MII presented a major cardiovascular malformation. Ultrastructurally, large aSERT were surrounded by abnormal-shaped mitochondria and clusters of small dense bodies formed by very small vesicles, and they had curvilinear dense tubules in the interior. The same pathology was observed in small peripheral aSERT. The presence of large aSERT, showing attainment of the periphery, demonstrated that the cytoplasm is pathologic. The compromised embryo development and implantation was associated with decreased clinical outcomes and newborn malformations. Therefore, oocytes with large aSERT should not be used for embryo transfer. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Indications and interventional options for non-resectable tracheal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Jenny Louise; Patterson, Caroline Marie

    2014-01-01

    Non-specific presentation and normal examination findings in early disease often result in tracheal obstruction being overlooked as a diagnosis until patients present acutely. Once diagnosed, surgical options should be considered, but often patient co-morbidity necessitates other interventional options. Non-resectable tracheal stenosis can be successfully managed by interventional bronchoscopy, with therapeutic options including airway dilatation, local tissue destruction and airway stenting. There are common aspects to the management of tracheal obstruction, tracheomalacia and tracheal fistulae. This paper reviews the pathogenesis, presentation, investigation and management of tracheal disease, with a focus on tracheal obstruction and the role of endotracheal intervention in management. PMID:24624290

  18. Tracheal and bronchial stenoses and other obstructive conditions

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Claudia; Cohen, Aliza P.

    2016-01-01

    Although tracheal stenosis and bronchial stenosis are relatively rare in the pediatric population, they are both associated with significant morbidity and mortality. While most cases of congenital tracheal stenosis in children present as complete tracheal rings (CTRs), other congenital tracheal obstructions are also encountered in clinical practice. In addition, acquired obstructive tracheal conditions stemming from endotracheal trauma or previous surgical interventions may occur. Many affected children also have associated cardiovascular malformations, further complicating their management. Optimal management of children with tracheal or bronchial stenoses requires comprehensive diagnostic evaluation and optimization prior to surgery. Slide tracheoplasty has been the operative intervention of choice in the treatment of the majority of these children. PMID:28066618

  19. Recurred Post-intubation Tracheal Stenosis Treated with Bronchoscopic Cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ye-Ryung; Taek Jeong, Joon; Kyu Lee, Myoung; Kim, Sang-Ha; Joong Yong, Suk; Jeong Lee, Seok; Lee, Won-Yeon

    Post-intubation tracheal stenosis accounts for the greatest proportion of whole-cause tracheal stenosis. Treatment of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requires a multidisciplinary approach. Surgery or an endoscopic procedure can be used, depending on the type of stenosis. However, the efficacy of cryotherapy in post-intubation tracheal stenosis has not been validated. Here, we report a case of recurring post-intubation tracheal stenosis successfully treated with bronchoscopic cryotherapy that had previously been treated with surgery. In this case, cryotherapy was effective in treating web-like fibrous stenosis, without requiring more surgery. Cryotherapy can be considered as an alternative or primary treatment for post-intubation tracheal stenosis.

  20. TRPC1/TRPC3 channels mediate lysophosphatidylcholine-induced apoptosis in cultured human coronary artery smooth muscles cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Li, Gui-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The earlier study showed that lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) induced apoptosis in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs); however, the related molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. The present study investigated how lysoPC induces apoptosis in cultured human coronary artery SMCs using cell viability assay, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and molecular biological approaches. We found that lysoPC reduced cell viability in human coronary artery SMCs by eliciting a remarkable Ca2+ influx. The effect was antagonized by La3+, SKF-96365, or Pyr3 as well as by silencing TRPC1 or TRPC3. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that TRPC1 and TRPC3 had protein-protein interaction. Silencing TRPC1 or TRPC3 countered the lysoPC-induced increase of Ca2+ influx and apoptosis, and the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and cleaved caspase-3 and decrease of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and the survival kinase pAkt. These results demonstrate the novel information that TRPC1/TRPC3 channels mediate lysoPC-induced Ca2+ influx and apoptosis via activating the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and cleaved caspase-3 and inhibiting the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and the survival kinase pAkt in human coronary artery SMCs, which implies that TRPC1/TRC3 channels may be the therapeutic target of lysoPC-induced disorders such as atherosclerosis. PMID:27472391

  1. Bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory activities of glaucine: In vitro studies in human airway smooth muscle and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Cortijo, J; Villagrasa, V; Pons, R; Berto, L; Martí-Cabrera, M; Martinez-Losa, M; Domenech, T; Beleta, J; Morcillo, E J

    1999-08-01

    1. Selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitors are of potential interest in the treatment of asthma. We examined the effects of the alkaloid S-(+)-glaucine, a PDE4 inhibitor, on human isolated bronchus and granulocyte function. 2. Glaucine selectively inhibited PDE4 from human bronchus and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in a non-competitive manner (Ki=3.4 microM). Glaucine displaced [3H]-rolipram from its high-affinity binding sites in rat brain cortex membranes (IC50 approximately 100 microM). 3. Glaucine inhibited the spontaneous and histamine-induced tone in human isolated bronchus (pD2 approximately 4.5). Glaucine (10 microM) did not potentiate the isoprenaline-induced relaxation but augmented cyclic AMP accumulation by isoprenaline. The glaucine-induced relaxation was resistant to H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. Glaucine depressed the contractile responses to Ca2+ (pD'2 approximately 3.62) and reduced the sustained rise of [Ca2+]i produced by histamine in cultured human airway smooth muscle cells (-log IC50 approximately 4.3). 4. Glaucine augmented cyclic AMP levels in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes challenged with N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) or isoprenaline, and inhibited FMLP-induced superoxide generation, elastase release, leukotriene B4 production, [Ca2+]i signal and platelet aggregation as well as opsonized zymosan-, phorbol myristate acetate-, and A23187-induced superoxide release. The inhibitory effect of glaucine on superoxide generation by FMLP was reduced by H-89. 5. In conclusion, Ca2+ channel antagonism by glaucine appears mainly responsible for the relaxant effect of glaucine in human isolated bronchus while PDE4 inhibition contributes to the inhibitory effects of glaucine in human granulocytes. The very low PDE4/binding site ratio found for glaucine makes this compound attractive for further structure-activity studies.

  2. Voltage-gated sodium channel expressed in cultured human smooth muscle cells: involvement of SCN9A.

    PubMed

    Jo, Taisuke; Nagata, Taiji; Iida, Haruko; Imuta, Hiroyuki; Iwasawa, Kuniaki; Ma, Ji; Hara, Kei; Omata, Masao; Nagai, Ryozo; Takizawa, Hajime; Nagase, Takahide; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2004-06-04

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channel (I(Na)) is expressed under culture conditions in human smooth muscle cells (hSMCs) such as coronary myocytes. The aim of this study is to clarify the physiological, pharmacological and molecular characteristics of I(Na) expressed in cultured hSMCs obtained from bronchus, main pulmonary and coronary artery. I(Na), was recorded in these hSMCs and inhibited by tetrodotoxin (TTX) with an IC(50) value of approximately 10 nM. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of mRNA showed the prominent expression of transcripts for SCN9A, which was consistent with the results of real-time quantitative RT-PCR. These results provide novel evidence that TTX-sensitive Na(+) channel expressed in cultured hSMCs is mainly composed of Na(v)1.7.

  3. Differential responsiveness to contractile agents of isolated smooth muscle cells from human colons as a function of age and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Boyer, J C; Guitton, C; Pignodel, C; Cuq, P; Moussu, P; Pouderoux, P; Christen, M O; Balmes, J L; Bali, J P

    1997-11-01

    To study the involvement of age and inflammation in motor colonic activity in man, contractile responses to CCK, carbachol, and KCl of isolated colonic smooth muscle cells (SMC) from normal and inflamed human colons were evaluated; the incidence of sex and smoking on contraction was also analyzed. Contractile responses to the three agonists were significantly lower in tissues with a low degree of inflammation than in tissues with high level of inflammation or normal tissues. This reduction in cell responsiveness appears to be nonspecific and nonreceptor mediated. A positive correlation of the contractile responses to the three stimulants with the age of patients was observed. In contrast, no association was found between sex, smoking, and cell contraction. In conclusion, contractions of SMC due to CCK, carbachol, and KCl were significantly modified during life; inflammation of the colon led to a loss of SMC responsiveness.

  4. NOX4 downregulation leads to senescence of human vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Przybylska, Dorota; Janiszewska, Dorota; Goździk, Aleksandra; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna; Sunderland, Piotr; Sikora, Ewa; Mosieniak, Grażyna

    2016-01-01

    Senescence is a stress response characterized by an irreversible growth arrest and alterations in certain cell functions. It is believed that both double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) and increased ROS level are the main culprit of senescence. Excessive ROS production is also particularly important in the development of a number of cardiovascular disorders. In this context the involvement of professional ROS-producing enzymes, NADPH oxidases (NOX), was postulated. In contrary to the common knowledge, we have shown that not only increased ROS production but also diminished ROS level could be involved in the induction of senescence. Accordingly, our studies revealed that stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induced by doxorubicin or H2O2, correlates with increased level of DSB and ROS. On the other hand, both SIPS and replicative senescence were accompanied by diminished expression of NOX4. Moreover, inhibition of NOX activity or decrease of NOX4 expression led to permanent growth arrest of VSMCs and secretion of interleukins and VEGF. Interestingly, cells undergoing senescence due to NOX4 depletion neither acquired DSB nor activated DNA damage response. Instead, transient induction of the p27, upregulation of HIF-1alpha, decreased expression of cyclin D1 and hypophosphorylated Rb was observed. Our results showed that lowering the level of ROS-producing enzyme - NOX4 oxidase below physiological level leads to cellular senescence of VSMCs which is correlated with secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Thus the use of specific NOX4 inhibitors for pharmacotherapy of vascular diseases should be carefully considered. PMID:27655718

  5. Bivalirudin inhibits periprocedural platelet function and tissue factor expression of human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Pepke, Wojciech; Eisenreich, Andreas; Jaster, Markus; Ayral, Yunus; Bobbert, Peter; Mayer, Alexander; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Rauch, Ursula

    2013-04-01

    A major concern of stent implantation after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is acute stent thrombosis. Effective inhibition of periprocedural platelet function in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) leads to an improved outcome. In this study, we examined the periprocedural platelet reactivity after administrating bivalirudin during PCI compared to unfractionated heparin (UFH) administration. Further, the effect of bivalirudin on induced tissue factor (TF) expression in smooth muscle cells (SMC) was determined. Patients with CAD (n = 58) and double antithrombotic medication were treated intraprocedural with UFH (n = 30) or bivalirudin (n = 28). Platelet activation markers were flow cytometrically measured before and after stenting. The expression of TF in SMC was determined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The thrombogenicity of platelet-derived microparticles and SMC was assessed via a TF activity assay. Bivalirudin significantly diminished the agonist-induced platelet reactivity post-PCI. Compared to UFH treatment, the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP)-induced thrombospondin expression post-PCI was reduced when bivalirudin was administrated during intervention. In contrast to UFH, bivalirudin reduced the P-selectin expression of unstimulated and ADP-induced platelets post-PCI. Moreover, bivalirudin inhibited the thrombin-, but not FVIIa- or FVIIa/FX-induced TF expression and pro-coagulant TF activity of SMC. Moreover, bivalirudin reduced the TF activity of platelet-derived microparticles postinduction with TRAP or ADP. Bivalirudin is better than UFH in reducing periprocedural platelet activation. Moreover, thrombin-induced TF expression is inhibited by bivalirudin. Thus, bivalirudin seems to be a better anticoagulant during PCI than UFH. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. After Effects of Cerebellar Continuous Theta Burst Stimulation on Reflexive Saccades and Smooth Pursuit in Humans.

    PubMed

    Colnaghi, Silvia; Colagiorgio, P; Ramat, S; D'Angelo, E; Koch, G; Versino, M

    2017-08-01

    The use of cerebellar repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation has been attempted for perturbing reflexive and voluntary eye movements, but discrepancies are seen between the results of distinct studies possibly due to the different stimulation sites, intensities, and paradigms. We describe the after effects of 20 and 40 s continuous Theta Burst Stimulation (cTBS) as compared to sham stimulation, applied over the lateral cerebellar vermis and paravermis on Reflexive Saccades (RS) and Smooth Pursuit (SP) eye movements, recorded in the 30 min following stimulation. The experiments were carried out in eight healthy volunteers, and eye movements were recorded monocularly with video-oculography. The 40 s cTBS significantly increased the amplitude of ipsilateral RS and the acceleration of the ipsilateral SP, and this effect was detectable all over the 30-min recording period; 40 s cTBS did not modify the other parameters, namely the peak velocity, the duration and the latency of RS, and the latency and the velocity of SP. The 20 s cTBS was ineffective on all RS and SP parameters. Finally, we detected a significant quite-linear reduction of RS peak velocity over time, but this was independent from cTBS and was probably caused by fatigue. The effects of 40 s cTBS in our experiments mimic the disorder of ocular motility in Wallenberg's syndrome and could result from functional impairment of cerebellopontine pathways. This effect lasts 30 min at least, and can provide a useful framework for adaptive ocular motor studies.

  7. Differential gene expression profiling of human adipose stem cells differentiating into smooth muscle-like cells by TGFβ1/BMP4.

    PubMed

    Elçin, Ayşe Eser; Parmaksiz, Mahmut; Dogan, Arin; Seker, Sukran; Durkut, Serap; Dalva, Klara; Elçin, Yaşar Murat

    2017-03-15

    Regenerative repair of the vascular system is challenging from the perspectives of translational medicine and tissue engineering. There are fundamental hurdles in front of creating bioartificial arteries, which involve recaputilation of the three-layered structure under laboratory settings. Obtaining and maintaining smooth muscle characteristics is an important limitation, as the transdifferentiated cells fail to display mature phenotype. This study aims to shed light on the smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose stem cells (hASCs). To this end, we first acquired hASCs from lipoaspirate samples. Upon characterization, the cells were induced to differentiate into smooth muscle (SM)-like cells using a variety of inducer combinations. Among all, TGFβ1/BMP4 combination had the highest differentiation efficiency, based on immunohistochemical analyses. hSM-like cell samples were compared to hASCs and to the positive control, human coronary artery-smooth muscle cells (hCA-SMCs) through gene transcription profiling. Microarray findings revealed the activation of gene groups that function in smooth muscle differentiation, signaling pathways, extracellular modeling and cell proliferation. Our results underline the effectiveness of the growth factors and suggest some potential variables for detecting the SM-like cell characteristics. Evidence in transcriptome level was used to evaluate the TGFβ1/BMP4 combination as a previously unexplored effector for the smooth muscle differentiation of adipose stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Human vascular smooth muscle cells have at least two distinct PDGF receptors and can secrete PDGF-AA

    SciTech Connect

    Hosang, M.; Rouge, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a potent mitogen and chemoattractant for smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts in culture, is believed to play an important role in the formation of proliferative lesions of arterio-sclerosis. PDGF appears as three different dimeric isoforms: AA, AB, and BB. These were recently found to bind to two different receptors, the A/B receptor (which binds all three isoforms) and the B receptor (which binds only PDGF-BB). To find out whether these receptors exhibit functional differences, we have monitored the binding and mitogenic activities of PDGF-AA and -BB in human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (HSMCs), human dermal fibroblasts (HFs), and Swiss mouse 3T3 cells. With each cell type, there was a good correlation between the maximal levels of DNA synthesis achieved by these isoforms and the numbers of the appropriate receptor present on the cell surface: HMSCs, which have at least 32,000 B receptors but only 8,000 A/B receptors, responded well to PDGF-BB but responded poorly to PDGF-AA; whereas Swiss 3T3 cells, which have about equal numbers of B and A/B receptors (70,000 and 90,000, respectively), responded equally well to both isoforms. PDGF-AB was a more efficacious mitogen of HSMCs and HFs than was PDGF-AA and inhibited (125I)-PDGF-BB binding to HSMCs more effectively than PDGF-AA. This indicates that there may exist a third PDGF receptor type to which PDGF-BB and -AB but not PDGF-AA can bind.

  9. Intracellular pH changes in human aortic smooth muscle cells in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; Patrick, C. W. Jr; McIntire, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell (SMC) layers of human arteries may be exposed to blood flow after endothelium denudation, for example, following balloon angioplasty treatment. These SMCs are also constantly subjected to pressure driven transmural fluid flow. Flow-induced shear stress can alter SMC growth and metabolism. Signal transduction mechanisms involved in these flow effects on SMCs are still poorly understood. In this work, the hypothesis that shear stress alters the intracellular pH (pHi) of SMC is examined. When exposed to venous and arterial levels of shear stress, human aortic smooth muscle cells (hASMC) undergo alkalinization. The alkalinization plateau persisted even after 20 min of cell exposure to flow. Addition of amiloride (10 micromoles) or its 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) analog (EIPA, 10 micromoles), both Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitors, attenuated intracellular alkalinization, suggesting the involvement of the Na+/H+ exchanger in this response. The same concentrations of these inhibitors did not show an effect on pHi of hASMCs in static culture. 4-Acetamido-4'-isothio-cyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS, 1 mM), a Cl-/HCO3- exchange inhibitor, affected the pHi of hASMCs both in static and flow conditions. Our results suggest that flow may perturb the Na+/H+ exchanger leading to an alkalinization of hASMCs, a different response from the flow-induced acidification seen with endothelial cells at the same levels of shear stress. Understanding the flow-induced signal transduction pathways in the vascular cells is of great importance in the tissue engineering of vascular grafts. In the case of SMCs, the involvement of pHi changes in nitric oxide production and proliferation regulation highlights further the significance of such studies.

