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Sample records for human transferrin receptor-1

  1. Stoichiometries of Transferrin Receptors 1 and 2 in Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Chloupková, Maja; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in either the hereditary hemochromatosis protein, HFE, or transferrin receptor 2, TfR2, result in a similarly severe form of the most common type of iron overload disease called hereditary hemochromatosis. Models of the interactions between HFE, TfR1, and TfR2 imply that these proteins are present in different molar concentrations in the liver, where they control expression of the iron regulatory hormone, hepcidin, in response to body iron loading. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo levels of mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR and concentrations of these proteins by quantitative immunoblotting in human liver tissues. The level of TfR2 mRNA was 21- and 63- fold higher than that of TfR1 and HFE, respectively. Molar concentration of TfR2 protein was the highest and determined to be 1.95 nmoles/g protein in whole cell lysates and 10.89 nmoles/g protein in microsomal membranes. Molar concentration of TfR1 protein was 4.5- and 6.1-fold lower than that of TfR2 in whole cell lysates and membranes, respectively. The level of HFE protein was below 0.53 nmoles/g of total protein. HFE is thus present in substoichiometric concentrations with respect to both TfR1 and TfR2 in human liver tissue. This finding supports a model, in which availability of HFE is limiting for formation of complexes with TfR1 or TfR2. PMID:19819738

  2. Human and Host Species Transferrin Receptor 1 Use by North American Arenaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Min; Fofana, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT At least five New World (NW) arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fevers in South America. These pathogenic clade B viruses, as well as nonpathogenic arenaviruses of the same clade, use transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) of their host species to enter cells. Pathogenic viruses are distinguished from closely related nonpathogenic ones by their additional ability to utilize human TfR1 (hTfR1). Here, we investigate the receptor usage of North American arenaviruses, whose entry proteins share greatest similarity with those of the clade B viruses. We show that all six North American arenaviruses investigated utilize host species TfR1 orthologs and present evidence consistent with arenavirus-mediated selection pressure on the TfR1 of the North American arenavirus host species. Notably, one of these viruses, AV96010151, closely related to the prototype Whitewater Arroyo virus (WWAV), entered cells using hTfR1, consistent with a role for a WWAV-like virus in three fatal human infections whose causative agent has not been identified. In addition, modest changes were sufficient to convert hTfR1 into a functional receptor for most of these viruses, suggesting that a minor alteration in virus entry protein may allow these viruses to use hTfR1. Our data establish TfR1 as a cellular receptor for North American arenaviruses, highlight an “arms race” between these viruses and their host species, support the association of North American arenavirus with fatal human infections, and suggest that these viruses have a higher potential to emerge and cause human diseases than has previously been appreciated. IMPORTANCE hTfR1 use is a key determinant for a NW arenavirus to cause hemorrhagic fevers in humans. All known pathogenic NW arenaviruses are transmitted in South America by their host rodents. North American arenaviruses are generally considered nonpathogenic, but some of these viruses have been tentatively implicated in human fatalities. We show that these North American

  3. H-Ferritin Is Preferentially Incorporated by Human Erythroid Cells through Transferrin Receptor 1 in a Threshold-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Soichiro; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Masuda, Taro; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Mizumoto, Chisaki; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin is an iron-storage protein composed of different ratios of 24 light (L) and heavy (H) subunits. The serum level of ferritin is a clinical marker of the body’s iron level. Transferrin receptor (TFR)1 is the receptor not only for transferrin but also for H-ferritin, but how it binds two different ligands and the blood cell types that preferentially incorporate H-ferritin remain unknown. To address these questions, we investigated hematopoietic cell-specific ferritin uptake by flow cytometry. Alexa Fluor 488-labeled H-ferritin was preferentially incorporated by erythroid cells among various hematopoietic cell lines examined, and was almost exclusively incorporated by bone marrow erythroblasts among human primary hematopoietic cells of various lineages. H-ferritin uptake by erythroid cells was strongly inhibited by unlabeled H-ferritin but was only partially inhibited by a large excess of holo-transferrin. On the other hand, internalization of labeled holo-transferrin by these cells was not inhibited by H-ferritin. Chinese hamster ovary cells lacking functional endogenous TFR1 but expressing human TFR1 with a mutated RGD sequence, which is required for transferrin binding, efficiently incorporated H-ferritin, indicating that TFR1 has distinct binding sites for H-ferritin and holo-transferrin. H-ferritin uptake by these cells required a threshold level of cell surface TFR1 expression, whereas there was no threshold for holo-transferrin uptake. The requirement for a threshold level of TFR1 expression can explain why among primary human hematopoietic cells, only erythroblasts efficiently take up H-ferritin. PMID:26441243

  4. Dihydroartemisinin Exerts Its Anticancer Activity through Depleting Cellular Iron via Transferrin Receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Qian; Zhou, Naiyuan; Duan, Juan; Chen, Tao; Hao, Miao; Yang, Xinying; Li, Junyang; Yin, Jun; Chu, Ruiai; Wang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Artemisinin and its main active metabolite dihydroartemisinin, clinically used antimalarial agents with low host toxicity, have recently shown potent anticancer activities in a variety of human cancer models. Although iron mediated oxidative damage is involved, the mechanisms underlying these activities remain unclear. In the current study, we found that dihydroartemisinin caused cellular iron depletion in time- and concentration-dependent manners. It decreased iron uptake and disturbed iron homeostasis in cancer cells, which were independent of oxidative damage. Moreover, dihydroartemisinin reduced the level of transferrin receptor-1 associated with cell membrane. The regulation of dihydroartemisinin to transferrin receptor-1 could be reversed by nystatin, a cholesterol-sequestering agent but not the inhibitor of clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Dihydroartemisinin also induced transferrin receptor-1 palmitoylation and colocalization with caveolin-1, suggesting a lipid rafts mediated internalization pathway was involved in the process. Also, nystatin reversed the influences of dihydroartemisinin on cell cycle and apoptosis related genes and the siRNA induced downregulation of transferrin receptor-1 decreased the sensitivity to dihydroartemisinin efficiently in the cells. These results indicate that dihydroartemisinin can counteract cancer through regulating cell-surface transferrin receptor-1 in a non-classical endocytic pathway, which may be a new action mechanism of DHA independently of oxidative damage. PMID:22900042

  5. Mouse mammary tumor virus uses mouse but not human transferrin receptor 1 to reach a low pH compartment and infect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Enxiu; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Ying Qihua; Davey, Robert A.; Ross, Susan R.

    2008-11-25

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a pH-dependent virus that uses mouse transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) for entry into cells. Previous studies demonstrated that MMTV could induce pH 5-dependent fusion-from-with of mouse cells. Here we show that the MMTV envelope-mediated cell-cell fusion requires both the entry receptor and low pH (pH 5). Although expression of the MMTV envelope and TfR1 was sufficient to mediate low pH-dependent syncytia formation, virus infection required trafficking to a low pH compartment; infection was independent of cathepsin-mediated proteolysis. Human TfR1 did not support virus infection, although envelope-mediated syncytia formation occurred with human cells after pH 5 treatment and this fusion depended on TfR1 expression. However, although the MMTV envelope bound human TfR1, virus was only internalized and trafficked to a low pH compartment in cells expressing mouse TfR1. Thus, while human TfR1 supported cell-cell fusion, because it was not internalized when bound to MMTV, it did not function as an entry receptor. Our data suggest that MMTV uses TfR1 for all steps of entry: cell attachment, induction of the conformational changes in Env required for membrane fusion and internalization to an appropriate acidic compartment.

  6. Nonhuman Transferrin Receptor 1 Is an Efficient Cell Entry Receptor for Ocozocoautla de Espinosa Virus

    PubMed Central

    Caì, Yíngyún; Yú, Shuĭqìng; Mazur, Steven; Dŏng, Lián; Janosko, Krisztina; Zhāng, Téngfēi; Müller, Marcel A.; Hensley, Lisa E.; Bavari, Sina; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Ocozocoautla de Espinosa virus (OCEV) is a novel, uncultured arenavirus. We found that the OCEV glycoprotein mediates entry into grivet and bat cells through transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) binding but that OCEV glycoprotein precursor (GPC)-pseudotyped retroviruses poorly entered 53 human cancer cell lines. Interestingly, OCEV and Tacaribe virus could use bat, but not human, TfR1. Replacing three human TfR1 amino acids with their bat ortholog counterparts transformed human TfR1 into an efficient OCEV and Tacaribe virus receptor. PMID:24109228

  7. Transferrin Receptor 1 Facilitates Poliovirus Permeation of Mouse Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Taketoshi; Ishizaka, Aya; Nihei, Coh-ichi

    2016-01-01

    As a possible route for invasion of the CNS, circulating poliovirus (PV) in the blood is believed to traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB), resulting in paralytic poliomyelitis. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that mouse transferrin receptor 1 (mTfR1) is responsible for PV attachment to the cell surface, allowing invasion into the CNS via the BBB. PV interacts with the apical domain of mTfR1 on mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (MBEC4) in a dose-dependent manner via its capsid protein (VP1). We found that F-G, G-H, and H-I loops in VP1 are important for this binding. However, C-D, D-E, and E-F loops in VP1-fused Venus proteins efficiently penetrate MBEC4 cells. These results imply that the VP1 functional domain responsible for cell attachment is different from that involved in viral permeation of the brain capillary endothelium. We observed that co-treatment of MBEC4 cells with excess PV particles but not dextran resulted in blockage of transferrin transport into cells. Using the Transwell in vitro BBB model, transferrin co-treatment inhibited permeation of PV into MBEC4 cells and delayed further viral permeation via mTfR1 knockdown. With mTfR1 as a positive mediator of PV-host cell attachment and PV permeation of MBEC4 cells, our results indicate a novel role of TfR1 as a cellular receptor for human PV receptor/CD155-independent PV invasion of the CNS. PMID:26637351

  8. A missense mutation in TFRC, encoding transferrin receptor 1, causes combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Jabara, Haifa H; Boyden, Steven E; Chou, Janet; Ramesh, Narayanaswamy; Massaad, Michel J; Benson, Halli; Bainter, Wayne; Fraulino, David; Rahimov, Fedik; Sieff, Colin; Liu, Zhi-Jian; Alshemmari, Salem H; Al-Ramadi, Basel K; Al-Dhekri, Hasan; Arnaout, Rand; Abu-Shukair, Mohammad; Vatsayan, Anant; Silver, Eli; Ahuja, Sanjay; Davies, E Graham; Sola-Visner, Martha; Ohsumi, Toshiro K; Andrews, Nancy C; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Fleming, Mark D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kunkel, Louis M; Geha, Raif S

    2016-01-01

    Patients with a combined immunodeficiency characterized by normal numbers but impaired function of T and B cells had a homozygous p.Tyr20His substitution in transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), encoded by TFRC. The substitution disrupts the TfR1 internalization motif, resulting in defective receptor endocytosis and markedly increased TfR1 expression on the cell surface. Iron citrate rescued the lymphocyte defects, and expression of wild-type but not mutant TfR1 rescued impaired transferrin uptake in patient-derived fibroblasts. Tfrc(Y20H/Y20H) mice recapitulated the immunological defects of patients. Despite the critical role of TfR1 in erythrocyte development and function, patients had only mild anemia and only slightly increased TfR1 expression in erythroid precursors. We show that STEAP3, a metalloreductase expressed in erythroblasts, associates with TfR1 and partially rescues transferrin uptake in patient-derived fibroblasts, suggesting that STEAP3 may provide an accessory TfR1 endocytosis signal that spares patients from severe anemia. These findings demonstrate the importance of TfR1 in adaptive immunity.

  9. Lethal iron deprivation induced by non-neutralizing antibodies targeting transferrin receptor 1 in malignant B cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, José A; Luria-Pérez, Rosendo; López-Valdés, Héctor E; Casero, David; Daniels, Tracy R; Patel, Shabnum; Avila, David; Leuchter, Richard; So, Sokuntheavy; Ortiz-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Bonavida, Benjamin; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Charles, Andrew C; Pellegrini, Matteo; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L

    2011-11-01

    A number of antibodies have been developed that induce lethal iron deprivation (LID) by targeting the transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1/CD71) and either neutralizing transferrin (Tf) binding, blocking internalization of the receptor and/or inducing its degradation. We have developed recombinant antibodies targeting human TfR1 (ch128.1 and ch128.1Av), which induce receptor degradation and are cytotoxic to certain malignant B-cells. We now show that internalization of TfR1 bound to these antibodies can lead to its sequestration and degradation, as well as reduced Tf uptake, and the induction of a transcriptional response consistent with iron deprivation, which is mediated in part by downstream targets of p53. Cells resistant to these antibodies do not sequester and degrade TfR1 after internalization of the antibody/receptor complex, and accordingly maintain their ability to internalize Tf. These findings are expected to facilitate the rational design and clinical use of therapeutic agents targeting iron import via TfR1 in hematopoietic malignancies.

  10. Lethal iron deprivation induced by non-neutralizing antibodies targeting transferrin receptor 1 in malignant B cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, JoséA.; Luria-Pérez, Rosendo; López-Valdés, Héctor E.; Casero, David; Daniels, Tracy R.; Patel, Shabnum; Avila, David; Leuchter, Richard; So, Sokuntheavy; ánchez, Elizabeth Ortiz-S; Bonavida, Benjamin; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Charles, Andrew .C; Pellegrini, Matteo; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2013-01-01

    A number of antibodies have been developed that induce lethal iron deprivation (LID) by targeting the transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1/CD71) and either neutralizing transferrin (Tf) binding, blocking internalization of the receptor and/or inducing its degradation. We have developed recombinant antibodies targeting human TfR1 (ch128.1 and ch128.1Av), which induce receptor degradation and are cytotoxic to certain malignant B-cells. We now show that internalization of TfR1 bound to these antibodies can lead to its sequestration and degradation, as well as reduced Tf uptake, and the induction of a transcriptional response consistent with iron deprivation, which is mediated in part by downstream targets of p53. Cells resistant to these antibodies do not sequester and degrade TfR1 after internalization of the antibody/receptor complex, and accordingly maintain their ability to internalize Tf. These findings are expected to facilitate the rational design and clinical use of therapeutic agents targeting iron import via TfR1 in hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:21870996

  11. Epitope mapping of anti-human transferrin monoclonal antibodies: potential uses for transferrin-transferrin receptor interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Perera, Yasser; García, Darién; Guirola, Osmany; Huerta, Vivian; García, Yanet; Muñoz, Yasmiana

    2008-01-01

    Human transferrin (hTf) is an 80 kDa glycoprotein involved in iron transport from the absorption sites to the sites of storage and utilization. Additionally, transferrin also plays a relevant role as a bacteriostatic agent preventing uncontrolled bacterial growth in the host. In this work we describe a well-characterized Mabs panel in terms of precise epitope localization and estimate affinity for the two major hTf isoforms. We found at least four antigenic regions in the hTf molecule, narrowed down the interacting antigen residues within three of such regions, and located them on a molecular model of hTf. Two of the antigenic regions partially overlap with previously described transferrin-binding sites for both human receptor (antigenic region I: containing amino acid residues from Asp-69 to Asn-76 at the N-lobe) and bacterial receptors from two pathogenic species (antigenic region III: amino acid residues from Leu-665 to Ser-672 at the C-lobe). Hence, such monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) could be used as an additional tool for conformational studies and/or the characterization of the interaction between hTf and both types of receptor molecules.

  12. Meningococcal transferrin-binding proteins A and B show cooperation in their binding kinetics for human transferrin.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Russell H; Oakhill, Jonathan S; Joannou, Christopher L; Gorringe, Andrew R; Evans, Robert W

    2005-02-01

    Neisseria meningitidis, a causative agent of bacterial meningitis and septicemia, obtains transferrin-bound iron by expressing two outer membrane-located transferrin-binding proteins, TbpA and TbpB. A novel system was developed to investigate the interaction between Tbps and human transferrin. Copurified TbpA-TbpB, recombined TbpA-TbpB, and individual TbpA and TbpB were reconstituted into liposomes and fused onto an HPA chip (BIAcore). All preparations formed stable monolayers, which, with the exception of TbpB, could be regenerated by removing bound transferrin. The ligand binding properties of these monolayers were characterized with surface plasmon resonance and shown to be specific for human transferrin. Kinetic data for diferric human transferrin binding showed that recombined TbpA-TbpB had K(a) and K(d) values similar to those of copurified TbpA-TbpB. Individual TbpA and TbpB also displayed K(a) values similar to those of copurified TbpA-TbpB, but their K(d) values were one order of magnitude higher. Chemical cross-linking studies revealed that TbpA and TbpB, in the absence of human transferrin, formed large complexes with TbpA as the predominant species. Upon human transferrin binding, a complex was formed with a molecular mass corresponding to that of a TbpB-human transferrin heterodimer as well as a higher-molecular-mass complex of this heterodimer cross-linked to TbpA. This indicates that TbpA and TbpB form a functional meningococcal receptor complex in which there is cooperativity in the human transferrin binding kinetics. However, iron loss from the diferric human transferrin-TbpA-TbpB complex was not greater than that from human transferrin alone, suggesting that additional meningococcal transport components are involved in the process of iron removal.

  13. Meningococcal Transferrin-Binding Proteins A and B Show Cooperation in Their Binding Kinetics for Human Transferrin

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Russell H.; Oakhill, Jonathan S.; Joannou, Christopher L.; Gorringe, Andrew R.; Evans, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis, a causative agent of bacterial meningitis and septicemia, obtains transferrin-bound iron by expressing two outer membrane-located transferrin-binding proteins, TbpA and TbpB. A novel system was developed to investigate the interaction between Tbps and human transferrin. Copurified TbpA-TbpB, recombined TbpA-TbpB, and individual TbpA and TbpB were reconstituted into liposomes and fused onto an HPA chip (BIAcore). All preparations formed stable monolayers, which, with the exception of TbpB, could be regenerated by removing bound transferrin. The ligand binding properties of these monolayers were characterized with surface plasmon resonance and shown to be specific for human transferrin. Kinetic data for diferric human transferrin binding showed that recombined TbpA-TbpB had Ka and Kd values similar to those of copurified TbpA-TbpB. Individual TbpA and TbpB also displayed Ka values similar to those of copurified TbpA-TbpB, but their Kd values were one order of magnitude higher. Chemical cross-linking studies revealed that TbpA and TbpB, in the absence of human transferrin, formed large complexes with TbpA as the predominant species. Upon human transferrin binding, a complex was formed with a molecular mass corresponding to that of a TbpB-human transferrin heterodimer as well as a higher-molecular-mass complex of this heterodimer cross-linked to TbpA. This indicates that TbpA and TbpB form a functional meningococcal receptor complex in which there is cooperativity in the human transferrin binding kinetics. However, iron loss from the diferric human transferrin-TbpA-TbpB complex was not greater than that from human transferrin alone, suggesting that additional meningococcal transport components are involved in the process of iron removal. PMID:15664936

  14. Insights into the mechanism of cell death induced by saporin delivered into cancer cells by an antibody fusion protein targeting the transferrin receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R.; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodríguez, José A.; Leoh, Lai Sum; Erb, Michael A.; Diamante, Graciel; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2012-01-01

    We previously developed an antibody-avidin fusion protein (ch128.1Av) that targets the human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and exhibits direct cytotoxicity against malignant B cells in an iron-dependent manner. ch128.1Av is also a delivery system and its conjugation with biotinylated saporin (b-SO6), a plant ribosome-inactivating toxin, results in a dramatic iron-independent cytotoxicity, both in malignant cells that are sensitive or resistant to ch128.1Av alone, in which the toxin effectively inhibits protein synthesis and triggers caspase activation. We have now found that the ch128.1Av/b-SO6 complex induces a transcriptional response consistent with oxidative stress and DNA damage, a response that is not observed with ch128.1Av alone. Furthermore, we show that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine partially blocks saporin-induced apoptosis suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to DNA damage and ultimately saporin-induced cell death. Interestingly, the toxin was detected in nuclear extracts by immunoblotting, suggesting the possibility that saporin might induce direct DNA damage. However, confocal microscopy did not show a clear and consistent pattern of intranuclear localization. Finally, using the long-term culture-initiating cell assay we found that ch128.1Av/b-SO6 is not toxic to normal human hematopoietic stem cells suggesting that this critical cell population would be preserved in therapeutic interventions using this immunotoxin. PMID:23085102

  15. Insights into the mechanism of cell death induced by saporin delivered into cancer cells by an antibody fusion protein targeting the transferrin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodríguez, José A; Leoh, Lai Sum; Erb, Michael A; Diamante, Graciel; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Penichet, Manuel L

    2013-02-01

    We previously developed an antibody-avidin fusion protein (ch128.1Av) that targets the human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and exhibits direct cytotoxicity against malignant B cells in an iron-dependent manner. ch128.1Av is also a delivery system and its conjugation with biotinylated saporin (b-SO6), a plant ribosome-inactivating toxin, results in a dramatic iron-independent cytotoxicity, both in malignant cells that are sensitive or resistant to ch128.1Av alone, in which the toxin effectively inhibits protein synthesis and triggers caspase activation. We have now found that the ch128.1Av/b-SO6 complex induces a transcriptional response consistent with oxidative stress and DNA damage, a response that is not observed with ch128.1Av alone. Furthermore, we show that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine partially blocks saporin-induced apoptosis suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to DNA damage and ultimately saporin-induced cell death. Interestingly, the toxin was detected in nuclear extracts by immunoblotting, suggesting the possibility that saporin might induce direct DNA damage. However, confocal microscopy did not show a clear and consistent pattern of intranuclear localization. Finally, using the long-term culture-initiating cell assay we found that ch128.1Av/b-SO6 is not toxic to normal human hematopoietic stem cells suggesting that this critical cell population would be preserved in therapeutic interventions using this immunotoxin.

  16. Evaluating the effectiveness of transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1) as a magnetic resonance reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sofia M; Herrmann, Anne; Moss, Diana; Poptani, Harish; Williams, Steve R; Murray, Patricia; Taylor, Arthur

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) reporter genes have the potential for tracking the biodistribution and fate of cells in vivo, thus allowing the safety, efficacy and mechanisms of action of cell-based therapies to be comprehensively assessed. In this study, we evaluate the effectiveness of the iron importer transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1) as an MR reporter gene in the model cell line CHO-K1. Overexpression of the TfR1 transgene led to a reduction in the levels of endogenous TfR1 mRNA, but to a 60-fold increase in total TfR1 protein levels. Although the mRNA levels of ferritin heavy chain-1 (Fth1) did not change, Fth1 protein levels increased 13-fold. The concentration of intracellular iron increased significantly, even when cells were cultured in medium that was not supplemented with iron and the amount of iron in the extracellular environment was thus at physiological levels. However, we found that, by supplementing the cell culture medium with ferric citrate, a comparable degree of iron uptake and MR contrast could be achieved in control cells that did not express the TfR1 transgene. Sufficient MR contrast to enable the cells to be detected in vivo following their administration into the midbrain of chick embryos was obtained irrespective of the reporter gene. We conclude that TfR1 is not an effective reporter and that, to track the biodistribution of cells with MR imaging in the short term, it is sufficient to simply culture cells in the presence of ferric citrate. Copyright © 2016 The Authors Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Erythrocytic Iron Deficiency Enhances Susceptibility to Plasmodium chabaudi Infection in Mice Carrying a Missense Mutation in Transferrin Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Lelliott, Patrick M.; McMorran, Brendan J.; Foote, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of iron deficiency in areas of high malaria transmission is complicated by evidence which suggests that iron deficiency anemia protects against malaria, while iron supplementation increases malaria risk. Iron deficiency anemia results in an array of pathologies, including reduced systemic iron bioavailability and abnormal erythrocyte physiology; however, the mechanisms by which these pathologies influence malaria infection are not well defined. In the present study, the response to malaria infection was examined in a mutant mouse line, TfrcMRI24910, identified during an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) screen. This line carries a missense mutation in the gene for transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Heterozygous mice exhibited reduced erythrocyte volume and density, a phenotype consistent with dietary iron deficiency anemia. However, unlike the case in dietary deficiency, the erythrocyte half-life, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and intraerythrocytic ferritin content were unchanged. Systemic iron bioavailability was also unchanged, indicating that this mutation results in erythrocytic iron deficiency without significantly altering overall iron homeostasis. When infected with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi adami, mice displayed increased parasitemia and succumbed to infection more quickly than their wild-type littermates. Transfusion of fluorescently labeled erythrocytes into malaria parasite-infected mice demonstrated an erythrocyte-autonomous enhanced survival of parasites within mutant erythrocytes. Together, these results indicate that TFR1 deficiency alters erythrocyte physiology in a way that is similar to dietary iron deficiency anemia, albeit to a lesser degree, and that this promotes intraerythrocytic parasite survival and an increased susceptibility to malaria in mice. These findings may have implications for the management of iron deficiency in the context of malaria. PMID:26303393

  18. Synthesis and characterization of human transferrin-stabilized gold nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guével, Xavier; Daum, Nicole; Schneider, Marc

    2011-07-01

    Human transferrin has been biolabelled with gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) using a simple, fast and non-toxic method. These nanocrystals (<2 nm) are stabilized in the protein via sulfur groups and have a high fluorescence emission in the near infrared region (QY = 4.3%; λem = 695 nm). Structural investigation and photophysical measurements show a high population of clusters formed of 22-33 gold atoms covalently bound to the transferrin. In solutions with pH ranging from 5 to 10 and in buffer solutions (PBS, HEPES), those biolabelled proteins exhibit a good stability. No significant quenching effect of the fluorescent transferrin has been detected after iron loading of iron-free transferrin (apoTf) and in the presence of a specific polyclonal antibody. Additionally, antibody-induced agglomeration demonstrates no alteration in the protein activity and the receptor target ability. MTT and Vialight® Plus tests show no cytotoxicity of these labelled proteins in cells (1 µg ml - 1-1 mg ml - 1). Cell line experiments (A549) indicate also an uptake of the iron loaded fluorescent proteins inside cells. These remarkable data highlight the potential of a new type of non-toxic fluorescent transferrin for imaging and targeting.

  19. Human placental coated vesicles contain receptor-bound transferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Booth, A G; Wilson, M J

    1981-01-01

    Human placental coated vesicles have been purified by a method involving sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation and treatment with wheat-germ agglutinin. These preparations were free of contamination by placental microvillus fragments. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis demonstrated that the coated vesicles contained a single serum protein, which was identified as transferrin. This transferrin was only observed after the vesicles were treated with a non-ionic detergent, and its behaviour during crossed hydrophobic-interaction immunoelectrophoresis suggested that a large proportion of it was receptor-bound. No other serum proteins, including immunoglobulin G, could be detected in these preparations. Receptor-bound transferrin was the only antigen common to placental coated vesicles and microvilli, implying that other plasma-membrane proteins are excluded from the region of membrane involved in coated-vesicle formation. Images PLATE 2 PLATE 1 Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6272755

  20. Temporal manipulation of transferrin-receptor-1-dependent iron uptake identifies a sensitive period in mouse hippocampal neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Fretham, S J B; Carlson, E S; Wobken, J; Tran, P V; Petryk, A; Georgieff, M K

    2012-08-01

    Iron is a necessary substrate for neuronal function throughout the lifespan, but particularly during development. Early life iron deficiency (ID) in humans (late gestation through 2-3 yr) results in persistent cognitive and behavioral abnormalities despite iron repletion. Animal models of early life ID generated using maternal dietary iron restriction also demonstrate persistent learning and memory deficits, suggesting a critical requirement for iron during hippocampal development. Precise definition of the temporal window for this requirement has been elusive due to anemia and total body and brain ID inherent to previous dietary restriction models. To circumvent these confounds, we developed transgenic mice that express tetracycline transactivator regulated, dominant negative transferrin receptor (DNTfR1) in hippocampal neurons, disrupting TfR1 mediated iron uptake specifically in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Normal iron status was restored by doxycycline administration. We manipulated the duration of ID using this inducible model to examine long-term effects of early ID on Morris water maze learning, CA1 apical dendrite structure, and defining factors of critical periods including parvalbmin (PV) expression, perineuronal nets (PNN), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Ongoing ID impaired spatial memory and resulted in disorganized apical dendrite structure accompanied by altered PV and PNN expression and reduced BDNF levels. Iron repletion at P21, near the end of hippocampal dendritogenesis, restored spatial memory, dendrite structure, and critical period markers in adult mice. However, mice that remained hippocampally iron deficient until P42 continued to have spatial memory deficits, impaired CA1 apical dendrite structure, and persistent alterations in PV and PNN expression and reduced BDNF despite iron repletion. Together, these findings demonstrate that hippocampal iron availability is necessary between P21 and P42 for development of normal

  1. Aluminum stimulates uptake of non-transferrin bound iron and transferrin bound iron in human glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yongbae; Olivi, Luisa; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Maertens, Alex; Bressler, Joseph P. . E-mail: Bressler@kennedykrieger.org

    2007-05-01

    Aluminum and other trivalent metals were shown to stimulate uptake of transferrin bound iron and nontransferrin bound iron in erytholeukemia and hepatoma cells. Because of the association between aluminum and Alzheimer's Disease, and findings of higher levels of iron in Alzheimer's disease brains, the effects of aluminum on iron homeostasis were examined in a human glial cell line. Aluminum stimulated dose- and time-dependent uptake of nontransferrin bound iron and iron bound to transferrin. A transporter was likely involved in the uptake of nontransferrin iron because uptake reached saturation, was temperature-dependent, and attenuated by inhibitors of protein synthesis. Interestingly, the effects of aluminum were not blocked by inhibitors of RNA synthesis. Aluminum also decreased the amount of iron bound to ferritin though it did not affect levels of divalent metal transporter 1. These results suggest that aluminum disrupts iron homeostasis in Brain by several mechanisms including the transferrin receptor, a nontransferrin iron transporter, and ferritin.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acquires iron by cell-surface sequestration and internalization of human holo-transferrin.

    PubMed

    Boradia, Vishant Mahendra; Malhotra, Himanshu; Thakkar, Janak Shrikant; Tillu, Vikas Ajit; Vuppala, Bhavana; Patil, Pravinkumar; Sheokand, Navdeep; Sharma, Prerna; Chauhan, Anoop Singh; Raje, Manoj; Raje, Chaaya Iyengar

    2014-08-28

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), which requires iron for survival, acquires this element by synthesizing iron-binding molecules known as siderophores and by recruiting a host iron-transport protein, transferrin, to the phagosome. The siderophores extract iron from transferrin and transport it into the bacterium. Here we describe an additional mechanism for iron acquisition, consisting of an M.tb protein that drives transport of human holo-transferrin into M.tb cells. The pathogenic strain M.tb H37Rv expresses several proteins that can bind human holo-transferrin. One of these proteins is the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, Rv1436), which is present on the surface of M.tb and its relative Mycobacterium smegmatis. Overexpression of GAPDH results in increased transferrin binding to M.tb cells and iron uptake. Human transferrin is internalized across the mycobacterial cell wall in a GAPDH-dependent manner within infected macrophages.

  3. Determination of human transferrin concentrations in mouse models of neisserial infection.

    PubMed

    Perera, Yasser; Cobas, Karen; Garrido, Yainelis; Nazabal, Consuelo; Brown, Enma; Pajon, Rolando

    2006-04-20

    Transferrin constitutes the major protein involved in the transport of iron from the sites of absorption to the sites of storage and utilization. Despite the high affinity of transferrin for iron, most bacterial pathogens, such as the human restricted Neisseria meningitidis, have developed iron acquisition mechanisms. Several animal models of bacterial infection that include the exogenous supply of human transferrin have been implemented, and tests using transgenic mouse models are underway. Here we describe an ELISA sandwich procedure based on two monoclonal antibodies with negligible cross-reactivity to murine transferrin, to estimate human transferrin concentrations in mouse sera. The assay can detect as little as 10 ng/ml of human transferrin with coefficients of variation ranging from 1.6% to 4.4% (intra-assay) and 3.8% to 5% (inter-assay). The recovery values range from 90% to 110% in the assay working range (25-400 ng/ml). Human transferrin concentrations estimated in sera from 41 human transferrin transgenic mice ranged from 2 to 14 microg/ml. Further estimations of human transferrin levels in mouse sera of a previously described mouse model of N. meningitidis were also carried out. The intraperitoneal injection of 8 mg of human transferrin achieved a sustained value of human transferrin in mouse sera in the range of 1-2mg/ml over the first 24h, indicating that bacteria reaching the blood stream during this time would be exposed to levels of hTf found in normal human serum.

  4. Transferrin-conjugated boron nitride nanotubes: protein grafting, characterization, and interaction with human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ciofani, Gianni; Del Turco, Serena; Genchi, Giada Graziana; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Basta, Giuseppina; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2012-10-15

    In this paper we report on a covalent grafting of boron nitride nanotubes with human transferrin. After silanization of the nanotube wall, transferrin was linked to the nanotubes through carbamide binding. The obtained transferrin-conjugated boron nitride nanotubes (tf-BNNTs) resulted stable in aqueous environments and were characterized in terms of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, size distribution analysis and Z-potential measurement. Effective covalent grafting of transferrin was demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The obtained tf-BNNTs were thereafter tested on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs); in particular cellular up-take was investigated by confocal, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, demonstrating the key role of transferrin during the internalization process. Here reported for the first time in the literature, the covalent BNNT functionalization with a targeting ligand represents a fundamental step towards BNNT exploitation as smart and selective nanocarriers in a number of nanomedicine applications.

  5. Metabolic and cytoskeletal modulation of transferrin receptor mobility in mitogen-activated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, G M; Galbraith, R M

    1980-01-01

    The transferrin receptors which appear on mitogen-activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were found by the use of immunofluorescence techniques to display temperature-dependent patching and capping reactions upon binding of transferrin. Lateral mobility of ligand-occupied membrane sites was accompanied by both shedding and endocytosis of receptor-transferrin complexes. In the presence of sodium azide or the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B, cap formation and shedding were markedly inhibited. In contrast, endocytosis of patched receptor-ligand complexes was inhibited by azide and microtubule inhibitors, including colchicine, vinblastine and vincristine. Co-capping experiments performed to elucidate further the alterations in membrane configuration involved in these reactions failed to reveal any topographical relationship between transferrin receptors and lectin-binding sites in these cells. These studied indicate that temperature-dependent mobility of transferrin receptors upon mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes is dependent upon the integrity of the cytoskeletal system and metabolic function of the cell. PMID:6258830

  6. Cloning, characterization, and modeling of a monoclonal anti-human transferrin antibody that competes with the transferrin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Orlandini, M.; Santucci, A.; Tramontano, A.; Neri, P.; Oliviero, S.

    1994-01-01

    In this report we describe the isolation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against human serum transferrin (Tf) and the cloning and sequencing of its cDNA. The antibody competes with the transferrin receptor (TR) for binding to human Tf and is therefore expected to bind at or very close to a region of interaction between Tf and its receptor. From the deduced amino acid sequence, we constructed a 3-dimensional model of the variable domains of the antibody based on the canonical structure model for the hypervariable loops. The proposed structure of the antibody is a first step toward a more detailed characterization of the antibody-Tf complex and possibly toward a better understanding of the Tf interaction with its receptor. The model might prove useful in guiding site-directed mutagenesis studies, simplifying the experimental elucidation of the antibody structure, and in the use of automatic procedures to dock the interacting molecules as soon as structural information about the structure of the human Tf molecule will be available. PMID:7530542

  7. Separation of Albumin, Ceruloplasmin, and Transferrin from Human Plasma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Grady; Frieden, Earl

    1982-01-01

    Procedures are provided for separating the principal metalloproteins (albumin, ceruloplasmin, and transferrin) from plasma using column chromatographic techniques. The experiment can be completed in two separate three-hour laboratory periods during which column chromatography is illustrated and the effect of pH on charge and affinity of a protein…

  8. How the Binding of Human Transferrin Primes the Transferrin Receptor Potentiating Iron Release at Endosomal pH

    SciTech Connect

    B Eckenroth; A Steere; N Chasteen; S Everse; A Mason

    2011-12-31

    Delivery of iron to cells requires binding of two iron-containing human transferrin (hTF) molecules to the specific homodimeric transferrin receptor (TFR) on the cell surface. Through receptor-mediated endocytosis involving lower pH, salt, and an unidentified chelator, iron is rapidly released from hTF within the endosome. The crystal structure of a monoferric N-lobe hTF/TFR complex (3.22-{angstrom} resolution) features two binding motifs in the N lobe and one in the C lobe of hTF. Binding of Fe{sub N}hTF induces global and site-specific conformational changes within the TFR ectodomain. Specifically, movements at the TFR dimer interface appear to prime the TFR to undergo pH-induced movements that alter the hTF/TFR interaction. Iron release from each lobe then occurs by distinctly different mechanisms: Binding of His349 to the TFR (strengthened by protonation at low pH) controls iron release from the C lobe, whereas displacement of one N-lobe binding motif, in concert with the action of the dilysine trigger, elicits iron release from the N lobe. One binding motif in each lobe remains attached to the same {alpha}-helix in the TFR throughout the endocytic cycle. Collectively, the structure elucidates how the TFR accelerates iron release from the C lobe, slows it from the N lobe, and stabilizes binding of apohTF for return to the cell surface. Importantly, this structure provides new targets for mutagenesis studies to further understand and define this system.

  9. Determination of genetic transferrin variants in human serum by high-resolution capillary zone electrophoresis(†).

    PubMed

    Caslavska, Jitka; Joneli, Jeannine; Wanzenried, Ursula; Schiess, Jeannette; Lanz, Christian; Thormann, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    High-resolution capillary zone electrophoresis in the routine arena with stringent quality assurance is employed for the determination of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin in human serum. The assay comprises mixing of human serum with a Fe(III) -containing solution prior to analysis of the iron-saturated mixture in a dynamically double-coated capillary using a commercial buffer at alkaline pH. In contrast to other assays, it provides sufficient resolution for proper recognition of genetic transferrin variants. Analysis of 7290 patient sera revealed 166 isoform patterns that could be assigned to genetic variants, namely, 109 BC, 53 CD, one BD and three CC variants. Several subtypes of transferrin D can be distinguished as they have large enough differences in pI values. Subtypes of transferrin C and B cannot be resolved. However, analysis of the detection time ratios of tetrasialo isoforms of transferrin BC and transferrin CD variants revealed multimodal frequency histograms, indicating the presence of subtypes of transferrin C, B and D. The data gathered over 11 years demonstrate the robustness of the high-resolution capillary zone electrophoresis assay. This is the first account of a capillary zone electrophoresis based carbohydrate-deficient transferrin assay with a broad overview on transferrin isoform patterns associated with genetic transferrin variants.

  10. Delivery of iron to human cells by bovine transferrin. Implications for the growth of human cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Young, S P; Garner, C

    1990-01-01

    Following suggestions that transferrin present in fetal-bovine serum, a common supplement used in tissue-culture media, may not bind well to human cells, we have isolated the protein and investigated its interaction with both human and bovine cells. Bovine transferrin bound to a human cell line, K562, at 4 degrees C with a kd of 590 nM, whereas human transferrin bound with a kd of 3.57 nM, a 165-fold difference. With a bovine cell line, NBL4, bovine transferrin bound with the higher affinity, kd 9.09 nM, whereas human transferrin bound with a kd of 41.7 nM, only a 5-fold difference. These values were reflected in an 8.6-fold difference in the rate of iron delivery by the two proteins to human cells, whereas delivery to bovine cells was the same. Nevertheless, the bovine transferrin was taken up by the human cells by a specific receptor-mediated process. Human cells cultured in bovine diferric transferrin at 40 micrograms/ml, the concentration expected in the presence of 10% fetal-bovine serum, failed to thrive, whereas cells cultured in the presence of human transferrin proliferated normally. These results suggest that growth of human cells in bovine serum could give rise to a cellular iron deficiency, which may in turn lead to the selection of clones of cells adapted for survival with less iron. This has important consequences for the use of such cells as models, since they may have aberrant iron-dependent pathways and perhaps other unknown alterations in cell function. PMID:2302189

  11. Haemophilus influenzae can use human transferrin as a sole source for required iron.

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, D A; Sparling, P F

    1985-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae grown on enriched medium containing protoporphyrin IX rather than hemin was iron starved by the addition of the chelator ethylenediamine di-o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid. Iron starvation could be overcome in each of 33 H. influenzae type b isolates by 30% Fe-saturated human transferrin but not by human lactoferrin. Among nontypeable H. influenzae, 28 of 35 isolates, including 2 of 3 systemic isolates, were able to utilize Fe-transferrin. None of 18 H. parainfluenzae isolates was able to use Fe-transferrin. Iron starvation of H. influenzae type b resulted in increased amounts of three membrane proteins of 94,000 to 98,000 daltons. Images PMID:3872264

  12. Fluorescent adduct formation with terbium: a novel strategy for transferrin glycoform identification in human body fluids and carbohydrate-deficient transferrin HPLC method validation.

    PubMed

    Sorio, Daniela; De Palo, Elio Franco; Bertaso, Anna; Bortolotti, Federica; Tagliaro, Franco

    2017-02-01

    This paper puts forward a new method for the transferrin (Tf) glycoform analysis in body fluids that involves the formation of a transferrin-terbium fluorescent adduct (TfFluo). The key idea is to validate the analytical procedure for carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT), a traditional biochemical serum marker to identify chronic alcohol abuse. Terbium added to a human body-fluid sample produced TfFluo. Anion exchange HPLC technique, with fluorescence detection (λ exc 298 nm and λ em 550 nm), permitted clear separation and identification of Tf glycoform peaks without any interfering signals, allowing selective Tf sialoforms analysis in human serum and body fluids (cadaveric blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and dried blood spots) hampered for routine test. Serum samples (n = 78) were analyzed by both traditional absorbance (Abs) and fluorescence (Fl) HPLC methods and CDT% levels demonstrated a significant correlation (p < 0.001 Pearson). Intra- and inter-runs CV% was 3.1 and 4.6%, respectively. The cut-off of 1.9 CDT%, related to the HPLC Abs proposed as the reference method, by interpolation in the correlation curve with the present method demonstrated a 1.3 CDT% cut-off. Method comparison by Passing-Bablok and Bland-Altman tests demonstrated Fl versus Abs agreement. In conclusion, the novel method is a reliable test for CDT% analysis and provides a substantial analytical improvement offering important advantages in terms of types of body fluid analysis. Its sensitivity and absence of interferences extend clinical applications being reliable for CDT assay on body fluids usually not suitable for routine test. Graphical Abstract The formation of a transferrin-terbium fluorescent adduct can be used to analyze the transferrin glycoforms. The HPLC method for carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT%) measurement was validated and employed to determine the levels in different body fluids.

  13. Machupo Virus Glycoprotein Determinants for Human Transferrin Receptor 1 Binding and Cell Entry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    and SABV [17,18], and a major determinant of host adaptation. However, studies on receptor use and cellular tropism suggest that the non-pathogenic...938–948. 19. Oldenburg J, Reignier T, Flanagan ML, Hamilton GA, Cannon PM (2007) Differences in tropism and pH dependence for glycoproteins from the...2010) Investigation of clade B New World arenavirus tropism by using chimeric GP1 proteins. J Virol 84: 1176–1182. 24. Bowden TA, Crispin M, Graham SC

  14. Transferrin as a drug carrier: Cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and transport kinetics of doxorubicin transferrin conjugate in the human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Szwed, Marzena; Matusiak, Agnieszka; Laroche-Clary, Audrey; Robert, Jacques; Marszalek, Ilona; Jozwiak, Zofia

    2014-03-01

    Leukemias are one of most common malignancies worldwide. There is a substantial need for new chemotherapeutic drugs effective against this cancer. Doxorubicin (DOX), used for treatment of leukemias and solid tumors, is poorly efficacious when it is administered systemically at conventional doses. Therefore, several strategies have been developed to reduce the side effects of this anthracycline treatment. In this study we compared the effect of DOX and doxorubicin-transferrin conjugate (DOX-TRF) on human leukemia cell lines: chronic erythromyeloblastoid leukemia (K562), sensitive and resistant (K562/DOX) to doxorubicin, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CCRF-CEM). Experiments were also carried out on normal cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We analyzed the chemical structure of DOX-TRF conjugate by using mass spectroscopy. The in vitro growth-inhibition assay XTT, indicated that DOX-TRF is more cytotoxic for leukemia cells sensitive and resistant to doxorubicin and significantly less sensitive to normal cells compared to DOX alone. During the assessment of intracellular DOX-TRF accumulation it was confirmed that the tested malignant cells were able to retain the examined conjugate for longer periods of time than normal lymphocytes. Comparison of kinetic parameters showed that the rate of DOX-TRF efflux was also slower in the tested cells than free DOX. The results presented here should contribute to the understanding of the differences in antitumor activities of the DOX-TRF conjugate and free drug.

  15. Effects of human serum and apo-Transferrin on Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    She, Pengfei; Chen, Lihua; Qi, Yong; Xu, Huan; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yangxia; Luo, Zhen; Wu, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Biofilm-associated Staphylococcus epidermidis infections present clinically important features due to their high levels of resistance to traditional antibiotics. As a part of human innate immune system, serum shows different degrees of protection against systemic S. epidermidis infection. We investigated the ability of human serum as well as serum component to inhibit the formation of, and eradication of mature S. epidermidis biofilms. In addition, the synergistic effect of vancomycin combined with apo-Transferrin was checked. Human serum exhibited significant antibiofilm activities against S. epidermidis at the concentration without affecting planktonic cell growth. However, there was no effect of human serum on established biofilms. By component separation, we observed that antibiofilm effect of serum components mainly due to the proteins could be damaged by heat inactivation (e.g., complement) or heat-stable proteins ≥100 kDa. In addition, serum apo-Transferrin showed modest antibiofilm effect, but without influence on S. epidermidis initial adhesion. And there was a synergistic antibiofilm interaction between vancomycin and apo-Transferrin against S. epidermidis. Our results indicate that serum or its components (heat-inactivated components or heat-stable proteins ≥100 kDa) could inhibits S. epidermidis biofilm formation. Besides, apo-Transferrin could partially reduce the biofilm formation at the concentration that does not inhibit planktonic cell growth.

  16. Recombinant Human Adenovirus: Targeting to the Human Transferrin Receptor Improves Gene Transfer to Brain Microcapillary Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Haibin; Anderson, Brian; Mao, Qinwen; Davidson, Beverly L.

    2000-01-01

    Some inborn errors of metabolism due to deficiencies of soluble lysosomal enzymes cause global neurodegenerative disease. Representative examples include the infantile and late infantile forms of the ceroid lipofuscinoses (CLN1 or CLN2 deficiency, respectively) and mucopolysaccharidoses type VII (MPS VII), a deficiency of β-glucuronidase. Treatment of the central nervous system component of these disorders will require widespread protein or enzyme replacement, either through dissemination of the protein or through dissemination of a gene encoding it. We hypothesize that transduction of brain microcapillary endothelium (BME) with recombinant viral vectors, with secretion of enzyme product basolaterally, could allow for widespread enzyme dissemination. To achieve this, viruses should be modified to target the BME. This requires (i) identification of a BME-resident target receptor, (ii) identification of motifs targeted to that molecule, (iii) the construction of modified viruses to allow for binding to the target receptor, and (iv) demonstrated transduction of receptor-expressing cells. In proof of principal experiments, we chose the human transferrin receptor (hTfR), a molecule found at high density on human BME. A nonamer phage display library was panned for motifs which could bind hTfR. Forty-three clones were sequenced, most of which contained an AKxxK/R, KxKxPK/R, or KxK motif. Ten peptides representative of the three motifs were cloned into the HI loop of adenovirus type 5 fiber. All motifs tested retained their ability to trimerize and bind transferrin receptor, and seven allowed for recombinant adenovirus production. Importantly, the fiber-modified viruses facilitated increased gene transfer (2- to 34-fold) to hTfR expressing cell lines and human brain microcapillary endothelia expressing high levels of endogenous receptor. Our data indicate that adenoviruses can be modified in the HI loop for expanded tropism to the hTfR. PMID:11070036

  17. DEAE-Affi-Gel Blue chromatography of human serum: use for purification of native transferrin.

    PubMed

    Werner, P A; Galbraith, R M; Arnaud, P

    1983-10-01

    Human serum was subjected to chromatography on DEAE-Affi-Gel Blue which combines ion-exchange and pseudo-ligand-affinity chromatography in a 0.02 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.0. All serum proteins were bound with the exception of transferrin, IgG (immunoglobulin G) and trace amounts of IgA. After a second step of Sephadex G-100 gel chromatography, or affinity chromatography against goat anti-human IgG F(ab')2 coupled to AH-Sepharose 4B, IgG and IgA were removed. The transferrin obtained was homogeneous and of high yield (greater than 80%), and was unaltered as judged by analyses of molecular weight, isoelectric point, iron-binding capacity, antigenicity, and ability to bind to high-affinity specific cellular receptors. Thus, DEAE-Affi-Gel Blue chromatography may be used as the basis for a simple, rapid, two-step method for the purification of large amounts of native transferrin from serum.

  18. Interaction of imatinib mesylate with human serum transferrin: The comparative spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Śliwińska-Hill, Urszula

    2017-02-15

    Imatinib mesylate (Imt) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor mainly used in the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (Ph+CML). Human serum transferrin is the most abundant serum protein responsible for the transport of iron ions and many endogenous and exogenous ligands. In this study the mechanism of interactions between the imatinib mesylate and all states of transferrin (apo-Tf, Htf and holo-Tf) has been investigated by fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), circular dichroism (CD) and zeta potential spectroscopic methods. Based on the experimental results it was proved that under physiological conditions the imatinib mesylate binds to the each form of transferrin with a binding constant c.a. 10(5)M(-1). The thermodynamic parameters indicate that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals were involved in the interaction of apo-Tf with the drug and hydrophobic and ionic strength participate in the reaction of Htf and holo-Tf with imatinib mesylate. Moreover, it was shown that common metal ions, Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) strongly influenced apo-Tf-Imt binding constant. The CD studies showed that there are no conformational changes in the secondary structure of the proteins. No significant changes in secondary structure of the proteins upon binding with the drug and instability of apo-Tf-Imt system are the desirable effects from pharmacological point of view.

  19. Interaction of imatinib mesylate with human serum transferrin: The comparative spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śliwińska-Hill, Urszula

    2017-02-01

    Imatinib mesylate (Imt) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor mainly used in the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (Ph + CML). Human serum transferrin is the most abundant serum protein responsible for the transport of iron ions and many endogenous and exogenous ligands. In this study the mechanism of interactions between the imatinib mesylate and all states of transferrin (apo-Tf, Htf and holo-Tf) has been investigated by fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), circular dichroism (CD) and zeta potential spectroscopic methods. Based on the experimental results it was proved that under physiological conditions the imatinib mesylate binds to the each form of transferrin with a binding constant c.a. 105 M- 1. The thermodynamic parameters indicate that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals were involved in the interaction of apo-Tf with the drug and hydrophobic and ionic strength participate in the reaction of Htf and holo-Tf with imatinib mesylate. Moreover, it was shown that common metal ions, Zn2 + and Ca2 + strongly influenced apo-Tf-Imt binding constant. The CD studies showed that there are no conformational changes in the secondary structure of the proteins. No significant changes in secondary structure of the proteins upon binding with the drug and instability of apo-Tf-Imt system are the desirable effects from pharmacological point of view.

  20. Interaction of VO2+ ion with human serum transferrin and albumin.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Daniele; Garribba, Eugenio; Micera, Giovanni

    2009-04-01

    The complexation of VO(2+) ion with the high molecular mass components of the blood serum, human serum transferrin (hTf) and albumin (HSA), has been re-examined using EPR spectroscopy. In the case of transferrin, the results confirm those previously obtained, showing that VO(2+) ion occupies three different binding sites, A, B(1) and B(2), distinguishable in the X-band anisotropic spectrum recorded in D(2)O. With albumin the results show that a dinuclear complex (VO)(2)(d)HSA is formed in equimolar aqueous solutions or with an excess of protein; in the presence of an excess of VO(2+), the multinuclear complex (VO)(x)(m)HSA is the prevalent species, where x=5-6 indicates the equivalents of metal ion coordinated by HSA. The structure of the dinuclear species is discussed and the donor atoms involved in the metal coordination are proposed on the basis of the measured EPR parameters. Two different binding modes of albumin can be distinguished varying the pH, with only one species being present at the physiological value. The results show that the previously named "strong" site is not the N-terminal copper binding site, and some hypothesis on the metal coordination is discussed, with the (51)V A(z) values for the proposed donor sets obtained by DFT (density functional theory) calculations. Finally, preliminary results obtained in the ternary system VO(2+)/hTf/HSA are shown in order to determine the different binding strength of the two proteins. Due to the low VO(2+) concentration used, the recording of the EPR spectra through the repeated acquisition of the weak signals is essential to obtain a good signal to noise ratio in these systems.

  1. Expression of transferrin receptors on mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes: relation to cellular activation and related metabolic events.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, R M; Galbraith, G M

    1981-01-01

    Mitogen-activated normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes bind transferrin to specific membrane receptors. In this study, lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin for 0-66 hr were examined to determine the relation of this phenomenon to cellular activation and related metabolic events. Transferrin receptors were first detected at 20-24 hr. This event was consistently preceded by RNA and protein turnover which commenced during the first 6 hr of culture, whereas initiation of DNA synthesis was detected concurrently with the appearance of receptors or slightly later (24-30 hr). Exposure of cells to inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis early during culture (at 0 or 24 hr) prevented the expression of transferrin receptors, but also caused generalized metabolic failure, and abrogated cellular activation. In contrast, later addition of these agents at 48 hr did not interfere significantly with the process of activation, but did suppress the terminal increase in receptor-bearing cells observed during the final 18 hr in control cultures lacking inhibitor. After deliberate thermal stripping of receptors from activated cells, the reappearance of membrance binding sites which normally occurred within 30 min, was also blocked by cycloheximide, puromycin and actinomycin D. However, similar inhibition of DNA which was induced by hydroxyurea had much less effect upon both the initial appearance of receptors and their reappearance after ligand-induced depletion. These results demonstrate that the appearance of transferrin receptors upon human lymphocytes is dependent upon cellular activation and requires synthesis of protein and RNA. PMID:6172372

  2. Transfusion of human volunteers with older, stored red blood cells produces extravascular hemolysis and circulating non-transferrin-bound iron.

    PubMed

    Hod, Eldad A; Brittenham, Gary M; Billote, Genia B; Francis, Richard O; Ginzburg, Yelena Z; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Jhang, Jeffrey; Schwartz, Joseph; Sharma, Shruti; Sheth, Sujit; Sireci, Anthony N; Stephens, Hannah L; Stotler, Brie A; Wojczyk, Boguslaw S; Zimring, James C; Spitalnik, Steven L

    2011-12-15

    Transfusions of RBCs stored for longer durations are associated with adverse effects in hospitalized patients. We prospectively studied 14 healthy human volunteers who donated standard leuko-reduced, double RBC units. One unit was autologously transfused "fresh" (3-7 days of storage), and the other "older" unit was transfused after 40 to 42 days of storage. Of the routine laboratory parameters measured at defined times surrounding transfusion, significant differences between fresh and older transfusions were only observed in iron parameters and markers of extravascular hemolysis. Compared with fresh RBCs, mean serum total bilirubin increased by 0.55 mg/dL at 4 hours after transfusion of older RBCs (P = .0003), without significant changes in haptoglobin or lactate dehydrogenase. In addition, only after the older transfusion, transferrin saturation increased progressively over 4 hours to a mean of 64%, and non-transferrin-bound iron appeared, reaching a mean of 3.2μM. The increased concentrations of non-transferrin-bound iron correlated with enhanced proliferation in vitro of a pathogenic strain of Escherichia coli (r = 0.94, P = .002). Therefore, circulating non-transferrin-bound iron derived from rapid clearance of transfused, older stored RBCs may enhance transfusion-related complications, such as infection.

  3. Observation of interactions of human serum components with transferrin by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Taga, Atsushi; Maruyama, Rie; Yamamoto, Yuka; Honda, Susumu

    2008-01-22

    Interaction of human transferrin (TF) with human serum components was investigated by affinity capillary electrophoresis. It was found that any peaks of human serum protein fractions did not give migration time change on addition of intact TF to running buffer (50mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.5), whereas two peaks belonging to alpha-globulin fraction showed marked acceleration upon addition of desialylated TF. These results provide strong evidence that the sialic acid residue in TF masks its binding ability to serum proteins. The association constants of desialylated TF to these interactive components, estimated based on the double reciprocal plot of migration time change vs. glycoprotein concentration, were at a high level of 10(7)M(-1). TF is well known as a ferric ion transfer protein, and hence formation of this protein might be changed by ferric ion. The presence of iron(II) played no essential role in this interaction, though its influence was not negligible.

  4. Prospective Design of Anti‐Transferrin Receptor Bispecific Antibodies for Optimal Delivery into the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kanodia, JS; Gadkar, K; Bumbaca, D; Zhang, Y; Tong, RK; Luk, W; Hoyte, K; Lu, Y; Wildsmith, KR; Couch, JA; Watts, RJ; Dennis, MS; Ernst, JA; Scearce‐Levie, K; Atwal, JK; Joseph, S

    2016-01-01

    Anti‐transferrin receptor (TfR)‐based bispecific antibodies have shown promise for boosting antibody uptake in the brain. Nevertheless, there are limited data on the molecular properties, including affinity required for successful development of TfR‐based therapeutics. A complex nonmonotonic relationship exists between affinity of the anti‐TfR arm and brain uptake at therapeutically relevant doses. However, the quantitative nature of this relationship and its translatability to humans is heretofore unexplored. Therefore, we developed a mechanistic pharmacokinetic‐pharmacodynamic (PK‐PD) model for bispecific anti‐TfR/BACE1 antibodies that accounts for antibody‐TfR interactions at the blood‐brain barrier (BBB) as well as the pharmacodynamic (PD) effect of anti‐BACE1 arm. The calibrated model correctly predicted the optimal anti‐TfR affinity required to maximize brain exposure of therapeutic antibodies in the cynomolgus monkey and was scaled to predict the optimal affinity of anti‐TfR bispecifics in humans. Thus, this model provides a framework for testing critical translational predictions for anti‐TfR bispecific antibodies, including choice of candidate molecule for clinical development. PMID:27299941

  5. N-lobe versus C-lobe complexation of bismuth by human transferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, H; Li, H; Mason, A B; Woodworth, R C; Sadler, P J

    1999-01-01

    Interactions of recombinant N-lobe of human serum transferrin (hTF/2N) with Bi3+, a metal ion widely used in medicine, have been investigated by both UV and NMR spectroscopy. The bicarbonate-independent stability constant for Bi3+ binding (K*) to hTF/2N was determined to be log K* 18.9+/-0.2 in 5 mM bicarbonate/10 mM Hepes buffer at 310 K, pH7.4. The presence of Fe3+ in the C-lobe of intact hTF perturbed Bi3+ binding to the N-lobe, whereas binding of Bi3+ to the C-lobe was unaffected by the presence of Fe3+ in the N-lobe. Reactions of Bi3+ (as bismuth nitrilotriacetate or ranitidine bismuth citrate) with hTF/2N in solutions containing 10 mM bicarbonate induced specific changes to high-field 1H-NMR peaks. The 1H co-ordination shifts induced by Bi3+ were similar to those induced by Fe3+ and Ga3+, suggesting that Bi3+ binding causes similar structural changes to those induced by hTF/2N. 13C-NMR data showed that carbonate binds to hTF/2N concomitantly with Bi3+. PMID:9854031

  6. Failure to extinguish fear and genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Klumpers, F; Oosting, R S; Evers, D J J; Leon Kenemans, J; Baas, J M P

    2012-09-25

    Failure to extinguish fear can lead to persevering anxiety and has been postulated as an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of human anxiety disorders. In animals, it is well documented that the endogenous cannabinoid system has a pivotal role in the successful extinction of fear, most importantly through the cannabinoid receptor 1. However, no human studies have reported a translation of this preclinical evidence yet. Healthy medication-free human subjects (N=150) underwent a fear conditioning and extinction procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex was measured to assess fear-conditioned responding, and subjective fear ratings were collected. Participants were genotyped for two polymorphisms located within the promoter region (rs2180619) and the coding region (rs1049353) of cannabinoid receptor 1. As predicted from the preclinical literature, acquisition and expression of conditioned fear did not differ between genotypes. Crucially, whereas both homozygote (G/G, N=23) and heterozygote (A/G, N=68) G-allele carriers of rs2180619 displayed robust extinction of fear, extinction of fear-potentiated startle was absent in A/A homozygotes (N=51). Additionally, this resistance to extinguish fear left A/A carriers of rs2180619 with significantly higher levels of fear-potentiated startle at the end of the extinction training. No effects of rs1049353 genotype were observed regarding fear acquisition and extinction. These results suggest for the first time involvement of the human endocannabinoid system in fear extinction. Implications are that genetic variability in this system may underlie individual differences in anxiety, rendering cannabinoid receptor 1 a potential target for novel pharmacological treatments of anxiety disorders.

  7. The structural basis of transferrin sequestration by transferrin-binding protein B

    SciTech Connect

    Calmettes, Charles; Alcantara, Joenel; Yu, Rong-Hua; Schryvers, Anthony B.; Moraes, Trevor F.

    2012-03-28

    Neisseria meningitidis, the causative agent of bacterial meningitis, acquires the essential element iron from the host glycoprotein transferrin during infection through a surface transferrin receptor system composed of proteins TbpA and TbpB. Here we present the crystal structures of TbpB from N. meningitidis in its apo form and in complex with human transferrin. The structure reveals how TbpB sequesters and initiates iron release from human transferrin.

  8. Targeted Delivery of Amoxicillin to C. trachomatis by the Transferrin Iron Acquisition Pathway.

    PubMed

    Hai, Jun; Serradji, Nawal; Mouton, Ludovic; Redeker, Virginie; Cornu, David; El Hage Chahine, Jean-Michel; Verbeke, Philippe; Hémadi, Miryana

    2016-01-01

    Weak intracellular penetration of antibiotics makes some infections difficult to treat. The Trojan horse strategy for targeted drug delivery is among the interesting routes being explored to overcome this therapeutic difficulty. Chlamydia trachomatis, as an obligate intracellular human pathogen, is responsible for both trachoma and sexually transmitted diseases. Chlamydia develops in a vacuole and is therefore protected by four membranes (plasma membrane, bacterial inclusion membrane, and bacterial membranes). In this work, the iron-transport protein, human serum-transferrin, was used as a Trojan horse for antibiotic delivery into the bacterial vacuole. Amoxicillin was grafted onto transferrin. The transferrin-amoxicillin construct was characterized by mass spectrometry and absorption spectroscopy. Its affinity for transferrin receptor 1, determined by fluorescence emission titration [KaffTf-amox = (1.3 ± 1.0) x 108], is very close to that of transferrin [4.3 x 108]. Transmission electron and confocal microscopies showed a co-localization of transferrin with the bacteria in the vacuole and were also used to evaluate the antibiotic capability of the construct. It is significantly more effective than amoxicillin alone. These promising results demonstrate targeted delivery of amoxicillin to suppress Chlamydia and are of interest for Chlamydiaceae and maybe other intracellular bacteria therapies.

  9. Targeted Delivery of Amoxicillin to C. trachomatis by the Transferrin Iron Acquisition Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Jun; Serradji, Nawal; Mouton, Ludovic; Redeker, Virginie; Cornu, David; El Hage Chahine, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Weak intracellular penetration of antibiotics makes some infections difficult to treat. The Trojan horse strategy for targeted drug delivery is among the interesting routes being explored to overcome this therapeutic difficulty. Chlamydia trachomatis, as an obligate intracellular human pathogen, is responsible for both trachoma and sexually transmitted diseases. Chlamydia develops in a vacuole and is therefore protected by four membranes (plasma membrane, bacterial inclusion membrane, and bacterial membranes). In this work, the iron-transport protein, human serum-transferrin, was used as a Trojan horse for antibiotic delivery into the bacterial vacuole. Amoxicillin was grafted onto transferrin. The transferrin-amoxicillin construct was characterized by mass spectrometry and absorption spectroscopy. Its affinity for transferrin receptor 1, determined by fluorescence emission titration [KaffTf-amox = (1.3 ± 1.0) x 108], is very close to that of transferrin [4.3 x 108]. Transmission electron and confocal microscopies showed a co-localization of transferrin with the bacteria in the vacuole and were also used to evaluate the antibiotic capability of the construct. It is significantly more effective than amoxicillin alone. These promising results demonstrate targeted delivery of amoxicillin to suppress Chlamydia and are of interest for Chlamydiaceae and maybe other intracellular bacteria therapies. PMID:26919720

  10. Identification of new binding sites of human transferrin incubated with organophosphorus agents via Q Exactive LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fengjuan; Ding, Junjie; Yu, Huilan; Gao, Runli; Wang, Hongmei; Pei, Chengxin

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphorus agents (OPs) like sarin, VX, or soman could inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity and cause poisoning. OPs could bind many proteins, such as butyrylcholinesterase and albumin, and the adducts formed could identify the exposure. In this paper, we studied human transferrin, which was one of the proteins that could be labeled by OPs. Pure human transferrin was incubated with an overdose of organophosphorus agents, including sarin, soman, VX, tabun, cyclosarin, ethyl tabun, and propyl tabun, and then additional OPs was removed through dialysis. Trypsin was used to cleave the OP-treated proteins and Q Exactive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (Q Exactive LC-MS/MS) was used to identify them. The present study set out to accomplish two goals. The first goal was to find a good method for identifying multiple binding sites on a given protein through Q Exactive LC-MS/MS. The second goal was to investigate the labeled peptides when transferrin was incubated with a numerous molar excess of OPs. Results showed that tyrosine, lysine, and serine formed covalent bonds with OPs. Twenty OP-labeled sites were found: ten tyrosine sites (including two reported sites), seven lysine sites, and three serine sites. Characteristic fragments for labeled-tyrosine and labeled-lysine adducts were summarized in detail. In conclusion, the method by Q Exactive LC-MS/MS using in this present work is a good way to diagnose exposure to OPs accurately when the binding sites of OPs are uncertain. Novel modified peptides and the characteristic ions found in this work could help investigators assess exposure to OPs.

  11. Human maternal behaviour is associated with arginine vasopressin receptor 1A gene.

    PubMed

    Avinun, Reut; Ebstein, Richard P; Knafo, Ariel

    2012-10-23

    Parenting is one of the main influences on children's early development, and yet its underlying genetic mechanisms have only recently begun to be explored, with many studies neglecting to control for possible child effects. This study focuses on maternal behaviour and on an allele at the RS3 promoter region of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) gene, previously associated with autism and with higher amygdala activation in a face-matching task. Mothers were observed during a free-play session with each of their 3.5-year-old twins. Multilevel regression analyses revealed that mothers who are carriers of the AVPR1A RS3 allele tend to show less structuring and support throughout the interaction independent of the child's sex and RS3 genotype. This finding advances our understanding of the genetic influences on human maternal behaviour.

  12. Structure of the Membrane Proximal Oxioreductase Domain of Human Steap3, the Dominant Ferrireductase of the Erythroid Transferrin Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Sendamarai, A.K.; Ohgami, R.S.; Fleming, M.D.; Lawrence, C.M.

    2009-05-27

    The daily production of 200 billion erythrocytes requires 20 mg of iron, accounting for nearly 80% of the iron demand in humans. Thus, erythroid precursor cells possess an efficient mechanism for iron uptake in which iron loaded transferrin (Tf) binds to the transferrin receptor (TfR) at the cell surface. The Tf:TfR complex then enters the endosome via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Upon endosomal acidification, iron is released from Tf, reduced to Fe{sup 2+} by Steap3, and transported across the endosomal membrane by divalent metal iron transporter 1. Steap3, the major ferrireductase in erythrocyte endosomes, is a member of a unique family of reductases. Steap3 is comprised of an N-terminal cytosolic oxidoreductase domain and a C-terminal heme-containing transmembrane domain. Cytosolic NADPH and a flavin are predicted cofactors, but the NADPH/flavin binding domain differs significantly from those in other eukaryotic reductases. Instead, Steap3 shows remarkable, although limited homology to FNO, an archaeal oxidoreductase. We have determined the crystal structure of the human Steap3 oxidoreductase domain in the absence and presence of NADPH. The structure reveals an FNO-like domain with an unexpected dimer interface and substrate binding sites that are well positioned to direct electron transfer from the cytosol to a heme moiety predicted to be fixed within the transmembrane domain. Here, we discuss possible gating mechanisms for electron transfer across the endosomal membrane.

  13. Establishment of a miniaturized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for human transferrin quantification using an intelligent multifunctional analytical plate.

    PubMed

    Spies, Peter; Chen, Guo Jun; Gygax, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    A miniaturized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a reaction volume of 5 microl for human transferrin quantification has successfully been developed using an intelligent multifunctional analytical plate (IMAPlate 5RC96), the first miniature analytical platform capable of manually performing parallel liquid transfer, reaction, and analysis. This is the first article to validate the platform for the ELISA application. The data obtained from the standards in this miniaturized ELISA can well be fitted by a one-site binding reaction mode, the coefficient of variation (CV) of the whole plate for an artificial sample (spiking a known concentration of human transferrin into the assay diluent) is 7.0%, and the mean recovery is between 94 and 114% (n=96), comparable to the values from conventional ELISA in a 96-well format plate. The IMAPlate 5RC96-based miniaturized ELISA not only can reduce sample and reagent consumption to 5% of the conventional ELISA but also can shorten the reaction time. Combined with the advantages brought by miniaturization, the easy-to-handle, parallel, and simultaneous liquid transfer features of the IMAPlate 5RC96 provide a completely new lab tool for manually performing high-throughput ELISA. Our results demonstrate that the IMAPlate 5RC96 is a convenient, robust, high-throughput lab device feasible for miniaturized ELISA in an ordinary laboratory.

  14. Discoidin domain receptor 1: isoform expression and potential functions in cirrhotic human liver.

    PubMed

    Song, Sunmi; Shackel, Nicholas A; Wang, Xin M; Ajami, Katerina; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Gorrell, Mark D

    2011-03-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and is activated by collagens. Transcriptional profiling of cirrhosis in human liver using a DNA array and quantitative PCR detected elevated mRNA expression of DDR1 compared with that in nondiseased liver. The present study characterized DDR1 expression in cirrhotic and nondiseased human liver and examined the cellular effects of DDR1 expression. mRNA expression of all five isoforms of DDR1 was detected in human liver, whereas DDR1a demonstrated differential expression in liver with hepatitis C virus and primary biliary cirrhosis compared with nondiseased liver. In addition, immunoblot analysis detected shed fragments of DDR1 more readily in cirrhotic liver than in nondiseased liver. Inasmuch as DDR1 is subject to protease-mediated cleavage after prolonged interaction with collagen, this differential expression may indicate more intense activation of DDR1 protein in cirrhotic compared with nondiseased liver. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence localized intense DDR1 mRNA and protein expression to epithelial cells including hepatocytes at the portal-parenchymal interface and the luminal aspect of the biliary epithelium. Overexpression of DDR1a altered hepatocyte behavior including increased adhesion and less migration on extracelular matrix substrates. DDR1a regulated extracellular expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2. These data elucidate DDR1 function pertinent to cirrhosis and indicate the importance of epithelial cell-collagen interactions in chronic liver injury.

  15. Genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG theta power in humans.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Kenemans, J L; Böcker, K B E; Baas, J M P

    2014-11-01

    It has long been postulated that exogenous cannabinoids have a profound effect on human cognitive functioning. These cannabinoid effects are thought to depend, at least in parts, on alterations of phase-locking of local field potential neuronal firing. The latter can be measured as activity in the theta frequency band (4-7Hz) by electroencephalogram. Theta oscillations are supposed to serve as a mechanism in neural representations of behaviorally relevant information. However, it remains unknown whether variability in endogenous cannabinoid activity is involved in theta rhythms and therefore, may serve as an individual differences index of human cognitive functioning. To clarify this issue, we recorded resting state EEG activity in 164 healthy human subjects and extracted EEG power across frequency bands (δ, θ, α, and β). To assess variability in the endocannabinoid system, two genetic polymorphisms (rs1049353, rs2180619) within the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) were determined in all participants. As expected, we observed significant effects of rs1049353 on EEG power in the theta band at frontal, central and parietal electrode regions. Crucially, these effects were specific for the theta band, with no effects on activity in the other frequency bands. Rs2180619 showed no significant associations with theta power after Bonferroni correction. Taken together, we provide novel evidence in humans showing that genetic variability in the cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG power in the theta frequency band. This extends prior findings of exogenous cannabinoid effects on theta power to the endogenous cannabinoid system.

  16. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A. R.; Harkness, John H.; Neve, Kim A.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K.; Eshleman, Amy J.; Phillips, Tamara J.; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30–40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options. PMID:27031617

  17. Clinical significance of leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 expression in human cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xueshan; Miao, Fang; Cao, Yanning; Xue, Jiangnan; Cao, Qizhi; Zhang, Xiaoshu

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is broadly expressed on the majority of immune cells; however, the biological role of LAIR in solid tumors has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, using immunohistochemical staining analysis, the expression of LAIR-1 in human cervical cancer (HCC) and nontumor-adjacent tissue specimens was determined, and the results indicated that the expression of LAIR-1 in HCC tissue was higher compared with that in noncancerous tissue. The χ2 test was used to analyze the correlation between the expression of LAIR-1 in tumor tissues with clinicopathological parameters. The results showed that the expression of LAIR-1 in the cancer cell nucleus was significantly associated with tumor size, pathological differentiation, T classification and clinical stage. In addition, the expression in the cytoplasm was evidently associated with the number of positive lymph nodes. The HCC cell line, ME-180, which does not express LAIR-1, was stably transfected using LAIR-1 cDNA. Cell Counting Kit-8 and an annexin V assay showed that the overexpression of LAIR-1 in ME-180 cells suppressed the proliferation and anti-apoptosis capacity of the cells. These findings demonstrated that LAIR-1 is markedly overexpressed in HCC tissue, and that its expression status is associated with tumor progression. LAIR-1 may be a biomarker and target in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with HCC. PMID:28105100

  18. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  19. Structural, functional, and tissue distribution analysis of human transferrin receptor-2 by murine monoclonal antibodies and a polyclonal antiserum.

    PubMed

    Deaglio, Silvia; Capobianco, Andrea; Calì, Angelita; Bellora, Francesca; Alberti, Federica; Righi, Luisella; Sapino, Anna; Camaschella, Clara; Malavasi, Fabio

    2002-11-15

    Human transferrin receptor-2 (TFR-2) is a protein highly homologous to TFR-1/CD71 and is endowed with the ability to bind transferrin (TF) with low affinity. High levels of TFR-2 mRNA were found in the liver and in erythroid precursors. Mutations affecting the TFR-2 gene led to hemochromatosis type 3, a form of inherited iron overload. Several issues on distribution and function of the receptor were answered by raising a panel of 9 monoclonal antibodies specific for TFR-2 by immunizing mice with murine fibroblasts transfected with the human TFR-2 cDNA. A polyclonal antiserum was also produced in mice immunized with 3 peptides derived from the TFR-2 sequence, exploiting an innovative technique. The specificity of all the reagents produced was confirmed by reactivity with TFR-2(+) target cells and simultaneous negativity with TFR-1(+) cells. Western blot analyses showed a dominant chain of approximately 90 kDa in TFR-2 transfectants and HepG2 cell line. Analysis of distribution in normal tissues and in representative cell lines revealed that TFR-2 displays a restricted expression pattern--it is present at high levels in hepatocytes and in the epithelial cells of the small intestine, including the duodenal crypts. Exposure of human TFR-2(+) cells to TF-bound iron is followed by a significant up-regulation and relocalization of membrane TFR-2. The tissue distribution pattern, the behavior following exposure to iron-loaded TF, and the features of the disease resulting from TFR-2 inactivation support the hypothesis that TFR-2 contributes to body iron sensing.

  20. Mutational analysis of the cytoplasmic tail of the human transferrin receptor. Identification of a sub-domain that is required for rapid endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Gironès, N; Alverez, E; Seth, A; Lin, I M; Latour, D A; Davis, R J

    1991-10-05

    It has been reported that the sequence Tyr20-X-Arg-Phe23 present within the cytoplasmic tail of the transferrin receptor may represent a tyrosine internalization signal (Collawn, J.F., Stangel, M., Kuhn, L.A., Esekogwu, V., Jing, S., Trowbridge, I.S., and Tainer, J. A. (1990) Cell 63, 1061-1072). However, as Tyr20 is not conserved between species (Alvarez, E., Gironès, N., and Davis, R. J. (1990) Biochem. J. 267, 31-35), the functional role of the putative tyrosine internalization signal is not clear. To address this question, we constructed a series of 32 deletions and point mutations within the cytoplasmic tail of the human transferrin receptor. The effect of these mutations on the apparent first order rate constant for receptor endocytosis was examined. It was found that the region of the cytoplasmic tail that is proximal to the transmembrane domain (residues 28-58) is dispensable for rapid endocytosis. In contrast, the distal region of the cytoplasmic tail (residues 1-27) was found to be both necessary and sufficient for the rapid internalization of the transferrin receptor. The region identified includes Tyr20-X-Arg-Phe23, but is significantly larger than this tetrapeptide. It is therefore likely that structural information in addition to the proposed tyrosine internalization signal is required for endocytosis. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether a heterologous tyrosine internalization signal (from the low density lipoprotein receptor) could function to cause the rapid endocytosis of the transferrin receptor. It was observed that this heterologous tyrosine internalization signal did not allow rapid endocytosis. We conclude that the putative tyrosine internalization signal (Tyr20-Thr-Arg-Phe23) is not sufficient to determine rapid endocytosis of the transferrin receptor. The data reported here indicate that the transferrin receptor internalization signal is formed by a larger cytoplasmic tail structure located at the amino terminus of the receptor.

