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Sample records for human transcription factors

  1. A human transcription factor in search mode

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Kevin; Essuman, Bernard; He, Yiqing; Coutsias, Evangelos; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; Simmerling, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TF) can change shape to bind and recognize DNA, shifting the energy landscape from a weak binding, rapid search mode to a higher affinity recognition mode. However, the mechanism(s) driving this conformational change remains unresolved and in most cases high-resolution structures of the non-specific complexes are unavailable. Here, we investigate the conformational switch of the human mitochondrial transcription termination factor MTERF1, which has a modular, superhelical topology complementary to DNA. Our goal was to characterize the details of the non-specific search mode to complement the crystal structure of the specific binding complex, providing a basis for understanding the recognition mechanism. In the specific complex, MTERF1 binds a significantly distorted and unwound DNA structure, exhibiting a protein conformation incompatible with binding to B-form DNA. In contrast, our simulations of apo MTERF1 revealed significant flexibility, sampling structures with superhelical pitch and radius complementary to the major groove of B-DNA. Docking these structures to B-DNA followed by unrestrained MD simulations led to a stable complex in which MTERF1 was observed to undergo spontaneous diffusion on the DNA. Overall, the data support an MTERF1-DNA binding and recognition mechanism driven by intrinsic dynamics of the MTERF1 superhelical topology. PMID:26673724

  2. Circuitry and dynamics of human transcription factor regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Neph, Shane; Stergachis, Andrew B.; Reynolds, Alex; Sandstrom, Richard; Borenstein, Elhanan; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The combinatorial cross-regulation of hundreds of sequence-specific transcription factors defines a regulatory network that underlies cellular identity and function. Here we use genome-wide maps of in vivo DNaseI footprints to assemble an extensive core human regulatory network comprising connections among 475 sequence-specific transcription factors, and to analyze the dynamics of these connections across 41 diverse cell and tissue types. We find that human transcription factor networks are highly cell-selective and are driven by cohorts of factors that include regulators with previously unrecognized roles in control of cellular identity. Moreover, we identify many widely expressed factors that impact transcriptional regulatory networks in a cell-selective manner. Strikingly, in spite of their inherent diversity, all cell type regulatory networks independently converge on a common architecture that closely resembles the topology of living neuronal networks. Together, our results provide the first description of the circuitry, dynamics, and organizing principles of the human transcription factor regulatory network. PMID:22959076

  3. Functional analysis of transcription factor binding sites in human promoters

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The binding of transcription factors to specific locations in the genome is integral to the orchestration of transcriptional regulation in cells. To characterize transcription factor binding site function on a large scale, we predicted and mutagenized 455 binding sites in human promoters. We carried out functional tests on these sites in four different immortalized human cell lines using transient transfections with a luciferase reporter assay, primarily for the transcription factors CTCF, GABP, GATA2, E2F, STAT, and YY1. Results In each cell line, between 36% and 49% of binding sites made a functional contribution to the promoter activity; the overall rate for observing function in any of the cell lines was 70%. Transcription factor binding resulted in transcriptional repression in more than a third of functional sites. When compared with predicted binding sites whose function was not experimentally verified, the functional binding sites had higher conservation and were located closer to transcriptional start sites (TSSs). Among functional sites, repressive sites tended to be located further from TSSs than were activating sites. Our data provide significant insight into the functional characteristics of YY1 binding sites, most notably the detection of distinct activating and repressing classes of YY1 binding sites. Repressing sites were located closer to, and often overlapped with, translational start sites and presented a distinctive variation on the canonical YY1 binding motif. Conclusions The genomic properties that we found to associate with functional TF binding sites on promoters -- conservation, TSS proximity, motifs and their variations -- point the way to improved accuracy in future TFBS predictions. PMID:22951020

  4. TFCat: the curated catalog of mouse and human transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Debra L; Sundararajan, Saravanan; Badis, Gwenael; Hughes, Timothy R; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Roach, Jared C; Sladek, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Unravelling regulatory programs governed by transcription factors (TFs) is fundamental to understanding biological systems. TFCat is a catalog of mouse and human TFs based on a reliable core collection of annotations obtained by expert review of the scientific literature. The collection, including proven and homology-based candidate TFs, is annotated within a function-based taxonomy and DNA-binding proteins are organized within a classification system. All data and user-feedback mechanisms are available at the TFCat portal . PMID:19284633

  5. DNA methylation presents distinct binding sites for human transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaohui; Wan, Jun; Su, Yijing; Song, Qifeng; Zeng, Yaxue; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Shin, Jaehoon; Cox, Eric; Rho, Hee Sool; Woodard, Crystal; Xia, Shuli; Liu, Shuang; Lyu, Huibin; Ming, Guo-Li; Wade, Herschel; Song, Hongjun; Qian, Jiang; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation, especially CpG methylation at promoter regions, has been generally considered as a potent epigenetic modification that prohibits transcription factor (TF) recruitment, resulting in transcription suppression. Here, we used a protein microarray-based approach to systematically survey the entire human TF family and found numerous purified TFs with methylated CpG (mCpG)-dependent DNA-binding activities. Interestingly, some TFs exhibit specific binding activity to methylated and unmethylated DNA motifs of distinct sequences. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we focused on Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), and decoupled its mCpG- and CpG-binding activities via site-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, KLF4 binds specific methylated or unmethylated motifs in human embryonic stem cells in vivo. Our study suggests that mCpG-dependent TF binding activity is a widespread phenomenon and provides a new framework to understand the role and mechanism of TFs in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00726.001. PMID:24015356

  6. FOXO transcription factors support oxidative stress resistance in human chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Akasaki, Yukio; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Saito, Masahiko; Caramés, Beatriz; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Lotz, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A major signaling pathway that regulates cellular aging is the Insulin/IGF-1/Pl3k/Akt/forkhead-box class O (FOXO) transcription factor axis. Previously, we observed that FOXO factors are dysregulated in aged and OA cartilage. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of downregulated FOXOs on chondrocytes. Methods Small interference RNAs (siRNAs) for FOXO1 and FOXO3 were transfected into human articular chondrocytes. Cell viability following treatment with the oxidant tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) was measured by MTT assay. Caspase-3/7 activation and apoptotic cell were examined. Gene and protein expression of antioxidant proteins and autophagy related proteins and changes in inflammatory mediators following treatment with IL-1β were analyzed. Cells transfected with FOXO plasmids were also analyzed. Results Cell viability was significantly reduced by siFOXO under treatment with t-BHP. Apoptosis accompanied by caspase activation was significantly induced in FOXO-siRNA transfected chondrocytes. Knock-down of FOXO1 and FOXO1+3 resulted in significant reductions of GPX-1, catalase, LC3, Beclin1, and SIRT1 proteins following treatment with t-BHP. In contrast, constitutive active form of FOXO 3 increased cell viability while inducing GPX1, Beclin1, and LC3 in response to t-BHP. Expression and production of ADAMTS-4 and Chemerin were significantly increased in FOXO-siRNA transfected chondrocytes. Conclusions Reduced expression of FOXO transcription factors in chondrocytes increased susceptibility to cell death induced by oxidative stress. This was associated with reduced antioxidant proteins and autophagy related proteins. Our data provide evidence for a key role of FOXO transcription factors as regulators of chondrocyte oxidative stress resistance and tissue homeostasis. PMID:25186470

  7. Pluripotent stem cell transcription factors during human odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Juliana Malta; da Costa-Neves, Adriana; Kerkis, Irina; da Silva, Marcelo Cavenaghi Pereira

    2013-09-01

    Stem cells are capable of generating various cell lines and can be obtained from adult or embryonic tissues for clinical therapies. Stem cells from deciduous dental pulp are among those that are easily obtainable from adult tissues and have been widely studied because of their ability to differentiate into a variety of cell lines in the presence of various chemical mediators. We have analyze the expression of several proteins related to the differentiation and proliferative potential of cell populations that compose the tooth germ of human fetuses. We evaluate 20 human fetuses of both genders. After being paraffin-embedded, cap and bell stages of tooth germ development were subjected to immunohistochemistry for the following markers: Oct-4, Nanog, Stat-3 and Sox-2. The studied antibodies showed nuclear or cytoplasmic immunnostaining within various anatomical structures and with various degrees of expression, indicating the action of these proteins during tooth development. We conclude that the interrelationship between these transcription factors is complex and associated with self-renewal and cell differentiation. Our results suggest that the expression of Oct-4, Nanog, Sox-2 and Stat-3 are related to differentiation in ameloblasts and odontoblasts.

  8. Human Lineage-Specific Transcriptional Regulation through GA-Binding Protein Transcription Factor Alpha (GABPa)

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Nowick, Katja; Piccini, Ilaria; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Querfurth, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A substantial fraction of phenotypic differences between closely related species are likely caused by differences in gene regulation. While this has already been postulated over 30 years ago, only few examples of evolutionary changes in gene regulation have been verified. Here, we identified and investigated binding sites of the transcription factor GA-binding protein alpha (GABPa) aiming to discover cis-regulatory adaptations on the human lineage. By performing chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing experiments in a human cell line, we found 11,619 putative GABPa binding sites. Through sequence comparisons of the human GABPa binding regions with orthologous sequences from 34 mammals, we identified substitutions that have resulted in 224 putative human-specific GABPa binding sites. To experimentally assess the transcriptional impact of those substitutions, we selected four promoters for promoter-reporter gene assays using human and African green monkey cells. We compared the activities of wild-type promoters to mutated forms, where we have introduced one or more substitutions to mimic the ancestral state devoid of the GABPa consensus binding sequence. Similarly, we introduced the human-specific substitutions into chimpanzee and macaque promoter backgrounds. Our results demonstrate that the identified substitutions are functional, both in human and nonhuman promoters. In addition, we performed GABPa knock-down experiments and found 1,215 genes as strong candidates for primary targets. Further analyses of our data sets link GABPa to cognitive disorders, diabetes, KRAB zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF), and human-specific genes. Thus, we propose that differences in GABPa binding sites played important roles in the evolution of human-specific phenotypes. PMID:26814189

  9. Domain structure of a human general transcription initiation factor, TFIIF.

    PubMed Central

    Yonaha, M; Aso, T; Kobayashi, Y; Vasavada, H; Yasukochi, Y; Weissman, S M; Kitajima, S

    1993-01-01

    The structural and functional domains of a general transcription initiation factor, TFIIF (RAP30/74, FC), have been investigated using various deletion mutants of each subunit, both in vivo and in vitro. An in vivo assay showed that the N-terminal sequence containing residues of 1-110 of RAP30 that is located close to a sigma homology region interacts with a minimum sequence of residues 62-171 of RAP74 to form a heteromeric interaction. Reconstitution of in vitro transcription activity by deletion mutants of RAP74 clearly indicated that both N-terminal residues 73-205 and C-terminal residues 356-517 are essential for full activity, the former interacting with RAP30, thus complexing with RNA polymerase II. From these data, the functional significance of domain structure of TFIIF is discussed in terms of its sigma homology sequences and complex formation with RNA polymerase II in the initiation and elongation of transcription. Images PMID:8441635

  10. The mesenchymal transcription factor SNAI-1 instructs human liver specification.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Orit; Valdes, Victor Julian; Ezhkova, Elena; Gouon-Evans, Valerie

    2016-07-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) are processes required for embryo organogenesis. Liver develops from the epithelial foregut endoderm from which the liver progenitors, hepatoblasts, are specified. The migrating hepatoblasts acquire a mesenchymal phenotype to form the liver bud. In mid-gestation, hepatoblasts mature into epithelial structures: the hepatocyte cords and biliary ducts. While EMT has been associated with liver bud formation, nothing is known about its contribution to hepatic specification. We previously established an efficient protocol from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to generate hepatic cells (Hep cells) resembling the hepatoblasts expressing alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and albumin (ALB). Here we show that Hep cells express both epithelial (EpCAM and E-cadherin) and mesenchymal (vimentin and SNAI-1) markers. Similar epithelial and mesenchymal hepatoblasts were identified in human and mouse fetal livers, suggesting a conserved interspecies phenotype. Knock-down experiments demonstrated the importance of SNAI-1 in Hep cell hepatic specification. Moreover, ChIP assays revealed direct binding of SNAI-1 in the promoters of AFP and ALB genes consistent with its transcriptional activator function in hepatic specification. Altogether, our hESC-derived Hep cell cultures reveal the dual mesenchymal and epithelial phenotype of hepatoblast-like cells and support the unexpected transcriptional activator role of SNAI-1 in hepatic specification. PMID:27240252

  11. Functional Analyses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Differ between Present-Day and Archaic Humans

    PubMed Central

    Weyer, Sven; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    We analyze 25 previously identified transcription factor binding sites that carry DNA sequence changes that are present in all or nearly all present-day humans, yet occur in the ancestral state in Neandertals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relatives of humans. When the ancestral and derived forms of the transcription factor binding sites are tested using reporter constructs in 3 neuronal cell lines, the activity of 12 of the derived versions of transcription factor binding sites differ from the respective ancestral variants. This suggests that the majority of this class of evolutionary differences between modern humans and Neandertals may affect gene expression in at least some tissue or cell type. PMID:26454764

  12. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C.; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity. PMID:25717144

  13. Retinoic acid receptors and GATA transcription factors activate the transcription of the human lecithin:retinol acyltransferase gene

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Kun; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2008-01-01

    Lecithin retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) catalyzes the esterification of retinol (vitamin A). Retinyl esters and LRAT protein levels are reduced in many types of cancer cells. We present data that both the LRAT and retinoic acid receptor β2 (RARβ2) mRNA levels in the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 are lower than those in cultured normal human prostate epithelial cells (PrEC). The activity of the human LRAT promoter (2.0 kb) driving a luciferase reporter gene in PC-3 cells is less than 40% of that in PrEC cells. Retinoic acid (RA) treatment increased this LRAT promoter-luciferase activity in PrEC cells, but not in PC-3 cells. Deletion of various regions of the human LRAT promoter demonstrated that a 172-bp proximal promoter region is essential for LRAT transcription and confers RA responsiveness in PrEC cells. This 172-bp region, contained within the 186 bp pLRAT/luciferase construct, has five putative GATA binding sites. Co-transfection of RARβ2 or RARγ and the transcription factor GATA-4 increased LRAT (pLRAT186) promoter activity in both PrEC and PC-3 cells. In addition, we found that both retinoic acid and retinol induced transcripts for the STRA6 gene, which encodes a membrane receptor involved in retinol (vitamin A) uptake, in PrEC cells but not in PC-3 cells. In summary, our data show that the transcriptional regulation of the human LRAT gene is aberrant in human prostate cancer cells and that GATA transcription factors are involved in the transcriptional activation of LRAT in PrEC cells. PMID:18652909

  14. Partial Conservation between Mice and Humans in Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Transcription Factor Codes

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Nana; Cave, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian main olfactory bulb (OB) has a large population of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons that contains several subtypes defined by the co-expression other neurotransmitters and calcium binding proteins. The three most commonly studied OB interneuron subtypes co-express either Calretinin, Calbindin, or Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th). Combinations of transcription factors used to specify the phenotype of progenitors are referred to as transcription factor codes, and the current understanding of transcription factor codes that specify OB inhibitory neuron phenotypes are largely based on studies in mice. The conservation of these transcription factor codes in the human OB, however, has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to establish whether transcription factor codes in OB interneurons are conserved between mice and humans. This study compared the co-expression of Foxp2, Meis2, Pax6, and Sp8 transcription factors with Calretinin, Calbindin, or Th in human and mouse OB interneurons. This analysis found strong conservation of Calretinin co-expression with Sp8 and Meis2 as well as Th co-expression with Pax6 and Meis2. This analysis also showed that selective Foxp2 co-expression with Calbindin was conserved between mice and humans, which suggests Foxp2 is a novel determinant of the OB Calbindin interneuron phenotype. Together, the findings in this study provide insight into the conservation of transcription codes for OB interneuron phenotypes between humans and mice, as well as reveal some important differences between the species. This advance in our understanding of transcription factor codes in OB interneurons provides an important complement to the codes that have been established for other regions within the mammalian central nervous system, such as the cortex and spinal cord. PMID:27489533

  15. Partial Conservation between Mice and Humans in Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Transcription Factor Codes.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Nana; Cave, John W

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian main olfactory bulb (OB) has a large population of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons that contains several subtypes defined by the co-expression other neurotransmitters and calcium binding proteins. The three most commonly studied OB interneuron subtypes co-express either Calretinin, Calbindin, or Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th). Combinations of transcription factors used to specify the phenotype of progenitors are referred to as transcription factor codes, and the current understanding of transcription factor codes that specify OB inhibitory neuron phenotypes are largely based on studies in mice. The conservation of these transcription factor codes in the human OB, however, has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to establish whether transcription factor codes in OB interneurons are conserved between mice and humans. This study compared the co-expression of Foxp2, Meis2, Pax6, and Sp8 transcription factors with Calretinin, Calbindin, or Th in human and mouse OB interneurons. This analysis found strong conservation of Calretinin co-expression with Sp8 and Meis2 as well as Th co-expression with Pax6 and Meis2. This analysis also showed that selective Foxp2 co-expression with Calbindin was conserved between mice and humans, which suggests Foxp2 is a novel determinant of the OB Calbindin interneuron phenotype. Together, the findings in this study provide insight into the conservation of transcription codes for OB interneuron phenotypes between humans and mice, as well as reveal some important differences between the species. This advance in our understanding of transcription factor codes in OB interneurons provides an important complement to the codes that have been established for other regions within the mammalian central nervous system, such as the cortex and spinal cord. PMID:27489533

  16. Characterization of the transcriptional activation domains of human TEF3-1 (transcription enhancer factor 3 isoform 1).

    PubMed

    Qiao, Cheng; Jiang, Yajie; Deng, Cuilan; Huang, Zebo; Teng, Kaixuan; Chen, Lan; Liu, Xin

    2015-03-01

    TEF3-1 (transcription enhancer factor 3 isoform 1) is a human transcriptional factor, which has a N-terminal TEA/ATTS domain supposedly for DNA binding and C-terminal PRD and STY domains for transcriptional activation. Taking advantage of the efficient reporter design of yeast two-hybrid system, we characterized the TEF3-1 domains in activating gene expression. Previously study usually mentioned that the C-terminal domain of TEF3-1 has the transcriptional activity, however, our data shows that the peptides TEF3-11-66 and TEF3-1197-434 functioned as two independent activation domains, suggesting that N-terminal domain of TEF3-1 also has transcriptional activation capacity. Additionally, more deletions of amino acids 197-434 showed that only the peptides TEF3-1197-265 contained the minimum sequences for the C-terminal transcriptional activation domain. The protein structure is predicted to contain a helix-turn-helix structure in TEF3-11-66 and four β sheets in TEF3-1197-265. Finally, after the truncated fragments of TEF3-1 were expressed in HUVEC cells, the whole TEF3-1 and the two activation domains could increase F-actin stress fiber, cell proliferation, migration and targeted gene expression. Further analysis and characterization of the activation domains in TEF3-1 may broaden our understanding of the gene involved in angiogenesis and other pathological processes.

  17. Alterations in transcription factor binding in radioresistant human melanoma cells after ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sahijdak, W.M.; Yang, Chin-Rang; Zuckerman, J.S.; Meyers, M.; Boothman, D.A.

    1994-04-01

    We analyzed alterations in transcription factor binding to specific, known promoter DNA consensus sequences between irradiated and unirradiated radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells. The goal of this study was to begin to investigate which transcription factors and DNA-binding sites are responsible for the induction of specific transcripts and proteins after ionizing radiation. Transcription factor binding was observed using DNA band-shift assays and oligonucleotide competition analyses. Confluence-arrested U1-Mel cells were irradiated (4.5 Gy) and harvested at 4 h. Double-stranded oligonucleotides containing known DNA-binding consensus sites for specific transcription factors were used. Increased DNA binding activity after ionizing radiation was noted with oligonucleotides containing the CREB, NF-kB and Sp1 consensus sites. No changes in protein binding to AP-1, AP-2, AP-3, or CTF/NF1, GRE or Oct-1 consensus sequences were noted. X-ray activation of select transcription factors, which bind certain consensus sites in promoters, may cause specific induction or repression of gene transcription. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  18. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  19. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  20. Transcription factor binding sites downstream of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcription start site are important for virus infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Van Lint, C; Amella, C A; Emiliani, S; John, M; Jie, T; Verdin, E

    1997-01-01

    When transcriptionally active, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter contains a nucleosome-free region encompassing both the promoter/enhancer region and a large region (255 nucleotides [nt]) downstream of the transcription start site. We have previously identified new binding sites for transcription factors downstream of the transcription start site (nt 465 to 720): three AP-1 sites (I, II, and III), an AP3-like motif (AP3-L), a downstream binding factor (DBF) site, and juxtaposed Sp1 sites. Here, we show that the DBF site is an interferon-responsive factor (IRF) binding site and that the AP3-L motif binds the T-cell-specific factor NF-AT. Mutations that abolish the binding of each factor to its cognate site are introduced in an infectious HIV-1 molecular clone to study their effect on HIV-1 transcription and replication. Individual mutation of the DBF or AP3-L site as well as the double mutation AP-1(III)/AP3-L did not affect HIV-1 replication compared to that of the wild-type virus. In contrast, proviruses carrying mutations in the Sp1 sites were totally defective in terms of replication. Virus production occurred with slightly delayed kinetics for viruses containing combined mutations in the AP-1(III), AP3-L, and DBF sites and in the AP3-L and DBF-sites, whereas viruses mutated in the AP-1(I,II,III) and AP3-L sites and in the AP-1(I,II,III), AP3-L, and DBF sites exhibited a severely defective replicative phenotype. No RNA-packaging defect could be measured for any of the mutant viruses as determined by quantification of their HIV genomic RNA. Measurement of the transcriptional activity of the HIV-1 promoter after transient transfection of the HIV-1 provirus DNA or of long terminal repeat-luciferase constructs showed a positive correlation between the transcriptional and the replication defects for most mutants. PMID:9223506

  1. Transcriptional regulation of OCT4 by the ETS transcription factor ESE-1 in NCCIT human embryonic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Won; Do, Hyun-Jin; Ha, Woo Tae; Han, Mi-Hee; Yang, Heung-Mo; Lee, Soo-Hong; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Hwan

    2014-07-25

    The epithelium-specific ETS transcription factor-1 (ESE-1) is physiologically important in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Recently, OCT4, a transcription factor involved in stem cell pluripotency, has been implicated in tumorigenesis. In this study, we invested the molecular mechanism by which ESE-1 regulates transcription of OCT4 in NCCIT human embryonic carcinoma cells. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that OCT4 levels were high in undifferentiated NCCIT cells but significantly decreased upon retinoic acid-mediated differentiation, concomitant with up-regulation of ESE-1 expression. OCT4 mRNA level rose following shRNA-mediated knockdown of ESE-1, but declined when ESE-1 was overexpressed, suggesting that the expression levels of OCT4 and ESE-1 may be coordinated in an opposite manner. Promoter-reporter assays revealed that induced OCT4 promoter activity in NCCIT cells was significantly down-regulated by ESE-1 overexpression in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of ESE-1 on OCT4 promoter activity was relieved by co-expression of an ESE-1 mutant lacking the transactivation domain, but not by mutants lacking other domains. Serial deletion and site-directed mutagenesis of the OCT4 promoter revealed that a potential ETS binding site (EBS) is present in the conserved region 2 (CR2). ESE-1 interacted with the EBS element in CR2 and enrichment of CR2 significantly increased upon RA-mediated differentiation of NCCIT cells, suggesting that this binding is likely to be involved in ESE-1-mediated repression of OCT4 promoter activity upon differentiation. Taken together, the results of this study reveal the molecular details of the mechanism by which the oncogenic factor ESE-1 regulates expression of the stem cell transcription factor OCT4 in pluripotent NCCIT cells.

  2. Role of the POZ zinc finger transcription factor FBI-1 in human and murine adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Laudes, Matthias; Christodoulides, Constantinos; Sewter, Ciaran; Rochford, Justin J; Considine, Robert V; Sethi, Jaswinder K; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2004-03-19

    Poxvirus zinc finger (POZ) zinc finger domain transcription factors have been shown to play a role in the control of growth arrest and differentiation in several types of mesenchymal cells but not, as yet, adipocytes. We found that a POZ domain protein, factor that binds to inducer of short transcripts-1 (FBI-1), was induced during both murine and human preadipocyte differentiation with maximal expression levels seen at days 2-4. FBI-1 mRNA was expressed in human adipose tissue with the highest levels found in samples from morbidly obese subjects. Murine cell lines constitutively expressing FBI-1 showed evidence for accelerated adipogenesis with earlier induction of markers of differentiation and enhanced lipid accumulation, suggesting that FBI-1 may be an active participant in the differentiation process. Consistent with the properties of this family of proteins in other cell systems, 3T3L1 cells stably overexpressing FBI-1 showed reduced DNA synthesis and reduced expression of cyclin A, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, and p107, proteins known to be involved in the regulation of mitotic clonal expansion. In addition, FBI-1 reduced the transcriptional activity of the cyclin A promoter. Thus, FBI-1, a POZ zinc finger transcription factor, is induced during the early phases of human and murine preadipocyte differentiation where it may contribute to adipogenesis through influencing the switch from cellular proliferation to terminal differentiation.

  3. Role of the POZ Zinc Finger Transcription Factor FBI-1 in Human and Murine Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Laudes, Matthias; Christodoulides, Constantinos; Sewter, Ciaran; Rochford, Justin J.; Considine, Robert V.; Sethi, Jaswinder K.; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; O’Rahilly, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Poxvirus zinc finger (POZ) zinc finger domain transcription factors have been shown to play a role in the control of growth arrest and differentiation in several types of mesenchymal cells but not, as yet, adipocytes. We found that a POZ domain protein, factor that binds to inducer of short transcripts-1 (FBI-1), was induced during both murine and human preadipocyte differentiation with maximal expression levels seen at days 2–4. FBI-1 mRNA was expressed in human adipose tissue with the highest levels found in samples from morbidly obese subjects. Murine cell lines constitutively expressing FBI-1 showed evidence for accelerated adipogenesis with earlier induction of markers of differentiation and enhanced lipid accumulation, suggesting that FBI-1 may be an active participant in the differentiation process. Consistent with the properties of this family of proteins in other cell systems, 3T3L1 cells stably overexpressing FBI-1 showed reduced DNA synthesis and reduced expression of cyclin A, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, and p107, proteins known to be involved in the regulation of mitotic clonal expansion. In addition, FBI-1 reduced the transcriptional activity of the cyclin A promoter. Thus, FBI-1, a POZ zinc finger transcription factor, is induced during the early phases of human and murine preadipocyte differentiation where it may contribute to adipogenesis through influencing the switch from cellular proliferation to terminal differentiation. PMID:14701838

  4. [Intracellular localization of transcription factor PROX1 in the human retina in ontogeny].

    PubMed

    Markitantova, Iu V; Zinov'eva, R D

    2014-01-01

    The spatiotemporal intracellular localization of the transcription factor PROX1 in the human retina during prenatal development (fetal weeks 9.5 to 31) and in the adult human retina was studied for the first time. The PROX1 protein was identified in the cell nuclei of the neuroblast retinal layers at the stage of active cell proliferation (fetal week 9.5) as well as in the nuclei of differentiating neurons of the inner nuclear retinal layer (horizontal, amacrine, and bipolar cells) from weeks 13 to 31 of prenatal development. The PROX1 protein localization in the adult retina was the same as at the late stage of prenatal development. Our results indicate the involvement of the transcription factor PROX1 in the regulation of proliferation of progenitor cells and differentiation of the inner nuclear layer cells of the human retina. These results confirm the conservative functions of Prox1/PROX1 in the vertebrate retina.

  5. Human Transcription Factor hTAFII150 (CIF150) Is Involved in Transcriptional Regulation of Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jay; Halenbeck, Robert; Kaufmann, Jörg

    1999-01-01

    Here we present evidence that CIF150 (hTAFII150), the human homolog of Drosophila TAFII150, plays an important and selective role in establishing gene expression patterns necessary for progression through the cell cycle. Gel filtration experiments demonstrate that CIF150 (hTAFII150) seems to be less tightly associated with human transcription factor IID than hTAFII130 is associated with hTAFII250. The transient functional knockout of CIF150 (hTAFII150) protein led to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M transition in mammalian cell lines. PCR display analysis with the RNA derived from CIF150-depleted cells indicated that CIF150 (hTAFII150) is required for the transcription of only a subset of RNA polymerase II genes. CIF150 (hTAFII150) directly stimulated cyclin B1 and cyclin A transcription in cotransfection assays and in vitro assays, suggesting that the expression of these genes is dependent on CIF150 (hTAFII150) function. We defined a CIF150 (hTAFII150) consensus binding site and demonstrated that a CIF150-responsive cis element is present in the cyclin B1 core promoter. These results suggest that one function of CIF150 (hTAFII150) is to select specific RNA polymerase II core promoter elements involved in cell cycle progression. PMID:10409744

  6. Autoregulation and maturity onset diabetes of the young transcription factors control the human PAX4 promoter.

    PubMed

    Smith, S B; Watada, H; Scheel, D W; Mrejen, C; German, M S

    2000-11-24

    During pancreatic development, the paired homeodomain transcription factor PAX4 is required for the differentiation of the insulin-producing beta cells and somatostatin-producing delta cells. To establish the position of PAX4 in the hierarchy of factors controlling islet cell development, we examined the control of the human PAX4 gene promoter. In both cell lines and transgenic animals, a 4.9-kilobase pair region directly upstream of the human PAX4 gene transcriptional start site acts as a potent pancreas-specific promoter. Deletion mapping experiments demonstrate that a 118-base pair region lying approximately 1.9 kilobase pairs upstream of the transcription start site is both necessary and sufficient to direct pancreas-specific expression. Serial deletions through this region reveal the presence of positive elements that bind several pancreatic transcription factors as follows: the POU homeodomain factor HNF1alpha, the orphan nuclear receptor HNF4alpha, the homeodomain factor PDX1, and a heterodimer composed of two basic helix-loop-helix factors. Interestingly, mutations in the genes encoding four of these factors cause a dominantly inherited form of human diabetes called Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young. In addition, PAX4 itself has at least two high affinity binding sites within the promoter through which it exerts a strong negative autoregulatory effect. Together, these results suggest a model in which PAX4 expression is activated during pancreatic development by a combination of pancreas-specific factors but is then switched off once PAX4 protein reaches sufficient levels.

  7. Regulation of endogenous human gene expression by ligand-inducible TALE transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Andrew C; Gaj, Thomas; Sirk, Shannon J; Lamb, Brian M; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-10-17

    The construction of increasingly sophisticated synthetic biological circuits is dependent on the development of extensible tools capable of providing specific control of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Here, we describe a new class of synthetic transcription factors that activate gene expression in response to extracellular chemical stimuli. These inducible activators consist of customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins combined with steroid hormone receptor ligand-binding domains. We demonstrate that these ligand-responsive TALE transcription factors allow for tunable and conditional control of gene activation and can be used to regulate the expression of endogenous genes in human cells. Since TALEs can be designed to recognize any contiguous DNA sequence, the conditional gene regulatory system described herein will enable the design of advanced synthetic gene networks.

  8. Stress-impaired transcription factor expression and insulin secretion in transplanted human islets

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chunhua; Kayton, Nora S.; Shostak, Alena; Poffenberger, Greg; Cyphert, Holly A.; Aramandla, Radhika; Thompson, Courtney; Papagiannis, Ioannis G.; Shiota, Masakazu; Stafford, John M.; Greiner, Dale L.; Herrera, Pedro L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Stein, Roland; Powers, Alvin C.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and progressive β cell dysfunction. Excess glucose and lipid impair β cell function in islet cell lines, cultured rodent and human islets, and in vivo rodent models. Here, we examined the mechanistic consequences of glucotoxic and lipotoxic conditions on human islets in vivo and developed and/or used 3 complementary models that allowed comparison of the effects of hyperglycemic and/or insulin-resistant metabolic stress conditions on human and mouse islets, which responded quite differently to these challenges. Hyperglycemia and/or insulin resistance impaired insulin secretion only from human islets in vivo. In human grafts, chronic insulin resistance decreased antioxidant enzyme expression and increased superoxide and amyloid formation. In human islet grafts, expression of transcription factors NKX6.1 and MAFB was decreased by chronic insulin resistance, but only MAFB decreased under chronic hyperglycemia. Knockdown of NKX6.1 or MAFB expression in a human β cell line recapitulated the insulin secretion defect seen in vivo. Contrary to rodent islet studies, neither insulin resistance nor hyperglycemia led to human β cell proliferation or apoptosis. These results demonstrate profound differences in how excess glucose or lipid influence mouse and human insulin secretion and β cell activity and show that reduced expression of key islet-enriched transcription factors is an important mediator of glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity. PMID:27064285

  9. Regulation of the human LAT gene by the Elf-1 transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Finco, Timothy S; Justice-Healy, Geri E; Patel, Shivani J; Hamilton, Victoria E

    2006-01-01

    Background The LAT gene encodes an intracellular adaptor protein that links cell-surface receptor engagement to numerous downstream signalling events, and thereby plays an integral role in the function of cell types that express the gene, including T cells, mast cells, natural killer cells, and platelets. To date, the mechanisms responsible for the transcriptional regulation of this gene have not been investigated. Results In this study we have mapped the transcriptional start sites for the human LAT gene and localized the 5' and 3' boundaries of the proximal promoter. We find that the promoter contains both positive and negative regulatory regions, and that two binding sites for the Ets family of transcription factors have a strong, positive effect on gene expression. Each site binds the Ets family member Elf-1, and overexpression of Elf-1 augments LAT promoter activity. The promoter also contains a Runx binding site adjacent to one of the Ets sites. This site, which is shown to bind Runx-1, has an inhibitory effect on gene expression. Finally, data is also presented indicating that the identified promoter may regulate cell-type specific expression. Conclusion Collectively, these results provide the first insights into the transcriptional regulation of the LAT gene, including the discovery that the Ets transcription factor Elf-1 may play a central role in its expression. PMID:16464244

  10. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  11. Transcription factor binding and spacing constraints in the human beta-actin proximal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Danilition, S L; Frederickson, R M; Taylor, C Y; Miyamoto, N G

    1991-01-01

    The human beta-actin promoter, including its 5' flanking region and 5' untranslated region, is ubiquitously active in mammalian cells in culture. In this report we investigated the transcriptional activity of, and the protein-DNA interactions that occur within, the proximal region of the human beta-actin promoter. Efficient beta-actin promoter activity in transfected human HeLa cells requires only 114bp of 5' flanking sequences. Two of the cis-actin regulatory elements within this region of the beta-actin promoter, the CCAAT box and proximal CCArGG box, are specific in vitro binding sites for the transcription factors, nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) and serum response factor (p67SRF), respectively. These two elements are required together to stimulate in vivo transcription from the homologous as well as a heterologous promoter. Finally, a particular spatial alignment between the CCAAT box and proximal CCArGG box is required for trans-activation in vivo. The above provides strong evidence for a functional interaction between NF-Y and p67SRF when bound to their respective binding sites in the beta-actin promoter. Images PMID:1762920

  12. Nuclear transcription factor Y and its roles in cellular processes related to human disease.

    PubMed

    Ly, Luong Linh; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear transcription factor Y (NF-Y) is an example of a transcriptional regulation factor in eukaryotes consisting of three different subunits, NF-YA, NF-YB and NF-YC, which are all necessary for formation of NF-Y complexes and binding to CCAAT boxes in promoters of its target genes. Highly conserved between human and Drosophila, NF-Y regulates transcription of various genes related to the cell cycle and various human diseases. Drosophila models have been widely used as tools for studying genetics and developmental biology and more recently for analyzing the functions of human disease genes, including those responsible for developmental and neurological disorders, cancer, cardiovascular disease and metabolic and storage diseases, as well as genes required for function of the visual, auditory and immune systems. In this review, in vivo findings from Drosophila models relevant to the roles of NF-Y in various human diseases are summarized. Recent studies have demonstrated novel contributions of dNF-Y to apoptosis and apoptosis-induced proliferation, and in photoreceptor cell differentiation during the development of the Drosophila compound eye.

  13. Stress-Activated Cap’n’collar Transcription Factors in Aging and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.; Bohmann, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Cap’n’collar (Cnc) transcription factors are conserved in metazoans and have important developmental and homeostatic functions. The vertebrate Nrf1, Nrf2, and Nrf3, the Caenorhabditis elegans SKN-1, and the Drosophila CncC comprise a subgroup of Cnc factors that mediate adaptive responses to cellular stress. The most studied stress-activated Cnc factor is Nrf2, which orchestrates the transcriptional response of cells to oxidative stressors and electrophilic xenobiotics. In rodent models, signaling by Nrf2 defends against oxidative stress and aging-associated disorders, such as neurodegeneration, respiratory diseases, and cancer. In humans, polymorphisms that decrease Nrf2 abundance have been associated with various pathologies of the skin, respiratory system, and digestive tract. In addition to preventing disease in rodents and humans, Cnc factors have lifespan-extending and anti-aging functions in invertebrates. However, despite the pro-longevity and antioxidant roles of stress-activated Cnc factors, their activity paradoxically declines in aging model organisms and in humans suffering from progressing respiratory disease or neurodegeneration. We review the roles and regulation of stress-activated Cnc factors across species, present all reported instances in which their activity is paradoxically decreased in aging and disease, and discuss the possibility that the pharmacological restoration of Nrf2 signaling may be useful in the prevention and treatment of age-related diseases. PMID:20215646

  14. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development.

  15. Localization of the human genes encoding the two subunits of general transcription factor TFIIE.

    PubMed

    Purrello, M; Di Pietro, C; Rapisarda, A; Motta, S; Pavone, L; Grzeschik, K H; Sichel, G

    1994-09-01

    TFIIE is a general transcription factor for class II genes composed of two types of subunits, a large one of 56 kDa and a small of 34 kDa. By Southern analysis at high and at low stringency of a panel of mouse/human hybrid cell lines and by in situ chromosomal hybridization, we have demonstrated that both polypeptides are encoded by genes that are single copy in the human genome and are localized at 3q13-q21 and at 8p12, respectively. A TaqI RFLP (heterozygosity index of 0.07) was detected at the locus for the 56-kDa subunit.

  16. Binding of transcription factors and creation of a large nucleoprotein complex on the human cytomegalovirus enhancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ghazal, P.; Lubon, H.; Fleckenstein, B.; Hennighausen, L.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of the human cytomegalovirus immediate early region 1 enhancer on transcription was studied in vitro with HeLa cell nuclear extract. Stimulation of in vitro transcription mediated by the enhancer element involves its recognition by specific trans-acting factors present in the nuclear extract. DNase I protection analysis was used to determine at the nucleotide level those enhancer sequences that interact with nuclear factors. At least nine sites of protein-DNA interaction were detected over approx. = 400 base pairs of enhancer sequence. The regions of nuclease protection are associated with 21-, 19-, 18-, and 17-base-pair repeat elements as well as with a unique sequence, creating a large nucleoprotein complex. The relationship between the protein binding and the activity of the immediate early region 1 enhancer is discussed.

  17. Human Trefoil Factor 3 induces the transcription of its own promoter through STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yong; Wang, Liangxi; Zhou, Yifang; Mao, Xuefei; Deng, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Human trefoil factor 3 (hTFF3) is a small peptide of potential therapeutic value. The mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation of hTFF3 remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify the core functional elements for the self-induction action of hTFF3 and transcription factors. First, truncated promoters were constructed to identify the functional regions of the hTFF3 promoter. Next, point mutation, chromatin immunoprecipitation, RNA interference, and gene overexpression experiments were performed to analyze the transcriptional binding sites responsible for the self-induced transcription of hTFF3. Our results revealed the −1450 bp to −1400 bp fragment of the hTFF3 promoter was the functional region for the self-induction action of hTFF3. Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that a STAT3 binding site is present in the −1417 bp to −1409 bp region. Subsequently, site-directed mutagenesis analysis determined that this STAT3 binding site was critical for the self-induction effect of hTFF3. ChIP experiments confirmed that STAT3 binds to the hTFF3 promoter. STAT3 overexpression and knockdown experiments revealed that STAT3 enhanced the self-induction effect and the expression of hTFF3. This study confirmed that hTFF3 exhibits self-induction action, and that STAT3 is the key transcription factor to maintain the function of self-induction. PMID:27453253

  18. WRKY transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Paul J; Somssich, Imre E; Ringler, Patricia; Shen, Qingxi J

    2010-05-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants and form integral parts of signalling webs that modulate many plant processes. Here, we review recent significant progress in WRKY transcription factor research. New findings illustrate that WRKY proteins often act as repressors as well as activators, and that members of the family play roles in both the repression and de-repression of important plant processes. Furthermore, it is becoming clear that a single WRKY transcription factor might be involved in regulating several seemingly disparate processes. Mechanisms of signalling and transcriptional regulation are being dissected, uncovering WRKY protein functions via interactions with a diverse array of protein partners, including MAP kinases, MAP kinase kinases, 14-3-3 proteins, calmodulin, histone deacetylases, resistance proteins and other WRKY transcription factors. WRKY genes exhibit extensive autoregulation and cross-regulation that facilitates transcriptional reprogramming in a dynamic web with built-in redundancy.

  19. Resetting transcription factor control circuitry toward ground-state pluripotency in human.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yasuhiro; Guo, Ge; Loos, Remco; Nichols, Jennifer; Ficz, Gabriella; Krueger, Felix; Oxley, David; Santos, Fatima; Clarke, James; Mansfield, William; Reik, Wolf; Bertone, Paul; Smith, Austin

    2014-09-11

    Current human pluripotent stem cells lack the transcription factor circuitry that governs the ground state of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC). Here, we report that short-term expression of two components, NANOG and KLF2, is sufficient to ignite other elements of the network and reset the human pluripotent state. Inhibition of ERK and protein kinase C sustains a transgene-independent rewired state. Reset cells self-renew continuously without ERK signaling, are phenotypically stable, and are karyotypically intact. They differentiate in vitro and form teratomas in vivo. Metabolism is reprogrammed with activation of mitochondrial respiration as in ESC. DNA methylation is dramatically reduced and transcriptome state is globally realigned across multiple cell lines. Depletion of ground-state transcription factors, TFCP2L1 or KLF4, has marginal impact on conventional human pluripotent stem cells but collapses the reset state. These findings demonstrate feasibility of installing and propagating functional control circuitry for ground-state pluripotency in human cells. PMID:25215486

  20. Resetting Transcription Factor Control Circuitry toward Ground-State Pluripotency in Human

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Yasuhiro; Guo, Ge; Loos, Remco; Nichols, Jennifer; Ficz, Gabriella; Krueger, Felix; Oxley, David; Santos, Fatima; Clarke, James; Mansfield, William; Reik, Wolf; Bertone, Paul; Smith, Austin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Current human pluripotent stem cells lack the transcription factor circuitry that governs the ground state of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC). Here, we report that short-term expression of two components, NANOG and KLF2, is sufficient to ignite other elements of the network and reset the human pluripotent state. Inhibition of ERK and protein kinase C sustains a transgene-independent rewired state. Reset cells self-renew continuously without ERK signaling, are phenotypically stable, and are karyotypically intact. They differentiate in vitro and form teratomas in vivo. Metabolism is reprogrammed with activation of mitochondrial respiration as in ESC. DNA methylation is dramatically reduced and transcriptome state is globally realigned across multiple cell lines. Depletion of ground-state transcription factors, TFCP2L1 or KLF4, has marginal impact on conventional human pluripotent stem cells but collapses the reset state. These findings demonstrate feasibility of installing and propagating functional control circuitry for ground-state pluripotency in human cells. PMID:25215486

  1. Characterization of human mitochondrial ferritin promoter: identification of transcription factors and evidences of epigenetic control.

    PubMed

    Guaraldo, Michela; Santambrogio, Paolo; Rovelli, Elisabetta; Di Savino, Augusta; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cittaro, Davide; Roetto, Antonella; Levi, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) is an iron storage protein belonging to the ferritin family but, unlike the cytosolic ferritin, it has an iron-unrelated restricted tissue expression. FtMt appears to be preferentially expressed in cell types characterized by high metabolic activity and oxygen consumption, suggesting a role in protecting mitochondria from iron-dependent oxidative damage. The human gene (FTMT) is intronless and its promoter region has not been described yet. To analyze the regulatory mechanisms controlling FTMT expression, we characterized the 5' flanking region upstream the transcriptional starting site of FTMT by in silico enquiry of sequences conservation, DNA deletion analysis, and ChIP assay. The data revealed a minimal promoter region and identified the presence of SP1, CREB and YY1 as positive regulators, and GATA2, FoxA1 and C/EBPβ as inhibitors of the transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, the FTMT transcription is increased by acetylating and de-methylating agent treatments in K562 and HeLa cells. These treatments up-regulate FtMt expression even in fibroblasts derived from a Friedreich ataxia patient, where it might exert a beneficial effect against mitochondrial oxidative damage. The expression of FTMT appears regulated by a complex mechanism involving epigenetic events and interplay between transcription factors. PMID:27625068

  2. Characterization of human mitochondrial ferritin promoter: identification of transcription factors and evidences of epigenetic control

    PubMed Central

    Guaraldo, Michela; Santambrogio, Paolo; Rovelli, Elisabetta; Di Savino, Augusta; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cittaro, Davide; Roetto, Antonella; Levi, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) is an iron storage protein belonging to the ferritin family but, unlike the cytosolic ferritin, it has an iron-unrelated restricted tissue expression. FtMt appears to be preferentially expressed in cell types characterized by high metabolic activity and oxygen consumption, suggesting a role in protecting mitochondria from iron-dependent oxidative damage. The human gene (FTMT) is intronless and its promoter region has not been described yet. To analyze the regulatory mechanisms controlling FTMT expression, we characterized the 5′ flanking region upstream the transcriptional starting site of FTMT by in silico enquiry of sequences conservation, DNA deletion analysis, and ChIP assay. The data revealed a minimal promoter region and identified the presence of SP1, CREB and YY1 as positive regulators, and GATA2, FoxA1 and C/EBPβ as inhibitors of the transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, the FTMT transcription is increased by acetylating and de-methylating agent treatments in K562 and HeLa cells. These treatments up-regulate FtMt expression even in fibroblasts derived from a Friedreich ataxia patient, where it might exert a beneficial effect against mitochondrial oxidative damage. The expression of FTMT appears regulated by a complex mechanism involving epigenetic events and interplay between transcription factors. PMID:27625068

  3. Transcriptional Factor PU.1 Regulates Decidual C1q Expression in Early Pregnancy in Human.

    PubMed

    Madhukaran, Shanmuga Priyaa; Kishore, Uday; Jamil, Kaiser; Teo, Boon Heng Dennis; Choolani, Mahesh; Lu, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    C1q is the first recognition subcomponent of the complement classical pathway, which in addition to being synthesized in the liver, is also expressed by macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). Trophoblast invasion during early placentation results in accumulation of debris that triggers the complement system. Hence, both early and late components of the classical pathway are widely distributed in the placenta and decidua. In addition, C1q has recently been shown to significantly contribute to feto-maternal tolerance, trophoblast migration, and spiral artery remodeling, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. Pregnancy in mice, genetically deficient in C1q, mirrors symptoms similar to that of human preeclampsia. Thus, regulated complement activation has been proposed as an essential requirement for normal successful pregnancy. Little is known about the molecular pathways that regulate C1q expression in pregnancy. PU.1, an Ets-family transcription factor, is required for the development of hematopoietic myeloid lineage immune cells, and its expression is tissue-specific. Recently, PU.1 has been shown to regulate C1q gene expression in DCs and macrophages. Here, we have examined if PU.1 transcription factor regulates decidual C1q expression. We used immune-histochemical analysis, PCR, and immunostaining to localize and study the gene expression of PU.1 transcription factor in early human decidua. PU.1 was highly expressed at gene and protein level in early human decidual cells including trophoblast and stromal cells. Surprisingly, nuclear as well as cytoplasmic PU.1 expression was observed. Decidual cells with predominantly nuclear PU.1 expression had higher C1q expression. It is likely that nuclear and cytoplasmic PU.1 localization has a role to play in early pregnancy via regulating C1q expression in the decidua during implantation.

  4. The Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Is Critical for Human Endometrial Stromal Cell Decidualization.

    PubMed

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Szwarc, Maria M; Vasquez, Yasmin M; Peavey, Mary C; Mazur, Erik C; Gibbons, William E; Lanz, Rainer B; DeMayo, Francesco J; Lydon, John P

    2016-04-01

    Progesterone, via the progesterone receptor (PGR), is essential for endometrial stromal cell decidualization, a cellular transformation event in which stromal fibroblasts differentiate into decidual cells. Uterine decidualization supports embryo implantation and placentation as well as subsequent events, which together ensure a successful pregnancy. Accordingly, impaired decidualization results not only in implantation failure or early fetal miscarriage, but also may lead to potential adverse outcomes in all three pregnancy trimesters. Transcriptional reprogramming on a genome-wide scale underlies progesterone dependent decidualization of the human endometrial stromal cell (hESC). However, identification of the functionally essential signals encoded by these global transcriptional changes remains incomplete. Importantly, this knowledge-gap undercuts future efforts to improve diagnosis and treatment of implantation failure based on a dysfunctional endometrium. By integrating genome-wide datasets derived from decidualization of hESCs in culture, we reveal that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) transcription factor is rapidly induced by progesterone and that this induction is indispensable for progesterone-dependent decidualization. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) identified at least ten progesterone response elements within the PLZF gene, indicating that PLZF may act as a direct target of PGR signaling. The spatiotemporal expression profile for PLZF in both the human and mouse endometrium offers further support for stromal PLZF as a mediator of the progesterone decidual signal. To identify functional targets of PLZF, integration of PLZF ChIP-Seq and RNA Pol II RNA-Seq datasets revealed that the early growth response 1 (EGR1) transcription factor is a PLZF target for which its level of expression must be reduced to enable progesterone dependent hESC decidualization. Apart from furnishing essential insights

  5. The Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Is Critical for Human Endometrial Stromal Cell Decidualization

    PubMed Central

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Szwarc, Maria M.; Vasquez, Yasmin M.; Peavey, Mary C.; Mazur, Erik C.; Gibbons, William E.; Lanz, Rainer B.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone, via the progesterone receptor (PGR), is essential for endometrial stromal cell decidualization, a cellular transformation event in which stromal fibroblasts differentiate into decidual cells. Uterine decidualization supports embryo implantation and placentation as well as subsequent events, which together ensure a successful pregnancy. Accordingly, impaired decidualization results not only in implantation failure or early fetal miscarriage, but also may lead to potential adverse outcomes in all three pregnancy trimesters. Transcriptional reprogramming on a genome-wide scale underlies progesterone dependent decidualization of the human endometrial stromal cell (hESC). However, identification of the functionally essential signals encoded by these global transcriptional changes remains incomplete. Importantly, this knowledge-gap undercuts future efforts to improve diagnosis and treatment of implantation failure based on a dysfunctional endometrium. By integrating genome-wide datasets derived from decidualization of hESCs in culture, we reveal that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) transcription factor is rapidly induced by progesterone and that this induction is indispensable for progesterone-dependent decidualization. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) identified at least ten progesterone response elements within the PLZF gene, indicating that PLZF may act as a direct target of PGR signaling. The spatiotemporal expression profile for PLZF in both the human and mouse endometrium offers further support for stromal PLZF as a mediator of the progesterone decidual signal. To identify functional targets of PLZF, integration of PLZF ChIP-Seq and RNA Pol II RNA-Seq datasets revealed that the early growth response 1 (EGR1) transcription factor is a PLZF target for which its level of expression must be reduced to enable progesterone dependent hESC decidualization. Apart from furnishing essential insights

  6. Regulatory factor X1-induced down-regulation of transforming growth factor β2 transcription in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chenzhuo; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2012-06-29

    Regulatory factor X (RFX) proteins are transcription factors. Seven mammalian RFX proteins have been identified. RFX1 is the prototype RFX. However, its biological functions are not known. Here, RFX1 overexpression reduced fetal bovine serum-stimulated proliferation of SH-SY5Y cells, a human neuroblastoma cell line. This inhibition is associated with decreased transforming growth factor β2 (TGFβ2) and phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Exogenous TGFβ2 increased cell proliferation and phospho-ERK in cells overexpressing RFX1. An anti-TGFβ2 antibody and PD98059, an ERK activation inhibitor, inhibited SH-SY5Y cell proliferation. TGFβ2 promoter activity was decreased in cells overexpressing RFX1. Chromosome immunoprecipitation assay showed that RFX1 bound the TGFβ2 promoter. RFX1 down-regulation increased TGFβ2 in SH-SY5Y and HCN-1A cells, a normal human neuronal cell line. More importantly, TGFβ2 concentrations were negatively correlated with RFX1 levels in human medulloblastoma tissues with a R(2) of 0.464. These results suggest that RFX1 reduces cell proliferation through inhibiting the TGFβ2-ERK signaling pathway. RFX1 blocks TGFβ2 expression through its direct action on TGFβ2 transcription. This effect also appears in human brain tumor tissues. Because TGFβ is known to be involved in cancer development, our results provide initial evidence to suggest that RFX1 may play an important role in human tumor biology.

  7. Mutational Landscape and Antiproliferative Functions of ELF Transcription Factors in Human Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ando, Mizuo; Kawazu, Masahito; Ueno, Toshihide; Koinuma, Daizo; Ando, Koji; Koya, Junji; Kataoka, Keisuke; Yasuda, Takahiko; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Fukumura, Kazutaka; Yamato, Azusa; Soda, Manabu; Sai, Eirin; Yamashita, Yoshihiro; Asakage, Takahiro; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Kurokawa, Mineo; Miyazono, Kohei; Nimer, Stephen D; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Mano, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    ELF4 (also known as MEF) is a member of the ETS family of transcription factors. An oncogenic role for ELF4 has been demonstrated in hematopoietic malignancies, but its function in epithelial tumors remains unclear. Here, we show that ELF4 can function as a tumor suppressor and is somatically inactivated in a wide range of human tumors. We identified a missense mutation affecting the transactivation potential of ELF4 in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Restoration of the transactivation activity through introduction of wild-type ELF4 significantly inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and tumor xenograft growth. Furthermore, we found that ELF1 and ELF2, closely related transcription factors to ELF4, also exerted antiproliferative effects in multiple cancer cell lines. Mutations in ELF1 and ELF2, as in ELF4, were widespread across human cancers, but were almost all mutually exclusive. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing revealed ELF4-binding sites in genomic regions adjacent to genes related to cell-cycle regulation and apoptosis. Finally, we provide mechanistic evidence that the antiproliferative effects of ELF4 were mediated through the induction of HRK, an activator of apoptosis, and DLX3, an inhibitor of cell growth. Collectively, our findings reveal a novel subtype of human cancer characterized by inactivating mutations in the ELF subfamily of proteins, and warrant further investigation of the specific settings where ELF restoration may be therapeutically beneficial. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1814-24. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26921333

  8. Hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha down-regulates type i collagen through Sp3 transcription factor in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Duval, Elise; Bouyoucef, Mouloud; Leclercq, Sylvain; Baugé, Catherine; Boumédiene, Karim

    2016-09-01

    Cartilage engineering is one challenging issue in regenerative medicine. Low oxygen tension or hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1α) gene therapy are promising strategies in the field of cartilage repair. Previously, we showed that hypoxia and its mediator HIF-1 regulate matrix genes expression (collagens and aggrecan). Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of type I collagen (COL1A1) by HIF-1 in human articular chondrocytes. We show that HIF-1α reduces COL1A1 transcription, through a distal promoter (-2300 to -1816 bp upstream transcription initiation site), containing two GC boxes that bind Sp transcription factors (Sp1/Sp3). Sp1 acts as a positive regulator but is not induced by HIF-1. COL1A1 inhibition caused by HIF-1 implies only Sp3, which accumulates and competes Sp1 binding on COL1A1 promoter. Additionally, Sp3 ectopic expression inhibits COL1A1, while Sp3 knockdown counteracts the downregulation of COL1A1 induced by HIF-1. In conclusion, we established a new regulatory model of COL1A1 regulation by HIF-1, and bring out its relationship with Sp3 transcription factor. In a fundamental level, these findings give insights in the mechanisms controlling COL1A1 gene expression. This may be helpful to improve strategies to impair type I collagen expression during chondrocyte differentiation for cartilage engineering. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(9):756-763, 2016. PMID:27521280

  9. Regulation of human prohormone convertase 2 promoter activity by the transcription factor EGR-1.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, E; Ayoubi, T A; Meulemans, S M; Van De Ven, W J

    1997-01-01

    Prohormone convertases are involved in the tissue-specific endoproteolytic processing of prohormones and neuropeptide precursors within the secretory pathway. In the present study, we have isolated genomic clones comprising the 5'-terminal region of the human prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) gene and established characteristics of the PC2 promoter region. The proximal promoter region is very G+C-rich and does not contain a canonical TATA box or a CAAT box. Transient expression assays with a set of human PC2 gene fragments containing progressive 5' deletions demonstrate that the proximal promoter region is capable of directing high levels of neuroendocrine-specific expression of reporter gene constructs. In addition, we show that the transcription factor EGR-1 interacts with two distinct elements within the proximal human PC2 promoter region. Transfection experiments also demonstrate that EGR-1 is able to enhance PC2 promoter activity. PMID:9359835

  10. Genetic factors affecting gene transcription and catalytic activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in human liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanqing; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Gamazon, Eric R; Mirkov, Snezana; Chen, Peixian; Wu, Kehua; Sun, Chang; Cox, Nancy J; Cook, Edwin; Das, Soma; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to discover cis- and trans-acting factors significantly affecting mRNA expression and catalytic activity of human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Transcription levels of five major hepatic UGT1A (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6 and UGT1A9) and five UGT2B (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17) genes were quantified in human liver tissue samples (n = 125) using real-time PCR. Glucuronidation activities of 14 substrates were measured in 47 livers. We genotyped 167 tagSNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) in UGT1A (n = 43) and UGT2B (n = 124), as well as the known functional UGT1A1*28 and UGT2B17 CNV (copy number variation) polymorphisms. Transcription levels of 15 transcription factors (TFs) known to regulate these UGTs were quantified. We found that UGT expression and activity were highly variable among the livers (median and range of coefficient of variations: 135%, 74-217% and 52%, 39-105%, respectively). CAR, PXR and ESR1 were found to be the most important trans-regulators of UGT transcription (median and range of correlation coefficients: 46%, 6-58%; 47%, 9-58%; and 52%, 24-75%, respectively). Hepatic UGT activities were mainly determined by UGT gene transcription levels. Twenty-one polymorphisms were significantly (FDR-adjusted P < 0.05) associated with mRNA expression and/or activities of UGT1A1, UGT1A3 and UGT2B17. We found novel SNPs in the UGT2B17 CNV region accounting for variability in UGT2B17 gene transcription and testosterone glucuronidation rate, in addition to that attributable to the UGT2B17 CNV. Our study discovered novel pharmacogenetic markers and provided detailed insight into the genetic network regulating hepatic UGTs.

  11. Genetic factors affecting gene transcription and catalytic activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in human liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanqing; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Gamazon, Eric R; Mirkov, Snezana; Chen, Peixian; Wu, Kehua; Sun, Chang; Cox, Nancy J; Cook, Edwin; Das, Soma; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to discover cis- and trans-acting factors significantly affecting mRNA expression and catalytic activity of human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Transcription levels of five major hepatic UGT1A (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6 and UGT1A9) and five UGT2B (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17) genes were quantified in human liver tissue samples (n = 125) using real-time PCR. Glucuronidation activities of 14 substrates were measured in 47 livers. We genotyped 167 tagSNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) in UGT1A (n = 43) and UGT2B (n = 124), as well as the known functional UGT1A1*28 and UGT2B17 CNV (copy number variation) polymorphisms. Transcription levels of 15 transcription factors (TFs) known to regulate these UGTs were quantified. We found that UGT expression and activity were highly variable among the livers (median and range of coefficient of variations: 135%, 74-217% and 52%, 39-105%, respectively). CAR, PXR and ESR1 were found to be the most important trans-regulators of UGT transcription (median and range of correlation coefficients: 46%, 6-58%; 47%, 9-58%; and 52%, 24-75%, respectively). Hepatic UGT activities were mainly determined by UGT gene transcription levels. Twenty-one polymorphisms were significantly (FDR-adjusted P < 0.05) associated with mRNA expression and/or activities of UGT1A1, UGT1A3 and UGT2B17. We found novel SNPs in the UGT2B17 CNV region accounting for variability in UGT2B17 gene transcription and testosterone glucuronidation rate, in addition to that attributable to the UGT2B17 CNV. Our study discovered novel pharmacogenetic markers and provided detailed insight into the genetic network regulating hepatic UGTs. PMID:24879639

  12. Glial Cell Missing 1 Regulates Placental Growth Factor (PGF) Gene Transcription in Human Trophoblast1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Miao; Mukherjea, Debashree; Gobble, Ryan M.; Groesch, Kathleen A.; Torry, Ronald J.; Torry, Donald S.

    2008-01-01

    Placental growth factor (PGF, previously known as PlGF) is prominently expressed by trophoblasts in human placenta, whereas most nontrophoblast cells express low levels of PGF mRNA under normal physiological conditions. We have shown that hypoxia decreases PGF expression in the trophoblast, but little is known about transcriptional regulation of PGF gene expression. We sought to determine promoter regions of the human PGF gene that contribute to its restricted high constitutive expression in the trophoblast. Overlapping putative promoter regions of human PGF gene encompassing −1.5 kb were cloned into reporter vectors and co-transfected into trophoblast and nontrophoblast cell lines. Promoter activity generated by a −1.5-kb clone was significantly higher in trophoblasts than in nontrophoblasts. Selective deletion mutants showed that a clone encompassing the PGF (−828/+34) region generated promoter activity similar to the −1.5-kb region in the trophoblast. However, deletion of another 131 bp from this subclone (−698/+34) resulted in significantly less promoter activity in the trophoblast. The (−828/−698) region significantly enhanced activity of a minimal promoter construct in trophoblast but not in nontrophoblast cells, suggesting that this region contributes to regulating PGF transcription in the trophoblast. Site-directed mutagenesis of a glial cell missing 1 (GCM1) motif in the 131-bp region significantly decreased enhancer activity in the trophoblast. Furthermore, overexpression of GCM1 significantly increased PGF −1.5-kb promoter activity and PGF mRNA expression in trophoblast and nontrophoblast cells. Forced overexpression of GCM1 restored PGF expression in the hypoxic trophoblast. These data support a functional role for GCM1 contributing to constitutively high trophoblast PGF expression and is the first direct evidence of an oxygen-responsive, trophoblast-specific transcription factor contributing to the regulation of PGF expression. PMID

  13. Regulation of the human ADAMTS-4 promoter by transcription factors and cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Thirunavukkarasu, Kannan . E-mail: kannan@lilly.com; Pei, Yong; Moore, Terry L.; Wang, He; Yu, Xiao-peng; Geiser, Andrew G.; Chandrasekhar, Srinivasan

    2006-06-23

    ADAMTS-4 (aggrecanase-1) is a metalloprotease that plays a role in aggrecan degradation in the cartilage extracellular matrix. In order to understand the regulation of ADAMTS-4 gene expression we have cloned and characterized a functional 4.5 kb human ADAMTS-4 promoter. Sequence analysis of the promoter revealed the presence of putative binding sites for nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and Runx family of transcription factors that are known to regulate chondrocyte maturation and differentiation. Using promoter-reporter assays and mRNA analysis we have analyzed the role of chondrocyte-expressed transcription factors NFATp and Runx2 and have shown that ADAMTS-4 is a potential downstream target of these two factors. Our results suggest that inhibition of the expression/function of NFATp and/or Runx2 may enable us to modulate aggrecan degradation in normal physiology and/or in degenerative joint diseases. The ADAMTS-4 promoter would serve as a valuable mechanistic tool to better understand the regulation of ADAMTS-4 expression by signaling pathways that modulate cartilage matrix breakdown.

  14. The forkhead transcription factor FOXP1 represses human plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    van Keimpema, Martine; Grüneberg, Leonie J; Mokry, Michal; van Boxtel, Ruben; van Zelm, Menno C; Coffer, Paul; Pals, Steven T; Spaargaren, Marcel

    2015-10-29

    Expression of the forkhead transcription factor FOXP1 is essential for early B-cell development, whereas downregulation of FOXP1 at the germinal center (GC) stage is required for GC B-cell function. Aberrantly high FOXP1 expression is frequently observed in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, being associated with poor prognosis. Here, by gene expression analysis upon ectopic overexpression of FOXP1 in primary human memory B cells (MBCs) and B-cell lines, combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing, we established that FOXP1 directly represses expression of PRDM1, IRF4, and XBP1, transcriptional master regulators of plasma cell (PC) differentiation. In accordance, FOXP1 is prominently expressed in primary human naive and MBCs, but expression strongly decreases during PC differentiation. Moreover, as compared with immunoglobulin (Ig) M(+) MBCs, IgG(+) MBCs combine lower expression of FOXP1 with an enhanced intrinsic PC differentiation propensity, and constitutive (over)expression of FOXP1 in B-cell lines and primary human MBCs represses their ability to differentiate into PCs. Taken together, our data indicate that proper control of FOXP1 expression plays a critical role in PC differentiation, whereas aberrant expression of FOXP1 might contribute to lymphomagenesis by blocking this terminal B-cell differentiation. PMID:26289642

  15. The forkhead transcription factor FOXP1 represses human plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    van Keimpema, Martine; Grüneberg, Leonie J.; Mokry, Michal; van Boxtel, Ruben; van Zelm, Menno C.; Coffer, Paul; Pals, Steven T.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of the forkhead transcription factor FOXP1 is essential for early B-cell development, whereas downregulation of FOXP1 at the germinal center (GC) stage is required for GC B-cell function. Aberrantly high FOXP1 expression is frequently observed in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, being associated with poor prognosis. Here, by gene expression analysis upon ectopic overexpression of FOXP1 in primary human memory B cells (MBCs) and B-cell lines, combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequencing, we established that FOXP1 directly represses expression of PRDM1, IRF4, and XBP1, transcriptional master regulators of plasma cell (PC) differentiation. In accordance, FOXP1 is prominently expressed in primary human naive and MBCs, but expression strongly decreases during PC differentiation. Moreover, as compared with immunoglobulin (Ig) M+ MBCs, IgG+ MBCs combine lower expression of FOXP1 with an enhanced intrinsic PC differentiation propensity, and constitutive (over)expression of FOXP1 in B-cell lines and primary human MBCs represses their ability to differentiate into PCs. Taken together, our data indicate that proper control of FOXP1 expression plays a critical role in PC differentiation, whereas aberrant expression of FOXP1 might contribute to lymphomagenesis by blocking this terminal B-cell differentiation. PMID:26289642

  16. Transcription from the second heavy-strand promoter of human mtDNA is repressed by transcription factor A in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lodeiro, Maria F; Uchida, Akira; Bestwick, Megan; Moustafa, Ibrahim M; Arnold, Jamie J; Shadel, Gerald S; Cameron, Craig E

    2012-04-24

    Cell-based studies support the existence of two promoters on the heavy strand of mtDNA: heavy-strand promoter 1 (HSP1) and HSP2. However, transcription from HSP2 has been reported only once in a cell-free system, and never when recombinant proteins have been used. Here, we document transcription from HSP2 using an in vitro system of defined composition. An oligonucleotide template representing positions 596-685 of mtDNA was sufficient to observe transcription by the human mtRNA polymerase (POLRMT) that was absolutely dependent on mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (TFB2M). POLRMT/TFB2M-dependent transcription was inhibited by concentrations of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) stoichiometric with the transcription template, a condition that activates transcription from the light-strand promoter (LSP) in vitro. Domains of TFAM required for LSP activation were also required for HSP2 repression, whereas other mtDNA binding proteins failed to alter transcriptional output. Binding sites for TFAM were located on both sides of the start site of transcription from HSP2, suggesting that TFAM binding interferes with POLRMT and/or TFB2M binding. Consistent with a competitive binding model for TFAM repression of HSP2, the impact of TFAM concentration on HSP2 transcription was diminished by elevating the POLRMT and TFB2M concentrations. In the context of our previous studies of LSP and HSP1, it is now clear that three promoters exist in human mtDNA. Each promoter has a unique requirement for and/or response to the level of TFAM present, thus implying far greater complexity in the regulation of mammalian mitochondrial transcription than recognized to date.