  10. Intracellular pH changes in human aortic smooth muscle cells in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; Patrick, C. W. Jr; McIntire, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell (SMC) layers of human arteries may be exposed to blood flow after endothelium denudation, for example, following balloon angioplasty treatment. These SMCs are also constantly subjected to pressure driven transmural fluid flow. Flow-induced shear stress can alter SMC growth and metabolism. Signal transduction mechanisms involved in these flow effects on SMCs are still poorly understood. In this work, the hypothesis that shear stress alters the intracellular pH (pHi) of SMC is examined. When exposed to venous and arterial levels of shear stress, human aortic smooth muscle cells (hASMC) undergo alkalinization. The alkalinization plateau persisted even after 20 min of cell exposure to flow. Addition of amiloride (10 micromoles) or its 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) analog (EIPA, 10 micromoles), both Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitors, attenuated intracellular alkalinization, suggesting the involvement of the Na+/H+ exchanger in this response. The same concentrations of these inhibitors did not show an effect on pHi of hASMCs in static culture. 4-Acetamido-4'-isothio-cyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS, 1 mM), a Cl-/HCO3- exchange inhibitor, affected the pHi of hASMCs both in static and flow conditions. Our results suggest that flow may perturb the Na+/H+ exchanger leading to an alkalinization of hASMCs, a different response from the flow-induced acidification seen with endothelial cells at the same levels of shear stress. Understanding the flow-induced signal transduction pathways in the vascular cells is of great importance in the tissue engineering of vascular grafts. In the case of SMCs, the involvement of pHi changes in nitric oxide production and proliferation regulation highlights further the significance of such studies.

  11. Effects of ginsenoside on large-conductance K(Ca) channels in human corporal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sung, H H; Chae, M R; So, I; Jeon, J-H; Park, J K; Lee, S W

    2011-01-01

    Ginseng was known to be an effective natural product that enhances penile erection. However, the precise biological function and mechanisms of action of ginseng with regard to erectile function remain unknown. The principal objective of this study was to identify ginsenoside (principal molecular ingredients of ginseng)-induced activation of large-conductance K(Ca) channel in human corporal smooth muscle cells, and to determine ginseng's mechanism of action on penile erection. Electrophysiological studies using cultured human corporal smooth muscle cells were conducted. We evaluated the effects of total ginsenosides (TGS) and ginsenoside Rg3 on large-conductance K(Ca) channel by determining whole-cell currents and single-channel activities. There was an increase in outward current dependent on TGS concentration (at +60 mV, 1 μg ml(-1); 168.3±59.3%, n=6, P<0.05, 10 μg ml(-1); 173.2±36.8%, n=4, P<0.05, 50 μg ml(-1); 295.3±62.3%, n=19, P<0.001, 100 μg ml(-1); and 462.3±97.1%, n=5, P<0.001) and Rg3 concentration (at +60 mV, 1 μM (0.78 μg ml(-1)); 222.8±64.8%, n=11, P<0.0001, 10 μM; 672.6±137.1%, n=10, P<0.0001, 50 μM; and 1713.3±234.7%, n=15, P<0.001) in the solution that was blocked completely by tetraethylammonium (TEA). Channel opening in cell-attached mode and channel activity in the inside-out membrane patches was also increased significantly by 50 μg of TGS or 10 μM of Rg3. The results of this study suggested that the activation of large-conductance K(Ca) channels by ginsenoside could be one mechanism of ginsenoside-induced relaxation in corporal smooth muscle.

  12. Mechanisms of action of otilonium bromide (OB) in human cultured smooth muscle cells and rat colonic strips.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cutillas, M; Gil, V; Gallego, D; Mañé, N; Martín, M T; Jiménez, M

    2013-12-01

    The pharmacological properties of otilonium bromide (OB) have been investigated using different experimental models, techniques, and conditions, and consequently, the results are not always easy to compare. The aim of the present work was to investigate the pharmacological properties of OB in human cultured colonic smooth muscle cells (HCSMCs), which is the main target of the drug 'in vivo'. Rat colonic strips were used to confirm the pharmacological properties. Human cultured colonic smooth muscle cells were studied using the calcium imaging technique. Microelectrodes and muscle bath experiments were performed in rat colonic strips. Otilonium bromide (OB) concentration dependently inhibited nifedipine-sensitive calcium transients induced by KCl (EC50  = 3.6 μM) and BayK8644 (EC50  = 4.0 μM). All the following experiments were performed in the presence of nifedipine. In HCSMC, carbachol-induced calcium transients were inhibited by OB (EC50  = 8.4 μM). Carbachol evoked 1-a smooth muscle depolarization (10 mV) that was antagonized by 100 μM OB; and 2-a contraction that was inhibited by OB (EC50  = 13.0 μM). 'Non-nitrergic (L-NNA 1 mM) non-purinergic (MRS2500 1 μM)' conditions were used to elicit endogenous excitatory responses. Electrical field stimulation caused 1-an atropine-sensitive excitatory junction potential that was inhibited by OB (EC50  = 8.9 μM) and 2-an atropine-sensitive contraction that was inhibited by OB (EC50  = 7.3 μM). In HCSMC, neurokinin A (NKA) and CaCl2 induced calcium transients that were inhibited by OB (NKA: EC50  = 11.7 μM; CaCl2 : EC50  = 17.5 μM). Otilonium bromide causes inhibition of L-/T-type calcium channels, muscarinic, and tachykininergic responses that acting together explain the pharmacological properties of the compound. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Proliferating or interleukin 1-activated human vascular smooth muscle cells secrete copious interleukin 6.

    PubMed Central

    Loppnow, H; Libby, P

    1990-01-01

    The cells that make up blood vessel walls appear to participate actively in local immune and inflammatory responses, as well as in certain vascular diseases. We tested here whether smooth muscle cells (SMC) can produce the important inflammatory mediator IL6. Unstimulated SMC in vitro elaborated 5 X 10(3) pg recIL6/24h (i.e., biological activity equivalent to 5 X 10(3) pg recombinant IL6 (recIL6), as determined in B9-assay with a recIL6 standard). Several pathophysiologically relevant factors augmented IL6 release from SMC including 10 micrograms LPS/ml (10(4) pg recIL6), 10 ng tumor necrosis factor/ml (4 X 10(4) pg recIL6), and most notably 10 ng IL1/ml (greater than or equal to 3.2 X 10(5) pg recIL6). Production of IL6 activity corresponded to IL6 mRNA accumulation and de novo synthesis. SMC released newly synthesized IL6 rapidly, as little metabolically labeled material remained cell-associated. In supernatants of IL1-stimulated SMC, IL6 accounted for as much as 4% of the secreted proteins. In normal vessels SMC seldom divide, but SMC proliferation can occur in hypertension or during atherogenesis. We therefore tested the relationship between IL6 production and SMC proliferation in response to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) in vitro. Quiescent SMC released scant IL6 activity, whereas PDGF (1-100 ng/ml) produced concentration-dependent and coordinate enhancement of SMC proliferation and IL6 release (linear regression of growth vs. IL6 release yielded r greater than 0.9). IL6 itself neither stimulated nor inhibited SMC growth or IL6 production. Intact medial strips studied in short-term organoid culture produced large quantities of IL6, similar to the results obtained with cultured SMC. These findings illustrate a new function of vascular SMC by which these cells might participate in local immunoregulation and in the pathogenesis of various important vascular diseases as well as in inflammatory responses generally. Images PMID:2312724

  14. Lipid Loading of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Induces Changes in Tropoelastin Protein Levels and Physical Structure

    PubMed Central

    Samouillan, Valerie; Dandurand, Jany; Nasarre, Laura; Badimon, Lina; Lacabanne, Colette; Llorente-Cortés, Vicenta

    2012-01-01

    Aggregated low-density lipoprotein (agLDL), one of the main LDL modifications in the arterial intima, contributes to massive intracellular cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), which are major producers of elastin in the vascular wall. Our aim was to analyze the levels, physical structure, and molecular mobility of tropoelastin produced by agLDL-loaded human VSMC (agLDL-VSMC) versus that produced by control VSMC. Western blot analysis demonstrated that agLDL reduced VSMC-tropoelastin protein levels by increasing its degradation rate. Moreover, our results demonstrated increased levels of precursor and mature forms of cathepsin S in agLDL-VSMC. Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed modifications in the secondary structures of tropoelastin produced by lipid-loaded VSMCs. Thermal and dielectric analyses showed that agLDL-VSMC tropoelastin has decreased glass transition temperatures and distinct chain dynamics that, in addition to a loss of thermal stability, lead to strong changes in its mechanical properties. In conclusion, agLDL lipid loading of human vascular cells leads to an increase in cathepsin S production concomitantly with a decrease in cellular tropoelastin protein levels and dramatic changes in secreted tropoelastin physical structure. Therefore, VSMC-lipid loading likely determines alterations in the mechanical properties of the vascular wall and plays a crucial role in elastin loss during atherosclerosis. PMID:22947869

  15. LC/MS/MS data analysis of the human uterine smooth muscle S-nitrosoproteome fingerprint in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Craig C.; Quilici, David R.; Schlauch, Karen A.; Burkin, Heather R.; Buxton, Iain L.O.

    2015-01-01

    The data described in this article is the subject of an article in the American Journal of Physiology: Cell Physiology, titled “The Human Uterine Smooth Muscle S-nitrosoproteome Fingerprint in Pregnancy, Labor, and Preterm Labor” (doi:10.1152/ajpcell.00198.2013) (Ulrich et al., 2013) [1]. The data described is a large scale mass spectrometry data set that defines the human uterine smooth muscle S-nitrosoproteome differences among laboring, non-laboring, preterm laboring tissue after treatment with S-nitrosoglutathione. PMID:26322325

  16. Correlation between human vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and protein kinase C alpha-expression: effect of d-alpha-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Marilley, D; Mosieniak, G; Boscoboinik, D; Azzi, A

    1996-11-01

    Population doublings of four different human aortic vascular smooth muscle cell strains correlate with the amount of protein kinase C alpha present in these cells. d-alpha-Tocopherol inhibits, at different extents, protein kinase C activity in all cells studied. Furthermore, the extent of inhibition positively correlates with amount of protein kinase C alpha expression and not with that of the other isoforms. It is suggested that, in human aortic smooth muscle cells, protein kinase C alpha modulates cell proliferation and serves as a target for d-alpha-tocopherol inhibition.

  17. Agonistic Anti-PDGF Receptor Autoantibodies from Patients with Systemic Sclerosis Impact Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells Function In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Svegliati, Silvia; Amico, Donatella; Spadoni, Tatiana; Fischetti, Colomba; Finke, Doreen; Moroncini, Gianluca; Paolini, Chiara; Tonnini, Cecilia; Grieco, Antonella; Rovinelli, Marina; Funaro, Ada; Gabrielli, Armando

    2017-01-01

    One of the earliest events in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is microvasculature damage with intimal hyperplasia and accumulation of cells expressing PDGF receptor. Stimulatory autoantibodies targeting PDGF receptor have been detected in SSc patients and demonstrated to induce fibrosis in vivo and convert in vitro normal fibroblasts into SSc-like cells. Since there is no evidence of the role of anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of SSc vascular lesions, we investigated the biologic effect of agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies from SSc patients on human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and the signaling pathways involved. The synthetic (proliferation, migration, and type I collagen gene α1 chain expression) and contractile (smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin expression) profiles of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells were assessed in vitro after incubation with SSc anti-PDGF receptors stimulatory autoantibodies. The role of reactive oxygen species, NOX isoforms, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was investigated. Human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells acquired a synthetic phenotype characterized by higher growth rate, migratory activity, gene expression of type I collagen α1 chain, and less expression of markers characteristic of the contractile phenotype such as smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin when stimulated with PDGF and autoantibodies against PDGF receptor, but not with normal IgG. This phenotypic profile is mediated by increased generation of reactive oxygen species and expression of NOX4 and mTORC1. Our data indicate that agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies may contribute to the pathogenesis of SSc intimal hyperplasia.

  18. Agonistic Anti-PDGF Receptor Autoantibodies from Patients with Systemic Sclerosis Impact Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells Function In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Svegliati, Silvia; Amico, Donatella; Spadoni, Tatiana; Fischetti, Colomba; Finke, Doreen; Moroncini, Gianluca; Paolini, Chiara; Tonnini, Cecilia; Grieco, Antonella; Rovinelli, Marina; Funaro, Ada; Gabrielli, Armando

    2017-01-01

    One of the earliest events in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is microvasculature damage with intimal hyperplasia and accumulation of cells expressing PDGF receptor. Stimulatory autoantibodies targeting PDGF receptor have been detected in SSc patients and demonstrated to induce fibrosis in vivo and convert in vitro normal fibroblasts into SSc-like cells. Since there is no evidence of the role of anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of SSc vascular lesions, we investigated the biologic effect of agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies from SSc patients on human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and the signaling pathways involved. The synthetic (proliferation, migration, and type I collagen gene α1 chain expression) and contractile (smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin expression) profiles of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells were assessed in vitro after incubation with SSc anti-PDGF receptors stimulatory autoantibodies. The role of reactive oxygen species, NOX isoforms, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was investigated. Human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells acquired a synthetic phenotype characterized by higher growth rate, migratory activity, gene expression of type I collagen α1 chain, and less expression of markers characteristic of the contractile phenotype such as smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin when stimulated with PDGF and autoantibodies against PDGF receptor, but not with normal IgG. This phenotypic profile is mediated by increased generation of reactive oxygen species and expression of NOX4 and mTORC1. Our data indicate that agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies may contribute to the pathogenesis of SSc intimal hyperplasia. PMID:28228756

  19. Management of Post-Intubation Tracheal Membrane Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Eliçora, Aykut; Akgül, Aslı G; Topçu, Salih; Özbay, Serkan; Hoşten, Tülay; Sezer, Hüseyin F; Eliçora, Sultan Şevik

    2016-07-01

    Iatrogenic tracheal rupture is a rare complication after intubation. Overinflation of the tracheal cuff was speculated to be a frequent cause of tracheal rupture. The surgical approach is a widespread treatment for tracheal ruptures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of conservative and surgical therapy approaches in tracheal rupture cases inflicted by tracheal intubation. Data on 12 patients who experienced tracheal ruptures secondary to intubation were reviewed. The average age of the patients was 58 years (range of 38 to 81 years). Six patients were men and 6 patients were women. Four of the patients were performed thoracotomy for primary surgery and underwent surgical therapy. 8 patients were treated conservatively. The results of both approaches were evaluated. Patients, who underwent both conservative and surgical therapy, were completely recovered. There was no rupture originated complication or death. Both conservative and surgical therapies are appropriate for treatment of membranous tracheal rupture.

  20. Adrenomedullin is a potent inhibitor of angiotensin II-induced migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Kano, H; Yasunari, K; Minami, M; Hanehira, T; Yoshikawa, J

    1997-06-01

    The migration of coronary artery medial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) into the intima is proposed to be an important process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerotic lesions. In the current study, we examined the possible interaction of adrenomedullin, a novel vasorelaxant peptide, and angiotensin II (Ang II) on human coronary artery SMC migration using Boyden's chamber method. Ang II stimulated SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(6) and 10(8) mol/L. This stimulation was clearly blocked by the Ang II type 1 receptor antagonist losartan but not by the type 2 receptor antagonist PD 123319. The migration stimulatory effect of Ang II was chemotactic in nature for cultured human coronary artery SMCs but was not chemokinetic. Human adrenomedullin clearly inhibited Ang II-induced migration in a concentration-dependent manner. Human adrenomedullin stimulated cAMP formation in these cells. Inhibition by adrenomedullin of Ang II-induced SMC migration was paralleled by an increase in the cellular level of cAMP. 8-Bromo-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, and forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, inhibited the Ang II-induced SMC migration. These results suggest that Ang II stimulates SMC migration via type 1 receptors in human coronary artery and adrenomedullin inhibits Ang II-induced migration at least partly through a cAMP-dependent mechanism. Taken together with the finding that adrenomedullin is synthesized in and secreted from vascular endothelial cells, this peptide may play a role as a local antimigration factor in certain pathological conditions.

  1. H2S relaxes isolated human airway smooth muscle cells via the sarcolemmal K(ATP) channel.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Robert; DeSantiago, Breann; Lee, Danielle Y; Yang, Guangdong; Kim, Jae Yeon; Foster, D Brian; Chan-Li, Yee; Horton, Maureen R; Panettieri, Reynold A; Wang, Rui; An, Steven S

    2014-03-28

    Here we explored the impact of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on biophysical properties of the primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM)-the end effector of acute airway narrowing in asthma. Using magnetic twisting cytometry (MTC), we measured dynamic changes in the stiffness of isolated ASM, at the single-cell level, in response to varying doses of GYY4137 (1-10mM). GYY4137 slowly released appreciable levels of H2S in the range of 10-275 μM, and H2S released was long lived. In isolated human ASM cells, GYY4137 acutely decreased stiffness (i.e. an indicator of the single-cell relaxation) in a dose-dependent fashion, and stiffness decreases were sustained in culture for 24h. Human ASM cells showed protein expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE; a H2S synthesizing enzyme) and ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. The KATP channel opener pinacidil effectively relaxed isolated ASM cells. In addition, pinacidil-induced ASM relaxation was completely inhibited by the treatment of cells with the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide. Glibenclamide also markedly attenuated GYY4137-mediated relaxation of isolated human ASM cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that H2S causes the relaxation of human ASM and implicate as well the role for sarcolemmal KATP channels. Finally, given that ASM cells express intrinsic enzymatic machinery of generating H2S, we suggest thereby this class of gasotransmitter can be further exploited for potential therapy against obstructive lung disease.