  1. Comparison of the Antiproliferative Activity of Two Antitumour Ruthenium(III) Complexes With Their Apotransferrin and Transferrin-Bound Forms in a Human Colon Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Keppler, B. K.; Hartmann, M.; Messori, L.; Berger, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    Two ruthenium(III) complexes, namely trans-indazolium[tetrachlorobis(indazole)- ruthenate(III)], HInd[RuInd2Cl4] and trans-imidazolium[tetrachlorobis(imidazole)- ruthenate(III)], HIm[RuIm2Cl4] exhibit high anticancer activity in an autochthonous colorectal carcinoma model in rats. Recently, it has been shown that both complexes bind specifically to human serum apotransferrin and the resulting adducts have been studied through spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques with the ultimate goal of preparing adducts with good selectivity for cancer cells due to the fact that tumour cells express high amounts of transferrin receptors on their cell surface. In order to investigate whether the cellular uptake of the complexes was mediated by apotransferrin or transferrin, we compared the antiproliferative efficacy of HInd[RuInd2Cl4] and HIm[RuIm2Cl4] with its apotransferrin- and transferrin-bound form in the human colon cancer cell line SW707 using the microculture tetrazolium test (MTT). Our results show that especially the transferrin-bound forms exhibit high antiproliferative activity, which exceeds that of the free complex, indicating that this protein can act as a carrier of the ruthenium complexes into the tumor cell. PMID:18472789

  2. Human fear acquisition deficits in relation to genetic variants of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 and the serotonin transporter.

    PubMed

    Heitland, Ivo; Groenink, Lucianne; Bijlsma, Elisabeth Y; Oosting, Ronald S; Baas, Johanna M P

    2013-01-01

    The ability to identify predictors of aversive events allows organisms to appropriately respond to these events, and failure to acquire these fear contingencies can lead to maladaptive contextual anxiety. Recently, preclinical studies demonstrated that the corticotropin-releasing factor and serotonin systems are interactively involved in adaptive fear acquisition. Here, 150 healthy medication-free human subjects completed a cue and context fear conditioning procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex (FPS) was measured to assess both uninstructed fear acquisition and instructed fear expression. All participants were genotyped for polymorphisms located within regulatory regions of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1 - rs878886) and the serotonin transporter (5HTTLPR). These polymorphisms have previously been linked to panic disorder and anxious symptomology and personality, respectively. G-allele carriers of CRHR1 (rs878886) showed no acquisition of fear conditioned responses (FPS) to the threat cue in the uninstructed phase, whereas fear acquisition was present in C/C homozygotes. Moreover, carrying the risk alleles of both rs878886 (G-allele) and 5HTTLPR (short allele) was associated with increased FPS to the threat context during this phase. After explicit instructions regarding the threat contingency were given, the cue FPS and context FPS normalized in all genotype groups. The present results indicate that genetic variability in the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1, especially in interaction with the 5HTTLPR, is involved in the acquisition of fear in humans. This translates prior animal findings to the human realm.

  3. Spectral and metal-binding properties of three single-point tryptophan mutants of the human transferrin N-lobe.

    PubMed Central

    He, Q Y; Mason, A B; Lyons, B A; Tam, B M; Nguyen, V; MacGillivray, R T; Woodworth, R C

    2001-01-01

    Human serum transferrin N-lobe (hTF/2N) contains three conserved tryptophan residues, Trp(8), Trp(128) and Trp(264), located in three different environments. The present report addresses the different contributions of the three tryptophan residues to the UV-visible, fluorescence and NMR spectra of hTF/2N and the effect of the mutations at each tryptophan residue on the iron-binding properties of the protein. Trp(8) resides in a hydrophobic box containing a cluster of three phenylalanine side chains and is H bonded through the indole N to an adjacent water cluster lying between two beta-sheets containing Trp(8) and Lys(296) respectively. The fluorescence of Trp(8) may be quenched by the benzene rings. The apparent increase in the rate of iron release from the Trp(8)-->Tyr mutant could be due to the interference of the mutation with the H-bond linkage resulting in an effect on the second shell network. The partial quenching in the fluorescence of Trp(128) results from the nearby His(119) residue. Difference-fluorescence spectra reveal that any protein containing Trp(128) shows a blue shift upon binding metal ion, and the NMR signal of Trp(128) broadens out and disappears upon the binding of paramagnetic metals to the protein. These data imply that Trp(128) is a major fluorescent and NMR reporter group for metal binding, and possibly for cleft closure in hTF/2N. Trp(264) is located on the surface of the protein and does not connect to any functional residues. This explains the facts that Trp(264) is the major contributor to both the absorbance and fluorescence spectra, has a strong NMR signal and the mutation at Trp(264) has little effect on the iron-binding and release behaviours of the protein. PMID:11171122

  4. Reduced bioenergetics and toll-like receptor 1 function in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in aging.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feng; Guo, Xiuyang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yuan, Xiaoling; Chen, Shu; Malawista, Stephen E; Bockenstedt, Linda K; Allore, Heather G; Montgomery, Ruth R

    2014-02-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decline in immune function (immunosenescence) resulting in an increased susceptibility to viral and bacterial infections. Here we show reduced expression of Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1) in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and an underlying age-dependent deficiency in PMN bioenergetics. In older (>65 years) adults, stimulation through TLR1 led to lower activation of integrins (CD11b and CD18), lower production of the chemokine IL-8, and lower levels of the phosphorylated signaling intermediate p38 MAP kinase than in PMN from younger donors (21-30 years). In addition, loss of CD62L, a marker of PMN activation, was reduced in PMN of older adults stimulated through multiple pathways. Rescue of PMN from apoptosis by stimulation with TLR1 was reduced in PMN from older adults. In seeking an explanation for effects of aging across multiple pathways, we examined PMN energy utilization and found that glucose uptake after stimulation through TLR1 was dramatically lower in PMN of older adults. Our results demonstrate a reduction in TLR1 expression and TLR1-mediated responses in PMN with aging, and reduced efficiency of bioenergetics in PMN. These changes likely contribute to reduced PMN efficiency in aging through multiple aspects of PMN function and suggest potential therapeutic opportunities.

  5. Uptake of Al3+ into the N-lobe of human serum transferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Kubal, G; Mason, A B; Sadler, P J; Tucker, A; Woodworth, R C

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the binding of Al3+ to human serum apotransferrin (80 kDa) and recombinant N-lobe human apotransferrin (40 kDa) in 0.1 M-sodium bicarbonate solution at a pH meter reading in 2H2O (pH*) of 8.8 using 1H n.m.r. spectroscopy. The results show that for the intact protein, preferential binding of Al3+ to the N-lobe occurs. Molecular modelling combined with an analysis of ring-current-induced shifts suggest that n.m.r. spectroscopy can be used to probe hinge bending processes which accompany metal uptake in solution. PMID:1497609

  6. Transferrin surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles-mediated delivery of a proteasome inhibitor to human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Frasco, Manuela F; Almeida, Gabriela M; Santos-Silva, Filipe; Pereira, Maria do Carmo; Coelho, Manuel A N

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a drug delivery system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles for an efficient and targeted action of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib against pancreatic cancer cells. The PLGA nanoparticles were formulated with a poloxamer, and further surface-modified with transferrin for tumor targeting. The nanoparticles were characterized as polymer carriers of bortezomib, and the cellular uptake and growth inhibitory effects were evaluated in pancreatic cells. Cellular internalization of nanoparticles was observed in normal and cancer cells, but with higher uptake by cancer cells. The sustained release of the loaded bortezomib from PLGA nanoparticles showed cytotoxic effects against pancreatic normal and cancer cells. Noteworthy differential cytotoxicity was attained by transferrin surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles since significant cell growth inhibition by delivered bortezomib was only observed in cancer cells. These findings demonstrate that the ligand transferrin enhanced the targeted delivery of bortezomib-loaded PLGA nanoparticles to pancreatic cancer cells. These in vitro results highlight the transferrin surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles as a promising system for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

  7. Folding and conformational studies on SCR1-3 domains of human complement receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Clark, N S; Dodd, I; Mossakowska, D E; Smith, R A; Gore, M G

    1996-10-01

    Short consensus repeats SCR3 and SCR1-3 are soluble recombinant proteins, consisting of the third and first three N-terminal domains of complement receptor 1, respectively, which retain some anti-complement activity. The conformational stabilities and folding/unfolding of SCR3 and SCR1-3 have been studied using circular dichroism and equilibrium and pre-equilibrium fluorescence spectroscopy. Denaturation by guanidinium hydrochloride (GdnHCl) is rapid and completely reversible. Reduction of disulphide bridges in the folded proteins by beta-mercaptoethanol leads to an increase in fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence intensity of the folded proteins is approximately 7.5% of that of the respective unfolded proteins. The data can be approximated to a two-state transition between native and denatured forms of the proteins. SCR3 has a conformational stability in water of 12-13 kJ/mol whereas that of SCR1-3 is 19.5-19.9 kJ/mol depending upon the technique utilized. The heat capacity change associated with the unfolding of SCR1-3 was obtained by a series of GdnHCl unfolding experiments over a range of temperatures and was found to be 6.6 kJ/K.mol or 33.8 J/K.mol(residue). The refolding process of SCR3 was found to be simple, described by a single exponential equation, whereas that of SCR1-3 was found to be complex and could be fitted to a double exponential equation indicating the presence of folding intermediates.

  8. Radioprotective effect of transferrin targeted citicoline liposomes.

    PubMed

    Suresh Reddy, Jannapally; Venkateswarlu, Vobalaboina; Koning, Gerben A

    2006-01-01

    The high level of expression of transferrin receptors (Tf-R) on the surface of endothelial cells of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) had been widely utilized to deliver drugs to the brain. The primary aim of this study was to use transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis as a pathway for the rational development of holo-transferrin coupled liposomes for drug targeting to the brain. Citicoline is a neuroprotective agent used clinically to treat for instance Parkinson disease, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and brain ischemia. Citicoline does not readily cross the BBB because of its strong polar nature. Hence, citicoline was used as a model drug. (Citicoline liposomes have been prepared using dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) by dry lipid film hydration-extrusion method). The effect of the use of liposomes composed of DPPC or DSPC on their citicoline encapsulation efficiency and their stability in vitro were studied. Transferrin was coupled to liposomes by a technique which involves the prevention of scavenging diferric iron atoms of transferrin. The coupling efficiency of transferrin to the liposomes was studied. In vitro evaluation of transferrin-coupled liposomes was performed for their radioprotective effect in radiation treated cell cultures. In this study, OVCAR-3 cells were used as a model cell type over-expressing the Tf-R and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as BBB endothelial cell model. The average diameter of DPPC and DSPC liposomes were 138 +/- 6.3 and 79.0 +/- 3.2 nm, respectively. The citicoline encapsulation capacity of DPPC and DSPC liposomes was 81.8 +/- 12.8 and 54.9 +/- 0.04 microg/micromol of phospholipid, respectively. Liposomes prepared from DSPC showed relatively better stability than DPPC liposomes at 37 degrees C and in the presence of serum. Hence, DSPC liposomes were used for transferrin coupling and an average of 46-55 molecules of transferrin were present per liposome. Free citicoline

  9. Generation and characterization of small single domain antibodies inhibiting human tumor necrosis factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Steeland, Sophie; Puimège, Leen; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Haustraete, Jurgen; Devoogdt, Nick; Hulpiau, Paco; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Laukens, Debby; Meuleman, Philip; De Vos, Martine; Libert, Claude

    2015-02-13

    The cytokine TNF is a well known drug target for several inflammatory diseases such as Crohn disease. Despite the great success of TNF blockers, therapy could be improved because of high costs and side effects. Selective inhibition of TNF receptor (TNFR) 1 signaling holds the potential to greatly reduce the pro-inflammatory activity of TNF, thereby preserving the advantageous immunomodulatory signals mediated by TNFR2. We generated a selective human TNFR1 inhibitor based on Nanobody (Nb) technology. Two anti-human TNFR1 Nbs were linked with an anti-albumin Nb to generate Nb Alb-70-96 named "TNF Receptor-One Silencer" (TROS). TROS selectively binds and inhibits TNF/TNFR1 and lymphotoxin-α/TNFR1 signaling with good affinity and IC50 values, both of which are in the nanomolar range. Surface plasmon resonance analysis reveals that TROS competes with TNF for binding to human TNFR1. In HEK293T cells, TROS strongly reduces TNF-induced gene expression, like IL8 and TNF, in a dose-dependent manner; and in ex vivo cultured colon biopsies of CD patients, TROS inhibits inflammation. Finally, in liver chimeric humanized mice, TROS antagonizes inflammation in a model of acute TNF-induced liver inflammation, reflected in reduced human IL8 expression in liver and reduced IL6 levels in serum. These results demonstrate the considerable potential of TROS and justify the evaluation of TROS in relevant disease animal models of both acute and chronic inflammation and eventually in patients.

  10. Glutaminolysis and Transferrin Regulate Ferroptosis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Minghui; Monian, Prashant; Quadri, Nosirudeen; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Jiang, Xuejun

    2015-07-16

    Ferroptosis has emerged as a new form of regulated necrosis that is implicated in various human diseases. However, the mechanisms of ferroptosis are not well defined. This study reports the discovery of multiple molecular components of ferroptosis and its intimate interplay with cellular metabolism and redox machinery. Nutrient starvation often leads to sporadic apoptosis. Strikingly, we found that upon deprivation of amino acids, a more rapid and potent necrosis process can be induced in a serum-dependent manner, which was subsequently determined to be ferroptosis. Two serum factors, the iron-carrier protein transferrin and amino acid glutamine, were identified as the inducers of ferroptosis. We further found that the cell surface transferrin receptor and the glutamine-fueled intracellular metabolic pathway, glutaminolysis, played crucial roles in the death process. Inhibition of glutaminolysis, the essential component of ferroptosis, can reduce heart injury triggered by ischemia/reperfusion, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach for treating related diseases.

  11. TIBC, UIBC and Transferrin

    MedlinePlus

    ... suspected of having either iron deficiency or iron overload. These two tests are used to calculate the ... thus transferrin saturation becomes very low. In iron overload states, such as hemochromatosis , the iron level will ...

  12. Iron, transferrin and myelinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M. H.; Devès, G.; Baron, B.; Guillou, F.

    2003-09-01

    Transferrin (Tf), the iron binding protein of vertebrates serum, is known to be synthesized by oligodendrocytes (Ols) in the central nervous system. It has been postulated that Tf is involved in Ols maturation and myelinogenesis. This link is particularly important in the understanding of a severe human pathology: the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. We generated transgenic mice containing the complete human Tf gene and extensive regulatory sequences from the 5 ' and 3 ' untranslated regions that specifically overexpress Tf in Ols. Brain cytoarchitecture of the transgenic mice appears to be normal in all brain regions examined, total myelin content is increased by 30% and motor coordination is significantly improved when compared with non-transgenic littermates. Tf role in the central nervous system may be related to its affinity for metallic cations. Normal and transgenic mice were used for determination of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) concentration in cerebellum and corpus callosum. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow proton-induced X-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. Preliminary results were obtained and carbon distribution was revealed as a very good analysis to distinguish precisely the white matter region. A comparison of metallic and mineral elements contents in brain between normal and transgenic mice shows that iron, copper and zinc levels remained constant. This result provides evidence that effects of Tf overexpression in the brain do not solely relate to iron transport.

  13. Exposure to anthrax toxin alters human leucocyte expression of anthrax toxin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Ingram, R J; Harris, A; Ascough, S; Metan, G; Doganay, M; Ballie, L; Williamson, E D; Dyson, H; Robinson, J H; Sriskandan, S; Altmann, D M

    2013-07-01

    Anthrax is a toxin-mediated disease, the lethal effects of which are initiated by the binding of protective antigen (PA) with one of three reported cell surface toxin receptors (ANTXR). Receptor binding has been shown to influence host susceptibility to the toxins. Despite this crucial role for ANTXR in the outcome of disease, and the reported immunomodulatory consequence of the anthrax toxins during infection, little is known about ANTXR expression on human leucocytes. We characterized the expression levels of ANTXR1 (TEM8) on human leucocytes using flow cytometry. In order to assess the effect of prior toxin exposure on ANTXR1 expression levels, leucocytes from individuals with no known exposure, those exposed to toxin through vaccination and convalescent individuals were analysed. Donors could be defined as either 'low' or 'high' expressers based on the percentage of ANTXR1-positive monocytes detected. Previous exposure to toxins appears to modulate ANTXR1 expression, exposure through active infection being associated with lower receptor expression. A significant correlation between low receptor expression and high anthrax toxin-specific interferon (IFN)-γ responses was observed in previously infected individuals. We propose that there is an attenuation of ANTXR1 expression post-infection which may be a protective mechanism that has evolved to prevent reinfection.

  14. Regulation of adiponectin receptor 1 in human hepatocytes by agonists of nuclear receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeier, Markus; Weigert, Johanna; Schaeffler, Andreas; Weiss, Thomas; Kirchner, Stefan; Laberer, Sabine; Schoelmerich, Juergen; Buechler, Christa . E-mail: christa.buechler@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

    2005-09-02

    The adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 have been identified to mediate the insulin-sensitizing effects of adiponectin. Although AdipoR2 was suggested to be the main receptor for this adipokine in hepatocytes, AdipoR1 protein is highly abundant in primary human hepatocytes and hepatocytic cell lines. Nuclear receptors are main regulators of lipid metabolism and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} and {gamma}, retinoid X receptor (RXR), and liver X receptor (LXR) by specific ligands may influence AdipoR1 abundance. AdipoR1 protein is neither altered by RXR or LXR agonists nor by pioglitazone. In contrast, fenofibric acid reduces AdipoR1 whereas hepatotoxic troglitazone upregulates AdipoR1 protein in HepG2 cells. Taken together this work shows for the first time that AdipoR1 protein is expressed in human hepatocytes but that it is not a direct target gene of nuclear receptors. Elevated AdipoR1 induced by hepatotoxic troglitazone may indicate a role of this receptor in adiponectin-mediated beneficial effects in liver damage.

  15. Sulfonylurea Receptor 1 in Humans with Post-Traumatic Brain Contusions

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Valverde, Tamara; Vidal-Jorge, Marian; Martínez-Saez, Elena; Castro, Lidia; Arikan, Fuat; Cordero, Esteban; Rădoi, Andreea; Poca, Maria-Antonia; Simard, J. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Post-traumatic brain contusions (PTBCs) are traditionally considered primary injuries and can increase in size, generate perilesional edema, cause mass effect, induce neurological deterioration, and cause death. Most patients experience a progressive increase in pericontusional edema, and nearly half, an increase in the hemorrhagic component itself. The underlying molecular pathophysiology of contusion-induced brain edema and hemorrhagic progression remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate sulfonylurea 1/transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (SUR1-TRPM4) ion channel SUR1 expression in various cell types (neurons, astrocytes, endothelial cells, microglia, macrophages, and neutrophils) of human brain contusions and whether SUR1 up-regulation was related to time postinjury. Double immunolabeling of SUR1 and cell-type– specific proteins was performed in 26 specimens from traumatic brain injury patients whose lesions were surgically evacuated. Three samples from limited brain resections performed for accessing extra-axial skull-base tumors or intraventricular lesions were controls. We found SUR1 was significantly overexpresed in all cell types and was especially prominent in neurons and endothelial cells (ECs). The temporal pattern depended on cell type: 1) In neurons, SUR1 increased within 48 h of injury and stabilized thereafter; 2) in ECs, there was no trend; 3) in glial cells and microglia/macrophages, a moderate increase was observed over time; and 4) in neutrophils, it decreased with time. Our results suggest that up-regulation of SUR1 in humans point to this channel as one of the important molecular players in the pathophysiology of PTBCs. Our findings reveal opportunities to act therapeutically on the mechanisms of growth of traumatic contusions and therefore reduce the number of patients with neurological deterioration and poor neurological outcomes. PMID:26398596

  16. Acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase-2 (EhADH2) and clathrin are involved in internalization of human transferrin by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Reyes-López, Magda; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa María; Avila, Eva E; de la Garza, Mireya

    2011-01-01

    Transferrin (Tf) is a host glycoprotein capable of binding two ferric-iron ions to become holotransferrin (holoTf), which transports iron in to all cells. Entamoeba histolytica is a parasitic protozoan able to use holoTf as a sole iron source in vitro. The mechanism by which this parasite scavenges iron from holoTf is unknown. An E. histolytica holoTf-binding protein (EhTfbp) was purified by using an anti-human transferrin receptor (TfR) monoclonal antibody. EhTfbp was identified by MS/MS analysis and database searches as E. histolytica acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase-2 (EhADH2), an iron-dependent enzyme. Both EhTfbp and EhADH2 bound holoTf and were recognized by the anti-human TfR antibody, indicating that they correspond to the same protein. It was found that the amoebae internalized holoTf through clathrin-coated pits, suggesting that holoTf endocytosis could be important for the parasite during colonization and invasion of the intestinal mucosa and liver.

  17. Expression of protease-activated receptor 1 and 2 and anti-tubulogenic activity of protease-activated receptor 1 in human endothelial colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Tiago M; Vara, Dina S; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P; Pula, Giordano

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are obtained from the culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (hPBMNC) fractions and are characterised by high proliferative and pro-vasculogenic potential, which makes them of great interest for cell therapy. Here, we describe the detection of protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and 2 amongst the surface proteins expressed in ECFCs. Both receptors are functionally coupled to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, which become activated and phosphorylated in response to selective PAR1- or PAR2-activating peptides. Specific stimulation of PAR1, but not PAR2, significantly inhibits capillary-like tube formation by ECFCs in vitro, suggesting that tubulogenesis is negatively regulated by proteases able to stimulate PAR1 (e.g. thrombin). The activation of ERKs is not involved in the regulation of tubulogenesis in vitro, as suggested by use of the MEK inhibitor PD98059 and by the fact that PAR2 stimulation activates ERKs without affecting capillary tube formation. Both qPCR and immunoblotting showed a significant downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor 2 (VEGFR2) in response to PAR1 stimulation. Moreover, the addition of VEGF (50-100 ng/ml) but not basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) (25-100 ng/ml) rescued tube formation by ECFCs treated with PAR1-activating peptide. Therefore, we propose that reduction of VEGF responsiveness resulting from down-regulation of VEGFR2 is underlying the anti-tubulogenic effect of PAR1 activation. Although the role of PAR2 remains elusive, this study sheds new light on the regulation of the vasculogenic activity of ECFCs and suggests a potential link between adult vasculogenesis and the coagulation cascade.

  18. The Neurotensin Receptor-1 Pathway Contributes to Human Ductal Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Dupouy, Sandra; Viardot-Foucault, Véronique; Alifano, Marco; Souazé, Frédérique; Plu-Bureau, Geneviève; Chaouat, Marc; Lavaur, Anne; Hugol, Danielle; Gespach, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background The neurotensin (NTS) and its specific high affinity G protein coupled receptor, the NT1 receptor (NTSR1), are considered to be a good candidate for one of the factors implicated in neoplastic progression. In breast cancer cells, functionally expressed NT1 receptor coordinates a series of transforming functions including cellular migration and invasion. Methods and Results we investigated the expression of NTS and NTSR1 in normal human breast tissue and in invasive ductal breast carcinomas (IDCs) by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. NTS is expressed and up-regulated by estrogen in normal epithelial breast cells. NTS is also found expressed in the ductal and invasive components of IDCs. The high expression of NTSR1 is associated with the SBR grade, the size of the tumor, and the number of metastatic lymph nodes. Furthermore, the NTSR1 high expression is an independent factor of prognosis associated with the death of patients. Conclusion these data support the activation of neurotensinergic deleterious pathways in breast cancer progression. PMID:19156213

  19. Erythroblast transferrin receptors and transferrin kinetics in iron deficiency and various anemias

    SciTech Connect

    Muta, K.; Nishimura, J.; Ideguchi, H.; Umemura, T.; Ibayashi, H.

    1987-06-01

    To clarify the role of transferrin receptors in cases of altered iron metabolism in clinical pathological conditions, we studied: number of binding sites; affinity; and recycling kinetics of transferrin receptors on human erythroblasts. Since transferrin receptors are mainly present on erythroblasts, the number of surface transferrin receptors was determined by assay of binding of /sup 125/I-transferrin and the percentage of erythroblasts in bone marrow mononuclear cells. The number of binding sites on erythroblasts from patients with an iron deficiency anemia was significantly greater than in normal subjects. Among those with an aplastic anemia, hemolytic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and polycythemia vera compared to normal subjects, there were no considerable differences in the numbers of binding sites. The dissociation constants (Kd) were measured using Scatchard analysis. The apparent Kd was unchanged (about 10 nmol/L) in patients and normal subjects. The kinetics of endocytosis and exocytosis of /sup 125/I-transferrin, examined by acid treatment, revealed no variations in recycling kinetics among the patients and normal subjects. These data suggest that iron uptake is regulated by modulation of the number of surface transferrin receptors, thereby reflecting the iron demand of the erythroblast.

  20. Leprosy and the Adaptation of Human Toll-Like Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sunny H.; Gochhait, Sailesh; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Pettersson, Fredrik H.; Teo, Yik Y.; Khor, Chiea C.; Rautanen, Anna; Chapman, Stephen J.; Mills, Tara C.; Srivastava, Amit; Rudko, Aleksey; Freidin, Maxim B.; Puzyrev, Valery P.; Ali, Shafat; Aggarwal, Shweta; Chopra, Rupali; Reddy, Belum S. N.; Garg, Vijay K.; Roy, Suchismita; Meisner, Sarah; Hazra, Sunil K.; Saha, Bibhuti; Floyd, Sian; Keating, Brendan J.; Kim, Cecilia; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Knight, Julian C.; Hill, Philip C.; Adegbola, Richard A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Fine, Paul E. M.; Pitchappan, Ramasamy M.; Bamezai, Rameshwar N. K.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Vannberg, Fredrik O.

    2010-01-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae and remains endemic in many parts of the world. Despite several major studies on susceptibility to leprosy, few genomic loci have been replicated independently. We have conducted an association analysis of more than 1,500 individuals from different case-control and family studies, and observed consistent associations between genetic variants in both TLR1 and the HLA-DRB1/DQA1 regions with susceptibility to leprosy (TLR1 I602S, case-control P = 5.7×10−8, OR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.20–0.48, and HLA-DQA1 rs1071630, case-control P = 4.9×10−14, OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.35–0.54). The effect sizes of these associations suggest that TLR1 and HLA-DRB1/DQA1 are major susceptibility genes in susceptibility to leprosy. Further population differentiation analysis shows that the TLR1 locus is extremely differentiated. The protective dysfunctional 602S allele is rare in Africa but expands to become the dominant allele among individuals of European descent. This supports the hypothesis that this locus may be under selection from mycobacteria or other pathogens that are recognized by TLR1 and its co-receptors. These observations provide insight into the long standing host-pathogen relationship between human and mycobacteria and highlight the key role of the TLR pathway in infectious diseases. PMID:20617178

  1. Uptake of 111In-labeled fully human monoclonal antibody TSP-A18 reflects transferrin receptor expression in normal organs and tissues of mice.

    PubMed

    Sugyo, Aya; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sudo, Hitomi; Nomura, Fumiko; Satoh, Hirokazu; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Kurosawa, Gene; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Saga, Tsuneo

    2017-03-01

    Transferrin receptor (TfR) is an attractive molecule for targeted therapy of cancer. Various TfR-targeted therapeutic agents such as anti-TfR antibodies conjugated with anticancer agents have been developed. An antibody that recognizes both human and murine TfR is needed to predict the toxicity of antibody-based agents before clinical trials, there is no such antibody to date. In this study, a new fully human monoclonal antibody TSP-A18 that recognizes both human and murine TfR was developed and the correlation analysis of the radiolabeled antibody uptake and TfR expression in two murine strains was conducted. TSP-A18 was selected using extracellular portions of human and murine TfR from a human antibody library. The cross-reactivity of TSP-A18 with human and murine cells was confirmed by flow cytometry. Cell binding and competitive inhibition assays with [111In]TSP-A18 showed that TSP-A18 bound highly to TfR-expressing MIAPaCa-2 cells with high affinity. Biodistribution studies of [111In]TSP-A18 and [67Ga]citrate (a transferrin-mediated imaging probe) were conducted in C57BL/6J and BALB/c-nu/nu mice. [111In]TSP-A18 was accumulated highly in the spleen and bone containing marrow component of both strains, whereas high [67Ga]citrate uptake was only observed in bone containing marrow component and not in the spleen. Western blotting indicated the spleen showed the strongest TfR expression compared with other organs in both strains. There was significant correlation between [111In]TSP-A18 uptake and TfR protein expression in both strains, whereas there was significant correlation of [67Ga]citrate uptake with TfR expression only in C57BL/6J. These findings suggest that the difference in TfR expression between murine strains should be carefully considered when testing for the toxicity of anti-TfR antibody in mice and the uptake of anti-TfR antibody could reflect tissue TfR expression more accurately compared with that of transferrin-mediated imaging probe such as [67Ga]citrate.

  2. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 is an enhancer of tumor angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    González-Chavarría, Iván; Cerro, Rita P; Parra, Natalie P; Sandoval, Felipe A; Zuñiga, Felipe A; Omazábal, Valeska A; Lamperti, Liliana I; Jiménez, Silvana P; Fernandez, Edelmira A; Gutiérrez, Nicolas A; Rodriguez, Federico S; Onate, Sergio A; Sánchez, Oliberto; Vera, Juan C; Toledo, Jorge R

    2014-01-01

    Altered expression and function of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) has been associated with several diseases such as endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and obesity. In these pathologies, oxLDL/LOX-1 activates signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation, cell motility and angiogenesis. Recent studies have indicated that olr1 mRNA is over-expressed in stage III and IV of human prostatic adenocarcinomas. However, the function of LOX-1 in prostate cancer angiogenesis remains to be determined. Our aim was to analyze the contribution of oxLDL and LOX-1 to tumor angiogenesis using C4-2 prostate cancer cells. We analyzed the expression of pro-angiogenic molecules and angiogenesis on prostate cancer tumor xenografts, using prostate cancer cell models with overexpression or knockdown of LOX-1 receptor. Our results demonstrate that the activation of LOX-1 using oxLDL increases cell proliferation, and the expression of the pro-angiogenic molecules VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in a dose-dependent manner. Noticeably, these effects were prevented in the C4-2 prostate cancer model when LOX-1 expression was knocked down. The angiogenic effect of LOX-1 activated with oxLDL was further demonstrated using the aortic ring assay and the xenograft model of tumor growth on chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos. Consequently, we propose that LOX-1 activation by oxLDL is an important event that enhances tumor angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells.

  3. Reevaluation of Fatty Acid Receptor 1 as a Drug Target for the Stimulation of Insulin Secretion in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Robert; Kaiser, Gabriele; Gerst, Felicia; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Due-Hansen, Maria E.; Grundmann, Manuel; Machicao, Fausto; Peter, Andreas; Kostenis, Evi; Ulven, Trond; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Ullrich, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The role of free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1/GPR40) in glucose homeostasis is still incompletely understood. Small receptor agonists stimulating insulin secretion are undergoing investigation for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Surprisingly, genome-wide association studies did not discover diabetes risk variants in FFAR1. We reevaluated the role of FFAR1 in insulin secretion using a specific agonist, FFAR1-knockout mice and human islets. Nondiabetic individuals were metabolically phenotyped and genotyped. In vitro experiments indicated that palmitate and a specific FFAR1 agonist, TUG-469, stimulate glucose-induced insulin secretion through FFAR1. The proapoptotic effect of chronic exposure of β-cells to palmitate was independent of FFAR1. TUG-469 was protective, whereas inhibition of FFAR1 promoted apoptosis. In accordance with the proapoptotic effect of palmitate, in vivo cross-sectional observations demonstrated a negative association between fasting free fatty acids (NEFAs) and insulin secretion. Because NEFAs stimulate secretion through FFAR1, we examined the interaction of genetic variation in FFAR1 with NEFA and insulin secretion. The inverse association of NEFA and secretion was modulated by rs1573611 and became steeper for carriers of the minor allele. In conclusion, FFAR1 agonists support β-cell function, but variation in FFAR1 influences NEFA effects on insulin secretion and therefore could affect therapeutic efficacy of FFAR1 agonists. PMID:23378609

  4. Neptunium uptake by serum transferrin.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Isabelle; Den Auwer, Christophe; Moisy, Philippe; Ansoborlo, Eric; Vidaud, Claude; Funke, Harld

    2005-04-01

    Although of major impact in terms of biological and environmental hazards, interactions of actinide cations with biological molecules are only partially understood. Human serum transferrin (Tf) is one of the major iron carriers in charge of iron regulation in the cell cycle and consequently contamination by actinide cations is a critical issue of nuclear toxicology. Combined X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and near infrared absorption spectrometry were used to characterize a new complex between Tf and Np (IV) with the synergistic nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) anion. Description of the neptunium polyhedron within the iron coordination site is given.

  5. Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli are protected from leukocyte phagocytosis by binding to erythrocyte complement receptor 1 in human blood.

    PubMed

    Brekke, Ole-Lars; Hellerud, Bernt Christian; Christiansen, Dorte; Fure, Hilde; Castellheim, Albert; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Pharo, Anne; Lindstad, Julie Katrine; Bergseth, Grethe; Leslie, Graham; Lambris, John D; Brandtzaeg, Petter; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2011-09-01

    The initial interaction of Gram-negative bacteria with erythrocytes and its implications on leukocyte phagocytosis and oxidative burst in human whole blood were examined. Alexa-labeled Escherichia coli, wild-type H44/76 N. meningitidis and the H44/76lpxA lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant were incubated with whole blood using lepirudin as anticoagulant which has no adverse effects on complement. Bacteria free in plasma, bound to erythrocytes or phagocytized by granulocytes and monocytes were quantified using flow cytometry. The effects of the C3 inhibitor compstatin, a C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRa) and a complement receptor 1 (CR1)-blocking antibody (3D9) were examined. Most bacteria (80%) immediately bound to erythrocytes. The binding gradually declined over time, with a parallel increase in phagocytosis. Complement inhibition with compstatin reduced erythrocyte binding and bacterial C3 opsonization. In contrast, the C5aRa efficiently reduced phagocytosis, but did not affect the binding of bacteria to erythrocytes. The anti-CR1 blocking mAb dose-dependently reduced bacterial binding to erythrocytes to nil, with subsequent increased phagocytosis and oxidative burst. LPS had no effect on these processes since similar results were obtained using an LPS-deficient N. meningitidis mutant. In vivo experiments in a pig model of sepsis showed limited binding of bacteria to erythrocytes, consistent with the facts that erythrocyte CR1 receptors are absent in non-primates and that the bacteria were mainly found in the lungs. In conclusion, complement-dependent binding of Gram-negative bacteria to erythrocyte CR1 decreases phagocytosis and oxidative burst by leukocytes in human whole blood.

  6. Methamphetamine induces trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) expression in human T lymphocytes: role in immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Uma; Cenna, Jonathan M; Haldar, Bijayesh; Fernandes, Nicole C; Razmpour, Roshanak; Fan, Shongshan; Ramirez, Servio H; Potula, Raghava

    2016-01-01

    The novel transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor, trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), represents a potential, direct target for drugs of abuse and monoaminergic compounds, including amphetamines. For the first time, our studies have illustrated that there is an induction of TAAR1 mRNA expression in resting T lymphocytes in response to methamphetamine. Methamphetamine treatment for 6 h significantly increased TAAR1 mRNA expression (P < 0.001) and protein expression (P < 0.01) at 24 h. With the use of TAAR1 gene silencing, we demonstrate that methamphetamine-induced cAMP, a classic response to methamphetamine stimulation, is regulated via TAAR1. We also show by TAAR1 knockdown that the down-regulation of IL-2 in T cells by methamphetamine, which we reported earlier, is indeed regulated by TAAR1. Our results also show the presence of TAAR1 in human lymph nodes from HIV-1-infected patients, with or without a history of methamphetamine abuse. TAAR1 expression on lymphocytes was largely in the paracortical lymphoid area of the lymph nodes with enhanced expression in lymph nodes of HIV-1-infected methamphetamine abusers rather than infected-only subjects. In vitro analysis of HIV-1 infection of human PBMCs revealed increased TAAR1 expression in the presence of methamphetamine. In summary, the ability of methamphetamine to activate trace TAAR1 in vitro and to regulate important T cell functions, such as cAMP activation and IL-2 production; the expression of TAAR1 in T lymphocytes in peripheral lymphoid organs, such as lymph nodes; and our in vitro HIV-1 infection model in PBMCs suggests that TAAR1 may play an important role in methamphetamine -mediated immune-modulatory responses.

  7. Binding of Hepatitis A Virus to its Cellular Receptor 1 Inhibits T-Regulatory Cell Functions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Manangeeswaran, Mohanraj; Jacques, Jérôme; Tami, Cecilia; Konduru, Krishnamurthy; Amharref, Nadia; Perrella, Oreste; Casasnovas, Jose M.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Perrella, Alessandro; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims CD4+ T regulatory (Treg) cells suppress immune responses and control self-tolerance and immunity to pathogens, cancer, and alloantigens. Most pathogens activate Treg cells to minimize immune-mediated tissue damage and prevent clearance, which promotes chronic infections. However, hepatitis A virus (HAV) temporarily inhibits Treg-cell functions. We investigated whether the interaction of HAV with its cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), a T-cell co-stimulatory molecule, inhibits the function of Treg cells to control HAV infection. Methods We studied the effects of HAV interaction with HAVCR1 on human T cells using binding, signal transduction, apoptosis, activation, suppression, cytokine production, and confocal microscopy analyses. Cytokines were analyzed in sera from 14 patients with HAV infection using bead arrays. Results Human Treg cells constitutively express HAVCR1. Binding of HAV to HAVCR1 blocked phosphorylation of Akt, prevented activation of the T-cell receptor, and inhibited function of Treg cells. At the peak viremia, patients with acute HAV infection had no Treg-cell suppression function, produced low levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF–β), which limited leukocyte recruitment and survival, and high levels of interleukin-22, which prevented liver damage. Conclusions Interaction between HAV and its receptor HAVCR1 inhibits Treg cell function, resulting in an immune imbalance that allows viral expansion with limited hepatocellular damage during early stages of infection—a characteristic of HAV pathogenesis. The mechanism by which HAV is cleared in the absence of Treg-cell function could be used as a model to develop anti-cancer therapies, modulate autoimmune and allergic responses, and prevent transplant rejection. PMID:22430395

  8. Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli are protected from leukocyte phagocytosis by binding to erythrocyte complement receptor 1 in human blood

    PubMed Central

    Brekke, Ole-Lars; Hellerud, Bernt Christian; Christiansen, Dorte; Fure, Hilde; Castellheim, Albert; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Pharo, Anne; Lindstad, Julie Katrine; Bergseth, Grethe; Leslie, Graham; Lambris, John D.; Brandtzaeg, Petter; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2011-01-01

    The initial interaction of Gram-negative bacteria with erythrocytes and its implications on leukocyte phagocytosis and oxidative burst in human whole blood were examined. Alexa-labeled Escherichia coli, wild-type H44/76 Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) and the H44/76lpxA lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant were incubated with whole blood using lepirudin as anticoagulant which has no adverse effects on complement. Bacteria free in plasma, bound to erythrocytes or phagocytized by granulocytes and monocytes were quantified using flow cytometry. The effects of the C3 inhibitor compstatin, a C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRa) and a complement receptor 1 (CR1)-blocking antibody (3D9) were examined. Most bacteria (80%) immediately bound to erythrocytes. The binding gradually declined over time, with a parallel increase in phagocytosis. Complement inhibition with compstatin reduced erythrocyte binding and bacterial C3 opsonization. In contrast, the C5aRa efficiently reduced phagocytosis, but did not affect the binding of bacteria to erythrocytes. The anti-CR1 blocking mAb dose-dependently reduced bacterial binding to erythrocytes to nil, with subsequent increased phagocytosis and oxidative burst. LPS had no effect on these processes since similar results were obtained using an LPS-deficient N. meningitidis mutant. In vivo experiments in a pig model of sepsis showed limited binding of bacteria to erythrocytes, consistent with the facts that erythrocyte CR1 receptors are absent in non-primates and that the bacteria were mainly found in the lungs. In conclusion, complement-dependent binding of Gram-negative bacteria to erythrocyte CR1 decreases phagocytosis and oxidative burst by leukocytes in human whole blood. PMID:21839519

  9. Antagonism of the prostaglandin D2 receptor 1 suppresses nicotinic acid-induced vasodilation in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kang; Wu, Tsuei-Ju; Wu, Kenneth K; Sturino, Claudio; Metters, Kathleen; Gottesdiener, Keith; Wright, Samuel D; Wang, Zhaoyin; O'Neill, Gary; Lai, Eseng; Waters, M Gerard

    2006-04-25

    Nicotinic acid (NA) is commonly used to treat dyslipidemia, but it elicits an adverse effect, termed flushing, which consists of cutaneous vasodilation with associated discomfort. An animal model of NA-induced flushing has been established in mice. As in humans, NA stimulated vasodilation in a dose-dependent manner, was associated with an increase of the vasodilatory prostaglandin (PG) D2 in plasma and could be blocked by pretreatment with aspirin. Two PGD2 receptors have been identified: PGD2 receptor 1 (DP1, also called DP) and PGD2 receptor 2 (DP2, sometimes termed CRTH2). DP2 does not mediate NA-induced vasodilation; the DP2-specific agonist DK-PGD2 (13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGD2) did not induce cutaneous vasodilation, and DP2-/- mice had a normal vasodilatory response to NA. By contrast, BW245C, a DP1-selective agonist, induced vasodilation in mice, and MK-0524, a DP1-selective antagonist, blocked both PGD2- and NA-induced vasodilation. NA-induced vasodilation was also studied in DP1+/+, DP1+/-, and DP1-/- mice; although NA-induced vasodilation depended almost completely on DP1 in female mice, it depended only partially on DP1 in male mice. The residual NA-induced vasodilation in male DP-/- mice was aspirin-sensitive. Thus, in the mouse, DP1 appears to be an important component involved in NA-induced vasodilation, but other cyclooxygenase-dependent mechanisms also may be involved. A clinical study in healthy men and women demonstrated that treatment with MK-0524 reduced the symptoms of flushing and the increase in skin perfusion after the administration of NA. These studies suggest that DP1 receptor antagonism may be an effective means to suppress NA-induced flushing in humans.

  10. Comparison of colorimetry and electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy for the quantification of non-transferrin bound iron in human sera.

    PubMed

    Jittangprasert, Piyada; Wilairat, Prapin; Pootrakul, Pensri

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes a comparison of two analytical techniques, one employing bathophenanthrolinedisulfonate (BPT), a most commonly-used reagent for Fe (II) determination, as chromogen and an electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS) for the quantification of non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI) in sera from thalassemic patients. Nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was employed as the ligand for binding iron from low molecular weight iron complexes present in the serum but without removing iron from the transferrin protein. After ultrafiltration the Fe (III)-NTA complex was then quantified by both methods. Kinetic study of the rate of the Fe (II)-BPT complex formation for various excess amounts of NTA ligand was also carried out. The kinetic data show that a minimum time duration (> 60 minutes) is necessary for complete complex formation when large excess of NTA is used. Calibration curves given by colorimetric and ETAAS methods were linear over the range of 0.15-20 microM iron (III). The colorimetric and ETAAS methods exhibited detection limit (3sigma) of 0.13 and 0.14 microM, respectively. The NTBI concentrations from 55 thalassemic serum samples measured employing BPT as chromogen were statistically compared with the results determined by ETAAS. No significant disagreement at 95% confidence level was observed. It is, therefore, possible to select any one of these two techniques for determination of NTBI in serum samples of thalassemic patients. However, the colorimetric procedure requires a longer analysis time because of a slow rate of exchange of NTA ligand with BPT, leading to the slow rate of formation of the colored complex.

  11. [Transferrin in various hematological syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gepner-Woźniewska, M; Sitarska, E; Kluciński, W; Konopka, L; Roszkowski, S

    1977-01-01

    In 100 patients with various haematological syndromes and in 22 healthy subjects serum transferrin was determined by the method of radial immunodiffusion of Mancini. The results were correlated with total iron-binding capacity, iron concentration, beta1 globulin and albumin levels. A statistically significant rise in serum transferrin concentration was demonstrated only in patients with sideropenic anaemia. In the remaining groups of patients transferrin concentration was decreased without regard to associated disturbances of iron metabolism and iron level. The comparison of the total iron-binding capacity with transferrin level determined by radial immunodiffusion may suggest presence of iron-binding proteins other than transferrin.

  12. Insights into endosomal maturation of human holo-transferrin in the enteric parasite Entamoeba histolytica: essential roles of Rab7A and Rab5 in biogenesis of giant early endocytic vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Verma, Kuldeep; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Datta, Sunando

    2015-12-01

    The pathogenic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica is one of the causative agents of health hazards in tropical countries. It causes amoebic dysentery, colitis and liver abscesses in human. Iron is one of the essential nutritional resources for survival and chronic infection caused by the amoeba. The parasite has developed multiple ways to import, sequester and utilize iron from various iron-binding proteins from its host. In spite of its central role in pathogenesis, the mechanism of iron uptake by the parasite is largely unknown. Here, we carried out a systematic study to understand the role of some of the amoebic homologues of mammalian endocytic Rab GTPases (Rab5 and Rab21, Rab7A and Rab7B) in intracellular transport of human holo-transferrin by the parasite. Flow cytometry and quantitative microscopic image analysis revealed that Rab5 and Rab7A are required for the biogenesis of amoebic giant endocytic vacuoles (GEVs) and regulate the early phase of intracellular trafficking of transferrin. Rab7B is involved in the late phase, leading to the degradation of transferrin in the amoebic lysosome-like compartments. Using time-lapse fluorescence imaging in fixed trophozoites, we determined the kinetics of the vesicular transport of transferrin through Rab5-, Rab7A- and Rab7B-positive compartments. The involvement of Rab7A in the early phase of endocytosis by the parasite marks a significant divergence from its host in terms of spatiotemporal regulation by the Rab GTPases.

  13. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sunmi; Shackel, Nicholas A.; Wang, Xin M.; Ajami, Katerina; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Gorrell, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and is activated by collagens. Transcriptional profiling of cirrhosis in human liver using a DNA array and quantitative PCR detected elevated mRNA expression of DDR1 compared with that in nondiseased liver. The present study characterized DDR1 expression in cirrhotic and nondiseased human liver and examined the cellular effects of DDR1 expression. mRNA expression of all five isoforms of DDR1 was detected in human liver, whereas DDR1a demonstrated differential expression in liver with hepatitis C virus and primary biliary cirrhosis compared with nondiseased liver. In addition, immunoblot analysis detected shed fragments of DDR1 more readily in cirrhotic liver than in nondiseased liver. Inasmuch as DDR1 is subject to protease-mediated cleavage after prolonged interaction with collagen, this differential expression may indicate more intense activation of DDR1 protein in cirrhotic compared with nondiseased liver. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence localized intense DDR1 mRNA and protein expression to epithelial cells including hepatocytes at the portal-parenchymal interface and the luminal aspect of the biliary epithelium. Overexpression of DDR1a altered hepatocyte behavior including increased adhesion and less migration on extracelular matrix substrates. DDR1a regulated extracellular expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2. These data elucidate DDR1 function pertinent to cirrhosis and indicate the importance of epithelial cell–collagen interactions in chronic liver injury. PMID:21356365

  14. Evidence that His349 acts as a pH-inducible switch to accelerate receptor-mediated iron release from the C-lobe of human transferrin

    PubMed Central

    Steere, Ashley N.; Byrne, Shaina L.; Chasteen, N. Dennis; Smith, Valerie C.; MacGillivray, Ross T. A.

    2015-01-01

    His349 in human transferrin (hTF) is a residue critical to transferrin receptor (TFR)-stimulated iron release from the C-lobe. To evaluate the importance of His349 on the TFR interaction, it was replaced by alanine, aspartate, lysine, leucine, tryptophan, and tyrosine in a monoferric C-lobe hTF construct (FeChTF). Using a stop-ped-flow spectrofluorimeter, we determined rate processes assigned to iron release and conformational events (in the presence and in the absence of the TFR). Significantly, all mutant/TFR complexes feature dampened iron release rates. The critical contribution of His349 is most convincingly revealed by analysis of the kinetics as a function of pH (5.6–6.2). The FeChTF/TFR complex titrates with a pKa of approximately 5.9. By contrast, the H349A mutant/TFR complex releases iron at higher pH with a profile that is almost the inverse of that of the control complex. At the putative endosomal pH of 5.6 (in the presence of salt and chelator), iron is released from the H349W mutant/TFR and H349Y mutant/TFR complexes with a single rate constant similar to the iron release rate constant for the control; this suggests that these substitutions bypass the required pH-induced conformational change allowing the C-lobe to directly interact with the TFR to release iron. The H349K mutant proves that although the positive charge is crucial to complete iron release, the geometry at this position is also critical. The H349D mutant shows that a negative charge precludes complete iron release at pH 5.6 both in the presence and in the absence of the TFR. Thus, histidine uniquely drives the pH-induced conformational change in the C-lobe required for TFR interaction, which in turn promotes iron release. PMID:20711621

  15. Study on effect of lomefloxacin on human holo-transferrin in the presence of essential and nonessential amino acids: Spectroscopic and molecular modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Marouzi, Somaye; Sharifi Rad, Atena; Beigoli, Sima; Teimoori Baghaee, Parisa; Assaran Darban, Reza; Chamani, Jamshidkhan

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how lomefloxacin (LMF) interacts with human holo-transferrin (HTF) in the presence of two kinds of essential and nonessential amino acids. The investigations were carried out by fluorescence spectroscopy, zeta potential and molecular modeling techniques under imitated physiological conditions. We were able to determine the number of binding sites, the drug binding affinity to HTF in the presence of essential and nonessential amino acids and the quenching source of HTF. The interaction between HTF with LMF suggested that the microenvironment of the Trp residues was altered causing a strong static fluorescence quenching in the binary and ternary systems. The results pointed at the formation of a complex in the binary and ternary systems which caused an enhancement of the RLS intensity that was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. The density functional theory (DFT) was employed to determine the amino acid residues on HTF that interacted with LMF. Also, Steric and van der Waals forces as well as the contribution of small amounts of hydrogen bonds were stronger or Tyr 71 in chain (b) than for 128 Trp in chain (a) of HTF.

  16. Mutagenesis of the aspartic acid ligands in human serum transferrin: lobe-lobe interaction and conformation as revealed by antibody, receptor-binding and iron-release studies.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, A; He, Q Y; Tam, B; MacGillivray, R A; Woodworth, R

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant non-glycosylated human serum transferrin and mutants in which the liganding aspartic acid (D) in one or both lobes was changed to a serine residue (S) were produced in a mammalian cell system and purified from the tissue culture media. Significant downfield shifts of 20, 30, and 45 nm in the absorption maxima were found for the D63S-hTF, D392S-hTF and the double mutant, D63S/D392S-hTF when compared to wild-type hTF. A monoclonal antibody to a sequential epitope in the C-lobe of hTF reported affinity differences between the apo- and iron-forms of each mutant and the control. Cell-binding studies performed under the same buffer conditions used for the antibody work clearly showed that the mutated lobe(s) had an open cleft. It is not clear whether the receptor itself may play a role in promoting the open conformation or whether the iron remains in the cleft. PMID:9461487

  17. Pulmonary transvascular flux of transferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.A.; Malik, A.B. )

    1989-11-01

    We compared the pulmonary transvascular fluxes of transferrin and albumin in the intact sheep lung. Anesthetized sheep were prepared with lung lymph fistulas. The vascular blood pool was marked with {sup 99m}Tc-erythrocytes, autologous transferrin was labeled with {sup 113m}In, and albumin was labeled with {sup 125}I. Samples of blood, plasma, lymph, and lung were obtained up to 180 min after tracer infusion. Lymph tissue radioactivities were corrected for the intravascular component and expressed as extravascular-to-plasma concentration ratios. Clearance of transferrin and albumin from the plasma space followed a two-compartment model. The clearance rate constant was 2.1 {plus minus} 0.1 x 10(-3) min for albumin and 2.4 {plus minus} 0.1 x 10(-3) min for transferrin (P less than 0.05). Lymph-to-plasma ratios for albumin and transferrin were not different. However, the extravascular-to-plasma ratio for albumin was greater than transferrin (P less than 0.05). The lymph and lung data were deconvoluted for the plasma input function and fit to a two-compartment model. The results indicate that albumin and transferrin have similar permeabilities across the vascular barrier but have different pulmonary circulation to lymph kinetics because the extravascular volume of distribution of albumin is greater than transferrin.

  18. Transferrin iron uptake is stimulated by ascorbate via an intracellular reductive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lane, Darius J R; Chikhani, Sherin; Richardson, Vera; Richardson, Des R

    2013-06-01

    Although ascorbate has long been known to stimulate dietary iron (Fe) absorption and non-transferrin Fe uptake, the role of ascorbate in transferrin Fe uptake is unknown. Transferrin is a serum Fe transport protein supplying almost all cellular Fe under physiological conditions. We sought to examine ascorbate's role in this process, particularly as cultured cells are typically ascorbate-deficient. At typical plasma concentrations, ascorbate significantly increased (59)Fe uptake from transferrin by 1.5-2-fold in a range of cells. Moreover, ascorbate enhanced ferritin expression and increased (59)Fe accumulation in ferritin. The lack of effect of cycloheximide or the cytosolic aconitase inhibitor, oxalomalate, on ascorbate-mediated (59)Fe uptake from transferrin indicate increased ferritin synthesis or cytosolic aconitase activity was not responsible for ascorbate's activity. Experiments with membrane-permeant and -impermeant ascorbate-oxidizing reagents indicate that while extracellular ascorbate is required for stimulation of (59)Fe uptake from (59)Fe-citrate, only intracellular ascorbate is needed for transferrin (59)Fe uptake. Additionally, experiments with l-ascorbate analogs indicate ascorbate's reducing ene-diol moiety is necessary for its stimulatory activity. Importantly, neither N-acetylcysteine nor buthionine sulfoximine, which increase or decrease intracellular glutathione, respectively, affected transferrin-dependent (59)Fe uptake. Thus, ascorbate's stimulatory effect is not due to a general increase in cellular reducing capacity. Ascorbate also did not affect expression of transferrin receptor 1 or (125)I-transferrin cellular flux. However, transferrin receptors, endocytosis, vacuolar-type ATPase activity and endosomal acidification were required for ascorbate's stimulatory activity. Therefore, ascorbate is a novel modulator of the classical transferrin Fe uptake pathway, acting via an intracellular reductive mechanism.

  19. Pharmaceutical formulation affects titanocene transferrin interactions.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Katherine M; Snoeberger, Robert C; Batista, Victor S; Valentine, Ann M

    2011-10-07

    Since the discovery of the anticancer activity of titanocene dichloride (TDC), many derivatives have been developed and evaluated. MKT4, a soluble, water-stable formulation of TDC, was used for both Phase I and Phase II human clinical trials. This formulation is investigated here by using (1)H and (13)C NMR, FT-ICR mass spectrometry, and UV/vis-detected pH-dependent speciation. DFT calculations are also utilized to assess the likelihood of proposed species. Human serum transferrin has been identified as a potential vehicle for the Ti anticancer drugs; these studies examine whether and how formulation of TDC as MKT4 may influence its interactions, both thermodynamic and kinetic, with human serum transferrin by using UV/vis absorption and fluorescence quenching. MKT4 binds differently than TDC to transferrin, showing different kinetics of binding as well as a different molar absorptivity of binding (7500 M(-1) cm(-1) per site). Malate, used in the buffer for MKT4 administration, acts as a synergistic anion for Ti binding, shifting the tyrosine to Ti charge transfer energy and decreasing the molar absorptivity to 5000 M(-1) cm(-1) per site. These differences may have had consequences after the change from TDC to MKT4 in human clinical trials.

  20. A synthetic peptide derived from A1 module in CRD4 of human TNF receptor-1 inhibits binding and proinflammatory effect of human TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yingnan; Wang, Zhaohe; Bu, Xianzhang; Tang, Shu; Mei, Zhengrong; Liu, Peiqing

    2009-06-01

    Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine, which has been shown to be a causative factor in rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and septic shock. Proinflammatory effect of TNF-alpha is activated mainly through human TNF receptor-1 (TNF-R1). However, the role of the fourth cystein-rich domain (CRD4) of TNF-R1 extracellular portion in the interaction of TNF-alpha with TNF-R1 is still unclear. In the present study, binding activity of TNF-alpha to TNF-R1 and protein levels of IkappaB-alpha and nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) p65 subunit in HeLa cells were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western-blot analysis. Pep 3 (LRENECVS) which was derived from the hydrophilic region of A1 module in CRD4 remarkably inhibited the binding of TNF-alpha to TNF-R1, and also reversed TNF-alpha-induced degradation of IkappaB-alpha and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB p65 subunit in HeLa cells. Our results confirmed that the hydrophilic region of A1 module in CRD4 participated in the interaction of TNF-alpha with TNF-R1, and demonstrated the potential of small-molecule TNF-alpha extracellular inhibitors targeting at A1 module in CRD4 of TNF-R1 in suppressing proinflammatory effect of TNF-alpha.

  1. Escape from bacterial iron piracy through rapid evolution of transferrin

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Matthew F.; Elde, Nels C.

    2015-01-01

    Iron sequestration provides an innate defense termed nutritional immunity, leading pathogens to scavenge iron from hosts. Although the molecular basis of this battle for iron is established, its potential as a force for evolution at host-pathogen interfaces is unknown. We show that the iron transport protein transferrin is engaged in ancient and ongoing evolutionary conflicts with TbpA, a transferrin surface receptor from bacteria. Single substitutions in transferrin at rapidly evolving sites reverse TbpA binding, providing a mechanism to counteract bacterial iron piracy among great apes. Furthermore, the C2 transferrin polymorphism in humans evades TbpA variants from Haemophilus influenzae, revealing a functional basis for standing genetic variation. These findings identify a central role for nutritional immunity in the persistent evolutionary conflicts between primates and bacterial pathogens. PMID:25504720

  2. Losartan attenuates human monocyte-derived dendritic cell immune maturation via downregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong; Lu, Hao; Liu, Hongying; Yao, Kang; Sun, Aijun; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2012-08-01

    The angiotensin II receptor-1 blockers have generally been shown to have antiatherogenic effects, and dendritic cells (DCs) are the most efficient antigen presenting cells that play an active role in the development of atherosclerosis through inflammatory-immune responses. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the antiatherogenic effect of losartan, the first angiotensin II receptor-1 blockers, might partly be mediated by attenuating DCs maturation. In this study, we showed that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and angiotensin II (Ang II) could induce the maturation of human monocyte-derived DCs, stimulate CD83, HLA-DR expressions and IL-12, interferon-gamma secretions and increase the capacity of DCs to stimulate T-cell proliferation, which were suppressed by losartan. OxLDL could promote the autocrine secretion of Ang II by DCs and upregulate the expressions of 3 scavenger receptors SR-A, CD36, and LOX-1. Losartan reduced oxLDL-induced LOX-1 expression but not SR-A and CD36 expressions. Ang II could only upregulate the LOX-1 expression, which was reduced by losartan. OxLDL- and Ang II-induced upregulation of CD83 and secretion of IL-12 were all attenuated by LOX-1 neutralizing antibody. In conclusion, losartan could attenuate the oxLDL- and Ang II-induced immune maturation of human monocyte-derived DCs partly through downregulation of the LOX-1 expression.

  3. Binding of trivalent chromium to serum transferrin is sufficiently rapid to be physiologically relevant.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ge; Wu, Kristi; Cruce, Alex A; Bowman, Michael K; Vincent, John B

    2015-02-01

    Transferrin, the major iron transport protein in the blood, also transports trivalent chromium in vivo. Recent in vitro studies have, however, suggested that the binding of chromic ions to apotransferrin is too slow to be biologically relevant. Nevertheless, the in vitro studies have generally failed to adequately take physiological bicarbonate concentrations into account. In aqueous buffer (with ambient (bi)carbonate concentrations), the binding of chromium to transferrin is too slow to be physiologically relevant, taking days to reach equilibrium with the protein's associated conformational changes. However, in the presence of 25mM (bi)carbonate, the concentration in human blood, chromic ions bind rapidly and tightly to transferrin. Details of the kinetics of chromium binding to human serum transferrin and conalbumin (egg white transferrin) in the presence of bicarbonate and other major potential chromium ligands are described and are consistent with transferrin being the major chromic ion transporter from the blood to tissues.

  4. Cyclic analogs of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alphaMSH) with high agonist potency and selectivity at human melanocortin receptor 1b.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Maria A; MacNeil, Tanya; Tang, Rui; Fong, Tung M; Cabello, M Angeles; Maroto, Marta; Teran, Ana

    2008-06-01

    Alpha-melanotropin (alphaMSH), Ac-Ser1-Tyr2-Ser3-Met4-Glu5-His6-Phe7-Arg8-Trp9-Gly10-Lys11-Pro12-Val13-NH2,(1) has been long recognized as an important physiological regulator of skin and hair pigmentation in mammals. Binding of this peptide to the melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) leads to activation of tyrosinase, the key enzyme of the melanin biosynthesis pathway. In this study, interactions of the human MC1bR (an isoform of the receptor 1a) with the synthetic cyclic analogs of alphaMSH were studied. These ligands were analogs of MTII, Ac-Nle4-cyclo-(Asp5-His6-D-Phe7-Arg8-Trp9-Lys10)-NH2, a potent pan-agonist at the human melanocortin receptors (hMC1,3-5R). In the structure of MTII, the His6-D-Phe7-Arg8-Trp9 segment has been recognized as "essential" for molecular recognition at the human melanocortin receptors (hMC1,3-5R). Herein, the role of the Trp9 in the ligand interactions with the hMC1b,3-5R has been reevaluated. Analogs with various amino acids in place of Trp9 were synthesized and tested in vitro in receptor affinity binding and cAMP functional assays at human melanocortin receptors 1b, 3, 4 and 5 (hMC1b,3-5R). Several of the new peptides were high potency agonists (partial) at hMC1bR (EC50 from 0.5 to 20 nM) and largely inactive at hMC3-5R. The bulky aromatic side chain in position 9, such as that in Trp, was found not to be essential to agonism (partial) of the studied peptides at hMC1bR.

  5. Transferrin-bearing maghemite nano-constructs for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piraux, H.; Hai, J.; Gaudisson, T.; Ammar, S.; Gazeau, F.; El Hage Chahine, J. M.; Hémadi, M.

    2015-05-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in biomedicine for hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imagery. Targeting them to specific cancerous cells is, therefore, of a great value for therapy and diagnostic. Transferrin and its receptor constitute the major iron-acquisition system in human. The former crosses the plasma membrane within a few minutes by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Thus, transferrin can be a valuable vector for the delivery of NPs to specific cells and across the blood brain barrier. For such a purpose, three different sizes of maghemite NPs (5, 10, and 15 nm) were synthesized by the polyol method, coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, and coupled to transferrin by amide bonds. The number of transferrins per nanoparticle was determined. Raw nanoparticles and the "transferrin-nanoparticle" constructs were characterized. The magnetic properties and the colloidal stability of raw NPs and transferrin-NP constructs were measured and analyzed in relation to their inorganic core size variation. They all proved to be good candidates for nanoparticle targeting for biomedical application.

  6. Regulation of cell surface transferrin receptor-2 by iron-dependent cleavage and release of a soluble form

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Alessia; Vieillevoye, Maud; Nai, Antonella; Rausa, Marco; Ladli, Meriem; Lacombe, Catherine; Mayeux, Patrick; Verdier, Frédérique; Camaschella, Clara; Silvestri, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Transferrin receptor-2 is a transmembrane protein whose expression is restricted to hepatocytes and erythroid cells. Transferrin receptor-2 has a regulatory function in iron homeostasis, since its inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Hepatic transferrin receptor-2 participates in iron sensing and is involved in hepcidin activation, although the mechanism remains unclear. Erythroid transferrin receptor-2 associates with and stabilizes erythropoietin receptors on the erythroblast surface and is essential to control erythrocyte production in iron deficiency. We identified a soluble form of transferrin receptor-2 in the media of transfected cells and showed that cultured human erythroid cells release an endogenous soluble form. Soluble transferrin receptor-2 originates from a cleavage of the cell surface protein, which is inhibited by diferric transferrin in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, the shedding of the transferrin receptor-2 variant G679A, mutated in the Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid motif and unable to bind diferric transferrin, is not modulated by the ligand. This observation links the process of transferrin receptor-2 removal from the plasma membrane to iron homeostasis. Soluble transferrin receptor-2 does not affect the binding of erythropoietin to erythropoietin receptor or the consequent signaling and partially inhibits hepcidin promoter activation only in vitro. Whether it is a component of the signals released by erythropoiesis in iron deficiency remains to be investigated. Our results indicate that membrane transferrin receptor-2, a sensor of circulating iron, is released from the cell membrane in iron deficiency. PMID:25637053

  7. Transferrin: Endocytosis and Cell Signaling in Parasitic Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Luna, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Iron is the fourth most abundant element on Earth and the most abundant metal in the human body. This element is crucial for life because almost all organisms need iron for several biological activities. This is the case with pathogenic organisms, which are at the vanguard in the battle with the human host for iron. The latest regulates Fe concentration through several iron-containing proteins, such as transferrin. The transferrin receptor transports iron to each cell that needs it and maintains it away from pathogens. Parasites have developed several strategies to obtain iron as the expression of specific transferrin receptors localized on plasma membrane, internalized through endocytosis. Signal transduction pathways related to the activation of the receptor have functional importance in proliferation. The study of transferrin receptors and other proteins with action in the signaling networks is important because these proteins could be used as therapeutic targets due to their specificity or to differences with the human counterpart. In this work, we describe proteins that participate in signal transduction processes, especially those that involve transferrin endocytosis, and we compare these processes with those found in T. brucei, T. cruzi, Leishmania spp., and E. histolytica parasites. PMID:26090431

  8. The Importance of the Stem Cell Marker Prominin-1/CD133 in the Uptake of Transferrin and in Iron Metabolism in Human Colon Cancer Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Garcion, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    As the pentaspan stem cell marker CD133 was shown to bind cholesterol and to localize in plasma membrane protrusions, we investigated a possible function for CD133 in endocytosis. Using the CD133 siRNA knockdown strategy and non-differentiated human colon cancer Caco-2 cells that constitutively over-expressed CD133, we provide for the first time direct evidence for a role of CD133 in the intracellular accumulation of fluorescently labeled extracellular compounds. Assessed using AC133 monoclonal antibody, CD133 knockdown was shown to improve Alexa488-transferrin (Tf) uptake in Caco-2 cells but had no impact on FITC-dextran or FITC-cholera-toxin. Absence of effect of the CD133 knockdown on Tf recycling established a role for CD133 in inhibiting Tf endocytosis rather than in stimulating Tf exocytosis. Use of previously identified inhibitors of known endocytic pathways and the positive impact of CD133 knockdown on cellular uptake of clathrin-endocytosed synthetic lipid nanocapsules supported that CD133 impact on endocytosis was primarily ascribed to the clathrin pathway. Also, cholesterol extraction with methyl-β-cyclodextrine up regulated Tf uptake at greater intensity in the CD133high situation than in the CD133low situation, thus suggesting a role for cholesterol in the inhibitory effect of CD133 on endocytosis. Interestingly, cell treatment with the AC133 antibody down regulated Tf uptake, thus demonstrating that direct extracellular binding to CD133 could affect endocytosis. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy established that down regulation of CD133 improved the accessibility to the TfR from the extracellular space, providing a mechanism by which CD133 inhibited Tf uptake. As Tf is involved in supplying iron to the cell, effects of iron supplementation and deprivation on CD133/AC133 expression were investigated. Both demonstrated a dose-dependent down regulation here discussed to the light of transcriptional and post-transciptional effects. Taken

  9. Bioactive secondary metabolites of a marine Bacillus sp. inhibit superoxide generation and elastase release in human neutrophils by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Wen-Yi; Kuo, Jimmy; Huang, Yin-Ting; Chung, Pei-Jen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-06-03

    It is well known that overwhelming neutrophil activation is closely related to acute and chronic inflammatory injuries. Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) plays an important role in activation of neutrophils and may represent a potent therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we demonstrated that IA-LBI07-1 (IA), an extract of bioactive secondary metabolites from a marine Bacillus sp., has anti-inflammatory effects in human neutrophils. IA significantly inhibited superoxide generation and elastase release in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated neutrophils, but failed to suppress the cell responses activated by non-FPR1 agonists. IA did not alter superoxide production and elastase activity in cell-free systems. IA also attenuated the downstream signaling from FPR1, such as the Ca2+, MAP kinases and AKT pathways. In addition, IA inhibited the binding of N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein, a fluorescent analogue of FMLP, to FPR1 in human neutrophils and FPR1-transfected HEK293 cells. Taken together, these results show that the anti-inflammatory effects of IA in human neutrophils are through the inhibition of FPR1. Also, our data suggest that IA may have therapeutic potential to decrease tissue damage induced by human neutrophils.

  10. Analogs of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone with high agonist potency and selectivity at human melanocortin receptor 1b: the role of Trp(9) in molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Maria A; Macneil, Tanya; Tang, Rui; Fong, Tung M; Angeles Cabello, M; Maroto, Marta; Teran, Ana

    2008-05-01

    alpha-Melanocyte stimulating hormone (alphaMSH), Ac-Ser(1)-Tyr(2)-Ser(3)-Met(4)-Glu(5)-His(6)-Phe(7)-Arg(8)-Trp(9)-Gly(10)-Lys(11)-Pro(12)-Val(13)-NH(2), is an endogenous agonist for the melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R), the receptor found in the skin, several types of immune cells, and other peripheral sites. Three-dimensional models of complexes of this receptor with alphaMSH and its synthetic analog NDP-alphaMSH, Ac-Ser(1)-Tyr(2)-Ser(3)-Nle(4)-Glu(5)-His(6)-D-Phe(7)-Arg(8)-Trp(9)-Gly(10)-Lys(11)-Pro(12)-Val(13)-NH(2), have been previously proposed. In those models, the 6-9 segment of the ligand was considered essential for the ligand-receptor interactions. In this study, we probed the role of Trp(9) of NDP-alphaMSH in interactions with hMC1bR. Analogs of NDP-alphaMSH with various amino acids in place of Trp(9) were synthesized and tested in vitro in receptor affinity binding and cAMP functional assays at human melanocortin receptors 1b, 3, 4, and 5 (hMC1b,3-5R). Several new compounds displayed high agonist potency at hMC1bR (EC(50) = 0.5-5 nM) and receptor subtype selectivity greater than 2000-fold versus hMC3-5R. The Trp(9) residue of NDP-alphaMSH was determined to be not essential for molecular recognition at hMC1bR.

  11. Neurotensin-induced Proinflammatory Signaling in Human Colonocytes Is Regulated by β-Arrestins and Endothelin-converting Enzyme-1-dependent Endocytosis and Resensitization of Neurotensin Receptor 1*

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ivy Ka Man; Murphy, Jane E.; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2012-01-01

    The neuropeptide/hormone neurotensin (NT) mediates intestinal inflammation and cell proliferation by binding of its high affinity receptor, neurotensin receptor-1 (NTR1). NT stimulates IL-8 expression in NCM460 human colonic epithelial cells by both MAP kinase- and NF-κB-dependent pathways. Although the mechanism of NTR1 endocytosis has been studied, the relationship between NTR1 intracellular trafficking and inflammatory signaling remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we show that in NCM460 cells exposed to NT, β-arrestin-1 (βARR1), and β-arrestin-2 (βARR2) translocate to early endosomes together with NTR1. Endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) degrades NT in acidic conditions, and its activity is crucial for NTR1 recycling. Pretreatment of NCM460 cells with the ECE-1 inhibitor SM19712 or gene silencing of βARR1 or βARR2 inhibits NT-stimulated ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylation, NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and phosphorylation, and IL-8 secretion. Furthermore, NT-induced cell proliferation, but not IL-8 transcription, is attenuated by the JNK inhibitor, JNK(AII). Thus, NTR1 internalization and recycling in human colonic epithelial cells involves βARRs and ECE-1, respectively. Our results also indicate that βARRs and ECE-1-dependent recycling regulate MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling as well as cell proliferation in human colonocytes in response to NT. PMID:22416137

  12. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  13. A spectroscopic and molecular modeling study of sinomenine binding to transferrin.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongyan; Xiang, Junfeng; Zhang, Yazhou; Tang, Yalin

    2007-03-15

    Sinomenine, an herbal ingredient isolated from Sinomenium acutum, is used for the amelioration of arthritis. It has been found that this molecule could bind to human serum transferrin (Tf), the iron (III) transport protein in the blood, by using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and molecular modeling methods. The results provide possible usage of transferrin to transport sinomenine.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) modulates free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1) dependent insulin secretion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Robert; Hieronimus, Anja; Lamprinou, Apostolia; Heni, Martin; Hatziagelaki, Erifili; Ullrich, Susanne; Stefan, Norbert; Staiger, Harald; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation in FFAR1 modulates insulin secretion dependent on non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations. We previously demonstrated lower insulin secretion in minor allele carriers of PPARG Pro12Ala in high-NEFA environment, but the mode of action could not been revealed. We tested if this effect is mediated by FFAR1 in humans. Subjects with increased risk of diabetes who underwent oral glucose tolerance tests were genotyped for 7 tagging SNPs in FFAR1 and PPARG Pro12Ala. The FFAR1 SNPs rs12462800 and rs10422744 demonstrated interactions with PPARG on insulin secretion. FFAR1 rs12462800 (p = 0.0006) and rs10422744 (p = 0.001) were associated with reduced insulin secretion in participants concomitantly carrying the PPARG minor allele and having high fasting FFA. These results suggest that the minor allele of the PPARG SNP exposes its carriers to modulatory effects of FFAR1 on insulin secretion. This subphenotype may define altered responsiveness to FFAR1-agonists, and should be investigated in further studies. PMID:25161890

  15. Formylated MHC Class Ib Binding Peptides Activate Both Human and Mouse Neutrophils Primarily through Formyl Peptide Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Malene; Holdfeldt, André; Gabl, Michael; Wang, Ji Ming; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Two different immune recognition systems have evolved in parallel to recognize peptides starting with an N-formylated methionine, and recognition similarities/differences between these two systems have been investigated. A number of peptides earlier characterized in relation to the H2-M3 complex that presents N-formylated peptides to cytotoxic T cells, have been characterized in relation to the formyl peptide receptors expressed by phagocytic neutrophils in both men (FPRs) and mice (Fprs). FPR1/Fpr1 was identified as the preferred receptor for all fMet-containing peptides examined, but there was no direct correlation between H2-M3 binding and the neutrophil activation potencies. Similarly, there was no direct correlation between the activities induced by the different peptides in human and mouse neutrophils, respectively. The formyl group was important in both H2-M3 binding and FPR activation, but FPR2 was the preferred receptor for the non-formylated peptide. The structural requirements differed between the H2-M3 and FPR/Fpr recognition systems and these data suggest that the two recognition systems have different evolutionary traits. PMID:27907124

  16. Determination of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin in human serum by capillary zone electrophoresis: evaluation of assay performance and quality assurance over a 10-year period in the routine arena.

    PubMed

    Joneli, Jeannine; Wanzenried, Ursula; Schiess, Jeannette; Lanz, Christian; Caslavska, Jitka; Thormann, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    The performance of high-resolution CZE for determination of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) in human serum based on internal and external quality data gathered over a 10-year period is reported. The assay comprises mixing of serum with a Fe(III) ion-containing solution prior to analysis of the iron saturated mixture in a dynamically double-coated capillary using a commercial buffer at alkaline pH. CDT values obtained with a human serum of a healthy individual and commercial quality control sera are shown to vary less than 10%. Values of a control from a specific lot were found to slowly decrease as function of time (less than 10% per year). Furthermore, due to unknown reasons, gradual changes in the monitored pattern around pentasialo-transferrin were detected, which limit the use of commercial control sera of the same lot to less than 2 years. Analysis of external quality control sera revealed correct classification of the samples over the entire 10-year period. Data obtained compare well with those of HPLC and CZE assays of other laboratories. The data gathered over a 10-year period demonstrate the robustness of the high-resolution CZE assay. This is the first account of a CZE-based CDT assay with complete internal and external quality assessment over an extended time period.

  17. The effect of soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) and human thyroid antibodies on the course of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis in rats.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, R A; McIntosh, R S; Morgan, B P; Levin, J L; Weetman, A P

    1996-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), induced by immunisation of rats with thyroid extract and complete Freund's adjuvant, has been used as a model to study the effects of complement inhibition mediated by soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) administration during the initial phase of the disease. There was no effect of sCR1 on the severity of thyroiditis at day 28 after immunisation or on the levels of thyroid antibodies, whether sCR1 was given during the first or second week after immunisation. Human IgG containing high levels of thyroid peroxidase antibodies given to rats at the time of immunisation caused significant worsening of thyroiditis severity (P < 0.01 compared to animals receiving normal IgG) but sCR1 again had no effect in this variant of the EAT model. The results indicate that complement does not play a major role in the initial phase of tissue injury in EAT and complement inhibition does not impair the generation of an autoimmune response against the thyroid, although it remains possible that complement activation is important during the chronic phase of disease maintenance in human autoimmune thyroid disease.

  18. Complex of transferrin with ruthenium for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Richards, Powell; Srivastava, Suresh C.; Meinken, George E.