  17. TMREC: A Database of Transcription Factor and MiRNA Regulatory Cascades in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuyuan; Li, Wei; Lian, Baofeng; Liu, Xinyi; Zhang, Yan; Dai, Enyu; Yu, Xuexin; Meng, Fanlin; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, studies have reported that the combinatorial regulation of transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) is essential for the appropriate execution of biological events and developmental processes. Dysregulations of these regulators often cause diseases. However, there are no available resources on the regulatory cascades of TFs and miRNAs in the context of human diseases. To fulfill this vacancy, we established the TMREC database in this study. First, we integrated curated transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations to construct the TF and miRNA regulatory network. Next, we identified all linear paths using the Breadth First Search traversal method. Finally, we used known disease-related genes and miRNAs to measure the strength of association between cascades and diseases. Currently, TMREC consists of 74,248 cascades and 25,194 cascade clusters, involving in 412 TFs, 266 miRNAs and 545 diseases. With the expanding of experimental support regulation data, we will regularly update the database. TMREC aims to help experimental biologists to comprehensively analyse gene expression regulation, to understand the aetiology and to predict novel therapeutic targets.TMREC is freely available at http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/TMREC/. PMID:25932650

  18. Survey of variation in human transcription factors reveals prevalent DNA binding changes

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Luis A.; Rogers, Julia M.; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Woodard, Jaie; Mariani, Luca; Kock, Kian Hong; Inukai, Sachi; Siggers, Trevor; Shokri, Leila; Gordân, Raluca; Sahni, Nidhi; Cotsapas, Chris; Hao, Tong; Yi, Song; Kellis, Manolis; Daly, Mark J.; Vidal, Marc; Hill, David E.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of exomes and genomes has revealed abundant genetic variation affecting the coding sequences of human transcription factors (TFs), but the consequences of such variation remain largely unexplored. We developed a computational, structure-based approach to evaluate TF variants for their impact on DNA-binding activity and used universal protein binding microarrays to assay sequence-specific DNA-binding activity across 41 reference and 117 variant alleles found in individuals of diverse ancestries and families with Mendelian diseases. We found 77 variants in 28 genes that affect DNA-binding affinity or specificity and identified thousands of rare alleles likely to alter the DNA-binding activity of human sequence-specific TFs. Our results suggest that most individuals have unique repertoires of TF DNA-binding activities, which may contribute to phenotypic variation. PMID:27013732

  19. Exploiting ancestral mammalian genomes for the prediction of human transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The computational prediction of Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBS) remains a challenge due to their short length and low information content. Comparative genomics approaches that simultaneously consider several related species and favor sites that have been conserved throughout evolution improve the accuracy (specificity) of the predictions but are limited due to a phenomenon called binding site turnover, where sequence evolution causes one TFBS to replace another in the same region. In parallel to this development, an increasing number of mammalian genomes are now sequenced and it is becoming possible to infer, to a surprisingly high degree of accuracy, ancestral mammalian sequences. Results We propose a TFBS prediction approach that makes use of the availability of inferred ancestral mammalian genomes to improve its accuracy. This method aims to identify binding loci, which are regions of a few hundred base pairs that have preserved their potential to bind a given transcription factor over evolutionary time. After proposing a neutral evolutionary model of predicted TFBS counts in a DNA region of a given length, we use it to identify regions that have preserved the number of predicted TFBS they contain to an unexpected degree given their divergence. The approach is applied to human chromosome 1 and shows significant gains in accuracy as compared to both existing single-species and multi-species TFBS prediction approaches, in particular for transcription factors that are subject to high turnover rates. Availability The source code and predictions made by the program are available at http://www.cs.mcgill.ca/~blanchem/bindingLoci. PMID:23281809

  20. The adipocyte specific transcription factor C/EBPalpha modulates human ob gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S G; De Vos, P; Guerre-Millo, M; Wong, K; Hermann, T; Staels, B; Briggs, M R; Auwerx, J

    1996-01-01

    The ob gene product, leptin, apparently exclusively expressed in adipose tissue, is a signaling factor regulating body weight homeostasis and energy balance. ob gene expression is increased in obese rodents and regulated by feeding, insulin, and glucocorticoids, which supports the concept that ob gene expression is under hormonal control, which is expected for a key factor controlling body weight homeostasis and energy balance. In humans, ob mRNA expression is increased in gross obesity; however, the effects of the above factors on human ob expression are unknown. We describe the structure of the human ob gene and initial functional analysis of its promoter. The human ob gene's three exons cover approximately 15 kb of genomic DNA. The entire coding region is contained in exons 2 and 3, which are separated by a 2-kb intron. The first small 30-bp untranslated exon is located >10.5 kb upstream of the initiator ATG codon. Three kilobases of DNA upstream of the transcription start site has been cloned and characterized. Only 217 bp of 5' sequence are required for basal adipose tissue-specific expression of the ob gene as well as enhanced expression by C/EBPalpha. Mutation of the single C/EBPalpha site in this region abolished inducibility of the promoter by C/EBPalpha in cotransfection assays. The gene structure will facilitate our analysis of ob mutations in human obesity, whereas knowledge of sequence elements and factors regulating ob gene expression should be of major importance in the prevention and treatment of obesity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8643605

  1. Identification of the imprinted KLF14 transcription factor undergoing human-specific accelerated evolution.

    PubMed

    Parker-Katiraee, Layla; Carson, Andrew R; Yamada, Takahiro; Arnaud, Philippe; Feil, Robert; Abu-Amero, Sayeda N; Moore, Gudrun E; Kaneda, Masahiro; Perry, George H; Stone, Anne C; Lee, Charles; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Stephen W

    2007-05-01

    Imprinted genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin manner and are located in clusters throughout the genome. Aberrations in the expression of imprinted genes on human Chromosome 7 have been suggested to play a role in the etiologies of Russell-Silver Syndrome and autism. We describe the imprinting of KLF14, an intronless member of the Krüppel-like family of transcription factors located at Chromosome 7q32. We show that it has monoallelic maternal expression in all embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues studied, in both human and mouse. We examine epigenetic modifications in the KLF14 CpG island in both species and find this region to be hypomethylated. In addition, we perform chromatin immunoprecipitation and find that the murine Klf14 CpG island lacks allele-specific histone modifications. Despite the absence of these defining features, our analysis of Klf14 in offspring from DNA methyltransferase 3a conditional knockout mice reveals that the gene's expression is dependent upon a maternally methylated region. Due to the intronless nature of Klf14 and its homology to Klf16, we suggest that the gene is an ancient retrotransposed copy of Klf16. By sequence analysis of numerous species, we place the timing of this event after the divergence of Marsupialia, yet prior to the divergence of the Xenarthra superclade. We identify a large number of sequence variants in KLF14 and, using several measures of diversity, we determine that there is greater variability in the human lineage with a significantly increased number of nonsynonymous changes, suggesting human-specific accelerated evolution. Thus, KLF14 may be the first example of an imprinted transcript undergoing accelerated evolution in the human lineage. PMID:17480121

  2. Transcription factors link mouse WAP-T mammary tumors with human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Otto, Benjamin; Streichert, Thomas; Wegwitz, Florian; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Klätschke, Kristin; Wagener, Christoph; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V

    2013-03-15

    Mouse models are important tools to decipher the molecular mechanisms of mammary carcinogenesis and to mimic the respective human disease. Despite sharing common phenotypic and genetic features, the proper translation of murine models to human breast cancer remains a challenging task. In a previous study we showed that in the SV40 transgenic WAP-T mice an active Met-pathway and epithelial-mesenchymal characteristics distinguish low- and high-grade mammary carcinoma. To assign these murine tumors to corresponding human tumors we here incorporated the analysis of expression of transcription factor (TF) coding genes and show that thereby a more accurate interspecies translation can be achieved. We describe a novel cross-species translation procedure and demonstrate that expression of unsupervised selected TFs, such as ELF5, HOXA5 and TFCP2L1, can clearly distinguish between the human molecular breast cancer subtypes--or as, for example, expression of TFAP2B between yet unclassified subgroups. By integrating different levels of information like histology, gene set enrichment, expression of differentiation markers and TFs we conclude that tumors in WAP-T mice exhibit similarities to both, human basal-like and non-basal-like subtypes. We furthermore suggest that the low- and high-grade WAP-T tumor phenotypes might arise from distinct cells of tumor origin. Our results underscore the importance of TFs as common cross-species denominators in the regulatory networks underlying mammary carcinogenesis.

  3. Reprogramming of human fibroblasts to pluripotent stem cells using mRNA of four transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Yakubov, Eduard; Rechavi, Gidi; Rozenblatt, Shmuel; Givol, David

    2010-03-26

    Reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced pluripotent cells (iPS) was accomplished in 2006 by expressing four, or less, embryonic stem cell (ESC)-specific transcription factors. Due to the possible danger of DNA damage and the potential tumorigenicity associated with such DNA damage, attempts were made to minimize DNA integration by the vectors involved in this process without complete success. Here we present a method of using RNA transfection as a tool for reprogramming human fibroblasts to iPS. We used RNA synthesized in vitro from cDNA of the same reprogramming four transcription factors. After transfection of the RNA, we show intracellular expression and nuclear localization of the respective proteins in at least 70% of the cells. We used five consecutive transfections to support continuous protein expression resulting in the formation of iPS colonies that express alkaline phosphatase and several ESC markers and that can be expanded. This method completely avoids DNA integration and may be developed to replace the use of DNA vectors in the formation of iPS.

  4. An inducible transcription factor activates expression of human immunodeficiency virus in T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Gary; Baltimore, David

    1987-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) production from latently infected T lymphocytes can be induced with compounds that activate the cells to secrete lymphokines1,2. The elements in the HIV genome which control activation are not known but expression might be regulated through a variety of DNA elements. The cis-acting control elements of the viral genome are enhancer and promoter regions. The virus also encodes trans-acting factors specified by the tat-III (refs 3-6) and art genes7. We have examined whether products specific to activated T cells might stimulate viral transcription by binding to regions on viral DNA. Activation of T cells, which increases HIV expression up to 50-fold, correlated with induction of a DNA binding protein indistinguishable from a recognized transcription factor, called NF-κB (ref. 8), with binding sites in the viral enhancer. Mutation of these binding sites abolished inducibility. That NF-κB acts in synergy with the viral tat-III gene product to enhance HIV expression in T cells may have implications for the pathogenesis of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome).

  5. Krüppel-like factor 9 is a circadian transcription factor in human epidermis that controls proliferation of keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Spörl, Florian; Korge, Sandra; Jürchott, Karsten; Wunderskirchner, Minetta; Schellenberg, Katja; Heins, Sven; Specht, Aljona; Stoll, Claudia; Klemz, Roman; Maier, Bert; Wenck, Horst; Schrader, Annika; Kunz, Dieter; Blatt, Thomas; Kramer, Achim

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks govern a wide range of cellular and physiological functions in various organisms. Recent evidence suggests distinct functions of local clocks in peripheral mammalian tissues such as immune responses and cell cycle control. However, studying circadian action in peripheral tissues has been limited so far to mouse models, leaving the implication for human systems widely elusive. In particular, circadian rhythms in human skin, which is naturally exposed to strong daytime-dependent changes in the environment, have not been investigated to date on a molecular level. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of circadian gene expression in human epidermis. Whole-genome microarray analysis of suction-blister epidermis obtained throughout the day revealed a functional circadian clock in epidermal keratinocytes with hundreds of transcripts regulated in a daytime-dependent manner. Among those, we identified a circadian transcription factor, Krüppel-like factor 9 (Klf9), that is substantially up-regulated in a cortisol and differentiation-state-dependent manner. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments showed strong antiproliferative effects of Klf9. Putative Klf9 target genes include proliferation/differentiation markers that also show circadian expression in vivo, suggesting that Klf9 affects keratinocyte proliferation/differentiation by controlling the expression of target genes in a daytime-dependent manner. PMID:22711835

  6. The Inflammatory Transcription Factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 Drive Age-Associated Transcriptional Changes in the Human Kidney.

    PubMed

    O'Brown, Zach K; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Higgins, John P; Kim, Stuart K

    2015-12-01

    Human kidney function declines with age, accompanied by stereotyped changes in gene expression and histopathology, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are largely unknown. To identify potential regulators of kidney aging, we compared age-associated transcriptional changes in the human kidney with genome-wide maps of transcription factor occupancy from ChIP-seq datasets in human cells. The strongest candidates were the inflammation-associated transcription factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3, the activities of which increase with age in epithelial compartments of the renal cortex. Stimulation of renal tubular epithelial cells with the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (a STAT3 activator), IFNγ (a STAT1 activator), or TNFα (an NFκB activator) recapitulated age-associated gene expression changes. We show that common DNA variants in RELA and NFKB1, the two genes encoding subunits of the NFκB transcription factor, associate with kidney function and chronic kidney disease in gene association studies, providing the first evidence that genetic variation in NFκB contributes to renal aging phenotypes. Our results suggest that NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 underlie transcriptional changes and chronic inflammation in the aging human kidney.

  7. Transcription Factors OVOL1 and OVOL2 Induce the Mesenchymal to Epithelial Transition in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Hernan; Hernandez, James; Weidner, Savannah; McEachin, Richard C.; Fuller, David; Sud, Sudha; Schumann, Taibriana; Wilkinson, John E.; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Li, Hangwen; Maher, Christopher A.; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Healy, Patrick N.; Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Cell plasticity regulated by the balance between the mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and the opposite program, EMT, is critical in the metastatic cascade. Several transcription factors (TFs) are known to regulate EMT, though the mechanisms of MET remain unclear. We demonstrate a novel function of two TFs, OVOL1 and OVOL2, as critical inducers of MET in human cancers. Our findings indicate that the OVOL-TFs control MET through a regulatory feedback loop with EMT-inducing TF ZEB1, and the regulation of mRNA splicing by inducing Epithelial Splicing Regulatory Protein 1 (ESRP1). Using mouse prostate tumor models we show that expression of OVOL-TFs in mesenchymal prostate cancer cells attenuates their metastatic potential. The role of OVOL-TFs as inducers of MET is further supported by expression analyses in 917 cancer cell lines, suggesting their role as crucial regulators of epithelial-mesenchymal cell plasticity in cancer. PMID:24124593

  8. Transcription factor 4 (TCF4) and schizophrenia: integrating the animal and the human perspective.

    PubMed

    Quednow, Boris B; Brzózka, Magdalena M; Rossner, Moritz J

    2014-08-01

    Schizophrenia is a genetically complex disease considered to have a neurodevelopmental pathogenesis and defined by a broad spectrum of positive and negative symptoms as well as cognitive deficits. Recently, large genome-wide association studies have identified common alleles slightly increasing the risk for schizophrenia. Among the few schizophrenia-risk genes that have been consistently replicated is the basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factor 4 (TCF4). Haploinsufficiency of the TCF4 (formatting follows IUPAC nomenclature: TCF4 protein/protein function, Tcf4 rodent gene cDNA mRNA, TCF4 human gene cDNA mRNA) gene causes the Pitt-Hopkins syndrome-a neurodevelopmental disease characterized by severe mental retardation. Accordingly, Tcf4 null-mutant mice display developmental brain defects. TCF4-associated risk alleles are located in putative coding and non-coding regions of the gene. Hence, subtle changes at the level of gene expression might be relevant for the etiopathology of schizophrenia. Behavioural phenotypes obtained with a mouse model of slightly increased gene dosage and electrophysiological investigations with human risk-allele carriers revealed an overlapping spectrum of schizophrenia-relevant endophenotypes. Most prominently, early information processing and higher cognitive functions appear to be associated with TCF4 risk genotypes. Moreover, a recent human study unravelled gene × environment interactions between TCF4 risk alleles and smoking behaviour that were specifically associated with disrupted early information processing. Taken together, TCF4 is considered as an integrator ('hub') of several bHLH networks controlling critical steps of various developmental, and, possibly, plasticity-related transcriptional programs in the CNS and changes of TCF4 expression also appear to affect brain networks important for information processing. Consequently, these findings support the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia and provide a

  9. A negative elongation factor for human RNA polymerase II inhibits the anti-arrest transcript-cleavage factor TFIIS

    PubMed Central

    Palangat, Murali; Renner, Dan B.; Price, David H.; Landick, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Formation of productive transcription complexes after promoter escape by RNA polymerase II is a major event in eukaryotic gene regulation. Both negative and positive factors control this step. The principal negative elongation factor (NELF) contains four polypeptides and requires for activity the two-polypeptide 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribobenzimidazole-sensitivity inducing factor (DSIF). DSIF/NELF inhibits early transcript elongation until it is counteracted by the positive elongation factor P-TEFb. We report a previously undescribed activity of DSIF/NELF, namely inhibition of the transcript cleavage factor TFIIS. These two activities of DSIF/NELF appear to be mechanistically distinct. Inhibition of nucleotide addition requires ≥18 nt of nascent RNA, whereas inhibition of TFIIS occurs at all transcript lengths. Because TFIIS promotes escape from promoter-proximal pauses by stimulating cleavage of back-tracked nascent RNA, TFIIS inhibition may help DSIF/NELF negatively regulate productive transcription. PMID:16214896

  10. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor as the molecular target of cadmium toxicity in human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Chantarawong, Wipa; Takeda, Kazuhisa; Sangartit, Weerapon; Yoshizawa, Miki; Pradermwong, Kantimanee; Shibahara, Shigeki

    2014-11-28

    Dietary intake of cadmium is inevitable, causing age-related increase in cadmium accumulation in many organs, including hair, choroid and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Cadmium has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and macular degeneration. The functions of cochlea and retina are maintained by melanocytes and RPE, respectively, and the differentiation of these pigment cells is regulated by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). In the present study, we explored the potential toxicity of cadmium in the cochlea and retina by using cultured human melanocytes and human RPE cell lines. MITF consists of multiple isoforms, including melanocyte-specific MITF-M and widely expressed MITF-H. Levels of MITF-M protein and its mRNA in human epidermal melanocytes and HMV-II melanoma cells were decreased significantly by cadmium. In parallel with the MITF reduction, mRNA levels of tyrosinase, the key enzyme of melanin biosynthesis that is regulated by MITF-M, were also decreased. In RPE cells, however, the levels of total MITF protein, constituting mainly MITF-H, were not decreased by cadmium. We thus identify MITF-M as the molecular target of cadmium toxicity in melanocytes, thereby accounting for the increased risk of disability from melanocyte malfunction, such as hearing and vision loss among people with elevated cadmium exposure. PMID:25449283

  11. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A is required for the segregation of mitochondrial DNA in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Sumitani, Megumi; Endo, Hitoshi

    2011-01-15

    The segregation and transmission of the mitochondrial genome in humans are complicated processes but are particularly important for understanding the inheritance and clinical abnormalities of mitochondrial disorders. However, the molecular mechanism of the segregation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is largely unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is required for the segregation of mtDNA in cultured cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of TFAM in HeLa cells resulted in the enlarged mtDNA, as indicated by the assembly of fluorescent signals stained with PicoGreen. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed the enlarged mtDNA and further showed the existence of increased numbers of mitochondria lacking mtDNA signals in TFAM knockdown cells. By complementation analysis, the C-terminal tail of TFAM, which enhances its affinity with DNA, was found to be required for the appropriate distribution of mtDNA. Furthermore, we found that TFAM knockdown induced asymmetric segregation of mtDNA between dividing daughter cells. These results suggest an essential role for human TFAM in symmetric segregation of mtDNA. PMID:20955698

  12. Transcriptional activation of the human epidermal growth factor receptor promoter by human p53.

    PubMed Central

    Ludes-Meyers, J H; Subler, M A; Shivakumar, C V; Munoz, R M; Jiang, P; Bigger, J E; Brown, D R; Deb, S P; Deb, S

    1996-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) promoter is activated by both wild-type and tumor-derived mutant p53. In this communication, we demonstrate that EGFR promoter sequence requirements for transactivation by wild-type and mutant p53 are different. Transient-expression assays with EGFR promoter deletions identified a wild-type human p53 response element, 5'-AGCTAGACGTCCGGGCAGCCCCCGGCG -3', from positions --265 to --239. Electrophoretic mobility shift analysis and DNase I footprinting assays indicated that wild-type p53 binds sequence specifically to the response element. Using circularly permuted DNA fragments containing the p53-binding site, we show that wild-type p53 binding induces DNA bending at this site. We further show that the EGFR promoter is also activated by tumor-derived p53 mutants p53-143A, p53-175H, p53-248W, p53-273H, and p53-281G. However, the transactivation by mutant p53 does not require the wild-type p53-binding site. The minimal EGFR promoter from positions --104 to --20 which does not contain the wild-type p53-binding site is transactivated by the p53 mutants but not by the wild-type protein, showing a difference in the mechanism of transactivation by wild-type and mutant p53. Transactivation of the EGFR promoter by p53 may represent a novel mechanism of cell growth regulation. PMID:8887630

  13. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor as the molecular target of cadmium toxicity in human melanocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chantarawong, Wipa; Takeda, Kazuhisa; Sangartit, Weerapon; Yoshizawa, Miki; Pradermwong, Kantimanee; Shibahara, Shigeki

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • In human melanocytes, cadmium decreases the expression of MITF-M and tyrosinase and their mRNAs. • In human melanoma cells, cadmium decreases the expression of MITF-M protein and tyrosinase mRNA. • Expression of MITF-H is less sensitive to cadmium toxicity in melanocyte-linage cells. • Cadmium does not decrease the expression of MITF-H in retinal pigment epithelial cells. • MITF-M is the molecular target of cadmium toxicity in melanocytes. - Abstract: Dietary intake of cadmium is inevitable, causing age-related increase in cadmium accumulation in many organs, including hair, choroid and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Cadmium has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hearing loss and macular degeneration. The functions of cochlea and retina are maintained by melanocytes and RPE, respectively, and the differentiation of these pigment cells is regulated by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). In the present study, we explored the potential toxicity of cadmium in the cochlea and retina by using cultured human melanocytes and human RPE cell lines. MITF consists of multiple isoforms, including melanocyte-specific MITF-M and widely expressed MITF-H. Levels of MITF-M protein and its mRNA in human epidermal melanocytes and HMV-II melanoma cells were decreased significantly by cadmium. In parallel with the MITF reduction, mRNA levels of tyrosinase, the key enzyme of melanin biosynthesis that is regulated by MITF-M, were also decreased. In RPE cells, however, the levels of total MITF protein, constituting mainly MITF-H, were not decreased by cadmium. We thus identify MITF-M as the molecular target of cadmium toxicity in melanocytes, thereby accounting for the increased risk of disability from melanocyte malfunction, such as hearing and vision loss among people with elevated cadmium exposure.

  14. Profiling ethanol-targeted transcription factors in human carcinoma cell-derived embryoid bodies.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Chanchal; Halder, Debasish; Chai, Jin Choul; Lee, Young Seek; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2016-01-15

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a collective term that represents fetal abnormalities associated with maternal alcohol consumption. Prenatal alcohol exposure and related anomalies are well characterized, but the molecular mechanism behind this phenomenon is not yet understood. Few insights have been gained from genetic and epigenetic studies of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Our aim was to profile the important molecular regulators of ethanol-related alterations of the genome. For this purpose, we have analyzed the gene expression pattern of human carcinoma cell-derived embryoid bodies in the absence or presence of ethanol. A cDNA microarray analysis was used to profile mRNA expression in embryoid bodies at day 7 with or without ethanol treatment. A total of 493 differentially expressed genes were identified in response to 50 mM ethanol exposure. Of these, 111 genes were up-regulated, and 382 were down-regulated. Gene ontology term enrichment analysis revealed that these genes are involved in important biological processes: neurological system processes, cognition, behavior, sensory perception of smell, taste and chemical stimuli and synaptic transmission. Similarly, the enrichment of disease-related genes included relevant categories such as neurological diseases, developmental disorders, skeletal and muscular disorders, and connective tissue disorders. Furthermore, we have identified a group of 26 genes that encode transcription factors. We validated the relative gene expression of several transcription factors using quantitative real time PCR. We hope that our study substantially contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of alcohol-mediated anomalies and facilitates further research.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of the human Liver X Receptor α gene by Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α.

    PubMed

    Theofilatos, Dimitris; Anestis, Aristomenis; Hashimoto, Koshi; Kardassis, Dimitris

    2016-01-15

    Liver X Receptors (LXRs) are sterol-activated transcription factors that play major roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, HDL biogenesis and reverse cholesterol transport. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms that control the expression of the human LXRα gene in hepatic cells. A series of reporter plasmids containing consecutive 5' deletions of the hLXRα promoter upstream of the luciferase gene were constructed and the activity of each construct was measured in HepG2 cells. This analysis showed that the activity of the human LXRα promoter was significantly reduced by deleting the -111 to -42 region suggesting the presence of positive regulatory elements in this short proximal fragment. Bioinformatics data including motif search and ChIP-Seq revealed the presence of a potential binding motif for Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 α (HNF-4α) in this area. Overexpression of HNF-4α in HEK 293T cells increased the expression of all LXRα promoter constructs except -42/+384. In line, silencing the expression of endogenous HNF-4α in HepG2 cells was associated with reduced LXRα protein levels and reduced activity of the -111/+384 LXRα promoter but not of the -42/+384 promoter. Using ChiP assays in HepG2 cells combined with DNAP assays we mapped the novel HNF-4α specific binding motif (H4-SBM) in the -50 to -40 region of the human LXRα promoter. A triple mutation in this H4-SBM abolished HNF-4α binding and reduced the activity of the promoter to 65% relative to the wild type. Furthermore, the mutant promoter could not be transactivated by HNF-4α. In conclusion, our data indicate that HNF-4α may have a wider role in cell and plasma cholesterol homeostasis by controlling the expression of LXRα in hepatic cells. PMID:26692490

  16. Human gene-centered transcription factor networks for enhancers and disease variants.

    PubMed

    Fuxman Bass, Juan I; Sahni, Nidhi; Shrestha, Shaleen; Garcia-Gonzalez, Aurian; Mori, Akihiro; Bhat, Numana; Yi, Song; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2015-04-23

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) comprising interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and regulatory loci control development and physiology. Numerous disease-associated mutations have been identified, the vast majority residing in non-coding regions of the genome. As current GRN mapping methods test one TF at a time and require the use of cells harboring the mutation(s) of interest, they are not suitable to identify TFs that bind to wild-type and mutant loci. Here, we use gene-centered yeast one-hybrid (eY1H) assays to interrogate binding of 1,086 human TFs to 246 enhancers, as well as to 109 non-coding disease mutations. We detect both loss and gain of TF interactions with mutant loci that are concordant with target gene expression changes. This work establishes eY1H assays as a powerful addition to the toolkit of mapping human GRNs and for the high-throughput characterization of genomic variants that are rapidly being identified by genome-wide association studies.

  17. Human Gene-Centered Transcription Factor Networks for Enhancers and Disease Variants

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Juan I. Fuxman; Sahni, Nidhi; Shrestha, Shaleen; Garcia-Gonzalez, Aurian; Mori, Akihiro; Bhat, Numana; Yi, Song; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) comprising interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and regulatory loci control development and physiology. Numerous disease-associated mutations have been identified, the vast majority residing in non-coding regions of the genome. As current GRN mapping methods test one TF at a time and require the use of cells harboring the mutation(s) of interest, they are not suitable to identify TFs that bind to wild type and mutant loci. Here, we use gene-centered yeast one-hybrid (eY1H) assays to interrogate binding of 1,086 human TFs to 246 enhancers, as well as to 109 non-coding disease mutations. We detect both loss and gain of TF interactions with mutant loci that are concordant with target gene expression changes. This work establishes eY1H assays as a powerful addition to the toolkit of mapping human GRNs and for the high-throughput characterization of genomic variants that are rapidly being identified by genome-wide association studies. PMID:25910213

  18. Post-transcriptional regulation of neurofibromin level in cultured human melanocytes in response to growth factors.

    PubMed

    Griesser, J; Kaufmann, D; Maier, B; Mailhammer, R; Kuehl, P; Krone, W

    1997-03-01

    Among the symptoms that characterize neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are pigmentation anomalies such as cafe au lait spots. It has been suggested that the reduction of the neurofibromin level in the epidermis of NF1 patients is responsible for the observed signs such as altered melanogenesis and altered density of melanocytes. Our studies show that in cultured normal human melanocytes, the neurofibromin level can be varied in vitro over a wide range by using different culture conditions. The influence of factors that control differentiation and proliferation of melanocytes on neurofibromin levels was studied. Immunoprecipitation followed by western blotting showed a 3- to 4-fold increase of neurofibromin after stimulation by PMA or bFGF, respectively, and a 1.5-fold increase in cells stimulated with steel factor. The increase of neurofibromin was not paralleled by a higher NF1 mRNA level as proved by northern blotting. Pulse-chase experiments with 35S-labeled melanocytes revealed an approximately 3-fold increase in the half-life of neurofibromin in bFGF- or PMA-stimulated cells compared to controls. These results indicate that the neurofibromin level of cultured melanocytes can be regulated by a mechanism independent of NF1 gene transcription and translation, which might influence the degradation rate of the protein.

  19. Functional Differences between Human and Bovine Immunodeficiency Virus Tat Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, Hal P.; Wiegand, Heather L.; Bieniasz, Paul D.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2000-01-01

    Transcriptional transactivation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter element by the essential viral Tat protein requires recruitment of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the viral TAR RNA target. The recruitment of P-TEFb, which has been proposed to be necessary and sufficient for activation of viral gene expression, is mediated by the highly cooperative interaction of Tat and cyclin T1, an essential component of P-TEFb, with the HIV-1 TAR element. Species, such as rodents, that encode cyclin T1 variants that are unable to support TAR binding by the Tat-cyclin T1 heterodimer are also unable to support HIV-1 Tat function. In contrast, we here demonstrate that the bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) Tat protein is fully able to bind to BIV TAR both in vivo and in vitro in the absence of any cellular cofactor. Nevertheless, BIV Tat can specifically recruit cyclin T1 to the BIV TAR element, and this recruitment is as essential for BIV Tat function as it is for HIV-1 Tat activity. However, because the cyclin T1 protein does not contribute to TAR binding, BIV Tat is able to function effectively in cells from several species that do not support HIV-1 Tat function. Thus, BIV Tat, while apparently dependent on the same cellular cofactor as the Tat proteins encoded by other lentiviruses, is nevertheless unique in terms of the mechanism used to recruit the BIV Tat-cyclin T1 complex to the viral LTR promoter. PMID:10775603

  20. Human interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-2 is essential for Toll-like receptor-mediated transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Sinead M; Keating, Sinead E; Szymak, Joanna; Bowie, Andrew G

    2011-07-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors that recognize microbial ligands and subsequently trigger intracellular signaling pathways involving transcription factors such as NFκB and MAPKs such as p38. TLR signaling can regulate both transcriptional and post-transcriptional events leading to altered gene expression and thus appropriate immune responses. The interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) family comprises four kinases that regulate TLR signaling. However, the role of IRAK-2 has remained unclear, especially in human cells. Recent studies using cells from in-bred Irak2(-/-) mice showed that murine IRAK-2 was not required for early TLR signaling events but had a role in delayed NFκB activation and in cytokine production. IRAK-2 in mice has four splice variants, two of which are inhibitory, whereas human IRAK-2 has no splice variants. Thus IRAK-2 in mice and humans may function differently, and therefore we analyzed the role of IRAK-2 in TLR responses in primary human cells. siRNA knockdown of IRAK-2 expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed a role for human IRAK-2 in both TLR4- and TLR8-mediated early NFκB and p38 MAPK activation and in induction of TNF mRNA. These data conflict with findings from the in-bred Irak2(-/-) mice but concur with what has been seen in wild-derived mice for TLR2. Moreover, human IRAK-2 was required for regulating MyD88-dependent TNFα mRNA stability via the TNF 3'UTR. Collectively, these data demonstrate for the first time an essential role for IRAK-2 in primary human cells for both transcriptional and post-transcriptional TLR responses.

  1. Human Interleukin-1 Receptor-associated Kinase-2 Is Essential for Toll-like Receptor-mediated Transcriptional and Post-transcriptional Regulation of Tumor Necrosis Factor α*

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Sinead M.; Keating, Sinead E.; Szymak, Joanna; Bowie, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition receptors that recognize microbial ligands and subsequently trigger intracellular signaling pathways involving transcription factors such as NFκB and MAPKs such as p38. TLR signaling can regulate both transcriptional and post-transcriptional events leading to altered gene expression and thus appropriate immune responses. The interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) family comprises four kinases that regulate TLR signaling. However, the role of IRAK-2 has remained unclear, especially in human cells. Recent studies using cells from in-bred Irak2−/− mice showed that murine IRAK-2 was not required for early TLR signaling events but had a role in delayed NFκB activation and in cytokine production. IRAK-2 in mice has four splice variants, two of which are inhibitory, whereas human IRAK-2 has no splice variants. Thus IRAK-2 in mice and humans may function differently, and therefore we analyzed the role of IRAK-2 in TLR responses in primary human cells. siRNA knockdown of IRAK-2 expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed a role for human IRAK-2 in both TLR4- and TLR8-mediated early NFκB and p38 MAPK activation and in induction of TNF mRNA. These data conflict with findings from the in-bred Irak2−/− mice but concur with what has been seen in wild-derived mice for TLR2. Moreover, human IRAK-2 was required for regulating MyD88-dependent TNFα mRNA stability via the TNF 3′UTR. Collectively, these data demonstrate for the first time an essential role for IRAK-2 in primary human cells for both transcriptional and post-transcriptional TLR responses. PMID:21606490

  2. Gene amplification of the transcription factor DP1 and CTNND1 in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Sandra D; Angulo, Barbara; Suarez-Gauthier, Ana; Melchor, Lorenzo; Medina, Pedro P; Sanchez-Verde, Lydia; Torres-Lanzas, Juan; Pita, Guillermo; Benitez, Javier; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse

    2010-09-01

    The search for novel oncogenes is important because they could be the target of future specific anticancer therapies. In the present paper we report the identification of novel amplified genes in lung cancer by means of global gene expression analysis. To screen for amplicons, we aligned the gene expression data according to the position of transcripts in the human genome and searched for clusters of over-expressed genes. We found several clusters with gene over-expression, suggesting an underlying genomic amplification. FISH and microarray analysis for DNA copy number in two clusters, at chromosomes 11q12 and 13q34, confirmed the presence of amplifications spanning about 0.4 and 1 Mb for 11q12 and 13q34, respectively. Amplification at these regions each occurred at a frequency of 3%. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR of each individual transcript within the amplicons allowed us to verify the increased in gene expression of several genes. The p120ctn and DP1 proteins, encoded by two candidate oncogenes, CTNND1 and TFDP1, at 11q12 and 13q amplicons, respectively, showed very strong immunostaining in lung tumours with gene amplification. We then focused on the 13q34 amplicon and in the TFDP1 candidate oncogene. To further determine the oncogenic properties of DP1, we searched for lung cancer cell lines carrying TFDP1 amplification. Depletion of TFDP1 expression by small interference RNA in a lung cancer cell line (HCC33) with TFDP1 amplification and protein over-expression reduced cell viability by 50%. In conclusion, we report the identification of two novel amplicons, at 13q34 and 11q12, each occurring at a frequency of 3% of non-small cell lung cancers. TFDP1, which encodes the E2F-associated transcription factor DP1 is a candidate oncogene at 13q34. The data discussed in this publication have been deposited in NCBIs Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) and are accessible through GEO Series Accession No. GSE21168.

  3. Novel PRD-like homeodomain transcription factors and retrotransposon elements in early human development

    PubMed Central

    Töhönen, Virpi; Katayama, Shintaro; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Sheikhi, Mona; Madissoon, Elo; Filippini-Cattaneo, Giuditta; Jaconi, Marisa; Johnsson, Anna; Bürglin, Thomas R.; Linnarsson, Sten; Hovatta, Outi; Kere, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional program that drives human preimplantation development is largely unknown. Here, by using single-cell RNA sequencing of 348 oocytes, zygotes and single blastomeres from 2- to 3-day-old embryos, we provide a detailed analysis of the human preimplantation transcriptome. By quantifying transcript far 5′-ends (TFEs), we include in our analysis transcripts that derive from alternative promoters. We show that 32 and 129 genes are transcribed during the transition from oocyte to four-cell stage and from four- to eight-cell stage, respectively. A number of identified transcripts originates from previously unannotated genes that include the PRD-like homeobox genes ARGFX, CPHX1, CPHX2, DPRX, DUXA, DUXB and LEUTX. Employing de novo promoter motif extraction on sequences surrounding TFEs, we identify significantly enriched gene regulatory motifs that often overlap with Alu elements. Our high-resolution analysis of the human transcriptome during preimplantation development may have important implications on future studies of human pluripotent stem cells and cell reprograming. PMID:26360614

  4. Transcriptional activation of human CDCA8 gene regulated by transcription factor NF-Y in embryonic stem cells and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Can; Miao, Cong-Xiu; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Lv-Jun; Gu, Yi-Fan; Zhou, Di; Chen, Lian-Sheng; Lin, Ge; Lu, Guang-Xiu

    2015-09-11

    The cell division cycle associated 8 (CDCA8) gene plays an important role in mitosis. Overexpression of CDCA8 was reported in some human cancers and is required for cancer growth and progression. We found CDCA8 expression was also high in human ES cells (hESCs) but dropped significantly upon hESC differentiation. However, the regulation of CDCA8 expression has not yet been studied. Here, we characterized the CDCA8 promoter and identified its cis-elements and transcription factors. Three transcription start sites were identified. Reporter gene assays revealed that the CDCA8 promoter was activated in hESCs and cancer cell lines. The promoter drove the reporter expression specifically to pluripotent cells during early mouse embryo development and to tumor tissues in tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that CDCA8 is transcriptionally activated in hESCs and cancer cells. Mechanistically, two key activation elements, bound by transcription factor NF-Y and CREB1, respectively, were identified in the CDCA8 basic promoter by mutation analyses and electrophoretic motility shift assays. NF-Y binding is positively correlated with promoter activities in different cell types. Interestingly, the NF-YA subunit, binding to the promoter, is primarily a short isoform in hESCs and a long isoform in cancer cells, indicating a different activation mechanism of the CDCA8 transcription between hESCs and cancer cells. Finally, enhanced CDCA8 promoter activities by NF-Y overexpression and reduced CDCA8 transcription by NF-Y knockdown further verified that NF-Y is a positive regulator of CDCA8 transcription. Our study unearths the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CDCA8 expression in hESCs and cancer cells, which provides a better understanding of its biological functions.

  5. Cell-Cycle Control of Developmentally Regulated Transcription Factors Accounts for Heterogeneity in Human Pluripotent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amar M.; Chappell, James; Trost, Robert; Lin, Li; Wang, Tao; Tang, Jie; Wu, Hao; Zhao, Shaying; Jin, Peng; Dalton, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Summary Heterogeneity within pluripotent stem cell (PSC) populations is indicative of dynamic changes that occur when cells drift between different states. Although the role of metastability in PSCs is unclear, it appears to reflect heterogeneity in cell signaling. Using the Fucci cell-cycle indicator system, we show that elevated expression of developmental regulators in G1 is a major determinant of heterogeneity in human embryonic stem cells. Although signaling pathways remain active throughout the cell cycle, their contribution to heterogeneous gene expression is restricted to G1. Surprisingly, we identify dramatic changes in the levels of global 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, an unanticipated source of epigenetic heterogeneity that is tightly linked to cell-cycle progression and the expression of developmental regulators. When we evaluated gene expression in differentiating cells, we found that cell-cycle regulation of developmental regulators was maintained during lineage specification. Cell-cycle regulation of developmentally regulated transcription factors is therefore an inherent feature of the mechanisms underpinning differentiation. PMID:24371808

  6. Expression profile of undifferentiated cell transcription factor 1 in normal and cancerous human epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mouallif, Mustapha; Albert, Adelin; Zeddou, Mustapha; Ennaji, My Mustapha; Delvenne, Philippe; Guenin, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Undifferentiated cell Transcription Factor 1 (UTF1) is a chromatin-bound protein involved in stem cell differentiation. It was initially reported to be restricted to stem cells or germinal tissues. However, recent work suggests that UTF1 is also expressed in somatic cells and that its expression may increase during carcinogenesis. To further clarify the expression profile of UTF1, we evaluated UTF1 expression levels immunohistochemically in eight normal human epithelia (from breast, prostate, endometrium, bladder, colon, oesophagus, lung and kidney) and their corresponding tumours as well as in several epithelial cell lines. We showed UTF1 staining in normal and tumour epithelial tissues, but with varying intensities according to the tissue location. In vitro analyses also revealed that UTF1 is expressed in somatic epithelial cell lines even in the absence of Oct4A and Sox2, its two main known regulators. The comparison of UTF1 levels in normal and tumoral tissues revealed significant overexpression in endometrial and prostatic adenocarcinomas, whereas lower intensity of the staining was observed in renal and colic tumours, suggesting a potential tissue-specific function of UTF1. Altogether, these results highlight a potential dual role for UTF1, acting either as an oncogene or as a tumour suppressor depending on the tissue. These findings also question its role as a specific marker for stem cells. PMID:24738751

  7. Specific interactions between transcription factors and the promoter-regulatory region of the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ghazal, P.; Lubon, H.; Hennighausen, L. )

    1988-03-01

    Repeat sequence motifs as well as unique sequences between nucleotides {minus}150 and {minus}22 of the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 gene interact in vitro with nuclear proteins. The authors show that a transcriptional element between nucleotides {minus}91 and {minus}65 stimulated promoter activity in vivo and in vitro by binding specific cellular transcription factors. Finally, a common sequence motif, (T)TGG/AC, present in 15 of the determined binding sites suggests a particular class of nuclear factors associated with the immediate-early 1 gene.

  8. Transcription factor Mohawk and the pathogenesis of human anterior cruciate ligament degradation

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Akihiko; Otabe, Koji; Ayabe, Fumiaki; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Onizuka, Naoko; Ito, Yoshiaki; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Lotz, Martin K.; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression and function of Mohawk (MKX) in human adult anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tissues and ligament cells from normal and osteoarthritis-affected knees. Methods Knee joints were obtained at autopsy within 24-48 hours postmortem from 13 normal donors (age 36.9±11.0 years), 16 OA donors (age 79.7±11.4 years) and 8 old donors without OA (age 76.9±12.9 years). All cartilage surfaces were graded macroscopically. MKX expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR. ACL-derived cells were used to study regulation of MKX expression by IL-1β. MKX was knocked down by siRNA to analyze function of MKX in extracellular matrix (ECM) production and differentiation in ACL-derived cells. Results The expression of MKX was significantly decreased in ACL-derived cells from OA knees compared with normal knees. Consistent with this finding, immunohistochemistry showed that MKX positive cells were significantly reduced in ACL tissues from OA donors in particular in cells located in disorientated fibers. In ACL-derived cells, IL-1β strongly suppressed MKX gene expression and reduced ligament ECM genes, COL1A1 and TNXB. On the other hand, SOX9, chondrocyte master transcription factor, was up regulated by IL-1β treatment. Importantly, knock down of MKX expression by siRNA upregulated SOX9 expression in ACL-derived cells, whereas the expression of COL1A1 and TNXB were decreased. Conclusion Reduced expression of MKX is a feature of degenerated ACL in OA-affected joints and this may be in part mediated by IL-1β. MKX appears necessary to maintain the tissue specific cellular differentiation status and ECM production in adult human tendons and ligaments. PMID:23686683

  9. Cdk-activating kinase complex is a component of human transcription factor TFIIH.

    PubMed

    Shiekhattar, R; Mermelstein, F; Fisher, R P; Drapkin, R; Dynlacht, B; Wessling, H C; Morgan, D O; Reinberg, D

    1995-03-16

    Transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) contains a kinase capable of phosphorylating the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here we report the identification of the Cdk-activating kinase (Cak) complex (Cdk7 and cyclin H) as a component of TFIIH after extensive purification of TFIIH by chromatography. We find that affinity-purified antibodies directed against cyclin H inhibit TFIIH-dependent transcription and that both cyclin H and Cdk7 antibodies inhibit phosphorylation of the CTD of the largest subunit of the RNAPII in the preinitiation complex. Cak is present in at least two distinct complexes, TFIIH and a smaller complex that is unable to phosphorylate RNAPII in the preinitiation complex. Both Cak complexes, as well as recombinant Cak, phosphorylate a CTD peptide. Finally, TFIIH was shown to phosphorylate both Cdc2 and Cdk2, suggesting that there could be a link between transcription and the cell cycle machinery.

  10. Inhibiting cell migration and cell invasion by silencing the transcription factor ETS-1 in human bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingwei; Wu, Hanwei; Lin, Muqi; Zhan, Yonghao; Zhuang, Chengle; Lin, Junhao; Li, Jianfa; Xu, Wen; Fu, Xing; Zhang, Qiaoxia; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Guoping; Huang, Weiren

    2016-01-01

    As one of the members of the ETS gene family, the transcription factor v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (ETS-1) plays key role in the regulation of physiological processes in normal cells and tumors. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between the transcription factor ETS-1 and malignant phenotypes of bladder cancer. We demonstrated that ETS-1 was up-regulated in human bladder cancer tissue compared to paired normal bladder tissue. In order to evaluate the functional role of ETS-1 in human bladder cancer, vectors expressing ETS-1 shRNA and ETS-1 protein were constructed in vitro and transfected into the human bladder cancer T24 and 5637 cells. Our results showed that the transcription factor ETS-1 could promote cell migration and cell invasion in human bladder cancer, without affecting cell proliferation and apoptosis. In conclusion, ETS-1 plays oncogenic roles through inducing cell migration and invasion in human bladder cancer, and it can be used as a therapeutic target for treating human bladder cancer. PMID:27036016

  11. Inhibiting cell migration and cell invasion by silencing the transcription factor ETS-1 in human bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Xintao; Chen, Mingwei; Wu, Hanwei; Lin, Muqi; Zhan, Yonghao; Zhuang, Chengle; Lin, Junhao; Li, Jianfa; Xu, Wen; Fu, Xing; Zhang, Qiaoxia; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Guoping; Huang, Weiren

    2016-05-01

    As one of the members of the ETS gene family, the transcription factor v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (ETS-1) plays key role in the regulation of physiological processes in normal cells and tumors. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between the transcription factor ETS-1 and malignant phenotypes of bladder cancer. We demonstrated that ETS-1 was up-regulated in human bladder cancer tissue compared to paired normal bladder tissue. In order to evaluate the functional role of ETS-1 in human bladder cancer, vectors expressing ETS-1 shRNA and ETS-1 protein were constructed in vitro and transfected into the human bladder cancer T24 and 5637 cells. Our results showed that the transcription factor ETS-1 could promote cell migration and cell invasion in human bladder cancer, without affecting cell proliferation and apoptosis. In conclusion, ETS-1 plays oncogenic roles through inducing cell migration and invasion in human bladder cancer, and it can be used as a therapeutic target for treating human bladder cancer.

  12. C/EBP transcription factors regulate NADPH oxidase in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Manea, Simona-Adriana; Todirita, Andra; Raicu, Monica; Manea, Adrian

    2014-07-01

    In atherosclerosis, oxidative stress-induced vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) dysfunction is partially mediated by up-regulated NADPH oxidase (Nox); the mechanisms of enzyme regulation are not entirely defined. CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) regulate cellular proliferation and differentiation, and the expression of many inflammatory and immune genes. We aimed at elucidating the role of C/EBP in the regulation of Nox in SMCs exposed to pro-inflammatory conditions. Human aortic SMCs were treated with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) for up to 24 hrs. Lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence, real-time PCR, Western blot, promoter-luciferase reporter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were employed to investigate Nox regulation. IFN-γ dose-dependently induced Nox activity and expression, nuclear translocation and up-regulation of C/EBPα, C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ protein expression levels. Silencing of C/EBPα, C/EBPβ or C/EBPδ reduced significantly but differentially the IFN-γ-induced up-regulation of Nox activity, gene and protein expression. In silico analysis indicated the existence of typical C/EBP sites within Nox1, Nox4 and Nox5 promoters. Transient overexpression of C/EBPα, C/EBPβ or C/EBPδ enhanced the luciferase level directed by the promoters of the Nox subtypes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated the physical interaction of C/EBPα, C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ proteins with the Nox1/4/5 promoters. C/EBP transcription factors are important regulators of Nox enzymes in IFN-γ-exposed SMCs. Activation of C/EBP may induce excessive Nox-derived reactive oxygen species formation, further contributing to SMCs dysfunction and atherosclerotic plaque development. Pharmacological targeting of C/EBP-related signalling pathways may be used to counteract the adverse effects of oxidative stress. PMID:24797079

  13. Simulated binding of transcription factors to active and inactive regions folds human chromosomes into loops, rosettes and topological domains

    PubMed Central

    Brackley, Chris A.; Johnson, James; Kelly, Steven; Cook, Peter R.; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Biophysicists are modeling conformations of interphase chromosomes, often basing the strengths of interactions between segments distant on the genetic map on contact frequencies determined experimentally. Here, instead, we develop a fitting-free, minimal model: bivalent or multivalent red and green ‘transcription factors’ bind to cognate sites in strings of beads (‘chromatin’) to form molecular bridges stabilizing loops. In the absence of additional explicit forces, molecular dynamic simulations reveal that bound factors spontaneously cluster—red with red, green with green, but rarely red with green—to give structures reminiscent of transcription factories. Binding of just two transcription factors (or proteins) to active and inactive regions of human chromosomes yields rosettes, topological domains and contact maps much like those seen experimentally. This emergent ‘bridging-induced attraction’ proves to be a robust, simple and generic force able to organize interphase chromosomes at all scales. PMID:27060145

  14. The Transcription Factor DLX3 Regulates the Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Follicle Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra; Felthaus, Oliver; Schmalz, Gottfried; Brockhoff, Gero; Reichert, Torsten E

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor DLX3 plays a decisive role in bone development of vertebrates. In neural-crest derived stem cells from the dental follicle (DFCs), DLX3 is differentially expressed during osteogenic differentiation, while other osteogenic transcription factors such as DLX5 or RUNX2 are not highly induced. DLX3 has therefore a decisive role in the differentiation of DFCs, but its actual biological effects and regulation are unknown. This study investigated the DLX3-regulated processes in DFCs. After DLX3 overexpression, DFCs acquired a spindle-like cell shape with reorganized actin filaments. Here, marker genes for cell morphology, proliferation, apoptosis, and osteogenic differentiation were significantly regulated as shown in a microarray analysis. Further experiments showed that DFCs viability is directly influenced by the expression of DLX3, for example, the amount of apoptotic cells was increased after DLX3 silencing. This transcription factor stimulates the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs and regulates the BMP/SMAD1-pathway. Interestingly, BMP2 did highly induce DLX3 and reverse the inhibitory effect of DLX3 silencing in osteogenic differentiation. However, after DLX3 overexpression in DFCs, a BMP2 supplementation did not improve the expression of DLX3 and the osteogenic differentiation. In conclusion, DLX3 influences cell viability and regulates osteogenic differentiation of DFCs via a BMP2-dependent pathway and a feedback control. PMID:22107079

  15. Transforming growth factor β signaling upregulates the expression of human GDP-fucose transporter by activating transcription factor Sp1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu-Xin; Ma, Anna; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    GDP-fucose transporter plays a crucial role in fucosylation of glycoproteins by providing activated fucose donor, GDP-fucose, for fucosyltransferases in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus. Fucose-containing glycans are involved in many biological processes, which are essential for growth and development. Mutations in the GDP-fucose transporter gene cause leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome II, a disease characterized by slow growth, mental retardation and immunodeficiency. However, no information is available regarding its transcriptional regulation. Here, by using human cells, we show that TGF-β1 specifically induces the GDP-fucose transporter expression, but not other transporters tested such as CMP-sialic acid transporter, suggesting a diversity of regulatory pathways for the expression of these transporters. The regulatory elements that are responsive to the TGF-β1 stimulation are present in the region between bp -330 and -268 in the GDP-fucose transporter promoter. We found that this region contains two identical octamer GC-rich motifs (GGGGCGTG) that were demonstrated to be essential for the transporter expression. We also show that the transcription factor Sp1 specifically binds to the GC-rich motifs in vitro and Sp1 coupled with phospho-Smad2 is associated with the promoter region covering the Sp1-binding motifs in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. In addition, we further confirmed that Sp1 is essential for the GDP-fucose transporter expression stimulated by TGF-β1 using a luciferase reporter system. These results highlight the role of TGF-β signaling in regulation of the GDP-fucose transporter expression via activating Sp1. This is the first transcriptional study for any nucleotide sugar transporters that have been identified so far. Notably, TGF-β1 receptor itself is known to be modified by fucosylation. Given the essential role of GDP-fucose transporter in fucosylation, the finding that TGF-β1 stimulates the expression of

  16. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells.

  17. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24500196

  18. Transcriptional regulation of the human acid alpha-glucosidase gene. Identification of a repressor element and its transcription factors Hes-1 and YY1.

    PubMed

    Yan, B; Heus, J; Lu, N; Nichols, R C; Raben, N; Plotz, P H

    2001-01-19

    Acid alpha-glucosidase, the product of a housekeeping gene, is a lysosomal enzyme that degrades glycogen. A deficiency of this enzyme is responsible for a recessively inherited myopathy and cardiomyopathy, glycogenesis type II. We have previously demonstrated that the human acid alpha-glucosidase gene expression is regulated by a silencer within intron 1, which is located in the 5'-untranslated region. In this study, we have used deletion analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and footprint analysis to further localize the silencer to a 25-base pair element. The repressive effect on the TK promoter was about 50% in both orientations in expression plasmid, and two transcriptional factors were identified with antibodies binding specifically to the element. Mutagenesis and functional analyses of the element demonstrated that the mammalian homologue 1 of Drosophila hairy and Enhancer of split (Hes-1) binding to an E box (CACGCG) and global transcription factor-YY1 binding to its core site function as a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, the overexpression of Hes-1 significantly enhanced the repressive effect of the silencer element. The data should be helpful in understanding the expression and regulation of the human acid alpha-glucosidase gene as well as other lysosomal enzyme genes.

  19. Glucocorticoid signaling drives epigenetic and transcription factors to induce key regulators of human parturition.

    PubMed

    Zannas, Anthony S; Chrousos, George P

    2015-10-27

    Glucocorticoids are thought to play an important role in parturition. Two recent articles by Di Stefano et al. in the Archives and Wang et al. in this issue of Science Signaling reveal novel mechanisms by which glucocorticoid signaling can drive the epigenetic and transcriptional machinery to induce molecules involved in parturition, including the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and the autacoid hormone prostaglandin E2. These findings contribute to our understanding of how glucocorticoids may regulate human parturition.

  20. Transcription elongation factor SII interacts with a domain of the large subunit of human RNA polymerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaport, J.; Cho, K.; Saltzman, A.; Prenger, J.; Golomb, M.; Weinmann, R.

    1988-08-01

    Genomic sequences for the large subunit of human RNA polymerase II corresponding to a part of the fifth exon were inserted into an expression vector at the carboxy-terminal end of the ..beta..-galactosidase gene. The in-frame construct produced a 125-kilodalton fusion protein, containing approximately 10 kilodaltons of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II and 116 kilodaltons of ..beta..-galactosidase. The purified bacterially produced fusion protein inhibited specific transcription from the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter, while ..beta..-galactosidase had no effect. The effect of the fusion protein was during RNA elongation, not at the level of initiation, resembling the faithfully initiated but incomplete transcripts produced with purified factors in the absence of SII. Similarly, monoclonal antibody 2-7B, which reacts with the RNA polymerase II region represented in the fusion protein, inhibited specific transcription at the level of elongation in a whole-cell extract. Both monoclonal antibody 2-7B and the fusion protein, although unable to inhibit purified RNA polymerase II in a nonspecific transcription assay, selectively blocked the stimulation elicited by transcription elongation factor SII on the activity of the purified enzyme in vitro. This suggests that the fusion protein traps the SII in nonstimulatory interactions and that anitibody 2-7B inhibits SII binding to RNA polymerase II. Thus, this suggests that an SII-binding contact required for specific RNA elongation resides within the fifth exon region of the largest RNA polymerase II subunit.

  1. Crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the RAP74 subunit of human transcription factor IIF

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Katsuhiko; De Angelis, Jacqueline; Roeder, Robert G.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-12-13

    The x-ray structure of a C-terminal fragment of the RAP74 subunit of human transcription factor (TF) IIF has been determined at 1.02-{angstrom} resolution. The {alpha}/{beta} structure is strikingly similar to the globular domain of linker histone H5 and the DNA-binding domain of hepatocyte nuclear factor 3{gamma} (HNF-3{gamma}), making it a winged-helix protein. The surface electrostatic properties of this compact domain differ significantly from those of bona fide winged-helix transcription factors (HNF-3{gamma} and RFX1) and from the winged-helix domains found within the RAP30 subunit of TFIIF and the {beta} subunit of TFIIE. RAP74 has been shown to interact with the TFIIF-associated C-terminal domain phosphatase FCP1, and a putative phosphatase binding site has been identified within the RAP74 winged-helix domain.

  2. Architecture of the Human and Yeast General Transcription and DNA Repair Factor TFIIH.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Cimermancic, Peter; Viswanath, Shruthi; Ebmeier, Christopher C; Kim, Bong; Dehecq, Marine; Raman, Vishnu; Greenberg, Charles H; Pellarin, Riccardo; Sali, Andrej; Taatjes, Dylan J; Hahn, Steven; Ranish, Jeff

    2015-09-01

    TFIIH is essential for both RNA polymerase II transcription and DNA repair, and mutations in TFIIH can result in human disease. Here, we determine the molecular architecture of human and yeast TFIIH by an integrative approach using chemical crosslinking/mass spectrometry (CXMS) data, biochemical analyses, and previously published electron microscopy maps. We identified four new conserved "topological regions" that function as hubs for TFIIH assembly and more than 35 conserved topological features within TFIIH, illuminating a network of interactions involved in TFIIH assembly and regulation of its activities. We show that one of these conserved regions, the p62/Tfb1 Anchor region, directly interacts with the DNA helicase subunit XPD/Rad3 in native TFIIH and is required for the integrity and function of TFIIH. We also reveal the structural basis for defects in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and trichothiodystrophy, with mutations found at the interface between the p62 Anchor region and the XPD subunit.

  3. The Ability of Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b To Transactivate Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transcription Depends on a Functional Kinase Domain, Cyclin T1, and Tat

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Koh; Cujec, Thomas P.; Peng, Junmin; Garriga, Judit; Price, David H.; Graña, Xavier; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1998-01-01

    By binding to the transactivation response element (TAR) RNA, the transcriptional transactivator (Tat) from the human immunodeficiency virus increases rates of elongation rather than initiation of viral transcription. Two cyclin-dependent serine/threonine kinases, CDK7 and CDK9, which phosphorylate the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, have been implicated in Tat transactivation in vivo and in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate that CDK9, which is the kinase component of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex, can activate viral transcription when tethered to the heterologous Rev response element RNA via the regulator of expression of virion proteins (Rev). The kinase activity of CDK9 and cyclin T1 is essential for these effects. Moreover, P-TEFb binds to TAR only in the presence of Tat. We conclude that Tat–P-TEFb complexes bind to TAR, where CDK9 modifies RNA polymerase II for the efficient copying of the viral genome. PMID:9696809

  4. Long-term and tight control of gene expression in mouse skeletal muscle by a new hybrid human transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Roscilli, Giuseppe; Rinaudo, Cira Daniela; Cimino, Monica; Sporeno, Elisabetta; Lamartina, Stefania; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Toniatti, Carlo

    2002-11-01

    Diseases requiring frequent and lifelong injections of recombinant proteins would be more efficaciously treated by intramuscular delivery of genes encoding secretable proteins. However, the success of this approach largely depends on our capability to temporally regulate transcription of delivered genes. Therefore, we sought to generate a humanized transcription factor to regulate transgene expression in muscle. A novel 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT)-dependent transcriptional regulator (called HEA-3) was constructed by fusing in-frame the DNA binding domain of the human hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF1alpha), which is not expressed in muscle cells, a G(521)R mutant of the ligand binding domain of human estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha), and the activation domain derived from human nuclear factor-kappaB p65 subunit (NF-kappaB p65). We demonstrate that an artificial promoter containing multimeric HNF1alpha binding sites is silent in muscles and in cell lines that lack endogenous HNF1alpha. HEA-3 stimulated transcription from this target promoter in a stringent 4-OHT-dependent manner. The dynamic range of transgene regulation was high, because of the low basal activity and high inducibility of the system. Ex vivo, HEA-3 increased expression of the transfected reporter gene by more than 1000-fold in a ligand-dependent manner. In vivo, HEA-3 stimulated by more than 100-fold, the expression of secreted alkaline phosphatase after delivery as plasmid DNA into mouse muscles. Moreover, long-term modulation of the expression of intramuscularly delivered mouse erythropoietin was achieved in immunocompetent mice.

  5. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in both nuclei and mitochondria and regulates cancer cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Bin; Izumi, Hiroto; Yasuniwa, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Wu, Bin; Tanimoto, Akihide; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Kohno, Kimitoshi

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) localizes in nuclei and binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. {yields} mtTFA contains two putative nuclear localization signals (NLS) in the HMG-boxes. {yields} Overexpression of mtTFA enhances the growth of cancer cells, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibits their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). {yields} Knockdown of mtTFA expression induces p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is one of the high mobility group protein family and is required for both transcription from and maintenance of mitochondrial genomes. However, the roles of mtTFA have not been extensively studied in cancer cells. Here, we firstly reported the nuclear localization of mtTFA. The proportion of nuclear-localized mtTFA varied among different cancer cells. Some mtTFA binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that mtTFA can regulate the expression of nuclear genes. Overexpression of mtTFA enhanced the growth of cancer cell lines, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibited their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). Knockdown of mtTFA expression induced p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. These results imply that mtTFA functions in both nuclei and mitochondria to promote cell growth.

  6. Purinergic P2Y2 Receptor Control of Tissue Factor Transcription in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells: NEW AP-1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR SITE AND NEGATIVE REGULATOR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwei; Zhang, Lingxin; Wang, Chuan; Roy, Shama; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that the P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) is the predominant nucleotide receptor expressed in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) and that P2Y2R activation by ATP or UTP induces dramatic up-regulation of tissue factor (TF), a key initiator of the coagulation cascade. However, the molecular mechanism of this P2Y2R-TF axis remains unclear. Here, we report the role of a newly identified AP-1 consensus sequence in the TF gene promoter and its original binding components in P2Y2R regulation of TF transcription. Using bioinformatics tools, we found that a novel AP-1 site at -1363 bp of the human TF promoter region is highly conserved across multiple species. Activation of P2Y2R increased TF promoter activity and mRNA expression in HCAEC. Truncation, deletion, and mutation of this distal AP-1 site all significantly suppressed TF promoter activity in response to P2Y2R activation. EMSA and ChIP assays further confirmed that upon P2Y2R activation, c-Jun, ATF-2, and Fra-1, but not the typical c-Fos, bound to the new AP-1 site. In addition, loss-of-function studies using siRNAs confirmed a positive transactivation role of c-Jun and ATF-2 but unexpectedly revealed a strong negative role of Fra-1 in P2Y2R-induced TF up-regulation. Furthermore, we found that P2Y2R activation promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation through Src, leading to Fra-1 activation, whereas Rho/JNK mediated P2Y2R-induced activation of c-Jun and ATF-2. These findings reveal the molecular basis for P2Y G protein-coupled receptor control of endothelial TF expression and indicate that targeting the P2Y2R-Fra-1-TF pathway may be an attractive new strategy for controlling vascular inflammation and thrombogenicity associated with endothelial dysfunction.

  7. Transcription factor 7-like 1 is involved in hypothalamo–pituitary axis development in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Gaston-Massuet, Carles; McCabe, Mark J.; Scagliotti, Valeria; Young, Rodrigo M.; Carreno, Gabriela; Gregory, Louise C.; Jayakody, Sujatha A.; Pozzi, Sara; Gualtieri, Angelica; Basu, Basudha; Koniordou, Markela; Wu, Chun-I; Bancalari, Rodrigo E.; Rahikkala, Elisa; Veijola, Riitta; Lopponen, Tuija; Graziola, Federica; Turton, James; Signore, Massimo; Mousavy Gharavy, Seyedeh Neda; Charolidi, Nicoletta; Sokol, Sergei Y.; Merrill, Bradley J.; Dattani, Mehul T.; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant embryonic development of the hypothalamus and/or pituitary gland in humans results in congenital hypopituitarism (CH). Transcription factor 7-like 1 (TCF7L1), an important regulator of the WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway, is expressed in the developing forebrain and pituitary gland, but its role during hypothalamo–pituitary (HP) axis formation or involvement in human CH remains elusive. Using a conditional genetic approach in the mouse, we first demonstrate that TCF7L1 is required in the prospective hypothalamus to maintain normal expression of the hypothalamic signals involved in the induction and subsequent expansion of Rathke’s pouch progenitors. Next, we reveal that the function of TCF7L1 during HP axis development depends exclusively on the repressing activity of TCF7L1 and does not require its interaction with β-catenin. Finally, we report the identification of two independent missense variants in human TCF7L1, p.R92P and p.R400Q, in a cohort of patients with forebrain and/or pituitary defects. We demonstrate that these variants exhibit reduced repressing activity in vitro and in vivo relative to wild-type TCF7L1. Together, our data provide support for a conserved molecular function of TCF7L1 as a transcriptional repressor during HP axis development in mammals and identify variants in this transcription factor that are likely to contribute to the etiology of CH. PMID:26764381

  8. Transcriptional regulation of the human cystathionine beta-synthase -1b basal promoter: synergistic transactivation by transcription factors NF-Y and Sp1/Sp3.