  2. Engineering vascular tissue with functional smooth muscle cells derived from human iPS cells and nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongyu; Hu, Jiang; Jiao, Jiao; Liu, Zhongning; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Chao; Chang, Lung-Ji; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X; Yang, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) are promising in the replacement of diseased vascular tissues. However, it remains a great challenge to obtain a sufficient number of functional smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in a clinical setting to construct patient-specific TEBVs. In addition, it is critical to develop a scaffold to accommodate these cells and retain their functional phenotype for the regeneration of TEBVs. In this study, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established from primary human aortic fibroblasts, and characterized with the pluripotency markers expression and cells' capabilities to differentiate into all three germ layer cells. A highly efficient method was then developed to induce these human iPSCs into proliferative SMCs. After multiple times of expansion, the expanded SMCs retained the potential to be induced into the functional contractile phenotype of mature SMCs, which was characterized by the contractile response to carbachol treatment, up-regulation of specific collagen genes under transforming growth factor β1 treatment, and up-regulation of specific matrix metalloproteinase genes under cytokine stimulation. We also developed an advanced macroporous and nanofibrous (NF) poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffold with suitable pore size and interpore connectivity to seed these human iPSC-derived SMCs and maintain their differentiated phenotype. Subcutaneous implantation of the SMC-scaffold construct in nude mice demonstrated vascular tissue formation, with robust collagenous matrix deposition inside the scaffold and the maintenance of differentiated SMC phenotype. Taken together, this study established an exciting approach towards the construction of patient-specific TEBVs. We established patient-specific human iPSCs, derived proliferative SMCs for expansion, turned on their mature contractile SMC phenotype, and developed an advanced scaffold for these cells to regenerate vascular tissue in vivo.

  3. Methionine enhances the contractile activity of human colon circular smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Choe, Eun Kyung; Moon, Jung Sun; Park, Kyu Joo

    2012-07-01

    Effective drug to manage constipation has been unsatisfactory. We sought to determine whether methionine has effect on the human colon. Human colon tissues were obtained from the specimens of colon resection. Microelectrode recording was performed and contractile activity of muscle strips and the propagation of the contractions in the colon segment were measured. At 10 µM, methionine depolarized the resting membrane potential (RMP) of circular muscle (CM) cells. In the CM strip, methionine increased the amplitude and area under the curve (AUC) of contractions. In the whole segment of colon, methionine increased the amplitude and AUC of the high amplitude contractions in the CM. These effects on contraction were maximal at 10 µM and were not observed in longitudinal muscles in both the strip and the colon segment. Methionine reversed the effects of pretreatment with sodium nitroprusside, tetrodotoxin and N(w)-oxide-L-arginine, resulting in depolarization of the RMP, and increased amplitude and AUC of contractions in the muscle strip. Methionine treatment affected the wave pattern of the colon segment by evoking small sized amplitude contractions superimposed on preexisting wave patterns. Our results indicate that a compound mimicking methionine may provide prokinetic functions in the human colon.

  4. Functional ion channels in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells: Voltage-dependent cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Amy L.; Remillard, Carmelle V.; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Fantozzi, Ivana; Ko, Eun A.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2011-01-01

    The activity of voltage-gated ion channels is critical for the maintenance of cellular membrane potential and generation of action potentials. In turn, membrane potential regulates cellular ion homeostasis, triggering the opening and closing of ion channels in the plasma membrane and, thus, enabling ion transport across the membrane. Such transmembrane ion fluxes are important for excitation–contraction coupling in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). Families of voltage-dependent cation channels known to be present in PASMC include voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels, voltage-dependent Ca2+-activated K+ (Kca) channels, L- and T- type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, voltage-gated Na+ channels and voltage-gated proton channels. When cells are dialyzed with Ca2+-free K+- solutions, depolarization elicits four components of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-sensitive Kvcurrents based on the kinetics of current activation and inactivation. In cell-attached membrane patches, depolarization elicits a wide range of single-channel K+ currents, with conductances ranging between 6 and 290 pS. Macroscopic 4-AP-sensitive Kv currents and iberiotoxin-sensitive Kca currents are also observed. Transcripts of (a) two Na+ channel α-subunit genes (SCN5A and SCN6A), (b) six Ca2+ channel α–subunit genes (α1A, α1B, α1X, α1D, α1Eand α1G) and many regulatory subunits (α2δ1, β1-4, and γ6), (c) 22 Kv channel α–subunit genes (Kv1.1 - Kv1.7, Kv1.10, Kv2.1, Kv3.1, Kv3.3, Kv3.4, Kv4.1, Kv4.2, Kv5.1, Kv 6.1-Kv6.3, Kv9.1, Kv9.3, Kv10.1 and Kv11.1) and three Kv channel β-subunit genes (Kvβ1-3) and (d) four Kca channel α–subunit genes (Sloα1 and SK2-SK4) and four Kca channel β-subunit genes (Kcaβ1-4) have been detected in PASMC. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive and rapidly inactivating Na+ currents have been recorded with properties similar to those in cardiac myocytes. In the presence of 20 mM external Ca2+, membrane depolarization from a holding potential of -100 mV elicits a rapidly

  5. Engineering of human tracheal tissue with collagen-enforced poly-lactic-glycolic acid non-woven mesh: a preliminary study in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Feng, Xue; Mao, Tianqiu; Feng, Xinghua; Ouyang, Hong-Wei; Zhao, Guifang; Chen, Fulin

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of the current study is to fabricate tissue engineered trachea with poly-lactic-glycolic acid (PLGA) non-woven mesh enforced by collagen type I. PLGA fibres coated with collagen solution were put together and fabricated into the shape of a human trachea, after drying and cross-linking treatment, a non-woven mesh with "C" shape formed. Chondrocytes from sheep nasal septum cartilage were expanded in vitro and seeded into PLGA/collagen non-woven mesh in the density of 5.0 x 10(7)mL(-1). After 5 days of in vitro incubation, six Cell-PLGA/collagen composites were implanted subcutaneously into the back of 6 nude mice to prefabricate a tissue engineering trachea. Eight weeks later, the cartilage formation was observed by gross inspection and histological examination. Cartilage-like tissue in the shape of the initial PLGA/collagen scaffold had been regenerated successfully without obvious inflammatory response. The tissue engineered trachea cartilage consisted of evenly spaced lacunae embedded in matrix stained red with safranin-O staining. The amount of GAGs in tissue engineered trachea cartilage reached 71.42% of normal value in native cartilage. This study demonstrated that collagen-enforced PLGA non-woven mesh facilitated the adhesion and proliferation of chondrocytes, it also owned adequate mechanical strength to serve as an ideal scaffold for trachea tissue engineering without internal support.

  6. Effects of guaifenesin, N-acetylcysteine, and ambroxol on MUC5AC and mucociliary transport in primary differentiated human tracheal-bronchial cells.

    PubMed

    Seagrave, Jeanclare; Albrecht, Helmut H; Hill, David B; Rogers, Duncan F; Solomon, Gail

    2012-10-31

    Therapeutic intervention in the pathophysiology of airway mucus hypersecretion is clinically important. Several types of drugs are available with different possible modes of action. We examined the effects of guaifenesin (GGE), N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and ambroxol (Amb) on differentiated human airway epithelial cells stimulated with IL-13 to produce additional MUC5AC. After IL-13 pre-treatment (3 days), the cultures were treated with GGE, NAC or Amb (10-300 μM) in the continued presence of IL-13. Cellular and secreted MUC5AC, mucociliary transport rates (MTR), mucus rheology at several time points, and the antioxidant capacity of the drugs were assessed. IL-13 increased MUC5AC content (~25%) and secretion (~2-fold) and decreased MTR, but only slightly affected the G' (elastic) or G" (viscous) moduli of the secretions. GGE significantly inhibited MUC5AC secretion and content in the IL-13-treated cells in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50s at 24 hr ~100 and 150 μM, respectively). NAC or Amb were less effective. All drugs increased MTR and decreased G' and G" relative to IL-13 alone. Cell viability was not affected and only NAC exhibited antioxidant capacity. Thus, GGE effectively reduces cellular content and secretion of MUC5AC, increases MTR, and alters mucus rheology, and may therefore be useful in treating airway mucus hypersecretion and mucostasis in airway diseases.

  7. Effects of guaifenesin, N-acetylcysteine, and ambroxol on MUC5AC and mucociliary transport in primary differentiated human tracheal-bronchial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Therapeutic intervention in the pathophysiology of airway mucus hypersecretion is clinically important. Several types of drugs are available with different possible modes of action. We examined the effects of guaifenesin (GGE), N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and ambroxol (Amb) on differentiated human airway epithelial cells stimulated with IL-13 to produce additional MUC5AC. Methods After IL-13 pre-treatment (3 days), the cultures were treated with GGE, NAC or Amb (10–300 μM) in the continued presence of IL-13. Cellular and secreted MUC5AC, mucociliary transport rates (MTR), mucus rheology at several time points, and the antioxidant capacity of the drugs were assessed. Results IL-13 increased MUC5AC content (~25%) and secretion (~2-fold) and decreased MTR, but only slightly affected the G’ (elastic) or G” (viscous) moduli of the secretions. GGE significantly inhibited MUC5AC secretion and content in the IL-13-treated cells in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50s at 24 hr ~100 and 150 μM, respectively). NAC or Amb were less effective. All drugs increased MTR and decreased G’ and G” relative to IL-13 alone. Cell viability was not affected and only NAC exhibited antioxidant capacity. Conclusions Thus, GGE effectively reduces cellular content and secretion of MUC5AC, increases MTR, and alters mucus rheology, and may therefore be useful in treating airway mucus hypersecretion and mucostasis in airway diseases. PMID:23113953

  8. DJ-1 Regulates Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Smooth Muscle-like Cells in Response to Sphingosylphosphorylcholine.

    PubMed

    Baek, Suji; Lee, Kang Pa; Jung, Seung Hyo; Cui, Long; Ko, Kinarm; Kim, Bokyung; Won, Kyung Jong

    2017-09-26

    Although multiple factors contribute to the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into various types of cells, the differentiation of hMSCs into smooth muscle cells (SMCs), one of central events in vascular remodeling, remains to be clarified. ROS participate in the differentiation of hMSCs into several cell types and were regulated by redox-sensitive molecules including a multifunctional protein DJ-1. Here, we investigated the correlation between altered proteins, especially those related to ROS, and SMC differentiation in sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC)-stimulated hMSCs. Treatment with SPC resulted in an increased expression of SMC markers, namely α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and calponin, and an increased production of ROS in hMSCs. A proteomic analysis of SPC-stimulated hMSCs revealed a distinctive alteration of the ratio between the oxidized and reduced forms of DJ-1 in hMSCs in response to SPC. The increased abundance of oxidized DJ-1 in SPC-stimulated hMSCs was validated by immunoblot analysis. The SPC-induced increase in the expression of α-SMA was stronger in DJ-1-knockdown hMSCs than in control cells. Moreover, the expression of α-SMA, and the calponin and generation of ROS in response to SPC were weaker in normal hMSCs than in DJ-1-overexpressing hMSCs. Exogenous H2 O2 mimicked the responses induced by SPC treatment. These results indicate that the ROS-related DJ-1 pathway regulates the differentiation of hMSCs into SMCs in response to SPC. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits proliferation of human aortic smooth muscle cells via up-regulating expression of mitofusin 2.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zhouwu; Yu, Min; Zeng, Guoning; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Libiao; Tan, Xuerui

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway. Mitofusin 2 (Mfn-2) also suppresses VSMC proliferation through Ras-Raf-ERK/MAPK, suggesting a possible link between EGCG, Mfn-2 and ERK/MAPK. However, the effect of EGCG on Mfn-2 remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of Mfn-2 in the regulation of VSMC proliferation by EGCG, and assessed the underlying mechanisms. The effects of EGCG on the proliferation of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) were observed by 5-ethynl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assay. Mfn-2 gene and protein levels, and Ras, p-c-Raf and p-ERK1/2 protein levels were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. Mfn-2 gene silencing was achieved by RNA interference. EGCG 50 μmol/L profoundly inhibited the proliferation of HASMCs in culture, up-regulated Mfn-2, and down-regulated the expression of p-c-Raf and p-ERK1/2. Furthermore, RNA interference-mediated gene knockdown of Mfn-2 antagonized EGCG-induced anti-proliferation and down-regulation of Ras, p-c-Raf and p-ERK1/2. These results suggest that EGCG inhibits the proliferation of HASMCs in vitro largely via Mfn-2-mediated suppression of the Ras-Raf-ERK/MAPK signaling pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. High glucose induces cell death of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells through the formation of hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Concepción; Lafuente, Nuria; Matesanz, Nuria; Cercas, Elena; Llergo, José L; Vallejo, Susana; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F

    2001-01-01

    Alterations of the vessel structure, which is mainly determined by smooth muscle cells through cell growth and/or cell death mechanisms, are characteristic of diabetes complications. We analysed the influence of high glucose (22 mM) on cultured human aortic smooth muscle cell growth and death, as hyperglycaemia is considered one of the main factors involved in diabetic vasculopathy. Growth curves were performed over 96 h in medium containing 0.5% foetal calf serum. Cell number increased by 2–4 fold over the culture period in the presence of 5.5 mM (low) glucose, while a 20% reduction in final cell number was observed with high glucose. Under serum-free conditions, cell number remained constant in low glucose cultures, but a 40% decrease was observed in high glucose cultures, suggesting that high glucose may induce increased cell death rather than reduced proliferation. Reduced final cell number induced by high glucose was also observed after stimulation with 5 or 10% foetal calf serum. The possible participation of oxidative stress was investigated by co-incubating high glucose with different reactive oxygen species scavengers. Only catalase reversed the effect of high glucose. Intracellular H2O2 content, visualized with 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein and quantified by flow cytometry, was increased after high glucose treatment. To investigate the cell death mechanism induced by high glucose, apoptosis and necrosis were quantified. No differences were observed regarding the apoptotic index between low and high glucose cultures, but lactate dehydrogenase activity was increased in high glucose cultures. In conclusion, high glucose promotes necrotic cell death through H2O2 formation, which may participate in the development of diabetic vasculopathy. PMID:11487505

  11. 2-Methoxycinnamaldehyde inhibits the TNF-α-induced proliferation and migration of human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Young-Hee; Kim, Soo-A

    2017-01-01

    The abnormal proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a crucial event in the development of atherosclerosis, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is actively involved in this process by enhancing the proliferation and migration of VSMCs. 2-Methoxycinnamaldehyde (MCA) is a natural compound of Cinnamomum cassia. Although 2-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (HCA), another compound from Cinnamomum cassia, has been widely studied with regard to its antitumor activity, MCA has not attracted researchers' interest due to its mild toxic effects on cancer cells and its mechanisms of action remain unknown. In this study, we examined the effects of MCA on the TNF-α-induced proliferation and migration of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). As shown by our results, MCA inhibited TNF-α-induced cell proliferation by reducing the levels of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, CDK4 and CDK6, and increasing the levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21 and p27, without resulting in cellular cytotoxicity. Furthermore, MCA decreased the level of secreted matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 by inhibiting MMP-9 transcription. Unexpectedly, MCA did not affect the TNF-α-induced levels of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). However, by showing that MCA potently inhibited the degradation of IκBα and the subsequent nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), we demonstrated that MCA exerts its effects through the NF-κB signaling pathway. MCA also effectively inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced HASMC migration. Taken together, these observations suggest that MCA has the potential for use as an anti-atherosclerotic agent.

  12. Regulation of oxytocin receptor responsiveness by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 in human myometrial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Willets, Jonathon M; Brighton, Paul J; Mistry, Rajendra; Morris, Gavin E; Konje, Justin C; Challiss, R A John

    2009-08-01

    Oxytocin plays an important role in the progression, timing, and modulation of uterine contraction during labor and is widely used as an uterotonic agent. We investigated the mechanisms regulating oxytocin receptor (OTR) signaling in human primary myometrial smooth muscle cells and the ULTR cell-line. Oxytocin produced concentration-dependent increases in both total [(3)H]inositol phosphate accumulation and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)); however, responses were greater and more reproducible in the ULTR cell line. Assessment of phospholipase C activity in single cells revealed that the OTR desensitizes rapidly (within 5 min) in the presence of oxytocin (100 nm). To characterize OTR desensitization further, cells were stimulated with a maximally effective concentration of oxytocin (100 nm, 30 sec) followed by a variable washout period and a second identical application of oxytocin. This brief exposure to oxytocin caused a marked decrease (>70%) in OTR responsiveness to rechallenge and was fully reversed by increasing the time period between agonist challenges. To assess involvement of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) in OTR desensitization, cells were transfected with small interfering RNAs to cause specific > or =75% knockdown of GRKs 2, 3, 5, or 6. In both primary myometrial and ULTR cells, knockdown of GRK6 largely prevented oxytocin-induced OTR desensitization; in contrast, selective depletion of GRKs 2, 3, or 5 was without effect. These data indicate that GRK6 recruitment is a cardinal effector of OTR responsiveness and provide mechanistic insight into the likely in vivo regulation of OTR signaling in uterine smooth muscle.