    1984-05-15

    A novel Ruthenium-transferrin complex, prepared by reacting iron-free human transferrin dissolved in a sodium acetate solution at pH 7 with ruthenium by heating at about 40.degree. C. for about 2 hours, and purifying said complex by means of gel chromotography with pH 7 sodium acetate as eluent. The mono- or di-metal complex produced can be used in nuclear medicine in the diagnosis and/or treatment of tumors and abscesses. Comparative results with Ga-67-citrate, which is the most widely used tumor-localizing agent in nuclear medicine, indicate increased sensitivity of detection and greater tumor uptake with the Ru-transferrin complex.

  19. Complex of transferrin with ruthenium for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Richards, P.; Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.

    1984-05-15

    A novel ruthenium-transferrin complex is disclosed which is prepared by reacting iron-free human transferrin dissolved in a sodium acetate solution at pH 7 with ruthenium by heating at about 40 C for about 2 hours. The complex is purified by means of gel chromotography with pH 7 sodium acetate as eluent. The mono- or di-metal complex produced can be used in nuclear medicine in the diagnosis and/or treatment of tumors and abscesses. Comparative results with Ga-67-citrate, which is the most widely used tumor-localizing agent in nuclear medicine, indicate increased sensitivity of detection and greater tumor uptake with the Ru-transferrin complex. No Drawings

  20. Transferrin receptor function in hereditary hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.H.; Kushner, J.P.; Ray, F.A.; Kaplan, J.

    1984-02-01

    The binding of /sup 125/I-diferric transferrin to cultured skin fibroblasts and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes was studied in cells derived from individuals homozygous for hereditary hemochromatosis and from normal individuals. Receptors with a high affinity for diferric transferrin were present on all cells. Transferrin receptor number decreased by more than 50% when fibroblasts from both normal and hemochromatotic subjects were maintained in iron-supplemented medium. The number of transferrin receptors expressed by normal and hemochromatotic lymphocytes after mitogen stimulation in iron-supplemented media was less than 50% that of lymphocytes which were mitogen stimulated in standard medium. No change in the affinity of the receptors of diferric transferrin was seen in cells maintained in iron-supplemented medium. Competition experiments in the presence of deferoxamine suggested that the transferrin receptors of fibroblasts and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes have a 70- to 100-fold higher affinity for diferric transferrin than for apotransferrin. No differences in the properties of transferrin receptors were found between patients with hereditary hemochromatosis and normal individuals. Although transferrin binding decreases when cells are exposed to high levels of iron in the medium, the failure to totally abolish transferrin binding to the receptor suggests that the concentration of diferric transferrin to which cells are exposed may be a major determinant of cellular iron loading in hereditary hemochromatosis.

  1. Human fear acquisition deficits in relation to genetic variants of the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 and the serotonin transporter--revisited.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Groenink, L; van Gool, J M; Domschke, K; Reif, A; Baas, J M P

    2016-02-01

    We recently showed that a genetic polymorphism (rs878886) in the human corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) is associated with reduced fear-conditioned responses to a threat cue. This is a potentially important finding considering that the failure to acquire fear contingencies can leave an individual in a maladaptive state of more generalized anxiety. Consistent with that idea, the CRHR1-dependent fear acquisition deficit translated into heightened contextual anxiety when taking genetic variability within the serotonin transporter long polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) into account. To replicate our previous findings, we conducted a replication study in 224 healthy medication-free human subjects using the exact same cue and context virtual reality fear-conditioning procedure as in study by Heitland et al. (2013). In the replication study, consistent with the original findings, CRHR1 rs878886 G-allele carriers showed reduced acquisition of cue-specific fear-conditioned responses compared with C/C homozygotes. Also, in this larger sample the cue acquisition deficit of G-allele carriers translated into heightened contextual anxiety, even independent of 5-HTT gene variation. In contrast to our earlier findings, there was an additional interaction effect of CRHR1 rs878886 and the triallelic 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 variant on cued fear acquisition. In summary, this study replicated the initially reported association of the CRHR1 rs878886 G-allele with cued fear acquisition deficits, albeit with a different pattern of results regarding the interaction with 5-HTT variation. This further supports the notion that the human corticotropin-releasing hormone plays a role in the acquisition of fears.

  2. 21 CFR 866.5880 - Transferrin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-binding and transporting serum protein) in serum, plasma, and other body fluids. Measurement of... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transferrin immunological test system. 866.5880 Section 866.5880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5880 - Transferrin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transferrin immunological test system. 866.5880 Section 866.5880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5880 - Transferrin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transferrin immunological test system. 866.5880 Section 866.5880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  5. Iron acquisition in Pasteurella haemolytica: expression and identification of a bovine-specific transferrin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ogunnariwo, J A; Schryvers, A B

    1990-01-01

    Seven type 1 field isolates of Pasteurella haemolytica were screened for their ability to use different transferrins as a source of iron for growth. All seven strains were capable of using bovine but not human, porcine, avian, or equine transferrin. A screening assay failed to detect siderophore production in any of the strains tested. Iron-deficient cells from these strains expressed a binding activity, specific for bovine transferrin, that was regulated by the level of iron in the medium. Inhibition of expression by translation and transcription inhibitors suggested that iron regulation was occurring at the gene level. Affinity isolation of receptor proteins from all seven strains with biotinylated bovine transferrin identified a 100-kilodalton iron-regulated outer membrane protein as the bovine transferrin receptor. Iron-regulated outer membrane proteins of 71 and 77 kilodaltons were isolated along with the 100-kilodalton protein when less stringent washing procedures were employed in the affinity isolation procedure. Images PMID:2365453

  6. A novel gene silencer, pyrrole-imidazole polyamide targeting human lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 gene improves endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Takahiro; Fukuda, Noboru; Tsunemi, Akiko; Yao, En-Hui; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Tahira, Kazunobu; Matsumoto, Taro; Matsumoto, Koichi; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Nagase, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Sawamura, Tatsuya

    2009-03-01

    Pyrrole-imidazole polyamide can be combined in antiparallel side-by-side dimeric complexes along the minor groove of DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Pyrrole-imidazole polyamides are effective inhibitors of transcription factors as well as viral repressors and transactivators. Recently, lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) was reported to be a major factor contributing to the pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis. In this study, we designed a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide specific for the LOX-1 gene and evaluated its effect on LOX-1 gene transcription. A pyrrole-imidazole polyamide was designed to target the AP-1 binding site of the LOX-1 gene and synthesized by solid phase methods. This pyrrole-imidazole polyamide significantly inhibited LOX-1 promoter activity in HEK293 cells, determined by the luciferase assay. LOX-1 mRNA expression was also inhibited by the pyrrole-imidazole polyamide at a concentration of 10-9 mol/l in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), determined by the real-time PCR method. HUVEC were treated by pyrrole-imidazole polyamide targeting the LOX-1 gene, and apoptosis was assessed using Hoechst stain, terminal deoxy nucleotidyl transferase-mediated UTP end labeling method, and dye-uptake bioassay. Treatment of HUVEC for 72 h with LOX-1 targeted pyrrole-imidazole polyamide decreased apoptosis induced by angiotensin II and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) loading in all assays. This novel therapeutic agent, pyrrole-imidazole polyamide, could specifically inhibit LOX-1 gene expression by reducing the promoter activity of the gene. Pyrrole-imidazole polyamide seems to be a powerful promising new agent that can be used to explore therapies based on inhibition of transcription. Molecular recognition of DNA by small molecules could provide insight into the development of new human medicines.

  7. Characterization of the interaction between diferric transferrin and transferrin receptor 2 by functional assays and atomic force microscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Ikuta, Katsuya; Yersin, Alexandre; Ikai, Atsushi; Aisen, Philip; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TfR2), a homologue of classical transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), is found in two isoforms, α and β. Like TfR1, TfR2α is a type II membrane protein, but the β form lacks transmembrane portions and therefore is likely to be an intracellular protein. To investigate the functional properties of TfR2α we expressed the protein with FLAG-tagging in transferrin receptor-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells. The association constant for binding of diferric transferrin (Tf) to TfR2α is 5.6 × 106 M−1, which is about 50 times lower than that of TfR1, with correspondingly reduced rates of iron uptake. Evidence for Tf internalization and recycling via TfR2α without degradation, as in the TfR1 pathway, was also found. The interaction of TfR2α with Tf was further investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), a powerful tool for investigation of the interaction between ligand and receptor at the single molecule level on the living cell surface. Dynamic force microscopy reveals a difference in the interactions of Tf with TfR2α and TfR1, with Tf-TfR1 unbinding characterized by 2 energy barriers, while only one is present for Tf-TfR2. We speculate that this difference may reflect Tf binding to TfR2α by a single lobe, whereas two lobes of Tf participate in binding to TfR1. The difference in the binding properties of Tf to TfR1 and TfR2α may help account for the different physiological roles of the two receptors. PMID:20096706

  8. Transferrin-Mediated Cellular Iron Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Ashley N.; Mason, Anne B.

    2015-01-01

    Essential to iron homeostasis is the transport of iron by the bilobal protein human serum transferrin (hTF). Each lobe (N- and C-lobe) of hTF forms a deep cleft which binds a single Fe3+. Iron-bearing hTF in the blood binds tightly to the specific transferrin receptor (TFR), a homodimeric transmembrane protein. After undergoing endocytosis, acidification of the endosome initiates the release of Fe3+ from hTF in a TFR-mediated process. Iron-free hTF remains tightly bound to the TFR at acidic pH; following recycling back to the cell surface, it is released to sequester more iron. Efficient delivery of iron is critically dependent on hTF/TFR interactions. Therefore, identification of the pH-specific contacts between hTF and the TFR is crucial. Recombinant protein production has enabled deconvolution of this complex system. The studies reviewed herein support a model in which pH-induced interrelated events control receptor-stimulated iron release from each lobe of hTF. PMID:23046645

  9. V101L of human formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) increases receptor affinity and augments the antagonism mediated by cyclosporins

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Caihong; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Jia; Feng, Yang; Wang, Haonan; Xue, Jinglun; Chen, Yani; Ye, Richard D.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation plays a major role in drug response variability. CsA (cyclosporin A), a widely used immunosuppressive agent, is a specific antagonist for FPR1 (formyl peptide receptor 1), which is an important G-protein-coupled chemoattractant receptor in the innate immune system. In order to study the variable responses of cyclosporins to different FPR1 mutants, we investigated the distribution of human FPR1 haplotypes among 209 healthy Han Chinese subjects. The haplotype pattern in Han Chinese were characterized on the basis of five SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), including rs5030878 (p.T11I), rs2070745 (p.V101L), rs5030880 (p.R190W), rs1042229 (p.N192K) and rs867228 (p.A346E). Receptor binding affinity of cyclosporins to FPR1 haplotypes was assessed using N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys–FITC in CHO-Gα16 cells stably transfected with cDNAs encoding the top 12 FPR1 haplotypes in the Han Chinese. Variants of FPR1 carrying a single amino acid substitution of leucine for valine at position 101 (p.Leu101) displayed significantly higher pKi values for CsA and CsH (cyclosporin H), indicative of an improved receptor affinity. The polymorphism of FPR1 p.Leu101 also enhanced the inhibitory effects of cyclosporins on fMLF (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine)-induced activities, including calcium mobilization, cell chemotaxis and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation. These results point to a possible complication for clinical use of CsA in patients carrying the p.Leu101 allele of FPR1. PMID:23373827

  10. V101L of human formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) increases receptor affinity and augments the antagonism mediated by cyclosporins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Caihong; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Jia; Feng, Yang; Wang, Haonan; Xue, Jinglun; Chen, Yani; Ye, Richard D; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2013-04-15

    Genetic variation plays a major role in drug response variability. CsA (cyclosporin A), a widely used immunosuppressive agent, is a specific antagonist for FPR1 (formyl peptide receptor 1), which is an important G-protein-coupled chemoattractant receptor in the innate immune system. In order to study the variable responses of cyclosporins to different FPR1 mutants, we investigated the distribution of human FPR1 haplotypes among 209 healthy Han Chinese subjects. The haplotype pattern in Han Chinese were characterized on the basis of five SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), including rs5030878 (p.T11I), rs2070745 (p.V101L), rs5030880 (p.R190W), rs1042229 (p.N192K) and rs867228 (p.A346E). Receptor binding affinity of cyclosporins to FPR1 haplotypes was assessed using N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-FITC in CHO-G(α16) cells stably transfected with cDNAs encoding the top 12 FPR1 haplotypes in the Han Chinese. Variants of FPR1 carrying a single amino acid substitution of leucine for valine at position 101 (p.Leu(101)) displayed significantly higher pK(i) values for CsA and CsH (cyclosporin H), indicative of an improved receptor affinity. The polymorphism of FPR1 p.Leu(101) also enhanced the inhibitory effects of cyclosporins on fMLF (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine)-induced activities, including calcium mobilization, cell chemotaxis and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation. These results point to a possible complication for clinical use of CsA in patients carrying the p.Leu(101) allele of FPR1.

  11. Monocyte transferrin-iron uptake in hereditary hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sizemore, D.J.; Bassett, M.L.

    1984-05-01

    Transferrin-iron uptake by peripheral blood monocytes was studied in vitro to test the hypothesis that the relative paucity of mononuclear phagocyte iron loading in hereditary hemochromatosis results from a defect in uptake of iron from transferrin. Monocytes from nine control subjects and 17 patients with hemochromatosis were cultured in the presence of 59Fe-labelled human transferrin. There was no difference in 59Fe uptake between monocytes from control subjects and monocytes from patients with hemochromatosis who had been treated by phlebotomy and who had normal body iron stores. However, 59Fe uptake by monocytes from iron-loaded patients with hemochromatosis was significantly reduced compared with either control subjects or treated hemochromatosis patients. It is likely that this was a secondary effect of iron loading since iron uptake by monocytes from treated hemochromatosis patients was normal. Assuming that monocytes in culture reflect mononuclear phagocyte iron metabolism in vivo, this study suggests that the relative paucity of mononuclear phagocyte iron loading in hemochromatosis is not related to an abnormality in transferrin-iron uptake by these cells.

  12. Erythropoiesis-driven regulation of hepcidin in human red cell disorders is better reflected through concentrations of soluble transferrin receptor rather than growth differentiation factor 15.

    PubMed

    Fertrin, Kleber Yotsumoto; Lanaro, Carolina; Franco-Penteado, Carla Fernanda; de Albuquerque, Dulcinéia Martins; de Mello, Mariana Rezende Bandeira; Pallis, Flávia Rubia; Bezerra, Marcos André Cavalcanti; Hatzlhofer, Betania Lucena Domingues; Olbina, Gordana; Saad, Sara Terezinha Olalla; da Silva Araújo, Aderson; Westerman, Mark; Costa, Fernando Ferreira

    2014-04-01

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) is a bone marrow-derived cytokine whose ability to suppress iron regulator hepcidin in vitro and increased concentrations found in patients with ineffective erythropoiesis (IE)suggest that hepcidin deficiency mediated by GDF-15 may be the pathophysiological explanation for nontransfusional iron overload. We aimed to compare GDF-15 production in anemic states with different types of erythropoietic dysfunction. Complete blood counts, biochemical markers of iron status, plasma hepcidin, GDF-15, and known hepcidin regulators [interleukin-6 and erythropoietin (EPO)] were measured in 87 patients with red cell disorders comprising IE and hemolytic states: thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, and cobalamin deficiency. Healthy volunteers were also evaluated for comparison. Neither overall increased EPO,nor variable GDF-15 concentrations correlated with circulating hepcidin concentrations (P = 0.265 and P = 0.872). Relative hepcidin deficiency was found in disorders presenting with concurrent elevation of GDF-15 and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), a biomarker of erythropoiesis, and sTfR had the strongest correlation with hepcidin (r(s) = 0.584, P < 0.0001). Our data show that high concentrations of GDF-15 in vivo are not necessarily associated with pathological hepcidin reduction, and hepcidin deficiency was only found when associated with sTfR overproduction. sTfR elevation may be a necessary common denominator of erythropoiesis-driven mechanisms to favor iron absorption in anemic states and appears a suitable target for investigative approaches to iron disorders.

  13. The impact of highly hydrophobic material on the structure of transferrin and its ability to bind iron.

    PubMed

    Drug, E; Fadeev, L; Gozin, M

    2011-05-30

    Transferrin is a blood-plasma glycoprotein, which is responsible for ferric-ion delivery and which functions as the most important ferric pool in the body. The reversible complexation process of Fe(3+) ions is associated with conformational changes of the three-dimensional structure of the transferrin. This conformational dynamics is attributed to a partial unfolding of the N-lobe of the protein and could be described as a transition between the holo to the apo forms of the transferrin. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the unprecedented ability of the transferrin to solubilize various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in physiological solution and to explore the impact of these materials on the structure and functionality of the transferrin. The synthesis and characterization of novel materials, consisting of complexes between human transferrin and hydrophobic high-carbon-content compounds, is reported here for the first time. Furthermore, it is shown that the preparation of these complexes from holo-transferrin leads to an irreversible loss of the ferric ions from the protein. Analytical studies of these novel complexes may shed a light on the mechanism by which transferrin could lose its ability to bind and thus to transport and store iron. These findings clearly demonstrate a possible damaging impact of various hydrophobic pollutants, which can enter an organism by inhalation or ingestion, on the functionality of the transferrin.

  14. Immunoregulation by low density lipoproteins in man. Inhibition of mitogen-induced T lymphocyte proliferation by interference with transferrin metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, J A; Lipsky, P E

    1984-01-01

    Human low density lipoprotein (LDL, d = 1.020-1.050 g/ml) inhibits mitogen-stimulated T lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Because both LDL and transferrin bind to specific cell surface receptors and enter cells by the similar means of receptor-mediated endocytosis, and because transferrin is necessary for lymphocyte DNA synthesis, we investigated the possibility that LDL may inhibit mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte responses by interfering with transferrin metabolism. LDL inhibited mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte [3H]thymidine incorporation in a concentration-dependent manner. The degree of inhibition was most marked in serum-free cultures, but was also observed in serum-containing cultures. The addition of transferrin not only augmented mitogen-induced lymphocyte [3H]thymidine incorporation in serum-free medium but also completely reversed the inhibitory effect of LDL in both serum-free and serum-containing media. Similar results were obtained when lymphocyte proliferation was assayed by counting the number of cells in culture. Transferrin also reversed the inhibition of lymphocyte responses caused by very low density lipoproteins and by cholesterol. The ability of transferrin to reverse the inhibitory effect of lipoproteins was specific, in that native but not denatured transferrin was effective whereas a variety of other proteins were ineffective. These results indicate that LDL inhibits mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte responses by interfering with transferrin metabolism. LDL only inhibited lymphocyte responses after a 48-h incubation if present from the initiation of the culture. By contrast, transferrin reversed inhibition when added after 24 h of the 48-h incubation. LDL did not inhibit lymphocyte responses by nonspecifically associating with transferrin. In addition, the acquisition of specific lymphocyte transferrin receptors was not blocked by LDL. Moreover, transferrin did not prevent the binding and uptake of fluorescent-labeled LDL by activated lymphocytes

  15. Nutritional immunity. Escape from bacterial iron piracy through rapid evolution of transferrin.

    PubMed

    Barber, Matthew F; Elde, Nels C

    2014-12-12

    Iron sequestration provides an innate defense, termed nutritional immunity, leading pathogens to scavenge iron from hosts. Although the molecular basis of this battle for iron is established, its potential as a force for evolution at host-pathogen interfaces is unknown. We show that the iron transport protein transferrin is engaged in ancient and ongoing evolutionary conflicts with TbpA, a transferrin surface receptor from bacteria. Single substitutions in transferrin at rapidly evolving sites reverse TbpA binding, providing a mechanism to counteract bacterial iron piracy among great apes. Furthermore, the C2 transferrin polymorphism in humans evades TbpA variants from Haemophilus influenzae, revealing a functional basis for standing genetic variation. These findings identify a central role for nutritional immunity in the persistent evolutionary conflicts between primates and bacterial pathogens.

  16. Purification of transferrins and lactoferrin using DEAE affi-gel blue.

    PubMed

    Chung, M C; Chan, S L; Shimizu, S

    1991-01-01

    1. A simple method for purifying transferrins and lactoferrin is described. 2. The method consists of a preliminary step of dye-ligand chromatography using DEAE Affi-Gel Blue as the gel matrix at pH 7.5. In this chromatographic step, the transferrins and lactoferrin were readily separated from the bulk of the other proteins by start buffer elution. 3. Differences in the chromatographic behaviour of the various serum transferrins (monkey, human, rabbit, pig, chicken and duck) and ovotransferrin upon DEAE Affi-Gel Blue chromatography can be attributed to differences in the anionic charge of the transferrins in 0.02 M potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.5, thus resulting in the differential retardation of these protein molecules by the gel matrix. 4. The result of DEAE Affi-Gel Blue chromatography of human lactoferrin is different from that for the transferrins. This may possibly reflect the differences in the strength of interaction between lactoferrin and transferrin with this gel matrix.

  17. Irciniastatin A induces potent and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and thereby promotes ectodomain shedding of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in human lung carcinoma A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Quach, Hue Tu; Hirano, Seiya; Fukuhara, Sayuri; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Kanoh, Naoki; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Usui, Takeo; Kataoka, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Irciniastatin A is a pederin-type marine product that potently inhibits translation. We have recently shown that irciniastatin A induces ectodomain shedding of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 with slower kinetics than other translation inhibitors. In human lung carcinoma A549 cells, irciniastatin A induced a marked and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and induced little activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Moreover, the TNF receptor 1 shedding induced by irciniastatin A was blocked by the MAP kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor U0126, but not by the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 or the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Thus unlike other translation inhibitors that trigger ribotoxic stress response, our results show that irciniastatin A is a unique translation inhibitor that induces a potent and sustained activation of the ERK pathway, and thereby promotes the ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 in A549 cells.

  18. Transferrin Impacts Bacillus thuringiensis Biofilm Levels

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Elrica; Taplin, Martha; Garcia, Angel; Williams-Mapp, Baracka

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the impact of transferrin on Bacillus thuringiensis biofilms. Three commercial strains, an environmental strain (33679), the type strain (10792), and an isolate from a diseased insect (700872), were cultured in iron restricted minimal medium. All strains produced biofilm when grown in vinyl plates at 30°C. B. thuringiensis 33679 had a biofilm biomass more than twice the concentration exhibited by the other strains. The addition of transferrin resulted in slightly increased growth yields for 2 of the 3 strains tested, including 33679. In contrast, the addition of 50 μg/mL of transferrin resulted in an 80% decrease in biofilm levels for strain 33679. When the growth temperature was increased to 37°C, the addition of 50 μg/mL of transferrin increased culture turbidity for only strain 33679. Biofilm levels were again decreased in strain 33679 at 37°C. Growth of B. thuringiensis cultures in polystyrene resulted in a decrease in overall growth yields at 30°C, with biofilm levels significantly decreased for 33679 in the presence of transferrin. These findings demonstrate that transferrin impacts biofilm formation in select strains of B. thuringiensis. Identification of these differences in biofilm regulation may be beneficial in elucidating potential virulence mechanisms among the differing strains. PMID:28025643

  19. On the evolutionary significance and metal-binding characteristics of a monolobal transferrin from Ciona intestinalis

    PubMed Central

    Tinoco, Arthur D.; Peterson, Cynthia W.; Lucchese, Baldo; Doyle, Robert P.; Valentine, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    Transferrins are a family of proteins that bind and transport Fe(III). Modern transferrins are typically bilobal and are believed to have evolved from an ancient gene duplication of a monolobal form. A novel monolobal transferrin, nicatransferrin (nicaTf), was identified in the primitive ascidian species Ciona intestinalis that possesses the characteristic features of the proposed ancestral Tf protein. In this work, nicaTf was expressed in Pichia pastoris. Extensive solution studies were performed on nicaTf, including UV-vis, fluorescence, CD, EPR and NMR spectroscopies, and electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The expressed protein is nonglycosylated, unlike the protein isolated from the organism. This property does not affect its ability to bind Fe(III). However, Fe(III)-bound nicaTf displays important spectral differences from other Fe(III)-bound transferrins, which are likely the consequence of differences in metal coordination. Coordination differences could also account for the weaker affinity of nicaTf for Fe(III) (log K = 18.5) compared with bilobal human serum transferrin (HsTf) (log K = 22.5 and 21.4). The Fe–nicaTf complex is not labile, as indicated by slow metal removal kinetics by the high-affinity chelator tiron at pH 7.4. The protein alternatively binds up to one equivalent of Ti(IV) or V(V), which suggests that it may transport nonferric metals. These solution studies provide insight into the structure and function of the primitive monolobal transferrin of C. intestinalis for comparison with higher order bilobal transferrins. They suggest that a major advantage for the evolution of modern transferrins, dominantly of bilobal form, is stronger Fe(III) affinity because of cooperativity. PMID:18287008

  20. Apical and basolateral transferrin receptors in polarized BeWo cells recycle through separate endosomes

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Contrary to most other epithelia, trophoblasts in the human placenta, which form the physical barrier between the fetal and the maternal blood circulation, express high numbers of transferrin receptors on their apical cell surface. This study describes the establishment of a polarized trophoblast-like cell line BeWo, which exhibit a high expression of transferrin receptors on the apex of the cells. Cultured on permeable filter supports, BeWo cells formed a polarized monolayer with microvilli on their apical cell surface. Across the monolayer a transepithelial resistance developed of approximately 600 omega.cm2 within 4 d. Depletion of Ca2+ from the medium decreased the resistance to background levels, showing its dependence on the integrity of tight junctions. Within the same period of time the secretion of proteins became polarized. In addition, the compositions of integral membrane proteins at the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains were distinct as determined by domain-selective iodination. Similar to placental trophoblasts, binding of 125I-labeled transferrin to BeWo monolayers revealed that the transferrin receptor was expressed at both plasma membrane domains. Apical and basolateral transferrin receptors were found in a 1:2 surface ratio and exhibited identical dissociation constants and molecular weights. After uptake, transferrin recycled predominantly to the domain of administration, indicating separate recycling pathways from the apical and basolateral domain. This was confirmed by using diaminobenzidine cytochemistry, a technique by which colocalization of endocytosed 125I-labeled and HRP-conjugated transferrin can be monitored. No mixing of the two types of ligands was observed, when both ligands were simultaneously internalized for 10 or 60 min from opposite domains, demonstrating that BeWo cells possess separate populations of apical and basolateral early endosomes. In conclusion, the trophoblast-like BeWo cell line can serve as a unique

  1. Transferrin receptors on the surfaces of retinal pigment epithelial cells are associated with the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Hunt, R C; Dewey, A; Davis, A A

    1989-04-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial cells, derived from human donor eyes, have been grown in culture as monolayers on membrane filters or plastic surfaces and shown to possess transferrin receptors with a monomeric molecular mass of 93,000. These receptors internalize 125I-labelled transferrin and recycle it to the surrounding medium in a similar manner to other cell types. Scatchard analyses show that there are about 100,000 high-affinity receptors on the surface of each cell and most of these receptors are associated with the cytoskeleton. In total cell extracts, there are additional low-affinity binding sites that do not appear to be strongly associated with the cytoskeleton. The apparent interaction of transferrin receptors with the cytoskeleton was confirmed in two ways: first, using 200 kV electron microscopy for stereo analyses, skeleton-associated transferrin receptors were detected by a monoclonal anti-receptor antibody and a colloidal gold-conjugated second antibody after Triton X-100 extraction of pigment epithelial cells grown directly on laminin-coated gold grids; and, second, when cell surface receptors were labelled with radioiodinated transferrin and then incubated for various periods of time, the labelled transferrin was observed to move from a Triton X-100-insoluble fraction (a putative cytoskeletal compartment) to a Triton-soluble compartment that was not associated with the cytoskeleton. Using either horseradish peroxidase or colloidal gold-labelled transferrin, it has been shown that basolateral and apical surface-located receptors participate in receptor-mediated endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits, endosomes and tubular structures. Initially, transferrin internalized from the apical surface is observed in small endosomes that often appear to be embedded in an apical layer of microfilaments. From these peripheral regions of the cells, the labelled receptors move to larger endosomes and multivesicular bodies deeper in the cytoplasm. These structures

  2. An iron-dependent and transferrin-mediated cellular uptake pathway for plutonium.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Aryal, Baikuntha; Paunesku, Tatjana; Vogt, Stefan; Rickert, Paul G; Seifert, Soenke; Lai, Barry; Woloschak, Gayle E; Soderholm, L

    2011-06-26

    Plutonium is a toxic synthetic element with no natural biological function, but it is strongly retained by humans when ingested. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, receptor binding assays and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy, we find that rat adrenal gland (PC12) cells can acquire plutonium in vitro through the major iron acquisition pathway--receptor-mediated endocytosis of the iron transport protein serum transferrin; however, only one form of the plutonium-transferrin complex is active. Low-resolution solution models of plutonium-loaded transferrins derived from small-angle scattering show that only transferrin with plutonium bound in the protein's C-terminal lobe (C-lobe) and iron bound in the N-terminal lobe (N-lobe) (Pu(C)Fe(N)Tf) adopts the proper conformation for recognition by the transferrin receptor protein. Although the metal-binding site in each lobe contains the same donors in the same configuration and both lobes are similar, the differences between transferrin's two lobes act to restrict, but not eliminate, cellular Pu uptake.

  3. An iron-dependent and transferrin-mediated cellular uptake pathway for plutonium.

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M. P.; Gorman-Lewis, D.; Aryal, B. P.; Paunesku, T.; Vogt, S.; Rickert, P. G.; Seifert, S.; Lai, B.; Woloschak, G. E.; Soderholm, L.

    2011-08-01

    Plutonium is a toxic synthetic element with no natural biological function, but it is strongly retained by humans when ingested. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, receptor binding assays and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy, we find that rat adrenal gland (PC12) cells can acquire plutonium in vitro through the major iron acquisition pathway -- receptor-mediated endocytosis of the iron transport protein serum transferrin; however, only one form of the plutonium-transferrin complex is active. Low-resolution solution models of plutonium-loaded transferrins derived from small-angle scattering show that only transferrin with plutonium bound in the protein's C-terminal lobe (C-lobe) and iron bound in the N-terminal lobe (N-lobe) (Pu{sub c}Fe{sub N}Tf) adopts the proper conformation for recognition by the transferrin receptor protein. Although the metal-binding site in each lobe contains the same donors in the same configuration and both lobes are similar, the differences between transferrin's two lobes act to restrict, but not eliminate, cellular Pu uptake.

  4. Identification of small molecule agonists of human relaxin family receptor 1 (RXFP1) by utilizing a homogenous cell-based cAMP assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Catherine Z.; Southall, Noel; Xiao, Jingbo; Marugan, Juan J.; Ferrer, Marc; Hu, Xin; Jones, Raisa E.; Feng, Shu; Agoulnik, Irina U.

    2016-01-01

    The relaxin hormone is involved in a variety of biological functions including female reproduction and parturition, regulation of cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary, and hepatic functions. It regulates extracellular matrix remodeling, cell invasiveness, proliferation, differentiation, and overall tissue homeostasis. The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) RXFP1, relaxin family receptor 1, is a cognate relaxin receptor that mainly signals through cyclic AMP second messenger. While agonists of the receptor could have a wide range of pharmacological utility, up to date, there are no reported small molecule agonists for relaxin receptors. Here, we report the development of quantitative high-throughput platform for RXFP1 agonist screen based on homogenous cell-based HTRF cAMP assay technology. Two small molecules of similar structure were independently identified from a screen of more than 365,677 compounds. Neither compound showed activity in a counter screen with HEK293T cells transfected with an unrelated GPCR vasopressin 1b receptor. These small molecule agonists also demonstrated selectivity against the RXFP2 receptor, providing a basis for future medicinal chemistry optimization of selective relaxin receptor agonists. PMID:23212924

  5. Reptilian transferrins: evolution of disulphide bridges and conservation of iron-binding center.

    PubMed

    Ciuraszkiewicz, Justyna; Biczycki, Marian; Maluta, Aleksandra; Martin, Samuel; Watorek, Wiesław; Olczak, Mariusz

    2007-07-01

    Transferrins, found in invertebrates and vertebrates, form a physiologically important family of proteins playing a major role in iron acquisition and transport, defense against microbial pathogens, growth and differentiation. These proteins are bilobal in structure and each lobe is composed of two domains divided by a cleft harboring an iron atom. Vertebrate transferrins comprise of serotransferrins, lactoferrins and ovotransferrins. In mammals serotransferrins transport iron in physiological fluids and deliver it to cells, while lactoferrins scavenge iron, limiting its availability to invading microbes. In oviparous vertebrates there is only one transferrin gene, expressed either in the liver to be delivered to physiological fluids as serotransferrin, or in the oviduct with a final localization in egg white as ovotransferrin. Being products of one gene sero- and ovotransferrin are identical at the amino-acid sequence level but with different, cell specific glycosylation patterns. Our knowledge of the mechanisms of transferrin iron binding and release is based on sequence and structural data obtained for human serotransferrin and hen and duck ovotransferrins. No sequence information about other ovotransferrins was available until our recent publication of turkey, ostrich, and red-eared turtle (TtrF) ovotransferrin mRNA sequences [Ciuraszkiewicz, J., Olczak, M., Watorek, W., 2006. Isolation, cloning and sequencing of transferrins from red-eared turtle, African ostrich and turkey. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 143 B, 301-310]. In the present paper, ten new reptilian mRNA transferrin sequences obtained from the Nile crocodile (NtrF), bearded dragon (BtrF), Cuban brown anole (AtrF), veiled and Mediterranean chameleons (VtrF and KtrF), sand lizard (StrF), leopard gecko (LtrF), Burmese python (PtrF), African house snake (HtrF), and grass snake (GtrF) are presented and analyzed. Nile crocodile and red-eared turtle transferrins have a disulphide bridge pattern identical to

  6. Prooxidant activity of transferrin and lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    Klebanoff, S J; Waltersdorph, A M

    1990-11-01

    Acceleration of the autoxidation of Fe2+ by apotransferrin or apolactoferrin at acid pH is indicated by the disappearance of Fe2+, the uptake of oxygen, and the binding of iron to transferrin or lactoferrin. The product(s) formed oxidize iodide to an iodinating species and are bactericidal to Escherichia coli. Toxicity to E. coli by FeSO4 (10(-5) M) and human apotransferrin (100 micrograms/ml) or human apolactoferrin (25 micrograms/ml) was optimal at acid pH (4.5-5.0) and with logarithmic phase organisms. Both the iodinating and bactericidal activities were inhibited by catalase and the hydroxyl radical (OH.) scavenger mannitol, whereas superoxide dismutase was ineffective. NaCl at 0.1 M inhibited bactericidal activity, but had little or no effect on iodination. Iodide increased the bactericidal activity of Fe2+ and apotransferrin or apolactoferrin. The formation of OH.was suggested by the formation of the OH.spin-trap adduct (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyroline N-oxide [DMPO]/OH)., with the spin trap DMPO and the formation of the methyl radical adduct on the further addition of dimethyl sulfoxide. (DMPO/OH).formation was inhibited by catalase, whereas superoxide dismutase had little or no effect. These findings suggest that Fe2+ and apotransferrin or apolactoferrin can generate OH.via an H2O2 intermediate with toxicity to microorganisms, and raise the possibility that such a mechanism may contribute to the microbicidal activity of phagocytes.

  7. Hemochromatosis due to mutations in transferrin receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Roetto, Antonella; Daraio, Filomena; Alberti, Federica; Porporato, Paolo; Calì, Angelita; De Gobbi, Marco; Camaschella, Clara

    2002-01-01

    A rare recessive disorder which leads to iron overload and severe clinical complications similar to those reported in HFE-related hemochromatosis has been delineated and sometimes called hemochromatosis type 3. The gene responsible is Transferrin Receptor 2 (TFR2), which maps to chromosome 7q22. The TFR2 gene presents a significative homology to transferrin receptor (TFRC) gene, encodes for a transmembrane protein with a large extracellular domain, is able to bind transferrin, even if with lower affinity than TFRC. The TFR2 function is still unclear. The transcript does not contain IRE elements and is not modified by the cellular iron status. At variance with TFRC, interactions between TFR2 and HFE do not occur, at least in their soluble forms. TFR2 is spliced in two alternative forms, alfa and beta. The alfa form is strongly expressed in the liver. The beta form, codified from a start site in exon 4 of the alpha, has a low and ubiquitous expression. Using anti-TFR2 monoclonal antibodies we have confirmed expression of the protein in the liver but also in duodenal epithelial cells, and studied the protein functional behaviour in cell lines, in response to iron addition, iron deprivation and olo-transferrin exposure. Our results suggest a regulatory role of TFR2 in iron metabolism. Five TFR2 homozygous mutations have been documented in HFE3 patients: a nonsense mutation (Y250X); a C insertion that causes a frameshift and a premature stop codon (E60X); a missense mutation (M172K); a 12 basepair deletion in exon 16, that causes 4 aminoacid loss (AVAQ 594-597del) in the extracellular domain of TFR2; a missense mutation in exon 17 (Q690P). The mutation analysis supports the hypothesis that all are private mutations. The pathogenetic role of TFR2 in hemochromatosis has been recently further demonstrated through the targeted expression of the Y250X human mutation in mice, which develop sings of iron overload identical to the human disease. Although the rarity of TFR2

  8. Complex of transferrin with ruthenium for medical applications. [Ru 97, Ru 103

    DOEpatents

    Richards, P.; Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.

    1980-11-03

    A novel Ruthenium-transferrin complex, prepared by reacting iron-free human transferrin dissolved in a sodium acetate solution at pH 7 with ruthenium by heating at about 40/sup 0/C for about 2 hours, and purifying said complex by means of gel chromatography with pH 7 sodium acetate as eluent. The mono- or di-metal complex produced can be used in nuclear medicine in the diagnosis and/or treatment of tumors and abscesses. Comparitive results with Ga-67-citrate, which is the most widely used tumor-localizing agent in nuclear medicine, indicate increased sensitivity of detection and greater tumor uptake with the Ru-transferrin complex.

  9. Tyramine and β-phenylethylamine, from fermented food products, as agonists for the human trace amine-associated receptor 1 (hTAAR1) in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hiroto; Takebe, Youhei; Murakami, Yuka; Takahama, Yusei; Morimura, Shigeru

    2017-01-13

    The aromatic amines tyramine and β-phenylethylamine are abundant in fermented foods. Recently, a family of human trace amine-associated receptors (hTAARs) was discovered that responds to these compounds. This study examined the expression of hTAAR genes in five human organs. Among them, the stomach expressed hTAAR1 and hTAAR9. Interestingly, more hTAAR1 was expressed in the pylorus than in the other stomach regions. The CRE-SEAP reporter assay revealed that only hTAAR1 functioned as a Gs-coupled receptor in response to tyramine and β-phenylethylamine stimulation. The β-phenylethylamine-mediated hTAAR1 activity could be potentiated using 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. These data suggest that tyramine and β-phenylethylamine in fermented foods act at hTAAR1 as agonists in the pylorus of stomach.

  10. Biophysical Studies of the Induced Dimerization of Human VEGF Receptor 1 Binding Domain by Divalent Metals Competing with VEGF-A

    PubMed Central

    Reille-Seroussi, Marie; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Broussy, Sylvain; Coric, Pascale; Seijo, Bili; Lascombe, Marie-Bernard; Gautier, Benoit; Liu, Wang-Quing; Huguenot, Florent; Inguimbert, Nicolas; Bouaziz, Serge; Vidal, Michel; Broutin, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is tightly regulated through the binding of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) to their receptors (VEGFRs). In this context, we showed that human VEGFR1 domain 2 crystallizes in the presence of Zn2+, Co2+ or Cu2+ as a dimer that forms via metal-ion interactions and interlocked hydrophobic surfaces. SAXS, NMR and size exclusion chromatography analyses confirm the formation of this dimer in solution in the presence of Co2+, Cd2+ or Cu2+. Since the metal-induced dimerization masks the VEGFs binding surface, we investigated the ability of metal ions to displace the VEGF-A binding to hVEGFR1: using a competition assay, we evidenced that the metals displaced the VEGF-A binding to hVEGFR1 extracellular domain binding at micromolar level. PMID:27942001

  11. Positive and Negative Cross-Talk between Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1, Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4, and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Mandi M; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E

    2016-10-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid mediator that mediates cellular effects via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a peptide that acts via a receptor tyrosine kinase. LPA and EGF both induce proliferation of prostate cancer cells and can transactivate each other's receptors. The LPA receptor LPA1 is particularly important for LPA response in human prostate cancer cells. Previous work in our laboratory has demonstrated that free fatty acid 4 (FFA4), a GPCR activated by ω-3 fatty acids, inhibits responses to both LPA and EGF in these cells. One potential mechanism for the inhibition involves negative interactions between FFA4 and LPA1, thereby suppressing responses to EGF that require LPA1 In the current study, we examined the role of LPA1 in mediating EGF and FFA4 agonist responses in two human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC-3. The results show that an LPA1-selective antagonist inhibits proliferation and migration to both LPA and EGF. Knockdown of LPA1 expression, using silencing RNA, blocks responses to LPA and significantly inhibits responses to EGF. The partial response to EGF that is observed after LPA1 knockdown is not inhibited by FFA4 agonists. Finally, the role of arrestin-3, a GPCR-binding protein that mediates many actions of activated GPCRs, was tested. Knockdown of arrestin-3 completely inhibits responses to both LPA and EGF in prostate cancer cells. Taken together, these results suggest that LPA1 plays a critical role in EGF responses and that FFA4 agonists inhibit proliferation by suppressing positive cross-talk between LPA1 and the EGF receptor.

  12. Soluble TNF-alpha receptor 1 and IL-6 plasma levels in humans subjected to the sleep deprivation model of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, W. T.; Reuben, J. M.; Mullington, J. M.; Price, N. J.; Lee, B. N.; Smith, E. O.; Szuba, M. P.; Van Dongen, H. P.; Dinges, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent to which sleep loss may predispose astronauts to a state of altered immunity during extended space travel prompts evaluation with ground-based models. OBJECTIVE: We sought to measure plasma levels of selected cytokines and their receptors, including the putative sleep-regulation proteins soluble TNF-alpha receptor (sTNF-alpha R) I and IL-6, in human subjects undergoing 2 types of sleep deprivation during environmental confinement with performance demands. METHODS: Healthy adult men (n = 42) were randomized to schedules that varied in severity of sleep loss: 4 days (88 hours) of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) involving two 2-hour naps per day or 4 days of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Plasma samples were obtained every 6 hours across 5 days and analyzed by using enzyme-linked immunoassays for sTNF-alpha RI, sTNF-alpha RII, IL-6, soluble IL-2 receptor, IL-10, and TNF-alpha. RESULTS: Interactions between the effects of time and sleep deprivation level were detected for sTNF-alpha RI and IL-6 but not for sTNF-alpha RII, soluble IL-2 receptor, IL-10, and TNF-alpha. Relative to the PSD condition, subjects in the TSD condition had elevated plasma levels of sTNF-alpha RI on day 2 (P =.04), day 3 (P =.01), and across days 2 to 4 of sleep loss (P =.01) and elevated levels of IL-6 on day 4 (P =.04). CONCLUSIONS: Total sleep loss produced significant increases in plasma levels of sTNF-alpha RI and IL-6, messengers that connect the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems. These changes appeared to reflect elevations of the homeostatic drive for sleep because they occurred in TSD but not PSD, suggesting that naps may serve as the basis for a countermeasures approach to prolonged spaceflight.

  13. Peptide length and folding state govern the capacity of staphylococcal β-type phenol-soluble modulins to activate human formyl-peptide receptors 1 or 2.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Dorothee; Rautenberg, Maren; Linke, Dirk; Peschel, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Most staphylococci produce short α-type PSMs and about twice as long β-type PSMs that are potent leukocyte attractants and toxins. PSMs are usually secreted with the N-terminal formyl group but are only weak agonists for the leukocyte FPR1. Instead, the FPR1-related FPR2 senses PSMs efficiently and is crucial for leukocyte recruitment in infection. Which structural features distinguish FPR1 from FPR2 ligands has remained elusive. To analyze which peptide properties may govern the capacities of β-type PSMs to activate FPRs, full-length and truncated variants of such peptides from Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus lugdunensis were synthesized. FPR2 activation was observed even for short N- or C-terminal β-type PSM variants once they were longer than 18 aa, and this activity increased with length. In contrast, the shortest tested peptides were potent FPR1 agonists, and this property declined with increasing peptide length. Whereas full-length β-type PSMs formed α-helices and exhibited no FPR1-specific activity, the truncated peptides had less-stable secondary structures, were weak agonists for FPR1, and required N-terminal formyl-methionine residues to be FPR2 agonists. Together, these data suggest that FPR1 and FPR2 have opposed ligand preferences. Short, flexible PSM structures may favor FPR1 but not FPR2 activation, whereas longer peptides with α-helical, amphipathic properties are strong FPR2 but only weak FPR1 agonists. These findings should help to unravel the ligand specificities of 2 critical human PRRs, and they may be important for new, anti-infective and anti-inflammatory strategies.

  14. Tissue distribution and clearance kinetics of non-transferrin-bound iron in the hypotransferrinemic mouse: a rodent model for hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Craven, C.M.; Alexander, J.; Eldridge, M.; Kushner, J.P.; Bernstein, S.; Kaplan, J.

    1987-05-01

    Genetically hypotransferrinemic mice accumulate iron in the liver and pancreas. A similar pattern of tissue iron accumulation occurs in humans with hereditary hemochromatosis. In both disorders, there is a decrease plasma concentration of apotransferrin. To test the hypothesis that nontransferrin-bound iron exists and is clear by the parenchymal tissues, the tissue distribution of /sup 59/Fe was studied in animals lacking apotransferrin. Two groups of animals were used: normal rats and mice whose transferrin had been saturated by an intravenous injection of nonradiolabeled iron, and mice with congential hypotransferrinemia. In control animals, injected /sup 59/Fe was found primarily in the bone marrow and spleen. In the transferrin iron-saturated animals, injected /sup 59/Fe accumulated in the liver and pancreas. Gastrointestinally absorbed iron in hypotransferrinemic or transferrin iron-saturated mice was deposited in the liver. This indicates that newly absorbed iron is released from mucosal cells not bound to transferrin. Clearance studies demonstrated that transferrin-bound /sup 59/Fe was removed from the circulation of rats with a half-time of 50 min. In transferrin iron-saturated animals, injected /sup 59/Fe was removed with a half-time of <30 s. Analysis of the distribution of /sup 59/Fe in serum samples by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated the presence of /sup 59/Fe not bound to transferrin. These results demonstrate the existence of and uptake system for non-transferrin-bound iron. These observations support the hypothesis that parenchymal iron overload is consequence of reduced concentrations of apotransferrin.

  15. Noncoding 3' sequences of the transferrin receptor gene are required for mRNA regulation by iron.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, D; Kühn, L C

    1987-01-01

    The cell-surface receptor for transferrin mediates cellular uptake of iron from serum. Transferrin receptor protein and mRNA levels are increased in cells treated with iron chelating agents, and are decreased by treatment with iron salts or hemin. Here we report that expression of human transferrin receptor cDNA constructions in stably transfected mouse fibroblasts is regulated both by the iron chelator, desferrioxamine, and by hemin. We found that sequences within the 3' noncoding region are required for the iron-dependent feed-back regulation of receptor expression, whereas the presence of the transferrin receptor promoter region is not necessary. Regulation by iron is observed when transcription is initiated at either the SV-40 early promoter or the transferrin receptor promoter, but deletion of a 2.3 kb fragment within the 2.6 kb 3' noncoding region of the cDNA abolishes regulation and increases the constitutive level of receptor expression. Furthermore, the 3' deletion does not affect the decrease in receptors which is observed in response to growth arrest, indicating that transferrin receptor expression is controlled by at least two distinct mechanisms. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. PMID:3608980

  16. Selection of cell lines resistant to anti-transferrin receptor antibody: evidence for a mutation in transferrin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Lesley, J F; Schulte, R J

    1984-01-01

    Some anti-murine transferrin receptor monoclonal antibodies block iron uptake in mouse cell lines and inhibit cell growth. We report here the selection and characterization of mutant murine lymphoma cell lines which escape this growth inhibition by anti-transferrin receptor antibody. Growth assays and immunoprecipitation of transferrin receptor in hybrids between independently derived mutants or between mutants and antibody-susceptible parental cell lines indicate that all of the selected lines have a similar genetic alteration that is codominantly expressed in hybrids. Anti-transferrin receptor antibodies and transferrin itself still bind to the mutant lines with saturating levels and Kd values very similar to those of the parental lines. However, reciprocal clearing experiments by immunoprecipitation and reciprocal blocking of binding to the cell surface with two anti-transferrin receptor antibodies indicate that the mutant lines have altered a fraction of their transferrin receptors such that the growth-inhibiting antibody no longer binds, whereas another portion of their transferrin receptors is similar to those of the parental lines and binds both antibodies. These results argue that the antibody-selected mutant cell lines are heterozygous in transferrin receptor expression, probably with a mutation in one of the transferrin receptor structural genes. Images PMID:6092931

  17. Characterization of transferrin binding proteins 1 and 2 in invasive type b and nontypeable strains of Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed Central

    Gray-Owen, S D; Schryvers, A B

    1995-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae has the ability to obtain iron from human transferrin via two bacterial cell surface transferrin binding proteins, Tbp1 and Tbp2. Although a wide array of strains have been shown to express these receptor proteins, two studies have recently identified a series of isolates which appeared to lack the ability to bind transferrin. Included in this group were the members of a cryptic genospecies of nontypeable biotype IV strains which appear to possess a tropism for female urogenital tissues and are major etiologic agents of neonatal and postpartum bacteremia due to H. influenzae. The present study employed oligonucleotide primers specific for genes encoding the Tbp proteins of a type b biotype I strain of H. influenzae to probe the genomic DNAs of isolates from the previous studies. The tbpA and tbpB genes which encode Tbp1 and Tbp2, respectively, were detected in all of the strains tested either by PCR amplification directly or by Southern hybridization analysis. All of the strains displayed a transferrin binding phenotype, and affinity isolation of receptor proteins with transferrin-conjugated Sepharose recovered Tbp1 and/or Tbp2 from 11 of 14 strains, including 2 of the nontypeable biotype IV strains. In addition, all of the strains were capable of growing on human transferrin specifically, indicating that the mechanism of iron assimilation from transferrin is functional and is not siderophore mediated. These results confirm the presence of tbp genes in all of the invasive H. influenzae isolates characterized to date, suggesting that Tbp-mediated iron acquisition is important in disease which initiates from either the respiratory or urogenital mucosa. PMID:7558284

  18. Studies on the binding of fulvic acid with transferrin by spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiu-feng; Yang, Guang; Dong, Yu; Zhao, Yan-qin; Sun, Xiao-ran; Chen, Lei; Chen, Hong-bo

    2015-02-01

    Transferrin has shown potential in the delivery of anticancer drugs into primarily proliferating cancer cells that over-express transferrin receptors. Fulvic acid has a wide range of biological and pharmacological activities which caused widespread concerns, the interaction of fulvic acid with human serum transferrin (Tf) has great significance for gaining a deeper insight about anticancer activities of fulvic acid. In this study, the mechanism of interaction between fulvic acid and Tf, has been investigated by using fluorescence quenching, thermodynamics, synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) under physiological condition. Our results have shown that fulvic acid binds to Tf and form a new complex, and the calculated apparent association constants are 5.04 × 108 M-1, 5.48 × 107 M-1, 7.38 × 106 M-1 from the fluorescence quenching at 288 K, 298 K, and 310 K. The thermodynamic parameters indicate that hydrogen bonding and weak van der Waals are involved in the interaction between fulvic acid and Tf. The binding of fulvic acid to Tf causes the α-helix structure content of the protein to reduce, and resulting that peptide chains of Tf become more stretched. Our results have indicated a mechanism of the interaction between fulvic acid and Tf, which may provide information for possible design of methods to deliver drug molecules via transferrin to target tissues and cells effectively.

  19. Transferrin Binding to Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Activated by Phytohemagglutinin Involves a Specific Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Robert M.; Werner, Phillip; Arnaud, Philippe; Galbraith, Gillian M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Immunohistological studies have indicated that membrane sites binding transferrin are present upon activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In this study, we have investigated transferrin uptake in human lymphocytes exposed to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), by quantitative radiobinding and immunofluorescence in parallel. In stimulated lymphocytes, binding was maximal after a 30-min incubation, being greatest at 37°C, and greater at 22°C than at 4°C. Although some shedding and endocytosis of transferrin occurred at 22° and 37°C, these factors, and resulting synthesis of new sites, did not affect measurement of binding which was found to be saturable, reversible, and specific for transferrin (Ka 0.5-2.5 × 108 M−1). Binding was greater after a 48-h exposure to PHA than after 24 h, and was maximal at 66 h. Sequential Scatchard analysis revealed no significant elevation in affinity of interaction. However, although the total number of receptors increased, the proportion of cells in which binding of ligand was detected immunohistologically increased in parallel, and after appropriate correction, the cellular density of receptors remained relatively constant throughout (60,000-80,000 sites/cell). Increments in binding during the culture period were thus due predominantly to expansion of a population of cells bearing receptors. Similar differences in binding were apparent upon comparison of cells cultured in different doses of PHA, and in unstimulated cells binding was negligible. Transferrin receptors appear, therefore, to be readily detectable only upon lymphocytes that have been activated. Images PMID:6253523

  20. 21 CFR 866.5880 - Transferrin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the transferrin (an iron... transferrin levels aids in the diagnosis of malnutrition, acute inflammation, infection, and red blood cell disorders, such as iron deficiency anemia. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  1. 21 CFR 866.5880 - Transferrin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the transferrin (an iron... transferrin levels aids in the diagnosis of malnutrition, acute inflammation, infection, and red blood cell disorders, such as iron deficiency anemia. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  2. SNAP23-Dependent Surface Translocation of Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) Receptor 1 Is Essential for NOX2-Mediated Exocytotic Degranulation in Human Mast Cells Induced by Trichomonas vaginalis-Secreted LTB4.

    PubMed

    Min, Arim; Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; El-Benna, Jamel; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2017-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted parasite that causes vaginitis in women and itself secretes lipid mediator leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Mast cells are important effector cells of tissue inflammation during infection with parasites. Membrane-bridging SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) complexes are critical for fusion during exocytosis. Although T. vaginalis-derived secretory products (TvSP) have been shown to induce exocytosis in mast cells, information regarding the signaling mechanisms between mast cell activation and TvSP is limited. In this study, we found that SNAP23-dependent surface trafficking of LTB4 receptor 1 (BLT1) is required for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2)-mediated exocytotic degranulation of mast cells induced by TvSP. First, stimulation with TvSP induced exocytotic degranulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in HMC-1 cells. Next, TvSP-induced ROS generation and exocytosis were strongly inhibited by transfection of BLT1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). TvSP induced trafficking of BLT1 from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. We also found that knockdown of SNAP23 abrogated TvSP-induced ROS generation, exocytosis, and surface trafficking of BLT1 in HMC-1 cells. By coimmunoprecipitation, there was a physical interaction between BLT1 and SNAP23 in TvSP-stimulated HMC-1 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that SNAP23-dependent surface trafficking of BLT1 is essential for exocytosis in human mast cells induced by T. vaginalis-secreted LTB4 Our data collectively demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism for SNAP23-dependent mast cell activation of T. vaginalis-secreted LTB4 involving surface trafficking of BLT1. These results can help to explain how the cross talk mechanism between parasite and host can govern deliberately tissue inflammatory responses.

  3. Transferrin receptor facilitates TGF-β and BMP signaling activation to control craniofacial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lei, R; Zhang, K; Liu, K; Shao, X; Ding, Z; Wang, F; Hong, Y; Zhu, M; Li, H; Li, H

    2016-01-01

    The Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS), consisting of cleft palate, glossoptosis and micrognathia, is a common human birth defect. However, how this abnormality occurs remains largely unknown. Here we report that neural crest cell (NCC)-specific knockout of transferrin receptor (Tfrc), a well known transferrin transporter protein, caused micrognathia, cleft palate, severe respiratory distress and inability to suckle in mice, which highly resemble human PRS. Histological and anatomical analysis revealed that the cleft palate is due to the failure of palatal shelves elevation that resulted from a retarded extension of Meckel's cartilage. Interestingly, Tfrc deletion dramatically suppressed both transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in cranial NCCs-derived mandibular tissues, suggesting that Tfrc may act as a facilitator of these two signaling pathways during craniofacial morphogenesis. Together, our study uncovers an unknown function of Tfrc in craniofacial development and provides novel insight into the etiology of PRS. PMID:27362800

  4. Comparison of the interactions of transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor 2 with transferrin and the hereditary hemochromatosis protein HFE.

    PubMed

    West, A P; Bennett, M J; Sellers, V M; Andrews, N C; Enns, C A; Bjorkman, P J

    2000-12-08

    The transferrin receptor (TfR) interacts with two proteins important for iron metabolism, transferrin (Tf) and HFE, the protein mutated in hereditary hemochromatosis. A second receptor for Tf, TfR2, was recently identified and found to be functional for iron uptake in transfected cells (Kawabata, H., Germain, R. S., Vuong, P. T., Nakamaki, T., Said, J. W., and Koeffler, H. P. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 16618-16625). TfR2 has a pattern of expression and regulation that is distinct from TfR, and mutations in TfR2 have been recognized as the cause of a non-HFE linked form of hemochromatosis (Camaschella, C., Roetto, A., Cali, A., De Gobbi, M., Garozzo, G., Carella, M., Majorano, N., Totaro, A., and Gasparini, P. (2000) Nat. Genet. 25, 14-15). To investigate the relationship between TfR, TfR2, Tf, and HFE, we performed a series of binding experiments using soluble forms of these proteins. We find no detectable binding between TfR2 and HFE by co-immunoprecipitation or using a surface plasmon resonance-based assay. The affinity of TfR2 for iron-loaded Tf was determined to be 27 nm, 25-fold lower than the affinity of TfR for Tf. These results imply that HFE regulates Tf-mediated iron uptake only from the classical TfR and that TfR2 does not compete for HFE binding in cells expressing both forms of TfR.

  5. Iron uptake from plasma transferrin by a transferrin receptor 2 mutant mouse model of haemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Anita C.G.; Delima, Roheeth D.; Morgan, Evan H.; Herbison, Carly E.; Tirnitz-Parker, Janina E.E.; Graham, Ross M.; Fleming, Robert E.; Britton, Robert S.; Bacon, Bruce R.; Olynyk, John K.; Trinder, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Hereditary haemochromatosis type 3 is caused by mutations in transferrin receptor (TFR) 2. TFR2 has been shown to mediate iron transport in vitro and regulate iron homeostasis. The aim of this study was to determine the role of Tfr2 in iron transport in vivo using a Tfr2 mutant mouse. Methods Tfr2 mutant and wild-type mice were injected intravenously with 59Fe-transferrin and tissue 59Fe uptake was measured. Tfr1, Tfr2 and ferroportin expression was measured by real-time PCR and Western blot. Cellular localisation of ferroportin was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Transferrin-bound iron uptake by the liver and spleen in Tfr2 mutant mice was reduced by 20% and 65%, respectively, whilst duodenal and renal uptake was unchanged compared with iron-loaded wild-type mice. In Tfr2 mutant mice, liver Tfr2 protein was absent, whilst ferroportin protein was increased in non-parenchymal cells and there was a low level of expression in hepatocytes. Tfr1 expression was unchanged compared with iron-loaded wild-type mice. Splenic Tfr2 protein expression was absent whilst Tfr1 and ferroportin protein expression was increased in Tfr2 mutant mice compared with iron-loaded wild-type mice. Conclusions A small reduction in hepatic transferrin-bound iron uptake in Tfr2 mutant mice suggests that Tfr2 plays a minor role in liver iron transport and its primary role is to regulate iron metabolism. Increased ferroportin expression due to decreased hepcidin mRNA levels is likely to be responsible for impaired splenic iron uptake in Tfr2 mutant mice. PMID:20133002

  6. Endosomal recycling regulates Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1/Tumor Endothelial Marker 8-dependent cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jingsheng; Faundez, Victor; Werner, Erica

    2010-07-15

    Mechanisms for receptor-mediated anthrax toxin internalization and delivery to the cytosol are well understood. However, far less is known about the fate followed by anthrax toxin receptors prior and after cell exposure to the toxin. We report that Anthrax Toxin Receptor 1/Tumor Endothelial Marker 8 (TEM8) localized at steady state in Rab11a-positive and transferrin receptor-containing recycling endosomes. TEM8 followed a slow constitutive recycling route of approximately 30min as determined by pulsed surface biotinylation and chase experiments. A Rab11a dominant negative mutant and Myosin Vb tail expression impaired TEM8 recycling by sequestering TEM8 in intracellular compartments. Sequestration of TEM8 in intracellular compartments with monensin coincided with increased TEM8 association with a multi-protein complex isolated with antibodies against transferrin receptor. Addition of the cell-binding component of anthrax toxin, Protective Antigen, reduced TEM8 half-life from 7 to 3 hours, without preventing receptor recycling. Pharmacological and molecular perturbation of recycling endosome function using monensin, dominant negative Rab11a, or myosin Vb tail, reduced PA binding efficiency and TEM8-dependent cell spreading on PA-coated surfaces without affecting toxin delivery to the cytosol. These results indicate that the intracellular fate of TEM8 differentially affect its cell adhesion and cell intoxication functions.

  7. Transferrin receptor-targeted theranostic gold nanoparticles for photosensitizer delivery in brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Suraj; Novak, Thomas; Miller, Kayla; Zhu, Yun; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is not only inefficient, but also nonspecific to brain stroma. These are major limitations in the effective treatment of brain cancer. Transferrin peptide (Tfpep) targeted gold nanoparticles (Tfpep-Au NPs) loaded with the photodynamic pro-drug, Pc 4, have been designed and compared with untargeted Au NPs for delivery of the photosensitizer to brain cancer cell lines. In vitro studies of human glioma cancer lines (LN229 and U87) overexpressing the transferrin receptor (TfR) show a significant increase in cellular uptake for targeted conjugates as compared to untargeted particles. Pc 4 delivered from Tfpep-Au NPs clusters within vesicles after targeting with the Tfpep. Pc 4 continues to accumulate over a 4 hour period. Our work suggests that TfR-targeted Au NPs may have important therapeutic implications for delivering brain tumor therapies and/or providing a platform for noninvasive imaging.

  8. Structure of diferric hen serum transferrin at 2.8 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Guha Thakurta, Piyali; Choudhury, Debi; Dasgupta, Rakhi; Dattagupta, J K

    2003-10-01

    Hen serum transferrin in its diferric form (hST) has been isolated, purified and the three-dimensional structure determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.8 A resolution. The final refined structure of hST, comprising 5232 protein atoms, two Fe(3+) cations, two CO(3)(2-) anions, 54 water molecules and one fucose moiety, has an R factor of 21.5% and an R(free) of 26.9% for all data. The structure has been compared with the three-dimensional structure of hen ovotransferrin (hOT) and also with structures of some other transferrins, viz. rabbit serum transferrin (rST) and human lactoferrin (hLF). The overall conformation of the hST molecule is essentially the same as that of other transferrins. However, the relative orientation of the two lobes, which is related to the species-specific receptor-recognition property of transferrins, has been found to be different in hST from that in hOT, rST and hLF. On the basis of superposition of the N lobes, rotations of 5.8, 16.9 and 11.3 degrees are required to bring the C lobes of hOT, rST and hLF, respectively, into coincidence with that of hST. A number of additional hydrogen bonds between the two domains in the N and C lobes have been identified in the structure of hST compared with that of hOT, which indicate a greater compactness of the lobes of hST than those of hOT. Being products of the same gene, hST and hOT have 100% sequence identity and differ only in the attached carbohydrate moiety. On the other hand, despite having similar functions, hST and rST have only 51% sequence similarity. However, the nature of the interdomain interactions of hST are closer to rST than to hOT. A putative carbohydrate-binding site has been identified in the N lobe of hST at Asn52 and a fucose molecule could be modelled at the site. The variations in interdomain and interlobe interactions in hST, together with altered lobe orientation with respect to hOT, rST and hLF, which are the representatives of the other subfamily of transferrins, are

  9. Evolutionary diversification of the vertebrate transferrin multi-gene family.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Austin L; Friedman, Robert

    2014-11-01

    In a phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate transferrins (TFs), six major clades (subfamilies) were identified: (a) S, the mammalian serotransferrins; (b) ICA, the mammalian inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase (ICA) homologs; (c) L, the mammalian lactoferrins; (d) O, the ovotransferrins of birds and reptiles; (e) M, the melanotransferrins of bony fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals; and (f) M-like, a newly identified TF subfamily found in bony fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. A phylogenetic tree based on the joint alignment of N-lobes and C-lobes supported the hypothesis that three separate events of internal duplication occurred in vertebrate TFs: (a) in the common ancestor of the M subfamily, (b) in the common ancestor of the M-like subfamily, and (c) in the common ancestor of other vertebrate TFs. The S, ICA, and L subfamilies were found only in placental mammals, and the phylogenetic analysis supported the hypothesis that these three subfamilies arose by gene duplication after the divergence of placental mammals from marsupials. The M-like subfamily was unusual in several respects, including the presence of a uniquely high proportion of clade-specific conserved residues, including distinctive but conserved residues in the sites homologous to those functioning in carbonate binding of human serotransferrin. The M-like family also showed an unusually high proportion of cationic residues in the positively charged region corresponding to human lactoferrampin, suggesting a distinctive role of this region in the M-like subfamily, perhaps in antimicrobial defense.

  10. Evolutionary Diversification of the Vertebrate Transferrin Multi-gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Austin L.; Friedman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In a phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate transferrins (TFs), six major clades (subfamilies) were identified: (1) S, the mammalian serotransferrins; (2) ICA, the mammalian inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase (ICA) homologs; (3) L, the mammalian lactoferrins; (4) O, the ovotransferrins of birds and reptiles; (4) M, the melanotransferrins of bony fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals; and (5) M-like, a newly identified TF subfamily found in bony fishes, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. A phylogenetic tree based on the joint alignment of N-lobes and C-lobes supported the hypothesis that three separate events of internal duplication occurred in vertebrate TFs: (1) in the common ancestor of the M subfamily; (2) in the common ancestor of the M-like subfamily; and (3) in the common ancestor of other vertebrate TFs. The S, ICA, and L subfamilies were found only in placental mammals, and the phylogenetic analysis supported the hypothesis that these three subfamilies arose by gene duplication after the divergence of placental mammals from marsupials. The M-like subfamily was unusual in several respects, including the presence of a uniquely high proportion of clade-specific conserved residues, including distinctive but conserved residues in the sites homologous to those functioning in carbonate binding of human serotransferrin. The M-like family also showed a unusually high proportion of cationic residues in the positively charged region corresponding to human lactoferrampin, suggesting a distinctive role of this region in the M-like subfamily, perhaps in antimicrobial defense. PMID:25142446

  11. Transferrin is required for early T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Macedo, M Fatima; de Sousa, Maria; Ned, Renee M; Mascarenhas, Claudia; Andrews, Nancy C; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2004-08-01

    Transferrin, the major plasma iron carrier, mediates iron entry into cells through interaction with its receptor. Several in vitro studies have demonstrated that transferrin plays an essential role in lymphocyte division, a role attributed to its iron transport function. In the present study we used hypotransferrinaemic (Trf(hpx/hpx)) mice to investigate the possible involvement of transferrin in T lymphocyte differentiation in vivo. The absolute number of thymocytes was substantially reduced in Trf(hpx/hpx) mice, a result that could not be attributed to increased apoptosis. Moreover, the proportions of the four major thymic subpopulations were maintained and the percentage of dividing cells was not reduced. A leaky block in the differentiation of CD4(-) CD8(-) CD3(-) CD44(-) CD25(+) (TN3) into CD4(-) CD8(-) CD3(-) CD44(-) CD25(-) (TN4) cells was observed. In addition, a similar impairment of early thymocyte differentiation was observed in mice with reduced levels of transferrin receptor. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that transferrin itself or a pathway triggered by the interaction of transferrin with its receptor is essential for normal early T-cell differentiation in vivo.

  12. Serum transferrin receptors in detection of iron deficiency in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rusia, U; Flowers, C; Madan, N; Agarwal, N; Sood, S K; Sikka, M

    1999-08-01

    A prospective hospital-based study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of serum transferrin receptors in the detection of iron deficiency in pregnant women. The iron status of 100 pregnant women with single uncomplicated term pregnancies in the first stage of labor was established using standard laboratory measures. These included complete hemogram, red cell indices, serum iron, percent transferrin saturation, and serum ferritin. In addition, serum transferrin receptor (STFR) was estimated. The results of 81 women with complete laboratory profiles were analyzed. Thirty-five (43.2%) women were anemic (hemoglobin <11 g/dl). Hemoglobin (Hb) showed a significant correlation with MCH, MCHC, serum iron, and percent transferrin saturation, suggesting that the anemia was likely to be due to iron deficiency. The mean STFR level was 18.05+/-9.9 mg/l in the anemic women and was significantly raised (p<0.001) compared with that of the nonanemic women. STFR correlated significantly with Hb (p<0.001), MCH (p<0.05), MCHC (p<0.01), serum iron (p<0.01), and percent transferrin saturation (p<0.01) and also showed a highly significant correlation with the degree of anemia. Serum ferritin in these women did not correlate with Hb, and only 54.4% of the women had levels <12 ng/ml, which does not reflect the true prevalence of iron deficiency. Serum transferrin receptor estimation is thus a useful measure for detecting iron deficiency in pregnancy.

  13. Transferrin receptor targeted PLA-TPGS micelles improved efficacy and safety in docetaxel delivery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul Pratap; Sharma, Gunjan; Sonali; Agrawal, Poornima; Pandey, Bajarangprasad L; Koch, Biplob; Muthu, Madaswamy S

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to develop targeted polymeric micelles of poly-lactic acid-D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (PLA-TPGS), which are assembled along with D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-transferrin conjugate (TPGS-Tf), and loaded docetaxel (DTX) as a model drug for enhanced treatment of lung cancer in comparison to non-targeted polymeric micelles and DTX injection (Docel™). A549 human lung cancer cells were employed as an in vitro model to access cytotoxicity study of the DTX loaded polymeric micelles. The safety of DTX formulations were studied by the measurement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and total protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of rats after the treatments. The IC50 values demonstrated that the non-targeted and transferrin receptor targeted polymeric micelles could be 7 and 70 folds more effective than Docel™ after 24 h treatment with the A549 cells. Results suggested that transferrin receptor targeted polymeric micelles have showed better efficacy and safety than the non-targeted polymeric micelles and Docel™.

  14. Standardisation and use of the alcohol biomarker carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT).

    PubMed

    Helander, Anders; Wielders, Jos; Anton, Raymond; Arndt, Torsten; Bianchi, Vincenza; Deenmamode, Jean; Jeppsson, Jan-Olof; Whitfield, John B; Weykamp, Cas; Schellenberg, François

    2016-08-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) is a glycoform profile of serum transferrin that increases in response to sustained high alcohol intake and over the last decades has become an important alcohol biomarker with clinical and forensic applications. However, the wide range of CDT measurement procedures has resulted in lack of uniform results and reference limits, and hampered comparison of results. In 2005, the IFCC therefore founded a special working group (WG) aiming for standardisation of CDT measurement. This review summarises the history of CDT and the actions taken by the WG-CDT. Initial steps included the definition of the measurand (serum disialotransferrin to total transferrin fraction expressed in %), and the determination of a well-defined anion-exchange HPLC procedure as the candidate reference measurement procedure (cRMP). Subsequent achievements were the establishment of a network of reference laboratories to perform the cRMP, setting a reference interval, and development of a reference material based on human serum for which the laboratory network assign values. Using a set of reference materials for calibration allowed for achieving equivalence of results of all present CDT measurement procedures. The final steps of the WG-CDT have been a full validation of the cRMP to make it an IFCC approved RMP, and providing guidance for international standardisation of all CDT measurement procedures.

  15. Reprint of Standardisation and use of the alcohol biomarker carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT).

    PubMed

    Helander, Anders; Wielders, Jos; Anton, Raymond; Arndt, Torsten; Bianchi, Vincenza; Deenmamode, Jean; Jeppsson, Jan-Olof; Whitfield, John B; Weykamp, Cas; Schellenberg, François

    2017-03-18

    Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) is a glycoform profile of serum transferrin that increases in response to sustained high alcohol intake and over the last decades has become an important alcohol biomarker with clinical and forensic applications. However, the wide range of CDT measurement procedures has resulted in lack of uniform results and reference limits, and hampered comparison of results. In 2005, the IFCC therefore founded a special working group (WG) aiming for standardisation of CDT measurement. This review summarises the history of CDT and the actions taken by the WG-CDT. Initial steps included the definition of the measurand (serum disialotransferrin to total transferrin fraction expressed in %), and the determination of a well-defined anion-exchange HPLC procedure as the candidate reference measurement procedure (cRMP). Subsequent achievements were the establishment of a network of reference laboratories to perform the cRMP, setting a reference interval, and development of a reference material based on human serum for which the laboratory network assign values. Using a set of reference materials for calibration allowed for achieving equivalence of results of all present CDT measurement procedures. The final steps of the WG-CDT have been a full validation of the cRMP to make it an IFCC approved RMP, and providing guidance for international standardisation of all CDT measurement procedures.

  16. Transferrin-modified nanostructured lipid carriers as multifunctional nanomedicine for codelivery of DNA and doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yiqun; Zhang, Ying; Li, Danni; Chen, Yuanyuan; Sun, Jiping; Kong, Fansheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC), composed of solid and liquid lipids, and surfactants are potentially good colloidal drug carriers. The aim of this study was to develop surface-modified NLC as multifunctional nanomedicine for codelivery of enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid (pEGFP) and doxorubicin (DOX). Methods Two different nanocarriers: pEGFP- and DOX-loaded NLC, and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) were prepared. Transferrin-containing ligands were used for the surface coating of the vectors. Their average size, zeta potential, and drug encapsulation capacity were evaluated. In vitro transfection efficiency of the modified vectors was evaluated in human alveolar adenocarcinoma cell line (A549 cells), and in vivo transfection efficiency of the modified vectors was evaluated in a mouse bearing A549 cells model. Results Transferrin-modified DOX and pEGFP coencapsulated NLC (T-NLC) has a particle size of 198 nm and a +19 mV surface charge. The in vitro cell viabilities of the T-NLC formulations were over 80% compared with the control. T-NLC displayed remarkably greater gene transfection efficiency and enhanced antitumor activity than DOX- and pEGFP-coencapsulated SLN in vivo. Conclusion The results demonstrate that T-NLC noticeably enhanced antitumor activity through the combination of gene therapy with chemotherapy. Also coating of active transferrin improved the lung cancer cell-targeting of the carriers. In summary, the novel gene and drug delivery system offers a promising strategy for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:25187713

  17. Nonenzymatic glycation of transferrin: decrease of iron-binding capacity and increase of oxygen radical production.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, S; Kawakami, N; Ohara, A

    1995-03-01

    The total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) and iron contents of diabetic rat serum, as well as the iron-binding capacity of glycated transferrin and oxygen radical production by the glycated proteins were examined. The TIBC and iron content of diabetic rat sera were found to be much lower than those of control rat sera. Incubation of human serum with glucose in vitro resulted in a significant fall of its unsaturated iron-binding capacity (UIBC) with time. When apotransferrin was incubated with glucose, its UIBC significantly decreased. The iron content of holotransferrin was markedly reduced by incubation with bathophenanthroline sulphonic acid (BPSA) in the presence of glucose, although the content was not altered by incubation with BPSA alone. The generation of superoxide radical (O2-) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) by the glycated holotransferrin was much greater than that by glycated apotransferrin. Glycated holotransferrin showed significantly accelerated hydroxyl radical production by the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system, while intact holotransferrin did not. Treatment of holotransferrin with glucose caused the fragmentation of the protein, while the same treatment of apotransferrin did not. These results suggest that iron ions in the glycated transferrin molecule are bound loosely to the protein and are redox-active and the glycated holotransferrin produces oxygen radicals including O2- and OH. efficiently, and that the glycated transferrin does not function as an iron-binding protein.