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Y; Konrad, M A; Matherly, L H; Taub, J W

    2001-01-01

    Cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) catalyses the condensation of serine and homocysteine to form cystathionine, an intermediate step in the synthesis of cysteine. Human CBS encodes five distinct 5' non-coding exons, the most frequent termed CBS -1a and CBS -1b, each transcribed from its own unique GC-rich TATA-less promoter. The minimal transcriptional region (-3792 to -3667) of the CBS -1b promoter was defined by 5'- and 3'-deletions, and transient transfections of reporter gene constructs in HepG2 cells, characterized by CBS transcription exclusively from the -1b promoter. Included in this 125 bp region are 3 GC-boxes (termed GC-a, GC-b and GC-c), an inverted CAAT-box and an E-box. By gel-shift and supershift assays, binding of specificity protein (Sp)1 and Sp3 to the GC-box elements, upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF-1) to the E-box, and both nuclear factor (NF)-Y and an NF-1-like factor to the CAAT box could be demonstrated. By transient trans fections and reporter gene assays in HepG2 and Drosophila SL2 cells, a functional interplay was indicated between NF-Y binding to the CAAT-box, or between USF-1 binding to the E-box, and Sp1/Sp3 binding to the GC-box elements. In SL2 cells, NF-Y and Sp1/Sp3 were synergistic. Furthermore, both Sp1 and the long Sp3 isoform transactivated the CBS -1b minimal promoter; however, the short Sp3 isoforms were potent repressors. These results may explain the cell- or tissue-specific regulation of CBS transcription, and clarify the bases for alterations in CBS gene expression in human disease and Down's syndrome. PMID:11415440

  9. Zinc Finger and X-Linked Factor (ZFX) Binds to Human SET Transcript 2 Promoter and Transactivates SET Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Siliang; Duan, Ping; Li, Jinping; Senkowski, Tristan; Guo, Fengbiao; Chen, Haibin; Romero, Alberto; Cui, Yugui; Liu, Jiayin; Jiang, Shi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    SET (SE Translocation) protein carries out multiple functions including those for protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibition, histone modification, DNA repair, and gene regulation. SET overexpression has been detected in brain neurons of patients suffering Alzheimer’s disease, follicle theca cells of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) patients, and ovarian cancer cells, indicating that SET may play a pathological role for these disorders. SET transcript 2, produced by a specific promoter, represents a major transcript variant in different cell types. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional activation of human SET transcript 2 promoter in HeLa cells. Promoter deletion experiments and co-transfection assays indicated that ZFX, the Zinc finger and X-linked transcription factor, was able to transactivate the SET promoter. A proximal promoter region containing four ZFX-binding sites was found to be critical for the ZFX-mediated transactivation. Mutagenesis study indicated that the ZFX-binding site located the closest to the transcription start site accounted for most of the ZFX-mediated transactivity. Manipulation of ZFX levels by overexpression or siRNA knockdown confirmed the significance and specificity of the ZFX-mediated SET promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation results verified the binding of ZFX to its cognate sites in the SET promoter. These findings have led to identification of ZFX as an upstream factor regulating SET gene expression. More studies are required to define the in vivo significance of this mechanism, and specifically, its implication for several benign and malignant diseases related to SET dysregulation. PMID:27775603

  10. Human GATA-3: a lineage-restricted transcription factor that regulates the expression of the T cell receptor alpha gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, I C; Vorhees, P; Marin, N; Oakley, B K; Tsai, S F; Orkin, S H; Leiden, J M

    1991-01-01

    In addition to its role in the recognition of foreign antigens, the T cell receptor (TCR) alpha gene serves as a model system for studies of developmentally-regulated, lineage-specific gene expression in T cells. TCR alpha gene expression is restricted to cells of the TCR alpha/beta+ lineage, and is controlled by a T cell-specific transcriptional enhancer located 4.5 kb 3' to the C alpha gene segment. The TCR alpha enhancer contains four nuclear protein binding sites called T alpha 1-T alpha 4. In this report we describe the identification and characterization of a novel human cDNA, hGATA-3 that binds to the T alpha 3 element of the human TCR alpha enhancer. hGATA-3 contains a zinc finger domain that is highly related to the DNA-binding domain of the erythroid-specific transcription factor, GATA-1, and binds to a region of T alpha 3 that contains a consensus GATA binding site (AGATAG). Northern blot analyses of hematopoietic cell lines demonstrate that hGATA-3 is expressed exclusively in T cells. Overexpression of hGATA-3 in HeLa cells or human B cells specifically activated transcription from a co-transfected reporter plasmid containing two copies of the T alpha 3 binding site located upstream of the minimal SV40 promoter. Taken together these results demonstrate that hGATA-3 is a novel lineage-specific hematopoietic transcription factor that appears to play an important role in regulating the T cell-specific expression of the TCR alpha gene. Images PMID:1827068

  11. In Vitro Anticancer Activity of Phlorofucofuroeckol A via Upregulation of Activating Transcription Factor 3 against Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Hyun Ji; Kwon, Tae-Hyung; Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Lee, Su-Jin; Park, Nyun-Ho; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2016-01-01

    Phlorofucofuroeckol A (PFF-A), one of the phlorotannins found in brown algae, has been reported to exert anti-cancer property. However, the molecular mechanism for the anti-cancer effect of PFF-A has not been known. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) has been reported to be associated with apoptosis in colorectal cancer. The present study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism by which PFF-A stimulates ATF3 expression and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A decreased cell viability through apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells. PFF-A increased ATF3 expression through regulating transcriptional activity. The responsible cis-element for ATF3 transcriptional activation by PFF-A was cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), located between positions −147 and −85 of the ATF3 promoter. Inhibition of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3β, and IκB kinase (IKK)-α blocked PFF-A-mediated ATF3 expression. ATF3 knockdown by ATF3 siRNA attenuated the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by PFF-A, while ATF3 overexpression increased PFF-A-mediated cleaved PARP. These results suggest that PFF-A may exert anti-cancer property through inducing apoptosis via the ATF3-mediated pathway in human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:27043582

  12. Cloning and chromosomal localization of the human and murine genes for the T-cell transcription factors NFATc and NFATp.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Ho, S N; Luna, J; Giacalone, J; Thomas, D J; Timmerman, L A; Crabtree, G R; Francke, U

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is a transcription factor complex involved in the activation of cytokines and cell surface molecules associated with coordinating the actions of different cells required for an immune response. Two different genes have recently been cloned that encode proteins capable of functioning as the pre-existing (p) and cytosolic (c) component of the NFAT transcription complex, NFATc of human and NFATp of murine origin (Northrop et al., 1994; McCaffrey et al., 1993b). We report here the partial cDNA cloning of the murine homolog of NFATc and the human homolog of NFATp, and the chromosomal localization of both genes in both species to conserved syntenic regions. Through the use of mapping panels of human x Chinese hamster and mouse x rodent cells hybrids, the NFATc genes were mapped to human and mouse chromosomes 18. By analyzing a chromosome 18 radiation hybrid panel, the human NFATc gene was localized to the q terminus, closely linked to STS marker D18S497. The murine Nfatc gene was sublocalized to chromosome band 18E4 by FISH. The NFATp genes were mapped by somatic cell hybrid analysis to human chromosome 20 and mouse chromosome 2. Human NFATp was assigned to chromosome region 20q13.2-->q13.3 by FISH. Based on the conserved syntenic region on human chromosome 20 and mouse chromosome 2, murine Nfatp is predicted to reside in the vicinity of a mutant locus wasted. Homozygous wst/wst mice display a phenotype reminiscent of severe combined immune deficiency or ataxia telangiectasia, disorders that could therefore be considered candidates for NFATp mutations.

  13. Induction of transcription factor CEBP homology protein mediates hypoglycaemia-induced necrotic cell death in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kögel, Donat; Svensson, Birte; Copanaki, Ekaterini; Anguissola, Sergio; Bonner, Caroline; Thurow, Nadia; Gudorf, Daniel; Hetschko, Holger; Müller, Thorsten; Peters, Marion; König, Hans-Georg; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2006-11-01

    Oxygen and glucose deprivation are direct consequences of tissue ischaemia. We explored the interaction of hypoxia and hypoglycaemia on cell survival and gene expression in the absence of glutamatergic signalling using human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells as a model. In agreement with previous investigations in non-neural cells, prolonged hypoxia (0.5% O(2)) failed to induce significant cell death in this system. In contrast, exposure to hypoglycaemia induced significant necrotic cell death (> 80% after 72 h). Interestingly, hypoglycaemia-induced cell death was completely abrogated by simultaneous exposure to hypoxia, suggesting strong cytoprotective effects of hypoxia. Subsequent microarray analysis of the underlying transcriptional responses revealed that the transcription factor CEBP homology protein (CHOP) was strongly induced by hypoglycaemia, and suppressed by simultaneous hypoxia. RNA interference against CHOP significantly protected cells from glucose deprivation-induced cell death. Hypoxia-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) activation also protected cells against hypoglycaemia-induced cell death, but VEGF failed to modify hypoglycaemia-induced CHOP induction. Our data suggest that hypoglycaemia-induced necrotic cell death of neuroblastoma cells is an active process mediated via the induction of the transcription factor CHOP, and that hypoxia counteracts this cell death via at least two distinct mechanisms: repression of CHOP and induction of VEGF.

  14. The forkhead transcription factor Foxl2 is sumoylated in both human and mouse: sumoylation affects its stability, localization, and activity.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Mara; Deiana, Manila; Meloni, Alessandra; Marcia, Loredana; Puddu, Alessandro; Cao, Antonio; Schlessinger, David; Crisponi, Laura

    2010-01-01

    The FOXL2 forkhead transcription factor is expressed in ovarian granulosa cells, and mutated FOXL2 causes the blepharophimosis, ptosis and epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES) and predisposes to premature ovarian failure. Inactivation of Foxl2 in mice demonstrated its indispensability for female gonadal sex determination and ovary development and revealed its antagonism of Sox9, the effector of male testis development. To help to define the regulatory activities of FOXL2, we looked for interacting proteins. Based on yeast two-hybrid screening, we found that FOXL2 interacts with PIAS1 and UBC9, both parts of the sumoylation machinery. We showed that human FOXL2 is sumoylated in transfected cell lines, and that endogenous mouse Foxl2 is comparably sumoylated. This modification changes its cellular localization, stability and transcriptional activity. It is intriguing that similar sumoylation and regulatory consequences have also been reported for SOX9, the male counterpart of FOXL2 in somatic gonadal tissues. PMID:20209145

  15. Molecular cloning of a putative novel human bZIP transcription factor on chromosome 17q22

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, L.; Johnsen, O.; Skartlien, A.H.

    1994-08-01

    We have cloned and characterized cDNA clones representing several mRNA isoforms generated by alternative splicing of a single gene localized to chromosome 17q22. Sequence analysis showed that the predicted translational product of the longest open reading frame (2316 nucleotides, 772 amino acids) is related to transcription factors of the basic elucine zipper (bZIP) class. The sequence contained several regions characteristic of transcriptional regulatory domains. A cluster of amino acids flanking the bZIP region on both sides was highly conserved between TCF11 and p45 NF-E2, a subunit of the human globin locus control region-binding protein, NF-E2. These same regions showed remarkable homology to two invertebrate proteins, CNC and skn-1, postulated to regulate embryonic development in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, respectively. 46 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of CYP2B6 Expression by Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 3β in Human Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linhao; Li, Daochuan; Heyward, Scott; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    CYP2B6 plays an increasingly important role in xenobiotic metabolism and detoxification. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR) have been established as predominant regulators for the inductive expression of CYP2B6 gene in human liver. However, there are dramatic interindividual variabilities in CYP2B6 expression that cannot be fully explained by the CAR/PXR-based modulation alone. Here, we show that expression level of CYP2B6 was correlated with that of hepatocyte nuclear factor 3β (HNF3β) in human primary hepatocytes prepared from 35 liver donors. Utilizing recombinant virus-mediated overexpression or knockdown of HNF3β in HepG2 cells, as well as constructs containing serial deletion and site-directed mutation of HNF3β binding motifs in CYP2B6 luciferase reporter assays, we demonstrated that the presence or lack of HNF3β expression markedly correlated with CYP2B6 gene expression and its promoter activity. Novel enhancer modules of HNF3β located upstream of the CYP2B6 gene transcription start site were identified and functionally validated as key elements governing HNF3β-mediated CYP2B6 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in human primary hepatocytes and surface plasmon resonance binding affinity experiments confirmed the essential role of these enhancers in the recruitment of HNF3β to the promoter of CYP2B6 gene. Overall, these findings indicate that HNF3β represents a new liver enriched transcription factor that is involved in the transcription of CYP2B6 gene and contributes to the large interindividual variations of CYP2B6 expression in human population. PMID:26930610

  17. Structural Insights into the Autoregulation and Cooperativity of the Human Transcription Factor Ets-2*

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Joseph A; Cooper, Christopher D. O.; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-01-01

    Ets-2, like its closely related homologue Ets-1, is a member of the Ets family of DNA binding transcription factors. Both proteins are subject to multiple levels of regulation of their DNA binding and transactivation properties. One such regulatory mechanism is the presence of an autoinhibitory module, which in Ets-1 allosterically inhibits the DNA binding activity. This inhibition can be relieved by interaction with protein partners or cooperative binding to closely separated Ets binding sites in a palindromic arrangement. In this study we describe the 2.5 Å resolution crystal structure of a DNA complex of the Ets-2 Ets domain. The Ets domain crystallized with two distinct species in the asymmetric unit, which closely resemble the autoinhibited and DNA bound forms of Ets-1. This discovery prompted us to re-evaluate the current model for the autoinhibitory mechanism and the structural basis for cooperative DNA binding. In contrast to Ets-1, in which the autoinhibition is caused by a combination of allosteric and steric mechanisms, we were unable to find clear evidence for the allosteric mechanism in Ets-2. We also demonstrated two possibly distinct types of cooperative binding to substrates with Ets binding motifs separated by four and six base pairs and suggest possible molecular mechanisms for this behavior. PMID:25670864

  18. Structural insights into the autoregulation and cooperativity of the human transcription factor Ets-2.

    PubMed

    Newman, Joseph A; Cooper, Christopher D O; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-03-27

    Ets-2, like its closely related homologue Ets-1, is a member of the Ets family of DNA binding transcription factors. Both proteins are subject to multiple levels of regulation of their DNA binding and transactivation properties. One such regulatory mechanism is the presence of an autoinhibitory module, which in Ets-1 allosterically inhibits the DNA binding activity. This inhibition can be relieved by interaction with protein partners or cooperative binding to closely separated Ets binding sites in a palindromic arrangement. In this study we describe the 2.5 Å resolution crystal structure of a DNA complex of the Ets-2 Ets domain. The Ets domain crystallized with two distinct species in the asymmetric unit, which closely resemble the autoinhibited and DNA bound forms of Ets-1. This discovery prompted us to re-evaluate the current model for the autoinhibitory mechanism and the structural basis for cooperative DNA binding. In contrast to Ets-1, in which the autoinhibition is caused by a combination of allosteric and steric mechanisms, we were unable to find clear evidence for the allosteric mechanism in Ets-2. We also demonstrated two possibly distinct types of cooperative binding to substrates with Ets binding motifs separated by four and six base pairs and suggest possible molecular mechanisms for this behavior.

  19. Therapeutic transdifferentiation of human fibroblasts into endothelial cells using forced expression of lineage-specific transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wing Tak; Cooke, John P

    2016-01-01

    Transdifferentiation is the direct conversion from one somatic cell type into another desired somatic cell type. This reprogramming method offers an attractive approach for regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate that neonatal fibroblasts can be transdifferentiated into endothelial cells using only four endothelial transcription factors, namely, ETV2, FLI1, GATA2, and KLF4. We observed a significant up-regulation of endothelial genes including KDR, CD31, CD144, and vWF in human neonatal foreskin (BJ) fibroblasts infected with the lentiviral construct encoding the open reading frame of the four transcription factors. We observed morphological changes in BJ fibroblasts from the fibroblastic spindle shape into a more endothelial-like cobblestone structures. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that ~16% of the infected cells with the lentiviral constructs encoding 4F expressed CD31. The sorted cells were allowed to expand for 2 weeks and these cells were immunostained and found to express endothelial markers CD31. The induced endothelial cells also incorporated fluorescence-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein and efficiently formed capillary-like networks when seeded on Matrigel. These results suggested that the induced endothelial cells were functional in vitro. Taken together, we successfully demonstrated the direct conversion of human neonatal fibroblasts into endothelial cells by transduction of lentiviral constructs encoding endothelial lineage-specific transcription factors ETV2, FLI1, GATA2, and KLF4. The directed differentiation of fibroblasts into endothelial cells may have significant utility in diseases characterized by fibrosis and loss of microvasculature. PMID:27081470

  20. Crystal structure of a TAF1-TAF7 complex in human transcription factor IID reveals a promoter binding module

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Curran, Elizabeth C; Hinds, Thomas R; Wang, Edith H; Zheng, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The general transcription factor IID (TFIID) initiates RNA polymerase II-mediated eukaryotic transcription by nucleating pre-initiation complex formation at the core promoter of protein-encoding genes. TAF1, the largest integral subunit of TFIID, contains an evolutionarily conserved yet poorly characterized central core domain, whose specific mutation disrupts cell proliferation in the temperature-sensitive mutant hamster cell line ts13. Although the impaired TAF1 function in the ts13 mutant has been associated with defective transcriptional regulation of cell cycle genes, the mechanism by which TAF1 mediates transcription as part of TFIID remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of the human TAF1 central core domain in complex with another conserved TFIID subunit, TAF7, which biochemically solubilizes TAF1. The TAF1-TAF7 complex displays an inter-digitated compact architecture, featuring an unexpected TAF1 winged helix (WH) domain mounted on top of a heterodimeric triple barrel. The single TAF1 residue altered in the ts13 mutant is buried at the junction of these two structural domains. We show that the TAF1 WH domain has intrinsic DNA-binding activity, which depends on characteristic residues that are commonly used by WH fold proteins for interacting with DNA. Importantly, mutations of these residues not only compromise DNA binding by TAF1, but also abrogate its ability to rescue the ts13 mutant phenotype. Together, our results resolve the structural organization of the TAF1-TAF7 module in TFIID and unveil a critical promoter-binding function of TAF1 in transcription regulation. PMID:25412659

  1. Factor-binding element in the human c-myc promoter involved in transcriptional regulation by transforming growth factor. beta. 1 and by the retinoblastoma gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Pietenpol, J.A.; Stein, R.W.; Moses, H.L. ); Muenger, K.; Howley, P.M. )

    1991-11-15

    Previous studies have shown that transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) inhibition of keratinocyte proliferation involves suppression of c-myc transcription, and indirect evidence has suggested that the retinoblastoma gene product (pRB) may be involved in this process. In this study, transient expression of pRB in skin keratinocytes was shown to repress transcription of the human c-myc promoter region was required for regulation by both TGF-{beta}1 and pRB. These sequences, termed the TGF-{beta} control element (TCE), lie between positions {minus}86 and {minus}63 relative to the P1 transcription start site. Oligonucleotides containing the TCE bound to several nuclear factors in mobility-shift assays using extracts from cells with or without normal pRB. Binding of some factors was inhibited by TGF-{beta}1 treatment of TGF-{beta}-sensitive but not TGF-{beta}-insensitive cells. These data indicate that pRB can suppress c-myc transcription and growth inhibition.

  2. A Taiwanese Propolis Derivative Induces Apoptosis through Inducing Endoplasmic Reticular Stress and Activating Transcription Factor-3 in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Fat-Moon; Lien, Gi-Shih; Huang, Wei-Jan; Chen, Chia-Nan; Lu, Shao-Yu; Yan, Ming-De

    2013-01-01

    Activating transcription factor-(ATF-) 3, a stress-inducible transcription factor, is rapidly upregulated under various stress conditions and plays an important role in inducing cancer cell apoptosis. NBM-TP-007-GS-002 (GS-002) is a Taiwanese propolin G (PPG) derivative. In this study, we examined the antitumor effects of GS-002 in human hepatoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells in vitro. First, we found that GS-002 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in dose-dependent manners. Several main apoptotic indicators were found in GS-002-treated cells, such as the cleaved forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). GS-002 also induced endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress as evidenced by increases in ER stress-responsive proteins including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), phosphorylated protein endoplasmic-reticular-resident kinase (PERK), and ATF-3. The induction of ATF-3 expression was mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in GS-002-treated cells. Furthermore, we found that GS-002 induced more cell apoptosis in ATF-3-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that the induction of apoptosis by the propolis derivative, GS-002, is partially mediated through ER stress and ATF-3-dependent pathways, and GS-002 has the potential for development as an antitumor drug. PMID:24222778

  3. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS E7 ENHANCES HYPOXIA-INDUCIBLE FACTOR 1 MEDIATED TRANSCRIPTION BY INHIBITING BINDING OF HISTONE DEACETYLASES

    PubMed Central

    Bodily, Jason M.; Mehta, Kavi P. M.; Laimins, Laimonis A.

    2010-01-01

    Infection by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) leads to the formation of benign lesions, warts, and in some cases, cervical cancer. The formation of these lesions is dependent upon increased expression of pro-angiogenic factors. Angiogenesis is linked to tissue hypoxia through the activity of the oxygen sensitive hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). Our studies indicate that the HPV E7 protein enhances HIF-1 transcriptional activity while E6 functions to counteract the repressive effects of p53. Both high and low risk HPV E7 proteins were found to bind to HIF-1α through a domain located in the the N terminus. Importantly, the ability of E7 to enhance HIF-1 activity mapped to the C terminus and correlated with the displacement of the histone deacetylases HDAC1, HDAC4, and HDAC7 from HIF-1α by E7. Our findings describe a novel role of the E7 oncoprotein in activating the function of a key transcription factor mediating hypoxic responses by blocking the binding of HDACs. PMID:21148070

  4. Expression of the Human Endogenous Retrovirus HTDV/HERV-K Is Enhanced by Cellular Transcription Factor YY1

    PubMed Central

    Knössl, Michael; Löwer, Roswitha; Löwer, Johannes

    1999-01-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus HTDV/HERV-K, which resides in moderate copy numbers in the human genome, is expressed in a cell-type-specific manner, predominantly in teratocarcinoma cells. We have analyzed the regulatory potential of the 5′ enhancer of the HERV-K long terminal repeat. Protein extracts of HERV-K-expressing teratocarcinoma cell lines (GH and Tera2) and nonexpressing HeLa and HepG2 cells form different protein complexes on the enhancer sequence as detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Using competition EMSAs, DNase I footprinting, and supershift experiments, we localized the binding site of these complexes to a 20-bp sequence within the enhancer and showed that the transcription factor YY1 is one component of the HERV-K enhancer complex. Replacement of the YY1 binding site with unrelated sequences reduced expression of the luciferase gene as a reporter in transient-transfection assays. PMID:9882329

  5. E1BF/Ku interacts physically and functionally with the core promoter binding factor CPBF and promotes the basal transcription of rat and human ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Niu, H; Zhang, J; Jacob, S T

    1995-01-01

    We have previously characterized an RNA polymerase (pol) I transcription factor, E1BF, from rat cells. This protein is immunologically related to Ku autoantigen and is required in pol-I directed transcription of rodent ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA). Glycerol density gradient fractionation and in situ UV cross-linking analysis of the purified factor showed directly that it consists of a heterodimer of 85 and 72 kDa polypeptides. E1BF also interacted with the human core promoter and augmented transcription of human rDNA as much as fivefold in HeLa nuclear extract, whereas transcription from adenovirus major late promoter, CMV or SV40 early promoters by pol II and of U6 and 5S RNA genes by pol III were either unaffected or minimally inhibited by the antibodies. Purified rat E1BF partially restored the suppression of human rDNA transcription by anti-Ku antibodies. Immunoprecipitation of rat cell extract with the anti-Ku antibodies followed by SDS-PAGE of the precipitated proteins and Southwestern analysis showed that E1BF interacts with CPBF, a core promoter binding factor. When the majority of CPBF and E1BF was removed from the reaction mixture by preincubation with a core promoter oligo nucleotide fragment, rDNA transcription was severely impaired. Addition of exogenous CPBF or E1BF to such a reaction resulted in significant restoration of the transcription, whereas inclusion of both factors caused further enhancement of rDNA transcription. These data demonstrate that E1BF is a basal pol I transcription factor that interacts with a core promoter binding factor both physically and functionally, and that is not a general pol II or pol III transcription factor.

  6. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed. PMID:16834538

  7. Transcriptional regulation of basic fibroblast growth factor gene by p53 in human glioblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ueba, T; Nosaka, T; Takahashi, J A; Shibata, F; Florkiewicz, R Z; Vogelstein, B; Oda, Y; Kikuchi, H; Hatanaka, M

    1994-01-01

    Mutations of the p53 gene are found in various human cancers. The frequency of its mutation is reported to increase during tumor progression in most tumors. In human gliomas, mutations of the p53 gene are found in about one-third of the malignant forms and in few of the benign ones, indicating their possible involvement in tumor progression. On the other hand, we have recently shown that basic fibroblast growth factor (basic FGF) plays a crucial role in tumor progression as an autocrine growth factor in tissues of human gliomas. Therefore, we hypothesized that p53 might regulate the promoter activity of the basic FGF gene, which has several GC boxes and no typical TATA box. In this study, cotransfection assays using human glioblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma cells and establishment of stable cell lines expressing mutant-type p53 were performed. The basic FGF gene promoter was demonstrated to be regulated by p53 at the transcriptional level and its basal core promoter was found to be responsive to p53. Expression of endogenous basic FGF was also demonstrated to be activated by mutant type p53. Wild-type p53 repressed gene expression of the basic FGF and its mutant activated it in vitro, implying one of the possible pathways in tumor progression. Images PMID:8090761

  8. Multiple forms of the human gene-specific transcription factor USF. II. DNA binding properties and transcriptional activity of the purified HeLa USF.

    PubMed

    Sawadogo, M

    1988-08-25

    The gene-specific upstream stimulatory transcription factor (USF) is required for maximal expression of the adenovirus major late promoter in vivo as well as in vitro. We have examined the DNA binding and transcriptional properties of USF purified to near-homogeneity from HeLa cell nuclei (Sawadogo, M., Van Dyke, M. W., Gregor, P. D., and Roeder, R. G. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 11985-11993). The 44-and 43,000-dalton forms of USF displayed identical affinities for the major late promoter upstream sequence. Specific binding parameters were greatly influenced by neighboring sequences, but not by the topological state of the DNA. The dissociation rate was highly dependent upon the concentration of competitor DNA, indicating that USF can efficiently transfer from one binding site to another by passing through a doubly bound intermediate state (direct transfer mechanism). Transcription stimulation by purified USF showed titration curves identical to those observed with cruder preparations of the transcription factor. However, the overall stimulation observed at saturating USF concentration was significantly lower with the purified protein. By contrast, interaction with TATA box-binding RNA polymerase II transcription factor D was observed with both USF-containing fractions. This could suggest the existence of two different mechanisms for upstream sequence-dependent transcription stimulation, where one critical component (or some necessary modification of the upstream factor itself) may be missing in reactions reconstituted with purified USF.

  9. Sigma Factors for Cyanobacterial Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Sousuke; Asayama, Munehiko

    2009-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthesizing microorganisms that can be used as a model for analyzing gene expression. The expression of genes involves transcription and translation. Transcription is performed by the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme, comprising a core enzyme and a sigma (σ) factor which confers promoter selectivity. The unique structure, expression, and function of cyanobacterial σ factors (and RNAP core subunits) are summarized here based on studies, reported previously. The types of promoter recognized by the σ factors are also discussed with regard to transcriptional regulation. PMID:19838335

  10. Short-lived mammals (shrew, mouse) have a less robust metal-responsive transcription factor than humans and bats.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Katharina; Steiner, Kurt; Petrov, Boyan; Georgiev, Oleg; Schaffner, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Non-essential "heavy" metals such as cadmium tend to accumulate in an organism and thus are a particular threat for long-lived animals. Here we show that two unrelated, short-lived groups of mammals (rodents and shrews, separated by 100 Mio years of evolution) each have independently acquired mutations in their metal-responsive transcription factor (MTF-1) in a domain relevant for robust transcriptional induction by zinc and cadmium. While key amino acids are mutated in rodents, in shrews an entire exon is skipped. Rodents and especially shrews are unique regarding the alterations of this region. To investigate the biological relevance of these alterations, MTF-1s from the common shrew (Sorex araneus), the mouse, humans and a bat (Myotis blythii), were tested by cotransfection with a reporter gene into cells lacking MTF-1. Whereas shrews only live for 1.5-2.5 years, bats, although living on a very similar insect diet, have a lifespan of several decades. We find that bat MTF-1 is similarly metal-responsive as its human counterpart, while shrew MTF-1 is less responsive, similar to mouse MTF-1. We propose that in comparison to most other mammals, the short-lived shrews and rodents can afford a "lower-quality" system for heavy metal homeostasis and detoxification. PMID:27067444

  11. In vitro and in vivo binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat protein and Sp1 transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Jeang, K T; Chun, R; Lin, N H; Gatignol, A; Glabe, C G; Fan, H

    1993-01-01

    Recent genetic experiments have suggested that tat transactivation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat requires functional upstream enhancer sequences--Sp1 sites, in particular. In these experiments, HeLa cell nuclear extracts were passed over affinity matrices containing chemically synthesized or bacterially expressed HIV-1 Tat. Assay of material that bound to and eluted from the Tat matrices revealed the presence of the Sp1 transcription factor. Other transcription factors (Oct and NF-kappa B) also bound to Tat matrices but with less efficiency--in parallel with the lower capacities of these binding motifs to confer Tat responsiveness on a basal HIV-1 promoter compared with Sp1 sites. Passage of nuclear extracts over matrices containing other neutral proteins, including bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, and lysozyme, revealed no or reduced binding. Cross-linking experiments indicated that the purified Sp1 and Tat proteins can form multimeric complexes in the absence of other proteins. The region of Tat responsible for Sp1 binding was localized to a region encompassing residues 30 to 62. Immunoprecipitation experiments with HIV-1-infected T lymphocytes indicated coimmunoprecipitation of Tat and Sp1. These experiments extend previous genetic experiments and suggest a direct interaction between Tat and Sp1 during transactivation. Images PMID:7690421

  12. Structure, organization, and transcription units of the human {alpha}-platelet-derived growth factor receptor gene, PDGFRA

    SciTech Connect

    Kawagishi, Jun; Yamamoto, Tokuo; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Yoshimoto, Takashi

    1995-11-20

    Isolation and characterization of genomic clones encoding human {alpha}-platelet derived growth factor receptor (HGAM-approved symbol PDGFRA) revealed that the gene spans approximately 65 kb and contains 23 exons. The 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mRNA is encoded by exon 1, and a large intron of 23 kb separates exon 2 encoding the translation initiator codon AUG and the signal sequence. The locations of exon/intron boundaries in the extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains, the transmembrane domain, the two cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domains, and the kinase insertion domain are very similar to those in c-kit and macrophage colony stimulating factor-1 receptor genes. The transcription start site was mapped to a position 393 bp upstream of the AUG translation initiator codon by Si mapping and primer extension analysis. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the gene lacks a typical TATA box but contains a typical CCAAT box and GATA motifs. This region also contains potential sites for AP-1, AP-2, Oct-1, Oct-2, and Sp1. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the gene was fused to the luciferase reporter gene, and transcription units of the gene were determined. 49 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Chondrogenic potential of human mesenchymal stem cells and expression of Slug transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Brini, Anna T; Niada, Stefania; Lambertini, Elisabetta; Torreggiani, Elena; Arrigoni, Elena; Lisignoli, Gina; Piva, Roberta

    2015-06-01

    The scientific literature rarely reports experimental failures or inconsistent outcomes in the induction of cell differentiation; however, researchers commonly experience poor or unsuccessful responses to differentiating agents when culturing stem cells. One way of investigating the underlying reasons for such responses is to look at the basal expression levels of specific genes in multipotent stem cells before the induction of differentiation. In addition to shedding light on the complex properties of stem cells and the molecular modulation of differentiation pathways, this strategy can also lead to the development of important time- and money-saving tools that aid the efficient selection of cellular specimens--in this case, stem cells that are more prone to differentiate towards specific lineages and are therefore more suitable for cell-based therapeutic protocols in regenerative medicine. To address this latter aspect, this study focused on understanding the reasons why some human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) samples are less efficient at differentiating towards chondrogenesis. This study shows that analysis of the basal expression levels of Slug, a negative regulator of chondrogenesis in hMSC, provides a rapid and simple tool for distinguishing stem cell samples with the potential to form a cartilage-like matrix, and that are therefore suitable for cartilage tissue engineering. It is shown that high basal levels of Slug prevent the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs, even in the presence of transforming growth factor-β and elevated levels of Sox9.

  14. Conversion of Human Fibroblasts to Stably Self-Renewing Neural Stem Cells with a Single Zinc-Finger Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Ebrahim; Moradi, Sharif; Nemati, Shiva; Satarian, Leila; Basiri, Mohsen; Gourabi, Hamid; Zare Mehrjardi, Narges; Günther, Patrick; Lampert, Angelika; Händler, Kristian; Hatay, Firuze Fulya; Schmidt, Diana; Molcanyi, Marek; Hescheler, Jürgen; Schultze, Joachim L.; Saric, Tomo; Baharvand, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Summary Direct conversion of somatic cells into neural stem cells (NSCs) by defined factors holds great promise for mechanistic studies, drug screening, and potential cell therapies for different neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we report that a single zinc-finger transcription factor, Zfp521, is sufficient for direct conversion of human fibroblasts into long-term self-renewable and multipotent NSCs. In vitro, Zfp521-induced NSCs maintained their characteristics in the absence of exogenous factor expression and exhibited morphological, molecular, developmental, and functional properties that were similar to control NSCs. In addition, the single-seeded induced NSCs were able to form NSC colonies with efficiency comparable with control NSCs and expressed NSC markers. The converted cells were capable of surviving, migrating, and attaining neural phenotypes after transplantation into neonatal mouse and adult rat brains, without forming tumors. Moreover, the Zfp521-induced NSCs predominantly expressed rostral genes. Our results suggest a facilitated approach for establishing human NSCs through Zfp521-driven conversion of fibroblasts. PMID:27052315

  15. Functional interaction between the human cytomegalovirus 86-kilodalton IE2 protein and the cellular transcription factor CREB.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, D; Gebert, S; Arlt, H; Stamminger, T

    1995-01-01

    The 86-kDa IE2 protein (IE86) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has been described as a promiscuous transactivator of viral, as well as cellular, gene expression. Investigation of the mechanism used by IE86 to activate gene expression from the early UL112/113 promoter of HCMV revealed the existence of three binding sites for IE86 located between nucleotides -290 and -120 relative to the transcriptional start site (H. Arlt, D. Lang, S. Gebert, and T. Stamminger, J. Virol. 68:4117-4125, 1994). As shown previously, deletion of these target sites resulted in a reduction of IE86-mediated transactivation by approximately 70%. The remaining promoter, however, could still be stimulated about 40-fold, indicating the presence of an additional responsive element within these sequences. Here, we provide evidence that a binding site for the cellular transcription factor CREB can also act as a target for IE86 transactivation. By DNase I protection analysis, a binding sequence for CREB could be detected between nucleotides -78 and -56 within the respective promoter region. After in vitro mutagenesis of this CREB-binding site within the context of the entire UL112/113 promoter, a marked reduction in transactivation levels was evident. Moreover, when individual CREB-binding sites were positioned upstream of a minimal, TATA box-containing UL112/113 promoter, they were able to confer strong IE86 responsiveness, whereas a mutated sequence did not exert any effect. In far Western blot and pull-down experiments, a direct interaction of IE86 with the cellular transcription factor CREB could be observed. The in vivo relevance of this in vitro interaction was confirmed by using various GAL4 fusion proteins in the presence or absence of IE86 which revealed a strong activation only in the presence of both a GAL4-CREB fusion and IE86. This shows that at least one specific member of the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors is involved in mediating transactivation by the HCMV IE86 protein

  16. Directing cardiomyogenic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells by plasmid-based transient overexpression of cardiac transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Susann; Schwanke, Kristin; Haase, Alexandra; David, Robert; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael; Martin, Ulrich; Zweigerdt, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Cardiomyocytes (CMs) derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) possess a high potential for regenerative medicine. Previous publications suggested that viral transduction of a defined set of transcription factors (TFs) known to play pivotal roles in heart development also increases cardiomyogenesis in vitro upon overexpression in mouse or human ES cells. To circumvent issues associated with viral approaches such as insertional mutagenesis, we have established a transient transfection system for straightforward testing of TF combinations. Applying this method, the transfection efficiency and the temporal pattern of transgene expression were extensively assessed in hPSCs by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), TF-specific immunofluorescence analysis, and flow cytometry. Testing TF combinations in our approach revealed that BAF60C, GATA4, and MESP1 (BGM) were most effective for cardiac forward programming in human induced pluripotent stem cell lines and human ES cells as well. Removal of BAF60C slightly diminished formation of CM-like cells, whereas depletion of GATA4 or MESP1 abolished cardiomyogenesis. Each of these TFs alone had no inductive effect. In addition, we have noted sensitivity of CM formation to cell density effects, which highlights the necessity for cautious analysis when interpreting TF-directed lineage induction. In summary, this is the first report on TF-induced cardiomyogenesis of hPSCs applying a transient, nonintegrating method of cell transfection.

  17. The central domain of yeast transcription factor Rpn4 facilitates degradation of reporter protein in human cells.

    PubMed

    Morozov, A V; Spasskaya, D S; Karpov, D S; Karpov, V L

    2014-10-16

    Despite high interest in the cellular degradation machinery and protein degradation signals (degrons), few degrons with universal activity along species have been identified. It has been shown that fusion of a target protein with a degradation signal from mammalian ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) induces fast proteasomal degradation of the chimera in both mammalian and yeast cells. However, no degrons from yeast-encoded proteins capable to function in mammalian cells were identified so far. Here, we demonstrate that the yeast transcription factor Rpn4 undergoes fast proteasomal degradation and its central domain can destabilize green fluorescent protein and Alpha-fetoprotein in human HEK 293T cells. Furthermore, we confirm the activity of this degron in yeast. Thus, the Rpn4 central domain is an effective interspecies degradation signal.

  18. Altered expression of the imprinted transcription factor PLAGL1 deregulates a network of genes in the human IUGR placenta.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Martin-Trujillo, Alex; Petazzi, Paolo; Guillaumet-Adkins, Amy; Esteller, Manel; Monk, David

    2014-12-01

    Genomic imprinting is the epigenetic process that results in monoallelic expression of genes depending on parental origin. These genes are known to be critical for placental development and fetal growth in mammals. Aberrant epigenetic profiles at imprinted loci, such as DNA methylation defects, are surprisingly rare in pregnancies with compromised fetal growth, while variations in transcriptional output from the expressed alleles of imprinted genes are more commonly reported in pregnancies complicated with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). To determine if PLAGL1 and HYMAI, two imprinted transcripts deregulated in Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus, are involved in non-syndromic IUGR we compared the expression and DNA methylation levels in a large cohort of placental biopsies from IUGR and uneventful pregnancies. This revealed that despite appropriate maternal methylation at the shared PLAGL1/HYMAI promoter, there was a loss of correlation between PLAGL1 and HYMAI expression in IUGR. This incongruity was due to higher HYMAI expression in IUGR gestations, coupled with PLAGL1 down-regulation in placentas from IUGR girls, but not boys. The PLAGL1 protein is a zinc-finger transcription factor that has been shown to be a master coordinator of a genetic growth network in mice. We observe PLAGL1 binding to the H19/IGF2 shared enhancers in placentae, with significant correlations between PLAGL1 levels with H19 and IGF2 expression levels. In addition, PLAGL1 binding and expression also correlate with expression levels of metabolic regulator genes SLC2A4, TCF4 and PPARγ1. Our results strongly suggest that fetal growth can be influenced by altered expression of the PLAGL1 gene network in human placenta.

  19. Altered expression of the imprinted transcription factor PLAGL1 deregulates a network of genes in the human IUGR placenta

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Martin-Trujillo, Alex; Petazzi, Paolo; Guillaumet-Adkins, Amy; Esteller, Manel; Monk, David

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is the epigenetic process that results in monoallelic expression of genes depending on parental origin. These genes are known to be critical for placental development and fetal growth in mammals. Aberrant epigenetic profiles at imprinted loci, such as DNA methylation defects, are surprisingly rare in pregnancies with compromised fetal growth, while variations in transcriptional output from the expressed alleles of imprinted genes are more commonly reported in pregnancies complicated with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). To determine if PLAGL1 and HYMAI, two imprinted transcripts deregulated in Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus, are involved in non-syndromic IUGR we compared the expression and DNA methylation levels in a large cohort of placental biopsies from IUGR and uneventful pregnancies. This revealed that despite appropriate maternal methylation at the shared PLAGL1/HYMAI promoter, there was a loss of correlation between PLAGL1 and HYMAI expression in IUGR. This incongruity was due to higher HYMAI expression in IUGR gestations, coupled with PLAGL1 down-regulation in placentas from IUGR girls, but not boys. The PLAGL1 protein is a zinc-finger transcription factor that has been shown to be a master coordinator of a genetic growth network in mice. We observe PLAGL1 binding to the H19/IGF2 shared enhancers in placentae, with significant correlations between PLAGL1 levels with H19 and IGF2 expression levels. In addition, PLAGL1 binding and expression also correlate with expression levels of metabolic regulator genes SLC2A4, TCF4 and PPARγ1. Our results strongly suggest that fetal growth can be influenced by altered expression of the PLAGL1 gene network in human placenta. PMID:24993786

  20. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription. PMID:24406346

  1. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription

    PubMed Central

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription. PMID:25764111

  2. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription. PMID:25764111

  3. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription.

  4. Purification and characterization of FBI-1, a cellular factor that binds to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 inducer of short transcripts.

    PubMed

    Pessler, F; Pendergrast, P S; Hernandez, N

    1997-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) promoter directs the synthesis of two classes of RNA molecules, short transcripts and full-length transcripts. The synthesis of short transcripts depends on a bipartite DNA element, the inducer of short transcripts (IST), located in large part downstream of the HIV-1 start site of transcription. IST does not require any viral product for function and is thought to direct the assembly of transcription complexes that are incapable of efficient elongation. Nothing is known, however, about the biochemical mechanisms that mediate IST function. Here, we report the identification and purification of a factor that binds specifically to the IST. This factor, FBI-1, recognizes a large bipartite binding site that coincides with the bipartite IST element. It is constituted at least in part by an 86-kDa polypeptide that can be specifically cross-linked to IST. FBI-1 also binds to promoter and attenuation regions of a number of cellular and viral transcription units that are regulated by a transcription elongation block. This observation, together with the observation that the binding of FBI-1 to IST mutants correlates with the ability of these mutants to direct IST function, suggests that FBI-1 may be involved in the establishment of abortive transcription complexes.

  5. Purification and characterization of FBI-1, a cellular factor that binds to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 inducer of short transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Pessler, F; Pendergrast, P S; Hernandez, N

    1997-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) promoter directs the synthesis of two classes of RNA molecules, short transcripts and full-length transcripts. The synthesis of short transcripts depends on a bipartite DNA element, the inducer of short transcripts (IST), located in large part downstream of the HIV-1 start site of transcription. IST does not require any viral product for function and is thought to direct the assembly of transcription complexes that are incapable of efficient elongation. Nothing is known, however, about the biochemical mechanisms that mediate IST function. Here, we report the identification and purification of a factor that binds specifically to the IST. This factor, FBI-1, recognizes a large bipartite binding site that coincides with the bipartite IST element. It is constituted at least in part by an 86-kDa polypeptide that can be specifically cross-linked to IST. FBI-1 also binds to promoter and attenuation regions of a number of cellular and viral transcription units that are regulated by a transcription elongation block. This observation, together with the observation that the binding of FBI-1 to IST mutants correlates with the ability of these mutants to direct IST function, suggests that FBI-1 may be involved in the establishment of abortive transcription complexes. PMID:9199312

  6. DIESEL EXHAUST ACTIVATES REDOX-SENSITIVE TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS AND KINASES IN HUMAN AIRWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major component of airborne particulate matter. In previous studies we have described the acute inflammatory response of the human airway to inhaled DE. This was characterized by neutrophil, mast cell, and lymphocyte infiltration into the bronchial mucosa...

  7. BloodChIP: a database of comparative genome-wide transcription factor binding profiles in human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Chacon, Diego; Beck, Dominik; Perera, Dilmi; Wong, Jason W H; Pimanda, John E

    2014-01-01

    The BloodChIP database (http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/CRCWeb.nsf/page/BloodChIP) supports exploration and visualization of combinatorial transcription factor (TF) binding at a particular locus in human CD34-positive and other normal and leukaemic cells or retrieval of target gene sets for user-defined combinations of TFs across one or more cell types. Increasing numbers of genome-wide TF binding profiles are being added to public repositories, and this trend is likely to continue. For the power of these data sets to be fully harnessed by experimental scientists, there is a need for these data to be placed in context and easily accessible for downstream applications. To this end, we have built a user-friendly database that has at its core the genome-wide binding profiles of seven key haematopoietic TFs in human stem/progenitor cells. These binding profiles are compared with binding profiles in normal differentiated and leukaemic cells. We have integrated these TF binding profiles with chromatin marks and expression data in normal and leukaemic cell fractions. All queries can be exported into external sites to construct TF-gene and protein-protein networks and to evaluate the association of genes with cellular processes and tissue expression.

  8. BloodChIP: a database of comparative genome-wide transcription factor binding profiles in human blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Chacon, Diego; Beck, Dominik; Perera, Dilmi; Wong, Jason W. H.; Pimanda, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The BloodChIP database (http://www.med.unsw.edu.au/CRCWeb.nsf/page/BloodChIP) supports exploration and visualization of combinatorial transcription factor (TF) binding at a particular locus in human CD34-positive and other normal and leukaemic cells or retrieval of target gene sets for user-defined combinations of TFs across one or more cell types. Increasing numbers of genome-wide TF binding profiles are being added to public repositories, and this trend is likely to continue. For the power of these data sets to be fully harnessed by experimental scientists, there is a need for these data to be placed in context and easily accessible for downstream applications. To this end, we have built a user-friendly database that has at its core the genome-wide binding profiles of seven key haematopoietic TFs in human stem/progenitor cells. These binding profiles are compared with binding profiles in normal differentiated and leukaemic cells. We have integrated these TF binding profiles with chromatin marks and expression data in normal and leukaemic cell fractions. All queries can be exported into external sites to construct TF–gene and protein–protein networks and to evaluate the association of genes with cellular processes and tissue expression. PMID:24185696

  9. SNPs in putative regulatory regions identified by human mouse comparative sequencing and transcription factor binding site data

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Poulabi; Bahlo, Melanie; Schwartz, Jody R.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Houston, Kathryn A.; Dubchak, Inna; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    Genome wide disease association analysis using SNPs is being explored as a method for dissecting complex genetic traits and a vast number of SNPs have been generated for this purpose. As there are cost and throughput limitations of genotyping large numbers of SNPs and statistical issues regarding the large number of dependent tests on the same data set, to make association analysis practical it has been proposed that SNPs should be prioritized based on likely functional importance. The most easily identifiable functional SNPs are coding SNPs (cSNPs) and accordingly cSNPs have been screened in a number of studies. SNPs in gene regulatory sequences embedded in noncoding DNA are another class of SNPs suggested for prioritization due to their predicted quantitative impact on gene expression. The main challenge in evaluating these SNPs, in contrast to cSNPs is a lack of robust algorithms and databases for recognizing regulatory sequences in noncoding DNA. Approaches that have been previously used to delineate noncoding sequences with gene regulatory activity include cross-species sequence comparisons and the search for sequences recognized by transcription factors. We combined these two methods to sift through mouse human genomic sequences to identify putative gene regulatory elements and subsequently localized SNPs within these sequences in a 1 Megabase (Mb) region of human chromosome 5q31, orthologous to mouse chromosome 11 containing the Interleukin cluster.

  10. Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Differentiate into Oligodendrocyte Progenitors Using the Expression of Olig2 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Askari, Nahid; Yaghoobi, Mohammad Mehdi; Shamsara, Mehdi; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The helix-loop-helix transcription factor Olig2 is essential for lineage determination of oligodendrocytes. Differentiation of stem cells into oligodendrocytes and transplanting them is a novel strategy for the repair of different demyelination diseases. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are of great interest in regenerative medicine due to their potential for repairing damaged tissues. In this study, DPSCs were isolated from human third molars and transfected with the human Olig2 gene as a differentiation inducer for the oligodendrogenic pathway. Following the differentiation procedure, the expression of Sox2, NG2, PDGFRα, Nestin, MBP, Olig2, Oct4, glial fibrillary acidic protein and A2B5 as stage-specific markers was studied by real-time RT-qPCR, immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis. The cells were transplanted into a mouse model of local sciatic damage by lysolecithin as a model for demyelination. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) actively remyelinated and recovered the lysolecithin-induced damages in the sciatic nerve as revealed by treadmill exercise, the von Frey filament test and hind paw withdrawal in response to a thermal stimulus. Recovery of behavioral reflexes occurred 2-6 weeks after OPC transplantation. The results demonstrate that the expression of Olig2 in DPSCs reduces the expression of stem cell markers and induces the development of oligodendrocyte progenitors as revealed by the emergence of oligodendrocyte markers. DPSCs could be programmed into oligodendrocyte progenitors and considered as a simple and valuable source for the cell therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25966902

  11. Functional polymorphisms in the transcription factor NRF2 in humans increase the risk of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Marzec, Jacqui M; Christie, Jason D; Reddy, Sekhar P; Jedlicka, Anne E; Vuong, Hue; Lanken, Paul N; Aplenc, Richard; Yamamoto, Tae; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Cho, Hye-Youn; Kleeberger, Steven R

    2007-07-01

    We recently used positional cloning to identify the transcription factor Nrf2 (NF-E2 related factor 2) as a susceptibility gene in a murine model of oxidant-induced acute lung injury (ALI). NRF2 binds to antioxidant response elements (ARE) and up-regulates protective detoxifying enzymes in response to oxidative stress. This led us to investigate NRF2 as a candidate susceptibility gene for risk of development of ALI in humans. We identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by resequencing NRF2 in ethnically diverse subjects, and one (-617 C/A) significantly (P<0.001) diminished luciferase activity of promoter constructs containing the SNP and significantly decreased the binding affinity (P<0.001) relative to the wild type at this locus (-617 CC). In a nested case-control study, patients with the -617 A SNP had a significantly higher risk for developing ALI after major trauma (OR 6.44; 95% CI 1.34, 30.8; P=0.021) relative to patients with the wild type (-617 CC). This translational investigation provides novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of susceptibility to ALI and may help to identify patients who are predisposed to develop ALI under at risk conditions, such as trauma and sepsis. Furthermore, these findings may have important implications in other oxidative stress related illnesses.

  12. Novel Transcription Factor-Like Function of Human Matrix Metalloproteinase 3 Regulating the CTGF/CCN2 Gene▿

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Takanori; Kubota, Satoshi; Kawata, Kazumi; Mukudai, Yoshiki; Uehara, Junji; Ohgawara, Toshihiro; Ibaragi, Soichiro; Sasaki, Akira; Kuboki, Takuo; Takigawa, Masaharu

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) is well known as a secretory endopeptidase that degrades extracellular matrices. Recent reports indicated the presence of MMPs in the nucleus (A. J. Kwon et al., FASEB J. 18:690-692, 2004); however, its function has not been well investigated. Here, we report a novel function of human nuclear MMP3 as a trans regulator of connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF). Initially, we cloned MMP3 cDNA as a DNA-binding factor for the CCN2/CTGF gene. An interaction between MMP3 and transcription enhancer dominant in chondrocytes (TRENDIC) in the CCN2/CTGF promoter was confirmed by a gel shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. The CCN2/CTGF promoter was activated by overexpressed MMP3, whereas a TRENDIC mutant promoter lost the response. Also, the knocking down of MMP3 suppressed CCN2/CTGF expression. By cytochemical and histochemical analyses, MMP3 was detected in the nuclei of chondrocytic cells in culture and also in the nuclei of normal and osteoarthritic chondrocytes in vivo. The nuclear translocation of externally added recombinant MMP3 and six putative nuclear localization signals in MMP3 also were shown. Furthermore, we determined that heterochromatin protein gamma coordinately regulates CCN2/CTGF by interacting with MMP3. The involvement of this novel role of MMP3 in the development, tissue remodeling, and pathology of arthritic diseases through CCN2/CTGF regulation thus is suggested. PMID:18172013

  13. The Cancer-Related Transcription Factor Runx2 Modulates Cell Proliferation in Human Osteosarcoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Claudia M.J.; Vega, Oscar A.; Osorio, Mariana M.; Tapia, Julio C.; Antonelli, Marcelo; Stein, Gary S.; Van Wijnen, Andre J.; Galindo, Mario A.

    2013-01-01

    Runx2 regulates osteogenic differentiation and bone formation, but also suppresses pre-osteoblast proliferation by affecting cell cycle progression in the G1 phase. The growth suppressive potential of Runx2 is normally inactivated in part by protein destabilization, which permits cell cycle progression beyond the G1/S phase transition, and Runx2 is again up-regulated after mitosis. Runx2 expression also correlates with metastasis and poor chemotherapy response in osteosarcoma. Here we show that six human osteosarcoma cell lines (SaOS, MG63, U2OS, HOS, G292, and 143B) have different growth rates, which is consistent with differences in the lengths of the cell cycle. Runx2 protein levels are cell cycle-regulated with respect to the G1/S phase transition in U2OS, HOS, G292, and 143B cells. In contrast, Runx2 protein levels are constitutively expressed during the cell cycle in SaOS and MG63 cells. Forced expression of Runx2 suppresses growth in all cell lines indicating that accumulation of Runx2 in excess of its pre-established levels in a given cell type triggers one or more anti-proliferative pathways in osteosarcoma cells. Thus, regulatory mechanisms controlling Runx2 expression in osteosarcoma cells must balance Runx2 protein levels to promote its putative oncogenic functions, while avoiding suppression of bone tumor growth. PMID:22949168

  14. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  15. DIFFERENTIAL TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION AD GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS ON EXPOSURE TO RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA) AND VANADIUM

    EPA Science Inventory


    Differential transcription factor activation and gene expression profiles in human vascular endothelial cells on exposure to residual oil fly ash (ROFA) and vanadium.
    Srikanth S. Nadadur and Daniel L. Costa, US EPA, ORD, NHEERL (ETD, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch), Research ...

  16. Computational analysis of tissue-specific combinatorial gene regulation: predicting interaction between transcription factors in human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xueping; Lin, Jimmy; Zack, Donald J.; Qian, Jiang

    2006-01-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression is generally regulated by more than a single transcription factor (TF). Multiple TFs work in concert to achieve tissue specificity. In order to explore these complex TF interaction networks, we performed a large-scale analysis of TF interactions for 30 human tissues. We first identified tissue-specific genes for 30 tissues based on gene expression databases. We then evaluated the relationships between TFs using the relative position and co-occurrence of their binding sites in the promoters of tissue-specific genes. The predicted TF–TF interactions were validated by both known protein–protein interactions and co-expression of their target genes. We found that our predictions are enriched in known protein–protein interactions (>80 times that of random expectation). In addition, we found that the target genes show the highest co-expression in the tissue of interest. Our findings demonstrate that non-tissue specific TFs play a large role in regulation of tissue-specific genes. Furthermore, they show that individual TFs can contribute to tissue specificity in different tissues by interacting with distinct TF partners. Lastly, we identified several tissue-specific TF clusters that may play important roles in tissue-specific gene regulation. PMID:16982645

  17. Interaction of human mitochondrial transcription factor A in mitochondria: its involvement in the dynamics of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Endo, Hitoshi

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is a key regulator of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). TFAM interacts with itself and forms dimers; however, the precise interaction domain in vivo has not yet been determined. We herein showed that human TFAM formed oligomers in mitochondria by in situ chemical cross-linking. We used the separated fluorescent protein, monomeric Kusabira-Green, as a reporter to monitor their self-association in mitochondria. This reporter successfully detected the TFAM-TFAM interaction in cells as fluorescent signals on mitochondria. We also found that the N-terminal high-mobility group box domain was sufficient for this interaction. The expression of the dimer-defective mutant induced enlarged mtDNA nucleoids, suggesting the importance of dimerization in the distribution of mtDNA. The reporter system also supported the association and mixture between independent nucleoids through TFAM by a cell fusion assay using hemagglutinating virus of Japan. We here, for the first time, visualized the interaction of TFAM molecules in mitochondria and proposed its implications for the dynamics of mtDNA nucleoids.

  18. Probing Zn2+-binding effects on the zinc-ribbon domain of human general transcription factor TFIIB.

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mahua; Elsby, Laura M; Mal, Tapas K; Gooding, Jane M; Roberts, Stefan G E; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2004-01-01

    The general transcription factor, TFIIB, plays an important role in the assembly of the pre-initiation complex. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of TFIIB contains a zinc-ribbon motif, which is responsible for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II and TFIIF to the core promoter region. Although zinc-ribbon motif structures of eukaryotic and archaeal TFIIBs have been reported previously, the structural role of Zn2 binding to TFIIB remains to be determined. In the present paper, we report NMR and biochemical studies of human TFIIB NTD, which characterize the structure and dynamics of the TFIIB Zn2-binding domain in both Zn2-bound and -free states. The NMR data show that, whereas the backbone fold of NTD is pre-formed in the apo state, Zn2 binding reduces backbone mobility in the b-turn (Arg28-Gly30), induces enhanced structural rigidity of the charged-cluster domain in the central linker region of TFIIB and appends a positive surface charge within the Zn2-binding site. V8 protease-sensitivity assays of full-length TFIIB support the Zn2-dependent structural changes. These structural effects of Zn2 binding on TFIIB may have a critical role in interactions with its binding partners, such as the Rpb1 subunit of RNA polymerase II. PMID:14641108

  19. A murine uterine transcriptome, responsive to steroid receptor coactivator-2, reveals transcription factor 23 as essential for decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Szwarc, Maria M; Kovanci, Ertug; Creighton, Chad J; O'Malley, Bert W; Demayo, Francesco J; Lydon, John P

    2014-04-01

    Recent data from human and mouse studies strongly support an indispensable role for steroid receptor coactivator-2 (SRC-2)-a member of the p160/SRC family of coregulators-in progesterone-dependent endometrial stromal cell decidualization, an essential cellular transformation process that regulates invasion of the developing embryo into the maternal compartment. To identify the key progesterone-induced transcriptional changes that are dependent on SRC-2 and required for endometrial decidualization, we performed comparative genome-wide transcriptional profiling of endometrial tissue RNA from ovariectomized SRC-2(flox/flox) (SRC-2(f/f) [control]) and PR(cre/+)/SRC-2(flox/flox) (SRC-2(d/d) [SRC-2-depleted]) mice, acutely treated with vehicle or progesterone. Although data mining revealed that only a small subset of the total progesterone-dependent transcriptional changes is dependent on SRC-2 (∼13%), key genes previously reported to mediate progesterone-driven endometrial stromal cell decidualization are present within this subset. Along with providing a more detailed molecular portrait of the decidual transcriptional program governed by SRC-2, the degree of functional diversity of these progesterone mediators underscores the pleiotropic regulatory role of SRC-2 in this tissue. To showcase the utility of this powerful informational resource to uncover novel signaling paradigms, we stratified the total SRC-2-dependent subset of progesterone-induced transcriptional changes in terms of novel gene expression and identified transcription factor 23 (Tcf23), a basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor, as a new progesterone-induced target gene that requires SRC-2 for full induction. Importantly, using primary human endometrial stromal cells in culture, we demonstrate that TCF23 function is essential for progesterone-dependent decidualization, providing crucial translational support for this transcription factor as a new decidual mediator of progesterone action.

  20. A Murine Uterine Transcriptome, Responsive to Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2, Reveals Transcription Factor 23 as Essential for Decidualization of Human Endometrial Stromal Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Szwarc, Maria M.; Kovanci, Ertug; Creighton, Chad J.; O'Malley, Bert W.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent data from human and mouse studies strongly support an indispensable role for steroid receptor coactivator-2 (SRC-2)—a member of the p160/SRC family of coregulators—in progesterone-dependent endometrial stromal cell decidualization, an essential cellular transformation process that regulates invasion of the developing embryo into the maternal compartment. To identify the key progesterone-induced transcriptional changes that are dependent on SRC-2 and required for endometrial decidualization, we performed comparative genome-wide transcriptional profiling of endometrial tissue RNA from ovariectomized SRC-2flox/flox (SRC-2f/f [control]) and PRcre/+/SRC-2flox/flox (SRC-2d/d [SRC-2-depleted]) mice, acutely treated with vehicle or progesterone. Although data mining revealed that only a small subset of the total progesterone-dependent transcriptional changes is dependent on SRC-2 (∼13%), key genes previously reported to mediate progesterone-driven endometrial stromal cell decidualization are present within this subset. Along with providing a more detailed molecular portrait of the decidual transcriptional program governed by SRC-2, the degree of functional diversity of these progesterone mediators underscores the pleiotropic regulatory role of SRC-2 in this tissue. To showcase the utility of this powerful informational resource to uncover novel signaling paradigms, we stratified the total SRC-2-dependent subset of progesterone-induced transcriptional changes in terms of novel gene expression and identified transcription factor 23 (Tcf23), a basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor, as a new progesterone-induced target gene that requires SRC-2 for full induction. Importantly, using primary human endometrial stromal cells in culture, we demonstrate that TCF23 function is essential for progesterone-dependent decidualization, providing crucial translational support for this transcription factor as a new decidual mediator of progesterone action. PMID

  1. Induction of Stable Drug Resistance in Human Breast Cancer Cells Using a Combinatorial Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Library

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeongeun; Hirsh, Andrew S.; Wittner, Ben S.; Maeder, Morgan L.; Singavarapu, Rajasekhar; Lang, Magdalena; Janarthanan, Sailajah; McDermott, Ultan; Yajnik, Vijay; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Joung, J. Keith; Sgroi, Dennis C.

    2011-01-01

    Combinatorial libraries of artificial zinc-finger transcription factors (ZF-TFs) provide a robust tool for inducing and understanding various functional components of the cancer phenotype. Herein, we utilized combinatorial ZF-TF library technology to better understand how breast cancer cells acquire resistance to fulvestrant, a clinically important anti-endocrine therapeutic agent. From a diverse collection of nearly 400,000 different ZF-TFs, we isolated six ZF-TF library members capable of inducing stable, long-term anti-endocrine drug-resistance in two independent estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell lines. Comparative gene expression profile analysis of the six different ZF-TF-transduced breast cancer cell lines revealed five distinct clusters of differentially expressed genes. One cluster was shared among all 6 ZF-TF-transduced cell lines and therefore constituted a common fulvestrant-resistant gene expression signature. Pathway enrichment-analysis of this common fulvestrant resistant signature also revealed significant overlap with gene sets associated with an estrogen receptor-negative-like state and with gene sets associated with drug resistance to different classes of breast cancer anti-endocrine therapeutic agents. Enrichment-analysis of the four remaining unique gene clusters revealed overlap with myb-regulated genes. Finally, we also demonstrated that the common fulvestrant-resistant signature is associated with poor prognosis by interrogating five independent, publicly available human breast cancer gene expression datasets. Our results demonstrate that artificial ZF-TF libraries can be used successfully to induce stable drug-resistance in human cancer cell lines and to identify a gene expression signature that is associated with a clinically relevant drug-resistance phenotype. PMID:21818254

  2. GM-CSF Down-Regulates TLR Expression via the Transcription Factor PU.1 in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Kambis; Wisgrill, Lukas; Wessely, Isabelle; Diesner, Susanne C.; Schüller, Simone; Dürr, Celia; Heinle, Armando; Sachet, Monika; Pollak, Arnold; Förster-Waldl, Elisabeth; Spittler, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are crucial sensors of microbial agents such as bacterial or viral compounds. These receptors constitute key players in the induction of inflammation, e.g. in septic or chronic inflammatory diseases. Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) such as granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF) or granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) have been extensively investigated in their capacity to promote myelopoiesis in febrile neutropenia or to overcome immunosuppression in patients suffering from sepsis-associated neutropenia or from monocytic immunoincompetence. We report here that GM-CSF, downregulates TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4 in a time- and dose-dependent fashion in human monocytes. Diminished pathogen recognition receptor expression was accompanied by reduced downstream p38 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling upon lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding—and accordingly led to impaired proinflammatory cytokine production. Knockdown experiments of the transcription factors PU.1 and VentX showed that GM-CSF driven effects on TLR regulation is entirely PU.1 but not VentX dependent. We further analysed monocyte TLR and CD14 expression upon exposure to the IMID® immunomodulatory drug Pomalidomide (CC-4047), a Thalidomide analogue known to downregulate PU.1. Indeed, Pomalidomide in part reversed the GM-CSF-mediated effects. Our data indicate a critical role of PU.1 in the regulation of TLR1, 2, 4 and of CD14, thus targeting PU.1 ultimately results in TLR modulation. The PU.1 mediated immunomodulatory properties of GM-CSF should be taken into consideration upon usage of GM-CSF in inflammatory or infection-related conditions. PMID:27695085

  3. Human parvovirus B19 causes cell cycle arrest of human erythroid progenitors via deregulation of the E2F family of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhihong; Zhi, Ning; Wong, Susan; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Liu, Delong; Raghavachari, Nalini; Munson, Peter J.; Su, Su; Malide, Daniela; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S.

    2010-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) is the only human pathogenic parvovirus. It causes a wide spectrum of human diseases, including fifth disease (erythema infectiosum) in children and pure red cell aplasia in immunocompromised patients. B19V is highly erythrotropic and preferentially replicates in erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs). Current understanding of how B19V interacts with cellular factors to regulate disease progression is limited, due to a lack of permissive cell lines and animal models. Here, we employed a recently developed primary human CD36+ EPC culture system that is highly permissive for B19V infection to identify cellular factors that lead to cell cycle arrest after B19V infection. We found that B19V exploited the E2F family of transcription factors by downregulating activating E2Fs (E2F1 to E2F3a) and upregulating repressive E2Fs (E2F4 to E2F8) in the primary CD36+ EPCs. B19V nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) was a key viral factor responsible for altering E2F1–E2F5 expression, but not E2F6–E2F8 expression. Interaction between NS1 and E2F4 or E2F5 enhanced the nuclear import of these repressive E2Fs and induced stable G2 arrest. NS1-induced G2 arrest was independent of p53 activation and increased viral replication. Downstream E2F4/E2F5 targets, which are potentially involved in the progression from G2 into M phase and erythroid differentiation, were identified by microarray analysis. These findings provide new insight into the molecular pathogenesis of B19V in highly permissive erythroid progenitors. PMID:20890043

  4. Regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 transcription in squamous cell carcinoma of uterine cervix: the role of human papillomavirus gene E2 expression and activation of transcription factor NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Gasparian, A V; Fedorova, M D; Kisselev, F L

    2007-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays an important role in initiation and progression of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of human uterine cervix. Regulation of MMP-9 expression in such tumors is insufficiently studied. Involvement of the human papillomavirus (HPV) gene E2 and transcription factor NF-kappaB in the regulation of MMP-9 transcription has been shown in some model systems and types of malignant tumors. The present work was mainly designed to reveal a possible role of the HPV gene E2 and transcription factor NF-kappaB in the induction of MMP-9 expression in SCC. Specimens of tumor and corresponding adjacent normal tissue from 26 patients with SCC of the uterine cervix were studied. The intact E2 frame was observed in 19 of 26 (73.1%), the E2 gene mRNA was expressed in 10 of 15 (66.7%), NF-kappaB was activated in 17 of 23 (73.9%), and the expression of MMP-9 mRNA was recorded in 10 of 20 (50%) of the informative cases. The MMP-9 transcription did not correlate with gene E2 status, but in all cases correlated with the activation of NF-kappaB transcription factor (10 of 10 vs. 5 of 10 MMP-9-negative cases, p = 0.016). Thus, the NF-kappaB role has been proved in the regulation of MMP-9 transcription in SCC. There was no correlation of the E2 status and MMP-9 expression with clinical/morphological characteristics of the tumors: size, local invasiveness, metastasizing into regional lymph nodes, and level of differentiation. The high intensity of NF-kappaB activation correlated with low degree of differentiation of the tumors studied (p = 0.044). These findings suggested that NF-kappaB should be a molecular factor of the poor prognosis of human SCC.

  5. Glucocorticoids facilitate the transcription from the human cytomegalovirus major immediate early promoter in glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor-I-like protein-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue-Toyoda, Maki; Kato, Kohsuke; Nagata, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-27

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common and usually asymptomatic virus agent in healthy individuals. Initiation of HCMV productive infection depends on expression of the major immediate early (MIE) genes. The transcription of HCMV MIE genes is regulated by a diverse set of transcription factors. It was previously reported that productive HCMV infection is triggered probably by elevation of the plasma hydroxycorticoid level. However, it is poorly understood whether the transcription of MIE genes is directly regulated by glucocorticoid. Here, we found that the dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, facilitates the transcription of HCMV MIE genes through the MIE promoter and enhancer in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent manner. By competitive EMSA and reporter assays, we revealed that an NF-I like protein is involved in DEX-mediated transcriptional activation of the MIE promoter. Thus, this study supports a notion that the increased level of hydroxycorticoid in the third trimester of pregnancy reactivates HCMV virus production from the latent state. - Highlights: • DEX facilitates the transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • GR is involved in DEX-dependent transcription from the HCMV MIE promoter. • A 17 bp repeat is responsible for the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX. • An NF-I-like protein is involved in the HCMV MIE promoter activation by DEX.