  13. Mechanisms of pneumothorax following tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Berg, L F; Mafee, M F; Campos, M; Applebaum, E L

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism by which pneumothorax may occur as a complication of tracheal intubation, we submitted four cats to tracheotomy and three to tracheal intubation. To simulate the dissection of air along fascial planes following tracheotomy, we placed catheters in either the pretracheal or subcutaneous plane and applied positive pressure to the catheters. The cats undergoing tracheal intubation were ventilated with excessive positive pressure. Computed tomography was used to document the progression of pneumothorax. High positive pressures during mechanical ventilation led to pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum, and the mechanism was primarily the dissection of air along the perivascular sheaths of the pulmonary arteries, presumably due to rupture of perivascular alveoli. Dissection of air along the pretracheal fascia following tracheotomy produced pneumomediastinum but not pneumothorax. This suggests that pneumothorax occurring clinically is more likely a complication of assisted ventilation than a complication of tracheotomy surgery.

  14. WISP1 overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of human vascular smooth muscle cells via AKT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shun; Liu, Hao; Lu, Lihe; Wan, Heng; Lin, Zhiqi; Qian, Kai; Yao, Xingxing; Chen, Qing; Liu, Wenjun; Yan, Jianyun; Liu, Zhengjun

    2016-10-05

    Proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play crucial roles in the development of vascular restenosis. Our previous study showed that CCN4, namely Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1), significantly promotes proliferation and migration of rat VSMCs, but its mechanism remains unclear. This study aims to investigate whether and how WISP1 stimulates proliferation and migration of human VSMCs. Western blot analysis showed that FBS treatment increased WISP1 protein levels in human VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner. Overexpression of WISP1 using adenovirus encoding WISP1 (AD-WISP1) significantly increased proliferation rate of human VSMCs by 2.98-fold compared with empty virus (EV)-transfected cells, shown by EdU incorporation assay. Additionally, Scratch-induced wound healing assay revealed that adenovirus-mediated overexpression of WISP1 significantly increased cell migration compared with EV-transfected cells from 6h (4.56±1.14% vs. 11.23±2.25%, P<0.05) to 48h (25.25±5.51% vs. 97.54±13.12%, P<0.01) after injury. Transwell Migration Assay confirmed that WISP1 overexpression significantly promoted human VSMC migration by 2.25-fold compared with EV. Furthermore, WISP1 overexpression stimulated Akt signaling activation in human VSMCs. Blockage of Akt signaling by Akt inhibitor AZD5363 or PI3K inhibitor LY294002, led to an inhibitory effect of WISP1-induced proliferation and migration in human VSMCs. Moreover, we found that WISP1 overexpression stimulated GSK3α/β phosphorylation, and increased expression of cyclin D1 and MMP9 in human VSMCs, and this effect was abolished by AZD5363. Collectively, we demonstrated that Akt signaling pathway mediates WISP1-induced migration and proliferation of human VSMCs, suggesting that WISP1 may act as a novel potential therapeutic target for vascular restenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5795 - Tracheal tube cleaning brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube cleaning brush. 868.5795 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5795 Tracheal tube cleaning brush. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube cleaning brush is a device consisting of a brush with plastic bristles...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5795 - Tracheal tube cleaning brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal tube cleaning brush. 868.5795 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5795 Tracheal tube cleaning brush. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube cleaning brush is a device consisting of a brush with plastic bristles...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5795 - Tracheal tube cleaning brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal tube cleaning brush. 868.5795 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5795 Tracheal tube cleaning brush. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube cleaning brush is a device consisting of a brush with plastic bristles...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5795 - Tracheal tube cleaning brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal tube cleaning brush. 868.5795 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5795 Tracheal tube cleaning brush. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube cleaning brush is a device consisting of a brush with plastic bristles...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5750 Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5795 - Tracheal tube cleaning brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal tube cleaning brush. 868.5795 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5795 Tracheal tube cleaning brush. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube cleaning brush is a device consisting of a brush with plastic bristles...

  5. Dexmedetomidine for tracheal extubation in deeply anesthetized adult patients after otologic surgery: a comparison with remifentanil.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qing; Hu, Chunbo; Ye, Min; Shen, Xia

    2015-07-23

    Remifentanil and dexmedetomidine are well known to suppress airway reflexes during airway procedures. Smooth tracheal extubation is important after otologic surgery. The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of dexmedetomidine or remifentanil infusion for producing smooth tracheal extubation in deeply anesthetized patients after otologic surgery. Seventy-four ASA I-II adult patients (18-60 years old) scheduled for elective otologic surgery were randomly assigned to one of three groups: sevoflurane-remifentanil (Group SR, n = 25), sevoflurane-dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg/kg) (Group SD5, n = 24), or sevoflurane-dexmedetomidine (0.7 μg/kg) (Group SD7, n = 25). Remifentanil or dexmedetomidine were administered for 10 min at the end of surgery. The primary outcome was the rate of smooth extubation. Respiratory pattern, airway obstruction, hemodynamic and respiratory profiles, time to awake, rescue analgesics in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU), and postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) were also recorded. The rate of smooth tracheal extubation as defined 1 min post-extubation was the same for Groups SR and SD7 (P > 0.05), but the rate of smooth extubation was lower for Group SD5 than for the other two groups (p < 0.05). During extubation, the respiratory rate was lower in Group SR than in both dexmedetomidine groups (p < 0.05). The hemodynamic profiles at extubation were similar between groups (p > 0.05), but the mean arterial pressure and heart rate were higher in Group SR at 10 and 15 min after extubation (p < 0.05). The incidence of airway obstruction and time to awake were comparable for all groups (p > 0.05). The need for rescue analgesic in the PACU was more common in Group SR than in both dexmedetomidine groups (P < 0.01). Compared to Group SR, both dexmedetomidine groups had less PONV on postoperative day 1 (p < 0.05). Combined with 1 MAC sevoflurane, dexmedetomidine 0.7 ug/kg and remifentanil

  6. CD38 and airway hyper-responsiveness: studies on human airway smooth muscle cells and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Alonso G P; Deshpande, Deepak A; Dileepan, Mythili; Walseth, Timothy F; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2015-02-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease in which altered calcium regulation, contractility, and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation contribute to airway hyper-responsiveness and airway wall remodeling. The enzymatic activity of CD38, a cell-surface protein expressed in human ASM cells, generates calcium mobilizing second messenger molecules such as cyclic ADP-ribose. CD38 expression in human ASM cells is augmented by cytokines (e.g., TNF-α) that requires the activation of MAP kinases and the transcription factors, NF-κB and AP-1, and is post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-140-3p and miR-708 by binding to 3' Untranslated Region of CD38 as well as by modulating the activation of signaling mechanisms involved in its regulation. Mice deficient in Cd38 exhibit reduced airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine relative to the response in wild-type mice. Intranasal challenge of Cd38-deficient mice with TNF-α or IL-13, or the environmental fungus Alternaria alternata, causes significantly attenuated methacholine responsiveness compared with wild-type mice, with comparable airway inflammation. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer studies revealed partial restoration of airway hyper-responsiveness to inhaled methacholine in the Cd38-deficient mice. These studies provide evidence for CD38 involvement in the development of airway hyper-responsiveness; a hallmark feature of asthma. Future studies aimed at drug discovery and delivery targeting CD38 expression and (or) activity are warranted.

  7. In-depth evaluation of commercially available human vascular smooth muscle cells phenotype: Implications for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Timraz, Sara B H; Farhat, Ilyas A H; Alhussein, Ghada; Christoforou, Nicolas; Teo, Jeremy C M

    2016-05-01

    In vitro research on vascular tissue engineering has extensively used isolated primary human or animal smooth muscle cells (SMC). Research programs that lack such facilities tend towards commercially available primary cells sources. Here, we aim to evaluate the capacity of commercially available human SMC to maintain their contractile phenotype, and determine if dedifferentiation towards the synthetic phenotype occurs in response to conventional cell culture and passaging without any external biochemical or mechanical stimuli. Lower passage SMC adopted a contractile phenotype marked by a relatively slower proliferation rate, higher expression of proteins of the contractile apparatus and smoothelin, elongated morphology, and reduced deposition of collagen types I and III. As the passage number increased, migratory capacity was enhanced, average cell speed, total distance and net distance travelled increased up to passage 8. Through the various assays, corroborative evidence pinpoints SMC at passage 7 as the transition point between the contractile and synthetic phenotypes, while passage 8 distinctly and consistently exhibited characteristics of synthetic phenotype. This knowledge is particularly useful in selecting SMC of appropriate passage number for the target vascular tissue engineering application, for example, a homeostatic vascular graft for blood vessel replacement versus recreating atherosclerotic blood vessel model in vitro. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro photodynamic therapy with chlorin e6 leads to apoptosis of human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, Magdalena; Kałas, Wojciech; Biały, Dariusz; Zioło, Ewa; Arkowski, Jacek; Mazurek, Walentyna; Strzadała, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention has become the most common and widely implemented method of heart revascularization. However, the development of restenosis remains the major limitation of this method. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) recently emerged as a new and promising method for the prevention of arterial restenosis. Here the efficacy of chlorin e6 in PDT was investigated in vitro using human vascular smooth muscle cells (TG/HA-VSMCs) as one of the cell types crucial in the development of restenosis. PDT-induced cell death was studied on many levels,including annexin V staining, measurement of the generation reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-3 activity,and assessment of changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and fragmentation of DNA. Photosensitization of TG/HA-VSMCs with a 170 lM of chlorin e6 and subsequent illumination with the light of a 672-nm diode laser(2 J/cm2) resulted in the generation of ROS, a decrease in cell membrane polarization, caspase-3 activation, as well as DNA fragmentation. Interestingly, the latter two apoptotic events could not be observed in photosensitized and illuminated NIH3T3 fibroblasts, suggesting different outcomes of the model of PDT in various types of cells. The results obtained with human VSMCs show that chlorin e6 may be useful in the PDT of aerial restenosis, but its efficacy still needs to be established in an animal model.

  9. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 controls urokinase-dependent signaling and functions in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyan, Julia Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna

    2009-04-01

    The urokinase (uPA)/urokinase receptor (uPAR) multifunctional system is an important mediator of functional behaviour of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). uPAR associates with platelet-derived growth factor receptor {beta} (PDGFR-{beta}), which serves as a transmembrane adaptor for uPAR in VSMC, to transduce intracellular signaling and initiate functional changes. The precise and rapid propagation of these signaling cascades demands both strict and flexible regulatory mechanisms that remain unexplored. We provide evidence that the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 mediates these processes. uPA regulated SHP-2 phosphorylation, catalytic activity, and its co-localization and association with the PDGFR-{beta}. Active PDGFR-{beta} was required for the uPA-induced SHP-2 phosphorylation. uPAR-directed STAT1 pathway was disturbed in cells expressing SHP-2 inactive mutant. Both, cell proliferation and migration were impaired in VSMC with downregulated SHP-2. Elucidating the underlying mechanisms, we found that uPA induced SHP-2 recruitment to lipid rafts. Disruption of rafts abolished uPA-related control of SHP-2 phosphorylation, its association with PDGFR-{beta} and finally the VSMC functional responses. Our results demonstrate that SHP-2 plays an important role in uPA-directed signaling and functional control of human VSMC and suggest that this phosphatase might contribute to the pathogenesis of the uPA-related vascular remodeling.

  10. LOX-1, a bridge between GLP-1R and mitochondrial ROS generation in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yao; Mercanti, Federico; Dai, Dongsheng; Wang, Xianwei; Ding, Zufeng; Pothineni, Naga Venkata; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2013-07-19

    A growing body of evidence indicates that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists or dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors play an important role in modulating oxidant stress in vascular beds. However, the underlying mechanism of this process remains unclear. In recent studies, we observed an increase in GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) expression in the aorta of LOX-1 knock-out mice. Since LOX-1 is a pivotal regulator of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we conducted studies to identify relationship between LOX-1, ROS and GLP-1 agonism or DPP-4 antagonism. We observed a sustained decrease in GLP-1R expression in human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) treated with ox-LDL. When VSMCs were treated with different concentration of liraglutide (a GLP-1 agonist) or NVPDPP728 (a DPP-4 inhibitor), expression of ROS decreased compared with ox-LDL alone treatment. To further prove that LOX-1 plays a pivotal role in ROS and GLP-1R expression, we treated VSMCs with LOX-1 antibody or transfected cells with human LOX-1 cDNA. The inhibitory effect of ox-LDL on GLP-1R expression was reversed with anti-LOX-1 antibody treatment, while the inhibitory effect of liraglutide and NVPDPP728 on ROS generation was attenuated when cells were transfected with LOX-1 cDNA. Our results suggest that LOX-1 may play a bridging role in GLP-1 activation and ROS interaction.

  11. Induction by lysophosphatidylcholine, a major phospholipid component of atherogenic lipoproteins, of human coronary artery smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Minami, M; Kano, H; Hanehira, T; Yoshikawa, J

    1998-07-28

    The objectives of the present study were (1) to determine whether lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC), a prominent component of oxidatively modified LDL, induces migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and, if so, to clarify the mechanism, and (2) to investigate the possible interactions of lyso-PC and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, endothelin- (ET-1), adrenomedullin (AM), or vitamin E on SMC migration by the Boyden's chamber method. Lyso-PC induced SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-6) and 5 x 10(-5) mol/L. By contrast, phosphatidylcholine was without significant activity, and lysophosphatidylinositol and lysophosphatidylserine were much less effective than lyso-PC. Lyso-PC increased basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) production in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-6) and 5 x 10(-5) mol/L in these cells. Furthermore, lyso-PC-induced SMC migration was inhibited by neutralizing antibody to bFGF but not by neutralizing antibody to transforming growth factor-beta1. Lyso-PC-induced migration was significantly enhanced by PDGF-BB or ET-1 but was clearly inhibited by human AM and vitamin E. These results indicate that (1) lyso-PC induces human coronary artery SMC migration at least in part through release of endogenous bFGF and (2) this lyso-PC-induced migration can be further induced by PDGF-BB and ET-1 and can be inhibited by human AM and vitamin E. Lyso-PC may recruit medial SMCs during the process of coronary atherosclerosis in part by releasing bFGF in concert with PDGF-BB or ET-1 in vascular tissues. This lyso-PC-induced SMC migration may be suppressed by AM and vitamin E under certain pathological conditions.

  12. Location of smooth-muscle myosin and tropomyosin binding sites in the C-terminal 288 residues of human caldesmon.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, P A; Fraser, I D; Marston, S B

    1995-01-01

    We have produced nine recombinant fragments, H1 to H9, from a human cDNA that codes for the C-terminal 288 residues of caldesmon. The fragment H1, encompassing the 288 residues, is equivalent to domains 3 and 4 of caldesmon (amino acids 506-793 in human, 476-737 in the chicken gizzard sequence). It has been shown [Huber, Redwood, Avent, Tanner and Marston (1993) J. Muscle Res. Cell Motil. 14, 385-391] to bind to actin, Ca(2+)-calmodulin, tropomyosin and myosin. The fragments, H2 to H9, differ in length between 60 and 176 residues and cover the whole of domains 3 and 4 with many of the fragments overlapping. We have characterized the myosin and tropomyosin binding of these fragments. The binding of both tropomyosin and myosin is highly dependent on salt concentration, indicating the ionic nature of these interactions. The location of the myosin binding is an extended region encompassing the junction of domains 3/4 and domain 4a (residues 622-714, human; 566-657, chicken gizzard). Tropomyosin binds in a smaller region within domain 4a of caldesmon (residues 663-714, human; 606-657 chicken gizzard). We confirmed predictions based on sequence similarities of a tropomyosin binding site in domain 3 of caldesmon; however, this site bound to skeletal-muscle tropomyosin and had little affinity for the smooth-muscle tropomyosin isoform. None of the protein fragments H2-H9 retained the affinity of the parent fragment H1 for either myosin or tropomyosin. This indicates the need for several interaction sites scattered over an extended region to attain higher affinity. The regions interacting with caldesmon in both tropomyosin and myosin are coiled-coil structures. This is probably the reason for their shared interaction sites on caldesmon and their similar natures of binding. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 9 PMID:8526878

  13. Tracheal lipoma mimicking obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Mota, Vinícius Turano; Maia, José Geraldo Soares; Barbosa, Ana Teresa Fernandes; Fernandes, Diego Franco Silveira; Rocha, Emanuelly Botelho

    2010-01-01

    Tracheal tumors are rare and can be difficult to diagnose due to their capacity to mimic other obstructive lung diseases, such as asthma and COPD. We report the case of a female patient with a tracheal tumor. She had previously been treated for asthma and COPD, with little response to the treatment. The onset of infectious complications prompted further investigation. Chest CT images suggested the presence of a tumor, which was confirmed by fiberoptic bronchoscopy. The tumor was endoscopically resected. However, the patient evolved to death due to pneumonia and septic shock.

  14. Effects of the dual TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on human endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, Marcelo H.; Tellier, Céline; Michiels, Carine; Ellertsen, Ingvill; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Bäck, Magnus

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •EV-077 reduced TNF-α induced inflammation in endothelial cells. •The thromboxane mimetic U69915 enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. •EV-077 inhibited smooth muscle cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The prothrombotic mediator thromboxane A{sub 2} is derived from arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase and thromboxane synthase pathways, and transduces its effect through the thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptor. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on inflammatory markers in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and on human coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation. To this end, mRNA levels of different proinflammatory mediators were studied by real time quantitative PCR, supernatants were analyzed by enzyme immune assay, and cell proliferation was assessed using WST-1. EV-077 significantly decreased mRNA levels of ICAM-1 and PTX3 after TNFα incubation, whereas concentrations of 6-keto PGF1α in supernatants of endothelial cells incubated with TNFα were significantly increased after EV-077 treatment. Although U46619 did not alter coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation, this thromboxane mimetic enhanced the proliferation induced by serum, insulin and growth factors, which was significantly inhibited by EV-077. In conclusion, EV-077 inhibited TNFα-induced endothelial inflammation and reduced the enhancement of smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by a thromboxane mimetic, supporting that the thromboxane pathway may be associated with early atherosclerosis in terms of endothelial dysfunction and vascular hypertrophy.