  18. Desialation of transferrin by rat liver endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Irie, S; Kishimoto, T; Tavassoli, M

    1988-01-01

    To examine the role of liver endothelium in desialation of transferrin (TF), pulse-chase studies were done by incubation of either 3H (sialic acid labeled)-, or 125I, or 59Fe (protein core labeled)-TF with fractionated liver endothelium. While 125I or 59Fe labels were externalized after initial binding and internalization, a large proportion of 3H label was internalized and remained within the cell. When the supernatant of these experiments was studied by isoelectricfocusing and Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA120) affinity chromatography, generation of asialotransferrin was noted by both techniques. Incubation of liver endothelium with double-labeled TF (sialic acids with 3H and protein core with 125I or 59Fe) led initially to a concordant uptake of the two labels, which were then dissociated and 3H was retained by the cell. These findings indicate desialation of TF by liver endothelium. The significance of these findings in the pathogenesis of hepatic siderosis is discussed. PMID:3165384

  19. A novel control of human keratin expression: cannabinoid receptor 1-mediated signaling down-regulates the expression of keratins K6 and K16 in human keratinocytes in vitro and in situ

    PubMed Central

    Zákány, Nóra; Tóth, Balázs I.; Bíró, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors (CB) are expressed throughout human skin epithelium. CB1 activation inhibits human hair growth and decreases proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. Since psoriasis is a chronic hyperproliferative, inflammatory skin disease, it is conceivable that the therapeutic modulation of CB signaling, which can inhibit both proliferation and inflammation, could win a place in future psoriasis management. Given that psoriasis is characterized by up-regulation of keratins K6 and K16, we have investigated whether CB1 stimulation modulates their expression in human epidermis. Treatment of organ-cultured human skin with the CB1-specific agonist, arachidonoyl-chloro-ethanolamide (ACEA), decreased K6 and K16 staining intensity in situ. At the gene and protein levels, ACEA also decreased K6 expression of cultured HaCaT keratinocytes, which show some similarities to psoriatic keratinocytes. These effects were partly antagonized by the CB1-specific antagonist, AM251. While CB1-mediated signaling also significantly inhibited human epidermal keratinocyte proliferation in situ, as shown by K6/Ki-67-double immunofluorescence, the inhibitory effect of ACEA on K6 expression in situ was independent of its anti-proliferative effect. Given recent appreciation of the role of K6 as a functionally important protein that regulates epithelial wound healing in mice, it is conceivable that the novel CB1-mediated regulation of keratin 6/16 revealed here also is relevant to wound healing. Taken together, our results suggest that cannabinoids and their receptors constitute a novel, clinically relevant control element of human K6 and K16 expression. PMID:23638377

  20. Siderophilin metal coordination. 1. Complexation of thorium by transferrin: structure-function implications

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Wesley R.; Carrano, Carl J.; Pecoraro, Vincent L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    1981-05-01

    As part of a program to develop actinide-specific sequestering agents, the coordination of actinide ions by human transferrin is being investigated. Therapeutically useful synthetic ligands must be able to compete with this iron-transport protein for the bound actinide ion. As in the Fe(III) complex of the native protein, two Th(IV) ions bind at pH 7. This coordination has been monitored at several pH values by using difference ultraviolet spectroscopy. The corresponding coordination of a phenolic ligand, ethylene-bis-(o-hydroxyphenylglycine) [EHPG], has been used to determine {Delta}{epsilon} for a tyrosyl group coordinated to Th(IV), in contrast to the common practice of assuming the {Delta}{epsilon} for protons and all metal ions is the same. This in turn is used to determine, from the observed {Delta}{epsilon} upon protein coordination, the number of transferrin tyrosine residues that coordinate. Maxima in the Th(IV) + EHPG difference UV spectra occur at 292 and 238 nm, with corresponding {Delta}{epsilon} values per phenolic group of 2330 and 8680 cm{sup -1} M{sup -1}, respectively. At pH 7.2, the Th(IV) transferrin spectrum is closely similar to the TH(IV) EHPG spectrum, with maxima at 292 and 240 nm. The {Delta}{epsilon} at 240 nm reaches a maximum of 24700 cm{sup -1} M{sup -1}, which corresponds to coordination of three tyrosine residues in the dithorium-transferrin complex; the stronger binding site (“A” or C-terminal) coordinates via two tyrosines and the weaker (“B” or N-terminal) via one. There is evidence suggesting that the N-terminal site is slightly smaller than the C-terminal site; while Th(IV) easily fits into the C-terminal site, the large ionic radius of Th(IV) makes this ion of borderline size to fit into the N-terminal site. This may be an important biological difference between Th(IV) and the slightly smaller Pu(IV), which should easily fit into both sites. At pH values below 7, the complexation of Th(IV) by transferrin decreases

  1. Development and Evaluation of Transferrin-Stabilized Paclitaxel Nanocrystal Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ying; Wang, Zhao-hui; Li, Tonglei; McNally, Helen; Park, Kinam; Sturek, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare and evaluate a paclitaxel nanocrystal-based formulation stabilized by serum protein transferrin in a non-covalent manner. The pure paclitaxel nanocrystals were first prepared using an antisolvent precipitation method augmented by sonication. The serum protein transferrin was selected for use after evaluating the stabilizing effect of several serum proteins including albumin and immunoglobulin G. The formulation contained approximately 55~60% drug and was stable for at least 3 months at 4 °C. In vivo antitumor efficacy studies using mice inoculated with KB cells demonstrate significantly higher tumor inhibition rate of 45.1% for paclitaxel-transferrin formulation compared to 28.8% for paclitaxel nanosuspension treatment alone. Interestingly, the Taxol® formulation showed higher antitumor activity than the paclitaxel-transferrin formulation, achieving a 93.3% tumor inhibition rate 12 days post initial dosing. However, the paclitaxel-transferrin formulation showed a lower level of toxicity, which is indicated by steady increase in body weight of mice over the treatment period. In comparison, treatment with Taxol® resulted in toxicity issues as body weight decreased. These results suggest the potential benefit of using a serum protein in a non-covalent manner in conjunction with paclitaxel nanocrystals as a promising drug delivery model for anticancer therapy. PMID:24378441

  2. Phorbol diesters and transferrin modulate lymphoblastoid cell transferrin receptor expression by two different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Alcantara, O.; Phillips, J.L.; Boldt, D.H.

    1986-12-01

    Expression of transferrin receptors (TfR) by activated lymphocytes is necessary for lymphocyte DNA synthesis and proliferation. Regulation of TfR expression, therefore, is a mechanism by which the lymphocyte's proliferative potential may be directed and controlled. The authors studied mechanisms by which lymphoblastoid cells modulate TfR expression during treatment with phorbol diesters or iron transferrin (FeTf), agents which cause downregulation of cell surface TfR. Phorbol diester-induced TfR downregulation occurred rapidly, being detectable at 2 min and reaching maximal decreases of 50% by 15 min. It was inhibited by cold but not by agents that destabilize cytoskeletal elements. Furthermore, this downregulation was reversed rapidly by washing or by treatment with the membrane interactive agent, chlorpromazine. In contrast, FeTf-induced TfR downregulation occurred slowly. Decreased expression of TfR was detectable only after 15 min and maximal downregulation was achieved after 60 min. Although FeTf-induced downregulation also was inhibited by cold, it was inhibited in addition by a group of microtubule destabilizing agents (colchicine, vinblastine, podophyllotoxin) or cytochalasin B, a microfilament inhibitor. Furthermore, FeTf-induced downregulation was not reversed readily by washing or by treatment with chlorpromazine. Phorbol diesters cause TfR downregulation by a cytoskeleton-independent mechanism. These data indicate that TfR expression is regulated by two independent mechanisms in lymphoblastoid cells, and they provide the possibility that downregulation of TfR by different mechanisms may result in different effects in these cells.

  3. Biological variability of transferrin saturation and unsaturated iron binding capacity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, PC; Reboussin, DM; Press, RD; Barton, JC; Acton, RT; Moses, GC; Leiendecker-Foster, C; McLaren, GD; Dawkins, FW; Gordeuk, VR; Lovato, L; Eckfeldt, JH

    2007-01-01

    Background Transferrin saturation is widely considered the preferred screening test for hemochromatosis. Unsaturated iron binding capacity has similar performance at lower cost. However, the within-person biological variability of both these tests may limit their ability at commonly used cut points to detect HFE C282Y homozygous patients. Methods The Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study screened 101,168 primary care participants for iron overload using tansferrin saturation, unsaturated iron binding capacity, ferritin and HFE C282Y and H63D genotyping. Transferrin saturation and unsaturated iron binding capacity were performed at initial screening and again when selected participants and controls returned for a clinical examination several months later. A missed case was defined as a C282Y homozygote who had transferrin saturation below cut point (45 % women, 50 % men) or unsaturated iron binding capacity above cut point (150 μmol/L women, 125 μmol/L men) at either the initial screening or clinical examination, or both, regardless of serum ferritin. Results There were 209 C282Y previously undiagnosed homozygotes with transferrin saturation and unsaturated iron binding capacity testing done at initial screening and clinical examination. Sixty-eight C282Y homozygotes (33%) would have been missed at these transferrin saturation cut points (19 men, 49 women, median SF 170 μg/L, first and third quartiles 50 and 474 μg/L), and 58 homozygotes (28 %) would have been missed at the unsaturated iron binding capacity cut points (20 men, 38 women, median SF 168 μg/L, quartiles 38 and 454 μg/L). There was no advantage to using fasting samples. Conclusions The within-person biological variability of transferrin saturation and unsaturated iron binding capacity limit their usefulness as an initial screening test for expressing C282Y homozygotes. PMID:17976429

  4. Elucidation of the Mechanism by Which Catecholamine Stress Hormones Liberate Iron from the Innate Immune Defense Proteins Transferrin and Lactoferrin ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sandrini, Sara M.; Shergill, Raminder; Woodward, Jonathan; Muralikuttan, Remya; Haigh, Richard D.; Lyte, Mark; Freestone, Primrose P.

    2010-01-01

    The ability of catecholamine stress hormones and inotropes to stimulate the growth of infectious bacteria is now well established. A major element of the growth induction process has been shown to involve the catecholamines binding to the high-affinity ferric-iron-binding proteins transferrin (Tf) and lactoferrin, which then enables bacterial acquisition of normally inaccessible sequestered host iron. The nature of the mechanism(s) by which the stress hormones perturb iron binding of these key innate immune defense proteins has not been fully elucidated. The present study employed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemical iron-binding analyses to demonstrate that catecholamine stress hormones form direct complexes with the ferric iron within transferrin and lactoferrin. Moreover, these complexes were shown to result in the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) and the loss of protein-complexed iron. The use of bacterial ferric iron uptake mutants further showed that both the Fe(II) and Fe(III) released from the Tf could be directly used as bacterial nutrient sources. We also analyzed the transferrin-catecholamine interactions in human serum and found that therapeutically relevant concentrations of stress hormones and inotropes could directly affect the iron binding of serum-transferrin so that the normally highly bacteriostatic tissue fluid became significantly more supportive of the growth of bacteria. The relevance of these catecholamine-transferrin/lactoferrin interactions to the infectious disease process is considered. PMID:19820086

  5. Soluble transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index in iron deficiency anemia and anemia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Margetic, Sandra; Topic, Elizabeta; Ruzic, Dragica Ferenec; Kvaternik, Marina

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical efficiency of soluble transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/logF) in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as the differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and anemia in rheumatoid arthritis. The study included 96 patients with anemia and 61 healthy volunteers as a control group. In healthy subjects there were no significant sex and age differences in the parameters tested. The study results showed these parameters to be reliable in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as in the differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. The results indicate that sTfR/logF could be used to help differentiate coexisting iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed a higher discriminating power of transferrin receptor-ferritin index vs. soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as in the differential diagnosis between iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. In patients with anemia in rheumatoid arthritis, the parameters tested showed no significant differences with respect to C-reactive protein concentration. These results suggested that the parameters tested are not affected by acute or chronic inflammatory disease.

  6. Transferrin receptors in rat brain: neuropeptide-like pattern and relationship to iron distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J M; Ruff, M R; Weber, R J; Pert, C B

    1985-01-01

    We have characterized and visualized the binding of 125I-labeled transferrin to sections of rat brain. This saturable, reversible, high-affinity (Kd = 1 X 10(-9) M) binding site appears indistinguishable from transferrin receptors previously characterized in other tissues. Moreover, a monoclonal antibody raised to rat lymphocyte transferrin receptors could immunoprecipitate recovered intact transferrin solubilized from labeled brain slices, indicating that labeling was to the same molecular entity previously characterized as the transferrin receptor. The pattern of transferrin receptor distribution visualized in brain with both 125I-labeled transferrin and an anti-transferrin receptor monoclonal antibody are almost indistinguishable but differ from the pattern of iron distribution. Iron-rich brain areas generally receive neuronal projections from areas with abundant transferrin receptors, suggesting that iron may be transported neuronally. However, many brain areas with a high density of transferrin receptors appear unrelated to iron uptake and neuronal transport and form a receptor distribution pattern similar to that of other known neuropeptides. This "neuropeptide-like" distribution pattern suggests that transferrin may have neuromodulatory, perhaps behavioral, function in brain. Images PMID:2989832

  7. Patterns of structural and sequence variation within isotype lineages of the Neisseria meningitidis transferrin receptor system

    PubMed Central

    Adamiak, Paul; Calmettes, Charles; Moraes, Trevor F; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis inhabits the human upper respiratory tract and is an important cause of sepsis and meningitis. A surface receptor comprised of transferrin-binding proteins A and B (TbpA and TbpB), is responsible for acquiring iron from host transferrin. Sequence and immunological diversity divides TbpBs into two distinct lineages; isotype I and isotype II. Two representative isotype I and II strains, B16B6 and M982, differ in their dependence on TbpB for in vitro growth on exogenous transferrin. The crystal structure of TbpB and a structural model for TbpA from the representative isotype I N. meningitidis strain B16B6 were obtained. The structures were integrated with a comprehensive analysis of the sequence diversity of these proteins to probe for potential functional differences. A distinct isotype I TbpA was identified that co-varied with TbpB and lacked sequence in the region for the loop 3 α-helix that is proposed to be involved in iron removal from transferrin. The tightly associated isotype I TbpBs had a distinct anchor peptide region, a distinct, smaller linker region between the lobes and lacked the large loops in the isotype II C-lobe. Sequences of the intact TbpB, the TbpB N-lobe, the TbpB C-lobe, and TbpA were subjected to phylogenetic analyses. The phylogenetic clustering of TbpA and the TbpB C-lobe were similar with two main branches comprising the isotype 1 and isotype 2 TbpBs, possibly suggesting an association between TbpA and the TbpB C-lobe. The intact TbpB and TbpB N-lobe had 4 main branches, one consisting of the isotype 1 TbpBs. One isotype 2 TbpB cluster appeared to consist of isotype 1 N-lobe sequences and isotype 2 C-lobe sequences, indicating the swapping of N-lobes and C-lobes. Our findings should inform future studies on the interaction between TbpB and TbpA and the process of iron acquisition. PMID:25800619

  8. Immobilization of soluble complement receptor 1 on islets.

    PubMed

    Luan, Nguyen M; Teramura, Yuji; Iwata, Hiroo

    2011-07-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans (islets) is a promising method to treat insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Control of complement activation is necessary to improve graft survival in alloislet and xenoislet transplantation. In this study, human soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) was immobilized on the islet cell surface through poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated phospholipid (PEG-lipid) without loss of islet cell viability or insulin secretion ability. sCR1 on islets effectively inhibits complement activation and protects islets against attack by xenoreactive antibodies and complement. This method will be an efficient means to control early islet loss in clinical islet transplantation and realize xenoislet transplantation in the future.

  9. Chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Ma, Yuting; Baracco, Elisa E; Sistigu, Antonella; Enot, David P; Pietrocola, Federico; Yang, Heng; Adjemian, Sandy; Chaba, Kariman; Semeraro, Michaela; Signore, Michele; De Ninno, Adele; Lucarini, Valeria; Peschiaroli, Francesca; Businaro, Luca; Gerardino, Annamaria; Manic, Gwenola; Ulas, Thomas; Günther, Patrick; Schultze, Joachim L; Kepp, Oliver; Stoll, Gautier; Lefebvre, Céline; Mulot, Claire; Castoldi, Francesca; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Ladoire, Sylvain; Apetoh, Lionel; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Lucattelli, Monica; Delarasse, Cécile; Boige, Valérie; Ducreux, Michel; Delaloge, Suzette; Borg, Christophe; André, Fabrice; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Vitale, Ilio; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-20

    Antitumor immunity driven by intratumoral dendritic cells contributes to the efficacy of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in cancer. We identified a loss-of-function allele of the gene coding for formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) that was associated with poor metastasis-free and overall survival in breast and colorectal cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The therapeutic effects of anthracyclines were abrogated in tumor-bearing Fpr1(-/-) mice due to impaired antitumor immunity. Fpr1-deficient dendritic cells failed to approach dying cancer cells and, as a result, could not elicit antitumor T cell immunity. Experiments performed in a microfluidic device confirmed that FPR1 and its ligand, annexin-1, promoted stable interactions between dying cancer cells and human or murine leukocytes. Altogether, these results highlight the importance of FPR1 in chemotherapy-induced anticancer immune responses.

  10. Control of transferrin expression by β-amyloid through the CP2 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sang-Min; Kim, Jung-Woong; Kim, Chul-Hong; An, Joo-Hee; Kang, Eun-Jin; Kim, Chul Geun; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2010-10-01

    Accumulation of β-amyloid protein (Aβ) is one of the most important pathological features of Alzheimer's disease. Although Aβ induces neurodegeneration in the cortex and hippocampus through several molecular mechanisms, few studies have evaluated the modulation of transcription factors during Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the transcriptional activity of transcription factor CP2 in neuronal damage mediated by Aβ (Aβ(1-42) and Aβ(25-35) ). An unbiased motif search of the transferrin promoter region showed that CP2 binds to the transferrin promoter, an iron-regulating protein, and regulates transferrin transcription. Ectopic expression of CP2 led to increased transferrin expression at both the mRNA and protein levels, whereas knockdown of CP2 down-regulated transferrin mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, CP2 trans-activated transcription of a transferrin reporter gene. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that CP2 binds to the transferrin promoter region. Furthermore, the binding affinity of CP2 to the transferrin promoter was regulated by Aβ, as Aβ (Aβ(1-42) and Aβ(25-35) ) markedly increased the binding affinity of CP2 for the transferrin promoter. Taken together, these results suggest that CP2 contributes to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease by inducing transferrin expression via up-regulating its transcription.

  11. Effect of transferrin saturation on internal iron exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Bergamaschi, G.; Eng, M.J.; Huebers, H.A.; Finch, C.A.

    1986-10-01

    Radioiron was introduced into the intestinal lumen to evaluate absorption, injected as nonviable red cells to evaluate reticuloendothelial (RE) processing of iron, and injected as hemoglobin to evaluate hepatocyte iron processing. Redistribution of iron through the plasma was evaluated in control animals and animals whose transferrin was saturated by iron infusion. Radioiron introduced into the lumen of the gut as ferrous sulfate and as transferrin-bound iron was absorbed about half as well in iron-infused animals, and absorbed iron was localized in the liver. The similar absorption of transferrin-bound iron suggested that absorption of ferrous iron occurred via the mucosal cell and did not enter by diffusion. The decrease in absorption was associated with an increase in mucosal iron and ferritin content produced by the iron infusion. An inverse relationship (r = -0.895) was shown between mucosal ferritin iron and absorption. When iron was injected as nonviable red cells, it was deposited predominantly in reticuloendothelial cells of the spleen. Return of this radioiron to the plasma was only 6% of that in control animals. While there was some movement of iron from spleen to liver, this could be accounted for by intravascular hemolysis. Injected hemoglobin tagged with radioiron was for the most part taken up and held by the liver. Some 13% initially localized in the marrow in iron-infused animals was shown to be storage iron unavailable for hemoglobin synthesis. These studies demonstrate the hepatic trapping of absorbed iron and the inability of either RE cell or hepatocyte to release iron in the transferrin-saturated animal.

  12. Transferrin gene frequencies in Cádiz (southern Spain).

    PubMed

    Gamero, J J; Romero, J L; Vizcaya, M A; Arufe, I

    1990-12-01

    The genetic polymorphism of transferrin (Tf) was studied in a sample of 385 healthy unrelated subjects of both sexes resident in the province of Cádiz (southern Spain). Isoelectric focusing was carried out in polyacrylamide gels, followed by staining with Coomassie Blue R250. The gene frequencies obtained were as follows: Tf C1, 0.7922; Tf C2, 0.1883; Tf C3, 0.0195.

  13. High-resolution kinetics of transferrin acidification in BALB/c 3T3 cells: exposure to pH 6 followed by temperature-sensitive alkalinization during recycling.

    PubMed

    Sipe, D M; Murphy, R F

    1987-10-01

    The kinetics of acidification of diferric human transferrin in BALB/c mouse 3T3 cells were determined by flow cytometry using a modification of the fluorescein-rhodamine fluorescence ratio technique. For cells labeled at 0 degrees C and warmed to 37 degrees C, the minimum pH observed was 6.1 +/- 0.2, occurring 5 min after warmup. This step was followed by a slower alkalinization to the pH of the external medium, occurring with a half-time of 5 min. Warmup to 24 degrees C or 17 degrees C resulted in slowing of the time of onset of acidification such that the minimum pH was 6.3 +/- 0.2, attained 15 and 25 min after warmup, respectively; the alkalinization step was completely blocked. The limited acidification observed for transferrin corresponds to the initial phase of acidification normally observed for other (nonrecycled) ligands. Since transferrin is not further acidified, the results confirm the existence of two phases of acidification during endocytosis. Measurements of transferrin dissociation at neutral pH after exposure to mildly acidic pH support the conclusion that the transferrin cycle may be completed without exposure of transferrin to a pH below 6. The mildly acidic pH of the endocytic compartments involved in recycling may play a role in regulating enzymatic processing of endocytosed material.

  14. Quantitative synchrotron X-ray fluorescence study of the penetration of transferrin-conjugated gold nanoparticles inside model tumour tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianqing; Kempson, Ivan; de Jonge, Martin; Howard, Daryl L.; Thierry, Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    The next generation of therapeutic nanoparticles in the treatment of cancer incorporate specific targeting. There is implicit importance in understanding penetration of targeted nanomedicines within tumour tissues via accurate and quantitative temporospatial measurements. In this study we demonstrate the potential of state-of-the-art synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to provide such insights. To this end, quantitative mapping of the distribution of transferrin-conjugated gold nanoparticles inside multicellular tumour spheroids was achieved using XFM and compared with qualitative data obtained using reflectance confocal microscopy. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with human transferrin with a narrow size-distribution and high binding affinity to tumour cells were prepared as confirmed by cellular uptake studies performed on 2D monolayers. Although the prepared 100 nm transferrin-conjugated gold nanoparticles had high targeting capability to cancer cells, penetration inside multicellular spheroids was limited even after 48 hours as shown by the quantitative XFM measurements. The rapid, quantitative and label-free nature of state-of-the-art synchrotron XFM make it an ideal technology to provide the structure-activity relationship understanding urgently required for developing the next generation of immuno-targeted nanomedicines.

  15. Applying the Fe(III) binding property of a chemical transferrin mimetic to Ti(IV) anticancer drug design.

    PubMed

    Parks, Timothy B; Cruz, Yahaira M; Tinoco, Arthur D

    2014-02-03

    As an endogenous serum protein binder of Ti(IV), transferrin (Tf) serves as an excellent vehicle to stabilize the hydrolysis prone metal ion and successfully transport it into cells. This transporting role is thought to be central to Ti(IV)'s anticancer function, but efforts to synthesize Ti(IV) compounds targeting transferrin have not produced a drug. Nonetheless, the Ti(IV) transferrin complex (Ti2Tf) greatly informs on a new Ti(IV)-based anticancer drug design strategy. Ti2Tf interferes with cellular uptake of Fe(III), which is particularly detrimental to cancer cells because of their higher requirement for iron. Ti(IV) compounds of chemical transferrin mimetic (cTfm) ligands were designed to facilitate Ti(IV) activity by attenuating Fe(III) intracellular levels. In having a higher affinity for Fe(III) than Ti(IV), these ligands feature the appropriate balance between stability and lability to effectively transport Ti(IV) into cancer cells, release Ti(IV) via displacement by Fe(III), and deplete the intracellular Fe(III) levels. The cTfm ligand N,N'-di(o-hydroxybenzyl)ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (HBED) was selected to explore the feasibility of the design strategy. Kinetic studies on the Fe(III) displacement process revealed that Ti(IV) can be transported and released into cells by HBED on a physiologically relevant time scale. Cell viability studies using A549 cancerous and MRC5 normal human lung cells and testing the cytotoxicity of HBED and its Ti(IV), Fe(III), and Ga(III) compounds demonstrate the importance of Fe(III) depletion in the proposed drug design strategy and the specificity of the strategy for Ti(IV) activity. The readily derivatized cTfm ligands demonstrate great promise for improved Ti(IV) anticancer drugs.

  16. Iron piracy: acquisition of transferrin-bound iron by bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, C N; Sparling, P F

    1994-12-01

    The mechanism of iron utilization from transferrin has been most extensively characterized in the pathogenic Neisseria species and Haemophilus species. Two transferrin-binding proteins, Tbp1 and Tbp2, have been identified in these pathogens and are thought to be components of the transferrin receptor. Tbp1 appears to be an integral, TonB-dependent outer membrane protein while Tbp2, a lipoprotein, may be peripherally associated with the outer membrane. The relative contribution of each of these proteins to transferrin binding and utilization is discussed and a model of iron uptake from transferrin is presented. Sequence comparisons of the genes encoding neisserial transferrin-binding proteins suggest that they are probably under positive selection for variation and may have resulted from inter-species genetic exchange.

  17. Interaction of the Hereditary Hemochromatosis Protein, HFE, with Transferrin Receptor 2 Is Required for Transferrin-Induced Hepcidin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Junwei; Chen, Juxing; Kramer, Maxwell; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The mechanisms that allow the body to sense iron levels in order to maintain iron homeostasis are unknown. Patients with the most common form of hereditary iron overload have mutations in the hereditary hemochromatosis protein, HFE. They have lower levels of hepcidin, than unaffected individuals. Hepcidin, a hepatic peptide hormone, negatively regulates iron efflux from the intestines into the blood. We report two hepatic cell lines, WIF-B cells and HepG2 cells transfected with HFE, where hepcidin expression responded to iron-loaded transferrin. The response was abolished when endogenous transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) was suppressed or in primary hepatocytes lacking either functional TfR2 or HFE. Furthermore, transferrin-treated HepG2 cells transfected with HFE chimeras containing only the α3 and cytoplasmic domains could upregulate hepcidin expression. Since the HFE α3 domain interacts with TfR2, these results supported our finding that TfR2/HFE complex is required for transcriptional regulation of hepcidin by holo-Tf. PMID:19254567

  18. The human vasoactive intestinal peptide/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide receptor 1 (VPAC1) promoter: characterization and role in receptor expression during enterocytic differentiation of the colon cancer cell line Caco-2Cl.20.

    PubMed Central

    Couvineau, A; Maoret, J J; Rouyer-Fessard, C; Carrero, I; Laburthe, M

    2000-01-01

    The basic organization of the human vasoactive intestinal peptide/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide receptor (VPAC) 1 promoter was investigated after cloning the 5'-flanking region (1.4 kb) of the VPAC1 gene from a human genomic library. Subsequent functional analysis of various deletions of the 5'-flanking sequence, subcloned upstream of a luciferase reporter gene, was carried out in HT-29 cells. The minimal promoter region identified encompasses the -205/+76 sequence and contains a crucial CCAAT box (-182/-178) and a GC-rich sequence. Moreover a region (-1348/-933) containing a silencer element was identified. We previously showed that the expression of the VPAC1 receptor binding site is strictly dependent upon the enterocytic differentiation of human colon cancer Caco-2 cells [Laburthe, Rousset, Rouyer-Fessard, Couvineau, Chantret, Chevalier and Zweibaum (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 10180-10184]. In the present study we show that VPAC1 mRNA increases dramatically when Caco-2Cl.20 cells differentiate, as measured by RNase protection assays and reverse transcriptase-PCR. A single transcript species of 3 kb is detected in differentiated cells by Northern-blot analysis. Accumulation of VPAC1 receptor mRNA is due to a 5-fold increase of transcription rate (run-on assay) without a change in mRNA half-life (9 h). Stable transfections of various constructs in Caco-2Cl.20 cells and subsequent analysis of reporter gene expression, during the enterocytic differentiation process over 25 days of culture, further indicated that the -254/+76 5'-flanking sequence is endowed with the regulatory element(s) necessary for transcriptional regulation of VPAC1 during differentiation. Altogether, these observations provide the first characterization of the basic organization of the human VPAC1 gene promoter and unravel the crucial role of a short promoter sequence in the strict transcriptional control of VPAC1 expression during differentiation of human colon cancer Caco-2

  19. miR-29a suppresses MCF-7 cell growth by downregulating tumor necrosis factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yiling; Yang, Fenghua; Li, Wenyuan; Xu, Chunyan; Li, Li; Chen, Lifei; Liu, Yancui; Sun, Ping

    2017-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 is the main receptor mediating many tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced cellular events. Some studies have shown that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 promotes tumorigenesis by activating nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway, while other studies have confirmed that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 plays an inhibitory role in tumors growth by inducing apoptosis in breast cancer. Therefore, the function of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in breast cancer requires clarification. In this study, we first found that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 was significantly increased in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines, and knockdown of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 by small interfering RNA inhibited cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. In addition, miR-29a was predicted as a regulator of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 by TargetScan and was shown to be inversely correlated with tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines. Luciferase reporter assay further confirmed that miR-29a negatively regulated tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression by binding to the 3' untranslated region. In our functional study, miR-29a overexpression remarkably suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation, arrested the cell cycle, and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cell. Furthermore, in combination with tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 transfection, miR-29a significantly reversed the oncogenic role caused by tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in MCF-7 cell. In addition, we demonstrated that miR-29a suppressed MCF-7 cell growth by inactivating the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway and by decreasing cyclinD1 and Bcl-2/Bax protein levels. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-29a is an important regulator of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression in breast cancer and functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 to

  20. Modulation of transferrin secretion by epidermal growth factor in immature rat Sertoli cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Onoda, M; Suarez-Quian, C A

    1994-03-01

    The modulation of transferrin secretion by FSH and epidermal growth factor (EGF) was studied in highly pure, primary cultures of immature rat Sertoli cells grown on a reconstituted basement membrane (Matrigel) in bicameral chambers. Sertoli cell purity was assessed by (1) morphometry, (2) alkaline phosphatase cytochemistry (a specific marker enzyme for peritubular cells) and (3) immunocytochemistry for the alpha-isoform of smooth muscle actin in contaminating peritubular cells. Results revealed a less than 0.5% peritubular cell contamination. During initial periods of culture with EGF or FSH alone or in combination, both EGF and FSH alone maintained transferrin secretion over basal values and their effects were additive. At subsequent times, EGF alone maintained transferrin secretion, but to less extent than did FSH alone, and inhibited significantly the ability of FSH to maintain transferrin secretion. The ratio of polarized transferrin secretion in response to FSH, EGF, or in combination was also examined. FSH significantly reversed the polarity of transferrin secretion, whereas EGF, although significantly reducing the ratio of apical to basal transferrin secretion, did not lead to a preferential basal secretion of transferrin. The change in the apical:basal transferrin secretion ratio, however, was not due to a reversal of the apically secreted transferrin towards a basal direction, but rather to an increase in the total basally secreted transferrin. The effects of cell density effects on transferrin secretion were then examined. At low cell density, the relative ability of EGF and FSH together to maintain transferrin secretion was greater than at high cell density, but overall transferrin secretion was greater as cell density increased. The inhibition of FSH by EGF on transferrin secretion was also density dependent: EGF significantly inhibited FSH effects at low cell density, but failed to do so at high cell density. These results suggest that regulation of

  1. Elastase and metalloproteinase activities regulate soluble complement receptor 1 release.

    PubMed

    Sadallah, S; Hess, C; Miot, S; Spertini, O; Lutz, H; Schifferli, J A

    1999-11-01

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1) is cleaved from the surface of polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) in the membrane-proximal region to yield a soluble fragment (sCR1) that contains the functional domains. The enzymes involved in this cleavage are produced by the PMN itself, since in vitro stimulation of purified PMN is followed by sCR1 release. Purified human neutrophil elastase (HNE) cleaved CR1 from erythrocytes and urinary vesicles originating from podocytes and enhanced tenfold the cleavage of CR1 from activated PMN. The largest fragment released from PMN by HNE was identical in size to CR1 shed spontaneously. The CR1 fragments cleaved from erythrocytes were functional. The shedding of sCR1 by activated PMN was inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (80 +/- 10%), alpha1-antiprotease (50 +/- 5%) and elafin (60 +/- 5%). Furthermore the cleavage was blocked by the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline (70 +/- 6 %) as well as by a monoclonal antibody against human neutrophil collagenase MMP8 (40 +/- 10%). Maximal inhibition of sCR1 shedding was obtained by a combination of 1,10-phenanthroline with elafin (86 +/- 6%). These inhibitors had no effect on L-selectin shedding, indicating that the cleavage of CR1 was specific. In conclusion, elastase or elastase-like activity may be responsible for the shedding of functional sCR1 in vivo, and this activity is controlled by the local release of PMN metalloproteases and alpha1antiprotease.

  2. Downregulation of protease-activated receptor-1 in human lung fibroblasts is specifically mediated by the prostaglandin E receptor EP2 through cAMP elevation and protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Elena; Hartig, Roland; Reiser, Georg

    2008-07-01

    Many cellular functions of lung fibroblasts are controlled by protease-activated receptors (PARs). In fibrotic diseases, PAR-1 plays a major role in controlling fibroproliferative and inflammatory responses. Therefore, in these diseases, regulation of PAR-1 expression plays an important role. Using the selective prostaglandin EP2 receptor agonist butaprost and cAMP-elevating agents, we show here that prostaglandin (PG)E(2), via the prostanoid receptor EP2 and subsequent cAMP elevation, downregulates mRNA and protein levels of PAR-1 in human lung fibroblasts. Under these conditions, the functional response of PAR-1 in fibroblasts is reduced. These effects are specific for PGE(2). Activation of other receptors coupled to cAMP elevation, such as beta-adrenergic and adenosine receptors, does not reproduce the effects of PGE(2). PGE(2)-mediated downregulation of PAR-1 depends mainly on protein kinase A activity, but does not depend on another cAMP effector, the exchange protein activated by cAMP. PGE(2)-induced reduction of PAR-1 level is not due to a decrease of PAR-1 mRNA stability, but rather to transcriptional regulation. The present results provide further insights into the therapeutic potential of PGE(2) to specifically control fibroblast function in fibrotic diseases.

  3. Phase III, Double-Blind, Randomized Trial That Compared Maintenance Lapatinib Versus Placebo After First-Line Chemotherapy in Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 1/2-Positive Metastatic Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Powles, Thomas; Huddart, Robert A; Elliott, Tony; Sarker, Shah-Jalal; Ackerman, Charlotte; Jones, Robert; Hussain, Syed; Crabb, Simon; Jagdev, Satinder; Chester, John; Hilman, Serena; Beresford, Mark; Macdonald, Graham; Santhanam, Sundar; Frew, John A; Stockdale, Andrew; Hughes, Simon; Berney, Daniel; Chowdhury, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To establish whether maintenance lapatinib after first-line chemotherapy is beneficial in human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 1/HER2-positive metastatic urothelial bladder cancer (UBC). Methods Patients with metastatic UBC were screened centrally for HER1/HER2 overexpression. Patients who screened positive for HER1/2 and who did not have progressive disease during chemotherapy (four to eight cycles) were randomly assigned one to one to lapatinib or placebo after completion of first-line/initial chemotherapy for metastatic disease. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Results Between 2007 and 2013, 446 patients with UBC were screened, and 232 with HER1- or HER2-positive disease were randomly assigned. The median PFS for lapatinib and placebo was 4.5 (95% CI, 2.8 to 5.4) and 5.1 (95% CI, 3.0 to 5.8) months, respectively (hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.43; P = .63). The overall survival for lapatinib and placebo was 12.6 (95% CI, 9.0 to 16.2) and 12.0 (95% CI, 10.5 to 14.9) months, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.70 to 1.31; P = .80). Discontinuation due to adverse events were similar in both arms (6% lapatinib and 5% placebo). The rate of grade 3 to 4 adverse events for lapatinib and placebo was 8.6% versus 8.1% ( P = .82). Preplanned subset analysis of patients strongly positive for HER1/HER2 (3+ on immunohistochemistry; n = 111), patients positive for only HER1 (n = 102), and patients positive for only HER2 (n = 42) showed no significant benefit with lapatinib in terms of PFS and overall survival ( P > .05 for each). Conclusion This trial did not find significant improvements in outcome by the addition of maintenance lapatinib to standard of care.

  4. Bacterial receptors for host transferrin and lactoferrin: molecular mechanisms and role in host-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Ari; Pogoutse, Anastassia; Adamiak, Paul; Moraes, Trevor F; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2013-12-01

    Iron homeostasis in the mammalian host limits the availability of iron to invading pathogens and is thought to restrict iron availability for microbes inhabiting mucosal surfaces. The presence of surface receptors for the host iron-binding glycoproteins transferrin (Tf) and lactoferrin (Lf) in globally important Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of humans and food production animals suggests that Tf and Lf are important sources of iron in the upper respiratory or genitourinary tracts, where they exclusively reside. Lf receptors have the additional function of protecting against host cationic antimicrobial peptides, suggesting that the bacteria expressing these receptors reside in a niche where exposure is likely. In this review we compare Tf and Lf receptors with respect to their structural and functional features, their role in colonization and infection, and their distribution among pathogenic and commensal bacteria.

  5. Decreased Degradation of Internalized Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Caused by Mutation of Aspartic Acid 6.30550 in a Protein Kinase-CK2 Consensus Sequence in the Third Intracellular Loop of Human Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor1

    PubMed Central

    Kluetzman, Kerri S.; Thomas, Richard M.; Nechamen, Cheryl A.; Dias, James A.

    2011-01-01

    A naturally occurring mutation in follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene has been reported: an amino acid change to glycine occurs at a conserved aspartic acid 550 (D550, D567, D6.30567). This residue is contained in a protein kinase-CK2 consensus site present in human FSHR (hFSHR) intracellular loop 3 (iL3). Because CK2 has been reported to play a role in trafficking of some receptors, the potential roles for CK2 and D550 in FSHR function were evaluated by generating a D550A mutation in the hFSHR. The hFSHR-D550A binds hormone similarly to WT-hFSHR when expressed in HEK293T cells. Western blot analyses showed lower levels of mature hFSHR-D550A. Maximal cAMP production of both hFSHR-D550A as well as the naturally occurring mutation hFSHR-D550G was diminished, but constitutive activity was not observed. Unexpectedly, when 125I-hFSH bound to hFSHR-D550A or hFSHR-D550G, intracellular accumulation of radiolabeled FSH was observed. Both sucrose and dominant-negative dynamin blocked internalization of radiolabeled FSH and its commensurate intracellular accumulation. Accumulation of radiolabeled FSH in cells transfected with hFSHR-D550A is due to a defect in degradation of hFSH as measured in pulse chase studies, and confocal microscopy imaging revealed that FSH accumulated in large intracellular structures. CK2 kinase activity is not required for proper degradation of internalized FSH because inhibition of CK2 kinase activity in cells expressing hFSHR did not uncouple degradation of internalized radiolabeled FSH. Additionally, the CK2 consensus site in FSHR iL3 is not required for binding because CK2alpha coimmunoprecipitated with hFSHR-D550A. Thus, mutation of D550 uncouples the link between internalization and degradation of hFSH. PMID:21270425

  6. Transferrin serves as a mediator to deliver organometallic ruthenium(II) anticancer complexes into cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Qun; Li, Xianchan; Zhao, Yao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Wang, Fuyi

    2013-05-06

    We report herein a systematic study on interactions of organometallic ruthenium(II) anticancer complex [(η(6)-arene)Ru(en)Cl](+) (arene = p-cymene (1) or biphenyl (2), en = ethylenediamine) with human transferrin (hTf) and the effects of the hTf-ligation on the bioavailability of these complexes with cisplatin as a reference. Incubated with a 5-fold excess of complex 1, 2, or cisplatin, 1 mol of diferric hTf (holo-hTf) attached 0.62 mol of 1, 1.01 mol of 2, or 2.14 mol of cisplatin. Mass spectrometry revealed that both ruthenium complexes coordinated to N-donors His242, His273, His578, and His606, whereas cisplatin bound to O donors Tyr136 and Tyr317 and S-donor Met256 in addition to His273 and His578 on the surface of both apo- and holo-hTf. Moreover, cisplatin could bind to Thr457 within the C-lobe iron binding cleft of apo-hTf. Neither ruthenium nor platinum binding interfered with the recognition of holo-hTf by the transferrin receptor (TfR). The ruthenated/platinated holo-hTf complexes could be internalized via TfR-mediated endocytosis at a similar rate to that of holo-hTf itself. Moreover, the binding to holo-hTf well preserved the bioavailability of the ruthenium complexes, and the hTf-bound 1 and 2 showed a similar cytotoxicity toward the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 to those of the complexes themselves. However, the conjugation with holo-hTf significantly reduced the cellular uptake of cisplatin and the amount of platinated DNA adducts formed intracellularly, leading to dramatic reduction of cisplatin cytotoxicity toward MCF-7. These findings suggest that hTf can serve as a mediator for the targeting delivery of Ru(arene) anticancer complexes while deactivating cisplatin.

  7. Molecular characterization of an insect transferrin and its selective incorporation into eggs during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kurama, T; Kurata, S; Natori, S

    1995-03-01

    A protein with a molecular mass of 65 kDa that was specifically taken up into eggs was purified from the hemolymph of adult female Sarcophaga peregrina flies. From cDNA analysis, this protein was shown to be a Sarcophaga transferrin. Unlike mammalian transferrin, the similarity between its N-terminal and C-terminal halves was only 19%, and it was suggested to conjugate one iron atom/molecule in its N-terminal half. Sarcophaga transferrin was found to transport iron ions into eggs during oogenesis and deliver them to another protein, thought to be ferritin. No significant activation of the transferrin gene was detected during embryogenesis, so probably maternal transferrin is used as an intercellular or intracellular iron-transporter during embryogenesis of this insect.

  8. Enhanced blood-brain barrier transmigration using a novel transferrin embedded fluorescent magneto-liposome nanoformulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hong; Sagar, Vidya; Agudelo, Marisela; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Subba Rao Atluri, Venkata; Raymond, Andrea; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Nair, Madhavan P.

    2014-02-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered as the primary impediment barrier for most drugs. Delivering therapeutic agents to the brain is still a big challenge to date. In our study, a dual mechanism, receptor mediation combined with external non-invasive magnetic force, was incorporated into ferrous magnet-based liposomes for BBB transmigration enhancement. The homogenous magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), with a size of ˜10 nm, were synthesized and confirmed by TEM and XRD respectively. The classical magnetism assay showed the presence of the characteristic superparamagnetic property. These MNPs encapsulated in PEGylated fluorescent liposomes as magneto-liposomes (MLs) showed mono-dispersion, ˜130 ± 10 nm diameter, by dynamic laser scattering (DLS) using the lipid-extrusion technique. Remarkably, a magnetite encapsulation efficiency of nearly 60% was achieved. Moreover, the luminescence and hydrodynamic size of the MLs was stable for over two months at 4 ° C. Additionally, the integrity of the ML structure remained unaffected through 120 rounds of circulation mimicking human blood fluid. After biocompatibility confirmation by cytotoxicity evaluation, these fluorescent MLs were further embedded with transferrin and applied to an in vitro BBB transmigration study in the presence or absence of external magnetic force. Comparing with magnetic force- or transferrin receptor-mediated transportation alone, their synergy resulted in 50-100% increased transmigration without affecting the BBB integrity. Consequently, confocal microscopy and iron concentration in BBB-composed cells further confirmed the higher cellular uptake of ML particles due to the synergic effect. Thus, our multifunctional liposomal magnetic nanocarriers possess great potential in particle transmigration across the BBB and may have a bright future in drug delivery to the brain.

  9. Enhanced blood-brain barrier transmigration using a novel transferrin embedded fluorescent magneto-liposome nanoformulation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong; Sagar, Vidya; Agudelo, Marisela; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Raymond, Andrea; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Nair, Madhavan P

    2014-02-07

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered as the primary impediment barrier for most drugs. Delivering therapeutic agents to the brain is still a big challenge to date. In our study, a dual mechanism, receptor mediation combined with external non-invasive magnetic force, was incorporated into ferrous magnet-based liposomes for BBB transmigration enhancement. The homogenous magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), with a size of ∼10 nm, were synthesized and confirmed by TEM and XRD respectively. The classical magnetism assay showed the presence of the characteristic superparamagnetic property. These MNPs encapsulated in PEGylated fluorescent liposomes as magneto-liposomes (MLs) showed mono-dispersion, ∼130 ± 10 nm diameter, by dynamic laser scattering (DLS) using the lipid-extrusion technique. Remarkably, a magnetite encapsulation efficiency of nearly 60% was achieved. Moreover, the luminescence and hydrodynamic size of the MLs was stable for over two months at 4 ° C. Additionally, the integrity of the ML structure remained unaffected through 120 rounds of circulation mimicking human blood fluid. After biocompatibility confirmation by cytotoxicity evaluation, these fluorescent MLs were further embedded with transferrin and applied to an in vitro BBB transmigration study in the presence or absence of external magnetic force. Comparing with magnetic force- or transferrin receptor-mediated transportation alone, their synergy resulted in 50-100% increased transmigration without affecting the BBB integrity. Consequently, confocal microscopy and iron concentration in BBB-composed cells further confirmed the higher cellular uptake of ML particles due to the synergic effect. Thus, our multifunctional liposomal magnetic nanocarriers possess great potential in particle transmigration across the BBB and may have a bright future in drug delivery to the brain.

  10. A Novel Rat Model of Hereditary Hemochromatosis Due to a Mutation in Transferrin Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Bartnikas, Thomas B; Wildt, Sheryl J; Wineinger, Amy E; Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Markianos, Kyriacos; Cooper, Dale M; Fleming, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic iron overload in rats has been reported, but whether it is due to genetic or environmental causes is unknown. In the current study, phenotypic analysis of Hsd:HHCL Wistar rats revealed a low incidence of histologically detected liver iron overload. Here we characterized the pathophysiology of the iron overload and showed that the phenotype is heritable and due to a mutation in a single gene. We identified a single male rat among the 132 screened animals that exhibited predominantly periportal, hepatocellular iron accumulation. This rat expressed low RNA levels of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin and low protein levels of transferrin receptor 2 (Tfr2), a membrane protein essential for hepcidin expression in humans and mice and mutated in forms of hereditary hemochromatosis. Sequencing of Tfr2 in the iron-overloaded rat revealed a novel Ala679Gly polymorphism in a highly conserved residue. Quantitative trait locus mapping indicated that this polymorphism correlated strongly with serum iron and transferrin saturations in male rats. Expression of the Gly679 variant in tissue culture cell lines revealed decreased steady-state levels of Tfr2. Characterization of iron metabolism in the progeny of polymorphic rats suggested that homozygosity for the Ala679Gly allele leads to a hemochromatosis phenotype. However, we currently cannot exclude the possibility that a polymorphism or mutation in the noncoding region of Tfr2 contributes to the iron-overload phenotype. Hsd:HHCL rats are the first genetic rat model of hereditary hemochromatosis and may prove useful for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of iron metabolism. PMID:23582421

  11. Chimpanzee Personality and the Arginine Vasopressin Receptor 1A Genotype.

    PubMed

    Wilson, V A D; Weiss, A; Humle, T; Morimura, N; Udono, T; Idani, G; Matsuzawa, T; Hirata, S; Inoue-Murayama, M

    2017-03-01

    Polymorphisms of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (AVPR1a) gene have been linked to various measures related to human social behavior, including sibling conflict and agreeableness. In chimpanzees, AVPR1a polymorphisms have been associated with traits important for social interactions, including sociability, joint attention, dominance, conscientiousness, and hierarchical personality dimensions named low alpha/stability, disinhibition, and negative emotionality/low dominance. We examined associations between AVPR1a and six personality domains and hierarchical personality dimensions in 129 chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) living in Japan or in a sanctuary in Guinea. We fit three linear and three animal models. The first model included genotype, the second included sex and genotype, and the third included genotype, sex, and sex × genotype. All personality phenotypes were heritable. Chimpanzees possessing the long form of the allele were higher in conscientiousness, but only in models that did not include the other predictors; however, additional analyses suggested that this may have been a consequence of study design. In animal models that included sex and sex × genotype, chimpanzees homozygous for the short form of the allele were higher in extraversion. Taken with the findings of previous studies of chimpanzees and humans, the findings related to conscientiousness suggest that AVPR1a may be related to lower levels of impulsive aggression. The direction of the association between AVPR1a genotype and extraversion ran counter to what one would expect if AVPR1a was related to social behaviors. These results help us further understand the genetic basis of personality in chimpanzees.

  12. Lethal Cardiomyopathy in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenjing; Barrientos, Tomasa; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A; Sauve, Anthony A; Andrews, Nancy C

    2015-10-20

    Both iron overload and iron deficiency have been associated with cardiomyopathy and heart failure, but cardiac iron utilization is incompletely understood. We hypothesized that the transferrin receptor (Tfr1) might play a role in cardiac iron uptake and used gene targeting to examine the role of Tfr1 in vivo. Surprisingly, we found that decreased iron, due to inactivation of Tfr1, was associated with severe cardiac consequences. Mice lacking Tfr1 in the heart died in the second week of life and had cardiomegaly, poor cardiac function, failure of mitochondrial respiration, and ineffective mitophagy. The phenotype could only be rescued by aggressive iron therapy, but it was ameliorated by administration of nicotinamide riboside, an NAD precursor. Our findings underscore the importance of both Tfr1 and iron in the heart, and may inform therapy for patients with heart failure.

  13. Transferrin receptor expression by stimulated cells in mixed lymphocyte culture.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, M; Bacon, P A; Symmons, D P; Walton, K W

    1985-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TRFr) expression by cells in mixed lymphocyte culture increases steadily for the first 5 days, but then reaches a plateau. By the sixth day in culture, about 20% of viable cells express TRFr in two-way mixed lymphocyte reactions. This subpopulation of TRFr-positive cells represents the proliferating population; it is heterogeneous, containing T-cell blasts and smaller cells which are a mixture of T and non-T cells. A small group of non-T cells have phenotypic similarity to natural killer (NK) cells. T cells appear to divide earlier in the course of the response than non-T cells. The biphasic nature of this response and the slower non-T reactivity may be due to a secondary stimulation of non-T cells by factors released from activated T cells (such as interleukin-2). PMID:2982734

  14. Transferrin C subtypes and ethnic heterogeneity in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Sikström, C; Nylander, P O

    1990-01-01

    Transferrin (TF) C subtypes were studied in Swedish Lapps (Saami) and in Swedes from northern, central and southern Sweden, and the allele frequencies were compared with those in other European populations. The Swedish Lapps were found to have the lowest frequency of the TF*C3 allele (1-2%) so far observed in Europe. Most European populations have TF*C3 allele frequencies between 5 and 7%. Finns differ by having high TF*C3 frequencies (13-14%). The relatively high TF*C3 frequencies found in northeastern Sweden (13%) and in central Sweden (9%) are most likely due to eastern influence. Unlike other genetic markers of eastern influence (e.g. TF*DCHI), which are of Asiatic Mongoloid origin, TF*C3 appears to originate from Finno-Ugric populations.

  15. Cord blood transferrin receptors to assess fetal iron status

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, D.; Savage, G.; Tubman, R.; Lappin, T.; Halliday, H.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To study iron status at different gestational ages using cord blood serum transferrin receptors (STfRs).
METHODS—STfRs, iron, ferritin, total iron binding capacity, haemoglobin, and reticulocytes were measured in 144 cord blood samples. The babies were divided into three groups according to gestation (26 very preterm (24-29 weeks); 50 preterm (30-36 weeks); 68 term (37-41 weeks)).
RESULTS—Serum iron, ferritin, and total iron binding capacity were highest at term, whereas reticulocytes were highest in the very preterm. STfR levels were not influenced by gestation. Haemoglobin (r = 0.46; p < 0.0001) and reticulocytes (r = 0.42; p < 0.0001) were the only indices that independently correlated with STfR levels.
CONCLUSIONS—STfR levels in cord blood are not directly influenced by gestation and probably reflect the iron requirements of the fetus for erythropoiesis.

 PMID:11420322

  16. Transferrin Receptor Controls AMPA Receptor Trafficking Efficiency and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Lei, Run; Li, Qiong; Wang, Xin-Xin; Wu, Qian; An, Peng; Zhang, Jianchao; Zhu, Minyan; Xu, Zhiheng; Hong, Yang; Wang, Fudi; Shen, Ying; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TFR) is an important iron transporter regulating iron homeostasis and has long been used as a marker for clathrin mediated endocytosis. However, little is known about its additional function other than iron transport in the development of central nervous system (CNS). Here we demonstrate that TFR functions as a regulator to control AMPA receptor trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. The conditional knockout (KO) of TFR in neural progenitor cells causes mice to develop progressive epileptic seizure, and dramatically reduces basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). We further demonstrate that TFR KO remarkably reduces the binding efficiency of GluR2 to AP2 and subsequently decreases AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling. Thus, our study reveals that TFR functions as a novel regulator to control AMPA trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. PMID:26880306

  17. Trace amine-associated receptor 1-Family archetype or iconoclast?

    PubMed

    Grandy, David K

    2007-12-01

    Interest has recently been rekindled in receptors that are activated by low molecular weight, noncatecholic, biogenic amines that are typically found as trace constituents of various vertebrate and invertebrate tissues and fluids. The timing of this resurgent focus on receptors activated by the "trace amines" (TA) beta-phenylethylamine (PEA), tyramine (TYR), octopamine (OCT), synephrine (SYN), and tryptamine (TRYP) is the direct result of 2 publications that appeared in 2001 describing the cloning of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) referred to by their discoverers Borowsky et al. as TA1 and Bunzow et al. as TA receptor 1 (TAR1). When heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and various eukaryotic cell lines, recombinant rodent and human TAR dose-dependently couple to the stimulation of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) production. Structure-activity profiling based on this functional response has revealed that in addition to the TA, other biologically active compounds containing a 2-carbon aliphatic side chain linking an amino group to at least 1 benzene ring are potent and efficacious TA receptor agonists with amphetamine (AMPH), methamphetamine, 3-iodothyronamine, thyronamine, and dopamine (DA) among the most notable. Almost 100 years after the search for TAR began, numerous TA1/TAR1-related sequences, now called TA-associated receptors (TAAR), have been identified in the genome of every species of vertebrate examined to date. Consequently, even though heterologously expressed TAAR1 fits the pharmacological criteria established for a bona fide TAR, a major challenge for those working in the field is to discern the in vivo pharmacology and physiology of each purported member of this extended family of GPCR. Only then will it be possible to establish whether TAAR1 is the family archetype or an iconoclast.

  18. Trace Amine Associated Receptor 1 Modulates Behavioral Effects of Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Laurie J.; Sullivan, Katherine A.; Vallender, Eric J.; Rowlett, James K.; Platt, Donna M.; Miller, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Few treatment options for alcohol use disorders (AUDs) exist and more are critically needed. Here, we assessed whether trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), a modulator of brain monoamine systems, is involved in the behavioral and reinforcement-related effects of ethanol and whether it could potentially serve as a therapeutic target. Methods Wild-type (WT) and TAAR1 knockout (KO) mice (75% C57J/BL6 and 25% 129S1/Sv background) were compared in tests of ethanol consumption (two-bottle choice [TBC]), motor impairment (loss of righting reflex, [LORR], locomotor activity) and ethanol clearance (blood ethanol level [BEL]). Results As compared with WT mice, KO mice displayed (1) significantly greater preference for and consumption of ethanol in a TBC paradigm (3%–11% vol/vol escalating over 10 weeks), with no significant difference observed in TBC with sucrose (1%–3%); (2) significantly greater sedative-like effects of acute ethanol (2.0 or 2.5 g/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]) manifested as LORR observed at a lower dose and for longer time, with similar BELs and rates of ethanol clearance; and (3) lower cumulative locomotor activity over 60 minutes in response to an acute ethanol challenge (1.0–2.5 g/kg, i.p.). Conclusions The present findings are the first to implicate TAAR1 in the behavioral and reinforcement-related effects of ethanol and raise the question of whether specific drugs that target TAAR1 could potentially reduce alcohol consumption in humans with AUDs. PMID:23861588

  19. Unusual Synergism of Transferrin and Citrate in the Regulation of Ti(IV) Speciation, Transport, and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tinoco, Arthur D; Saxena, Manoj; Sharma, Shweta; Noinaj, Nicholas; Delgado, Yamixa; Quiñones González, Ernesto P; Conklin, Steven E; Zambrana, Nicole; Loza-Rosas, Sergio A; Parks, Timothy B

    2016-05-04

    Human serum transferrin (sTf) is a protein that mediates the transport of iron from blood to cells. Assisted by the synergistic anion carbonate, sTf transports Fe(III) by binding the metal ion in a closed conformation. Previous studies suggest sTf's role as a potential transporter of other metals such as titanium. Ti is a widely used metal in colorants, foods, and implants. A substantial amount of Ti is leached into blood from these implants. However, the fate of the leached Ti and its transport into the cells is not known. Understanding Ti interaction with sTf assumes a greater significance with our ever increasing exposure to Ti in the form of implants. On the basis of in vitro studies, it was speculated that transferrin can bind Ti(IV) assisted by a synergistic anion. However, the role and identity of the synergistic anion(s) and the conformational state in which sTf binds Ti(IV) are not known. Here we have solved the first X-ray crystal structure of a Ti(IV)-bound sTf. We find that sTf binds Ti(IV) in an open conformation with both carbonate and citrate as synergistic anions at the metal binding sites, an unprecedented role for citrate. Studies with cell lines suggest that Ti(IV)-sTf is transported into cells and that sTf and citrate regulate the metal's blood speciation and attenuate its cytotoxic property. Our results provide the first glimpse into the citrate-transferrin synergism in the regulation of Ti(IV) bioactivity and offers insight into the future design of Ti(IV)-based anticancer drugs.

  20. The internalization signal and the phosphorylation site of transferrin receptor are distinct from the main basolateral sorting information.

    PubMed Central

    Dargemont, C; Le Bivic, A; Rothenberger, S; Iacopetta, B; Kühn, L C

    1993-01-01

    Wild-type human transferrin receptor (hTfR), like endogenous canine receptor, is expressed almost exclusively (97%) at the basolateral membrane of transfected Madin-Darbey canine kidney (MDCK) cells. We investigated the role of two distinct features of the hTfR cytoplasmic domain, namely the endocytic signal and the unique phosphorylation site, in polarized cell surface delivery. Basolateral location was not altered by point mutation of Ser24-->Ala24, indicating that phosphorylation is not involved in vectorial sorting of hTfR. The steady state distribution of hTfR was partially affected by a deletion of 36 cytoplasmic residues encompassing the internalization sequence. However, 80% of the receptors were still basolateral. As assessed by pulse-chase experiments in combination with biotinylation, newly synthesized wild-type and deletion mutant receptors were directly sorted to the domain of their steady state residency. Although both receptors could bind human transferrin, endocytosis of the deletion mutant was strongly impaired at either surface. These data indicate that the predominant basolateral targeting signal of hTfR is independent of the internalization sequence. Images PMID:8467813

  1. Characterization of monoferric fragments obtained by tryptic cleavage of bovine transferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, J H; Arzabe, F R; Richardson, N E; Deverson, E V

    1978-01-01

    1. The electrophoretically fast (F) and slow (S) fragments obtained by tryptic cleavage of bovine iron-saturated transferrin differed in carbohydrate content and peptide 'maps'. 2. A fragment capable of binding one Fe3+ ion per molecule was isolated after brief tryptic digestion of bovine apotransferrin and shown closely to resemble the S fragment obtained from the iron-saturated protein. 3. Fragments F and S are probably derived from the N- and C-terminal halves of the transferrin molecule respectively. 4. Bovine transferrin could donate iron to rabbit reticulocytes, but the monoferric fragments possessed little iron-donating ability. Images PLATE 1 PMID:646825

  2. Receptor recognition of transferrin bound to lanthanides and actinides: a discriminating step in cellular acquisition of f-block metals

    PubMed Central

    Deblonde, Gauthier J.-P.; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Mason, Anne B.; Abergel, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    Following an internal contamination event, the transport of actinide and lanthanide metal ions through the body is facilitated by endogenous ligands such as the human iron-transport protein transferrin (Tf). The recognition of resulting metallo-transferrin complexes (M2Tf) by the cognate transferrin receptor (TfR) is therefore a critical step for cellular uptake of these metal ions. A high performance liquid chromatography-based method has been used to probe the binding of M2Tf with TfR, yielding a direct measurement of the successive thermodynamic constants that correspond to the dissociation of TfR(M2Tf)2 and TfR(M2Tf) complexes for Fe3+, Ga3+, La3+, Nd3+, Gd3+, Yb3+, Lu3+, 232Th4+, 238UO22+, and 242Pu4+. Important features of this method are (i) its ability to distinguish both 1:1 and 1:2 complexes formed between the receptor and the metal-bound transferrin, and (ii) the requirement for very small amounts of each binding partner (<1 nmol of protein per assay). Consistent with previous reports, the strongest receptor affinity is found for Fe2Tf (Kd1 = 5 nM and Kd2 = 20 nM), while the lowest affinity was measured for Pu2Tf (Kd1 = 0.28 µM and Kd2 = 1.8 µM) binding to the TfR. Other toxic metal ions such as ThIV and UVI, when bound to Tf, are well recognized by the TfR. Under the described experimental conditions, the relative stabilities of TfR:(MxTf)y adducts follow the order Fe3+ >> Th4+ □ UO22+ □ Cm3+ > Ln3+ □ Ga3+ >>> Yb3+ □ Pu4+. This study substantiates a role for Tf in binding lanthanide fission products and actinides, and transporting them into cells by receptor mediated endocytosis. PMID:23446908

  3. Receptor recognition of transferrin bound to lanthanides and actinides: a discriminating step in cellular acquisition of f-block metals.

    PubMed

    Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Mason, Anne B; Abergel, Rebecca J

    2013-06-01

    Following an internal contamination event, the transport of actinide (An) and lanthanide (Ln) metal ions through the body is facilitated by endogenous ligands such as the human iron-transport protein transferrin (Tf). The recognition of resulting metallo-transferrin complexes (M2Tf) by the cognate transferrin receptor (TfR) is therefore a critical step for cellular uptake of these metal ions. A high performance liquid chromatography-based method has been used to probe the binding of M2Tf with TfR, yielding a direct measurement of the successive thermodynamic constants that correspond to the dissociation of TfR(M2Tf)2 and TfR(M2Tf) complexes for Fe(3+), Ga(3+), La(3+), Nd(3+), Gd(3+), Yb(3+), Lu(3+), (232)Th(4+), (238)UO2(2+), and (242)Pu(4+). Important features of this method are (i) its ability to distinguish both 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 complexes formed between the receptor and the metal-bound transferrin, and (ii) the requirement for very small amounts of each binding partner (<1 nmol of protein per assay). Consistent with previous reports, the strongest receptor affinity is found for Fe2Tf (Kd1 = 5 nM and Kd2 = 20 nM), while the lowest affinity was measured for Pu2Tf (Kd1 = 0.28 μM and Kd2 = 1.8 μM) binding to the TfR. Other toxic metal ions such as Th(IV) and U(VI), when bound to Tf, are well recognized by the TfR. Under the described experimental conditions, the relative stabilities of TfR:(MxTf)y adducts follow the order Fe(3+) > Th(4+) ~ UO2(2+) ~ Cm(3+) > Ln(3+) ~ Ga(3+) > Yb(3+) ~ Pu(4+). This study substantiates a role for Tf in binding lanthanide fission products and actinides, and transporting them into cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis.

  4. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on transferrin serum levels in patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Shirmohamadi, Adileh; Chitsazi, Mohamad Taghi; Faramarzi, Masoumeh; Salari, Ashkan; Naser Alavi, Fereshteh; Pashazadeh, Nazila

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transferrin is a negative acute phase protein, which decreases during inflammation and infection. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate changes in the transferrin serum levels subsequent to non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontal disease. Methods. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis and 20 systemically healthy subjects without periodontal disease, who had referred to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry, were selected. Transferrin serum levels and clinical periodontal parameters (pocket depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, bleeding index and plaque index) were measured at baseline and 3 months after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods (means ± standard deviations). Independent samples t-test was used to compare transferrin serum levels and clinical variables between the test and control groups. Paired samples t-test was used in the test group for comparisons before and after treatment. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. The mean transferrin serum level in patients with chronic periodontitis (213.1 ± 9.2 mg/dL) was significantly less than that in periodontally healthy subjects (307.8 ± 11.7 mg/dL). Three months after periodontal treatment, the transferrin serum level increased significantly (298.3 ± 7.6 mg/dL) and approached the levels in periodontally healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The decrease and increase in transferrin serum levels with periodontal disease and periodontal treatment, respectively, indicated an inverse relationship between transferrin serum levels and chronic periodontitis. PMID:27651883

  5. A novel transferrin/TfR2-mediated mitochondrial iron transport system is disrupted in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mastroberardino, Pier Giorgio; Hoffman, Eric K.; Horowitz, Maxx P.; Betarbet, Ranjita; Taylor, Georgia; Cheng, Dongmei; Na, Hye Mee; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gearing, Marla; Trojanowski, John Q.; Anderson, Marjorie; Chu, Charleen T.; Peng, Junmin; Greenamyre, J. Timothy

    2009-01-01

    More than 80 years after iron accumulation was initially described in the substantia nigra (SN) of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are still unknown. Similarly, how iron is delivered to its major recipients in the cell – mitochondria and the respiratory complexes – has yet to be elucidated. Here, we report a novel transferrin/transferrin receptor 2 (Tf/TfR2)-mediated iron transport pathway in mitochondria of SN dopamine neurons. We found that TfR2 has a previously uncharacterized mitochondrial targeting sequence that is sufficient to import the protein into these organelles. Importantly, the Tf/TfR2 pathway can deliver Tf bound iron to mitochondria and to the respiratory complex I as well. The pathway is redox-sensitive and oxidation of Tf thiols to disulfides induces release from Tf of highly reactive ferrous iron, which contributes to free radical production. In the rotenone model of PD, Tf accumulates in dopamine neurons, with much of it accumulating in the mitochondria. This is associated with iron deposition in SN, similar to what occurs in PD. In the human SN, TfR2 is also found in mitochondria of dopamine neurons, and in PD there is a dramatic increase of oxidized Tf in SN. Thus, we have discovered a novel mitochondrial iron transport system that goes awry in PD, and which may provide a new target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19250966

  6. Definition of the residues required for the interaction between glycine-extended gastrin and transferrin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Suzana; Ferrand, Audrey; Estève, Jean-Pierre; Mason, Anne B; Baldwin, Graham S

    2009-09-01

    Transferrin is the main iron transport protein found in the circulation, and the level of transferrin saturation in the blood is an important indicator of iron status. The peptides amidated gastrin(17) (Gamide) and glycine-extended gastrin(17) (Ggly) are well known for their roles in controlling acid secretion and as growth factors in the gastrointestinal tract. Several lines of evidence, including the facts that transferrin binds gastrin, that gastrins bind ferric ions, and that the level of expression of gastrins positively correlates with transferrin saturation, suggest the possible involvement of the transferrin-gastrin interaction in iron homeostasis. In the present work, the interaction between gastrins and transferrin has been characterized by surface plasmon resonance and covalent crosslinking. First, an interaction between iron-free apo-transferrin and Gamide or Ggly was observed. The fact that no interaction was observed in the presence of the chelator EDTA suggested that the gastrin-ferric ion complex was the interacting species. Moreover, removal of ferric ions with EDTA reduced the stability of the complex between apo-transferrin and gastrins, and no interaction was observed between Gamide or Ggly and diferric transferrin. Second, some or all of glutamates at positions 8-10 of the Ggly molecule, together with the C-terminal domain, were necessary for the interaction with apo-transferrin. Third, monoferric transferrin mutants incapable of binding iron in either the N-terminal or C-terminal lobe still bound Ggly. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that gastrin peptides bind to nonligand residues within the open cleft in each lobe of transferrin and are involved in iron loading of transferrin in vivo.

  7. Applying 89Zr-Transferrin To Study the Pharmacology of Inhibitors to BET Bromodomain Containing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin modifying proteins are attractive drug targets in oncology, given the fundamental reliance of cancer on altered transcriptional activity. Multiple transcription factors can be impacted downstream of primary target inhibition, thus making it challenging to understand the driving mechanism of action of pharmacologic inhibition of chromatin modifying proteins. This in turn makes it difficult to identify biomarkers predictive of response and pharmacodynamic tools to optimize drug dosing. In this report, we show that 89Zr-transferrin, an imaging tool we developed to measure MYC activity in cancer, can be used to identify cancer models that respond to broad spectrum inhibitors of transcription primarily due to MYC inhibition. As a proof of concept, we studied inhibitors of BET bromodomain containing proteins, as they can impart antitumor effects in a MYC dependent or independent fashion. In vitro, we show that transferrin receptor biology is inhibited in multiple MYC positive models of prostate cancer and double hit lymphoma when MYC biology is impacted. Moreover, we show that bromodomain inhibition in one lymphoma model results in transferrin receptor expression changes large enough to be quantified with 89Zr-transferrin and positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo. Collectively, these data further underscore the diagnostic utility of the relationship between MYC and transferrin in oncology, and provide the rationale to incorporate transferrin-based PET into early clinical trials with bromodomain inhibitors for the treatment of solid tumors. PMID:26725682

  8. Separation of iron-free and iron-saturated forms of transferrin and lactoferrin via capillary electrophoresis performed in fused-silica and neutral capillaries.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Paweł; Śpiewak, Klaudyna; Brindell, Małgorzata; Woźniakiewicz, Michał; Stochel, Grażyna; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2013-12-20

    A capillary electrophoresis-based method for the cost-effective and high efficient separation of iron-free and iron-saturated forms of two members of transferrin family: transferrin and lactoferrin has been developed. The proposed qualitative method relying on the SDS application allowed us to separate iron-free and iron-saturated forms of these proteins, as well as human serum albumin, used as an internal standard. Owing to the distinct migration times under established conditions, the combination of transferrin and lactoferrin assays within a single analytical procedure was feasible. The performance of the method using a fused-silica capillary has been compared with the results obtained using the same method but performed with the use of a neutral capillary of the same dimensions. Neutral capillary has been used as an alternative, since the comparable resolution has been achieved with a concomitant reduction of the electroosmotic flow. Despite of this fact, the migration of analytes occurred with similar velocity but in opposite order, due to the reverse polarity application. A quantitative method employing fused-silica capillary for iron saturation study has been also developed, to evaluate the iron saturation in commercial preparations of lactoferrin.

  9. Downregulation of transferrin receptor surface expression by intracellular antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Jilin; Wu Sha; Zhao Xiaoping; Wang Min; Li Wenhan; Shen Xin; Liu Jing; Lei Ping; Zhu Huifen; Shen Guanxin . E-mail: guanxin_shen@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-03-23

    To deplete cellular iron uptake, and consequently inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells, we attempt to block surface expression of transferrin receptor (TfR) by intracellular antibody technology. We constructed two expression plasmids (scFv-HAK and scFv-HA) coding for intracellular single-chain antibody against TfR with or without endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal, respectively. Then they were transfected tumor cells MCF-7 by liposome. Applying RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscope experiments, we insure that scFv-HAK intrabody was successfully expressed and retained in ER contrasted to the secreted expression of scFv-HA. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed that the TfR surface expression was markedly decreased approximately 83.4 {+-} 2.5% in scFv-HAK transfected cells, while there was not significantly decrease in scFv-HA transfected cells. Further cell growth and apoptosis characteristics were evaluated by cell cycle analysis, nuclei staining and MTT assay. Results indicated that expression of scFv-HAK can dramatically induce cell cycle G1 phase arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells, and consequently significantly suppress proliferation of tumor cells compared with other control groups. For First time this study demonstrates the potential usage of anti-TfR scFv-intrabody as a growth inhibitor of TfR overexpressing tumors.

  10. [Carbohydrate deficient transferrin and ethyl glucuronide: markers for alcohol use].

    PubMed

    Paling, Erik P; Mostert, Leendert J

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report on the usefulness of physicians testing for carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) and ethyl glucuronide (EtG) when there are doubts about alcohol use by their patients. A 44-year-old male consulted his general practitioner with depressive symptoms and denied using alcohol. Laboratory examination revealed an elevated CDT value. The latter was caused by chronic alcohol use. The second patient, a 32-year-old female with known alcohol dependence and receiving inpatient treatment at an addiction clinic, came back from leave. She denied having consumed alcohol and her blood alcohol concentration was zero. Examination of her urine showed an elevated EtG/creatinine ratio. This was caused by having had a few drinks during her leave and could not have been caused by using mouthwash or disinfection soap. We describe how to use the results of CDT and EtG testing in the therapeutic process and give recommendations for patient communication before performing these two tests.

  11. Variability of the Transferrin Receptor 2 Gene in AMD

    PubMed Central

    Blasiak, Janusz; Dorecka, Mariola; Kowalska, Marta; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek Pawel

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major factor in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Iron may catalyze the Fenton reaction resulting in overproduction of reactive oxygen species. Transferrin receptor 2 plays a critical role in iron homeostasis and variability in its gene may influence oxidative stress and AMD occurrence. To verify this hypothesis we assessed the association between polymorphisms of the TFR2 gene and AMD. A total of 493 AMD patients and 171 matched controls were genotyped for the two polymorphisms of the TFR2 gene: c.1892C>T (rs2075674) and c.−258+123T>C (rs4434553). We also assessed the modulation of some AMD risk factors by these polymorphisms. The CC and TT genotypes of the c.1892C>T were associated with AMD occurrence but the latter only in obese patients. The other polymorphism was not associated with AMD occurrence, but the CC genotype was correlated with an increasing AMD frequency in subjects with BMI < 26. The TT genotype and the T allele of this polymorphism decreased AMD occurrence in subjects above 72 years, whereas the TC genotype and the C allele increased occurrence of AMD in this group. The c.1892C>T and c.−258+123T>C polymorphisms of the TRF2 gene may be associated with AMD occurrence, either directly or by modulation of risk factors. PMID:24648608

  12. Variability of the transferrin receptor 2 gene in AMD.

    PubMed

    Wysokinski, Daniel; Blasiak, Janusz; Dorecka, Mariola; Kowalska, Marta; Robaszkiewicz, Jacek; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek Pawel

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major factor in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Iron may catalyze the Fenton reaction resulting in overproduction of reactive oxygen species. Transferrin receptor 2 plays a critical role in iron homeostasis and variability in its gene may influence oxidative stress and AMD occurrence. To verify this hypothesis we assessed the association between polymorphisms of the TFR2 gene and AMD. A total of 493 AMD patients and 171 matched controls were genotyped for the two polymorphisms of the TFR2 gene: c.1892C>T (rs2075674) and c.-258+123T>C (rs4434553). We also assessed the modulation of some AMD risk factors by these polymorphisms. The CC and TT genotypes of the c.1892C>T were associated with AMD occurrence but the latter only in obese patients. The other polymorphism was not associated with AMD occurrence, but the CC genotype was correlated with an increasing AMD frequency in subjects with BMI < 26. The TT genotype and the T allele of this polymorphism decreased AMD occurrence in subjects above 72 years, whereas the TC genotype and the C allele increased occurrence of AMD in this group. The c.1892C>T and c.-258+123T>C polymorphisms of the TRF2 gene may be associated with AMD occurrence, either directly or by modulation of risk factors.

  13. Neoplastic transformation of rat liver epithelial cells is enhanced by non-transferrin-bound iron

    PubMed Central

    Messner, Donald J; Kowdley, Kris V

    2008-01-01

    Background Iron overload is associated with liver toxicity, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in humans. While most iron circulates in blood as transferrin-bound iron, non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) also becomes elevated and contributes to toxicity in the setting of iron overload. The mechanism for iron-related carcinogenesis is not well understood, in part due to a shortage of suitable experimental models. The primary aim of this study was to investigate NTBI-related hepatic carcinogenesis using T51B rat liver epithelial cells, a non-neoplastic cell line previously developed for carcinogenicity and tumor promotion studies. Methods T51B cells were loaded with iron by repeated addition of ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) to the culture medium. Iron internalization was documented by chemical assay, ferritin induction, and loss of calcein fluorescence. Proliferative effects were determined by cell count, toxicity was determined by MTT assay, and neoplastic transformation was assessed by measuring colony formation in soft agar. Cyclin levels were measured by western blot. Results T51B cells readily internalized NTBI given as FAC. Within 1 week of treatment at 200 μM, there were significant but well-tolerated toxic effects including a decrease in cell proliferation (30% decrease, p < 0.01). FAC alone induced little or no colony formation in soft agar. In contrast, FAC addition to cells previously initiated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) resulted in a concentration dependent increase in colony formation. This was first detected at 12 weeks of FAC treatment and increased at longer times. At 16 weeks, colony formation increased more than 10 fold in cells treated with 200 μM FAC (p < 0.001). The iron chelator desferoxamine reduced both iron uptake and colony formation. Cells cultured with 200 μM FAC showed decreased cyclin D1, decreased cyclin A, and increased cyclin B1. Conclusion These results establish NTBI as a tumor promoter in T51B rat liver

  14. The TNF receptor 1: a split personality complex.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Bryan C; Peter, Marcus E

    2003-07-25

    The tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), a prototypic member of the death receptor family signals both cell survival and apoptosis. In this issue of Cell, report that apoptotic TNFR1 signaling proceeds via the sequential formation of two distinct complexes. Since the first complex can activate survival signals and influence the activity of the second complex, this mechanism provides a checkpoint to control the execution of apoptosis.

  15. Preparation, characterization and in vitro efficacy of magnetic nanoliposomes containing the artemisinin and transferrin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Artemisinin is the major sesquiterpene lactones in sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua L.), and its combination with transferrin exhibits versatile anti-cancer activities. Their non-selective targeting for cancer cells, however, limits their application. The aim of this study was to prepare the artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposomes in thermosensitive and non-thermosensitive forms and evaluate their antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells for better tumor-targeted therapy. Methods Artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposomes was prepared by extrusion method using various concentrations of lipids. These formulations were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index and shape morphology. The artemisinin and transferrin-loading efficiencies were determined using HPLC. The content of magnetic iron oxide in the nanoliposomes was analysed by spectrophotometry. The in vitro release of artemisinin, transferrin and magnetic iron oxide from vesicles was assessed by keeping of the nanoliposomes at 37°C for 12 h. The in vitro cytotoxicity of prepared nanoliposomes was investigated against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells using MTT assay. Results The entrapment efficiencies of artemisinin, transferrin and magnetic iron oxide in the non-thermosensitive nanoliposomes were 89.11% ± 0.23, 85.09% ± 0.31 and 78.10% ± 0.24, respectively. Moreover, the thermosensitive formulation showed a suitable condition for thermal drug release at 42°C and exhibited high antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in the presence of a magnetic field. Conclusions Our results showed that the thermosensitive artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposomes would be an effective choice for tumor-targeted therapy, due to its suitable stability and high effectiveness. PMID:24887240

  16. Mosquito transferrin, an acute-phase protein that is up-regulated upon infection

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiga, Toyoshi; Hernandez, Vida P.; Fallon, Ann M.; Law, John H.