  6. RbAp48, a novel inhibitory factor that regulates the transcription of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Yang, Jin; Yang, Zongxing; Lu, Xiangyun; Jin, Changzhong; Cheng, Linfang; Wu, Nanping

    2016-07-01

    Retinoblastoma binding protein 4 (RbAp48) is a histone chaperone which has been suggested to play a role in gene silencing. However, the role of RbAp48 in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and gene replication has not been determined to date, to the best of our knowledge. For this purpose, we demonstrated in the present study that RbAp48 expression was upregulated by HIV-1 infection, whereas the knockdown of RbAp48 promoted HIV infection and the production of virus particles. The ectopic expression of RbAp48 inhibited HIV-1 expression, and this inhibition correlated with a marked decrease in the expression of HIV-1 genomic RNA and various RNA transcripts. Further experiments to determine the mechanism responsible for the inhibitory effects of RbAp48 revealed that the ectopic expression of RbAp48 repressed HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR)-mediated basal transcription as well as TNF-α- and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)‑activated transcription. Furthermore, the results of the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed that RbAp48 binds to the HIV-1 LTR in vitro. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that, as a transcriptional cofactor, RbAp48 is likely to act as a potent antiretroviral defense. PMID:27222146

  7. Functional interplay of SP family members and nuclear factor Y is essential for transcriptional activation of the human Calreticulin gene.

    PubMed

    Schardt, Julian A; Keller, Manuela; Seipel, Katja; Pabst, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Calreticulin (CALR) is a highly conserved, multifunctional protein involved in a variety of cellular processes including the maintenance of intracellular calcium homeostasis, proper protein folding, differentiation and immunogenic cell death. More recently, a crucial role for CALR in the pathogenesis of certain hematologic malignancies was discovered: in clinical subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia, CALR overexpression mediates a block in differentiation, while somatic mutations have been found in the majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) or thrombopoietin receptor gene (MPL). However, the mechanisms underlying CALR promoter activation have insufficiently been investigated so far. By dissecting the core promoter region, we could identify a functional TATA-box relevant for transcriptional activation. In addition, we characterized two evolutionary highly conserved cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) within the proximal promoter each composed of one binding site for the transcription factors SP1 and SP3 as well as for the nuclear transcription factor Y (NFY) and we verified binding of these factors to their cognate sites in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-11-01

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor-DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)). PMID:26529010

  9. Estrogen induced concentration dependent differential gene expression in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells: Role of transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekharan, Sabarinath; Kandasamy, Krishna Kumar; Dayalan, Pavithra; Ramamurthy, Viraragavan

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •Estradiol (E2) at low dose induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. •E2 at high concentration induced cell stress in breast cancer cells. •Estrogen receptor physically interacts only with a few transcription factors. •Differential expression of genes with Oct-1 binding sites increased under stress. •Transcription factor binding sites showed distinct spatial distribution on genes. -- Abstract: Background: Breast cancer cells respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. The mechanism of this concentration dependent differential outcome is not well understood yet. Methodology: Meta-analysis of the expression data of MCF7 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified genes differentially expressed at the low or the high dose, and examined the nature of regulatory elements in the vicinity of these genes. Specifically, we looked for the difference in the presence, abundance and spatial distribution of binding sites for estrogen receptor (ER) and selected transcription factors (TFs) in the genomic region up to 25 kb upstream and downstream from the transcription start site (TSS) of these genes. Results: It was observed that at high dose E2 induced the expression of stress responsive genes, while at low dose, genes involved in cell cycle were induced. We found that the occurrence of transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs) for certain factors such as Sp1 and SREBP1 were higher on regulatory regions of genes expressed at low dose. At high concentration of E2, genes with a higher frequency of Oct-1 binding regions were predominantly involved. In addition, there were differences in the spatial distribution pattern of the TFBRs in the genomic regions among the two sets of genes. Discussion: E2 induced predominantly proliferative/metabolic response at low concentrations; but at high concentration, stress–rescue responses were induced

  10. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-01-01

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)). PMID:26529010

  11. The Transcription Factor Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 (IRF1) Plays a Key Role in the Terminal Effector Pathways of Human Preterm Labor.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ratana; Tran, Ha Thi; Liong, Stella; Barker, Gillian; Lappas, Martha

    2016-02-01

    Preterm birth is the largest single cause of neonatal death and morbidity. By activating cytokine- and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-signaling pathways, infection and/or inflammation are strongly associated with preterm delivery. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) is an important regulator of the inflammatory response. The aims of this study were to establish the effect of 1) labor on IRF1 expression in human fetal membranes and myometrium, 2) prolabor mediators on IRF1 expression and activity, and 3) IRF1 small interfering RNA on the expression of prolabor mediators. IRF1 expression was higher in fetal membranes and myometrium after spontaneous term labor and in preterm fetal membranes with infection. The proinflammatory cytokine IL1B, the bacterial product fsl-1, and viral analog polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly [I:C]) significantly increased IRF1 mRNA expression and transcriptional activity in human primary myometrial cells. In addition, IL1B increased IRF1 activity in primary amnion cells. IRF1 silencing in myometrial cells decreased IL1B-, fsl-1-, and poly (I:C)-induced cytokine (IL6, TNF, IL1B) and chemokine (CXCL8, CCL2) mRNA expression and IL6, CXCL8, and CCL2 release. IL1B-, fsl-1-, and poly (I:C)-induced PTGS2 mRNA expression and IL1B-induced prostaglandin release was also decreased by IRF1 silencing. In conclusion, IRF1 upregulation in fetal membranes and myometrium after term labor indicates a proinflammatory role for IRF1 in human parturition. IRF1 is involved in TLR- and cytokine-mediated signaling in human myometrium. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms associated with inflammation- and infection-associated preterm birth. IRF1 inhibitors as therapeutics for the management of spontaneous preterm birth warrants further investigation. PMID:26674566

  12. Characterization of CRTAM gene promoter: AP-1 transcription factor control its expression in human T CD8 lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Valle-Rios, Ricardo; Patiño-Lopez, Genaro; Medina-Contreras, Oscar; Canche-Pool, Elsy; Recillas-Targa, Felix; Lopez-Bayghen, Esther; Zlotnik, Albert; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2009-10-01

    Class-I MHC-restricted T-cell associated molecule (CRTAM) is a member of the Nectin-like adhesion molecule family. It is rapidly induced in NK, NKT and CD8(+) T cells. Interaction with its ligand Nectin-like 2 results in increased secretion of IFN-gamma by activated CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Through sequential bioinformatic analyses of the upstream region of the human CRTAM gene, we detected cis-elements potentially important for CRTAM gene transcription. Analyzing 2kb upstream from the ATG translation codon by mutation analysis in conjunction with luciferase reporter assays, electrophoretic mobility shify assay (EMSA) and supershift assays, we identified an AP-1 binding site, located at 1.4kb from the ATG translation codon of CRTAM gene as an essential element for CRTAM expression in activated but not resting human CD8(+) T cells. CRTAM expression was reduced in activated CD8(+) T cells treated with the JNK inhibitor SP600125, indicating that CRTAM expression is driven by the JNK-AP-1 signaling pathway. This study represents the first CRTAM gene promoter analysis in human T cells and indicates that AP-1 is a positive transcriptional regulator of this gene, a likely important finding because CRTAM has recently been shown to play a role in IFN-gamma and IL-17 production and T cell proliferation.

  13. Transcription factors of Lotus: regulation of isoflavonoid biosynthesis requires coordinated changes in transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Dale; Stranne, Maria; Mikkelsen, Lisbeth; Pakseresht, Nima; Welham, Tracey; Hiraka, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Sato, Shusei; Paquette, Suzanne; Wang, Trevor L; Martin, Cathie; Bailey, Paul

    2012-06-01

    Isoflavonoids are a class of phenylpropanoids made by legumes, and consumption of dietary isoflavonoids confers benefits to human health. Our aim is to understand the regulation of isoflavonoid biosynthesis. Many studies have shown the importance of transcription factors in regulating the transcription of one or more genes encoding enzymes in phenylpropanoid metabolism. In this study, we coupled bioinformatics and coexpression analysis to identify candidate genes encoding transcription factors involved in regulating isoflavonoid biosynthesis in Lotus (Lotus japonicus). Genes encoding proteins belonging to 39 of the main transcription factor families were examined by microarray analysis of RNA from leaf tissue that had been elicited with glutathione. Phylogenetic analyses of each transcription factor family were used to identify subgroups of proteins that were specific to L. japonicus or closely related to known regulators of the phenylpropanoid pathway in other species. R2R3MYB subgroup 2 genes showed increased expression after treatment with glutathione. One member of this subgroup, LjMYB14, was constitutively overexpressed in L. japonicus and induced the expression of at least 12 genes that encoded enzymes in the general phenylpropanoid and isoflavonoid pathways. A distinct set of six R2R3MYB subgroup 2-like genes was identified. We suggest that these subgroup 2 sister group proteins and those belonging to the main subgroup 2 have roles in inducing isoflavonoid biosynthesis. The induction of isoflavonoid production in L. japonicus also involves the coordinated down-regulation of competing biosynthetic pathways by changing the expression of other transcription factors. PMID:22529285

  14. A Role for the Transcription Factor Nk2 Homeobox 1 in Schizophrenia: Convergent Evidence from Animal and Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Malt, Eva A.; Juhasz, Katalin; Malt, Ulrik F.; Naumann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with diverse mental and somatic symptoms. The molecular mechanisms leading from genes to disease pathology in schizophrenia remain largely unknown. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that common single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with specific diseases are enriched in the recognition sequences of transcription factors that regulate physiological processes relevant to the disease. We have used a “bottom-up” approach and tracked a developmental trajectory from embryology to physiological processes and behavior and recognized that the transcription factor NK2 homeobox 1 (NKX2-1) possesses properties of particular interest for schizophrenia. NKX2-1 is selectively expressed from prenatal development to adulthood in the brain, thyroid gland, parathyroid gland, lungs, skin, and enteric ganglia, and has key functions at the interface of the brain, the endocrine-, and the immune system. In the developing brain, NKX2-1-expressing progenitor cells differentiate into distinct subclasses of forebrain GABAergic and cholinergic neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. The transcription factor is highly expressed in mature limbic circuits related to context-dependent goal-directed patterns of behavior, social interaction and reproduction, fear responses, responses to light, and other homeostatic processes. It is essential for development and mature function of the thyroid gland and the respiratory system, and is involved in calcium metabolism and immune responses. NKX2-1 interacts with a number of genes identified as susceptibility genes for schizophrenia. We suggest that NKX2-1 may lie at the core of several dose dependent pathways that are dysregulated in schizophrenia. We correlate the symptoms seen in schizophrenia with the temporal and spatial activities of NKX2-1 in order to highlight promising future research areas. PMID:27064909

  15. A Role for the Transcription Factor Nk2 Homeobox 1 in Schizophrenia: Convergent Evidence from Animal and Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Malt, Eva A; Juhasz, Katalin; Malt, Ulrik F; Naumann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with diverse mental and somatic symptoms. The molecular mechanisms leading from genes to disease pathology in schizophrenia remain largely unknown. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that common single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with specific diseases are enriched in the recognition sequences of transcription factors that regulate physiological processes relevant to the disease. We have used a "bottom-up" approach and tracked a developmental trajectory from embryology to physiological processes and behavior and recognized that the transcription factor NK2 homeobox 1 (NKX2-1) possesses properties of particular interest for schizophrenia. NKX2-1 is selectively expressed from prenatal development to adulthood in the brain, thyroid gland, parathyroid gland, lungs, skin, and enteric ganglia, and has key functions at the interface of the brain, the endocrine-, and the immune system. In the developing brain, NKX2-1-expressing progenitor cells differentiate into distinct subclasses of forebrain GABAergic and cholinergic neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. The transcription factor is highly expressed in mature limbic circuits related to context-dependent goal-directed patterns of behavior, social interaction and reproduction, fear responses, responses to light, and other homeostatic processes. It is essential for development and mature function of the thyroid gland and the respiratory system, and is involved in calcium metabolism and immune responses. NKX2-1 interacts with a number of genes identified as susceptibility genes for schizophrenia. We suggest that NKX2-1 may lie at the core of several dose dependent pathways that are dysregulated in schizophrenia. We correlate the symptoms seen in schizophrenia with the temporal and spatial activities of NKX2-1 in order to highlight promising future research areas. PMID:27064909

  16. c-ETS transcription factors play an essential role in the licensing of human MCM4 origin of replication.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Kaveri; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-11-01

    In metazoans, DNA replication is a highly regulated and ordered process that occurs during the S phase of cell cycle. It begins with the licensing of origins of replication usually found in close proximity of actively transcribing genes owing perhaps to a profound influence of transcription factors on the epigenetic signatures and architecture of chromatin. Here we show that ETS transcription factors are novel regulators of MCM4 origin, whose binding sites are localized between two divergently transcribing MCM4 and PRKDC genes. c-ETS1 and c-ETS2 were recruited to the MCM4 origin respectively during the S and G1 phases of cell cycle. c-ETS2 binding was facilitated by an active chromatin distinguished by acetylated histone H3 orchestrated by histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and followed by HBO1 mediated histone H4 acetylation. Interestingly, c-ETS2 overexpression led to increased BrdU incorporation in the S phase cells while its down-regulation by RNA interference compromised the loading of pre-replicative complex at the origin. Conversely, the recruitment of c-ETS1 at the origin coincided with histone H3 methylation signature characteristic of closed chromatin conformation. As expected, enforced expression of c-ETS1 severely compromised DNA replication whereas its down-regulation enhanced DNA replication as evident from increased BrdU incorporation. Thus, c-ETS transcription factors appear to be key regulators of MCM4 origin where c-ETS2 seems to promote DNA replication whereas c-ETS1 functions as a negative regulator.

  17. Involvement of atypical transcription factor E2F8 in the polyploidization during mouse and human decidualization

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qian-Rong; Zhao, Xu-Yu; Zuo, Ru-Juan; Wang, Tong-Song; Gu, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Ji-Long; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Polyploid decidual cells are specifically differentiated cells during mouse uterine decidualization. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanism and physiological significance of polyploidization in pregnancy. Here we report a novel role of E2F8 in the polyploidization of decidual cells in mice. E2F8 is highly expressed in decidual cells and regulated by progesterone through HB-EGF/EGFR/ERK/STAT3 signaling pathway. E2F8 transcriptionally suppresses CDK1, thus triggering the polyploidization of decidual cells. E2F8-mediated polyploidization is a response to stresses which are accompanied by decidualization. Interestingly, polyploidization is not detected during human decidualization with the down-regulation of E2F8, indicating differential expression of E2F8 may lead to the difference of decidual cell polyploidization between mice and humans. PMID:25892397

  18. Nuclear-encoded factors involved in post-transcriptional processing and modification of mitochondrial tRNAs in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Christopher A.; Nicholls, Thomas J.; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) encodes 22 tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) that are necessary for the intraorganellar translation of the 13 mtDNA-encoded subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. Maturation of mt-tRNAs involves 5′ and 3′ nucleolytic excision from precursor RNAs, as well as extensive post-transcriptional modifications. Recent data suggest that over 7% of all mt-tRNA residues in mammals undergo post-transcriptional modification, with over 30 different modified mt-tRNA positions so far described. These processing and modification steps are necessary for proper mt-tRNA function, and are performed by dedicated, nuclear-encoded enzymes. Recent growing evidence suggests that mutations in these nuclear genes (nDNA), leading to incorrect maturation of mt-tRNAs, are a cause of human mitochondrial disease. Furthermore, mtDNA mutations in mt-tRNA genes, which may also affect mt-tRNA function, processing, and modification, are also frequently associated with human disease. In theory, all pathogenic mt-tRNA variants should be expected to affect only a single process, which is mitochondrial translation, albeit to various extents. However, the clinical manifestations of mitochondrial disorders linked to mutations in mt-tRNAs are extremely heterogeneous, ranging from defects of a single tissue to complex multisystem disorders. This review focuses on the current knowledge of nDNA coding for proteins involved in mt-tRNA maturation that have been linked to human mitochondrial pathologies. We further discuss the possibility that tissue specific regulation of mt-tRNA modifying enzymes could play an important role in the clinical heterogeneity observed for mitochondrial diseases caused by mutations in mt-tRNA genes. PMID:25806043

  19. Transcription factors in pancreatic development. Animal models.

    PubMed

    Martin, Merce; Hauer, Viviane; Messmer, Mélanie; Orvain, Christophe; Gradwohl, Gérard

    2007-01-01

    Through the analysis of genetically modified mice a hierarchy of transcription factors regulating pancreas specification, endocrine destiny as well as endocrine subtype specification and differentiation has been established. In addition to conventional approaches such as transgenic technologies and gene targeting, recombinase fate mapping in mice has been key in establishing the lineage relationship between progenitor cells and their progeny in understanding pancreas formation. Moreover, the design of specific mouse models to conditionally express transcription factors in different populations of progenitor cells has revealed to what extent transcription factors required for islet cell development are also sufficient to induce endocrine differentiation and the importance of the competence of progenitor cells to respond to the genetic program implemented by these factors. Taking advantage of this basic science knowledge acquired in rodents, immature insulin-producing cells have recently been differentiated in vitro from human embryonic stem cells. Taken together these major advances emphasize the need to gain further in-depth knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling beta-cell differentiation in mice to generate functional beta-cells in the future that could be used for cell therapy in diabetes. PMID:17923766

  20. The mtfA Transcription Factor Gene Controls Morphogenesis, Gliotoxin Production, and Virulence in the Opportunistic Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Timothy D.

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the leading causative agent of invasive aspergillosis (IA). The number of cases is on the rise, with mortality rates as high as 90% among immunocompromised patients. Molecular genetic studies in A. fumigatus could provide novel targets to potentially set the basis for antifungal therapies. In the current study, we investigated the role of the transcription factor gene mtfA in A. fumigatus. Our results revealed that mtfA plays a role in the growth and development of the fungus. Deletion or overexpression of mtfA leads to a slight reduction in colony growth, as well as a reduction in conidiation levels, in the overexpression strain compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, production of the secondary metabolite gliotoxin increased when mtfA was overexpressed, coinciding with an increase in the transcription levels of the gliotoxin genes gliZ and gliP with respect to the wild type. In addition, our study showed that mtfA is also necessary for normal protease activity in A. fumigatus; deletion of mtfA resulted in a reduction of protease activity compared to wild-type levels. Importantly, the absence of mtfA caused a decrease in virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model, indicating that mtfA is necessary for A. fumigatus wild-type pathogenesis. PMID:24728192

  1. Regulation of human papillomavirus type 31 gene expression during the differentiation-dependent life cycle through histone modifications and transcription factor binding.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Tonia R; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2008-05-10

    The life cycle of high-risk human papillomaviruses is linked to epithelial differentiation with virion production restricted to highly differentiated suprabasal cells. Two major viral promoters direct high-risk HPV gene expression and their activities are dependent upon differentiation. The early promoter controls initiation of transcripts at sites upstream of the E6 open reading frame and is active in both undifferentiated as well as differentiated cells. The late viral promoter directs transcription from a series of heterogeneous start sites in E7 and is activated upon differentiation. In this study, the state of histones as well as the spectrum of transcription factors bound to the two major HPV 31 viral promoters in undifferentiated and differentiated cells were examined using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Our studies indicate that, in undifferentiated cells, the chromatin surrounding both promoter regions is in an open, transcriptionally active state as indicated by the presence of dimethylated forms of histone H3 K4 as well as acetylated H3 and acetylated H4. Upon differentiation, there was an increase of four to six fold in the levels of dimethylated H3K4 and acetylated H3 respectively around both promoter regions as well as an increase of approximately nine fold in acetylated H4 at the early promoter. This suggests that nucleosomes of both promoter regions are further activated through histone modifications during differentiation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were also used to examine the binding of transcription factors to the keratinocyte enhancer (KE)/early promoter region in the upstream regulatory region (URR) and late promoter sequences throughout differentiation. Our results suggest that a dynamic change in transcription factor binding occurs in both regions upon differentiation; most notably a significant increase in C/EBP-beta binding to the KE/early promoter region as well as C/EBP-alpha binding to the late promoter region upon

  2. Transcription factor RUNX2 up-regulates chemokine receptor CXCR4 to promote invasive and metastatic potentials of human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zheng-Jun; Yang, Lang; Qian, Feng; Wang, Yan-Xia; Yu, Xi; Ji, Cheng-Dong; Cui, Wei; Xiang, Dong-Fang; Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Ji Ming; Cui, You-Hong; Bian, Xiu-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) is a regulator of embryogenesis and development, but has also been implicated in the progression of certain human cancer. This study aimed to elucidate the role of RUNX2 in the invasive and metastatic potentials of human gastric cancer (GC) and the underlying mechanisms. We found that the levels of RUNX2 expression in gastric cancer tissues were correlated with the differentiation degrees, invasion depth and lymph node metastasis. COX regression analysis indicated that RUNX2 was an independent prognostic indicator for GC patients. RUNX2 significantly increased the migration and invasion ability of GC cells in vitro and enhanced the invasion and metastatic potential of GC cells in an orthotopic GC model of nude mice. Mechanistically, RUNX2 directly bound to the promoter region of the gene coding for the chemokine receptor CXCR4 to enhance its transcription. CXCR4 knockdown or treatment with AMD3100, a CXCR4 inhibitor, attenuated RUNX2-promoted invasion and metastasis. These results demonstrate that RUNX2 promotes the invasion and metastasis of human GC by transcriptionally up-regulating the chemokine receptor CXCR4. Therefore, the RUNX2-CXCR4 axis is a potential therapeutic target for GC. PMID:27007162

  3. Modulation of Cytokine Production and Transcription Factors Activities in Human Jurkat T Cells by Thymol and Carvacrol

    PubMed Central

    Gholijani, Nasser; Gharagozloo, Marjan; Kalantar, Fathollah; Ramezani, Amin; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Thymol and carvacrol, two main components of thyme, have shown anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of these components on Jurkat leukemia cells as an in vitro T cell model and their molecular mechanisms of activity. Methods: Cells were cultured in the presence of components and subsequently stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)/calcium ionophore for evaluating interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production. The activation of T cell transcription factors that included nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFATs), activator protein-1 (AP-1; c-Jun/c-Fos), and nuclear factor (NF)-κB were examined by Western blot analysis. Results: Thymol and carvacrol at 25 µg/ml significantly reduced IL-2 levels from 119.4 ± 8pg/ml in control cells treated only with PMA/Calcium ionophore and the solvent to 66.9 ± 6.4pg/ml (thymol) and 32.3 ± 3.6pg/ml (carvacrol) and IFN-γ from 423.7 ± 19.7pg/ml in control cells to 311.9 ± 11.6pg/ml (thymol) and 293.5 ± 16.7pg/ml (carvacrol). Western blot analyses of nuclear extracts showed that the same concentrations of components significantly reduced NFAT-2 to 44.2 ± 2.7% (thymol) and 91.4 ± 2.3% (carvacrol) of the control (p<0.05), and c-Fos to 31.2 ± 6.2% (thymol) and 27.6 ± 3.1% (carvacrol) of the control (p<0.01). No effects on NFAT-1, c-Jun and phospho-NF-κBp65 levels were observed. Conclusion: Thymol and carvacrol could contribute to modulation of T cell activity by reducing IL-2 and IFN-γ production possibly through down regulation of AP-1 and NFAT-2 transcription factors suggesting their potential usefulness for reduction of T cell overactivity in immune-mediated diseases. PMID:26793612

  4. Early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1) is critical for transcriptional control of SLAMF1 gene in human B cells.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Anton M; Putlyaeva, Lidia V; Covich, Milica; Klepikova, Anna V; Akulich, Kseniya A; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Korneev, Kirill V; Dmitriev, Sergey E; Polanovsky, Oleg L; Sidorenko, Svetlana P; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Kuprash, Dmitry V

    2016-10-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family member 1 (SLAMF1)/CD150 is a co-stimulatory receptor expressed on a variety of hematopoietic cells, in particular on mature lymphocytes activated by specific antigen, costimulation and cytokines. Changes in CD150 expression level have been reported in association with autoimmunity and with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We characterized the core promoter for SLAMF1 gene in human B-cell lines and explored binding sites for a number of transcription factors involved in B cell differentiation and activation. Mutations of SP1, STAT6, IRF4, NF-kB, ELF1, TCF3, and SPI1/PU.1 sites resulted in significantly decreased promoter activity of varying magnitude, depending on the cell line tested. The most profound effect on the promoter strength was observed upon mutation of the binding site for Early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1). This mutation produced a 10-20 fold drop in promoter activity and pinpointed EBF1 as the master regulator of human SLAMF1 gene in B cells. We also identified three potent transcriptional enhancers in human SLAMF1 locus, each containing functional EBF1 binding sites. Thus, EBF1 interacts with specific binding sites located both in the promoter and in the enhancer regions of the SLAMF1 gene and is critical for its expression in human B cells.

  5. Methamphetamine activates nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and induces human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transcription in human microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Wires, Emily S; Alvarez, David; Dobrowolski, Curtis; Wang, Yun; Morales, Marisela; Karn, Jonathan; Harvey, Brandon K

    2012-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) primarily infects glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent evidence suggests that HIV-infected individuals who abuse drugs such as methamphetamine (METH) have higher viral loads and experience more severe neurological complications than HIV-infected individuals who do not abuse drugs. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of METH on HIV expression from the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter and on an HIV integrated provirus in microglial cells, the primary host cells for HIV in the CNS. Primary human microglial cells immortalized with SV40 T antigen (CHME-5 cells) were cotransfected with an HIV LTR reporter and the HIV Tat gene, a key regulator of viral replication and gene expression, and exposed to METH. Our results demonstrate that METH treatment induced LTR activation, an effect potentiated in the presence of Tat. We also found that METH increased the nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), a key cellular transcriptional regulator of the LTR promoter, and the activity of an NF-κB-specific reporter plasmid in CHME-5 cells. The presence of a dominant-negative regulator of NF-κB blocked METH-related activation of the HIV LTR. Furthermore, treatment of HIV-latently infected CHME-5 (CHME-5/HIV) cells with METH induced HIV expression and nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB. These results suggest that METH can stimulate HIV gene expression in microglia cells through activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. This mechanism may outline the initial biochemical events leading to the observed increased neurodegeneration in HIV-positive individuals who use METH.

  6. Overlapping binding sites of two different transcription factors in the promoter of the human gene for the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Pollwein, P

    1993-01-29

    A four- to fivefold overexpression of the gene for the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) in individuals with Down's syndrome (DS) appears to be responsible for the fifty year earlier onset of Alzheimer's disease pathology in DS compared to the normal population. Elucidation of the mechanisms regulating the expression of the human APP gene might therefore be an important step forward in understanding the processes leading to Alzheimer's disease. Recently, an activating DNA fragment proximal to the transcriptional start site of the APP gene was identified, composed of two GC-elements, A and C, both required for full transcriptional activation (1). Here I present evidence that the transcription factor Sp1 can bind to element A and that another specific complex, called C2A, can be observed, which covers a region overlapping with the Sp1 binding site on the APP promoter. Gene transfer experiments with a truncated version of the APP promoter containing mutated binding sites for the factors mentioned above support that at least two different and independent regulatory pathways for APP gene expression might exist. An imbalance between these pathways is proposed to be a putative risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. ZCF32, a fungus specific Zn(II)2 Cys6 transcription factor, is a repressor of the biofilm development in the human pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Kakade, Pallavi; Sadhale, Parag; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-01-01

    As a human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans can cause a wide variety of disease conditions ranging from superficial to systemic infections. Many of these infections are caused by an inherent ability of the pathogen to form biofilms on medical devices resulting in high mortality. Biofilms formed by C. albicans are a complex consortium of yeast and hyphal cells embedded in an extracellular matrix and are regulated by a network of transcription factors. Here, we report the role of a novel Zn(II)2-Cys6 binuclear cluster transcription factor, ZCF32, in the regulation of biofilm formation. Global transcriptome analysis reveals that biofilm development is the most altered pathway in the zcf32 null mutant. To delineate the functional correlation between ZCF32 and biofilm development, we determined the set of genes directly regulated by Zcf32. Our data suggests that Zcf32 regulates biofilm formation by repressing the expression of adhesins, chitinases and a significant number of other GPI-anchored proteins. We establish that there is the lesser recruitment of Zcf32 on the promoters of biofilm genes in biofilm condition compared to the planktonic mode of growth. Taking together, we propose that the transcription factor ZCF32 negatively regulates biofilm development in C. albicans. PMID:27498700

  8. Krüppel-like factor 2 represses transcription of the telomerase catalytic subunit human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toshifumi; Mizuguchi, Mariko; Fujii, Masahiro; Nakamura, Masataka

    2015-04-01

    In normal human T cells, telomerase activity is strictly regulated. T cells are thought to express telomerase to avoid replicative senescence, unlike most normal somatic cells with definite replicative lifespan. T cells in blood and tissues are usually in a state of quiescence without expression of the limiting catalytic subunit of telomerase, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). In contrast to activation, repression of hTERT transcription has not been studied well. Our previous studies have found an hTERT promoter element with repressive function. Here we identified KLF2, which represses hTERT transcription by binding to the putative promoter element. KLF2 and hTERT exhibited reciprocal mRNA expression patterns in primary human T cells. In activated T cells, KLF2 binding to the hTERT promoter was eliminated, relieving the repression of hTERT transcription found in resting T cells. Our results suggest that KLF2 is involved in strict repression of hTERT expression through binding to the promoter in primary human T cells.

  9. Human STAGA complex is a chromatin-acetylating transcription coactivator that interacts with pre-mRNA splicing and DNA damage-binding factors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Martinez, E; Palhan, V B; Tjernberg, A; Lymar, E S; Gamper, A M; Kundu, T K; Chait, B T; Roeder, R G

    2001-10-01

    GCN5 is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) originally identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and required for transcription of specific genes within chromatin as part of the SAGA (SPT-ADA-GCN5 acetylase) coactivator complex. Mammalian cells have two distinct GCN5 homologs (PCAF and GCN5L) that have been found in three different SAGA-like complexes (PCAF complex, TFTC [TATA-binding-protein-free TAF(II)-containing complex], and STAGA [SPT3-TAF(II)31-GCN5L acetylase]). The composition and roles of these mammalian HAT complexes are still poorly characterized. Here, we present the purification and characterization of the human STAGA complex. We show that STAGA contains homologs of most yeast SAGA components, including two novel human proteins with histone-like folds and sequence relationships to yeast SPT7 and ADA1. Furthermore, we demonstrate that STAGA has acetyl coenzyme A-dependent transcriptional coactivator functions from a chromatin-assembled template in vitro and associates in HeLa cells with spliceosome-associated protein 130 (SAP130) and DDB1, two structurally related proteins. SAP130 is a component of the splicing factor SF3b that associates with U2 snRNP and is recruited to prespliceosomal complexes. DDB1 (p127) is a UV-damaged-DNA-binding protein that is involved, as part of a complex with DDB2 (p48), in nucleotide excision repair and the hereditary disease xeroderma pigmentosum. Our results thus suggest cellular roles of STAGA in chromatin modification, transcription, and transcription-coupled processes through direct physical interactions with sequence-specific transcription activators and with components of the splicing and DNA repair machineries. PMID:11564863

  10. Models of human core transcriptional regulatory circuitries

    PubMed Central

    Saint-André, Violaine; Federation, Alexander J.; Lin, Charles Y.; Abraham, Brian J.; Reddy, Jessica; Lee, Tong Ihn; Bradner, James E.; Young, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    A small set of core transcription factors (TFs) dominates control of the gene expression program in embryonic stem cells and other well-studied cellular models. These core TFs collectively regulate their own gene expression, thus forming an interconnected auto-regulatory loop that can be considered the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry (CRC) for that cell type. There is limited knowledge of core TFs, and thus models of core regulatory circuitry, for most cell types. We recently discovered that genes encoding known core TFs forming CRCs are driven by super-enhancers, which provides an opportunity to systematically predict CRCs in poorly studied cell types through super-enhancer mapping. Here, we use super-enhancer maps to generate CRC models for 75 human cell and tissue types. These core circuitry models should prove valuable for further investigating cell-type–specific transcriptional regulation in healthy and diseased cells. PMID:26843070

  11. A new paradigm for transcription factor TFIIB functionality.

    PubMed

    Gelev, Vladimir; Zabolotny, Janice M; Lange, Martin; Hiromura, Makoto; Yoo, Sang Wook; Orlando, Joseph S; Kushnir, Anna; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Paquet, Eric; Bachvarov, Dimcho; Schaffer, Priscilla A; Usheva, Anny

    2014-01-20

    Experimental and bioinformatic studies of transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) have revealed a mechanism of RNAP2 transcription initiation less uniform across gene promoters than initially thought. However, the general transcription factor TFIIB is presumed to be universally required for RNAP2 transcription initiation. Based on bioinformatic analysis of data and effects of TFIIB knockdown in primary and transformed cell lines on cellular functionality and global gene expression, we report that TFIIB is dispensable for transcription of many human promoters, but is essential for herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) gene transcription and replication. We report a novel cell cycle TFIIB regulation and localization of the acetylated TFIIB variant on the transcriptionally silent mitotic chromatids. Taken together, these results establish a new paradigm for TFIIB functionality in human gene expression, which when downregulated has potent anti-viral effects.

  12. Transcription factor abundance controlled by an auto-regulatory mechanism involving a transcription start site switch

    PubMed Central

    Ngondo, Richard Patryk; Carbon, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    A transcriptional feedback loop is the simplest and most direct means for a transcription factor to provide an increased stability of gene expression. In this work performed in human cells, we reveal a new negative auto-regulatory mechanism involving an alternative transcription start site (TSS) usage. Using the activating transcription factor ZNF143 as a model, we show that the ZNF143 low-affinity binding sites, located downstream of its canonical TSS, play the role of protein sensors to induce the up- or down-regulation of ZNF143 gene expression. We uncovered that the TSS switch that mediates this regulation implies the differential expression of two transcripts with an opposite protein production ability due to their different 5′ untranslated regions. Moreover, our analysis of the ENCODE data suggests that this mechanism could be used by other transcription factors to rapidly respond to their own aberrant expression level. PMID:24234445

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and retinoid X receptor transcription factors are released from activated human platelets and shed in microparticles.

    PubMed

    Ray, Denise M; Spinelli, Sherry L; Pollock, Stephen J; Murant, Thomas I; O'Brien, Jamie J; Blumberg, Neil; Francis, Charles W; Taubman, Mark B; Phipps, Richard P

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) and its ligands are important regulators of lipid metabolism, inflammation, and diabetes. We previously demonstrated that anucleate human platelets express the transcription factor PPARgamma and that PPARgamma ligands blunt platelet activation. To further understand the nature of PPARgamma in platelets, we determined the platelet PPARgamma isoform(s) and investigated the fate of PPARgamma following platelet activation. Our studies demonstrated that human platelets contain only the PPARgamma1 isoform and after activation with thrombin, TRAP, ADP or collagen PPARgamma is released from internal stores. PPARgamma release was blocked by a cytoskeleton inhibitor, Latrunculin A. Platelet-released PPARgamma was complexed with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and retained its ability to bind DNA. Interestingly, the released PPARgamma and RXR were microparticle associated and the released PPARgamma/RXR complex retained DNA-binding ability. Additionally, a monocytic cell line, THP-1, is capable of internalizing PMPs. Further investigation following treatment of these cells with the PPARgamma agonist, rosiglitazone and PMPs revealed a possible transcellular mechanism to attenuate THP-1 activation. These new findings are the first to demonstrate transcription factor release from platelets, revealing the complex spectrum of proteins expressed and expelled from platelets, and suggests that platelet PPARgamma has an undiscovered role in human biology. PMID:18217139

  14. Amphibian transcription factor IIIA proteins contain a sequence element functionally equivalent to the nuclear export signal of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev.

    PubMed

    Fridell, R A; Fischer, U; Lührmann, R; Meyer, B E; Meinkoth, J L; Malim, M H; Cullen, B R

    1996-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev protein is required for nuclear export of late HIV-1 mRNAs. This function is dependent on the mutationally defined Rev activation domain, which also forms a potent nuclear export signal. Transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) binds to 5S rRNA transcripts and this interaction has been proposed to play a role in the efficient nuclear export of 5S rRNA in amphibian oocytes. Here it is reported that amphibian TFIIIA proteins contain a sequence element with homology to the Rev activation domain that effectively substitutes for this domain in inducing the nuclear export of late HIV-1 mRNAs. It is further demonstrated that this TFIIIA sequence element functions as a protein nuclear export signal in both human cells and frog oocytes. Thus, this shared protein motif may play an analogous role in mediating the nuclear export of both late HIV-1 RNAs and 5S rRNA transcripts. PMID:8610146

  15. Serine Arginine-Rich Splicing Factor 1 (SRSF1) Contributes to the Transcriptional Activation of CD3ζ in Human T Cells.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Vaishali R; Gillooly, Andrew R; Perl, Marcel A; Markopoulou, Anastasia; Tsokos, George C

    2015-01-01

    T lymphocytes from many patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) express decreased levels of the T cell receptor (TCR)-associated CD3 zeta (ζ) signaling chain, a feature directly linked to their abnormal phenotype and function. Reduced mRNA expression partly due to defective alternative splicing, contributes to the reduced expression of CD3ζ chain. We previously identified by oligonucleotide pulldown and mass spectrometry approaches, the serine arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) binding to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of CD3ζ mRNA. We showed that SRSF1 regulates alternative splicing of the 3'UTR of CD3ζ to promote expression of the normal full length 3`UTR over an unstable splice variant in human T cells. In this study we show that SRSF1 regulates transcriptional activation of CD3ζ. Specifically, overexpression and silencing of SRSF1 respectively increases and decreases CD3ζ total mRNA and protein expression in Jurkat and primary T cells. Using promoter-luciferase assays, we show that SRSF1 enhances transcriptional activity of the CD3ζ promoter in a dose dependent manner. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that SRSF1 is recruited to the CD3ζ promoter. These results indicate that SRSF1 contributes to transcriptional activation of CD3ζ. Thus our study identifies a novel mechanism whereby SRSF1 regulates CD3ζ expression in human T cells and may contribute to the T cell defect in SLE.

  16. Expression of Nuclear Transcription Factor Kappa B in Locally Advanced Human Cervical Cancer Treated With Definitive Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Amit K.; Jhingran, Anuja; Klopp, Ann H.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Kunnumakkara, Ajai B.; Broadus, Russell R.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), a transcriptional factor that has been shown to be constitutively active in cervical cancer, is part of an important pathway leading to treatment resistance in many tumor types. The purpose of our study was to determine whether expression of NF-{kappa}B in pretreatment specimens and specimens taken shortly after treatment initiation correlated with outcome in cervical cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled in a study in which cervical biopsy specimens were obtained before radiation therapy and 48 h after treatment initiation. Matched biopsy specimens from 16 of these patients were available and evaluated for the nuclear expression of NF-{kappa}B protein by immunohistochemical staining. Results: After a median follow-up of 43 months, there were 9 total treatment failures. Nuclear staining for NF-{kappa}B was positive in 3 of 16 pretreatment biopsy specimens (19%) and 5 of 16 postradiation biopsy specimens (31%). Pretreatment expression of NF-{kappa}B nuclear staining correlated with increased rates of local-regional failure (100% vs. 23%, p = 0.01), distant failure (100% vs. 38%, p = 0.055), disease-specific mortality (100% vs. 31%, p = 0.03), and overall mortality (100% vs. 38%, p = 0.055). Conclusions: Our data suggest that pretreatment nuclear expression of NF-{kappa}B may be associated with a poor outcome for cervical cancer patients treated with chemoradiation. Although these data require validation in a larger group of patients, the results support the continued study of the relationship between NF-{kappa}B and outcome in patients treated for carcinoma of the cervix.

  17. [Function and expression of transcription factors implicated in gonadal differentiation].

    PubMed

    Morohashi, K

    1998-07-01

    Several transcription factors such as SRY, DAX-1, Ad4BP/SF-1, WT-1 and SOX -9, have been revealed to be implicated in gonadal development by analyzing the genetic disorders of human and the gene disrupted mice. All of these transcription factors are expressed in the early stage of the gonadal development and the expression profiles during the gonadal development are clearly different between the two sexes. Functions of the transcription factors are discussed by referring genes under the control of these factors. Effects of endocrine disruptants on the expression of Ad4BP/SF-1 in the fetal gonads was also discussed. PMID:9702047

  18. Cyclic phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid induce hyaluronic acid synthesis via CREB transcription factor regulation in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Maeda-Sano, Katsura; Gotoh, Mari; Morohoshi, Toshiro; Someya, Takao; Murofushi, Hiromu; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid mediator and an analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). cPA has a unique cyclic phosphate ring at the sn-2 and sn-3 positions of its glycerol backbone. We showed before that a metabolically stabilized cPA derivative, 2-carba-cPA, relieved osteoarthritis pathogenesis in vivo and induced hyaluronic acid synthesis in human osteoarthritis synoviocytes in vitro. This study focused on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts, which retain moisture and maintain health in the dermis. We investigated the effects of cPA and LPA on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts (NB1RGB cells). Using particle exclusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, we found that both cPA and LPA dose-dependently induced hyaluronic acid synthesis. We revealed that the expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 messenger RNA and protein is up-regulated by cPA and LPA treatment time dependently. We then characterized the signaling pathways up-regulating hyaluronic acid synthesis mediated by cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. Pharmacological inhibition and reporter gene assays revealed that the activation of the LPA receptor LPAR1, Gi/o protein, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) but not nuclear factor κB induced hyaluronic acid synthesis by the treatment with cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. These results demonstrate for the first time that cPA and LPA induce hyaluronic acid synthesis in human skin fibroblasts mainly through the activation of LPAR1-Gi/o followed by the PI3K, ERK, and CREB signaling pathway.

  19. Coexpression of NF-kappa B/Rel and Sp1 transcription factors in human immunodeficiency virus 1-induced, dendritic cell-T-cell syncytia.

    PubMed Central

    Granelli-Piperno, A; Pope, M; Inaba, K; Steinman, R M

    1995-01-01

    Productive infection of T cells with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) typically requires that the T cells be stimulated with antigens or mitogens. This requirement has been attributed to the activation of the transcription factor NF-kappa B, which synergizes with the constitutive transcription factor Sp1 to drive the HIV-1 promoter. Recently, we have found that vigorous replication of HIV-1 takes place in nonactivated memory T cells after syncytium formation with dendritic cells (DCs). These syncytia lack activated cells as determined by an absence of staining for Ki-67 cell cycle antigen. The expression and activity of NF-kappa B and Sp1 were, therefore, analyzed in isolated T cells and DCs from humans and mice. We have used immunolabeling, Western blot analysis, and electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays. T cells lack active NF-kappa B but express Sp1 as expected. DCs express high levels of all known NF-kappa B and Rel proteins, with activity residing primarily within RelB, p50, and p65. However, DCs lack Sp1, which may explain the failure of HIV-1 to replicate in purified DCs. Coexpression of NF-kappa B and Sp1 occurs in the heterologous DC-T-cell syncytia that are induced by HIV-1. Therefore, HIV-1-induced cell fusion brings together factors that upregulate virus transcription. Since DCs and memory T cells frequently traffic together in situ, these unusual heterologous syncytia could develop in infected individuals and lead to chronic HIV-1 replication without ostensible immune stimulation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7479915

  20. Cell-type specific and combinatorial usage of diverse transcription factors revealed by genome-wide binding studies in multiple human cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bum-Kyu; Bhinge, Akshay A.; Battenhouse, Anna; McDaniell, Ryan M.; Liu, Zheng; Song, Lingyun; Ni, Yunyun; Birney, Ewan; Lieb, Jason D.; Furey, Terrence S.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Iyer, Vishwanath R.

    2012-01-01

    Cell-type diversity is governed in part by differential gene expression programs mediated by transcription factor (TF) binding. However, there are few systematic studies of the genomic binding of different types of TFs across a wide range of human cell types, especially in relation to gene expression. In the ENCODE Project, we have identified the genomic binding locations across 11 different human cell types of CTCF, RNA Pol II (RNAPII), and MYC, three TFs with diverse roles. Our data and analysis revealed how these factors bind in relation to genomic features and shape gene expression and cell-type specificity. CTCF bound predominantly in intergenic regions while RNAPII and MYC preferentially bound to core promoter regions. CTCF sites were relatively invariant across diverse cell types, while MYC showed the greatest cell-type specificity. MYC and RNAPII co-localized at many of their binding sites and putative target genes. Cell-type specific binding sites, in particular for MYC and RNAPII, were associated with cell-type specific functions. Patterns of binding in relation to gene features were generally conserved across different cell types. RNAPII occupancy was higher over exons than adjacent introns, likely reflecting a link between transcriptional elongation and splicing. TF binding was positively correlated with the expression levels of their putative target genes, but combinatorial binding, in particular of MYC and RNAPII, was even more strongly associated with higher gene expression. These data illuminate how combinatorial binding of transcription factors in diverse cell types is associated with gene expression and cell-type specific biology. PMID:22090374

  1. Prunus transcription factors: breeding perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Valmor J.; Rubio, Manuel; Trainotti, Livio; Verde, Ignazio; Bonghi, Claudio; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Many plant processes depend on differential gene expression, which is generally controlled by complex proteins called transcription factors (TFs). In peach, 1533 TFs have been identified, accounting for about 5.5% of the 27,852 protein-coding genes. These TFs are the reference for the rest of the Prunus species. TF studies in Prunus have been performed on the gene expression analysis of different agronomic traits, including control of the flowering process, fruit quality, and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. These studies, using quantitative RT-PCR, have mainly been performed in peach, and to a lesser extent in other species, including almond, apricot, black cherry, Fuji cherry, Japanese apricot, plum, and sour and sweet cherry. Other tools have also been used in TF studies, including cDNA-AFLP, LC-ESI-MS, RNA, and DNA blotting or mapping. More recently, new tools assayed include microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNA-Seq) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). New functional genomics opportunities include genome resequencing and the well-known synteny among Prunus genomes and transcriptomes. These new functional studies should be applied in breeding programs in the development of molecular markers. With the genome sequences available, some strategies that have been used in model systems (such as SNP genotyping assays and genotyping-by-sequencing) may be applicable in the functional analysis of Prunus TFs as well. In addition, the knowledge of the gene functions and position in the peach reference genome of the TFs represents an additional advantage. These facts could greatly facilitate the isolation of genes via QTL (quantitative trait loci) map-based cloning in the different Prunus species, following the association of these TFs with the identified QTLs using the peach reference genome. PMID:26124770

  2. Prunus transcription factors: breeding perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Valmor J; Rubio, Manuel; Trainotti, Livio; Verde, Ignazio; Bonghi, Claudio; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Many plant processes depend on differential gene expression, which is generally controlled by complex proteins called transcription factors (TFs). In peach, 1533 TFs have been identified, accounting for about 5.5% of the 27,852 protein-coding genes. These TFs are the reference for the rest of the Prunus species. TF studies in Prunus have been performed on the gene expression analysis of different agronomic traits, including control of the flowering process, fruit quality, and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. These studies, using quantitative RT-PCR, have mainly been performed in peach, and to a lesser extent in other species, including almond, apricot, black cherry, Fuji cherry, Japanese apricot, plum, and sour and sweet cherry. Other tools have also been used in TF studies, including cDNA-AFLP, LC-ESI-MS, RNA, and DNA blotting or mapping. More recently, new tools assayed include microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNA-Seq) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). New functional genomics opportunities include genome resequencing and the well-known synteny among Prunus genomes and transcriptomes. These new functional studies should be applied in breeding programs in the development of molecular markers. With the genome sequences available, some strategies that have been used in model systems (such as SNP genotyping assays and genotyping-by-sequencing) may be applicable in the functional analysis of Prunus TFs as well. In addition, the knowledge of the gene functions and position in the peach reference genome of the TFs represents an additional advantage. These facts could greatly facilitate the isolation of genes via QTL (quantitative trait loci) map-based cloning in the different Prunus species, following the association of these TFs with the identified QTLs using the peach reference genome. PMID:26124770

  3. Transcription factor AP-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: Alterations in activity and expression during Human Papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Jammu and Kashmir (J&K) region of India. A substantial proportion of esophageal carcinoma is associated with infection of high-risk HPV type 16 and HPV18, the oncogenic expression of which is controlled by host cell transcription factor Activator Protein-1 (AP-1). We, therefore, have investigated the role of DNA binding and expression pattern of AP-1 in esophageal cancer with or without HPV infection. Methods Seventy five histopathologically-confirmed esophageal cancer and an equal number of corresponding adjacent normal tissue biopsies from Kashmir were analyzed for HPV infection, DNA binding activity and expression of AP-1 family of proteins by PCR, gel shift assay and immunoblotting respectively. Results A high DNA binding activity and elevated expression of AP-1 proteins were observed in esophageal cancer, which differed between HPV positive (19%) and HPV negative (81%) carcinomas. While JunB, c-Fos and Fra-1 were the major contributors to AP-1 binding activity in HPV negative cases, Fra-1 was completely absent in HPV16 positive cancers. Comparison of AP-1 family proteins demonstrated high expression of JunD and c-Fos in HPV positive tumors, but interestingly, Fra-1 expression was extremely low or nil in these tumor tissues. Conclusion Differential AP-1 binding activity and expression of its specific proteins between HPV - positive and HPV - negative cases indicate that AP-1 may play an important role during HPV-induced esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:19758438

  4. Effect of epidermal growth factor in HLA class I and class II transcription and protein expression in human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, D. J.; Courjal, F.; Maurizis, J. C.; Bignon, Y. J.; Chollet, P.; Plagne, R.

    1992-01-01

    The spontaneous expression of HLA class I and class II molecules in two human breast carcinoma cell lines (MCF7, T47D) and their modulation during epidermal growth factor treatment are reported. Transcription was analysed by Northern blot and hybridisation with HLA class II and class I cDNA specific probes. The expression of cell surface determinants was examined by internal protein labelling with 35s-methionine, immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibodies specific for HLA class I or class II, followed by isolation of the immune complex on protein A-Sepharose; at least a quantification of glycoprotein was performed by chromatofocusing. Glycoprotein quantification showed a significant increase of HLA class I and class II (DR) antigen expression after stimulation by epidermal growth factor (0.02 microgram ml-1) in the two cell lines, when compared with untreated cell controls. However, with epidermal growth factor treatment of MCF7 and T47D cells, low increases in the amounts of HLA class I and class II RNA were obtained. These differences between expressed antigens and correspondent RNA amounts would be explained by the fact that EGF in these two cell lines acts more in post-transcription for HLA class I and class II antigens. Images Figure 1 PMID:1637682

  5. Budesonide epimer R or dexamethasone selectively inhibit platelet-activating factor-induced or interleukin 1β-induced DNA binding activity of cis-acting transcription factors and cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression in human epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lukiw, Walter J.; Pelaez, Ricardo Palacios; Martinez, Jorge; Bazan, Nicolas G.

    1998-01-01

    To further understand the molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid action on gene expression, DNA-binding activities of the cis-acting transcription factors activator protein 1 (AP1), AP2, Egr1 (zif268), NF-κB, the signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins gamma interferon activation site (GAS), Sis-inducible element, and the TATA binding protein transcription factor II D (TFIID) were examined in human epidermal keratinocytes. The cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and platelet-activating factor (PAF), both potent mediators of inflammation, were used as triggers for gene expression. Budesonide epimer R (BUDeR) and dexamethasone (DEX) were studied as potential antagonists. BUDeR or DEX before IL-1β- or PAF-mediated gene induction elicited strong inhibition of AP1-, GAS-, and in particular NF-κB-DNA binding (P < 0.001, ANOVA). Only small effects were noted on AP2, Egr1 (zif268), and Sis-inducible element-DNA binding (P > 0.05). No significant effect was noted on the basal transcription factor TFIID recognition of TATA-containing core promoter sequences (P > 0.68). To test the hypothesis that changing cis-acting transcription factor binding activity may be involved in inflammatory-response related gene transcription, RNA message abundance for human cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2 (E.C.1.14.99.1) was assessed in parallel by using reverse transcription–PCR. Although the COX-1 gene was found to be expressed at constitutively low levels, the TATA-containing COX-2 gene, which contains AP1-like, GAS, and NF-κB DNA-binding sites in its immediate promoter, was found to be strongly induced by IL-1β or PAF (P < 0.001). BUDeR and DEX both suppressed COX-2 RNA message generation; however, no correlation was associated with TFIID–DNA binding. These results suggest that on stimulation by mediators of inflammation, although the basal transcription machinery remains intact, modulation of cis-activating transcription factor AP1, GAS, and NF-κB-DNA binding by the

  6. Inhibition of proliferation of estrogen receptor‑positive MCF‑7 human breast cancer cells by tamoxifen through c‑Jun transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Zou, Shi-Tao; Zhu, Ran; Li, Wei; Gu, Chun-Wei; Wei, Shao-Hua; Xie, Jia-Ming; Wu, Hao-Rong

    2013-04-01

    Activator of protein 1 (AP-1) is a heterodimeric transcription factor composed of various members of the Jun and Fos families and binds to DNA at specific AP-1 binding sites. AP-1 transcriptional activity is increased by phosphorylation at serine residues in the c‑Jun component of AP-1. In the present study, the proliferation of MCF-7 breast cancer cells was found to be suppressed by tamoxifen (TAM)-activated c-Jun through the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. The molecular mechanism by which c‑Jun activation induces antiproliferative signals in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive MCF-7 human breast cancer cells remains unknown. TAM inhibited the proliferation of ER-positive MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and ER-negative MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells and 48 h incubation with 10 µM TAM led to inhibition of 80% of proliferation. In addition, no significant difference in c-Jun mRNA and protein levels was detected in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-435 cells stimulated by TAM for 48 h. TAM treatment of MCF-7 cells activated the transcriptional activity of AP-1, which responds specifically to phorbol ester. To determine the role of c-Jun in the antiproliferation of MCF-7 cells stimulated by TAM, the inhibition rates of MCF‑7 cells were correlated with c‑Jun expression and stimulation of TAM. Results showed that the inhibition rate of TAM-stimulated MCF-7 cells was positively regulated by overexpression of c-Jun and negatively regulated by underexpression of c-Jun. Overall, these results indicate that the TAM-stimulated antiproliferation of MCF-7 cells is positively regulated by c-Jun through activation of the PKC pathway.

  7. Placental endoplasmic reticulum stress negatively regulates transcription of placental growth factor via ATF4 and ATF6β: implications for the pathophysiology of human pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Mizuuchi, Masahito; Cindrova-Davies, Tereza; Olovsson, Matts; Charnock-Jones, D Stephen; Burton, Graham J; Yung, Hong Wa

    2016-03-01

    Low maternal circulating concentrations of placental growth factor (PlGF) are one of the hallmarks of human pregnancy complications, including fetal growth restriction (FGR) and early-onset pre-eclampsia (PE). Currently, PlGF is used clinically with other biomarkers to screen for high-risk cases, although the mechanisms underlying its regulation are largely unknown. Placental endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has recently been found to be elevated in cases of FGR, and to an even greater extent in early-onset PE complicated with FGR. ER stress activates the unfolded protein response (UPR); attenuation of protein translation and a reduction in cell growth and proliferation play crucial roles in the pathophysiology of these complications of pregnancy. In this study, we further identified that ER stress regulates release of PlGF. We first observed that down-regulation of PlGF protein was associated with nuclear localization of ATF4, ATF6α and ATF6β in the syncytiotrophoblast of placentae from PE patients. Transcript analysis showed a decrease of PlGF mRNA, and an increase from genes encoding those UPR transcription factors in placentae from cases of early-onset PE, but not of late-onset (>34 weeks) PE, compared to term controls. Further investigations indicated a strong correlation between ATF4 and PlGF mRNA levels only (r = - 0.73, p < 0.05). These results could be recapitulated in trophoblast-like cells exposed to chemical inducers of ER stress or hypoxia-reoxygenation. The stability of PlGF transcripts was unchanged. The use of small interfering RNA specific for transcription factors in the UPR pathways revealed that ATF4 and ATF6β, but not ATF6α, modulate PlGF transcription. To conclude, ATF4 and ATF6β act synergistically in the negative regulation of PlGF mRNA expression, resulting in reduced PlGF secretion by the trophoblast in response to stress. Therefore, these results further support the targeting of placental ER stress as a potential new therapeutic

  8. The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 gene product interacts with and trans-activates the AP1 family of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Antinore, M J; Birrer, M J; Patel, D; Nader, L; McCance, D J

    1996-01-01

    The E7 gene product of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) binds to the retinoblastoma gene product (pRb) and dissociates pRb-E2F complexes. However, the observation that the ability of E7 to bind pRb is not required for the HPV16-induced immortalization of primary keratinocytes prompted a search for other cellular factors bound by E7. Using a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion protein system, we show that E7 complexes with AP1 transcription factors including c-Jun, JunB, JunD and c-Fos. The ability of E7 to complex with c-Jun in vivo is demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and the yeast two-hybrid system. An analysis of E7 point mutants in the GST system indicates that the E7 zinc-finger motif, but not the pRb binding domain, is involved in these interactions. Using c-Jun deletion mutants, E7 binding maps between amino acids 224 and 286 of c-Jun. E7 trans-activates c-Jun-induced transcription from a Jun responsive promoter, and this activity correlates with the ability of E7 mutants to bind Jun proteins. Finally, a transcriptionally inactive c-Jun deletion, which can bind E7, interferes with the E7-induced transformation of rat embryo fibroblasts in cooperation with an activated ras, indicating that the Jun-E7 interaction is physiologically relevant and that Jun factors may be targeted in the E7 transformation pathway. Images PMID:8617242

  9. Transcriptional activation of human adult alpha-globin genes by hypersensitive site-40 enhancer: function of nuclear factor-binding motifs occupied in erythroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rombel, I; Hu, K Y; Zhang, Q; Papayannopoulou, T; Stamatoyannopoulos, G; Shen, C K

    1995-01-01

    The developmental stage- and erythroid lineage-specific activation of the human embryonic zeta- and fetal/adult alpha-globin genes is controlled by an upstream regulatory element [hypersensitive site (HS)-40] with locus control region properties, a process mediated by multiple nuclear factor-DNA complexes. In vitro DNase I protection experiments of the two G+C-rich, adult alpha-globin promoters have revealed a number of binding sites for nuclear factors that are common to HeLa and K-562 extracts. However, genomic footprinting analysis has demonstrated that only a subset of these sites, clustered between -130 and +1, is occupied in an erythroid tissue-specific manner. The function of these in vivo-occupied motifs of the alpha-globin promoters, as well as those previously mapped in the HS-40 region, is assayed by site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression in embryonic/fetal erythroid K-562 cells. These studies, together with our expression data on the human embryonic zeta-globin promoter, provide a comprehensive view of the functional roles of individual nuclear factor-DNA complexes in the final stages of transcriptional activation of the human alpha-like globin promoters by the HS-40 element. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7604012

  10. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vicari, Luisa; Calabrese, Giovanna; Forte, Stefano; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Colarossi, Cristina; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2), encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology. PMID:26770207

  11. The SRC Family Tyrosine Kinase HCK and the ETS Family Transcription Factors SPIB and EHF Regulate Transcytosis across a Human Follicle-associated Epithelium Model*

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Tsuneaki; Morrison, Sherie L.

    2013-01-01

    A critical step in the induction of adaptive mucosal immunity is antigen transcytosis, in which luminal antigens are transported to organized lymphoid tissues across the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) of Peyer's patches. However, virtually nothing is known about intracellular signaling proteins and transcription factors that regulate apical-to-basolateral transcytosis. The FAE can transcytose a variety of luminal contents, including inert particles, in the absence of specific opsonins. Furthermore, it expresses receptors for secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), the main antibody in mucosal secretions, and uses them to efficiently transcytose SIgA-opsonized particles present in the lumen. Using a human FAE model, we show that the tyrosine kinase HCK regulates apical-to-basolateral transcytosis of non-opsonized and SIgA-opsonized particles. We also show that, in cultured intestinal epithelial cells, ectopic expression of the transcription factor SPIB or EHF is sufficient to activate HCK-dependent apical-to-basolateral transcytosis of these particles. Our results provide the first molecular insights into the intracellular regulation of antigen sampling at mucosal surfaces. PMID:23439650

  12. Genistein reduces tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 transcription but not urokinase expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    van Hinsbergh, V W; Vermeer, M; Koolwijk, P; Grimbergen, J; Kooistra, T

    1994-11-01

    The plasminogen activator inhibitor PAI-1 is markedly elevated in vivo and in vitro upon exposure to the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Here we report that the isoflavone compound genistein prevents the increase in synthesis of PAI-1 induced by these inflammatory mediators in human endothelial cells in vitro, and partially reduces the basal PAI-1 production by these cells. These effects of genistein were accompanied by a decrease in PAI-1 mRNA and in a suppression of the PAI-1 transcription rate as shown by run-on assay. A specific action of genistein, probably by inhibiting a tyrosine protein kinase, is likely, because the structural genistein analogue daidzein, which has a low tyrosine protein kinase inhibitor activity, did not inhibit PAI-1 synthesis. Vanadate, a tyrosine protein phosphatase inhibitor, increased PAI-1 production. The effect of genistein on PAI-1 synthesis was rather selective. Herbimycin A also reduced PAI-1 synthesis, but several other tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors, namely tyrphostin A47, methyl-2,5-dihydroxy-cinnamate, and compound 5, were unable to do so. All these tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors reduced basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF)-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation in endothelial cells. This indicates that the effect of genistein on PAI-1 transcription proceeds independently of its effect on mitogenesis. In contrast to TNF-alpha-induced PAI-1 production, the transcription and synthesis of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) was not inhibited by genistein. A TNF-alpha-mutant (Trp32Thr86TNF alpha) that specifically recognizes the 55-kD TNF-receptor, mimicked the effects of TNF alpha on both PAI-1 and u-PA. Because genistein affected PAI-1, but not u-PA induced by this mutant, involvement of different TNF-receptors cannot underlie the difference in the effects of genistein on PAI-1 and u-PA synthesis. Because genistein also

  13. Phylogenetic and Transcription Analysis of Chrysanthemum WRKY Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Aiping; Li, Peiling; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Li, Huiyun; Zeng, Jun; Shao, Yafeng; Zhu, Lu; Zhang, Zhaohe; Chen, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are known to function in a number of plant processes. Here we have characterized 15 WRKY family genes of the important ornamental species chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium). A total of 15 distinct sequences were isolated; initially internal fragments were amplified based on transcriptomic sequence, and then the full length cDNAs were obtained using RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) PCR. The transcription of these 15 genes in response to a variety of phytohormone treatments and both biotic and abiotic stresses was characterized. Some of the genes behaved as would be predicted based on their homology with Arabidopsis thaliana WRKY genes, but others showed divergent behavior. PMID:25196345

  14. Changes in the expression of splicing factor transcripts and variations in alternative splicing are associated with lifespan in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin P; Pilling, Luke C; Emond, Florence; Flurkey, Kevin; Harrison, David E; Yuan, Rong; Peters, Luanne L; Kuchel, George A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Melzer, David; Harries, Lorna W

    2016-10-01

    Dysregulation of splicing factor expression and altered alternative splicing are associated with aging in humans and other species, and also with replicative senescence in cultured cells. Here, we assess whether expression changes of key splicing regulator genes and consequent effects on alternative splicing are also associated with strain longevity in old and young mice, across 6 different mouse strains with varying lifespan (A/J, NOD.B10Sn-H2(b) /J, PWD.Phj, 129S1/SvlmJ, C57BL/6J and WSB/EiJ). Splicing factor expression and changes to alternative splicing were associated with strain lifespan in spleen and to a lesser extent in muscle. These changes mainly involved hnRNP splicing inhibitor transcripts with most changes more marked in spleens of young animals from long-lived strains. Changes in spleen isoform expression were suggestive of reduced cellular senescence and retained cellular proliferative capacity in long-lived strains. Changes in muscle isoform expression were consistent with reduced pro-inflammatory signalling in longer-lived strains. Two splicing regulators, HNRNPA1 and HNRNPA2B1, were also associated with parental longevity in humans, in the InCHIANTI aging study. Splicing factors may represent a driver, mediator or early marker of lifespan in mouse, as expression differences were present in the young animals of long-lived strains. Changes to alternative splicing patterns of key senescence genes in spleen and key remodelling genes in muscle suggest that correct regulation of alternative splicing may enhance lifespan in mice. Expression of some splicing factors in humans was also associated with parental longevity, suggesting that splicing regulation may also influence lifespan in humans. PMID:27363602

  15. Changes in the expression of splicing factor transcripts and variations in alternative splicing are associated with lifespan in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin P; Pilling, Luke C; Emond, Florence; Flurkey, Kevin; Harrison, David E; Yuan, Rong; Peters, Luanne L; Kuchel, George A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Melzer, David; Harries, Lorna W

    2016-10-01

    Dysregulation of splicing factor expression and altered alternative splicing are associated with aging in humans and other species, and also with replicative senescence in cultured cells. Here, we assess whether expression changes of key splicing regulator genes and consequent effects on alternative splicing are also associated with strain longevity in old and young mice, across 6 different mouse strains with varying lifespan (A/J, NOD.B10Sn-H2(b) /J, PWD.Phj, 129S1/SvlmJ, C57BL/6J and WSB/EiJ). Splicing factor expression and changes to alternative splicing were associated with strain lifespan in spleen and to a lesser extent in muscle. These changes mainly involved hnRNP splicing inhibitor transcripts with most changes more marked in spleens of young animals from long-lived strains. Changes in spleen isoform expression were suggestive of reduced cellular senescence and retained cellular proliferative capacity in long-lived strains. Changes in muscle isoform expression were consistent with reduced pro-inflammatory signalling in longer-lived strains. Two splicing regulators, HNRNPA1 and HNRNPA2B1, were also associated with parental longevity in humans, in the InCHIANTI aging study. Splicing factors may represent a driver, mediator or early marker of lifespan in mouse, as expression differences were present in the young animals of long-lived strains. Changes to alternative splicing patterns of key senescence genes in spleen and key remodelling genes in muscle suggest that correct regulation of alternative splicing may enhance lifespan in mice. Expression of some splicing factors in humans was also associated with parental longevity, suggesting that splicing regulation may also influence lifespan in humans.

  16. Chemical and genetic blockade of HDACs enhances osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by oppositely affecting osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Paola; Brini, Anna Teresa; Arrigoni, Elena; de Girolamo, Laura; Niada, Stefania; Matteucci, Emanuela; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2012-11-16

    The human adipose-tissue derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) are an interesting source for bone-tissue engineering applications. Our aim was to clarify in hASCs the role of acetylation in the control of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) γ. These key osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors are oppositely involved in osteo-differentiation. The hASCs, committed or not towards bone lineage with osteoinductive medium, were exposed to HDACs chemical blockade with Trichostatin A (TSA) or were genetically silenced for HDACs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen/calcium deposition, considered as early and late osteogenic markers, were evaluated concomitantly as index of osteo-differentiation. TSA pretreatment, useful experimental protocol to analyse pan-HDAC-chemical inhibition, and switch to osteogenic medium induced early-osteoblast maturation gene Runx2, while transiently decreased PPARγ and scarcely affected late-differentiation markers. Time-dependent effects were observed after knocking-down of HDAC1 and 3: Runx2 and ALP underwent early activation, followed by late-osteogenic markers increase and by PPARγ/ALP activity diminutions mostly after HDAC3 silencing. HDAC1 and 3 genetic blockade increased and decreased Runx2 and PPARγ target genes, respectively. Noteworthy, HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Our results reveal a role for HDACs in orchestrating osteo-differentiation of hASCs at transcriptional level, and might provide new insights into the modulation of hASCs-based regenerative therapy. PMID:23085045

  17. Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces human endothelial VEGF and MMP-2 production via transcription factor ZNF580: Novel insights into angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hui-Yan; Wei, Shu-Ping; Xu, Rui-Cheng; Xu, Peng-Xiao; Zhang, Wen-Cheng

    2010-05-07

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-induced migration and proliferation of endothelial cells are critical for angiogenesis. C2H2-zinc finger (ZNF) proteins usually play an essential role in altering gene expression and regulating the angiogenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a novel human C2H2-zinc finger gene ZNF580 (Gene ID: 51157) is involved in the migration and proliferation of endothelial cells stimulated by S1P. Our study shows that EAhy926 endothelial cells express S1P1, S1P3 and S1P5 receptors. Furthermore, S1P upregulates both ZNF580 mRNA and protein levels in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. SB203580, the specific inhibitor of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathway, blocks the S1P-induced upregulation of ZNF580. Moreover, overexpression/downexpression of ZNF580 in EAhy926 cells leads to the enhancement/decrease of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression as well as the migration and proliferation of EAhy926 endothelial cells. These results elucidate the important role that ZNF580 plays in the process of migration and proliferation of endothelial cells, which provides a foundation for a novel approach to regulate angiogenesis.