  15. Chloride channel blockade relaxes airway smooth muscle and potentiates relaxation by β-agonists

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Peter; Rinderspacher, Alison; Fu, Xiao Wen; Zhang, Yi; Landry, Donald W.; Emala, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Severe bronchospasm refractory to β-agonists continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality in asthmatic patients. We questioned whether chloride channels/transporters are novel targets for the relaxation of airway smooth muscle (ASM). We have screened a library of compounds, derivatives of anthranilic and indanyloxyacetic acid, that were originally developed to antagonize chloride channels in the kidney. We hypothesized that members of this library would be novel calcium-activated chloride channel blockers for the airway. The initial screen of this compound library identified 4 of 20 compounds that relaxed a tetraethylammonium chloride-induced contraction in guinea pig tracheal rings. The two most effective compounds, compounds 1 and 13, were further studied for their potential to either prevent the initiation of or relax the maintenance phase of an acetylcholine (ACh)-induced contraction or to potentiate β-agonist-mediated relaxation. Both relaxed an established ACh-induced contraction in human and guinea pig ex vivo ASM. In contrast, the prevention of an ACh-induced contraction required copretreatment with the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter blocker bumetanide. The combination of compound 13 and bumetanide also potentiated relaxation by the β-agonist isoproterenol in guinea pig tracheal rings. Compounds 1 and 13 hyperpolarized the plasma cell membrane of human ASM cells and blocked spontaneous transient inward currents, a measure of chloride currents in these cells. These functional and electrophysiological data suggest that modulating ASM chloride flux is a novel therapeutic target in asthma and other bronchoconstrictive diseases. PMID:24879056

  16. Role of Myoendothelial Gap Junctions in the Regulation of Human Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Differentiation by Laminar Shear Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zongqi; Chen, Yizhu; Zhang, Tiantian; Guo, Lingyu; Yang, Wenlong; Zhang, Junfeng; Wang, Changqian

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells may dedifferentiate into the synthetic phenotype and promote atherosclerosis. Here, we explored the role of myoendothelial gap junctions in phenotypic switching of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) co-cultured with human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) exposed to shear stress. HCASMCs and HCAECs were seeded on opposite sides of Transwell inserts, and HCAECs were exposed to laminar shear stress of 12 dyn/cm2 or 5 dyn/cm2. The myoendothelial gap junctions were evaluated by using a multi-photon microscope. In co-culture with HCAECs, HCASMCs exhibited a contractile phenotype, and maintained the expression of differentiation markers MHC and H1-calponin. HCASMCs and HCAECs formed functional intercellular junctions, as evidenced by colocalization of connexin(Cx)40 and Cx43 on cellular projections inside the Transwell membrane and biocytin transfer from HCAECs to HCASMCs. Cx40 siRNA and 18-α-GA attenuated protein expression of MHC and H1-calponin in HCASMCs. Shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2 increased Cx43 and decreased Cx40 expression in HCAECs, and partly inhibited biocytin transfer from HCAECs to HCASMCs, which could be completely blocked by Cx43 siRNA or restored by Cx40 DNA transfected into HCAECs. The exposure of HCAECs to shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2 promoted HCASMC phenotypic switching, manifested by morphological changes, decrease in MHC and H1-calponin expression, and increase in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB release, which was partly rescued by Cx43 siRNA or Cx40 DNA or PDGF receptor signaling inhibitor. The exposure of HCAECs to shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2 caused the dysfunction of Cx40/Cx43 heterotypic myoendothelial gap junctions, which may be replaced by homotypic Cx43/Cx43 channels, and induced HCASMC transition to the synthetic phenotype associated with the activation of PDGF receptor signaling, which may contribute to shear stress-associated arteriosclerosis. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG

  17. Cytokine Effects on Gap Junction Communication and Connexin Expression in Human Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells and Suburothelial Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Marco; Oberbach, Andreas; Schlichting, Nadine; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Neuhaus, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Background The last decade identified cytokines as one group of major local cell signaling molecules related to bladder dysfunction like interstitial cystitis (IC) and overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is essential for the coordination of normal bladder function and has been found to be altered in bladder dysfunction. Connexin (Cx) 43 and Cx45 are the most important gap junction proteins in bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC) and suburothelial myofibroblasts (hsMF). Modulation of connexin expression by cytokines has been demonstrated in various tissues. Therefore, we investigate the effect of interleukin (IL) 4, IL6, IL10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFβ1) on GJIC, and Cx43 and Cx45 expression in cultured human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC) and human suburothelial myofibroblasts (hsMF). Methodology/Principal Findings HBSMC and hsMF cultures were set up from bladder tissue of patients undergoing cystectomy. In cytokine stimulated cultured hBSMC and hsMF GJIC was analyzed via Fluorescence Recovery after Photo-bleaching (FRAP). Cx43 and Cx45 expression was assessed by quantitative PCR and confocal immunofluorescence. Membrane protein fraction of Cx43 and Cx45 was quantified by Dot Blot. Upregulation of cell-cell-communication was found after IL6 stimulation in both cell types. In hBSMC IL4 and TGFβ1 decreased both, GJIC and Cx43 protein expression, while TNFα did not alter communication in FRAP-experiments but increased Cx43 expression. GJ plaques size correlated with coupling efficacy measured, while Cx45 expression did not correlate with modulation of GJIC. Conclusions/Significance Our finding of specific cytokine effects on GJIC support the notion that cytokines play a pivotal role for pathophysiology of OAB and IC. Interestingly, the effects were independent from the classical definition of pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines. We conclude, that connexin

  18. Expression and proliferation profiles of PKC, JNK and p38MAPK in physiologically stretched human bladder smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wazir, Romel; Luo, De-Yi; Dai, Yi; Yue, Xuan; Tian, Ye; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •Stretch induces proliferation in human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMC). •5% Equibiaxial elongation produces maximum proliferation. •Physiologic stretch decreases apoptotic cell death. •PKC is involved in functional modulation of bladder. •JNK and p38 are not involved in proliferating HBSMC. -- Abstract: Objective: To determine protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase (JNK) and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38MAPK) expression levels and effects of their respective inhibitors on proliferation of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs) when physiologically stretched in vitro. Materials and methods: HBSMCs were grown on silicone membrane and stretch was applied under varying conditions; (equibiaxial elongation: 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%), (frequency: 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1 Hz). Optimal physiological stretch was established by assessing proliferation with 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assay and flow cytometry. PKC, JNK and p38 expression levels were analyzed by Western blot. Specificity was maintained by employing specific inhibitors; (GF109203X for PKC, SP600125 for JNK and SB203580 for p38MAPK), in some experiments. Results: Optimum proliferation was observed at 5% equibiaxial stretch (BrdU: 0.837 ± 0.026 (control) to 1.462 ± 0.023)%, (P < 0.05) and apoptotic cell death rate decreased from 16.4 ± 0.21% (control) to 4.5 ± 0.13% (P < 0.05) applied at 0.1 Hz. Expression of PKC was upregulated with slight increase in JNK and no change in p38MAPK after application of stretch. Inhibition had effects on proliferation (1.075 ± 0.024, P < 0.05 GF109203X); (1.418 ± 0.021, P > 0.05 SP600125) and (1.461 ± 0.01, P > 0.05 SB203580). These findings show that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent proliferative modulation through PKC and possibly JNK but not via p38MAPK in hBSMCs.

  19. Evaluation of mechanical properties of human mesenchymal stem cells during differentiation to smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Khani, Mohammad-Mehdi; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Rostami, Mostafa; Peirovi, Habibollah; Janmaleki, Mohsen

    2014-07-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent cells appropriate for a variety of tissue engineering and cell therapy applications. Mechanical properties of hMSCs during differentiation are associated with their particular metabolic activity and regulate cell function due to alternations in cytoskeleton and structural elements. The objective of this study is to evaluate elastic and viscoelastic properties of hMSCs during long term cultivation in control and transforming growth factor-β1 treatment groups using micropipette aspiration technique. The mean Young's modulus (E) of the control samples remained nearly unchanged during 6 days of cultivation, but that of the test samples showed an initial reduction compared to its relevant control sample after 2 days of treatment by biological growth factor, followed by a significant rise after 4 and 6 days. The viscoelastic creep tests showed that both instantaneous and equilibrium moduli significantly increased with the treatment time and reached to maximum values of 622.9 ± 114.2 and 144.3 ± 11.6 Pa at the sixth day, respectively, while increase in apparent viscosity was not statistically significant. Such change of mechanical properties of hMSCs during specific lineage commitment contributes to regenerative medicine as well as stem-cell-based therapy in which biophysical signals regulate stem cell fate.

  20. Tolerance following organophophate poisoning of tracheal muscle. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, J.M.; Dwyer, T.M.

    1987-07-21

    The effects of subacute exposure to the organophosphate acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (diisoprophylfluorophosphate, soman, sarin, and VX) on the binding properties of muscarinic receptors, the contractile responses, and the electrophysiological properties of swine tracheal smooth muscle were studied. Subacute organophosphate treatment decreased the number of muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle homogenates and in the surface membrane of isolated cells by 50-77%. DFP was the most potent, followed by sarin, VX, and soman. The organophosphates induced a change in the coupling of the receptor to the guanine nucleotide-binding protein, which resulted in a decrease in the number of high-affinity receptors available for agonist-induced actions. The sensitivity of the muscle to acetylcholine and bethanechol was largely unchanged by any of the organophosphates. It is concluded that tolerance development is a complex process and involves: changes in receptor number and coupling of these receptors to intra-cellular processes; changes in the sensitivity of the ganglia to cholinergic agonists; and changes in the membrane processes and channels controlling membrane potential. Surprisingly, the response of the muscle to agonists is not greatly affected even though 70% of the receptors are lost from the cell surface.

  1. Minimization of Retinal Slip Cannot Explain Human Smooth-Pursuit Eye Movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Beutter, Brent R.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Existing models assume that pursuit attempts a direct minimization of retinal image motion or "slip" (e.g. Robinson et al., 1986; Krauzlis & Weisberger, 1989). Using occluded line-figure stimuli, we have previously shown that humans can accurately pursue stimuli for which perfect tracking does not zero retinal slip (Neurologic ARCO). These findings are inconsistent with the standard control strategy of matching eye motion to a target-motion signal reconstructed by adding retinal slip and eye motion, but consistent with a visual front-end which estimates target motion via a global spatio-temporal integration for pursuit and perception. Another possible explanation is that pursuit simply attempts to minimize slip perpendicular to the segments (and neglects parallel "sliding" motion). To resolve this, 4 observers (3 naive) were asked to pursue the center of 2 types of stimuli with identical velocity-space descriptions and matched motion energy. The line-figure "diamond" stimulus was viewed through 2 invisible 3 deg-wide vertical apertures (38 cd/m2 equal to background) such that only the sinusoidal motion of 4 oblique line segments (44 cd/m2 was visible. The "cross" was identical except that the segments exchanged positions. Two trajectories (8's and infinity's) with 4 possible initial directions were randomly interleaved (1.25 cycles, 2.5s period, Ax = Ay = 1.4 deg). In 91% of trials, the diamond appeared rigid. Correspondingly, pursuit was vigorous (mean Again: 0.74) with a V/H aspect ratio approx. 1 (mean: 0.9). Despite a valid rigid solution, the cross however appeared rigid in 8% of trials. Correspondingly, pursuit was weaker (mean Hgain: 0.38) with an incorrect aspect ratio (mean: 1.5). If pursuit were just minimizing perpendicular slip, performance would be the same in both conditions.

  2. Smooth Sailing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Beverley; Pincott, Maxine; Rebman, Ashley; Northcutt, Jen; Barsanti, Amy; Silkunas, Betty; Brighton, Susan K.; Reitz, David; Winkler, Maureen

    1999-01-01

    Presents discipline tips from several teachers to keep classrooms running smoothly all year. Some of the suggestions include the following: a bear-cave warning system, peer mediation, a motivational mystery, problem students acting as the teacher's assistant, a positive-behavior-reward chain, a hallway scavenger hunt (to ensure quiet passage…

  3. Smooth Sailing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Beverley; Pincott, Maxine; Rebman, Ashley; Northcutt, Jen; Barsanti, Amy; Silkunas, Betty; Brighton, Susan K.; Reitz, David; Winkler, Maureen

    1999-01-01

    Presents discipline tips from several teachers to keep classrooms running smoothly all year. Some of the suggestions include the following: a bear-cave warning system, peer mediation, a motivational mystery, problem students acting as the teacher's assistant, a positive-behavior-reward chain, a hallway scavenger hunt (to ensure quiet passage…

  4. Rosiglitazone reverses salbutamol-induced β2-adrenoceptor tolerance in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fogli, Stefano; Pellegrini, Silvia; Adinolfi, Barbara; Mariotti, Veronica; Melissari, Erika; Betti, Laura; Fabbrini, Laura; Giannaccini, Gino; Lucacchini, Antonio; Bardelli, Claudio; Stefanelli, Fabio; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Breschi, Maria Cristina

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE β2-Adrenoceptor agonists are important therapeutic agents in the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The regular use of these drugs has been associated with proasthmatic-like changes that limit their efficacy and increase the risk of severe adverse reactions. We investigated whether the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ agonist rosiglitazone modulated salbutamol-induced β2-adrenoceptor desensitization in vivo and in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH An in vivo model of homologous β2-adrenoceptor desensitization, established in guinea-pigs by administering salbutamol continuously, was used to study the ability of rosiglitazone to prevent β2-adrenoceptor tolerance. In vitro experiments on human bronchial smooth muscle cells were performed to increase the clinical relevance of the study. KEY RESULTS In tracheal smooth muscle tissues from desensitized animals, we observed a decrease in the protective effect of salbutamol on carbachol-induced contraction, a hyperresponsiveness to cholinergic stimuli, a modest underexpression of β2-adrenoceptor gene and a marked decrease in β-adrenoceptor number, relative to control values. Treatment with rosiglitazone preserved salbutamol relaxant activity, mitigated carbachol hyperresponsiveness and partially restored β2-adrenoceptor binding sites in tracheal tissues from homologously desensitized animals. The highly selective PPARγ agonist, GW1929, reproduced the effect of rosiglitazone, in vivo. In vitroβ2-adrenoceptor desensitization decreased salbutamol-mediated cAMP production, without affecting forskolin responses and β2-adrenoceptor expression. Rosiglitazone and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 restored salbutamol sensitivity in homologously desensitized cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These data suggest a potential pharmacodynamic interaction between PPARγ agonists and salbutamol on airway smooth muscle responsiveness, supporting the therapeutic

  5. Standard methods for tracheal mite research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter, for the COLOSS Beebook from the Bee Research Center in Switzerland, summarizes all the current information about the tracheal mite (Acarapis woodi) infesting honey bees (Apis mellifera). The chapter covers the effects on bees, its life history, and its range, as well as the identifica...

  6. Optical Coherence Tomography Evaluation of Tracheal Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    0.50). A dose - response curve shows a weak correlation between the increase in mucosal thickness with dosage of S Pneumoniae inoculated (Figure 5...10000 100000 1000000 Figure 5: Dose response curve for septic tracheal mucosal thickness. DISCUSSION These studies confirm the feasibility of high

  7. Novel identification of the free fatty acid receptor FFAR1 that promotes contraction in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Kentaro; Zhang, Yi; Mizuta, Fumiko; Hoshijima, Hiroshi; Shiga, Toshiya; Masaki, Eiji; Emala, Charles W

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is one of the major risk factors for asthma. Previous studies have demonstrated that free fatty acid levels are elevated in the plasma of obese individuals. Medium- and long-chain free fatty acids act as endogenous ligands for the free fatty acid receptors FFAR1/GPR40 and FFAR4/GPR120, which couple to Gq proteins. We investigated whether FFAR1 and FFAR4 are expressed on airway smooth muscle and whether they activate Gq-coupled signaling and modulate airway smooth muscle tone. We detected the protein expression of FFAR1 and FFAR4 in freshly dissected native human and guinea pig airway smooth muscle and cultured human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The long-chain free fatty acids (oleic acid and linoleic acid) and GW9508 (FFAR1/FFAR4 dual agonist) dose-dependently stimulated transient intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) increases and inositol phosphate synthesis in HASM cells. Downregulation of FFAR1 or FFAR4 in HASM cells by small interfering RNA led to a significant inhibition of the long-chain free fatty acids-induced transient [Ca(2+)]i increases. Oleic acid, linoleic acid, or GW9508 stimulated stress fiber formation in HASM cells, potentiated acetylcholine-contracted guinea pig tracheal rings, and attenuated the relaxant effect of isoproterenol after an acetylcholine-induced contraction. In contrast, TUG-891 (FFAR4 agonist) did not induce the stress fiber formation or potentiate acetylcholine-induced contraction. These results suggest that FFAR1 is the functionally dominant free fatty acid receptor in both human and guinea pig airway smooth muscle. The free fatty acid sensors expressed on airway smooth muscle could be an important modulator of airway smooth muscle tone. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway is involved in lipocalin-2-promoted human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoliang; Ma, Ning; Meng, Liukun; Wei, Yingjie; Gui, Jingang

    2015-12-01

    Over-activated PI3K/Akt signaling, a pathway strongly related to cancer survival and proliferation, has been reported recently to be involved in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell apoptosis and proliferation in pulmonary hypertension (PH). In this study, we observed greatly increased lipocalin-2 (Lcn2) expression accompanied with over-activated PI3K/Akt signaling in a standard rat model of PH induced by monocrotaline. In view of the close relationship between Lcn2 and PI3K/Akt pathway, we hypothesized that the up-regulated Lcn2 might be a trigger of over-activated PI3K/Akt signaling in PH. Our results showed that Lcn2 significantly activated the PI3K/Akt pathway (determined by augmented Akt phosphorylation and up-regulated Mdm2) and significantly promoted proliferation (assessed by Ki67 staining) in cultured human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that inhibition of Akt phosphorylation (LY294002) abrogated the Lcn2-promoted proliferation in cultured human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. In conclusion, Lcn2 significantly promoted human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation by activating PI3K/Akt pathway. Further study on the role and mechanism of Lcn2 will help explore novel therapeutic strategies based on attenuating over-activated PI3K/Akt signaling in PH.