    1997-01-01

    When treated with heat-killed bacterial cells, mosquito cells in culture respond by up-regulating several proteins. Among these is a 66-kDa protein (p66) that is secreted from cells derived from both Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. p66 was degraded by proteolysis and gave a virtually identical pattern of peptide products for each mosquito species. The sequence of one peptide (31 amino acids) was determined and found to have similarity to insect transferrins. By using conserved regions of insect transferrin sequences, degenerate oligonucleotide PCR primers were designed and used to isolate a cDNA clone encoding an A. aegypti transferrin. The encoded protein contained a signal sequence that, when cleaved, would yield a mature protein of 68 kDa. It contained the 31-amino acid peptide, and the 3′ end exactly matched a cDNA encoding a polypeptide that is up-regulated when A. aegypti encapsulates filarial worms [Beerntsen, B. T., Severson, D. W. & Christensen, B. M. (1994) Exp. Parasitol. 79, 312–321]. This transferrin, like those of two other insect species, has conserved iron-binding residues in the N-terminal lobe but not in the C-terminal lobe, which also has large deletions in the polypeptide chain, compared with transferrins with functional C-terminal lobes. The hypothesis is developed that this transferrin plays a role similar to vertebrate lactoferrin in sequestering iron from invading organisms and that degradation of the structure of the C-terminal lobe might be a mechanism for evading pathogens that elaborate transferrin receptors to tap sequestered iron. PMID:9356450

  17. The role of transferrin in actinide(IV) uptake: comparison with iron(III).

    PubMed

    Jeanson, Aurélie; Ferrand, M; Funke, Harald; Hennig, Christoph; Moisy, Philippe; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Vidaud, Claude; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2010-01-25

    The impact of actinides on living organisms has been the subject of numerous studies since the 1950s. From a general point of view, these studies show that actinides are chemical poisons as well as radiological hazards. Actinides in plasma are assumed to be mainly complexed to transferrin, the iron carrier protein. This paper casts light on the uptake of actinides(IV) (thorium, neptunium, plutonium) by transferrin, focusing on the pH dependence of the interaction and on a molecular description of the cation binding site in the protein. Their behavior is compared with that of iron(III), the endogenous transferrin cation, from a structural point of view. Complementary spectroscopic techniques (UV/Vis spectrophotometry, microfiltration coupled with gamma spectrometry, and X-ray absorption fine structure) have been combined in order to propose a structural model for the actinide-binding site in transferrin. Comparison of our results with data available on holotransferrin suggests some similarities between the behavior of Fe(III) and Np(IV)/Pu(IV)/ Np(IV) is not complexed at pH <7, whereas at pH approximately 7.4 complexation can be regarded as quantitative. This pH effect is consistent with the in vivo transferrin "cycle". Pu(IV) also appears to be quantitatively bound by apotransferrin at around pH approximately 7.5, whereas Th(IV) was never complexed under our experimental conditions. EXAFS data at the actinide edge have allowed a structural model of the actinide binding site to be elaborated: at least one tyrosine residue could participate in the actinide coordination sphere (two for iron), forming a mixed hydroxo-transferrin complex in which actinides are bound with transferrin both through An-tyrosine and through An--OH bonds. A description of interatomic distances is provided.

  18. Structure, function and clinical significance of transferrin receptors.

    PubMed

    Feelders, R A; Kuiper-Kramer, E P; van Eijk, H G

    1999-01-01

    Iron plays an essential role in a spectrum of metabolic processes. Cellular iron uptake is facilitated by transferrin receptor (TfR)-mediated endocytosis. In recent years more insight has been obtained in TfR physiology and the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. The synthesis of TfR and the iron storage protein ferritin is regulated reciprocally at the post-transcriptional level according to the cellular iron status. As a result of externalization of TfR during the endocytic cycle, a soluble form of TfR can be detected in serum. The serum TfR (sTfR) level is closely related to erythroid TfR turnover and the prime determinants of the sTfR concentration are cellular iron demands and erythroid proliferation rate. In the absence of a hyperplastic erythropoiesis the sTfR level is a sensitive parameter of early tissue iron deficiency. The entire spectrum of body iron status can be assessed by measurement of serum ferritin and sTfR levels, with ferritin as marker of tissue iron stores and sTfR as index of tissue iron needs. The sTfR may be a promising tool to detect iron deficiency in inflammatory states and in the anaemia of chronic disease as its concentration is, in contrast to ferritin levels, not influenced by the acute phase response. Determination of sTfR levels may also improve assessment of body iron stores during pregnancy and in neonates. Finally, the sTfR may be a useful parameter to monitor erythropoiesis in various clinical settings, for instance in the prediction of the haematological response to erythropoietin treatment. However, standardization of the sTfR assay, with definition of reference and pathological ranges, is necessary for the definitive introduction of the sTfR as major parameter of iron metabolism.

  19. Pseudechis australis venomics: adaptation for a defense against microbial pathogens and recruitment of body transferrin.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Dessislava; Seifert, Jana; Öhler, Michaela; von Bergen, Martin; Spencer, Patrick; Arni, Raghuvir K; Genov, Nicolay; Betzel, Christian

    2011-05-06

    The venom composition of Pseudechis australis, a widely distributed in Australia reptile, was analyzed by 2-DE and mass spectrometric analysis. In total, 102 protein spots were identified as venom toxins. The gel is dominated by horizontal trains of spots with identical or very similar molecular masses but differing in the pI values. This suggests possible post-translational modifications of toxins, changing their electrostatic charge. The results demonstrate a highly specialized biosynthesis of toxins destroying the hemostasis (P-III metalloproteases, SVMPs), antimicrobial proteins (L-amino acid oxidases, LAAOs, and transferrin-like proteins, TFLPs), and myotoxins (phospholipase A(2)s, PLA(2)s). The three transferrin isoforms of the Australian P. australis (Elapidae snake) venom are highly homologous to the body transferrin of the African Lamprophis fuliginosus (Colubridae), an indication for the recruitment of body transferrin. The venomic composition suggests an adaptation for a defense against microbial pathogens from the prey. Transferrins have not previously been reported as components of elapid or other snake venoms. Ecto-5'-nucleotidases (5'-NTDs), nerve growth factors (VNGFs), and a serine proteinase inhibitor (SPI) were also identified. The venom composition and enzymatic activities explain the clinical manifestation of the king brown snakebite. The results can be used for medical, scientific, and biotechnological purposes.

  20. Soluble transferrin receptor, ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor--Ferritin index in assessment of anaemia in rhaeumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pavai, S; Jayaranee, S; Sargunan, S

    2007-10-01

    Anaemia of chronic disease (ACD) is a frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A diagnostic difficulty in RA is the distinction between iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) and ACD. The aim of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and sTfR/log ferritin (TfR-F) index to diagnose iron deficiency in RA patients with anaemia. Routine laboratory indices of anaemia and sTfR were measured in 20 healthy persons to form the control group, 30 patients with iron deficiency anaemia and 28 RA patients with anaemia. Serum sTfR levels were significantly elevated above the cut-off value in patients with IDA and those in the iron depleted RA subgroup (ferritin < 60 microg/L) compared with those in the control and iron repleted RA subgroup (ferritin > 60 microg/L). The same was observed for TfR-F index. However, five patients in the iron repleted RA sub group had an elevated sTfR level, of which two had increased TfR-F index. Serum sTfR correlated well with the markers of anaemia and not with ESR. Ferritin had no correlation with markers of anaemia but correlated well with ESR. Measurement of sTfR and TfR-F index are good indicators of iron deficiency in RA patients with anaemia. To be cost effective, sTfR can be estimated in RA patients with anaemia when the ferritin level is more than 60 microg/L.

  1. Development of docetaxel nanocrystals surface modified with transferrin for tumor targeting

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Seok; Park, Jeong-Sook

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop the surface modification of docetaxel nanocrystals (DTX-NCs) with apo-Transferrin human (Tf) for improving the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of DTX. DTX-NCs were prepared by a nanoprecipitation method, and the surface modified with Tf by an adsorption method (Tf-DTX-NCs). The morphology and particle size of DTX-NCs and Tf-DTX-NCs were characterized using a field emission scanning electron microscope and zetasizer. An in vitro drug release study was performed in phosphate-buffered saline containing 0.5% (w/v) Tween 80 for 24 hours. Cellular uptake was studied at 0.5, 1, and 2 hours. A cytotoxicity study was performed using the A549 (human lung cancer) cell line after 24-, 48-, and 72-hour treatments. The mean sizes were 295±97 and 398±102 nm for DTX-NCs and Tf-DTX-NCs, respectively. Tf-DTX-NCs and DTX-NCs exhibited rapid drug release, whereas DTX (pure) was slowly released. Tf-DTX-NCs showed higher cellular uptake than DTX-NCs in confocal microscopic and quantitative studies. Moreover, at DTX concentration of 100 µg/mL, Tf-DTX-NCs (82.6%±0.8%) showed higher cytotoxicity than DTX-NCs (77.4%±4.1%) and DTX (pure; 20.1%±4.6%) for 72-hour treatment. In conclusion, Tf-DTX-NCs significantly improved the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of DTX in the A549 cell line. PMID:28031702

  2. External detection of pulmonary accumulation of indium-113m labelled transferrin in the guinea pig.

    PubMed Central

    Hultkvist-Bengtsson, U; Mårtensson, L

    1990-01-01

    Accumulation of radioisotope labelled transferrin in the lungs of guinea pigs was determined with an external detection system. The method is based on the intravascular and extravascular distribution of indium-113m labelled transferrin compared with the intravascular distribution of technetium-99m labelled red blood cells. Guinea pigs were given iloprost, a prostacyclin analogue and potent pulmonary vasodilator, and noradrenaline, a pulmonary vasoconstrictor, in an attempt to increase and decrease respectively the blood volume in the lungs. Neither agent altered transferrin accumulation in the lung by comparison with a saline infusion. Iloprost infused before and after oleic acid infusion reduced macro-molecular leakage when compared with oleic acid alone. These data suggest that the double isotope method can distinguish between hydrostatic and injury induced pulmonary oedema. PMID:1699294

  3. An unusual case of iron deficiency anemia is associated with extremely low level of transferrin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shuangying; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Juan; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-01-01

    A case study of a female patient, diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia, was unresponsive to oral iron treatment and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy, a clinical profile resembling the iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) disorder. However, the patient failed to exhibit microcytic phenotype, one of the IRIDA hallmarks. Biochemical assays revealed that serum iron, hepcidin, interluekin 6, and transferrin saturation were within the normal range of references or were comparable to her non-anemic offspring. Iron contents in serum and red blood cells and hemoglobin levels were measured, which confirmed the partial improvement of anemia after parenteral iron therapy. Strikingly, serum transferrin receptor in patient was almost undetectable, reflecting the very low activity of bone-marrow erythropoiesis. Our data demonstrate that this is not a case of systemic iron deficiency, but rather cellular iron deficit due to the low level of transferrin receptor, particularly in erythroid tissue. PMID:26339443

  4. Characterization of iron uptake from transferrin by murine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, R; Savigni, D L; Morgan, E H; Baker, E

    2000-01-01

    Iron is required by the brain for normal function, however, the mechanisms by which it crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are poorly understood. The uptake and efflux of transferrin (Tf) and Fe by murine brain-derived (bEND3) and lymph node-derived (m1END1) endothelial cell lines was compared. The effects of iron chelators, metabolic inhibitors and the cellular activators, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), on Tf and Fe uptake were investigated. Cells were incubated with 59Fe-125I-Tf; Fe uptake was shown to increase linearly over time for both cell lines, while Tf uptake reached a plateau within 2 h. Both Tf and Fe uptake were saturable. bEND3 cells were shown to have half as many Tf receptors as m1END1 cells, but the mean cycling times of a Tf molecule were the same. Tf and Fe efflux from the cells were measured over time, revealing that after 2 h only 25% of the Tf but 80% of the Fe remained associated with the cells. Of 7 iron chelators, only deferriprone (L1) markedly decreased Tf uptake. However, Fe uptake was reduced by more than 50% by L1, pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PIH) and desferrithiocin (DFT). The cellular activators TNF-alpha or LPS had little effect on Tf turnover, but they accelerated Fe uptake in both endothelial cell types. Phenylarsenoxide (PhAsO) and N-ethyl maleimide (NEM), inhibitors of Tf endocytosis, reduced both Tf and Fe uptake in both cell lines, while bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of endosomal acidification, reduced Fe uptake but did not affect Tf uptake. The results suggest that Tf and Fe uptake by both bEND3 and m1END1 is via receptor-mediated endocytosis with release of Fe from Tf within the cell and recycling of apo-Tf. On the basis of Tf- and Fe-metabolism both cell lines are similar and therefore well suited for use in in vitro models for Fe transport across the BBB.

  5. Cell entry by human pathogenic arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Rojek, Jillian M; Kunz, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    The arenaviruses Lassa virus (LASV) in Africa and Machupo (MACV), Guanarito (GTOV) and Junin viruses (JUNV) in South America cause severe haemorrhagic fevers in humans with fatality rates of 15-35%. The present review focuses on the first steps of infection with human pathogenic arenaviruses, the interaction with their cellular receptor molecules and subsequent entry into the host cell. While similarities exist in genomic organization, structure and clinical disease caused by pathogenic Old World and New World arenaviruses these pathogens use different primary receptors. The Old World arenaviruses employ alpha-dystroglycan, a cellular receptor for proteins of the extracellular matrix, and the human pathogenic New World arenaviruses use the cellular cargo receptor transferrin receptor 1. While the New World arenavirus JUNV enters cells via clathrin-dependent endocytosis, evidence occurred for clathrin-independent entry of the prototypic Old World arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Upon internalization, arenaviruses are delivered to the endosome, where pH-dependent membrane fusion is mediated by the envelope glycoprotein (GP). While arenavirus GPs share characteristics with class I fusion GPs of other enveloped viruses, unusual mechanistic features of GP-mediated membrane fusion have recently been discovered for arenaviruses with important implications for viral entry.

  6. Transferrin binding and iron uptake by mouse lymph node cells during transformation in response to concanavalin A.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, J H; Rankin, M C

    1981-01-01

    Mouse lymph node cells cultured with Concanavalin A (Con A) in serum-free medium containing 59Fe-transferrin took up 59Fe more rapidly than cells cultured without Con-A. Uptake of iron commenced rapidly and preceded the onset of DNA synthesis in stimulated cells. Total uptake of transferrin during culture was much lower than that of iron, indicating that cells could remove iron from transferrin. The released transferrin appeared to be undergraded. Lymphoblasts bound six times more transferrin per cell than small lymphocytes. Lymphocytes also took up iron from citrate and nitrilotriacetate complexes, and iron so acquired was not readily removed by desferrioxamine, indicating that it was not bound extracellularly. PMID:7251060

  7. Immunization with Recombinant Transferrin Binding Protein B Enhances Clearance of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae from the Rat Lung

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Dianne C.; Cripps, Allan W.

    1999-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) is an opportunistic pathogen, and heterogeneity in the surface-exposed immunodominant domains of NTHI proteins is thought to be associated with the failure of an infection to stimulate an immune response that is cross-protective against heterologous NTHI strains. The aim of this study was to assess the vaccine potential of a surface-exposed component of the NTHI human transferrin receptor, TbpB, and to determine if the antibody response elicited was cross-reactive with heterologous strains of NTHI. The efficacy of immunization with a recombinant form of TbpB (rTbpB) was determined by assessing the pulmonary clearance of viable bacteria 4 h after a live challenge with NTHI. There was a significant reduction in the number of viable bacteria in both the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (34% for the 20-μg dose and 58% for the 40-μg dose) and lung homogenates (26% for the 20-μg dose and 60% for the 40-μg dose) of rats immunized with rTbpB compared to the control animals. While rTbpB-specific antibodies from immunized rats were nonspecific in the recognition of TbpB from six heterologous NTHI strains on Western blots, these antibodies differed in their ability to block transferrin binding to heterologous strains and to cross-react in bactericidal assays. If bactericidal antibodies are key indicators of the efficacy of the immune response in eliminating NTHI, this data suggests that while immunization with rTbpB stimulates protective responses against the homologous isolate, variability in the recognition of TbpB from heterologous isolates may limit the potential of rTbpB as an NTHI vaccine component. PMID:10225866

  8. Engineered Polymer-Transferrin Conjugates as Self-Assembling Targeted Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Makwana, Hiteshri; Mastrotto, Francesca; Magnusson, Johannes Pall; Sleep, Darrell; Hay, Joanna; Nicholls, Karl J; Allen, Stephanie; Alexander, Cameron

    2017-03-28

    Polymer-protein conjugates can be engineered to self-assemble into discrete and well-defined drug delivery systems which combine the advantages of receptor targeting and controlled drug release. We designed specific conjugates of the iron-binding and transport protein, transferrin (Tf), to combine the advantages of this serum-stable protein as a targeting agent for cancer cells with self-assembling polymers to act as carriers of cytotoxic drugs. Tf variants were expressed with cysteine residues at sites spanning different regions of the protein surface and the polymer conjugates grown from these variants were compared with polymer conjugates grown from non-selectively derivatised sites on native Tf. The resulting synthetic biopolymer hybrids were evaluated for self-assembly properties, size and topology, ability to carry an anti-cancer drug (paclitaxel) and cytotoxicity with and without a drug payload in a representative human colon cancer cell line. The results demonstrated that the engineered Tf variant polymer conjugates formed better-defined self-assembled nanoparticles than the non-selectively derivatised conjugates and showed greater efficacy in paclitaxel delivery. A polymer conjugate grown from a specific Tf variant, S415C was found to be taken up rapidly into cancer cells expressing the Tf-receptor, and, while tolerated well by cells in the absence of drugs, was as cytotoxic as free paclitaxel when loaded with the drug. Importantly, the S415C conjugate polymer was not the most active variant in Tf-receptor binding, suggesting that the nanoscale self-assembly of the polymer-protein hybrid is also a key factor in delivery efficacy. The data overall suggest new design rules for polymer-biopolymer hybrids and therapeutic delivery systems which include engineering specific residues for conjugation which mediate nanoscale assembly as well as control of ligand-receptor interactions to target specific cell types.

  9. Analysis of the Immunological Responses to Transferrin and Lactoferrin Receptor Proteins from Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rong-hua; Bonnah, Robert A.; Ainsworth, Samuel; Schryvers, Anthony B.

    1999-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis expresses surface receptor proteins that specifically bind host transferrin (Tf) and lactoferrin (Lf) in the first step of the iron acquisition pathway. Acute- and convalescent-phase antisera from a series of patients with M. catarrhalis pulmonary infections were tested against Tf and Lf receptor proteins purified from the corresponding isolates. After the purified proteins had been separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting, we observed strong reactivity against Tf-binding protein B (TbpB; also called OMP1) and Lf-binding protein B (LbpB) but little or no reactivity against Tf-binding protein A (TbpA) or Lf-binding protein A (LbpA), using the convalescent-phase antisera. Considerable antigenic heterogeneity was observed when TbpBs and LbpBs isolated from different strains were tested with the convalescent-phase antisera. Comparison to the reactivity against electroblotted total cellular proteins revealed that the immune response against LbpB and TbpB constitutes a significant portion of the total detectable immune response to M. catarrhalis proteins. Preparations of affinity-isolated TbpA and LbpA reacted with convalescent-phase antisera in a solid-phase binding assay, but blocking with soluble TbpB, soluble LbpB, or extracts from an LbpA− mutant demonstrated that this reactivity was attributed to contaminants in the TbpA and LbpA preparations. These studies demonstrate the immunogenicity of M. catarrhalis TbpB and LbpB in humans and support their potential as vaccine candidates. PMID:10417140

  10. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α Controls Iron Metabolism and Regulates Transferrin Receptor 2 in Mouse Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Masayuki; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Mizui, Yumiko; Sasaki, Shota; Fujimura, Takafumi; Takizawa, Masayuki; Ariga, Nagayuki; Ozaki, Hiroaki; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Inoue, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential element in biological systems, but excess iron promotes the formation of reactive oxygen species, resulting in cellular toxicity. Several iron-related genes are highly expressed in the liver, a tissue in which hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) plays a critical role in controlling gene expression. Therefore, the role of hepatic HNF4α in iron homeostasis was examined using liver-specific HNF4α-null mice (Hnf4aΔH mice). Hnf4aΔH mice exhibit hypoferremia and a significant change in hepatic gene expression. Notably, the expression of transferrin receptor 2 (Tfr2) mRNA was markedly decreased in Hnf4aΔH mice. Promoter analysis of the Tfr2 gene showed that the basal promoter was located at a GC-rich region upstream of the transcription start site, a region that can be transactivated in an HNF4α-independent manner. HNF4α-dependent expression of Tfr2 was mediated by a proximal promoter containing two HNF4α-binding sites located between the transcription start site and the translation start site. Both the GC-rich region of the basal promoter and the HNF4α-binding sites were required for maximal transactivation. Moreover, siRNA knockdown of HNF4α suppressed TFR2 expression in human HCC cells. These results suggest that Tfr2 is a novel target gene for HNF4α, and hepatic HNF4α plays a critical role in iron homeostasis. PMID:26527688

  11. Detection and measurement of carbohydrate deficient transferrin in serum using immuno-capture mass spectrometry: diagnostic applications for annual ryegrass toxicity and corynetoxin exposure.

    PubMed

    Penno, M A S; Colegate, S M; Michalski, W P; Hoffmann, P

    2012-10-01

    The neurological livestock disease annual ryegrass toxicity (ARGT) is caused by the ingestion of the naturally occurring glycolipid toxins - the corynetoxins. Corynetoxins also threaten human health as potential contaminants of the food supply. Presently, there are no routine diagnostic tests for corynetoxins-exposure in humans or livestock. Chronic ingestion of corynetoxins has been modeled in rats exposed to dietary tunicamycins for 12 months and carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) has been previously identified as a candidate disease biomarker. Here, the technique of immuno-capture mass spectrometry (icMS) was used to evaluate serum levels of CDT, discriminating between control and tunicamycins-exposed rats with 85% accuracy. The icMS approach is based on the combination of specific transferrin enrichment with functionalized magnetic beads and automated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). With no other clinically-relevant diagnostic tests available icMS could be readily adapted for high-throughput clinical assessment of corynetoxins-exposure in humans or livestock.

  12. Transferrin liposomes of docetaxel for brain-targeted cancer applications: formulation and brain theranostics.

    PubMed

    Sonali; Singh, Rahul Pratap; Singh, Nitesh; Sharma, Gunjan; Vijayakumar, Mahalingam R; Koch, Biplob; Singh, Sanjay; Singh, Usha; Dash, Debabrata; Pandey, Bajarangprasad L; Muthu, Madaswamy S

    2016-05-01

    Diagnosis and therapy of brain cancer was often limited due to low permeability of delivery materials across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and their poor penetration into the brain tissue. This study explored the possibility of utilizing theranostic d-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate mono-ester (TPGS) liposomes as nanocarriers for minimally invasive brain-targeted imaging and therapy (brain theranostics). The aim of this work was to formulate transferrin conjugated TPGS coated theranostic liposomes, which contain both docetaxel and quantum dots (QDs) for imaging and therapy of brain cancer. The theranostic liposomes with and without transferrin decoration were prepared and characterized for their particle size, polydispersity, morphology, drug encapsulation efficiency, in-vitro release study and brain theranostics. The particle sizes of the non-targeted and targeted theranostic liposomes were found below 200 nm. Nearly, 71% of drug encapsulation efficiency was achieved with liposomes. The drug release from transferrin conjugated theranostic liposomes was sustained for more than 72 h with 70% of drug release. The in-vivo results indicated that transferrin receptor-targeted theranostic liposomes could be a promising carrier for brain theranostics due to nano-sized delivery and its permeability which provided an improved and prolonged brain targeting of docetaxel and QDs in comparison to the non-targeted preparations.

  13. Disparities between immobilized enzyme and solution based digestion of transferrin with trypsin.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Regnier, Fred E

    2013-02-01

    Trypsin digestion is a major component of preparing proteins for peptide based identification and quantification by mass spectral (MS) analysis. Surprisingly proteolysis is the slowest part of the proteomics process by an order of magnitude. Numerous recent efforts to reduce protein digestion to a few minutes have centered on the use of an immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) to minimize both trypsin autolysis and vastly increase the trypsin to protein ratio. A central question in this approach is whether proteolysis with an IMER produces the same peptide cleavage products as derived from solution based digestion. The studies reported here examined this question with transferrin; a model protein of known resistance to trypsin digestion. Results from these studies confirmed that a trypsin-IMER can in fact digest transferrin in a few minutes; providing tryptic peptides that subsequent to MS analysis allow sequence identification equivalent to solution digestion. Although many of the peptides obtained from these two trypsin digestion systems were identical, many were not. The greatest difference was that the trypsin- IMER produces (i) numerous peptides bearing multiple lysine and/or arginine residues and (ii) identical portions of the protein sequence were found in multiple peptides. Most of these peptides were derived from five regions in transferrin. These results were interpreted to mean that proteolysis in the case of transferrin occurred faster than the rate at which buried lysine and arginine residues were unmasked in the five regions providing peptides that were only partially digested.

  14. Mutation analysis of the transferrin receptor-2 gene in patients with iron overload.

    PubMed

    Lee, P L; Halloran, C; West, C; Beutler, E

    2001-01-01

    Three mutations in the transferrin receptor-2 gene have recently been identified in four Sicilian families with iron overload who had a normal hemochromatosis gene, HFE (C. Camaschella, personal communication). To determine the extent to which mutations in the transferrin receptor-2 gene occur in other populations with iron overload, we have completely sequenced this gene in 17 whites, 10 Asians, and 8 African Americans with iron overload and a C282C/C282C HFE genotype, as well as 4 subjects without iron overload and homozygous for the mutant HFE C282Y genotype, 5 patients with iron overload and homozygous for the mutant HFE C282Y genotype, and 5 normal individuals. None of the individuals exhibited the Sicilian mutations, Y250X in exon 6, M172K in exon 4, and E60X in exon 2. One iron-overloaded individual of Asian descent exhibited a I238M mutation which was subsequently found to be a polymorphism present in the Asian population at a frequency of 0.0192. The presence of the I238M mutation was not associated with an increase in ferritin or transferrin saturation levels. Three silent polymorphisms were also identified, nt 1770 (D590D) and nt 1851 (A617A) and a polymorphism at nt 2255 in the 3' UTR. Thus, mutations in the transferrin receptor-2 gene were not responsible for the iron overload seen in our subjects.

  15. A comparative, cross-species investigation of the properties and roles of transferrin- and lactoferrin-binding protein B from pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ostan, N; Morgenthau, A; Yu, R H; Gray-Owen, S D; Schryvers, A B

    2017-02-01

    Pathogenic bacteria from the families Neisseriaeceae and Moraxellaceae acquire iron from their host using surface receptors that have the ability to hijack iron from the iron-sequestering host proteins transferrin (Tf) and lactoferrin (Lf). The process of acquiring iron from Tf has been well-characterized, including the role of the surface lipoprotein transferrin-binding protein B (TbpB). In contrast, the only well-defined role for the homologue, LbpB, is in its protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides, which is mediated by regions present in some LbpBs that are highly enriched in glutamic or aspartic acid. In this study we compare the Tf-TbpB and the Lf-LbpB interactions and examine the protective effect of LbpB against extracts from human and transgenic mouse neutrophils to gains insights into the physiological roles of LbpB. The results indicate that in contrast to the Tf-TbpB interaction, Lf-LbpB interaction is sensitive to pH and varies between species. In addition, the results with transgenic mouse neutrophils raise the question of whether there is species specificity in the cleavage of Lf to generate cationic antimicrobial peptides or differences in the potency of peptides derived from mouse and human Lf.

  16. Influence of endurance exercise (triathlon) on circulating transferrin receptors and other indicators of iron status in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Röcker, Lothar; Hinz, Katrin; Holland, Karsten; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Vogelgesang, Jens; Kiesewetter, Holger

    2002-01-01

    Numerous reports have described a poor iron status in female endurance athletes. However, the traditionally applied indicators of iron status (hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin) may not truly reflect the iron status. Therefore we studied the newly developed soluble transferrin receptor and other indicators of iron status in twelve female endurance athletes before and after a triathlon race. Resting values showed a poor iron status in the participants of the race. Serum TfR concentration increased slightly after the race. However, if the values are corrected for hemoconcentration no change could be found. Hemoglobin, serum ferritin and transferrin values were increased after the race.

  17. Rapid Lymphatic Dissemination of Encapsulated Group A Streptococci via Lymphatic Vessel Endothelial Receptor-1 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lynskey, Nicola N; Banerji, Suneale; Johnson, Louise A; Holder, Kayla A; Reglinski, Mark; Wing, Peter A C; Rigby, David; Jackson, David G; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-09-01

    The host lymphatic network represents an important conduit for pathogen dissemination. Indeed, the lethal human pathogen group A streptococcus has a predilection to induce pathology in the lymphatic system and draining lymph nodes, however the underlying basis and subsequent consequences for disease outcome are currently unknown. Here we report that the hyaluronan capsule of group A streptococci is a crucial virulence determinant for lymphatic tropism in vivo, and further, we identify the lymphatic vessel endothelial receptor-1 as the critical host receptor for capsular hyaluronan in the lymphatic system. Interference with this interaction in vivo impeded bacterial dissemination to local draining lymph nodes and, in the case of a hyper-encapsulated M18 strain, redirected streptococcal entry into the blood circulation, suggesting a pivotal role in the manifestation of streptococcal infections. Our results reveal a novel function for bacterial capsular polysaccharide in directing lymphatic tropism, with potential implications for disease pathology.

  18. Soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) protects against experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Piddlesden, S J; Jiang, S; Levin, J L; Vincent, A; Morgan, B P

    1996-12-01

    The loss of muscle function seen in myasthenia gravis and in the animal model of the disease, experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) is in part due to the activation of complement by anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies at the motor end-plate. In this study we describe the effects of a soluble recombinant form of human complement receptor 1 (sCR1) on the development of clinical disease and receptor loss in EAMG induced passively by administration of anti-AChR antibodies. Daily intraperitoneal injection of sCR1 significantly reduced the weight loss and severity of clinical symptoms seen and allowed treated animals to recover normal muscle function. These data suggest that sCR1 could provide a useful additional therapeutic agent in myasthenia.

  19. Rapid Lymphatic Dissemination of Encapsulated Group A Streptococci via Lymphatic Vessel Endothelial Receptor-1 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Louise A.; Holder, Kayla A.; Reglinski, Mark; Wing, Peter A. C.; Rigby, David; Jackson, David G.; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-01-01

    The host lymphatic network represents an important conduit for pathogen dissemination. Indeed, the lethal human pathogen group A streptococcus has a predilection to induce pathology in the lymphatic system and draining lymph nodes, however the underlying basis and subsequent consequences for disease outcome are currently unknown. Here we report that the hyaluronan capsule of group A streptococci is a crucial virulence determinant for lymphatic tropism in vivo, and further, we identify the lymphatic vessel endothelial receptor-1 as the critical host receptor for capsular hyaluronan in the lymphatic system. Interference with this interaction in vivo impeded bacterial dissemination to local draining lymph nodes and, in the case of a hyper-encapsulated M18 strain, redirected streptococcal entry into the blood circulation, suggesting a pivotal role in the manifestation of streptococcal infections. Our results reveal a novel function for bacterial capsular polysaccharide in directing lymphatic tropism, with potential implications for disease pathology. PMID:26352587

  20. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H.; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  1. Multiple Roles for Nogo Receptor 1 in Visual System Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Stephany, Céleste-Élise; Frantz, Michael G; McGee, Aaron W

    2016-12-01

    During the developmental critical period for visual plasticity, discordant vision alters the responsiveness of neurons in visual cortex. The subsequent closure of the critical period not only consolidates neural function but also limits recovery of acuity from preceding abnormal visual experience. Despite species-specific differences in circuitry of the visual system, these characteristics are conserved. The nogo-66 receptor 1 (ngr1) is one of only a small number of genes identified thus far that is essential to closing the critical period. Mice lacking a functional ngr1 gene retain developmental visual plasticity as adults and their visual acuity spontaneously improves after prolonged visual deprivation. Experiments employing conditional mouse genetics have revealed that ngr1 restricts plasticity within distinct circuits for ocular dominance and visual acuity. However, the mechanisms by which NgR1 limits plasticity have not been elucidated, in part because the subcellular localization and signal transduction of the protein are only partially understood. Here we explore potential mechanisms for NgR1 function in relation to manipulations that reactivate visual plasticity in adults and propose lines of investigation to address relevant gaps in knowledge.

  2. Collagen Fibril Ultrastructure in Mice Lacking Discoidin Domain Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Tonniges, Jeffrey R; Albert, Benjamin; Calomeni, Edward P; Roy, Shuvro; Lee, Joan; Mo, Xiaokui; Cole, Susan E; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2016-06-01

    The quantity and quality of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have a pivotal role in dictating biological processes. Several collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) are known to modulate collagen deposition and fibril diameter. However, limited studies exist on alterations in the fibril ultrastructure by CBPs. In this study, we elucidate how the collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) regulates the collagen content and ultrastructure in the adventitia of DDR1 knock-out (KO) mice. DDR1 KO mice exhibit increased collagen deposition as observed using Masson's trichrome. Collagen ultrastructure was evaluated in situ using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Although the mean fibril diameter was not significantly different, DDR1 KO mice had a higher percentage of fibrils with larger diameter compared with their wild-type littermates. No significant differences were observed in the length of D-periods. In addition, collagen fibrils from DDR1 KO mice exhibited a small, but statistically significant, increase in the depth of the fibril D-periods. Consistent with these observations, a reduction in the depth of D-periods was observed in collagen fibrils reconstituted with recombinant DDR1-Fc. Our results elucidate how DDR1 modulates collagen fibril ultrastructure in vivo, which may have important consequences in the functional role(s) of the underlying ECM.

  3. Collagen Fibril Ultrastructure in Mice Lacking Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Tonniges, Jeffrey R.; Albert, Benjamin; Calomeni, Edward P.; Roy, Shuvro; Lee, Joan; Mo, Xiaokui; Cole, Susan E.; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2016-01-01

    The quantity and quality of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have a pivotal role in dictating biological processes. Several collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) are known to modulate collagen deposition and fibril diameter. However, limited studies exist on alterations in the fibril ultrastructure by CBPs. In this study, we elucidate how the collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) regulates the collagen content and ultrastructure in the adventitia of DDR1 knock-out (KO) mice. DDR1 KO mice exhibit increased collagen deposition as observed using Masson’s trichrome. Collagen ultrastructure was evaluated in situ using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Although the mean fibril diameter was not significantly different, DDR1 KO mice had a higher percentage of fibrils with larger diameter compared with their wild-type littermates. No significant differences were observed in the length of D-periods. In addition, collagen fibrils from DDR1 KO mice exhibited a small, but statistically significant, increase in the depth of the fibril D-periods. Consistent with these observations, a reduction in the depth of D-periods was observed in collagen fibrils reconstituted with recombinant DDR1-Fc. Our results elucidate how DDR1 modulates collagen fibril ultrastructure in vivo, which may have important consequences in the functional role(s) of the underlying ECM. PMID:27329311

  4. Cannabinoid receptor 1 ligands revisited: Pharmacological assessment in the ACTOne system.

    PubMed

    Presley, Chaela S; Abidi, Ammaar H; Moore, Bob M

    2016-04-01

    In vitro cannabinoid pharmacology has evolved over time from simple receptor binding to include [(35)S]GTPγ, β-arrestin, and cAMP assays. Each assay has benefits and drawbacks; however, no single functional system has been used for high-throughput evaluation of compounds from binding to pharmacological functionality and antagonist assessment in a well-characterized human cell line. In this study, we evaluated and validated one system-ACTOne human embryonic kidney cells transfected with a cyclic nucleotide gated channel and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1)-and compared human CB1 affinity, functional, and antagonistic effects on cAMP with previously published results. The study was conducted on a diverse group of CB1 ligands, including endocannabinoids and related compounds, 2-AG, AEA, MAEA, and ACEA, the phytocannabinoid Δ(9) THC, and synthetic cannabinoids CP 55,940, WIN 55,212-2, SR 141716A, CP 945,598, and WIN 55,212-3. Our results were compared with literature values where human CB1 was used for affinity determination and cAMP was used as a functional readout. Here we report the first detailed evaluation of the ACTOne assay for the pharmacological evaluation of CB1 ligands. The results from the study reveal some interesting deviations from previously reported functional activities of the aforementioned ligands.

  5. Transferrin receptor 2 and HFE regulate furin expression via mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/Erk) signaling. Implications for transferrin-dependent hepcidin regulation

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Maura; Luscieti, Sara; Gandini, Valentina; Maccarinelli, Federica; Finazzi, Dario; Silvestri, Laura; Roetto, Antonella; Arosio, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Background Impaired regulation of hepcidin in response to iron is the cause of genetic hemochromatosis associated with defects of HFE and transferrin receptor 2. However, the role of these proteins in the regulation of hepcidin expression is unclear. Design and Methods Hepcidin expression, SMAD and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) phosphorylation and furin expression were analyzed in hepatic HepG2 cells in which HFE and transferrin receptor 2 were down-regulated or expressed, or furin activity specifically inhibited. Furin expression was also analyzed in the liver of transferrin receptor 2 null mice. Results We showed that the silencing of HFE and transferrin receptor 2 reduced both Erk phosphorylation and furin expression, that the exogenous expression of the two enhanced the induction of phosphoErk1/2 and furin by holotransferrin, but that this did not occur when the pathogenic HFE mutant C282Y was expressed. Furin, phosphoErk1/2 and phosphoSMAD1/5/8 were down-regulated also in transferrin receptor 2-null mice. Treatment of HepG2 cells with an inhibitor of furin activity caused a strong suppression of hepcidin mRNA, probably due to the inhibition of bone morphogenic protein maturation. Conclusions The data indicate that transferrin receptor 2 and HFE are involved in holotransferrin-dependent signaling for the regulation of furin which involved Erk phosphorylation. Furin in turn may control hepcidin expression. PMID:20634490

  6. Transferrin receptor 2: Continued expression in mouse liver in the face of iron overload and in hereditary hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Robert E.; Migas, Mary C.; Holden, Christopher C.; Waheed, Abdul; Britton, Robert S.; Tomatsu, Shunji; Bacon, Bruce R.; Sly, William S.

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a common autosomal recessive disorder characterized by excess absorption of dietary iron and progressive iron deposition in several tissues, particularly liver. Liver disease resulting from iron toxicity is the major cause of death in HH. Hepatic iron loading in HH is progressive despite down-regulation of the classical transferrin receptor (TfR). Recently a human cDNA highly homologous to TfR was identified and reported to encode a protein (TfR2) that binds holotransferrin and mediates uptake of transferrin-bound iron. We independently identified a full-length murine EST encoding the mouse orthologue of the human TfR2. Although homologous to murine TfR in the coding region, the TfR2 transcript does not contain the iron-responsive elements found in the 3′ untranslated sequence of TfR mRNA. To determine the potential role for TfR2 in iron uptake by liver, we investigated TfR and TfR2 expression in normal mice and murine models of dietary iron overload (2% carbonyl iron), dietary iron deficiency (gastric parietal cell ablation), and HH (HFE −/−). Northern blot analyses demonstrated distinct tissue-specific patterns of expression for TfR and TfR2, with TfR2 expressed highly only in liver where TfR expression is low. In situ hybridization demonstrated abundant TfR2 expression in hepatocytes. In contrast to TfR, TfR2 expression in liver was not increased in iron deficiency. Furthermore, hepatic expression of TfR2 was not down-regulated with dietary iron loading or in the HFE −/− model of HH. From these observations, we propose that TfR2 allows continued uptake of Tf-bound iron by hepatocytes even after TfR has been down-regulated by iron overload, and this uptake contributes to the susceptibility of liver to iron loading in HH. PMID:10681454

  7. Anti-tumor activity of paclitaxel through dual-targeting carrier of cyclic RGD and transferrin conjugated hyperbranched copolymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing; Liu, Yuexian; Su, Shishuai; Li, Wei; Chen, Chunying; Wu, Yan

    2012-02-01

    Targeted delivery strategies are becoming increasingly important. Herein, a novel hyperbranched amphiphilic poly[(amine-ester)-co-(D,L-lactide)]/1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine copolymer (HPAE-co-PLA/DPPE) with RGD peptide (cRGDfK) and transferrin (Tf) on the periphery was synthesized and used to prepare paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) for dual-targeting chemotherapy. These NPs show satisfactory size distribution, high encapsulated efficiency and a pH-dependent release profile. The intrinsic fluorescence of the hyperbranched copolymer renders the detection and tracking of NPs in vitro and in vivo conveniently. In vitro cytotoxicity studies proved that the presence of cRGDfK enhanced the cytotoxic efficiency by 10 folds in α(ν)β(3) integrin over-expressed human umbilical vein endothelial cells, while Tf improved cytotoxicity by 2 folds in Tf receptor over-expressed human cervical carcinoma cells. The drug-loaded NPs can be efficiently transported into the vascular endothelial cells and the target tumor cells. These results indicate that the cRGDfK and Tf decorated HPAE-co-PLA/DPPE could deliver chemotherapies specifically inside the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis with greater efficacy. Therefore, such a fluorescent nanocarrier prepared from non-cytotoxic and biodegradable polymers is promising for drug delivery in tumor therapy.

  8. Increased hepcidin in transferrin-treated thalassemic mice correlates with increased liver BMP2 expression and decreased hepatocyte ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiyong; Choesang, Tenzin; Li, Huihui; Sun, Shuming; Pham, Petra; Bao, Weili; Feola, Maria; Westerman, Mark; Li, Guiyuan; Follenzi, Antonia; Blanc, Lionel; Rivella, Stefano; Fleming, Robert E; Ginzburg, Yelena Z

    2016-03-01

    Iron overload results in significant morbidity and mortality in β-thalassemic patients. Insufficient hepcidin is implicated in parenchymal iron overload in β-thalassemia and approaches to increase hepcidin have therapeutic potential. We have previously shown that exogenous apo-transferrin markedly ameliorates ineffective erythropoiesis and increases hepcidin expression in Hbb(th1/th1) (thalassemic) mice. We utilize in vivo and in vitro systems to investigate effects of exogenous apo-transferrin on Smad and ERK1/2 signaling, pathways that participate in hepcidin regulation. Our results demonstrate that apo-transferrin increases hepcidin expression in vivo despite decreased circulating and parenchymal iron concentrations and unchanged liver Bmp6 mRNA expression in thalassemic mice. Hepatocytes from apo-transferrin-treated mice demonstrate decreased ERK1/2 pathway and increased serum BMP2 concentration and hepatocyte BMP2 expression. Furthermore, hepatocyte ERK1/2 phosphorylation is enhanced by neutralizing anti-BMP2/4 antibodies and suppressed in vitro in a dose-dependent manner by BMP2, resulting in converse effects on hepcidin expression, and hepatocytes treated with MEK/ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 in combination with BMP2 exhibit an additive increase in hepcidin expression. Lastly, bone marrow erythroferrone expression is normalized in apo-transferrin treated thalassemic mice but increased in apo-transferrin injected wild-type mice. These findings suggest that increased hepcidin expression after exogenous apo-transferrin is in part independent of erythroferrone and support a model in which apo-transferrin treatment in thalassemic mice increases BMP2 expression in the liver and other organs, decreases hepatocellular ERK1/2 activation, and increases nuclear Smad to increase hepcidin expression in hepatocytes.

  9. Experimental treatment of breast cancer-bearing BALB/c mice by artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Amir; Faezizadeh, Zohreh; Mesbah-Namin, Seyed Ali Reza; Saravani, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The combination of artemisinin and transferrin exhibits versatile anticancer activities. In previous, we successfully prepared artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposomes and evaluated their anti-proliferative activity against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines in vitro. In this study, we investigate the in vivo anti-breast cancer activity of artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposome against breast transplanted tumors in BALB/c mice model. Materials and Methods: Artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposomes were prepared and characterized for some physiochemical properties. Pieces of tumor tissue from the breast cancer-bearing BALB/c mice were transplanted subcutaneously to the syngeneic female BALB/c mice. In the presence of the external magnet that placed at the breast tumor site, the tissue distribution and tumor-suppressing effects of prepared nanoliposomes on tumor growth was evaluated. Results: The prepared nanoliposomes have fine spherical shape, rough surface, nano-sized diameter and magnetic properties. At 2 h after treatment, the intravenous administration of artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposomes followed using the magnetic field approximately produced 10- and 5.5-fold higher levels of artemisinin and transferrin in the tumors, respectively, compared with free artemisinin and transferrin. Moreover, in the presence of an external magnetic field, the prepared nanoliposomes could significantly induce apoptosis in the mice breast cancer cells as well as could reduce tumor volume in tumorized mice at 15 days after treatment. Conclusion: The data suggested that the artemisinin and transferrin-loaded magnetic nanoliposomes would be a good choice for the breast tumor-targeted therapy, due to its high targeting efficiency. PMID:26109756

  10. Snx3 regulates recycling of the transferrin receptor and iron assimilation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Caiyong; Garcia-Santos, Daniel; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Seguin, Alexandra; Li, Liangtao; Fegan, Katherine H; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J; Shah, Dhvanit I; Cooney, Jeffrey D; Chen, Wen; King, Matthew J; Yien, Yvette Y; Schultz, Iman J; Anderson, Heidi; Dalton, Arthur J; Freedman, Matthew L; Kingsley, Paul D; Palis, James; Hattangadi, Shilpa M; Lodish, Harvey F; Ward, Diane M; Kaplan, Jerry; Maeda, Takahiro; Ponka, Prem; Paw, Barry H

    2013-03-05

    Sorting of endocytic ligands and receptors is critical for diverse cellular processes. The physiological significance of endosomal sorting proteins in vertebrates, however, remains largely unknown. Here we report that sorting nexin 3 (Snx3) facilitates the recycling of transferrin receptor (Tfrc) and thus is required for the proper delivery of iron to erythroid progenitors. Snx3 is highly expressed in vertebrate hematopoietic tissues. Silencing of Snx3 results in anemia and hemoglobin defects in vertebrates due to impaired transferrin (Tf)-mediated iron uptake and its accumulation in early endosomes. This impaired iron assimilation can be complemented with non-Tf iron chelates. We show that Snx3 and Vps35, a component of the retromer, interact with Tfrc to sort it to the recycling endosomes. Our findings uncover a role of Snx3 in regulating Tfrc recycling, iron homeostasis, and erythropoiesis. Thus, the identification of Snx3 provides a genetic tool for exploring erythropoiesis and disorders of iron metabolism.

  11. Assessment of transferrin recycling by Triplet Lifetime Imaging in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Geissbuehler, Matthias; Kadlecova, Zuzana; Klok, Harm-Anton; Lasser, Theo

    2012-01-01

    An optical method is presented that allows the measurement of the triplet lifetime of a fluorescent molecule. This is a characteristic specific to each fluorophore. Based on differences in triplet lifetimes of two fluorescent species (autofluorescence versus label), this novel approach measures relative quantities of a transmembrane receptor and associated fluorescently labeled ligand during its recycling in living cells. Similarly to fluorescence-lifetime based methods, our approach is almost insensitive to photobleaching. A simple theory for unmixing two known triplet lifetimes is presented along with validation of the method by measurements of transferrin recycling in a model system based on chinese hamster ovarian cells (CHO). Transferrin is the delivery carrier for Fe3+ to the cell. PMID:23082293

  12. Enhanced optical immunosensor based on surface plasmon resonance for determination of transferrin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Sun, Ying; Song, Daqian; Zhang, Qinglin; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Hanqi

    2006-01-15

    Wavelength modulation surface plasmon resonance biosensors (SPR) using colloidal Au nanoparticles and double-linker sensing membrane enhancement are reported for determination of transferrin. The 2-mercaptoethylamine (MEA) was immobilized on the biosensor surface with traditional amine coupling method. The interaction between colloidal Au nanoparticles and MEA was investigated. The anti-transferrin was immobilized on the biosensor surface prepared with staphylococcal protein A (SPA). The interaction of the antibody and antigen was monitored in real time. The good response was obtained in the concentration range 1-20, 0.1-20 and 0.05-20 microg/mL for directly immune assay, double-linker assay and colloidal Au-amplified assay. The result clearly demonstrates that these methods may obtain significantly enhancement of sensitivity for the wavelength modulation SPR biosensor.

  13. Snx3 regulates recycling of the transferrin receptor and iron assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Caiyong; Garcia-Santos, Daniel; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Seguin, Alexandra; Li, Liangtao; Fegan, Katherine H.; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J.; Shah, Dhvanit I.; Cooney, Jeffrey D.; Chen, Wen; King, Matthew J.; Yien, Yvette Y.; Schultz, Iman J.; Anderson, Heidi; Dalton, Arthur J.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Kingsley, Paul D.; Palis, James; Hattangadi, Shilpa M.; Lodish, Harvey F.; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry; Maeda, Takahiro; Ponka, Prem; Paw, Barry H.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Sorting of endocytic ligands and receptors is critical for diverse cellular processes. The physiological significance of endosomal sorting proteins in vertebrates, however, remains largely unknown. Here we report that sorting nexin 3 (Snx3) facilitates the recycling of transferrin receptor (Tfrc), and thus is required for the proper delivery of iron to erythroid progenitors. Snx3 is highly expressed in vertebrate hematopoietic tissues. Silencing of Snx3 results in anemia and hemoglobin defects in vertebrates due to impaired transferrin (Tf)-mediated iron uptake and its accumulation in early endosomes. This impaired iron assimilation can be complemented with non-Tf iron chelates. We show that Snx3 and Vps35, a component of the retromer, interact with Tfrc to sort it to the recycling endosomes. Our findings uncover a role of Snx3 in regulating Tfrc recycling, iron homeostasis, and erythropoiesis. Thus, the identification of Snx3 provides a genetic tool for exploring erythropoiesis and disorders of iron metabolism. PMID:23416069

  14. Cell uptake of a biosensor detected by hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR: the transferrin case.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Céline; Stopin, Antoine; Lenda, Fatimazohra; Brotin, Thierry; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre; Jamin, Nadège; Sanson, Alain; Boulard, Yves; Leteurtre, François; Huber, Gaspard; Bogaert-Buchmann, Aurore; Tassali, Nawal; Desvaux, Hervé; Carrière, Marie; Berthault, Patrick

    2011-07-01

    For detection of biological events in vitro, sensors using hyperpolarized (129)Xe NMR can become a powerful tool, provided the approach can bridge the gap in sensitivity. Here we propose constructs based on the non-selective grafting of cryptophane precursors on holo-transferrin. This biological system was chosen because there are many receptors on the cell surface, and endocytosis further increases this density. The study of these biosensors with K562 cell suspensions via fluorescence microscopy and (129)Xe NMR indicates a strong interaction, as well as interesting features such as the capacity of xenon to enter the cryptophane even when the biosensor is endocytosed, while keeping a high level of polarization. Despite a lack of specificity for transferrin receptors, undoubtedly due to the hydrophobic character of the cryptophane moiety that attracts the biosensor into the cell membrane, these biosensors allow the first in-cell probing of biological events using hyperpolarized xenon.

  15. Toward standardization of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) measurements: III. Performance of native serum and serum spiked with disialotransferrin proves that harmonization of CDT assays is possible.

    PubMed

    Weykamp, Cas; Wielders, Jos P M; Helander, Anders; Anton, Raymond F; Bianchi, Vincenza; Jeppsson, Jan-Olof; Siebelder, Carla; Whitfield, John B; Schellenberg, François

    2013-05-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) is a generic term that refers to the transferrin glycoforms whose concentration in blood is temporarily increased by sustained alcohol consumption. Due to high clinical specificity, CDT was proposed as a biomarker of heavy alcohol use and has been available for about 20 years. A number of methods have been developed for CDT measurement based on different analytical techniques and principles and without any harmonization or calibration to a reference method. As a consequence, neither the reference limits nor the cut-off values have been similar across assays, hampering understanding of the diagnostic value of CDT and its routine use. This prompted the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) to initiate a Working Group on Standardization of CDT (WG-CDT). This third publication of the WG-CDT is devoted to testing the commutability of native and disialotransferrin-spiked serum panels as candidate secondary reference materials, in order to prove the harmonization potential of commercial CDT methods. The results showed that assay harmonization reduced the inter-laboratory imprecision in a network of reference laboratories running the HPLC candidate reference method. In the seven commercial methods evaluated in this study, the use of multi-level secondary calibrators of human serum origin significantly reduced the between-method imprecision. Thus, harmonization of CDT measurements by different methods can be achieved using this calibration system, opening the way for a full standardization of commercial methods against a reference method by use of certified reference materials.

  16. Interaction of lipids with the neurotensin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Bolivar, Juan H; Muñoz-García, Juan C; Castro-Dopico, Tomas; Dijkman, Patricia M; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Watts, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Information about lipid-protein interactions for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is scarce. Here, we use electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin-labelled lipids to study lipid interactions with the rat neurotensin receptor 1 (NTS1). A fusion protein containing rat NTS1 fully able to bind its ligand neurotensin was reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers at specific lipid:protein molar ratios. The fraction of motionally restricted lipids in the range of 40:1 to 80:1 lipids per receptor suggested an oligomeric state of the protein, and the result was unaffected by increasing the hydrophobic thickness of the lipid bilayer from C-18 to C-20 or C-22 chain length PC membranes. Comparison of the ESR spectra of different spin-labelled lipids allowed direct measurement of lipid binding constants relative to PC (Kr), with spin-labelled phosphatidylethanolamine (PESL), phosphatidylserine (PSSL), stearic acid (SASL), and a spin labelled cholesterol analogue (CSL) Kr values of 1.05±0.05, 1.92±0.08, 5.20±0.51 and 0.91±0.19, respectively. The results contrast with those from rhodopsin, the only other GPCR studied this way, which has no selectivity for the lipids analysed here. Molecular dynamics simulations of NTS1 in bilayers are in agreement with the ESR data, and point to sites in the receptor where PS could interact with higher affinity. Lipid selectivity could be necessary for regulation of ligand binding, oligomerisation and/or G protein activation processes. Our results provide insight into the potential modulatory mechanisms that lipids can exert on GPCRs.

  17. Corneal avascularity is due to soluble VEGF receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Ambati, Balamurali K; Nozaki, Miho; Singh, Nirbhai; Takeda, Atsunobu; Jani, Pooja D; Suthar, Tushar; Albuquerque, Romulo J C; Richter, Elizabeth; Sakurai, Eiji; Newcomb, Michael T; Kleinman, Mark E; Caldwell, Ruth B; Lin, Qing; Ogura, Yuichiro; Orecchia, Angela; Samuelson, Don A; Agnew, Dalen W; St Leger, Judy; Green, W Richard; Mahasreshti, Parameshwar J; Curiel, David T; Kwan, Donna; Marsh, Helene; Ikeda, Sakae; Leiper, Lucy J; Collinson, J Martin; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Khurana, Tejvir S; Shibuya, Masabumi; Baldwin, Megan E; Ferrara, Napoleone; Gerber, Hans-Peter; De Falco, Sandro; Witta, Jassir; Baffi, Judit Z; Raisler, Brian J; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2006-10-26

    Corneal avascularity-the absence of blood vessels in the cornea-is required for optical clarity and optimal vision, and has led to the cornea being widely used for validating pro- and anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategies for many disorders. But the molecular underpinnings of the avascular phenotype have until now remained obscure and are all the more remarkable given the presence in the cornea of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, a potent stimulator of angiogenesis, and the proximity of the cornea to vascularized tissues. Here we show that the cornea expresses soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sVEGFR-1; also known as sflt-1) and that suppression of this endogenous VEGF-A trap by neutralizing antibodies, RNA interference or Cre-lox-mediated gene disruption abolishes corneal avascularity in mice. The spontaneously vascularized corneas of corn1 and Pax6+/- mice and Pax6+/- patients with aniridia are deficient in sflt-1, and recombinant sflt-1 administration restores corneal avascularity in corn1 and Pax6+/- mice. Manatees, the only known creatures uniformly to have vascularized corneas, do not express sflt-1, whereas the avascular corneas of dugongs, also members of the order Sirenia, elephants, the closest extant terrestrial phylogenetic relatives of manatees, and other marine mammals (dolphins and whales) contain sflt-1, indicating that it has a crucial, evolutionarily conserved role. The recognition that sflt-1 is essential for preserving the avascular ambit of the cornea can rationally guide its use as a platform for angiogenic modulators, supports its use in treating neovascular diseases, and might provide insight into the immunological privilege of the cornea.

  18. Camel lactoferrin, a transferrin-cum-lactoferrin: crystal structure of camel apolactoferrin at 2.6 A resolution and structural basis of its dual role.

    PubMed

    Khan, J A; Kumar, P; Paramasivam, M; Yadav, R S; Sahani, M S; Sharma, S; Srinivasan, A; Singh, T P

    2001-06-08

    Camel lactoferrin is the first protein from the transferrin superfamily that has been found to display the characteristic functions of iron binding and release of lactoferrin as well as transferrin simultaneously. It was remarkable to observe a wide pH demarcation in the release of iron from two lobes. It loses 50 % iron at pH 6.5 and the remaining 50 % iron is released only at pH values between 4.0 and 2.0. Furthermore, proteolytically generated N and C-lobes of camel lactoferrin showed that the C-lobe lost iron at pH 6.5, while the N-lobe lost it only at pH less than 4.0. In order to establish the structural basis of this striking observation, the purified camel apolactoferrin was crystallized. The crystals belong to monoclinic space group C2 with unit cell dimensions a=175.8 A, b=80.9 A, c=56.4 A, beta=92.4 degrees and Z=4. The structure has been determined by the molecular replacement method and refined to an R-factor of 0.198 (R-free=0.268) using all the data in the resolution range of 20.0-2.6 A. The overall structure of camel apolactoferrin folds into two lobes which contain four distinct domains. Both lobes adopt open conformations indicating wide distances between the iron binding residues in the native iron-free form of lactoferrin. The dispositions of various residues of the iron binding pocket of the N-lobe of camel apolactoferrin are similar to those of the N-lobe in human apolactoferrin, while the corresponding residues in the C-lobe show a striking similarity with those in the C-lobes of duck and hen apo-ovotransferrins. These observations indicate that the N-lobe of camel apolactoferrin is structurally very similar to the N-lobe of human apolactoferrin and the structure of the C-lobe of camel apolactoferrin matches closely with those of the hen and duck apo-ovotransferrins. These observations suggest that the iron binding and releasing behaviour of the N-lobe of camel lactoferrin is similar to that of the N-lobe of human lactoferrin, whereas that of

  19. Oligodendrocyte differentiation and signaling after transferrin internalization: a mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Pérez, María Julia; Fernandez, Natalia; Pasquini, Juana María

    2013-10-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the cells producing the myelin membrane around the axons in the central nervous system and, although apotransferrin (aTf) is required for oligodendrocyte differentiation, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Fyn tyrosine kinase, a member of the Src family of proteins, has been shown to play an important role in myelination by up-regulating the expression of myelin basic protein; however, a molecular link between aTf and Fyn kinase signaling pathway during oligodendrocytes differentiation has not been established yet. Our aim was to investigate whether Fyn kinase, MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways are required for aTf-stimulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and also to determine if the transferrin receptor is involved in these mechanisms. Treatment of primary cultures of oligodendroglial precursor cells with aTf leads to Fyn kinase activation by a mechanism that involves transferrin receptor. In turn, Fyn kinase activation promotes MEK-mediated transient phosphorylation of ERK1/2. On the other hand, transferrin receptor internalization also produces rapid and sustained activation of Akt, which involves phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation. Finally, aTf incorporated through clathrin-mediated endocytosis increases myelin basic protein, F3-contactin and β-tubulin through Fyn/MEK/ERK pathways, as well as an activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Our results also demonstrate that the activation of the pathways necessary for oligodendroglial precursor cell maturation is dependent on AP2 recruitment onto the plasma membrane for clathrin-mediated endocytosis of transferrin receptor.

  20. Transferrin hypoglycosylation in hereditary fructose intolerance: using the clues and avoiding the pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, M; Płoski, R; Rokicki, D; Morava, E; Gizewska, M; Mierzewska, H; Pollak, A; Lefeber, D J; Wevers, R A; Pronicka, E

    2007-06-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is caused by a deficiency of aldolase B due to mutations of the ALDOB gene. The disease poses diagnostic problems because of unspecific clinical manifestations. We report three cases of HFI all of whom had a chronic disease with neurological, nephrological or gastroenterological symptoms, whereas nutritional fructose intolerance, the pathognomonic sign of HFI, was apparent only in retrospect. In all patients a hypoglycosylated pattern of transferrin isoforms was found but was misinterpreted as a sign of CDG Ix. The correct diagnosis was achieved with marked delay (26, 36 and 24 months, respectively) by sequencing of the ALDOB gene two common mutations were identified on both alleles or on one (A150P/A175D, A150P/-, and A150P/A175D). The diagnosis was further supported by normalization of transferrin isoforms on a fructose-free diet. Data available in two patients showed that following the fructose restriction the type I pattern of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin detectable on fructose-containing diet disappeared after 3-4 weeks. These cases illustrate that in the first years of life HFI may show misleading variability in clinical presentation and that protein glycosylation analysis such as transferrin isofocusing may give important diagnostic clues. However, care should be taken not to misinterpret the abnormal results as CDG Ix as well as to remember that a normal profile does not exclude HFI due to the possibility of spontaneous fructose restriction in the diet. The presented data also emphasize the usefulness of ALDOB mutation screening for diagnosis of HFI.

  1. [Transferrin concentration in seminal plasma in testicular varicocele with various sperm concentrations and various forms of azoospermia].

    PubMed

    Sigg, C; Brüngger, A; Rakosi, T

    1994-01-01

    Seminal plasma transferrin concentrations were measured in semen samples from 424 men attending a fertility unit. There was a clear positive correlation between seminal plasma transferrin concentration and sperm density: transferrin concentrations decrease with decreasing sperm density and are lowest in patients with azoospermia and those who have undergone vasectomy. The differences between the various groups in sperm density are highly significant, but individual data counts also vary widely. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that in polyzoospermia the seminal plasma transferrin concentration is increased, suggesting primary tubular hyperactivity. No correlations with other seminal parameters or hormonal values were found. Seminal plasma transferrin concentrations in normozoospermia and in varicocele testis or in cases with increased numbers of immature germ cells in the ejaculate were not significantly different. This may be interpreted as indicative of intact secretory activity of Sertoli cells in both varicocele and increased desquamation of immature germ cells. The absence of correlation with any of several important spermatological parameters and our inability to differentiate between azoospermia caused by obstruction and by tubular impairment indicate that seminal plasma transferrin is not a useful marker for Sertoli cell function or for seminiferous tubular dysfunction.

  2. Cloning and expression of a transferrin-binding protein from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, G F; Anderson, C; Potter, A A; Klashinsky, S; Willson, P J

    1992-01-01

    An expression library was constructed from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 7. Escherichia coli transformants expressing recombinant proteins were identified by immunoscreening with porcine convalescent serum. One transformant expressing a 60-kDa protein (60K protein) in aggregated form was identified. Serum raised against the recombinant protein recognized a polypeptide with an indistinguishable electrophoretic mobility in the A. pleuropneumoniae wild type after iron-restricted growth only. The recombinant protein bound transferrin after blotting onto nitrocellulose. Using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the specificity of this binding for the amino-terminal half of iron-saturated porcine transferrin was established. Also, the 60K wild-type protein bound hemin as assessed by hemin-agarose chromatography. Hemin could inhibit transferrin binding of the recombinant protein in the competitive ELISA, whereas hemoglobin and synthetic iron chelators failed to do so. Southern blot analysis of several other A. pleuropneumoniae strains indicated that highly homologous sequence is present in eight of eight isolates of serotype 7 and in some isolates of serotypes 2, 3, and 4. Images PMID:1541562

  3. Serum transferrin receptor levels in the evaluation of iron deficiency in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Rusia, U; Flowers, C; Madan, N; Agarwal, N; Sood, S K; Sikka, M

    1996-10-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a major global problem. Early onset of iron deficiency in developing countries makes it imperative to identify iron deficiency in neonates. Most conventional laboratory parameters of iron status fail to distinguish neonates with iron deficient erythropoiesis. Serum transferrin receptor (STFR) levels are a recent sensitive measure of iron deficiency and the present study was carried out to evaluate the usefulness of cord serum transferrin receptors in identifying iron deficient erythropoiesis in neonates. A complete hemogram, red cell indices, iron profile: serum iron (SI), percent transferrin saturation (TS%) and serum ferritin (SF) was carried out in 100 full-term neonates and their mothers at parturition. Cord and maternal STFR levels were estimated using a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. Anemic women had a significantly lower SI, their TS% and high STFR levels suggesting that iron deficiency was responsible for the anemia. In the neonates of iron deficient mothers, cord SI, TS% and cord ferritin were not significantly different from those of neonates born to non-anemic mothers. Cord STFR level correlated well with hemoglobin (Hb) and laboratory parameters of iron status, and its level was significantly higher in neonates born to anemic mothers than in those born to non-anemic mothers. It was the only laboratory parameter to differentiate between neonates born to anemic and non-anemic mothers. Therefore, STFR is a sensitive index of iron status in neonates and identifies neonates with iron deficient erythropoiesis.

  4. Cloning and expression of a putative transferrin cDNA of the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Ampasala, D R; Zheng, S-C; Retnakaran, A; Krell, P J; Arif, B M; Feng, Q-L

    2004-05-01

    A spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) transferrin cDNA (CfTf) was isolated and cloned from a cDNA library that was constructed using mRNA from fifth to sixth instar larvae. CfTf cDNA encoded a predicted protein of 681 amino acids with a molecular mass of approximately 76 kDa. CfTf shared 72% and 74% identities at the amino acid level with transferrins of Manduca sexta and Bombyx mori, respectively. Like other transferrins, CfTf retains most of the N-terminal, iron-binding amino acid residues. Northern blot analyses indicated that CfTf mRNA was present at high levels after ecdysis, but that the expression level was low prior to ecdysis at the fourth-sixth instar stages. The highest level of CfTf expression was detected in the fat body. Relatively low levels of expression were detected in the epidermis and no expression was found in the midgut. Expression of CfTf mRNA could be induced by bacteria but not fungi. Expression of CfTf mRNA was suppressed by iron load.

  5. Design and synthesis of tryptophan containing dipeptide derivatives as formyl peptide receptor 1 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Hung, Chih-Hao; Hsu, Ching-Yun; Huang, Yin-Ting; Tsai, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Pei-Wen

    2013-06-14

    Our previous studies identified an Fmoc-(S,R)-tryptophan-containing dipeptide derivative, 1, which selectively inhibited neutrophil elastase release induced by formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP) in human neutrophils. In an attempt to improve pharmacological activity, a series of tryptophan-containing dipeptides were synthesized and their pharmacological activities were investigated in human neutrophils. Of these, five compounds 3, 6, 19a, 24a, and 24b exhibited potent and dual inhibitory effects on FMLP-induced superoxide anion (O2˙(-)) generation and neutrophil elastase release in neutrophils with IC50 values of 0.23/0.60, 1.88/2.47, 1.87/3.60, 0.12/0.37, and 1.32/1.03 μM, respectively. Further studies indicated that inhibition of superoxide production in human neutrophils by these dipeptides was associated with the selective inhibition of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). Furthermore, the results of structure-activity relationship studies concluded that the fragment N-benzoyl-Trp-Phe-OMe (3) was most suitable as a core structure for interaction with FPR1, and may be approved as a lead for the development of new drugs in the treatment of neutrophilic inflammatory diseases. As some of the synthesized compounds exhibited separable conformational isomers, and showed diverse bioactivities, the conformation analysis of these compounds is also discussed herein.

  6. Toward standardization of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) measurements: II. Performance of a laboratory network running the HPLC candidate reference measurement procedure and evaluation of a candidate reference material.

    PubMed

    Helander, Anders; Wielders, Jos P M; Jeppsson, Jan-Olof; Weykamp, Cas; Siebelder, Carla; Anton, Raymond F; Schellenberg, François; Whitfield, John B

    2010-11-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) is a descriptive term used for a temporary change in the transferrin glycosylation profile caused by alcohol, and used as a biomarker of chronic high alcohol consumption. The use of an array of methods for measurement of CDT in various absolute or relative amounts, and sometimes covering different transferrin glycoforms, has complicated the comparability of results and caused confusion among medical staff. This situation prompted initiation of an IFCC Working Group on CDT standardization. This second publication of the WG-CDT covers the establishment of a network of reference laboratories running a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) candidate reference measurement procedure, and evaluation of candidate secondary reference materials. The network laboratories demonstrated good and reproducible performance and thus can be used to assign target values for calibrators and controls. A candidate secondary reference material based on native human serum lyophilized with a cryo-/lyoprotectant to prevent protein denaturation was found to be commutable and stable during storage. A proposed strategy for calibration of different CDT methods is also presented. In an external quality assurance study involving 66 laboratories and covering the current routine CDT assays (HPLC, capillary electrophoresis and immunoassay), recalculation of observed results based on the nominal values for the candidate calibrator reduced the overall coefficient of variation from 18.9% to 5.5%. The logistics for distribution of reference materials and review of results were found to be functional, indicating that a full reference system for CDT may soon be available.

  7. Transferrin-PEG-PE modified dexamethasone conjugated cationic lipid carrier mediated gene delivery system for tumor-targeted transfection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Fang; Ge, Linfu; Liu, Ximin; Kong, Fansheng

    2012-01-01

    Background The main barriers to non-viral gene delivery include cellular and nuclear membranes. As such, the aim of this study was to develop a type of vector that can target cells through receptor-mediated pathways and by using nuclear localization signal (NLS) to increase the nuclear uptake of genetic materials. Methods A dexamethasone (Dexa)-conjugated lipid was synthesized as the material of the solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), and transferrin (Tf) was linked onto polyethylene glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) to obtain Tf-PEG-PE ligands for the surface modification of the carriers. The in vitro transfection efficiency of the novel modified vectors was evaluated in human hepatoma carcinoma cell lines, and in vivo effects were observed in an animal model. Results Tf-PEG-PE modified SLNs/enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid (pEGFP) had a particle size of 222 nm and a gene loading quantity of 90%. Tf-PEG-PE-modified SLNs/pEGFP (Tf-SLNs/pEGFP) displayed remarkably higher transfection efficiency than non-modified SLNs/pEGFP and the vectors not containing Dexa, both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion It can be concluded that Tf and Dexa could function as an excellent active targeting ligand to improve the cell targeting and nuclear targeting ability of the carriers, and the resulting nanomedicine could be a promising active targeting drug/gene delivery system. PMID:22679364

  8. Transferrin-tailored solid lipid nanoparticles as vectors for site-specific delivery of temozolomide to brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Aviral; Singhai, Priyanka; Gurnany, Ekta; Updhayay, Satish; Mody, Nishi

    2013-03-01

    Blood-brain barrier restricts the uptake of many important hydrophilic drugs and limits their efficacy in the treatment of brain diseases because of the presence of tight junctions, high metabolic capacity, low pinocytic vesicular traffic, and efficient efflux mechanisms. In the present project, transferrin (Tf)-conjugated solid lipid nanoparticles (Tf-SLNs) were investigated for their ability to deliver temozolomide (TMZ) to the brain. SLNs were prepared by an ethanol injection method using hydrogenated soya phosphatidylcholine, triolein, cholesterol and distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine. Conjugation of SLNs with Tf was achieved by incubation of Tf with TMZ-loaded SLNs in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4) as a cross linker. SLNs preparation were characterized for particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, surface morphology, percent drug entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release, and hemolytic toxicity studies. In vitro cytotoxicity studies were performed on human cancer cell lines. The average size was found to be 221 ± 3.22 nm with entrapment efficiency of 69.83 ± 2.52 and 249 ± 2.61 nm with entrapment efficiency decreased to 64.21 ± 2.27 % for unconjugated SLNs and Tf-SLNs, respectively. Fluorescence studies revealed the enhanced uptake of Tf-SLNs in brain tissue compared with unconjugated SLNs.

  9. Megalin-dependent cubilin-mediated endocytosis is a major pathway for the apical uptake of transferrin in polarized epithelia.

    PubMed

    Kozyraki, R; Fyfe, J; Verroust, P J; Jacobsen, C; Dautry-Varsat, A; Gburek, J; Willnow, T E; Christensen, E I; Moestrup, S K

    2001-10-23

    Cubilin is a 460-kDa protein functioning as an endocytic receptor for intrinsic factor vitamin B(12) complex in the intestine and as a receptor for apolipoprotein A1 and albumin reabsorption in the kidney proximal tubules and the yolk sac. In the present study, we report the identification of cubilin as a novel transferrin (Tf) receptor involved in catabolism of Tf. Consistent with a cubilin-mediated endocytosis of Tf in the kidney, lysosomes of human, dog, and mouse renal proximal tubules strongly accumulate Tf, whereas no Tf is detectable in the endocytic apparatus of the renal tubule epithelium of dogs with deficient surface expression of cubilin. As a consequence, these dogs excrete increased amounts of Tf in the urine. Mice with deficient synthesis of megalin, the putative coreceptor colocalizing with cubilin, also excrete high amounts of Tf and fail to internalize Tf in their proximal tubules. However, in contrast to the dogs with the defective cubilin expression, the megalin-deficient mice accumulate Tf on the luminal cubilin-expressing surface of the proximal tubule epithelium. This observation indicates that megalin deficiency causes failure in internalization of the cubilin-ligand complex. The megalin-dependent, cubilin-mediated endocytosis of Tf and the potential of the receptors thereby to facilitate iron uptake were further confirmed by analyzing the uptake of (125)I- and (59)Fe-labeled Tf in cultured yolk sac cells.

  10. Transferrin-modified PLGA nanoparticles significantly increase the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in bladder cancer cells by increasing intracellular retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shihua; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Chengfan; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Zhihong; Li, Ningchen; Na, Yanqun

    2014-10-01

    To improve the anticancer effects of paclitaxel (Tax) on bladder cancer, transferrin-modified and unmodified poly( d,l lactide- co-glycolide) nanoparticles (NPs) were generated to deliver Tax. The characteristics of the NPs and the drug-release profiles were evaluated. The cytotoxicity levels of blank NPs and Tax-loaded NPs in the bladder cancer cell lines MBT-2, J-82, and TCC Sup were determined. The uptakes and retentions of the NPs by the cell lines and the intracellular distribution of the NPs were also studied. The results showed similar NPs characteristics and drug-release profiles for NPs with and without transferrin modification. The sizes of NPs with and without transferrin modification were 206 and 278 nm, respectively; the Z-potentials were -23.5 and -24.3 mV, respectively; the drug loadings were 6.5 and 6.7 % w/w, respectively. No cytotoxicity was observed in the bladder cancer cells exposed to blank NPs. Both types of Tax-loaded NPs, however, had significantly higher cytotoxicity levels compared with the Tax solution in the bladder cancer cells. The transferrin-modified, Tax-loaded NPs were significantly more cytotoxic than the Tax-loaded NPs without modification in the MBT-2 and TCC Sup cells. There were no significant differences in NP uptakes between transferrin-modified and unmodified NPs in any of the three studied bladder cancer cell lines; however, the retentions of the modified NPs were significantly higher in the MBT-2 and TCC Sup cells. These findings suggest that NPs can significantly improve the anticancer effect of Tax in bladder cells. Furthermore, transferrin-modified NPs can improve the anticancer effect by increasing intracellular retention and not by increasing uptake. The transferrin-modified NPs are promising drug delivery vehicle for bladder cancer treatment.