  18. Targeting human respiratory syncytial virus transcription anti-termination factor M2-1 to inhibit in vivo viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, B.; Richard, C.-A.; Sharma, G.; Wang, L.; Johansen, L.; Cao, J.; Pendharkar, V.; Sharma, D.-C.; Galloux, M.; Wang, Y.; Cui, R.; Zou, G.; Guillon, P.; von Itzstein, M.; Eléouët, J.-F.; Altmeyer, R.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is a leading cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection in infants, elderly and immunocompromised individuals. To date, no specific antiviral drug is available to treat or prevent this disease. Here, we report that the Smoothened receptor (Smo) antagonist cyclopamine acts as a potent and selective inhibitor of in vitro and in vivo hRSV replication. Cyclopamine inhibits hRSV through a novel, Smo-independent mechanism. It specifically impairs the function of the hRSV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex notably by reducing expression levels of the viral anti-termination factor M2-1. The relevance of these findings is corroborated by the demonstration that a single R151K mutation in M2-1 is sufficient to confer virus resistance to cyclopamine in vitro and that cyclopamine is able to reduce virus titers in a mouse model of hRSV infection. The results of our study open a novel avenue for the development of future therapies against hRSV infection. PMID:27194388

  19. Loss of transcription factor KLF5 in the context of p53 ablation drives invasive progression of human squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yizeng; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Tetreault, Marie-Pier; Billig, Janelle; Victor, Noel; Goyal, Abha; Sepulveda, Antonia R; Katz, Jonathan P

    2011-10-15

    Squamous cell cancers account for more than half of all human cancers, and esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The majority of esophageal squamous cell carcinomas have identifiable p53 mutations, yet the same p53 mutations are found at comparable frequencies in precancerous dysplasia, indicating that transformation requires additional somatic changes yet to be defined. Here, we show that the zinc finger transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5) transactivates NOTCH1 in the context of p53 mutation or loss. KLF5 loss limited NOTCH1 activity and was sufficient on its own to transform primary human keratinocytes harboring mutant p53, leading to the formation of invasive tumors. Restoration of NOTCH1 blocked transformation of KLF5-deficient and p53-mutant keratinocytes. Although human dysplastic epithelia accumulated KLF5, KLF5 expression was lost concurrently with NOTCH1 in squamous cell cancers. Taken together, these results define KLF5 loss as a critical event in squamous cell transformation and invasion. Our findings suggest that KLF5 may be a useful diagnostic and therapeutic target in esophageal squamous carcinomas and possibly more generally in other cancers associated with p53 loss of function.

  20. Transcription factors as targets of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowski, M; Czyz, M

    1999-01-01

    Several general and gene- and cell-selective transcription factors are required for specific transcription to occur. Many of them exert their functions through specific contacts either in the promoter region or at distant sequences regulating the initiation. These contacts may be altered by anticancer drugs which form non-covalent complexes with DNA. Covalent modifications of DNA by alkylating agents may prevent transcription factors from recognizing their specific sequences or may constitute multiple "unnatural" binding sites in DNA which attract the factors thus decreasing their availability in the cell. The anticancer drug-transcription factor interplay which is based on specific interactions with DNA may contribute to pharmacological properties of the former and provide a basis for the search for new drugs. PMID:10547027

  1. Identification of an osteoclast transcription factor that binds to the human T cell leukemia virus type I-long terminal repeat enhancer element.

    PubMed

    Inoue, D; Santiago, P; Horne, W C; Baron, R

    1997-10-01

    Transgenic mice expressing human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-tax under the control of HTLV-I-long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter develop skeletal abnormalities with high bone turnover and myelofibrosis. In these animals, Tax is highly expressed in bone with a pattern of expression restricted to osteoclasts and spindle-shaped cells within the endosteal myelofibrosis. To test the hypothesis that lineage-specific transcription factors promote transgene expression from the HTLV-I-LTR in osteoclasts, we first examined tax expression in transgenic bone marrow cultures. Expression was dependent on 1alpha,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol and coincided with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) expression, a marker of osteoclast differentiation. Furthermore, Tax was expressed in vitronectin receptor-positive mononuclear precursors as well as in mature osteoclast-like cells (OCLs). Consistent with our hypothesis, electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed the presence of an OCL nuclear factor (NFOC-1) that binds to the LTR 21-base pair direct repeat, a region critical for the promoter activity. This binding is further enhanced by Tax. Since NFOC-1 is absent in macrophages and conserved in osteoclasts among species including human, such a factor may play a role in lineage determination and/or in expression of the differentiated osteoclast phenotype.

  2. The Transcription Factor MIST1 Is a Novel Human Gastric Chief Cell Marker Whose Expression Is Lost in Metaplasia, Dysplasia, and Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lennerz, Jochen K. M.; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Oates, Edward L.; Huh, Won Jae; Doherty, Jason M.; Tian, Xiaolin; Bredemeyer, Andrew J.; Goldenring, James R.; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Shin, Young-Kee; Mills, Jason C.

    2010-01-01

    The lack of reliable molecular markers for normal differentiated epithelial cells limits understanding of human gastric carcinogenesis. Recognized precursor lesions for gastric adenocarcinoma are intestinal metaplasia and spasmolytic polypeptide expressing metaplasia (SPEM), defined here by ectopic CDX2 and TFF2 expression, respectively. In mice, expression of the bHLH transcription factor MIST1, normally restricted to mature chief cells, is down-regulated as chief cells undergo experimentally induced metaplasia. Here, we show MIST1 expression is also a specific marker of human chief cells. SPEM, with and without MIST1, is present in human lesions and, akin to murine data, likely represents transitional (TFF2+/MIST1+ = “hybrid”-SPEM) and established (TFF2+/MIST1− = SPEM) stages. Co-visualization of MIST1 and CDX2 shows similar progressive loss of MIST1 with a transitional, CDX2+/MIST1− hybrid-intestinal metaplasia stage. Interinstitutional analysis and comparison of findings in tissue microarrays, resection specimens, and biopsies (n > 400 samples), comprising the entire spectrum of recognized stages of gastric carcinogenesis, confirm MIST1 expression is restricted to the chief cell compartment in normal oxyntic mucosa, rare in established metaplastic lesions, and lost in intraepithelial neoplasia/dysplasia and carcinoma of various types with the exception of rare chief cell carcinoma (∼1%). Our findings implicate MIST1 as a reliable marker of mature, healthy chief cells, and we provide the first evidence that metaplasia in humans arises at least in part from the chief cell lineage. PMID:20709804

  3. Binding of the human E2F transcription factor to the retinoblastoma protein but not to cyclin A is abolished in HPV-16-immortalized cells.

    PubMed

    Pagano, M; Dürst, M; Joswig, S; Draetta, G; Jansen-Dürr, P

    1992-09-01

    The adenovirus E1A, SV40 large T and papillomavirus E7 proteins immortalize primary cells by virtue of their ability to bind the retinoblastoma gene product (pRB) and other cellular proteins, including cyclin A and the prRB-related protein, p107. It has been demonstrated that these viral oncogene products will prevent the inhibition of positive growth regulators by pRB, one of them being the E2F transcription factor. Here we show that the interactions of pRB and cyclin A with E2F are present also in normal keratinocytes and in primary human fibroblasts. In human keratinocytes immortalized by human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16), expressing high levels of HPV-16 E7 protein, complexes between E2F and pRB are disrupted. In this cell line, as well as in HeLa cells which express HPV-18 E7, complexes containing E2F and cyclin A are maintained, indicating that this interaction is not sensitive to the viral oncoprotein and that cyclin A can associate with E2F independently of pRB. In vitro binding experiments suggest that the E7 gene product is able to preferentially abolish the interaction of pRB with E2F, leaving the cyclin A complexes intact. Our findings suggest that E7-dependent immortalization of human cells is associated with modifications of E2F multiprotein complexes. PMID:1323816

  4. Involvement of doublesex and mab-3-related transcription factors in human female germ cell development demonstrated by xenograft and interference RNA strategies.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Marine; Frydman, Nelly; Tourpin, Sophie; Muczynski, Vincent; Mucsynski, Vincent; Souquet, Benoit; Benachi, Alexandra; Habert, René; Rouiller-Fabre, Virginie; Livera, Gabriel

    2014-10-01

    We identified three doublesex and mab-3-related transcription factors (DMRT) that were sexually differentially expressed in human fetal gonads and present in the ovaries at the time of meiotic initiation. These were also identified in murine embryonic female germ cells. Among these, we focused on DMRTA2 (DMRT5), whose function is unknown in the developing gonads, and clarified its role in human female fetal germ cells, using an original xenograft model. Early human fetal ovaries (8-11 weeks post-fertilization) were grafted into nude mice. Grafted ovaries developed normally, with no apparent overt changes, when compared with ungrafted ovaries at equivalent developmental stages. Appropriate germ cell density, mitotic/meiotic transition, markers of meiotic progression and follicle formation were evident. Four weeks after grafting, mice were treated with siRNA, specifically targeting human DMRTA2 mRNA. DMRTA2 inhibition triggered an increase in undifferentiated FUT4-positive germ cells and a decrease in the percentage of meiotic γH2AX-positive germ cells, when compared with mice that were injected with control siRNA. Interestingly, the expression of markers associated with pre-meiotic germ cell differentiation was also impaired, as was the expression of DMRTB1 (DMRT6) and DMRTC2 (DMRT7). This study reveals, for the first time, the requirement of DMRTA2 for normal human female embryonic germ cell development. DMRTA2 appears to be necessary for proper differentiation of oogonia, prior to entry into meiosis, in the human species. Additionally, we developed a new model of organ xenografting, coupled with RNA interference, which provides a useful tool for genetic investigations of human germline development.

  5. Involvement of doublesex and mab-3-related transcription factors in human female germ cell development demonstrated by xenograft and interference RNA strategies.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Marine; Frydman, Nelly; Tourpin, Sophie; Muczynski, Vincent; Mucsynski, Vincent; Souquet, Benoit; Benachi, Alexandra; Habert, René; Rouiller-Fabre, Virginie; Livera, Gabriel

    2014-10-01

    We identified three doublesex and mab-3-related transcription factors (DMRT) that were sexually differentially expressed in human fetal gonads and present in the ovaries at the time of meiotic initiation. These were also identified in murine embryonic female germ cells. Among these, we focused on DMRTA2 (DMRT5), whose function is unknown in the developing gonads, and clarified its role in human female fetal germ cells, using an original xenograft model. Early human fetal ovaries (8-11 weeks post-fertilization) were grafted into nude mice. Grafted ovaries developed normally, with no apparent overt changes, when compared with ungrafted ovaries at equivalent developmental stages. Appropriate germ cell density, mitotic/meiotic transition, markers of meiotic progression and follicle formation were evident. Four weeks after grafting, mice were treated with siRNA, specifically targeting human DMRTA2 mRNA. DMRTA2 inhibition triggered an increase in undifferentiated FUT4-positive germ cells and a decrease in the percentage of meiotic γH2AX-positive germ cells, when compared with mice that were injected with control siRNA. Interestingly, the expression of markers associated with pre-meiotic germ cell differentiation was also impaired, as was the expression of DMRTB1 (DMRT6) and DMRTC2 (DMRT7). This study reveals, for the first time, the requirement of DMRTA2 for normal human female embryonic germ cell development. DMRTA2 appears to be necessary for proper differentiation of oogonia, prior to entry into meiosis, in the human species. Additionally, we developed a new model of organ xenografting, coupled with RNA interference, which provides a useful tool for genetic investigations of human germline development. PMID:25082981

  6. Regulation of expression of N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase in human mammary epithelial cells: role of transcription factor AP-2.

    PubMed

    Cerda, S R; Chu, S S; Garcia, P; Chung, J; Grumet, J D; Thimmapaya, B; Weitzman, S A

    1999-11-01

    The DNA repair enzyme, N-methylpurine DNA glyclosylase (MPG), is overexpressed in breast cancer as compared with its expression in normal breast epithelial cells. In an effort to determine the mechanism responsible for this difference in expression, we studied rates and regulation of transcription of the MPG gene in normal (HMEC), spontaneously immortalized (MCF10A), and malignant (T47D) mammary epithelial cells. Steady state levels of MPG mRNA are 3-4-fold greater in T47D cells than in MCF10A cells. Nuclear "run-off" transcription measurements revealed MPG transcription rates to be approximately 3-fold greater in the tumor cells than in normal cells. Characterization of the MPG promoter by deletion analysis and transient transfection experiments revealed that all basal promoter activity resided between nucleotides -227 and -81 upstream from the ATG translation start site. Constructs containing this region were expressed at 4-fold greater levels when transfected into malignant T47D cells (56 x baseline) than in MCF10A cells (14 x baseline). Computer database analysis of the region of nucleotides -227 to -81 revealed multiple overlapping Sp1 consensus binding sites and two overlapping consensus AP-2 binding sites located between bases -181 and -169. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicated that while Sp1 bound this region of the promoter, nuclear extracts from both cell types contained equal Sp1 binding activity. In contrast, AP-2 binding activity was significantly greater in T47D cells, and Western blots confirmed increased AP-2 protein levels in these cells. Cotransfection into MCF10A cells of the MPG promoter construct and an AP-2 expression plasmid increased MPG promoter activity 2.1-fold. Cotransfection of a dominant negative mutant of AP-2 into T47D cells reduced the extent of MPG promoter-driven transcription by 50%. To investigate the functional significance of the two overlapping AP-2 consensus binding sites, each site was mutated separately

  7. Up-Regulation of CREG Expression by the Transcription Factor GATA1 Inhibits High Glucose- and High Palmitate-Induced Apoptosis in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Liu, Dan; Liu, Meili; Zhang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Quanyu; Yan, Chenghui; Han, Yaling

    2016-01-01

    Background Endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) is a novel gene reported to be involved in maintaining the homeostasis of ECs. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the role of CREG in high glucose/high palmitate-induced EC apoptosis and to decipher the upstream regulatory mechanism underlying the transcriptional regulation of CREG. Methods The expression of CREG and the rate of apoptosis were assessed in lower-limb atherosclerotic lesions from patients with type 2 DM (T2DM). Primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were isolated and cultured in a high glucose/high palmitate medium (25 mmol/L D-glucose, 0.4 mmol/L palmitate), and the over-expression and knock-down of CREG were performed in HUVECs to determine the role of CREG in EC apoptosis. The upstream regulatory mechanism of CREG was identified using a promoter-binding transcription-factor profiling array, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay and a mutation analysis. Results Compared with normal arteries from non-diabetic patients, reduced CREG expression and increased apoptosis were found in the endothelium of atherosclerotic lesions from patients with T2DM. In vitro treatment of HUVECs with a high glucose/high palmitate medium also resulted in decreased CREG expression and increased apoptosis. Moreover, high glucose/high palmitate induced-HUVEC apoptosis was increased by the knock-down of CREG and rescued by the over-expression of CREG. We also demonstrated that GATA1 was able to bind to the promoter of the human CREG gene. A deletion mutation at -297/-292 in the CREG promoter disrupted GATA1 binding and reduced the activation of CREG transcription by approximately 83.3%. Finally, the overexpression of GATA1 abrogated the high glucose/high palmitate-induced apoptosis in HUVECs. Conclusions

  8. Optogenetic Inhibitor of the Transcription Factor CREB.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed M; Reis, Jakeb M; Xia, Yan; Rashid, Asim J; Mercaldo, Valentina; Walters, Brandon J; Brechun, Katherine E; Borisenko, Vitali; Josselyn, Sheena A; Karanicolas, John; Woolley, G Andrew

    2015-11-19

    Current approaches for optogenetic control of transcription do not mimic the activity of endogenous transcription factors, which act at numerous sites in the genome in a complex interplay with other factors. Optogenetic control of dominant negative versions of endogenous transcription factors provides a mechanism for mimicking the natural regulation of gene expression. Here we describe opto-DN-CREB, a blue-light-controlled inhibitor of the transcription factor CREB created by fusing the dominant negative inhibitor A-CREB to photoactive yellow protein (PYP). A light-driven conformational change in PYP prevents coiled-coil formation between A-CREB and CREB, thereby activating CREB. Optogenetic control of CREB function was characterized in vitro, in HEK293T cells, and in neurons where blue light enabled control of expression of the CREB targets NR4A2 and c-Fos. Dominant negative inhibitors exist for numerous transcription factors; linking these to optogenetic domains offers a general approach for spatiotemporal control of native transcriptional events. PMID:26590638

  9. Epigenetic role of CCAAT box-binding transcription factor NF-Y on ID gene family in human embryonic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Moeinvaziri, Farideh; Shahhoseini, Maryam

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) is a histone substitute protein that specifically binds to the CCAAT box of the target genes and thereby promotes their regulation. NF-Y transcription factor, with defined CCAAT element-binding activities, target a gene family that encodes a group of basic helix-loop-helix ID factors (ID1-ID4), with or without CCAAT box at their promoter region. In this study, the expressions of NF-Y in mRNA and protein level were evaluated in a human embryonic carcinoma cell line, named NTera2, before and after 7 days induction of differentiation. We also looked into expression levels of ID genes in NTera2 cells during differentiation because of their critical role in development. By using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with real-time polymerase chain reaction, NF-Y incorporation and acetylation/dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9ac/me2) was quantitatively evaluated on the regulatory regions of considered genes to monitor the changes in epigenetic markers at ID gene promoters throughout differentiation. The results demonstrated a marked down-regulation of ID1, ID2, and ID3 genes, parallel to a loss of NF-Y binding to the promoters of these genes. The data show that although the genes encoding NF-Y complex remained expressed at mRNA level, NF-YC is lost at the protein level onset of differentiation. Additionally, the epigenetic marks of H3K9ac and H3K9me2 at the target gene promoters decreased and increased, respectively, after 1 day of differentiation. It is suggested that, in the absence of NF-Y binding, the corresponding regions adopt a heterochromatic nature, whereas when NF-Y comes back after 7 days of differentiation, the ID1-3 promoters become again converted into active chromatin. The ID4 gene, lacking a CCAAT box, behaves differently and does not show any incorporation. This experiment implies for the first time that the presence of NF-Y transcription factor plays a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation of ID genes in

  10. Mitochondrial biology. Replication-transcription switch in human mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Agaronyan, Karen; Morozov, Yaroslav I; Anikin, Michael; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2015-01-30

    Coordinated replication and expression of the mitochondrial genome is critical for metabolically active cells during various stages of development. However, it is not known whether replication and transcription can occur simultaneously without interfering with each other and whether mitochondrial DNA copy number can be regulated by the transcription machinery. We found that interaction of human transcription elongation factor TEFM with mitochondrial RNA polymerase and nascent transcript prevents the generation of replication primers and increases transcription processivity and thereby serves as a molecular switch between replication and transcription, which appear to be mutually exclusive processes in mitochondria. TEFM may allow mitochondria to increase transcription rates and, as a consequence, respiration and adenosine triphosphate production without the need to replicate mitochondrial DNA, as has been observed during spermatogenesis and the early stages of embryogenesis.

  11. Widespread Inducible Transcription Downstream of Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Vilborg, Anna; Passarelli, Maria C.; Yario, Therese A.; Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pervasive transcription of the human genome generates RNAs whose mode of formation and functions are largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine RNA-Seq with detailed mechanistic studies to describe a transcript type derived from protein-coding genes. The resulting RNAs, which we call DoGs for downstream of gene containing transcripts, possess long non-coding regions (often >45 kb) and remain chromatin bound. DoGs are inducible by osmotic stress through an IP3 receptor signaling-dependent pathway, indicating active regulation. DoG levels are increased by decreased termination of the upstream transcript, a previously undescribed mechanism for rapid transcript induction. Relative depletion of polyA signals in DoG regions correlates with increased levels of DoGs after osmotic stress. We detect DoG transcription in several human cell lines and provide evidence for thousands of DoGs genome-wide. PMID:26190259

  12. Regulation of cytochrome b5 gene transcription by Sp3, GATA-6, and steroidogenic factor 1 in human adrenal NCI-H295A cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ningwu; Dardis, Andrea; Miller, Walter L

    2005-08-01

    Sex steroid synthesis requires the 17,20 lyase activity of P450c17, which is enhanced by cytochrome b5, acting as an allosteric factor to promote association of P450c17 with its electron donor, P450 oxidoreductase. Cytochrome b5 is preferentially expressed in the fetal adrenal and postadrenarchal adrenal zona reticularis; the basis of this tissue-specific, developmentally regulated transcription of the b5 gene is unknown. We found b5 expression in all cell lines tested, including human adrenal NCI-H295A cells, where its mRNA is reduced by cAMP and phorbol ester. Multiple sites, between -83 and -122 bp upstream from the first ATG, initiate transcription. Deletional mutagenesis localized all detectable promoter activity within -327/+15, and deoxyribonuclease I footprinting identified protein binding at -72/-107 and -157/-197. DNA segments -65/-40, -114/-70 and -270/-245 fused to TK32/Luc yielded significant activity, and mutations in their Sp sites abolished that activity; electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that Sp3, but not Sp1, binds to these Sp sites. Nuclear factor 1 (NF-1) and GATA-6, but not GATA-4 bind to the NF-1 and GATA sites in -157/-197. In Drosophila S2 cells, Sp3 increased -327/Luc activity 58-fold, but Sp1 and NF-1 isoforms were inactive. Mutating the three Sp sites ablated activity without or with cotransfection of Sp1/Sp3. In NCI-H295A cells, mutating the three Sp sites reduced activity to 39%; mutating the Sp, GATA, and NF-1 sites abolished activity. In JEG-3 cells, GATA-4 was inactive, GATA-6 augmented -327/Luc activity to 231% over the control, and steroidogenic factor 1 augmented activity to 655% over the control; these activities required the Sp and NF-1 sites. Transcription of cytochrome b5 shares many features with the regulation of P450c17, whose activity it enhances. PMID:15831526

  13. Functional Analysis of Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2009-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate the expression of genes at the transcriptional level. Modification of TF activity dynamically alters the transcriptome, which leads to metabolic and phenotypic changes. Thus, functional analysis of TFs using ‘omics-based’ methodologies is one of the most important areas of the post-genome era. In this mini-review, we present an overview of Arabidopsis TFs and introduce strategies for the functional analysis of plant TFs, which include both traditional and recently developed technologies. These strategies can be assigned to five categories: bioinformatic analysis; analysis of molecular function; expression analysis; phenotype analysis; and network analysis for the description of entire transcriptional regulatory networks. PMID:19478073

  14. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O'Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  15. The ether lipid 1-octadecyl-2-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine induces expression of fos and jun proto-oncogenes and activates AP-1 transcription factor in human leukaemic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, F; Gajate, C; Modolell, M

    1994-01-01

    The ether lipid analogue 1-octadecyl-2-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET-18-OCH3) has been recently shown to induce apoptosis in the human leukaemic HL-60 and U937 myeloid cell lines [Mollinedo, Martinez-Dalmau and Modolell (1993) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 192, 603-609]. We have found that ET-18-OCH3 is also able to promote apoptosis in the human leukaemic Jurkat T lymphoid cell line. This lymphoid cell line as well as the two myeloid HL-60 and U937 cell lines incorporated significant amounts of exogenously added radiolabelled ET-18-OCH3. Addition of ET-18-OCH3 to these human leukaemic cells induced an increase in the steady-state mRNA levels of fos and jun proto-oncogenes, components of the transcription factor AP-1. These increases in fos and jun mRNA levels were associated with the activation of the AP-1 transcription factor after addition of ET-18-OCH3 to human leukaemic cells, as assessed by an enhanced binding activity of transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate DNA sequence as well as by stimulation of transcription from an AP-1 enhancer element. These data demonstrate that the ether lipid ET-18-OCH3 can affect gene expression by inducing expression of fos and jun proto-oncogenes and by modulating the activity of transcription factor AP-1. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8092982

  16. Mapping the expression of epithelial hair follicle stem cell-related transcription factors LHX2 and SOX9 in the human hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Purba, Talveen S; Haslam, Iain S; Shahmalak, Asim; Bhogal, Ranjit K; Paus, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    In the murine hair follicle (HF), the transcription factors LHX2 and SOX9 are implicated in epithelial hair follicle stem cell (eHFSC) self-renewal and the maintenance of eHFSC niche characteristics. However, the exact expression patterns of LHX2 and SOX9 in the human HF are unclear. Therefore, we have quantitatively mapped the localisation of known human eHFSC markers keratin 15 (K15) and keratin 19 (K19) in the outer root sheath (ORS) of male occipital scalp anagen HFs and related this to the localisation of LHX2 and SOX9 protein expression. As expected, K15(+) and K19(+) cells represented two distinct progenitor cell populations in the bulge and in the proximal bulb ORS (pbORS). Interestingly, cell fluorescence for K19 was significantly stronger within the pbORS versus the bulge, and vice versa for K15, describing a hitherto unrecognised differential expression pattern. LHX2 and SOX9 expressing cells were distributed throughout the ORS, including the bulge, but were not restricted to it. SOX9 expression was most prominent in the ORS immediately below the human bulge, whereas LHX2(+) cells were similarly distributed between the sub-bulge and pbORS, that is compartments not enriched with quiescent eHFSCs. During catagen development, the intensity of LHX2 and SOX9 protein expression increased in the proximal HF epithelium. Double immunostaining showed that the majority of SOX9(+) cells in the human anagen HF epithelium did not co-express K15, K19 or LHX2. This expression profile suggests that LHX2 and SOX9 highlight distinct epithelial progenitor cell populations, in addition to K15(+) or K19(+) cells, that could play an important role in the maintenance of the human HF epithelium.

  17. ETS transcription factors in embryonic vascular development.

    PubMed

    Craig, Michael P; Sumanas, Saulius

    2016-07-01

    At least thirteen ETS-domain transcription factors are expressed during embryonic hematopoietic or vascular development and potentially function in the formation and maintenance of the embryonic vasculature or blood lineages. This review summarizes our current understanding of the specific roles played by ETS factors in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and the implications of functional redundancies between them.

  18. Identification of EhTIF-IA: The putative E. histolytica orthologue of the human ribosomal RNA transcription initiation factor-IA.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ankita; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha; Jhingan, Gagan Deep

    2016-03-01

    Initiation of rDNA transcription requires the assembly of a specific multi-protein complex at the rDNA promoter containing the RNA Pol I with auxiliary factors. One of these factors is known as Rrn3P in yeast and Transcription Initiation Factor IA (TIF-IA) in mammals. Rrn3p/TIF-IA serves as a bridge between RNA Pol I and the pre-initiation complex at the promoter. It is phosphorylated at multiple sites and is involved in regulation of rDNA transcription in a growth-dependent manner. In the early branching parasitic protist Entamoeba histolytica, the rRNA genes are present exclusively on circular extra chromosomal plasmids. The protein factors involved in regulation of rDNA transcription in E. histolytica are not known. We have identified the E. histolytica equivalent of TIF-1A (EhTIF-IA) by homology search within the database and was further cloned and expressed. Immuno-localization studies showed that EhTIF-IA co-localized partially with fibrillarin in the peripherally localized nucleolus. EhTIF-IA was shown to interact with the RNA Pol I-specific subunit RPA12 both in vivo and in vitro. Mass spectroscopy data identified RNA Pol I-specific subunits and other nucleolar proteins to be the interacting partners of EhTIF-IA. Our study demonstrates for the first time a conserved putative RNA Pol I transcription factor TIF-IA in E. histolytica.

  19. Identification of EhTIF-IA: The putative E. histolytica orthologue of the human ribosomal RNA transcription initiation factor-IA.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ankita; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha; Jhingan, Gagan Deep

    2016-03-01

    Initiation of rDNA transcription requires the assembly of a specific multi-protein complex at the rDNA promoter containing the RNA Pol I with auxiliary factors. One of these factors is known as Rrn3P in yeast and Transcription Initiation Factor IA (TIF-IA) in mammals. Rrn3p/TIF-IA serves as a bridge between RNA Pol I and the pre-initiation complex at the promoter. It is phosphorylated at multiple sites and is involved in regulation of rDNA transcription in a growth-dependent manner. In the early branching parasitic protist Entamoeba histolytica, the rRNA genes are present exclusively on circular extra chromosomal plasmids. The protein factors involved in regulation of rDNA transcription in E. histolytica are not known. We have identified the E. histolytica equivalent of TIF-1A (EhTIF-IA) by homology search within the database and was further cloned and expressed. Immuno-localization studies showed that EhTIF-IA co-localized partially with fibrillarin in the peripherally localized nucleolus. EhTIF-IA was shown to interact with the RNA Pol I-specific subunit RPA12 both in vivo and in vitro. Mass spectroscopy data identified RNA Pol I-specific subunits and other nucleolar proteins to be the interacting partners of EhTIF-IA. Our study demonstrates for the first time a conserved putative RNA Pol I transcription factor TIF-IA in E. histolytica. PMID:26949087

  20. Interplay between viral Tat protein and c-Jun transcription factor in controlling LTR promoter activity in different human immunodeficiency virus type I subtypes.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Renée M; Derking, Ronald; Breidel, Seyguerney; Speijer, Dave; Berkhout, Ben; Jeeninga, Rienk E

    2014-04-01

    HIV-1 transcription depends on cellular transcription factors that bind to sequences in the long-terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. Each HIV-1 subtype has a specific LTR promoter configuration, and minor sequence changes in transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) or their arrangement can influence transcriptional activity, virus replication and latency properties. Previously, we investigated the proviral latency properties of different HIV-1 subtypes in the SupT1 T cell line. Here, subtype-specific latency and replication properties were studied in primary PHA-activated T lymphocytes. No major differences in latency and replication capacity were measured among the HIV-1 subtypes. Subtype B and AE LTRs were studied in more detail with regard to a putative AP-1 binding site using luciferase reporter constructs. c-Jun, a member of the AP-1 transcription factor family, can activate both subtype B and AE LTRs, but the latter showed a stronger response, reflecting a closer match with the consensus AP-1 binding site. c-Jun overexpression enhanced Tat-mediated transcription of the viral LTR, but in the absence of Tat inhibited basal promoter activity. Thus, c-Jun can exert a positive or negative effect via the AP-1 binding site in the HIV-1 LTR promoter, depending on the presence or absence of Tat. PMID:24447950

  1. Chemical and genetic blockade of HDACs enhances osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by oppositely affecting osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, Paola; Brini, Anna Teresa; Arrigoni, Elena; Girolamo, Laura de; Niada, Stefania; Matteucci, Emanuela; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation affected hASCs osteodifferentiation through Runx2-PPAR{gamma}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs silencing early activated Runx2 and ALP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} reduction and calcium/collagen deposition occurred later. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Runx2/PPAR{gamma} target genes were modulated in line with HDACs role in osteo-commitment. -- Abstract: The human adipose-tissue derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) are an interesting source for bone-tissue engineering applications. Our aim was to clarify in hASCs the role of acetylation in the control of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma}. These key osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors are oppositely involved in osteo-differentiation. The hASCs, committed or not towards bone lineage with osteoinductive medium, were exposed to HDACs chemical blockade with Trichostatin A (TSA) or were genetically silenced for HDACs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen/calcium deposition, considered as early and late osteogenic markers, were evaluated concomitantly as index of osteo-differentiation. TSA pretreatment, useful experimental protocol to analyse pan-HDAC-chemical inhibition, and switch to osteogenic medium induced early-osteoblast maturation gene Runx2, while transiently decreased PPAR{gamma} and scarcely affected late-differentiation markers. Time-dependent effects were observed after knocking-down of HDAC1 and 3: Runx2 and ALP underwent early activation, followed by late-osteogenic markers increase and by PPAR{gamma}/ALP activity diminutions mostly after HDAC3 silencing. HDAC1 and 3 genetic blockade increased and decreased Runx2 and PPAR{gamma} target genes, respectively. Noteworthy, HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Our results reveal

  2. Differential screening of a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma lambda gt11 expression library has identified increased transcription of elongation factor EF-1 alpha in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Grant, A G; Flomen, R M; Tizard, M L; Grant, D A

    1992-03-12

    A human pancreatic adenocarcinoma lambda gt11 expression library was differentially screened with mRNA derived from normal and cancerous pancreatic tissues. Five clones preferentially hybridized with pancreatic adenocarcinoma mRNA. cDNA inserts from 4 of these clones were amplified by PCR, labelled with alpha 32P and used in Northern blot analysis against mRNA prepared from a variety of tumour and normal tissues. lambda GER-4 identified a pancreas-associated mRNA (greater than 10 kb) with no homology with known sequences at either the nucleic or amino-acid level. lambda GER-2 identified a 1.7-kb mRNA transcript that was over-expressed in mRNA prepared from pancreas, colon, breast, lung and gastric tumours relative to normal tissues. Sequence analysis and restriction-enzyme mapping showed that this clone was completely homologous with the active form of human elongation factor EF-1 alpha. This high level of EF-1 alpha-mRNA expression in tumour tissues lends support to the increasing evidence that EF-1 alpha is an important regulator of the cell cycle. PMID:1544708

  3. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor DEC1 regulates the cisplatin-induced apoptotic pathway of human esophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seino, Hiroko; Wu, Yunyan; Morohashi, Satoko; Kawamoto, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Katsumi; Kato, Yukio; Takai, Yoshihiro; Kijima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    DEC1 [basic helix-loop-helix (BHLH) E40/Stra13/Sharp2] and DEC2 (BHLHE41/Sharp1) are BHLH transcription factors that are associated with the regulation of apoptosis, cell proliferation, and circadian rhythms, as well as malignancy in various cancers. However, the roles of DEC1 and DEC2 expression in esophageal cancer are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the roles of DEC1 and DEC2 in human esophageal cancer TE 5 and TE 10 cells that had been treated with cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin: CDDP). Expression of DEC1 and DEC2 was decreased with CDDP treatment in TE 5 cells; however, knockdown or overexpression of DEC1/DEC2 had little effects on CDDP-induced apoptosis in TE 5 cells. DEC1 expression was up-regulated in CDDP-treated TE 10 cells, whereas DEC2 expression was unchanged. DEC1 knockdown by siRNA in TE 10 decreased the amount of cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) after treatment with CDDP, whereas DEC2 knockdown had no effects on the amount of cleaved PARP in both the presence and absence of CDDP. We also demonstrated that DEC1 overexpression promoted cleaved PARP expression, whereas DEC2 overexpression had no effects on the amount of cleaved PARP in TE 10 cells. These results suggested that DEC1 has pro-apoptotic effects on human esophageal cancer TE 10 cells of well-differentiated type.

  4. Inhibitory effects of black pepper (Piper nigrum) extracts and compounds on human tumor cell proliferation, cyclooxygenase enzymes, lipid peroxidation and nuclear transcription factor-kappa-B.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunbao; Yadev, Vivek R; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2010-08-01

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum) and hot pepper (Capsicum spp.) are widely used in traditional medicines. Although hot Capsicum spp. extracts and its active principles, capsaicinoids, have been linked with anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities, whether black pepper and its active principle exhibit similar activities is not known. In this study, we have evaluated the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities of extracts and compounds from black pepper by using proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB, COX-1 and -2 enzymes, human tumor cell proliferation and lipid peroxidation (LPO). The capsaicinoids, the alkylamides, isolated from the hot pepper Scotch Bonnet were also used to compare the bioactivities of alkylamides and piperine from black pepper. All compounds derived from black pepper suppressed TNF-induced NF-kappaB activation, but alkyl amides, compound 4 from black pepper and 5 from hot pepper, were most effective. The human cancer cell proliferation inhibitory activities of piperine and alklyl amides in Capsicum and black pepper were dose dependant. The inhibitory concentrations 50% (IC50) of the alklylamides were in the range 13-200 microg/mL. The extracts of black pepper at 200 microg/mL and its compounds at 25 microg/mL inhibited LPO by 45-85%, COX enzymes by 31-80% and cancer cells proliferation by 3.5-86.8%. Overall, these results suggest that black pepper and its constituents like hot pepper, exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer activities.

  5. Successful induction of sclerostin in human-derived fibroblasts by 4 transcription factors and its regulation by parathyroid hormone, hypoxia, and prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Makoto; Kubota, Takuo; Wang, Wei; Ohata, Yasuhisa; Miura, Kohji; Kitaoka, Taichi; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Namba, Noriyuki; Michigami, Toshimi; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-04-01

    Sclerostin, coded by SOST, is a secretory protein that is specifically expressed in osteocytes and suppresses osteogenesis by inhibiting WNT signaling. The regulatory mechanism underlying SOST expression remains unclear mainly due to the absence of an adequate human cell model. Thus, we herein attempted to establish a cell model of human dermal fibroblasts in order to investigate the functions of sclerostin. We selected 20 candidate transcription factors (TFs) that induce SOST expression by analyzing gene expression patterns in the human sarcoma cell line, SaOS-2, between differentiation and maintenance cultures using microarrays. An effective set of TFs to induce SOST expression was sought by their viral transduction into fibroblasts, and a combination of four TFs: ATF3, KLF4, PAX4, and SP7, was identified as the most effective inducer of SOST expression. Quantitative PCR demonstrated that the expression levels of SOST in fibroblasts treated with the 4 TFs were 199- and 1439-fold higher than those of the control after 1-week and 4-week cultures, respectively. The level of sclerostin in the conditioned medium, as determined by ELISA, was 21.2pmol/l 4weeks after the transduction of the 4 TFs. Interestingly, the production of Dickkopf1 (DKK1), another secreted inhibitor of WNT signaling, was also increased by transduction of these 4 TFs. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) significantly suppressed the induced SOST by 38% and sclerostin by 82% that of the vehicle. Hypoxia increased the induced SOST by 62% that of normoxia. Furthermore, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increased SOST expression levels to 16-fold those of the vehicle. In conclusion, the efficient induction of SOST expression and sclerostin production was achieved in human dermal fibroblasts by the transduction of ATF3, KLF4, PAX4, and SP7, and the induced SOST and sclerostin were regulated by PTH, hypoxia, and PGE2. This model may contribute to elucidating the regulatory mechanisms underlying SOST expression and advancing

  6. Program-specific distribution of a transcription factor dependent on partner transcription factor and MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Zeitlinger, Julia; Simon, Itamar; Harbison, Christopher T; Hannett, Nancy M; Volkert, Thomas L; Fink, Gerald R; Young, Richard A

    2003-05-01

    Specialized gene expression programs are induced by signaling pathways that act on transcription factors. Whether these transcription factors can function in multiple developmental programs through a global switch in promoter selection is not known. We have used genome-wide location analysis to show that the yeast Ste12 transcription factor, which regulates mating and filamentous growth, is bound to distinct program-specific target genes dependent on the developmental condition. This condition-dependent distribution of Ste12 requires concurrent binding of the transcription factor Tec1 during filamentation and is differentially regulated by the MAP kinases Fus3 and Kss1. Program-specific distribution across the genome may be a general mechanism by which transcription factors regulate distinct gene expression programs in response to signaling. PMID:12732146

  7. A heteromeric transcription factor required for mammalian RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, S; Tanaka, Y; Kawaguchi, T; Nagaoka, T; Weissman, S M; Yasukochi, Y

    1990-01-01

    A general transcription factor, FC, essential for specific initiation of in vitro transcription by mammalian RNA polymerase II was identified and a procedure developed to purify it to near homogeneity from HeLa cell nuclei. Purified FC is composed of two polypeptides of apparent molecular masses 80 kDa and 30 kDa, on SDS-PAGE, and has a native size of 280 kDa estimated by gel filtration column. Both polypeptides were shown to be essential for reconstituting in vitro transcription activity. Biochemical analysis showed that the 80 kDa and 30 kDa components were present in a 1:1 molar ratio. FC was also demonstrated to interact directly or indirectly with purified RNA polymerase II. Similarities between FC and transcription factors reported by others from human, rat or Drosophila cells are discussed. Images PMID:2395645

  8. Regulation of the human tyrosinase gene in retinal pigment epithelium cells: the significance of transcription factor orthodenticle homeobox 2 and its polymorphic binding site

    PubMed Central

    Putula, Jaana; Mannermaa, Eliisa; Urtti, Arto; Honkakoski, Paavo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Tyrosinase is the rate-limiting enzyme responsible for melanin biosynthesis in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the eye. Melanin has an important role in retinal development, function, and protection against light-induced oxidative stress, and melanin levels are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Because the levels of and protection afforded by melanin seem to decline with increasing age, proper regulation of the human tyrosinase gene (TYR) in the RPE is an important but insufficiently understood process. Our purpose was to obtain detailed information on regulation of the TYR gene promoter in the human RPE and to specify the role of orthodenticle homeobox 2 (OTX2) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). Methods We used luciferase reporter constructs to study regulation of the human TYR gene promoter in cultured human RPE cells. We further studied the role of OTX2 and MITF, their binding sites, and endogenous expression by using mutagenesis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, yeast two-hybrid assay, RNA interference, and gene expression analyses. Results In the RPE, OTX2 activated the human TYR gene promoter via direct trans-activation of novel OTX2 binding elements. In addition, we found that indirect activation by OTX2 via more proximal MITF binding sites, even in the absence of OTX2 sites, took place. These results are consistent with the physical interaction observed between OTX2 and MITF. Overexpression or knockdown of OTX2 in RPE cells resulted in corresponding changes in tyrosinase mRNA expression. Finally, we found that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs4547091) at the most proximal OTX2 binding site is associated with altered nuclear protein binding and a remarkable decrease in TYR promoter activity in RPE cells. This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is more common in the European population in which AMD is also more prevalent. Conclusions In the RPE, OTX2 activates the human TYR gene

  9. Ultraviolet B Regulation of Transcription Factor Families

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, S.J.; Bowden, G.T.

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged and repeated exposure of the skin to ultraviolet light (UV) leads not only to aging of the skin but also increases the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Damage of cells induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) light both at the DNA level and molecular level initiates the activation of transcription factor pathways, which in turn regulate the expression of a number of genes termed the “UV response genes”. Two such transcription factor families that are activated in this way are those of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) families. These two transcription factor families have been identified to be involved in the processes of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell survival and therefore play important roles in tumorigenesis. The study of these two transcription factor pathways and the cross-talk between them in response to UVB exposure may help with the development of new chemopreventive strategies for the prevention of UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. PMID:17979627

  10. Transcription factors NF-IL6 and CREB recognize a common essential site in the human prointerleukin 1 beta gene.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, J; Saito, K; Waterman, W R; Webb, A C; Auron, P E

    1994-01-01

    A site located between -2782 and -2729 of the human prointerleukin-1 beta (IL1B) gene functions as a strong lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive enhancer independent of the previously identified enhancer located between -2896 and -2846 (F. Shirakawa, K. Saito, C.A. Bonagura, D.L. Galson, M. J. Fenton, A. C. Webb, and P. E. Auron, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:1332-1344, 1993). Although these two enhancers appear to function cooperatively in the native sequence context, they function independently as LPS-responsive elements upon removal of an interposed silencer sequence. The new enhancer is not induced by dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP) alone but is superinduced by costimulation with LPS-dbcAMP. This pattern of induction depends upon the nature of the sequence, a composite NF-IL6-cAMP response element (CRE) binding site. This pseudosymmetrical sequence is shown to contrast with a classical symmetric CRE which responds to dbcAMP but not LPS. DNA binding studies using in vivo nuclear extract, recombinant proteins, and specific antibodies show that LPS induces the formation of two different complexes at the enhancer: (i) an NF-IL6-CREB heterodimer and (ii) a heterodimer consisting of NF-IL6 and a non-CREB, CRE-binding protein. Cotransfection studies using NF-IL6 and CREB expression vectors show that NF-IL6 transactivates the enhancer in the presence of LPS, whereas CREB acts either positively or negatively, depending upon its cAMP-regulated phosphorylation state. Our data demonstrate that the newly identified enhancer is a specialized LPS-responsive sequence which can be modulated by cAMP as a result of the involvement of NF-IL6-CRE-binding protein heterodimers. Images PMID:7935442

  11. Ligand-Independent Activation of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor β during Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Transactivator of Transcription and Cocaine-Mediated Smooth Muscle Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Dalvi, Pranjali N; Gupta, Vijayalaxmi G; Griffin, Brooke R; O'Brien-Ladner, Amy; Dhillon, Navneet K

    2015-09-01

    Our previous study supports an additive effect of cocaine to human immunodeficiency virus infection in the development of pulmonary arteriopathy through enhancement of proliferation of pulmonary smooth muscle cells (SMCs), while also suggesting involvement of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) activation in the absence of further increase in PDGF-BB ligand. Redox-related signaling pathways have been shown to regulate tyrosine kinase receptors independent of ligand binding, so we hypothesized that simultaneous treatment of SMCs with transactivator of transcription (Tat) and cocaine may be able to indirectly activate PDGFR through modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) without the need for PDGF binding. We found that blocking the binding of ligand using suramin or monoclonal IMC-3G3 antibody significantly reduced ligand-induced autophosphorylation of Y1009 without affecting ligand-independent transphosphorylation of Y934 residue on PDGFRβ in human pulmonary arterial SMCs treated with both cocaine and Tat. Combined treatment of human pulmonary arterial SMCs with cocaine and Tat resulted in augmented production of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide when compared with either treatment alone. Inhibition of this ROS generation prevented cocaine- and Tat-mediated Src activation and transphosphorylation of PDGFRβ at Y934 without any changes in phosphorylation of Y1009, in addition to attenuation of smooth muscle hyperplasia. Furthermore, pretreatment with an Src inhibitor, PP2, also suppressed cocaine- and Tat-mediated enhanced Y934 phosphorylation and smooth muscle proliferation. Finally, we report total abrogation of cocaine- and Tat-mediated synergistic increase in cell proliferation on inhibition of both ligand-dependent and ROS/Src-mediated ligand-independent phosphorylation of PDGFRβ.

  12. Transcription factor AP1 binds the functional region of the promoter and regulates gene expression of human PPARdelta in LoVo cell.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaogang; Yang, Xudong; Han, Yan; Lu, Shemin

    2013-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ gene (PPARδ) is correlated with carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer, but the regulation of its gene transcription remains unclear. We herein report that AP1 binds the promoter and regulates PPARδ gene expression. With a luciferase reporter system, we identified a functional promoter region of 30 bp of PPARδ gene by deletion and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Using site-directed mutagenesis and decoy analyses, we demonstrated that AP1 bound the functional transcriptional factor binding site in a region extending from -176 to -73 of the PPARδ promoter, which was confirmed using EMSA and supershift assays. Consequently, inhibition of the AP1 binding site led to decreased PPARδ mRNA. Our study demonstrated that AP1 is the transcriptional factor that contributes to PPARδ expression in LoVo cells.

  13. Human beta casein fragment (54-59) modulates M. bovis BCG survival and basic transcription factor 3 (BTF3) expression in THP-1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Dharamsheela; Saxena, Reshu; Singh, Vandana; Haq, Wahajul; Katti, S B; Singh, Bhupendra Narain; Tripathi, Raj Kamal

    2012-01-01

    Immunostimulatory peptides potentiate the immune system of the host and are being used as a viable adjunct to established therapeutic modalities in treatment of cancer and microbial infections. Several peptides derived from milk protein have been reported to induce immunostimulatory activity. Human β -casein fragment (54-59), natural sequence peptide (NS) carrying the Val-Glu-Pro-Ile-Pro-Tyr amino acid residues, was reported to activate the macrophages and impart potent immunostimulatory activity. In present study, we found that this peptide increases the clearance of M. bovis BCG from THP-1 cell line in vitro. The key biomolecules, involved in the clearance of BCG from macrophage like, nitric oxide, pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, were not found to be significantly altered after peptide treatment in comparison to the untreated control. Using proteomic approach we found that BTF3a, an isoform of the Basic Transcription Factor, BTF3, was down regulated in THP-1 cell line after peptide treatment. This was reconfirmed by real time RT-PCR and western blotting. We report the BTF3a as a novel target of this hexapeptide. Based on the earlier findings and the results from the present studies, we suggest that the down regulation of BTF3a following the peptide treatment may augment the M. bovis BCG mediated apoptosis resulting in enhanced clearance of M. bovis BCG from THP-1 cell line.

  14. ABF transcription factors of Thellungiella salsuginea

    PubMed Central

    Vysotskii, Denis A.; de Vries-van Leeuwen, Ingrid J.; Souer, Erik; Babakov, Alexei V.; de Boer, Albertus H.

    2013-01-01

    ABF transcription factors are the key regulators of ABA signaling. Using RACE-PCR, we identified and sequenced the coding regions of four genes that encode ABF transcription factors in the extremophile plant Thellungiella salsuginea, a close relative of Arabidopsis thaliana that possesses high tolerance to abiotic stresses. An analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that the similarity between Thellungiella and Arabidopsis ABFs ranged from 71% to 88%. Similar to their Arabidopsis counterparts, Thellungiella ABFs share a bZIP domain and four conservative domains, including a highly conservative motif at the C-terminal tail, which was reported to be a canonical site for binding by 14-3-3 regulatory proteins. Gene expression analysis by real-time PCR revealed a rapid transcript induction of three of the ABF genes in response to salt stress. To check whether Thellungiella ABF transcription factors can interact with abundant 14-3-3 proteins, multiple constructs were designed, and yeast two-hybrid experiments were conducted. Six of the eight tested Ts14-3-3 proteins were able to bind the TsABFs in an isoform-specific manner. A serine-to-alanine substitution in the putative 14-3-3 binding motif resulted in the complete loss of interaction between the 14-3-3 proteins and the ABFs. The role of 14-3-3 interaction with ABFs in the salt and ABA signaling pathways is discussed in the context of Thellungiella survivability. PMID:23221757

  15. GOLDEN 2-LIKE Transcription Factors of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Ji, Meiling; Wen, Binbin; Liu, Li; Li, Shaoxuan; Chen, Xiude; Gao, Dongsheng; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Golden2-like (GLK) transcription factors are members of the GARP family of Myb transcription factors with an established relationship to chloroplast development in the plant kingdom. In the last century, Golden2 was proposed as a second golden producing factor and identified as controlling cellular differentiation in maize leaves. Then, GLKs were also found to play roles in disease defense and their function is conserved in regulating chloroplast development. Recently, research on GLKs has rapidly increased and shown that GLKs control chloroplast development in green and non-green tissues. Moreover, links between phytohormones and GLKs were verified. In this mini-review, we summarize the history, conservation, function, potential targets and degradation of GLKs. PMID:27757121

  16. Activating transcription factor 3 is overexpressed in human glioma and its knockdown in glioblastoma cells causes growth inhibition both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Siqi; Pang, Changhe; Song, Laijun; Guo, Fuyou; Sun, Hongwei

    2015-06-01

    Glioblastomas are highly malignant gliomas that are extremely invasive with high rates of recurrence and mortality. It has been reported that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is expressed in elevated levels in multiple malignant tumors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the function of ATF3 in the development of glioma and its clinical significance. Immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis and RT-qPCR revealed that the mRNA and protein levels of ATF3 and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) were higher in the glioma than in the normal human brain tissues, and that their levels were proportional to the pathological grades. By contrast, the mRNA and protein levels of mammary serine protease inhibitor (maspin; SERPINB5) were significantly lower in the glioma than in the normal brain tissue, and maspin expression was inversely proportional to the glioma pathological grade. The transfection of U373MG glioblastoma cells with ATF3-siRNA induced a number of changes in cell behavior; the cell proliferative activity was decreased and flow cytometry revealed an increased proportion of cells arrested in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. In addition, TUNEL staining indicated an increased proportion of cells undergoing apoptosis and Transwell assays revealed impaired cell mobility. The sizes of the tumors grown as xenografts in nude mice were also significantly reduced by treatment of host mice with ATF3-siRNA. Taken together, these results suggest that ATF3 promotes the progression of human gliomas. PMID:25872784

  17. Activating transcription factor 3 is overexpressed in human glioma and its knockdown in glioblastoma cells causes growth inhibition both in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    MA, SIQI; PANG, CHANGHE; SONG, LAIJUN; GUO, FUYOU; SUN, HONGWEI

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas are highly malignant gliomas that are extremely invasive with high rates of recurrence and mortality. It has been reported that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is expressed in elevated levels in multiple malignant tumors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the function of ATF3 in the development of glioma and its clinical significance. Immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis and RT-qPCR revealed that the mRNA and protein levels of ATF3 and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) were higher in the glioma than in the normal human brain tissues, and that their levels were proportional to the pathological grades. By contrast, the mRNA and protein levels of mammary serine protease inhibitor (maspin; SERPINB5) were significantly lower in the glioma than in the normal brain tissue, and maspin expression was inversely proportional to the glioma pathological grade. The transfection of U373MG glioblastoma cells with ATF3-siRNA induced a number of changes in cell behavior; the cell proliferative activity was decreased and flow cytometry revealed an increased proportion of cells arrested in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. In addition, TUNEL staining indicated an increased proportion of cells undergoing apoptosis and Transwell assays revealed impaired cell mobility. The sizes of the tumors grown as xenografts in nude mice were also significantly reduced by treatment of host mice with ATF3-siRNA. Taken together, these results suggest that ATF3 promotes the progression of human gliomas. PMID:25872784

  18. Nur transcription factors in stress and addiction

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Melo, Danae; Galleguillos, Danny; Sánchez, Natalia; Gysling, Katia; Andrés, María E.

    2013-01-01

    The Nur transcription factors Nur77 (NGFI-B, NR4A1), Nurr1 (NR4A2), and Nor-1 (NR4A3) are a sub-family of orphan members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. These transcription factors are products of immediate early genes, whose expression is rapidly and transiently induced in the central nervous system by several types of stimuli. Nur factors are present throughout the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis where are prominently induced in response to stress. Drugs of abuse and stress also induce the expression of Nur factors in nuclei of the motivation/reward circuit of the brain, indicating their participation in the process of drug addiction and in non-hypothalamic responses to stress. Repeated use of addictive drugs and chronic stress induce long-lasting dysregulation of the brain motivation/reward circuit due to reprogramming of gene expression and enduring alterations in neuronal function. Here, we review the data supporting that Nur transcription factors are key players in the molecular basis of the dysregulation of neuronal circuits involved in chronic stress and addiction. PMID:24348325

  19. Transcriptional regulation of NADPH oxidase isoforms, Nox1 and Nox4, by nuclear factor-{kappa}B in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Manea, Adrian; Tanase, Laurentia I.; Raicu, Monica; Simionescu, Maya

    2010-06-11

    Inflammation-induced changes in the activity and expression of NADPH oxidases (Nox) play a key role in atherogenesis. The molecular mechanisms of Nox regulation are scantily elucidated. Since nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) controls the expression of many genes associated to inflammation-related diseases, in this study we have investigated the role of NF-{kappa}B signaling in the regulation of Nox1 and Nox4 transcription in human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Cultured cells were exposed to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF{alpha}), a potent inducer of both Nox and NF-{kappa}B, up to 24 h. Lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence and dichlorofluorescein assays, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analysis showed that inhibition of NF-{kappa}B pathway reduced significantly the TNF{alpha}-dependent up-regulation of Nox-derived reactive oxygen species production, Nox1 and Nox4 expression. In silico analysis indicated the existence of typical NF-{kappa}B elements in the promoters of Nox1 and Nox4. Transient overexpression of p65/NF-{kappa}B significantly increased the promoter activities of both isoforms. Physical interaction of p65/NF-{kappa}B proteins with the predicted sites was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. These findings demonstrate that NF-{kappa}B is an essential regulator of Nox1- and Nox4-containing NADPH oxidase in SMCs. Elucidation of the complex relationships between NF-{kappa}B and Nox enzymes may lead to a novel pharmacological strategy to reduce both inflammation and oxidative stress in atherosclerosis and its associated complications.

  20. Transcriptional regulation of NADPH oxidase isoforms, Nox1 and Nox4, by nuclear factor-kappaB in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Manea, Adrian; Tanase, Laurentia I; Raicu, Monica; Simionescu, Maya

    2010-06-11

    Inflammation-induced changes in the activity and expression of NADPH oxidases (Nox) play a key role in atherogenesis. The molecular mechanisms of Nox regulation are scantily elucidated. Since nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) controls the expression of many genes associated to inflammation-related diseases, in this study we have investigated the role of NF-kappaB signaling in the regulation of Nox1 and Nox4 transcription in human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Cultured cells were exposed to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), a potent inducer of both Nox and NF-kappaB, up to 24h. Lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence and dichlorofluorescein assays, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analysis showed that inhibition of NF-kappaB pathway reduced significantly the TNFalpha-dependent up-regulation of Nox-derived reactive oxygen species production, Nox1 and Nox4 expression. In silico analysis indicated the existence of typical NF-kappaB elements in the promoters of Nox1 and Nox4. Transient overexpression of p65/NF-kappaB significantly increased the promoter activities of both isoforms. Physical interaction of p65/NF-kappaB proteins with the predicted sites was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. These findings demonstrate that NF-kappaB is an essential regulator of Nox1- and Nox4-containing NADPH oxidase in SMCs. Elucidation of the complex relationships between NF-kappaB and Nox enzymes may lead to a novel pharmacological strategy to reduce both inflammation and oxidative stress in atherosclerosis and its associated complications. PMID:20457132

  1. Two-dimensional electrophoretic mobility shift assay: identification and mapping of transcription factor CTCF target sequences within an FXYD5-COX7A1 region of human chromosome 19.

    PubMed

    Vetchinova, Anna S; Akopov, Sergey B; Chernov, Igor P; Nikolaev, Lev G; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2006-07-01

    An approach for fast identification and mapping of transcription factor binding sites within long genomic sequences is proposed. Using this approach, 10 CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) binding sites were identified within a 1-Mb FXYD5-COX7A1 human chromosome 19 region. In vivo binding of CTCF to these sites was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. CTCF binding sites were mapped within gene introns and intergenic regions, and some of them contained Alu-like repeated elements. PMID:16701069

  2. Distal Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) Response Element of Human Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) Binds Activator Protein 1 (AP-1) Transcription Factors and Regulates Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Schmucker, Adam C.; Wright, Jason B.; Cole, Michael D.; Brinckerhoff, Constance E.

    2012-01-01

    The collagenase matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) plays an important role in the destruction of cartilage in arthritic joints. MMP-13 expression is strongly up-regulated in arthritis, largely because of stimulation by inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β. Treatment of chondrocytes with IL-1β induces transcription of MMP-13 in vitro. IL-1β signaling converges upon the activator protein-1 transcription factors, which have been shown to be required for IL-1β-induced MMP-13 gene expression. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we detected activator protein-1 binding within an evolutionarily conserved DNA sequence ∼20 kb 5′ relative to the MMP-13 transcription start site (TSS). Also using ChIP, we detected histone modifications and binding of RNA polymerase II within this conserved region, all of which are consistent with transcriptional activation. Chromosome conformation capture indicates that chromosome looping brings this region in close proximity with the MMP-13 TSS. Finally, a luciferase reporter construct driven by a component of the conserved region demonstrated an expression pattern similar to that of endogenous MMP-13. These data suggest that a conserved region at 20 kb upstream from the MMP-13 TSS includes a distal transcriptional response element of MMP-13, which contributes to MMP-13 gene expression. PMID:22102411

  3. Specification of the Cardiac Conduction System by Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Cathy J.; Basson, Craig T.

    2009-01-01

    Diseases of the cardiovascular system that cause sudden cardiac deaths are often caused by lethal arrhythmias that originate from defects in the cardiac conduction system. Development of the cardiac conduction system is a complex biological process that can be wrought with problems. Although several genes involved in mature conduction system function have been identified, their association with development of specific subcomponents of the cardiac conduction system remains challenging. Several transcription factors, including homeodomain proteins and T-box proteins, are essential for cardiac conduction system morphogenesis and activation or repression of key regulatory genes. In addition, several transcription factors modify expression of genes encoding the ion channel proteins that contribute to the electrophysiological properties of the conduction system and govern contraction of the surrounding myocardium. Loss of transcriptional regulation during cardiac development has detrimental effects on cardiogenesis that may lead to arrhythmias. Human genetic mutations in some of these transcription factors have been identified and are known to cause congenital heart diseases that include cardiac conduction system malformations. In this review, we summarize the contributions of several key transcription factors to specification, patterning, maturation and function of the cardiac conduction system. Further analysis of the molecular programs involved in this process should lead to improved diagnosis and therapy of conduction system disease. PMID:19797194

  4. Dynamics of Transcription Factor Binding Site Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Tuğrul, Murat; Paixão, Tiago; Barton, Nicholas H.; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of gene regulation is crucial for our understanding of the phenotypic differences between species, populations and individuals. Sequence-specific binding of transcription factors to the regulatory regions on the DNA is a key regulatory mechanism that determines gene expression and hence heritable phenotypic variation. We use a biophysical model for directional selection on gene expression to estimate the rates of gain and loss of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in finite populations under both point and insertion/deletion mutations. Our results show that these rates are typically slow for a single TFBS in an isolated DNA region, unless the selection is extremely strong. These rates decrease drastically with increasing TFBS length or increasingly specific protein-DNA interactions, making the evolution of sites longer than ∼ 10 bp unlikely on typical eukaryotic speciation timescales. Similarly, evolution converges to the stationary distribution of binding sequences very slowly, making the equilibrium assumption questionable. The availability of longer regulatory sequences in which multiple binding sites can evolve simultaneously, the presence of “pre-sites” or partially decayed old sites in the initial sequence, and biophysical cooperativity between transcription factors, can all facilitate gain of TFBS and reconcile theoretical calculations with timescales inferred from comparative genomics. PMID:26545200

  5. Evolution of human IgH3'EC duplicated structures: both enhancers HS1,2 are polymorphic with variation of transcription factor's consensus sites.

    PubMed

    Giambra, Vincenzo; Fruscalzo, Alberto; Giufre', Maria; Martinez-Labarga, Cristina; Favaro, Marco; Rocchi, Mariano; Frezza, Domenico

    2005-02-14

    the 17-bp external element in hominids. The relevance of the polymorphisms in the HS1,2 enhancers is due to the variable number of binding sites for the transcription factors: NF-kappaB, CMYB, BSAP1/2, AP1/4, E47, MyoD and muE5 and thus to the possible influence of these variations on switch, production of Ig and on maturation of B cells.

  6. Human mediator subunit MED15 promotes transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Nakatsubo, Takuya; Nishitani, Saori; Kikuchi, Yuko; Iida, Satoshi; Yamada, Kana; Tanaka, Aki; Ohkuma, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotes, the Mediator complex is an essential transcriptional cofactor of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, it contains up to 30 subunits and consists of four modules: head, middle, tail, and CDK/Cyclin. One of the subunits, MED15, is located in the tail module, and was initially identified as Gal11 in budding yeast, where it plays an essential role in the transcriptional regulation of galactose metabolism with the potent transcriptional activator Gal4. For this reason, we investigated the function of the human MED15 subunit (hMED15) in transcriptional activation. First, we measured the effect of hMED15 knockdown on cell growth in HeLa cells. The growth rate was greatly reduced. By immunostaining, we observed the colocalization of hMED15 with the general transcription factors TFIIE and TFIIH in the nucleus. We measured the effects of siRNA-mediated knockdown of hMED15 on transcriptional activation using two different transcriptional activators, VP16 and SREBP1a. Treatment with siRNAs reduced transcriptional activation, and this reduction could be rescued by overexpression of HA/Flag-tagged, wild-type hMED15. To investigate hMED15 localization, we treated human MCF-7 cells with the MDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3, thus inducing p21 transcription. We found that hMED15 localized to both the p53 binding site and the p21 promoter region, along with TFIIE and TFIIH. These results indicate that hMED15 promotes transcriptional activation.

  7. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  8. Activation of transcription factor IL-6 (NF-IL-6) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) by lipid ozonation products is crucial to interleukin-8 gene expression in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kafoury, Ramzi M; Hernandez, Jazmir M; Lasky, Joseph A; Toscano, William A; Friedman, Mitchell

    2007-04-01

    Ozone (O(3)) is a major component of smog and an inhaled toxicant to the lung. O(3) rapidly reacts with the airway epithelial cell membrane phospholipids to generate lipid ozonation products (LOP). 1-Hydroxy-1-hydroperoxynonane (HHP-C9) is an important LOP, produced from the ozonation of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphatidylcholine. This LOP, at a biologically relevant concentration (100 microM), increases the activity of phospholipase C, nuclear factors-kappaB (NF-kappaB), and interleukin-6 (NF-IL-6) and the expression of the inflammatory gene, interleukin-8 (IL-8) in a cultured human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B). The signaling pathways of ozone and its biologically-active products are as yet undefined. In the present study, we report that the HHP LOP, HHP-C9 (100 microM x 4 h), activated the expression of IL-8 (218 +/- 26% increase over control, n = 4, P < 0.01) through an apparent interaction between the two transcription factors, NF-kappaB and NF-IL-6. Transfection studies using luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that HHP-C9 induced a significant increase in NF-kappaB-DNA binding activity (37 +/- 7% increase over control, n = 6, P < 0.05). Inhibition of NF-kappaB showed a statistically significant but modest decrease in IL-8 release, which suggested a role for another transcription factor, NF-IL-6. Exposure of BEAS-2B cells to HHP-C9 induced a significant increase in the DNA binding activity of NF-IL-6 (45 +/- 11% increase over control, n = 6, P < 0.05). The results of the present study indicate that NF-IL-6 interacts with NF-kappaB in regulating the expression of IL-8 in cultured human airway epithelial cells exposed to LOP, the biological products of ozone in the lung. PMID:17366569

  9. Regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and cytokine gene expression in myeloid cells by NF-kappa B/Rel transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Roulston, A; Lin, R; Beauparlant, P; Wainberg, M A; Hiscott, J

    1995-01-01

    CD4+ macrophages in tissues such as lung, skin, and lymph nodes, promyelocytic cells in bone marrow, and peripheral blood monocytes serve as important targets and reservoirs for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. HIV-1-infected myeloid cells are often diminished in their ability to participate in chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and intracellular killing. HIV-1 infection of myeloid cells can lead to the expression of surface receptors associated with cellular activation and/or differentiation that increase the responsiveness of these cells to cytokines secreted by neighboring cells as well as to bacteria or other pathogens. Enhancement of HIV-1 replication is related in part to increased DNA-binding activity of cellular transcription factors such as NF-kappa B. NF-kappa B binds to the HIV-1 enhancer region of the long terminal repeat and contributes to the inducibility of HIV-1 gene expression in response to multiple activating agents. Phosphorylation and degradation of the cytoplasmic inhibitor I kappa B alpha are crucial regulatory events in the activation of NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity. Both N- and C-terminal residues of I kappa B alpha are required for inducer-mediated degradation. Chronic HIV-1 infection of myeloid cells leads to constitutive NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity and provides an intranuclear environment capable of perpetuating HIV-1 replication. Increased intracellular stores of latent NF-kappa B may also result in rapid inducibility of NF-kappa B-dependent cytokine gene expression. In response to secondary pathogenic infections or antigenic challenge, cytokine gene expression is rapidly induced, enhanced, and sustained over prolonged periods in HIV-1-infected myeloid cells compared with uninfected cells. Elevated levels of several inflammatory cytokines have been detected in the sera of HIV-1-infected individuals. Secretion of myeloid cell-derived cytokines may both increase virus production and contribute to AIDS

  10. Comparative Analyses of Plant Transcription Factor Databases

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Silvia R; Basu, Chhandak

    2009-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteinaceous complex, which bind to the promoter regions in the DNA and affect transcription initiation. Plant TFs control gene expressions and genes control many physiological processes, which in turn trigger cascades of biochemical reactions in plant cells. The databases available for plant TFs are somewhat abundant but all convey different information and in different formats. Some of the publicly available plant TF databases may be narrow, while others are broad in scopes. For example, some of the best TF databases are ones that are very specific with just one plant species, but there are also other databases that contain a total of up to 20 different plant species. In this review plant TF databases ranging from a single species to many will be assessed and described. The comparative analyses of all the databases and their advantages and disadvantages are also discussed. PMID:19721806

  11. ISS Payload Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  12. Coupling the mitochondrial transcription machinery to human disease.