  9. Strategies for diagnosis and treatment of iatrogenic tracheal ruptures.

    PubMed

    Deja, M; Menk, M; Heidenhain, C; Spies, C D; Heymann, A; Weidemann, H; Branscheid, D; Weber-Carstens, S

    2011-12-01

    Management of tracheal ruptures in critically ill patients is challenging. Conservative treatment has been described, but in mechanically ventilated patients with distal tracheal ruptures surgical repair might be inevitable. Strategies for diagnosis and treatment of tracheal ruptures and handling of mechanical ventilation remain to be clarified. Our aim was to comprise a structured diagnostic and treatment protocol for patients suspicious of tracheal injury, including detailed principles of mechanical ventilation and specific indications for conservative or surgical treatment. Patients with tracheal ruptures were compared in accordance to the need of mechanical ventilation and to indication for surgical repair. In patients suffering from tracheal ruptures affecting the whole tracheal wall and with protrusion of mediastinal structures into the lumen surgery was indicated. We compared ventilatory, hemodynamic and clinical parameters between the different patient groups. We report our structured approach in diagnostics and treatment of tracheal ruptures and place special emphasis on respiratory management. Seventeen patients with tracheal rupture were identified. In 8 patients surgical repair was performed 1.8±1.5 days after diagnosis. Previous to surgery, ventilation parameters improved significantly: plateau pressure decreased, percentage of assisted spontaneous breathing increased and compliance improved. Conservative treatment was successful in long-term ventilated patients (13.7±8 days) even when suffering from distal lesions. Invasiveness of mechanical ventilation and obstruction of tracheal lumen might indicate conservative or surgical treatment strategies in long-term ventilated patients suffering from iatrogenic tracheal rupture. Indications for surgical repair remain to be further clarified.

  10. Epstein-Barr virus-associated smooth muscle tumours after transplantation, infection with human immunodeficiency virus and congenital immunodeficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Kais; Maecker-Kolhoff, Britta; Donnerstag, Frank; Laenger, Florian; Kreipe, Hans; Jonigk, Danny

    2013-01-01

    Smooth muscle tumours (SMT) after transplantation (PTSMT) or associated with congenital immunodeficiency syndromes (CI-SMT) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-SMT) are rare. The majority of PTSMT and CI-SMT are associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), while some HIV-SMT can be EBV-negative. SMT in immunodeficient states may present with unspecific symptoms which are mainly related to tumour localisation. In PTSMT, >50% of tumours manifest in the liver/transplant liver, but in general PTSMT, HIV-SMT and CI-SMT can occur at any site as single or multiple tumours. Multiple tumour manifestations do not define metastatic disease as PTSMT can occur synchronously and/or metachronously. PTSMT can originate from the recipient as well as from the donor. Morphologically, most tumours, in particular PTSMT, lack marked histological atypia or tumour necrosis, while some HIV-SMT and CI-SMT can present as sarcoma-like variants, but histomorphology does not predict clinical aggressiveness or tumourbiological behaviour. In PTSMT, surgery and reduced immunosuppression show comparable overall survival rates, while poor prognosis is mainly associated with intracranial manifestation and non-resectable tumours. In HIV-SMT and CI-SMT, surgery should be performed. In all 3 tumour types, adverse prognosis is mainly related to comorbidities associated with immunosuppression but not with the extent of histological atypia or tumour size. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Modulation of alpha smooth muscle actin and desmin expression in perisinusoidal cells of normal and diseased human livers.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Gräff, A.; Krüger, S.; Bochard, F.; Gabbiani, G.; Denk, H.

    1991-01-01

    It has been suggested that perisinusoidal liver cells (PSC) play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of fibrocontractive changes. Using light and electron microscopic immunolocalization techniques, a series of 207 normal and pathologic human liver specimens were evaluated for the expression of alpha smooth muscle (SM) actin and desmin in this and other nonparenchymal cell types. In normal adult liver tissue, PSCs were practically devoid of desmin and exceptionally stained for alpha-SM actin, whereas this actin isoform frequently was encountered in PSCs from the embryonic to the adolescent period. A broad spectrum of pathologic conditions was accompanied by the presence of alpha-SM actin containing PSCs; these were detected preferentially in periportal or perivenular zones according to the predominant location of the underlying hepatocellular damage. The occurrence of this PSC phenotype generally was associated with fibrogenesis and was in some cases detected earlier than overt collagen accumulation. Fibrous bands subdividing liver tissue in cirrhosis and focal nodular hyperplasia, as well as desmoplastic reaction to malignant tumors, contained alpha-SM actin-rich cells admixed with variable proportions of cells coexpressing desmin. In end stages, this population was less numerous than in active fibrotic or cirrhotic processes. Using immunogold electron microscopy, alpha-SM actin was localized in microfilament bundles of typical PSCs. Our results are compatible with the assumption that the appearance of alpha-SM actin and desmin-expressing myofibroblasts results at least in part from a phenotypic modulation of PSCs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2024709

  12. Sensory versus motor loci for integration of multiple motion signals in smooth pursuit eye movements and human motion perception.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yu-Qiong; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2011-08-01

    We have investigated how visual motion signals are integrated for smooth pursuit eye movements by measuring the initiation of pursuit in monkeys for pairs of moving stimuli of the same or differing luminance. The initiation of pursuit for pairs of stimuli of the same luminance could be accounted for as a vector average of the responses to the two stimuli singly. When stimuli comprised two superimposed patches of moving dot textures, the brighter stimulus suppressed the inputs from the dimmer stimulus, so that the initiation of pursuit became winner-take-all when the luminance ratio of the two stimuli was 8 or greater. The dominance of the brighter stimulus could be not attributed to either the latency difference or the ratio of the eye accelerations for the bright and dim stimuli presented singly. When stimuli comprised either spot targets or two patches of dots moving across separate locations in the visual field, the brighter stimulus had a much weaker suppressive influence; the initiation of pursuit could be accounted for by nearly equal vector averaging of the responses to the two stimuli singly. The suppressive effects of the brighter stimulus also appeared in human perceptual judgments, but again only for superimposed stimuli. We conclude that one locus of the interaction of two moving visual stimuli is shared by perception and action and resides in local inhibitory connections in the visual cortex. A second locus resides deeper in sensory-motor processing and may be more closely related to action selection than to stimulus selection.

  13. Regulation of proliferation and gene expression in cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells by resveratrol and standardized grape extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhirong; Chen Yan; Labinskyy, Nazar; Hsieh Tzechen; Ungvari, Zoltan; Wu, Joseph M. . E-mail: Joseph_Wu@nymc.edu

    2006-07-21

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that low to moderate consumption of red wine is inversely associated with the risk of coronary heart disease; the protection is in part attributed to grape-derived polyphenols, notably trans-resveratrol, present in red wine. It is not clear whether the cardioprotective effects of resveratrol can be reproduced by standardized grape extracts (SGE). In the present studies, we determined, using cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC), growth and specific gene responses to resveratrol and SGE provided by the California Table Grape Commission. Suppression of HASMC proliferation by resveratrol was accompanied by a dose-dependent increase in the expression of tumor suppressor gene p53 and heat shock protein HSP27. Using resveratrol affinity chromatography and biochemical fractionation procedures, we showed by immunoblot analysis that treatment of HASMC with resveratrol increased the expression of quinone reductase I and II, and also altered their subcellular distribution. Growth of HASMC was significantly inhibited by 70% ethanolic SGE; however, gene expression patterns in various cellular compartments elicited in response to SGE were substantially different from those observed in resveratrol-treated cells. Further, SGE also differed from resveratrol in not being able to induce relaxation of rat carotid arterial rings. These results indicate that distinct mechanisms are involved in the regulation of HASMC growth and gene expression by SGE and resveratrol.

  14. Carbamylated low-density lipoprotein induces proliferation and increases adhesion molecule expression of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Asci, Gulay; Basci, Ali; Shah, Sudhir V; Basnakian, Alexei; Toz, Huseyin; Ozkahya, Mehmet; Duman, Soner; Ok, Ercan

    2008-12-01

    Presence of accelerated atherosclerosis in dialysis patients cannot be entirely explained by conventional risk factors. Exposure to urea, which is elevated in patients with kidney disease, leads to the carbamylation of proteins. We investigated the effects of carbamylated low-density lipoprotein (cLDL) on human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Native LDL (nLDL) was carbamylated with potassium cyanate. Cells were incubated with different concentrations of cLDL carbamylated at different time points. Cytotoxicity, apoptosis, proliferation (bromodeoxyuridine incorporation), expression of adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix protein synthesis were studied. Carbamylated low-density lipoprotein exposure leads to morphological alterations and presence of cellular debris. Neither nLDL nor cLDL caused apoptosis. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was not different between groups. Carbamylated low-density lipoprotein led to a striking proliferation in VSMC compared to nLDL. Carbamylated low-density lipoprotein significantly increased intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression compared to the control. The effects of cLDL on proliferation and adhesion molecule expression were dose-dependent and correlated with the degree of low-density lipoprotein carbamylation. cLDL had no effect on extracellular matrix protein synthesis. The results support the hypothesis that cLDL may contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in uraemic patients.

  15. 12S-lipoxygenase protein associates with {alpha}-actin fibers in human umbilical artery vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisinger, Gary . E-mail: gary_w@tasmc.health.gov.il; Limor, Rona; Marcus-Perlman, Yonit; Knoll, Esther; Kohen, Fortune; Schinder, Vera; Firer, Michael; Stern, Naftali

    2007-05-11

    The current study sets out to characterize the intracellular localization of the platelet-type 12S-lipoxygenase (12-LO), an enzyme involved in angiotensin-II induced signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Immunohistochemical analysis of VSMC in vitro or human umbilical arteries in vivo showed a clear cytoplasmic localization. On immunogold electron microscopy, 12-LO was found primarily associated with cytoplasmic VSMC muscle fibrils. Upon angiotensin-II treatment of cultured VSMC, immunoprecipitated 12-LO was found bound to {alpha}-actin, a component of the cytoplasmic myofilaments. 12-LO/{alpha}-actin binding was blocked by VSMC pretreatment with the 12-LO inhibitors, baicalien or esculetine and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. Moreover, the binding of 12-LO to {alpha}-actin was not associated with 12-LO serine or tyrosine phosphorylation. These observations suggest a previously unrecognized angiotensin-II dependent protein interaction in VSMC through which 12-LO protein may be trafficked, for yet undiscovered purposes towards the much more abundantly expressed cytoskeletal protein {alpha}-actin.

  16. Sensory versus motor loci for integration of multiple motion signals in smooth pursuit eye movements and human motion perception

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yu-Qiong

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated how visual motion signals are integrated for smooth pursuit eye movements by measuring the initiation of pursuit in monkeys for pairs of moving stimuli of the same or differing luminance. The initiation of pursuit for pairs of stimuli of the same luminance could be accounted for as a vector average of the responses to the two stimuli singly. When stimuli comprised two superimposed patches of moving dot textures, the brighter stimulus suppressed the inputs from the dimmer stimulus, so that the initiation of pursuit became winner-take-all when the luminance ratio of the two stimuli was 8 or greater. The dominance of the brighter stimulus could be not attributed to either the latency difference or the ratio of the eye accelerations for the bright and dim stimuli presented singly. When stimuli comprised either spot targets or two patches of dots moving across separate locations in the visual field, the brighter stimulus had a much weaker suppressive influence; the initiation of pursuit could be accounted for by nearly equal vector averaging of the responses to the two stimuli singly. The suppressive effects of the brighter stimulus also appeared in human perceptual judgments, but again only for superimposed stimuli. We conclude that one locus of the interaction of two moving visual stimuli is shared by perception and action and resides in local inhibitory connections in the visual cortex. A second locus resides deeper in sensory-motor processing and may be more closely related to action selection than to stimulus selection. PMID:21593392

  17. A quantitative proteomic analysis of growth factor-induced compositional changes in lipid rafts of human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    MacLellan, Dawn L; Steen, Hanno; Adam, Rosalyn M; Garlick, Monica; Zurakowski, David; Gygi, Steven P; Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2005-12-01

    Signals that promote proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells (SMC) have been implicated in pathologic growth of hollow organs. Members of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) family, potent mitogens and motility factors for SMC, have been shown to signal through cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts. We recently demonstrated that PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis in urinary tract SMC was dependent on the integrity of lipid rafts. Despite its known ability to rapidly alter discrete proteins within rafts, the effect of PDGF on overall raft protein composition is unknown. In this study, we employed isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT) analysis to evaluate PDGF-induced protein changes in lipid rafts of primary culture human SMC. Following acute (i.e., 15 min) exposure of SMC to PDGF, 23 proteins increased in rafts >20%. In contrast, raft localization of only three proteins increased after 12 h of PDGF treatment. Among the proteins that increased at 15 min were the glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins Thy-1, 5'-nucleotidase, and CD55, the cytoskeletal proteins actin, actinin, tropomyosin-3 and -4, and the endocytosis-related proteins clathrin and beta-adaptin. In addition, eight Rho family members were localized to rafts by ICAT analysis. Collectively, these observations suggest a role for lipid rafts in regulation of PDGF-stimulated changes in the cytoskeleton.

  18. Effective combination of hydrostatic pressure and aligned nanofibrous scaffolds on human bladder smooth muscle cells: implication for bladder tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ahvaz, Hana Hanaee; Soleimani, Masoud; Mobasheri, Hamid; Bakhshandeh, Behnaz; Shakhssalim, Naser; Soudi, Sara; Hafizi, Maryam; Vasei, Mohammad; Dodel, Masumeh

    2012-09-01

    Bladder tissue engineering has been the focus of many studies due to its highly therapeutic potential. In this regard many aspects such as biochemical and biomechanical factors need to be studied extensively. Mechanical stimulations such as hydrostatic pressure and topology of the matrices are critical features which affect the normal functions of cells involved in bladder regeneration. In this study, hydrostatic pressure (10 cm H(2)O) and stretch forces were exerted on human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMCs) seeded on aligned nanofibrous polycaprolactone/PLLA scaffolds, and the alterations in gene and protein expressions were studied. The gene transcription patterns for collagen type I, III, IV, elastin, α-SMA, calponin and caldesmon were monitored on days 3 and 5 quantitatively. Changes in the expressions of α-SMA, desmin, collagen type I and III were quantified by Enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay. The scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscope, contact angle measurement and tensile testing. The positive effect of mechanical forces on the functional improvement of the engineered tissue was supported by translational down-regulation of α-SMA and VWF, up-regulation of desmin and improvement of collagen type III:I ratio. Altogether, our study reveals that proper hydrostatic pressure in combination with appropriate surface stimulation on hBSMCs causes a tissue-specific phenotype that needs to be considered in bladder tissue engineering.

  19. TLR4-NOX4-AP-1 signaling mediates lipopolysaccharide-induced CXCR6 expression in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Devang N.; Bailey, Steven R.; Gresham, John K.; Schuchman, David B.; Shelhamer, James H.; Goldstein, Barry J.; Foxwell, Brian M.; Stemerman, Michael B.; Maranchie, Jodi K.; Valente, Anthony J.; Mummidi, Srinivas; Chandrasekar, Bysani . E-mail: chandraseka@uthscsa.edu

    2006-09-08

    CXCL16 is a transmembrane non-ELR CXC chemokine that signals via CXCR6 to induce aortic smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. While bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been shown to stimulate CXCL16 expression in SMC, its effects on CXCR6 are not known. Here, we demonstrate that LPS upregulates CXCR6 mRNA, protein, and surface expression in human ASMC. Inhibition of TLR4 with neutralizing antibodies or specific siRNA interference blocked LPS-mediated CXCR6 expression. LPS stimulated both AP-1 (c-Fos, c-Jun) and NF-{kappa}B (p50 and p65) activation, but only inhibition of AP-1 attenuated LPS-induced CXCR6 expression. Using dominant negative expression vectors and siRNA interference, we demonstrate that LPS induces AP-1 activation via MyD88, TRAF6, ERK1/2, and JNK signaling pathways. Furthermore, the flavoprotein inhibitor diphenyleniodonium chloride significantly attenuated LPS-mediated AP-1-dependent CXCR6 expression, as did inhibition of NOX4 NADPH oxidase by siRNA. Finally, CXCR6 knockdown inhibited CXCL16-induced ASMC proliferation. These results demonstrate that LPS-TLR4-NOX4-AP-1 signaling can induce CXCR6 expression in ASMC, and suggest that the CXCL16-CXCR6 axis may be an important proinflammatory pathway in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  20. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived TSC2-haploinsufficient smooth muscle cells recapitulate features of Lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    PubMed

    Julian, Lisa M; Delaney, Sean P; Wang, Ying; Goldberg, Alexander A; Doré, Carole; Yockell-Lelièvre, Julien; Tam, Roger Y; Giannikou, Krinio; McMurray, Fiona; Shoichet, Molly S; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Henske, Elizabeth P; Kwiatkowski, David J; Darling, Thomas N; Moss, Joel; Kristof, Arnold S; Stanford, William L

    2017-08-22

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a progressive destructive neoplasm of the lung associated with inactivating mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 tumor suppressor genes. Cell or animal models that accurately reflect the pathology of LAM have been challenging to develop. Here we generated a robust human cell model of LAM by reprogramming TSC2 mutation-bearing fibroblasts from a patient with both Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) and LAM (TSC-LAM) into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), followed by selection of cells that resemble those found in LAM tumors by unbiased in vivo differentiation. We established expandable cell lines under smooth muscle cell (SMC) growth conditions that retained a patient-specific genomic TSC2+/- mutation and recapitulated the molecular and functional characteristics of pulmonary LAM cells. These include multiple indicators of hyperactive mTORC1 signaling, presence of specific neural crest and SMC markers, expression of VEGF-D and female sex hormone receptors, reduced autophagy, and metabolic reprogramming. Intriguingly, the LAM-like features of these cells suggest that haploinsufficiency at the TSC2 locus contributed to LAM pathology, and demonstrated that iPSC reprogramming and SMC lineage differentiation of somatic patient cells with germline mutations was a viable approach to generate LAM-like cells. The patient-derived SMC lines we have developed thus represent a novel cellular model of LAM which can advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and develop therapeutic strategies against LAM. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Meclofenamic Acid for Inhibition of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration: An In Vitro Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schober, Wolfgang; Kehlbach, Rainer; Gebert, Regina; Wiskirchen, Jakub; Rodegerdts, Enno; Claussen, Claus D.; Duda, Stephan H.

    2002-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to examine the effects of meclofenamic acid on proliferation, clonogenic activity,migratory ability, cell cycle distribution and p44/42 MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinase) expression in serum-stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells (haSMCs). Methods: haSMCs were treated with meclofenamic acid in three different concentrations (10mM, 100 mM, 200 mM) for 4 days. Then meclofenamic acid-free culture medium was supplemented until day 20. Growth kinetics were assessed. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry.Clonogenic activity was evaluated with colony formation assays.Migratory ability was investigated by stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) in 24-well plates with 8 mm pores membrane inserts. p44/42 MAPK was detected by Western blot technique. Results: Meclofenamic acid inhibited the proliferation,clonogenic activity and migratory ability of haSMCs in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis revealed a G2/M-phase block. The p44/42MAPK was significantly reduced. Conclusion: Meclofenamic acid inhibits the proliferation and migration of haSMCs. If a sufficient dose of meclofenamic acid can be applied systemically or by local drug delivery it could be a valuable substance to prevent restenosis after angioplasty.

  2. Interferon-induced, antiviral human MxA protein localizes to a distinct subcompartment of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Stertz, Silke; Reichelt, Mike; Krijnse-Locker, Jacomine; Mackenzie, Jason; Simpson, Jeremy C; Haller, Otto; Kochs, Georg

    2006-09-01

    Human MxA protein belongs to the superfamily of dynamin-like large GTPases that are involved in intracellular membrane trafficking. MxA is induced by interferons-alpha/beta (IFN-alpha/beta) and is a key component of the antiviral response against RNA viruses. Here, we show that MxA localizes to membranes that are positive for specific markers of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum, such as Syntaxin17, but is excluded from other membrane compartments. Overexpression of MxA leads to a characteristic reorganization of the associated membranes. Interestingly, Hook3, mannose-6-phosphate receptor, and Lamp-1, which normally accumulate in cis- Golgi, endosomes, and lysosomes, respectively, also colocalized with MxA, indicating that these markers were redistributed to the MxA-positive compartment. Functional assays, however, did not show any effect of MxA on endocytosis or the secretory pathway. The present results demonstrate that MxA is an IFN-induced antiviral effector protein that resembles the constitutively expressed large GTPase family members in its capacity to localize to and reorganize intracellular membranes.

  3. Comparison of different culture conditions for smooth muscle cell differentiation of human umbilical cord vein CD146+ perivascular cells.

    PubMed

    Gökçinar-Yagci, Beyza; Çelebi-Saltik, Betül

    2017-08-16

    Pericytes are CD146+ perivascular cells (PCs) that have multipotential differentiation capacity as mesenchymal stem cells. Beside their crucial roles in vascular development and blood flow regulation, they have ability to differentiate into vascular cell types in vivo. These properties make pericytes preferred cells in the field of vascular tissue engineering. Culture medium for in vitro differentiation of pericytes to vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) has not been defined yet. The aim of this study is to try different culture media for SMC differentiation of CD146+ PCs. For this purpose, CD146+ PCs were isolated from human umbilical cord vein. Then they were characterized by immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometric analysis. Three different culture media including; (1) Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1)+ bone morphogenic protein 4, (2) TGF-β1+ L-ascorbic acid (L-AA) and (3) Horse serum, were compared for differentiation of CD146+ PCs to SMCs by IFS and real time polymerase chain reaction. As a result, in the case of SMC differentiation of CD146+ PCs, second culture medium including TGF-β1 and L-AA was found to be more effective than other two media. These results are important for establishing proper culture conditions for in vitro SMC differentiation of CD146+ PCs.

  4. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases.

  5. Cyclic mechanical strain-induced proliferation and migration of human airway smooth muscle cells: role of EMMPRIN and MMPs.

    PubMed

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Zucker, Stanley; Cao, Jian; Chiarelli, Christian; Panettieri, Reynold A; Foda, Hussein D

    2005-09-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation and migration are major components of airway remodeling in asthma. Asthmatic airways are exposed to mechanical strain, which contributes to their remodeling. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) plays an important role in remodeling. In the present study, we examined if the mechanical strain of human ASM (HASM) cells contributes to their proliferation and migration and the role of MMPs in this process. HASM were exposed to mechanical strain using the FlexCell system. HASM cell proliferation, migration and MMP release, activation, and expression were assessed. Our results show that cyclic strain increased the proliferation and migration of HASM; cyclic strain increased release and activation of MMP-1, -2, and -3 and membrane type 1-MMP; MMP release was preceded by an increase in extracellular MMP inducer; Prinomastat [a MMP inhibitor (MMPI)] significantly decreased cyclic strain-induced proliferation and migration of HASM; and the strain-induced increase in the release of MMPs was accompanied by an increase in tenascin-C release. In conclusion, cyclic mechanical strain plays an important role in HASM cell proliferation and migration. This increase in proliferation and migration is through an increase in MMP release and activation. Pharmacological MMPIs should be considered in the pursuit of therapeutic options for airway remodeling in asthma.

  6. microRNA expression profile in human coronary smooth muscle cell-derived microparticles is a source of biomarkers.

    PubMed

    de Gonzalo-Calvo, David; Cenarro, Ana; Civeira, Fernando; Llorente-Cortes, Vicenta

    2016-01-01

    microRNA (miRNA) expression profile of extracellular vesicles is a potential tool for clinical practice. Despite the key role of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in cardiovascular pathology, there is limited information about the presence of miRNAs in microparticles secreted by this cell type, including human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). Here, we tested whether HCASMC-derived microparticles contain miRNAs and the value of these miRNAs as biomarkers. HCASMC and explants from atherosclerotic or non-atherosclerotic areas were obtained from coronary arteries of patients undergoing heart transplant. Plasma samples were collected from: normocholesterolemic controls (N=12) and familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients (N=12). Both groups were strictly matched for age, sex and cardiovascular risk factors. Microparticle (0.1-1μm) isolation and characterization was performed using standard techniques. VSMC-enriched miRNAs expression (miR-21-5p, -143-3p, -145-5p, -221-3p and -222-3p) was analyzed using RT-qPCR. Total RNA isolated from HCASMC-derived microparticles contained small RNAs, including VSMC-enriched miRNAs. Exposition of HCASMC to pathophysiological conditions, such as hypercholesterolemia, induced a decrease in the expression level of miR-143-3p and miR-222-3p in microparticles, not in cells. Expression levels of miR-222-3p were lower in circulating microparticles from FH patients compared to normocholesterolemic controls. Microparticles derived from atherosclerotic plaque areas showed a decreased level of miR-143-3p and miR-222-3p compared to non-atherosclerotic areas. We demonstrated for the first time that microparticles secreted by HCASMC contain microRNAs. Hypercholesterolemia alters the microRNA profile of HCASMC-derived microparticles. The miRNA signature of HCASMC-derived microparticles is a source of cardiovascular biomarkers. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights

  7. Air-Q laryngeal airway for rescue and tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Ads, Ayman; Auerbach, Frederic; Ryan, Kelly; El-Ganzouri, Abdel R

    2016-08-01

    We report the successful use of the Air-Q laryngeal airway (Air-Q LA) as a ventilatory device and a conduit for tracheal intubation to rescue the airway in a patient with difficult airway and tracheal stenosis. This is the first case report of the device to secure the airway after two episodes of hypoxemia in the operating room and intensive care unit. Consent for submission of this case report was obtained from our institution's human studies institutional review board given that the patient died a few months after his discharge from the hospital before his personal consent could be obtained and before preparation of this report. All personal identifiers that could lead to his identification have been removed from this report. A 59-year-old man was scheduled for a flexible and rigid bronchoscopy with possible laser excision of tracheal stenosis. He had a history of hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and diabetes. Assessment of airway revealed a thyromental distance of 6.5 cm, Mallampati class II, and body weight of 110 kg. He had hoarseness and audible inspiratory/expiratory stridor with Spo2 90% breathing room air. After induction and muscle relaxation, tracheal intubation and flexible bronchoscopy were achieved without incident. The patient was then extubated and a rigid bronchoscopy was attempted but failed with Spo2 dropping to 92%; rocuronium 60 mg was given, and reintubation was accomplished with a 7.5-mm endotracheal tube. A second rigid bronchoscopy attempt failed, with Spo2 dropping to 63%. Subsequent direct laryngoscopy revealed a bloody hypopharynx. A size 4.5 Air-Q LA was placed successfully and confirmed with capnography, and Spo2 returned to 100%. The airway was suctioned through the Air-Q LA device, and the airway was secured using a fiberoptic bronchoscope to place an endotracheal tube of 7.5-mm internal diameter. The case was canceled because of edema of the upper airway from multiple attempts with rigid bronchoscopy. The patient was transported

  8. Kalman smoothing improves the estimation of joint kinematics and kinetics in marker-based human gait analysis.

    PubMed

    De Groote, F; De Laet, T; Jonkers, I; De Schutter, J

    2008-12-05

    We developed a Kalman smoothing algorithm to improve estimates of joint kinematics from measured marker trajectories during motion analysis. Kalman smoothing estimates are based on complete marker trajectories. This is an improvement over other techniques, such as the global optimisation method (GOM), Kalman filtering, and local marker estimation (LME), where the estimate at each time instant is only based on part of the marker trajectories. We applied GOM, Kalman filtering, LME, and Kalman smoothing to marker trajectories from both simulated and experimental gait motion, to estimate the joint kinematics of a ten segment biomechanical model, with 21 degrees of freedom. Three simulated marker trajectories were studied: without errors, with instrumental errors, and with soft tissue artefacts (STA). Two modelling errors were studied: increased thigh length and hip centre dislocation. We calculated estimation errors from the known joint kinematics in the simulation study. Compared with other techniques, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint positions, by more than 50% for the simulated marker trajectories without errors and with instrumental errors. Compared with GOM, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint moments by more than 35%. Compared with Kalman filtering and LME, Kalman smoothing reduced the estimation errors for the joint accelerations by at least 50%. Our simulation results show that the use of Kalman smoothing substantially improves the estimates of joint kinematics and kinetics compared with previously proposed techniques (GOM, Kalman filtering, and LME) for both simulated, with and without modelling errors, and experimentally measured gait motion.

  9. Effect of natriuretic peptide family on the oxidized LDL-induced migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Ueda, M; Yoshikawa, J

    1997-10-01

    The migration of medial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) into the intima is proposed to be an important process of intimal thickening in atherosclerotic lesions. The present study examined the possible effect of a novel endothelium-derived relaxing peptide, C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-induced migration of cultured human coronary artery SMCs by the Boyden's chamber method. The effect of CNP was compared with that of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP, respectively). Oxidized LDL stimulates SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 20 and 200 micrograms/mL. This stimulation was chemotactic in nature but was not chemokinetic. By contrast, native LDL was without significant activity. CNP-22 clearly inhibited SMC migration stimulated with 200 micrograms/mL oxidized LDL in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-9) and 10(-6) mol/L. ANP-(1-28) and BNP-32 also inhibited oxidized LDL-induced SMC migration at concentrations of 10(-7) and 10(-6) mol/L, but these effects were weaker than the effect of CNP-22. Such inhibition by these natriuretic peptides was paralleled by an increase in the cellular level of cGMP. Oxidized LDL-induced migration was significantly inhibited by a stable analogue of cGMP, 8-bromo-cGMP, or an activator of the cytosolic guanylate cyclase, sodium nitroprusside. These natriuretic peptides did not suppress the cell adhesion either in the absence or presence of oxidized LDL. These data indicate that oxidized LDL stimulates migration of human coronary artery SMCs and that natriuretic peptides, especially CNP, inhibit this stimulated SMC migration, at least in part, through a cGMP-dependent process. Taken together with the finding that oxidized LDL is present in the intima, CNP may play a role as a local antimigration factor during the process of intimal thickening in hypercholesterolemia-induced coronary atherosclerosis.

  10. Human embryonic stem cell-derived vascular progenitor cells capable of endothelial and smooth muscle cell function.

    PubMed

    Hill, Katherine L; Obrtlikova, Petra; Alvarez, Diego F; King, Judy A; Keirstead, Susan A; Allred, Jeremy R; Kaufman, Dan S

    2010-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated development of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as separate cell lineages derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We demonstrate CD34(+) cells isolated from differentiated hESCs function as vascular progenitor cells capable of producing both ECs and SMCs. These studies better define the developmental origin and reveal the relationship between these two cell types, as well as provide a more complete biological characterization. hESCs are cocultured on M2-10B4 stromal cells or Wnt1-expressing M2-10B4 for 13 to 15 days to generate a CD34(+) cell population. These cells are isolated using a magnetic antibody separation kit and cultured on fibronectin-coated dishes in EC medium. To induce SMC differentiation, culture medium is changed and a morphological and phenotypic change occurs within 24 to 48 hours. CD34(+) vascular progenitor cells give rise to ECs and SMCs. The two populations express respective cell-specific transcripts and proteins, exhibit intracellular calcium in response to various agonists, and form robust tube-like structures when cocultured in Matrigel. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured under SMC conditions do not exhibit a change in phenotype or genotype. Wnt1-overexpressing stromal cells produced an increased number of progenitor cells. The ability to generate large numbers of ECs and SMCs from a single vascular progenitor cell population is promising for therapeutic use to treat a variety of diseased and ischemic conditions. The stepwise differentiation outlined here is an efficient, reproducible method with potential for large-scale cultures suitable for clinical applications. Copyright 2010 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative proteome analysis of Tumor necrosis factor α-stimulated human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in response to melittin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bee venom has been used to relieve pain and to treat inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, in humans. To better understand the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerosis effect of bee venom, gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify proteins whose expression was altered in human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (hVSMCs) stimulated by tumor necrosis factor alpha after 12 h in the presence of melittin. Results To obtain valuable insights into the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerosis mechanisms of melittin, two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF were used. The proteome study, we showed 33 significant proteins that were differentially expressed in the cells treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha and melittin. Thirteen proteins were significantly increased in the cells treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha, and those proteins were reduced in the cells treated with melittin. Five of the proteins that showed increased expression in the cells treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha are involved in cell migration, including calreticulin, an essential factor of development that plays a role in transcription regulation. The proteins involved in cell migration were reduced in the melittin treated cells. The observed changes in the expression of GRP75, prohibitin, and a select group of other proteins were validated with reverse transcribed-PCR. It was confirmed that the observed change in the protein levels reflected a change in the genes level. In addition, the phosphorylation of EGFR and ERK was validated by analyzing the protein pathway. Conclusion Taken together, these data established that the expression of some proteins was significantly changed by melittin treatment in tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulated the cells and provided insights into the mechanism of the melittin function for its potential use as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:23651618

  12. Hypoxia induces arginase II expression and increases viable human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell numbers via AMPKα1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianjing; Nelin, Leif D; Chen, Bernadette

    2017-04-01

    Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation is one of the hallmark features of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. With only supportive treatment options available for this life-threatening disease, treating and preventing the proliferation of PASMCs is a viable therapeutic option. A key promoter of hypoxia-induced increases in the number of viable human PASMCs is arginase II, with attenuation of viable cell numbers following pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA knockdown of the enzyme. Additionally, increased levels of arginase have been demonstrated in the pulmonary vasculature of patients with pulmonary hypertension. The signaling pathways responsible for the hypoxic induction of arginase II in PASMCs, however, remain unknown. Hypoxia is a recognized activator of AMPK, which is known to be expressed in human PASMCs (hPASMCs). Activation of AMPK by hypoxia has been shown to promote cell survival in PASMCs. In addition, pharmacologic agents targeting AMPK have been shown to attenuate chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in animal models. The present studies tested the hypothesis that hypoxia-induced arginase II expression in hPASMCs is mediated through AMPK signaling. We found that pharmacologic inhibitors of AMPK, as well as siRNA knockdown of AMPKα1, prevented hypoxia-induced arginase II. The hypoxia-induced increase in viable hPASMC numbers was also prevented following both pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA knockdown of AMPK. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of AMPK induced arginase II protein expression and viable cells numbers in hPASMCs. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Sodium leak channel, non-selective contributes to the leak current in human myometrial smooth muscle cells from pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Reinl, Erin L.; Cabeza, Rafael; Gregory, Ismail A.; Cahill, Alison G.; England, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Uterine contractions are tightly regulated by the electrical activity of myometrial smooth muscle cells (MSMCs). These cells require a depolarizing current to initiate Ca2+ influx and induce contraction. Cationic leak channels, which permit a steady flow of cations into a cell, are known to cause membrane depolarization in many tissue types. Previously, a Gd3+-sensitive, Na+-dependent leak current was identified in the rat myometrium, but the presence of such a current in human MSMCs and the specific ion channel conducting this current was unknown. Here, we report the presence of a Na+-dependent leak current in human myometrium and demonstrate that the Na+-leak channel, NALCN, contributes to this current. We performed whole-cell voltage-clamp on fresh and cultured MSMCs from uterine biopsies of term, non-laboring women and isolated the leak currents by using Ca2+ and K+ channel blockers in the bath solution. Ohmic leak currents were identified in freshly isolated and cultured MSMCs with normalized conductances of 14.6 pS/pF and 10.0 pS/pF, respectively. The myometrial leak current was significantly reduced (P < 0.01) by treating cells with 10 μM Gd3+ or by superfusing the cells with a Na+-free extracellular solution. Reverse transcriptase PCR and immunoblot analysis of uterine biopsies from term, non-laboring women revealed NALCN messenger RNA and protein expression in the myometrium. Notably, ∼90% knockdown of NALCN protein expression with lentivirus-delivered shRNA reduced the Gd3+-sensitive leak current density by 42% (P < 0.05). Our results reveal that NALCN, in part, generates the leak current in MSMCs and provide the basis for future research assessing NALCN as a potential molecular target for modulating uterine excitability. PMID:26134120

  14. Effect of irreversibly glycated LDL in human vascular smooth muscle cells: lipid loading, oxidative and inflammatory stress

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Anca V; Botez, Gabriela M; Stancu, Camelia S; Manea, Adrian; Raicu, Monica; Simionescu, Maya

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The major complication of diabetes is accelerated atherosclerosis, the progression of which entails complex interactions between the modified low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and the cells of the arterial wall. Advanced glycation end product-modified-LDL (AGE-LDL) that occurs at high rate in diabetes contributes to diabetic atherosclerosis, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to assess the direct effect of AGE-LDL on human vascular smooth muscle cells (hSMC) dysfunction. Cultured hSMC incubated (24 hrs) with human AGE-LDL, native LDL (nLDL) or oxidized LDL (oxLDL) were subjected to: (i) quantification of the expression of the receptors for modified LDL and AGE proteins (LRP1, CD36, RAGE) and estimation of lipid loading, (ii) determination of NADPH oxidase activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and (iii) evaluation of the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). The results show that exposure of hSMC to AGE-LDL (compared to nLDL) induced: (a) increased NADPH oxidase activity (30%) and ROS production (28%) by up-regulation of NOX1, NOX4, p22phox and p67phox expression, (b) accumulation of intracellular cholesteryl esters, (c) enhanced gene expression of LRP1 (160%) and CD36 (35%), and protein expression of LRP1, CD36 and RAGE, (d) increased MCP-1 gene expression (160%) and protein secretion (300%) and (e) augmented cell proliferation (30%). In conclusion, AGE-LDL activates hSMC (increasing CD36, LRP1, RAGE), inducing a pro-oxidant state (activation of NADPHox), lipid accumulation and a pro-inflammatory state (expression of MCP-1). These results may partly explain the contribution of AGE-LDL and hSMC to the accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes. PMID:19818091

  15. Differential regulation of hyaluronic acid synthase isoforms in human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells: possible implications for vein graft stenosis.

    PubMed

    van den Boom, M; Sarbia, M; von Wnuck Lipinski, K; Mann, P; Meyer-Kirchrath, J; Rauch, B H; Grabitz, K; Levkau, B; Schrör, K; Fischer, J W

    2006-01-06

    Autologous saphenous vein bypass grafts (SVG) are frequently compromised by neointimal thickening and subsequent atherosclerosis eventually leading to graft failure. Hyaluronic acid (HA) generated by smooth muscle cells (SMC) is thought to augment the progression of atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was (1) to investigate HA accumulation in native and explanted arterialized SVG, (2) to identify factors that regulate HA synthase (HAS) expression and HA synthesis, and (3) to study the function of the HAS2 isoform. In native SVG, expression of all 3 HAS isoforms was detected by RT-PCR. Histochemistry revealed that native and arterialized human saphenous vein segments were characterized by marked deposition of HA in association with SMC. Interestingly, in contrast to native SVG, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression by SMC and macrophages was detected only in arterialized SVG. In vitro in human venous SMC HAS isoforms were found to be differentially regulated. HAS2, HAS1, and HA synthesis were strongly induced by vasodilatory prostaglandins via Gs-coupled prostaglandin receptors. In addition, thrombin induced HAS2 via activation of PAR1 and interleukin 1beta was the only factor that induced HAS3. By small interfering RNA against HAS2, it was shown that HAS2 mediated HA synthesis is critically involved in cell cycle progression through G1/S phase and SMC proliferation. In conclusion, the present study shows that HA-rich extracellular matrix is maintained after arterialization of vein grafts and might contribute to graft failure because of its proproliferative function in venous SMC. Furthermore, COX-2-dependent prostaglandins may play a key role in the regulation of HA synthesis in arterialized vein grafts.

  16. Association between tracheal pepsin, a reliable marker of gastric aspiration, and head of bed elevation among ventilated neonates.

    PubMed

    Garland, J S; Alex, C P; Johnston, N; Yan, J C; Werlin, S L

    2014-01-01

    To determine the frequency of tracheal pepsin in ventilated neonates and whether the angle of head elevation was associated with tracheal pepsin. Serial trachael samples (at 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of ventilation) were obtained from intubated, ventilated very low birth weight infants. Presence of tracheal pepsin was determined by Western blot analysis using a specific anti-human pepsin antibody. Tracheal pepsin was detected in 35/66 (53%) of the ventilated neonates (birthweight: 798 ± 268 grams [mean ± standard deviation]). Neonates whose head elevation was in the upper quartile (≥14 degrees) during the first sampling time (day 3) were less likely (4/16 vs 9/10, P = 0.0013) to have tracheal pepsin when compared to neonates whose head elevation was in the lowest quartile (≤8 degrees). Pepsin, a marker for gastric secretion aspiration, was detected in 53% of ventilated low birth weight neonates; early elevation of the head of the bed was associated with a lower rate of tracheal pepsin.

  17. Surgical intervention strategies for congenital tracheal stenosis associated with a tracheal bronchus based on the location of stenosis.

    PubMed

    Morita, Keiichi; Yokoi, Akiko; Fukuzawa, Hiroaki; Hisamatsu, Chieko; Endo, Kosuke; Okata, Yuichi; Tamaki, Akihiko; Mishima, Yasuhiko; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Kosaku

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the appropriate surgical intervention strategies for congenital tracheal stenosis (CTS) associated with a tracheal bronchus based on the location of stenosis. The medical records of 13 pediatric patients with CTS associated with a tracheal bronchus at a single institution between January 2006 and December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Type 1: tracheal stenosis above the right upper lobe bronchus (RULB) (n = 1). One patient underwent slide tracheoplasty and was successfully extubated. Type 2: tracheal stenosis below the RULB (n = 7). Tracheal end-to-end anastomosis was performed before 2014, and one patient failed to extubate. Posterior-anterior slide tracheoplasty was performed since 2014, and all three patients were successfully extubated. Type 3: tracheal stenosis above the RULB to the carina (n = 5). One patient underwent posterior-anterior slide tracheoplasty and was successfully extubated. Two patients with left-right slide tracheoplasty and another two patients with tracheal end-to-end anastomosis for the stenosis below the RULB could not be extubated. Tracheal end-to-end anastomosis or slide tracheoplasty can be selected for tracheal stenosis above the RULB according to the length of stenosis. Posterior-anterior slide tracheoplasty appears feasible for tracheal stenosis below the RULB or above the RULB to the carina.

  18. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  19. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells derived from human cardiac explants demonstrate angiogenic potential and suitable for design of cell-containing vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, I S; Zhiven', M K; Saaya, Sh B; Shevchenko, A I; Smirnova, A M; Strunov, A; Karpenko, A A; Pokushalov, E A; Ivanova, L N; Makarevich, P I; Parfyonova, Y V; Aboian, E; Zakian, S M

    2017-03-03

    Endothelial and smooth muscle cells are considered promising resources for regenerative medicine and cell replacement therapy. It has been shown that both types of cells are heterogeneous depending on the type of vessels and organs in which they are located. Therefore, isolation of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from tissues relevant to the area of research is necessary for the adequate study of specific pathologies. However, sources of specialized human endothelial and smooth muscle cells are limited, and the search for new sources is still relevant. The main goal of our study is to demonstrate that functional endothelial and smooth muscle cells can be obtained from an available source-post-surgically discarded cardiac tissue from the right atrial appendage and right ventricular myocardium. Heterogeneous primary cell cultures were enzymatically isolated from cardiac explants and then grown in specific endothelial and smooth muscle growth media on collagen IV-coated surfaces. The population of endothelial cells was further enriched by immunomagnetic sorting for CD31, and the culture thus obtained was characterized by immunocytochemistry, ultrastructural analysis and in vitro functional tests. The angiogenic potency of the cells was examined by injecting them, along with Matrigel, into immunodeficient mice. Cells were also seeded on characterized polycaprolactone/chitosan membranes with subsequent analysis of cell proliferation and function. Endothelial cells isolated from cardiac explants expressed CD31, VE-cadherin and VEGFR2 and showed typical properties, namely, cytoplasmic Weibel-Palade bodies, metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoproteins, formation of capillary-like structures in Matrigel, and production of extracellular matrix and angiogenic cytokines. Isolated smooth muscle cells expressed extracellular matrix components as well as α-actin and myosin heavy chain. Vascular cells derived from cardiac explants demonstrated the ability to stimulate

  20. Massive aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff caused by closed tracheal suction system.

    PubMed

    Dave, Mital H; Frotzler, Angela; Madjdpour, Caveh; Koepfer, Nelly; Weiss, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff has been recognized to be a risk factor for the development of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This study investigated the effect of closed tracheal suctioning on aspiration of fluid past the tracheal tube cuff in an in vitro benchtop model. High-volume low pressure tube cuffs of 7.5 mm internal diameter (ID) were placed in a 22 mm ID artificial trachea connected to a test lung. Positive pressure ventilation (PPV) with 15 cm H₂O peak inspiratory pressure and 5 cm H₂O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was used. A closed tracheal suction system (CTSS) catheter (size 14Fr) was attached to the tracheal tube and suction was performed for 5, 10, 15, or 20 seconds under 200 or 300 cm H₂O suction pressures. Amount of fluid (mL) aspirated along the tube cuff and the airway pressure changes were recorded for each suction procedure. Fluid aspiration during different suction conditions was compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney test (Bonferroni correction [α = .01]). During 10, 15, and 20 seconds suction, airway pressure consistently dropped down to -8 to -13 cm H₂O (P < .001) from the preset level. Fluid aspiration was never observed under PPV + PEEP but occurred always during suctioning. Aspiration along the tube cuff was higher with -300 cm H₂O than with -200 cm H₂O suction pressure (P < .001) and was much more during 15 and 20 seconds suction time as compared to 5 seconds (P < .001). Massive aspiration of fluid occurs along the tracheal tube cuff during suction with the closed tracheal suction system. © SAGE Publications 2011.

  1. Sodium leak channel, non-selective contributes to the leak current in human myometrial smooth muscle cells from pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Reinl, Erin L; Cabeza, Rafael; Gregory, Ismail A; Cahill, Alison G; England, Sarah K

    2015-10-01

    Uterine contractions are tightly regulated by the electrical activity of myometrial smooth muscle cells (MSMCs). These cells require a depolarizing current to initiate Ca(2+) influx and induce contraction. Cationic leak channels, which permit a steady flow of cations into a cell, are known to cause membrane depolarization in many tissue types. Previously, a Gd(3+)-sensitive, Na(+)-dependent leak current was identified in the rat myometrium, but the presence of such a current in human MSMCs and the specific ion channel conducting this current was unknown. Here, we report the presence of a Na(+)-dependent leak current in human myometrium and demonstrate that the Na(+)-leak channel, NALCN, contributes to this current. We performed whole-cell voltage-clamp on fresh and cultured MSMCs from uterine biopsies of term, non-laboring women and isolated the leak currents by using Ca(2+) and K(+) channel blockers in the bath solution. Ohmic leak currents were identified in freshly isolated and cultured MSMCs with normalized conductances of 14.6 pS/pF and 10.0 pS/pF, respectively. The myometrial leak current was significantly reduced (P < 0.01) by treating cells with 10 μM Gd(3+) or by superfusing the cells with a Na(+)-free extracellular solution. Reverse transcriptase PCR and immunoblot analysis of uterine biopsies from term, non-laboring women revealed NALCN messenger RNA and protein expression in the myometrium. Notably, ∼90% knockdown of NALCN protein expression with lentivirus-delivered shRNA reduced the Gd(3+)-sensitive leak current density by 42% (P < 0.05). Our results reveal that NALCN, in part, generates the leak current in MSMCs and provide the basis for future research assessing NALCN as a potential molecular target for modulating uterine excitability. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine Modulates Molecular Arterial Homeostasis of Human Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ye, Geng-Fan; Zhu, Shao-Wei; Zhu, Shu-Gan; Li, Feng; Wang, Yun-Yan

    2016-12-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is widely expressed in the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of human intracranial aneurysms (IAs), but the effect and underlying mechanism of SPARC on VSMCs during the formation and progression of IAs needs to be probed. Human umbilical arterial smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) were treated with a gradient concentrations of SPARC in vitro for different time. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, cell cycle, and cell apoptosis were used to investigate the effect of SPARC on HUASMCs. After exposure to 2 and 4 μg/ml SPARC, cell viability were 89.3 ± 2.00 %, and 87.57 ± 2.17 % (P < 0.05 vs. control), respectively. Induced by 2 μg/ml SPARC, the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase was 74.77 ± 1.33 % (P < 0.05 vs. control), and the early and late apoptosis ratio were 7.38 ± 1.25 % and 4.86 ± 0.81 % (P < 0.01 vs. control), respectively. After exposure to 2 μg/ml SPARC for 2, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h, Western blot analysis showed that the protein level of p21 was upregulated significantly at 2-12 h (P < 0.05 vs. control), while the expression of p53 remained stable within 48 h. The expression of Bax protein increased markedly and peaked at 24 (P < 0.01 vs. control), while Bcl2 protein decreased significantly at 48 h (P < 0.01 vs. control). Cleaved caspase3 was also upregulated dramatically and peaked at 24 h (P < 0.05 vs. control). The protein level of MMP2 increased significantly and peaked at 24 h (P < 0.01 vs. control), while TIMP2 remained stable and even reduced at 48 h (P < 0.05 vs. control). Taken together, SPARC could arrest HUASMCs in G0/G1 phase by overexpression of p21 and induce mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in vitro, which could result in the decreased cell viability. Besides, SPARC might also lead to the activation of MMP2 instead of MMP9. These results indicated SPARC could reduce the self-repair capability and increase injury of media layer and internal elastic

  3. Functional expression of smooth muscle-specific ion channels in TGF-β1-treated human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Won Sun; Heo, Soon Chul; Jeon, Eun Su; Hong, Da Hye; Son, Youn Kyoung; Ko, Jae-Hong; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Lee, Sun Young; Kim, Jae Ho

    2013-01-01

    Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) have the power to differentiate into various cell types including chondrocytes, osteocytes, adipocytes, neurons, cardiomyocytes, and smooth muscle cells. We characterized the functional expression of ion channels after transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced differentiation of hASCs, providing insights into the differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. The treatment of hASCs with TGF-β1 dramatically increased the contraction of a collagen-gel lattice and the expression levels of specific genes for smooth muscle including α-smooth muscle actin, calponin, smooth mucle-myosin heavy chain, smoothelin-B, myocardin, and h-caldesmon. We observed Ca2+, big-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa), and voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) currents in TGF-β1-induced, differentiated hASCs and not in undifferentiated hASCs. The currents share the characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). RT-PCR and Western blotting revealed that the L-type (Cav1.2) and T-type (Cav3.1, 3.2, and 3.3), known to be expressed in vascular SMCs, dramatically increased along with the Cavβ1 and Cavβ3 subtypes in TGF-β1-induced, differentiated hASCs. Although the expression-level changes of the β-subtype BKCa channels varied, the major α-subtype BKCa channel (KCa1.1) clearly increased in the TGF-β1-induced, differentiated hASCs. Most of the Kv subtypes, also known to be expressed in vascular SMCs, dramatically increased in the TGF-β1-induced, differentiated hASCs. Our results suggest that TGF-β1 induces the increased expression of vascular SMC-like ion channels and the differentiation of hASCs into contractile vascular SMCs. PMID:23761629

  4. Functional expression of smooth muscle