  11. Differential expression and tumorigenic function of neurotensin receptor 1 in neuroendocrine tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Tae; Li, Jing; Song, Jun; Lee, Eun Y.; Weiss, Heidi L.; Townsend, Courtney M.; Evers, B. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Neurotensin (NTS), localized predominantly to the small bowel, stimulates the growth of a variety of cancers, including neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), mainly through its interaction with the high-affinity NTS receptor 1 (NTSR1). Here, we observed increased expression of NTSR1 in almost all tested clinical NET samples, but not in normal tissues. Through RT-PCR analysis, we found that the expression of NTSR1 and NTSR2 was either variable (NTSR1) or absent (NTSR2) in human NET cell lines. In contrast, NTSR3 and NTS were expressed in all NET cells. Treatment with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, a demethylating agent, increased levels of NTSR1 and NTSR2 suggesting that DNA methylation contributes to NTSR1/2 expression patterns, which was confirmed by methylation analyses. In addition, we found that knockdown of NTSR1 decreased proliferation, expression levels of growth-related proteins, and anchorage-independent growth of BON human carcinoid cells. Moreover, stable silencing of NTSR1 suppressed BON cell growth, adhesion, migration and invasion. Our results show that high expression of NTSR1 is found in clinical NETs and that promoter methylation is an important mechanism controlling the differential expression of NTSR1 and silencing of NTSR2 in NET cells. Furthermore, knockdown of NTSR1 in BON cells suppressed oncogenic functions suggesting that NTSR1 contributes to NET tumorigenesis. PMID:26298774

  12. Regulation of brachyury by fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yunping; Feng, Xin; Mintz, Akiva; Petty, W. Jeffrey; Hsu, Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that T-box transcription factor brachyury plays an important role in lung cancer development and progression. However, the mechanisms underlying brachyury-driven cellular processes remain unclear. Here we found that fibroblast growth factor receptor 1/mitogen-activated protein kinase (FGFR1/MAPK) signaling regulated brachyury in lung cancer. Analysis of FGFR1-4 and brachyury expression in human lung tumor tissue and cell lines found that only expression of FGFR1 was positively correlated with brachyury expression. Specific knockdown of FGFR1 by siRNA suppressed brachyury expression and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) (upregulation of E-cadherin and β-catenin and downregulation of Snail and fibronectin), whereas forced overexpression of FGFR1 induced brachyury expression and promoted EMT in lung cancer cells. Activation of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/FGFR1 signaling promoted phosphorylated MAPK extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus, upregulated brachyury expression, and increased cell growth and invasion. In addition, human lung cancer cells with higher brachyury expression were more sensitive to inhibitors targeting FGFR1/MAPK pathway. These findings suggest that FGFR1/MAPK may be important for brachyury activation in lung cancer, and this pathway may be an appealing therapeutic target for a subset of brachyury-driven lung cancer. PMID:27893433

  13. Hypoxia response and VEGF-A expression in human proximal tubular epithelial cells in stable and progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Rudnicki, Michael; Perco, Paul; Enrich, Julia; Eder, Susanne; Heininger, Dorothea; Bernthaler, Andreas; Wiesinger, Martin; Sarközi, Rita; Noppert, Susie-Jane; Schramek, Herbert; Mayer, Bernd; Oberbauer, Rainer; Mayer, Gert

    2009-03-01

    Proteinuria, inflammation, chronic hypoxia, and rarefaction of peritubular capillaries contribute to the progression of renal disease by affecting proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs). To study the transcriptional response that separates patients with a stable course from those with a progressive course of disease, we isolated PTECs by laser capture microdissection from cryocut tissue sections of patients with proteinuric glomerulopathies (stable n=20, progressive n=11) with a median clinical follow-up of 26 months. Gene-expression profiling and a systems biology analysis identified activation of intracellular vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling and hypoxia response pathways in progressive patients, which was associated with upregulation of hypoxia-inducible-factor (HIF)-1alpha and several HIF target genes, such as transferrin, transferrin-receptor, p21, and VEGF-receptor 1, but downregulation of VEGF-A. The inverse expression levels of HIF-1alpha and VEGF-A were significantly superior in predicting clinical outcome as compared with proteinuria, renal function, and degree of tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis at the time of biopsy. Interactome analysis showed the association of attenuated VEGF-A expression with the downregulation of genes that usually stimulate VEGF-A expression, such as epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and HIF-2alpha. In vitro experiments confirmed the positive regulatory effect of EGF and IGF-1 on VEGF-A transcription in human proximal tubular cells. Thus, in progressive but not in stable proteinuric kidney disease, human PTECs show an attenuated VEGF-A expression despite an activation of intracellular hypoxia response and VEGF signaling pathways, which might be due to a reduced expression of positive coregulators, such as EGF and IGF-1.

  14. Bioadhesive micelles of d-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol succinate 1000: Synergism of chitosan and transferrin in targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Poornima; Sonali; Singh, Rahul Pratap; Sharma, Gunjan; Mehata, Abhishesh K; Singh, Sanjay; Rajesh, Chellapa V; Pandey, Bajarangprasad L; Koch, Biplob; Muthu, Madaswamy S

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare targeted bioadhesive d-α- tocopheryl glycol succinate 1000 (TPGS) micelles containing docetaxel (DTX) for brain targeted cancer therapy. Considering the unique bioadhesive feature of chitosan, herein, we have developed a synergistic transferrin receptor targeted bioadhesive micelles using TPGS conjugated chitosan (TPGS-chitosan), which target the overexpressed transferrin receptors of glioma cells for brain cancer therapy. The micelles were prepared by the solvent casting method and characterized for their particle size, polydispersity, zeta-potential, surface morphology, drug encapsulation efficiency, and in-vitro release. The IC50 values demonstrated transferrin receptor targeted TPGS-chitosan micelles could be 248 folds more effective than Docel™ after 24h treatment with the C6 glioma cells. Further, time dependent bioadhesive cellular uptake study indicated that a synergistic effect was achieved with the chitosan and transferrin in targeted TPGS-chitosan micelles through the biodhesive property of chitosan as well as transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. The in-vivo pharmacokinetic results demonstrated that relative bioavailability of non-targeted and targeted micelles were 2.89 and 4.08 times more effective than Docel™ after 48h of treatments, respectively.

  15. Involvement of multiple distinct Bordetella receptor proteins in the utilization of iron liberated from transferrin by host catecholamine stress hormones

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Sandra K.; Brickman, Timothy J.; Suhadolc, Ryan J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bordetella bronchiseptica is a pathogen that can acquire iron using its native alcaligin siderophore system, but can also use the catechol xenosiderophore enterobactin via the BfeA outer membrane receptor. Transcription of bfeA is positively controlled by a regulator that requires induction by enterobactin. Catecholamine hormones also induce bfeA transcription and B. bronchiseptica can use the catecholamine norepinephrine for growth on transferrin. In this study, B. bronchiseptica was shown to use catecholamines to obtain iron from both transferrin and lactoferrin in the absence of siderophore. In the presence of siderophore, norepinephrine augmented transferrin utilization by B. bronchiseptica, as well as siderophore function in vitro. Genetic analysis identified BfrA, BfrD and BfrE as TonB dependent outer membrane catecholamine receptors. The BfeA enterobactin receptor was found to not be involved directly in catecholamine utilization; however, the BfrA, BfrD and BfrE catecholamine receptors could serve as receptors for enterobactin and its degradation product 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Thus, there is a functional link between enterobactin-dependent and catecholamine-dependent transferrin utilization. This investigation characterizes a new B. bronchiseptica mechanism for iron uptake from transferrin that uses host stress hormones that not only deliver iron directly to catecholamine receptors, but also potentiate siderophore activity by acting as iron shuttles. PMID:22458330

  16. Antimicrobial Mechanism of Action of Transferrins: Selective Inhibition of H+-ATPase ▿

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, María T.; Fierro, José F.

    2010-01-01

    Two bacterial species with different metabolic features, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Lactococcus lactis, were used as a comparative experimental model to investigate the antimicrobial target and mechanism of transferrins. In anaerobiosis, P. aeruginosa cells were not susceptible to lactoferrin (hLf) or transferrin (hTf). In aerobiosis, the cells were susceptible but O2 consumption was not modified, indicating that components of the electron transport chain (ETC) were not targeted. However, the respiratory chain inhibitor piericidin A significantly reduced the killing activity of both proteins. Moreover, 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP), a reducing agent that accepts electrons from the ETC coupled to H+ extrusion, made P. aeruginosa susceptible to hLf and hTf in anaerobiosis. These results indicated that active cooperation of the cell was indispensable for the antimicrobial effect. For L. lactis cells lacking an ETC, the absence of a detectable transmembrane electrical potential in hLf-treated cells suggested a loss of H+-ATPase activity. Furthermore, the inhibition of ATPase activity and H+ translocation (inverted membrane vesicles) provided direct evidence of the ability of hLf to inhibit H+-ATPase in L. lactis. Based on these data, we propose that hLf and hTf also inhibit the H+-ATPase of respiring P. aeruginosa cells. Such inhibition thereby interferes with reentry of H+ from the periplasmic space to the cytoplasm, resulting in perturbation of intracellular pH and the transmembrane proton gradient. Consistent with this hypothesis, periplasmic H+ accumulation was prevented by anaerobiosis or by piericidin A or was induced by DCIP in anaerobiosis. Collectively, these results indicate that transferrins target H+-ATPase and interfere with H+ translocation, yielding a lethal effect in vitro. PMID:20625147

  17. Identification of transferrin as the main binding site for protactinium in rat blood serum.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D M; Farrow, L C

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of 233Pa in rat serum at periods between 5 and 50 min after i.v. injection of a solution of protactinium chloride was studied by gel chromatography. Sequential analysis of sera on Sephacryl S-300 and DEAE-Sephadex showed that 233Pa was associated only with the transferrin fraction of the serum proteins. This finding was confirmed by iso-electric focusing electrophoresis. In the cytosol fractions prepared from the liver and kidneys of the 233Pa injected rats the nuclide was also shown to be protein bound.

  18. An improved simple colorimetric method for quantitation of non-transferrin-bound iron in serum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Okada, S; Kawabata, T; Yasuda, T

    1995-03-01

    A simple method for direct quantitation of non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) in serum is introduced. NTBI was separated from serum by adding excess nitrilotriacetic acid disodium salt (NTA) to serum to form an Fe-NTA complex and then ultrafiltrated using a micro-filter. The NTBI in the ultrafiltrate was quantitated using a bathophenanthroline-based method. The optimal detection condition and several potential confounding factors were investigated. The actual measurements to samples in vivo and in vitro showed that this method is very practical.

  19. The effects of soluble recombinant complement receptor 1 on complement-mediated experimental glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Couser, W G; Johnson, R J; Young, B A; Yeh, C G; Toth, C A; Rudolph, A R

    1995-05-01

    Complement is a major mediator of tissue injury in several types of glomerulonephritis. However, no therapeutic agents that inhibit complement activation are available for human use. sCR1 (TP10, BRL 55736) is a recombinant, soluble human complement receptor 1 (CR1) molecule lacking transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that inhibits C3 and C5 convertase activity by preferentially binding C4b and C3b. To test the efficacy of sCR1 on complement-mediated glomerulonephritis, rats were pretreated with sCR1 (60 mg/kg per day) before and during the induction of three models of complement-dependent glomerulonephritis (concanavalin A and antithymocyte serum models of proliferative glomerulonephritis, passive Heyman nephritis). Daily sCR1 and complement hemolytic activity levels were measured, and renal histology and urine protein excretion were examined. Mean serum sCR1 levels of 100 to 200 micrograms/mL were maintained with a reduction in complement hemolytic activity to less than 15% in most animals. In the antithymocyte serum model, sCR1-treated animals had significant reductions in mesangiolysis, glomerular platelet and macrophage infiltrates, and proteinuria at 48 h. In the concanavalin A model, sCR1 significantly reduced glomerular C3 and fibrin deposits, platelet infiltrates, and proteinuria at 48 h. In passive Heymann nephritis, proteinuria was also significantly reduced (199 +/- 8.5 versus 125 +/- 16 mg/day, P < 0.002) at 5 days. It was concluded that sCR1 significantly reduces both morphologic and functional consequences of several different types of complement-mediated glomerulonephritis and deserves evaluation as a potential therapeutic agent in complement-mediated immune glomerular disease in humans.

  20. Expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in smooth muscle cells after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Hideyuki; Miyata, Masaaki . E-mail: miyatam@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Kume, Noriaki; Minami, Manabu; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Orihara, Koji; Hamasaki, Shuichi; Biro, Sadatoshi; Otsuji, Yutaka; Kita, Toru; Tei, Chuwa

    2006-03-10

    Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an oxidized LDL receptor, and its role in restenosis after angioplasty remains unknown. We used a balloon-injury model of rabbit aorta, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that LOX-1 mRNA expression was modest in the non-injured aorta, reached a peak level 2 days after injury, and remained elevated until 24 weeks after injury. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization showed that LOX-1 was not detected in the media of non-injured aorta but expressed in both medial and neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMC) at 2 and 24 weeks after injury. Low concentrations of ox-LDL (10 {mu}g/mL) stimulated the cultured SMC proliferation, which was inhibited by antisense oligonucleotides of LOX-1 mRNA. Double immunofluorescense staining showed the colocalization of LOX-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human restenotic lesion. These results suggest that LOX-1 mediates ox-LDL-induced SMC proliferation and plays a role in neointimal formation after vascular injury.

  1. Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor-1 antagonists as modulators of innate immune cell function.

    PubMed

    Theron, A J; Steel, H C; Tintinger, G R; Gravett, C M; Anderson, R; Feldman, C

    2014-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) are produced predominantly by cells of the innate immune system, especially basophils, eosinophils, mast cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Notwithstanding potent bronchoconstrictor activity, cysLTs are also proinflammatory consequent to their autocrine and paracrine interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors expressed not only on the aforementioned cell types, but also on Th2 lymphocytes, as well as structural cells, and to a lesser extent neutrophils and CD8(+) cells. Recognition of the involvement of cysLTs in the immunopathogenesis of various types of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, especially bronchial asthma, prompted the development of selective cysLT receptor-1 (cysLTR1) antagonists, specifically montelukast, pranlukast, and zafirlukast. More recently these agents have also been reported to possess secondary anti-inflammatory activities, distinct from cysLTR1 antagonism, which appear to be particularly effective in targeting neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages. Underlying mechanisms include interference with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, 5'-lipoxygenase, and the proinflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa B. These and other secondary anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the commonly used cysLTR1 antagonists are the major focus of the current review, which also includes a comparison of the anti-inflammatory effects of montelukast, pranlukast, and zafirlukast on human neutrophils in vitro, as well as an overview of both the current clinical applications of these agents and potential future applications based on preclinical and early clinical studies.

  2. Association of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) haplotypes with listening to music.

    PubMed

    Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa; Oikkonen, Jaana; Onkamo, Päivi; Karma, Kai; Raijas, Pirre; Järvelä, Irma

    2011-04-01

    Music is listened in all cultures. We hypothesize that willingness to produce and perceive sound and music is social communication that needs musical aptitude. Here, listening to music was surveyed using a web-based questionnaire and musical aptitude using the auditory structuring ability test (Karma Music test) and Carl Seashores tests for pitch and for time. Three highly polymorphic microsatellite markers (RS3, RS1 and AVR) of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) gene, previously associated with social communication and attachment, were genotyped and analyzed in 31 Finnish families (n=437 members) using family-based association analysis. A positive association between the AVPR1A haplotype (RS1 and AVR) and active current listening to music (permuted P=0.0019) was observed. Other AVPR1A haplotype (RS3 and AVR) showed association with lifelong active listening to music (permuted P=0.0022). In addition to AVPR1A, two polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR and variable number of tandem repeat) of human serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), a candidate gene for many neuropsychiatric disorders and previously associated with emotional processing, were analyzed. No association between listening to music and the polymorphisms of SLC6A4 were detected. The results suggest that willingness to listen to music is related to neurobiological pathways affecting social affiliation and communication.

  3. Musashi RNA-binding protein 2 regulates estrogen receptor 1 function in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, M-H; Jeong, K J; Kim, W Y; Lee, H J; Gong, G; Suh, N; Győrffy, B; Kim, S; Jeong, S-Y; Mills, G B; Park, Y-Y

    2017-03-23

    Musashi RNA-binding protein 2 (MSI2) has important roles in human cancer. However, the regulatory mechanisms by which MSI2 alters breast cancer pathophysiology have not been clearly identified. Here we demonstrate that MSI2 directly regulates estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1), which is a well-known therapeutic target and has been shown to reflect clinical outcomes in breast cancer. Based on gene expression data analysis, we found that MSI2 expression was highly enriched in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer and that MSI2 expression was significantly correlated with ESR1 expression, including expression of ESR1 downstream target genes. In addition, MSI2 levels were associated with clinical outcomes. MSI2 influenced breast cancer cell growth by altering ESR1 function. MSI2 alters ESR1 by binding specific sites in ESR1 RNA and by increasing ESR1 protein stability. Taken together, our findings identified a novel regulatory mechanism of MSI2 as an upstream regulator of ESR1 and revealed the clinical relevance of the RNA-binding protein MSI2 in breast cancer.

  4. Constitutively active transforming growth factor β receptor 1 in the mouse ovary promotes tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Vincent, David F.; Davis, Anna Jane; Sansom, Owen J.; Bartholin, Laurent; Li, Qinglei

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-established tumor suppressive role of TGFβ proteins, depletion of key TGFβ signaling components in the mouse ovary does not induce a growth advantage. To define the role of TGFβ signaling in ovarian tumorigenesis, we created a mouse model expressing a constitutively active TGFβ receptor 1 (TGFBR1) in ovarian somatic cells using conditional gain-of-function approach. Remarkably, these mice developed ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors with complete penetrance, leading to reproductive failure and mortality. The tumors expressed multiple granulosa cell markers and caused elevated serum inhibin and estradiol levels, reminiscent of granulosa cell tumors. Consistent with the tumorigenic effect, overactivation of TGFBR1 altered tumor microenvironment by promoting angiogenesis and enhanced ovarian cell proliferation, accompanied by impaired cell differentiation and dysregulated expression of critical genes in ovarian function. By further exploiting complementary genetic models, we substantiated our finding that constitutively active TGFBR1 is a potent oncogenic switch in mouse granulosa cells. In summary, overactivation of TGFBR1 drives gonadal tumor development. The TGFBR1 constitutively active mouse model phenocopies a number of morphological, hormonal, and molecular features of human granulosa cell tumors and are potentially valuable for preclinical testing of targeted therapies to treat granulosa cell tumors, a class of poorly defined ovarian malignancies. PMID:27344183

  5. Layer-by-layer co-immobilization of soluble complement receptor 1 and heparin on islets.

    PubMed

    Luan, Nguyen Minh; Teramura, Yuji; Iwata, Hiroo

    2011-09-01

    Early graft loss due to instant blood-mediated inflammatory reactions (IBMIRs) is a major obstacle of clinical islet transplantation; inhibition of blood coagulation and complement activation is necessary to inhibit IBMIRs. Here, human soluble form complement receptor 1 (sCR1) and heparin were co-immobilized onto the surfaces of islet cells. sCR1 molecules carrying thiol groups were immobilized through maleimide-poly(ethylene glycol)-phospholipids anchored in the lipid bilayers of islet cells. Heparin was immobilized on the sCR1 layer via the affinity between sCR1 and heparin, and additional layers of sCR1 and heparin were formed layer-by-layer. The sCR1 and heparin molecules in these layers maintained anti-complement activation and anti-coagulation activities, respectively. This promising method could be employed to reduce the number of islet cells required to reverse hyperglycemia and prolong graft survival in both allo- and xeno-islet transplantation.

  6. Theranostic vitamin E TPGS micelles of transferrin conjugation for targeted co-delivery of docetaxel and ultra bright gold nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Muthu, Madaswamy S; Kutty, Rajaletchumy Veloo; Luo, Zhentao; Xie, Jianping; Feng, Si-Shen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an advanced theranostic micelles of D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS), which are conjugated with transferrin for targeted co-delivery of docetaxel (DTX) as a model drug and ultra bright gold clusters (AuNC) as a model imaging agent for simultaneous cancer imaging and therapy. The theranostic micelles with and without transferrin conjugation were prepared by the solvent casting method and characterized for their particle size, polydispersity, surface chemistry, drug encapsulation efficiency, drug loading and cellular uptake efficiency. Transferrin receptors expressing MDA-MB-231-luc breast cancer cells and NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells (control cells without transferrin receptor expression) were employed as an in vitro model to access cytotoxicity of the formulations. The overexpression of transferrin receptor on the surface of MDA-MB-231-luc cells was confirmed by flow cytometry. The biodistribution study and theranostic efficacy of the micelles were investigated by using the Xenogen IVIS(®) Spectrum imaging system, which includes AuNC based fluorescence imaging and luciferase induced bioluminescence imaging on MDA-MB-231-luc tumor bearing SCID mice. The IC50 values demonstrated that the non-targeted and targeted micelles could be 15.31 and 71.73 folds more effective than Taxotere(®) after 24 h treatment with the MDA-MB-231-luc cells. Transferrin receptor targeted delivery of such micelles was imaged in xenograft model and showed their great advantages for real-time tumor imaging and inhibition of tumor growth.

  7. Regulation of transferrin receptor expression at the cell surface by insulin-like growth factors, epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.J.; Kuck, L.; Faucher, M.; Czech, M.P.

    1986-05-01

    Addition of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), recombinant insulin-like growth factor I (rIGF-I) or epidermal growth factor (EGF) to BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts causes a marked increase in the binding of (/sup 125/I) diferric transferrin to cell surface receptors. This effect is very rapid and is complete within 5 minutes. The effect is transient with (/sup 125/I) diferric transferrin binding returning to control values within 25 minutes. In contrast, PDGF and rIGF-I cause a prolonged stimulation of (/sup 125/I) diferric transferrin binding that could be observed up to 2 hours. The increase in the binding of (/sup 125/I) diferric transferrin caused by growth factors was investigated by analysis of the binding isotherm. EGF, PDGF and rIGF-I were found to increase the cell surface expression of transferrin receptors rather than to alter the affinity of the transferrin receptors. Furthermore, PDGF and rIGF-I stimulated the sustained uptake of (/sup 59/Fe) diferric transferrin by BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts. Thus, the effect of these growth factors to increase the cell surface expression of the transferrin receptor appears to have an important physiological consequence.

  8. Conjugation of transferrin to azide-modified CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots using cyclooctyne click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Schieber, Christine; Bestetti, Alessandra; Lim, Jet Phey; Ryan, Anneke D; Nguyen, Tich-Lam; Eldridge, Robert; White, Anthony R; Gleeson, Paul A; Donnelly, Paul S; Williams, Spencer J; Mulvaney, Paul

    2012-10-15

    Twinkle twinkle quantum dot: Conjugation of biomolecules to azide-modified quantum dots (QDs) through a bifunctional linker, using strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition with the QD and a squaramide linkage to the biomolecule (see scheme). Transferrin-conjugated QDs were internalized by transferrin-receptor expressing HeLa cells.

  9. FRET reveals the organization of different receptor-ligand complexes (polymeric IgA-R and Transferrin-R) in endocytic membranes of polarized MDCK cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallrabe, Horst K.; Barroso, Margarida

    2004-06-01

    FRET-based assay has been used to determine the organization of transferrin-receptor bound to holo-transferrin in basolateral endocytic membranes and compare it to the previously characterized clustered organization of polymeric IgA-receptor (pIgA-R) bound to pIgA-R ligand in apical endocytic membranes. In polarized MDCK-PTR cells, we have internalized holo-transferrin from the basolateral plasma membrane - labeled with donor and acceptor fluorophores. Transferrin-receptor-holo-transferrin complexes were imaged in the basolateral endocytic compartment using FRET confocal laser scanning microscopy in fixed and live MDCK polarized cells. A two-parameter FRET assay demonstrates whether complexes are randomly distributed or clustered: Acceptor's positive impact on E% signifies random distribution; E% being independent of acceptor fluorescence levels indicates clusters. A second parameter for clustering is E% being negatively dependent on D:A ratios. Our results indicating a clustered organization of transferrin-receptor-holo transferrin complexes fit the well-known homodimeric structure of transferrin-receptor.

  10. Genetic changes at the transferrin locus in the red-backed vole (Clethrionomys gapperi)

    SciTech Connect

    Mihok, S.; Fuller, W.A.; Canham, R.P.; McPhee, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Genetic changes at the transferrin locus in Clethrionomys gapperi were intermittently monitored in a subarctic population from 1966 to 1978. Over this 13-year period, only minor fluctuations in gene frequency were observed. Gene frequency of Tf/sup J/ increased over winter during declines from high nonbreeding density in autumn. This phenomenon may have been responsible for a general negative correlation between the frequency of Tf/sup J/ and population density. Outside of winter, no frequency changes were detected within trappable age-classes of voles from relatively discrete seasonal generations. Excess of Tf/sup M/J/ heterozygotes occurred in three of four samples of young voles that matured in the year of their birth. A similar heterozygote excess occurred in one of six samples of overwintered voles taken in a year characterized by a high rate of population growth. These results suggest that selection may occur during ecologically different conditions of high density or population growth. A heterozygote advantage in early-season cohorts may account for the maintenance of transferrin polymorphism. This hypothesis requires further data on the breeding structure and early life history of voles.

  11. Electron microscopic evidence for externalization of the transferrin receptor in vesicular form in sheep reticulocytes

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Using ferritin-labeled protein A and colloidal gold-labeled anti-rabbit IgG, the fate of the sheep transferrin receptor has been followed microscopically during reticulocyte maturation in vitro. After a few minutes of incubation at 37 degrees C, the receptor is found on the cell surface or in simple vesicles of 100-200 nm, in which the receptor appears to line the limiting membrane of the vesicles. With time (60 min or longer), large multivesicular elements (MVEs) appear whose diameter may reach 1-1.5 micron. Inside these large MVEs are round bodies of approximately 50-nm diam that bear the receptor at their external surfaces. The limiting membrane of the large MVEs is relatively free from receptor. When the large MVEs fuse with the plasma membrane, their contents, the 50-nm bodies, are released into the medium. The 50-nm bodies appear to arise by budding from the limiting membrane of the intracellular vesicles. Removal of surface receptor with pronase does not prevent exocytosis of internalized receptor. It is proposed that the exocytosis of the approximately 50-nm bodies represents the mechanism by which the transferrin receptor is shed during reticulocyte maturation. PMID:2993317

  12. Assessment of urinary protein 1 and transferrin as early markers of cadmium nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, A M; Roels, H; Cardenas, A; Lauwerys, R

    1990-01-01

    Transferrin and protein 1, a sex linked alpha 2-microprotein, were assayed in urine from 58 workers exposed to cadmium (Cd) in a non-ferrous smelter and from 58 age matched referents. These two new markers of nephrotoxicity were compared with urinary beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-m), retinol binding protein (RBP), albumin, and beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAG). The response of protein 1 to Cd tubulotoxicity was similar to that of beta 2-m, RBP, and NAG. In Cd workers, protein 1 had a correlation with urinary Cd (r = 0.56) similar to beta 2-m (r = 0.48), RBP (r = 0.58), and NAG (r = 0.49). Values of these three low molecular weight proteins and of NAG were increased only in workers with urinary Cd higher than 10 micrograms/g creatinine. Urinary transferrin and albumin were similarly affected by exposure to Cd. Their response, however, was clearly more sensitive than that of low molecular weight proteins. Prevalences of positive values of these two high molecular weight proteins were not only higher but also tended to rise at lower concentrations of Cd in urine or blood. This finding suggests that in some subjects subtle defects in glomerular barrier function may precede the onset of proximal tubular impairment after chronic exposure to Cd. It remains to be assessed whether these subjects are more at risk of developing renal insufficiency. PMID:2203466

  13. Biocompatible transferrin-conjugated sodium hexametaphosphate-stabilized gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parab, Harshala J.; Huang, Jing-Hong; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Jan, Yi-Hua; Liu, Ru-Shi; Wang, Jui-Ling; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Hwu, Yeu-Kuang; Tsai, Din Ping; Chuang, Shih-Yi; Pang, Jong-Hwei S.

    2011-09-01

    The feasibility of using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for biomedical applications has led to considerable interest in the development of novel synthetic protocols and surface modification strategies for AuNPs to produce biocompatible molecular probes. This investigation is, to our knowledge, the first to elucidate the synthesis and characterization of sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au-HMP) in an aqueous medium. The role of HMP, a food additive, as a polymeric stabilizing and protecting agent for AuNPs is elucidated. The surface modification of Au-HMP nanoparticles was carried out using polyethylene glycol and transferrin to produce molecular probes for possible clinical applications. In vitro cell viability studies performed using as-synthesized Au-HMP nanoparticles and their surface-modified counterparts reveal the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. The transferrin-conjugated nanoparticles have significantly higher cellular uptake in J5 cells (liver cancer cells) than control cells (oral mucosa fibroblast cells), as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This study demonstrates the possibility of using an inexpensive and non-toxic food additive, HMP, as a stabilizer in the large-scale generation of biocompatible and monodispersed AuNPs, which may have future diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  14. Polymorphism of the Transferrin Gene in Eye Diseases: Keratoconus and Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wójcik, Katarzyna A.; Jiménez-García, Manuel P.; Kaminska, Anna; Polakowski, Piotr; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of keratoconus (KC) and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD). Iron may promote the stress by the Fenton reaction, so its homeostasis should be strictly controlled. Transferrin is essential for iron homeostasis because it transports iron from plasma into cells. The malfunction of transferrin, which may be caused by variation in its gene (TF) variation, may contribute to oxidative stress and change KC and FECD risk. To verify this hypothesis we investigated the association between three polymorphisms of the TF gene, g.3296G>A (rs8177178), g.3481A>G (rs8177179), and c.–2G>A (rs1130459), and KC and FECD occurrence. Genotyping was performed in blood lymphocytes in 216 patients with KC, 130 patients with FECD and 228 controls by PCR-RFLP. We studied also the influence of other risk factors. The A/A genotype and the A allele of the g.3296G>A polymorphism were associated with KC occurrence, while the G allele was negatively correlated with it. We observed a decrease in KC occurrence associated with the A/G genotype of the g.3481A>G polymorphism. We did not find any association between the c.–2G>A polymorphism and KC. No association was found between all three polymorphisms and FECD occurrence. PMID:24350254

  15. Biocompatible transferrin-conjugated sodium hexametaphosphate-stabilized gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Parab, Harshala J; Huang, Jing-Hong; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Jan, Yi-Hua; Liu, Ru-Shi; Wang, Jui-Ling; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Hwu, Yeu-Kuang; Tsai, Din Ping; Chuang, Shih-Yi; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2011-09-30

    The feasibility of using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for biomedical applications has led to considerable interest in the development of novel synthetic protocols and surface modification strategies for AuNPs to produce biocompatible molecular probes. This investigation is, to our knowledge, the first to elucidate the synthesis and characterization of sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au-HMP) in an aqueous medium. The role of HMP, a food additive, as a polymeric stabilizing and protecting agent for AuNPs is elucidated. The surface modification of Au-HMP nanoparticles was carried out using polyethylene glycol and transferrin to produce molecular probes for possible clinical applications. In vitro cell viability studies performed using as-synthesized Au-HMP nanoparticles and their surface-modified counterparts reveal the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. The transferrin-conjugated nanoparticles have significantly higher cellular uptake in J5 cells (liver cancer cells) than control cells (oral mucosa fibroblast cells), as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This study demonstrates the possibility of using an inexpensive and non-toxic food additive, HMP, as a stabilizer in the large-scale generation of biocompatible and monodispersed AuNPs, which may have future diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  16. Effect of cadmium on Fe/sup +3/-transferrin formation in the rat intestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, N.; Chen, B.Q.; Sugawara, C.; Miyake, H.

    1988-07-01

    The effect of cadmium (Cd) on iron (Fe) metabolism has been an important subject for Cd toxicity, since anemia is usually observed in Itai-Itai patients who are exposed for long periods to Cd from the surrounding environment. It was previously accepted that Cd-induced anemia was not dependent on the route of administration. Thereafter, however, it was shown that oral Cd administration was essential for the development of anemia. Studies suggest that one of the possible sensitive sites of competition between Cd and Fe is in the gastrointestinal tract. Cd competes with Fe at one or more steps in the transport system and these metals undergo the same step(s) during their absorption. An hypothesis implies that these two metals possess a common carrier. Two Fe-binding proteins, ferritin and transferrin are well documented in the case of Fe deficiency but not in Cd exposed animals. Recently, the authors reported that the status of mucosal Fe-binding proteins in rats fed with Cd was similar to that in the Fe deficient rats. The present work was performed in an attempt to clarify the effect of in vivo and in vitro Cd on mucosal transferrin formation, which is one of two main Fe-binding proteins.

  17. Common pathway for tumor cell uptake of gallium-67 and iron-59 via a transferrin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M.; Rasey, J.S.; Allen, D.R.; Nelson, N.J.; Harp, G.D.; Williams, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    We studied the tumor uptake of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate, (/sup 59/Fe)citrate, and /sup 125/I-labeled transferrin (TF) by the in vitro growth form of EMT-6, a sarcoma-like mammary tumor of BALB/c mice. In analyzing the binindg experiments, we developed a new mathematical model based on a formulation originally used to express the interaction of hormones with specific tissue receptors. The uptake of both carrier-free /sup 67/Ga and /sup 59/Fe by tumor cells was mediated by kinetically identical TF receptors. We also studied teric acid extracts of the stroma of EMT-6 tumors grown both in vivo and in vitro. Chromatography of these extracts on Sephacryl S-200 SF demonstrated that the cellular stroma contained specific TF-binding macromolecules. On the basis of these findings, we proposed the transferrin receptor hypothesis for the mechanism of /sup 67/Ga uptake by tumors. According to this view, a tumor-assisted TF receptor is the functional unit responsible for the affinity of gallum for certain neoplasms. This receptor was also active in the uptake of iron by tumors.

  18. Homology modelling of transferrin-binding protein A from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Oakhill, Jonathan S; Sutton, Brian J; Gorringe, Andrew R; Evans, Robert W

    2005-05-01

    Neisseria meningitidis, a causative agent of bacterial meningitis, obtains transferrin-bound iron by expressing two outer membrane located transferrin-binding proteins, TbpA and TbpB. TbpA is thought to be an integral outer membrane pore that facilitates iron uptake. Evidence suggests that TbpA is a useful antigen for inclusion in a vaccine effective against meningococcal disease, hence the identification of regions involved in ligand binding is of paramount importance to design strategies to block uptake of iron. The protein shares sequence and functional similarities to the Escherichia coli siderophore receptors FepA and FhuA, whose structures have been determined. These receptors are composed of two domains, a 22-stranded beta-barrel and an N-terminal plug region that sits within the barrel and occludes the transmembrane pore. A three-dimensional TbpA model was constructed using FepA and FhuA structural templates, hydrophobicity analysis and homology modelling. TbpA was found to possess a similar architecture to the siderophore receptors. In addition to providing insights into the highly immunogenic nature of TbpA and allowing the prediction of potentially important ligand-binding epitopes, the model also reveals a narrow channel through its entire length. The relevance of this channel and the spatial arrangement of external loops, to the mechanism of iron translocation employed by TbpA is discussed.

  19. The lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1: a new potential molecular target in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murdocca, Michela; Mango, Ruggiero; Pucci, Sabina; Biocca, Silvia; Testa, Barbara; Capuano, Rosamaria; Paolesse, Roberto; Sanchez, Massimo; Orlandi, Augusto; di Natale, Corrado; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-01-01

    The identification of new biomarkers and targets for tailored therapy in human colorectal cancer (CRC) onset and progression is an interesting challenge. CRC tissue produces an excess of ox-LDL, suggesting a close correlation between lipid dysfunction and malignant transformation. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is involved in several mechanisms closely linked to tumorigenesis. Here we report a tumor specific LOX-1 overexpression in human colon cancers: LOX-1 results strongly increased in the 72% of carcinomas (P<0.001), and strongly overexpressed in 90% of highly aggressive and metastatic tumours (P<0.001), as compared to normal mucosa. Moreover LOX-1 results modulated since the early stage of the disease (adenomas vs normal mucosa; P<0.001) suggesting an involvement in tumor insurgence and progression. The in vitro knockdown of LOX-1 in DLD-1 and HCT-8 colon cancer cells by siRNA and anti-LOX-1 antibody triggers to an impaired proliferation rate and affects the maintenance of cell growth and tumorigenicity. The wound-healing assay reveals an evident impairment in closing the scratch. Lastly knockdown of LOX-1 delineates a specific pattern of volatile compounds characterized by the presence of a butyrate derivative, suggesting a potential role of LOX-1 in tumor-specific epigenetic regulation in neoplastic cells. The role of LOX-1 as a novel biomarker and molecular target represents a concrete opportunity to improve current therapeutic strategies for CRC. In addition, the innovative application of a technology focused to the identification of LOX-1 driven volatiles specific to colorectal cancer provides a promising diagnostic tool for CRC screening and for monitoring the response to therapy. PMID:26895376

  20. Staphylococcal protein Ecb impairs complement receptor-1 mediated recognition of opsonized bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Amdahl, Hanne; Tan, Lydia; Meri, Taru; Kuusela, Pentti I.; van Strijp, Jos A.

    2017-01-01

    Staphyloccus aureus is a major human pathogen leading frequently to sepsis and soft tissue infections with abscesses. Multiple virulence factors including several immune modulating molecules contribute to its survival in the host. When S. aureus invades the human body, one of the first line defenses is the complement system, which opsonizes the bacteria with C3b and attract neutrophils by release of chemotactic peptides. Neutrophils express Complement receptor-1 [CR1, CD35) that interacts with the C3b-opsonized particles and thereby plays an important role in pathogen recognition by phagocytic cells. In this study we observed that a fraction of S. aureus culture supernatant prevented binding of C3b to neutrophils. This fraction consisted of S. aureus leukocidins and Efb. The C-terminus of Efb is known to bind C3b and shares significant sequence homology to the extracellular complement binding protein [Ecb). Here we show that S. aureus Ecb displays various mechanisms to block bacterial recognition by neutrophils. The presence of Ecb blocked direct interaction between soluble CR1 and C3b and reduced the cofactor activity of CR1 in proteolytic inactivation of C3b. Furthermore, Ecb could dose-dependently prevent recognition of C3b by cell-bound CR1 that lead to impaired phagocytosis of NHS-opsonized S. aureus. Phagocytosis was furthermore reduced in the presence of soluble CR1 [sCR1). These data indicate that the staphylococcal protein Ecb prevents recognition of C3b opsonized bacteria by neutrophil CR1 leading to impaired killing by phagocytosis and thereby contribute to immune evasion of S. aureus. PMID:28273167

  1. Enhanced transferrin receptor expression by proinflammatory cytokines in enterocytes as a means for local delivery of drugs to inflamed gut mucosa.

    PubMed

    Harel, Efrat; Rubinstein, Abraham; Nissan, Aviram; Khazanov, Elena; Nadler Milbauer, Mirela; Barenholz, Yechezkel; Tirosh, Boaz

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic intervention in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) is often associated with adverse effects related to drug distribution into non-diseased tissues, a situation which attracts a rational design of a targeted treatment confined to the inflamed mucosa. Upon activation of immune cells, transferrin receptor (TfR) expression increases at their surface. Because TfR is expressed in all cell types we hypothesized that its cell surface levels are regulated also in enterocytes. We, therefore, compared TfR expression in healthy and inflamed human colonic mucosa, as well as healthy and inflamed colonic mucosa of the DNBS-induced rat model. TfR expression was elevated in the colonic mucosa of IBD patients in both the basolateral and apical membranes of the enterocytes. Increased TfR expression was also observed in colonocytes of the induced colitis rats. To explore the underlying mechanism CaCo-2 cells were treated with various proinflammatory cytokines, which increased both TfR expression and transferrin cellular uptake in a mechanism that did not involve hyper proliferation. These findings were then exploited for the design of targetable carrier towards inflamed regions of the colon. Anti-TfR antibodies were conjugated to nano-liposomes. As expected, iron-starved Caco-2 cells internalized anti-TfR immunoliposomes better than controls. Ex vivo binding studies to inflamed mucosa showed that the anti-TfR immunoliposomes accumulated significantly better in the mucosa of DNBS-induced rats than the accumulation of non-specific immunoliposomes. It is concluded that targeting mucosal inflammation can be accomplished by nano-liposomes decorated with anti-TfR due to inflammation-dependent, apical, elevated expression of the receptor.

  2. Characterization and expression analysis of the transferrin gene in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and its upregulation in response to Streptococcus agalactiae infection.

    PubMed

    Poochai, Watsida; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Srisapoome, Prapansak; Unajak, Sasimanas; Areechon, Nontawith

    2014-10-01

    In this study, full-length tilapia transferrin (OnTF) isolated from liver cDNA of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) was found to have an open reading frame of 2,091-bp encoding 696 amino acid residues. Two additional amino acids: Gly(369) and Gly(370) were observed compared with the reported Nile tilapia transferrin protein sequence. Pre-mature protein has a predicted molecular weight of 78.2 kDa, while mature protein is 73.28 kDa in size. Comparative sequence analysis with transferrin from other species revealed two major putative iron-binding domains designated as the N-lobe and the C-lobe in accordance with the transferrin protein characteristics. The predicted tertiary structure of tilapia transferrin confirmed the presence of iron and anion-binding sites on both lobes that are conserved among transferrins from other species. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed significantly higher expression of tilapia transferrin gene in liver than in other tissues (p < 0.05). Transferrin expression in tilapia experimentally infected with 10(6) and 10(8) colony-forming units mL(-1) of Streptococcus agalactiae was significantly upregulated at 24 and 12 h post-infection (hpi), respectively, and decreased afterward. Iron-deficiency in serum of bacterially infected fish was detected at 48 and 24 hpi, respectively. The expression pattern of the transferrin gene and the iron levels of infected tilapia in this study were consistent with the function of transferrin in innate immunity.

  3. Photoreceptor avascular privilege is shielded by soluble VEGF receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ling; Uehara, Hironori; Zhang, Xiaohui; Das, Subrata K; Olsen, Thomas; Holt, Derick; Simonis, Jacquelyn M; Jackman, Kyle; Singh, Nirbhai; Miya, Tadashi R; Huang, Wei; Ahmed, Faisal; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Le, Yun Zheng; Mamalis, Christina; Chiodo, Vince A; Hauswirth, William W; Baffi, Judit; Lacal, Pedro M; Orecchia, Angela; Ferrara, Napoleone; Gao, Guangping; Young-hee, Kim; Fu, Yingbin; Owen, Leah; Albuquerque, Romulo; Baehr, Wolfgang; Thomas, Kirk; Li, Dean Y; Chalam, Kakarla V; Shibuya, Masabumi; Grisanti, Salvatore; Wilson, David J; Ambati, Jayakrishna; Ambati, Balamurali K

    2013-01-01

    Optimal phototransduction requires separation of the avascular photoreceptor layer from the adjacent vascularized inner retina and choroid. Breakdown of peri-photoreceptor vascular demarcation leads to retinal angiomatous proliferation or choroidal neovascularization, two variants of vascular invasion of the photoreceptor layer in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of irreversible blindness in industrialized nations. Here we show that sFLT-1, an endogenous inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), is synthesized by photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and is decreased in human AMD. Suppression of sFLT-1 by antibodies, adeno-associated virus-mediated RNA interference, or Cre/lox-mediated gene ablation either in the photoreceptor layer or RPE frees VEGF-A and abolishes photoreceptor avascularity. These findings help explain the vascular zoning of the retina, which is critical for vision, and advance two transgenic murine models of AMD with spontaneous vascular invasion early in life. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00324.001 PMID:23795287

  4. Anti-cancer activity of doxorubicin-loaded liposomes co-modified with transferrin and folic acid.

    PubMed

    Sriraman, Shravan Kumar; Salzano, Giusseppina; Sarisozen, Can; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    Cancer-specific drug delivery represents an attractive approach to prevent undesirable side-effects and increase the accumulation of the drug in the tumor. Surface modification of nanoparticles such as liposomes with targeting moieties specific to the up-regulated receptors on the surface of tumor cells thus represents an effective strategy. Furthermore, since this receptor expression can be heterogeneous, using a dual-combination of targeting moieties may prove advantageous. With this in mind, the anti-cancer activity of PEGylated doxorubicin-loaded liposomes targeted with folic acid (F), transferrin (Tf) or both (F+Tf) was evaluated. The dual-targeted liposomes showed a 7-fold increase in cell association compared to either of the single-ligand targeted ones in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell monolayers. The increased penetration and cell association of the dual-targeted liposomes were also demonstrated using HeLa cell spheroids. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the doxorubicin liposomes (LD) was then evaluated using HeLa and A2780-ADR ovarian carcinoma cell monolayers. In both these cell lines, the (F+Tf) LD showed significantly higher cytotoxic effects than the untargeted, or single-ligand targeted liposomes. In a HeLa xenograft model in nude mice, compared to the untreated group, though the untargeted LD showed 42% tumor growth inhibition, both the (F) LD and (F+Tf) LD showed 75% and 79% tumor growth inhibition respectively. These results thus highlight that though the dual-targeted liposomes represent an effective cytotoxic formulation in the in vitro setting, they were equally effective as the folic acid-targeted liposomes in reducing tumor burden in the more complex in vivo setting in this particular model.

  5. The human counterpart of zebrafish shiraz shows sideroblastic-like microcytic anemia and iron overload.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara; Campanella, Alessandro; De Falco, Luigia; Boschetto, Loredana; Merlini, Roberta; Silvestri, Laura; Levi, Sonia; Iolascon, Achille

    2007-08-15

    Inherited microcytic-hypochromic anemias in rodents and zebrafish suggest the existence of corresponding human disorders. The zebrafish mutant shiraz has severe anemia and is embryonically lethal because of glutaredoxin 5 (GRLX5) deletion, insufficient biogenesis of mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters, and deregulated iron-regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) activity. This leads to stabilization of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR) RNA, repression of ferritin, and ALA-synthase 2 (ALAS2) translation with impaired heme synthesis. We report the first case of GLRX5 deficiency in a middle-aged anemic male with iron overload and a low number of ringed sideroblasts. Anemia was worsened by blood transfusions but partially reversed by iron chelation. The patient had a homozygous (c.294A>G) mutation that interferes with intron 1 splicing and drastically reduces GLRX5 RNA. As in shiraz, aconitase and H-ferritin levels were low and TfR level was high in the patient's cells, compatible with increased IRP1 binding. Based on the biochemical and clinical phenotype, we hypothesize that IRP2, less degraded by low heme, contributes to the repression of the erythroblasts ferritin and ALAS2, increasing mitochondrial iron. Iron chelation, redistributing iron to the cytosol, might relieve IRP2 excess, improving heme synthesis and anemia. GLRX5 function is highly conserved, but at variance with zebrafish, its defect in humans leads to anemia and iron overload.

  6. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 disrupts mammary acinar architecture and initiates malignant transformation of mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Jessica L. F.; Shah, Raj; La Cava, Stephanie; Dolfi, Sonia C.; Mehta, Madhura S.; Kongara, Sameera; Price, Sandy; Ganesan, Shridar; Reuhl, Kenneth R.; Hirshfield, Kim M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1/Grm1) is a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, which was once thought to only participate in synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability, but has more recently been implicated in non-neuronal tissue functions. We previously described the oncogenic properties of Grm1 in cultured melanocytes in vitro and in spontaneous melanoma development with 100 % penetrance in vivo. Aberrant mGluR1 expression was detected in 60–80 % of human melanoma cell lines and biopsy samples. As most human cancers are of epithelial origin, we utilized immortalized mouse mammary epithelial cells (iMMECs) as a model system to study the transformative properties of Grm1. We introduced Grm1 into iMMECs and isolated several stable mGluR1-expressing clones. Phenotypic alterations in mammary acinar architecture were assessed using three-dimensional morphogenesis assays. We found that mGluR1-expressing iMMECs exhibited delayed lumen formation in association with decreased central acinar cell death, disrupted cell polarity, and a dramatic increase in the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Orthotopic implantation of mGluR1-expressing iMMEC clones into mammary fat pads of immunodeficient nude mice resulted in mammary tumor formation in vivo. Persistent mGluR1 expression was required for the maintenance of the tumorigenic phenotypes in vitro and in vivo, as demonstrated by an inducible Grm1-silencing RNA system. Furthermore, mGluR1 was found be expressed in human breast cancer cell lines and breast tumor biopsies. Elevated levels of extracellular glutamate were observed in mGluR1-expressing breast cancer cell lines and concurrent treatment of MCF7 xenografts with glutamate release inhibitor, riluzole, and an AKT inhibitor led to suppression of tumor progression. Our results are likely relevant to human breast cancer, highlighting a putative role of mGluR1 in the pathophysiology of breast cancer and the potential

  7. Transferrin receptor-targeted vitamin E TPGS micelles for brain cancer therapy: preparation, characterization and brain distribution in rats.

    PubMed

    Sonali; Agrawal, Poornima; Singh, Rahul Pratap; Rajesh, Chellappa V; Singh, Sanjay; Vijayakumar, Mahalingam R; Pandey, Bajrangprasad L; Muthu, Madaswamy Sona

    2016-06-01

    The effective treatment of brain cancer is hindered by the poor transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the low penetration across the blood-tumor barrier (BTB). The objective of this work was to formulate transferrin-conjugated docetaxel (DTX)-loaded d-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (vitamin E TPGS or TPGS) micelles for targeted brain cancer therapy. The micelles with and without transferrin conjugation were prepared by the solvent casting method and characterized for their particle size, polydispersity, drug encapsulation efficiency, drug loading, in vitro release study and brain distribution study. Particle sizes of prepared micelles were determined at 25 °C by dynamic light scattering technique. The external surface morphology was determined by transmission electron microscopy analysis and atomic force microscopy. The encapsulation efficiency was determined by spectrophotometery. In vitro release studies of micelles and control formulations were carried out by dialysis bag diffusion method. The particle sizes of the non-targeted and targeted micelles were <20 nm. About 85% of drug encapsulation efficiency was achieved with micelles. The drug release from transferrin-conjugated micelles was sustained for >24 h with 50% of drug release. The in vivo results indicated that transferrin-targeted TPGS micelles could be a promising carrier for brain targeting due to nano-sized drug delivery, solubility enhancement and permeability which provided an improved and prolonged brain targeting of DTX in comparison to the non-targeted micelles and marketed formulation.

  8. [Protein profile and iron deficiency: value of the study of the albumin-transferrin couple].

    PubMed

    Cacoub, P; Thiolières, J M; Alexandre, J A; Foglietti, M J; Giraudet, P; Godeau, P

    1996-01-01

    From a clinical standpoint, the search for iron deficiency is based upon serum ferritin. However, serumferritin values may be pathologic in other numerous pathological conditions such as inflammation, liver diseases, malignant hematologic disorders, hemolysis, etc. Proteic profile combines the analyze of proteins variations: protein results are converted in percent of normal values referenced for the technique used. It has been suggested that on the protein profile, an increase in serum transferrin level compared to a normal serum albumin level (DAT: difference albumin-transferrin), appears early in the course of iron deficiency. In order to know the value of a pathologic DAT > or = 28% in the diagnosis of iron deficiency, we prospectively studied 156 patients consecutively hospitalized in an internal medicine department. Iron deficiency was defined by a low serum ferritin level. Diagnosis performance (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values) of different biologic markers of iron deficiency (serum iron, saturation of total iron-binding capacity, low mean erythrocyte volume) and DAT was compared to the performance of low serum ferritin values. With the exception of low serum ferritin (which have by definition a specificity and a positive predictive value of 100%), pathologic DAT appeared as the best index of iron deficiency with the highest sensitivity (67.4%), specificity (97.3%), positive predictive value (91.2%), negative predicitive value (87.7%) and diagnosis efficacy (sensitivity x specificity = 0.66). A pathologic DAT associated to a low serum ferritin level increased the diagnosis performance of both tests to 0.72. Diagnosis efficacy of DAT was not changed (0.66) in 83 patients with a confounding factor for serum ferritin analysis (inflammation, liver diseases, malignant hematologic disorders, hemolysis) when diagnosis efficacy of all other tests decreased. There was a negative correlation between serum ferritin level and DAT level

  9. Disruption of PTH Receptor 1 in T Cells Protects against PTH-Induced Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Tawfeek, Hesham; Bedi, Brahmchetna; Li, Jau-Yi; Adams, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Weitzmann, M. Neale; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Pacifici, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyperparathyroidism in humans and continuous parathyroid hormone (cPTH) treatment in mice cause bone loss by regulating the production of RANKL and OPG by stromal cells (SCs) and osteoblasts (OBs). Recently, it has been reported that T cells are required for cPTH to induce bone loss as the binding of the T cell costimulatory molecule CD40L to SC receptor CD40 augments SC sensitivity to cPTH. However it is unknown whether direct PTH stimulation of T cells is required for cPTH to induce bone loss, and whether T cells contribute to the bone catabolic activity of PTH with mechanisms other than induction of CD40 signaling in SCs. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that silencing of PTH receptor 1 (PPR) in T cells blocks the bone loss and the osteoclastic expansion induced by cPTH, thus demonstrating that PPR signaling in T cells is central for PTH-induced reduction of bone mass. Mechanistic studies revealed that PTH activation of the T cell PPR stimulates T cell production of the osteoclastogenic cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNF). Attesting to the relevance of this effect, disruption of T cell TNF production prevents PTH-induced bone loss. We also show that a novel mechanism by which TNF mediates PTH induced osteoclast formation is upregulation of CD40 expression in SCs, which increases their RANKL/OPG production ratio. Conclusions/Significance These findings demonstrate that PPR signaling in T cells plays an essential role in PTH induced bone loss by promoting T cell production of TNF. A previously unknown effect of TNF is to increase SC expression of CD40, which in turn increases SC osteoclastogenic activity by upregulating their RANKL/OPG production ratio. PPR-dependent stimulation of TNF production by T cells and the resulting TNF regulation of CD40 signaling in SCs are potential new therapeutic targets for the bone loss of hyperparathyroidism. PMID:20808842

  10. Complement receptor 1 is a sialic acid-independent erythrocyte receptor of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Spadafora, Carmenza; Awandare, Gordon A; Kopydlowski, Karen M; Czege, Jozsef; Moch, J Kathleen; Finberg, Robert W; Tsokos, George C; Stoute, José A

    2010-06-17

    Plasmodium falciparum is a highly lethal malaria parasite of humans. A major portion of its life cycle is dedicated to invading and multiplying inside erythrocytes. The molecular mechanisms of erythrocyte invasion are incompletely understood. P. falciparum depends heavily on sialic acid present on glycophorins to invade erythrocytes. However, a significant proportion of laboratory and field isolates are also able to invade erythrocytes in a sialic acid-independent manner. The identity of the erythrocyte sialic acid-independent receptor has been a mystery for decades. We report here that the complement receptor 1 (CR1) is a sialic acid-independent receptor for the invasion of erythrocytes by P. falciparum. We show that soluble CR1 (sCR1) as well as polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against CR1 inhibit sialic acid-independent invasion in a variety of laboratory strains and wild isolates, and that merozoites interact directly with CR1 on the erythrocyte surface and with sCR1-coated microspheres. Also, the invasion of neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes correlates with the level of CR1 expression. Finally, both sialic acid-independent and dependent strains invade CR1 transgenic mouse erythrocytes preferentially over wild-type erythrocytes but invasion by the latter is more sensitive to neuraminidase. These results suggest that both sialic acid-dependent and independent strains interact with CR1 in the normal red cell during the invasion process. However, only sialic acid-independent strains can do so without the presence of glycophorin sialic acid. Our results close a longstanding and important gap in the understanding of the mechanism of erythrocyte invasion by P. falciparum that will eventually make possible the development of an effective blood stage vaccine.

  11. TNF receptor 1 signaling is critically involved in mediating angiotensin-II-induced cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Duerrschmid, Clemens; Crawford, Jeffrey R; Reineke, Erin; Taffet, George E; Trial, Joann; Entman, Mark L; Haudek, Sandra B

    2013-04-01

    Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) is associated with many conditions involving heart failure and pathologic hypertrophy. Ang-II induces the synthesis of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 that mediates the uptake of CD34(+)CD45(+) monocytic cells into the heart. These precursor cells differentiate into collagen-producing fibroblasts and are responsible for the Ang-II-induced development of non-adaptive cardiac fibrosis. In this study, we demonstrate that in vitro, using a human monocyte-to-fibroblast differentiation model, Ang-II required the presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) to induce fibroblast maturation from monocytes. In vivo, mice deficient in both TNF receptors did not develop cardiac fibrosis in response to 1week Ang-II infusion. We then subjected mice deficient in either TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1-KO) or TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2-KO) to continuous Ang-II infusion. Compared to wild-type, in TNFR1-KO, but not in TNFR2-KO hearts, collagen deposition was greatly attenuated, and markedly fewer CD34(+)CD45(+) cells were present. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated a striking reduction of key fibrosis-related, as well as inflammation-related mRNA expression in Ang-II-treated TNFR1-KO hearts. TNFR1-KO animals also developed less cardiac remodeling, cardiac hypertrophy, and hypertension compared to wild-type and TNFR2-KO in response to Ang-II. Our data suggest that TNF induced Ang-II-dependent cardiac fibrosis by signaling through TNFR1, which enhances the generation of monocytic fibroblast precursors in the heart.

  12. Prostaglandin E2 regulates angiogenesis via activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Federica; Solito, Raffaella; Morbidelli, Lucia; Giachetti, Antonio; Ziche, Marina; Donnini, Sandra

    2008-01-25

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) behaves as a mitogen in epithelial tumor cells as well as in many other cell types. We investigated the actions of PGE(2) on microvascular endothelial cells (capillary venular endothelial cells) with the purpose of delineating the signaling pathway leading to the acquisition of the angiogenic phenotype and to new vessel formation. PGE(2) (100 nM) produced activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR-1), as measured by its phosphorylation, but not of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. PGE(2) stimulated the EP3 subtype receptor, as deduced by abrogation of EP3 Galpha(i) subunit activity through pertussis toxin. Consistent with this result, in human umbilical venular endothelial cells missing the EP3 receptor, PGE(2) did not phosphorylate FGFR-1. Upon binding to its receptor, PGE(2) initiated an autocrine/paracrine signaling cascade involving the intracellular activation of c-Src, activation of matrix metalloproteinase (predominantly MMP2), which in turn caused the mobilization of membrane-anchored fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). In fact, in cells unable to release FGF-2 the transfection with both FGFR-1 and EP3 did not result in FGFR-1 phosphorylation in response to PGE(2). Relevance for the FGF2-FGFR-1 system was highlighted by confocal analysis, showing receptor internalization after cell exposure to the prostanoid. ERK1/2 appeared to be the distal signal involved, its phosphorylation being sensitive to either cSrc inhibitor or FGFR-1 blocker. Finally, PGE(2) stimulated cell migration and capillary formation in aortic rings, which were severely reduced by inhibitors of signaling molecules or by receptor antagonist. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for the involvement of FGFR-1 through FGF2 in eliciting PGE(2) angiogenic responses. This signaling pattern is similar to the autocrine-paracrine mechanism which operates in endothelial cells to support neovascular growth.

  13. Transferrin Receptor 2 Dependent Alterations of Brain Iron Metabolism Affect Anxiety Circuits in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Rosa Maria; Boda, Enrica; Montarolo, Francesca; Boero, Martina; Mezzanotte, Mariarosa; Saglio, Giuseppe; Buffo, Annalisa; Roetto, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    The Transferrin Receptor 2 (Tfr2) modulates systemic iron metabolism through the regulation of iron regulator Hepcidin (Hepc) and Tfr2 inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Based on data demonstrating Tfr2 expression in brain, we analysed Tfr2-KO mice in order to examine the molecular, histological and behavioural consequences of Tfr2 silencing in this tissue. Tfr2 abrogation caused an accumulation of iron in specific districts in the nervous tissue that was not accompanied by a brain Hepc response. Moreover, Tfr2-KO mice presented a selective overactivation of neurons in the limbic circuit and the emergence of an anxious-like behaviour. Furthermore, microglial cells showed a particular sensitivity to iron perturbation. We conclude that Tfr2 is a key regulator of brain iron homeostasis and propose a role for Tfr2 alpha in the regulation of anxiety circuits. PMID:27477597

  14. [FECAL NONINVASIVE TESTS (CALPROTECTIN, TRANSFERRIN, HEMOGLOBIN) IN COMPLEX DIAGNOSIS OF DISEASES OF INTESTINES].

    PubMed

    Livzan, M A; Lyalukova, E A; Nechaeva, G; Osipenko, M F; Dolgih, T I

    2015-01-01

    A research objective was the assessment of informational content of fecal noninvasive tests (calprotectin, transferrin, hemoglobin) in complex diagnosis of diseases of intestines. Open kogortny research by method of a cross cut included 52 patients (middle age - 38,6 years) with IBS-like symptoms (abdominal pain or discomfort, change of frequency and/or character of a chair). Sensitivity of dough on calprotectin for diagnosis of organic pathology of intestines made (89%), for dough on calprotectin and hemoglobin - also 89%. At patients at incomplete compliance of clinical signs to diagnostic criteria of IBS and lack of endoscopic signs of damage of a large intestine research on fecal biomarkers allows to increase efficiency of diagnostics.

  15. Transferrin receptor bearing cells in the peripheral blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, M; Bacon, P A; Symmons, D P; Blann, A D

    1985-01-01

    Activated, proliferating lymphocytes are a feature of rheumatoid arthritis. They are present both in the synovial membrane and in the peripheral circulation. The expression of transferrin receptors(TFR) is a good marker of cellular proliferation. This study shows increased levels of circulating TFR-bearing lymphocytes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The TFR+ population contains a disproportionately large number of T4+ cells, leading to a high T4:T8 ratio (5:1 in the TFR+ population, compared to 2:1 in the total circulating pool of lymphocytes). This reflects the pattern found in the rheumatoid synovium and suggests that lymphocyte activation in RA may be an extra-articular phenomenon. The TFR+ population also contains a range of non-T cells, including B cells, and a population bearing phenotypic similarities to natural killer (NK) cells. PMID:3002686

  16. Transferrin Decorated Thermoresponsive Nanogels as Magnetic Trap Devices for Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Asadian-Birjand, Mazdak; Biglione, Catalina; Bergueiro, Julian; Cappelletti, Ariel; Rahane, Chinmay; Chate, Govind; Khandare, Jayant; Klemke, Bastian; Strumia, Miriam C; Calderón, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    A rational design of magnetic capturing nanodevices, based on a specific interaction with circulating tumor cells (CTCs), can advance the capturing efficiency and initiate the development of modern smart nanoformulations for rapid isolation and detection of these CTCs from the bloodstream. Therefore, the development and evaluation of magnetic nanogels (MNGs) based on magnetic nanoparticles and linear thermoresponsive polyglycerol for the capturing of CTCs with overexpressed transferrin (Tf(+) ) receptors has been presented in this study. The MNGs are synthesized using a strain-promoted "click" approach which has allowed the in situ surface decoration with Tf-polyethylene glycol (PEG) ligands of three different PEG chain lengths as targeting ligands. An optimal value of around 30% of cells captures is achieved with a linker of eight ethylene glycol units. This study shows the potential of MNGs for the capture of CTCs and the necessity of precise control over the linkage of the targeting moiety to the capturing device.

  17. Paving the way for adequate myelination: The contribution of galectin-3, transferrin and iron.

    PubMed

    Franco, Paula G; Pasquini, Laura A; Pérez, María J; Rosato-Siri, María V; Silvestroff, Lucas; Pasquini, Juana M

    2015-11-14

    Considering the worldwide incidence of well characterized demyelinating disorders such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and the increasing number of pathologies recently found to involve hypomyelinating factors such as micronutrient deficits, elucidating the molecular basis of central nervous system (CNS) demyelination, remyelination and hypomyelination becomes essential to the development of future neuroregenerative therapies. In this context, this review discusses novel findings on the contribution of galectin-3 (Gal-3), transferrin (Tf) and iron to the processes of myelination and remyelination and their potentially positive regulation of oligodendroglial precursor cell (OPC) differentiation. Studies were conducted in cuprizone (CPZ)-induced demyelination and iron deficiency (ID)-induced hypomyelination, and the participation of glial and neural stem cells (NSC) in the remyelination process was evaluated by means of both in vivo and in vitro assays on primary cell cultures.

  18. Lactoferrin and transferrin fragments react with nitrite to form an inhibitor of Bacillus cereus spore outgrowth.

    PubMed Central

    Custer, M C; Hansen, J N

    1983-01-01

    Tryptone is a pancreatic digest of casein which contains a heterogeneous mixture of substances that react with nitrite when heated in the presence of sodium thioglycolate to form a bacteriostatic agent which inhibits outgrowth of Bacillus cereus T spores. The substances which are precursors to the bacteriostatic agent can be fractionated on the basis of molecular size and charge and have properties which indicate that they are fragments of lactoferrin, an iron-binding glycoprotein. The bacteriostatic agent could also be formed directly from purified lactoferrin after it had been subjected to proteolysis. Transferrin, an analogous iron-binding protein found in animal serum, also showed these same properties. This system may be a useful model for studies of the mechanism and site of nitrite bacteriostatic action. PMID:6405692

  19. Second international round robin for the quantification of serum non-transferrin-bound iron and labile plasma iron in patients with iron-overload disorders.

    PubMed

    de Swart, Louise; Hendriks, Jan C M; van der Vorm, Lisa N; Cabantchik, Z Ioav; Evans, Patricia J; Hod, Eldad A; Brittenham, Gary M; Furman, Yael; Wojczyk, Boguslaw; Janssen, Mirian C H; Porter, John B; Mattijssen, Vera E J M; Biemond, Bart J; MacKenzie, Marius A; Origa, Raffaella; Galanello, Renzo; Hider, Robert C; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2016-01-01

    Non-transferrin-bound iron and its labile (redox active) plasma iron component are thought to be potentially toxic forms of iron originally identified in the serum of patients with iron overload. We compared ten worldwide leading assays (6 for non-transferrin-bound iron and 4 for labile plasma iron) as part of an international inter-laboratory study. Serum samples from 60 patients with four different iron-overload disorders in various treatment phases were coded and sent in duplicate for analysis to five different laboratories worldwide. Some laboratories provided multiple assays. Overall, highest assay levels were observed for patients with untreated hereditary hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia intermedia, patients with transfusion-dependent myelodysplastic syndromes and patients with transfusion-dependent and chelated β-thalassemia major. Absolute levels differed considerably between assays and were lower for labile plasma iron than for non-transferrin-bound iron. Four assays also reported negative values. Assays were reproducible with high between-sample and low within-sample variation. Assays correlated and correlations were highest within the group of non-transferrin-bound iron assays and within that of labile plasma iron assays. Increased transferrin saturation, but not ferritin, was a good indicator of the presence of forms of circulating non-transferrin-bound iron. The possibility of using non-transferrin-bound iron and labile plasma iron measures as clinical indicators of overt iron overload and/or of treatment efficacy would largely depend on the rigorous validation and standardization of assays.

  20. Hypocretin receptor 1 blockade preferentially reduces high effort responding for cocaine without promoting sleep

    PubMed Central

    Brodnik, Zachary D.; Bernstein, David L.; Prince, Courtney D.; España, Rodrigo A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that blockade of the hypocretin receptor 1 may act as a useful pharmacotherapy for cocaine abuse. Here we investigated the extent to which various doses of a hypocretin receptor 1 antagonist, SB-334867, affect cocaine self-administration at varying doses of cocaine and across a range of effort requirements, and tested if these SB-334867 doses produce sedative effects. First, we trained animals to self-administer one of three doses of cocaine on a progressive ratio schedule, and then tested the effects of three doses of SB-334867. Responding for cocaine was then analyzed to segregate features of relatively high and low effort requirements across the progressive ratio session. In another set of experiments we tested the sleep-promoting effects of the same doses of SB-334867. Our data indicate that blockade of hypocretin receptor 1 preferentially reduces high effort responding for cocaine at levels that do not promote sedation. PMID:26049058

  1. Evaluation of Nonferrous Metals as Potential In Vivo Tracers of Transferrin-Based Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hanwei; Wang, Shunhai; Nguyen, Son N.; Elci, S. Gokhan; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2016-02-01

    Transferrin (Tf) is a promising candidate for targeted drug delivery. While development of such products is impossible without the ability to monitor biodistribution of Tf-drug conjugates in tissues and reliable measurements of their levels in blood and other biological fluids, the presence of very abundant endogenous Tf presents a significant impediment to such efforts. Several noncognate metals have been evaluated in this work as possible tracers of exogenous transferrin in complex biological matrices using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) as a detection tool. Placing Ni(II) on a His-tag of recombinant Tf resulted in formation of a marginally stable protein-metal complex, which readily transfers the metal to ubiquitous physiological scavengers, such as serum albumin. An alternative strategy targeted iron-binding pockets of Tf, where cognate Fe(III) was replaced by metal ions known to bind this protein. Both Ga(III) and In(III) were evaluated, with the latter being vastly superior as a tracer (stronger binding to Tf unaffected by the presence of metal scavengers and the retained ability to associate with Tf receptor). Spiking serum with indium-loaded Tf followed by ICP MS detection demonstrated that protein quantities as low as 0.04 nM can be readily detected in animal blood. Combining laser ablation with ICP MS detection allows distribution of exogenous Tf to be mapped within animal tissue cross-sections with spatial resolution exceeding 100 μm. The method can be readily extended to a range of other therapeutics where metalloproteins are used as either carriers or payloads.

  2. Transferrin receptors and the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Tracy R.; Bernabeu, Ezequiel; Rodríguez, José A.; Patel, Shabnum; Kozman, Maggie; Chiappetta, Diego A.; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional cancer therapy can be successful in destroying tumors, but can also cause dangerous side effects. Therefore, many targeted therapies are in development. The transferrin receptor (TfR) functions in cellular iron uptake through its interaction with transferrin. This receptor is an attractive molecule for the targeted therapy of cancer since it is upregulated on the surface of many cancer types and is efficiently internalized. This receptor can be targeted in two ways: 1) for the delivery of therapeutic molecules into malignant cells or 2) to block the natural function of the receptor leading directly to cancer cell death. Scope of review In the present article we discuss the strategies used to target the TfR for the delivery of therapeutic agents into cancer cells. We provide a summary of the vast types of anti-cancer drugs that have been delivered into cancer cells employing a variety of receptor binding molecules including Tf, anti-TfR antibodies, or TfR-binding peptides alone or in combination with carrier molecules including nanoparticles and viruses. Major conclusions Targeting the TfR has been shown to be effective in delivering many different therapeutic agents and causing cytotoxic effects in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. General significance The extensive use of TfR for targeted therapy attests to the versatility of targeting this receptor for therapeutic purposes against malignant cells. More advances in this area are expected to further improve the therapeutic potential of targeting the TfR for cancer therapy leading to an increase in the number of clinical trials of molecules targeting this receptor. PMID:21851850

  3. Energy transfer as a probe of protein dynamics in the proteins transferrin and calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, P B; Gorski, K M; Rosen, M A

    1988-01-01

    We have initiated an investigation into the usefulness of fluorescence energy transfer in probing protein dynamics. Our analysis involves measuring the energy transfer efficiency while perturbing the protein conformational equilibrium with heat. As the temperature increases, the amplitudes of vibrations increase, and fluorescence energy transfer should also increase if the donor and acceptor are in a flexible region of the protein. A theoretical analysis developed by Somogyi and co-workers for the temperature dependence of dipole-dipole energy transfer (Somogyi, B., J. Matko, S. Papp, J. Hevessey, G. R. Welch, and S. Damjanovich. 1984. Biochemistry. 23:3403-3411) was tested by the authors in one protein system. Energy transfer from tryptophan to a pyridoxamine derivatized side group in RNase increased 40% over 25 degrees C. Here we report further testing of this model in two additional protein systems: calmodulin, a calcium activated regulatory protein, and transferrin, a blood serum iron shuttle. Our studies show a slight differential sensitivity of the transfer efficiency to heat for the two systems. Normalized energy transfer over 6.5 A in calmodulin from a tyrosine donor to a Tb(III) acceptor increases 40% from 295 to 320 K. Normalized energy transfer over 42 A in transferrin from a Tb(III) donor to an Fe(III) acceptor increases 35% over the same temperature range. Whereas these results demonstrate that thermally induced fluctuations do increase energy transfer as predicted by Somogyi, they also appear rather insensitive to the nature of the protein host environment. In contrast to the Förster processes examined above, energy transfer over very short distances has shown an anomalously high temperature dependence. PMID:3395656

  4. Platelet high-density lipoprotein activates transferrin-derived phagocytosis activators, MAPPs, following thrombin digestion.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Haruhiko; Wu, Bin; Nagai, Yumiko; Tanaka, Sumiko; Onodera, Masayuki; Ogawa, Takafumi; Ueno, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecular activators of phagocytosis from platelets (MAPPs), transferrin-derived phagocytosis activators released from platelets, activate leukocytic phagocytosis via Fcγ receptors. It has been found that MAPPs can be prepared using stored platelets or their lysate. Using this artificial MAPP production system, it has been found that they can be produced from precursors (tetrameric and dimeric transferrins) following reaction with a low-molecular-weight (LMW) activator of MAPPs, which is liberated from a high-molecular-weight activator of MAPP (HMW activator) by reaction with thrombin. In this study, the HMW activator in platelet lysate was characterized by assaying phagocytosis of washed neutrophils. In an ultracentrifugation study of the platelet lysate, HMW activator activity was observed in the fraction corresponding to the density of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The activity was observed in the apolipoproteins obtained from the HDL fraction. Among the apolipoproteins tested only apolipoprotein CIII showed the activity to produce MAPP in vitro. Affinity chromatography of the apolipoproteins from the HDL fraction of the platelet lysate using an anti-apolipoprotein CIII column revealed that the substance that binds with the antibody showed MAPP-forming activity. In a gel filtration study of thrombin-treated apolipoprotein CIII, a peak of LMW activator activity was observed for fractions with a molecular size smaller than that of apolipoprotein CIII. Finally, MAPP-forming activity of HDL obtained from the plasma was examined. MAPP was formed only when delipidized HDL was used. In conclusion, it is suggested that platelet HDL is the HMW activator and that this activation is achieved via apolipoprotein CIII after thrombin reaction in platelets.

  5. Seasonal changes in haematology, lymphocyte transferrin receptors and intracellular iron in Ironman triathletes and untrained men.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether 12 months of chronic endurance training would affect haematology, CD4(+) lymphocyte transferrin receptor (CD71) expression, CD4(+) intracellular iron and the incidence of upper respiratory tract illnesses (URTI) in Ironman triathletes compared with untrained men. Resting venous blood samples were taken from 15 Ironman triathletes (TR 30 ± 5 year) and 12 untrained men (UT 30 ± 6 year) every 4 weeks for 12 months. Erythrocyte, leukocyte and platelet concentration, haematocrit, haemoglobin (Hb) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCHC) were measured with a full blood count. CD4(+) lymphocytes were analysed for changes in transferrin receptor (CD71) expression (CD4(+)CD71(+)), and intracellular iron (Fe(3+)), by flow cytometry. The TR group had significantly lower Hb, MCHC, and platelets for 10, 9 and 11 months, respectively; lower CD4(+)CD71(+) (3 months) and Fe(3+) (1 month), respectively; higher CD4(+)CD71(+) (1 month); a higher lymphocyte count for 4 months. There were no between-group differences in other variables. In both groups haematology and lymphocytes increased during spring, early summer and winter and decreased during late summer/late winter, with an inverse relationship between CD4(+)CD71(+) and Fe(3+). The TR group reported significantly fewer URTI than the UT. Low Hb and MCHC suggest an iron deficiency which may affect triathlete performance. Monthly changes in lymphocytes, CD4(+)CD71(+) and Fe(3+) suggested that spring, summer and late autumn are associated with CD4(+) proliferation. There may be seasonal relationships between haematology and lymphocyte function, independent of endurance training, possibly affecting performance but not the incidence of URTI.

  6. Mechanisms of plasma non-transferrin bound iron generation: insights from comparing transfused diamond blackfan anaemia with sickle cell and thalassaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Porter, John B; Walter, Patrick B; Neumayr, Lynne D; Evans, Patricia; Bansal, Sukhvinder; Garbowski, Maciej; Weyhmiller, Marcela G; Harmatz, Paul R; Wood, John C; Miller, Jeffery L; Byrnes, Colleen; Weiss, Guenter; Seifert, Markus; Grosse, Regine; Grabowski, Dagmar; Schmidt, Angelica; Fischer, Roland; Nielsen, Peter; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Vichinsky, Elliott

    2014-12-01

    In transfusional iron overload, extra-hepatic iron distribution differs, depending on the underlying condition. Relative mechanisms of plasma non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI) generation may account for these differences. Markers of iron metabolism (plasma NTBI, labile iron, hepcidin, transferrin, monocyte SLC40A1 [ferroportin]), erythropoiesis (growth differentiation factor 15, soluble transferrin receptor) and tissue hypoxia (erythropoietin) were compared in patients with Thalassaemia Major (TM), Sickle Cell Disease and Diamond-Blackfan Anaemia (DBA), with matched transfusion histories. The most striking differences between these conditions were relationships of NTBI to erythropoietic markers, leading us to propose three mechanisms of NTBI generation: iron overload (all), ineffective erythropoiesis (predominantly TM) and low transferrin-iron utilization (DBA).

  7. Resistance of different stocks and transferrin genotypes of coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, and steelhead trout, Salmo gairdneri, to bacterial kidney disease and vibriosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter , Gary W.; Schreck, Carl B.; McIntyre, John D.

    1979-01-01

    Juvenile coho salmon and steelhead trout ofdifferentstocks and three transferrin genotypes(AA, AC, and CCl, all reared in identical or similar environments, were experimentally infected with Corynebacterium sp., the causative agent ofbacterial kidney disease, or with Vibrio anguillarum, the causative agent of vibriosis. Mortality due to the pathogens was compared among stocks within a species and among transferrin genotypes within a stock to determine whetherthere was a geneticbasis for resistance to disease. Differences in resistance to bacterial kidney disease among coho salmon stocks had a genetic basis. Stock susceptibility to vibriosis was strongly influenced by environmental factors. Coho salmon orsteelhead trout of one stock may be resistant to one disease but susceptible to another. The importance of transferrin genotype of coho salmon in resistance to bacterial kidney disease was stock specific; in stocks that showed differential resistance of genotypes, the AA was the most susceptible. No differencesin resistance to vibriosis were observed among transferrin genotypes.

  8. Surfactant prevents quartz induced down-regulation of complement receptor 1 in human granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, G; Lundahl, J; Curstedt, T; Eklund, A

    1997-02-01

    Quartz is known to induce an inflammatory response in the alveolar space by recruitment of different effector cells. We investigated the interaction between granulocytes and quartz with respect to expression of complement receptor type 1 (CR1) and CR3, with and without the presence of surfactant. Granulocytes from hemolyzed blood were stimulated by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), which mobilize the intracellular pool of CR1 to the surface, and the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) measured by cytofluorometry was 47.4 (46-63.6) (median; interquartile range). Quartz exposure reduced the CR1 expression to 23.2 (22.8-30.6) MFI units (P < 0.01), a porcine surfactant preparation added during quartz exposure abolished the down-regulation completely, 47.7 (43.2-62.3) MFI units (P < 0.001). Similar results were obtained after preincubation of the cells with surfactant followed by quartz exposure. No significant influence on CR1 expression was found by a synthetic lipid mixture, nor was the CR3 expression affected. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the presence of surfactant inhibits quartz induced down-regulation of CR1 on activated granulocytes.

  9. The erythroid function of transferrin receptor 2 revealed by Tmprss6 inactivation in different models of transferrin receptor 2 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Nai, Antonella; Pellegrino, Rosa M.; Rausa, Marco; Pagani, Alessia; Boero, Martina; Silvestri, Laura; Saglio, Giuseppe; Roetto, Antonella; Camaschella, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed in the liver and in the erythroid compartment, mutated in a form of hereditary hemochromatosis. Hepatic TFR2, together with HFE, activates the transcription of the iron-regulator hepcidin, while erythroid TFR2 is a member of the erythropoietin receptor complex. The TMPRSS6 gene, encoding the liver-expressed serine protease matriptase-2, is the main inhibitor of hepcidin and inactivation of TMPRSS6 leads to iron deficiency with high hepcidin levels. Here we evaluate the phenotype resulting from the genetic loss of Tmprss6 in Tfr2 total (Tfr2−/−) and liver-specific (Tfr2LCKO) knockout mice. Tmprss6−/−Tfr2−/− and Tmprss6−/−Tfr2LCKO mice have increased hepcidin levels and show iron-deficiency anemia like Tmprss6−/−mice. However, while Tmprss6−/−Tfr2LCKO are phenotypically identical to Tmprss6−/− mice, Tmprss6−/−Tfr2−/− mice have increased red blood cell count and more severe microcytosis than Tmprss6−/− mice. In addition hepcidin expression in Tmprss6−/−Tfr2−/− mice is higher than in the wild-type animals, but lower than in Tmprss6−/− mice, suggesting partial inhibition of the hepcidin activating pathway. Our results prove that hepatic TFR2 acts upstream of TMPRSS6. In addition Tfr2 deletion causes a relative erythrocytosis in iron-deficient mice, which likely attenuates the effect of over-expression of hepcidin in Tmprss6−/− mice. Since liver-specific deletion of Tfr2 in Tmprss6−/− mice does not modify the erythrocyte count, we speculate that loss of Tfr2 in the erythroid compartment accounts for the hematologic phenotype of Tmprss6−/−Tfr2−/− mice. We propose that TFR2 is a limiting factor for erythropoiesis, particularly in conditions of iron restriction. PMID:24658816

  10. Biodistribution of Ru-97-labeled DTPA, DMSA and transferrin. [Diagnostic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P; Oster, Z H; Fairchild, R G; Atkins, H L; Brill, A B; Gil, M C; Srivastava, S C; Meinken, G E; Goldman, A G; Richards, P

    1980-01-01

    Ruthenium-97 is being produced at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP). The favorable physical properties of Ru-97 and chemical reactivity of ruthenium offer a potential for using this isotope to label compounds useful for delayed scanning. Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), 2,3-Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), and Transferrin (TF) were labeled with Ru-97-chloride. Ru-97-DTPA and In-111-DTPA, injected intravenously, showed similar organ distribution, kinetics, and more than 80% excretion by 0.5 h. Ru-97-DTPA and In-111-DTPA injected into the cisterna magna of dogs showed similar kinetics in brain, blood, and urinary bladder. The energy deposited by 1 mCi In-111-DTPA is twice that from 1 mCi Ru-97-DTPA. High quality camera images of the CSF space in the dog were obtained with both isotopes. Ru-97-DMSA was prepared with and without the addition of SnCl/sub 2/.2H/sub 2/O. Tin-free DMSA was rapidly excreted via the kidneys, whereas for maximum cortical deposition, the tin-containing preparation was superior. This compound is suitable for delayed imaging of both normal and impaired kidneys. Tissue distribution studies were performed in abscess-bearing rats with Ru-97-transferrin. Although blood levels were higher than with Ga-67-citrate, the abscess had twice as much Ru-97-TF as Ga-67-citrate and the Ru-97 muscle activity was one-third that of Ga-67. Imaging of abscess-bearing rabbits with Ru-97-TF visualized the abscesses as early as 1/2 hr after injection. Since the initial images visualize the abscess so clearly and since the TF portion of the compound binds to the abscess, Tc-99m-TF is being studied for the same purpose. Ru-97-labeled compounds are a promising replacement for In-111 and possibly also for Ga-67 compounds with the advantages of lower radiation dose and high quality image. (ERB)

  11. Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency in Inflammatory Bowel Disease by Transferrin Receptor-Ferritin Index.

    PubMed

    Abitbol, Vered; Borderie, Didier; Polin, Vanessa; Maksimovic, Fanny; Sarfati, Gilles; Esch, Anouk; Tabouret, Tessa; Dhooge, Marion; Dreanic, Johann; Perkins, Geraldine; Coriat, Romain; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2015-07-01

    Iron deficiency is common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but can be difficult to diagnose in the presence of inflammation because ferritin is an acute phase reactant. The transferrin receptor-ferritin index (TfR-F) has a high sensitivity and specificity for iron deficiency diagnosis in chronic diseases. The diagnostic efficacy of TfR-F is little known in patients with IBD. The aim of the study was to assess the added value of TfR-F to iron deficiency diagnosis in a prospective cohort of patients with IBD.Consecutive IBD patients were prospectively enrolled. Patients were excluded in case of blood transfusion, iron supplementation, or lack of consent. IBD activity was assessed on markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein, endoscopy, fecal calprotectin). Hemoglobin, ferritin, vitamin B9 and B12, Lactate dehydrogenase, haptoglobin, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) were assayed. TfR-F was calculated as the ratio sTfR/log ferritin. Iron deficiency was defined by ferritin <30 ng/mL or TfR-F >2 in the presence of inflammation.One-hundred fifty patients with median age 38 years (16-78) and Crohn disease (n = 105), ulcerative colitis (n = 43), or unclassified colitis (n = 2) were included. Active disease was identified in 45.3%. Anemia was diagnosed in 28%. Thirty-six patients (24%) had ferritin <30 ng/mL. Thirty-two patients (21.3%) had ferritin levels from 30 to 100 ng/ml and inflammation: 2 had vitamin B12 deficiency excluding TfR-F analysis, 13 of 30 (43.3%) had TfR-F >2. Overall, iron deficiency was diagnosed in 32.7% of the patients.TfR-F in addition to ferritin <30 ng/mL criterion increased by 36% diagnosis rates of iron deficiency. TfR-F appeared as a useful biomarker that could help physicians to diagnose true iron deficiency in patients with active IBD.

  12. Transferrin receptor-2 gene and non-C282Y homozygous patients with hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Martinez, P; Esculié-Coste, C; Bismuth, M; Giansily-Blaizot, M; Larrey, D; Schved, J F

    2001-01-01

    More than 80% of the patients affected by hereditary hemochromatosis, a common inherited iron disorder, are homozygotes for the 845G --> A (C282Y) mutation of the HFE gene. However, depending on the population, 10-20% of hereditary hemochromatosis can be linked either to other HFE genotypes, particularly the compound heterozygous state for C282Y and the 187 C --> G (H63D) mutation, or to mutations of new other genes. Recently, Camaschella et al. (Nat. Genet. 25, 14-15, 2000) identified a stop mutation (exon 6 nt 750 C --> T, Y250X) on the transferrin receptor-2 (TFR2) gene in two unrelated Sicilian families with hereditary hemochromatosis. The TFR2 gene is a transferrin receptor gene homologue that seems to be involved in iron metabolism. Moreover, one of the patients described by Camaschella et al. was a H63D homozygote. H63D homozygosity can be associated with various phenotypes from asymptomatic subjects to patients with a typical form of hereditary hemochromatosis. Thus, the Y250X mutation could be the molecular defect responsible for hereditary hemochromatosis in subjects with atypical HFE genotypes. We have searched for the Y250X mutation in 63 unrelated French subjects. Forty-three had a diagnosis of hereditary hemochromatosis based on classical criteria. This group included 12 H63D homozygotes, 3 C282Y heterozygotes, and 3 patients with none of the two most prevalent HFE mutants. These 18 patients had no other HFE sequence change and were subsequently subjected to DNA sequencing of the 15 last exons and flanking sequences of the TFR2 gene. The 25 remaining hereditary hemochromatosis patients who were tested for the Y250X mutant were compound heterozygotes for the C282Y and H63D mutations. Finally, we also tested for this TFR2 mutation 20 H63D homozygotes with milder manifestations of iron overload and no acquired cause of iron overload. None of the 63 tested subjects had the Y250X mutation. Concurrently, none of the 18 hereditary hemochromatosis patients

  13. Deoxynivalenol induces ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 and thereby inhibits the TNF-α-induced NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Seiya; Kataoka, Takao

    2013-02-15

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are known to inhibit eukaryotic translation and to trigger the ribotoxic stress response, which regulates gene expression via the activation of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase superfamily. In this study, we found that deoxynivalenol induced the ectodomain shedding of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFRSF1A) and thereby inhibited the TNF-α-induced signaling pathway. In human lung carcinoma A549 cells, deoxynivalenol and 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol inhibited the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) induced by TNF-α more strongly than that induced by interleukin 1α (IL-1α), whereas T-2 toxin and verrucarin A exerted nonselective inhibitory effects. Deoxynivalenol and 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol also inhibited the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway induced by TNF-α, but not that induced by IL-1α. Consistent with these findings, deoxynivalenol and 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol induced the ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 by TNF-α-converting enzyme (TACE), also known as a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17). In addition to the TACE inhibitor TAPI-2, the MAP kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126 and the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580, but not the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125, suppressed the ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 induced by deoxynivalenol and reversed its selective inhibition of TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 expression. Our results demonstrate that deoxynivalenol induces the TACE-dependent ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 via the activation of ERK and p38 MAP kinase, and thereby inhibits the TNF-α-induced NF-κB signaling pathway.

  14. Sequential assessment of pulmonary epithelial diethylene triamine penta-acetate clearance and intrapulmonary transferrin accumulation during Escherichia coli peritonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizaka, A.; Stephens, K.E.; Segall, G.M.; Hatherill, J.R.; McDougall, I.R.; Wu, Z.; Raffin, T.A. )

    1990-03-01

    The individual roles of pulmonary capillary endothelial and alveolar epithelial permeability in the pathogenesis of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are unclear. We developed a method for the sequential assessment of pulmonary macromolecule accumulation and small solute clearance in vivo using a gamma camera. We measured the exponential clearance coefficient of 111In-labeled diethylene triamine penta-acetate (111In-DTPA) to assess airway clearance of small solutes. We also calculated the exponential equilibration coefficient of 111In-labeled transferrin (111In-TF) to assess intrapulmonary accumulation of transferrin. We determined these parameters in guinea pigs with Escherichia coli peritonitis and compared them with a saline-treated control group, oleic-acid-treated groups, and a group treated with low molecular weight dextran Ringer solution. The pulmonary DTPA clearance and the intrapulmonary transferrin accumulation were significantly increased in the peritonitis group (29.4 +/- 8.2 x 10(-3) min-1, p less than 0.02, and 15.1 +/- 3.1 x 10(-3) min-1, p less than 0.02) when compared with the control group (3.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-3) min-1 and 4.5 +/- 0.5 x 10(-3) min-1). These changes developed within 5.5 h of the initial insult. Neither increased extravascular lung water nor elevated pulmonary artery and left atrial pressures were detected in the peritonitis group. The low molecular weight dextran Ringer group did not show a significant increase in the pulmonary DTPA clearance and the intrapulmonary transferrin accumulation.

  15. Development and optimization of transferrin-conjugated nanostructured lipid carriers for brain delivery of paclitaxel using Box-Behnken design.

    PubMed

    Emami, Jaber; Rezazadeh, Mahboubeh; Sadeghi, Hojjat; Khadivar, Khashayar

    2017-05-01

    The treatment of brain cancer remains one of the most difficult challenges in oncology. The purpose of this study was to develop transferrin-conjugated nanostructured lipid carriers (Tf-NLCs) for brain delivery of paclitaxel (PTX). PTX-loaded NLCs (PTX-NLCs) were prepared using solvent evaporation method and the impact of various formulation variables were assessed using Box-Behnken design. Optimized PTX-NLC was coupled with transferrin as targeting ligand and in vitro cytotoxicity of it was investigated against U-87 brain cancer cell line. As a result, 14.1 mg of cholesterol, 18.5 mg of triolein, and 0.5% poloxamer were used to prepare the optimal formulation. Mean particle size (PS), zeta potential (ZP), entrapment efficiency (EE), drug loading (DL), mean release time (MRT) of adopted formulation were confirmed to be 205.4 ± 11 nm, 25.7 ± 6.22 mV, 91.8 ± 0.5%, 5.38 ± 0.03% and 29.3 h, respectively. Following conjugation of optimized PTX-NLCs with transferrin, coupling efficiency was 21.3 mg transferrin per mmol of stearylamine; PS and MRT were increased while ZP, EE and DL decreased non-significantly. Tf-PTX-NLCs showed higher cytotoxic activity compared to non-targeted NLCs and free drug. These results indicated that the Tf-PTX-NLCs could potentially be exploited as a delivery system in brain cancer cells.

  16. Effect of iron deficiency on the response of mouse lymphocytes to concanavalin A: the importance of transferrin-bound iron.

    PubMed Central

    Mainou-Fowler, T; Brock, J H

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro response to Con A of lymphocytes from iron-deficient and normal mice in media containing either 10% fetal calf serum, apotransferrin or 20% iron-saturated transferrin was similar for the iron-deficient and control groups. However, the degree of proliferation in serum-free medium containing apotransferrin was significantly lower in all groups, compared to the responses in media containing either 20% iron-saturated transferrin or 10% fetal calf serum. Proliferation of lymphocytes from normal, iron-deficient or iron-repleted mice was lower in media supplemented with serum from iron-deficient mice than when serum from normal or iron-repleted mice was used. Addition of sufficient iron to bring the iron level of the deficient serum to that of normal serum significantly improved its ability to promote proliferation, while in vivo repletion of iron-deficient mice resulted in a restoration of normal lymphocyte responses to Con A. The proportion of cells positive for Thy 1.2, Ly 1 and Ly 2 antigens did not differ significantly between any groups of mice. Protein synthesis by cells proliferating in serum-free medium containing apotransferrin or 20% iron-saturated transferrin was the same in all groups of mice. These results indicate that decreased lymphocyte proliferative responses in iron deficiency may be due to inadequate levels of circulating transferrin-bound iron, rather than to intrinsic defects in the cells themselves or changes in the proportions of different T-cell subsets, and that iron availability does not affect protein synthesis by proliferating lymphocytes. PMID:3871421

  17. Reticulocyte haemoglobin content vs. soluble transferrin receptor and ferritin index in iron deficiency anaemia accompanied with inflammation.

    PubMed

    Marković, M; Majkić-Singh, N; Ignjatović, S; Singh, S

    2007-10-01

    Ferritin concentration, as a parameter of iron status that is commonly used in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), often has limited values if the iron deficiency is accompanied by inflammatory disease. This study evaluated the value of reticulocyte haemoglobin content (CHr) and soluble transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/F) in the diagnosis of IDA and differential diagnosis of IDA and anaemia of chronic disease. The study included 66 nonanaemic individuals as controls, 86 patients with IDA divided into noninflammatory and inflammatory subgroups, and 32 patients with anaemia of chronic disease. Blood count, iron, transferrin saturation, total iron binding capacity, ferritin, C-reactive protein, sTfR and CHr were determined. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis showed very high discriminating power for CHr, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and sTfR/F in the diagnosis of IDA. In patients with anaemia of chronic disease these parameters showed no significant difference from the control. CHr and sTfR enabled recognition of iron deficiency and were not affected by acute phase reaction. They are sensitive markers of body iron status with additional value to conventional tests for the detection of iron deficiency.

  18. Studies on the mechanism of pyrophosphate-mediated uptake of iron from transferrin by isolated rat-liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Konopka, K; Romslo, I

    1981-07-01

    1. Respiring rat liver mitochondria accumulate iron released from transferrin by pyrophosphate. The amount of iron accumulated is 1--1.5 nmol mg protein-1 h-1, or approximately 60% of the amount of iron mobilized from transferrin. 2. The uptake declines if respiration is inhibited, substrate is deleted, or the experiments are run under anaerobic conditions. Substrate depletion and respiratory inhibitors are less inhibitory under anaerobic conditions. 3. More than 80% of the amount of iron accumulated by aerobic, actively respiring mitochondria can be chelated by bathophenanthroline sulphonate, and with deuteroporphyrin included, up to 30% of the amount of iron accumulated is recovered as deuteroheme. Iron accumulated by respiration-inhibited mitochondria under aerobic conditions is not available for heme synthesis. 4. With time the uptake of iron increases eightfold relative to the uptake of pyrophosphate. 5. The results are compatible with a model in which ferric iron is mobilized from transferrin by pyrophosphate, ferric iron pyrophosphate is bound to the mitochondria, iron is reduced, dissociates from pyrophosphate and is taken up by the mitochondria. Ferrous iron thus formed is available for heme synthesis.

  19. Supporting data for the MS identification of distinct transferrin glycopeptide glycoforms and citrullinated peptides associated with inflammation or autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rosal-Vela, A.; Barroso, A.; Giménez, E.; García-Rodríguez, S.; Longobardo, V.; Postigo, J.; Iglesias, M.; Lario, A.; Merino, J.; Merino, R.; Zubiaur, M.; Sanz-Nebot, V.; Sancho, J.

    2016-01-01

    This data article presents the results of all the statistical analyses applied to the relative intensities of the detected 2D-DiGE protein spots for each of the 3 performed DiGE experiments. The data reveals specific subsets of protein spots with significant differences between WT and CD38-deficient mice with either Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), or with chronic inflammation induced by CFA, or under steady-state conditions. This article also shows the MS data analyses that allowed the identification of the protein species which serve to discriminate the different experimental groups used in this study. Moreover, the article presents MS data on the citrullinated peptides linked to specific protein species that were generated in CIA+ or CFA-treated mice. Lastly, this data article provides MS data on the efficiency of the analyses of the transferrin (Tf) glycopeptide glycosylation pattern in spleen and serum from CIA+ mice and normal controls. The data supplied in this work is related to the research article entitled “identification of multiple transferrin species in spleen and serum from mice with collagen-induced arthritis which may reflect changes in transferrin glycosylation associated with disease activity: the role of CD38” [1]. All mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with identifiers PRIDE: PXD002644, PRIDE: PXD002643, PRIDE: PXD003183 and PRIDE: PXD003163. PMID:26909372

  20. Double diagnostic meaning of serum transferrin receptor in hemodialysis patients: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Passanante, S; Diquattro, M; Greco, V; Li Cavoli, G; Bono, L; Palma, B; Scola, S; Faraci, C; Rotolo, U; Menozzi, I

    2004-01-01

    Hemodialysis patients on maintenance erythropoietin need an adequate supply of iron to optimize therapy and achieve and maintain target levels of hemoglobin. Evaluation of iron stores and early detection of iron deficiency are essential for management of erythropoiesis in chronic renal failure, but there is still no single biochemical or hematological parameter that is sensitive or specific enough to completely describe the distribution of iron in the body. Serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) is a marker of iron that is available for erythropoiesis. We selected 2 clinical cases in which hemodialysis patients were receiving maintenance erythropoietin. To suggest how sTfR can be used in its double diagnostic meaning according to the clinical context of the patient, sTfR was evaluated in one case as a marker of iron deficiency and in the other as a marker of erythropoiesis. The association of sTfR with hematological parameters of iron-deficient erythropoiesis (reticulocyte hemoglobin content, percentage of hypochromic erythrocytes, ratio of reticulocyte hemoglobin content to hemoglobin content) and parameters of stimulated erythropoiesis (absolute reticulocyte count, immature reticulocyte fraction) increases the accuracy of sTfR in its double diagnostic power.

  1. Transferrin mediated solid lipid nanoparticles containing curcumin: enhanced in vitro anticancer activity by induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mulik, Rohit S; Mönkkönen, Jukka; Juvonen, Risto O; Mahadik, Kakasaheb R; Paradkar, Anant R

    2010-10-15

    Photodegradation and low bioavailability are major hurdles for the therapeutic use of curcumin. Aim of the present study was to formulate transferrin-mediated solid lipid nanoparticles (Tf-C-SLN) to increase photostability, and enhance its anticancer activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Tf-C-SLN were prepared by homogenization method and characterized by size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and stability, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and in vitro release study. Microplate analysis and flow cytometry techniques were used for cytotoxicity and apoptosis study. The physical characterization showed the suitability of method of preparation. TEM and XRD study revealed the spherical nature and entrapment of curcumin in amorphous form, respectively. The cytotoxicity, ROS and cell uptake was found to be increased considerably with Tf-C-SLN compared to curcumin solubilized surfactant solution (CSSS) and curcumin-loaded SLN (C-SLN) suggesting the targeting effect. AnnexinV-FITC/PI double staining, DNA analysis and reduced mitochondrial potential confirmed the apoptosis. The flow cytometric studies revealed that the anticancer activity of curcumin is enhanced with Tf-C-SLN compared to CSSS and C-SLN, and apoptosis is the mechanism underlying the cytotoxicity. The present study indicated the potential of Tf-C-SLN in enhancing the anticancer effect of curcumin in breast cancer cells in vitro.

  2. Ultrasensitive Sensing Material Based on Opal Photonic Crystal for Label-Free Monitoring of Transferrin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Enqi; Peng, Yuan; Zhang, Xihao; Bai, Jialei; Song, Yanqiu; He, Houluo; Fan, Longxing; Qu, Xiaochen; Gao, Zhixian; Liu, Ying; Ning, Baoan

    2017-02-22

    A new opal photonic crystal (PC) sensing material, allowing label-free detection of transferrin (TRF), is proposed in the current study. This photonic crystal was prepared via a vertical convective self-assembly method with monodisperse microspheres polymerized by methyl methacrylate (MMA) and 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid (AAPBA). FTIR, TG, and DLS were used to characterize the components and particle size of the monodisperse microspheres. SEM was used to observe the morphology of the PC. The diffraction peak intensity decreases as the TRF concentration increase. This was due to the combination of TRF to the boronic acid group of the photonic crystal. After condition optimization, a standard curve was obtained and the linear range of TRF concentration was from 2 × 10(-3) ng/mL to 200 ng/mL. Measurement of TRF concentration in simulated urine sample was also investigated using the sensing material. The results indicated that the PC provided a cheap, label-free, and easy-to-use alternative for TRF determination in clinical diagnostics.

  3. Plasmid pORF-hTRAIL targeting to glioma using transferrin-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Li, Jianfeng; Jiang, Chen; Hong, Bo; Hao, Bing

    2016-01-01

    A gene drug delivery system for glioma therapy based on transferrin (Tf)-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) was prepared. Gene drug, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (hTRAIL)-encoding plasmid open reading frame (pORF-hTRAIL, Trail), was condensed by Tf-modified PAMAM to form nanoparticles (NPs). PAMAM-PEG-Tf/DNA NPs showed higher cellular uptake, in vitro gene expression, and cytotoxicity than PAMAM-PEG/DNA NPs in C6 cells. The in vivo targeting efficacy of NPs was visualized by ex vivo fluorescence imaging. Tf-modified NPs showed obvious glioma-targeting trend. Plasmid encoding green fluorescence protein (GFP) was also condensed by modified or unmodified PAMAM to evaluate the in vivo gene expression level. The PAMAM-PEG-Tf/plasmid encoding enhanced green fluorescence protein (pEGFP) NPs exhibited higher GFP expression level than PAMAM-PEG/pEGFP NPs. TUNEL assay revealed that Tf-modified NPs could induce much more tumor apoptosis. The median survival time of PAMAM-PEG-Tf/Trail-treated rats (28.5 days) was longer than that of rats treated with PAMAM-PEG/Trail (25.5 days), temozolomide (24.5 days), PAMAM-PEG-Tf/pEGFP (19 days), or saline (17 days). The therapeutic effect was further confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. This study demonstrated that targeting gene delivery system had potential application for the treatment of glioma. PMID:26719669

  4. Medical treatment of orthotopic glioblastoma with transferrin-conjugated nanoparticles encapsulating zoledronic acid

    PubMed Central

    Porru, Manuela; Zappavigna, Silvia; Salzano, Giuseppina; Luce, Amalia; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa; Artuso, Simona; Lusa, Sara; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Leonetti, Carlo; Caraglia, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastomas are highly aggressive adult brain tumors with poor clinical outcome. In the central nervous system (CNS) the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the most important limiting factor for both development of new drugs and drug delivery. Here, we propose a new strategy to treat glioblastoma based on transferrin (Tf)-targeted self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) incorporating zoledronic acid (ZOL) (NPs-ZOL-Tf). NPs-ZOL-Tf have been assessed on the glioblastoma cell line U373MG-LUC that showed a refractoriness in vitro to temozolomide (TMZ) and fotemustine (FTM). NPs-ZOL-Tf treatment resulted in higher in vitro cytotoxic activity than free ZOL. However, the potentiation of anti-proliferative activity of NPs-ZOL-Tf was superimposable to that one induced by NPs-ZOL (not armed with Tf). On the other hand, NPs-ZOL-Tf showed a higher antitumor efficacy if compared with that one caused by NPs-ZOL in immunosuppressed mice intramuscularly bearing U373MG-LUC xenografts, inducing a significant tumor weight inhibition (TWI). The experiments performed on mice with intracranial U373MG-LUC xenografts confirmed the efficacy of NPs-ZOL-Tf. These effects were paralleled by a higher intratumour localization of fluorescently-labeled-NPs-Tf both in intramuscular and intracranial xenografts. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the encapsulation of ZOL increases the antitumor efficacy of this drug in glioblastoma through the acquisition of ability to cross the BBB. PMID:25431953

  5. Reference limits and behaviour of serum transferrin receptor in children 6-10 years of age.

    PubMed

    Danise, P; Maconi, M; Morelli, G; Di Palma, A; Rescigno, G; Esposito, C; Avino, D; Talento, B

    2008-08-01

    Serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) originates mostly from erythroblasts and lesser from reticulocytes. The usefulness of sTfR has been implicated in several clinical situations, mainly as a marker of accelerated erythropoiesis or iron deficiency. The assessment of sTfR may be useful in the period of rapid growth during infancy, childhood and adolescence. We evaluated sTfR and the other quantitative and qualitative parameters of the erythropoiesis (Hb, MCV, CHr, Ret-He) and of the iron storage (serum ferritin, sTfR/ferritin index) in a total of 916 children aged 6-10 years. Children were divided into three groups: (A) healthy children, (B) with storage iron deficiency (serum ferritin < 12 microg/l) and (C) Beta trait carriers (HbA2 > 3.3). We determined reference intervals by sex and by age in healthy children. sTfR showed a slight but statistically significant age related increase but did not show significant sex differences. We compared sTfR and the other parameters investigated in the three groups of children. sTfR is not a decisive parameter that can be utilized alone in discriminating the border-line situations between normal and pathologic ones but can help in completing the panel of tests in iron deficiency and in thalassaemia Beta trait carriers.

  6. Characteristics of sequential targeting of brain glioma for transferrin-modified cisplatin liposome.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qing; Li, Li-Min; Han, Min; Tang, Xin-Jiang; Yao, Jin-Na; Ying, Xiao-Ying; Li, Fan-Zhu; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2013-02-28

    Methods on how to improve the sequential targeting of glioma subsequent to passing of drug through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) have been occasionally reported. However, the characteristics involved are poorly understood. In the present study, cisplatin (Cis) liposome (lipo) was modified with transferrin (Tf) to investigate the characteristics of potential sequential targeting to glioma. In bEnd3/C6 co-culture BBB models, higher transport efficiency across the BBB and cytotoxicity in basal C6 cells induced by Cis-lipo(Tf) than Cis-lipo and Cis-solution, suggest its sequential targeting effect. Interestingly, similar liposomal morphology as that of donor compartment was first demonstrated in the receptor solution of BBB models. Meanwhile, a greater acquisition in the lysosome of bEnd3, distributed sequentially into the nucleus of C6 cells were found for the Cis-lipo(Tf). Pre-incubation of chlorpromazine and Tf inhibited this process, indicating that a clathrin-dependent endocytosis is involved in the transport of Cis-lipo(Tf) across the BBB.

  7. Intratumoral therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using genetically engineered transferrin for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dennis J; Kwan, Byron H; Chao, Felix C; Nicolaides, Theodore P; Phillips, Joanna J; Lam, Gretchen Y; Mason, Anne B; Weiss, William A; Kamei, Daniel T

    2010-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor with median survival of only 12 to 15 months under the current standard of care. To both increase tumor specificity and decrease nonspecific side effects, recent experimental strategies in the treatment of GBM have focused on targeting cell surface receptors, including the transferrin (Tf) receptor, that are overexpressed in many cancers. A major limitation of Tf-based therapeutics is the short association of Tf within the cell to deliver its payload. We previously developed two mutant Tf molecules, K206E/R632A Tf and K206E/K534A Tf, in which iron is locked into each of the two homologous lobes. Relative to wild-type Tf, we showed enhanced delivery of diphtheria toxin (DT) from these mutants to a monolayer culture of HeLa cells. Here, we extend the application of our Tf mutants to the treatment of GBM. In vitro treatment of Tf mutants to a monolayer culture of glioma cells showed enhanced cellular association as well as enhanced delivery of conjugated DT. Treatment of GBM xenografts with mutant Tf-conjugated DT resulted in pronounced regression in vivo, indicating their potential use as drug carriers.

  8. Aluminum access to the brain: A role for transferrin and its receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Roskams, A.J.; Connor, J.R. )

    1990-11-01

    The toxicity of aluminum in plant and animal cell biology is well established, although poorly understood. Several recent studies have identified aluminum as a potential, although highly controversial, contributory factor in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and dialysis dementia. For example, aluminum has been found in high concentrations in senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, which occur in the brains of subjects with Alzheimer's disease. However, a mechanism for the entry of aluminum (Al{sup 3+}) into the cells of the central nervous system (CNS) has yet to be found. Here the authors describe a possible route of entry for aluminum into the cells of the CNS via the same high-affinity receptor-ligand system that has been postulated for iron (Fe{sup 3}) aluminum is able to gain access to the central nervous system under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the interaction between transferrin and its receptor may function as a general metal ion regulatory system in the CNS, extending beyond its postulated role in iron regulation.

  9. Bivalent Brain Shuttle Increases Antibody Uptake by Monovalent Binding to the Transferrin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hultqvist, Greta; Syvänen, Stina; Fang, Xiaotian T; Lannfelt, Lars; Sehlin, Dag

    2017-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an obstacle for antibody passage into the brain, impeding the development of immunotherapy and antibody-based diagnostics for brain disorders. In the present study, we have developed a brain shuttle for active transport of antibodies across the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis. We have thus recombinantly fused two single-chain variable fragments (scFv) of the transferrin receptor (TfR) antibody 8D3 to the light chains of mAb158, an antibody selectively binding to Aβ protofibrils, which are involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite the two TfR binders, a monovalent interaction with TfR was achieved due to the short linkers that sterically hinder bivalent binding to the TfR dimer. The design enabled efficient receptor-mediated brain uptake of the fusion protein. Two hours after administration, brain concentrations were 2-3% of the injected dose per gram brain, comparable to small molecular drugs and 80-fold higher than unmodified mAb158. After three days, fusion protein concentrations in AD transgenic mouse brains were 9-fold higher than in wild type mice, demonstrating high in vivo specificity. Thus, our innovative recombinant design markedly increases mAb158 brain uptake, which makes it a strong candidate for improved Aβ immunotherapy and as a PET radioligand for early diagnosis and evaluation of treatment effect in AD. Moreover, this approach could be applied to any target within the brain. PMID:28042336

  10. Transferrin-conjugated polymeric nanomedicine to enhance the anticancer efficacy of edelfosine in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Sun, Zhong-Liang

    2016-10-01

    In this study, transferrin (Tf)-conjugated polyethylene glycol (PEG)-poly-l-lysine (PLL)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (PEG-PLL-PLGA)-based micellar formulations were successfully prepared for the delivery of edelfosine (EDS) in leukemia treatment. The micelles were nanosized and presented spherical shaped particles. Our in vitro data suggest that the nanoformulations maintain the biological activity of drugs for longer periods and lead to a continuous release of active drug. The enhanced cellular uptake of EDS-TM resulted in significantly higher cytotoxic effect in K562 leukemia cells. Cell cycle analysis further demonstrated the significantly higher G2/M phase arrest of cancer cells. Immunoblot analysis clearly revealed the potential of EDS-TM in inducing apoptosis of cancer cells which could improve the anticancer efficacy in leukemia. Importantly, EDS-M and EDS-TM significantly prolonged the circulation profile of EDS throughout until 24h, indicating the potential of targeted nanoparticulate delivery system. The prolonged blood circulation potential of micellar formulations might improve the therapeutic potential of drug by increasing its bioavailability in the serum. It would be worthwhile evaluating the effects of the EDS-loaded micelles on cancer cells in vivo for clinical application.

  11. Study of maternal influences on fetal iron status at term using cord blood transferrin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, D; Savage, G; Tubman, T; Lappin, T; Halliday, H

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To determine effects of maternal iron depletion and smoking on iron status of term babies using serum transferrin receptors (STfR) and their ratio to ferritin (TfR-F index) in cord blood.
METHODS—Iron, ferritin, STfR, and haemoglobin (Hb) concentration were measured and TfR-F index calculated in 67 cord /maternal blood pairs. Twenty six mothers were iron depleted (ferritin <10 µg/l) and 28 were smokers.
RESULTS—Maternal iron depletion was associated with decreased cord ferritin (113 v 171 µg/l) and Hb (156 v 168 g/l) but no change in STfR or TfR-F index. Smoking was associated with increased cord Hb (168 v 157 g/l) and TfR-F index (4.1 v 3.4), and decreased ferritin (123 v 190 µg/l). Cord TfR-F index and Hb were positively correlated (r = 0.48).
CONCLUSIONS—Maternal iron depletion is associated with reduced fetal iron stores but no change in free iron availability. Smoking is associated with increased fetal iron requirements for erythropoiesis.

 PMID:11124923

  12. The second transferrin receptor regulates red blood cell production in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nai, Antonella; Lidonnici, Maria Rosa; Rausa, Marco; Mandelli, Giacomo; Pagani, Alessia; Silvestri, Laura; Ferrari, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    Transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) contributes to hepcidin regulation in the liver and associates with erythropoietin receptor in erythroid cells. Nevertheless, TFR2 mutations cause iron overload (hemochromatosis type 3) without overt erythroid abnormalities. To clarify TFR2 erythroid function, we generated a mouse lacking Tfr2 exclusively in the bone marrow (Tfr2BMKO). Tfr2BMKO mice have normal iron parameters, reduced hepcidin levels, higher hemoglobin and red blood cell counts, and lower mean corpuscular volume than normal control mice, a phenotype that becomes more evident in iron deficiency. In Tfr2BMKO mice, the proportion of nucleated erythroid cells in the bone marrow is higher and the apoptosis lower than in controls, irrespective of comparable erythropoietin levels. Induction of moderate iron deficiency increases erythroblasts number, reduces apoptosis, and enhances erythropoietin (Epo) levels in controls, but not in Tfr2BMKO mice. Epo-target genes such as Bcl-xL and Epor are highly expressed in the spleen and in isolated erythroblasts from Tfr2BMKO mice. Low hepcidin expression in Tfr2BMKO is accounted for by erythroid expansion and production of the erythroid regulator erythroferrone. We suggest that Tfr2 is a component of a novel iron-sensing mechanism that adjusts erythrocyte production according to iron availability, likely by modulating the erythroblast Epo sensitivity. PMID:25499454

  13. The Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptide and Transferrin on Enhanced Delivery of Drug to Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gitanjali; Lakkadwala, Sushant; Modgil, Amit; Singh, Jagdish

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of effectively delivering therapeutic agents to brain has led to an entire field of active research devoted to overcome the blood brain barrier (BBB) and efficiently deliver drugs to brain. This review focusses on exploring the facets of a novel platform designed for the delivery of drugs to brain. The platform was constructed based on the hypothesis that a combination of receptor-targeting agent, like transferrin protein, and a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) will enhance the delivery of associated therapeutic cargo across the BBB. The combination of these two agents in a delivery vehicle has shown significantly improved (p < 0.05) translocation of small molecules and genes into brain as compared to the vehicle with only receptor-targeting agents. The comprehensive details of the uptake mechanisms and properties of various CPPs are illustrated here. The application of this technology, in conjunction with nanotechnology, can potentially open new horizons for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. PMID:27231900

  14. The assessment of frequency of iron deficiency in athletes from the transferrin receptor-ferritin index.

    PubMed

    Malczewska, J; Szczepańska, B; Stupnicki, R; Sendecki, W

    2001-03-01

    The transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/logFerr) was determined in 131 male and 121 female athletes in order to assess the frequency of iron deficiency (threshold value of that index taken as 1.8). Blood was drawn for determining morphological indices as well as sTfR, ferritin, iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and haptoglobin. A significantly (p <.01) higher incidence of iron deficiency was observed in women (26%) than in men (11%). The iron deficiency was latent, since no subject was found to be anemic. The plasma iron was significantly lower and TIBC higher (p <.001) in both iron-deficient subgroups than in the non-deficient ones. This confirmed the latent character of iron deficiency. Some hematological indices (Hb, MCH, MCHC, MCV) were significantly lower in iron-deficient female athletes than in male athletes, which suggested a more profound iron deficiency in the former. The sTfR/logFerr index might thus be useful in detecting iron deficiency in athletes, especially in those with erythropoiesis disorders, since physical loads may affect the widely used ferritin levels.

  15. Effect of iron saturation on the bacteriostasis of human serum: in vivo does not correlate with in vitro saturation.

    PubMed

    Baltimore, R S; Shedd, D G; Pearson, H A

    1982-10-01

    Human serum inhibits the growth of a variety of human pathogens. One of the serum bacteriostatic components is transferrin, the major iron-binding protein. In the presence of transferrin, free iron, which is required for bacterial nucleoprotein synthesis, is unavailable and bacterial growth is inhibited. In an in vitro system, we tested the hypothesis that serum with highly saturated transferrin allows free iron to be available for rapid bacterial growth. We first confirmed the finding that addition of ionic iron sufficient to saturate transferrin in normal sera inhibits the bacteriostatic activity for Escherichia coli. In contrast, no differences were found in the growth rate of E. coli in sera from individuals representing the entire range of transferrin saturation found in humans (iron-deficient, normal, and thalassemic). This finding supports the thesis that iron added in vitro is more easily extracted than in vivo, where it is tightly bound to transferrin, and does not support the contention that ordinary iron treatment predisposes infants to infection.

  16. Evidence for association between polymorphisms in the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CNR1) gene and cannabis dependence

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Arpana; Wetherill, Leah; Dick, Danielle M.; Xuei, Xiaoling; Hinrichs, Anthony; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Nurnberger, John I.; Schuckit, Marc; Bierut, Laura J.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Foroud, Tatiana

    2009-01-01

    Genomic studies of cannabis use disorders have been limited. The cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) on chromosome 6q14–15 is an excellent candidate gene for cannabis dependence due to the important role of the G-protein coupled receptor encoded by this gene in the rewarding effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Previous studies have found equivocal evidence for an association between SNPs in CNR1 and a general vulnerability to substance use disorders. We investigate the association between 9 SNPs spanning CNR1 and cannabis dependence in 1,923 individuals. Two SNPs that were previously associated with cannabis dependence in other studies were also significant with this phenotype in our analyses [rs806368 (p = 0.05) and rs806380 (p = 0.009)]. Haplotype analyses revealed the association to be largely driven by the SNP rs806380. These results suggest a role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 gene in cannabis dependence. PMID:19016476

  17. Study of natural IgG antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yilai; Yan, Zhaoping; Huang, Yile; Qiu, Cailing; Chen, Xiangyun; Hu, Ying; Meng, Qingyong; Wei, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Natural antibodies have been found to have anti-tumorigenic function. This study was designed to investigate whether natural IgG antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) could suppress the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Three HCC cell lines and A549 lung cancer cells were used for this study. They were grown, respectively, with human plasma positive or negative for anti-VEGFR1 IgG. Cell viability, apoptosis and VEGFR1 gene expression were examined. Three patients with HCC were recruited for a case study. The results showed that plasma anti-VEGFR1 IgG significantly inhibited the proliferation of all three HCC cell lines but not A549 cell line; the proportions of apoptotic cells were significantly higher in HCC cells treated with anti-VEGFR1 IgG positive plasma than those treated with IgG negative plasma. The expression of the VEGFR1 gene was significantly higher in HCC cells than A549 cells. Of three HCC patients who received transfusion of anti-VEGFR1 IgG positive plasma, two cases with stage B showed a good response to the treatment but one with distant metastasis did not. Human plasma IgG against VEGFR1 may be a promising agent for anti-HCC therapy.

  18. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  19. Complement receptor 1 inhibitors for prevention of immune-mediated red cell destruction: potential use in transfusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina; Kang, Stanley; Tamasauskas, Daniel; Sung, Dorothy; Scaradavou, Andromachi

    2003-06-15

    Activation of complement cascade via the antibody-mediated classical pathway can initiate red blood cell (RBC) destruction, causing transfusion reactions and hemolytic anemia. In the present study, we have assessed the ability of a human recombinant soluble form of complement receptor 1 (sCR1) to inhibit complement-mediated RBC destruction in vitro and in vivo. Using an in vitro alloimmune incompatibility model, sCR1 inhibited complement activation and prevented hemolysis. Following transfusion of human group O RBCs into mice lacking detectable pre-existing antibodies against the transfused RBCs, systemic coadministration of 10 mg/kg sCR1, a dose well tolerated in human subjects for prevention of tissue injury, completely inhibited the in vivo clearance of the transfused RBCs and surface C3 deposition in the first hour after transfusion, correlating with the half-life of sCR1 in the circulation. Treatment with sCR1 increased the survival of transfused human group A RBCs in the circulation of mice with pre-existing anti-A for 2 hours after transfusion by 50%, reduced intravascular hemolysis, and lowered the levels of complement deposition (C3 and C4), but not immunoglobulin G (IgG) or IgM, on the transfused cells by 100-fold. We further identified potential functional domains in CR1 that can act to limit complement-mediated RBC destruction in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our data highlight a potential use of CR1-based inhibitors for prevention of complement-dependent immune hemolysis.

  20. Spectroscopic studies of the interaction mechanisms between mono-caffeoylquinic acids and transferrin.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yanqing; Dong, Jing; Chen, Shizhong; Liu, Meixian; Wang, Daidong; Zhang, Xiaotian; Wang, Hong; Lin, Zongtao

    2017-03-07

    Transferrin (Tf) is an important protein responsible for circulating and transporting iron into cytoplasm. Tf can be taken into cells through endocytosis mediated by Tf receptor, which usually overexpresses in cancer cells. The Tf-Tf receptor pathway opens a possible avenue for novel targeted cancer therapy by utilizing Tf-binding active compounds. Among which, anti-cancer active caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs) were recently found to be promising Tf-binders by our group. For better understanding the anti-cancer activities of CQAs, it is important to unveil the binding mechanisms between CQAs and Tf. In this study, the fluorescence quenching, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking were used to investigate the interactions between CQA and Tf. The results showed that the calculated apparent association constants of interactions between 1-, 3-, 4- and 5-CQA and Tf at 298K were 7.97×10(5)M(-1), 4.36×10(7)M(-1), 6.58×10(5)M(-1) and 4.42×10(6)M(-1), respectively. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the interaction between 1-, 3-, 5-CQA and Tf is due to H-bonding, and electrostatic interactions were likely involved in the binding of 4-CQA and Tf. The CD results indicated that bindings of 1-CQA, 4-CQA and 5-CQA with Tf resulted in more stretched β-turn and random coil translated from β-sheet. In contrast, 3-CQA led to more stable a-helix conformation. Molecular docking studies of CQAs with Tf further displayed that CQAs were able to interact with residues near Fe(3+) binding site. The spectroscopic studies revealed the action mechanisms, thermodynamics and interacting forces between CQAs and Tf, and thus are helpful for future design and discovery of Tf-binders for targeted cancer therapy applying Tf-Tf receptor pathway.

  1. Apoptosis-induced anticancer effect of transferrin-conjugated solid lipid nanoparticles of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Mulik, Rohit S; Mönkkönen, Jukka; Juvonen, Risto O; Mahadik, Kakasaheb R; Paradkar, Anant R

    Broad spectrum therapeutic potential of curcumin is usually hampered by its photodegradation and low bioavailability. Present investigation was designed with an objective to develop transferrin-mediated solid lipid nanoparticles (Tf-C-SLN) resistant to the photostability and capable of enhancing the bioavailability by targeted drug delivery to elicit anticancer activity against SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells in vitro. Hot homogenization method was used for the formulation of Tf-C-SLN and evaluated physicochemically using parameters such as, size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and photostability, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), differential scanning colorimetry (DSC), and in vitro release study. In vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis investigations were performed using microplate analysis and flow cytometry techniques. The physicochemical characterization confirmed the suitability of formulation method and various parameters therein. TEM investigation revealed the spherical morphology while NMR and DSC study confirmed the entrapment of curcumin inside the nanoparticles. The cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species, and cell uptake were found to be increased considerably with Tf-C-SLN compared with curcumin-solubilized surfactant solution, and curcumin-loaded SLN (C-SLN) suggesting the targeting effect. AnnexinV-FITC/PI double staining, DNA analysis, caspase detection, and reduced mitochondrial potential confirmed the induction of apoptosis with nanoparticle treatment. Enhanced anticancer activity with Tf-C-SLN compared with curcumin-solubilized surfactant solution and C-SLN was observed from flow cytometry investigations with apoptosis being the major underlying mechanism. The in vitro observations of our investigation are very compelling and concrete to advocate the potential of Tf-C-SLN in enhancing the anticancer effect of curcumin against neuroblastoma in vivo and possible clinical applications.

  2. Functional consequences of transferrin receptor-2 mutations causing hereditary hemochromatosis type 3.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ricky; Shvartsman, Maya; Morán, Erica; Lois, Sergi; Aranda, Jessica; Barqué, Anna; de la Cruz, Xavier; Bruguera, Miquel; Vagace, José Manuel; Gervasini, Guillermo; Sanz, Cristina; Sánchez, Mayka

    2015-05-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) type 3 is an autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism characterized by excessive iron deposition in the liver and caused by mutations in the transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) gene. Here, we describe three new HH type 3 Spanish families with four TFR2 mutations (p.Gly792Arg, c.1606-8A>G, Gln306*, and Gln672*). The missense variation p.Gly792Arg was found in homozygosity in two adult patients of the same family, and in compound heterozygosity in an adult proband that also carries a novel intronic change (c.1606-8A>G). Two new nonsense TFR2 mutations (Gln306* and Gln672*) were detected in a pediatric case. We examine the functional consequences of two TFR2 variants (p.Gly792Arg and c.1606-8A>G) using molecular and computational methods. Cellular protein localization studies using immunofluorescence demonstrated that the plasma membrane localization of p.Gly792Arg TFR2 is impaired. Splicing studies in vitro and in vivo reveal that the c.1606-8A>G mutation leads to the creation of a new acceptor splice site and an aberrant TFR2 mRNA. The reported mutations caused HH type 3 by protein truncation, altering TFR2 membrane localization or by mRNA splicing defect, producing a nonfunctional TFR2 protein and a defective signaling transduction for hepcidin regulation. TFR2 genotyping should be considered in adult but also in pediatric cases with early-onset of iron overload.

  3. Targeting etoposide to acute myelogenous leukaemia cells using nanostructured lipid carriers coated with transferrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajavinia, Amir; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Jafarian Dehkordi, Abbas

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diverse properties of transferrin (Tf)-conjugated nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) prepared using three different fatty amines, including stearylamine (SA), dodecylamine (DA) and spermine (SP), and two different methods for Tf coupling. Etoposide-loaded NLCs were prepared by an emulsion-solvent evaporation method followed by probe sonication. Chemical coupling of NLCs with Tf was mediated by an amide linkage between the surface-exposed amino group of the fatty amine and the carboxyl group of the protein. The physical coating was performed in a Ringer-Hepes buffer medium. NLCs were characterized by their particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, drug entrapment percentage, drug release profiles and Tf-coupling efficiency. The cytotoxicity of NLCs on K562 acute myelogenous leukaemia cells was studied by MTT assay, and their cellular uptake was studied by a flow cytometry method. SA-containing NLCs showed the lowest particle size, the highest zeta potential and the largest coupling efficiency values. The drug entrapment percentage and the zeta potential decreased after Tf coupling, but the average particle size increased. SP-containing formulations released their drug contents comparatively slower than SA- or DA-containing NLCs. Unconjugated NLCs released moderately more drug than Tf-NLCs. Flow cytometry studies revealed enhanced cellular uptake of Tf-NLCs compared to unconjugated ones. Blocking Tf receptors resulted in a significantly higher cell survival rate for Tf-NLCs. The highest cytotoxic activity was observed in the chemically coupled SA-containing nanoparticles, with an IC50 value of 15-fold lower than free etoposide.

  4. Urinary albumin and transferrin as early diagnostic markers of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    MAEDA, Hiroto; SOGAWA, Kazuyuki; SAKAGUCHI, Kazuko; ABE, Saori; SAGIZAKA, Wataru; MOCHIZUKI, Shunsuke; HORIE, Waka; WATANABE, Toshifumi; SHIBATA, Yui; SATOH, Mamoru; SANDA, Akihiro; NOMURA, Fumio; SUZUKI, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Feline renal diseases are increasingly noted in veterinary practice. It is important to diagnose and identify the pathological basis of renal dysfunction accurately at an early stage, but there are only a few reports on this area in clinical veterinary medicine. We investigated the efficacy of measurement of urinary albumin (u-Alb) and urinary transferrin (u-Tf) for early diagnosis using 5-µl urine samples collected noninvasively by catheterization from normal (IRIS stage I) cats and cats with stage I chronic kidney disease (CKD). The u-Alb levels in normal and stage I CKD cats were 6.0 ± 4.5 and 11.2 ± 8.4 mg/dl, respectively, and the u-Tf levels were 0.09 ± 0.42 and 0.52 ± 0.79 mg/dl, respectively. Based on ROC curve analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of u-Alb and u-Tf were higher than those of the currently used biomarker, the plasma creatinine level. The sensitivity of u-Alb was higher than that of u-Tf, whereas the specificity of u-Tf was higher than that of u-Alb. The validity of the threshold albumin level (20 mg/dl) was confirmed by measurements using SDS-PAGE. Since leakage of u-Tf in urine precedes leakage of u-Alb, inclusion of u-Tf in biochemistry tests may be appropriate for IRIS staging as a diagnostic marker of early diagnosis of renal disorder in cats. PMID:25819688

  5. Serum ferritin levels and transferrin saturation in men with prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Kuvibidila, Solo R.; Gauthier, Tony; Rayford, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Elevated body iron stores (serum ferritin >300 microg/L, transferrin saturation TS >50%) are associated with increased risk of liver and lung cancers. To determine whether such association also exists for prostate cancer (PC), we measured serum ferritin, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), and TS in serum samples from 34 men with newly diagnosed, untreated PC and 84 healthy men, ranging in age from 49-78 years. In contrast with other malignancies, men with PC had significantly lower mean concentrations of serum ferritin (156 microg/L) and TS (24.35%) than those without PC (ferritin, 245 microg/L; TS, 31.98%) (p<0.05). The 95% confidence intervals for ferritin were 109-203 microg/L and 205-286 microg/L, and those for TS were 20.29-28.4% and 28.35-35.61% for men with and without PC, respectively. Significant differences were observed between both groups in the distribution of serum ferritin (<100, 101-300, >300 microg/L) and TS (<16, 16-50, >50%) (p<0.05). A lower percentage of cases than of controls had serum ferritin (17.6% versus 29.8%) and TS (5.9% versus 14.7%) above normal. These differences persisted when the analysis was limited to African-American men (31 cases and 52 controls). Data suggest that elevated body iron stores are less common in men with PC compared to those without PC. PMID:15160979

  6. Variation of partial transferrin sequences and phylogenetic relationships among hares (Lepus capensis, Lagomorpha) from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Awadi, Asma; Suchentrunk, Franz; Makni, Mohamed; Ben Slimen, Hichem

    2016-10-01

    North African hares are currently included in cape hares, Lepus capensis sensu lato, a taxon that may be considered a superspecies or a complex of closely related species. The existing molecular data, however, are not unequivocal, with mtDNA control region sequences suggesting a separate species status and nuclear loci (allozymes, microsatellites) revealing conspecificity of L. capensis and L. europaeus. Here, we study sequence variation in the intron 6 (468 bp) of the transferrin nuclear gene, of 105 hares with different coat colour from different regions in Tunisia with respect to genetic diversity and differentiation, as well as their phylogenetic status. Forty-six haplotypes (alleles) were revealed and compared phylogenetically to all available TF haplotypes of various Lepus species retrieved from GenBank. Maximum Likelihood, neighbor joining and median joining network analyses concordantly grouped all currently obtained haplotypes together with haplotypes belonging to six different Chinese hare species and the African scrub hare L. saxatilis. Moreover, two Tunisian haploypes were shared with L. capensis, L timidus, L. sinensis, L. yarkandensis, and L. hainanus from China. These results indicated the evolutionary complexity of the genus Lepus with the mixing of nuclear gene haplotypes resulting from introgressive hybridization or/and shared ancestral polymorphism. We report the presence of shared ancestral polymorphism between North African and Chinese hares. This has not been detected earlier in the mtDNA sequences of the same individuals. Genetic diversity of the TF sequences from the Tunisian populations was relatively high compared to other hare populations. However, genetic differentiation and gene flow analyses (AMOVA, FST, Nm) indicated little divergence with the absence of geographically meaningful phylogroups and lack of clustering with coat colour types. These results confirm the presence of a single hare species in Tunisia, but a sound inference on

  7. Functional consequences of transferrin receptor-2 mutations causing hereditary hemochromatosis type 3

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ricky; Shvartsman, Maya; Morán, Erica; Lois, Sergi; Aranda, Jessica; Barqué, Anna; de la Cruz, Xavier; Bruguera, Miquel; Vagace, José Manuel; Gervasini, Guillermo; Sanz, Cristina; Sánchez, Mayka

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) type 3 is an autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism characterized by excessive iron deposition in the liver and caused by mutations in the transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) gene. Here, we describe three new HH type 3 Spanish families with four TFR2 mutations (p.Gly792Arg, c.1606-8A>G, Gln306*, and Gln672*). The missense variation p.Gly792Arg was found in homozygosity in two adult patients of the same family, and in compound heterozygosity in an adult proband that also carries a novel intronic change (c.1606-8A>G). Two new nonsense TFR2 mutations (Gln306* and Gln672*) were detected in a pediatric case. We examine the functional consequences of two TFR2 variants (p.Gly792Arg and c.1606-8A>G) using molecular and computational methods. Cellular protein localization studies using immunofluorescence demonstrated that the plasma membrane localization of p.Gly792Arg TFR2 is impaired. Splicing studies in vitro and in vivo reveal that the c.1606-8A>G mutation leads to the creation of a new acceptor splice site and an aberrant TFR2 mRNA. The reported mutations caused HH type 3 by protein truncation, altering TFR2 membrane localization or by mRNA splicing defect, producing a nonfunctional TFR2 protein and a defective signaling transduction for hepcidin regulation. TFR2 genotyping should be considered in adult but also in pediatric cases with early-onset of iron overload. PMID:26029709

  8. Zip14 (Slc39a14) mediates non-transferrin-bound iron uptake into cells.

    PubMed

    Liuzzi, Juan P; Aydemir, Fikret; Nam, Hyeyoung; Knutson, Mitchell D; Cousins, Robert J

    2006-09-12

    Zip14 is a member of the SLC39A zinc transporter family, which is involved in zinc uptake by cells. Up-regulation of Zip14 by IL-6 appears to contribute to the hepatic zinc accumulation and hypozincemia of inflammation. At least three members of the SLC39A family transport other trace elements, such as iron and manganese, in addition to zinc. We analyzed the capability of Zip14 to mediate non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) uptake by overexpressing mouse Zip14 in HEK 293H cells and Sf9 insect cells. Zip14 was found to localize to the plasma membrane, and its overexpression increased the uptake of both (65)Zn and (59)Fe. Addition of bathophenanthroline sulfonate, a cell-impermeant ferrous iron chelator, inhibited Zip14-mediated iron uptake from ferric citrate, suggesting that iron is taken up by HEK cells as Fe(2+). Iron uptake by HEK and Sf9 cells expressing Zip14 was inhibited by zinc. Suppression of endogenous Zip14 expression by using Zip14 siRNA reduced the uptake of both iron and zinc by AML12 mouse hepatocytes. Zip14 siRNA treatment also decreased metallothionein mRNA levels, suggesting that compensatory mechanisms were not sufficient to restore intracellular zinc. Collectively, these results indicate that Zip14 can mediate the uptake of zinc and NTBI into cells and that it may play a role in zinc and iron metabolism in hepatocytes, where this transporter is abundantly expressed. Because NTBI is commonly found in plasma of patients with hemochromatosis and transfusional iron overload, Zip14-mediated NTBI uptake may contribute to the hepatic iron loading that characterizes these diseases.

  9. The Invasion and Reproductive Toxicity of QDs-Transferrin Bioconjugates on Preantral Follicle in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gaixia; Lin, Suxia; Law, Wing-Cheung; Roy, Indrajit; Lin, Xiaotan; Mei, Shujiang; Ma, Hanwu; Chen, Siping; Niu, Hanben; Wang, Xiaomei

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of QD has been extensively studied over the past decade. However, the potential toxicity of QDs impedes its use for clinical research. In this work, we established a preantral follicle in vitro culture system to investigate the effects of QD-Transferrin (QDs-Tf) bioconjugates on follicle development and oocyte maturation. The preantral follicles were cultured and exposed to CdTe/ZnTe QDs-Tf bioconjugates with various concentrations and the reproductive toxicity was assessed at different time points post-treatment. The invasion of QDs-Tf for oocytes was verified by laser scanning confocal microscope. Steroid production was evaluated by immunoassay. C-band Giemsa staining was performed to observe the chromosome abnormality of oocytes. The results showed that the QDs-Tf bioconjugates could permeate into granulosa cells and theca cells, but not into oocyte. There are no obvious changes of oocyte diameter, the mucification of cumulus-oocyte-complexes and the occurrence of aneulpoidy as compared with the control group. However, delay in the antrum formation and decrease in the ratio of oocytes with first polar body were observed in QDs-Tf-treated groups. The matured oocytes with first polar body decreased significantly by ~16% (from 79.6±10 % to 63±2.9 %) when the concentration of QDs-Tf bioconjugates exceeded 2.89 nmol·L-1 (P < 0.05). Our results implied that the CdTe/ZnTe QDs-Tf bioconjugates were reproductive toxic for follicle development, and thus also revealed that this in vitro culture system of preantral follicle is a highly sensitive tool for study on the reproductive toxicity of nanoparticles. PMID:22916073

  10. Role of insulin-transferrin-selenium in auricular chondrocyte proliferation and engineered cartilage formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Liu, Jinchun; Kang, Ning; Yan, Li; Wang, Qian; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Ran; Cao, Yilin

    2014-01-21

    The goal of this study is to determine the effects of Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium (ITS) on proliferation of auricular chondrocytes and formation of engineered cartilage in vitro. Pig auricular monolayer chondrocytes and chondrocyte pellets were cultured in media containing 1% ITS at different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS, 10%, 6%, 2%, 0%), or 10% FBS alone as a control for four weeks. Parameters including cell proliferation in monolayer, wet weight, collagen type I/II/X (Col I, II, X) and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) expression, GAG content of pellets and gene expression associated with cartilage formation/dedifferentiation (lost cartilage phenotype)/hypertrophy within the chondrocyte pellets were assessed. The results showed that chondrocytes proliferation rates increased when FBS concentrations increased (2%, 6%, 10% FBS) in ITS supplemented groups. In addition, 1% ITS plus 10% FBS significantly promoted cell proliferation than 10% FBS alone. No chondrocytes grew in ITS alone medium. 1% ITS plus 10% FBS enhanced cartilage formation in terms of size, wet weight, cartilage specific matrices, and homogeneity, compared to 10% FBS alone group. Furthermore, ITS prevented engineered cartilage from dedifferentiation (i.e., higher index of Col II/Col I mRNA expression and expression of aggrecan) and hypertrophy (i.e., lower mRNA expression of Col X and MMP13). In conclusion, our results indicated that ITS efficiently enhanced auricular chondrocytes proliferation, retained chondrogenic phenotypes, and promoted engineered cartilage formation when combined with FBS, which is potentially used as key supplementation in auricular chondrocytes and engineered cartilage culture.

  11. A pivotal role for enhanced brainstem Orexin receptor 1 signaling in the central cannabinoid receptor 1-mediated pressor response in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Badr Mostafa; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2015-10-05

    Orexin receptor 1 (OX1R) signaling is implicated in cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) modulation of feeding. Further, our studies established the dependence of the central CB1R-mediated pressor response on neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in the RVLM. Here, we tested the novel hypothesis that brainstem orexin-A/OX1R signaling plays a pivotal role in the central CB1R-mediated pressor response. Our multiple labeling immunofluorescence findings revealed co-localization of CB1R, OX1R and the peptide orexin-A within the C1 area of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Activation of central CB1R following intracisternal (i.c.) WIN55,212-2 (15μg/rat) in conscious rats caused significant increases in BP and orexin-A level in RVLM neuronal tissue. Additional studies established a causal role for orexin-A in the central CB1R-mediated pressor response because (i) selective blockade of central CB1R (AM251, 30μg/rat; i.c.) abrogated WIN55,212-2-evoked increases in RVLM orexin-A level, (ii) the selective OX1R antagonist SB-408124 (10nmol/rat; i.c.) attenuated orexin-A (3nmol/rat; i.c.) or WIN55,212-2 (15μg/rat; i.c.)-evoked pressor response while selective CB1R blockade (AM251) had no effect on orexin-A (3nmol/rat; i.c.)-evoked pressor response, (iii) direct CB1R activation in the RVLM (WIN55,212-2; 0.1μg/rat) increased RVLM orexin-A and BP. Finally, SB-408124 attenuated WIN55,212-2-evoked increases in RVLM nNOS and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and BP. Our findings suggest that orexin-A/OX1R dependent activation of the RVLM nNOS/ERK1/2 cascade is essential neurochemical mechanism for the central CB1R-mediated pressor response in conscious rats.

  12. A pivotal role for enhanced brainstem Orexin receptor 1 signaling in the central cannabinoid receptor 1-mediated pressor response in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Badr Mostafa; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2015-01-01

    Orexin receptor 1 (OX1R) signaling is implicated in cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) modulation of feeding. Further, our studies established the dependence of the central CB1R-mediated pressor response on neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in the RVLM. We tested the novel hypothesis that brainstem orexin-A/OX1R signaling plays a pivotal role in the central CB1R-mediated pressor response. Our multiple labeling immunofluorescence findings revealed co-localization of CB1R, OX1R and the peptide orexin-A within the C1 area of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Activation of central CB1R following intracisternal (i.c.) WIN55,212-2 (15 µg/rat) in conscious rats caused significant increases in BP and orexin-A level in RVLM neuronal tissue. Additional studies established a causal role for orexin-A in the central CB1R-mediated pressor response because (i) selective blockade of central CB1R (AM251, 30 µg/rat; i.c.) abrogated WIN55,212-2-evoked increases in RVLM orexin-A level, (ii) the selective OX1R antagonist SB-408124 (10 nmol/rat; i.c.) attenuated orexin-A (3 nmol/rat; i.c.) or WIN55,212-2 (15 µg/rat; i.c.)-evoked pressor response while selective CB1R blockade (AM251) had no effect on orexin-A (3 nmol/rat; i.c.)-evoked pressor response, (iii) direct CB1R activation in the RVLM (WIN55,212-2; 0.1 µg/rat) increased RVLM orexin-A and BP. Finally, SB-408124 attenuated WIN55,212-2-evoked increases in RVLM nNOS and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and BP. Our findings suggest that orexin-A/OX1R dependent activation of the RVLM nNOS/ERK1/2 cascade is essential neurochemical mechanism for the central CB1R–mediated pressor response in conscious rats. PMID:26096126

  13. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  14. Molecular mass spectrometry in metallodrug development: a case of mapping transferrin-mediated transformations for a ruthenium(III) anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Jarosz, Maciej; Matczuk, Magdalena; Pawlak, Katarzyna; Timerbaev, Andrei R

    2014-12-03

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) techniques have been used to characterize the speciation of a Ru(III) anticancer drug, indazolium trans-[tetrachloridobis(1H-indazole) ruthenate(III)], upon its binding to transferrin and the impact of cellular reducing components on drug-transferrin adducts. Using time-of-flight ESI-MS, the polymorphism of apo- (iron-free) and holo-form (iron-saturated) of the protein was confirmed. While the ruthenium moieties bound to each of five isoforms under simulated extracellular conditions are essentially identical in numbers for apo- and holo-transferrin, distinct differences were found in the composition of Ru(III) species attached to either of the protein forms, which are dominated by differently coordinated aquated complexes. On the other hand, at least one of the RuN bonds in metal-organic framework remains intact even after prolonged interaction with the protein. Triple quadrupole tandem ESI-MS measurements demonstrated that the ruthenium species released from drug adducts with holo-transferrin in simulated cancer cytosol are underwent strong ligand exchange (as compared to the protein-bound forms) but most strikingly, they contain the metal center in the reduced Ru(II) state. In vitro probing the extra- and intracellular interactions of promising Ru(III) drug candidate performed by ESI-MS is thought to shed light on the transportation to tumor cells by transferrin and on the activation to more reactive species by the reducing environment of solid tumors.

  15. The usefulness of soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Se Hoon; Kim, Dong Sup; Yu, Seung Taek; Shin, Sae Ron

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is a truncated extracellular form of the membrane transferrin receptor produced by proteolysis. Concentrations of serum sTfR are related to iron status and erythropoiesis in the body. We investigated whether serum sTfR levels can aid in diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in children. Methods Ninety-eight patients with IDA were enrolled and were classified according to age at diagnosis. Group 1 comprised 78 children, aged 6-59 months, and group 2 comprised 20 adolescents, aged 12-16 years. Results In group 1, patients' serum sTfR levels correlated negatively with mean corpuscular volume; hemoglobin (Hb), ferritin, and serum iron levels; and transferrin saturation and positively with total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and red cell distribution width. In group 2, patients' serum sTfR levels did not correlate with ferritin levels and TIBC, but had a significant relationship with other iron indices. Hb and serum sTfR levels had a significant inverse relationship in both groups; however, in group 1, there was no correlation between Hb and serum ferritin levels. In 30 patients of group 1, serum sTfR levels were significantly decreased with an increase in Hb levels after iron supplementation for 1 month. Conclusion Serum sTfR levels significantly correlated with other diagnostic iron parameters of IDA and inversely correlated with an increase in Hb levels following iron supplementation. Therefore, serum sTfR levels can be a useful marker for the diagnosis and treatment of IDA in children. PMID:25729394

  16. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Regulates Leukotriene B4 Receptor 1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Takako; Koga, Tomoaki; Yokomizo, Takehiko

    2016-12-01

    Leukotriene B4 receptor 1 (BLT1), a high-affinity G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for leukotriene B4 (LTB4), plays important roles in inflammatory and immune reactions. Although the LTB4-BLT1 axis is known to promote inflammation, the binding proteins that modulate LTB4-BLT1 signaling have not been identified. Recently, we discovered that receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) interacts with BLT1 and modulates LTB4-BLT1 signaling. We propose RAGE as a new class of GPCR modulator and a new target of future GPCR studies.

  17. Diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in a child with complete Interferon-γ Receptor 1 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Olbrich, Peter; Martínez-Saavedra, Maria Teresa; Hurtado, José Maria Perez; Sanchez, Cristina; Sanchez, Berta; Deswarte, Carolina; Obando, Ignacio; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Speckmann, Carsten; Bustamante, Jacinta; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Neth, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive (AR) complete Interferon-γ Receptor1 (IFN-γR1) deficiency is a rare variant of Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD). Whilst hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains the only curative treatment, outcomes are heterogeneous; delayed engraftment and/or graft rejection being commonly observed. This case report and literature review expands the knowledge about this rare but potentially fatal pathology, providing details regarding diagnosis, antimicrobial treatment, transplant performance and outcome that may help to guide physicians caring for patients with AR complete IFN-γR1 or IFN-γR2 deficiency. PMID:26173802

  18. Hepatitis E virus ORF1 encoded macro domain protein interacts with light chain subunit of human ferritin and inhibits its secretion.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Nishant Kumar; Lole, Kavita S

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) is the major causative agent of acute hepatitis in developing countries. Its genome has three open reading frames (ORFs)-called as ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3. ORF1 encodes nonstructural polyprotein having multiple domains, namely: Methyltransferase, Y domain, Protease, Macro domain, Helicase, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In the present study, we show that HEV-macro domain specifically interacts with light chain subunit of human ferritin (FTL). In cultured hepatoma cells, HEV-macro domain reduces secretion of ferritin without causing any change in the expression levels of FTL. This inhibitory effect was further enhanced upon Brefeldin-A treatment. The levels of transferrin Receptor 1 or ferroportin, two important proteins in iron metabolism, remained unchanged in HEV-macro domain expressing cells. Similarly, there were no alterations in the levels of cellular labile iron pool and reactive oxygen species, indicating that HEV-macro domain does not influence cellular iron homeostasis/metabolism. As ferritin is an acute-phase protein, secreted in higher level in infected persons and HEV-macro domain has the property of reducing synthesis of inflammatory cytokines, we propose that by directly binding to FTL, macro domain prevents ferritin from entering into circulation and helps in further attenuation of the host immune response.

  19. Functional Genetic Variation of the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Cannabis Use Interact on Prefrontal Connectivity and Related Working Memory Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Colizzi, Marco; Fazio, Leonardo; Ferranti, Laura; Porcelli, Annamaria; Masellis, Rita; Marvulli, Daniela; Bonvino, Aurora; Ursini, Gianluca; Blasi, Giuseppe; Bertolino, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid signaling is involved in different brain functions and it is mediated by the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1), which is encoded by the CNR1 gene. Previous evidence suggests an association between cognition and cannabis use. The logical interaction between genetically determined cannabinoid signaling and cannabis use has not been determined. Therefore, we investigated whether CNR1 variation predicts CNR1 prefrontal mRNA expression in postmortem prefrontal human tissue. Then, we studied whether functional variation in CNR1 and cannabis exposure interact in modulating prefrontal function and related behavior during working memory processing. Thus, 208 healthy subjects (113 males) were genotyped for the relevant functional SNP and were evaluated for cannabis use by the Cannabis Experience Questionnaire. All individuals performed the 2-back working memory task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. CNR1 rs1406977 was associated with prefrontal mRNA and individuals carrying a G allele had reduced CNR1 prefrontal mRNA levels compared with AA subjects. Moreover, functional connectivity MRI demonstrated that G carriers who were also cannabis users had greater functional connectivity in the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and reduced working memory behavioral accuracy during the 2-back task compared with the other groups. Overall, our results indicate that the deleterious effects of cannabis use are more evident on a specific genetic background related to its receptor expression. PMID:25139064

  20. Discoidin domain receptor 1 promotes Th17 cell migration by activating the RhoA/ROCK/MAPK/ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Azreq, Mohammed-Amine El; Kadiri, Maleck; Boisvert, Marc; Pagé, Nathalie; Tessier, Philippe A.; Aoudjit, Fawzi

    2016-01-01

    Effector T cell migration through the tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) is an important step of the adaptive immune response and in the development of inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms involved in this process are still poorly understood. In this study, we addressed the role of a collagen receptor, the discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), in the migration of Th17 cells. We showed that the vast majority of human Th17 cells express DDR1 and that silencing DDR1 or using the blocking recombinant receptor DDR1:Fc significantly reduced their motility and invasion in three-dimensional (3D) collagen. DDR1 promoted Th17 migration by activating RhoA/ROCK and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways. Interestingly, the RhoA/ROCK signaling module was required for MAPK/ERK activation. Finally, we showed that DDR1 is important for the recruitment of Th17 cells into the mouse dorsal air pouch containing the chemoattractant CCL20. Collectively, our results indicate that DDR1, via the activation of RhoA/ROCK/MAPK/ERK signaling axis, is a key pathway of effector T cell migration through collagen of perivascular tissues. As such, DDR1 can contribute to the development of Th17-dependent inflammatory diseases. PMID:27391444

  1. Monoclonal Antibody Targeting of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1c Ameliorates Obesity and Glucose Intolerance via Central Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lelliott, Christopher J.; Ahnmark, Andrea; Admyre, Therese; Ahlstedt, Ingela; Irving, Lorraine; Keyes, Feenagh; Patterson, Laurel; Mumphrey, Michael B.; Bjursell, Mikael; Gorman, Tracy; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Buchanan, Andrew; Harrison, Paula; Vaughan, Tristan; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Lindén, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We have generated a novel monoclonal antibody targeting human FGFR1c (R1c mAb) that caused profound body weight and body fat loss in diet-induced obese mice due to decreased food intake (with energy expenditure unaltered), in turn improving glucose control. R1c mAb also caused weight loss in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, leptin receptor-mutant db/db mice, and in mice lacking either the melanocortin 4 receptor or the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1. In addition, R1c mAb did not change hypothalamic mRNA expression levels of Agrp, Cart, Pomc, Npy, Crh, Mch, or Orexin, suggesting that R1c mAb could cause food intake inhibition and body weight loss via other mechanisms in the brain. Interestingly, peripherally administered R1c mAb accumulated in the median eminence, adjacent arcuate nucleus and in the circumventricular organs where it activated the early response gene c-Fos. As a plausible mechanism and coinciding with the initiation of food intake suppression, R1c mAb induced hypothalamic expression levels of the cytokines Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and 3 and ERK1/2 and p70 S6 kinase 1 activation. PMID:25427253

  2. Constitutive activation of transforming growth factor Beta receptor 1 in the mouse uterus impairs uterine morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Duran, Samantha; Lydon, John P; DeMayo, Francesco J; Burghardt, Robert C; Bayless, Kayla J; Bartholin, Laurent; Li, Qinglei

    2015-02-01

    Despite increasing evidence pointing to the essential involvement of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) superfamily in reproduction, a definitive role of TGFB signaling in the uterus remains to be unveiled. In this study, we generated a gain-of-function mouse model harboring a constitutively active (CA) TGFB receptor 1 (TGFBR1), the expression of which was conditionally induced by the progesterone receptor (Pgr)-Cre recombinase. Overactivation of TGFB signaling was verified by enhanced phosphorylation of SMAD2 and increased expression of TGFB target genes in the uterus. TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice were sterile. Histological, cellular, and molecular analyses demonstrated that constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus promoted formation of hypermuscled uteri. Accompanying this phenotype was the upregulation of a battery of smooth muscle genes in the uterus. Furthermore, TGFB ligands activated SMAD2/3 and stimulated the expression of a smooth muscle maker gene, alpha smooth muscle actin (ACTA2), in human uterine smooth muscle cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy identified a marked reduction of uterine glands in TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice within the endometrial compartment that contained myofibroblast-like cells. Thus, constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus caused defects in uterine morphology and function, as evidenced by abnormal myometrial structure, dramatically reduced uterine glands, and impaired uterine decidualization. These results underscore the importance of a precisely controlled TGFB signaling system in establishing a uterine microenvironment conducive to normal development and function.

  3. YTRF is the conserved internalization signal of the transferrin receptor, and a second YTRF signal at position 31-34 enhances endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Collawn, J F; Lai, A; Domingo, D; Fitch, M; Hatton, S; Trowbridge, I S

    1993-10-15

    By functional analysis of mutant human transferrin receptors (TR) expressed in chicken embryo fibroblasts, we previously identified a tetrapeptide sequence, Y20TRF23, within the 61-residue cytoplasmic tail as the signal for high-efficiency endocytosis (Collawn, J. F., Stangel, M., Kuhn, L. A., Esekogwu, V., Jing, S., Trowbridge, I.S., and Tainer, J.A. (1990) Cell 63, 1061-1072). It has been inferred from other studies, however, that the TR internalization signal was localized to a much larger region, residues 7 through 26 (Girones, N., Alvarez, E., Seth, A., Lin, I-M., Latour, D.A., and Davis, R.J. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 19006-19012). Additionally, Tyr20 was reported to not be conserved in the Chinese hamster cytoplasmic tail sequence (Alvarez, E., Girones, N., and Davis, R.J. (1990) Biochem. J. 267, 31-35). In the studies reported here, we examined the effect of insertion of an extra copy of a YTRF sequence at three different locations within the human TR cytoplasmic domain and show that the insertion of another YTRF signal at position 31-34 in the wild-type TR, but not the other two locations, increases the rate of endocytosis 2-fold. Furthermore, introduction of YTRF at position 31-34 in an internalization-defective mutant receptor restores endocytosis to wild-type levels, indicating that YTRF signals at either positions 20-23 or 31-34 are necessary and sufficient to promote TR internalization and function in an independent and additive manner. We also report the complete primary structure of the Chinese hamster TR deduced from its cDNA sequence and show that the Tyr20 as well as the complete YTRF motif is conserved.

  4. Structural model of the cytosolic domain of the plant ethylene receptor 1 (ETR1).

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Hubert; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Kaljunen, Heidi; Tuukkanen, Anne; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2015-01-30

    Ethylene initiates important aspects of plant growth and development through disulfide-linked receptor dimers located in the endoplasmic reticulum. The receptors feature a small transmembrane, ethylene binding domain followed by a large cytosolic domain, which serves as a scaffold for the assembly of large molecular weight complexes of different ethylene receptors and other cellular participants of the ethylene signaling pathway. Here we report the crystallographic structures of the ethylene receptor 1 (ETR1) catalytic ATP-binding and the ethylene response sensor 1 dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domains and the solution structure of the entire cytosolic domain of ETR1, all from Arabidopsis thaliana. The isolated dimeric ethylene response sensor 1 DHp domain is asymmetric, the result of different helical bending angles close to the conserved His residue. The structures of the catalytic ATP-binding, DHp, and receiver domains of ethylene receptors and of a homologous, but dissimilar, GAF domain were refined against experimental small angle x-ray scattering data, leading to a structural model of the entire cytosolic domain of the ethylene receptor 1. The model illustrates that the cytosolic domain is shaped like a dumbbell and that the receiver domain is flexible and assumes a position different from those observed in prokaryotic histidine kinases. Furthermore the cytosolic domain of ETR1 plays a key role, interacting with all other receptors and several participants of the ethylene signaling pathway. Our model, therefore, provides the first step toward a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanics of this important signal transduction process in plants.

  5. Central Administration of Galanin Receptor 1 Agonist Boosted Insulin Sensitivity in Adipose Cells of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenwen; Fang, Penghua; He, Biao; Guo, Lili; Runesson, Johan; Langel, Ülo; Shi, Mingyi; Zhu, Yan; Bo, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies testified the beneficial effect of central galanin on insulin sensitivity of type 2 diabetic rats. The aim of the study was further to investigate whether central M617, a galanin receptor 1 agonist, can benefit insulin sensitivity. The effects of intracerebroventricular administration of M617 on insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling were evaluated in adipose tissues of type 2 diabetic rats. The results showed that central injection of M617 significantly increased plasma adiponectin contents, glucose infusion rates in hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp tests, GLUT4 mRNA expression levels, GLUT4 contents in plasma membranes, and total cell membranes of the adipose cells but reduced the plasma C-reactive protein concentration in nondiabetic and diabetic rats. The ratios of GLUT4 contents were higher in plasma membranes to total cell membranes in both nondiabetic and diabetic M617 groups than each control. In addition, the central administration of M617 enhanced the ratios of pAkt/Akt and pAS160/AS160, but not phosphorylative cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB)/CREB in the adipose cells of nondiabetic and diabetic rats. These results suggest that excitation of central galanin receptor 1 facilitates insulin sensitivity via activation of the Akt/AS160 signaling pathway in the fat cells of type 2 diabetic rats. PMID:27127795

  6. Structure and promoter analysis of the mouse membrane-bound transferrin-like protein (MTf) gene.

    PubMed

    Nakamasu, K; Kawamoto, T; Yoshida, E; Noshiro, M; Matsuda, Y; Kato, Y

    2001-03-01

    Recently, we purified membrane-bound transferrin-like protein (MTf) from the plasma membrane of rabbit chondrocytes and showed that the expression levels of MTf protein and mRNA were much higher in cartilage than in other tissues [Kawamoto T, Pan, H., Yan, W., Ishida, H., Usui, E., Oda, R., Nakamasu, K., Noshiro, M., Kawashima-Ohya, Y., Fujii, M., Shintani, H., Okada, Y. & Kato, Y. (1998) Eur. J. Biochem. 256, 503--509]. In this study, we isolated the MTf gene from a constructed mouse genomic library. The mouse MTf gene was encoded by a single-copy gene spanning approximately 26 kb and consisting of 16 exons. The transcription-initiation site was located 157 bp upstream from the translation-start codon, and a TATA box was not found in the 5' flanking region. The mouse MTf gene was mapped on the B3 band of chromosome 16 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Using primary chondrocytes, SK-MEL-28 (melanoma cell line), ATDC5 (chondrogenic cell line) and NIH3T3 (fibroblast cell line) cells, we carried out transient expression studies on various lengths of the 5' flanking region of the MTf gene fused to the luciferase reporter gene. Luciferase activity in SK-MEL-28 cells was higher than in primary chondrocytes. Although no luciferase activity was detectable in NIH3T3 cells, it was higher in chondrocytes than in ATDC5 chondrogenic cells. These findings were consistent with the levels of expression of MTf mRNA in these cells cultured under similar conditions. The patterns of increase and decrease in the luciferase activity in chondrocytes transfected with various 5' deleted constructs of the MTf promoter were similar to that in ATDC5 cells, but differed from that in SK-MEL-28 cells. The findings obtained with primary chondrocytes suggest that the regions between -693 and -444 and between -1635 and -1213 contain positive and negative cis-acting elements, respectively. The chondrocyte-specific expression of the MTf gene could be regulated via these regulatory elements in

  7. Synthesis and characterization of tumor-targeted copolymer nanocarrier modified by transferrin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ran; Wang, Yonglu; Li, Xueming; Bao, Wen; Xia, Guohua; Chen, Wei; Cheng, Jian; Xu, Yuanlong; Guo, Liting; Chen, Baoan

    2015-01-01

    To increase the encapsulation of hydrophilic antitumor agent daunorubicin (DNR) and multidrug resistance reversal agent tetrandrine (Tet) in the drug delivery system of nano-particles (NPs), a functional copolymer NP composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), poly-L-lysine (PLL), and polyethylene glycol (PEG) was synthesized and then loaded with DNR and Tet simultaneously to construct DNR/Tet–PLGA–PLL–PEG-NPs using a modified double-emulsion solvent evaporation/diffusion method. And to increase the targeted antitumor effect, DNR/Tet–PLGA–PLL–PEG-NPs were further modified with transferrin (Tf) due to its specific binding to Tf receptors (TfR), which is highly expressed on the surface of tumor cells. In this study, the influence of the diversity of formulation parameters was investigated systematically, such as drug loading, mean particle size, molecular weight, the concentration of PLGA–PLL–PEG–Tf, volume ratio of acetone to dichloromethane, the concentration of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) in the external aqueous phase, the volume ratio of the internal aqueous phase to the external aqueous phase, and the type of surfactants in the internal aqueous phase. Meanwhile, its possible effect on cell viability was evaluated. Our results showed that the regular spherical DNR/Tet–PLGA–PLL–PEG–Tf-NPs with a smooth surface, a relatively low polydispersity index, and a diameter of 213.0±12.0 nm could be produced. The encapsulation efficiency was 70.23%±1.91% for DNR and 86.5%±0.70% for Tet, the moderate drug loading was 3.63%±0.15% for DNR and 4.27%±0.13% for Tet. Notably, the accumulated release of DNR and Tet could be sustained over 1 week, and the Tf content was 2.18%±0.04%. In cell viability tests, DNR/Tet–PLGA–PLL–PEG–Tf-NPs could inhibit the proliferation of K562/ADR cells in a dose-dependent manner, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration value (total drug) of DNR/Tet–PLGA–PLL–PEG–Tf-NPs was lower than that of DNR

  8. SNAP23/25 and VAMP2 mediate exocytic event of transferrin receptor-containing recycling vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Keiji; Kobayashi, Minako; Nozaki, Shohei; Yagi, Chikako; Hatsuzawa, Kiyotaka; Katoh, Yohei; Shin, Hye-Won; Takahashi, Senye; Nakayama, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently showed that Rab11 is involved not only in formation of recycling vesicles containing the transferrin (Tfn)–transferrin receptor (TfnR) complex at perinuclear recycling endosomes but also in tethering of recycling vesicles to the plasma membrane (PM) in concert with the exocyst tethering complex. We here aimed at identifying SNARE proteins responsible for fusion of Tfn–TfnR-containing recycling vesicles with the PM, downstream of the exocyst. We showed that exocyst subunits, Sec6 and Sec8, can interact with SNAP23 and SNAP25, both of which are PM-localizing Qbc-SNAREs, and that depletion of SNAP23 and/or SNAP25 in HeLa cells suppresses fusion of Tfn–TfnR-containing vesicles with the PM, leading to accumulation of the vesicles at the cell periphery. We also found that VAMP2, an R-SNARE, is colocalized with endocytosed Tfn on punctate endosomal structures, and that its depletion in HeLa cells suppresses recycling vesicle exocytosis. These observations indicate that fusion of recycling vesicles with the PM downstream of the exocyst is mediated by SNAP23/25 and VAMP2, and provide novel insight into non-neuronal roles of VAMP2 and SNAP25. PMID:26092867

  9. Dihydroartemisinin and transferrin dual-dressed nano-graphene oxide for a pH-triggered chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijuan; Wei, Yanchun; Zhai, Shaodong; Chen, Qun; Xing, Da

    2015-09-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is a unique anti-malarial drug isolated from the plant Artemisia annua. Recently, it has been studied as an alternative modality for cancer therapy, utilizing its reactive oxygen species (ROS) yielding mechanism from interacting with Ferrous ion (Fe (II)). In this work, a novel nanodrug (DHA-GO-Tf) is constructed based on nanoscale Graphene oxide (GO) dual-dressed with DHA and Transferrin (Tf). Tf dually functions as a pilot for the nanoparticle to target tumor cell with over expressed Transferrin receptor (TfR) and a ferric ion carrier. Upon tumor cellular endocytosis, Ferric ion (Fe(III)) is released from the Tf, triggered by the low pH in the lysosomes of the tumor cell. The intracellular Fe (III) is reduced to Fe (II) and interacts with DHA to increase its cytotoxicity. The potential of this alternative anti-tumor modality is demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Comparing with DHA alone, the nanodrug DHA-GO-Tf resulted in a significantly enhanced tumor delivery specificity and cytotoxicity, and achieved a complete tumor cure in mice with minimal side-effects.

  10. Molecular characterization of iron binding proteins, transferrin and ferritin heavy chain subunit, from the bumblebee Bombus ignitus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Kim, Bo Yeon; Lee, Kwang Sik; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Cui, Zheng; Lu, Wei; Jia, Jing Ming; Kim, Doh Hoon; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2009-01-01

    Transferrin and ferritin are iron-binding proteins involved in transport and storage of iron as part of iron metabolism. Here, we describe the cDNA cloning and characterization of transferrin (Bi-Tf) and the ferritin heavy chain subunit (Bi-FerHCH), from the bumblebee Bombus ignitus. Bi-Tf cDNA spans 2340 bp and encodes a protein of 706 amino acids and Bi-FerHCH cDNA spans 1393 bp and encodes a protein of 217 amino acids. Comparative analysis revealed that Bi-Tf appears to have residues comprising iron-binding sites in the N-terminal lobe, and Bi-FerHCH contains a 5'UTR iron-responsive element and seven conserved amino acid residues associated with a ferroxidase center. The Bi-Tf and Bi-FerHCH cDNAs were expressed as 79 kDa and 27 kDa polypeptides, respectively, in baculovirus-infected insect Sf9 cells. Northern blot analysis revealed that Bi-Tf exhibits fat body-specific expression and Bi-FerHCH shows ubiquitous expression. The expression profiles of the Bi-Tf and Bi-FerHCH in the fat body of B. ignitus worker bees revealed that Bi-Tf and Bi-FerHCH are differentially induced in a time-dependent manner in a single insect by wounding, bacterial challenge, and iron overload.

  11. Targeting of the CNS in MPS-IH Using a Nonviral Transferrin-α-l-iduronidase Fusion Gene Product

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Mark J; McElmurry, Ron T; Peacock, Brandon; Tolar, Jakub; Blazar, Bruce R

    2008-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (Hurler syndrome) is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme α-l-iduronidase (IDUA), and is characterized by widespread lysosomal glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation. Successful treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases is limited by the presence of the blood–brain barrier, which prevents penetration of the therapeutic enzyme. Given that the brain capillary endothelial cells that form this barrier express high levels of the transferrin receptor (TfR), we hypothesized that the coupling of IDUA to transferrin (Tf) would facilitate IDUA delivery to the CNS. A plasmid bearing a fusion gene consisting of Tf and IDUA was constructed which, when delivered in vivo, resulted in the production of high levels of an enzymatically active protein that was transported into the CNS by TfR-mediated endocytosis. Short-term treatment resulted in a decrease in GAGs in the cerebellum of mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) mice. This approach, therefore, represents a potential strategy for the delivery of therapeutic enzyme to the CNS. PMID:18523448

  12. Self-assembled IR780-loaded transferrin nanoparticles as an imaging, targeting and PDT/PTT agent for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kaikai; Zhang, Yifan; Wang, Juan; Yuan, Ahu; Sun, Minjie; Wu, Jinhui; Hu, Yiqiao

    2016-01-01

    Combination of photothermal and photodynamic therapy (PTT/PDT) offer unique advantages over PDT alone. However, to achieve synergetic PDT/PTT effect, one generally needs two lasers with different wavelengths. Near-infrared dye IR-780 could be used as photosensitizer both for PTT and PDT, but its lipophilicity limits its practical use and in vivo efficiency. Herein, a simple multifunctional IR780-loaded nanoplatform based on transferrin was developed for targeted imaging and phototherapy of cancer compatible with a single-NIR-laser irradiation. The self-assembled transferrin-IR780 nanoparticles (Tf-IR780 NPs) exhibited narrow size distribution, good photo-stability, and encouraging photothermal performance with enhanced generation of ROS under laser irradiation. Following intravenous injection, Tf-IR780 NPs had a high tumor-to-background ratio in CT26 tumor-bearing mice. Treatment with Tf-IR780 NPs resulted in significant tumor suppression. Overall, the Tf-IR780 NPs show notable targeting and theranostic potential in cancer therapy. PMID:27263444

  13. Self-assembled targeted nanoparticles based on transferrin-modified eight-arm-polyethylene glycol–dihydroartemisinin conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kefeng; Dai, Lin; Li, Chunxiao; Liu, Jing; Wang, Luying; Lei, Jiandu

    2016-01-01

    Poor delivery of insoluble anticancer drugs has so far precluded their clinical application. In this study, an efficient tumor targeted-nanoparticle delivery system, transferrin-eight-arm-polyethylene glycol–dihydroartemisinin nanoparticles (TF-8arm-PEG-DHA NPs) for the vehiculation of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) was first prepared and evaluated for its targeting efficiency and cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo to Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells, which overexpress transferrin receptors (TFRs). The synthesized TF-8arm-PEG–DHA NPs had high solubility (~102 fold of free DHA), relatively high drug loading (~10 wt% DHA), long circulating half-life and moderate particle size (~147 nm). The in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo tumor growth inhibition studies in LLC-tumor bearing mice confirmed the enhanced efficacy of TF-modified 8arm-PEG-DHA NPs compared to free DHA and non-modified 8arm-PEG-DHA NPs. All these results together supported that the formulation developed in this work exhibited great potential as an effective tumor targeting delivery system for insoluble anticancer drugs. PMID:27377918

  14. Self-assembled targeted nanoparticles based on transferrin-modified eight-arm-polyethylene glycol–dihydroartemisinin conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kefeng; Dai, Lin; Li, Chunxiao; Liu, Jing; Wang, Luying; Lei, Jiandu

    2016-07-01

    Poor delivery of insoluble anticancer drugs has so far precluded their clinical application. In this study, an efficient tumor targeted-nanoparticle delivery system, transferrin-eight-arm-polyethylene glycol–dihydroartemisinin nanoparticles (TF-8arm-PEG-DHA NPs) for the vehiculation of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) was first prepared and evaluated for its targeting efficiency and cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo to Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells, which overexpress transferrin receptors (TFRs). The synthesized TF-8arm-PEG–DHA NPs had high solubility (~102 fold of free DHA), relatively high drug loading (~10 wt% DHA), long circulating half-life and moderate particle size (~147 nm). The in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo tumor growth inhibition studies in LLC-tumor bearing mice confirmed the enhanced efficacy of TF-modified 8arm-PEG-DHA NPs compared to free DHA and non-modified 8arm-PEG-DHA NPs. All these results together supported that the formulation developed in this work exhibited great potential as an effective tumor targeting delivery system for insoluble anticancer drugs.

  15. Improved quantification for non-transferrin-bound iron measurement using high-performance liquid chromatography by reducing iron contamination.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Katsunori; Ikuta, Katsuya; Tanaka, Hiroki; Ohtake, Takaaki; Torimoto, Yoshihiro; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) refers to all forms of iron in the plasma that bind to ligands other than transferrin, and is considered to be a marker of iron toxicity. A variety of analytical approaches for measuring NTBI have been reported; however, a clinically relevant level of sensitivity has yet to be achieved. In addition, insufficient values of NTBI in some patients and healthy subjects have led to the assumption that there may be contamination of reagents with background iron. The present study re-evaluated the analytical procedures of the assay with regard to the potential points of iron contamination in each step. NTA and tris carbonatocobaltate (III) solutions were prepared with removal of iron contamination, and then quantification of NTBI was performed. As a result, the sensitivity of the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based NTBI method was improved by the successful reduction of background iron contamination. Application of our modified method proved that NTBI was detected even in healthy volunteers, although the concentrations were extremely low; the average NTBI levels were 0.206±0.091 µM (males, n=20) and 0.212±0.095 µM (females, n=16). Thus, our modification of the NTBI assay may be clinically meaningful, and may contribute to the understanding of the clinical significance of relatively low, but elevated concentrations of NTBI in diseases other than typical iron overload.

  16. Antidepressant/anxiolytic potential and adverse effect liabilities of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists in animal models.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Shigeyuki; Shimazaki, Toshiharu; Nishiguchi, Mariko; Funakoshi, Takeo; Iijima, Michihiko; Ito, Akie; Kanuma, Kosuke; Sekiguchi, Yoshinori

    2015-08-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCH1 receptor) is known to be involved in the control of mood and stress, in addition to the regulation of feeding. Here, we report further evidence that the blockade of the MCH1 receptor exhibits antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effects in a variety of animal models using TASP0382650 and TASP0489838, newly synthesized MCH1 receptor antagonists, with different scaffolds. Both TASP0382650 and TASP0489838 exhibited high affinities for human MCH1 receptor with IC50 values of 7.13 and 3.80nM, respectively. Both compounds showed potent antagonist activities at the MCH1 receptor, as assessed using MCH-increased [(35)S]GTPγS binding to human MCH1 receptor and an MCH-induced [Ca(2+)]i assay in rat MCH1 receptor expressing cells. In contrast, neither TASP0382650 nor TASP0489838 showed an affinity for the MCH2 receptor, another MCH receptor subtype. The oral administration of TASP0382650 or TASP0489838 significantly reduced the immobility time during the forced swimming test in rats, and reduced hyperemotionality induced by an olfactory bulbectomy, both of which are indicative of an antidepressant-like potential. In the olfactory bulbectomy model, the antidepressant effect of TASP0382650 appeared following a single administration, suggesting a faster onset of action, compared with current medications. Moreover, both TASP0382650 and TASP0489838 exhibited anxiolytic effects in several animal models of anxiety. In contrast, both TASP0382650 and TASP0489838 did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity, motor function, spatial memory during the Morris water maze task, or the convulsion threshold to pentylenetetrazole. These findings provide additional evidence that the blockade of the MCH1 receptor exhibits antidepressant- and anxiolytic activities with no adverse effects in experimental animal models.

  17. Impacts of Nonsynonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Adiponectin Receptor 1 Gene on Corresponding Protein Stability: A Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Md. Abu; Solayman, Md.; Paul, Sudip; Saha, Moumoni; Khalil, Md. Ibrahim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Despite the reported association of adiponectin receptor 1 (ADIPOR1) gene mutations with vulnerability to several human metabolic diseases, there is lack of computational analysis on the functional and structural impacts of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the human ADIPOR1 at protein level. Therefore, sequence- and structure-based computational tools were employed in this study to functionally and structurally characterize the coding nsSNPs of ADIPOR1 gene listed in the dbSNP database. Our in silico analysis by SIFT, nsSNPAnalyzer, PolyPhen-2, Fathmm, I-Mutant 2.0, SNPs&GO, PhD-SNP, PANTHER, and SNPeffect tools identified the nsSNPs with distorting functional impacts, namely, rs765425383 (A348G), rs752071352 (H341Y), rs759555652 (R324L), rs200326086 (L224F), and rs766267373 (L143P) from 74 nsSNPs of ADIPOR1 gene. Finally the aforementioned five deleterious nsSNPs were introduced using Swiss-PDB Viewer package within the X-ray crystal structure of ADIPOR1 protein, and changes in free energy for these mutations were computed. Although increased free energy was observed for all the mutants, the nsSNP H341Y caused the highest energy increase amongst all. RMSD and TM scores predicted that mutants were structurally similar to wild type protein. Our analyses suggested that the aforementioned variants especially H341Y could directly or indirectly destabilize the amino acid interactions and hydrogen bonding networks of ADIPOR1. PMID:27294143

  18. Linkage and association analysis of candidate genes for TB and TNFalpha cytokine expression: evidence for association with IFNGR1, IL-10, and TNF receptor 1 genes.

    PubMed

    Stein, Catherine M; Zalwango, Sarah; Chiunda, Allan B; Millard, Christopher; Leontiev, Dmitry V; Horvath, Amanda L; Cartier, Kevin C; Chervenak, Keith; Boom, W Henry; Elston, Robert C; Mugerwa, Roy D; Whalen, Christopher C; Iyengar, Sudha K

    2007-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a growing public health threat globally and several studies suggest a role of host genetic susceptibility in increased TB risk. As part of a household contact study in Kampala, Uganda, we have taken a unique approach to the study of genetic susceptibility to TB by developing an intermediate phenotype model for TB susceptibility, analyzing levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) in response to culture filtrate as the phenotype. In the present study, we analyzed candidate genes related to TNFalpha regulation and found that interleukin (IL)-10, interferon-gamma receptor 1 (IFNGR1), and TNFalpha receptor 1 (TNFR1) genes were linked and associated to both TB and TNFalpha. We also show that these associations are with progression to active disease and not susceptibility to latent infection. This is the first report of an association between TB and TNFR1 in a human population and our findings for IL-10 and IFNGR1 replicate previous findings. By observing pleiotropic effects on both phenotypes, we show construct validity of our intermediate phenotype model, which enables the characterization of the role of these genetic polymorphisms on TB pathogenesis. This study further illustrates the utility of such a model for disentangling complex traits.

  19. Novel Mutation of Interferon-γ Receptor 1 Gene Presenting as Early Life Mycobacterial Bronchial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Maria J.; Kalra, Neelu; Horwitz, Alexandra; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) are a spectrum of inherited disorders characterized by localized or disseminated infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) deficiency was the first identified genetic disorder recognized as MSMD. Mutations in the genes encoding IFNGR1 can be recessive or dominant and cause complete or partial receptor deficiency. We present the case of a 2½-year-old boy with a history of recurrent wheezing, diagnosed with endobronchial mycobacterial infection. Immunological workup revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the IFNGR1 gene, a novel mutation predicted in silico to cause complete IFNGR1 deficiency. This case demonstrates that (a) Interferon-γ receptor deficiency can present resembling common disorders of the lung; (b) mycobacterial infections should be suspected when parenchymal lung disease, hilar lymphadenopathy, and endobronchial disease are present; and (c) high index of suspicion for immunodeficiency should be maintained in patients with disseminated nontubercular mycobacterial infection. PMID:27868075

  20. Trace amine-associated receptor 1: A promising target for the treatment of psychostimulant addiction.

    PubMed

    Jing, Li; Li, Jun-Xu

    2015-08-15

    Abuse of and addiction to psychostimulants remains a challenging clinical issue; yet no effective pharmacotherapy is available. Trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR 1) is increasingly recognized as a novel drug target that participates in the modulation of drug abuse. This review analyzed existing preclinical evidence from electrophysiological, biochemical to behavioral aspects regarding the functional interactions between TAAR 1 and dopaminergic system. TAAR 1 knockout mice demonstrate increased sensitivity to dopaminergic activation while TAAR 1 agonists reduce the neurochemical effects of cocaine and amphetamines, attenuate abuse- and addiction-related behavioral effects of cocaine and methamphetamine. It is concluded that TAAR 1 activation functionally modulates the dopaminergic activity and TAAR 1 agonists appear to be promising pharmacotherapies against psychostimulant addiction.

  1. Novel Mutation of Interferon-γ Receptor 1 Gene Presenting as Early Life Mycobacterial Bronchial Disease.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Maria J; Kalra, Neelu; Horwitz, Alexandra; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) are a spectrum of inherited disorders characterized by localized or disseminated infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) deficiency was the first identified genetic disorder recognized as MSMD. Mutations in the genes encoding IFNGR1 can be recessive or dominant and cause complete or partial receptor deficiency. We present the case of a 2½-year-old boy with a history of recurrent wheezing, diagnosed with endobronchial mycobacterial infection. Immunological workup revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the IFNGR1 gene, a novel mutation predicted in silico to cause complete IFNGR1 deficiency. This case demonstrates that (a) Interferon-γ receptor deficiency can present resembling common disorders of the lung; (b) mycobacterial infections should be suspected when parenchymal lung disease, hilar lymphadenopathy, and endobronchial disease are present; and (c) high index of suspicion for immunodeficiency should be maintained in patients with disseminated nontubercular mycobacterial infection.

  2. A common mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 gene in Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muenke, M; Schell, U; Hehr, A; Robin, N H; Losken, H W; Schinzel, A; Pulleyn, L J; Rutland, P; Reardon, W; Malcolm, S

    1994-11-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome (PS) is one of the classic autosomal dominant craniosynostosis syndromes with craniofacial anomalies and characteristic broad thumbs and big toes. We have previously mapped one of the genes for PS to the centromeric region of chromosome 8 by linkage analysis. Here we present evidence that mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) gene, which maps to 8p, cause one form of familial Pfeiffer syndrome. A C to G transversion in exon 5, predicting a proline to arginine substitution in the putative extracellular domain, was identified in all affected members of five unrelated PS families but not in any unaffected individuals. FGFR1 therefore becomes the third fibroblast growth factor receptor to be associated with an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder.

  3. Involvement of Prokineticin 2 and Prokineticin Receptor 1 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Testitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Biao; Yu, Lili; Wang, Jiaojiao; Li, Cuiling; Zhao, Kai; Zhang, Huiping

    2016-04-01

    Prokineticin 2, a newly discovered proinflammatory peptide, has been amply evidenced to be involved in the occurrence and progress of local and systematical inflammation. Although the presence of Prokineticn 2 in mammal testis has been documented clearly, research targeting the involvement of prokineticin 2 in testicular pathology, especially testitis, is rather scarce. Employing a lipopolysaccharide-induced testitis rat model, we for the first time demonstrated the expression and upregulation of prokineticin 2 in orchitis at several levels. Our effort also addressed the differential expression patterns of prokineticin 2 and interleukin-1β, a key inflammation indicator, during testitis suggesting Prokineticn 2 serves more than a proinflammatory factor in the context of testitis. Given one of the cognate receptors of prokineticin 2, prokineticin receptor 1 (PKR1) was also significantly upregulated in orchitis as discussed in the current study, it is very likely that PK2/PKR1 signaling contribute to the development of inflammation-related testicular diseases.

  4. Synthesis of Arylpiperazine Derivatives As Protease Activated Receptor 1 Antagonists And Their Evaluation As Antiproliferative Agents.

    PubMed

    Zotti, Andrea Ilaria; Di Gennaro, Elena; Corvino, Angela; Frecentese, Francesco; Magli, Elisa; Perissutti, Elisa; Cirino, Giuseppe; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Terranova-Barberio, Manuela; Iannelli, Federica; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Santagada, Vincenzo; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Budillon, Alfredo; Severino, Beatrice

    2016-09-26

    Protease activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G-coupled receptor activated by α-thrombin and other proteases. Several reports demonstrate PAR1 involvement in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In order to investigate on potential use of PAR1 antagonists as antiproliferative agents, we have identified a series of arylpiperazine derivatives acting as PAR1 antagonists; the selected molecules have been evaluated for their antiproliferative properties. All the compounds inhibited the growth of a panel of cell lines expressing PAR1; two of them, compounds 13 and 15, were able to inhibit, in a dose dependent manner, the growth of the selected cell lines with the lowest IC50 values, and were further characterized to define the mechanism responsible for the observed antiproliferative effect. This study directed us to the identification of two interesting leads that may help to further validate PAR1 as an important therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

  5. Levels of plasma soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) in normal Indian adult population.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, B; Raju, K R; Anand, V; Malu, S; Padmanabhan, S; Tiwari, S C; Das, N; Srivastava, L M

    1999-07-01

    A decrease in the membrane anchored erythrocyte complement receptor 1 (CR1) is reported as an acquired phenomenon in a number of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases with concomitant rise in soluble CR1 (sCR1) levels in plasma. There is a need to establish the normal range of sCR1 in Indian adults to assess the function and disease association of this protein. The plasma sCR1 levels of 50 healthy individuals have been estimated by an indigenously developed sandwich ELISA. sCR1 levels from 26 patients suffering from nephropathies had also been assayed which was much higher than the normal controls. This observation suggests sCR1 as a potential market for the assessment of disease activity in nephropathies.

  6. Function of G-Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-1 in Reproductive System Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hongyan; Xuan, Jingxiu; Liu, Yuan; Shi, Guixiu

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER-1), also known as GPR30, is a novel estrogen receptor mediating estrogen receptor signaling in multiple cell types. The progress of estrogen-related cancer is promoted by GPER-1 activation through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and phospholipase C (PLC) signaling pathways. However, this promoting effect of GPER-1 is nonclassic estrogen receptor (ER) dependent manner. In addition, clinical evidences revealed that GPER-1 is associated with estrogen resistance in estrogen-related cancer patients. These give a hint that GPER-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the estrogen-related cancers. However, preclinical studies also found that GPER-1 activation of its special agonist G-1 inhibits cancer cell proliferation. This review aims to summarize the characteristics and complex functions of GPER-1 in cancers. PMID:27314054

  7. Tetrahydroisoquinoline-7-carboxamide Derivatives as New Selective Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Yali; Bartual, Sergio G; Luo, Jinfeng; Xu, Tingting; Du, Wenting; Xun, Qiuju; Tu, Zhengchao; Brekken, Rolf A; Ren, Xiaomei; Bullock, Alex N; Liang, Guang; Lu, Xiaoyun; Ding, Ke

    2017-03-09

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a deadly symptom for serious lung inflammation. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a new potential target for anti-inflammatory drug discovery. A new selective tetrahydroisoquinoline-7-carboxamide based DDR1 inhibitor 7ae was discovered to tightly bind the DDR1 protein and potently inhibit its kinase function with a Kd value of 2.2 nM and an IC50 value of 6.6 nM, respectively. The compound dose-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) release in mouse primary peritoneal macrophages (MPMs). In addition, 7ae also exhibited promising in vivo anti-inflammatory effects in a LPS-induced mouse ALI model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first "proof of concept" investigation on the potential application of a small molecule DDR1 inhibitor to treat ALI.

  8. Effect of phorbol esters on iron uptake in human hematopoietic cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, U.; Titeux, M.; Louache, F.; Thomopoulos, P.; Rochant, H.

    1984-11-01

    We have investigated the effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on iron uptake into human hematopoietic cell lines K562, U937, and HL-60. TPA inhibited both cell growth and iron uptake by these cell lines. This effect was rapid, which is typical of phorbol esters which are biologically active, and it occurred at very low concentrations of TPA. This effect of TPA was dependent upon an inhibition of the transferrin-binding capacity as estimated on intact cells. However, experiments with transferrin binding on cell samples dissolved in 1% Triton X-100 showed that TPA-treated cells exhibited a transferrin-binding capacity similar to that of control cells. On the basis of this result, it is suggested that TPA modified a part of transferrin receptors present in the cells; as a result of this modification, these receptors became unavailable for binding transferrin, but they remained physically present in the cell. Other compounds capable of inducing the differentiation of leukemic cells, such as dimethyl sulfoxide, butyrate, retinoic acid, and 1 alpha,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3, did not acutely inhibit iron uptake. We also investigated the effect of TPA on transferrin receptors in a cellular system in which phorbol esters stimulate cell proliferation. At 16 X 10(-9) M, TPA markedly stimulated the proliferation of T-lymphocytes. However, in spite of this marked stimulation of cell proliferation, TPA-stimulated lymphocytes exhibited a transferrin-binding capacity much inferior to cells stimulated by other mitogens, such as phytohemagglutinin.

  9. Molecular expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, prokineticin receptor-1 and other biomarkers in infiltrating canalicular carcinoma of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Angélica; Morimoto, Sumiko; Vilchis, Felipe; Taniyama, Natsuko; Bautista, Claudia J.; Robles, Carlos; Bargalló, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is important in the growth and metastasis of cancer cells. In 2001, another angiogenic factor, endocrine gland-derived VEGF (EG-VEGF), was characterized and sequenced. EG-VEGF activity appears to be restricted to endothelial cells derived from endocrine glands. At the molecular level, its expression is regulated by hypoxia and steroid hormones. Although VEGF and EG-VEGF are structurally different, they function in a coordinated fashion. Since the majority of mammary tumors are hormone-dependent, it was hypothesized that EG-VEGF would be expressed in these tumors, and therefore, represent a potential target for anti-angiogenic therapy. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of VEGF, EG-VEGF and its receptor (prokineticin receptor-1), as well as that of breast cancer resistant protein, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, in 50 breast samples of infiltrating canalicular carcinoma (ICC) and their correlation with tumor staging. The samples were analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Both angiogenic growth factors were identified in all samples. However, in 90% of the samples, the expression level of VEGF was significantly higher than that of EG-VEGF (P=0.024). There was no association between the expression of VEGF, EG-VEGF or its receptor with tumor stage. In ICC, the predominant angiogenic factor expressed was VEGF. The expression level of either factor was not correlated with the tumor-node-metastasis stage. Although ICC is derived from endothelial cells, EG-VEGF expression was not the predominant angiogenic/growth factor in ICC. PMID:27703528

  10. Tissue-Specific Expression of Estrogen Receptor 1 Is Regulated by DNA Methylation in a T-DMR.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Ryo; Sato, Shun; Okada, Maki; Lee, Lifa; Tamura, Isao; Jozaki, Kosuke; Kajimura, Takuya; Asada, Hiromi; Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Tamura, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Shigeru; Sugino, Norihiro

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism controlling tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) is unclear. In other genes, DNA methylation of a region called the tissue-dependent and differentially methylated region (T-DMR) has been associated with tissue-specific gene expression. This study investigated whether human ESR1 has a T-DMR and whether DNA methylation of the T-DMR regulates its expression. ESR1 expression was tissue-specific, being high in the endometrium and mammary gland and low/nil in the placenta and skin. Therefore, DNA methylation profiles of the promoter of ESR1 were analyzed in these tissues and in breast cancer tissues. In all of the normal tissues, the proximal promoter regions were unmethylated. On the other hand, the distal regions (T-DMR) were unmethylated in the endometrium and mammary gland, but were moderately methylated and hypermethylated in the placenta and skin, respectively. T-DMR-methylated reporter assay was performed to examine whether DNA methylation at the T-DMR suppresses ESR1 transcription. T-DMR, but not the promoter region, had transcriptional activities and DNA methylation of the T-DMR suppressed ESR1 transcription. Early growth response protein 1 was shown to be a possible transcription factor to bind the T-DMR and up-regulate ESR1 expression. ESR1 has several upstream exons, and each upstream exon, Exon-A/Exon-B/Exon-C, had its own T-DMR. In some breast cancer cases and breast cancer cell lines, ESR1 expression was not regulated by DNA methylation at T-DMR as it is in normal tissues. In conclusion, ESR1 has a T-DMR. DNA methylation status at the T-DMR is involved in tissue-specific ESR1 expression in normal tissues but not always in breast cancer.

  11. MAGI Proteins Regulate the Trafficking and Signaling of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor 1 via a Compensatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, Maha M.; Dunn, Henry A.

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor1 (CRFR1) is associated with psychiatric illness and is a proposed target for the treatment of anxiety and depression. Similar to many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), CRFR1 harbors a PDZ (PSD-95/Disc Large/Zona Occludens)-binding motif at the end of its carboxyl-terminal tail. The interactions of PDZ proteins with GPCRs are crucial for the regulation of receptor function. In the present study, we characterize the interaction of all members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase with inverted orientation PDZ (MAGI) proteins with CRFR1. We show using co-immunoprecipitation that CRFR1 interacts with MAGI-1 and MAGI-3 in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells in a PDZ motif-dependent manner. We find that overexpression as well as knockdown of MAGI proteins result in a significant reduction in CRFR1 endocytosis. This effect is dependent on an intact PDZ binding motif for MAGI-2 and MAGI-3 but not MAGI-1. We show that the alteration in expression levels of MAGI-1, MAGI-2 or MAGI-3 can interfere with β-arrestin recruitment to CRFR1. This could explain the effects observed with receptor internalization. We also find that knockdown of endogenous MAGI-1, MAGI-2 or MAGI-3 in HEK293 cells can lead to an enhancement in ERK1/2 signaling but has no effect on cAMP formation. Interestingly, we observe a compensation effect between MAGI-1 and MAGI-3. Taken together, our data suggest that the MAGI proteins, MAGI-1, MAGI-2 and MAGI-3 can regulate β-arrestin-mediated internalization of CRFR1 as well as its signaling and that there is a compensatory mechanism involved in regulating the function of the MAGI subfamily.

  12. Wide-field lifetime-based FRET imaging for the assessment of early functional distribution of transferrin-based delivery in breast tumor-bearing small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Rudkouskaya, Alena; Barroso, Margarida; Intes, Xavier

    2016-02-01

    Targeted drug delivery is a critical aspect of successful cancer therapy. Assessment of dynamic distribution of the drug provides relative concentration and bioavailability at the target tissue. The most common approach of the assessment is intensity-based imaging, which only provides information about anatomical distribution. Observation of biomolecular interactions can be performed using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Thus, FRET-based imaging can assess functional distribution and provide potential therapeutic outcomes. In this study, we used wide-field lifetime-based FRET imaging for the study of early functional distribution of transferrin delivery in breast cancer tumor models in small animals. Transferrin is a carrier for cancer drug delivery. Its interaction with its receptor is within a few nanometers, which is suitable for FRET. Alexa Fluor® 700 and Alexa Fluor® 750 were conjugated to holo-transferrin which were then administered via tail vein injection to the mice implanted with T47D breast cancer xenografts. Images were continuously acquired for 60 minutes post-injection. The results showed that transferrin was primarily distributed to the liver, the urinary bladder, and the tumor. The cellular uptake of transferrin, which was indicated by the level of FRET, was high in the liver but very low in the urinary bladder. The results also suggested that the fluorescence intensity and FRET signals were independent. The liver showed increasing intensity and increasing FRET during the observation period, while the urinary bladder showed increasing intensity but minimal FRET. Tumors gave varied results corresponding to their FRET progression. These results were relevant to the biomolecular events that occurred in the animals.

  13. The small-molecule iron transport inhibitor ferristatin/NSC306711 promotes degradation of the transferrin receptor.

    PubMed

    Horonchik, Lior; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2008-07-21

    Iron delivery by transferrin (Tf) is accomplished through clathrin-mediated endocytosis of Tf receptors. The small molecule NSC306711 inhibits iron uptake from the Tf-TfR pathway. Here we show that the drug's mechanism of action is to induce internalization and degradation of unoccupied Tf receptors through an unexpected endocytic pathway. Unlike classical clathrin-mediated Tf receptor endocytosis, internalization promoted by NSC306711 is independent of clathrin and dynamin, and is sensitive to the cholesterol-depleting agents filipin and nystatin. The finding of this cholesterol-dependent Tf receptor internalization pathway through use of the small-molecule inhibitor sheds light on the pleiotropic nature of membrane trafficking dynamics and adds a complex dimension to our understanding of receptor regulation. Because of its unusual properties to inhibit iron uptake, we refer to NSC306711 as "ferristatin."

  14. IFCC approved HPLC reference measurement procedure for the alcohol consumption biomarker carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT): Its validation and use.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, François; Wielders, Jos; Anton, Raymond; Bianchi, Vincenza; Deenmamode, Jean; Weykamp, Cas; Whitfield, John; Jeppsson, Jan-Olof; Helander, Anders

    2017-02-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) is used as a biomarker of sustained high alcohol consumption. The currently available measurement procedures for CDT are based on various analytical techniques (HPLC, capillary electrophoresis, nephelometry), some differing in the definition of the analyte and using different reference intervals and cut-off values. The Working Group on Standardization of CDT (WG-CDT), initiated by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC), has validated an HPLC candidate reference measurement procedure (cRMP) for CDT (% disialotransferrin to total transferrin based on peak areas), demonstrating that it is suitable as a reference measurement procedure (RMP) for CDT. Presented is a detailed description of the cRMP and its calibration. Practical aspects on how to treat genetic variant and so-called di-tri bridge samples are described. Results of method performance characteristics, as demanded by ISO 15189 and ISO 15193, are given, as well as the reference interval and measurement uncertainty and how to deal with that in routine use. The correlation of the cRMP with commercial CDT procedures and the performance of the cRMP in a network of laboratories are also presented. The performance of the CDT cRMP in combination with previously developed commutable calibrators allows for standardization of the currently available commercial measurement procedures for CDT. The cRMP has recently been approved by the IFCC and will be from now on be known as the IFCC-RMP for CDT, while CDT results standardized according to this RMP should be indicated as CDTIFCC.

  15. Serum Hepcidin and Soluble Transferrin Receptor in the Assessment of Iron Metabolism in Children on a Vegetarian Diet.

    PubMed

    Ambroszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Klemarczyk, Witold; Mazur, Joanna; Gajewska, Joanna; Rowicka, Grażyna; Strucińska, Małgorzata; Chełchowska, Magdalena

    2017-03-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of vegetarian diet on iron metabolism parameters paying special attention to serum hepcidin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) concentrations in 43 prepubertal children (age range 4.5-9.0 years) on vegetarian and in 46 children on omnivorous diets. There were no significant differences according to age, weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) between vegetarian and omnivorous children. Vegetarians had similar intake of iron and vitamin B12 and a significantly higher intake of vitamin C (p < 0.05) compared with non-vegetarians. Hematologic parameters and serum iron concentrations were within the reference range in both groups of children. Serum transferrin levels were similar in all subjects; however, ferritin concentrations were significantly (p < 0.01) lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. In children on a vegetarian diet, median hepcidin levels were lower (p < 0.05) but sTfR concentrations significantly higher (p < 0.001) compared with omnivorous children. In the multivariate regression model, we observed associations between hepcidin level and ferritin concentration (β = 0.241, p = 0.05) in the whole group of children as well as between hepcidin concentration and CRP level (β = 0.419, p = 0.047) in vegetarians. We did not find significant associations with concentration of sTfR and selected biochemical, anthropometric, and dietary parameters in any of the studied groups of children. As hematologic parameters and iron concentrations in vegetarians and omnivores were comparable and ferritin level was lower in vegetarians, we suggest that inclusion of novel markers, in particular sTfR (not cofounded by inflammation) and hepcidin, can better detect subclinical iron deficiency in children following vegetarian diets.

  16. Role of ascorbic acid in transferrin-independent reduction and uptake of iron by U-937 cells.

    PubMed

    May, J M; Qu, Z C; Mendiratta, S

    1999-06-01

    The role of ascorbic acid in transferrin-independent ferric iron reduction and uptake was evaluated in cultured U-937 monocytic cells. Uptake of 55Fe by U-937 cells was doubled by 100 microM extracellular ascorbate, and by pre-incubation of cells with 100 microM dehydroascorbic acid, the two-electron-oxidized form of ascorbate. Reduction of extracellular ferric citrate also was enhanced by loading the cells with dehydroascorbic acid. Dehydroascorbic acid was taken up rapidly by the cells and reduced to ascorbate, such that the latter reached intracellular concentrations as high as 6 mM. However, some ascorbate did escape the cells and could be detected at concentrations of up to 1 microM in the incubation medium. Further, addition of ascorbate oxidase almost reversed the effects of dehydroascorbic acid on both 55Fe uptake and ferric citrate reduction. Thus, it is likely that extracellular ascorbate reduced ferric to ferrous iron, which was then taken up by the cells. This hypothesis also was supported by the finding that during loading with ferric citrate, only extracellular ascorbate increased the pool of intracellular ferrous iron that could be chelated with cell-penetrant ferrous iron chelators. In contrast to its inhibition of ascorbate-dependent ferric iron reduction, ascorbate oxidase was without effect on ascorbate-dependent reduction of extracellular ferricyanide. This indicates that the cells use different mechanisms for reduction of ferric iron and ferricyanide. Therefore, extracellular ascorbate derived from cells can enhance transferrin-independent iron uptake by reducing ferric to ferrous iron, but intracellular ascorbate neither contributes to this reduction nor modifies the redox status of intracellular free iron.

  17. Characterization of Inhibitors and Monoclonal Antibodies That Modulate the Interaction between Plasmodium falciparum Adhesin PfRh4 with Its Erythrocyte Receptor Complement Receptor 1*

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Nicholas T. Y.; Harder, Markus J.; Kennedy, Alexander T.; Lin, Clara S.; Weir, Christopher; Cowman, Alan F.; Call, Melissa J.; Schmidt, Christoph Q.; Tham, Wai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum parasites must invade red blood cells to survive within humans. Entry into red blood cells is governed by interactions between parasite adhesins and red blood cell receptors. Previously we identified that P. falciparum reticulocyte binding protein-like homologue 4 (PfRh4) binds to complement receptor 1 (CR1) to mediate entry of malaria parasites into human red blood cells. In this report we characterize a collection of anti-PfRh4 monoclonal antibodies and CR1 protein fragments that modulate the interaction between PfRh4 and CR1. We identify an anti-PfRh4 monoclonal that blocks PfRh4-CR1 interaction in vitro, inhibits PfRh4 binding to red blood cells, and as a result abolishes the PfRh4-CR1 invasion pathway in P. falciparum. Epitope mapping of anti-PfRh4 monoclonal antibodies identified distinct functional regions within PfRh4 involved in modulating its interaction with CR1. Furthermore, we designed a set of protein fragments based on extensive mutagenesis analyses of the PfRh4 binding site on CR1 and determined their interaction affinities using surface plasmon resonance. These CR1 protein fragments bind tightly to PfRh4 and also function as soluble inhibitors to block PfRh4 binding to red blood cells and to inhibit the PfRh4-CR1 invasion pathway. Our findings can aid future efforts in designing specific single epitope antibodies to block P. falciparum invasion via complement receptor 1. PMID:26324715

  18. Angiotensin II receptor 1 gene variants are associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema risk.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tianbo; Ren, Yongchao; Zhu, Xikai; Li, Xun; Ouyang, Yongri; He, Xue; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Yuan; Kang, Longli; Yuan, Dongya

    2016-11-22

    Previous studies demonstrated that Angiotensin II Receptor 1 (AGTR1) may play an important role in the development of high-altitude pulmonary edema. We envisaged a role for AGTR1 gene variants in the pathogenesis of HAPE and investigated their potential associations with HAPE in a Han Chinese population. We genotyped seven AGTR1 polymorphisms in 267 patients with diagnosed HAPE and 304 controls and evaluated their association with risk of HAPE. Statistically significant associations were found for the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs275651 (p = 0.017; odds ratio [OR] = 0.65) and rs275652 (p = 0.016; OR = 0.64). Another SNP rs10941679 showed a marginally significant association after adjusting for age and sex in the additive genetic model (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.01-2.04, p = 0.040). Haplotype analysis confirmed that the haplotype "AG" was associated with a 35% reduction in the risk of developing HAPE, while the haplotype "AA" increased the risk of developing HAPE by 44%. These results provide the first evidence linking genetic variations in AGTR1 with HAPE risk in Han Chinese individuals.

  19. Expression and Functional Relevance of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 in Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Benz, Alexander H.; Renné, Christoph; Maronde, Erik; Koch, Marco; Grabiec, Urszula; Kallendrusch, Sonja; Rengstl, Benjamin; Newrzela, Sebastian; Hartmann, Sylvia; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2013-01-01

    Background Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is expressed in certain types of malignancies. An analysis of CB1 expression and function in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), one of the most frequent lymphomas, was not performed to date. Design and Methods We examined the distribution of CB1 protein in primary cases of HL. Using lymphoma derived cell lines, the role of CB1 signaling on cell survival was investigated. Results A predominant expression of CB1 was found in Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells in a vast majority of classical HL cases. The HL cell lines L428, L540 and KM-H2 showed strong CB1-abundance and displayed a dose-dependent decline of viability under CB1 inhibition with AM251. Further, application of AM251 led to decrease of constitutively active NFκB/p65, a crucial survival factor of HRS-cells, and was followed by elevation of apoptotic markers in HL cells. Conclusions The present study identifies CB1 as a feature of HL, which might serve as a potential selective target in the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:24349109

  20. Blockade of hypocretin receptor-1 preferentially prevents cocaine seeking: comparison with natural reward seeking

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Fardon, Rémi; Weiss, Friedbert

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin (Orx/Hcrt) peptides participate in the regulation of a wide range of physiological processes and are recruited by drugs of abuse. To advance our understanding of the potential of the Orx/Hcrt receptor-1 (Hcrt-r1) as a treatment target for cocaine addiction, the effect of SB334867, a specific Hcrt-r1 antagonist, on reinstatement elicited by cocaine-associated stimuli vs. stimuli associated with a highly palatable conventional reinforcer (sweetened condensed milk [SCM]) was tested. Two separate groups of male Wistar rats were trained to associate a discriminative stimulus (S+) with the response-contingent availability of cocaine (0.25 mg/0.1 ml/infusion) or SCM (2/1 [v/v]) and subjected to reinstatement tests following extinction, during which the reinforcers and S+ were withheld, of cocaine or SCM-reinforced behavior. Following extinction, presentation of the cocaine or SCM S+ produced comparable recovery of responding. Hcrt-r1 blockade by SB334867 (1–10 mg/kg, IP) dose-dependently and selectively reversed conditioned reinstatement induced by cocaine-related stimuli, without interfering with reward seeking produced by the same stimulus when conditioned to SCM. The findings implicate an important role for Hcrt-r1 in appetitive behavior controlled by reward-related stimuli with selectivity for cocaine seeking and identify Hcrt-r1 as a potential treatment target for cocaine relapse prevention. PMID:24407199

  1. Enterovirus 71 Disrupts Interferon Signaling by Reducing the Level of Interferon Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Yi, Lina; Zhao, Jin; Yu, Jun; Chen, Ying; Lin, Marie C.; Kung, Hsiang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    The recent outbreak of enterovirus 71 (EV71) infected millions of children and caused over 1,000 deaths. To date, neither an effective vaccine nor antiviral treatment is available for EV71 infection. Interferons (IFNs) have been successfully applied to treat patients with hepatitis B and C viral infections for decades but have failed to treat EV71 infections. Here, we provide the evidence that EV71 antagonizes type I IFN signaling by reducing the level of interferon receptor 1 (IFNAR1). We show that the host cells could sense EV71 infection and stimulate IFN-β production. However, the induction of downstream IFN-stimulated genes is inhibited by EV71. Also, only a slight interferon response and antiviral effects could be detected in cells treated with recombinant type I IFNs after EV71 infection. Further studies reveal that EV71 blocks the IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1, STAT2, Jak1, and Tyk2 by reducing IFNAR1. Finally, we identified the 2A protease encoded by EV71 as an antagonist of IFNs and show that the protease activity is required for reducing IFNAR1 levels. Taken together, our study for the first time uncovers a mechanism used by EV71 to antagonize type I IFN signaling and provides new targets for future antiviral strategies. PMID:22258259

  2. Flow-regulated endothelial S1P receptor-1 signaling sustains vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bongnam; Obinata, Hideru; Galvani, Sylvain; Mendelson, Karen; Ding, Bisen; Skoura, Athanasia; Kinzel, Bernd; Brinkmann, Volker; Rafii, Shahin; Evans, Todd; Hla, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY During angiogenesis, nascent vascular sprouts fuse to form vascular networks enabling efficient circulation. Mechanisms that stabilize the vascular plexus are not well understood. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a blood-borne lipid mediator implicated in the regulation of vascular and immune systems. Here we describe a mechanism by which the G protein-coupled S1P receptor-1 (S1P1) stabilizes the primary vascular network. A gradient of S1P1 expression from the mature regions of the vascular network to the growing vascular front was observed. In the absence of endothelial S1P1, adherens junctions are destabilized, barrier function is breached, and flow is perturbed resulting in abnormal vascular hypersprouting. Interestingly, S1P1 responds to S1P as well as laminar shear stress to transduce flow-mediated signaling in endothelial cells both in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that blood flow and circulating S1P activate endothelial S1P1 to stabilize blood vessels in development and homeostasis. PMID:22975328

  3. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-02-16

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression -but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  4. Uremic Pruritus Is Not Associated with Endocannabinoid Receptor 1 Gene Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Heisig, Monika; Łaczmański, Łukasz; Reich, Adam; Lwow, Felicja

    2016-01-01

    Uremic pruritus (UP) is a frequent and bothersome symptom in hemodialysis patients. Its etiology is not fully understood and that is why there is no specific treatment. The endocannabinoid system plays a role in many pathological conditions. There is reliable evidence on the association between cannabinoid system and pruritus. In our study, we aimed to evaluate whether genetic variations in the endocannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene can affect UP. The rs12720071, rs806368, rs1049353, rs806381, rs10485170, rs6454674, and rs2023239 polymorphisms of the CNR1 gene were genotyped in 159 hemodialysis patients and 150 healthy controls using two multiplex polymerase chain reactions and the minisequencing technique. No statistically significant relationship was found in any of the evaluated genotypes between patients with and without UP, even after excluding patients with diabetes and dyslipidemia. There were no differences between patients with UP and the control group. However, in the group of all HD patients, a significantly higher incidence of GA genotype and lower incidence in GG genotype in the polymorphism rs806381s were revealed versus the control group (p = 0.04). It seems that polymorphisms of the CNR1 gene are not associated with uremic pruritus. PMID:27034934

  5. Sleep architecture of the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Adamantidis, Antoine; Salvert, Denise; Goutagny, Romain; Lakaye, Bernard; Gervasoni, Damien; Grisar, Thierry; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice

    2008-04-01

    Growing amounts of data indicate involvement of the posterior hypothalamus in the regulation of sleep, especially paradoxical sleep (PS). Accordingly, we previously showed that the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-producing neurons of the rat hypothalamus are selectively activated during a PS rebound. In addition, intracerebroventricular infusion of MCH increases total sleep duration, suggesting a new role for MCH in sleep regulation. To determine whether activation of the MCH system promotes sleep, we studied spontaneous sleep and its homeostatic regulation in mice with deletion of the MCH-receptor 1 gene (MCH-R1-/- vs. MCH-R1+/+) and their behavioural response to modafinil, a powerful antinarcoleptic drug. Here, we show that the lack of functional MCH-R1 results in a hypersomniac-like phenotype, both in basal conditions and after total sleep deprivation, compared to wild-type mice. Further, we found that modafinil was less potent at inducing wakefulness in MCH-R1-/- than in MCH-R1+/+ mice. We report for the first time that animals with genetically inactivated MCH signaling exhibit altered vigilance state architecture and sleep homeostasis. This study also suggests that the MCH system may modulate central pathways involved in the wake-promoting effect of modafinil.

  6. Alpha-2-macroglobulin gene, oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 locus, and sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Colacicco, Anna Maria; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; D'Introno, Alessia; Capurso, Cristiano; Kehoe, Patrick G; Seripa, Davide; Pilotto, Alberto; Santamato, Andrea; Capurso, Antonio; Panza, Francesco

    2009-09-01

    A total sample of 169 AD patients, and 264 age- and sex-matched unrelated caregivers from Apulia, southern Italy, were genotypized for alpha-2-macroglobulin (A2M) Val1000/Ile single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs669), apolipoprotein E (APOE), and SNPs (+1073 and +1071) in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (OLR1) gene on chromosome 12. A2M allele and genotype frequencies were similar between AD patients and controls, also after stratification for late onset (>/=70 years) and early onset (<70 years) or APOE varepsilon4 status. However, there was evidence in support of LD between the OLR1+1071, the OLR1+1073, and the rs669 SNPs, with T-C-A haplotype being associated with significant increased risk of AD in both the whole sample and when we stratified according to early and late onset AD subjects, with the allelic association with AD predominantly from the OLR1+1073 SNP, further supporting the role of OLR1 as a candidate risk gene for sporadic AD.

  7. Polymorphisms in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 gene and risk of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    D'Introno, Alessia; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Colacicco, Anna M; Capurso, Cristiano; Torres, Francesco; Capurso, Sabrina A; Capurso, Antonio; Panza, Francesco

    2005-03-01

    The +1073 C/T polymorphism of the oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (OLR1) gene has been reported to be associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease, whereas for the +1071 T/A polymorphism no association was found. We genotyped 169 sporadic Alzheimer's disease patients and 264 sex- and age-matched nondemented controls from Southern Italy for OLR1 +1073 C/T and +1071 T/A polymorphisms and for apolipoprotein E and LBP-1c/CP2/LSF. We also performed haplotype analysis. For the +1073 C/T polymorphism, the C allele and the CC genotype have been associated with a higher risk for Alzheimer's disease without apolipoprotein E or CP2 interaction. The two polymorphisms were in linkage disequilibrium, with the haplotype T-C at significant increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease in the whole sample and in elderly persons 70 years or older. In our population, the +1073 C/T OLR1 polymorphism exhibited a significant association with Alzheimer's disease, further supporting the role of OLR1 as a candidate risk gene for sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Metalloproteinase-9 contributes to endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis via protease activated receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Florence, Jon M.; Booshehri, Laela M.; Allen, Timothy C.; Kurdowska, Anna K.

    2017-01-01

    The atherosclerotic process begins when vascular endothelial cells undergo pro-inflammatory changes such as aberrant activation to dysfunctional phenotypes and apoptosis, leading to loss of vascular integrity. Our laboratory has demonstrated that exposure of mice to second hand smoke triggers an increase in expression of metalloproteinase-9. Further, metalloproteinase-9 released by second hand smoke—activated leukocytes may propagate pro-atherogenic alterations in endothelial cells. We have shown that levels of metalloproteinase-9 were increased in the plasma from apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE-/-) mice exposed to second hand smoke relative to non-exposed controls. Moreover, we have collected data from two different, but complementary, treatments of second hand smoke exposed atherosclerotic mice. Animals received either cell specific metalloproteinase-9 directed siRNA to minimize metalloproteinase-9 expression in neutrophils and endothelial cells, or a pharmacological inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase which indirectly limits metalloproteinase-9 production in neutrophils. These treatments reduced atherosclerotic changes in mice and improved overall vascular health. We also demonstrated that metalloproteinase-9 could activate endothelial cells and induce their apoptosis via cleavage of protease activated receptor-1. In summary, better understanding of metalloproteinase-9’s pathogenic capabilities as well as novel signaling pathways involved may lead to development of treatments which may provide additional benefits to atherosclerosis patients with a history of second hand smoke exposure. PMID:28166283

  9. Niacin ameliorates ulcerative colitis via prostaglandin D2-mediated D prostanoid receptor 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Juanjuan; Kong, Deping; Wang, Qi; Wu, Wei; Tang, Yanping; Bai, Tingting; Guo, Liang; Wei, Lumin; Zhang, Qianqian; Yu, Yu; Qian, Yuting; Zuo, Shengkai; Liu, Guizhu; Liu, Qian; Wu, Sheng; Zang, Yi; Zhu, Qian; Jia, Daile; Wang, Yuanyang; Yao, Weiyan; Ji, Yong; Yin, Huiyong; Nakamura, Masataka; Lazarus, Michael; Breyer, Richard M; Wang, Lifu; Yu, Ying

    2017-03-24

    Niacin, as an antidyslipidemic drug, elicits a strong flushing response by release of prostaglandin (PG) D2 However, whether niacin is beneficial for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unclear. Here, we observed niacin administration-enhanced PGD2 production in colon tissues in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-challenged mice, and protected mice against DSS or 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in D prostanoid receptor 1 (DP1)-dependent manner. Specific ablation of DP1 receptor in vascular endothelial cells, colonic epithelium, and myeloid cells augmented DSS/TNBS-induced colitis in mice through increasing vascular permeability, promoting apoptosis of epithelial cells, and stimulating pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion of macrophages, respectively. Niacin treatment improved vascular permeability, reduced apoptotic epithelial cells, promoted epithelial cell update, and suppressed pro-inflammatory gene expression of macrophages. Moreover, treatment with niacin-containing retention enema effectively promoted UC clinical remission and mucosal healing in patients with moderately active disease. Therefore, niacin displayed multiple beneficial effects on DSS/TNBS-induced colitis in mice by activation of PGD2/DP1 axis. The potential efficacy of niacin in management of IBD warrants further investigation.

  10. Expression of Nogo receptor 1 in microglia during development and following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gaoxiang; Ni, Jie; Mao, Lei; Yan, Ming; Pang, Tao; Liao, Hong

    2015-11-19

    As the receptor of myelin associated inhibitory factors Nogo receptor 1 (NgR1) plays an important role in central nervous system (CNS) injury and regeneration. It is found that NgR1 complex acts in neurons to transduce the signals intracelluarly including induction of growth cone collapse, inhibition of axonal regeneration and regulation of nerve inflammation. In recent studies, NgR1 has also been found to be expressed in the microglia. However, NgR1 expressed in microglia in the developing nervous systems and following CNS injury have not been widely investigated. In this study, we detected the expression and cellular localization of NgR1 in microglia during development and following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice. The results showed that NgR1 was mainly expressed in microglia during embryonic and postnatal periods. The expression levels peaked at P4 and decreased thereafter into adulthood, while increased significantly with aging representatively at 17 mo. On the other hand, there was no significant difference in the number of double positive NgR1(+)Iba1(+) cells between normal and TBI group. In summary, we first detected the expression of NgR1 in microglia during development and found that NgR1 protein expression increased significantly in microglia with aging. These findings will contribute to make a foundation for subsequent study about the role of NgR1 expressed in microglia on the CNS disorders.

  11. Mutations of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene during progression of lung tumors in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Takanori; Obo, Yumi; Furukawa, Mami; Hotta, Mayuko; Yamasaki, Ayako; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2009-01-16

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. In this study, mutations of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 (LPA1) gene were investigated to clarify the possible molecular mechanisms underlying the development of lung tumors induced by N-nitrosobis(2-hydroxypropyl)amine (BHP) in rats. Male Wistar rats, 6 weeks of age, were given 2000 ppm BHP in their drinking water for 12 weeks and then maintained without further treatment until sacrifice at 25 weeks. Genomic DNAs were extracted from paraffin-embedded tissues and exons 2-4 were examined for mutations, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. No LPA1 mutations were detected in 15 hyperplasias, but 2 out of 12 adenomas (16.7%) and 7 out of 17 adenocarcinomas (41.2%). These results suggest that mutations of LPA1 gene may be involved in the acquisition of growth advantage from adenomas to adenocarcinomas in lung carcinogenesis induced in rats by BHP.

  12. Brain structural and clinical changes after first episode psychosis: Focus on cannabinoid receptor 1 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pinilla, Paula; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Ortiz-García de la Foz, Víctor; Guest, Paul C; Ayesa-Arriola, Rosa; Córdova-Palomera, Aldo; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto

    2015-08-30

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene polymorphisms have been associated with central and peripheral effects of cannabis and schizophrenia pathophysiology. Here, we have tested whether three CNR1 variants (rs1049353, rs1535255 and rs2023239) are associated with changes in brain volumes, body mass index (BMI) or psychopathological scores in a 3-year longitudinal study of 65 first-episode psychosis patients. The rs1049353 at-risk allele was significantly associated with a greater reduction of caudate volume, and the rs2023239 T/C polymorphism showed a significant decrease in thalamic volume after the 3-year period. For those who were not cannabis users, the rs1535255 and rs2023239 polymorphisms had effects in lateral ventricle (LV), and LV and white matter, respectively. The rs2023239 variant also was associated with significant improvements in positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. There was no significant effect of any of the variants on changes in BMI over the 3-year study. Finally, an interaction between all three polymorphisms was found involving evolution of positive symptoms. These findings suggest that the cannabinoid pathway is associated with schizophrenia evolution over time. However, further studies using larger cohorts are needed to confirm these results. If confirmed, the present findings could lead in subsequent investigations for identification of novel drug targets for improved treatment of patients suffering from schizophrenia.

  13. Recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu₁).

    PubMed

    Owen, Dafydd R

    2011-08-17

    This Review summarizes the medicinal chemistry found in publications on both orthosteric and allosteric modulators of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu(1)) from 2005 to the present. The time period covered by the scope of this current review has been particularly rich in mGlu(1)-related publications with numbers quadrupling when compared to the preceding five year period of 2000-2005. Publications in the field peaked in 2007 with over 35 articles appearing in the peer reviewed literature in the course of that year. Given that glutamate is one of the primary excitatory neurotransmitters in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), it is unsurprising that it acts upon several receptors that are considered to be of potential therapeutic interest for many indications. Orthosteric and allosteric modulation of the receptor is possible, with a logical extrapolation to the chemotypes used for each strategy. The last five years of publications have yielded many mGlu(1) selective antagonist chemotypyes, most of which have shown efficacy in pain in vivo models. However, the primary impact of these compounds has been to highlight the mechanistic safety risks of mGlu(1) antagonism, independent of chemotype. As a review in medicinal chemistry, the primary focus of this paper will be on the design and, to a lesser degree, synthetic strategies for the delivery of subtype selective, CNS penetrant, druglike compounds through a "medchem" program, targeting modulators of the mGlu(1) receptor.

  14. AP-2{alpha} suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darrion L.; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-15

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2{alpha} is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2{alpha} binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2{alpha}-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2{alpha} interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2{alpha} is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  15. Discoidin domain receptor 1 controls linear invadosome formation via a Cdc42–Tuba pathway

    PubMed Central

    Juin, Amélie; Di Martino, Julie; Leitinger, Birgit; Henriet, Elodie; Gary, Anne-Sophie; Paysan, Lisa; Bomo, Jeremy; Baffet, Georges; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile; Rosenbaum, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of type I collagen fibrils in tumors is associated with an increased risk of metastasis. Invadosomes are F-actin structures able to degrade the extracellular matrix. We previously found that collagen I fibrils induced the formation of peculiar linear invadosomes in an unexpected integrin-independent manner. Here, we show that Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen receptor overexpressed in cancer, colocalizes with linear invadosomes in tumor cells and is required for their formation and matrix degradation ability. Unexpectedly, DDR1 kinase activity is not required for invadosome formation or activity, nor is Src tyrosine kinase. We show that the RhoGTPase Cdc42 is activated on collagen in a DDR1-dependent manner. Cdc42 and its specific guanine nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF), Tuba, localize to linear invadosomes, and both are required for linear invadosome formation. Finally, DDR1 depletion blocked cell invasion in a collagen gel. Altogether, our data uncover an important role for DDR1, acting through Tuba and Cdc42, in proteolysis-based cell invasion in a collagen-rich environment. PMID:25422375

  16. Characterization of Chronic Cutaneous Lesions from TNF-Receptor-1-Deficient Mice Infected by Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Carolina Ferreira; Manzoni-de-Almeida, Daniel; Mello, Paula Seixas; Natale, Caio Cotta; Santiago, Helton da Costa; Miranda, Luíza da Silva; Ferraz, Fernanda Oliveira; dos Santos, Liliane Martins; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves; Vieira, Leda Quercia

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania major-infected TNF receptor 1 deficient (TNFR1 KO) mice resolve parasitism but fail to resolve lesions, while wild-type mice completely heal. We investigated the cell composition, cytokine production, and apoptosis in lesions from L. major-infected TNFR1 KO and wild-type (WT) mice. Chronic lesions from L. major-infected TNFR1 KO mice presented larger number of CD8+ T and Ly6G+ cells. In addition, higher concentrations of mRNA for IFN-γ CCL2 and CCL5, as well as protein, but lower numbers of apoptotic cells, were found in lesions from TNFR1 KO mice than in WT, at late time points of infection. Our studies showed that persistent lesions in L. major-infected TNFR1 KO mice may be mediated by continuous migration of cells to the site of inflammation due to the presence of chemokines and also by lower levels of apoptosis. We suggest that this model has some striking similarities to the mucocutaneous clinical form of leishmaniasis. PMID:22203861

  17. Ganglioside mediate the interaction between Nogo receptor 1 and LINGO-1.

    PubMed

    Saha, Nayanendu; Kolev, Momchil V; Semavina, Mariya; Himanen, Juha; Nikolov, Dimitar B

    2011-09-16

    Upon spinal cord injury, the myelin inhibitors, including the myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), Nogo-A and the oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein (OMgp), bind to and signal via a single neuronal receptor/co-receptor complex comprising of Nogo receptor 1(NgR1)/LINGO-1 and p75 or TROY, impeding regeneration of injured axons. We employed a cell-free system to study the binding of NgR1 to its co-receptors and the myelin inhibitor Nogo-A, and show that gangliosides mediate the interaction of NgR1 with LINGO-1. Solid phase binding assays demonstrate that the sialic acid moieties of gangliosides and the stalk of NgR1 are the principal determinants of these molecular interactions. Moreover, the tripartite complex comprising of NgR1, LINGO-1 and ganglioside exhibits stronger binding to Nogo-A (Nogo-54) in the presence of p75, suggesting the gangliosides modulate the myelin inhibitor-receptor signaling.

  18. Nogo Receptor 1 Confines a Disinhibitory Microcircuit to the Critical Period in Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Stephany, Céleste-Élise; Ikrar, Taruna; Nguyen, Collins; Xu, Xiangmin; McGee, Aaron W

    2016-10-26

    A characteristic of the developing mammalian visual system is a brief interval of plasticity, termed the "critical period," when the circuitry of primary visual cortex is most sensitive to perturbation of visual experience. Depriving one eye of vision (monocular deprivation [MD]) during the critical period alters ocular dominance (OD) by shifting the responsiveness of neurons in visual cortex to favor the nondeprived eye. A disinhibitory microcircuit involving parvalbumin-expressing (PV) interneurons initiates this OD plasticity. The gene encoding the neuronal nogo-66-receptor 1 (ngr1/rtn4r) is required to close the critical period. Here we combined mouse genetics, electrophysiology, and circuit mapping with laser-scanning photostimulation to investigate whether disinhibition is confined to the critical period by ngr1 We demonstrate that ngr1 mutant mice retain plasticity characteristic of the critical period as adults, and that ngr1 operates within PV interneurons to restrict the loss of intracortical excitatory synaptic input following MD in adult mice, and this disinhibition induces a "lower PV network configuration" in both critical-period wild-type mice and adult ngr1(-/-) mice. We propose that ngr1 limits disinhibition to close the critical period for OD plasticity and that a decrease in PV expression levels reports the diminished recent cumulative activity of these interneurons.

  19. Prolonging Survival of Corneal Transplantation by Selective Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Min; Liu, Yong; Xiao, Yang; Han, Gencheng; Jia, Liang; Wang, Liqiang; Lei, Tian; Huang, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most used therapy for eye disorders. Although the cornea is somewhat an immune privileged organ, immune rejection is still the major problem that reduces the success rate. Therefore, effective chemical drugs that regulate immunoreactions are needed to improve the outcome of corneal transplantations. Here, a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) selective agonist was systematically evaluated in mouse allogeneic corneal transplantation and compared with the commonly used immunosuppressive agents. Compared with CsA and the non-selective sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist FTY720, the S1P1 selective agonist can prolong the survival corneal transplantation for more than 30 days with a low immune response. More importantly, the optimal dose of the S1P1 selective agonist was much less than non-selective S1P receptor agonist FTY720, which would reduce the dose-dependent toxicity in drug application. Then we analyzed the mechanisms of the selected S1P1 selective agonist on the immunosuppression. The results shown that the S1P1 selective agonist could regulate the distribution of the immune cells with less CD4+ T cells and enhanced Treg cells in the allograft, moreover the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines TGF-β1 and IL-10 unregulated which can reduce the immunoreactions. These findings suggest that S1P1 selective agonist may be a more appropriate immunosuppressive compound to effectively prolong mouse allogeneic corneal grafts survival. PMID:25216235

  20. Recombinant pigment epithelium-derived factor PEDF binds vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Erin K; Francis, Mary K; Knepper, Janice E

    2015-08-01

    Angiogenesis, or the formation of new blood vessels, is stimulated by angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. To explore the mechanism by which PEDF acts, recombinant PEDF was expressed with a 6x-His tag (for purification) and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag. The PEDF fusion protein was confirmed to be active in inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and migration. Direct binding of PEDF to both vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) and VEGFR-2 was demonstrated in an in vitro assay similar to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PEDF was shown by immune-confocal microscopy to be localized within treated endothelial cells. When VEGF-stimulated endothelial cells were incubated with PEDF the VEGF receptors showed intracellular localization. These data suggest that the interaction between PEDF and VEGFR-1 or VEGFR-2 may be a possible mechanism for inhibiting angiogenesis. PEDF may be binding to the VEGF receptors to promote their internalization and/or degradation to limit VEGF responses in treated cells.

  1. Adiponectin receptor 1 conserves docosahexaenoic acid and promotes photoreceptor cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Dennis S.; Calandria, Jorgelina M.; Gordon, William C.; Jun, Bokkyoo; Zhou, Yongdong; Gelfman, Claire M.; Li, Songhua; Jin, Minghao; Knott, Eric J.; Chang, Bo; Abuin, Alex; Issa, Tawfik; Potter, David; Platt, Kenneth A.; Bazan, Nicolas G.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of pathways necessary for photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) function is critical to uncover therapies for blindness. Here we report the discovery of adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) as a regulator of these cells’ functions. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is avidly retained in photoreceptors, while mechanisms controlling DHA uptake and retention are unknown. Thus, we demonstrate that AdipoR1 ablation results in DHA reduction. In situ hybridization reveals photoreceptor and RPE cell AdipoR1 expression, blunted in AdipoR1−/− mice. We also find decreased photoreceptor-specific phosphatidylcholine containing very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and severely attenuated electroretinograms. These changes precede progressive photoreceptor degeneration in AdipoR1−/− mice. RPE-rich eyecup cultures from AdipoR1−/− reveal impaired DHA uptake. AdipoR1 overexpression in RPE cells enhances DHA uptake, whereas AdipoR1 silencing has the opposite effect. These results establish AdipoR1 as a regulatory switch of DHA uptake, retention, conservation and elongation in photoreceptors and RPE, thus preserving photoreceptor cell integrity. PMID:25736573

  2. Xenotransplantation of islets enclosed in agarose microcapsule carrying soluble complement receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Luan, Nguyen Minh; Iwata, Hiroo

    2012-11-01

    Strong immunological reactions remain a major barrier to treating diabetic patients using xenogeneic islets. In a previous study, we developed a method for enclosing islets with agarose microbeads carrying soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1-Mics), a potent complement inhibitor in both classical and alternative complement activation pathways. This is the follow-up in vivo study to evaluate the protective effect of these sCR1-Mics using a xenotransplantation model (rats to mice). ACI/NSIc rat islets enclosed in sCR1-Mics were transplanted into the intraperitoneal cavity of diabetic C57BL/6 mice without immunosuppression therapy. Transplantation of islets in plain agarose microbeads (Mics) was used as a reference. While islets enclosed in plain Mics were rapidly destroyed (graft survival in recipients of 1000 islets: 11.6±3.8 days), transplantation of islets in sCR1-Mics significantly prolonged graft survival (34.1±3.2 days). Moreover, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests revealed that islets in sCR1-Mics normalized blood glucose levels in a similar manner as islets in pancreas of normal mice. In conclusion, sCR1 immobilized onto agarose microbeads exerted some protective effect in xenogeneic islets resulting in prolonged graft survival.

  3. Soluble complement receptor 1 protects the peripheral nerve from early axon loss after injury.

    PubMed

    Ramaglia, Valeria; Wolterman, Ruud; de Kok, Maryla; Vigar, Miriam Ann; Wagenaar-Bos, Ineke; King, Rosalind Helen Mary; Morgan, Brian Paul; Baas, Frank

    2008-04-01

    Complement activation is a crucial early event in Wallerian degeneration. In this study we show that treatment of rats with soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1), an inhibitor of all complement pathways, blocked both systemic and local complement activation after crush injury of the sciatic nerve. Deposition of membrane attack complex (MAC) in the nerve was inhibited, the nerve was protected from axonal and myelin breakdown at 3 days after injury, and macrophage infiltration and activation was strongly reduced. We show that both classical and alternative complement pathways are activated after acute nerve trauma. Inhibition of the classical pathway by C1 inhibitor (Cetor) diminished, but did not completely block, MAC deposition in the injured nerve, blocked myelin breakdown, inhibited macrophage infiltration, and prevented macrophage activation at 3 days after injury. However, in contrast to sCR1 treatment, early signs of axonal degradation were visible in the nerve, linking MAC deposition to axonal damage. We conclude that sCR1 protects the nerve from early axon loss after injury and propose complement inhibition as a potential therapy for the treatment of diseases in which axon loss is the main cause of disabilities.

  4. Cyclic strain increases protease-activated receptor-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Frye, S. R.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic strain regulates many vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functions through changing gene expression. This study investigated the effects of cyclic strain on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in VSMCs and the possible signaling pathways involved, on the basis of the hypothesis that cyclic strain would enhance PAR-1 expression, reflecting increased thrombin activity. Uniaxial cyclic strain (1 Hz, 20%) of cells cultured on elastic membranes induced a 2-fold increase in both PAR-1 mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of PAR-1, as assessed by cell proliferation in response to thrombin, was also increased by cyclic strain. In addition, treatment of cells with antioxidants or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor blocked strain-induced PAR-1 expression. Preincubation of cells with protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or Ro 31-8220) enhanced strain-increased PAR-1 expression, whereas inhibitors of NO synthase, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases had no effect. Cyclic strain in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor induced PAR-1 mRNA levels beyond the effect of cyclic strain alone, whereas no additive effect was observed between cyclic strain and platelet-derived growth factor-AB. Our findings that cyclic strain upregulates PAR-1 mRNA expression but that shear stress downregulates this gene in VSMCs provide an opportunity to elucidate signaling differences by which VSMCs respond to different mechanical forces.

  5. Learning and memory deficits in mice lacking protease activated receptor-1.