    PubMed

    Shadel, Gerald S

    2004-10-01

    Mitochondria are the central processing units for cellular energy metabolism and, in addition to carrying out oxidative phosphorylation, regulate important processes such as apoptosis and calcium homeostasis. Because mitochondria possess a genome that is central to their multiple functions, an understanding of the mechanism of mitochondrial gene expression is required to decipher the many ways mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to human disease. Towards this end, two human transcription factors that are related to rRNA methyltransferases have recently been characterized, providing new insight into the mechanism of mitochondrial transcription and a novel link to maternally inherited deafness. Furthermore, studies in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae model system have revealed a functional coupling of transcription and translation at the inner mitochondrial membrane, where assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation system commences. Defects in an analogous coupling mechanism in humans might underlie the cytochrome oxidase deficiency that causes a form of Leigh Syndrome.

  13. Pathologically Relevant Prelamin A Interactions with Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Infante, Arantza; Rodríguez, Clara I

    2016-01-01

    LMNA-linked laminopathies are a group of rare human diseases caused by mutations in LMNA or by disrupted posttranslational processing of its largest encoded isoform, prelamin A. The accumulation of mutated or immature forms of farnesylated prelamin A, named progerin or prelamin A, respectively, dominantly disrupts nuclear lamina structure with toxic effects in cells. One hypothesis is that aberrant lamin filament networks disrupt or "trap" proteins such as transcription factors, thereby interfering with their normal activity. Since laminopathies mainly affect tissues of mesenchymal origin, we tested this hypothesis by generating an experimental model of laminopathy by inducing prelamin A accumulation in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We provide detailed protocols for inducing and detecting prelamin A accumulation in hMSCs, and describe the bioinformatic analysis and in vitro assays of transcription factors potentially affected by prelamin A accumulation.

  14. Evidence for an early gene duplication event in the evolution of the mitochondrial transcription factor B family and maintenance of rRNA methyltransferase activity in human mtTFB1 and mtTFB2.

    PubMed

    Cotney, Justin; Shadel, Gerald S

    2006-11-01

    Most metazoans have two nuclear genes encoding orthologues of the well-characterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial transcription factor B (sc-mtTFB). This class of transcription factors is homologous to the bacterial KsgA family of rRNA methyltransferases, which in Escherichia coli dimethylates adjacent adenine residues in a stem-loop of the 16S rRNA. This posttranscriptional modification is conserved in most metazoan cytoplasmic and mitochondrial rRNAs. Homo sapiens mitochondrial transcription factor B1 (h-mtTFB1) possesses this enzymatic activity, implicating it as a dual-function protein involved in mitochondrial transcription and translation. Here we demonstrate that h-mtTFB2 also has rRNA methyltransferase activity but is a less efficient enzyme than h-mtTFB1. In contrast, sc-mtTFB has no detectable rRNA methyltransferase activity, correlating with the lack of the corresponding modification in the mitochondrial rRNA of budding yeast. Based on these results, and reports that Drosophila melanogaster mtTFB1 and mtTFB2 do not have completely overlapping functions, we propose a model for human mtDNA regulation that takes into account h-mtTFB1 and h-mtTFB2 likely having partially redundant transcription factor and rRNA methyltransferase functions. Finally, phylogenetic analyses of this family of proteins strongly suggest that the presence of two mtTFB homologues in metazoans is the result of a gene duplication event that occurred early in eukaryotic evolution prior to the divergence of fungi and metazoans. This model suggests that, after the gene duplication event, differential selective pressures on the rRNA methyltransferase and transcription factor activities of mtTFB genes occurred, with extreme cases culminating in the loss of one of the paralogous genes in certain species.

  15. HIF Transcription Factors, Inflammation, and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Palazon, Asis; Goldrath, Ananda; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The hypoxic response in cells and tissues is mediated by the family of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factors that play an integral role in the metabolic changes that drive cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability. HIF expression and stabilization in immune cells can be triggered by hypoxia, but also by other factors associated with pathological stress: e.g., inflammation, infectious microorganisms, and cancer. HIF induces a number of aspects of host immune function, from boosting phagocyte microbicidal capacity to driving T cell differentiation and cytotoxic activity. Cellular metabolism is emerging as a key regulator of immunity, and it constitutes another layer of fine-tuned immune control by HIF that can dictate myeloid cell and lymphocyte development, fate, and function. Here we discuss how oxygen sensing in the immune microenvironment shapes immunological response and examine how HIF and the hypoxia pathway control innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:25367569

  16. HIF transcription factors, inflammation, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Palazon, Asis; Goldrath, Ananda W; Nizet, Victor; Johnson, Randall S

    2014-10-16

    The hypoxic response in cells and tissues is mediated by the family of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcription factors; these play an integral role in the metabolic changes that drive cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability. HIF expression and stabilization in immune cells can be triggered by hypoxia, but also by other factors associated with pathological stress: e.g., inflammation, infectious microorganisms, and cancer. HIF induces a number of aspects of host immune function, from boosting phagocyte microbicidal capacity to driving T cell differentiation and cytotoxic activity. Cellular metabolism is emerging as a key regulator of immunity, and it constitutes another layer of fine-tuned immune control by HIF that can dictate myeloid cell and lymphocyte development, fate, and function. Here we discuss how oxygen sensing in the immune microenvironment shapes immunological response and examine how HIF and the hypoxia pathway control innate and adaptive immunity.

  17. Pea3 transcription factor promotes neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Kandemir, Basak; Caglayan, Berrak; Hausott, Barbara; Erdogan, Burcu; Dag, Ugur; Demir, Ozlem; Sogut, Melis S.; Klimaschewski, Lars; Kurnaz, Isil A.

    2014-01-01

    Pea3 subfamily of E–twenty six transcription factors consist of three major -exhibit branching morphogenesis, the function of Pea3 family in nervous system development and regeneration is only beginning to unfold. In this study, we provide evidence that Pea3 can directs neurite extension and axonal outgrowth in different model systems, and that Serine 90 is important for this function. We have also identified neurofilament-L and neurofilament-M as two putative novel targets for Pea3. PMID:25018694

  18. Snail Family Transcription Factors Are Implicated in Thyroid Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Robert G.; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Ines; Anderson, Catriona; Flores, Teresa; Hughes, Sharon; Tselepis, Chris; Ross, James A.; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2007-01-01

    E-Cadherin (CDH1) expression is reduced in thyroid carcinomas by primarily unknown mechanisms. In several tissues, SNAIL (SNAI1) and SLUG (SNAI2) induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition by altering target gene transcription, including CDH1 repression, but these transcription factors have not been studied in thyroid carcinoma. Recently, our group has provided direct evidence that ectopic SNAI1 expression induces epithelial and mesenchymal mouse tumors. SNAI1, SNAI2, and CDH1 expression were analyzed in thyroid-derived cell lines and samples of human follicular and papillary thyroid carcinoma by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. The effect of SNAI1 expression on CDH1 transcription was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting in ori-3 cells. Thyroid carcinoma development was analyzed in CombitTA-Snail mice, in which SNAI1 levels are up-regulated. SNAI1 and SNAI2 were not expressed in cells derived from normal thyroid tissue, or in normal human thyroid samples, but were highly expressed in cell lines derived from thyroid carcinomas, in human thyroid carcinoma samples, and their metastases. SNAI1 expression in ori-3 cells repressed CDH1 transcription. Combi-TA mice developed papillary thyroid carcinomas, the incidence of which was increased by concomitant radiotherapy. In conclusion, SNAI1 and SNAI2 are ectopically expressed in thyroid carcinomas, and aberrant expression in mice is associated with papillary carcinoma development. PMID:17724139

  19. Interaction studies of the human and Arabidopsis thaliana Med25-ACID proteins with the herpes simplex virus VP16- and plant-specific Dreb2a transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Ximena; Blomberg, Jeanette; Brännström, Kristoffer; Olofsson, Anders; Schleucher, Jürgen; Björklund, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Mediator is an evolutionary conserved multi-protein complex present in all eukaryotes. It functions as a transcriptional co-regulator by conveying signals from activators and repressors to the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery. The Arabidopsis thaliana Med25 (aMed25) ACtivation Interaction Domain (ACID) interacts with the Dreb2a activator which is involved in plant stress response pathways, while Human Med25-ACID (hMed25) interacts with the herpes simplex virus VP16 activator. Despite low sequence similarity, hMed25-ACID also interacts with the plant-specific Dreb2a transcriptional activator protein. We have used GST pull-down-, surface plasmon resonance-, isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR chemical shift experiments to characterize interactions between Dreb2a and VP16, with the hMed25 and aMed25-ACIDs. We found that VP16 interacts with aMed25-ACID with similar affinity as with hMed25-ACID and that the binding surface on aMed25-ACID overlaps with the binding site for Dreb2a. We also show that the Dreb2a interaction region in hMed25-ACID overlaps with the earlier reported VP16 binding site. In addition, we show that hMed25-ACID/Dreb2a and aMed25-ACID/Dreb2a display similar binding affinities but different binding energetics. Our results therefore indicate that interaction between transcriptional regulators and their target proteins in Mediator are less dependent on the primary sequences in the interaction domains but that these domains fold into similar structures upon interaction.

  20. Transcription factor repertoire of homeostatic eosinophilopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Bouffi, Carine; Kartashov, Andrey V.; Schollaert, Kaila L.; Chen, Xiaoting; Bacon, W. Clark; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Barski, Artem; Fulkerson, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    The production of mature eosinophils is a tightly orchestrated process with the aim to sustain normal eosinophil levels in tissues while also maintaining low numbers of these complex and sensitive cells in the blood. To identify regulators of homeostatic eosinophilopoiesis in mice, we took a global approach to identify genome-wide transcriptome and epigenome changes that occur during homeostasis at critical developmental stages, including eosinophil-lineage commitment and lineage maturation. Our analyses revealed a markedly greater number of transcriptome alterations associated with eosinophil maturation (1199 genes) than with eosinophil-lineage commitment (490 genes), highlighting the greater transcriptional investment necessary for differentiation. Eosinophil progenitors (EoPs) were noted to express high levels of granule proteins and contain granules with an ultrastructure distinct from that of mature resting eosinophils. Our analyses also delineated a 976-gene eosinophil-lineage transcriptome that included a repertoire of 56 transcription factors, many of which have never previously been associated with eosinophils. EoPs and eosinophils, but not granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (GMPs) or neutrophils, expressed Helios and Aiolos, members of the Ikaros family of transcription factors, which regulate gene expression via modulation of chromatin structure and DNA accessibility. Epigenetic studies revealed a distinct distribution of active chromatin marks between genes induced with lineage commitment and genes induced with cell maturation during eosinophil development. In addition, Aiolos and Helios binding sites were significantly enriched in genes expressed by EoPs and eosinophils with active chromatin, highlighting a potential novel role for Helios and Aiolos in regulating gene expression during eosinophil development. PMID:26268651

  1. Sequence variation in transcription factor IIIA.

    PubMed Central

    Gaskins, C J; Hanas, J S

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies characterized macromolecular differences between Xenopus and Rana transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) (Gaskins et al., 1989, Nucl. Acids Res. 17, 781-794). In the present study, cDNAs for TFIIIA from Xenopus borealis and Rana catesbeiana (American bullfrog) were cloned and sequenced in order to gain molecular insight into the structure, function, and species variation of TFIIIA and the TFIIIA-type zinc finger. X. borealis and R. catesbeiana TFIIIAs have 339 and 335 amino acids respectively, 5 and 9 fewer than X. laevis TFIIIA. X. borealis TFIIIA exhibited 84% sequence homology (55 amino acid differences) with X. laevis TFIIIA and R. catesbeiana TFIIIA exhibited 63% homology (128 amino acid changes) with X. laevis TFIIIA. This sequence variation is not random; the C-terminal halves of these TFIIIAs contain substantially more non-conservative changes than the N-terminal halves. In particular, the N-terminal region of TFIIIA (that region forming strong DNA contacts) is the most conserved and the C-terminal tail (that region involved in transcription promotion) the most divergent. Hydropathy analyses of these sequences revealed zinc finger periodicity in the N-terminal halves, extreme hydrophilicity in the C-terminal halves, and a different C-terminal tail hydropathy for R. catesbeiana TFIIIA. Although considerable sequence variation exists in these TFIIIA zinc fingers, the Cys/His, Tyr/Phe and Leu residues are strictly conserved between X. laevis and X. borealis. Strict conservation of only the Cys/His motif is observed between X. laevis and R. catesbeiana TFIIIA. Overall, Cys/His zinc fingers in TFIIIA are much less conserved than Cys/Cys fingers in erythroid transcription factor (Eryf 1) and also less conserved than homeo box domains in segmentation genes. The collective evidence indicates that TFIIIA evolved from a common precursor containing up to 12 finger domains which subsequently evolved at different rates. Images PMID:2110661

  2. Transcriptional Landscape of the Prenatal Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeremy A.; Ding, Song-Lin; Sunkin, Susan M.; Smith, Kimberly A; Ng, Lydia; Szafer, Aaron; Ebbert, Amanda; Riley, Zackery L.; Aiona, Kaylynn; Arnold, James M.; Bennet, Crissa; Bertagnolli, Darren; Brouner, Krissy; Butler, Stephanie; Caldejon, Shiella; Carey, Anita; Cuhaciyan, Christine; Dalley, Rachel A.; Dee, Nick; Dolbeare, Tim A.; Facer, Benjamin A. C.; Feng, David; Fliss, Tim P.; Gee, Garrett; Goldy, Jeff; Gourley, Lindsey; Gregor, Benjamin W.; Gu, Guangyu; Howard, Robert E.; Jochim, Jayson M.; Kuan, Chihchau L.; Lau, Christopher; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Lee, Felix; Lemon, Tracy A.; Lesnar, Phil; McMurray, Bergen; Mastan, Naveed; Mosqueda, Nerick F.; Naluai-Cecchini, Theresa; Ngo, Nhan-Kiet; Nyhus, Julie; Oldre, Aaron; Olson, Eric; Parente, Jody; Parker, Patrick D.; Parry, Sheana E.; Player, Allison Stevens; Pletikos, Mihovil; Reding, Melissa; Royall, Joshua J.; Roll, Kate; Sandman, David; Sarreal, Melaine; Shapouri, Sheila; Shapovalova, Nadiya V.; Shen, Elaine H.; Sjoquist, Nathan; Slaughterbeck, Clifford R.; Smith, Michael; Sodt, Andy J.; Williams, Derric; Zöllei, Lilla; Fischl, Bruce; Gerstein, Mark B.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Glass, Ian A.; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hevner, Robert F.; Huang, Hao; Jones, Allan R.; Knowles, James A.; Levitt, Pat; Phillips, John W.; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Dang, Chinh; Bernard, Amy; Hohmann, John G.; Lein, Ed S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The anatomical and functional architecture of the human brain is largely determined by prenatal transcriptional processes. We describe an anatomically comprehensive atlas of mid-gestational human brain, including de novo reference atlases, in situ hybridization, ultra-high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and microarray analysis on highly discrete laser microdissected brain regions. In developing cerebral cortex, transcriptional differences are found between different proliferative and postmitotic layers, wherein laminar signatures reflect cellular composition and developmental processes. Cytoarchitectural differences between human and mouse have molecular correlates, including species differences in gene expression in subplate, although surprisingly we find minimal differences between the inner and human-expanded outer subventricular zones. Both germinal and postmitotic cortical layers exhibit fronto-temporal gradients, with particular enrichment in frontal lobe. Finally, many neurodevelopmental disorder and human evolution-related genes show patterned expression, potentially underlying unique features of human cortical formation. These data provide a rich, freely-accessible resource for understanding human brain development. PMID:24695229

  3. A new transcription factor for mitosis: in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the RFX transcription factor Sak1 works with forkhead factors to regulate mitotic expression.

    PubMed

    Garg, Angad; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet

    2015-08-18

    Mitotic genes are one of the most strongly oscillating groups of genes in the eukaryotic cell cycle. Understanding the regulation of mitotic gene expression is a key issue in cell cycle control but is poorly understood in most organisms. Here, we find a new mitotic transcription factor, Sak1, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Sak1 belongs to the RFX family of transcription factors, which have not previously been connected to cell cycle control. Sak1 binds upstream of mitotic genes in close proximity to Fkh2, a forkhead transcription factor previously implicated in regulation of mitotic genes. We show that Sak1 is the major activator of mitotic gene expression and also confirm the role of Fkh2 as the opposing repressor. Sep1, another forkhead transcription factor, is an activator for a small subset of mitotic genes involved in septation. From yeasts to humans, forkhead transcription factors are involved in mitotic gene expression and it will be interesting to see whether RFX transcription factors may also be involved in other organisms.

  4. Antiproliferative effects of artemisinin on human breast cancer cells requires the downregulated expression of the E2F1 transcription factor and loss of E2F1-target cell cycle genes.

    PubMed

    Tin, Antony S; Sundar, Shyam N; Tran, Kalvin Q; Park, Anna H; Poindexter, Kevin M; Firestone, Gary L

    2012-04-01

    Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene phytolactone derived from Artemisia annua, is a potent antimalarial compound with promising anticancer properties, although the mechanism of its anticancer signaling is not well understood. Artemisinin inhibited proliferation and induced a strong G1 cell cycle arrest of cultured MCF7 cells, an estrogen-responsive human breast cancer cell line that represents an early-stage cancer phenotype, and effectively inhibited the in-vivo growth of MCF7 cell-derived tumors from xenografts in athymic nude mice. Artemisinin also induced a growth arrest of tumorigenic human breast cancer cell lines with preneoplastic and late stage cancer phenotypes, but failed to arrest the growth of a nontumorigenic human mammary cell line. Concurrent with the cell cycle arrest of MCF7 cells, artemisinin selectively downregulated the transcript and protein levels of the CDK2 and CDK4 cyclin-dependent kinases, cyclin E, cyclin D1, and the E2F1 transcription factor. Analysis of CDK2 promoter-luciferase reporter constructs showed that the artemisinin ablation of CDK2 gene expression was accounted for by the loss of CDK2 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that artemisinin inhibited E2F1 interactions with the endogenous MCF7 cell CDK2 and cyclin E promoters. Moreover, constitutive expression of exogenous E2F1 prevented the artemisinin-induced cell cycle arrest and downregulation of CDK2 and cyclin E gene expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the artemisinin disruption of E2F1 transcription factor expression mediates the cell cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells and represents a critical transcriptional pathway by which artemisinin controls human reproductive cancer cell growth. PMID:22185819

  5. Initiation and beyond: multiple functions of the human mitochondrial transcription machinery.

    PubMed

    Bonawitz, Nicholas D; Clayton, David A; Shadel, Gerald S

    2006-12-28

    Mitochondria contain their own DNA (mtDNA) that is expressed and replicated by nucleus-encoded factors imported into the organelle. Recently, the core human mitochondrial transcription machinery has been defined, comprising a bacteriophage-related mtRNA polymerase (POLRMT), an HMG-box transcription factor (h-mtTFA), and two transcription factors (h-mtTFB1 and h-mtTFB2) that also serve as rRNA methyltransferases. Here, we describe these transcription components as well as recent insights into the mechanism of human mitochondrial transcription initiation and its regulation. We also discuss novel roles for the mitochondrial transcription machinery beyond transcription initiation, including priming of mtDNA replication, packaging of mtDNA, coordination of ribosome biogenesis, and coupling of transcription to translation.

  6. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of a NAC1 transcription factor in Medicago truncatula roots.

    PubMed

    D'haeseleer, Katrien; Den Herder, Griet; Laffont, Carole; Plet, Julie; Mortier, Virginie; Lelandais-Brière, Christine; De Bodt, Stefanie; De Keyser, Annick; Crespi, Martin; Holsters, Marcelle; Frugier, Florian; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2011-08-01

    • Legume roots develop two types of lateral organs, lateral roots and nodules. Nodules develop as a result of a symbiotic interaction with rhizobia and provide a niche for the bacteria to fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. • The Arabidopsis NAC1 transcription factor is involved in lateral root formation, and is regulated post-transcriptionally by miRNA164 and by SINAT5-dependent ubiquitination. We analyzed in Medicago truncatula the role of the closest NAC1 homolog in lateral root formation and in nodulation. • MtNAC1 shows a different expression pattern in response to auxin than its Arabidopsis homolog and no changes in lateral root number or nodulation were observed in plants affected in MtNAC1 expression. In addition, no interaction was found with SINA E3 ligases, suggesting that post-translational regulation of MtNAC1 does not occur in M. truncatula. Similar to what was found in Arabidopsis, a conserved miR164 target site was retrieved in MtNAC1, which reduced protein accumulation of a GFP-miR164 sensor. Furthermore, miR164 and MtNAC1 show an overlapping expression pattern in symbiotic nodules, and overexpression of this miRNA led to a reduction in nodule number. • This work suggests that regulatory pathways controlling a conserved transcription factor are complex and divergent between M. truncatula and Arabidopsis.

  7. Transcription factor-mediated reprogramming toward hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ebina, Wataru; Rossi, Derrick J

    2015-01-01

    De novo generation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from renewable cell types has been a long sought-after but elusive goal in regenerative medicine. Paralleling efforts to guide pluripotent stem cell differentiation by manipulating developmental cues, substantial progress has been made recently toward HSC generation via combinatorial transcription factor (TF)-mediated fate conversion, a paradigm established by Yamanaka's induction of pluripotency in somatic cells by mere four TFs. This review will integrate the recently reported strategies to directly convert a variety of starting cell types toward HSCs in the context of hematopoietic transcriptional regulation and discuss how these findings could be further developed toward the ultimate generation of therapeutic human HSCs. PMID:25712209

  8. The transcription factor Spi-B regulates human plasmacytoid dendritic cell survival through direct induction of the antiapoptotic gene BCL2-A1.

    PubMed

    Karrich, Julien J; Balzarolo, Melania; Schmidlin, Heike; Libouban, Marion; Nagasawa, Maho; Gentek, Rebecca; Kamihira, Shimeru; Maeda, Takahiro; Amsen, Derk; Wolkers, Monika C; Blom, Bianca

    2012-05-31

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) selectively express Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7 and TLR-9, which allow them to rapidly secrete massive amounts of type I interferons after sensing nucleic acids derived from viruses or bacteria. It is not completely understood how development and function of pDCs are controlled at the transcriptional level. One of the main factors driving pDC development is the ETS factor Spi-B, but little is known about its target genes. Here we demonstrate that Spi-B is crucial for the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells into pDCs by controlling survival of pDCs and its progenitors. In search for Spi-B target genes, we identified the antiapoptotic gene Bcl2-A1 as a specific and direct target gene, thereby consolidating the critical role of Spi-B in cell survival.

  9. Chromosomal localization of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TCF6), single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSBP), and endonuclease G (ENDOG), three human housekeeping genes involving in mitochondrial biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiranti, V.; Rossi, G.; DiDonato, S.

    1995-01-20

    By using a PCR-based screening of a somatic cell hybrid panel and FISH, we have assigned the loci of mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSBP), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TCF6), and mitochondrial endonuclease G (ENDOG) genes to human chromosomes 7q34, 10q21, and 9q34.1, respectively. The products of these three genes are involved in fundamental aspects of mitochondrial biogenesis, such as replication and transcription of the mitochondrial genome. The chromosomal localization of these genes is important to testing whether the corresponding proteins may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of human disorders associated with qualitative or quantitative abnormalities of mitochondrial DNA. 20 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. Crystal structure of a subcomplex of human transcription factor TFIID formed by TATA binding protein-associated factors hTAF4 (hTAF(II)135) and hTAF12 (hTAF(II)20).

    PubMed

    Werten, Sebastiaan; Mitschler, André; Romier, Christophe; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Thuault, Sylvie; Davidson, Irwin; Moras, Dino

    2002-11-22

    The crystal structure is presented of a complex formed by the interacting domains from two subunits of the general transcription factor TFIID, the human TATA binding protein-associated factors hTAF4 (hTAF(II)135) and hTAF12 (hTAF(II)20). In agreement with predictions, hTAF12 forms a histone fold that is very similar to that of histone H2B, yet unexpected differences are observed between the structures of the hTAF12 interaction domain of hTAF4 and histone H2A. Most importantly, the hTAF4 fragment forms only the first two helices of a classical histone fold, which are followed by a 26-residue disordered region. This indicates that either full-length TAF4 contains an unusually long connecting loop between its second and third helix, and this helix is not required for stable interaction with TAF12, or that TAF4 represents a novel class of partial histone fold motifs. Structural models and structure-based sequence alignments support a role for TAF4b and hSTAF42/yADA1 as alternative partners for TAF12 and are consistent with the formation of nucleosome-like histone-fold octamers through interaction of TAF12 with a TAF6-TAF9 tetramer, yet argue against involvement of TAF12-containing histone-fold pairs in DNA binding. PMID:12237304

  11. Mapping functional regions of transcription factor TFIIIA.

    PubMed Central

    Vrana, K E; Churchill, M E; Tullius, T D; Brown, D D

    1988-01-01

    Functional deletion mutants of the trans-acting factor TFIIIA, truncated at both ends of the molecule, have been expressed by in vitro transcription of a cDNA clone and subsequent cell-free translation of the synthetic mRNAs. A region of TFIIIA 19 amino acids or less, near the carboxyl terminus, is critical for maximal transcription and lies outside the DNA-binding domain. The elongated protein can be aligned over the internal control region (ICR) of the Xenopus 5S RNA gene with its carboxyl terminus oriented toward the 5' end of the gene and its amino terminus oriented toward the 3' end of the gene. The nine "zinc fingers" and the linkers that separate them comprise 80% of the protein mass and correspond to the DNA-binding domain of TFIIIA. The zinc fingers near the amino terminus of the protein contribute more to the overall binding energy of the protein to the ICR than do the zinc fingers near the carboxyl end. The most striking feature of TFIIIA is its modular structure. This is demonstrated by the fact that each zinc finger binds to just one of three short nucleotide sequences within the ICR. Images PMID:2837652

  12. Mapping functional regions of transcription factor TFIIIA.

    PubMed

    Vrana, K E; Churchill, M E; Tullius, T D; Brown, D D

    1988-04-01

    Functional deletion mutants of the trans-acting factor TFIIIA, truncated at both ends of the molecule, have been expressed by in vitro transcription of a cDNA clone and subsequent cell-free translation of the synthetic mRNAs. A region of TFIIIA 19 amino acids or less, near the carboxyl terminus, is critical for maximal transcription and lies outside the DNA-binding domain. The elongated protein can be aligned over the internal control region (ICR) of the Xenopus 5S RNA gene with its carboxyl terminus oriented toward the 5' end of the gene and its amino terminus oriented toward the 3' end of the gene. The nine "zinc fingers" and the linkers that separate them comprise 80% of the protein mass and correspond to the DNA-binding domain of TFIIIA. The zinc fingers near the amino terminus of the protein contribute more to the overall binding energy of the protein to the ICR than do the zinc fingers near the carboxyl end. The most striking feature of TFIIIA is its modular structure. This is demonstrated by the fact that each zinc finger binds to just one of three short nucleotide sequences within the ICR.

  13. Inhibition of transcription factor nuclear factor-κB by a mutant inhibitor-κBα attenuates resistance of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to TNF-α caspase-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Duffey, D C; Crowl-Bancroft, C V; Chen, Z; Ondrey, F G; Nejad-Sattari, M; Dong, G; Van Waes, C

    2000-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a cytokine that can induce cell death of different cancers via a cellular cascade of proteases, the caspases. However, TNF-α has been detected in tumour and serum of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and tumour cell lines derived from this environment often exhibit resistance to TNF-α-induced cell death. Cell death mediated by TNF-α and caspases may be inhibited by cytoprotective genes regulated by transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). We recently showed that NF-κB is constitutively activated in HNSCC, and that inhibition of NF-κB by expression of a nondegradable mutant inhibitor of NF-κB, IκBαM, markedly decreased survival and growth of HNSCC cells in vivo. In the present study, we examined the TNF-α sensitivity and response of HNSCC with constitutively active NF-κB, and of HNSCC cells in which NF-κB is inhibited by stable expression of a dominant negative mutant inhibitor, IκBαM. Human lines UM-SCC-9, 11B and 38, previously shown to exhibit constitutive activation of NF-κB, were found to be highly resistant to growth inhibition by up to 104U/ml of TNF-α in 5 day MTT assay. These TNF-α resistant HNSCC lines expressed TNF receptor I, and exhibited constitutive and TNF-α-inducible activation of NF-κB as demonstrated by nuclear localization of NF-κB p65 by immunohistochemistry. UM-SCC-9 I11 cells which stably expressed an inhibitor of NF-κB, IκBαm, were susceptible to TNF-α-induced growth inhibition. DNA cell cycle analysis revealed that TNF-α induced growth inhibition was associated with accumulation of cells with sub-G0/G1 DNA content. Cell death was demonstrated by trypan blue staining, and was blocked by caspase inhibitor. We conclude that HNSCC that exhibit constitutive and TNF-α-inducible activation of transcription factor NF-κB are resistant to TNF-α, and that inhibition of NF-κB sensitizes HNSCC to TNF-α caspase-mediated cytotoxicity. The demonstration of

  14. Transcription factor LSF (TFCP2) inhibits melanoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yuji; Yajima, Ichiro; Kumasaka, Mayuko; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Tanaka, Asami; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Inoue, Yuji; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu; Kyoya, Mikiko; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Kato, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Late SV40 factor 3 (LSF), a transcription factor, contributes to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, decreased expression level of LSF in skin melanoma compared to that in benign melanocytic tumors and nevi in mice and humans was found in this study. Anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of melanoma cells was suppressed by LSF overexpression through an increased percentage of G1 phase cells and an increased p21CIP1 expression level in vitro and in vivo. Anchorage-dependent growth in LSF-overexpressed melanoma cells was promoted by depletion of LSF in the LSF-overexpressed cells. Integrated results of our EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed binding of LSF within a 150-bp upstream region of the transcription start site of p21CIP1 in melanoma cells. Taken together, our results suggest potential roles of LSF as a growth regulator through control of the transcription of p21CIP1 in melanocytes and melanoma cells as well as a biomarker for nevus. PMID:26506241

  15. The Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXK2 Promotes AP-1-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zongling; Donaldson, Ian J.; Liu, Jingru; Hayes, Andrew; Zeef, Leo A. H.

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional control circuitry in eukaryotic cells is complex and is orchestrated by combinatorially acting transcription factors. Forkhead transcription factors often function in concert with heterotypic transcription factors to specify distinct transcriptional programs. Here, we demonstrate that FOXK2 participates in combinatorial transcriptional control with the AP-1 transcription factor. FOXK2 binding regions are widespread throughout the genome and are often coassociated with AP-1 binding motifs. FOXK2 acts to promote AP-1-dependent gene expression changes in response to activation of the AP-1 pathway. In this context, FOXK2 is required for the efficient recruitment of AP-1 to chromatin. Thus, we have uncovered an important new molecular mechanism that controls AP-1-dependent gene expression. PMID:22083952

  16. The Functional Consequences of Variation in Transcription Factor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Cusanovich, Darren A.; Pavlovic, Bryan; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Gilad, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    One goal of human genetics is to understand how the information for precise and dynamic gene expression programs is encoded in the genome. The interactions of transcription factors (TFs) with DNA regulatory elements clearly play an important role in determining gene expression outputs, yet the regulatory logic underlying functional transcription factor binding is poorly understood. Many studies have focused on characterizing the genomic locations of TF binding, yet it is unclear to what extent TF binding at any specific locus has functional consequences with respect to gene expression output. To evaluate the context of functional TF binding we knocked down 59 TFs and chromatin modifiers in one HapMap lymphoblastoid cell line. We then identified genes whose expression was affected by the knockdowns. We intersected the gene expression data with transcription factor binding data (based on ChIP-seq and DNase-seq) within 10 kb of the transcription start sites of expressed genes. This combination of data allowed us to infer functional TF binding. Using this approach, we found that only a small subset of genes bound by a factor were differentially expressed following the knockdown of that factor, suggesting that most interactions between TF and chromatin do not result in measurable changes in gene expression levels of putative target genes. We found that functional TF binding is enriched in regulatory elements that harbor a large number of TF binding sites, at sites with predicted higher binding affinity, and at sites that are enriched in genomic regions annotated as “active enhancers.” PMID:24603674

  17. Transcription factor C/EBPβ promotes the transcription of the porcine GPR120 gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Zhou, Ji-Dan; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Rui-Rui; Zhan, Meng-Si; Tang, Xiao-Yin; Deng, Bing; Lei, Ming-Gang; Xiong, Yuan-Zhu

    2016-02-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120), an adipogenic receptor critical for the differentiation and maturation of adipocytes, plays an important role in controlling obesity in both humans and rodents and, thus, is an attractive target of obesity treatment studies. However, the mechanisms that regulate the expression of porcine GPR120 remain unclear. In this study, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) techniques were used to analyze and identify the binding of C/EBPβ (transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta) to the GPR120 promoter. C/EBPβ overexpression and RNA interference studies showed that C/EBPβ regulated GPR120 promoter activity and endogenous GPR120 expression. The binding site of C/EBPβ in the GPR120 promoter region from -101 to -87 was identified by promoter deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis. Overexpression of C/EBPβ increased endogenous GPR120 expression in pig kidney cells (PK). Furthermore, when endogenous C/EBPβ was knocked down, GPR120 mRNA and protein levels were decreased. The stimulatory effect of C/EBPβ on GPR120 transcription and its ability to bind the transcription factor-binding site were confirmed by luciferase, ChIP, and EMSA. Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression levels of C/EBPβ were induced by high fat diet feeding. Taken together, it can be concluded that C/EBPβ plays a vital role in regulating GPR120 transcription and suggests HFD-feeding induces GPR120 transcription by influencing C/EBPβ expression.

  18. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase pausing and dislodgement of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Adam C; Egan, J Barry; Shearwin, Keith E

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional interference is the in cis suppression of one transcriptional process by another. Mathematical modeling shows that promoter occlusion by elongating RNA polymerases cannot produce strong interference. Interference may instead be generated by (1) dislodgement of slow-to-assemble pre-initiation complexes and transcription factors and (2) prolonged occlusion by paused RNA polymerases.

  19. Specification of jaw identity by the Hand2 transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Noriko; Kokubo, Hiroki; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Saga, Yumiko

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition of the lower jaw (mandible) was evolutionarily important for jawed vertebrates. In humans, syndromic craniofacial malformations often accompany jaw anomalies. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Hand2, which is conserved among jawed vertebrates, is expressed in the neural crest in the mandibular process but not in the maxillary process of the first branchial arch. Here, we provide evidence that Hand2 is sufficient for upper jaw (maxilla)-to-mandible transformation by regulating the expression of homeobox transcription factors in mice. Altered Hand2 expression in the neural crest transformed the maxillae into mandibles with duplicated Meckel’s cartilage, which resulted in an absence of the secondary palate. In Hand2-overexpressing mutants, non-Hox homeobox transcription factors were dysregulated. These results suggest that Hand2 regulates mandibular development through downstream genes of Hand2 and is therefore a major determinant of jaw identity. Hand2 may have influenced the evolutionary acquisition of the mandible and secondary palate. PMID:27329940

  20. Coding limits on the number of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Itzkovitz, Shalev; Tlusty, Tsvi; Alon, Uri

    2006-01-01

    Background Transcription factor proteins bind specific DNA sequences to control the expression of genes. They contain DNA binding domains which belong to several super-families, each with a specific mechanism of DNA binding. The total number of transcription factors encoded in a genome increases with the number of genes in the genome. Here, we examined the number of transcription factors from each super-family in diverse organisms. Results We find that the number of transcription factors from most super-families appears to be bounded. For example, the number of winged helix factors does not generally exceed 300, even in very large genomes. The magnitude of the maximal number of transcription factors from each super-family seems to correlate with the number of DNA bases effectively recognized by the binding mechanism of that super-family. Coding theory predicts that such upper bounds on the number of transcription factors should exist, in order to minimize cross-binding errors between transcription factors. This theory further predicts that factors with similar binding sequences should tend to have similar biological effect, so that errors based on mis-recognition are minimal. We present evidence that transcription factors with similar binding sequences tend to regulate genes with similar biological functions, supporting this prediction. Conclusion The present study suggests limits on the transcription factor repertoire of cells, and suggests coding constraints that might apply more generally to the mapping between binding sites and biological function. PMID:16984633

  1. Arhgap36-dependent activation of Gli transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Rack, Paul G.; Ni, Jun; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Nguyen, Vien; Crapster, J. Aaron; Hovestadt, Volker; Kool, Marcel; Jones, David T. W.; Mich, John K.; Firestone, Ari J.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Chen, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activation and Gli-dependent transcription play critical roles in embryonic patterning, tissue homeostasis, and tumorigenesis. By conducting a genome-scale cDNA overexpression screen, we have identified the Rho GAP family member Arhgap36 as a positive regulator of the Hh pathway in vitro and in vivo. Arhgap36 acts in a Smoothened (Smo)-independent manner to inhibit Gli repressor formation and to promote the activation of full-length Gli proteins. Arhgap36 concurrently induces the accumulation of Gli proteins in the primary cilium, and its ability to induce Gli-dependent transcription requires kinesin family member 3a and intraflagellar transport protein 88, proteins that are essential for ciliogenesis. Arhgap36 also functionally and biochemically interacts with Suppressor of Fused. Transcriptional profiling further reveals that Arhgap36 is overexpressed in murine medulloblastomas that acquire resistance to chemical Smo inhibitors and that ARHGAP36 isoforms capable of Gli activation are up-regulated in a subset of human medulloblastomas. Our findings reveal a new mechanism of Gli transcription factor activation and implicate ARHGAP36 dysregulation in the onset and/or progression of GLI-dependent cancers. PMID:25024229

  2. Thyroid-specific transcription factors control Hex promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    Puppin, Cinzia; D'Elia, Angela V.; Pellizzari, Lucia; Russo, Diego; Arturi, Franco; Presta, Ivan; Filetti, Sebastiano; Bogue, Clifford W.; Denson, Lee A.; Damante, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The homeobox-containing gene Hex is expressed in several cell types, including thyroid follicular cells, in which it regulates the transcription of tissue- specific genes. In this study the regulation of Hex promoter activity was investigated. Using co- transfection experiments, we demonstrated that the transcriptional activity of the Hex gene promoter in rat thyroid FRTL-5 cells is ∼10-fold greater than that observed in HeLa and NIH 3T3 cell lines (which do not normally express the Hex gene). To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences, we evaluated the effect of the thyroid- specific transcription factor TTF-1 on the Hex promoter activity. TTF-1 produced 3–4-fold increases in the Hex promoter activity. Gel- retardation assays and mutagenesis experiments revealed the presence of functionally relevant TTF-1 binding sites in the Hex promoter region. These in vitro data may also have functional relevance in vivo, since a positive correlation between TTF-1 and Hex mRNAs was demonstrated in human thyroid tissues by means of RT–PCR analysis. The TTF-1 effect, however, is not sufficient to explain the difference in Hex promoter activity between FRTL-5 and cells that do not express the Hex gene. For this reason, we tested whether Hex protein is able to activate the Hex promoter. Indeed, co-transfection experiments indicate that Hex protein is able to increase the activity of its own promoter in HeLa cells ∼4-fold. TTF-1 and Hex effects are additive: when transfected together in HeLa cells, the Hex promoter activity is increased 6–7-fold. Thus, the contemporary presence of both TTF-1 and Hex could be sufficient to explain the higher transcriptional activity of the Hex promoter in thyroid cells with respect to cell lines that do not express the Hex gene. These findings demonstrate the existence of direct cross-regulation between thyroid-specific transcription factors. PMID:12655000

  3. Oxytocin-stimulated NFAT transcriptional activation in human myometrial cells.

    PubMed

    Pont, Jason N A; McArdle, Craig A; López Bernal, Andrés

    2012-10-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) is a peptide hormone that binds the OXT receptor on myometrial cells, initiating an intracellular signaling cascade, resulting in accumulation of intracellular calcium and smooth muscle contraction. In other systems, an elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) stimulates nuclear translocation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), which is transcriptionally active in arterial and ileal smooth muscle. Here we have investigated the role of NFAT in the mechanism of action of OXT. Human myometrial cells expressed all five NFAT isoforms (NFATC1-C4 and -5). Myometrial cells were transduced with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a NFATC1-EFP reporter, and a semi-automated imaging system was used to monitor effects of OXT on reporter localization in live cells. OXT induced a concentration-dependent nuclear translocation of NFATC1-EFP in a reversible manner, which was inhibited by OXT antagonists and calcineurin inhibitors. Pulsatile stimulation with OXT caused intermittent, pulse-frequency-dependent, nuclear translocation of NFATC1-EFP, which was more efficient than sustained stimulation. OXT induced nuclear translocation of endogenous NFAT that was transcriptionally active, because OXT stimulated activity of a NFAT-response element-luciferase reporter and induced calcineurin-NFAT dependent expression of RGS2, RCAN1, and PTGS2 (COX2) mRNA. Furthermore, OXT-dependent transcription was dependent on protein neosynthesis; cycloheximide abolished RGS2 transcription but augmented RCAN1 and COX2 transcriptional readouts. This study identifies a novel signaling mechanism within the myometrium, whereby calcineurin-NFAT signaling mediates OXT-induced transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we show NFATC1-EFP is responsive to pulses of OXT, a mechanism by which myometrial cells could decode OXT pulse frequency.

  4. Role of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 1alpha and 2alpha in the regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression in a human trophoblast cell line.

    PubMed

    Meade, E S; Ma, Y Y; Guller, S

    2007-10-01

    The plasminogen activator inhibitors (PAIs) play critical roles in regulating hemostatic and invasive functions of trophoblasts through suppression of plasmin-dependent fibrinolysis and extracellular matrix degradation. The expression of PAI-1 is increased under hypoxic conditions, although the mechanism remains incompletely understood. In the current study we used HTR-8/SVneo cells, a first trimester extravillous trophoblast cell line, and siRNA technology to examine the role of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs)-1alpha and -2alpha in the regulation of PAI-1 expression. Using serum-containing and serum-free media culture media it was initially noted that levels of PAI-1, but not PAI-2 protein, were markedly induced by hypoxic (2-3% oxygen) treatment. Under hypoxic conditions, Western blotting revealed that the presence of siRNAs to HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha suppressed expression of their respective proteins, whereas treatment with non-targeting and cyclophilin B siRNAs did not. Importantly, incubation with siRNA to HIF-1alpha or HIF-2alpha alone reduced PAI-1 protein levels to a similar extent, with the combined treatment inducing a more profound effect. The presence of HIF siRNAs reduced levels of PAI-1 mRNA as measured by quantitative real-time PCR, indicating that HIF-1alpha and HIF-2 alpha regulate PAI-1 expression at a transcriptional level. These results indicate that both HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha play important and similar roles in hypoxia-mediated stimulation of PAI-1 expression in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Our findings provide insight into the physiological regulation of trophoblast PAI-1 expression in early pregnancy when placental oxygen levels are low, as well as a mechanism for over-expression of placental PAI-1 noted in pregnancies with preeclampsia.

  5. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha isoforms originated from the P1 promoter are expressed in human pancreatic beta-cells and exhibit stronger transcriptional potentials than P2 promoter-driven isoforms.

    PubMed

    Eeckhoute, J; Moerman, E; Bouckenooghe, T; Lukoviak, B; Pattou, F; Formstecher, P; Kerr-Conte, J; Vandewalle, B; Laine, B

    2003-05-01

    The nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4 alpha is involved in a transcriptional network and plays an important role in pancreatic beta-cells. Mutations in the HNF4 alpha gene are correlated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1. HNF4 alpha isoforms result from both alternative splicing and alternate usage of promoters P1 and P2. It has recently been reported that HNF4 alpha transcription is driven almost exclusively by the P2 promoter in pancreatic islets. We observed that transcripts from both P1 and P2 promoters were expressed in human pancreatic beta-cells and in the pancreatic beta-cell lines RIN m5F and HIT-T15. Expression of HNF4 alpha proteins originating from the P1 promoter was confirmed by immunodetection. Due to the presence of the activation function module AF-1, HNF4 alpha isoforms originating from the P1 promoter exhibit stronger transcriptional activities and recruit coactivators more efficiently than isoforms driven by the P2 promoter. Conversely, activities of isoforms produced by both promoters were similarly repressed by the corepressor small heterodimer partner. These behaviors were observed on the promoter of HNF1 alpha that is required for beta-cell function. Our results highlight that expression of P1 promoter-driven isoforms is important in the control of pancreatic beta-cell function.

  6. Oxygen-evoked changes in transcriptional activity of the 5'-flanking region of the human amiloride-sensitive sodium channel (alphaENaC) gene: role of nuclear factor kappaB.

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Deborah L; Janes, Mandy; Newman, David J; Best, Oliver G

    2002-01-01

    Expression of the alpha-subunit of the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel (alphaENaC) is regulated by a number of factors in the lung, including oxygen partial pressure (PO2). As transcriptional activation is a mechanism for raising cellular mRNA levels, we investigated the effect of physiological changes in PO2 on the activity of the redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and transcriptional activity of 5'-flanking regions of the human alphaENaC gene using luciferase reporter-gene vectors transiently transfected into human adult alveolar carcinoma A549 cells. By Western blotting we confirmed the presence of NF-kappaB p65 but not p50 in these cells. Transiently increasing PO2 from 23 to 42 mmHg for 24 h evoked a significant increase in NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity and transactivation of a NF-kappaB-driven luciferase construct (pGLNF-kappaBpro), which was blocked by the NF-kappaB activation inhibitor sulphasalazine (5 mM). Transcriptional activity of alphaENaC-luciferase constructs containing 5'-flanking sequences (including the NF-kappaB consensus) were increased by raising PO2 from 23 to 142 mmHg if they contained transcriptional initiation sites (TIS) for exons 1A and 1B (pGL3E2.2) or the 3' TIS of exon 1B alone (pGL3E0.8). Sulphasalazine had no significant effect on the activity of these constructs, suggesting that the PO2-evoked rise in activity was not a direct consequence of NF-kappaB activation. Conversely, the relative luciferase activity of a construct that lacked the 3' TIS, a 3' intron and splice site but still retained the 5' TIS and NF-kappaB consensus sequence was suppressed significantly by raising PO2. This effect was reversed by sulphasalazine, suggesting that activation of NF-kappaB mediated PO2-evoked suppression of transcription from the exon 1A TIS of alphaENaC. PMID:12023897

  7. GATA transcription factors in adrenal development and tumors.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Helka; Kiiveri, Sanne; Bielinska, Malgorzata; Rahman, Nafis; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Wilson, David B; Heikinheimo, Markku

    2007-02-01

    Of the six GATA transcription factors, GATA-4 and GATA-6 are expressed in the mouse and human adrenal with distinct developmental profiles. GATA-4 is confined to the fetal cortex, i.e. to the less differentiated proliferating cells, while GATA-6 is expressed both in the fetal and adult adrenal. In vitro, GATA-4 regulates inhibin-alpha and steroidogenic factor-1 implicated in normal adrenal function. GATA-6 probably has roles in the development and differentiation of adrenocortical cells, and in the regulation of steroidogenesis. GATA-4 expression is dramatically upregulated and GATA-6 downregulated in gonadotropin dependent mouse adrenocortical tumors. This is accompanied by the appearance of luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR). In vitro, GATA-4 transactivates LHR promoter, and gonadotropins upregulate GATA-4 levels. Human adrenal tumors occasionally express GATA-4, whereas GATA-6 levels are usually lower than normal.

  8. In vivo delivery of transcription factors with multifunctional oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kunwoo; Rafi, Mohammad; Wang, Xiaojian; Aran, Kiana; Feng, Xuli; Lo Sterzo, Carlo; Tang, Richard; Lingampalli, Nithya; Kim, Hyun Jin; Murthy, Niren

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutics based on transcription factors have the potential to revolutionize medicine but have had limited clinical success as a consequence of delivery problems. The delivery of transcription factors is challenging because it requires the development of a delivery vehicle that can complex transcription factors, target cells and stimulate endosomal disruption, with minimal toxicity. Here, we present a multifunctional oligonucleotide, termed DARTs (DNA assembled recombinant transcription factors), which can deliver transcription factors with high efficiency in vivo. DARTs are composed of an oligonucleotide that contains a transcription-factor-binding sequence and hydrophobic membrane-disruptive chains that are masked by acid-cleavable galactose residues. DARTs have a unique molecular architecture, which allows them to bind transcription factors, trigger endocytosis in hepatocytes, and stimulate endosomal disruption. The DARTs have enhanced uptake in hepatocytes as a result of their galactose residues and can disrupt endosomes efficiently with minimal toxicity, because unmasking of their hydrophobic domains selectively occurs in the acidic environment of the endosome. We show that DARTs can deliver the transcription factor nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to the liver, catalyse the transcription of Nrf2 downstream genes, and rescue mice from acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

  9. Genome-wide transcription factor binding: beyond direct target regulation.

    PubMed

    MacQuarrie, Kyle L; Fong, Abraham P; Morse, Randall H; Tapscott, Stephen J

    2011-04-01

    The binding of transcription factors to specific DNA target sequences is the fundamental basis of gene regulatory networks. Chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with DNA tiling arrays or high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq, respectively) has been used in many recent studies that detail the binding sites of various transcription factors. Surprisingly, data from a variety of model organisms and tissues have demonstrated that transcription factors vary greatly in their number of genomic binding sites, and that binding events can significantly exceed the number of known or possible direct gene targets. Thus, current understanding of transcription factor function must expand to encompass what role, if any, binding might have outside of direct transcriptional target regulation. In this review, we discuss the biological significance of genome-wide binding of transcription factors and present models that can account for this phenomenon.

  10. Mechanisms of transcription factor evolution in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Jonathan F; Zimmer, Fabian; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2016-07-27

    Transcriptions factors (TFs) are pivotal for the regulation of virtually all cellular processes, including growth and development. Expansions of TF families are causally linked to increases in organismal complexity. Here we study the evolutionary dynamics, genetic causes and functional implications of the five largest metazoan TF families. We find that family expansions dominate across the whole metazoan tree; however, some branches experience exceptional family-specific accelerated expansions. Additionally, we find that such expansions are often predated by modular domain rearrangements, which spur the expansion of a new sub-family by separating it from the rest of the TF family in terms of protein-protein interactions. This separation allows for radical shifts in the functional spectrum of a duplicated TF. We also find functional differentiation inside TF sub-families as changes in expression specificity. Furthermore, accelerated family expansions are facilitated by repeats of sequence motifs such as C2H2 zinc fingers. We quantify whole genome duplications and single gene duplications as sources of TF family expansions, implying that some, but not all, TF duplicates are preferentially retained. We conclude that trans-regulatory changes (domain rearrangements) are instrumental for fundamental functional innovations, that cis-regulatory changes (affecting expression) accomplish wide-spread fine tuning and both jointly contribute to the functional diversification of TFs. PMID:27288445

  11. Methods for Proteomic Analysis of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Daifeng; Jarrett, Harry W.; Haskins, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of the transcription factor (TF) proteome presents challenges including the large number of low abundance and post-translationally modified proteins involved. Specialized purification and analysis methods have been developed over the last decades which facilitate the study of the TF proteome and these are reviewed here. Generally applicable proteomics methods that have been successfully applied are also discussed. TFs are selectively purified by affinity techniques using the DNA response element (RE) as the basis for highly specific binding, and several agents have been discovered that either enhance binding or diminish non-specific binding. One such affinity method called “trapping” enables purification of TFs bound to nM concentrations and recovery of TF complexes in a highly purified state. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) is the most important assay of TFs because it provides both measures of the affinity and amount of the TF present. Southwestern (SW) blotting and DNA-protein crosslinking (DPC) allow in vitro estimates of DNA-binding-protein mass, while chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) allows confirmation of promoter binding in vivo. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis methods (2-DE), and 3-DE methods which combines EMSA with 2-DE, allow further resolution of TFs. The synergy of highly selective purification and analytical strategies has led to an explosion of knowledge about the TF proteome and the proteomes of other DNA- and RNA-binding proteins. PMID:19726046

  12. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Cheol; Park, Wook-Ha; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Pak, Youngmi Kim

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations.

  13. Nuclear localization of vascular endothelial growth factor-D and regulation of c-Myc-dependent transcripts in human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    El-Chemaly, Souheil; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Malide, Daniela; Meza-Carmen, Victor; Kato, Jiro; Cui, Ye; Padilla, Philip I; Samidurai, Arun; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Moss, Joel

    2014-07-01

    Lymphangiogenesis and angiogenesis are processes that are, in part, regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-D. The formation of lymphatic structures has been implicated in multiple lung diseases, including pulmonary fibrosis. VEGF-D is a secreted protein produced by fibroblasts and macrophages, which induces lymphangiogenesis by signaling via VEGF receptor-3, and angiogenesis through VEGF receptor-2. VEGF-D contains a central VEGF homology domain, which is the biologically active domain, with flanking N- and C-terminal propeptides. Full-length VEGF-D (∼ 50 kD) is proteolytically processed in the extracellular space, to generate VEGF homology domain that contains the VEGF-D receptor-binding sites. Here, we report that, independent of its cell surface receptors, full-length VEGF-D accumulated in nuclei of fibroblasts, and that this process appears to increase with cell density. In nuclei, full-length VEGF-D associated with RNA polymerase II and c-Myc. In cells depleted of VEGF-D, the transcriptionally regulated genes appear to be modulated by c-Myc. These findings have potential clinical implications, as VEGF-D was found in fibroblast nuclei in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a disease characterized by fibroblast proliferation. These findings are consistent with actions of full-length VEGF-D in cellular homeostasis in health and disease, independent of its receptors.

  14. A distance difference matrix approach to identifying transcription factors that regulate differential gene expression

    PubMed Central

    De Bleser, Pieter; Hooghe, Bart; Vlieghe, Dominique; van Roy, Frans

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a method that considers target genes of a transcription factor, and searches for transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) of secondary factors responsible for differential responses among these targets. Based on the distance difference matrix concept, the method simultaneously integrates statistical overrepresentation and co-occurrence of TFBSs. Our approach is validated on datasets of differentially regulated human genes and is shown to be highly effective in detecting TFBSs responsible for the observed differential gene expression. PMID:17504544

  15. Organization of the human mitochondrial transcription initiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Yakubovskaya, Elena; Guja, Kip E.; Eng, Edward T.; Choi, Woo Suk; Mejia, Edison; Beglov, Dmitri; Lukin, Mark; Kozakov, Dima; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Initiation of transcription in human mitochondria involves two factors, TFAM and TFB2M, in addition to the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, POLRMT. We have investigated the organization of the human mitochondrial transcription initiation complex on the light-strand promoter (LSP) through solution X-ray scattering, electron microscopy (EM) and biochemical studies. Our EM results demonstrate a compact organization of the initiation complex, suggesting that protein–protein interactions might help mediate initiation. We demonstrate that, in the absence of DNA, only POLRMT and TFAM form a stable interaction, albeit one with low affinity. This is consistent with the expected transient nature of the interactions necessary for initiation and implies that the promoter DNA acts as a scaffold that enables formation of the full initiation complex. Docking of known crystal structures into our EM maps results in a model for transcriptional initiation that strongly correlates with new and existing biochemical observations. Our results reveal the organization of TFAM, POLRMT and TFB2M around the LSP and represent the first structural characterization of the entire mitochondrial transcriptional initiation complex. PMID:24413562

  16. Induction of the Gene Encoding Macrophage Chemoattractant Protein 1 by Orientia tsutsugamushi in Human Endothelial Cells Involves Activation of Transcription Factor Activator Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Seong, Seung-Yong; Huh, Myung-Sook; Kim, Na-Hyun; Choi, Myung-sik; Kim, Ik-sang

    2002-01-01

    Human macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is a potent mediator of macrophage migration and therefore plays an essential role in early events of inflammation. In endothelial cells, at least three independent pathways regulate MCP-1 expression by NF-κB and AP-1. Orientia tsutsugamushi causes vasculitis in humans by replicating inside macrophages and endothelial cells. In the present study, we investigated the cis-acting and trans-acting elements involved in O. tsutsugamushi-induced MCP-1 gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Although NF-κB activation was observed in HUVEC infected with O. tsutsugamushi, inhibition of NF-κB activation did not affect the MCP-1 expression. However, treatment of HUVEC with extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase inhibitor or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor suppressed expression of MCP-1 mRNA concomitant with downregulation of activator protein 1 (AP-1) activation. Deletion of triphorbol acetate response elements (TRE) at position −69 to −63 of MCP-1 gene abolished inducible promoter activity. Deletion of TRE at position −69 to −63−96 to −90 or deletion of NF-κB-binding site at position −69 to −63−88 to −79 did not affect the inducibility of promoter. Site-directed mutagenesis of the NF-κB binding sites at positions −2640 to −2632, −2612 to −2603 in the enhancer region, or the AP-1 biding site at position −2276 to −2270 decreased the inducible activity of the promoter. Taken together, AP-1 activation by both the ERK pathway and the p38 MAPK pathway as well as their binding to TRE at position −69 to −63 in proximal promoter and TRE at position −2276 to −2270 in enhancer region is altogether essential in induction of MCP-1 mRNA in HUVEC infected with O. tsutsugamushi. Although NF-κB activation is not essential per se, the κB site in the enhancer region is important in MCP-1 induction of HUVEC. This discrepancy in the

  17. Transcription factor networks in embryonic stem cells and testicular cancer and the definition of epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Wolfgang A; Hoffmann, Michèle J

    2007-01-01

    The stem cell phenotype of human and murine ES cells has recently been shown to be maintained by a self-stabilizing network of transcription factors, NANOG, OCT4, and SOX2. These factors maintain their own and each other's transcription, activating, by combinatorial interactions, genes responsible for the ES cell phenotype while repressing genes required for differentiation. This 'core circuitry' interacts with an 'expanded circuitry' encompassing signal transduction and chromatin regulator proteins. During ES cell differentiation the crucial transcription factors are down-regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation. Aberrant activation of the ES transcription factor network elicited by increased dosage of an embryonic gene cluster at 12p including NANOG, together with additional genetic and epigenetic alterations, appears to be a crucial event in the genesis of testicular germ cell cancers. Intriguingly, the ES cell transcription factor network fits current as well as past definitions of 'epigenetic'.

  18. Noncoding Transcriptional Landscape in Human Aging.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marina C; Leitão, Ana Lúcia; Enguita, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a universal phenomenon in metazoans, characterized by a general decline of the organism physiology associated with an increased risk of mortality and morbidity. Aging of an organism correlates with a decline in function of its cells, as shown for muscle, immune, and neuronal cells. As the DNA content of most cells within an organism remains largely identical throughout the life span, age-associated transcriptional changes must be achieved by epigenetic mechanisms. However, how aging may impact on the epigenetic state of cells is only beginning to be understood. In light of a growing number of studies demonstrating that noncoding RNAs can provide molecular signals that regulate expression of protein-coding genes and define epigenetic states of cells, we hypothesize that noncoding RNAs could play a direct role in inducing age-associated profiles of gene expression. In this context, the role of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) as regulators of gene expression might be important for the overall transcriptional landscape observed in aged human cells. The possible functions of lncRNAs and other noncoding RNAs, and their roles in the regulation of aging-related cellular pathways will be analyzed.

  19. In silico Analysis of Transcription Factor Repertoire and Prediction of Stress Responsive Transcription Factors in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Mochida, Keiichi; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2009-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) are often termed as ‘master regulators’ which bind to DNA and either activate or repress gene transcription. We have computationally analysed the soybean genome sequence data and constructed a proper set of TFs based on the Hidden Markov Model profiles of DNA-binding domain families. Within the soybean genome, we identified 4342 loci encoding 5035 TF models which grouped into 61 families. We constructed a database named SoybeanTFDB (http://soybeantfdb.psc.riken.jp) containing the full compilation of soybean TFs and significant information such as: functional motifs, full-length cDNAs, domain alignments, promoter regions, genomic organization and putative regulatory functions based on annotations of gene ontology (GO) inferred by comparative analysis with Arabidopsis. With particular interest in abiotic stress signalling, we analysed the promoter regions for all of the TF encoding genes as a means to identify abiotic stress responsive cis-elements as well as all types of cis-motifs provided by the PLACE database. SoybeanTFDB enables scientists to easily access cis-element and GO annotations to aid in the prediction of TF function and selection of TFs with functions of interest. This study provides a basic framework and an important user-friendly public information resource which enables analyses of transcriptional regulation in soybean. PMID:19884168

  20. Elucidation of separate, but collaborative functions of the rRNA methyltransferase-related human mitochondrial transcription factors B1 and B2 in mitochondrial biogenesis reveals new insight into maternally inherited deafness.

    PubMed

    Cotney, Justin; McKay, Sharen E; Shadel, Gerald S

    2009-07-15

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is controlled by signaling networks that relay information to and from the organelles. However, key mitochondrial factors that mediate such pathways and how they contribute to human disease are not understood fully. Here we demonstrate that the rRNA methyltransferase-related human mitochondrial transcription factors B1 and B2 are key downstream effectors of mitochondrial biogenesis that perform unique, yet cooperative functions. The primary function of h-mtTFB2 is mtDNA transcription and maintenance, which is independent of its rRNA methyltransferase activity, while that of h-mtTFB1 is mitochondrial 12S rRNA methylation needed for normal mitochondrial translation, metabolism and cell growth. Over-expression of h-mtTFB1 causes 12S rRNA hypermethylation, aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis and increased sorbitol-induced cell death. These phenotypes are recapitulated in cells harboring the pathogenic A1555G mtDNA mutation, implicating a deleterious rRNA methylation-dependent retrograde signal in maternally inherited deafness pathology and shedding significant insight into how h-mtTFB1 acts as a nuclear modifier of this disease.

  1. Elucidation of separate, but collaborative functions of the rRNA methyltransferase-related human mitochondrial transcription factors B1 and B2 in mitochondrial biogenesis reveals new insight into maternally inherited deafness

    PubMed Central

    Cotney, Justin; McKay, Sharen E.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is controlled by signaling networks that relay information to and from the organelles. However, key mitochondrial factors that mediate such pathways and how they contribute to human disease are not understood fully. Here we demonstrate that the rRNA methyltransferase-related human mitochondrial transcription factors B1 and B2 are key downstream effectors of mitochondrial biogenesis that perform unique, yet cooperative functions. The primary function of h-mtTFB2 is mtDNA transcription and maintenance, which is independent of its rRNA methyltransferase activity, while that of h-mtTFB1 is mitochondrial 12S rRNA methylation needed for normal mitochondrial translation, metabolism and cell growth. Over-expression of h-mtTFB1 causes 12S rRNA hypermethylation, aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis and increased sorbitol-induced cell death. These phenotypes are recapitulated in cells harboring the pathogenic A1555G mtDNA mutation, implicating a deleterious rRNA methylation-dependent retrograde signal in maternally inherited deafness pathology and shedding significant insight into how h-mtTFB1 acts as a nuclear modifier of this disease. PMID:19417006

  2. The role of FOXO and PPAR transcription factors in diet-mediated inhibition of PDC activation and carbohydrate oxidation during exercise in humans and the role of pharmacological activation of PDC in overriding these changes.

    PubMed

    Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Constantin, Despina; Stephens, Francis; Laithwaite, David; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2012-05-01

    High-fat feeding inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC)-controlled carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation, which contributes to muscle insulin resistance. We aimed to reveal molecular changes underpinning this process in resting and exercising humans. We also tested whether pharmacological activation of PDC overrides these diet-induced changes. Healthy males consumed a control diet (CD) and on two further occasions an isocaloric high-fat diet (HFD). After each diet, subjects cycled for 60 min after intravenous infusion with saline (CD and HFD) or dichloroacetate (HFD+DCA). Quadriceps muscle biopsies obtained before and after 10 and 60 min of exercise were used to estimate CHO use, PDC activation, and mRNAs associated with insulin, fat, and CHO signaling. Compared with CD, HFD increased resting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2), PDK4, forkhead box class O transcription factor 1 (FOXO1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor transcription factor α (PPARα) mRNA and reduced PDC activation. Exercise increased PDC activation and whole-body CHO use in HFD, but to a lower extent than in CD. Meanwhile PDK4 and FOXO1, but not PPARα or PDK2, mRNA remained elevated. HFD+DCA activated PDC throughout and restored whole-body CHO use during exercise. FOXO1 appears to play a role in HFD-mediated muscle PDK4 upregulation and inhibition of PDC and CHO oxidation in humans. Also, pharmacological activation of PDC restores HFD-mediated inhibition of CHO oxidation during exercise. PMID:22315317

  3. Unexpected complexity of the Reef-Building Coral Acropora millepora transcription factor network

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coral reefs are disturbed on a global scale by environmental changes including rising sea surface temperatures and ocean acidification. Little is known about how corals respond or adapt to these environmental changes especially at the molecular level. This is mostly because of the paucity of genome-wide studies on corals and the application of systems approaches that incorporate the latter. Like in any other organism, the response of corals to stress is tightly controlled by the coordinated interplay of many transcription factors. Results Here, we develop and apply a new system-wide approach in order to infer combinatorial transcription factor networks of the reef-building coral Acropora millepora. By integrating sequencing-derived transcriptome measurements, a network of physically interacting transcription factors, and phylogenetic network footprinting we were able to infer such a network. Analysis of the network across a phylogenetically broad sample of five species, including human, reveals that despite the apparent simplicity of corals, their transcription factors repertoire and interaction networks seem to be largely conserved. In addition, we were able to identify interactions among transcription factors that appear to be species-specific lending strength to the novel concept of "Taxonomically Restricted Interactions". Conclusions This study provides the first look at transcription factor networks in corals. We identified a transcription factor repertoire encoded by the coral genome and found consistencies of the domain architectures of transcription factors and conserved regulatory subnetworks across eumetazoan species, providing insight into how regulatory networks have evolved. PMID:21526989

  4. Determination and Inference of Eukaryotic Transcription Factor Sequence Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Albu, Mihai; Cote, Atina; Montenegro-Montero, Alejandro; Drewe, Philipp; Najafabadi, Hamed S.; Lambert, Samuel A.; Mann, Ishminder; Cook, Kate; Zheng, Hong; Goity, Alejandra; van Bakel, Harm; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Galli, Mary; Lewsey, Mathew; Huang, Eryong; Mukherjee, Tuhin; Chen, Xiaoting; Reece-Hoyes, John S.; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Shaulsky, Gad; Walhout, Albertha J.M.; Bouget, François-Yves; Ratsch, Gunnar; Larrondo, Luis F.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Transcription factor (TF) DNA sequence preferences direct their regulatory activity, but are currently known for only ~1% of all eukaryotic TFs. Broadly sampling DNA-binding domain (DBD) types from multiple eukaryotic clades, we determined DNA sequence preferences for >1,000 TFs encompassing 54 different DBD classes from 131 diverse eukaryotes. We find that closely related DBDs almost always have very similar DNA sequence preferences, enabling inference of motifs for ~34% of the ~170,000 known or predicted eukaryotic TFs. Sequences matching both measured and inferred motifs are enriched in ChIP-seq peaks and upstream of transcription start sites in diverse eukaryotic lineages. SNPs defining expression quantitative trait loci in Arabidopsis promoters are also enriched for predicted TF binding sites. Importantly, our motif “library” (http://cisbp.ccbr.utoronto.ca) can be used to identify specific TFs whose binding may be altered by human disease risk alleles. These data present a powerful resource for mapping transcriptional networks across eukaryotes. PMID:25215497

  5. Glutamine Metabolism Regulates the Pluripotency Transcription Factor OCT4

    PubMed Central

    Marsboom, Glenn; Zhang, Guo-Fang; Pohl-Avila, Nicole; Zhang, Yanmin; Yuan, Yang; Kang, Hojin; Hao, Bo; Brunengraber, Henri; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of pluripotency by cellular metabolism in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are not fully understood. We found that high levels of glutamine metabolism are essential to prevent degradation of OCT4, a key transcription factor regulating hESC pluripotency. Glutamine withdrawal depletes the endogenous anti-oxidant glutathione, which results in the oxidation of OCT4 cysteine residues required for its DNA binding and enhanced OCT4 degradation. The emergence of the OCT4lo cell population following glutamine withdrawal did not result in greater propensity for cell death. Instead, glutamine withdrawal during vascular differentiation of hESCs generated cells with greater angiogenic capacity, thus indicating that modulating glutamine metabolism enhances the differentiation and functional maturation of cells. These findings demonstrate that the pluripotency transcription factor OCT4 can serve as a metabolic-redox sensor in hESCs and that metabolic cues can act in concert with growth factor signaling to orchestrate stem cell differentiation. PMID:27346346

  6. E2F transcription factor 1 regulates cellular and organismal senescence by inhibiting Forkhead box O transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Peng, Shengyi; Tao, Li; Ruan, Haihe; Yang, Yanglu; Li, Tie-Mei; Adams, Ursula; Meng, Songshu; Bi, Xiaolin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2014-12-01

    E2F1 and FOXO3 are two transcription factors that have been shown to participate in cellular senescence. Previous report reveals that E2F1 enhanced cellular senescence in human fibroblast cells, while FOXO transcription factors play against senescence by regulation reactive oxygen species scavenging proteins. However, their functional interplay has been unclear. Here we use E2F1 knock-out murine Embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), knockdown RNAi constructs, and ectopic expression of E2F1 to show that it functions by negatively regulating FOXO3. E2F1 attenuates FOXO3-mediated expression of MnSOD and Catalase without affecting FOXO3 protein stability, subcellular localization, or phosphorylation by Akt. We mapped the interaction between E2F1 and FOXO3 to a region including the DNA binding domain of E2F1 and the C-terminal transcription-activation domain of FOXO3. We propose that E2F1 inhibits FOXO3-dependent transcription by directly binding FOXO3 in the nucleus and preventing activation of its target genes. Moreover, knockdown of the Caenorhabditis elegans E2F1 ortholog efl-1 significantly extends lifespan in a manner that requires the activity of the C. elegans FOXO gene daf-16. We conclude that there is an evolutionarily conserved signaling connection between E2F1 and FOXO3, which regulates cellular senescence and aging by regulating the activity of FOXO3. We speculate that drugs and/or therapies that inhibit this physical interaction might be good candidates for reducing cellular senescence and increasing longevity.

  7. E2F transcription factor 1 regulates cellular and organismal senescence by inhibiting Forkhead box O transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Peng, Shengyi; Tao, Li; Ruan, Haihe; Yang, Yanglu; Li, Tie-Mei; Adams, Ursula; Meng, Songshu; Bi, Xiaolin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2014-12-01

    E2F1 and FOXO3 are two transcription factors that have been shown to participate in cellular senescence. Previous report reveals that E2F1 enhanced cellular senescence in human fibroblast cells, while FOXO transcription factors play against senescence by regulation reactive oxygen species scavenging proteins. However, their functional interplay has been unclear. Here we use E2F1 knock-out murine Embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), knockdown RNAi constructs, and ectopic expression of E2F1 to show that it functions by negatively regulating FOXO3. E2F1 attenuates FOXO3-mediated expression of MnSOD and Catalase without affecting FOXO3 protein stability, subcellular localization, or phosphorylation by Akt. We mapped the interaction between E2F1 and FOXO3 to a region including the DNA binding domain of E2F1 and the C-terminal transcription-activation domain of FOXO3. We propose that E2F1 inhibits FOXO3-dependent transcription by directly binding FOXO3 in the nucleus and preventing activation of its target genes. Moreover, knockdown of the Caenorhabditis elegans E2F1 ortholog efl-1 significantly extends lifespan in a manner that requires the activity of the C. elegans FOXO gene daf-16. We conclude that there is an evolutionarily conserved signaling connection between E2F1 and FOXO3, which regulates cellular senescence and aging by regulating the activity of FOXO3. We speculate that drugs and/or therapies that inhibit this physical interaction might be good candidates for reducing cellular senescence and increasing longevity. PMID:25344604

  8. E2F Transcription Factor 1 Regulates Cellular and Organismal Senescence by Inhibiting Forkhead Box O Transcription Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qi; Peng, Shengyi; Tao, Li; Ruan, Haihe; Yang, Yanglu; Li, Tie-Mei; Adams, Ursula; Meng, Songshu; Bi, Xiaolin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2014-01-01

    E2F1 and FOXO3 are two transcription factors that have been shown to participate in cellular senescence. Previous report reveals that E2F1 enhanced cellular senescence in human fibroblast cells, while FOXO transcription factors play against senescence by regulation reactive oxygen species scavenging proteins. However, their functional interplay has been unclear. Here we use E2F1 knock-out murine Embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), knockdown RNAi constructs, and ectopic expression of E2F1 to show that it functions by negatively regulating FOXO3. E2F1 attenuates FOXO3-mediated expression of MnSOD and Catalase without affecting FOXO3 protein stability, subcellular localization, or phosphorylation by Akt. We mapped the interaction between E2F1 and FOXO3 to a region including the DNA binding domain of E2F1 and the C-terminal transcription-activation domain of FOXO3. We propose that E2F1 inhibits FOXO3-dependent transcription by directly binding FOXO3 in the nucleus and preventing activation of its target genes. Moreover, knockdown of the Caenorhabditis elegans E2F1 ortholog efl-1 significantly extends lifespan in a manner that requires the activity of the C. elegans FOXO gene daf-16. We conclude that there is an evolutionarily conserved signaling connection between E2F1 and FOXO3, which regulates cellular senescence and aging by regulating the activity of FOXO3. We speculate that drugs and/or therapies that inhibit this physical interaction might be good candidates for reducing cellular senescence and increasing longevity. PMID:25344604

  9. Regulation of type-II collagen gene expression during human chondrocyte de-differentiation and recovery of chondrocyte-specific phenotype in culture involves Sry-type high-mobility-group box (SOX) transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, D G; Liu, G; Dharmavaram, R; Hawkins, D; Piera-Velazquez, S; Jimenez, S A

    2001-01-01

    During ex vivo growth as monolayer cultures, chondrocytes proliferate and undergo a process of de-differentiation. This process involves a change in morphology and a change from expression of chondrocyte-specific genes to that of genes that are normally expressed in fibroblasts. Transfer of the monolayer chondrocyte culture to three-dimensional culture systems induces the cells to re-acquire a chondrocyte-specific phenotype and produce a cartilaginous-like tissue in vitro. We investigated mechanisms involved in the control of the de-differentiation and re-differentiation process in vitro. De-differentiated chondrocytes re-acquired their chondrocyte-specific phenotype when cultured on poly-(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (polyHEMA) as assayed by morphology, reverse transcriptase PCR of chondrocyte-specific mRNA, Western-blot analysis and chondrocyte-specific promoter activity. Essentially, full recovery of the chondrocyte-specific phenotype was observed when cells that had been cultured for 4 weeks on plastic were transferred to culture on polyHEMA. However, after subsequent passages on plastic, the phenotype recovery was incomplete or did not occur. The activity of a gene reporter construct containing the promoter and enhancer from the human type-II collagen gene (COL2A1) was modulated by the culture conditions, so that its transcriptional activity was repressed in monolayer cultures and rescued to some extent when the cells were switched to polyHEMA cultures. The binding of Sry-type high-mobility-group box (SOX) transcription factors to the enhancer region was modulated by the culture conditions, as were the mRNA levels for SOX9. A transfected human type-II collagen reporter construct was activated in de-differentiated cells by ectopic expression of SOX transcription factors. These results underscore the overt change in phenotype that occurs when chondrocytes are cultured as monolayers on tissue-culture plastic substrata. PMID:11716775

  10. Lactoferrin from Camelus dromedarius Inhibits Nuclear Transcription Factor-kappa B Activation, Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression and Prostaglandin E2 Production in Stimulated Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Naila; Alghasham, Abdullah; Rasheed, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive joint disorder, which remains the leading cause of chronic disability in aged people. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF)-κB is a major cellular event in OA and its activation by interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays a critical role in cartilage breakdown in these patients. Objective: In this study, we examined the effect of lactoferrin on NF-κB activation, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in stimulated human articular chondrocytes. Materials and Methods: Human chondrocytes were derived from OA articular cartilage and treated with camel lactoferrin and then stimulated with IL-1β. Gene expression was determined by TaqMan assays and protein expression was studied by Western immunoblotting. NF-κB activity and PGE2 levels were determined by ELISA based assays. NF-κB activity was also determined by treatment of chondrocytes with NF-κB specific inhibitor Bay 11–7082. Results: Lactoferrin inhibited IL-1β-induced activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in human OA chondrocytes. Lactoferrin also inhibited mRNA/protein expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2. Moreover, Bay 11–7082 also inhibited IL-1β-induced expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2. The inhibitory effect of lactoferrin on the IL-1β induced expression of COX-2 or production of PGE2 was mediated at least in part via suppression of NF-κB activation. Conclusions: Our data determine camel lactoferrin as a novel inhibitor of IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB signaling events and production of cartilage-degrading molecule PGE2 via inhibition of COX-2 expressions. These results may have important implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the prevention/treatment of OA and other degenerative/inflammatory diseases. SUMMARY Lactoferrin shows anti-arthritic activity in IL-1β stimulated primary human chondrocytes.Lactoferrin inhibits IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation.Lactoferrin inhibits

  11. Antioxidant-induced changes of the AP-1 transcription complex are paralleled by a selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Das, B C; Lengert, M; Geletneky, K; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    Considering the involvement of a redox-regulatory pathway in the expression of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV type 16 (HPV-16)-immortalized human keratinocytes were treated with the antioxidant pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (PDTC). PDTC induces elevated binding of the transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate recognition site within the viral regulatory region. Despite of increased AP-1 binding, normally indispensable for efficient HPV-16 transcription, viral gene expression was selectively suppressed at the level of initiation of transcription. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assays showed that the composition of the AP-1 complex, predominantly consisting of Jun homodimers in untreated cells, was altered. Irrespective of enhanced c-fos expression, c-jun was phosphorylated and became primarily heterodimerized with fra-1, which was also induced after PDTC incubation. Additionally, there was also an increased complex formation between c-jun and junB. Because both fra-1 and junB overexpression negatively interferes with c-jun/c-fos trans-activation of AP-1-responsive genes, our results suggest that the observed block in viral transcription is mainly the consequence of an antioxidant-induced reconstitution of the AP-1 transcription complex. Since expression of the c-jun/c-fos gene family is tightly regulated during cellular differentiation, defined reorganization of a central viral transcription factor may represent a novel mechanism controlling the transcription of pathogenic HPVs during keratinocyte differentiation and in the progression to cervical cancer. PMID:8985358

  12. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-01

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (˜50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a ‘buoy’ to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination.

  13. Yeast GAL11 protein is a distinctive type transcription factor that enhances basal transcription in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, H; Hiraoka, Y; Fukasawa, T

    1993-01-01

    The yeast auxiliary transcription factor GAL11, a candidate for the coactivator, was partially purified from yeast cells, and its function was characterized in a cell-free transcription system. The partially purified GAL11 protein stimulated basal transcription from the CYC1 core promoter by a factor of 4-5 at the step of preinitiation complex formation. GAL11 protein also enhanced transcription activated by general regulatory factor 1, GAL4-AH, or GAL4-VP16 to the same extent as the basal transcription. Therefore, the apparent potentiation of the activators by GAL11 was attributable to the stimulation of basal transcription. The wild-type GAL11 protein (but not a mutant-type protein) produced in bacteria stimulated transcription as effectively as GAL11 from yeast. These results suggest that GAL11 functions as a positive cofactor of basal and activator-induced transcription in a cell-free transcription system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8378310

  14. Mammalian transcription factor A is a core component of the mitochondrial transcription machinery.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yonghong; Dierckx, Anke; Wanrooij, Paulina H; Wanrooij, Sjoerd; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Wilhelmsson, L Marcus; Falkenberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Claes M

    2012-10-01

    Transcription factor A (TFAM) functions as a DNA packaging factor in mammalian mitochondria. TFAM also binds sequence-specifically to sites immediately upstream of mitochondrial promoters, but there are conflicting data regarding its role as a core component of the mitochondrial transcription machinery. We here demonstrate that TFAM is required for transcription in mitochondrial extracts as well as in a reconstituted in vitro transcription system. The absolute requirement of TFAM can be relaxed by conditions that allow DNA breathing, i.e., low salt concentrations or negatively supercoiled DNA templates. The situation is thus very similar to that described in nuclear RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription, in which the free energy of supercoiling can circumvent the need for a subset of basal transcription factors at specific promoters. In agreement with these observations, we demonstrate that TFAM has the capacity to induce negative supercoils in DNA, and, using the recently developed nucleobase analog FRET-pair tC(O)-tC(nitro), we find that TFAM distorts significantly the DNA structure. Our findings differ from recent observations reporting that TFAM is not a core component of the mitochondrial transcription machinery. Instead, our findings support a model in which TFAM is absolutely required to recruit the transcription machinery during initiation of transcription. PMID:23012404

  15. Transcription factor expression in lipopolysaccharide-activated peripheral-blood-derived mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Jared C.; Smith, Kelly D.; Strobe, Katie L.; Nissen, Stephanie M.; Haudenschild, Christian D.; Zhou, Daixing; Vasicek, Thomas J.; Held, G. A.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo A.; Hood, Leroy E.; Aderem, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Transcription factors play a key role in integrating and modulating biological information. In this study, we comprehensively measured the changing abundances of mRNAs over a time course of activation of human peripheral-blood-derived mononuclear cells (“macrophages”) with lipopolysaccharide. Global and dynamic analysis of transcription factors in response to a physiological stimulus has yet to be achieved in a human system, and our efforts significantly advanced this goal. We used multiple global high-throughput technologies for measuring mRNA levels, including massively parallel signature sequencing and GeneChip microarrays. We identified 92 of 1,288 known human transcription factors as having significantly measurable changes during our 24-h time course. At least 42 of these changes were previously unidentified in this system. Our data demonstrate that some transcription factors operate in a functional range below 10 transcripts per cell, whereas others operate in a range three orders of magnitude greater. The highly reproducible response of many mRNAs indicates feedback control. A broad range of activation kinetics was observed; thus, combinatorial regulation by small subsets of transcription factors would permit almost any timing input to cis-regulatory elements controlling gene transcription. PMID:17913878

  16. Over-expression of Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors enhances differentiation of human umbilical cord blood cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Guseva, Daria; Rizvanov, Albert A; Salafutdinov, Ilnur I; Kudryashova, Nezhdana V; Palotás, András; Islamov, Rustem R

    2014-09-01

    Gene and cell-based therapies comprise innovative aspects of regenerative medicine. Even though stem cells represent a highly potential therapeutic strategy, their wide-spread exploitation is marred by ethical concerns, potential for malignant transformation and a plethora of other technical issues, largely restricting their use to experimental studies. Utilizing genetically modified human umbilical cord blood mono-nuclear cells (hUCB-MCs), this communication reports enhanced differentiation of transplants in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Over-expressing Oct4 and Sox2 induced production of neural marker PGP9.5, as well as transformation of hUCB-MCs into micro-glial and endothelial lines in ALS spinal cords. In addition to producing new nerve cells, providing degenerated areas with trophic factors and neo-vascularisation might prevent and even reverse progressive loss of moto-neurons and skeletal muscle paralysis.

  17. Bidirectional Transcription Directs Both Transcriptional Gene Activation and Suppression in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kevin V.; Santoso, Sharon; Turner, Anne-Marie; Pastori, Chiara; Hawkins, Peter G.

    2008-01-01

    Small RNAs targeted to gene promoters in human cells have been shown to modulate both transcriptional gene suppression and activation. However, the mechanism involved in transcriptional activation has remained poorly defined, and an endogenous RNA trigger for transcriptional gene silencing has yet to be identified. Described here is an explanation for siRNA-directed transcriptional gene activation, as well as a role for non-coding antisense RNAs as effector molecules driving transcriptional gene silencing. Transcriptional activation of p21 gene expression was determined to be the result of Argonaute 2–dependent, post-transcriptional silencing of a p21-specific antisense transcript, which functions in Argonaute 1–mediated transcriptional control of p21 mRNA expression. The data presented here suggest that in human cells, bidirectional transcription is an endogenous gene regulatory mechanism whereby an antisense RNA directs epigenetic regulatory complexes to a sense promoter, resulting in RNA-directed epigenetic gene regulation. The observations presented here support the notion that epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes, such as p21, may be the result of an imbalance in bidirectional transcription levels. This imbalance allows the unchecked antisense RNA to direct silent state epigenetic marks to the sense promoter, resulting in stable transcriptional gene silencing. PMID:19008947

  18. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  19. Dynamic Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulation of Human Epidermal Keratinocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cavazza, Alessia; Miccio, Annarita; Romano, Oriana; Petiti, Luca; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Peano, Clelia; Severgnini, Marco; Rizzi, Ermanno; De Bellis, Gianluca; Bicciato, Silvio; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Human skin is maintained by the differentiation and maturation of interfollicular stem and progenitors cells. We used DeepCAGE, genome-wide profiling of histone modifications and retroviral integration analysis, to map transcripts, promoters, enhancers, and super-enhancers (SEs) in prospectively isolated keratinocytes and transit-amplifying progenitors, and retrospectively defined keratinocyte stem cells. We show that >95% of the active promoters are in common and differentially regulated in progenitors and differentiated keratinocytes, while approximately half of the enhancers and SEs are stage specific and account for most of the epigenetic changes occurring during differentiation. Transcription factor (TF) motif identification and correlation with TF binding site maps allowed the identification of TF circuitries acting on enhancers and SEs during differentiation. Overall, our study provides a broad, genome-wide description of chromatin dynamics and differential enhancer and promoter usage during epithelial differentiation, and describes a novel approach to identify active regulatory elements in rare stem cell populations. PMID:27050947

  20. Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (Pdx1) down-regulates hepatic transcription factor 1 alpha (HNF1α) expression during reprogramming of human hepatic cells into insulin-producing cells

    PubMed Central

    Donelan, William; Li, Shiwu; Wang, Hai; Lu, Shun; Xie, Chao; Tang, Dongqi; Chang, Lung-Ji; Yang, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Pdx1 triggers rapid hepatocyte dedifferentiation by down-regulating liver-enriched transcription factors and liver-specific functional genes such as hepatic nuclear factor-1α (HNF1α), albumin, and AAT. However, the links between Pdx1 over-expression and hepatic gene down-regulation are incompletely understood. HNF1α and HNF4α are important transcription factors that establish and maintain the hepatocyte phenotype. The human HNF4α gene contains two promoters (P1 and P2) that drive expression of P1-(HNF4α 1-6) or P2-(HNF4α 7-9)-derived isoforms, which are used in different tissues and at different times during development. We hypothesized that the relative expression of HNF1α and HNF4α following ectopic Pdx1 expression may promote hepatic cell dedifferentiation and transdifferentiation toward pancreatic beta-cells. We produced lentiviruses expressing Pdx1, Pdx1-VP16, and Ngn3, along with dual-color reporter genes to indicate hepatic and pancreatic beta-cell phenotype changes. Using these PTF alone or in combinations, we demonstrated that Pdx1 not only activates specific beta-cell genes but down-regulates HNF1α. Pdx1-mediated reduction of HNF1α is accompanied by altered expression of its major activator, HNF4α isoforms, down-regulating hepatic genes ALB and AAT. Pdx1 up-regulates HNF4α via the P2 promoter. These P2-driven isoforms compete with P1-driven isoforms to suppress target gene transcription. In Huh7 cells, the AF-1 activation domain is more important for transactivation, whereas in INS1 cells, the F inhibitory domain is more important. The loss and gain of functional activity strongly suggests that Pdx1 plays a central role in reprogramming hepatocytes into beta-cells by suppressing the hepatic phenotype. PMID:26279745

  1. Over-expression of Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors enhances differentiation of human umbilical cord blood cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, Daria; Rizvanov, Albert A.; Salafutdinov, Ilnur I.; Kudryashova, Nezhdana V.; Palotás, András; Islamov, Rustem R.

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Gene and cell-based therapies comprise innovative aspects of regenerative medicine. • Genetically modified hUCB-MCs enhanced differentiation of cells in a mouse model of ALS. • Stem cells successfully transformed into micro-glial and endothelial lines in spinal cords. • Over-expressing oct4 and sox2 also induced production of neural marker PGP9.5. • Formation of new nerve cells, secreting trophic factors and neo-vascularisation could improve symptoms in ALS. - Abstract: Gene and cell-based therapies comprise innovative aspects of regenerative medicine. Even though stem cells represent a highly potential therapeutic strategy, their wide-spread exploitation is marred by ethical concerns, potential for malignant transformation and a plethora of other technical issues, largely restricting their use to experimental studies. Utilizing genetically modified human umbilical cord blood mono-nuclear cells (hUCB-MCs), this communication reports enhanced differentiation of transplants in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Over-expressing Oct4 and Sox2 induced production of neural marker PGP9.5, as well as transformation of hUCB-MCs into micro-glial and endothelial lines in ALS spinal cords. In addition to producing new nerve cells, providing degenerated areas with trophic factors and neo-vascularisation might prevent and even reverse progressive loss of moto-neurons and skeletal muscle paralysis.

  2. Aerospace Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The following contains the final report on the activities related to the Cooperative Agreement between the human factors research group at NASA Ames Research Center and the Psychology Department at San Jose State University. The participating NASA Ames division has been, as the organization has changed, the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division (ASHFRD and Code FL), the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division (Code AF), and the Human Factors Research and Technology Division (Code IH). The inclusive dates for the report are November 1, 1984 to January 31, 1999. Throughout the years, approximately 170 persons worked on the cooperative agreements in one capacity or another. The Cooperative Agreement provided for research personnel to collaborate with senior scientists in ongoing NASA ARC research. Finally, many post-MA/MS and post-doctoral personnel contributed to the projects. It is worth noting that 10 former cooperative agreement personnel were hired into civil service positions directly from the agreements.

  3. Genomic localization of the human genes TAF1A, TAF1B and TAF1C, encoding TAF(I)48, TAF(I)63 and TAF(I)110 subunits of class I general transcription initiation factor SL1.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, C; Rapisarda, A; Amico, V; Bonaiuto, C; Viola, A; Scalia, M; Motta, S; Amato, A; Engel, H; Messina, A; Sichel, G; Grzeschik, K; Purrello, M

    2000-01-01

    Human SL1 is a general transcription initiation factor (GTF) essential for RNA polymerase I to start rRNA synthesis at class I promoters. It is comprised of the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and three TBP-associated factors (TAF(I)48, TAF(I)63 and TAF(I)110). We have determined that the human genes TAF1A, TAF1B and TAF1C, encoding these three TAF(I) polypeptides, are localized at lq42, 2p25 and 16q24, respectively. All three genes are present as single copies in the human genome and map to different chromosomes, as shown by somatic cell hybrid panel and radiation hybrid panel analysis and FISH. Two of these genes, TAF1C and TAF1B, are transcribed into multiple RNAs, as determined through Northern analysis of mRNA from various human organs and cell lines. If translated into different polypeptides, this could result in production of variant isoforms of SL1 with different activation potentials.

  4. Systematic functional profiling of transcription factor networks in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang-Woo; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Maeng, Shinae; Lee, Kyung-Tae; So, Yee-Seul; Hong, Joohyeon; Choi, Jaeyoung; Byun, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Hyelim; Bang, Soohyun; Song, Min-Hee; Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Seo-Young; Ji, Je-Hyun; Park, Goun; Kwon, Hyojeong; Cha, Suyeon; Meyers, Gena Lee; Wang, Li Li; Jang, Jooyoung; Janbon, Guilhem; Adedoyin, Gloria; Kim, Taeyup; Averette, Anna K; Heitman, Joseph; Cheong, Eunji; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Yin-Won; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2015-04-07

    Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis in humans, but its overall biological and pathogenic regulatory circuits remain elusive, particularly due to the presence of an evolutionarily divergent set of transcription factors (TFs). Here, we report the construction of a high-quality library of 322 signature-tagged gene-deletion strains for 155 putative TF genes previously predicted using the DNA-binding domain TF database, and examine their in vitro and in vivo phenotypic traits under 32 distinct growth conditions. At least one phenotypic trait is exhibited by 145 out of 155 TF mutants (93%) and ∼85% of them (132/155) are functionally characterized for the first time in this study. The genotypic and phenotypic data for each TF are available in the C. neoformans TF phenome database (http://tf.cryptococcus.org). In conclusion, our phenome-based functional analysis of the C. neoformans TF mutant library provides key insights into transcriptional networks of basidiomycetous fungi and human fungal pathogens.

  5. Abduction and asylum in the lives of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Burger, Anat; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Wolynes, Peter G

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that there are many nonfunctional transcription factor binding sites along a genome. Although these "decoy" sites compete with the promoter region for binding of transcription factors, they may also protect these proteins from degradation. We show that in the limit of perfect protection, where bound transcription factors are never degraded, the competitive effect of nonfunctional binding sites is completely canceled out by the stability gained from reduced degradation. We examine the response of an autoregulated gene to the total number of transcription factors to quantify the consequences of competition for transcription factors. We show that intuition about this system can be gained by mathematically constructing a single gene with effective parameters that reproduce the behavior of a gene with added decoy sites. In analogy to dressed particles in many-body systems we term this description a "quasi gene." We find that protective decoys buffer against noise by reducing correlations between transcription factors, specifically in the case of production of transcription factors in bursts. We show that the addition of protective decoy sites causes the level of gene expression to approach that predicted from deterministic mass action models. Finally, we show that protective decoy sites decrease the size of the region of parameter space that exhibits bistability. PMID:20160109

  6. Helix-loop-helix transcription factors mediate activation and repression of the p75LNGFR gene.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaramello, A; Neuman, K; Palm, K; Metsis, M; Neuman, T

    1995-01-01

    Sequence analysis of rat and human low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor p75LNGFR gene promoter regions revealed a single E-box cis-acting element, located upstream of the major transcription start sites. Deletion analysis of the E-box sequence demonstrated that it significantly contributes to p75LNGFR promoter activity. This E box has a dual function; it mediates either activation or repression of the p75LNGFR promoter activity, depending on the interacting transcription factors. We showed that the two isoforms of the class A basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor ME1 (ME1a and ME1b), the murine homolog of the human HEB transcription factor, specifically repress p75LNGFR promoter activity. This repression can be released by coexpression of the HLH Id2 transcriptional regulator. In vitro analyses demonstrated that ME1a forms a stable complex with the p75LNGFR E box and likely competes with activating E-box-binding proteins. By using ME1a-overexpressing PC12 cells, we showed that the endogenous p75LNGFR gene is a target of ME1a repression. Together, these data demonstrate that the p75LNGFR E box and the interacting bHLH transcription factors are involved in the regulation of p75LNGFR gene expression. These results also show that class A bHLH transcription factors can repress and Id-like negative regulators can stimulate gene expression. PMID:7565756

  7. Assessment of Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Frances; Foley, Tico

    1999-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering, often referred to as Ergonomics, is a science that applies a detailed understanding of human characteristics, capabilities, and limitations to the design, evaluation, and operation of environments, tools, and systems for work and daily living. Human Factors is the investigation, design, and evaluation of equipment, techniques, procedures, facilities, and human interfaces, and encompasses all aspects of human activity from manual labor to mental processing and leisure time enjoyments. In spaceflight applications, human factors engineering seeks to: (1) ensure that a task can be accomplished, (2) maintain productivity during spaceflight, and (3) ensure the habitability of the pressurized living areas. DSO 904 served as a vehicle for the verification and elucidation of human factors principles and tools in the microgravity environment. Over six flights, twelve topics were investigated. This study documented the strengths and limitations of human operators in a complex, multifaceted, and unique environment. By focusing on the man-machine interface in space flight activities, it was determined which designs allow astronauts to be optimally productive during valuable and costly space flights. Among the most promising areas of inquiry were procedures, tools, habitat, environmental conditions, tasking, work load, flexibility, and individual control over work.

  8. Introduction to human factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  9. Transcription factors Sox10 and Sox2 functionally interact with positive transcription elongation factor b in Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Arter, Juliane; Wegner, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Sox proteins are mechanistically versatile regulators with established relevance to different developmental processes and crucial impact on chromatin structure, DNA conformation, and transcriptional initiation. Here, we show that Sox2 and Sox10, two Sox proteins important for Schwann cell development, also have the capability to activate transcriptional elongation in a Schwann cell line by recruiting the positive transcription elongation factor b. Recruitment is mediated by physical interaction between the carboxyterminal transactivation domains of the two Sox proteins and the Cyclin T1 subunit of positive transcription elongation factor b, with interaction interfaces for the two Sox proteins being mapped to adjacent regions of the central part of Cyclin T1. Supporting the relevance of this interaction to Schwann cell development, transcription of myelin genes appears regulated at the level of elongation. Our results thus add a new facet to the activity of Sox proteins and expand the functional repertoire of this important group of developmental regulators. Sox transcription factors are important regulators of nervous system development. While they are known to regulate transcription by recruiting and stabilizing the RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex directly or with help of the Mediator complex, this study provides evidence that Sox10 and Sox2 additionally influence transcription in glial cells at the elongation stage by recruiting P-TEFb. Cdk9, cyclin-dependent kinase 9; P-TEFb, positive transcription elongation factor b; Pol II, RNA polymerase II; Sox, Sox2 or Sox10 protein.

  10. Transcription factor networks in erythroid cell and megakaryocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Doré, Louis C.

    2011-01-01

    Erythroid cells and megakaryocytes are derived from a common precursor, the megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitor. Although these 2 closely related hematopoietic cell types share many transcription factors, there are several key differences in their regulatory networks that lead to differential gene expression downstream of the megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitor. With the advent of next-generation sequencing and our ability to precisely define transcription factor chromatin occupancy in vivo on a global scale, we are much closer to understanding how these 2 lineages are specified and in general how transcription factor complexes govern hematopoiesis. PMID:21622645

  11. Transcriptional directionality of the human insulin-degrading enzyme promoter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lang; Wang, Pan; Ding, Qingyang; Wang, Zhao

    2013-10-01

    Unidirectional promoters dominate among mammalian genomes. However, the mechanism through which the transcriptional directionality of promoters is accomplished remains to be clarified. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a ubiquitously expressed zinc metalloprotease, whose promoter contains a CpG island. We previously showed that the basal promoter region of mouse IDE has bidirectional transcriptional activity, but an upstream promoter element blocks its antisense transcription. Therefore, we wonder whether the human IDE promoter contains an analogous element. Similarly, the basal promoter region of human IDE (-102 ~ +173 and -196 ~ +173 relative to the transcription start site) showed bidirectional transcriptional activity. However, the region from -348 to +173 could only be transcribed from the normal orientation, implying that an upstream promoter element between -348 and -196 blocks the antisense transcription of the human IDE promoter. Through promoter deletion and mutagenesis analysis, we mapped this element precisely and found that the upstream promoter element locates between -318 and -304. Furthermore, the transcription-blocking elements in the mouse and human IDE promoters inhibited the transcription of the SV40 promoter when put downstream of it. In conclusion, we identify an upstream promoter element which blocks the antisense transcription of the human IDE promoter. Our studies are helpful to clarify the transcriptional directionality of promoters.

  12. Transcription factors as targets for DNA-interacting drugs.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowski, Marek; Denny, William A; Nelson, Stephanie M; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2003-06-01

    Gene expression, both tissue specific or inducible, is controlled at the level of transcription by various transcription factors interacting with specific sequences of DNA. Anticancer drugs and other potential therapeutic agents alter interactions of regulatory proteins with DNA by a variety of different mechanisms. The main ones, considered in the review, are: i) competition for the transcription factor DNA binding sequences by drugs that interact non-covalently with DNA (e.g. anthracyclines, acridines, actinomycin D, pyrrole antibiotics and their polyamide derivatives); ii) covalent modifications of DNA by alkylating agents (e.g. nitrogen mustards, cisplatin) that prevent transcription factors from recognizing their specific sequences, or that result in multiple "unnatural" binding sites in DNA which hijack the transcription factors, thus decreasing their availability in the nucleus; iii) competition with binding sites on the transcription factors by synthetic oligonucleotides or peptide nucleic acids in an antigene strategy. The latter compounds may also compete for binding sites on regulatory proteins, acting as decoys to lower their active concentration in the cell. In this review, we have summarized recent advances which have been made towards understanding the above mechanisms by which small molecules interfere with the function of transcription factors. PMID:12678680

  13. [Functional annotation of rice WRKY transcription factors based on their transcriptional features].

    PubMed

    Liyun, Li; Jianan, Shi; Shuo, Yang; Caiqiang, Sun; Guozhen, Liu

    2016-02-01

    Transcription factors regulate alteration of transcription levels. Recently, huge amount of transcriptomic data are accumulated via the application of high throughput sequencing technology, and it is reasonable to postulate that in-depth analysis of transcription data could be used to enhance gene annotation. In this study, we chose the gene family of rice WRKY transcription factors. Based on literature search, the transcriptional data under different biological processes, including biotic and abiotic stress, development, and nutrient absorption and hormone treatments were analyzed systematically. To the end, we summarize the list of differentially expressed WRKY genes. We also expect that such information will enrich their functional annotation and also provide direct clues for subsequent functional studies. PMID:26907776

  14. Yin Yang 1: a multifaceted protein beyond a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhiyong; Cao, Paul; Wan, Mei Mei; Sui, Guangchao

    2010-01-01

    As a transcription factor, Yin Yang 1 (YY1) regulates the transcription of a dazzling list of genes and the number of its targets still mounts. Recent studies revealed that YY1 possesses functions independent of its DNA binding activity and its regulatory role in tumorigenesis has started to emerge.

  15. Maintenance of Transcription-Translation Coupling by Elongation Factor P

    PubMed Central

    Elgamal, Sara

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Under conditions of tight coupling between translation and transcription, the ribosome enables synthesis of full-length mRNAs by preventing both formation of intrinsic terminator hairpins and loading of the transcription termination factor Rho. While previous studies have focused on transcription factors, we investigated the role of Escherichia coli elongation factor P (EF-P), an elongation factor required for efficient translation of mRNAs containing consecutive proline codons, in maintaining coupled translation and transcription. In the absence of EF-P, the presence of Rho utilization (rut) sites led to an ~30-fold decrease in translation of polyproline-encoding mRNAs. Coexpression of the Rho inhibitor Psu fully restored translation. EF-P was also shown to inhibit premature termination during synthesis and translation of mRNAs encoding intrinsic terminators. The effects of EF-P loss on expression of polyproline mRNAs were augmented by a substitution in RNA polymerase that accelerates transcription. Analyses of previously reported ribosome profiling and global proteomic data identified several candidate gene clusters where EF-P could act to prevent premature transcription termination. In vivo probing allowed detection of some predicted premature termination products in the absence of EF-P. Our findings support a model in which EF-P maintains coupling of translation and transcription by decreasing ribosome stalling at polyproline motifs. Other regulators that facilitate ribosome translocation through roadblocks to prevent premature transcription termination upon uncoupling remain to be identified. PMID:27624127

  16. Transcription Factors in the Cellular Response to Charged Particle Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles, such as carbon ions, bear the promise of a more effective cancer therapy. In human spaceflight, exposure to charged particles represents an important risk factor for chronic and late effects such as cancer. Biological effects elicited by charged particle exposure depend on their characteristics, e.g., on linear energy transfer (LET). For diverse outcomes (cell death, mutation, transformation, and cell-cycle arrest), an LET dependency of the effect size was observed. These outcomes result from activation of a complex network of signaling pathways in the DNA damage response, which result in cell-protective (DNA repair and cell-cycle arrest) or cell-destructive (cell death) reactions. Triggering of these pathways converges among others in the activation of transcription factors, such as p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activated protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Depending on dose, radiation quality, and tissue, p53 induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. In low LET radiation therapy, p53 mutations are often associated with therapy resistance, while the outcome of carbon ion therapy seems to be independent of the tumor’s p53 status. NF-κB is a central transcription factor in the immune system and exhibits pro-survival effects. Both p53 and NF-κB are activated after ionizing radiation exposure in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. The NF-κB activation was shown to strongly depend on charged particles’ LET, with a maximal activation in the LET range of 90–300 keV/μm. AP-1 controls proliferation, senescence, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nrf2 can induce cellular antioxidant defense systems, CREB might also be involved in survival responses. The extent of activation of these transcription factors by charged particles and their interaction in the cellular radiation response greatly influences the destiny of the irradiated and also

  17. Transcription Factors in the Cellular Response to Charged Particle Exposure.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Christine E; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles, such as carbon ions, bear the promise of a more effective cancer therapy. In human spaceflight, exposure to charged particles represents an important risk factor for chronic and late effects such as cancer. Biological effects elicited by charged particle exposure depend on their characteristics, e.g., on linear energy transfer (LET). For diverse outcomes (cell death, mutation, transformation, and cell-cycle arrest), an LET dependency of the effect size was observed. These outcomes result from activation of a complex network of signaling pathways in the DNA damage response, which result in cell-protective (DNA repair and cell-cycle arrest) or cell-destructive (cell death) reactions. Triggering of these pathways converges among others in the activation of transcription factors, such as p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), activated protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Depending on dose, radiation quality, and tissue, p53 induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. In low LET radiation therapy, p53 mutations are often associated with therapy resistance, while the outcome of carbon ion therapy seems to be independent of the tumor's p53 status. NF-κB is a central transcription factor in the immune system and exhibits pro-survival effects. Both p53 and NF-κB are activated after ionizing radiation exposure in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. The NF-κB activation was shown to strongly depend on charged particles' LET, with a maximal activation in the LET range of 90-300 keV/μm. AP-1 controls proliferation, senescence, differentiation, and apoptosis. Nrf2 can induce cellular antioxidant defense systems, CREB might also be involved in survival responses. The extent of activation of these transcription factors by charged particles and their interaction in the cellular radiation response greatly influences the destiny of the irradiated and also

  18. Artemisinin triggers a G1 cell cycle arrest of human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells and inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase-4 promoter activity and expression by disrupting nuclear factor-κB transcriptional signaling.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kalvin Q; Tin, Antony S; Firestone, Gary L

    2014-03-01

    Relatively little is known about the antiproliferative effects of artemisinin, a naturally occurring antimalarial compound from Artemisia annua, or sweet wormwood, in human endometrial cancer cells. Artemisinin induced a G1 cell cycle arrest in cultured human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells and downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) and CDK4 transcript and protein levels. Analysis of CDK4 promoter-luciferase reporter constructs showed that the artemisinin ablation of CDK4 gene expression was accounted for by the loss of CDK4 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that artemisinin inhibited nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) subunit p65 and p50 interactions with the endogenous Ishikawa cell CDK4 promoter. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed that artemisinin disrupts endogenous p65 and p50 nuclear translocation through increased protein-protein interactions with IκB-α, an NF-κB inhibitor, and disrupts its interaction with the CDK4 promoter, leading to a loss of CDK4 gene expression. Artemisinin treatment stimulated the cellular levels of IκB-α protein without altering the level of IκB-α transcripts. Finally, expression of exogenous p65 resulted in the accumulation of this NF-κB subunit in the nucleus of artemisinin-treated and artemisinin-untreated cells, reversed the artemisinin downregulation of CDK4 protein expression and promoter activity, and prevented the artemisinin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a key event in the artemisinin antiproliferative effects in endometrial cancer cells is the transcriptional downregulation of CDK4 expression by disruption of NF-κB interactions with the CDK4 promoter. PMID:24296733

  19. Zinc regulates a key transcriptional pathway for epileptogenesis via metal-regulatory transcription factor 1

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Karen M. J.; Schaub, Christina; Pitsch, Julika; Kulbida, Rebecca; Opitz, Thoralf; Ekstein, Dana; Dalal, Adam; Urbach, Horst; Beck, Heinz; Yaari, Yoel; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common focal seizure disorder in adults. In many patients, transient brain insults, including status epilepticus (SE), are followed by a latent period of epileptogenesis, preceding the emergence of clinical seizures. In experimental animals, transcriptional upregulation of CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+-channels, resulting in an increased propensity for burst discharges of hippocampal neurons, is an important trigger for epileptogenesis. Here we provide evidence that the metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1) mediates the increase of CaV3.2 mRNA and intrinsic excitability consequent to a rise in intracellular Zn2+ that is associated with SE. Adeno-associated viral (rAAV) transfer of MTF1 into murine hippocampi leads to increased CaV3.2 mRNA. Conversely, rAAV-mediated expression of a dominant-negative MTF1 abolishes SE-induced CaV3.2 mRNA upregulation and attenuates epileptogenesis. Finally, data from resected human hippocampi surgically treated for pharmacoresistant TLE support the Zn2+-MTF1-CaV3.2 cascade, thus providing new vistas for preventing and treating TLE. PMID:26498180

  20. Human CHAC1 Protein Degrades Glutathione, and mRNA Induction Is Regulated by the Transcription Factors ATF4 and ATF3 and a Bipartite ATF/CRE Regulatory Element*

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Rebecca R.; Prescott, Eugenia T.; Sylvester, Charity F.; Higdon, Ashlee N.; Shan, Jixiu; Kilberg, Michael S.; Mungrue, Imran N.

    2015-01-01

    Using an unbiased systems genetics approach, we previously predicted a role for CHAC1 in the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway, linked functionally to activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) following treatment with oxidized phospholipids, a model for atherosclerosis. Mouse and yeast CHAC1 homologs have been shown to degrade glutathione in yeast and a cell-free system. In this report, we further defined the ATF4-CHAC1 interaction by cloning the human CHAC1 promoter upstream of a luciferase reporter system for in vitro assays in HEK293 and U2OS cells. Mutation and deletion analyses defined two major cis DNA elements necessary and sufficient for CHAC1 promoter-driven luciferase transcription under conditions of ER stress or ATF4 coexpression: the −267 ATF/cAMP response element (CRE) site and a novel −248 ATF/CRE modifier (ACM) element. We also examined the ability of the CHAC1 ATF/CRE and ACM sequences to bind ATF4 and ATF3 using immunoblot-EMSA and confirmed ATF4, ATF3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β binding at the human CHAC1 promoter in the proximity of the ATF/CRE and ACM using ChIP. To further validate the function of CHAC1 in a human cell model, we measured glutathione levels in HEK293 cells with enhanced CHAC1 expression. Overexpression of CHAC1 led to a robust depletion of glutathione, which was alleviated in a CHAC1 catalytic mutant. These results suggest an important role for CHAC1 in oxidative stress and apoptosis with implications for human health and disease. PMID:25931127

  1. Functional cyclic AMP response element in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) promoter modulates epidermal growth factor receptor pathway- or androgen withdrawal-mediated BCRP/ABCG2 transcription in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Natarajan, Karthika; Safren, Lowell; Hamburger, Anne W; Hussain, Arif; Ross, Douglas D

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorylated cyclic-AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (p-CREB) is a downstream effector of a variety of important signaling pathways. We investigated whether the human BCRP promoter contains a functional cAMP response element (CRE). 8Br-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased the activity of a BCRP promoter reporter construct and BCRP mRNA in human carcinoma cells. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway activation also led to an increase in p-CREB and in BCRP promoter reporter activity via two major downstream EGFR signaling pathways: the phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT, ERK and CREB, while simultaneously enhancing BCRP mRNA and functional protein expression. EGF-stimulated CREB phosphorylation and BCRP induction were diminished by inhibition of EGFR, PI3K/AKT or RAS/MAPK signaling. CREB silencing using RNA interference reduced basal levels of BCRP mRNA and diminished the induction of BCRP by EGF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that a putative CRE site on the BCRP promoter bound p-CREB by a point mutation of the CRE site abolished EGF-induced stimulation of BCRP promoter reporter activity. Furthermore, the CREB co-activator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC2), is involved in CREB-mediated BCRP transcription: androgen depletion of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells increased both CREB phosphorylation and CRTC2 nuclear translocation, and enhanced BCRP expression. Silencing CREB or CRTC2 reduced basal BCRP expression and BCRP induction under androgen-depletion conditions. This novel CRE site plays a central role in mediating BCRP gene expression in several human cancer cell lines following activation of multiple cancer-relevant signaling pathways. PMID:25615818

  2. Endothelial Gata5 transcription factor regulates blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Messaoudi, Smail; He, Ying; Gutsol, Alex; Wight, Andrew; Hébert, Richard L.; Vilmundarson, Ragnar O.; Makrigiannis, Andrew P.; Chalmers, John; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; McPherson, Ruth; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Touyz, Rhian M.; Nemer, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Despite its high prevalence and economic burden, the aetiology of human hypertension remains incompletely understood. Here we identify the transcription factor GATA5, as a new regulator of blood pressure (BP). GATA5 is expressed in microvascular endothelial cells and its genetic inactivation in mice (Gata5-null) leads to vascular endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. Endothelial-specific inactivation of Gata5 mimics the hypertensive phenotype of the Gata5-null mice, suggestive of an important role for GATA5 in endothelial homeostasis. Transcriptomic analysis of human microvascular endothelial cells with GATA5 knockdown reveals that GATA5 affects several genes and pathways critical for proper endothelial function, such as PKA and nitric oxide pathways. Consistent with a role in human hypertension, we report genetic association of variants at the GATA5 locus with hypertension traits in two large independent cohorts. Our results unveil an unsuspected link between GATA5 and a prominent human condition, and provide a new animal model for hypertension. PMID:26617239

  3. Roles of Iroquois Transcription Factors in Kidney Development

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Amanda N.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) affect 1/500 live births. CAKUT lead to end stage renal failure in children, and are associated with high morbidity rates. Understanding the mechanisms of kidney development, and that of other associated urogenital tissues, is crucial to the prevention and treatment of CAKUT. The kidney arises from self-renewing mesenchymal renal stem cells that produce nephrons, which are the principal functional units of the organ. To date, the genetic and cellular mechanisms that control nephrogenesis have remained poorly understood. In recent years, developmental studies using amphibians and zebrafish have revealed that their simple embryonic kidney, known as the pronephros, is a useful paradigm for comparative studies of nephron ontogeny. Here, we discuss the new found roles for Iroquois transcription factors in pronephric nephron patterning, and explore the relevance of these findings for kidney development in humans. PMID:24855634

  4. ETS transcription factors in hematopoietic stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Ciau-Uitz, Aldo; Wang, Lu; Patient, Roger; Liu, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are essential for the maintenance of the hematopoietic system. However, these cells cannot be maintained or created in vitro, and very little is known about their generation during embryogenesis. Many transcription factors and signaling pathways play essential roles at various stages of HSC development. Members of the ETS ('E twenty-six') family of transcription factors are recognized as key regulators within the gene regulatory networks governing hematopoiesis, including the ontogeny of HSCs. Remarkably, although all ETS transcription factors bind the same DNA consensus sequence and overlapping tissue expression is observed, individual ETS transcription factors play unique roles in the development of HSCs. Also, these transcription factors are recurrently used throughout development and their functions are context-dependent, increasing the challenge of studying their mechanism of action. Critically, ETS factors also play roles under pathological conditions, such as leukemia and, therefore, deciphering their mechanism of action will not only enhance our knowledge of normal hematopoiesis, but also inform protocols for their creation in vitro from pluripotent stem cells and the design of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of malignant blood cell diseases. In this review, we summarize the key findings on the roles of ETS transcription factors in HSC development and discuss novel mechanisms by which they could control hematopoiesis.

  5. Intergenic transcriptional interference is blocked by RNA polymerase III transcription factor TFIIIB in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Korde, Asawari; Rosselot, Jessica M; Donze, David

    2014-02-01

    The major function of eukaryotic RNA polymerase III is to transcribe transfer RNA, 5S ribosomal RNA, and other small non-protein-coding RNA molecules. Assembly of the RNA polymerase III complex on chromosomal DNA requires the sequential binding of transcription factor complexes TFIIIC and TFIIIB. Recent evidence has suggested that in addition to producing RNA transcripts, chromatin-assembled RNA polymerase III complexes may mediate additional nuclear functions that include chromatin boundary, nucleosome phasing, and general genome organization activities. This study provides evidence of another such "extratranscriptional" activity of assembled RNA polymerase III complexes, which is the ability to block progression of intergenic RNA polymerase II transcription. We demonstrate that the RNA polymerase III complex bound to the tRNA gene upstream of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATG31 gene protects the ATG31 promoter against readthrough transcriptional interference from the upstream noncoding intergenic SUT467 transcription unit. This protection is predominately mediated by binding of the TFIIIB complex. When TFIIIB binding to this tRNA gene is weakened, an extended SUT467-ATG31 readthrough transcript is produced, resulting in compromised ATG31 translation. Since the ATG31 gene product is required for autophagy, strains expressing the readthrough transcript exhibit defective autophagy induction and reduced fitness under autophagy-inducing nitrogen starvation conditions. Given the recent discovery of widespread pervasive transcription in all forms of life, protection of neighboring genes from intergenic transcriptional interference may be a key extratranscriptional function of assembled RNA polymerase III complexes and possibly other DNA binding proteins.

  6. Transcription-Factor-Dependent Control of Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Beckervordersandforth, Ruth; Zhang, Chun-Li; Lie, Dieter Chichung

    2015-10-01

    Adult-generated dentate granule neurons have emerged as major contributors to hippocampal plasticity. New neurons are generated from neural stem cells through a complex sequence of proliferation, differentiation, and maturation steps. Development of the new neuron is dependent on the precise temporal activity of transcription factors, which coordinate the expression of stage-specific genetic programs. Here, we review current knowledge in transcription factor-mediated regulation of mammalian neural stem cells and neurogenesis and will discuss potential mechanisms of how transcription factor networks, on one hand, allow for precise execution of the developmental sequence and, on the other hand, allow for adaptation of the rate and timing of adult neurogenesis in response to complex stimuli. Understanding transcription factor-mediated control of neuronal development will provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying neurogenesis-dependent plasticity in health and disease.

  7. Transcription factor networks regulating hepatic fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Panagiota; Talianidis, Iannis

    2015-01-01

    Tight regulation of lipid levels is critical for cellular and organismal homeostasis, not only in terms of energy utilization and storage, but also to prevent potential toxicity. The liver utilizes a set of hepatic transcription factors to regulate the expression of genes implicated in all aspects of lipid metabolism including catabolism, transport, and synthesis. In this article, we will review the main transcriptional mechanisms regulating the expression of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. The principal regulatory pathways are composed of simple modules of transcription factor crosstalks, which correspond to building blocks of more complex regulatory networks. These transcriptional networks contribute to the regulation of proper lipid homeostasis in parallel to posttranslational mechanisms and end product-mediated modulation of lipid metabolizing enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics.

  8. Regulatory coding of lymphoid lineage choice by hematopoietic transcription factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Luigi A.; Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2003-01-01

    During lymphopoiesis, precursor cells negotiate a complex regulatory space, defined by the levels of several competing and cross-regulating transcription factors, before arriving at stable states of commitment to the B-, T- and NK-specific developmental programs. Recent perturbation experiments provide evidence that this space has three major axes, corresponding to the PU.1 versus GATA-1 balance, the intensity of Notch signaling through the CSL pathway, and the ratio of E-box transcription factors to their Id protein antagonists.

  9. Plant NAC-type transcription factor proteins contain a NARD domain for repression of transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yu-Jun; Song, Qing-Xin; Chen, Hao-Wei; Zou, Hong-Feng; Wei, Wei; Kang, Xu-Sheng; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2010-10-01

    Plant-specific transcription factor NAC proteins play essential roles in many biological processes such as development, senescence, morphogenesis, and stress signal transduction pathways. In the NAC family, some members function as transcription activators while others act as repressors. In the present study we found that though the full-length GmNAC20 from soybean did not have transcriptional activation activity, the carboxy-terminal activation domain of GmNAC20 had high transcriptional activation activity in the yeast assay system. Deletion experiments revealed an active repression domain with 35 amino acids, named NARD (NAC Repression Domain), in the d subdomain of NAC DNA-binding domain. NARD can reduce the transcriptional activation ability of diverse transcription factors when fused to either the amino-terminal or the carboxy-terminal of the transcription factors. NARD-like sequences are also present in other NAC family members and they are functional repression domain when fused to VP16 in plant protoplast assay system. Mutation analysis of conserved amino acid residues in NARD showed that the hydrophobic LVFY motif may partially contribute to the repression function. It is hypothesized that the interactions between the repression domain NARD and the carboxy-terminal activation domain may finally determine the ability of NAC family proteins to regulate downstream gene expressions.

  10. DNA dynamics play a role as a basal transcription factor in the positioning and regulation of gene transcription initiation

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Gelev, Vladimir; Yoo, Sang Wook; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Bishop, Alan R.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Usheva, Anny

    2010-01-01

    We assess the role of DNA breathing dynamics as a determinant of promoter strength and transcription start site (TSS) location. We compare DNA Langevin dynamic profiles of representative gene promoters, calculated with the extended non-linear PBD model of DNA with experimental data on transcription factor binding and transcriptional activity. Our results demonstrate that DNA dynamic activity at the TSS can be suppressed by mutations that do not affect basal transcription factor binding–DNA contacts. We use this effect to establish the separate contributions of transcription factor binding and DNA dynamics to transcriptional activity. Our results argue against a purely ‘transcription factor-centric’ view of transcription initiation, suggesting that both DNA dynamics and transcription factor binding are necessary conditions for transcription initiation. PMID:20019064

  11. Characterization of metal-responsive transcription factor (MTF-1) from the giant rodent capybara reveals features in common with human as well as with small rodents (mouse, rat). Short communication.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Uschi; Leuzinger, Lucas; Steiner, Kurt; Georgiev, Oleg; Schaffner, Walter

    2008-08-01

    From mammals to insects, metal-responsive transcription factor 1 (MTF-1) is essential for the activation of metallothionein genes upon heavy-metal load. We have previously found that human MTF-1 induces a stronger metal response than mouse MTF-1. The latter differs from the human one in a number of amino acid positions and is also shorter by 78 aa at its C-terminus. We reasoned that the weaker metal inducibility might be associated with a lesser demand for tight metal homeostasis in a low-weight, short-lived animal, and thus set out to determine the sequence of MTF-1 from the largest living rodent, the Brazilian capybara that can reach 65 kg and also has a considerably longer life span than smaller rodents. An expression clone for capybara MTF-1 was then tested for its activity in both mouse and human cells. Our analysis revealed three unexpected features: i) capybara MTF-1 in terms of amino acid sequence is much more closely related to human than to mouse MTF-1, suggesting an accelerated evolution of MTF-1 in the evolutionary branch leading to small rodents; ii) capybara MTF-1 is even 32 aa shorter at its C-terminus than mouse MTF-1, and iii) in an activity test, it is not more active than mouse MTF-1. The latter two findings might indicate that capybara has evolved in an environment with low heavy-metal load.

  12. Cooperative activation of Xenopus rhodopsin transcription by paired-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression is regulated by the large Maf and Pax-like transcription factors, Nrl/LNrl and Crx/Otx5. The ubiquitous occurrence of their target DNA binding sites throughout rod-specific gene promoters suggests that multiple transcription factor interactions within the promoter are functionally important. Cooperative action by these transcription factors activates rod-specific genes such as rhodopsin. However, a quantitative mechanistic explanation of transcriptional rate determinants is lacking. Results We investigated the contributions of various paired-like transcription factors and their cognate cis-elements to rhodopsin gene activation using cultured cells to quantify activity. The Xenopus rhodopsin promoter (XOP) has a bipartite structure, with ~200 bp proximal to the start site (RPP) coordinating cooperative activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 and the adjacent 5300 bp upstream sequence increasing the overall expression level. The synergistic activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 also occurred when XOP was stably integrated into the genome. We determined that Crx/Otx5 synergistically activated transcription independently and additively through the two Pax-like cis-elements, BAT1 and Ret4, but not through Ret1. Other Pax-like family members, Rax1 and Rax2, do not synergistically activate XOP transcription with Nrl/LNrl and/or Crx/Otx5; rather they act as co-activators via the Ret1 cis-element. Conclusions We have provided a quantitative model of cooperative transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin promoter through interaction of Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl at two paired-like cis-elements proximal to the NRE and TATA binding site. Further, we have shown that Rax genes act in cooperation with Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl as co-activators of rhodopsin transcription. PMID:24499263

  13. Determination of Acetylation of the Gli Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Coni, Sonia; Di Magno, Laura; Canettieri, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The Gli transcription factors (Gli1, Gli2, and Gli3) are the final effectors of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling and play a key role in development and cancer. The activity of the Gli proteins is finely regulated by covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and acetylation. Both Gli1 and Gli2 are acetylated at a conserved lysine, and this modification causes the inhibition of their transcriptional activity. Thus, the acetylation status of these proteins represents a useful marker to monitor Hh activation in pathophysiological conditions. Herein we describe the techniques utilized to detect in vitro and intracellular acetylation of the Gli transcription factors. PMID:26179046

  14. The effects of cytosine methylation on general transcription factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jianshi; Lian, Tengfei; Gu, Chan; Yu, Kai; Gao, Yi Qin; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation on CpG sites is the most common epigenetic modification. Recently, methylation in a non-CpG context was found to occur widely on genomic DNA. Moreover, methylation of non-CpG sites is a highly controlled process, and its level may vary during cellular development. To study non-CpG methylation effects on DNA/protein interactions, we have chosen three human transcription factors (TFs): glucocorticoid receptor (GR), brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 (BMAL1) - circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) and estrogen receptor (ER) with methylated or unmethylated DNA binding sequences, using single-molecule and isothermal titration calorimetry assays. The results demonstrated that these TFs interact with methylated DNA with different effects compared with their cognate DNA sequences. The effects of non-CpG methylation on transcriptional regulation were validated by cell-based luciferase assay at protein level. The mechanisms of non-CpG methylation influencing DNA-protein interactions were investigated by crystallographic analyses and molecular dynamics simulation. With BisChIP-seq assays in HEK-293T cells, we found that GR can recognize highly methylated sites within chromatin in cells. Therefore, we conclude that non-CpG methylation of DNA can provide a mechanism for regulating gene expression through directly affecting the binding of TFs.

  15. The effects of cytosine methylation on general transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jianshi; Lian, Tengfei; Gu, Chan; Yu, Kai; Gao, Yi Qin; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation on CpG sites is the most common epigenetic modification. Recently, methylation in a non-CpG context was found to occur widely on genomic DNA. Moreover, methylation of non-CpG sites is a highly controlled process, and its level may vary during cellular development. To study non-CpG methylation effects on DNA/protein interactions, we have chosen three human transcription factors (TFs): glucocorticoid receptor (GR), brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 (BMAL1) - circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) and estrogen receptor (ER) with methylated or unmethylated DNA binding sequences, using single-molecule and isothermal titration calorimetry assays. The results demonstrated that these TFs interact with methylated DNA with different effects compared with their cognate DNA sequences. The effects of non-CpG methylation on transcriptional regulation were validated by cell-based luciferase assay at protein level. The mechanisms of non-CpG methylation influencing DNA-protein interactions were investigated by crystallographic analyses and molecular dynamics simulation. With BisChIP-seq assays in HEK-293T cells, we found that GR can recognize highly methylated sites within chromatin in cells. Therefore, we conclude that non-CpG methylation of DNA can provide a mechanism for regulating gene expression through directly affecting the binding of TFs. PMID:27385050

  16. Variable Glutamine-Rich Repeats Modulate Transcription Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gemayel, Rita; Chavali, Sreenivas; Pougach, Ksenia; Legendre, Matthieu; Zhu, Bo; Boeynaems, Steven; van der Zande, Elisa; Gevaert, Kris; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Babu, M. Madan; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Excessive expansions of glutamine (Q)-rich repeats in various human proteins are known to result in severe neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington’s disease and several ataxias. However, the physiological role of these repeats and the consequences of more moderate repeat variation remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Q-rich domains are highly enriched in eukaryotic transcription factors where they act as functional modulators. Incremental changes in the number of repeats in the yeast transcriptional regulator Ssn6 (Cyc8) result in systematic, repeat-length-dependent variation in expression of target genes that result in direct phenotypic changes. The function of Ssn6 increases with its repeat number until a certain threshold where further expansion leads to aggregation. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals that the Ssn6 repeats affect its solubility and interactions with Tup1 and other regulators. Thus, Q-rich repeats are dynamic functional domains that modulate a regulator’s innate function, with the inherent risk of pathogenic repeat expansions. PMID:26257283

  17. The effects of cytosine methylation on general transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jianshi; Lian, Tengfei; Gu, Chan; Yu, Kai; Gao, Yi Qin; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2016-07-07

    DNA methylation on CpG sites is the most common epigenetic modification. Recently, methylation in a non-CpG context was found to occur widely on genomic DNA. Moreover, methylation of non-CpG sites is a highly controlled process, and its level may vary during cellular development. To study non-CpG methylation effects on DNA/protein interactions, we have chosen three human transcription factors (TFs): glucocorticoid receptor (GR), brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 (BMAL1) - circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) and estrogen receptor (ER) with methylated or unmethylated DNA binding sequences, using single-molecule and isothermal titration calorimetry assays. The results demonstrated that these TFs interact with methylated DNA with different effects compared with their cognate DNA sequences. The effects of non-CpG methylation on transcriptional regulation were validated by cell-based luciferase assay at protein level. The mechanisms of non-CpG methylation influencing DNA-protein interactions were investigated by crystallographic analyses and molecular dynamics simulation. With BisChIP-seq assays in HEK-293T cells, we found that GR can recognize highly methylated sites within chromatin in cells. Therefore, we conclude that non-CpG methylation of DNA can provide a mechanism for regulating gene expression through directly affecting the binding of TFs.

  18. Genes for human general transcription initiation factors TFIIIB, TFIIIB-associated proteins, TFIIIC2 and PTF/SNAPC: functional and positional candidates for tumour predisposition or inherited genetic diseases?

    PubMed

    Purrello, M; Di Pietro, C; Rapisarda, A; Amico, V; Giunta, V; Engel, H; Stevens, S; Hsieh, Y; Teichman, M; Wang, Z; Sichel, G; Roeder, R; Grzeschik, K H

    2001-08-01

    TFIIIB, TFIIIC2, and PTF/SNAPC are heteromultimeric general transcription factors (GTFs) needed for expression of genes encoding small cytoplasmic (scRNAs) and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Their activity is stimulated by viral oncogenes, such as SV40 large T antigen and Adenovirus E1A, and is repressed by specific transcription factors (STFs) acting as anti-oncogenes, such as p53 and pRb. GTFs role as final targets of critical signal transduction pathways, that control cell proliferation and differentiation, and their involvement in gene expression regulation suggest that the genes encoding them are potential proto-oncogenes or anti-oncogenes or may be otherwise involved in the pathogenesis of inherited genetic diseases. To test our hypothesis through the positional candidate gene approach, we have determined the physical localization in the human genome of the 11 genes, encoding the subunits of these GTFs, and of three genes for proteins associated with TFIIIB (GTF3BAPs). Our data, obtained by chromosomal in situ hybridization, radiation hybrids and somatic cell hybrids analysis, demonstrate that these genes are present in the human genome as single copy sequences and that some cluster to the same cytogenetic band, alone or in combination with class II GTFs. Intriguingly, some of them are localized within chromosomal regions where recurrent, cytogenetically detectable mutations are seen in specific neoplasias, such as neuroblastoma, uterine leyomioma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the salivary glands and hemangiopericytoma, or where mutations causing inherited genetic diseases map, such as Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Their molecular function and genomic position make these GTF genes interesting candidates for causal involvement in oncogenesis or in the pathogenesis of inherited genetic diseases.

  19. Signaling Proteins and Transcription Factors in Normal and Malignant Early B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Reyes-León, Adriana; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2011-01-01

    B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates. PMID:22046564

  20. Signaling proteins and transcription factors in normal and malignant early B cell development.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Reyes-León, Adriana; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2011-01-01

    B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates.

  1. Human Factors Review Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R.

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  2. RegNetwork: an integrated database of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory networks in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Ping; Wu, Canglin; Miao, Hongyu; Wu, Hulin

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression is of fundamental importance to numerous biological processes. Nowadays, an increasing amount of gene regulatory relationships have been documented in various databases and literature. However, to more efficiently exploit such knowledge for biomedical research and applications, it is necessary to construct a genome-wide regulatory network database to integrate the information on gene regulatory relationships that are widely scattered in many different places. Therefore, in this work, we build a knowledge-based database, named 'RegNetwork', of gene regulatory networks for human and mouse by collecting and integrating the documented regulatory interactions among transcription factors (TFs), microRNAs (miRNAs) and target genes from 25 selected databases. Moreover, we also inferred and incorporated potential regulatory relationships based on transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs into RegNetwork. As a result, RegNetwork contains a comprehensive set of experimentally observed or predicted transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory relationships, and the database framework is flexibly designed for potential extensions to include gene regulatory networks for other organisms in the future. Based on RegNetwork, we characterized the statistical and topological properties of genome-wide regulatory networks for human and mouse, we also extracted and interpreted simple yet important network motifs that involve the interplays between TF-miRNA and their targets. In summary, RegNetwork provides an integrated resource on the prior information for gene regulatory relationships, and it enables us to further investigate context-specific transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory interactions based on domain-specific experimental data. Database URL: http://www.regnetworkweb.org.

  3. RegNetwork: an integrated database of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory networks in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Ping; Wu, Canglin; Miao, Hongyu; Wu, Hulin

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression is of fundamental importance to numerous biological processes. Nowadays, an increasing amount of gene regulatory relationships have been documented in various databases and literature. However, to more efficiently exploit such knowledge for biomedical research and applications, it is necessary to construct a genome-wide regulatory network database to integrate the information on gene regulatory relationships that are widely scattered in many different places. Therefore, in this work, we build a knowledge-based database, named ‘RegNetwork’, of gene regulatory networks for human and mouse by collecting and integrating the documented regulatory interactions among transcription factors (TFs), microRNAs (miRNAs) and target genes from 25 selected databases. Moreover, we also inferred and incorporated potential regulatory relationships based on transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs into RegNetwork. As a result, RegNetwork contains a comprehensive set of experimentally observed or predicted transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory relationships, and the database framework is flexibly designed for potential extensions to include gene regulatory networks for other organisms in the future. Based on RegNetwork, we characterized the statistical and topological properties of genome-wide regulatory networks for human and mouse, we also extracted and interpreted simple yet important network motifs that involve the interplays between TF-miRNA and their targets. In summary, RegNetwork provides an integrated resource on the prior information for gene regulatory relationships, and it enables us to further investigate context-specific transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory interactions based on domain-specific experimental data. Database URL: http://www.regnetworkweb.org PMID:26424082

  4. Erythro-megakaryocytic transcription factors associated with hereditary anemia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2014-01-01

    Most heritable anemias are caused by mutations in genes encoding globins, red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteins, or enzymes in the glycolytic and hexose monophosphate shunt pathways. A less common class of genetic anemia is caused by mutations that alter the functions of erythroid transcription factors (TFs). Many TF mutations associated with heritable anemia cause truncations or amino acid substitutions, resulting in the production of functionally altered proteins. Characterization of these mutant proteins has provided insights into mechanisms of gene expression, hematopoietic development, and human disease. Mutations within promoter or enhancer regions that disrupt TF binding to essential erythroid genes also cause anemia and heritable variations in RBC traits, such as fetal hemoglobin content. Defining the latter may have important clinical implications for de-repressing fetal hemoglobin synthesis to treat sickle cell anemia and β thalassemia. Functionally important alterations in genes encoding TFs or their cognate cis elements are likely to occur more frequently than currently appreciated, a hypothesis that will soon be tested through ongoing genome-wide association studies and the rapidly expanding use of global genome sequencing for human diagnostics. Findings obtained through such studies of RBCs and associated diseases are likely generalizable to many human diseases and quantitative traits. PMID:24652993

  5. Transcriptional regulation of human thromboxane synthase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.D.; Baek, S.J.; Fleischer, T

    1994-09-01

    The human thromboxane synthase (TS) gene encodes a microsomal enzyme catalyzing the conversion of prostaglandin endoperoxide into thromboxane A{sub 2}(TxA{sub 2}), a potent inducer of vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation. A deficiency in platelet TS activity results in bleeding disorders, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Increased TxA{sub 2} has been associated with many pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular disease, pulmonary hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and thrombosis in sickle cell patients. Since the formation of TxA{sub 2} is dependent upon TS, the regulation of TS gene expression may presumably play a crucial role in vivo. Abrogation of the regulatory mechanism in TS gene expression might contribute, in part, to the above clinical manifestations. To gain insight into TS gene regulation, a 1.7 kb promoter of the human TS gene was cloned and sequenced. RNase protection assay and 5{prime} RACE protocols were used to map the transcription initiation site to nucleotide A, 30 bp downstream from a canonical TATA box. Several transcription factor binding sites, including AP-1, PU.1, and PEA3, were identified within this sequence. Transient expression studies in HL-60 cells transfected with constructs containing various lengths (0.2 to 5.5 kb) of the TS promoter/luciferase fusion gene indicated the presence of multiple repressor elements within the 5.5 kb TS promoter. However, a lineage-specific up-regulation of TS gene expression was observed in HL-60 cells induced by TPA to differentiate along the macrophage lineage. The increase in TS transcription was not detectable until 36 hr after addition of the inducer. These results suggest that expression of the human TS gene may be regulated by a mechanism involving repression and derepression of the TS promoter.

  6. Core human mitochondrial transcription apparatus is a regulated two-component system in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shutt, Timothy E; Lodeiro, Maria F; Cotney, Justin; Cameron, Craig E; Shadel, Gerald S

    2010-07-01

    The core human mitochondrial transcription apparatus is currently regarded as an obligate three-component system comprising the bacteriophage T7-related mitochondrial RNA polymerase, the rRNA methyltransferase-related transcription factor, h-mtTFB2, and the high mobility group box transcription/DNA-packaging factor, h-mtTFA/TFAM. Using a faithful recombinant human mitochondrial transcription system from Escherichia coli, we demonstrate that specific initiation from the mtDNA promoters, LSP and HSP1, only requires mitochondrial RNA polymerase and h-mtTFB2 in vitro. When h-mtTFA is added to these basal components, LSP exhibits a much lower threshold for activation and a larger amplitude response than HSP1. In addition, when LSP and HSP1 are together on the same transcription template, h-mtTFA-independent transcription from HSP1 and h-mtTFA-dependent transcription from both promoters is enhanced and a higher concentration of h-mtTFA is required to stimulate HSP1. Promoter competition experiments revealed that, in addition to LSP competing transcription components away from HSP1, additional cis-acting signals are involved in these aspects of promoter regulation. Based on these results, we speculate that the human mitochondrial transcription system may have evolved to differentially regulate transcription initiation and transcription-primed mtDNA replication in response to the amount of h-mtTFA associated with nucleoids, which could begin to explain the heterogeneity of nucleoid structure and activity in vivo. Furthermore, this study sheds new light on the evolution of mitochondrial transcription components by showing that the human system is a regulated two-component system in vitro, and thus more akin to that of budding yeast than thought previously.

  7. Core human mitochondrial transcription apparatus is a regulated two-component system in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shutt, Timothy E.; Lodeiro, Maria F.; Cotney, Justin; Cameron, Craig E.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2010-01-01

    The core human mitochondrial transcription apparatus is currently regarded as an obligate three-component system comprising the bacteriophage T7-related mitochondrial RNA polymerase, the rRNA methyltransferase-related transcription factor, h-mtTFB2, and the high mobility group box transcription/DNA-packaging factor, h-mtTFA/TFAM. Using a faithful recombinant human mitochondrial transcription system from Escherichia coli, we demonstrate that specific initiation from the mtDNA promoters, LSP and HSP1, only requires mitochondrial RNA polymerase and h-mtTFB2 in vitro. When h-mtTFA is added to these basal components, LSP exhibits a much lower threshold for activation and a larger amplitude response than HSP1. In addition, when LSP and HSP1 are together on the same transcription template, h-mtTFA-independent transcription from HSP1 and h-mtTFA-dependent transcription from both promoters is enhanced and a higher concentration of h-mtTFA is required to stimulate HSP1. Promoter competition experiments revealed that, in addition to LSP competing transcription components away from HSP1, additional cis-acting signals are involved in these aspects of promoter regulation. Based on these results, we speculate that the human mitochondrial transcription system may have evolved to differentially regulate transcription initiation and transcription-primed mtDNA replication in response to the amount of h-mtTFA associated with nucleoids, which could begin to explain the heterogeneity of nucleoid structure and activity in vivo. Furthermore, this study sheds new light on the evolution of mitochondrial transcription components by showing that the human system is a regulated two-component system in vitro, and thus more akin to that of budding yeast than thought previously. PMID:20562347

  8. Epigenetic program and transcription factor circuitry of dendritic cell development.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiong; Chauvistré, Heike; Costa, Ivan G; Gusmao, Eduardo G; Mitzka, Saskia; Hänzelmann, Sonja; Baying, Bianka; Klisch, Theresa; Moriggl, Richard; Hennuy, Benoit; Smeets, Hubert; Hoffmann, Kurt; Benes, Vladimir; Seré, Kristin; Zenke, Martin

    2015-11-16

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that develop from hematopoietic stem cells through successive steps of lineage commitment and differentiation. Multipotent progenitors (MPP) are committed to DC restricted common DC progenitors (CDP), which differentiate into specific DC subsets, classical DC (cDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC). To determine epigenetic states and regulatory circuitries during DC differentiation, we measured consecutive changes of genome-wide gene expression, histone modification and transcription factor occupancy during the sequel MPP-CDP-cDC/pDC. Specific histone marks in CDP reveal a DC-primed epigenetic signature, which is maintained and reinforced during DC differentiation. Epigenetic marks and transcription factor PU.1 occupancy increasingly coincide upon DC differentiation. By integrating PU.1 occupancy and gene expression we devised a transcription factor regulatory circuitry for DC commitment and subset specification. The circuitry provides the transcription factor hierarchy that drives the sequel MPP-CDP-cDC/pDC, including Irf4, Irf8, Tcf4, Spib and Stat factors. The circuitry also includes feedback loops inferred for individual or multiple factors, which stabilize distinct stages of DC development and DC subsets. In summary, here we describe the basic regulatory circuitry of transcription factors that drives DC development.

  9. Epigenetic program and transcription factor circuitry of dendritic cell development

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiong; Chauvistré, Heike; Costa, Ivan G.; Gusmao, Eduardo G.; Mitzka, Saskia; Hänzelmann, Sonja; Baying, Bianka; Klisch, Theresa; Moriggl, Richard; Hennuy, Benoit; Smeets, Hubert; Hoffmann, Kurt; Benes, Vladimir; Seré, Kristin; Zenke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that develop from hematopoietic stem cells through successive steps of lineage commitment and differentiation. Multipotent progenitors (MPP) are committed to DC restricted common DC progenitors (CDP), which differentiate into specific DC subsets, classical DC (cDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC). To determine epigenetic states and regulatory circuitries during DC differentiation, we measured consecutive changes of genome-wide gene expression, histone modification and transcription factor occupancy during the sequel MPP-CDP-cDC/pDC. Specific histone marks in CDP reveal a DC-primed epigenetic signature, which is maintained and reinforced during DC differentiation. Epigenetic marks and transcription factor PU.1 occupancy increasingly coincide upon DC differentiation. By integrating PU.1 occupancy and gene expression we devised a transcription factor regulatory circuitry for DC commitment and subset specification. The circuitry provides the transcription factor hierarchy that drives the sequel MPP-CDP-cDC/pDC, including Irf4, Irf8, Tcf4, Spib and Stat factors. The circuitry also includes feedback loops inferred for individual or multiple factors, which stabilize distinct stages of DC development and DC subsets. In summary, here we describe the basic regulatory circuitry of transcription factors that drives DC development. PMID:26476451

  10. Localization of the genes encoding two transcription factors, LMX1 and CDX3, regulating insulin gene expression to human chromosomes 1 and 13

    SciTech Connect

    German, M.S.; Wang, J.; Fernald, A.A.

    1994-11-15

    The human lmx-1 and cdx-3 genomic clones {lambda}F11.1 and {lambda}F4.1, respectively, were isolated from a human genomic library by cross-hybridization with cDNA clones encoding Syrian hamster lmx-1 and cdx-3. The identities of the two clones were confirmed by DNA sequencing. The chromosomal locations of the human lmx-1 (LMX1) and cdx-3 (CDX3) genes were determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. {lambda}F11.1 and {lambda}F4.1 DNAs were labeled with biotin by nick-translation in the presence of biotin-11-dUTP.

  11. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  12. DNA specificity determinants associate with distinct transcription factor functions.

    PubMed

    Hollenhorst, Peter C; Chandler, Katherine J; Poulsen, Rachel L; Johnson, W Evan; Speck, Nancy A; Graves, Barbara J

    2009-12-01

    To elucidate how genomic sequences build transcriptional control networks, we need to understand the connection between DNA sequence and transcription factor binding and function. Binding predictions based solely on consensus predictions are limited, because a single factor can use degenerate sequence motifs and because related transcription factors often prefer identical sequences. The ETS family transcription factor, ETS1, exemplifies these challenges. Unexpected, redundant occupancy of ETS1 and other ETS proteins is observed at promoters of housekeeping genes in T cells due to common sequence preferences and the presence of strong consensus motifs. However, ETS1 exhibits a specific function in T cell activation; thus, unique transcriptional targets are predicted. To uncover the sequence motifs that mediate specific functions of ETS1, a genome-wide approach, chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq), identified both promoter and enhancer binding events in Jurkat T cells. A comparison with DNase I sensitivity both validated the dataset and also improved accuracy. Redundant occupancy of ETS1 with the ETS protein GABPA occurred primarily in promoters of housekeeping genes, whereas ETS1 specific occupancy occurred in the enhancers of T cell-specific genes. Two routes to ETS1 specificity were identified: an intrinsic preference of ETS1 for a variant of the ETS family consensus sequence and the presence of a composite sequence that can support cooperative binding with a RUNX transcription factor. Genome-wide occupancy of RUNX factors corroborated the importance of this partnership. Furthermore, genome-wide occupancy of co-activator CBP indicated tight co-localization with ETS1 at specific enhancers, but not redundant promoters. The distinct sequences associated with redundant versus specific ETS1 occupancy were predictive of promoter or enhancer location and the ontology of nearby genes. These findings demonstrate that diversity

  13. A clustering property of highly-degenerate transcription factor binding sites in the mammalian genome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaolin; Xuan, Zhenyu; Otto, Stefanie; Hover, John R; McCorkle, Sean R; Mandel, Gail; Zhang, Michael Q

    2006-01-01

    Transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are short DNA sequences interacting with transcription factors (TFs), which regulate gene expression. Due to the relatively short length of such binding sites, it is largely unclear how the specificity of protein-DNA interaction is achieved. Here, we have performed a genome-wide analysis of TFBS-like sequences for the transcriptional repressor, RE1 Silencing Transcription Factor (REST), as well as for several other representative mammalian TFs (c-myc, p53, HNF-1 and CREB). We find a nonrandom distribution of inexact sites for these TFs, referred to as highly-degenerate TFBSs, that are enriched around the cognate binding sites. Comparisons among human, mouse and rat orthologous promoters reveal that these highly-degenerate sites are conserved significantly more than expected by random chance, suggesting their positive selection during evolution. We propose that this arrangement provides a favorable genomic landscape for functional target site selection.

  14. Selective Activation of Transcription by a Novel CCAAT Binding Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sankar N.; Golumbek, Paul T.; Karsenty, Gerard; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    1988-07-01

    A novel CCAAT binding factor (CBF) composed of two different subunits has been extensively purified from rat liver. Both subunits are needed for specific binding to DNA. Addition of this purified protein to nuclear extracts of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts stimulates transcription from several promoters including the α 2(I) collagen, the α 1(I) collagen, the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat (RSV-LTR), and the adenovirus major late promoter. Point mutations in the CCAAT motif that show either no binding or a decreased binding of CBF likewise abolish or reduce activation of transcription by CBF. Activation of transcription requires, therefore, the specific binding of CBF to its recognition sites.

  15. Transcription of the human beta enolase gene (ENO-3) is regulated by an intronic muscle-specific enhancer that binds myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2 proteins and ubiquitous G-rich-box binding factors.

    PubMed Central

    Feo, S; Antona, V; Barbieri, G; Passantino, R; Calì, L; Giallongo, A

    1995-01-01

    To provide evidence for the cis-regulatory DNA sequences and trans-acting factors involved in the complex pattern of tissue- and stage-specific expression of the beta enolase gene, constructs containing fragments of the gene fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene were used in transient-transfection assays of C2C12 myogenic cells. Deletion analysis revealed the presence of four major regions: two negative regions in the 5'-flanking sequence, a basal promoter region which directs expression at low levels in proliferating and differentiated muscle cells, and a positive region within the first intron that confers cell-type-specific and differentiation-induced expression. This positive regulatory element is located in the 3'-proximal portion of the first intron (nucleotides +504 to +637) and acts as an enhancer irrespective of orientation and position from the homologous beta enolase promoter or the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter, conferring in both cases muscle-specific expression to the linked reporter gene. Deletion of a putative myocyte-specific enhancer factor 1 (MEF-1) binding site, containing a canonical E-box motif, had no effects on muscle-specific transcription, indicating that this site is not required for the activity of the enhancer. Gel mobility shift assays, competition analysis, DNase I footprinting, and mutagenesis studies indicated that this element interacts through an A/T-rich box with a MEF-2 protein(s) and through a G-rich box with a novel ubiquitous factor(s). Mutation of either the G-rich box or the A/T-rich box resulted in a significantly reduced activity of the enhancer in transient-transfection assays. These data indicate that MEF-2 and G-rich-box binding factors are each necessary for tissue-specific expression of the beta enolase gene in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:7565752

  16. Transcription factors interfering with dedifferentiation induce cell type-specific transcriptional profiles

    PubMed Central

    Hikichi, Takafusa; Matoba, Ryo; Ikeda, Takashi; Watanabe, Akira; Yamamoto, Takuya; Yoshitake, Satoko; Tamura-Nakano, Miwa; Kimura, Takayuki; Kamon, Masayoshi; Shimura, Mari; Kawakami, Koichi; Okuda, Akihiko; Okochi, Hitoshi; Inoue, Takafumi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Masui, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are able to regulate differentiation-related processes, including dedifferentiation and direct conversion, through the regulation of cell type-specific transcriptional profiles. However, the functional interactions between the TFs regulating different transcriptional profiles are not well understood. Here, we show that the TFs capable of inducing cell type-specific transcriptional profiles prevent the dedifferentiation induced by TFs for pluripotency. Of the large number of TFs expressed in a neural-lineage cell line, we identified a subset of TFs that, when overexpressed, strongly interfered with the dedifferentiation triggered by the procedure to generate induced pluripotent stem cells. This interference occurred through a maintenance mechanism of the cell type-specific transcriptional profile. Strikingly, the maintenance activity of the interfering TF set was strong enough to induce the cell line-specific transcriptional profile when overexpressed in a heterologous cell type. In addition, the TFs that interfered with dedifferentiation in hepatic-lineage cells involved TFs with known induction activity for hepatic-lineage cells. Our results suggest that dedifferentiation suppresses a cell type-specific transcriptional profile, which is primarily maintained by a small subset of TFs capable of inducing direct conversion. We anticipate that this functional correlation might be applicable in various cell types and might facilitate the identification of TFs with induction activity in efforts to understand differentiation. PMID:23550161

  17. IRF4 Transcription Factor-Dependent CD11b+ Dendritic Cells in Human and Mouse Control Mucosal IL-17 Cytokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Schlitzer, Andreas; McGovern, Naomi; Teo, Pearline; Zelante, Teresa; Atarashi, Koji; Low, Donovan; Ho, Adrian W.S.; See, Peter; Shin, Amanda; Wasan, Pavandip Singh; Hoeffel, Guillaume; Malleret, Benoit; Heiseke, Alexander; Chew, Samantha; Jardine, Laura; Purvis, Harriet A.; Hilkens, Catharien M.U.; Tam, John; Poidinger, Michael; Stanley, E. Richard; Krug, Anne B.; Renia, Laurent; Sivasankar, Baalasubramanian; Ng, Lai Guan; Collin, Matthew; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Honda, Kenya; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Ginhoux, Florent

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mouse and human dendritic cells (DCs) are composed of functionally specialized subsets, but precise interspecies correlation is currently incomplete. Here, we showed that murine lung and gut lamina propria CD11b+ DC populations were comprised of two subsets: FLT3- and IRF4-dependent CD24+CD64− DCs and contaminating CSF-1R-dependent CD24−CD64+ macrophages. Functionally, loss of CD24+CD11b+ DCs abrogated CD4+ T cell-mediated interleukin-17 (IL-17) production in steady state and after Aspergillus fumigatus challenge. Human CD1c+ DCs, the equivalent of murine CD24+CD11b+ DCs, also expressed IRF4, secreted IL-23, and promoted T helper 17 cell responses. Our data revealed heterogeneity in the mouse CD11b+ DC compartment and identifed mucosal tissues IRF4-expressing DCs specialized in instructing IL-17 responses in both mouse and human. The demonstration of mouse and human DC subsets specialized in driving IL-17 responses highlights the conservation of key immune functions across species and will facilitate the translation of mouse in vivo findings to advance DC-based clinical therapies. PMID:23706669

  18. Resetting the transcription factor network reverses terminal chronic hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Taichiro; Bell, Aaron; Brooks, Jenna M; Setoyama, Kentaro; Melis, Marta; Han, Bing; Fukumitsu, Ken; Handa, Kan; Tian, Jianmin; Kaestner, Klaus H; Vodovotz, Yoram; Locker, Joseph; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Fox, Ira J

    2015-04-01

    The cause of organ failure is enigmatic for many degenerative diseases, including end-stage liver disease. Here, using a CCl4-induced rat model of irreversible and fatal hepatic failure, which also exhibits terminal changes in the extracellular matrix, we demonstrated that chronic injury stably reprograms the critical balance of transcription factors and that diseased and dedifferentiated cells can be returned to normal function by re-expression of critical transcription factors, a process similar to the type of reprogramming that induces somatic cells to become pluripotent or to change their cell lineage. Forced re-expression of the transcription factor HNF4α induced expression of the other hepatocyte-expressed transcription factors; restored functionality in terminally diseased hepatocytes isolated from CCl4-treated rats; and rapidly reversed fatal liver failure in CCl4-treated animals by restoring diseased hepatocytes rather than replacing them with new hepatocytes or stem cells. Together, the results of our study indicate that disruption of the transcription factor network and cellular dedifferentiation likely mediate terminal liver failure and suggest reinstatement of this network has therapeutic potential for correcting organ failure without cell replacement.

  19. Human Factors Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  20. Developmental expression patterns of candidate co-factors for vertebrate Six family transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, Karen M.; Pignoni, Francesca; Yan, Bo; Moody, Sally A.

    2010-01-01

    Six family transcription factors play important roles in craniofacial development. Their transcriptional activity can be modified by co-factor proteins. Two Six genes and one co-factor gene (Eya1) are involved in the human Branchio-otic (BO) and Branchio-otic-renal (BOR) syndromes. However, mutations in Six and Eya genes only account for about half of these patients. To discover potential new causative genes, we searched the Xenopus genome for orthologues of Drosophila co-factor proteins that interact with the fly Six-related factor, SO. We identified 33 Xenopus genes with high sequence identity to 20 of the 25 fly SO-interacting proteins. We provide the developmental expression patterns of the Xenopus orthologues for 11 of the fly genes, and demonstrate that all are expressed in developing craniofacial tissues with at least partial overlap with Six1/Six2. We speculate that these genes may function as Six-interacting partners with important roles in vertebrate craniofacial development and perhaps congenital syndromes. PMID:21089078

  1. CREB in the Pathophysiology of Cancer: Implications for Targeting Transcription Factors for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kathleen M.; Frank, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors are key regulators of the pattern of gene expression in a cell and directly control central processes such as proliferation, survival, self-renewal, and invasion. Given this critical role, the function of transcription factors is normally regulated closely, often through transient phosphorylation. Although transcription factors are not often directly modified by mutations in cancer cells, they frequently become activated constitutively through mutations affecting “upstream” pathways. By continually driving the expression of key target genes, these oncogenic transcription factors play a central role in tumor pathogenesis. One such transcription factor is the cAMP-regulatory element-binding protein (CREB), which can be activated through phosphorylation by a number of kinases, including Akt, p90Rsk, protein kinase A, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases and regulates genes whose deregulated expression promotes oncogenesis, including cyclins, Bcl-2 family members, and Egr-1. CREB is overexpressed and constitutively phosphorylated in a number of forms of human cancer, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and non – small cell lung cancer, and appears to play a direct role in disease pathogenesis and prognosis. Although transcription factors have not been a central focus of drug development, recent advances suggest that CREB and other such proteins may be worthwhile targets for cancer therapy. PMID:19351775

  2. Transcriptional analysis of the 5'-noncoding region of the human involucrin gene.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Bayghen, E; Vega, A; Cadena, A; Granados, S E; Jave, L F; Gariglio, P; Alvarez-Salas, L M

    1996-01-01

    Human involucrin whose gene transcription is directed by a 2456-nucleotide (nt) 5'-noncoding region is a structural component of the epithelial cornified layer. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that this region is transcriptionally active in multiplying keratinocytes and is enhanced by 2 mM CaCl2 treatment. Calcium-independent transcriptional activity and the interaction with the AP-1 transcriptional factor was located on the proximal part (nt -159 to -1) of the 5'-noncoding region. However, CaCl2 responsiveness was mapped to a distal 1185-nt fragment (nt -2456 to -1272). Moreover, this fragment potentiated the Herpes simplex thymidine kinase promoter in normal keratinocytes and is responsive to calcium treatment in a cell type-specific manner. Interestingly, the absence of a 491-nt fragment located between the two enhancer domains (nt -651 to -160) resulted in transcriptional activation in multiplying keratinocytes. This fragment interacts with AP-1 and the YY1 transcriptional silencer. It is concluded that human involucrin 5'-noncoding region contains at least three regulatory domains, a distal CaCl2-responsive enhancer, a putative transcriptional silencer (that interacts with AP-1 and YY1), and a proximal enhancer/promoter (that interacts with AP-1). Thus, this study demonstrates the presence of particular transcriptional factors can potentially regulate the human involucrin expression.

  3. Oncogenicity of the developmental transcription factor Sox9

    PubMed Central

    Matheu, Ander; Collado, Manuel; Wise, Clare; Manterola, Lorea; Cekaite, Lina; Tye, Angela J.; Canamero, Marta; Bujanda, Luis; Schedl, Andreas; Cheah, Kathryn S.E.; Skotheim, Rolf I.; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; de Munain, Adolfo López; Briscoe, James; Serrano, Manuel; Lovell-Badge, Robin

    2012-01-01

    SOX9, a high mobility group (HMG) box transcription factor, plays critical roles during embryogenesis and its activity is required for development, differentiation and lineage commitment in various tissues including the intestinal epithelium. Here, we present functional and clinical data of a broadly important role for SOX9 in tumorigenesis. SOX9 was overexpressed in a wide range of human cancers, where its expression correlated with malignant character and progression. Gain of SOX9 copy number is detected in some primary colorectal cancers. SOX9 exhibited several pro-oncogenic properties, including the ability to promote proliferation, inhibit senescence and collaborate with other oncogenes in neoplastic transformation. In primary MEFs and colorectal cancer cells, SOX9 expression facilitated tumor growth and progression whilst its inactivation reduced tumorigenicity. Mechanistically, we have found that Sox9 directly binds and activates the promoter of the polycomb protein Bmi1, whose upregulation represses the tumor suppressor Ink4a/Arf locus. In agreement with this, human colorectal cancers showed a positive correlation between expression levels of SOX9 and BMI1 and a negative correlation between SOX9 and ARF in clinical samples. Taken together, our findings provide direct mechanistic evidence of the involvement of SOX9 in neoplastic pathobiology, particularly in colorectal cancer. PMID:22246670

  4. Human factors workplace considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    Computer workstations assume many different forms and play different functions today. In order for them to assume the effective interface role which they should play they must be properly designed to take into account the ubiguitous human factor. In addition, the entire workplace in which they are used should be properly configured so as to enhance the operational features of the individual workstation where possible. A number of general human factors workplace considerations are presented. This ongoing series of notes covers such topics as achieving comfort and good screen visibility, hardware issues (e.g., mouse maintenance), screen symbology features (e.g., labels, cursors, prompts), and various miscellaneous subjects. These notes are presented here in order to: (1) illustrate how one's workstation can be used to support telescience activities of many other people working within an organization, and (2) provide a single complete set of considerations for future reference.

  5. Modeling co-occupancy of transcription factors using chromatin features

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Zhao, Weiling; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression requires both transcription factor (TFs) and epigenetic modifications, and interplays between the two types of factors have been discovered. However study of relationships between chromatin features and TF–TF co-occupancy remains limited. Here, we revealed the relationship by first illustrating distinct profile patterns of chromatin features related to different binding events, including single TF binding and TF–TF co-occupancy of 71 TFs from five human cell lines. We further implemented statistical analyses to demonstrate the relationship by accurately predicting co-occupancy genome-widely using chromatin features including DNase I hypersensitivity, 11 histone modifications (HMs) and GC content. Remarkably, our results showed that the combination of chromatin features enables accurate predictions across the five cells. For individual chromatin features, DNase I enables high and consistent predictions. H3K27ac, H3K4me 2, H3K4me3 and H3K9ac are more reliable predictors than other HMs. Although the combination of 11 HMs achieves accurate predictions, their predictive ability varies considerably when a model obtained from one cell is applied to others, indicating relationship between HMs and TF–TF co-occupancy is cell type dependent. GC content is not a reliable predictor, but the addition of GC content to any other features enhances their predictive ability. Together, our results elucidate a strong relationship between TF–TF co-occupancy and chromatin features. PMID:26590261

  6. Transcription Factor Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1β Regulates Renal Cholesterol Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aboudehen, Karam; Kim, Min Soo; Mitsche, Matthew; Garland, Kristina; Anderson, Norma; Noureddine, Lama; Pontoglio, Marco; Patel, Vishal; Xie, Yang; DeBose-Boyd, Russell; Igarashi, Peter

    2016-08-01

    HNF-1β is a tissue-specific transcription factor that is expressed in the kidney and other epithelial organs. Humans with mutations in HNF-1β develop kidney cysts, and HNF-1β regulates the transcription of several cystic disease genes. However, the complete spectrum of HNF-1β-regulated genes and pathways is not known. Here, using chromatin immunoprecipitation/next generation sequencing and gene expression profiling, we identified 1545 protein-coding genes that are directly regulated by HNF-1β in murine kidney epithelial cells. Pathway analysis predicted that HNF-1β regulates cholesterol metabolism. Expression of dominant negative mutant HNF-1β or kidney-specific inactivation of HNF-1β decreased the expression of genes that are essential for cholesterol synthesis, including sterol regulatory element binding factor 2 (Srebf2) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (Hmgcr). HNF-1β mutant cells also expressed lower levels of cholesterol biosynthetic intermediates and had a lower rate of cholesterol synthesis than control cells. Additionally, depletion of cholesterol in the culture medium mitigated the inhibitory effects of mutant HNF-1β on the proteins encoded by Srebf2 and Hmgcr, and HNF-1β directly controlled the renal epithelial expression of proprotein convertase subtilisin-like kexin type 9, a key regulator of cholesterol uptake. These findings reveal a novel role of HNF-1β in a transcriptional network that regulates intrarenal cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26712526

  7. Activation of Archaeal Transcription Mediated by Recruitment of Transcription Factor B*

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Simon M.; Thumann, Sybille; Richau, Renate; Weirauch, Matt T.; Lowe, Todd M.; Thomm, Michael; Hausner, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    Archaeal promoters consist of a TATA box and a purine-rich adjacent upstream sequence (transcription factor B (TFB)-responsive element (BRE)), which are bound by the transcription factors TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and TFB. Currently, only a few activators of archaeal transcription have been experimentally characterized. The best studied activator, Ptr2, mediates activation by recruitment of TBP. Here, we present a detailed biochemical analysis of an archaeal transcriptional activator, PF1088, which was identified in Pyrococcus furiosus by a bioinformatic approach. Operon predictions suggested that an upstream gene, pf1089, is polycistronically transcribed with pf1088. We demonstrate that PF1088 stimulates in vitro transcription by up to 7-fold when the pf1089 promoter is used as a template. By DNase I and hydroxyl radical footprinting experiments, we show that the binding site of PF1088 is located directly upstream of the BRE of pf1089. Mutational analysis indicated that activation requires the presence of the binding site for PF1088. Furthermore, we show that activation of transcription by PF1088 is dependent upon the presence of an imperfect BRE and is abolished when the pf1089 BRE is replaced with a BRE from a strong archaeal promoter. Gel shift experiments showed that TFB recruitment to the pf1089 operon is stimulated by PF1088, and TFB seems to stabilize PF1088 operator binding even in the absence of TBP. Taken together, these results represent the first biochemical evidence for a transcriptional activator working as a TFB recruitment factor in Archaea, for which the designation TFB-RF1 is suggested. PMID:22496454

  8. Theory on the dynamic memory in the transcription-factor-mediated transcription activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, R.

    2011-04-01

    We develop a theory to explain the origin of the static and dynamical memory effects in transcription-factor-mediated transcription activation. Our results suggest that the following inequality conditions should be satisfied to observe such memory effects: (a) τL≫max(τR,τE), (b) τLT≫τT, and (c) τI⩾(τEL+τTR) where τL is the average time required for the looping-mediated spatial interactions of enhancer—transcription-factor complex with the corresponding promoter—RNA-polymerase or eukaryotic RNA polymerase type II (PolII in eukaryotes) complex that is located L base pairs away from the cis-acting element, (τR,τE) are respectively the search times required for the site-specific binding of the RNA polymerase and the transcription factor with the respective promoter and the cis-regulatory module, τLT is the time associated with the relaxation of the looped-out segment of DNA that connects the cis-acting site and promoter, τT is the time required to generate a complete transcript, τI is the transcription initiation time, τEL is the elongation time, and τTR is the termination time. We have theoretically derived the expressions for the various searching, looping, and loop-relaxation time components. Using the experimentally determined values of various time components we further show that the dynamical memory effects cannot be experimentally observed whenever the segment of DNA that connects the cis-regulatory element with the promoter is not loaded with bulky histone bodies. Our analysis suggests that the presence of histone-mediated compaction of the connecting segment of DNA can result in higher values of looping and loop-relaxation times, which is the origin of the static memory in the transcription activation that is mediated by the memory gene loops in eukaryotes.

  9. Human factors in aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L. (Editor); Nagel, David C. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of human-factors (HF) analysis for aviation applications are examined in a collection of reviews by leading experts, with an emphasis on recent developments. The aim is to provide information and guidance to the aviation community outside the HF field itself. Topics addressed include the systems approach to HF, system safety considerations, the human senses in flight, information processing, aviation workloads, group interaction and crew performance, flight training and simulation, human error in aviation operations, and aircrew fatigue and circadian rhythms. Also discussed are pilot control; aviation displays; cockpit automation; HF aspects of software interfaces; the design and integration of cockpit-crew systems; and HF issues for airline pilots, general aviation, helicopters, and ATC.

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tat Protein Activates Transcription Factor NF-κB through the Cellular Interferon-Inducible, Double-Stranded RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase, PKR

    PubMed Central

    Demarchi, Francesca; Gutierrez, Maria Ines; Giacca, Mauro

    1999-01-01

    The transactivator protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Tat) is a powerful activator of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), acting through degradation of the inhibitor IκB-α (F. Demarchi, F. d’Adda di Fagagna, A. Falaschi, and M. Giacca, J. Virol. 70:4427–4437, 1996). Here, we show that this activity of Tat requires the function of the cellular interferon-inducible protein kinase PKR. Tat-mediated NF-κB activation and transcriptional induction of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat were impaired in murine cells in which the PKR gene was knocked out. Both functions were restored by cotransfection of Tat with the cDNA for PKR. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of PKR specifically reduced the levels of Tat transactivation in different human cell types. Activation of NF-κB by Tat required integrity of the basic domain of Tat; previous studies have indicated that this domain is necessary for specific Tat-PKR interaction. PMID:10400814

  11. Identifying genetic modulators of the connectivity between transcription factors and their transcriptional targets.

    PubMed

    Fazlollahi, Mina; Muroff, Ivor; Lee, Eunjee; Causton, Helen C; Bussemaker, Harmen J

    2016-03-29

    Regulation of gene expression by transcription factors (TFs) is highly dependent on genetic background and interactions with cofactors. Identifying specific context factors is a major challenge that requires new approaches. Here we show that exploiting natural variation is a potent strategy for probing functional interactions within gene regulatory networks. We developed an algorithm to identify genetic polymorphisms that modulate the regulatory connectivity between specific transcription factors and their target genes in vivo. As a proof of principle, we mapped connectivity quantitative trait loci (cQTLs) using parallel genotype and gene expression data for segregants from a cross between two strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We identified a nonsynonymous mutation in the DIG2 gene as a cQTL for the transcription factor Ste12p and confirmed this prediction empirically. We also identified three polymorphisms in TAF13 as putative modulators of regulation by Gcn4p. Our method has potential for revealing how genetic differences among individuals influence gene regulatory networks in any organism for which gene expression and genotype data are available along with information on binding preferences for transcription factors.

  12. Is actin a transcription initiation factor for RNA polymerase B?

    PubMed Central

    Egly, J M; Miyamoto, N G; Moncollin, V; Chambon, P

    1984-01-01

    We have previously reported that two fractions derived from HeLa cell S100 extracts, the heparin flow-through and the heparin 0.6 M KCl eluate are required in vitro for efficient and accurate transcription by RNA polymerase class B (II). We have further purified a factor present in the heparin flow-through fraction, which markedly stimulates specific transcription catalyzed by the heparin 0.6 M KCl eluate. We report here that some of the properties of the stimulatory factor present in our most purified fractions are strikingly similar to those of actin. We demonstrate also that this factor acts at the pre-initiation level of the transcription reaction. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. PMID:6499833

  13. SoxD Transcription Factors: Multifaceted Players of Neural Development

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eun Hye; Kim, Jaesang

    2016-01-01

    SoxD transcription factor subfamily includes three members, Sox5, Sox6, and Sox13. Like other Sox genes, they contain the High-Mobility-Group (HMG) box as the DNA binding domain but in addition feature the subgroup-specific leucine zipper motif. SoxD genes are expressed in diverse cell types in multiple organs during embryogenesis and in adulthood. Among the cells expressing them are those present in the developing nervous system including neural stem (or progenitor) cells as well as differentiating neurons and oligodendrocytes. SoxD transcription factors do not contain distinct activator or repressor domain, and they are believed to function in modulation of other transcription factors in promoter-specific manners. This brief review article will attempt to summarize the latest studies on the function of SoxD genes in embryogenesis with a particular emphasis on the regulation of neural development. PMID:27426080

  14. Transcriptional regulation of drought response: a tortuous network of transcriptional factors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dhriti; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Drought is one of the leading factors responsible for the reduction in crop yield worldwide. Due to climate change, in future, more areas are going to be affected by drought and for prolonged periods. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying the drought response is one of the major scientific concerns for improving crop yield. Plants deploy diverse strategies and mechanisms to respond and tolerate drought stress. Expression of numerous genes is modulated in different plants under drought stress that help them to optimize their growth and development. Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a major role in plant response and tolerance by regulating the expression of many genes under drought stress. Transcription factors being the major regulator of gene expression play a crucial role in stress response. ABA regulates the expression of most of the target genes through ABA-responsive element (ABRE) binding protein/ABRE binding factor (AREB/ABF) transcription factors. Genes regulated by AREB/ABFs constitute a regulon termed as AREB/ABF regulon. In addition to this, drought responsive genes are also regulated by ABA-independent mechanisms. In ABA-independent regulation, dehydration-responsive element binding protein (DREB), NAM, ATAF, and CUC regulons play an important role by regulating many drought-responsive genes. Apart from these major regulons, MYB/MYC, WRKY, and nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) transcription factors are also involved in drought response and tolerance. Our understanding about transcriptional regulation of drought is still evolving. Recent reports have suggested the existence of crosstalk between different transcription factors operating under drought stress. In this article, we have reviewed various regulons working under drought stress and their crosstalk with each other. PMID:26579147

  15. Transcriptional regulation of drought response: a tortuous network of transcriptional factors

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dhriti; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Drought is one of the leading factors responsible for the reduction in crop yield worldwide. Due to climate change, in future, more areas are going to be affected by drought and for prolonged periods. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying the drought response is one of the major scientific concerns for improving crop yield. Plants deploy diverse strategies and mechanisms to respond and tolerate drought stress. Expression of numerous genes is modulated in different plants under drought stress that help them to optimize their growth and development. Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a major role in plant response and tolerance by regulating the expression of many genes under drought stress. Transcription factors being the major regulator of gene expression play a crucial role in stress response. ABA regulates the expression of most of the target genes through ABA-responsive element (ABRE) binding protein/ABRE binding factor (AREB/ABF) transcription factors. Genes regulated by AREB/ABFs constitute a regulon termed as AREB/ABF regulon. In addition to this, drought responsive genes are also regulated by ABA-independent mechanisms. In ABA-independent regulation, dehydration-responsive element binding protein (DREB), NAM, ATAF, and CUC regulons play an important role by regulating many drought-responsive genes. Apart from these major regulons, MYB/MYC, WRKY, and nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) transcription factors are also involved in drought response and tolerance. Our understanding about transcriptional regulation of drought is still evolving. Recent reports have suggested the existence of crosstalk between different transcription factors operating under drought stress. In this article, we have reviewed various regulons working under drought stress and their crosstalk with each other. PMID:26579147

  16. DNA microarray analysis of functionally discrete human brain regions reveals divergent transcriptional profiles

    PubMed Central

    Evans, S.J.; Choudary, P.V.; Vawter, M.P.; Li, J.; Meador-Woodruff, J.H.; Lopez, J.F.; Burke, S.M.; Thompson, R.C.; Myers, R.M.; Jones, E.G.; Bunney, W.E.; Watson, S.J.; Akil, H.

    2010-01-01

    Transcriptional profiles within discrete human brain regions are likely to reflect structural and functional specialization. Using DNA microarray technology, this study investigates differences in transcriptional profiles of highly divergent brain regions (the cerebellar cortex and the cerebral cortex) as well as differences between two closely related brain structures (the anterior cingulate cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). Replication of this study across three independent laboratories, to address false-positive and false-negative results using microarray technology, is also discussed. We find greater than a thousand transcripts to be differentially expressed between cerebellum and cerebral cortex and very few transcripts to be differentially expressed between the two neocortical regions. We further characterized transcripts that were found to be specifically expressed within brain regions being compared and found that ontological classes representing signal transduction machinery, neurogenesis, synaptic transmission, and transcription factors were most highly represented. PMID:14572446

  17. Human TAFII31 protein is a transcriptional coactivator of the p53 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, H; Levine, A J

    1995-01-01

    The p53 protein activates transcription of a target gene by binding to a specific DNA response element and interacting with the transcriptional apparatus of RNA polymerase II. The amino-terminal domain of p53 interacts with a component of the TFIID basal transcription complex. The human TATA-binding-protein-associated factor TAFII31, a component of TFIID, has been identified as a critical protein required for p53-mediated transcriptional activation. TAFII31 and p53 proteins bind to each other via amino acid residues in the amino-terminal domain of p53 that are essential for transcription. Antibodies directed against TAFII31 protein inhibit p53-activated but not basal transcription in vitro. These results demonstrate that TAFII31 is a coactivator for the p53 protein. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:7761466

  18. Monoamine oxidase B levels are highly expressed in human gliomas and are correlated with the expression of HiF-1α and with transcription factors Sp1 and Sp3

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Martyn A.; Baskin, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases A and B (MAOA and MAOB) are highly expressed in many cancers. Here we investigated the level of MAOB in gliomas and confirmed its high expression. We found that MAOB levels correlated with tumor grade and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HiF-1α) expression. HiF-1α was localized to the nuclei in high-grade gliomas, but it was primarily cytosolic in low-grade gliomas and normal human astrocytes. Expression of both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and MAOB are correlated to HiF-1α expression levels. Levels of MAOB are correlated by the levels of transcription factor Sp3 in the majority of GBM examined, but this control of MAOB expression by Sp3 in low grade astrocytic gliomas is significantly different from control in the in the majority of glioblastomas. The current findings support previous suggestions that MAOB can be exploited for the killing of cancer cells. Selective cell toxicity can be achieved by designing non-toxic prodrugs that require MAOB for their catalytic conversion into mature cytotoxic chemotherapeutics. PMID:26689994

  19. ChREBP, a glucose-responsive transcriptional factor, enhances glucose metabolism to support biosynthesis in human cytomegalovirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongjun; Maguire, Tobi G; Alwine, James C

    2014-02-01

    Carbohydrate-response element binding protein (ChREBP) plays a key role in regulating glucose metabolism and de novo lipogenesis in metabolic tissues and cancer cells. Here we report that ChREBP is also a critical regulator of the metabolic alterations induced during human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. The expression of both ChREBP-α and ChREBP-β is robustly induced in HCMV-infected human fibroblasts; this induction is required for efficient HCMV infection. Depletion of ChREBP in HCMV-infected cells results in reduction of HCMV-induced glucose transporter 4 and glucose transporter 2 expression, leading to inhibition of glucose uptake, lactate production, nucleotide biosynthesis, and NADPH generation. We previously reported that HCMV infection induces lipogenesis through the activation of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1, which is mediated by the induction of PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase. Data from the present study show that HCMV-induced lipogenesis is also controlled by the induction of ChREBP, in a second mechanism involved in the regulation of HCMV-induced de novo lipogenesis. These results suggest that ChREBP plays a key role in reprogramming glucose and lipid metabolism in HCMV infection.

  20. Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 1 directs polar replication fork pausing.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yonghong; Posse, Viktor; Zhu, Xuefeng; Hyvärinen, Anne K; Jacobs, Howard T; Falkenberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Claes M

    2016-07-01

    During replication of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), clashes with the transcription apparatus can cause replication fork collapse and genomic instability. To avoid this problem, a replication fork barrier protein is situated downstream of rDNA, there preventing replication in the direction opposite rDNA transcription. A potential candidate for a similar function in mitochondria is the mitochondrial transcription termination factor 1 (MTERF1, also denoted mTERF), which binds to a sequence just downstream of the ribosomal transcription unit. Previous studies have shown that MTERF1 prevents antisense transcription over the ribosomal RNA genes, a process which we here show to be independent of the transcription elongation factor TEFM. Importantly, we now demonstrate that MTERF1 arrests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication with distinct polarity. The effect is explained by the ability of MTERF1 to act as a directional contrahelicase, blocking mtDNA unwinding by the mitochondrial helicase TWINKLE. This conclusion is also supported by in vivo evidence that MTERF1 stimulates TWINKLE pausing. We conclude that MTERF1 can direct polar replication fork arrest in mammalian mitochondria. PMID:27112570

  1. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Upregulates the Mitochondrial Transcription and Translation Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, M. P.; Antrobus, R.; Rorbach, J.; van Haute, L.; Umrania, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Minczuk, M.; Lehner, P. J.; Sinclair, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) profoundly affects cellular metabolism. Like in tumor cells, HCMV infection increases glycolysis, and glucose carbon is shifted from the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle to the biosynthesis of fatty acids. However, unlike in many tumor cells, where aerobic glycolysis is accompanied by suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, HCMV induces mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Here, we affinity purified mitochondria and used quantitative mass spectrometry to determine how the mitochondrial proteome changes upon HCMV infection. We found that the mitochondrial transcription and translation systems are induced early during the viral replication cycle. Specifically, proteins involved in biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosome were highly upregulated by HCMV infection. Inhibition of mitochondrial translation with chloramphenicol or knockdown of HCMV-induced ribosome biogenesis factor MRM3 abolished the HCMV-mediated increase in mitochondrially encoded proteins and significantly impaired viral growth under bioenergetically restricting conditions. Our findings demonstrate how HCMV manipulates mitochondrial biogenesis to support its replication. PMID:27025248

  2. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Sigova, Alla A; Abraham, Brian J; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M; Guo, Yang Eric; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Sharp, Phillip A; Young, Richard A

    2015-11-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and -distal DNA elements to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) binds to both gene regulatory elements and their associated RNA species across the entire genome. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy, whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive-feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs.

  3. Transcription-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor activation by hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Thomas E; Sang, Yingying; Ma, Yongxian; Abounader, Roger; Rosen, Eliot M; Xia, Shuli; Laterra, John

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms and biological implications of coordinated receptor tyrosine kinase coactivation remain poorly appreciated. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and c-Met are frequently coexpressed in cancers, including those associated with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) overexpression, such as malignant astrocytoma. In a previous analysis of the HGF-induced transcriptome, we found that two EGFR agonists, transforming growth factor-alpha and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF), are prominently up-regulated by HGF in human glioma cells. We now report that stimulating human glioblastoma cells with recombinant HGF induces biologically relevant EGFR activation. EGFR phosphorylation at Tyr(845) and Tyr(1068) increased 6 to 24 h after cell stimulation with HGF and temporally coincided with the induction of transforming growth factor-alpha (~5-fold) and HB-EGF (~23-fold) expression. Tyr(845) and Tyr(1068) phosphorylation, in response to HGF, was inhibited by cycloheximide and actinomycin D, consistent with a requirement for DNA transcription and RNA translation. Specifically, blocking HB-EGF binding to EGFR with the antagonist CRM197 inhibited HGF-induced EGFR phosphorylation by 60% to 80% and inhibited HGF-induced S-G(2)-M transition. CRM197 also inhibited HGF-induced anchorage-dependent cell proliferation but had no effect on HGF-mediated cytoprotection. These findings establish that EGFR can be activated with functional consequences by HGF as a result of EGFR ligand expression. This transcription-dependent cross-talk between the HGF receptor c-Met and EGFR expands our understanding of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling networks and may have considerable consequences for oncogenic mechanisms and cancer therapeutics.

  4. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha ligand binding and F domains mediate interaction and transcriptional synergy with the pancreatic islet LIM HD transcription factor Isl1.

    PubMed

    Eeckhoute, J; Briche, I; Kurowska, M; Formstecher, P; Laine, B

    2006-12-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor HNF4alpha and the LIM homeodomain factor Isl1 are co-expressed in pancreatic beta-cells and are required for the differentiation and function of these endocrine cells. HNF4alpha activates numerous genes and mutations in its gene are associated with maturity onset diabetes of the young. Cofactors and transcription factors that interact with HNF4alpha are crucial to modulate its transcriptional activity, since the latter is not regulated by conventional ligands. These transcriptional partners interact mainly through the HNF4alpha AF-1 module and the ligand binding domain, which contains the AF-2 module. Here, we showed that Isl1 could enhance the HNF4alpha-mediated activation of transcription of the HNF1alpha, PPARalpha and insulin I promoters. Isl1 interacted with the HNF4alpha AF-2 but also required the HNF4alpha carboxy-terminal F domain for optimal interaction and transcriptional synergy. More specifically, we found that naturally occurring HNF4alpha isoforms, differing only in their F domain, exhibited different abilities to interact and synergize with Isl1, extending the crucial transcriptional modulatory role of the HNF4alpha F domain. HNF4alpha interacted with both the homeodomain and the first LIM domain of Isl1. We found that the transcriptional synergy between HNF4alpha and Isl1 involved an increase in HNF4alpha loading on promoter. The effect was more pronounced on the rat insulin I promoter containing binding sites for both HNF4alpha and Isl1 than on the human HNF1alpha promoter lacking an Isl1 binding site. Moreover, Isl1 could mediate the recruitment of the cofactor CLIM2 resulting in a further transcriptional enhancement of the HNF1alpha promoter activity.

  5. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α−/− cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α−/− cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α−/− cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration). PMID:27065079

  6. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α(-/-) cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α(-/-) cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α(-/-) cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration).

  7. Helicopter Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Even under optimal conditions, helicopter flight is a most demanding form of human-machine interaction, imposing continuous manual, visual, communications, and mental demands on pilots. It is made even more challenging by small margins for error created by the close proximity of terrain in NOE flight and missions flown at night and in low visibility. Although technology advances have satisfied some current and proposed requirements, hardware solutions alone are not sufficient to ensure acceptable system performance and pilot workload. However, human factors data needed to improve the design and use of helicopters lag behind advances in sensor, display, and control technology. Thus, it is difficult for designers to consider human capabilities and limitations when making design decisions. This results in costly accidents, design mistakes, unrealistic mission requirements, excessive training costs, and challenge human adaptability. NASA, in collaboration with DOD, industry, and academia, has initiated a program of research to develop scientific data bases and design principles to improve the pilot/vehicle interface, optimize training time and cost, and maintain pilot workload and system performance at an acceptable level. Work performed at Ames, and by other research laboratories, will be reviewed to summarize the most critical helicopter human factors problems and the results of research that has been performed to: (1) Quantify/model pilots use of visual cues for vehicle control; (2) Improve pilots' performance with helmet displays of thermal imagery and night vision goggles for situation awareness and vehicle control; (3) Model the processes by which pilots encode maps and compare them to the visual scene to develop perceptually and cognitively compatible electronic map formats; (4) Evaluate the use of spatially localized auditory displays for geographical orientation, target localization, radio frequency separation; (5) Develop and flight test control

  8. Yeast Genetic Analysis Reveals the Involvement of Chromatin Reassembly Factors in Repressing HIV-1 Basal Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Respaldiza, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Gil, Alfonso; Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Jimeno-González, Silvia; Jordan, Albert; Chávez, Sebastián

    2009-01-01

    Rebound of HIV viremia after interruption of anti-retroviral therapy is due to the small population of CD4+ T cells that remain latently infected. HIV-1 transcription is the main process controlling post-integration latency. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription takes place at both initiation and elongation levels. Pausing of RNA polymerase II at the 5′ end of HIV-1 transcribed region (5′HIV-TR), which is immediately downstream of the transcription start site, plays an important role in the regulation of viral expression. The activation of HIV-1 transcription correlates with the rearrangement of a positioned nucleosome located at this region. These two facts suggest that the 5′HIV-TR contributes to inhibit basal transcription of those HIV-1 proviruses that remain latently inactive. However, little is known about the cell elements mediating the repressive role of the 5′HIV-TR. We performed a genetic analysis of this phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after reconstructing a minimal HIV-1 transcriptional system in this yeast. Unexpectedly, we found that the critical role played by the 5′HIV-TR in maintaining low levels of basal transcription in yeast is mediated by FACT, Spt6, and Chd1, proteins so far associated with chromatin assembly and disassembly during ongoing transcription. We confirmed that this group of factors plays a role in HIV-1 postintegration latency in human cells by depleting the corresponding human orthologs with shRNAs, both in HIV latently infected cell populations and in particular single-integration clones, including a latent clone with a provirus integrated in a highly transcribed gene. Our results indicate that chromatin reassembly factors participate in the establishment of the equilibrium between activation and repression of HIV-1 when it integrates into the human genome, and they open the possibility of considering these factors as therapeutic targets of HIV-1 latency. PMID:19148280

  9. Activating Transcription Factor 3 and the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, David; Raivich, Gennadij; Anderson, Patrick Norval

    2012-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) belongs to the ATF/cyclic AMP responsive element binding family of transcription factors and is often described as an adaptive response gene whose activity is usually regulated by stressful stimuli. Although expressed in a number of splice variants and generally recognized as a transcriptional repressor, ATF3 has the ability to interact with a number of other transcription factors including c-Jun to form complexes which not only repress, but can also activate various genes. ATF3 expression is modulated mainly at the transcriptional level and has markedly different effects in different types of cell. The levels of ATF3 mRNA and protein are normally very low in neurons and glia but their expression is rapidly upregulated in response to injury. ATF3 expression in neurons is closely linked to their survival and the regeneration of their axons following axotomy, and that in peripheral nerves correlates with the generation of a Schwann cell phenotype that is conducive to axonal regeneration. ATF3 is also induced by Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands but acts as a negative regulator of TLR signaling, suppressing the innate immune response which is involved in immuno-surveillance and can enhance or reduce the survival of injured neurons and promote the regeneration of their axons. PMID:22347845

  10. Tunable protein synthesis by transcript isoforms in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes generate multiple RNA transcript isoforms though alternative transcription, splicing, and polyadenylation. However, the relationship between human transcript diversity and protein production is complex as each isoform can be translated differently. We fractionated a polysome profile and reconstructed transcript isoforms from each fraction, which we term Transcript Isoforms in Polysomes sequencing (TrIP-seq). Analysis of these data revealed regulatory features that control ribosome occupancy and translational output of each transcript isoform. We extracted a panel of 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions that control protein production from an unrelated gene in cells over a 100-fold range. Select 5′ untranslated regions exert robust translational control between cell lines, while 3′ untranslated regions can confer cell type-specific expression. These results expose the large dynamic range of transcript-isoform-specific translational control, identify isoform-specific sequences that control protein output in human cells, and demonstrate that transcript isoform diversity must be considered when relating RNA and protein levels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10921.001 PMID:26735365

  11. Temporal patterns of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcripts in human fetal astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Tornatore, C; Meyers, K; Atwood, W; Conant, K; Major, E

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of the developing central nervous system results in a dementing process in children, termed HIV-1-associated encephalopathy. Infection of astroglial elements of the pediatric nervous system has been demonstrated and suggests that direct infection of some astrocytes may contribute to the neurologic deficit. In this model, HIV-1 establishes a persistent state of infection in astrocytes, which can be reactivated by the cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta). To better understand the natural history of viral persistence in astroglial cells, we characterized infection at the transcriptional level. The most abundant viral transcript during the establishment of persistence was the subgenomic multiply spliced 2-kb message, similar to mononuclear cell models of HIV-1 latency. Following reactivation with TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta the multiply spliced 2-kb message remained the most abundant viral transcript, in contrast to infected mononuclear cells in which reactivation leads to the reemergence of the 9- and 4-kb transcripts. Further characterization of the persistent 2-kb transcript by PCR amplification of in vitro-synthesized viral cDNA showed that, in the absence of cytokine stimulation, the most abundant multiply spliced transcripts were the Nef- and Rev-specific messages. However, following cytokine stimulation, double- and triple-spliced Tat-, Rev-, and Nef-specific messages could be identified. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that, during viral persistence, astrocytes expressed Nef protein but few or no viral structural proteins. These results demonstrate that viral persistence in astrocytes at the transcriptional level is fundamentally different from that seen in mononuclear cells and could account for the virtual absence of astroglial expression of viral structural antigens in vivo. Images PMID:8254781

  12. Transcriptional neoteny in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Somel, Mehmet; Franz, Henriette; Yan, Zheng; Lorenc, Anna; Guo, Song; Giger, Thomas; Kelso, Janet; Nickel, Birgit; Dannemann, Michael; Bahn, Sabine; Webster, Maree J.; Weickert, Cynthia S.; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2009-01-01

    In development, timing is of the utmost importance, and the timing of developmental processes often changes as organisms evolve. In human evolution, developmental retardation, or neoteny, has been proposed as a possible mechanism that contributed to the rise of many human-specific features, including an increase in brain size and the emergence of human-specific cognitive traits. We analyzed mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex of humans, chimpanzees, and rhesus macaques to determine whether human-specific neotenic changes are present at the gene expression level. We show that the brain transcriptome is dramatically remodeled during postnatal development and that developmental changes in the human brain are indeed delayed relative to other primates. This delay is not uniform across the human transcriptome but affects a specific subset of genes that play a potential role in neural development. PMID:19307592

  13. The transcription factor Pokemon: a new key player in cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takahiro; Hobbs, Robin M; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2005-10-01

    Learning how critical cell regulatory pathways are controlled may lead to new opportunities for cancer treatment. We recently identified the transcription factor Pokemon as a central regulator of the important tumor suppressor ARF. Pokemon is overexpressed in multiple human cancers and cells lacking Pokemon are refractory to oncogenic transformation. These findings suggest that Pokemon may offer an effective new target for cancer therapeutics.

  14. TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE OF AN INTACT LUNG PREPARATION TO METALLIC PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVATION FOLLOWING EXPOSURE OF AN INTACT LUNG PREPARATION TO METALLIC PARTICULATE MATTER

    James M. Samet1,2, Robert Silbajoris1, Tony Huang1 and Ilona Jaspers3

    1Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laborato...

  15. Uncovering Transcriptional Regulatory Networks by Sparse Bayesian Factor Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jia; Zhang, Jianqiu(Michelle); Qi, Yuan(Alan); Chen, Yidong; Huang, Yufei

    2010-12-01

    The problem of uncovering transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) based on microarray data is considered. A novel Bayesian sparse correlated rectified factor model (BSCRFM) is proposed that models the unknown TF protein level activity, the correlated regulations between TFs, and the sparse nature of TF-regulated genes. The model admits prior knowledge from existing database regarding TF-regulated target genes based on a sparse prior and through a developed Gibbs sampling algorithm, a context-specific transcriptional regulatory network specific to the experimental condition of the microarray data can be obtained. The proposed model and the Gibbs sampling algorithm were evaluated on the simulated systems, and results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach. The proposed model was then applied to the breast cancer microarray data of patients with Estrogen Receptor positive ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) status and Estrogen Receptor negative ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) status, respectively.

  16. Binding of basal transcription factor TFIIH to the acidic activation domains of VP16 and p53.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, H; Pearson, A; Coulombe, B; Truant, R; Zhang, S; Regier, J L; Triezenberg, S J; Reinberg, D; Flores, O; Ingles, C J

    1994-01-01

    Acidic transcriptional activation domains function well in both yeast and mammalian cells, and some have been shown to bind the general transcription factors TFIID and TFIIB. We now show that two acidic transactivators, herpes simplex virus VP16 and human p53, directly interact with the multisubunit human general transcription factor TFIIH and its Saccharomyces cerevisiae counterpart, factor b. The VP16- and p53-binding domains in these factors lie in the p62 subunit of TFIIH and in the homologous subunit, TFB1, of factor b. Point mutations in VP16 that reduce its transactivation activity in both yeast and mammalian cells weaken its binding to both yeast and human TFIIH. This suggests that binding of activation domains to TFIIH is an important aspect of transcriptional activation. Images PMID:7935417

  17. Mammalian cAMP-responsive element can activate transcription in yeast and binds a yeast factor(s) that resembles the mammalian transcription factor ANF.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R H; Jones, N C

    1989-01-01

    The human ATF and AP1 transcription factors bind to highly related DNA sequences. Their consensus binding sites differ by a single nucleotide, but this single change is crucial in determining factor binding specificity. We have previously identified an AP1 (yAP1) binding activity in yeast. In this report we identify a yeast ATF (yATF) binding activity whose specificity can be distinguished from that of yAP1 by the same crucial nucleotide that distinguishes binding of human ATF and AP1. The ATF binding site can act as an efficient upstream activating sequence in vivo, suggesting that yATF is a transcriptional activator. The yATF DNA-binding complex is phosphorylated and the binding activity of partially purified yATF can be enhanced in vitro by the addition of protein kinase A, indicating that the phosphorylation state of yATF may be important in determining its ability to bind DNA. Images PMID:2538834

  18. Interaction of hepatocyte nuclear factors in transcriptional regulation of tissue specific hormonal expression of human multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (abcc2)

    SciTech Connect

    Qadri, Ishtiaq Hu, L.-J.; Iwahashi, Mieko; Al-Zuabi, Subhi; Quattrochi, Linda C.; Simon, Francis R.

    2009-02-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) (ABCC2) is an ATP-binding cassette membrane protein located primarily on apical surface of hepatocytes that mediates transport of conjugated xenobiotics and endogenous compounds into bile. MRP2 is highly expressed in hepatocytes, and at lower levels in small intestines, stomach and kidney. Previous reports have characterized mammalian MRP2 promoters, but none have established the molecular mechanism(s) involved in liver enriched expression. This study aims to investigate the mechanism of hepatic MRP2 regulation. A 2130 bp of MRP2 promoter was cloned from PAC-1 clone P108G1-7, to identify putative liver specific/hormone responsive functional DNA binding sites. Using deletion analysis, site specific mutagenesis and co-transfection studies, liver specific expression was determined. MRP2 promoter-LUC constructs were highly expressed in liver cell lines compared to non-liver cells. The region extending from - 3 to+ 458 bp of MRP2 promoter starting from AUG contained the potential binding sites for CAAATT box enhancer binding protein (C/EBP), hepatocytes nuclear factor 1, 3 and 4 (HNF1, HNF3, and HNF4. Only HNF1 and HNF4 co-transfection with MRP2 luciferase increased expression. Site specific mutational analysis of HNF1 binding site indicated an important role for HNF1{alpha}. HNF4{alpha} induction of MRP2 was independent of HNF1 binding site. C/EBP, HNF3, and HNF6 inhibited HNF1{alpha} while HNF4{alpha} induced MRP2 luciferase expression and glucocorticoids stimulated MRP2 expression. This study emphasizes the complex regulation of MRP2 with HNF1{alpha} and HNF4{alpha} playing a central role. The coordinated regulation of xenobiotic transporters and oxidative conjugation may determine the adaptive responses to cellular detoxification processes.

  19. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) induces the differentiation of an adult human pancreatic ductal cell line into insulin-expressing cells through stepwise activation of key transcription factors for embryonic beta cell development.

    PubMed

    Assouline-Thomas, Béatrice; Ellis, Daniel; Petropavlovskaia, Maria; Makhlin, Julia; Ding, Jieping; Rosenberg, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of β-cells in diabetic patients is an important goal of diabetes research. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) was discovered in the partially duct-obstructed hamster pancreas. Its bioactive fragment, pentadecapeptide 104-118 (INGAP-P), has been shown to reverse diabetes in animal models and to improve glucose homeostasis in patients with diabetes in clinical trials. Further development of INGAP as a therapy for diabetes requires identification of target cells in the pancreas and characterization of the mechanisms of action. We hypothesized that adult human pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and can be induced by INGAP to undergo endocrine differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we treated the normal human pancreatic ductal cell line (HPDE) with either INGAP-P or full-length recombinant protein (rINGAP) for short-term periods. Our data show that this single drug treatment induces both proliferation and transdifferentiation of HPDE cells, the latter being characterized by the rapid sequential activation of endocrine developmental transcription factors Pdx-1, Ngn3, NeuroD, IA-1, and MafA and subsequently the expression of insulin at both the mRNA and the protein levels. After 7 days, C-peptide was detected in the supernatant of INGAP-treated cells, reflecting their ability to secrete insulin. The magnitude of differentiation was enhanced by embedding the cells in Matrigel, which led to islet-like cluster formation. The islet-like clusters cells stained positive for nuclear Pdx-1 and Glut 2 proteins, and were expressing Insulin mRNA. These new data suggest that human adult pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and demonstrate that a short exposure to INGAP triggers their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells in vitro. In the context of the urgent search for a regenerative and/or cellular therapy for diabetes, these results make INGAP a promising therapeutic candidate.

  20. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) induces the differentiation of an adult human pancreatic ductal cell line into insulin-expressing cells through stepwise activation of key transcription factors for embryonic beta cell development.

    PubMed

    Assouline-Thomas, Béatrice; Ellis, Daniel; Petropavlovskaia, Maria; Makhlin, Julia; Ding, Jieping; Rosenberg, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of β-cells in diabetic patients is an important goal of diabetes research. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) was discovered in the partially duct-obstructed hamster pancreas. Its bioactive fragment, pentadecapeptide 104-118 (INGAP-P), has been shown to reverse diabetes in animal models and to improve glucose homeostasis in patients with diabetes in clinical trials. Further development of INGAP as a therapy for diabetes requires identification of target cells in the pancreas and characterization of the mechanisms of action. We hypothesized that adult human pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and can be induced by INGAP to undergo endocrine differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we treated the normal human pancreatic ductal cell line (HPDE) with either INGAP-P or full-length recombinant protein (rINGAP) for short-term periods. Our data show that this single drug treatment induces both proliferation and transdifferentiation of HPDE cells, the latter being characterized by the rapid sequential activation of endocrine developmental transcription factors Pdx-1, Ngn3, NeuroD, IA-1, and MafA and subsequently the expression of insulin at both the mRNA and the protein levels. After 7 days, C-peptide was detected in the supernatant of INGAP-treated cells, reflecting their ability to secrete insulin. The magnitude of differentiation was enhanced by embedding the cells in Matrigel, which led to islet-like cluster formation. The islet-like clusters cells stained positive for nuclear Pdx-1 and Glut 2 proteins, and were expressing Insulin mRNA. These new data suggest that human adult pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and demonstrate that a short exposure to INGAP triggers their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells in vitro. In the context of the urgent search for a regenerative and/or cellular therapy for diabetes, these results make INGAP a promising therapeutic candidate. PMID:26558987

  1. Sp1 Transcription Factor Interaction with Accumulated Prelamin A Impairs Adipose Lineage Differentiation in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Essential Role of Sp1 in the Integrity of Lipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Eguino, Garbiñe; Infante, Arantza; Schlangen, Karin; Aransay, Ana M.; Fullaondo, Ane; Soriano, Mario; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Martín, Ángel G.

    2012-01-01

    Lamin A (LMNA)-linked lipodystrophies may be either genetic (associated with LMNA mutations) or acquired (associated with the use of human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors [PIs]), and in both cases they share clinical features such as anomalous distribution of body fat or generalized loss of adipose tissue, metabolic alterations, and early cardiovascular complications. Both LMNA-linked lipodystrophies are characterized by the accumulation of the lamin A precursor prelamin A. The pathological mechanism by which prelamin A accumulation induces the lipodystrophy associated phenotypes remains unclear. Since the affected tissues in these disorders are of mesenchymal origin, we have generated an LMNA-linked experimental model using human mesenchymal stem cells treated with a PI, which recapitulates the phenotypes observed in patient biopsies. This model has been demonstrated to be a useful tool to unravel the pathological mechanism of the LMNA-linked lipodystrophies, providing an ideal system to identify potential targets to generate new therapies for drug discovery screening. We report for the first time that impaired adipogenesis is a consequence of the interaction between accumulated prelamin A and Sp1 transcription factor, sequestration of which results in altered extracellular matrix gene expression. In fact, our study shows a novel, essential, and finely tuned role for Sp1 in adipose lineage differentiation in human mesenchymal stem cells. These findings define a new physiological experimental model to elucidate the pathological mechanisms LMNA-linked lipodystrophies, creating new opportunities for research and treatment not only of LMNA-linked lipodystrophies but also of other adipogenesis-associated metabolic diseases. PMID:23197810

  2. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  3. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases.

  4. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light–oxygen–voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na+-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na+ currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  5. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase

    PubMed Central

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5′- and 3′-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead