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Sample records for human trna synthetase

  1. Functional expansion of human tRNA synthetases achieved by structural inventions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-01-21

    Known as an essential component of the translational apparatus, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase family catalyzes the first step reaction in protein synthesis, that is, to specifically attach each amino acid to its cognate tRNA. While preserving this essential role, tRNA synthetases developed other roles during evolution. Human tRNA synthetases, in particular, have diverse functions in different pathways involving angiogenesis, inflammation and apoptosis. The functional diversity is further illustrated in the association with various diseases through genetic mutations that do not affect aminoacylation or protein synthesis. Here we review the accumulated knowledge on how human tRNA synthetases used structural inventions to achieve functional expansions.

  2. Functional expansion of human tRNA synthetases achieved by structural inventions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-01-01

    Known as an essential component of the translational apparatus, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase family catalyzes the first step reaction in protein synthesis, that is, to specifically attach each amino acid to its cognate tRNA. While preserving this essential role, tRNA synthetases developed other roles during evolution. Human tRNA synthetases, in particular, have diverse functions in different pathways involving angiogenesis, inflammation and apoptosis. The functional diversity is further illustrated in the association with various diseases through genetic mutations that do not affect aminoacylation or protein synthesis. Here we review the accumulated knowledge on how human tRNA synthetases used structural inventions to achieve functional expansions. PMID:19932696

  3. tRNA synthetase: tRNA Aminoacylation and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yan Ling Joy; Poruri, Kiranmai; Martinis, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are prominently known for their classic function in the first step of protein synthesis, where they bear the responsibility of setting the genetic code. Each enzyme is exquisitely adapted to covalently link a single standard amino acid to its cognate set of tRNA isoacceptors. These ancient enzymes have evolved idiosyncratically to host alternate activities that go far beyond their aminoacylation role and impact a wide range of other metabolic pathways and cell signaling processes. The family of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases have also been suggested as a remarkable scaffold to incorporate new domains that would drive evolution and the emergence of new organisms with more complex function. Because they are essential, the tRNA synthetases have served as pharmaceutical targets for drug and antibiotic development. The recent unfolding of novel important functions for this family of proteins offers new and promising pathways for therapeutic development to treat diverse human diseases. PMID:24706556

  4. Gain-Of-Function Mutational Activation of Human TRNA Synthetase Procytokine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.L.; Kapoor, M.; Otero, F.J.; Slike, B.M.; Tsuruta, H.; Frausto, R.; Bates, A.; Ewalt, K.L.; Cheresh, D.A.; Schimmel, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    Disease-causing mutations occur in genes for aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. That some mutations are dominant suggests a gain of function. Native tRNA synthetases, such as tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, catalyze aminoacylation and are also procytokines that are activated by natural fragmentation. In principle, however, gain-of-function phenotypes could arise from mutational activation of synthetase procytokines. From crystal structure analysis, we hypothesized that a steric block of a critical Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif in full-length TyrRS suppresses the cytokine activity of a natural fragment. To test this hypothesis, we attempted to uncover ELR in the procytokine by mutating a conserved tyrosine (Y341) that tethers ELR. Site-specific proteolytic cleavage and small-angle X-ray scattering established subtle opening of the structure by the mutation. Strikingly, four different assays demonstrated mutational activation of cytokine functions. The results prove the possibilities for constitutive gain-of-function mutations in tRNA synthetases.

  5. Complex organisation of the 5'-end of the human glycine tRNA synthetase gene.

    PubMed

    Mudge, S J; Williams, J H; Eyre, H J; Sutherland, G R; Cowan, P J; Power, D A

    1998-03-16

    Glycine tRNA synthetase (glyRS) catalyses the addition of the amino acid glycine to its cognate tRNA molecules. In the silk moth worm Bombyx mori, this gene is subject to complex transcriptional regulation because of the predominance of glycine in silk. In vertebrates, glycine is a major constituent of collagen but there have been no studies of glyRS regulation. In this study we have isolated and mapped a genomic clone containing the 5'-end of glyRS. Primer extension studies identified only one transcriptional start point (TSP) in three different cell lines. Expression of the transcript identified may be regulated translationally because it contains five potential initiation codons, three of which are in good context for initiation. The most 3' of the potential initiation codons has previously been predicted to be the initiating codon for cytoplasmic glyRS. Two of the upstream codons are in-frame with this codon, and both are predicted to extend the N-terminus of glyRS to include a mitochondrial targeting sequence. Sequencing of genomic DNA surrounding the TSP showed features common to the promoters of housekeeping genes, as well as a canonical TATA box at the unusual position of +9. Surprisingly, promoter activity in vitro was not specified by a 1.9 kb genomic fragment containing the TSP and TATA box, but by a contiguous 0.4 kb fragment immediately downstream. These studies suggest that the transcription of glyRS from a single start point requires downstream promoter elements.

  6. The isolated carboxy-terminal domain of human mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase rescues the pathological phenotype of mitochondrial tRNA mutations in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Perli, Elena; Giordano, Carla; Pisano, Annalinda; Montanari, Arianna; Campese, Antonio F; Reyes, Aurelio; Ghezzi, Daniele; Nasca, Alessia; Tuppen, Helen A; Orlandi, Maurizia; Di Micco, Patrizio; Poser, Elena; Taylor, Robert W; Colotti, Gianni; Francisci, Silvia; Morea, Veronica; Frontali, Laura; Zeviani, Massimo; d'Amati, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) diseases are multisystem disorders due to mutations in nuclear or mtDNA genes. Among the latter, more than 50% are located in transfer RNA (tRNA) genes and are responsible for a wide range of syndromes, for which no effective treatment is available at present. We show that three human mt aminoacyl-tRNA syntethases, namely leucyl-, valyl-, and isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase are able to improve both viability and bioenergetic proficiency of human transmitochondrial cybrid cells carrying pathogenic mutations in the mt-tRNAIle gene. Importantly, we further demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of human mt leucyl-tRNA synthetase is both necessary and sufficient to improve the pathologic phenotype associated either with these “mild” mutations or with the “severe” m.3243A>G mutation in the mt-tRNALeu(UUR) gene. Furthermore, we provide evidence that this small, non-catalytic domain is able to directly and specifically interact in vitro with human mt-tRNALeu(UUR) with high affinity and stability and, with lower affinity, with mt-tRNAIle. Taken together, our results sustain the hypothesis that the carboxy-terminal domain of human mt leucyl-tRNA synthetase can be used to correct mt dysfunctions caused by mt-tRNA mutations. PMID:24413190

  7. Aminoacylation of tRNA in the evolution of an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Lipman, Richard S. A.; Hou, Ya-Ming

    1998-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases catalyze aminoacylation of tRNAs by joining an amino acid to its cognate tRNA. The selection of the cognate tRNA is jointly determined by separate structural domains that examine different regions of the tRNA. The cysteine-tRNA synthetase of Escherichia coli has domains that select for tRNAs containing U73, the GCA anticodon, and a specific tertiary structure at the corner of the tRNA L shape. The E. coli enzyme does not efficiently recognize the yeast or human tRNACys, indicating the evolution of determinants for tRNA aminoacylation from E. coli to yeast to human and the coevolution of synthetase domains that interact with these determinants. By successively modifying the yeast and human tRNACys to ones that are efficiently aminoacylated by the E. coli enzyme, we have identified determinants of the tRNA that are important for aminoacylation but that have diverged in the course of evolution. These determinants provide clues to the divergence of synthetase domains. We propose that the domain for selecting U73 is conserved in evolution. In contrast, we propose that the domain for selecting the corner of the tRNA L shape diverged early, after the separation between E. coli and yeast, while that for selecting the GCA-containing anticodon loop diverged late, after the separation between yeast and human. PMID:9811828

  8. Long-Range Structural Effects of a Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease-Causing Mutation in Human Glycyl-TRNA Synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, W.; Nangle, L.A.; Zhang, W.; Schimmel, P.; Yang, X.-L.

    2009-06-04

    Functional expansion of specific tRNA synthetases in higher organisms is well documented. These additional functions may explain why dominant mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, the most common heritable disease of the peripheral nervous system. At least 10 disease-causing mutant alleles of GlyRS have been annotated. These mutations scatter broadly across the primary sequence and have no apparent unifying connection. Here we report the structure of wild type and a CMT-causing mutant (G526R) of homodimeric human GlyRS. The mutation is at the site for synthesis of glycyl-adenylate, but the rest of the two structures are closely similar. Significantly, the mutant form diffracts to a higher resolution and has a greater dimer interface. The extra dimer interactions are located {approx}30 {angstrom} away from the G526R mutation. Direct experiments confirm the tighter dimer interaction of the G526R protein. The results suggest the possible importance of subtle, long-range structural effects of CMT-causing mutations at the dimer interface. From analysis of a third crystal, an appended motif, found in higher eukaryote GlyRSs, seems not to have a role in these long-range effects.

  9. Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and their connections to disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Gyu; Schimmel, Paul; Kim, Sunghoon

    2008-08-12

    Aminoacylation of transfer RNAs establishes the rules of the genetic code. The reactions are catalyzed by an ancient group of 20 enzymes (one for each amino acid) known as aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (AARSs). Surprisingly, the etiology of specific diseases-including cancer, neuronal pathologies, autoimmune disorders, and disrupted metabolic conditions-is connected to specific aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. These connections include heritable mutations in the genes for tRNA synthetases that are causally linked to disease, with both dominant and recessive disease-causing mutations being annotated. Because some disease-causing mutations do not affect aminoacylation activity or apparent enzyme stability, the mutations are believed to affect functions that are distinct from aminoacylation. Examples include enzymes that are secreted as procytokines that, after activation, operate in pathways connected to the immune system or angiogenesis. In addition, within cells, synthetases form multiprotein complexes with each other or with other regulatory factors and in that way control diverse signaling pathways. Although much has been uncovered in recent years, many novel functions, disease connections, and interpathway connections of tRNA synthetases have yet to be worked out.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a native human tRNA synthetase whose allelic variants are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wei; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2006-12-01

    Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a native human tRNA synthetase whose allelic variants are associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth Disease. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of a group of enzymes that catalyze the synthesis of aminoacyl-tRNAs for translation. Mutations of human and mouse GlyRSs are causally associated with Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, the most common genetic disorder of the peripheral nervous system. As the first step towards a structure–function analysis of this disease, native human GlyRS was expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystal belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or its enantiomorphic space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 91.74, c = 247.18 Å, and diffracted X-rays to 3.0 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained one GlyRS molecule and had a solvent content of 69%.

  11. A prokaryote and human tRNA synthetase provide an essential RNA splicing function in yeast mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Houman, Fariba; Rho, Seung Bae; Zhang, Jiansu; Shen, Xiaoyu; Wang, Chien-Chia; Schimmel, Paul; Martinis, Susan A.

    2000-01-01

    Mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides two essential functions. In addition to aminoacylation, LeuRS functions in RNA splicing. The details of how it came to act in splicing are not known. Here we show that Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human mitochondrial LeuRSs can substitute in splicing for the S. cerevisiae mitochondrial LeuRS. Mutations of yeast mitochondrial LeuRS that had previously been shown to abolish splicing activity also eliminate splicing by the M. tuberculosis enzyme. These results suggest the role of LeuRS in splicing in yeast mitochondria results from features of the enzyme that are broadly conserved in evolution. These features are not likely to be designed for splicing per se, but instead have been adopted in yeast for that purpose. PMID:11087829

  12. A Rationally Engineered Misacylating Aminoacyl-Trna Synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, T.L.; Rodriguez-Hernandez, A.; Corigliano, E.M.; Perona, J.J.

    2009-05-12

    Information transfer from nucleic acid to protein is mediated by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which catalyze the specific pairings of amino acids with transfer RNAs. Despite copious sequence and structural information on the 22 tRNA synthetase families, little is known of the enzyme signatures that specify amino acid selectivities. Here, we show that transplanting a conserved arginine residue from glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS) to glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) improves the K{sub M} of GlnRS for noncognate glutamate. Two crystal structures of this C229R GlnRS mutant reveal that a conserved twin-arginine GluRS amino acid identity signature cannot be incorporated into GlnRS without disrupting surrounding protein structural elements that interact with the tRNA. Consistent with these findings, we show that cumulative replacement of other primary binding site residues in GlnRS, with those of GluRS, only slightly improves the ability of the GlnRS active site to accommodate glutamate. However, introduction of 22 amino acid replacements and one deletion, including substitution of the entire primary binding site and two surface loops adjacent to the region disrupted in C229R, improves the capacity of Escherichia coli GlnRS to synthesize misacylated Glu-tRNA{sup Gln} by 16,000-fold. This hybrid enzyme recapitulates the function of misacylating GluRS enzymes found in organisms that synthesize Gln-tRNA{sup Gln} by an alternative pathway. These findings implicate the RNA component of the contemporary GlnRS-tRNA{sup Gln} complex in mediating amino acid specificity. This role for tRNA may persist as a relic of primordial cells in which the evolution of the genetic code was driven by RNA-catalyzed amino acid-RNA pairing.

  13. Structural Basis for Specific Inhibition of tRNA Synthetase by an ATP Competitive Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fang, Pengfei; Han, Hongyan; Wang, Jing; Chen, Kaige; Chen, Xin; Guo, Min

    2015-06-18

    Pharmaceutical inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases demand high species and family specificity. The antimalarial ATP-mimetic cladosporin selectively inhibits Plasmodium falciparum LysRS (PfLysRS). How the binding to a universal ATP site achieves the specificity is unknown. Here we report three crystal structures of cladosporin with human LysRS, PfLysRS, and a Pf-like human LysRS mutant. In all three structures, cladosporin occupies the class defining ATP-binding pocket, replacing the adenosine portion of ATP. Three residues holding the methyltetrahydropyran moiety of cladosporin are critical for the specificity of cladosporin against LysRS over other class II tRNA synthetase families. The species-exclusive inhibition of PfLysRS is linked to a structural divergence beyond the active site that mounts a lysine-specific stabilizing response to binding cladosporin. These analyses reveal that inherent divergence of tRNA synthetase structural assembly may allow for highly specific inhibition even through the otherwise universal substrate binding pocket and highlight the potential for structure-driven drug development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetase Deficiency Promotes Angiogenesis via the Unfolded Protein Response Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Castranova, Daniel; Davis, Andrew E.; Lo, Brigid D.; Miller, Mayumi F.; Paukstelis, Paul J.; Swift, Matthew R.; Pham, Van N.; Torres-Vázquez, Jesús; Bell, Kameha; Shaw, Kenna M.; Kamei, Makoto; Weinstein, Brant M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Understanding the mechanisms regulating normal and pathologic angiogenesis is of great scientific and clinical interest. In this report, we show that mutations in two different aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, threonyl tRNA synthetase (tarsy58) or isoleucyl tRNA synthetase (iarsy68), lead to similar increased branching angiogenesis in developing zebrafish. Approach and Results The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) pathway is activated by aminoacyl tRNA synthetase deficiencies, and we show that UPR genes atf4, atf6, and xbp1, as well as the key pro-angiogenic ligand vascular endothelial growth factor (vegfaa), are all up-regulated in tarsy58 and iarsy68 mutants. Finally, we show that the PERK-ATF4 arm of the UPR pathway is necessary for both the elevated vegfaa levels and increased angiogenesis observed in tarsy58 mutants. Conclusions Our results suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress acts as a pro-angiogenic signal via UPR pathway-dependent up-regulation of vegfaa. PMID:26821951

  15. Structure of human cytosolic phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase: evidence for kingdom-specific design of the active sites and tRNA binding patterns.

    PubMed

    Finarov, Igal; Moor, Nina; Kessler, Naama; Klipcan, Liron; Safro, Mark G

    2010-03-10

    The existence of three types of phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS), bacterial (alphabeta)(2), eukaryotic/archaeal cytosolic (alphabeta)(2), and mitochondrial alpha, is a prominent example of structural diversity within the aaRS family. PheRSs have considerably diverged in primary sequences, domain compositions, and subunit organizations. Loss of the anticodon-binding domain B8 in human cytosolic PheRS (hcPheRS) is indicative of variations in the tRNA(Phe) binding and recognition as compared to bacterial PheRSs. We report herein the crystal structure of hcPheRS in complex with phenylalanine at 3.3 A resolution. A novel structural module has been revealed at the N terminus of the alpha subunit. It stretches out into the solvent of approximately 80 A and is made up of three structural domains (DBDs) possessing DNA-binding fold. The dramatic reduction of aminoacylation activity for truncated N terminus variants coupled with structural data and tRNA-docking model testify that DBDs play crucial role in hcPheRS activity.

  16. let-65 is cytoplasmic methionyl tRNA synthetase in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Alriyami, Maha Z.; Jones, Martin R.; Johnsen, Robert C.; Banerjee, Yajnavalka; Baillie, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic methionyl tRNA synthetase (MetRS) is one of more than 20 cytoplasmic aminoacyl tRNA synthetase enzymes (ARS). This family of enzymes catalyzes a process fundamental for protein translation. Using a combination of genetic mapping, oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization, and phenotypic correlation, we show that mutations in the essential gene, let-65, reside within the predicted Caenorhabditis elegans homologue of MetRS, which we have named mars-1. We demonstrate that the lethality associated with alleles of let-65 is fully rescued by a transgenic array that spans the mars-1 genomic region. Furthermore, sequence analysis reveals that six let-65 alleles lead to the alteration of highly conserved amino acids. PMID:25606464

  17. Unique domain appended to vertebrate tRNA synthetase is essential for vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoling; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Hui-Min; Swindell, Eric C.; Marshall, Alan G.; Guo, Min; Kishi, Shuji; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2012-01-01

    New domains were progressively added to cytoplasmic aminoacyl transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetases during evolution. One example is the UNE-S domain, appended to seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS) in species that developed closed circulatory systems. Here we show using solution and crystal structure analyses and in vitro and in vivo functional studies that UNE-S harbours a robust nuclear localization signal (NLS) directing SerRS to the nucleus where it attenuates vascular endothelial growth factor A expression. We also show that SerRS mutants previously linked to vasculature abnormalities either deleted the NLS or have the NLS sequestered in an alternative conformation. A structure-based second-site mutation, designed to release the sequestered NLS, restored normal vasculature. Thus, the essential function of SerRS in vascular development depends on UNE-S. These results are the first to show an essential role for a tRNA synthetase-associated appended domain at the organism level, and suggest that acquisition of UNE-S has a role in the establishment of the closed circulatory systems of vertebrates. PMID:22353712

  18. Expanding tRNA recognition of a tRNA synthetase by a single amino acid change

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Liang; Tumbula-Hansen, Debra; Toogood, Helen; Söll, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (AspRS) occurs in two types: the discriminating enzyme (D-AspRS) forms only Asp-tRNAAsp, whereas the nondiscriminating enzyme (ND-AspRS) also synthesizes Asp-tRNAAsn, which is a required intermediate for protein synthesis in many organisms. We attempted to expand the tRNA recognition of the discriminating Thermococcus kodakaraensis AspRS to that of a ND-AspRS by in vitro mutagenesis. An alignment of 26 archaeal AspRS proteins revealed two positions (26 and 85 in the T. kodakaraensis sequence) whose amino acid identity changes according to the enzymes' tRNA specificity. In their anticodon-binding domain, D-AspRS proteins contain W26 (or Q26) and K85, compared with H26 and P85 in the ND-AspRSs. T. kodakaraensis AspRS gained the ability to form Asp-tRNAAsn in vitro when the W26H or K85P changes were introduced independently or in combination. In the aminoacylation of tRNAAsn or tRNAAsp transcripts, the mutant enzymes displayed at least a 100- to 500-fold change in tRNA specificity, as judged by the ratio of the kcat/Km values of Asp-tRNAAsp vs. Asp-tRNAAsn formation. That T. kodakaraensis mutant AspRSs mischarge tRNAAsn was also manifested in the higher level (1.7%) of aspartylation of unfractionated Pyrococcus tRNA compared with that achieved by the wild-type enzyme (0.9%). Northern blot analysis of the Asp-tRNA separated by acid/urea gel electrophoresis confirmed the in vitro synthesis of Asp-tRNAAsn. A structure-based model points to a direct interaction of K85 in T. kodakaraensis AspRS with the anticodon nucleotide C36 of tRNAAsp. Thus, a switch between D-AspRS and ND-AspRS enzymes could have evolved with only limited amino acid changes. PMID:12730374

  19. Structural Insights into the Polyphyletic Origins of Glycyl tRNA Synthetases.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; Santamaría-Suárez, Hugo Aníbal; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Beinsteiner, Brice; Mertens, Haydyn; Svergun, Dmitri; Brieba, Luis G; Grøtli, Morten; Torres-Larios, Alfredo

    2016-07-08

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. A structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor.

  20. Structural Insights into the Polyphyletic Origins of Glycyl tRNA Synthetases*♦

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; Santamaría-Suárez, Hugo Aníbal; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Beinsteiner, Brice; Brieba, Luis G.; Grøtli, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. A structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor. PMID:27226617

  1. Structural insights into the polyphyletic origins of glycyl tRNA synthetases

    DOE PAGES

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; ...

    2016-05-23

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifexmore » aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. Furthermore, a structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor.« less

  2. Structural insights into the polyphyletic origins of glycyl tRNA synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; Santamaría-Suárez, Hugo Aníbal; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Beinsteiner, Brice; Mertens, Haydyn; Svergun, Dmitri; Brieba, Luis G.; Grøtli, Morten; Torres-Larios, Alfredo

    2016-05-23

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. Furthermore, a structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor.

  3. An Incompatibility between a Mitochondrial tRNA and Its Nuclear-Encoded tRNA Synthetase Compromises Development and Fitness in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Meiklejohn, Colin D.; Holmbeck, Marissa A.; Siddiq, Mohammad A.; Abt, Dawn N.; Rand, David M.; Montooth, Kristi L.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription, translation, and respiration require interactions between genes encoded in two distinct genomes, generating the potential for mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes to interact epistatically and cause incompatibilities that decrease fitness. Mitochondrial-nuclear epistasis for fitness has been documented within and between populations and species of diverse taxa, but rarely has the genetic or mechanistic basis of these mitochondrial–nuclear interactions been elucidated, limiting our understanding of which genes harbor variants causing mitochondrial–nuclear disruption and of the pathways and processes that are impacted by mitochondrial–nuclear coevolution. Here we identify an amino acid polymorphism in the Drosophila melanogaster nuclear-encoded mitochondrial tyrosyl–tRNA synthetase that interacts epistatically with a polymorphism in the D. simulans mitochondrial-encoded tRNATyr to significantly delay development, compromise bristle formation, and decrease fecundity. The incompatible genotype specifically decreases the activities of oxidative phosphorylation complexes I, III, and IV that contain mitochondrial-encoded subunits. Combined with the identity of the interacting alleles, this pattern indicates that mitochondrial protein translation is affected by this interaction. Our findings suggest that interactions between mitochondrial tRNAs and their nuclear-encoded tRNA synthetases may be targets of compensatory molecular evolution. Human mitochondrial diseases are often genetically complex and variable in penetrance, and the mitochondrial–nuclear interaction we document provides a plausible mechanism to explain this complexity. PMID:23382693

  4. tRNA recognition site of Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Leon, O; Schulman, L H

    1987-08-25

    We have previously shown that anticodon bases are essential for specific recognition of tRNA substrates by Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) [Schulman, L. H., & Pelka, H. (1983) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 80, 6755-6759] and that the enzyme tightly binds to C34 at the wobble position of E. coli initiator methionine tRNA (tRNAfMet) [Pelka, H., & Schulman, L. H. (1986) Biochemistry 25, 4450-4456]. We have also previously demonstrated that an affinity labeling derivative of tRNAfMet can be quantitatively cross-linked to the tRNA binding site of MetRS [Valenzuela, D., & Schulman, L. H. (1986) Biochemistry 25, 4555-4561]. Here, we have determined the site in MetRS which is cross-linked to the anticodon of tRNAfMet, as well as the location of four additional cross-links. Only a single peptide, containing Lys465, is covalently coupled to C34, indicating that the recognition site for the anticodon is close to this sequence in the three-dimensional structure of MetRS. The D loop at one corner of the tRNA molecule is cross-linked to three peptides, containing Lys402, Lys439, and Lys596. The 5' terminus of the tRNA is cross-linked to Lys640, near the carboxy terminus of the enzyme. Since the 3' end of tRNAfMet is positioned close to the active site in the N-terminal domain [Hountondji, C., Blanquet, S., & Lederer, F. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 1175-1180], this result indicates that the carboxy ends of the two polypeptide chains of native dimeric MetRS are folded back toward the N-terminal domain of each subunit.

  5. A dispensable peptide from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase affects tRNA binding.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, Roberto; Salazar, Juan; Canales, Mauricio; Orellana, Omar

    2002-12-18

    The activation domain of class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which contains the Rossmann fold and the signature sequences HIGH and KMSKS, is generally split into two halves by the connective peptides (CP1, CP2) whose amino acid sequences are idiosyncratic. CP1 has been shown to participate in the binding of tRNA as well as the editing of the reaction intermediate aminoacyl-AMP or the aminoacyl-tRNA. No function has been assigned to CP2. The amino acid sequence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans TrpRS was predicted from the genome sequence. Protein sequence alignments revealed that A. ferrooxidans TrpRS contains a 70 amino acids long CP2 that is not found in any other bacterial TrpRS. However, a CP2 in the same relative position was found in the predicted sequence of several archaeal TrpRSs. A. ferrooxidans TrpRS is functional in vivo in Escherichia coli. A deletion mutant of A. ferrooxidans trpS lacking the coding region of CP2 was constructed. The in vivo activity of the mutant TrpRS in E. coli, as well as the kinetic parameters of the in vitro activation of tryptophan by ATP, were not altered by the deletion. However, the K(m) value for tRNA was seven-fold higher upon deletion, reducing the efficiency of aminoacylation. Structural modeling suggests that CP2 binds to the inner corner of the L shape of tRNA.

  6. Structural basis of translational control by Escherichia coli threonyl tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Romby, Pascale; Rees, Bernard; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan; Caillet, Joel; Springer, Mathias; Ehresmann, Chantal; Ehresmann, Bernard; Moras, Dino

    2002-05-01

    Escherichia coli threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) represses the translation of its own messenger RNA by binding to an operator located upstream of the initiation codon. The crystal structure of the complex between the core of ThrRS and the essential domain of the operator shows that the mRNA uses the recognition mode of the tRNA anticodon loop to initiate binding. The final positioning of the operator, upon which the control mechanism is based, relies on a characteristic RNA motif adapted to the enzyme surface. The finding of other thrS operators that have this conserved motif leads to a generalization of this regulatory mechanism to a subset of Gram-negative bacteria.

  7. A Drosophila model for mito-nuclear diseases generated by an incompatible interaction between tRNA and tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Holmbeck, Marissa A.; Donner, Julia R.; Villa-Cuesta, Eugenia; Rand, David M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Communication between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes is vital for cellular function. The assembly of mitochondrial enzyme complexes, which produce the majority of cellular energy, requires the coordinated expression and translation of both mitochondrially and nuclear-encoded proteins. The joint genetic architecture of this system complicates the basis of mitochondrial diseases, and mutations both in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)- and nuclear-encoded genes have been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction. Previously, in a set of mitochondrial-nuclear introgression strains, we characterized a dual genome epistasis in which a naturally occurring mutation in the Drosophila simulans simw501 mtDNA-encoded transfer RNA (tRNA) for tyrosine (tRNATyr) interacts with a mutation in the nuclear-encoded mitochondrially localized tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we show that the incompatible mitochondrial-nuclear combination results in locomotor defects, reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity, decreased oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzyme activity and severe alterations in mitochondrial morphology. Transgenic rescue strains containing nuclear variants of the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase are sufficient to rescue many of the deleterious phenotypes identified when paired with the simw501 mtDNA. However, the severity of this defective mito-nuclear interaction varies across traits and genetic backgrounds, suggesting that the impact of mitochondrial dysfunction might be tissue specific. Because mutations in mitochondrial tRNATyr are associated with exercise intolerance in humans, this mitochondrial-nuclear introgression model in Drosophila provides a means to dissect the molecular basis of these, and other, mitochondrial diseases that are a consequence of the joint genetic architecture of mitochondrial function. PMID:26035388

  8. A Drosophila model for mito-nuclear diseases generated by an incompatible interaction between tRNA and tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Holmbeck, Marissa A; Donner, Julia R; Villa-Cuesta, Eugenia; Rand, David M

    2015-08-01

    Communication between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes is vital for cellular function. The assembly of mitochondrial enzyme complexes, which produce the majority of cellular energy, requires the coordinated expression and translation of both mitochondrially and nuclear-encoded proteins. The joint genetic architecture of this system complicates the basis of mitochondrial diseases, and mutations both in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)- and nuclear-encoded genes have been implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction. Previously, in a set of mitochondrial-nuclear introgression strains, we characterized a dual genome epistasis in which a naturally occurring mutation in the Drosophila simulans simw(501) mtDNA-encoded transfer RNA (tRNA) for tyrosine (tRNA(Tyr)) interacts with a mutation in the nuclear-encoded mitochondrially localized tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we show that the incompatible mitochondrial-nuclear combination results in locomotor defects, reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity, decreased oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzyme activity and severe alterations in mitochondrial morphology. Transgenic rescue strains containing nuclear variants of the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase are sufficient to rescue many of the deleterious phenotypes identified when paired with the simw(501) mtDNA. However, the severity of this defective mito-nuclear interaction varies across traits and genetic backgrounds, suggesting that the impact of mitochondrial dysfunction might be tissue specific. Because mutations in mitochondrial tRNA(Tyr) are associated with exercise intolerance in humans, this mitochondrial-nuclear introgression model in Drosophila provides a means to dissect the molecular basis of these, and other, mitochondrial diseases that are a consequence of the joint genetic architecture of mitochondrial function.

  9. Peripheral neuropathy via mutant tRNA synthetases: Inhibition of protein translation provides a possible explanation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that inhibition of protein translation may be a common pathogenic mechanism for peripheral neuropathy associated with mutant tRNA synthetases (aaRSs). aaRSs are enzymes that ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNA, thus catalyzing the first step of translation. Dominant mutations in five distinct aaRSs cause Charcot‐Marie‐Tooth (CMT) peripheral neuropathy, characterized by length‐dependent degeneration of peripheral motor and sensory axons. Surprisingly, loss of aminoacylation activity is not required for mutant aaRSs to cause CMT. Rather, at least for some mutations, a toxic‐gain‐of‐function mechanism underlies CMT‐aaRS. Interestingly, several mutations in two distinct aaRSs were recently shown to inhibit global protein translation in Drosophila models of CMT‐aaRS, by a mechanism independent of aminoacylation, suggesting inhibition of translation as a common pathogenic mechanism. Future research aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the translation defect induced by CMT‐mutant aaRSs should provide novel insight into the molecular pathogenesis of these incurable diseases. PMID:27352040

  10. Dynamics of the Active Sites of Dimeric Seryl tRNA Synthetase from Methanopyrus kandleri.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saheb; Nandi, Nilashis

    2015-08-27

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) carry out the first step of protein biosynthesis. Several aaRSs are multimeric, and coordination between the dynamics of active sites present in each monomer is a prerequisite for the fast and accurate aminoacylation. However, important lacunae of understanding exist concerning the conformational dynamics of multimeric aaRSs. Questions remained unanswered pertaining to the dynamics of the active site. Little is known concerning the conformational dynamics of the active sites in response to the substrate binding, reorganization of the catalytic residues around reactants, time-dependent changes at the reaction center, which are essential for facilitating the nucleophilic attack, and interactions at the interface of neighboring monomers. In the present work, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of dimeric (mk)SerRS from Methanopyrus kandleri bound with tRNA using an explicit solvent system. Two dimeric states of seryl tRNA synthetase (open, substrate bound, and adenylate bound) and two monomeric states (open and substrate bound) are simulated with bound tRNA. The aim is to understand the conformational dynamics of (mk)SerRS during its reaction cycle. While the present results provide a clear dynamical perspective of the active sites of (mk)SerRS, they corroborate with the results from the time-averaged experimental data such as crystallographic and mutation analysis of methanogenic SerRS from M. kandleri and M. barkeri. It is observed from the present simulation that the motif 2 loop gates the active site and its Glu351 and Arg360 stabilizes ATP in a bent state favorable for nucleophilic attack. The flexibility of the walls of the active site gradually reduces near reaction center, which is a more organized region compared to the lid region. The motif 2 loop anchors Ser and ATP using Arg349 in a hydrogen bonded geometry crucial for nucleophilic attack and favorably influences the electrostatic potential at the

  11. Structure and Activity of an Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase that Charges tRNA with Nitro-Tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Buddha,M.; Crane, B.

    2005-01-01

    The most divergent of two tryptophanyl tRNA synthetases (TrpRS II) found in Deinococcus radiodurans interacts with a nitric oxide synthase protein that produces 4-nitro-tryptophan (4-NRP). TrpRS II efficiently charges transfer RNATrp with 4-NRP and 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HRP). The crystal structures of TrpRS II bound to tryptophan and 5-HRP reveal residue substitutions that accommodate modified indoles. A class of auxiliary bacterial TrpRSs conserve this capacity to charge tRNA with nonstandard amino acids.

  12. Interaction of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and tRNA: positive and negative cooperativity of their active centres.

    PubMed

    Malygin, E G; Zinoviev, V V; Fasiolo, F; Kisselev, L L; Kochkina, L L; Achverdyan, V Z

    1976-07-01

    The influence of tRNA on the kinetics of PP-ATP exchange and aminoacyl-tRNA formation catalysed by leucyl-, phenylalanyl-, and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetases has been investigated. These enzymes were chosen because they belong to three main classes of quaternary structure alpha1, alpha2beta2 and alpha2, respectively. The present paper shows that the investigated synthetases manifest kinetic cooperativity of the active centres which is negative in the case of AAA formation and positive in the case of leucyl- and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthesis. The obtained data were interpreted with the aid of the trigger model of the enzyme.

  13. In silico detection of tRNA sequence features characteristic to aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase class membership

    PubMed Central

    Jakó, Éena; Ittzés, Péter; Szenes, Áron; Kun, Ádám; Szathmáry, Eörs; Pál, Gábor

    2007-01-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are grouped into Class I and II based on primary and tertiary structure and enzyme properties suggesting two independent phylogenetic lineages. Analogously, tRNA molecules can also form two respective classes, based on the class membership of their corresponding aaRS. Although some aaRS–tRNA interactions are not extremely specific and require editing mechanisms to avoid misaminoacylation, most aaRS–tRNA interactions are rather stereospecific. Thus, class-specific aaRS features could be mirrored by class-specific tRNA features. However, previous investigations failed to detect conserved class-specific nucleotides. Here we introduce a discrete mathematical approach that evaluates not only class-specific ‘strictly present’, but also ‘strictly absent’ nucleotides. The disjoint subsets of these elements compose a unique partition, named extended consensus partition (ECP). By analyzing the ECP for both Class I and II tDNA sets from 50 (13 archaeal, 30 bacterial and 7 eukaryotic) species, we could demonstrate that class-specific tRNA sequence features do exist, although not in terms of strictly conserved nucleotides as it had previously been anticipated. This finding demonstrates that important information was hidden in tRNA sequences inaccessible for traditional statistical methods. The ECP analysis might contribute to the understanding of tRNA evolution and could enrich the sequence analysis tool repertoire. PMID:17704131

  14. MD Simulations of tRNA and Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Dynamics, Folding, Binding, and Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongzhong; Macnamara, Lindsay M.; Leuchter, Jessica D.; Alexander, Rebecca W.; Cho, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    While tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are classes of biomolecules that have been extensively studied for decades, the finer details of how they carry out their fundamental biological functions in protein synthesis remain a challenge. Recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are verifying experimental observations and providing new insight that cannot be addressed from experiments alone. Throughout the review, we briefly discuss important historical events to provide a context for how far the field has progressed over the past few decades. We then review the background of tRNA molecules, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and current state of the art MD simulation techniques for those who may be unfamiliar with any of those fields. Recent MD simulations of tRNA dynamics and folding and of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dynamics and mechanistic characterizations are discussed. We highlight the recent successes and discuss how important questions can be addressed using current MD simulations techniques. We also outline several natural next steps for computational studies of AARS:tRNA complexes. PMID:26184179

  15. No rosetta stone for a sense-antisense origin of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase classes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tom A; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Fares, Mario A

    2009-02-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are crucial enzymes that join amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, thereby implementing the genetic code. These enzymes fall into two unrelated structural classes whose evolution has not been explained. The leading hypothesis, proposed by Rodin and Ohno, is that the two classes originated as a pair of sense-antisense genes encoded on opposite strands of a single DNA molecule. This unusual idea obtained its main support from reports of a "Rosetta stone": a locus where genes for heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and an Nicotinamide adenine dinulecotide-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH), which are structurally homologous to the two classes of aaRS, overlap extensively on complementary DNA strands. This remarkable locus was first characterized in the oomycete Achlya klebsiana and has since been reported in many other species. Here we present evidence that the open reading frames on the antisense strand of HSP70 genes are spurious, and we identify a more probable candidate for the gene encoding the oomycete NAD-GDH enzyme. These results cast extensive doubt on the Rosetta Stone argument.

  16. The RNA sequence context defines the mechanistic routes by which yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase charges tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sissler, M; Giegé, R; Florentz, C

    1998-01-01

    Arginylation of tRNA transcripts by yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase can be triggered by two alternate recognition sets in anticodon loops: C35 and U36 or G36 in tRNA(Arg) and C36 and G37 in tRNA(Asp) (Sissler M, Giegé R, Florentz C, 1996, EMBO J 15:5069-5076). Kinetic studies on tRNA variants were done to explore the mechanisms by which these sets are expressed. Although the synthetase interacts in a similar manner with tRNA(Arg) and tRNA(Asp), the details of the interaction patterns are idiosyncratic, especially in anticodon loops (Sissler M, Eriani G, Martin F, Giegé R, Florentz C, 1997, Nucleic Acids Res 25:4899-4906). Exchange of individual recognition elements between arginine and aspartate tRNA frameworks strongly blocks arginylation of the mutated tRNAs, whereas full exchange of the recognition sets leads to efficient arginine acceptance of the transplanted tRNAs. Unpredictably, the similar catalytic efficiencies of native and transplanted tRNAs originate from different k(cat) and Km combinations. A closer analysis reveals that efficient arginylation results from strong anticooperative effects between individual recognition elements. Nonrecognition nucleotides as well as the tRNA architecture are additional factors that tune efficiency. Altogether, arginyl-tRNA synthetase is able to utilize different context-dependent mechanistic routes to be activated. This confers biological advantages to the arginine aminoacylation system and sheds light on its evolutionary relationship with the aspartate system. PMID:9622124

  17. Evolutionary Limitation and Opportunities for Developing tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors with 5-Binding-Mode Classification

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Pengfei; Guo, Min

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs as building blocks for translation. Each of the aaRS families plays a pivotal role in protein biosynthesis and is indispensable for cell growth and survival. In addition, aaRSs in higher species have evolved important non-translational functions. These translational and non-translational functions of aaRS are attractive for developing antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic agents and for treating other human diseases. The interplay between amino acids, tRNA, ATP, EF-Tu and non-canonical binding partners, had shaped each family with distinct pattern of key sites for regulation, with characters varying among species across the path of evolution. These sporadic variations in the aaRSs offer great opportunity to target these essential enzymes for therapy. Up to this day, growing numbers of aaRS inhibitors have been discovered and developed. Here, we summarize the latest developments and structural studies of aaRS inhibitors, and classify them with distinct binding modes into five categories. PMID:26670257

  18. A case of anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase antibody syndrome complicated by hemophagocytic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kota; Tamura, Masao; Kurajoh, Masafumi; Hosono, Yuji; Nakajima, Ran; Tsuboi, Kazuyuki; Abe, Takeo; Ogita, Chie; Yokoyama, Yuichi; Furukawa, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Saito, Atsushi; Nishioka, Aki; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto; Kitano, Masayasu; Tsunoda, Shinichiro; Omura, Koichiro; Koyama, Hidenori; Matsui, Kiyoshi; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Sano, Hajime

    2016-01-01

      A 48-year-old woman had suffered from a fever and general fatigue, and visited the other hospital for fever elevation in November 2013, at which time interstitial lung disease was revealed. In January 2014, she experienced an eruption in the hand and developed peripheral blood flow damage. Under a diagnosis of adult Still's disease, the patient was administered 0.5 mg of betamethasone as well as cyclosporin at 75 mg/day. In November 2014, general fatigue, fever, and headache were noted, while MRI revealed an enlarged hypophysis and laboratory findings were positive for the anti-pituitary cell antibody, thus a diagnosis of autoimmune hypophysitis was made. Although disease activity was low, she requested hospitalization and was admitted by the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at our hospital in May 2015, though only observed. Fever developed again, along with interstitial lung disease, Raynaud's phenomenon, and pain in the crural area again, and we considered the possibility of another disease. After stopping administration of betamethasone and cyclosporin, we made a diagnosis of anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase antibody syndrome, and administered methylprednisolone at 500 mg for 3 days as well as prednisolone at 35 mg/day following steroid pulse therapy. Although her condition soon improved, fever, muscle pain, and pancytopenia returned after 3 days. Bone marrow findings revealed the existence of hemophagocytosis, for which we again gave methylprednisolone at 500 mg for 3 days and cyclosporin at 125 mg/day. Thereafter, the patient recovered and was discharged from the hospital.

  19. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  20. Introduction of a leucine half-zipper engenders multiple high-quality crystals of a recalcitrant tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Min; Shapiro, Ryan; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-03-01

    E. coli alanyl-tRNA synthetase is recalcitrant to crystallization. A group of leucine substitutions has transformed the protein. Although Escherichia coli alanyl-tRNA synthetase was among the first tRNA synthetases to be sequenced and extensively studied by functional analysis, it has proved to be recalcitrant to crystallization. This challenge remained even for crystallization of the catalytic fragment. By mutationally introducing three stacked leucines onto the solvent-exposed side of an α-helix, an engineered catalytic fragment of the synthetase was obtained that yielded multiple high-quality crystals and cocrystals with different ligands. The engineered α-helix did not form a leucine zipper that interlocked with the same α-helix from another molecule. Instead, using the created hydrophobic spine, it interacted with other surfaces of the protein as a leucine half-zipper (LHZ) to enhance the crystal lattice interactions. The LHZ made crystal lattice contacts in all crystals of different space groups. These results illustrate the power of introducing an LHZ into helices to facilitate crystallization. The authors propose that the method can be unified with surface-entropy reduction and can be broadly used for protein-surface optimization in crystallization.

  1. Modeling of tRNA-assisted mechanism of Arg activation based on a structure of Arg-tRNA synthetase, tRNA, and an ATP analog (ANP).

    PubMed

    Konno, Michiko; Sumida, Tomomi; Uchikawa, Emiko; Mori, Yukie; Yanagisawa, Tatsuo; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yokoyama, Shigeuki

    2009-09-01

    The ATP-pyrophosphate exchange reaction catalyzed by Arg-tRNA, Gln-tRNA and Glu-tRNA synthetases requires the assistance of the cognate tRNA. tRNA also assists Arg-tRNA synthetase in catalyzing the pyrophosphorolysis of synthetic Arg-AMP at low pH. The mechanism by which the 3'-end A76, and in particular its hydroxyl group, of the cognate tRNA is involved with the exchange reaction catalyzed by those enzymes has yet to be established. We determined a crystal structure of a complex of Arg-tRNA synthetase from Pyrococcus horikoshii, tRNA(Arg)(CCU) and an ATP analog with Rfactor = 0.213 (Rfree = 0.253) at 2.0 A resolution. On the basis of newly obtained structural information about the position of ATP bound on the enzyme, we constructed a structural model for a mechanism in which the formation of a hydrogen bond between the 2'-OH group of A76 of tRNA and the carboxyl group of Arg induces both formation of Arg-AMP (Arg + ATP --> Arg-AMP + pyrophosphate) and pyrophosphorolysis of Arg-AMP (Arg-AMP + pyrophosphate --> Arg + ATP) at low pH. Furthermore, we obtained a structural model of the molecular mechanism for the Arg-tRNA synthetase-catalyzed deacylation of Arg-tRNA (Arg-tRNA + AMP --> Arg-AMP + tRNA at high pH), in which the deacylation of aminoacyl-tRNA bound on Arg-tRNA synthetase and Glu-tRNA synthetase is catalyzed by a quite similar mechanism, whereby the proton-donating group (-NH-C+(NH2)2 or -COOH) of Arg and Glu assists the aminoacyl transfer from the 2'-OH group of tRNA to the phosphate group of AMP at high pH.

  2. Conformational movements and cooperativity upon amino acid, ATP and tRNA binding in threonyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan; Rees, Bernard; Dock-Bregeon, Anne Catherine; Moras, Dino

    2003-08-01

    The crystal structures of threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) from Staphylococcus aureus, with ATP and an analogue of threonyl adenylate, are described. Together with the previously determined structures of Escherichia coli ThrRS with different substrates, they allow a comprehensive analysis of the effect of binding of all the substrates: threonine, ATP and tRNA. The tRNA, by inserting its acceptor arm between the N-terminal domain and the catalytic domain, causes a large rotation of the former. Within the catalytic domain, four regions surrounding the active site display significant conformational changes upon binding of the different substrates. The binding of threonine induces the movement of as much as 50 consecutive amino acid residues. The binding of ATP triggers a displacement, as large as 8A at some C(alpha) positions, of a strand-loop-strand region of the core beta-sheet. Two other regions move in a cooperative way upon binding of threonine or ATP: the motif 2 loop, which plays an essential role in the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, and the ordering loop, which closes on the active site cavity when the substrates are in place. The tRNA interacts with all four mobile regions, several residues initially bound to threonine or ATP switching to a position in which they can contact the tRNA. Three such conformational switches could be identified, each of them in a different mobile region. The structural analysis suggests that, while the small substrates can bind in any order, they must be in place before productive tRNA binding can occur.

  3. Origin and evolution of glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase WHEP domains reveal evolutionary relationships within Holozoa.

    PubMed

    Ray, Partho Sarothi; Fox, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Repeated domains in proteins that have undergone duplication or loss, and sequence divergence, are especially informative about phylogenetic relationships. We have exploited divergent repeats of the highly structured, 50-amino acid WHEP domains that join the catalytic subunits of bifunctional glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) as a sequence-informed repeat (SIR) to trace the origin and evolution of EPRS in holozoa. EPRS is the only fused tRNA synthetase, with two distinct aminoacylation activities, and a non-canonical translation regulatory function mediated by the WHEP domains in the linker. Investigating the duplications, deletions and divergence of WHEP domains, we traced the bifunctional EPRS to choanozoans and identified the fusion event leading to its origin at the divergence of ichthyosporea and emergence of filozoa nearly a billion years ago. Distribution of WHEP domains from a single species in two or more distinct clades suggested common descent, allowing the identification of linking organisms. The discrete assortment of choanoflagellate WHEP domains with choanozoan domains as well as with those in metazoans supported the phylogenetic position of choanoflagellates as the closest sister group to metazoans. Analysis of clustering and assortment of WHEP domains provided unexpected insights into phylogenetic relationships amongst holozoan taxa. Furthermore, observed gaps in the transition between WHEP domain groupings in distant taxa allowed the prediction of undiscovered or extinct evolutionary intermediates. Analysis based on SIR domains can provide a phylogenetic counterpart to palaentological approaches of discovering "missing links" in the tree of life.

  4. Origin and Evolution of Glutamyl-prolyl tRNA Synthetase WHEP Domains Reveal Evolutionary Relationships within Holozoa

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partho Sarothi; Fox, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated domains in proteins that have undergone duplication or loss, and sequence divergence, are especially informative about phylogenetic relationships. We have exploited divergent repeats of the highly structured, 50-amino acid WHEP domains that join the catalytic subunits of bifunctional glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) as a sequence-informed repeat (SIR) to trace the origin and evolution of EPRS in holozoa. EPRS is the only fused tRNA synthetase, with two distinct aminoacylation activities, and a non-canonical translation regulatory function mediated by the WHEP domains in the linker. Investigating the duplications, deletions and divergence of WHEP domains, we traced the bifunctional EPRS to choanozoans and identified the fusion event leading to its origin at the divergence of ichthyosporea and emergence of filozoa nearly a billion years ago. Distribution of WHEP domains from a single species in two or more distinct clades suggested common descent, allowing the identification of linking organisms. The discrete assortment of choanoflagellate WHEP domains with choanozoan domains as well as with those in metazoans supported the phylogenetic position of choanoflagellates as the closest sister group to metazoans. Analysis of clustering and assortment of WHEP domains provided unexpected insights into phylogenetic relationships amongst holozoan taxa. Furthermore, observed gaps in the transition between WHEP domain groupings in distant taxa allowed the prediction of undiscovered or extinct evolutionary intermediates. Analysis based on SIR domains can provide a phylogenetic counterpart to palaentological approaches of discovering “missing links” in the tree of life. PMID:24968216

  5. Two conformations of a crystalline human tRNA synthetase–tRNA complex: implications for protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiang-Lei; Otero, Francella J; Ewalt, Karla L; Liu, Jianming; Swairjo, Manal A; Köhrer, Caroline; RajBhandary, Uttam L; Skene, Robert J; McRee, Duncan E; Schimmel, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Aminoacylation of tRNA is the first step of protein synthesis. Here, we report the co-crystal structure of human tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase and tRNATrp. This enzyme is reported to interact directly with elongation factor 1α, which carries charged tRNA to the ribosome. Crystals were generated from a 50/50% mixture of charged and uncharged tRNATrp. These crystals captured two conformations of the complex, which are nearly identical with respect to the protein and a bound tryptophan. They are distinguished by the way tRNA is bound. In one, uncharged tRNA is bound across the dimer, with anticodon and acceptor stem interacting with separate subunits. In this cross-dimer tRNA complex, the class I enzyme has a class II-like tRNA binding mode. This structure accounts for biochemical investigations of human TrpRS, including species-specific charging. In the other conformation, presumptive aminoacylated tRNA is bound only by the anticodon, the acceptor stem being free and having space to interact precisely with EF-1α, suggesting that the product of aminoacylation can be directly handed off to EF-1α for the next step of protein synthesis. PMID:16724112

  6. TFAM detects co-evolution of tRNA identity rules with lateral transfer of histidyl-tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Ardell, David H.; Andersson, Siv G. E.

    2006-01-01

    We present TFAM, an automated, statistical method to classify the identity of tRNAs. TFAM, currently optimized for bacteria, classifies initiator tRNAs and predicts the charging identity of both typical and atypical tRNAs such as suppressors with high confidence. We show statistical evidence for extensive variation in tRNA identity determinants among bacterial genomes due to variation in overall tDNA base content. With TFAM we have detected the first case of eukaryotic-like tRNA identity rules in bacteria. An α-proteobacterial clade encompassing Rhizobiales, Caulobacter crescentus and Silicibacter pomeroyi, unlike a sister clade containing the Rickettsiales, Zymomonas mobilis and Gluconobacter oxydans, uses the eukaryotic identity element A73 instead of the highly conserved prokaryotic element C73. We confirm divergence of bacterial histidylation rules by demonstrating perfect covariation of α-proteobacterial tRNAHis acceptor stems and residues in the motif IIb tRNA-binding pocket of their histidyl-tRNA synthetases (HisRS). Phylogenomic analysis supports lateral transfer of a eukaryotic-like HisRS into the α-proteobacteria followed by in situ adaptation of the bacterial tDNAHis and identity rule divergence. Our results demonstrate that TFAM is an effective tool for the bioinformatics, comparative genomics and evolutionary study of tRNA identity. PMID:16473847

  7. Impaired protein translation in Drosophila models for Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy caused by mutant tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Niehues, Sven; Bussmann, Julia; Steffes, Georg; Erdmann, Ines; Köhrer, Caroline; Sun, Litao; Wagner, Marina; Schäfer, Kerstin; Wang, Guangxia; Koerdt, Sophia N.; Stum, Morgane; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Thomas, Ulrich; Aberle, Hermann; Burgess, Robert W.; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Dieterich, Daniela; Storkebaum, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in five tRNA synthetases cause Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, suggesting that altered aminoacylation function underlies the disease. However, previous studies showed that loss of aminoacylation activity is not required to cause CMT. Here we present a Drosophila model for CMT with mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS). Expression of three CMT-mutant GARS proteins induces defects in motor performance and motor and sensory neuron morphology, and shortens lifespan. Mutant GARS proteins display normal subcellular localization but markedly reduce global protein synthesis in motor and sensory neurons, or when ubiquitously expressed in adults, as revealed by FUNCAT and BONCAT. Translational slowdown is not attributable to altered tRNAGly aminoacylation, and cannot be rescued by Drosophila Gars overexpression, indicating a gain-of-toxic-function mechanism. Expression of CMT-mutant tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase also impairs translation, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. Finally, genetic reduction of translation is sufficient to induce CMT-like phenotypes, indicating a causal contribution of translational slowdown to CMT. PMID:26138142

  8. Impaired protein translation in Drosophila models for Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy caused by mutant tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Niehues, Sven; Bussmann, Julia; Steffes, Georg; Erdmann, Ines; Köhrer, Caroline; Sun, Litao; Wagner, Marina; Schäfer, Kerstin; Wang, Guangxia; Koerdt, Sophia N; Stum, Morgane; Jaiswal, Sumit; RajBhandary, Uttam L; Thomas, Ulrich; Aberle, Hermann; Burgess, Robert W; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Dieterich, Daniela; Storkebaum, Erik

    2015-07-03

    Dominant mutations in five tRNA synthetases cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, suggesting that altered aminoacylation function underlies the disease. However, previous studies showed that loss of aminoacylation activity is not required to cause CMT. Here we present a Drosophila model for CMT with mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS). Expression of three CMT-mutant GARS proteins induces defects in motor performance and motor and sensory neuron morphology, and shortens lifespan. Mutant GARS proteins display normal subcellular localization but markedly reduce global protein synthesis in motor and sensory neurons, or when ubiquitously expressed in adults, as revealed by FUNCAT and BONCAT. Translational slowdown is not attributable to altered tRNA(Gly) aminoacylation, and cannot be rescued by Drosophila Gars overexpression, indicating a gain-of-toxic-function mechanism. Expression of CMT-mutant tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase also impairs translation, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. Finally, genetic reduction of translation is sufficient to induce CMT-like phenotypes, indicating a causal contribution of translational slowdown to CMT.

  9. Nucleotide sequence of a human tRNA gene heterocluster

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.N.; Pirtle, I.L.; Pirtle, R.M.

    1986-05-01

    Leucine tRNA from bovine liver was used as a hybridization probe to screen a human gene library harbored in Charon-4A of bacteriophage lambda. The human DNA inserts from plaque-pure clones were characterized by restriction endonuclease mapping and Southern hybridization techniques, using both (3'-/sup 32/P)-labeled bovine liver leucine tRNA and total tRNA as hybridization probes. An 8-kb Hind III fragment of one of these ..gamma..-clones was subcloned into the Hind III site of pBR322. Subsequent fine restriction mapping and DNA sequence analysis of this plasmid DNA indicated the presence of four tRNA genes within the 8-kb DNA fragment. A leucine tRNA gene with an anticodon of AAG and a proline tRNA gene with an anticodon of AGG are in a 1.6-kb subfragment. A threonine tRNA gene with an anticodon of UGU and an as yet unidentified tRNA gene are located in a 1.1-kb subfragment. These two different subfragments are separated by 2.8 kb. The coding regions of the three sequenced genes contain characteristic internal split promoter sequences and do not have intervening sequences. The 3'-flanking region of these three genes have typical RNA polymerase III termination sites of at least four consecutive T residues.

  10. Rational protein engineering in action: The first crystal structure of a phenylalanine tRNA synthetase from Staphylococcus haemolyticus

    SciTech Connect

    Evdokimov, Artem G.; Mekel, Marlene; Hutchings, Kim; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Holler, Tod; McGrath, Teresa; Beattie, Bryan; Fauman, Eric; Yan, Chunhong; Heaslet, Holly; Walter, Richard; Finzel, Barry; Ohren, Jeffrey; McConnell, Patrick; Braden, Timothy; Sun, Fang; Spessard, Cindy; Banotai, Craig; Al-Kassim, Loola; Ma, Weijun; Wengender, Paul; Kole, Denis; Garceau, Norman; Toogood, Peter; Liu, Jia

    2008-07-08

    In this article, we describe for the first time the high-resolution crystal structure of a phenylalanine tRNA synthetase from the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus haemolyticus. We demonstrate the subtle yet important structural differences between this enzyme and the previously described Thermus thermophilus ortholog. We also explain the structure-activity relationship of several recently reported inhibitors. The native enzyme crystals were of poor quality -- they only diffracted X-rays to 3--5 {angstrom} resolution. Therefore, we have executed a rational surface mutagenesis strategy that has yielded crystals of this 2300-amino acid multidomain protein, diffracting to 2 {angstrom} or better. This methodology is discussed and contrasted with the more traditional domain truncation approach.

  11. Rational protein engineering in action: the first crystal structure of a phenylalanine tRNA synthetase from Staphylococcus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, Artem G; Mekel, Marlene; Hutchings, Kim; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Holler, Tod; McGrath, Teresa; Beattie, Bryan; Fauman, Eric; Yan, Chunhong; Heaslet, Holly; Walter, Richard; Finzel, Barry; Ohren, Jeffrey; McConnell, Patrick; Braden, Timothy; Sun, Fang; Spessard, Cindy; Banotai, Craig; Al-Kassim, Loola; Ma, Weijun; Wengender, Paul; Kole, Denis; Garceau, Norman; Toogood, Peter; Liu, Jia

    2008-04-01

    In this article, we describe for the first time the high-resolution crystal structure of a phenylalanine tRNA synthetase from the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus haemolyticus. We demonstrate the subtle yet important structural differences between this enzyme and the previously described Thermus thermophilus ortholog. We also explain the structure-activity relationship of several recently reported inhibitors. The native enzyme crystals were of poor quality--they only diffracted X-rays to 3-5A resolution. Therefore, we have executed a rational surface mutagenesis strategy that has yielded crystals of this 2300-amino acid multidomain protein, diffracting to 2A or better. This methodology is discussed and contrasted with the more traditional domain truncation approach.

  12. Identification and functional characterization of a novel bacterial type asparagine synthetase A: a tRNA synthetase paralog from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Manhas, Reetika; Tripathi, Pankaj; Khan, Sameena; Sethu Lakshmi, Bhavana; Lal, Shambhu Krishan; Gowri, Venkatraman Subramanian; Sharma, Amit; Madhubala, Rentala

    2014-04-25

    Asparagine is formed by two structurally distinct asparagine synthetases in prokaryotes. One is the ammonia-utilizing asparagine synthetase A (AsnA), and the other is asparagine synthetase B (AsnB) that uses glutamine or ammonia as a nitrogen source. In a previous investigation using sequence-based analysis, we had shown that Leishmania spp. possess asparagine-tRNA synthetase paralog asparagine synthetase A (LdASNA) that is ammonia-dependent. Here, we report the cloning, expression, and kinetic analysis of ASNA from Leishmania donovani. Interestingly, LdASNA was both ammonia- and glutamine-dependent. To study the physiological role of ASNA in Leishmania, gene deletion mutations were attempted via targeted gene replacement. Gene deletion of LdASNA showed a growth delay in mutants. However, chromosomal null mutants of LdASNA could not be obtained as the double transfectant mutants showed aneuploidy. These data suggest that LdASNA is essential for survival of the Leishmania parasite. LdASNA enzyme was recalcitrant toward crystallization so we instead crystallized and solved the atomic structure of its close homolog from Trypanosoma brucei (TbASNA) at 2.2 Å. A very significant conservation in active site residues is observed between TbASNA and Escherichia coli AsnA. It is evident that the absence of an LdASNA homolog from humans and its essentiality for the parasites make LdASNA a novel drug target.

  13. Brugia malayi Asparaginyl - tRNA Synthetase Stimulates Endothelial Cell Proliferation, Vasodilation and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    D, Jeeva Jothi; Dhanraj, Muthu; Solaiappan, Shanmugam; Sivanesan, Sanjana; Kron, Michael; Dhanasekaran, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of chronic infection with lymphatic filarial parasites is the development of lymphatic disease which often results in permanent vasodilation and lymphedema, but all of the mechanisms by which filarial parasites induce pathology are not known. Prior work showed that the asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (BmAsnRS) of Brugia malayi, an etiological agent of lymphatic filariasis, acts as a physiocrine that binds specifically to interleukin-8 (IL-8) chemokine receptors. Endothelial cells are one of the many cell types that express IL-8 receptors. IL-8 also has been reported previously to induce angiogenesis and vasodilation, however, the effect of BmAsnRS on endothelial cells has not been reported. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that BmAsnRS might produce physiological changes in endothelial by studying the in vitro effects of BmAsnRS using a human umbilical vein cell line EA.hy926 and six different endothelial cell assays. Our results demonstrated that BmAsnRS produces consistent and statistically significant effects on endothelial cells that are identical to the effects of VEGF, vascular endothelial growth factor. This study supports the idea that new drugs or immunotherapies that counteract the adverse effects of parasite-derived physiocrines may prevent or ameliorate the vascular pathology observed in patients with lymphatic filariasis. PMID:26751209

  14. tRNA fragments in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Paul; Ivanov, Pavel

    2014-11-28

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) is traditionally considered to be an adaptor molecule that helps ribosomes to decode messenger RNA (mRNA) and synthesize protein. Recent studies have demonstrated that tRNAs also serve as a major source of small non-coding RNAs that possess distinct and varied functions. These tRNA fragments are heterogeneous in size, nucleotide composition, biogenesis and function. Here we describe multiple roles that tRNA fragments play in cell physiology and discuss their relevance to human health and disease.

  15. The Structure of Yeast Glutaminyl-tRNA Synthetase and Modeling of Its Interaction with tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Thomas D.; Luft, Joseph R.; Wolfley, Jennifer R.; Snell, Mary E.; Tsuruta, Hiro; Corretore, Stephanie; Quartley, Erin; Phizicky, Eric M.; Grayhack, Elizabeth J.; Snell, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) contains an appended N-terminal domain (NTD) whose precise function is unknown. Although GlnRS structures from two prokaryotic species are known, no eukaryotic GlnRS structure has been reported. Here we present the first crystallographic structure of yeast GlnRS, finding that the structure of the C-terminal domain is highly similar to Escherichia coli GlnRS but that 214 residues, including the NTD, are crystallographically disordered. We present a model of the full-length enzyme in solution, using the structures of the C-terminal domain, and the isolated NTD, with small-angle X-ray scattering data of the full-length molecule. We proceed to model the enzyme bound to tRNA, using the crystallographic structures of GatCAB and GlnRS–tRNA complex from bacteria. We contrast the tRNA-bound model with the tRNA-free solution state and perform molecular dynamics on the full-length GlnRS–tRNA complex, which suggests that tRNA binding involves the motion of a conserved hinge in the NTD. PMID:23583912

  16. The Enzymatic Paradox of Yeast Arginyl-tRNA Synthetase: Exclusive Arginine Transfer Controlled by a Flexible Mechanism of tRNA Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Eriani, Gilbert; Geslain, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Identity determinants are essential for the accurate recognition of transfer RNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. To date, arginine determinants in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been identified exclusively in vitro and only on a limited number of tRNA Arginine isoacceptors. In the current study, we favor a full cellular approach and expand the investigation of arginine determinants to all four tRNA Arg isoacceptors. More precisely, this work scrutinizes the relevance of the tRNA nucleotides at position 20, 35 and 36 in the yeast arginylation reaction. We built 21 mutants by site-directed mutagenesis and tested their functionality in YAL5, a previously engineered yeast knockout deficient for the expression of tRNA Arg CCG. Arginylation levels were also monitored using Northern blot. Our data collected in vivo correlate with previous observations. C35 is the prominent arginine determinant followed by G36 or U36 (G/U36). In addition, although there is no major arginine determinant in the D loop, the recognition of tRNA Arg ICG relies to some extent on the nucleotide at position 20. This work refines the existing model for tRNA Arg recognition. Our observations indicate that yeast Arginyl-tRNA synthetase (yArgRS) relies on distinct mechanisms to aminoacylate the four isoacceptors. Finally, according to our refined model, yArgRS is able to accommodate tRNA Arg scaffolds presenting N34, C/G35 and G/A/U36 anticodons while maintaining specificity. We discuss the mechanistic and potential physiological implications of these findings. PMID:26844776

  17. The Enzymatic Paradox of Yeast Arginyl-tRNA Synthetase: Exclusive Arginine Transfer Controlled by a Flexible Mechanism of tRNA Recognition.

    PubMed

    McShane, Ariel; Hok, Eveline; Tomberlin, Jensen; Eriani, Gilbert; Geslain, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Identity determinants are essential for the accurate recognition of transfer RNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. To date, arginine determinants in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been identified exclusively in vitro and only on a limited number of tRNA Arginine isoacceptors. In the current study, we favor a full cellular approach and expand the investigation of arginine determinants to all four tRNA Arg isoacceptors. More precisely, this work scrutinizes the relevance of the tRNA nucleotides at position 20, 35 and 36 in the yeast arginylation reaction. We built 21 mutants by site-directed mutagenesis and tested their functionality in YAL5, a previously engineered yeast knockout deficient for the expression of tRNA Arg CCG. Arginylation levels were also monitored using Northern blot. Our data collected in vivo correlate with previous observations. C35 is the prominent arginine determinant followed by G36 or U36 (G/U36). In addition, although there is no major arginine determinant in the D loop, the recognition of tRNA Arg ICG relies to some extent on the nucleotide at position 20. This work refines the existing model for tRNA Arg recognition. Our observations indicate that yeast Arginyl-tRNA synthetase (yArgRS) relies on distinct mechanisms to aminoacylate the four isoacceptors. Finally, according to our refined model, yArgRS is able to accommodate tRNA Arg scaffolds presenting N34, C/G35 and G/A/U36 anticodons while maintaining specificity. We discuss the mechanistic and potential physiological implications of these findings.

  18. Yeast mitochondrial threonyl-tRNA synthetase recognizes tRNA isoacceptors by distinct mechanisms and promotes CUN codon reassignment

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Jiqiang; Peterson, Kaitlyn M.; Simonovic, Ivana; Cho, Chris; Soll, Dieter; Simonovic, Miljan

    2014-03-12

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) ensure faithful translation of mRNA into protein by coupling an amino acid to a set of tRNAs with conserved anticodon sequences. Here, we show that in mitochondria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a single aaRS (MST1) recognizes and aminoacylates two natural tRNAs that contain anticodon loops of different size and sequence. Besides a regular ?? with a threonine (Thr) anticodon, MST1 also recognizes an unusual ??, which contains an enlarged anticodon loop and an anticodon triplet that reassigns the CUN codons from leucine to threonine. Our data show that MST1 recognizes the anticodon loop in both tRNAs, but employs distinct recognition mechanisms. The size but not the sequence of the anticodon loop is critical for ?? recognition, whereas the anticodon sequence is essential for aminoacylation of ??. The crystal structure of MST1 reveals that, while lacking the N-terminal editing domain, the enzyme closely resembles the bacterial threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS). A detailed structural comparison with Escherichia coli ThrRS, which is unable to aminoacylate ??, reveals differences in the anticodon-binding domain that probably allow recognition of the distinct anticodon loops. Finally, our mutational and modeling analyses identify the structural elements in MST1 (e.g., helix {alpha}11) that define tRNA selectivity. Thus, MTS1 exemplifies that a single aaRS can recognize completely divergent anticodon loops of natural isoacceptor tRNAs and that in doing so it facilitates the reassignment of the genetic code in yeast mitochondria.

  19. Adenosine conformations of nucleotides bound to methionyl tRNA synthetase by transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Murali, N; Lin, Y; Mechulam, Y; Plateau, P; Rao, B D

    1997-01-01

    The conformations of MgATP and AMP bound to a monomeric tryptic fragment of methionyl tRNA synthetase have been investigated by two-dimensional proton transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (TRNOESY). The sample protocol was chosen to minimize contributions from adventitious binding of the nucleotides to the observed NOE. The experiments were performed at 500 MHz on three different complexes, E.MgATP, E.MgATP.L-methioninol, and E.AMP.L-methioninol. A starter set of distances obtained by fitting NOE build-up curves (not involving H5' and H5") were used to determine a CHARMm energy-minimized structure. The positioning of the H5' and H5" protons was determined on the basis of a conformational search of the torsion angle to obtain the best fit with the observed NOEs for their superposed resonance. Using this structure, a relaxation matrix was set up to calculate theoretical build-up curves for all of the NOEs and compare them with the observed curves. The final structures deduced for the adenosine moieties in the three complexes are very similar, and are described by a glycosidic torsion angle (chi) of 56 degrees +/- 5 degrees and a phase angle of pseudorotation (P) in the range of 47 degrees to 52 degrees, describing a 3(4)T-4E sugar pucker. The glycosidic torsion angle, chi, deduced here for this adenylyl transfer enzyme and those determined previously for three phosphoryl transfer enzymes (creatine kinase, arginine kinase, and pyruvate kinase), and one pyrophosphoryl enzyme (PRibPP synthetase), are all in the range 52 degrees +/- 8 degrees. The narrow range of values suggests a possible common motif for the recognition and binding of the adenosine moiety at the active sites of ATP-utilizing enzymes, irrespective of the point of cleavage on the phosphate chain. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:9129831

  20. Evidence that tRNA synthetase-directed proton transfer stops mistranslation.

    PubMed

    Waas, William F; Schimmel, Paul

    2007-10-30

    To prevent mistranslation, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) discriminate against noncognate amino acids and cellular metabolites. Defects in specificity produce statistical proteins which, in mammalian cells, lead to activation of the unfolded protein response and cell death. Because of inherent limitations in amino acid discrimination by a single active site, AARSs evolved a separate domain to clear mischarged amino acids. Although the structure of a widely distributed editing domain for ThrRS and AlaRS is known, the mechanism of amino acid clearance remains elusive. This domain has two motifs that together have four conserved residues in the pocket used to clear serine from mischarged tRNAs. Here, using ThrRS as an example, rapid single-turnover kinetics, mutagenesis, and solvent isotope analysis show that a strictly conserved histidine (between ThrRS and AlaRS) extracts a proton in the chemical step of the editing reaction. Three other conserved residues, and two additional residues in the editing pocket, are not directly implicated in the chemical step. These results are relevant to the previously reported mutagenesis of the homologous editing pocket of alanyl-tRNA synthetase, where even a mild defect in editing causes neurodegeneration in the mouse. Thus, a single proton-transfer event needed to prevent mistranslation can have profound implications for disease.

  1. Cytoplasmic Leucyl-Trna Synthetase of Neurospora Crassa Is Not Specified by the Leu-5 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Benarous, R.; Chow, C. M.; RajBhandary, U. L.

    1988-01-01

    We generated a λgt11 Neurospora crassa cDNA library and screened the library for the cytoplasmic leucyl-tRNA synthetase (cyto LeuRS) clones using cyto LeuRS specific antibody. Two clones, λNCLRSC1 and λNCLRSC2, were obtained which have inserts of ~2 kbp and ~1.3 kbp, and which overlap by about 0.6 kbp. The following lines of evidence indicate that λNCLRSC1 and λNCLRSC2 encode parts of cyto LeuRS. (1) Antibodies affinity purified using either of the fusion proteins encoded by λNCLRSC1 or λNCLRSC2 inhibit cyto LeuRS activity. Thus, the fusion protein and cyto LeuRS share immunological determinants. (2) The same antibodies also react with an ~115-kDa protein, which comigrates with purified cyto LeuRS, in immunoblots of total N. crassa proteins. We used the cDNA clones to probe a N. crassa genomic DNA library and isolated two genomic DNA clones. Partial sequence analysis of cDNA and genomic DNA clones shows a methionine initiated open reading frame, which includes a stretch of amino acid residues that are highly conserved and that are at the ATP binding site in aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Using the cloned DNA as probe, we show that the cyto LeuRS mRNA is ~3900 nucleotides long. Finally, we have used restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping to show that the cyto LeuRS gene resides on the far right of linkage group II and not on linkage group V where the leu-5 mutation, which was previously reported to specify cyto LeuRS, is located. PMID:2842224

  2. Assignment of the human MARS gene, encoding methioninyl-tRNA synthetase, to chromosome 12 using human X Chinese hamster cell hybrids.

    PubMed

    Cirullo, R E; Wasmuth, J J

    1984-05-01

    We have isolated interspecific somatic cell hybrids between a temperature-sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell methioninyl -tRNA synthetase mutant and human peripheral leukocytes. The hybrids were selected at 39 degrees C which requires the retention and expression of the human gene, MARS , which complements the defective CHO gene. In vitro heat-inactivation experiments on the methioninyl -tRNA synthetase activity in cell-free extracts from heat-resistant hybrids indicate that the human form of this enzyme and, therefore, the human MARS gene is present in hybrid cells. Cytogenetic analysis of three independent temperature-resistant hybrids revealed the presence of a single human chromosome, number 12. Two other independent hybrids examined contained human chromosome 12 as well as a second human chromosome. Electrophoretic analysis of extracts from hybrid cell lines for a human chromosome 12 marker isozyme, LDH-B, showed a pattern of heterotetrameric bands consistent with the presence of the human form of this enzyme in these cells. The correlation between the presence of the human form of methioninyl -tRNA synthetase and human chromosome 12 in temperature-resistant hybrids indicates that the human MARS locus is located on this chromosome.

  3. Oxidative stress diverts tRNA synthetase to nucleus for protection against DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wei, Na; Shi, Yi; Truong, Lan N; Fisch, Kathleen M; Xu, Tao; Gardiner, Elisabeth; Fu, Guangsen; Hsu, Yun-Shiuan Olivia; Kishi, Shuji; Su, Andrew I; Wu, Xiaohua; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2014-10-23

    Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) is known for its essential aminoacylation function in protein synthesis. Here we report a function for TyrRS in DNA damage protection. We found that oxidative stress, which often downregulates protein synthesis, induces TyrRS to rapidly translocate from the cytosol to the nucleus. We also found that angiogenin mediates or potentiates this stress-induced translocalization. The nuclear-localized TyrRS activates transcription factor E2F1 to upregulate the expression of DNA damage repair genes such as BRCA1 and RAD51. The activation is achieved through direct interaction of TyrRS with TRIM28 to sequester this vertebrate-specific epigenetic repressor and its associated HDAC1 from deacetylating and suppressing E2F1. Remarkably, overexpression of TyrRS strongly protects against UV-induced DNA double-strand breaks in zebrafish, whereas restricting TyrRS nuclear entry completely abolishes the protection. Therefore, oxidative stress triggers an essential cytoplasmic enzyme used for protein synthesis to translocate to the nucleus to protect against DNA damage.

  4. Molecular evolution of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase proteins in the early history of life.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Gregory P; Andam, Cheryl P; Alm, Eric J; Gogarten, J Peter

    2011-12-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) consist of several families of functionally conserved proteins essential for translation and protein synthesis. Like nearly all components of the translation machinery, most aaRS families are universally distributed across cellular life, being inherited from the time of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). However, unlike the rest of the translation machinery, aaRS have undergone numerous ancient horizontal gene transfers, with several independent events detected between domains, and some possibly involving lineages diverging before the time of LUCA. These transfers reveal the complexity of molecular evolution at this early time, and the chimeric nature of genomes within cells that gave rise to the major domains. Additionally, given the role of these protein families in defining the amino acids used for protein synthesis, sequence reconstruction of their pre-LUCA ancestors can reveal the evolutionary processes at work in the origin of the genetic code. In particular, sequence reconstructions of the paralog ancestors of isoleucyl- and valyl- RS provide strong empirical evidence that at least for this divergence, the genetic code did not co-evolve with the aaRSs; rather, both amino acids were already part of the genetic code before their cognate aaRSs diverged from their common ancestor. The implications of this observation for the early evolution of RNA-directed protein biosynthesis are discussed.

  5. Molecular Evolution of Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetase Proteins in the Early History of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Gregory P.; Andam, Cheryl P.; Alm, Eric J.; Gogarten, J. Peter

    2011-12-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) consist of several families of functionally conserved proteins essential for translation and protein synthesis. Like nearly all components of the translation machinery, most aaRS families are universally distributed across cellular life, being inherited from the time of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). However, unlike the rest of the translation machinery, aaRS have undergone numerous ancient horizontal gene transfers, with several independent events detected between domains, and some possibly involving lineages diverging before the time of LUCA. These transfers reveal the complexity of molecular evolution at this early time, and the chimeric nature of genomes within cells that gave rise to the major domains. Additionally, given the role of these protein families in defining the amino acids used for protein synthesis, sequence reconstruction of their pre-LUCA ancestors can reveal the evolutionary processes at work in the origin of the genetic code. In particular, sequence reconstructions of the paralog ancestors of isoleucyl- and valyl- RS provide strong empirical evidence that at least for this divergence, the genetic code did not co-evolve with the aaRSs; rather, both amino acids were already part of the genetic code before their cognate aaRSs diverged from their common ancestor. The implications of this observation for the early evolution of RNA-directed protein biosynthesis are discussed.

  6. Structural characterization of antibiotic self-immunity tRNA synthetase in plant tumour biocontrol agent

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Shaileja; Palencia, Andrés; Virus, Cornelia; Schulwitz, Sarah; Temple, Brenda R.; Cusack, Stephen; Reader, John

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-producing microbes evolved self-resistance mechanisms to avoid suicide. The biocontrol Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 secretes the Trojan Horse antibiotic agrocin 84 that is selectively transported into the plant pathogen A. tumefaciens and processed into the toxin TM84. We previously showed that TM84 employs a unique tRNA-dependent mechanism to inhibit leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), while the TM84-producer prevents self-poisoning by expressing a resistant LeuRS AgnB2. We now identify a mechanism by which the antibiotic-producing microbe resists its own toxin. Using a combination of structural, biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that AgnB2 evolved structural changes so as to resist the antibiotic by eliminating the tRNA-dependence of TM84 binding. Mutagenesis of key resistance determinants results in mutants adopting an antibiotic-sensitive phenotype. This study illuminates the evolution of resistance in self-immunity genes and provides mechanistic insights into a fascinating tRNA-dependent antibiotic with applications for the development of anti-infectives and the prevention of biocontrol emasculation. PMID:27713402

  7. The yeast protein Arc1p binds to tRNA and functions as a cofactor for the methionyl- and glutamyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Simos, G; Segref, A; Fasiolo, F; Hellmuth, K; Shevchenko, A; Mann, M; Hurt, E C

    1996-01-01

    Arc1p was found in a screen for components that interact genetically with Los1p, a nuclear pore-associated yeast protein involved in tRNA biogenesis. Arc1p is associated with two proteins which were identified as methionyl-tRNA and glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS and GluRS) by a new mass spectrometry method. ARC1 gene disruption leads to slow growth and reduced MetRS activity, and synthetically lethal arc1- mutants are complemented by the genes for MetRS and GluRS. Recombinant Arc1p binds in vitro to purified monomeric yeast MetRS, but not to an N-terminal truncated form, and strongly increases its apparent affinity for tRNAMet. Furthermore, Arc1p, which is allelic to the quadruplex nucleic acid binding protein G4p1, exhibits specific binding to tRNA as determined by gel retardation and UV-cross-linking. Arc1p is, therefore, a yeast protein with dual specificity: it associates with tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. This functional interaction may be required for efficient aminoacylation in vivo. Images PMID:8895587

  8. Crystal structures and biochemical analyses suggest a unique mechanism and role for human glycyl-tRNA synthetase in Ap4A homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rey-Ting; Chong, Yeeting E; Guo, Min; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2009-10-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases catalyze the attachment of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs for protein synthesis. However, the aminoacylation reaction can be diverted to produce diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), a universal pleiotropic signaling molecule needed for cell regulation pathways. The only known mechanism for Ap4A production by a tRNA synthetase is through the aminoacylation reaction intermediate aminoacyl-AMP, thus making Ap4A synthesis amino acid-dependent. Here, we demonstrate a new mechanism for Ap4A synthesis. Crystal structures and biochemical analyses show that human glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) produces Ap4A by direct condensation of two ATPs, independent of glycine concentration. Interestingly, whereas the first ATP-binding pocket is conserved for all class II tRNA synthetases, the second ATP pocket is formed by an insertion domain that is unique to GlyRS, suggesting that GlyRS is the only tRNA synthetase catalyzing direct Ap4A synthesis. A special role for GlyRS in Ap4A homeostasis is proposed.

  9. 5 S rRNA and tRNA import into human mitochondria. Comparison of in vitro requirements.

    PubMed

    Entelis, N S; Kolesnikova, O A; Dogan, S; Martin, R P; Tarassov, I A

    2001-12-07

    In vivo, human mitochondria import 5 S rRNA and do not import tRNAs from the cytoplasm. We demonstrated previously that isolated human mitochondria are able to internalize a yeast tRNA(Lys) in the presence of yeast soluble factors. Here, we describe an assay for specific uptake of 5 S rRNA by isolated human mitochondria and compare its requirements with the artificial tRNA import. The efficiency of 5 S rRNA uptake by isolated mitochondria was comparable with that found in vivo. The import was shown to depend on ATP and the transmembrane electrochemical potential and was directed by soluble proteins. Blocking the pre-protein import channel inhibited internalization of both 5 S rRNA and tRNA, which suggests this apparatus be involved in RNA uptake by the mitochondria. We show that human mitochondria can also selectively internalize several in vitro synthesized versions of yeast tRNA(Lys) as well as a transcript of the human mitochondrial tRNA(Lys). Either yeast or human soluble proteins can direct this import, suggesting that human cells possess all factors needed for such an artificial translocation. On the other hand, the efficiency of import directed by yeast or human protein factors varies significantly, depending on the tRNA version. Similarly to the yeast system, tRNA(Lys) import into human mitochondria depended on aminoacylation and on the precursor of the mitochondrial lysyl-tRNA synthetase. 5 S rRNA import was also dependent upon soluble protein(s), which were distinct from the factors providing tRNA internalization.

  10. Diversity of human tRNA genes from the 1000-genomes project.

    PubMed

    Parisien, Marc; Wang, Xiaoyun; Pan, Tao

    2013-12-01

    The sequence diversity of individual human genomes has been extensively analyzed for variations and phenotypic implications for mRNA, miRNA, and long non-coding RNA genes. TRNA (tRNA) also exhibits large sequence diversity in the human genome, but tRNA gene sequence variation and potential functional implications in individual human genomes have not been investigated. Here we capitalize on the sequencing data from the 1000-genomes project to examine the diversity of tRNA genes in the human population. Previous analysis of the reference human genome indicated an unexpected large number of diverse tRNA genes beyond the necessity of translation, suggesting that some tRNA transcripts may perform non-canonical functions. We found 24 new tRNA sequences in>1% and 76 new tRNA sequences in>0.2% of all individuals, indicating that tRNA genes are also subject to evolutionary changes in the human population. Unexpectedly, two abundant new tRNA genes contain base-pair mismatches in the anticodon stem. We experimentally determined that these two new tRNAs have altered structures in vitro; however, one new tRNA is not aminoacylated but extremely stable in HeLa cells, suggesting that this new tRNA can be used for non-canonical function. Our results show that at the scale of human population, tRNA genes are more diverse than conventionally understood, and some new tRNAs may perform non-canonical, extra-translational functions that may be linked to human health and disease.

  11. Structure of the acceptor stem of Escherichia coli tRNA Ala: role of the G3.U70 base pair in synthetase recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, A; Varani, G

    1997-01-01

    The fidelity of translation of the genetic code depends on accurate tRNA aminoacylation by cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Thus, each tRNA has specificity not only for codon recognition, but also for amino acid identity; this aminoacylation specificity is referred to as tRNA identity. The primary determinant of the acceptor identity of Escherichia coli tRNAAlais a wobble G3.U70 pair within the acceptor stem. Despite extensive biochemical and genetic data, the mechanism by which the G3.U70 pair marks the acceptor end of tRNAAla for aminoacylation with alanine has not been clarified at the molecular level. The solution structure of a microhelix derived from the tRNAAla acceptor end has been determined at high precision using a very extensive set of experimental constraints (approximately 32 per nt) obtained by heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods. The tRNAAla acceptor end is overall similar to A-form RNA, but important differences are observed. The G3.U70 wobble pair distorts the conformation of the phosphodiester backbone and presents the functional groups of U70 in an unusual spatial location. The discriminator base A73 has extensive stacking overlap with G1 within the G1.C72 base pair at the end of the double helical stem and the -CCA end is significantly less ordered than the rest of the molecule. PMID:9153306

  12. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason W.; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2015-10-20

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  13. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA; Anderson, John Christopher [San Diego, CA; Chin, Jason W [San Diego, CA; Liu, David R [Lexington, MA; Magliery, Thomas J [North Haven, CT; Meggers, Eric L [Philadelphia, PA; Mehl, Ryan Aaron [San Diego, CA; Pastrnak, Miro [San Diego, CA; Santoro, Stephen William [San Diego, CA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2012-05-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  14. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2006-08-01

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  15. Variations in clique and community patterns in protein structures during allosteric communication: investigation of dynamically equilibrated structures of methionyl tRNA synthetase complexes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amit; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2008-11-04

    The allosteric concept has played a key role in understanding the biological functions of proteins. The rigidity or plasticity and the conformational population are the two important ideas invoked in explaining the allosteric effect. Although molecular insights have been gained from a large number of structures, a precise assessment of the ligand-induced conformational changes in proteins at different levels, ranging from gross topology to intricate details, remains a challenge. In this study, we have explored the conformational changes in the complexes of methionyl tRNA synthetase (MetRS) through novel network parameters such as cliques and communities, which identify the rigid regions in the protein structure networks (PSNs) constructed from the noncovalent interactions of amino acid side chains. MetRS belongs to the aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (aaRS) family that plays a crucial role in the translation of genetic code. These enzymes are modular with distinct domains from which extensive genetic, kinetic, and structural data are available, highlighting the role of interdomain communication. The network parameters evaluated here on the conformational ensembles of MetRS complexes, generated from molecular dynamics simulations, have enabled us to understand the interdomain communication in detail. Additionally, the characterization of conformational changes in terms of cliques and communities has also become possible, which had eluded conventional analyses. Furthermore, we find that most of the residues participating in cliques and communities are strikingly different from those that take part in long-range communication. The cliques and communities evaluated here for the first time on PSNs have beautifully captured the local geometries in detail within the framework of global topology. Here the allosteric effect is revealed at the residue level via identification of the important residues specific for structural rigidity and functional flexibility in MetRS. This ought

  16. Large Conformational Changes of Insertion 3 in Human Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase (hGlyRS) during Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xiangyu; Qin, Xiangjing; Chen, Lei; Jia, Qian; Zhang, Yonghui; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lei, Dongsheng; Ren, Gang; Zhou, Zhihong; Wang, Zhong; Li, Qing; Xie, Wei

    2016-01-21

    Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is the enzyme that covalently links glycine to cognate tRNA for translation. It is of great interest because of its nonconserved quaternary structures, unique species-specific aminoacylation properties, and noncanonical functions in neurological diseases, but none of these is fully understood. We report two crystal structures of human GlyRS variants, in the free form and in complex with tRNA Gly respectively, and reveal new aspects of the glycylation mechanism. We discover that insertion 3 differs considerably in conformation in catalysis and that it acts like a "switch" and fully opens to allow tRNA to bind in a cross-subunit fashion. The flexibility of the protein is supported by molecular dynamics simulation, as well as enzymatic activity assays. The biophysical and biochemical studies suggest that human GlyRS may utilize its flexibility for both the traditional function (regulate tRNA binding) and alternative functions (roles in diseases).

  17. Large Conformational Changes of Insertion 3 in Human Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase (hGlyRS) during Catalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Xiangyu; Qin, Xiangjing; Chen, Lei; ...

    2016-01-21

    Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is the enzyme that covalently links glycine to cognate tRNA for translation. It is of great interest because of its nonconserved quaternary structures, unique species-specific aminoacylation properties, and noncanonical functions in neurological diseases, but none of these is fully understood. We report two crystal structures of human GlyRS variants, in the free form and in complex with tRNA Gly respectively, and reveal new aspects of the glycylation mechanism. We discover that insertion 3 differs considerably in conformation in catalysis and that it acts like a "switch" and fully opens to allow tRNA to bind in a cross-subunitmore » fashion. The flexibility of the protein is supported by molecular dynamics simulation, as well as enzymatic activity assays. The biophysical and biochemical studies suggest that human GlyRS may utilize its flexibility for both the traditional function (regulate tRNA binding) and alternative functions (roles in diseases).« less

  18. Comparison of histidine recognition in human and trypanosomatid histidyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Koh, Cho Yeow; Wetzel, Allan B; de van der Schueren, Will J; Hol, Wim G J

    2014-11-01

    As part of a project aimed at obtaining selective inhibitors and drug-like compounds targeting tRNA synthetases from trypanosomatids, we have elucidated the crystal structure of human cytosolic histidyl-tRNA synthetase (Hs-cHisRS) in complex with histidine in order to be able to compare human and parasite enzymes. The resultant structure of Hs-cHisRS•His represents the substrate-bound state (H-state) of the enzyme. It provides an interesting opportunity to compare with ligand-free and imidazole-bound structures Hs-cHisRS published recently, both of which represent the ligand-free state (F-state) of the enzyme. The H-state Hs-cHisRS undergoes conformational changes in active site residues and several conserved motif of HisRS, compared to F-state structures. The histidine forms eight hydrogen bonds with HisRS of which six engage the amino and carboxylate groups of this amino acid. The availability of published imidazole-bound structure provides a unique opportunity to dissect the structural roles of individual chemical groups of histidine. The analysis revealed the importance of the amino and carboxylate groups, of the histidine in leading to these dramatic conformational changes of the H-state. Further, comparison with previously published trypanosomatid HisRS structures reveals a pocket in the F-state of the parasite enzyme that may provide opportunities for developing specific inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei HisRS.

  19. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation study of archaeal leucyl-tRNA synthetase in complex with different mischarged tRNA in editing conformation.

    PubMed

    Rayevsky, A V; Sharifi, M; Tukalo, M A

    2017-09-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play important roles in maintaining the accuracy of protein synthesis. Some aaRSs accomplish this via editing mechanisms, among which leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) edits non-cognate amino acid norvaline mainly by post-transfer editing. However, the molecular basis for this pathway for eukaryotic and archaeal LeuRS remain unclear. In this study, a complex of archaeal P. horikoshii LeuRS (PhLeuRS) with misacylated tRNA(Leu) was modeled wherever tRNA's acceptor stem was oriented directly into the editing site. To understand the distinctive features of organization we reconstructed a complex of PhLeuRS with tRNA and visualize post-transfer editing interactions mode by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. To study molecular basis for substrate selectivity by PhLeuRS's editing site we utilized MD simulation of the entire LeuRS complexes using a diverse charged form of tRNAs, namely norvalyl-tRNA(Leu) and isoleucyl-tRNA(Leu). In general, the editing site organization of LeuRS from P.horikoshii has much in common with bacterial LeuRS. The MD simulation results revealed that the post-transfer editing substrate norvalyl-A76, binds more strongly than isoleucyl-A76. Moreover, the branched side chain of isoleucine prevents water molecules from being closer and hence the hydrolysis reaction slows significantly. To investigate a possible mechanism of the post-transfer editing reaction, by PhLeuRS we have determined that two water molecules (the attacking and assisting water molecules) are localized near the carbonyl group of the amino acid to be cleaved off. These water molecules approach the substrate from the opposite side to that observed for Thermus thermophilus LeuRS (TtLeuRS). Based on the results obtained, it was suggested that the post-transfer editing mechanism of PhLeuRS differs from that of prokaryotic TtLeuRS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Crystallogenesis in tRNA aminoacylation systems: how packing accounts for crystallization drawbacks with yeast aspartyl-tRNA synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, C.; Lorber, B.; Théobald-Dietrich, A.; Giegé, R.

    2001-11-01

    Two active forms of homodimeric aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae differing in length at their N-terminus crystallize in the same orthorhombic space group (P4 12 12) with identical cell parameters. Initial studies were hampered by the poor and anisotropic diffraction of the crystals of enzyme extracted from yeast cells. Isotropic diffraction at higher resolution was obtained when crystals were grown from an engineered protein deprived of its 70 N-terminal amino acids. The present work describes the packing contacts in crystals of the shortened protein whose structure was solved at 2.3 Å resolution. Each subunit of the enzyme develops two lattice interactions covering a surface of 670 Å 2, about 7-fold smaller than that of the interface between monomers. The smallest lattice interaction, covering 150 Å 2, brings the anticodon binding domain adjacent to the N-terminus of one monomer in contact with a loop from the active-site domain of a neighboring monomer. Modeling of the extension in the solvent channels shows that the 150 Å 2 intermolecular contact is perturbed in protein molecules possessing a floppy appendix while their second and larger 520 Å 2 contact area is unaffected. Altogether the packing organization explains the poor diffraction properties of the native enzyme crystals and the enhanced diffraction of the crystals of shortened synthetase.

  1. Large Conformational Changes of Insertion 3 in Human Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase (hGlyRS) during Catalysis*

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiangyu; Qin, Xiangjing; Chen, Lei; Jia, Qian; Zhang, Yonghui; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lei, Dongsheng; Ren, Gang; Zhou, Zhihong; Wang, Zhong; Li, Qing; Xie, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is the enzyme that covalently links glycine to cognate tRNA for translation. It is of great research interest because of its nonconserved quaternary structures, unique species-specific aminoacylation properties, and noncanonical functions in neurological diseases, but none of these is fully understood. We report two crystal structures of human GlyRS variants, in the free form and in complex with tRNAGly respectively, and reveal new aspects of the glycylation mechanism. We discover that insertion 3 differs considerably in conformation in catalysis and that it acts like a “switch” and fully opens to allow tRNA to bind in a cross-subunit fashion. The flexibility of the protein is supported by molecular dynamics simulation, as well as enzymatic activity assays. The biophysical and biochemical studies suggest that human GlyRS may utilize its flexibility for both the traditional function (regulate tRNA binding) and alternative functions (roles in diseases). PMID:26797133

  2. The putative tRNA 2-thiouridine synthetase Ncs6 is an essential sulfur carrier in Methanococcus maripaludis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuchen; Long, Feng; Wang, Liangliang; Söll, Dieter; Whitman, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Thiolation of carbon-2 of uridine located in the first position of the anticodons of tRNAGlnUUG, tRNAGluUUC, and tRNALysUUU is a conserved RNA modification event requiring the 2-thiouridine synthetase Ncs6/Ctu1 in archaea and eukaryotes. Ncs6/Ctu1 activates uridine by adenylation, but its role in sulfur transfer is unclear. Here we show that Mmp1356, the Ncs6/Ctu1 homolog in the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis, forms a persulfide enzyme adduct with an active site cysteine; this suggests that Mmp1356 directly participates in sulfur transfer as a persulfide carrier. Transposon mutagenesis shows that Mmp1356 is likely to be an essential protein. PMID:24530533

  3. Two complementary enzymes for threonylation of tRNA in crenarchaeota: crystal structure of Aeropyrum pernix threonyl-tRNA synthetase lacking a cis-editing domain.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Satoru; Juan, Ella Czarina Magat; Sato, Yoshiteru; Miyashita, Yu-Ichiro; Hoque, Md Mominul; Suzuki, Kaoru; Sagara, Tsubasa; Tsunoda, Masaru; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Takénaka, Akio

    2009-11-27

    In protein synthesis, threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) must recognize threonine (Thr) from the 20 kinds of amino acids and the cognate tRNA(Thr) from different tRNAs in order to generate Thr-tRNA(Thr). In general, an organism possesses one kind of gene corresponding to ThrRS. However, it has been recently found that some organisms have two different genes for ThrRS in the genome, suggesting that their proteins ThrRS-1 and ThrRS-2 function separately and complement each other in the threonylation of tRNA(Thr), one for catalysis and the other for trans-editing of misacylated Ser-tRNA(Thr). In order to clarify their three-dimensional structures, we performed X-ray analyses of two putatively assigned ThrRSs from Aeropyrum pernix (ApThrRS-1 and ApThrRS-2). These proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and crystallized. The crystal structure of ApThrRS-1 has been successfully determined at 2.3 A resolution. ApThrRS-1 is a dimeric enzyme composed of two identical subunits, each containing two domains for the catalytic reaction and for anticodon binding. The essential editing domain is completely missing as expected. These structural features reveal that ThrRS-1 catalyzes only the aminoacylation of the cognate tRNA, suggesting the necessity of the second enzyme ThrRS-2 for trans-editing. Since the N-terminal sequence of ApThrRS-2 is similar to the sequence of the editing domain of ThrRS from Pyrococcus abyssi, ApThrRS-2 has been expected to catalyze deaminoacylation of a misacylated serine moiety at the CCA terminus.

  4. Characterization of cDNAs and genomic DNAs for human threonyl- and cysteinyl-tRNA synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Cruzen, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    Techniques of molecular biology were used to clone, sequence and map two human aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) cDNAs: threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) a class II enzyme and cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (CysRS) a class I enzyme. The predicted protein sequence of human ThrRS is highly homologous to that of lower eukaryotic and prokaryotic ThRSs, particularly in the regions containing the three structural motifs common to all class II synthetases. Signature regions 1 and 2, which characterize the class IIa subgroup (SerRS, ThrRS and HisRS) are highly conserved from bacteria to human. Structural predictions for human ThrRS based on the known structure of the closely related SerRS from E.coli implicate strongly conserved residues in the signature sequences to be important in substrate binding. The amino terminal 100 residues of the deduced amino acid sequence of ThrRS shares structural similarity to SerRS consistent with forming an antiparallel helix implicated in tRNA binding. The 5' untranslated sequence of the human ThrRS gene shares short stretches of common sequence with the gene for hamster HisRS including a binding site for the promoter specific transcription factor sp-1. The deduced amino acid sequence of human CysRS has a high degree of sequence identify to E. coli CysRS. Human CysRS possesses the classic characteristics of a class I synthetase and is most closely related to the MetRS subgroup. The amino terminal half of human CysRS can be modeled as a nucleotide binding fold and shares significant sequence and structural similarity to the other enzymes in this subgroup. The CysRS structural gene (CARS) was mapped to human chromosome 11p15.5 by fluorescent in situ hybridization. CARS is the first aaRS gene to be mapped to chromosome 11. The steady state of both CysRS and ThrRs mRNA were quantitated in several human tissues. Message levels for these enzymes appear to be subjected to differential regulation in different cell types.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of a human mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Inna; Kessler, Naama; Moor, Nina; Klipcan, Liron; Koc, Emine; Templeton, Paul; Spremulli, Linda; Safro, Mark

    2007-09-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant human mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (mitPheRS) are reported. Diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution and the mitPheRS structure was solved using the molecular-replacement method. Human monomeric mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (mitPheRS) is an enzyme that catalyzes the charging of tRNA with the cognate amino acid phenylalanine. Human mitPheRS is a chimera of the bacterial α-subunit of PheRS and the B8 domain of its β-subunit. Together, the α-subunit and the ‘RNP-domain’ (B8 domain) at the C-terminus form the minimal structural set to construct an enzyme with phenylalanylation activity. The recombinant human mitPheRS was purified to homogeneity and crystallized in complex with phenylalanine and ATP. The crystals diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55, b = 90, c = 96 Å.

  6. Mutation of the human mitochondrial phenylalanine-tRNA synthetase causes infantile-onset epilepsy and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency☆

    PubMed Central

    Almalki, Abdulraheem; Alston, Charlotte L.; Parker, Alasdair; Simonic, Ingrid; Mehta, Sarju G.; He, Langping; Reza, Mojgan; Oliveira, Jorge M.A.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W.; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are essential enzymes in protein synthesis since they charge tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. Mutations in the genes encoding mitochondrial aaRSs have been associated with a wide spectrum of human mitochondrial diseases. Here we report the identification of pathogenic mutations (a partial genomic deletion and a highly conserved p. Asp325Tyr missense variant) in FARS2, the gene encoding mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase, in a patient with early-onset epilepsy and isolated complex IV deficiency in muscle. The biochemical defect was expressed in myoblasts but not in fibroblasts and associated with decreased steady state levels of COXI and COXII protein and reduced steady state levels of the mt-tRNAPhe transcript. Functional analysis of the recombinant mutant p. Asp325Tyr FARS2 protein showed an inability to bind ATP and consequently undetectable aminoacylation activity using either bacterial tRNA or human mt-tRNAPhe as substrates. Lentiviral transduction of cells with wildtype FARS2 restored complex IV protein levels, confirming that the p.Asp325Tyr mutation is pathogenic, causing respiratory chain deficiency and neurological deficits on account of defective aminoacylation of mt-tRNAPhe. PMID:24161539

  7. Mutation of the human mitochondrial phenylalanine-tRNA synthetase causes infantile-onset epilepsy and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Almalki, Abdulraheem; Alston, Charlotte L; Parker, Alasdair; Simonic, Ingrid; Mehta, Sarju G; He, Langping; Reza, Mojgan; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Lightowlers, Robert N; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are essential enzymes in protein synthesis since they charge tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. Mutations in the genes encoding mitochondrial aaRSs have been associated with a wide spectrum of human mitochondrial diseases. Here we report the identification of pathogenic mutations (a partial genomic deletion and a highly conserved p. Asp325Tyr missense variant) in FARS2, the gene encoding mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase, in a patient with early-onset epilepsy and isolated complex IV deficiency in muscle. The biochemical defect was expressed in myoblasts but not in fibroblasts and associated with decreased steady state levels of COXI and COXII protein and reduced steady state levels of the mt-tRNA(Phe) transcript. Functional analysis of the recombinant mutant p. Asp325Tyr FARS2 protein showed an inability to bind ATP and consequently undetectable aminoacylation activity using either bacterial tRNA or human mt-tRNA(Phe) as substrates. Lentiviral transduction of cells with wildtype FARS2 restored complex IV protein levels, confirming that the p.Asp325Tyr mutation is pathogenic, causing respiratory chain deficiency and neurological deficits on account of defective aminoacylation of mt-tRNA(Phe).

  8. Essentiality Assessment of Cysteinyl and Lysyl-tRNA Synthetases of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Ravishankar, Sudha; Ambady, Anisha; Swetha, Rayapadi G.; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha; Sambandamurthy, Vasan K.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of mupirocin, an antibiotic that targets isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase, established aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase as an attractive target for the discovery of novel antibacterial agents. Despite a high degree of similarity between the bacterial and human aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, the selectivity observed with mupirocin triggered the possibility of targeting other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases as potential drug targets. These enzymes catalyse the condensation of a specific amino acid to its cognate tRNA in an energy-dependent reaction. Therefore, each organism is expected to encode at least twenty aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, one for each amino acid. However, a bioinformatics search for genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases from Mycobacterium smegmatis returned multiple genes for glutamyl (GluRS), cysteinyl (CysRS), prolyl (ProRS) and lysyl (LysRS) tRNA synthetases. The pathogenic mycobacteria, namely, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, were also found to possess two genes each for CysRS and LysRS. A similar search indicated the presence of additional genes for LysRS in gram negative bacteria as well. Herein, we describe sequence and structural analysis of the additional aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes found in M. smegmatis. Characterization of conditional expression strains of Cysteinyl and Lysyl-tRNA synthetases generated in M. smegmatis revealed that the canonical aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase are essential, while the additional ones are not essential for the growth of M. smegmatis. PMID:26794499

  9. Molecular mimicry of human tRNALys anti-codon domain by HIV-1 RNA genome facilitates tRNA primer annealing

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher P.; Saadatmand, Jenan; Kleiman, Lawrence; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The primer for initiating reverse transcription in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is tRNALys3. Host cell tRNALys is selectively packaged into HIV-1 through a specific interaction between the major tRNALys-binding protein, human lysyl-tRNA synthetase (hLysRS), and the viral proteins Gag and GagPol. Annealing of the tRNA primer onto the complementary primer-binding site (PBS) in viral RNA is mediated by the nucleocapsid domain of Gag. The mechanism by which tRNALys3 is targeted to the PBS and released from hLysRS prior to annealing is unknown. Here, we show that hLysRS specifically binds to a tRNA anti-codon-like element (TLE) in the HIV-1 genome, which mimics the anti-codon loop of tRNALys and is located proximal to the PBS. Mutation of the U-rich sequence within the TLE attenuates binding of hLysRS in vitro and reduces the amount of annealed tRNALys3 in virions. Thus, LysRS binds specifically to the TLE, which is part of a larger LysRS binding domain in the viral RNA that includes elements of the Psi packaging signal. Our results suggest that HIV-1 uses molecular mimicry of the anti-codon of tRNALys to increase the efficiency of tRNALys3 annealing to viral RNA. PMID:23264568

  10. Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase: the first crystallization of a human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefond, Luc; Frugier, Magali; Touzé, Elodie; Lorber, Bernard; Florentz, Catherine; Giegé, Richard Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; Sauter, Claude

    2007-04-01

    Crystals of human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase lacking the C-terminal S4-like domain diffract to 2.7 Å resolution and are suitable for structure determination. Human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and a truncated version with its C-terminal S4-like domain deleted were purified and crystallized. Only the truncated version, which is active in tyrosine activation and Escherichia coli tRNA{sup Tyr} charging, yielded crystals suitable for structure determination. These tetragonal crystals, belonging to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, were obtained in the presence of PEG 4000 as a crystallizing agent and diffracted X-rays to 2.7 Å resolution. Complete data sets could be collected and led to structure solution by molecular replacement.

  11. Molecular structure of the human argininosuccinate synthetase gene: Occurrence of alternative mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, S.O.; Beaudet, A.L.; Bock, H.G.O.; O'Brien, W.E.

    1984-10-01

    The human genome contains one expressed argininosuccinate synthetase gene and ca. 14 pseudogenes that are dispersed to at least 11 human chromosomes. Eleven clones isolated from a human genomic DNA library were characterized extensively by restriction mapping, Southern blotting, and nucleotide sequencing. These 11 clones represent the entire expressed argininosuccinate synthetase gene that spans 63 kilobases and contains at least 13 exons. The expressed gene codes for two mRNAs that differ in their 5' untranslated sequences and arise by alternative splicing involving the inclusion or deletion of an entire exon. In normal human liver and cultured fibroblasts, the predominant mature argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA lacks sequences encoded by exon 2 in the expressed gene. In contrast, the predominant argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA in baboon liver contains exon 2 sequences. A transformed canavanine-resistant human cell line in which argininosuccinate synthetase activity is 180-fold higher than that in wild-type cells contains abundant amounts of both forms of the argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA. The mRNA lacking exon 2 sequences is the more abundant mRNA species in the canavanine-resistant cells. These observations show that splicing of the argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA is species specific in primates and varies among different human cell types.

  12. A case of anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (ARS) antibody-positive polymyositis (PM)/dermatomyositis (DM)-associated interstitial pneumonia (IP) successfully controlled with bosentan therapy.

    PubMed

    Naito, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Yosuke; Hino, Mitsunori; Gemma, Akihiko

    2017-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital and was diagnosed with interstitial pneumonia (IP) associated with amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM). The patient experienced three acute IP exacerbations in the 7 years that followed, which were each treated and resolved with steroid pulse therapy. The patient was closely examined for respiratory failure with right heart catheterization (RHC), which demonstrated that she had a mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of 34 mmHg. The patient was thus diagnosed as having pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS) and was started on bosentan therapy, which led to improvements in mPAP as well as in subjective symptoms over time. Indeed, she had had no acute exacerbations with serum markers of IP remaining low over 6 years following initiation of bosentan therapy, suggesting that bosentan may have a role in controlling IP. In addition, she was confirmed to be anti-ARS antibody-positive after 5 years of bosentan therapy, when anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (anti-ARS) antibody testing became available.

  13. Human tRNA genes function as chromatin insulators

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Jesse R; Chiu, Jonathan; Zhu, Jingchun; Katzman, Sol; Kurukuti, Sreenivasulu; Wade, Paul A; Haussler, David; Kamakaka, Rohinton T

    2012-01-01

    Insulators help separate active chromatin domains from silenced ones. In yeast, gene promoters act as insulators to block the spread of Sir and HP1 mediated silencing while in metazoans most insulators are multipartite autonomous entities. tDNAs are repetitive sequences dispersed throughout the human genome and we now show that some of these tDNAs can function as insulators in human cells. Using computational methods, we identified putative human tDNA insulators. Using silencer blocking, transgene protection and repressor blocking assays we show that some of these tDNA-containing fragments can function as barrier insulators in human cells. We find that these elements also have the ability to block enhancers from activating RNA pol II transcribed promoters. Characterization of a putative tDNA insulator in human cells reveals that the site possesses chromatin signatures similar to those observed at other better-characterized eukaryotic insulators. Enhanced 4C analysis demonstrates that the tDNA insulator makes long-range chromatin contacts with other tDNAs and ETC sites but not with intervening or flanking RNA pol II transcribed genes. PMID:22085927

  14. Isolation of a cDNA clone for human threonyl-tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Kontis, K.J.; Arfin, S.M.

    1989-05-01

    A cDNA for threonyl-tRNA synthetase was isolated from a human placental cDNA /lambda/gt11 expression library by immunological screening, and its identity was confirmed by hybrid-selected mRNA translation. With this cDNA used as a hybridization probe, borrelidin-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cells that overproduced threonyl-tRNA synthetase were shown to have increased levels of threonyl-tRNA synthetase mRNA and gene sequences. Amplification of the gene did not appear to have been accompanied by any major structural reorganizations.

  15. Entamoeba lysyl-tRNA synthetase contains a cytokine-like domain with chemokine activity towards human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Castro de Moura, Manuel; Miro, Francesc; Han, Jung Min; Kim, Sunghoon; Celada, Antonio; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2011-11-01

    Immunological pressure encountered by protozoan parasites drives the selection of strategies to modulate or avoid the immune responses of their hosts. Here we show that the parasite Entamoeba histolytica has evolved a chemokine that mimics the sequence, structure, and function of the human cytokine HsEMAPII (Homo sapiens endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II). This Entamoeba EMAPII-like polypeptide (EELP) is translated as a domain attached to two different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) that are overexpressed when parasites are exposed to inflammatory signals. EELP is dispensable for the tRNA aminoacylation activity of the enzymes that harbor it, and it is cleaved from them by Entamoeba proteases to generate a standalone cytokine. Isolated EELP acts as a chemoattractant for human cells, but its cell specificity is different from that of HsEMAPII. We show that cell specificity differences between HsEMAPII and EELP can be swapped by site directed mutagenesis of only two residues in the cytokines' signal sequence. Thus, Entamoeba has evolved a functional mimic of an aaRS-associated human cytokine with modified cell specificity.

  16. Molecular mimicry of human tRNALys anti-codon domain by HIV-1 RNA genome facilitates tRNA primer annealing.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher P; Saadatmand, Jenan; Kleiman, Lawrence; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2013-02-01

    The primer for initiating reverse transcription in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is tRNA(Lys3). Host cell tRNA(Lys) is selectively packaged into HIV-1 through a specific interaction between the major tRNA(Lys)-binding protein, human lysyl-tRNA synthetase (hLysRS), and the viral proteins Gag and GagPol. Annealing of the tRNA primer onto the complementary primer-binding site (PBS) in viral RNA is mediated by the nucleocapsid domain of Gag. The mechanism by which tRNA(Lys3) is targeted to the PBS and released from hLysRS prior to annealing is unknown. Here, we show that hLysRS specifically binds to a tRNA anti-codon-like element (TLE) in the HIV-1 genome, which mimics the anti-codon loop of tRNA(Lys) and is located proximal to the PBS. Mutation of the U-rich sequence within the TLE attenuates binding of hLysRS in vitro and reduces the amount of annealed tRNA(Lys3) in virions. Thus, LysRS binds specifically to the TLE, which is part of a larger LysRS binding domain in the viral RNA that includes elements of the Psi packaging signal. Our results suggest that HIV-1 uses molecular mimicry of the anti-codon of tRNA(Lys) to increase the efficiency of tRNA(Lys3) annealing to viral RNA.

  17. The gene encoding human glutathione synthetase (GSS) maps to the long arm of chromosome 20 at band 11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G.C.; Vaska, V.L.; Ford, J.H.

    1995-12-10

    Two forms of glutathione synthetase deficiency have been described. While one form is mild, causing hemolytic anemia, the other more severe form causes 5-oxoprolinuria with secondary neurological involvement. Despite the existence of two deficiency phenotypes, Southern blots hybridized with a glutathione synthetase cDNA suggest that there is a single glutathione synthetase gene in the human genome. Analysis of somatic cell hybrids showed the human glutathione synthetase gene (GSS) to be located on chromosome 20, and this assignment has been refined to subband 20q11.2 using in situ hybridization. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in human disease.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Svetlana; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2013-04-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mtARSs) are essential in the process of transferring genetic information from mitochondrial DNA to the complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These synthetases perform an integral step in the initiation of mitochondrial protein synthesis by charging tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. All mtARSs are encoded by nuclear genes, nine of which have recently been described as disease genes for mitochondrial disorders. Unexpectedly, the clinical presentations of these diseases are highly specific to the affected synthetase. Encephalopathy is the most common manifestation but again with gene-specific outcomes. Other clinical presentations include myopathy with anemia, cardiomyopathy, tubulopathy and hearing loss with female ovarian dysgenesis. Here we review the described mutation types and the associated patient phenotypes. The identified mutation spectrum suggests that only mutation types that allow some residual tRNA-charging activity can result in the described mtARS diseases but the molecular mechanisms behind the selective tissue involvement are not currently understood.

  19. Hts1 Encodes Both the Cytoplasmic and Mitochondrial Histidyl-Trna Synthetase of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae: Mutations Alter the Specificity of Compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, M. I.; Mason, T. L.; Fink, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical evidence shows that a single nuclear gene HTS1 encodes both the mitochondrial and cytoplasmic histidyl-tRNA synthetases (Hts). The gene specifies two messages, one with two in-frame ATGs (-60 and +1) and another with only the downstream ATG (+1). We have made a new set of mutations that enables us to express only the mitochondrial or the cytoplasmic form and compared the subcellular distribution of the Hts1 protein in these mutants and wild type, using an antibody that interacts with both the mitochondrial and cytoplasmic Hts1 as well as Hts1::LacZ fusions. Mutations in the upstream ATG (-60) or frameshift mutations in the presequence affect only the mitochondrial enzyme and not the cytoplasmic enzyme. Mutations in the downstream ATG (+1 ATG to ATC) destroy the function of the cytosolic enzyme, but do not affect the function of the mitochondrial enzyme. Overexpression of this construct restores cytoplasmic function. Cells expressing a truncated form of Hts containing a deletion of the first 20 amino-terminal residues (Htsc) produce a functional cytoplasmic enzyme, which does not provide mitochondrial function. Overexpression of this truncated cytoplasmic protein provides mitochondrial function and produces detectable levels of the synthetase in the mitochondrion. These experiments suggest that Hts1 contains two domains that together allow efficient localization of Htsm to the mitochondrion: an amino-terminal presequence in the mitochondrial precursor that is likely cleaved upon delivery to the mitochondrion and a second amino-terminal sequence (residues 21-53) present in both the precursor and the cytoplasmic form. Neither one by itself is sufficient to act as an efficient mitochondrial targeting signal. Using our antibody we have been able to detect a protein of increased molecular mass that corresponds to that of the predicted precursor. Taken together these studies show that the specificity of compartmentation of the Hts protein depends

  20. Monophyly of class I aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, USPA, ETFP, photolyase, and PP-ATPase nucleotide-binding domains: implications for protein evolution in the RNA.

    PubMed

    Aravind, L; Anantharaman, Vivek; Koonin, Eugene V

    2002-07-01

    Protein sequence and structure comparisons show that the catalytic domains of Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, a related family of nucleotidyltransferases involved primarily in coenzyme biosynthesis, nucleotide-binding domains related to the UspA protein (USPA domains), photolyases, electron transport flavoproteins, and PP-loop-containing ATPases together comprise a distinct class of alpha/beta domains designated the HUP domain after HIGH-signature proteins, UspA, and PP-ATPase. Several lines of evidence are presented to support the monophyly of the HUP domains, to the exclusion of other three-layered alpha/beta folds with the generic "Rossmann-like" topology. Cladistic analysis, with patterns of structural and sequence similarity used as discrete characters, identified three major evolutionary lineages within the HUP domain class: the PP-ATPases; the HIGH superfamily, which includes class I aaRS and related nucleotidyltransferases containing the HIGH signature in their nucleotide-binding loop; and a previously unrecognized USPA-like group, which includes USPA domains, electron transport flavoproteins, and photolyases. Examination of the patterns of phyletic distribution of distinct families within these three major lineages suggests that the Last Universal Common Ancestor of all modern life forms encoded 15-18 distinct alpha/beta ATPases and nucleotide-binding proteins of the HUP class. This points to an extensive radiation of HUP domains before the last universal common ancestor (LUCA), during which the multiple class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases emerged only at a late stage. Thus, substantial evolutionary diversification of protein domains occurred well before the modern version of the protein-dependent translation machinery was established, i.e., still in the RNA world.

  1. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Mizuno, Rie; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ijiri, Kenichi

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  2. Mapping the tRNA binding site on the surface of human DNMT2 methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Shanmugam, Raghuvaran; Helm, Mark; Jeltsch, Albert

    2012-06-05

    The DNMT2 enzyme methylates tRNA-Asp at position C38. Because there is no tRNA-Dnmt2 cocrystal structure available, we have mapped the tRNA binding site of DNMT2 by systematically mutating surface-exposed lysine and arginine residues to alanine and studying the tRNA methylation activity and binding of the corresponding variants. After mutating 20 lysine and arginine residues, we identified eight of them that caused large (>4-fold) decreases in catalytic activity. These residues cluster within and next to a surface cleft in the protein, which is large enough to accommodate the tRNA anticodon loop and stem. This cleft is located next to the binding pocket for the cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine, and the catalytic residues of DNMT2 are positioned at its walls or bottom. Many of the variants with strongly reduced catalytic activity showed only a weak loss of tRNA binding or even bound better to tRNA than wild-type DNMT2, which suggests that the enzyme induces some conformational changes in the tRNA in the transition state of the methyl group transfer reaction. Manual placement of tRNA into the structure suggests that DNMT2 mainly interacts with the anticodon stem and loop.

  3. Rational design of an orthogonal tryptophanyl nonsense suppressor tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Randall A.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    While a number of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (aaRS):tRNA pairs have been engineered to alter or expand the genetic code, only the Methanococcus jannaschii tyrosyl tRNA synthetase and tRNA have been used extensively in bacteria, limiting the types and numbers of unnatural amino acids that can be utilized at any one time to expand the genetic code. In order to expand the number and type of aaRS/tRNA pairs available for engineering bacterial genetic codes, we have developed an orthogonal tryptophanyl tRNA synthetase and tRNA pair, derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the process of developing an amber suppressor tRNA, we discovered that the Escherichia coli lysyl tRNA synthetase was responsible for misacylating the initial amber suppressor version of the yeast tryptophanyl tRNA. It was discovered that modification of the G:C content of the anticodon stem and therefore reducing the structural flexibility of this stem eliminated misacylation by the E. coli lysyl tRNA synthetase, and led to the development of a functional, orthogonal suppressor pair that should prove useful for the incorporation of bulky, unnatural amino acids into the genetic code. Our results provide insight into the role of tRNA flexibility in molecular recognition and the engineering and evolution of tRNA specificity. PMID:20571084

  4. PylSn and the Homologous N-terminal Domain of Pyrrolysyl-tRNA Synthetase Bind the tRNA That Is Essential for the Genetic Encoding of Pyrrolysine*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ruisheng; Krzycki, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrrolysine is represented by an amber codon in genes encoding proteins such as the methylamine methyltransferases present in some Archaea and Bacteria. Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) attaches pyrrolysine to the amber-suppressing tRNAPyl. Archaeal PylRS, encoded by pylS, has a catalytic C-terminal domain but an N-terminal region of unknown function and structure. In Bacteria, homologs of the N- and C-terminal regions of archaeal PylRS are respectively encoded by pylSn and pylSc. We show here that wild type PylS from Methanosarcina barkeri and PylSn from Desulfitobacterium hafniense bind tRNAPyl in EMSA with apparent Kd values of 0.12 and 0.13 μm, respectively. Truncation of the N-terminal region of PylS eliminated detectable tRNAPyl binding as measured by EMSA, but not catalytic activity. A chimeric protein with PylSn fused to the N terminus of truncated PylS regained EMSA-detectable tRNAPyl binding. PylSn did not bind other D. hafniense tRNAs, nor did the competition by the Escherichia coli tRNA pool interfere with tRNAPyl binding. Further indicating the specificity of PylSn interaction with tRNAPyl, substitutions of conserved residues in tRNAPyl in the variable loop, D stem, and T stem and loop had significant impact in binding, whereas those having base changes in the acceptor stem or anticodon stem and loop still retained the ability to complex with PylSn. PylSn and the N terminus of PylS comprise the protein superfamily TIGR03129. The members of this family are not similar to any known RNA-binding protein, but our results suggest their common function involves specific binding of tRNAPyl. PMID:22851181

  5. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-30

    8b. OFFICE SYMBOL 9. PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORGANIZATION (If oppl l/.et - Air Force Ofc. of Scientific Res. f/ I Be. ADDRESS...phenotype. Recent studies have also led to the identification of an enzyme which incorporates hypoxanthine into mature tRNA macromolecules. The...observation consistent with our original hypothesis. Investigations into tRNA modifications within the anticodon region have led to the identification of an

  6. Site-specific crosslinking of 4-thiouridine-modified human tRNA(3Lys) to reverse transcriptase from human immunodeficiency virus type I.

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Y; Steitz, J A

    1995-01-01

    We have mapped specific RNA-protein contacts between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type I reverse transcriptase (RT) and its natural primer, human tRNA(3Lys), using a site-specific crosslinking strategy. Four different tRNA(3Lys) constructs with a single 32P-labeled 4-thiouridine (4-thioU) residue at positions -1, 16, 36 or 41 were synthesized. After incubation with RT followed by irradiation, crosslinks were localized to either the p66 or p51 subunit of RT by digestion with nuclease and SDS gel fractionation. 4-thioU at position -1 or 16 transferred label to the p66 subunit almost exclusively (> 90%), whereas position 36 labeled both p66 and p51 (3:1). Position 41 yielded no detectable crosslinks. The region of p66 contacted by position -1 of tRNA(3Lys) was localized to the 203 C-terminal amino acids of RT by CNBr cleavage, whereas a 127 amino acid-CNBr peptide (residues 230-357) from both p66 and p51 was labeled by position 36. Functionality of the 4-thioU-modified tRNA(3Lys)(-1) crosslinked to RT in the presence of an RNA but not a DNA template was demonstrated by the ability of the tRNA to be extended. These results localize the 5' half of the tRNA on the interface between the two RT subunits, closer to the RNase H domain than to the polymerase active site, in accord with previous suggestions. They argue further that a specific binding site for the 5' end of the primer tRNA(3Lys) may exist within the C-terminal portion of the p66 subunit, which could be important for the initiation of reverse transcription. Images PMID:7540137

  7. Human lysyl-tRNA synthetase is secreted to trigger proinflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Gyu; Kim, Hye Jin; Min, You Hong; Choi, Eung-Chil; Shin, Young Kee; Park, Bum-Joon; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Sunghoon

    2005-01-01

    Although aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) are essential for protein synthesis, they also function as regulators and signaling molecules in diverse biological processes. Here, we screened 11 different human ARSs to identify the enzyme that is secreted as a signaling molecule. Among them, we found that lysyl-tRNA synthetase (KRS) was secreted from intact human cells, and its secretion was induced by TNF-α. The secreted KRS bound to macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells to enhance the TNF-α production and their migration. The mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and Gαi were determined to be involved in the signal transduction triggered by KRS. All of these activities demonstrate that human KRS may work as a previously uncharacterized signaling molecule, inducing immune response through the activation of monocyte/macrophages. PMID:15851690

  8. Assignment of the cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase gene (CARS) to 11p15. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Cruzen, M.E.; Bengtsson, U.; McMahon, J.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Arfin, S.M. )

    1993-03-01

    The attachment of each of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids to their cognate tRNA isoaccepting families is catalyzed by a specific aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. The structural genes encoding 10 of these enzymes have been assigned to specific human chromosomes. The HARS, LARS, RARS, and TARS genes, encoding histidyl-, leucyl-, arginyl-, and threonyl-tRNA synthetases, respectively, are all located on chromosome 5( 1, 5, 7, 9, 14). The MARS (methionyl-tRNA synthetase), NARS (asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase), VARS (valyl-tRNA synthetase), and WARS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase) genes have been assigned to chromosomes 12, 18, 6, and 14, respectively (3, 4, 6, 8). A gene originally identified as encoding glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase was mapped to chromosome 1q32-q42 (10). However, a recent study suggests that the product of this gene is, in fact, a multifunctional enzyme with both glutamyl- and prolyl-tRNA synthetase activities (2). The fact that 4 of the 10 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes already mapped are located on chromosome 5 may be fortuitous but might also indicate an evolutionary or regulatory relatedness. It is therefore, of interest to map genes encoding other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to determine if additional examples of synteny exist. The recent isolation of cDNA and genomic DNA clones for human cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase has now enabled us to map the CARS gene to segment p15.5 on chromosome 11 by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

  9. Comparison of effects of aspirin and indomethacin on human platelet prostaglandin synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Crook, D; Collins, A J

    1977-01-01

    Human platelets were incubated in vitro with either aspirin or indomethacin and the prostaglandin synthetase activity of the resultant microsomal fraction from each incubation measured using a radiometric technique. Whereas aspirin produced a dose-related inhibition of the enzyme, indomethacin produced little or no inhibition over the same concentration range (10(-6) mol/l--10(-3) mol/l). Furthermore, administration of aspirin (600 mg) to volunteers produced a highly significant, prolonged inhibition of platelet microsomal prostaglandin synthetase whereas no inhibition was found with indomethacin (50 mg). As indomethacin is considerably more potent than aspirin as an inhibitor of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase in vitro, the results suggest a fundamental difference in the nature of the inhibition produced by each drug, aspirin being an essentially irreversible inhibitor whereas the inhibition produced by indomethacin is reversible. Studies with [3H-acetyl] aspirin have confirmed previous findings (Roth and Majerus, 1975) that aspirin produces an irreversible acetylation of a particulate fraction protein from human platelets. PMID:411427

  10. Phosphorylation of Human CTP Synthetase 1 by Protein Kinase A: IDENTIFICATION OF Thr455 AS A MAJOR SITE OF PHOSPHORYLATION*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    CTP synthetase is an essential enzyme that generates the CTP required for the synthesis of nucleic acids and membrane phospholipids. In this work, we examined the phosphorylation of the human CTPS1-encoded CTP synthetase 1 by protein kinase A. CTP synthetase 1 was expressed and purified from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ double mutant that lacks CTP synthetase activity. Using purified CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase A activity was time- and dose-dependent. The phosphorylation, which primarily occurred on a threonine residue, was accompanied by a 50% decrease in CTP synthetase 1 activity. The synthetic peptide LGKRRTLFQT that contains the protein kinase A motif for Thr455 was a substrate for protein kinase A. A Thr455 to Ala (T455A) mutation in CTP synthetase 1 was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and was expressed and purified from the S. cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ mutant. The T455A mutation caused a 78% decrease in protein kinase A phosphorylation, and the loss of the phosphothreonine residue and a major phosphopeptide that were present in the purified wild type enzyme phosphorylated by protein kinase A. The CTP synthetase 1 activity of the T455A mutant enzyme was 2-fold higher than the wild type enzyme. In addition, the T455A mutation caused a 44% decrease in the amount of human CTP synthetase 1 that was phosphorylated in S. cerevisiae cells, and this was accompanied by a 2.5-fold increase in the cellular concentration of CTP and a 1.5-fold increase in the choline-dependent synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. PMID:17189248

  11. Structure of Human Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Synthetase at 2.3 Å Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Manoj, N.; Strauss, E.; Begley, T.P.; Ealick, S.E.

    2010-12-01

    The structure of human phosphopantothenoylcysteine (PPC) synthetase was determined at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. PPC synthetase is a dimer with identical monomers. Some features of the monomer fold resemble a group of NAD-dependent enzymes, while other features resemble the ribokinase fold. The ATP, phosphopantothenate, and cysteine binding sites were deduced from modeling studies. Highly conserved ATP binding residues include Gly43, Ser61, Gly63, Gly66, Phe230, and Asn258. Highly conserved phosphopantothenate binding residues include Asn59, Ala179, Ala180, and Asp183 from one monomer and Arg55 from the adjacent monomer. The structure predicts a ping pong mechanism with initial formation of an acyladenylate intermediate, followed by release of pyrophosphate and attack by cysteine to form the final products PPC and AMP.

  12. A fluorescence-based coupling reaction for monitoring the activity of recombinant human NAD synthetase.

    PubMed

    Bembenek, Michael E; Kuhn, Eric; Mallender, William D; Pullen, Lester; Li, Ping; Parsons, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    NAD synthetase is responsible for the conversion of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. This reaction provides a biosynthetic route of the coenzyme and, thus, a source of cellular reducing equivalents. Alterations in the oxidative reductive potential of the cell have been implicated as a contributing factor in many disease states. Thus, this enzyme represents a new class of potential drug targets, and, hence, our efforts were focused upon developing a robust assay for utilization in a high throughput screen. Toward that end, we describe a coupled enzyme assay format for the measurement of recombinant human NAD synthetase by employing lactate dehydrogenase in a cycling/amplification reaction linked ultimately to the fluorescence generation of resorufin from resazurin via diaphorase. We present kinetics of the reaction of NAD synthetase in the coupled assay format, optimization conditions, and inhibition of the reaction by gossypol [1,1',6,6',7,7'-hexahydroxy-3,3'-dimethyl-5,5'-bis(1-methylethyl)-[2,2'- binaphthalene]-8,8'-dicarboxaldehyde] and illustrate the robustness of the assay by demonstrating 384-well microtiter plate uniformity statistics. Collectively, our results show that the assay method is both robust and well suited for this class of enzymes involved in the NAD+ biosynthetic pathway.

  13. Localization of two human autoantigen genes by PCR screening and in situ hybridization-glycyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 7p15 and Alanyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 16q22

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, R.C.; Pai, S.I.; Liu, P.; Ge, Q.; Targoff, I.N.

    1995-11-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aminoacyl-RS) catalyze the attachment of an amino acid to its cognate tRNA. Five of 20 human aminoacyl-RS (histidyl-RS, threonyl-RS, isoleucyl-RS, glycyl-RS, and alanyl-RS) have been identified as targets of autoantibodies in the autoimmune disease polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM; 9). A sixth autoantigenic amino-acyl-RS, lysyl-RS, was recently reported. The genes for histidyl-RS and threonyl-RS have been assigned to chromosome 5, as have the genes for leucyl-RS and arginyl-RS. Six other aminoacyl-RS (glutamyl-prolyl-RS, valyl-RS, cysteinyl-RS, methionyl-RS, tryptophanyl-RS, and asparaginyl-RS) were assigned to chromosomes 1, 6, 11, 12, 14, and 18, respectively. The reason for a preponderance of aminoacyl-RS genes on chromosome 5 is unknown, but it has been suggested that regulatory relatedness might be a factor. Recently the entire or partial cDNA sequences for two autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS genes, glycyl-RS (gene symbol GARS; 4) and alanyl-RS (gene symbol AARS; 1), were reported. To understand further the genesis of autoimmune responses to aminoacyl-RS and to determine whether genes for autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS colocalize to chromosome 5, we have determined the chromosomal site of the GARS and AARS genes by PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrid panels and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Inhibition of human estrogen synthetase (aromatase) by flavones.

    PubMed

    Kellis, J T; Vickery, L E

    1984-09-07

    Several naturally occurring and synthetic flavones were found to inhibit the aromatization of androstenedione and testosterone to estrogens catalyzed by human placental and ovarian microsomes. These flavones include (in order of decreasing potency) 7,8-benzoflavone, chrysin, apigenin, flavone, flavanone, and quercetin; 5,6-benzoflavone was not inhibitory. 7,8-Benzoflavone and chrysin were potent competitive inhibitors and induced spectral changes in the aromatase cytochrome P-450 indicative of substrate displacement. Flavones may thus compete with steroids in their interaction with certain monooxygenases and thereby alter steroid hormone metabolism.

  15. Inhibition of human glutamine synthetase by L-methionine-S,R-sulfoximine-relevance to the treatment of neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2014-12-01

    At high concentrations, the glutamine synthetase inhibitor L-methionine-S,R-sulfoximine (MSO) is a convulsant, especially in dogs. Nevertheless, sub-convulsive doses of MSO are neuroprotective in rodent models of hyperammonemia, acute liver disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and suggest MSO may be clinically useful. Previous work has also shown that much lower doses of MSO are required to produce convulsions in dogs than in primates. Evidence from the mid-20th century suggests that humans are also less sensitive. In the present work, the inhibition of recombinant human glutamine synthetase by MSO is shown to be biphasic-an initial reversible competitive inhibition (K i 1.19 mM) is followed by rapid irreversible inactivation. This K i value for the human enzyme accounts, in part, for relative insensitivity of primates to MSO and suggests that this inhibitor could be used to safely inhibit glutamine synthetase activity in humans.

  16. Structure of human carbamoyl phosphate synthetase: deciphering the on/off switch of human ureagenesis

    PubMed Central

    de Cima, Sergio; Polo, Luis M.; Díez-Fernández, Carmen; Martínez, Ana I.; Cervera, Javier; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Human carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS1), a 1500-residue multidomain enzyme, catalyzes the first step of ammonia detoxification to urea requiring N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG) as essential activator to prevent ammonia/amino acids depletion. Here we present the crystal structures of CPS1 in the absence and in the presence of NAG, clarifying the on/off-switching of the urea cycle by NAG. By binding at the C-terminal domain of CPS1, NAG triggers long-range conformational changes affecting the two distant phosphorylation domains. These changes, concerted with the binding of nucleotides, result in a dramatic remodeling that stabilizes the catalytically competent conformation and the building of the ~35 Å-long tunnel that allows migration of the carbamate intermediate from its site of formation to the second phosphorylation site, where carbamoyl phosphate is produced. These structures allow rationalizing the effects of mutations found in patients with CPS1 deficiency (presenting hyperammonemia, mental retardation and even death), as exemplified here for some mutations. PMID:26592762

  17. A single Danio rerio hars gene encodes both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial histidyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Ashley L; Cahan, Sara Helms; Franklyn, Christopher S; Ebert, Alicia M

    2017-01-01

    Histidyl tRNA Synthetase (HARS) is a member of the aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (ARS) family of enzymes. This family of 20 enzymes is responsible for attaching specific amino acids to their cognate tRNA molecules, a critical step in protein synthesis. However, recent work highlighting a growing number of associations between ARS genes and diverse human diseases raises the possibility of new and unexpected functions in this ancient enzyme family. For example, mutations in HARS have been linked to two different neurological disorders, Usher Syndrome Type IIIB and Charcot Marie Tooth peripheral neuropathy. These connections raise the possibility of previously undiscovered roles for HARS in metazoan development, with alterations in these functions leading to complex diseases. In an attempt to establish Danio rerio as a model for studying HARS functions in human disease, we characterized the Danio rerio hars gene and compared it to that of human HARS. Using a combination of bioinformatics, molecular biology, and cellular approaches, we found that while the human genome encodes separate genes for cytoplasmic and mitochondrial HARS protein, the Danio rerio genome encodes a single hars gene which undergoes alternative splicing to produce the respective cytoplasmic and mitochondrial versions of Hars. Nevertheless, while the HARS genes of humans and Danio differ significantly at the genomic level, we found that they are still highly conserved at the amino acid level, underscoring the potential utility of Danio rerio as a model organism for investigating HARS function and its link to human diseases in vivo.

  18. Phosphorylation of human CTP synthetase 1 by protein kinase C: identification of Ser(462) and Thr(455) as major sites of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Fang; Martin, Shelley S; Baldwin, Enoch P; Carman, George M

    2007-06-15

    Phosphorylation of human CTP synthetase 1 by mammalian protein kinase C was examined. Using purified Escherichia coli-expressed CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was time- and dose-dependent and dependent on the concentrations of ATP and CTP synthetase 1. The protein kinase C phosphorylation of the recombinant enzyme was accompanied by a 95-fold increase in CTP synthetase 1 activity. Phosphopeptide mapping and phosphoamino acid analyses showed that CTP synthetase 1 was phosphorylated on multiple serine and threonine residues. The induction of PKC1(R398A)-encoded protein kinase C resulted in a 50% increase for human CTP synthetase 1 phosphorylation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Delta ura8Delta mutant lacking yeast CTP synthetase activity. Synthetic peptides that contain the protein kinase C motif for Ser(462) and Thr(455) were substrates for mammalian protein kinase C, and S462A and T455A mutations resulted in decreases in the extent of CTP synthetase 1 phosphorylation that occurred in vivo. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of S. cerevisiae-expressed CTP synthetase 1 mutant enzymes phosphorylated with mammalian protein kinase C confirmed that Ser(462) and Thr(455) were phosphorylation sites. The S. cerevisiae-expressed and purified S462A mutant enzyme exhibited a 2-fold reduction in CTP synthetase 1 activity, whereas the purified T455A mutant enzyme exhibited a 2-fold elevation in CTP synthetase 1 activity (Choi, M.-G., and Carman, G.M. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 5367-5377). These data indicated that protein kinase C phosphorylation at Ser(462) stimulates human CTP synthetase 1 activity, whereas phosphorylation at Thr(455) inhibits activity.

  19. Phosphorylation of Human CTP Synthetase 1 by Protein Kinase C IDENTIFICATION OF Ser462 AND Thr455 AS MAJOR SITES OF PHOSPHORYLATION*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Fang; Martin, Shelley S.; Baldwin, Enoch P.; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphorylation of human CTP synthetase 1 by mammalian protein kinase C was examined. Using purified Escherichia coli-expressed CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was time-and dose-dependent, and dependent on the concentrations of ATP and CTP synthetase 1. The protein kinase C phosphorylation of the recombinant enzyme was accompanied by a 95-fold increase in CTP synthetase 1 activity. Phosphopeptide mapping and phosphoamino acid analyses showed that CTP synthetase 1 was phosphorylated on multiple serine and threonine residues. The induction of PKC1R398A-encoded protein kinase C resulted in a 50% increase for human CTP synthetase 1 phosphorylation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ mutant lacking yeast CTP synthetase activity. Synthetic peptides that contain the protein kinase C motif for Ser462 and Thr455 were substrates for mammalian protein kinase C, and S462A and T455A mutations resulted in decreases in the extent of CTP synthetase 1 phosphorylation that occurred in vivo. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of S. cerevisiae-expressed CTP synthetase 1 mutant enzymes phosphorylated with mammalian protein kinase C confirmed that Ser462 and Thr455 were phosphorylation sites. The S. cerevisiae-expressed and purified S462A mutant enzyme exhibited a 2-fold reduction in CTP synthetase 1 activity, whereas the purified T455A mutant enzyme exhibits a 2-fold elevation in CTP synthetase 1 activity (Choi, M.-G., and Carman, G.M. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 5367–5377). These data indicated that protein kinase C phosphorylation at Ser462 stimulates human CTP synthetase 1 activity, whereas phosphorylation at Thr455 inhibits activity. PMID:17463002

  20. Exploring the Catalytic Mechanism of Human Glutamine Synthetase by Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Issoglio, Federico M; Campolo, Nicolas; Zeida, Ari; Grune, Tilman; Radi, Rafael; Estrin, Dario A; Bartesaghi, Silvina

    2016-10-13

    Glutamine synthetase is an important enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In mammals, it plays a key role in preventing excitotoxicity in the brain and detoxifying ammonia in the liver. In plants and bacteria, it is fundamental for nitrogen metabolism, being critical for the survival of the organism. In this work, we show how the use of classical molecular dynamics simulations and multiscale quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations allowed us to examine the structural properties and dynamics of human glutamine synthetase (HsGS), as well as the reaction mechanisms involved in the catalytic process with atomic level detail. Our results suggest that glutamine formation proceeds through a two-step mechanism that includes a first step in which the γ-glutamyl phosphate intermediate forms, with a 5 kcal/mol free energy barrier and a -8 kcal/mol reaction free energy, and then a second rate-limiting step involving the ammonia nucleophilic attack, with a free energy barrier of 19 kcal/mol and a reaction free energy of almost zero. A detailed analysis of structural features within each step exposed the relevance of the acid-base equilibrium related to protein residues and substrates in the thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions. These results provide a comprehensive study of HsGS dynamics and establish the groundwork for further analysis regarding changes in HsGS activity, as occur in natural variants and post-translational modifications.

  1. The mRNA of human cytoplasmic arginyl-tRNA synthetase recruits prokaryotic ribosomes independently.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Ji, Quan-Quan; Ruan, Liang-Liang; Ye, Qing; Wang, En-Duo

    2014-07-25

    There are two isoforms of cytoplasmic arginyl-tRNA synthetase (hcArgRS) in human cells. The long form is a component of the multiple aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex, and the other is an N-terminal truncated form (NhcArgRS), free in the cytoplasm. It has been shown that the two forms of ArgRS arise from alternative translational initiation in a single mRNA. The short form is produced from the initiation at a downstream, in-frame AUG start codon. Interestingly, our data suggest that the alternative translational initiation of hcArgRS mRNA also takes place in Escherichia coli transformants. When the gene encoding full-length hcArgRS was overexpressed in E. coli, two forms of hcArgRS were observed. The N-terminal sequencing experiment identified that the short form was identical to the NhcArgRS in human cytoplasm. By constructing a bicistronic system, our data support that the mRNA encoding the N-terminal extension of hcArgRS has the capacity of independently recruiting E. coli ribosomes. Furthermore, two critical elements for recruiting prokaryotic ribosomes were identified, the “AGGA” core of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the “A-rich” sequence located just proximal to the alternative in-frame initiation site. Although the mechanisms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic translational initiation are distinct, they share some common features. The ability of the hcArgRS mRNA to recruit the prokaryotic ribosome may provide clues for shedding light on the mechanism of alternative translational initiation of hcArgRS mRNA in eukaryotic cells.

  2. Distribution of immunoreactive glutamine synthetase in the adult human and mouse brain. Qualitative and quantitative observations with special emphasis on extra-astroglial protein localization.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bannier, Jana; Meyer-Lotz, Gabriela; Steiner, Johann; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Walter, Martin; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, thus playing a pivotal role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis. Despite a plethora of studies on this enzyme, knowledge about the regional and cellular distribution of this enzyme in human brain is still fragmentary. Therefore, we mapped fourteen post-mortem brains of psychically healthy individuals for the distribution of the glutamine synthetase immunoreactive protein. It was found that glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity is expressed in multiple gray and white matter astrocytes, but also in oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and certain neurons. Since a possible extra-astrocytic expression of glutamine synthetase is highly controversial, we paid special attention to its appearance in oligodendrocytes and neurons. By double immunolabeling of mouse brain slices and cultured mouse brain cells for glutamine synthetase and cell-type-specific markers we provide evidence that besides astrocytes subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, microglial cells and neurons express glutamine synthetase. Moreover, we show that glutamine synthetase-immunopositive neurons are not randomly distributed throughout human and mouse brain, but represent a subpopulation of nitrergic (i.e. neuronal nitric oxide synthase expressing) neurons. Possible functional implications of an extra-astrocytic localization of glutamine synthetase are discussed.

  3. An exposed cysteine residue of human angiostatic mini tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Wakasugi, Keisuke

    2010-04-13

    Human tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) catalyzes the aminoacylation of tRNA(Trp). Human TrpRS exists in two forms: a major form that is the full-length protein and a truncated form (mini TrpRS) in which most of the N-terminal extension is absent. Human mini, but not full-length, TrpRS has angiostatic activity. Because the full-length protein, which lacks angiostatic activity, has all of the amino acid determinants of the mini form, which has activity, I searched for conformational differences between the two proteins. Using a disulfide cross-linking assay, I showed that the molecular environment around Cys62 is significantly different between the two proteins. This difference can be explained by inspection of the three-dimensional structure of the full-length protein. These results give a clear demonstration of a significant difference, around a specific residue (Cys62), between a potent angiostatic and nonangiostatic version of human TrpRS.

  4. Leishmania donovani tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase structure in complex with a tyrosyl adenylate analog and comparisons with human and protozoan counterparts.

    PubMed

    Barros-Álvarez, Ximena; Kerchner, Keshia M; Koh, Cho Yeow; Turley, Stewart; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Ranade, Ranae M; Gillespie, J Robert; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Buckner, Frederick S; Hol, Wim G J

    2017-07-01

    The crystal structure of Leishmania donovani tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (LdTyrRS) in complex with a nanobody and the tyrosyl adenylate analog TyrSA was determined at 2.75 Å resolution. Nanobodies are the variable domains of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies. The nanobody makes numerous crystal contacts and in addition reduces the flexibility of a loop of LdTyrRS. TyrSA is engaged in many interactions with active site residues occupying the tyrosine and adenine binding pockets. The LdTyrRS polypeptide chain consists of two pseudo-monomers, each consisting of two domains. Comparing the two independent chains in the asymmetric unit reveals that the two pseudo-monomers of LdTyrRS can bend with respect to each other essentially as rigid bodies. This flexibility might be useful in the positioning of tRNA for catalysis since both pseudo-monomers in the LdTyrRS chain are needed for charging tRNA(Tyr). An "extra pocket" (EP) appears to be present near the adenine binding region of LdTyrRS. Since this pocket is absent in the two human homologous enzymes, the EP provides interesting opportunities for obtaining selective drugs for treating infections caused by L. donovani, a unicellular parasite causing visceral leishmaniasis, or kala azar, which claims 20,000 to 30,000 deaths per year. Sequence and structural comparisons indicate that the EP is a characteristic which also occurs in the active site of several other important pathogenic protozoa. Therefore, the structure of LdTyrRS could inspire the design of compounds useful for treating several different parasitic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  5. Congenital Visual Impairment and Progressive Microcephaly Due to Lysyl-Transfer Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) Synthetase (KARS) Mutations: The Expanding Phenotype of Aminoacyl-Transfer RNA Synthetase Mutations in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Hugh J; Humphreys, Peter; Smith, Amanda; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Bulman, Dennis E; Beaulieu, Chandree L; Majewski, Jacek; Boycott, Kym M; Geraghty, Michael T

    2015-07-01

    Aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthetases (ARSs) are a group of enzymes required for the first step of protein translation. Each aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase links a specific amino acid to its corresponding transfer RNA component within the cytoplasm, mitochondria, or both. Mutations in ARSs have been linked to a growing number of diseases. Lysyl-transfer RNA synthetase (KARS) links the amino acid lysine to its cognate transfer RNA. We report 2 siblings with severe infantile visual loss, progressive microcephaly, developmental delay, seizures, and abnormal subcortical white matter. Exome sequencing identified mutations within the KARS gene (NM_005548.2):c.1312C>T; p.Arg438Trp and c.1573G>A; p.Glu525Lys occurring within a highly conserved region of the catalytic domain. Our patients' phenotype is remarkably similar to a phenotype recently reported in glutaminyl-transfer RNA synthetase (QARS), another bifunctional ARS gene. This finding expands the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in KARS and draws attention to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase as a group of enzymes that are increasingly being implicated in human disease.

  6. Over-expression in Escherichia coli and characterization of two recombinant isoforms of human FAD synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Brizio, Carmen; Galluccio, Michele; Wait, Robin; Torchetti, Enza Maria; Bafunno, Valeria; Accardi, Rosita; Gianazza, Elisabetta; Indiveri, Cesare; Barile, Maria . E-mail: m.barile@biologia.uniba.it

    2006-06-09

    FAD synthetase (FADS) (EC 2.7.7.2) is a key enzyme in the metabolic pathway that converts riboflavin into the redox cofactor FAD. Two hypothetical human FADSs, which are the products of FLAD1 gene, were over-expressed in Escherichia coli and identified by ESI-MS/MS. Isoform 1 was over-expressed as a T7-tagged protein which had a molecular mass of 63 kDa on SDS-PAGE. Isoform 2 was over-expressed as a 6-His-tagged fusion protein, carrying an extra 84 amino acids at the N-terminal with an apparent molecular mass of 60 kDa on SDS-PAGE. It was purified near to homogeneity from the soluble cell fraction by one-step affinity chromatography. Both isoforms possessed FADS activity and had a strict requirement for MgCl{sub 2}, as demonstrated using both spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods. The purified recombinant isoform 2 showed a specific activity of 6.8 {+-} 1.3 nmol of FAD synthesized/min/mg protein and exhibited a K {sub M} value for FMN of 1.5 {+-} 0.3 {mu}M. This is First report on characterization of human FADS, and First cloning and over-expression of FADS from an organism higher than yeast.

  7. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of human holocarboxylase synthetase, a gene responsible for biotin dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Aoki, Y.; Ishida, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) catalyzes biotin incorporation into various carboxylases that require biotin as a prosthetic group. They are acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid synthesis; pyruvate carboxylase, a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis; propionyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase, enzymes involved in amino acid catabolism. HCS is therefore involved in various metabolic processes and is a key enzyme for biotin utilization by mammalian cells. Deficiency of HCS in man is known to cause biotin-responsive multiple carboxylase deficiency. Isolation of cDNA clones for the enzyme is essential to understand HCS and its deficiency at the molecular level. We purified bovine liver HCS and sequenced its proteolytic peptides. Degenerative oligonucleotide primers were synthesized from the two peptide sequences and used to amplify a putative HCS cDNA fragment from human liver by PCR. Using the amplified DNA fragment as a probe, we screened {lambda}gt10 human liver cDNA library and isolated 12 positive clones. The isolated cDNAs encoded a protein of 726 amino acids with molecular mass of 80,759. The protein contained several sequences identical or similar to those of peptides derived from the bovine liver HCS. The predicted protein had a homologous region with BirA which acts as both a biotin-[acetyl-CoA-carboxylase] ligase and a biotin repressor in E. coli, suggesting a functional relationship between the two proteins. We expressed the protein using pET3 a vector in E. coli (BL21 strain) and raised antiserum against the expressed protein. The antiserum immunoprecipitated HCS activities of human lymphoblasts and bovine liver. A one-base deletion and a missense mutation were found in cells from siblings with HCS deficiency. The human HCS gene was assigned to chromosome 21, region 21q22.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis.

  8. Resveratrol compounds inhibit human holocarboxylase synthetase and cause a lean phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Cordonier, Elizabeth L.; Adjam, Riem; Camara Teixeira, Daniel; Onur, Simone; Zbasnik, Richard; Read, Paul E.; Döring, Frank; Schlegel, Vicki L.; Zempleni, Janos

    2015-01-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) is the sole protein-biotin ligase in the human proteome. HLCS has key regulatory functions in intermediary metabolism, including fatty acid metabolism, and in gene repression through epigenetic mechanisms. The objective of this study was to identify foodborne inhibitors of HLCS that alter HLCS-dependent pathways in metabolism and gene regulation. When libraries of extracts from natural products and chemically pure compounds were screened for HLCS inhibitor activity, resveratrol compounds in grape materials caused an HLCS inhibition of >98% in vitro. The potency of these compounds was piceatannol > resveratrol > piceid. Grape-borne compounds other than resveratrol metabolites also contributed toward HLCS inhibition, e.g., p-coumaric acid and cyanidin chloride. HLCS inhibitors had meaningful effects on body fat mass. When Drosophila melanogaster brummer mutants, which are genetically predisposed to storing excess amounts of lipids, were fed diets enriched with grape leaf extracts and piceid, body fat mass decreased by more than 30% in males and females. However, Drosophila responded to inhibitor treatment with an increase in the expression of HLCS, which elicited an increase in the abundance of biotinylated carboxylases in vivo. We conclude that mechanisms other than inhibition of HLCS cause body fat loss in flies. We propose that the primary candidate is the inhibition of the insulin receptor/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:26303405

  9. Human selenophosphate synthetase 1 has five splice variants with unique interactions, subcellular localizations and expression patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Kwang Hee; Shim, Myoung Sup; Shin, Hyein; Xu, Xue-Ming; Carlson, Bradley A.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Lee, Byeong Jae

    2010-06-18

    Selenophosphate synthetase 1 (SPS1) is an essential cellular gene in higher eukaryotes. Five alternative splice variants of human SPS1 (major type, {Delta}E2, {Delta}E8, +E9, +E9a) were identified wherein +E9 and +E9a make the same protein. The major type was localized in both the nuclear and plasma membranes, and the others in the cytoplasm. All variants form homodimers, and in addition, the major type forms a heterodimer with {Delta}E2, and {Delta}E8 with +E9. The level of expression of each splice variant was different in various cell lines. The expression of each alternative splice variant was regulated during the cell cycle. The levels of the major type and {Delta}E8 were gradually increased until G2/M phase and then gradually decreased. {Delta}E2 expression peaked at mid-S phase and then gradually decreased. However, +E9/+E9a expression decreased gradually after cell cycle arrest. The possible involvement of SPS1 splice variants in cell cycle regulation is discussed.

  10. Chemical validation of trypanothione synthetase: a potential drug target for human trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Torrie, Leah S; Wyllie, Susan; Spinks, Daniel; Oza, Sandra L; Thompson, Stephen; Harrison, Justin R; Gilbert, Ian H; Wyatt, Paul G; Fairlamb, Alan H; Frearson, Julie A

    2009-12-25

    In the search for new therapeutics for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis, many potential drug targets in Trypanosoma brucei have been validated by genetic means, but very few have been chemically validated. Trypanothione synthetase (TryS; EC 6.3.1.9; spermidine/glutathionylspermidine:glutathione ligase (ADP-forming)) is one such target. To identify novel inhibitors of T. brucei TryS, we developed an in vitro enzyme assay, which was amenable to high throughput screening. The subsequent screen of a diverse compound library resulted in the identification of three novel series of TryS inhibitors. Further chemical exploration resulted in leads with nanomolar potency, which displayed mixed, uncompetitive, and allosteric-type inhibition with respect to spermidine, ATP, and glutathione, respectively. Representatives of all three series inhibited growth of bloodstream T. brucei in vitro. Exposure to one of our lead compounds (DDD86243; 2 x EC(50) for 72 h) decreased intracellular trypanothione levels to <10% of wild type. In addition, there was a corresponding 5-fold increase in the precursor metabolite, glutathione, providing strong evidence that DDD86243 was acting on target to inhibit TryS. This was confirmed with wild-type, TryS single knock-out, and TryS-overexpressing cell lines showing expected changes in potency to DDD86243. Taken together, these data provide initial chemical validation of TryS as a drug target in T. brucei.

  11. Neurodegenerative disease-associated mutants of a human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase present individual molecular signatures

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Claude; Lorber, Bernard; Gaudry, Agnès; Karim, Loukmane; Schwenzer, Hagen; Wien, Frank; Roblin, Pierre; Florentz, Catherine; Sissler, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are associated with a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. The effects of these mutations on the structure and function of the enzymes remain to be established. Here, we investigate six mutants of the aspartyl-tRNA synthetase correlated with leukoencephalopathies. Our integrated strategy, combining an ensemble of biochemical and biophysical approaches, reveals that mutants are diversely affected with respect to their solubility in cellular extracts and stability in solution, but not in architecture. Mutations with mild effects on solubility occur in patients as allelic combinations whereas those with strong effects on solubility or on aminoacylation are necessarily associated with a partially functional allele. The fact that all mutations show individual molecular and cellular signatures and affect amino acids only conserved in mammals, points towards an alternative function besides aminoacylation. PMID:26620921

  12. A human tRNA methyltransferase 9-like protein prevents tumour growth by regulating LIN9 and HIF1-α

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Ulrike; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Patil, Ashish; Endres, Lauren; Estrada, Yeriel; Chan, Clement TY; Su, Dan; Dedon, Peter C; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Begley, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to aberrant regulation of translation as a driver of cell transformation in cancer. Given the direct control of translation by tRNA modifications, tRNA modifying enzymes may function as regulators of cancer progression. Here, we show that a tRNA methyltransferase 9-like (hTRM9L/KIAA1456) mRNA is down-regulated in breast, bladder, colorectal, cervix and testicular carcinomas. In the aggressive SW620 and HCT116 colon carcinoma cell lines, hTRM9L is silenced and its re-expression and methyltransferase activity dramatically suppressed tumour growth in vivo. This growth inhibition was linked to decreased proliferation, senescence-like G0/G1-arrest and up-regulation of the RB interacting protein LIN9. Additionally, SW620 cells re-expressing hTRM9L did not respond to hypoxia via HIF1-α-dependent induction of GLUT1. Importantly, hTRM9L-negative tumours were highly sensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics and this was associated with altered tRNA modification levels compared to antibiotic resistant hTRM9L-expressing SW620 cells. Our study links hTRM9L and tRNA modifications to inhibition of tumour growth via LIN9 and HIF1-α-dependent mechanisms. It also suggests that aminoglycoside antibiotics may be useful to treat hTRM9L-deficient tumours. PMID:23381944

  13. A human tRNA methyltransferase 9-like protein prevents tumour growth by regulating LIN9 and HIF1-α.

    PubMed

    Begley, Ulrike; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Patil, Ashish; Endres, Lauren; Estrada, Yeriel; Chan, Clement T Y; Su, Dan; Dedon, Peter C; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Begley, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Emerging evidence points to aberrant regulation of translation as a driver of cell transformation in cancer. Given the direct control of translation by tRNA modifications, tRNA modifying enzymes may function as regulators of cancer progression. Here, we show that a tRNA methyltransferase 9-like (hTRM9L/KIAA1456) mRNA is down-regulated in breast, bladder, colorectal, cervix and testicular carcinomas. In the aggressive SW620 and HCT116 colon carcinoma cell lines, hTRM9L is silenced and its re-expression and methyltransferase activity dramatically suppressed tumour growth in vivo. This growth inhibition was linked to decreased proliferation, senescence-like G0/G1-arrest and up-regulation of the RB interacting protein LIN9. Additionally, SW620 cells re-expressing hTRM9L did not respond to hypoxia via HIF1-α-dependent induction of GLUT1. Importantly, hTRM9L-negative tumours were highly sensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics and this was associated with altered tRNA modification levels compared to antibiotic resistant hTRM9L-expressing SW620 cells. Our study links hTRM9L and tRNA modifications to inhibition of tumour growth via LIN9 and HIF1-α-dependent mechanisms. It also suggests that aminoglycoside antibiotics may be useful to treat hTRM9L-deficient tumours.

  14. Elucidation of the active conformation of the APS-kinase domain of human PAPS synthetase 1.

    PubMed

    Sekulic, Nikolina; Dietrich, Kristen; Paarmann, Ingo; Ort, Stephan; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2007-03-23

    Bifunctional human PAPS synthetase (PAPSS) catalyzes, in a two-step process, the formation of the activated sulfate carrier 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS). The first reaction involves the formation of the 5'-adenosine phosphosulfate (APS) intermediate from ATP and inorganic sulfate. APS is then further phosphorylated on its 3'-hydroxyl group by an additional ATP molecule to generate PAPS. The former reaction is catalyzed by the ATP-sulfurylase domain and the latter by the APS-kinase domain. Here, we report the structure of the APS-kinase domain of PAPSS isoform 1 (PAPSS1) representing the Michaelis complex with the products ADP-Mg and PAPS. This structure provides a rare glimpse of the active conformation of an enzyme catalyzing phosphoryl transfer without resorting to substrate analogs, inactivating mutations, or catalytically non-competent conditions. Our structure shows the interactions involved in the binding of the magnesium ion and PAPS, thereby revealing residues critical for catalysis. The essential magnesium ion is observed bridging the phosphate groups of the products. This function of the metal ion is made possible by the DGDN-loop changing its conformation from that previously reported, and identifies these loop residues unambiguously as a Walker B motif. Furthermore, the second aspartate residue of this motif is the likely candidate for initiating nucleophilic attack on the ATP gamma-phosphate group by abstracting the proton from the 3'-hydroxyl group of the substrate APS. We report the structure of the APS-kinase domain of human PAPSS1 in complex with two APS molecules, demonstrating the ability of the ATP/ADP-binding site to bind APS. Both structures reveal extended N termini that approach the active site of the neighboring monomer. Together, these results significantly increase our understandings of how catalysis is achieved by APS-kinase.

  15. Crystal structure of tetrameric form of human lysyl-tRNA synthetase: Implications for multisynthetase complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Min; Ignatov, Michael; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2008-09-17

    In mammals, many aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are bound together in a multisynthetase complex (MSC) as a reservoir of procytokines and regulation molecules for functions beyond aminoacylation. The {alpha}{sub 2} homodimeric lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS) is tightly bound in the MSC and, under specific conditions, is secreted to trigger a proinflammatory response. Results by others suggest that {alpha}{sub 2} LysRS is tightly bound into the core of the MSC with homodimeric {beta}{sub 2} p38, a scaffolding protein that itself is multifunctional. Not understood is how the two dimeric proteins combine to make a presumptive {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetramer and, in particular, the location of the surfaces on LysRS that would accommodate the p38 interactions. Here we present a 2.3-{angstrom} crystal structure of a tetrameric form of human LysRS. The relatively loose (as seen in solution) tetramer interface is assembled from two eukaryote-specific sequences, one in the catalytic- and another in the anticodon-binding domain. This same interface is predicted to provide unique determinants for interaction with p38. The analyses suggest how the core of the MSC is assembled and, more generally, that interactions and functions of synthetases can be built and regulated through dynamic protein-protein interfaces. These interfaces are created from small adaptations to what is otherwise a highly conserved (through evolution) polypeptide sequence.

  16. Crystal structure of human phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase 1 reveals a novel allosteric site.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Lu, Yongcheng; Peng, Baozhen; Ding, Jianping

    2007-01-01

    PRPP (phosphoribosylpyrophosphate) is an important metabolite essential for nucleotide synthesis and PRS (PRPP synthetase) catalyses synthesis of PRPP from R5P (ribose 5-phosphate) and ATP. The enzymatic activity of PRS is regulated by phosphate ions, divalent metal cations and ADP. In the present study we report the crystal structures of recombinant human PRS1 in complexes with SO4(2-) ions alone and with ATP, Cd2+ and SO4(2-) ions respectively. The AMP moiety of ATP binds at the ATP-binding site, and a Cd2+ ion binds at the active site and in a position to interact with the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. A SO4(2-) ion, an analogue of the activator phosphate, was found to bind at both the R5P-binding site and the allosteric site defined previously. In addi-tion, an extra SO4(2-) binds at a site at the dimer interface between the ATP-binding site and the allosteric site. Binding of this SO4(2-) stabilizes the conformation of the flexible loop at the active site, leading to the formation of the active, open conformation which is essential for binding of ATP and initiation of the catalytic reaction. This is the first time that structural stabilization at the active site caused by binding of an activator has been observed. Structural and biochemical data show that mutations of some residues at this site influence the binding of SO4(2-) and affect the enzymatic activity. The results in the present paper suggest that this new SO4(2-)-binding site is a second allosteric site to regulate the enzymatic activity which might also exist in other eukaryotic PRSs (except plant PRSs of class II), but not in bacterial PRSs.

  17. Increased expression of argininosuccinate synthetase protein predicts poor prognosis in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yan-Shen; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Ming-Derg; Yen, Meng-Chi; Luo, Yi-Pey; Chen, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1, also known as ASS) has been found in cancer cells and is involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of ASS expression in human gastric cancer and to determine the possible correlations between ASS expression and clinicopathological findings. Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin‑embedded tissues to determine whether ASS was expressed in 11 of 11 specimens from patients with gastric cancer. The protein was localized primarily to the cytoplasm of cancer cells and normal epithelium. In the Oncomine cancer microarray database, expression of the ASS gene was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues. To investigate the clinicopathological and prognostic roles of ASS expression, we performed western blot analysis of 35 matched specimens of gastric adenocarcinomas and normal tissue obtained from patients treated at the National Cheng Kung University Hospital. The ratio of relative ASS expression (expressed as the ASS/β-actin ratio) in tumor tissues to that in normal tissues was correlated with large tumor size (P=0.007) and with the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system (P=0.031). Patients whose cancer had increased the relative expression of ASS were positive for perineural invasion and had poor recurrence-free survival. In summary, ASS expression in gastric cancer was associated with a poor prognosis. Further study of mechanisms to silence the ASS gene or decrease the enzymatic activity of ASS protein has the potential to provide new treatments for patients with gastric cancer.

  18. N114S mutation causes loss of ATP-induced aggregation of human phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Honglin; Peng, Xiaohui; Zhao Fang; Zhang Guobin; Tao Ye; Luo Zhaofeng; Li Yang; Teng Maikun; Li Xu Wei Shiqiang

    2009-02-20

    This study examined recombinant wild-type human phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase 1 (wt-PRS1, EC 2.7.6.1) and the point mutant Asn114Ser PRS1 (N114S-Mutant) in cells of a patient with primary gout. Dynamic light-scattering and sedimentation velocity experiments indicated that the monomeric wt-PRS1 in solution was assembled into hexamers after adding the substrate ATP. However, this ATP-induced aggregation effect was not observed with N114S-Mutant, which has a 50% higher enzymatic activity than that of wt-PRS1. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the point mutation causes an increase of {alpha}-helix content and a decrease of turn content. Examination of the crystal structure of wt-PRS1 indicated that 12 hydrogen bonds formed by 6 pairs of N114 and D139 have an important role in stabilizing the hexamer. We suggest that the substitution of S114 for N114 in N114S-Mutant leads to the rupture of 12 hydrogen bonds and breakage of the PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} allosteric site where PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} functions as a fixer of the ATP-binding loop. Therefore, we consider that formation of the hexamer as the structural basis of the ADP allosteric inhibition is greatly weakened by the N114S mutation, and that alteration of the ATP-binding loop conformation is the key factor in the increased activity of N114S-Mutant. These two factors could be responsible for the high level of activity of N114S-Mutant in this patient.

  19. Chemical Carcinogen-Induced Changes in tRNA Metabolism in Human Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    the resolution and quantitation of modified ucleosides in the urine of cancer patients would not be particularly useful for the cell culture studies...Comparison of nucleic acid catabolism by normal human fibroblasts and fibroblasts transformed with methylazoxymethyl alcohol ( MAMA ),an activated...catabolite in long-term, pulse-chase experiments. However, the kinetics of catabolism differed, in that only the MAMA -transformed cells had generated

  20. Chromosomal localization of the gene for the human trifunctional enzyme, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase-formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Rozen, R; Barton, D; Du, J; Hum, D W; MacKenzie, R E; Francke, U

    1989-01-01

    A trifunctional protein in man, 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase-10-formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, catalyzes three consecutive steps in the interconversion of tetrahydrofolate derivatives; these derivatives supply one-carbon units for intermediary metabolism. Somatic cell hybridization and in situ hybridization were used to localize the functional gene coding for this protein--to human chromosome 14q24, near the c-fos and TGF-beta 3 loci. A second hybridizing sequence, possibly a pseudogene, was identified near the centromere of the X chromosome, at Xp11. Images Figure 1 PMID:2786332

  1. A euryarchaeal lysyl-tRNA synthetase: resemblance to class I synthetases.

    PubMed

    Ibba, M; Morgan, S; Curnow, A W; Pridmore, D R; Vothknecht, U C; Gardner, W; Lin, W; Woese, C R; Söll, D

    1997-11-07

    The sequencing of euryarchaeal genomes has suggested that the essential protein lysyl-transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetase (LysRS) is absent from such organisms. However, a single 62-kilodalton protein with canonical LysRS activity was purified from Methanococcus maripaludis, and the gene that encodes this protein was cloned. The predicted amino acid sequence of M. maripaludis LysRS is similar to open reading frames of unassigned function in both Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and Methanococcus jannaschii but is unrelated to canonical LysRS proteins reported in eubacteria, eukaryotes, and the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus solfataricus. The presence of amino acid motifs characteristic of the Rossmann dinucleotide-binding domain identifies M. maripaludis LysRS as a class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, in contrast to the known examples of this enzyme, which are class II synthetases. These data question the concept that the classification of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases does not vary throughout living systems.

  2. Spectrophotometric assays for monitoring tRNA aminoacylation and aminoacyl-tRNA hydrolysis reactions.

    PubMed

    First, Eric A; Richardson, Charles J

    2017-01-15

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases play a central role in protein synthesis, catalyzing the attachment of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs. Here, we describe a spectrophotometric assay for tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase in which the Tyr-tRNA product is cleaved, regenerating the tRNA substrate. As tRNA is the limiting substrate in the assay, recycling it substantially increases the sensitivity of the assay while simultaneously reducing its cost. The tRNA aminoacylation reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by coupling the production of AMP to the conversion of NAD(+) to NADH. We have adapted the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase assay to monitor: (1) aminoacylation of tRNA by l- or d-tyrosine, (2) cyclodipeptide formation by cyclodipeptide synthases, (3) hydrolysis of d-aminoacyl-tRNAs by d-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase, and (4) post-transfer editing by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. All of these assays are continuous and homogenous, making them amenable for use in high-throughput screens of chemical libraries. In the case of the cyclodipeptide synthase, d-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase, and post-transfer editing assays, the aminoacyl-tRNAs are generated in situ, avoiding the need to synthesize and purify aminoacyl-tRNA substrates prior to performing the assays. Lastly, we describe how the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase assay can be adapted to monitor the activity of other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and how the approach to regenerating the tRNA substrate can be used to increase the sensitivity and decrease the cost of commercially available aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase assays.

  3. Multiple adaptive mechanisms affect asparagine synthetase substrate availability in asparaginase-resistant MOLT-4 human leukaemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Aslanian, A M; Kilberg, M S

    2001-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is treated by combination chemotherapy with a number of drugs, almost always including the enzyme L-asparaginase (ASNase). Although the initial remission rate is quite high, relapse and associated drug resistance remain a problem. In vitro studies have demonstrated an adaptive increase in asparagine synthetase (AS) expression in ASNase-resistant cells, which is believed to permit ASNase-resistant human leukaemia cells to survive in vivo. The present results, obtained with ASNase-sensitive and -resistant human MOLT-4 leukaemia cell lines, illustrate that several other adaptive processes occur to provide sufficient amounts of the AS substrates, aspartate and glutamine, required to support this increased enzymic activity. In both cell populations, aspartate is derived almost exclusively from intracellular sources, whereas the necessary glutamine arises from both intracellular and extracellular sources. Transport of glutamine into ASNase-resistant cells is significantly enhanced compared with the parental cells, whereas amino acid efflux (e.g. asparagine) is reduced. Most of the adaptive change for the amino acid transporters, Systems A, ASC and L, is rapidly (12 h) reversed following ASNase removal. The enzymic activity of glutamine synthetase is also enhanced in ASNase-resistant cells by a post-transcriptional mechanism. The results demonstrate that there are several sites of metabolic adaptation in ASNase-treated leukaemia cells that serve to promote the replenishment of both glutamine and asparagine. PMID:11485552

  4. A role for [Fe4S4] clusters in tRNA recognition—a theoretical study

    PubMed Central

    Stiebritz, Martin T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years, structural studies have led to the unexpected discovery of iron–sulfur clusters in enzymes that are involved in DNA replication/repair and protein biosynthesis. Although these clusters are generally well-studied cofactors, their significance in the new contexts often remains elusive. One fascinating example is a tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from the thermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima, TmTrpRS, that has recently been structurally characterized. It represents an unprecedented connection among a primordial iron–sulfur cofactor, RNA and protein biosynthesis. Here, a possible role of the [Fe4S4] cluster in tRNA anticodon-loop recognition is investigated by means of density functional theory and comparison with the structure of a human tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA complex. It turns out that a cluster-coordinating cysteine residue, R224, and polar main chain atoms form a characteristic structural motif for recognizing a putative 5′ cytosine or 5′ 2-thiocytosine moiety in the anticodon loop of the tRNA molecule. This motif provides not only affinity but also specificity by creating a structural and energetical penalty for the binding of other bases, such as uracil. PMID:24753428

  5. Elaborate uORF/IRES features control expression and localization of human glycyl-tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrova, Jana; Paulus, Caroline; Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; Jossinet, Fabrice; Frugier, Magali

    2015-01-01

    The canonical activity of glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) is to charge glycine onto its cognate tRNAs. However, outside translation, GARS also participates in many other functions. A single gene encodes both the cytosolic and mitochondrial forms of GARS but 2 mRNA isoforms were identified. Using immunolocalization assays, in vitro translation assays and bicistronic constructs we provide experimental evidence that one of these mRNAs tightly controls expression and localization of human GARS. An intricate regulatory domain was found in its 5′-UTR which displays a functional Internal Ribosome Entry Site and an upstream Open Reading Frame. Together, these elements hinder the synthesis of the mitochondrial GARS and target the translation of the cytosolic enzyme to ER-bound ribosomes. This finding reveals a complex picture of GARS translation and localization in mammals. In this context, we discuss how human GARS expression could influence its moonlighting activities and its involvement in diseases. PMID:26327585

  6. Domain movements during CCA-addition: a new function for motif C in the catalytic core of the human tRNA nucleotidyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Felix G M; Rickert, Christian; Bluschke, Alexander; Betat, Heike; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Mörl, Mario

    2015-01-01

    CCA-adding enzymes are highly specific RNA polymerases that synthesize and maintain the sequence CCA at the tRNA 3'-end. This nucleotide triplet is a prerequisite for tRNAs to be aminoacylated and to participate in protein biosynthesis. During CCA-addition, a set of highly conserved motifs in the catalytic core of these enzymes is responsible for accurate sequential nucleotide incorporation. In the nucleotide binding pocket, three amino acid residues form Watson-Crick-like base pairs to the incoming CTP and ATP. A reorientation of these templating amino acids switches the enzyme's specificity from CTP to ATP recognition. However, the mechanism underlying this essential structural rearrangement is not understood. Here, we show that motif C, whose actual function has not been identified yet, contributes to the switch in nucleotide specificity during polymerization. Biochemical characterization as well as EPR spectroscopy measurements of the human enzyme reveal that mutating the highly conserved amino acid position D139 in this motif interferes with AMP incorporation and affects interdomain movements in the enzyme. We propose a model of action, where motif C forms a flexible spring element modulating the relative orientation of the enzyme's head and body domains to accommodate the growing 3'-end of the tRNA. Furthermore, these conformational transitions initiate the rearranging of the templating amino acids to switch the specificity of the nucleotide binding pocket from CTP to ATP during CCA-synthesis.

  7. Domain movements during CCA-addition: A new function for motif C in the catalytic core of the human tRNA nucleotidyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Felix G M; Rickert, Christian; Bluschke, Alexander; Betat, Heike; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Mörl, Mario

    2015-01-01

    CCA-adding enzymes are highly specific RNA polymerases that synthesize and maintain the sequence CCA at the tRNA 3′-end. This nucleotide triplet is a prerequisite for tRNAs to be aminoacylated and to participate in protein biosynthesis. During CCA-addition, a set of highly conserved motifs in the catalytic core of these enzymes is responsible for accurate sequential nucleotide incorporation. In the nucleotide binding pocket, three amino acid residues form Watson-Crick-like base pairs to the incoming CTP and ATP. A reorientation of these templating amino acids switches the enzyme's specificity from CTP to ATP recognition. However, the mechanism underlying this essential structural rearrangement is not understood. Here, we show that motif C, whose actual function has not been identified yet, contributes to the switch in nucleotide specificity during polymerization. Biochemical characterization as well as EPR spectroscopy measurements of the human enzyme reveal that mutating the highly conserved amino acid position D139 in this motif interferes with AMP incorporation and affects interdomain movements in the enzyme. We propose a model of action, where motif C forms a flexible spring element modulating the relative orientation of the enzyme's head and body domains to accommodate the growing 3′-end of the tRNA. Furthermore, these conformational transitions initiate the rearranging of the templating amino acids to switch the specificity of the nucleotide binding pocket from CTP to ATP during CCA-synthesis. PMID:25849199

  8. A comparative analysis of CCA-adding enzymes from human and E. coli: differences in CCA addition and tRNA 3'-end repair.

    PubMed

    Lizano, Esther; Scheibe, Marion; Rammelt, Christiane; Betat, Heike; Mörl, Mario

    2008-05-01

    Representing one of the most fascinating RNA polymerases, the CCA-adding enzyme (tRNA nucleotidyltransferase) is responsible for synthesis and repair of the 3'-terminal CCA sequence in tRNA transcripts. As a consequence of this important function, this enzyme is found in all organisms analyzed so far. Here, it is shown that the closely related enzymes of Homo sapiens and Escherichia coli differ substantially in their substrate preferences for the incorporation of CTP and ATP. While both enzymes require helical structures (mimicking the upper part of tRNAs) for C addition, the data indicate that the E. coli enzyme--in contrast to the human version--is quite promiscuous concerning the incorporation of ATP, where any RNA ending with two C residues is accepted. This feature is consistent with the primary function of the E. coli protein as a repair enzyme. Furthermore, even if the amino acid motif that interacts with the incoming nucleotides in the NTP binding pocket of these enzymes is destroyed and does no longer discriminate between individual bases, both nucleotidyltransferases have a back-up mechanism that ensures CCA addition with considerable accuracy and efficiency in order to guarantee functional protein synthesis and, consequently, the survival of the cell.

  9. tRNA genes and the genetic code.

    PubMed

    Foltan, Jaromir S

    2008-08-07

    The genetic code describes translational assignments between codons and amino acids. tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are those molecules by means of which these assignments are established. Any aaRS recognizes its tRNAs according to some of their nucleotides called identity elements (IEs). Let a 1Mut-similarity Sim (1Mut) be the average similarity between such tRNA genes whose codons differ by one point mutation. We showed that: (1) a global maximum of Sim (1Mut) is reached at the standard genetic code 27 times for 4 sets of IEs of tRNA genes of eukaryotic species, while it is so only 5 times for similarities Sim (C&R) between all tRNA genes whose codons lie in the same column or row of the code. Therefore, point mutations of anticodons were tested by nature to recruit tRNAs from one isoaccepting group to another, (2) because plain similarities Sim (all) between tRNA genes of species within any of the three domains of life are higher than between tRNA genes of species belonging to different domains, tRNA genes retained information about early evolution of cells, (3) we searched the order of tRNAs in which they were most probably assigned to their codons and amino acids. The beginning Ala, (Val), Pro, Ile, Lys, Arg, Trp, Met, Asp, Cys, (Ser) of our resulting chronology lies under a plateau on a graph of Sim (1Mut,IE)(univ.ancestors) plotted over this chronology for a set S(IE) of all IEs of tRNA genes, whose universal ancestors were separately computed for each codon. This plateau has remained preserved along the whole line of evolution of the code and is consistent with observations of Ribas de Pouplana and Schimmel [2001. Aminoacy1-tRNA synthetases: potential markers of genetic code development. Trends Biochem. Sci. 26, 591-598] that specific pairs of aaRSs-one from each of their two classes-can be docked simultaneously onto the acceptor stem of tRNA and hence an interaction existed between their ancestors using a reduced code, (4) sharpness of a

  10. Expression cloning of a human cDNA encoding folylpoly(gamma-glutamate) synthetase and determination of its primary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Garrow, T A; Admon, A; Shane, B

    1992-01-01

    A human cDNA for folypoly(gamma-glutamate) synthetase [FPGS; tetrahydrofolate:L-glutamate gamma-ligase (ADP forming), EC 6.3.2.17] has been cloned by functional complementation of an Escherichia coli folC mutant. The cDNA encodes a 545-residue protein of M(r) 60,128. The deduced sequence has regions that are highly homologous to peptide sequences obtained from purified pig liver FPGS and shows limited homology to the E. coli and Lactobacillus casei FPGSs. Expression of the cDNA in E. coli results in elevated expression of an enzyme with characteristics of mammalian FPGS. Expression of the cDNA in AUXB1, a mammalian cell lacking FPGS activity, overcomes the cell's requirement for thymidine and purines but does not overcome the cell's glycine auxotrophy, consistent with expression of the protein in the cytosol but not the mitochondria. PMID:1409616

  11. Lysine tRNA and cell division: a G1 cell cycle mutant is temperature sensitive for the modification of tRNA5Lys to tRNA4Lys.

    PubMed Central

    Ortwerth, B J; Lin, V K; Lewis, J; Wang, R J

    1984-01-01

    Ts-694 is a temperature sensitive mutant of hamster cells which is blocked in the G1 phase of the cell cycle at the restrictive temperature of 39 degrees. A comparison of the Lys-tRNA isoacceptors by RPC-5 chromatography showed a decrease in tRNA5Lys and an increase in tRNA4Lys at 39 degrees. This was identical to the changes seen in confluent cultures at the permissive temperature of 33 degrees. These Lys-tRNA changes were not seen in ts-694 cells blocked in G1 by isoleucine deficiency, nor in two other G1 ts mutants at the restrictive temperature. Cells trapped in S phase by a thymidine block also contained decreased levels of tRNA4Lys when raised to 39 degrees. Both tRNA4Lys levels and cell division increased when the cells were returned to the permissive temperature. An in vitro assay was established for the modification of tRNA5Lys to tRNA4Lys with tRNA6Lys and tRNA2Lys as intermediates. The first reaction is the synthesis of tRNA6Lys which involves the introduction of a modified uridine at the third position of the anticodon. Extracts of 694 cells grown at 33 degrees were able to modify rat liver [3H] tRNA5Lys to tRNA6Lys and tRNA4Lys in vitro when assayed at 25 degrees but not at 39 degrees. Extracts of Balb/c 3T3 cells, however, were more active at 39 degrees than at 25 degrees showing that the normal enzyme is not temperature sensitive. Ts-694 cell tRNA, isolated from cells grown at 33 degrees was aminoacylated at both 25 degrees and 39 degrees with rat liver synthetases. tRNA4Lys was present at both temperatures indicating that ts-694 cells do not contain a temperature sensitive tRNA4Lys. Images PMID:6569451

  12. tRNA and Its Activation Targets as Biomarkers and Regulators of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    regulation as a function of tumorigenic status (Figure 5). This test was necessary because the five lines we used above for ribosome profiling are...Task 3 – Examine tumor initiating cell properties upon tRNA over-expression. a) Test whether tRNA over-expression promotes cell proliferation...overexpression in human cells and underscore the complexity of cellular regulation of tRNA expression. b) Test whether tRNA over-expression is

  13. A Human Disease-causing Point Mutation in Mitochondrial Threonyl-tRNA Synthetase Induces Both Structural and Functional Defects*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Ruan, Zhi-Rong; Liu, Ru-Juan; Eriani, Gilbert; Wang, En-Duo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria require all translational components, including aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), to complete organelle protein synthesis. Some aaRS mutations cause mitochondrial disorders, including human mitochondrial threonyl-tRNA synthetase (hmtThrRS) (encoded by TARS2), the P282L mutation of which causes mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. However, its catalytic and structural consequences remain unclear. Herein, we cloned TARS2 and purified the wild-type and P282L mutant hmtThrRS. hmtThrRS misactivates non-cognate Ser and uses post-transfer editing to clear erroneously synthesized products. In vitro and in vivo analyses revealed that the mutation induces a decrease in Thr activation, aminoacylation, and proofreading activities and a change in the protein structure and/or stability, which might cause reduced catalytic efficiency. We also identified a splicing variant of TARS2 mRNA lacking exons 8 and 9, the protein product of which is targeted into mitochondria. In HEK293T cells, the variant does not dimerize and cannot complement the ThrRS knock-out strain in yeast, suggesting that the truncated protein is inactive and might have a non-canonical function, as observed for other aaRS fragments. The present study describes the aminoacylation and editing properties of hmtThrRS, clarifies the molecular consequences of the P282L mutation, and shows that the yeast ThrRS-deletion model is suitable to test pathology-associated point mutations or alternative splicing variants of mammalian aaRS mRNAs. PMID:26811336

  14. Mitochondrial leucine tRNA level and PTCD1 are regulated in response to leucine starvation.

    PubMed

    Schild, Christof; Hahn, Dagmar; Schaller, André; Jackson, Christopher Benjamin; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Mirkovitch, Jelena; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc

    2014-07-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat domain protein 1 (PTCD1) is a novel human protein that was recently shown to decrease the levels of mitochondrial leucine tRNAs. The physiological role of this regulation, however, remains unclear. Here we show that amino acid starvation by leucine deprivation significantly increased the mRNA steady-state levels of PTCD1 in human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells. Amino acid starvation also increased the mitochondrially encoded leucine tRNA (tRNA(Leu(CUN))) and the mRNA for the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LARS2). Despite increased PTCD1 mRNA steady-state levels, amino acid starvation decreased PTCD1 on the protein level. Decreasing PTCD1 protein concentration increases the stability of the mitochondrial leucine tRNAs, tRNA(Leu(CUN)) and tRNA(Leu(UUR)) as could be shown by RNAi experiments against PTCD1. Therefore, it is likely that decreased PTCD1 protein contributes to the increased tRNA(Leu(CUN)) levels in amino acid-starved cells. The stabilisation of the mitochondrial leucine tRNAs and the upregulation of the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase LARS2 might play a role in adaptation of mitochondria to amino acid starvation.

  15. Structure of a tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase containing an iron–sulfur cluster

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gye Won; Yang, Xiang-Lei; McMullan, Daniel; Chong, Yeeting E.; Krishna, S. Sri; Rife, Christopher L.; Weekes, Dana; Brittain, Scott M.; Abdubek, Polat; Ambing, Eileen; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; van den Bedem, Henry; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Schimmel, Paul; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that contains an iron–sulfur cluster in the tRNA anticodon-binding region and efficiently charges tRNA with tryptophan has been found in Thermotoga maritima. The crystal structure of TmTrpRS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase; TrpRS; EC 6.1.1.2) reveals an iron–sulfur [4Fe–­4S] cluster bound to the tRNA anticodon-binding (TAB) domain and an l-­tryptophan ligand in the active site. None of the other T. maritima aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) contain this [4Fe–4S] cluster-binding motif (C-x 22-C-x 6-C-x 2-C). It is speculated that the iron–sulfur cluster contributes to the stability of TmTrpRS and could play a role in the recognition of the anticodon. PMID:20944229

  16. Shaping tRNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priano, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This model-building activity provides a quick, visual, hands-on tool that allows students to examine more carefully the cloverleaf structure of a typical tRNA molecule. When used as a supplement to lessons that involve gene expression, this exercise reinforces several concepts in molecular genetics, including nucleotide base-pairing rules, the…

  17. Shaping tRNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priano, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This model-building activity provides a quick, visual, hands-on tool that allows students to examine more carefully the cloverleaf structure of a typical tRNA molecule. When used as a supplement to lessons that involve gene expression, this exercise reinforces several concepts in molecular genetics, including nucleotide base-pairing rules, the…

  18. Aminoacyl transfer ribonucleic acid synthetases from cell-free extract of Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Ilan, J; Ilan, J

    1969-05-02

    Aminoacyl transfer ribonucleic acid synthetases for leucine tyrosine, histidine, valine, proline, threonine, and lysine were obtainnned from cell-free extract of Plasmodium berghei. The leucyl-tRNA synthetase cane charge tRNA from liver or Escherichia coli with leucine-c(14), liver tRNA being a better substrate. The amount of aminoacylation increses linerly with respect to the quantity of tRNA added from either source and is dependent on the amount of enzyme added. The rate of aminoacylation is constant for 10 minutes and then decreases. It is enhanced by polyvinylsulfate. One-tenth millimoler pyrimethamine, hydroxystilbamidine, quinacrine, and acriflavine inhibited the formation of C(14)-valyl-tRNA. Species specificity between tRNA and its charging enzyme with respect to the recognition site is discussed.

  19. Secreted human glycyl-tRNA synthetase implicated in defense against ERK-activated tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Chul; Kang, Taehee; Jin, Da; Han, Jung Min; Kim, Sang Bum; Park, Yun Jung; Cho, Kiwon; Park, Young Woo; Guo, Min; He, Weiwei; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Schimmel, Paul; Kim, Sunghoon

    2012-03-13

    Although adaptive systems of immunity against tumor initiation and destruction are well investigated, less understood is the role, if any, of endogenous factors that have conventional functions. Here we show that glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GRS), an essential component of the translation apparatus, circulates in serum and can be secreted from macrophages in response to Fas ligand that is released from tumor cells. Through cadherin (CDH)6 (K-cadherin), GRS bound to different ERK-activated tumor cells, and released phosphatase 2A (PP2A) from CDH6. The activated PP2A then suppressed ERK signaling through dephosphorylation of ERK and induced apoptosis. These activities were inhibited by blocking GRS with a soluble fragment of CDH6. With in vivo administration of GRS, growth of tumors with a high level of CDH6 and ERK activation were strongly suppressed. Our results implicate a conventional cytoplasmic enzyme in translation as an intrinsic component of the defense against ERK-activated tumor formation.

  20. Identification of holocarboxylase synthetase chromatin binding sites in human mammary cell lines using the DNA adenine methyltransferase identification technology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dipika; Pannier, Angela K; Zempleni, Janos

    2011-06-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) is a chromatin protein that is essential for mediating the covalent binding of biotin to histones. Biotinylation of histones plays crucial roles in the repression of genes and repeats in the human genome. We tested the feasibility of DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) technology to map HCS binding sites in human mammary cell lines. Full-length HCS was fused to DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) for subsequent transfection into breast cancer (MCF-7) and normal breast (MCF-10A) cells. HCS docking sites in chromatin were identified by using the unique adenine methylation sites established by Dam in the fusion construct; docking sites were unambiguously identified using methylation-sensitive digestion, cloning, and sequencing. In total, 15 novel HCS binding sites were identified in the two cell lines, and the following 4 of the 15 overlapped between MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells: inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase A, corticotropin hormone precursor, ribosome biogenesis regulatory protein, and leptin precursor. We conclude that DamID is a useful technology to map HCS binding sites in human chromatin and propose that the entire set of HCS binding sites could be mapped by combining DamID with microarray technology.

  1. Assignment of two human autoantigen genes-isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 9q21 and lysyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 16q23-q24

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, R.C.; Blinder, J.; Pai, S.I.

    1996-08-15

    Protein synthesis is initiated by the attachment of amino acids to cognate tRNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS). Five of twenty human aaRS (histidyl-RS, threonyl-RS, alanyl-RS, glycyl-RS, and isoleucyl-RS) have been identified as targets of autoantibodies in the autoimmune disease polymyositis/dermatomyositis. Autoantibodies to human lysyl-RS, a sixth autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS, were recently identified. The genes for histidyl-RS and threonyl-RS have been localized to chromosome 5, and we recently reported that the genes for alanyl-RS and glycyl-RS localize to chromosomes 16 and 7, respectively. To understand the genesis of autoimmune responses to aaRS better, we have used PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrid panels and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to assign the genes for isoleucyl-RS and lysyl-RS. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Asparagine synthetase expression alone is sufficient to induce l-asparaginase resistance in MOLT-4 human leukaemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Aslanian, A M; Fletcher, B S; Kilberg, M S

    2001-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is treated by combination chemotherapy with a number of drugs, always including the enzyme L-asparaginase (ASNase). Although the initial remission rate is quite high, relapse and associated drug resistance are a significant problem. In vitro studies have demonstrated increased asparagine synthetase (AS) expression in ASNase-resistant cells, which has led to the hypothesis that elevated AS activity permits drug-resistant survival. The data presented show that not only is elevated AS expression a property of ASNase-resistant MOLT-4 human leukaemia cells, but that short-term (12 h) treatment of the cells with ASNase causes a relatively rapid induction of AS expression. The results also document that the elevated expression of AS in ASNase-resistant cells is not fully reversible, even 6 weeks after ASNase removal from the culture medium. Furthermore, ASNase resistance, assessed as both drug-insensitive cell growth rates and decreased drug-induced apoptosis, parallels this irreversible AS expression. Mimicking the elevated AS activity in ASNase-resistant cells by overexpression of the human AS protein by stable retroviral transformation of parental MOLT4 cells is sufficient to induce the ASNase-resistance phenotype. These data document that ASNase resistance in ALL cells is a consequence of elevated AS expression and that although other drug-induced metabolic changes occur, they are secondary to the increased asparagine biosynthetic rate. PMID:11415466

  3. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase by RNAi suppresses cell growth in human melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhou, Fusheng; Du, Wenhui; Dou, Jinfa; Xu, Yu; Gao, Wanwan; Chen, Gang; Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Yang, Sen

    2016-05-01

    Melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, causes more than 40,000 deaths each year worldwide. And epidermoid carcinoma is another major form of skin cancer, which could be studied together with melanoma in several aspects. Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine, and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance and prognosis in several human cancers. The present study aims to explore the potential role of ASNS in melanoma cells A375 and human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. We applied a lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) system to study its function in cell growth of both cells. The results revealed that inhibition of ASNS expression by RNAi significantly suppressed the growth of melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells, and induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in melanoma cells. Knockdown of ASNS in A375 cells remarkably downregulated the expression levels of CDK4, CDK6, and Cyclin D1, and upregulated the expression of p21. Therefore, our study provides evidence that ASNS may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma.

  4. The T box mechanism: tRNA as a regulatory molecule

    PubMed Central

    Green, Nicholas J.; Grundy, Frank J.; Henkin, Tina M.

    2009-01-01

    The T box mechanism is widely used in Gram-positive bacteria to regulate expression of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes and genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and uptake. Binding of a specific uncharged tRNA to a riboswitch element in the nascent transcript causes a structural change in the transcript that promotes expression of the downstream coding sequence. In most cases, this occurs by stabilization of an antiterminator element that competes with formation of a terminator helix. Specific tRNA recognition by the nascent transcript results in increased expression of genes important for tRNA aminoacylation in response to decreased pools of charged tRNA. PMID:19932103

  5. Activation of LXR increases acyl-CoA synthetase activity through direct regulation of ACSL3 in human placental trophoblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Weedon-Fekjaer, M. Susanne; Dalen, Knut Tomas; Solaas, Karianne; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Duttaroy, Asim K.; Nebb, Hilde Irene

    2010-01-01

    Placental fatty acid transport and metabolism are important for proper growth and development of the feto-placental unit. The nuclear receptors, liver X receptors α and β (LXRα and LXRβ), are key regulators of lipid metabolism in many tissues, but little is known about their role in fatty acid transport and metabolism in placenta. The current study investigates the LXR-mediated regulation of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACSL3) and its functions in human placental trophoblast cells. We demonstrate that activation of LXR increases ACSL3 expression, acyl-CoA synthetase activity, and fatty acid uptake in human tropholast cells. Silencing of ACSL3 in these cells attenuates the LXR-mediated increase in acyl-CoA synthetase activity. Furthermore, we show that ACSL3 is directly regulated by LXR through a conserved LXR responsive element in the ACSL3 promoter. Our results suggest that LXR plays a regulatory role in fatty acid metabolism by direct regulation of ACSL3 in human placental trophoblast cells. PMID:20219900

  6. Activation of LXR increases acyl-CoA synthetase activity through direct regulation of ACSL3 in human placental trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Weedon-Fekjaer, M Susanne; Dalen, Knut Tomas; Solaas, Karianne; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Duttaroy, Asim K; Nebb, Hilde Irene

    2010-07-01

    Placental fatty acid transport and metabolism are important for proper growth and development of the feto-placental unit. The nuclear receptors, liver X receptors alpha and beta (LXRalpha and LXRbeta), are key regulators of lipid metabolism in many tissues, but little is known about their role in fatty acid transport and metabolism in placenta. The current study investigates the LXR-mediated regulation of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACSL3) and its functions in human placental trophoblast cells. We demonstrate that activation of LXR increases ACSL3 expression, acyl-CoA synthetase activity, and fatty acid uptake in human tropholast cells. Silencing of ACSL3 in these cells attenuates the LXR-mediated increase in acyl-CoA synthetase activity. Furthermore, we show that ACSL3 is directly regulated by LXR through a conserved LXR responsive element in the ACSL3 promoter. Our results suggest that LXR plays a regulatory role in fatty acid metabolism by direct regulation of ACSL3 in human placental trophoblast cells.

  7. The FAD synthetase from the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae: a bifunctional enzyme exhibiting activity-dependent redox requirements.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, María; Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; Serrano, Ana; Marcuello, Carlos; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Lostao, Anabel; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Medina, Milagros; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta

    2017-08-08

    Prokaryotic bifunctional FAD synthetases (FADSs) catalyze the biosynthesis of FMN and FAD, whereas in eukaryotes two enzymes are required for the same purpose. FMN and FAD are key cofactors to maintain the flavoproteome homeostasis in all type of organisms. Here we shed light to the properties of the hitherto unstudied bacterial FADS from the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpnFADS). As other members of the family, SpnFADS catalyzes the three typical activities of prokaryotic FADSs: riboflavin kinase (RFK), ATP:FMN:adenylyltransferase (FMNAT), and FAD pyrophosphorylase (FADpp). However, several SpnFADS biophysical properties differ from those of other family members. In particular; i) the RFK activity is not inhibited by the riboflavin (RF) substrate, ii) the FMNAT and FADSpp activities require flavin substrates in the reduced state, iii) binding of adenine nucleotide ligands is required for the binding of flavinic substrates/products and iv) the monomer is the preferred state. Collectively, our results add interesting mechanistic differences among the few prokaryotic bifunctional FADSs already characterized, which might reflect the adaptation of the enzyme to relatively different environments. In a health point of view, differences among FADS family members provide us with a framework to design selective compounds targeting these enzymes for the treatment of diverse infectious diseases.

  8. Interactions between avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase and tRNATrp. Mapping of complexed tRNA with chemicals and nucleases.

    PubMed

    Garret, M; Romby, P; Giegé, R; Litvak, S

    1984-03-12

    The interactions between beef tRNATrp with avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase have been studied by statistical chemical modifications of phosphate (ethylnitrosourea) and cytidine (dimethyl sulfate) residues, as well as by digestion of complexed tRNA by Cobra venom nuclease and Neurospora crassa endonuclease. Results with nucleases and chemicals show that reverse transcriptase interacts preferentially with the D arm, the anticodon stem and the T psi stem. All these regions are located in the outside of the L-shaped structure of tRNA. This domain of interaction is different to that reported previously in the complex of beef tRNA with the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (M. Garret et al.; Eur. J. Biochem. In press). Avian reverse transcriptase destabilizes the region of tRNA where most of the tertiary interactions maintaining the structure of tRNA are located.

  9. Interactions between avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase and tRNATrp. Mapping of complexed tRNA with chemicals and nucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Garret, M; Romby, P; Giegé, R; Litvak, S

    1984-01-01

    The interactions between beef tRNATrp with avian myeloblastosis reverse transcriptase have been studied by statistical chemical modifications of phosphate (ethylnitrosourea) and cytidine (dimethyl sulfate) residues, as well as by digestion of complexed tRNA by Cobra venom nuclease and Neurospora crassa endonuclease. Results with nucleases and chemicals show that reverse transcriptase interacts preferentially with the D arm, the anticodon stem and the T psi stem. All these regions are located in the outside of the L-shaped structure of tRNA. This domain of interaction is different to that reported previously in the complex of beef tRNA with the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (M. Garret et al.; Eur. J. Biochem. In press). Avian reverse transcriptase destabilizes the region of tRNA where most of the tertiary interactions maintaining the structure of tRNA are located. Images PMID:6200830

  10. A glycolytic enzyme, enolase, is recruited as a cofactor of tRNA targeting toward mitochondria in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Entelis, Nina; Brandina, Irina; Kamenski, Piotr; Krasheninnikov, Igor A.; Martin, Robert P.; Tarassov, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    In many organisms, mitochondria import nuclear DNA-encoded small RNAs. In yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one out of two cytoplasmic isoacceptor tRNAsLys is partially addressed into the organelle. Mitochondrial targeting of this tRNA was shown to depend on interaction with the precursor of mitochondrial lysyl–tRNA synthetase, preMsk1p. However, preMsk1p alone was unable to direct tRNA targeting, suggesting the existence of additional protein factor(s). Here, we identify the glycolytic enzyme, enolase, as such a factor. We demonstrate that recombinant enolase and preMSK1p are sufficient to direct tRNA import in vitro and that depletion of enolase inhibits tRNA import in vivo. Enzymatic and tRNA targeting functions of enolase appear to be independent. Three newly characterized properties of the enolase can be related to its novel function: (1) specific affinity to the imported tRNA, (2) the ability to facilitate formation of the complex between preMsk1p and the imported tRNA, and (3) partial targeting toward the mitochondrial outer membrane. We propose a model suggesting that the cell exploits mitochondrial targeting of the enolase in order to address the tRNA toward peri-mitochondrially synthesized preMsk1p. Our results indicate an alternative molecular chaperone function of glycolytic enzyme enolase in tRNA mitochondrial targeting. PMID:16738406

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of human tRNA Lys,3 UUU: the role of modified bases in mRNA recognition.

    PubMed

    McCrate, Nina E; Varner, Mychel E; Kim, Kenneth I; Nagan, Maria C

    2006-01-01

    Accuracy in translation of the genetic code into proteins depends upon correct tRNA-mRNA recognition in the context of the ribosome. In human tRNA(Lys,3)UUU three modified bases are present in the anticodon stem-loop--2-methylthio-N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine at position 37 (ms2t6A37), 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine at position 34 (mcm5s2U34) and pseudouridine (psi) at position 39--two of which, ms2t6A37 and mcm5s2U34, are required to achieve wild-type binding activity of wild-type human tRNA(Lys,3)UUU [C. Yarian, M. Marszalek, E. Sochacka, A. Malkiewicz, R. Guenther, A. Miskiewicz and P. F. Agris (2000) Biochemistry, 39, 13390-13395]. Molecular dynamics simulations of nine tRNA anticodon stem-loops with different combinations of nonstandard bases were performed. The wild-type simulation exhibited a canonical anticodon stair-stepped conformation. The ms2t6 modification at position 37 is required for maintenance of this structure and reduces solvent accessibility of U36. Ms2t6A37 generally hydrogen bonds across the loop and may prevent U36 from rotating into solution. A water molecule does coordinate to psi39 most of the simulation time but weakly, as most of the residence lifetimes are <40 ps.

  12. Dual Role of the Molybdenum Cofactor Biosynthesis Protein MOCS3 in tRNA Thiolation and Molybdenum Cofactor Biosynthesis in Humans*

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Mita Mullick; Dosche, Carsten; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Leimkühler, Silke

    2012-01-01

    We studied two pathways that involve the transfer of persulfide sulfur in humans, molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis and tRNA thiolation. Investigations using human cells showed that the two-domain protein MOCS3 is shared between both pathways. MOCS3 has an N-terminal adenylation domain and a C-terminal rhodanese-like domain. We showed that MOCS3 activates both MOCS2A and URM1 by adenylation and a subsequent sulfur transfer step for the formation of the thiocarboxylate group at the C terminus of each protein. MOCS2A and URM1 are β-grasp fold proteins that contain a highly conserved C-terminal double glycine motif. The role of the terminal glycine of MOCS2A and URM1 was examined for the interaction and the cellular localization with MOCS3. Deletion of the C-terminal glycine of either MOCS2A or URM1 resulted in a loss of interaction with MOCS3. Enhanced cyan fluorescent protein and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein fusions of the proteins were constructed, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency was determined by the decrease in the donor lifetime. The cellular localization results showed that extension of the C terminus with an additional glycine of MOCS2A and URM1 altered the localization of MOCS3 from the cytosol to the nucleus. PMID:22453920

  13. tRNA acceptor-stem and anticodon bases embed separate features of amino acid chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Charles W.; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    abstract The universal genetic code is a translation table by which nucleic acid sequences can be interpreted as polypeptides with a wide range of biological functions. That information is used by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to translate the code. Moreover, amino acid properties dictate protein folding. We recently reported that digital correlation techniques could identify patterns in tRNA identity elements that govern recognition by synthetases. Our analysis, and the functionality of truncated synthetases that cannot recognize the tRNA anticodon, support the conclusion that the tRNA acceptor stem houses an independent code for the same 20 amino acids that likely functioned earlier in the emergence of genetics. The acceptor-stem code, related to amino acid size, is distinct from a code in the anticodon that is related to amino acid polarity. Details of the acceptor-stem code suggest that it was useful in preserving key properties of stereochemically-encoded peptides that had developed the capacity to interact catalytically with RNA. The quantitative embedding of the chemical properties of amino acids into tRNA bases has implications for the origins of molecular biology. PMID:26595350

  14. Cloning and characterization of a putative human holocytochrome c-type synthetase gene (HCCS) isolated from the critical region for microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, L.; Ballabio, A.; Zoghbi, H.Y.

    1996-06-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome (MLS) is an X-linked male-lethal disorder associated with X chromosomal rearrangements resulting in monosomy from Xpter to Xp22. Features include microphthalmia, sclerocornea, linear skin defects, and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Using a cross-species conservation strategy, an expressed sequence from the 450- to the 550-kb MLS critical region on Xp22 was identified by screening a human embryo cDNA library. Northern analysis revealed a transcript of {approx}2.6 kb in all tissues examined, with weaker expression of {approx}1.2- and {approx}5.2-kb transcripts. The strongest expression was observed in heart and skeletal muscle. Sequence analysis of a 3-kb cDNA contig revealed an 807-bp open reading frame encoding a putative 268-amino-acid-protein. Comparison of the sequence with sequences in the databases revealed homology with holocytochrome c-type synthetases, which catalyze the covalent addition of a heme group onto c-type cytochromes in the mitochondria. The c-type cytochromes are required for proper functioning of the electron transport pathway. The human gene (HGMW-approved symbol HCCS) and the corresponding murine gene characterized in this paper are the first mammalian holocytochrome c-type synthetases to be described in the literature. Because of the lack of a neuromuscular phenotype in MLS, it is uncertain whether the deletion of a mitochondrial holocytochrome synthetase would contribute to the phenotype seen in MLS. The expression pattern of this gene and knowledge about the function of holocytochrome synthetases, however, suggest that it is a good candidate for X-linked encephalomyopathies typically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Interplay between Catalysts and Substrates for Activity of Class Ib Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases and Implications for Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Preyesh; Lin, Sheng-Xiang; Giege, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase:transfer RNA (aaRS:tRNA) systems became recently essential targets in molecular medicine, because perturbed recognition of cognate tRNAs by aaRSs and poor precision in tRNA aminoacylation do not guarantee accurate protein biosynthesis, thus leading to diseases. Sets of identity determinants situated at particular zones of tRNA are responsible for functional accuracy. Recent work in X-ray crystallography has revealed various snapshots of aaRS:ligand complexes which represent the stages required for aminoacylation. Here we focus on a small group of class I aaRSs conserved in evolution, the ArgRSs, GluRSs, GlnRSs, and atypical LysRSs found mostly in Archaea and in a few Bacteria, that catalyze amino acid activation only in the presence of their cognate tRNAs. Structural and functional features of these aaRSs, ranked in subclass Ib, together with their peculiar mode of tRNA recognition and identity expression are reviewed and compared. Strategies to inhibit class Ib aaRS:tRNA aminoacylation systems, their dysfunction leading to human diseases, and the implications for pharmacology are outlined.

  16. An Inhibitor of Exported Mycobacterium tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Selectively Blocks the Growth of Pathogenic Mycobacteria in Axenic Culture and in Human Monocytes: Extracellular Proteins as Potential Novel Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Harth, Günter; Horwitz, Marcus A.

    1999-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogenic mycobacteria export abundant quantities of proteins into their extracellular milieu when growing either axenically or within phagosomes of host cells. One major extracellular protein, the enzyme glutamine synthetase, is of particular interest because of its link to pathogenicity. Pathogenic mycobacteria, but not nonpathogenic mycobacteria, export large amounts of this protein. Interestingly, export of the enzyme is associated with the presence of a poly-l-glutamate/glutamine structure in the mycobacterial cell wall. In this study, we investigated the influence of glutamine synthetase inhibitors on the growth of pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria and on the poly-l-glutamate/glutamine cell wall structure. The inhibitor l-methionine-S-sulfoximine rapidly inactivated purified M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase, which was 100-fold more sensitive to this inhibitor than a representative mammalian glutamine synthetase. Added to cultures of pathogenic mycobacteria, l-methionine- S-sulfoximine rapidly inhibited extracellular glutamine synthetase in a concentration-dependent manner but had only a minimal effect on cellular glutamine synthetase, a finding consistent with failure of the drug to cross the mycobacterial cell wall. Remarkably, the inhibitor selectively blocked the growth of pathogenic mycobacteria, all of which release glutamine synthetase extracellularly, but had no effect on nonpathogenic mycobacteria or nonmycobacterial microorganisms, none of which release glutamine synthetase extracellularly. The inhibitor was also bacteriostatic for M. tuberculosis in human mononuclear phagocytes (THP-1 cells), the pathogen's primary host cells. Paralleling and perhaps underlying its bacteriostatic effect, the inhibitor markedly reduced the amount of poly-l-glutamate/glutamine cell wall structure in M. tuberculosis. Although it is possible that glutamine synthetase inhibitors interact with additional extracellular

  17. Piecemeal Buildup of the Genetic Code, Ribosomes, and Genomes from Primordial tRNA Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Derek; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The origin of biomolecular machinery likely centered around an ancient and central molecule capable of interacting with emergent macromolecular complexity. tRNA is the oldest and most central nucleic acid molecule of the cell. Its co-evolutionary interactions with aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase protein enzymes define the specificities of the genetic code and those with the ribosome their accurate biosynthetic interpretation. Phylogenetic approaches that focus on molecular structure allow reconstruction of evolutionary timelines that describe the history of RNA and protein structural domains. Here we review phylogenomic analyses that reconstruct the early history of the synthetase enzymes and the ribosome, their interactions with RNA, and the inception of amino acid charging and codon specificities in tRNA that are responsible for the genetic code. We also trace the age of domains and tRNA onto ancient tRNA homologies that were recently identified in rRNA. Our findings reveal a timeline of recruitment of tRNA building blocks for the formation of a functional ribosome, which holds both the biocatalytic functions of protein biosynthesis and the ability to store genetic memory in primordial RNA genomic templates. PMID:27918435

  18. Multiple erythroid isoforms of human long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases are produced by switch of the fatty acid gate domains.

    PubMed

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2006-07-11

    The formation of acyl-CoA by the action of acyl-CoA synthetases plays a crucial role in membrane lipid turnover, including the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. In human, five Acyl-CoA Synthetase Long-chain (ACSL) genes have been identified with as many as 3 different transcript variants for each. Acyl-CoA Synthetase Long-chain member 6 (ACSL6) is responsible for activation of long-chain fatty acids in erythrocytes. Two additional transcript variants were also isolated from brain and testis. We report the expression in reticulocytes of two new variants and of the one isolated from brain. All three represented different spliced variants of a mutually exclusive exon pair. They encode a slightly different short motif which contains a conserved structural domain, the fatty acid Gate domain. The motifs differ in the presence of either the aromatic residue phenylalanine (Phe) or tyrosine (Tyr). Based on homology, two new isoforms for the closely related ACSL1 were predicted and characterized. One represented a switch of the Phe- to the Tyr-Gate domain motif, the other resulted from the exclusion of both. Swapping of this motif also appears to be common in all mammalian ACSL member 1 and 6 homologs. We propose that a Phe to Tyr substitution or deletion of the Gate domain, is the structural reason for the conserved alternative splicing that affects these motifs. Our findings support our hypothesis that this region is structurally important to define the activity of these enzymes.

  19. Biosynthesis of Selenocysteine on Its tRNA in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Mix, Heiko; Zhang, Yan; Saira, Kazima; Glass, Richard S; Berry, Marla J; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Hatfield, Dolph L

    2007-01-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is cotranslationally inserted into protein in response to UGA codons and is the 21st amino acid in the genetic code. However, the means by which Sec is synthesized in eukaryotes is not known. Herein, comparative genomics and experimental analyses revealed that the mammalian Sec synthase (SecS) is the previously identified pyridoxal phosphate-containing protein known as the soluble liver antigen. SecS required selenophosphate and O-phosphoseryl-tRNA[Ser]Sec as substrates to generate selenocysteyl-tRNA[Ser]Sec. Moreover, it was found that Sec was synthesized on the tRNA scaffold from selenide, ATP, and serine using tRNA[Ser]Sec, seryl-tRNA synthetase, O-phosphoseryl-tRNA[Ser]Sec kinase, selenophosphate synthetase, and SecS. By identifying the pathway of Sec biosynthesis in mammals, this study not only functionally characterized SecS but also assigned the function of the O-phosphoseryl-tRNA[Ser]Sec kinase. In addition, we found that selenophosphate synthetase 2 could synthesize monoselenophosphate in vitro but selenophosphate synthetase 1 could not. Conservation of the overall pathway of Sec biosynthesis suggests that this pathway is also active in other eukaryotes and archaea that synthesize selenoproteins. PMID:17194211

  20. Mutations of Human NARS2, Encoding the Mitochondrial Asparaginyl-tRNA Synthetase, Cause Nonsyndromic Deafness and Leigh Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Mohsin; Huang, Vincent H.; Qaiser, Tanveer A.; Potluri, Prasanth; Mahl, Sarah E.; Davila, Antonio; Nazli, Sabiha; Hancock, Saege; Yu, Margret; Gargus, Jay; Chang, Richard; Al-sheqaih, Nada; Newman, William G.; Abdenur, Jose; Starr, Arnold; Hegde, Rashmi; Dorn, Thomas; Busch, Anke; Park, Eddie; Wu, Jie; Schwenzer, Hagen; Flierl, Adrian; Florentz, Catherine; Sissler, Marie; Khan, Shaheen N.; Li, Ronghua; Guan, Min-Xin; Friedman, Thomas B.; Wu, Doris K.; Procaccio, Vincent; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Wallace, Douglas C.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Huang, Taosheng; Riazuddin, Saima

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate association of variants in the mitochondrial asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase NARS2 with human hearing loss and Leigh syndrome. A homozygous missense mutation ([c.637G>T; p.Val213Phe]) is the underlying cause of nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNB94) and compound heterozygous mutations ([c.969T>A; p.Tyr323*] + [c.1142A>G; p.Asn381Ser]) result in mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency and Leigh syndrome, which is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by symmetric, bilateral lesions in the basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. The severity of the genetic lesions and their effects on NARS2 protein structure cosegregate with the phenotype. A hypothetical truncated NARS2 protein, secondary to the Leigh syndrome mutation p.Tyr323* is not detectable and p.Asn381Ser further decreases NARS2 protein levels in patient fibroblasts. p.Asn381Ser also disrupts dimerization of NARS2, while the hearing loss p.Val213Phe variant has no effect on NARS2 oligomerization. Additionally we demonstrate decreased steady-state levels of mt-tRNAAsn in fibroblasts from the Leigh syndrome patients. In these cells we show that a decrease in oxygen consumption rates (OCR) and electron transport chain (ETC) activity can be rescued by overexpression of wild type NARS2. However, overexpression of the hearing loss associated p.Val213Phe mutant protein in these fibroblasts cannot complement the OCR and ETC defects. Our findings establish lesions in NARS2 as a new cause for nonsyndromic hearing loss and Leigh syndrome. PMID:25807530

  1. Mutations of human NARS2, encoding the mitochondrial asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase, cause nonsyndromic deafness and Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Simon, Mariella; Richard, Elodie M; Wang, Xinjian; Shahzad, Mohsin; Huang, Vincent H; Qaiser, Tanveer A; Potluri, Prasanth; Mahl, Sarah E; Davila, Antonio; Nazli, Sabiha; Hancock, Saege; Yu, Margret; Gargus, Jay; Chang, Richard; Al-Sheqaih, Nada; Newman, William G; Abdenur, Jose; Starr, Arnold; Hegde, Rashmi; Dorn, Thomas; Busch, Anke; Park, Eddie; Wu, Jie; Schwenzer, Hagen; Flierl, Adrian; Florentz, Catherine; Sissler, Marie; Khan, Shaheen N; Li, Ronghua; Guan, Min-Xin; Friedman, Thomas B; Wu, Doris K; Procaccio, Vincent; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Wallace, Douglas C; Ahmed, Zubair M; Huang, Taosheng; Riazuddin, Saima

    2015-03-01

    Here we demonstrate association of variants in the mitochondrial asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase NARS2 with human hearing loss and Leigh syndrome. A homozygous missense mutation ([c.637G>T; p.Val213Phe]) is the underlying cause of nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNB94) and compound heterozygous mutations ([c.969T>A; p.Tyr323*] + [c.1142A>G; p.Asn381Ser]) result in mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency and Leigh syndrome, which is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by symmetric, bilateral lesions in the basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. The severity of the genetic lesions and their effects on NARS2 protein structure cosegregate with the phenotype. A hypothetical truncated NARS2 protein, secondary to the Leigh syndrome mutation p.Tyr323* is not detectable and p.Asn381Ser further decreases NARS2 protein levels in patient fibroblasts. p.Asn381Ser also disrupts dimerization of NARS2, while the hearing loss p.Val213Phe variant has no effect on NARS2 oligomerization. Additionally we demonstrate decreased steady-state levels of mt-tRNAAsn in fibroblasts from the Leigh syndrome patients. In these cells we show that a decrease in oxygen consumption rates (OCR) and electron transport chain (ETC) activity can be rescued by overexpression of wild type NARS2. However, overexpression of the hearing loss associated p.Val213Phe mutant protein in these fibroblasts cannot complement the OCR and ETC defects. Our findings establish lesions in NARS2 as a new cause for nonsyndromic hearing loss and Leigh syndrome.

  2. Human endomembrane H sup + pump strongly resembles the ATP-synthetase of Archaebacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Suedhof, T.C.; Stone, D.K.; Johnston, P.A.; Xie, Xiaosong ); Fried, V.A. )

    1989-08-01

    Preparations of mammalian H{sup +} pumps that acidify intracellular vesicles contain eight or nine polypeptides, ranging in size from 116 to 17 kDa. Biochemical analysis indicates that the 70- and 58-kDa polypeptides are subunits critical for ATP hydrolysis. The amino acid sequences of the major catalytic subunits (58 and 70 kDa) of the endomembrane H{sup +} pump are unknown from animal cells. The authors report here the complete sequence of the 58-kDa subunit derived from a human kidney cDNA clone and partial sequences of the 70- and 58-kDa subunits purified from clathrin-coated vesicles of bovine brain. The amino acid sequences of both proteins strongly resemble the sequences of the corresponding subunits of the vacuolar H{sup +} pumps of Archaebacteria, plants, and fungi. The archaebacterial enzyme is believed to use a H{sup +} gradient to synthesize ATP. Thus, a common ancestral protein has given rise to a H{sup +} pump that synthesizes ATP in one organism and hydrolyzes it in another and is highly conserved from prokaryotes to humans. The same pump appears to mediate the acidification of intracellular organelles, including coated vesicles, lysosomes, and secretory granules, as well as extracellular fluids such as urine.

  3. Discovery and characterization of a novel class of pyrazolopyrimidinedione tRNA synthesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Justin I; Smith, James F; Tomaras, Andrew P; Zaniewski, Richard; McPherson, Craig J; McAllister, Laura A; Hartman-Neumann, Sandra; Arcari, Joel T; Lescoe, Marykay; Gutierrez, Jemy; Yuan, Ying; Limberakis, Chris; Miller, Alita A

    2015-06-01

    A high-throughput phenotypic screen for novel antibacterial agents led to the discovery of a novel pyrazolopyrimidinedione, PPD-1, with preferential activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Resistance mapping revealed the likely target of inhibition to be lysyl tRNA synthetase (LysRS). Preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies led to an analog, PPD-2, which gained Gram-negative antibacterial activity at the expense of MRSA activity and resistance to this compound mapped to prolyl tRNA synthetase (ProRS). These targets of inhibition were confirmed in vitro, with PPD-1 showing IC₅₀s of 21.7 and 35 μM in purified LysRS and ProRS enzyme assays, and PPD-2, 151 and 0.04 μM, respectively. The highly attractive chemical properties of these compounds combined with intriguing preliminary SAR suggest that further exploration of this compelling novel series is warranted.

  4. Acyl-CoA synthetase and the peroxisomal enzymes of beta-oxidation in human liver. Quantitative analysis of their subcellular localization.

    PubMed Central

    Bronfman, M; Inestrosa, N C; Nervi, F O; Leighton, F

    1984-01-01

    The presence of acyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.2.1.3) in peroxisomes and the subcellular distribution of beta-oxidation enzymes in human liver were investigated by using a single-step fractionation method of whole liver homogenates in metrizamide continuous density gradients and a novel procedure of computer analysis of results. Peroxisomes were found to contain 16% of the liver palmitoyl-CoA synthetase activity, and 21% and 60% of the enzyme activity was localized in mitochondria and microsomal fractions respectively. Fatty acyl-CoA oxidase was localized exclusively in peroxisomes, confirming previous results. Human liver peroxisomes were found to contribute 13%, 17% and 11% of the liver activities of crotonase, beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and thiolase respectively. The absolute activities found in peroxisomes for the enzymes investigated suggest that in human liver fatty acyl-CoA oxidase is the rate-limiting enzyme of the peroxisomal beta-oxidation pathway, when palmitic acid is the substrate. PMID:6240978

  5. Multiple erythroid isoforms of human long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases are produced by switch of the fatty acid gate domains

    PubMed Central

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2006-01-01

    Background The formation of acyl-CoA by the action of acyl-CoA synthetases plays a crucial role in membrane lipid turnover, including the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. In human, five Acyl-CoA Synthetase Long-chain (ACSL) genes have been identified with as many as 3 different transcript variants for each. Results Acyl-CoA Synthetase Long-chain member 6 (ACSL6) is responsible for activation of long-chain fatty acids in erythrocytes. Two additional transcript variants were also isolated from brain and testis. We report the expression in reticulocytes of two new variants and of the one isolated from brain. All three represented different spliced variants of a mutually exclusive exon pair. They encode a slightly different short motif which contains a conserved structural domain, the fatty acid Gate domain. The motifs differ in the presence of either the aromatic residue phenylalanine (Phe) or tyrosine (Tyr). Based on homology, two new isoforms for the closely related ACSL1 were predicted and characterized. One represented a switch of the Phe- to the Tyr-Gate domain motif, the other resulted from the exclusion of both. Swapping of this motif also appears to be common in all mammalian ACSL member 1 and 6 homologs. Conclusion We propose that a Phe to Tyr substitution or deletion of the Gate domain, is the structural reason for the conserved alternative splicing that affects these motifs. Our findings support our hypothesis that this region is structurally important to define the activity of these enzymes. PMID:16834775

  6. Studies on the thiol group of lactose synthetase A protein from human milk and on the binding of uridine diphosphate galactose to the enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, B. J.; Andrews, P.

    1974-01-01

    The lactose synthetase activity of A protein from human milk was much decreased but not abolished by reaction with thiol-group reagents. Protection experiments indicated that a free thiol group on the enzyme is situated near the UDP-galactose binding site and inactivation of the enzyme with p-hydroxymercuribenzoate was probably due to prevention of UDP-galactose binding. Affinity chromatography showed that the mercuribenzoate substituent also decreased the affinity of A protein for N-acetylglucosamine but complex-formation between A protein–N-acetylglucosamine and α-lactalbumin was relatively unaffected. UDP-galactose appears to be bound to the enzyme mainly through its pyrophosphate group with Mn2+ ion and through the cis hydroxyls of ribose, whereas its hexose moiety has little if any affinity for the enzyme. Lactose synthetase activity remaining after the reaction with thiol-group reagents indicates that a free thiol group is not an essential part of the A protein active site. PMID:4375968

  7. Crystal structure of the archaeal asparagine synthetase: interrelation with aspartyl-tRNA and asparaginyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Mickaël; Fréchin, Mathieu; Oliéric, Vincent; Charron, Christophe; Sauter, Claude; Lorber, Bernard; Roy, Hervé; Kern, Daniel

    2011-09-23

    Asparagine synthetase A (AsnA) catalyzes asparagine synthesis using aspartate, ATP, and ammonia as substrates. Asparagine is formed in two steps: the β-carboxylate group of aspartate is first activated by ATP to form an aminoacyl-AMP before its amidation by a nucleophilic attack with an ammonium ion. Interestingly, this mechanism of amino acid activation resembles that used by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which first activate the α-carboxylate group of the amino acid to form also an aminoacyl-AMP before they transfer the activated amino acid onto the cognate tRNA. In a previous investigation, we have shown that the open reading frame of Pyrococcus abyssi annotated as asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) 2 is, in fact, an archaeal asparagine synthetase A (AS-AR) that evolved from an ancestral aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (AspRS). We present here the crystal structure of this AS-AR. The fold of this protein is similar to that of bacterial AsnA and resembles the catalytic cores of AspRS and AsnRS. The high-resolution structures of AS-AR associated with its substrates and end-products help to understand the reaction mechanism of asparagine formation and release. A comparison of the catalytic core of AS-AR with those of archaeal AspRS and AsnRS and with that of bacterial AsnA reveals a strong conservation. This study uncovers how the active site of the ancestral AspRS rearranged throughout evolution to transform an enzyme activating the α-carboxylate group into an enzyme that is able to activate the β-carboxylate group of aspartate, which can react with ammonia instead of tRNA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. No tRNA3Lys unwinding in a complex with HIV NCp7.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, C J; Gautheret, D; Loret, E P

    1997-10-03

    The nucleocapsid protein NCp7 of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 is important for the annealing of HIV RNA and tRNA3Lys, the tRNA acting as a primer during reverse transcription of HIV RNA. A wild type NCp7 and a Cys23 mutant having a disrupted zinc finger were analyzed with far UV circular dichroism (CD). CD data analysis revealed that NCp7 has a high content of extended structures in aqueous buffer, decreasing in Cys23 NCp7 and in NCp7 in the absence of zinc. An increase in beta-turn structures is observed in NCp7 bound to tRNA3Lys. Furthermore, CD data shows that Cys23 NCp7 binds tRNA3Lys. The CD spectrum of tRNA3Lys is typical of an A-form helix and retains this structure after binding of NCp7, which demonstrates that NCp7 does not induce tRNA3Lys unwinding. CD spectra of tRNA3Lys were measured from 5 to 80 degrees C to observe CD changes resulting from tRNA3Lys melting. Molecular modeling of the complex identifies two potential tRNA anticodon binding sites in the NCp7 N-terminal region and first zinc finger. In this model, both binding sites can interact with 12 nucleotides in the anticodon domain without requiring a base specificity.

  9. Identification of a residue crucial for the angiostatic activity of human mini tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase by focusing on its molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Terumasa; Miyanokoshi, Miki; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Wakasugi, Keisuke

    2016-04-20

    Human tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) exists in two forms: a full-length TrpRS and a mini TrpRS. We previously found that human mini, but not full-length, TrpRS is an angiostatic factor. Moreover, it was shown that the interaction between mini TrpRS and the extracellular domain of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin is crucial for its angiostatic activity. However, the molecular mechanism of the angiostatic activity of human mini TrpRS is only partly understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of truncated (mini) form of TrpRS proteins from human, bovine, or zebrafish on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated chemotaxis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We show that both human and bovine mini TrpRSs inhibited VEGF-induced endothelial migration, whereas zebrafish mini TrpRS did not. Next, to identify residues crucial for the angiostatic activity of human mini TrpRS, we prepared several site-directed mutants based on amino acid sequence alignments among TrpRSs from various species and demonstrated that a human mini K153Q TrpRS mutant cannot inhibit VEGF-stimulated HUVEC migration and cannot bind to the extracellular domain of VE-cadherin. Taken together, we conclude that the Lys153 residue of human mini TrpRS is a VE-cadherin binding site and is therefore crucial for its angiostatic activity.

  10. Identification of a residue crucial for the angiostatic activity of human mini tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase by focusing on its molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Terumasa; Miyanokoshi, Miki; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Wakasugi, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Human tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) exists in two forms: a full-length TrpRS and a mini TrpRS. We previously found that human mini, but not full-length, TrpRS is an angiostatic factor. Moreover, it was shown that the interaction between mini TrpRS and the extracellular domain of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin is crucial for its angiostatic activity. However, the molecular mechanism of the angiostatic activity of human mini TrpRS is only partly understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of truncated (mini) form of TrpRS proteins from human, bovine, or zebrafish on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated chemotaxis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We show that both human and bovine mini TrpRSs inhibited VEGF-induced endothelial migration, whereas zebrafish mini TrpRS did not. Next, to identify residues crucial for the angiostatic activity of human mini TrpRS, we prepared several site-directed mutants based on amino acid sequence alignments among TrpRSs from various species and demonstrated that a human mini K153Q TrpRS mutant cannot inhibit VEGF-stimulated HUVEC migration and cannot bind to the extracellular domain of VE-cadherin. Taken together, we conclude that the Lys153 residue of human mini TrpRS is a VE-cadherin binding site and is therefore crucial for its angiostatic activity. PMID:27094087

  11. Monitoring mis-acylated tRNA suppression efficiency in mammalian cells via EGFP fluorescence recovery.

    PubMed

    Ilegems, Erwin; Pick, Horst M; Vogel, Horst

    2002-12-01

    A reporter assay was developed to detect and quantify nonsense codon suppression by chemically aminoacylated tRNAs in mammalian cells. It is based on the cellular expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as a reporter for the site-specific amino acid incorporation in its sequence using an orthogonal suppressor tRNA derived from Escherichia coli. Suppression of an engineered amber codon at position 64 in the EGFP run-off transcript could be achieved by the incorporation of a leucine via an in vitro aminoacylated suppressor tRNA. Microinjection of defined amounts of mutagenized EGFP mRNA and suppressor tRNA into individual cells allowed us to accurately determine suppression efficiencies by measuring the EGFP fluorescence intensity in individual cells using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Control experiments showed the absence of natural suppression or aminoacylation of the synthetic tRNA by endogenous aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. This reporter assay opens the way for the optimization of essential experimental parameters for expanding the scope of the suppressor tRNA technology to different cell types.

  12. Alternative pathways for editing non-cognate amino acids by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowski, H; Fersht, A R

    1981-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the editing mechanisms of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase operate by two alternative pathways: pre-transfer, by hydrolysis of the non-cognate aminoacyl adenylate; post-transfer, by hydrolysis of the mischarged tRNA. The methionyl-tRNA synthetases from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus and isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase from E. coli, for example, are shown to reject misactivated homocysteine rapidly by the pre-transfer route. A novel feature of this reaction is that homocysteine thiolactone is formed by the facile cyclisation of the homocysteinyl adenylate. Valyl-tRNA synthetases, on the other hand, reject the more readily activated non-cognate amino acids by primarily the post-transfer route. The features governing the choice of pathway are discussed. PMID:7024910

  13. Long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3-mediated phosphatidylcholine synthesis is required for assembly of very low density lipoproteins in human hepatoma Huh7 cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongbing; Ye, Jin

    2008-01-11

    Hepatocytes play a crucial role in regulating lipid metabolism by exporting cholesterol and triglyceride into plasma through secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). VLDL production is also required for release of hepatitis C virus (HCV) from infected hepatocytes. Here, we show that long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACSL3) plays a crucial role in secretion of VLDL and HCV from hepatocytes. In cultured human hepatoma Huh7 cells, ACSL3 is specifically required for incorporation of fatty acids into phosphatidylcholine. In cells receiving small interfering RNA targeting ACSL3, secretion of apolipoprotein B, the major protein component of VLDL, was inhibited and the lipoprotein was rapidly degraded. This inhibition in secretion was completely eliminated when these cells were treated with phosphatidylcholine. Treatment of cells with small interfering RNA targeting ACSL3 also inhibited secretion of HCV from Huh7-derived cells. These results identify ACSL3 as a new enzymatic target to limit VLDL secretion and HCV infection.

  14. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases database.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, M; Deniziak, M A; Barciszewski, J

    2001-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) are at the center of the question of the origin of life. They constitute a family of enzymes integrating the two levels of cellular organization: nucleic acids and proteins. AARSs arose early in evolution and are believed to be a group of ancient proteins. They are responsible for attaching amino acid residues to their cognate tRNA molecules, which is the first step in the protein synthesis. The role they play in a living cell is essential for the precise deciphering of the genetic code. The analysis of AARSs evolutionary history was not possible for a long time due to a lack of a sufficiently large number of their amino acid sequences. The emerging picture of synthetases' evolution is a result of recent achievements in genomics [Woese,C., Olsen,G.J., Ibba,M. and Söll,D. (2000) Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev., 64, 202-236]. In this paper we present a short introduction to the AARSs database. The updated database contains 1047 AARS primary structures from archaebacteria, eubacteria, mitochondria, chloroplasts and eukaryotic cells. It is the compilation of amino acid sequences of all AARSs known to date, which are available as separate entries via the WWW at http://biobases.ibch.poznan.pl/aars/.

  15. A new mechanism of post-transfer editing by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases: catalysis of hydrolytic reaction by bacterial-type prolyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Boyarshin, Konstantin S; Priss, Anastasia E; Rayevskiy, Alexsey V; Ilchenko, Mykola M; Dubey, Igor Ya; Kriklivyi, Ivan A; Yaremchuk, Anna D; Tukalo, Michael A

    2017-02-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases are enzymes that specifically attach amino acids to cognate tRNAs for use in the ribosomal stage of translation. For many aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, the required level of amino acid specificity is achieved either by specific hydrolysis of misactivated aminoacyl-adenylate intermediate (pre-transfer editing) or by hydrolysis of the mischarged aminoacyl-tRNA (post-transfer editing). To investigate the mechanism of post-transfer editing of alanine by prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the pathogenic bacteria Enterococcus faecalis, we used molecular modeling, molecular dynamic simulations, quantum mechanical (QM) calculations, site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme, and tRNA modification. The results support a new tRNA-assisted mechanism of hydrolysis of misacylated Ala-tRNA(Pro). The most important functional element of this catalytic mechanism is the 2'-OH group of the terminal adenosine 76 of Ala-tRNA(Pro), which forms an intramolecular hydrogen bond with the carbonyl group of the alanine residue, strongly facilitating hydrolysis. Hydrolysis was shown by QM methods to proceed via a general acid-base catalysis mechanism involving two functionally distinct water molecules. The transition state of the reaction was identified. Amino acid residues of the editing active site participate in the coordination of substrate and both attacking and assisting water molecules, performing the proton transfer to the 3'-O atom of A76.

  16. tRNA wobble modifications and protein homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Namit; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract tRNA is a central component of the protein synthesis machinery in the cell. In living cells, tRNAs undergo numerous post-transcriptional modifications. In particular, modifications at the anticodon loop play an important role in ensuring efficient protein synthesis, maintaining protein homeostasis, and helping cell adaptation and survival. Hypo-modification of the wobble position of the tRNA anticodon loop is of particular relevance for translation regulation and is implicated in various human diseases. In this review we summarize recent evidence of how methyl and thiol modifications in eukaryotic tRNA at position 34 affect cellular fitness and modulate regulatory circuits at normal conditions and under stress. PMID:27335723

  17. Antiviral activity of human oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) is mediated by enhancing retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yugen; Ghosh, Arundhati; Cuevas, Rolando A.; Forero, Adriana; Dhar, Jayeeta; Ibsen, Mikkel Søes; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan Leo; Schmidt, Tobias; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K.; Fujita, Takashi; Hartmann, Rune; Barik, Sailen; Hornung, Veit; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Virus infection is sensed in the cytoplasm by retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I, also known as DDX58), which requires RNA and polyubiquitin binding to induce type I interferon (IFN), and activate cellular innate immunity. We show that the human IFN-inducible oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) protein had antiviral activity and mediated RIG-I activation by mimicking polyubiquitin. Loss of OASL expression reduced RIG-I signaling and enhanced virus replication in human cells. Conversely, OASL expression suppressed replication of a number of viruses in a RIG-I-dependent manner and enhanced RIG-I-mediated IFN induction. OASL interacted and colocalized with RIG-I, and through its C-terminal ubiquitin-like domain specifically enhanced RIG-I signaling. Bone marrow derived macrophages from mice deficient for Oasl2 showed that among the two mouse orthologs of human OASL; Oasl2 is functionally similar to human OASL. Our findings show a mechanism by which human OASL contributes to host antiviral responses by enhancing RIG-I activation. PMID:24931123

  18. The binding of tyrosinyl-5'-AMP to tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (E.coli).

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, F; Krauss, G; Kownatzki, R; Maass, G

    1979-01-01

    The binding between tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (E.coli) and the alkylanalogue of the aminoacyladenylate, tyrosinyl-5'-AMP, has been investigated by fluorescence titrations and rapid mixing experiments. Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase has two equivalent and independent binding sites for tyrosinyl-5'-AMP. The intrinsic binding constant is 4 x 10(7)M-1. The binding sites for tRNATyr and tyrosinyl-5'-AMP are independent of each other, the anticooperative mode of tRNA binding being preserved in the presence of tyrosinyl-5-AMP. PMID:377229

  19. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 6 regulates lipid synthesis and mitochondrial oxidative capacity in human and rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, Bruno G; Sampaio, Igor H; Bomfim, Lucas H M; Queiroz, André L; Silveira, Leonardo R; Souza, Anderson O; Fernandes, Anna M A P; Eberlin, Marcos N; Huang, Tai-Yu; Zheng, Donghai; Neufer, P Darrell; Cortright, Ronald N; Alberici, Luciane C

    2017-02-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 6 (ACSL6) mRNA is present in human and rat skeletal muscle, and is modulated by nutritional status: exercise and fasting decrease ACSL6 mRNA, whereas acute lipid ingestion increase its expression. ACSL6 genic inhibition in rat primary myotubes decreased lipid accumulation, as well as activated the higher mitochondrial oxidative capacity programme and fatty acid oxidation through the AMPK/PGC1-α pathway. ACSL6 overexpression in human primary myotubes increased phospholipid species and decreased oxidative metabolism. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL 1 to 6) are key enzymes regulating the partitioning of acyl-CoA species toward different metabolic fates such as lipid synthesis or β-oxidation. Despite our understanding of ecotopic lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle being associated with metabolic diseases such as obesity and type II diabetes, the role of specific ACSL isoforms in lipid synthesis remains unclear. In the present study, we describe for the first time the presence of ACSL6 mRNA in human skeletal muscle and the role that ACSL6 plays in lipid synthesis in both rodent and human skeletal muscle. ACSL6 mRNA was observed to be up-regulated by acute high-fat meal ingestion in both rodents and humans. In rats, we also demonstrated that fasting and chronic aerobic training negatively modulated the ACSL6 mRNA and other genes of lipid synthesis. Similar results were obtained following ACSL6 knockdown in rat myotubes, which was associated with a decreased accumulation of TAGs and lipid droplets. Under the same knockdown condition, we further demonstrate an increase in fatty acid content, p-AMPK, mitochondrial content, mitochondrial respiratory rates and palmitate oxidation. These results were associated with increased PGC-1α, UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA and decreased reactive oxygen species production. In human myotubes, ACSL6 overexpression reduced palmitate oxidation and PGC-1α mRNA. In conclusion, ACSL6 drives acyl-CoA toward lipid

  20. [Polymorphism in the human 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase genes (OAS), associated with predisposition to severe forms of tick-borne encephalitis, in populations from North Eurasia].

    PubMed

    Barkhash, A V; Babenko, V N; Kobzev, V F; Romashchenko, A G; Voevoda, M I

    2010-01-01

    2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetases are a family of interferon-induced enzymes which play an important role in the antiviral defense in mammals. In human genome three genes encoding functional synthetases (OAS1, OAS2 and OAS3) form a cluster. Previously we found that particular genotypes and/or alleles of five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within OAS2 and OAS3 genes are associated with predisposition to severe forms of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in Russian population. In current study we investigated the distribution of three of that SNPs (OAS3rs2285932 (C/T Ile438Ile), OAS3rs2072136 (G/A, Ser567Ser) and OAS2 rs15895 (G/A, Trp720Ter relative to p71 isoform)) in seven populations from North Eurasia: Caucasians (Russians and Germans (from Altai region)), Central Asian Mongoloids (Altaians, Khakasses, Tuvinians and Shorians) and Arctic Mongoloids (Chukchi). Differences between populations in genotype, allele and haplotype frequencies and in linkage disequilibrium structure for these SNPs were detected. We found that these frequencies correlate with the ethnicity of the populations and with their supposed differential exposure to TBE virus. Particularly, the lowest frequencies of G/G genotype for OAS3 gene rs2072136 SNP (that according to our previously obtained data is associated with predisposition to severe forms of TBE) were found in Altaians, Khakasses, Tuvinians and Shorians who may highly contact with TBE virus in places of their habitation. Thus, data obtained allow to suppose that TBE virus might act as a selection factor for particular OAS genes variants in Central Asian Mongoloids.

  1. Human holocarboxylase synthetase with a start site at methionine-58 is the predominant nuclear variant of this protein and has catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Baolong; Wijeratne, Subhashinee S.K.; Rodriguez-Melendez, Rocio; Zempleni, Janos

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Unambiguous evidence is provided that methionine-58 serves as an in-frame alternative translation site for holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS58). {yields} Full-length HLCS and HLCS58 enter the nucleus, but HLCS58 is the predominant variant. {yields} HLCS58 has biological activity as biotin protein ligase. -- Abstract: Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) catalyzes the covalent binding of biotin to both carboxylases in extranuclear structures and histones in cell nuclei, thereby mediating important roles in intermediary metabolism, gene regulation, and genome stability. HLCS has three putative translational start sites (methionine-1, -7, and -58), but lacks a strong nuclear localization sequence that would explain its participation in epigenetic events in the cell nucleus. Recent evidence suggests that small quantities of HLCS with a start site in methionine-58 (HLCS58) might be able to enter the nuclear compartment. We generated the following novel insights into HLCS biology. First, we generated a novel HLCS fusion protein vector to demonstrate that methionine-58 is a functional translation start site in human cells. Second, we used confocal microscopy and western blots to demonstrate that HLCS58 enters the cell nucleus in meaningful quantities, and that full-length HLCS localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm but may also enter the nucleus. Third, we produced recombinant HLCS58 to demonstrate its biological activity toward catalyzing the biotinylation of both carboxylases and histones. Collectively, these observations are consistent with roles of HLCS58 and full-length HLCS in nuclear events. We conclude this report by proposing a novel role for HLCS in epigenetic events, mediated by physical interactions between HLCS and other chromatin proteins as part of a larger multiprotein complex that mediates gene repression.

  2. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L; Steitz, Thomas A; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-11-25

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNA(Pyl) have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate N(ε)-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNA(Pyl). Here, we examine an N(ε)-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids.

  3. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M.; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L.; Steitz, Thomas A.; O’Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNAPyl have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate Nε-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNAPyl. Here, we examine an Nε-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids. PMID:25385624

  4. Involvement of imported tRNA in intramitochondrial translation. [Tetrahymena

    SciTech Connect

    Suyama, Y.

    1981-01-01

    These studies show that only 10 out of 36 mitochondrial tRNAs hybridize to mtDNA. Consistent with previous observations, Arg, Ile, Lys, Val tRNAs must be imported cytoplasmic tRNAs, since these tRNAs do not hybridize to mtDNA. The evident indicates that these imported tRNAs in Tetrahymena mitochondria are not contaminating cytoplasmic tRNAs in our mitochondrial preparations. The conclusion that they function in intramitochondrial translation is based on the demonstration that all the native and imported tRNAs are associated with the functinal mitochondrial 80S monosome as well as with carefully washed 55S subunits. As expected if they function in translation, all these tRNAs on the ribosomes should become acylated when mitochondria are engaged in protein synthesis. From the codon recognition patterns determined previously, it is quite probable that Tetrahymena mitochondrial translation system differs from mammalian and fungal mitochondrial systems. The mechanisms for transporting tRNA into mitochondria is not known. However, it was proposed earlier that the corresponding tRNA synthetase may act as transport protein.

  5. Structure of Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase-Halofuginone Complex Provides Basis for Development of Drugs against Malaria and Toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vitul; Yogavel, Manickam; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Touquet, Bastien; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Sharma, Amit

    2015-05-05

    The Chinese herb Dichroa febrifuga has traditionally treated malaria-associated fever. Its active component febrifugine (FF) and derivatives such as halofuginone (HF) are potent anti-malarials. Here, we show that FF-based derivatives arrest parasite growth by direct interaction with and inhibition of the protein translation enzyme prolyl-tRNA synthetase (PRS). Dual administration of inhibitors that target different tRNA synthetases suggests high utility of these drug targets. We reveal the ternary complex structure of PRS-HF and adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate where the latter facilitates HF integration into the PRS active site. Structural analyses also highlight spaces within the PRS architecture for HF derivatization of its quinazolinone, but not piperidine, moiety. We also show a remarkable ability of HF to kill the related human parasite Toxoplasma gondii, suggesting wider HF efficacy against parasitic PRSs. Hence, our cell-, enzyme-, and structure-based data on FF-based inhibitors strengthen the case for their inclusion in anti-malarial and anti-toxoplasmosis drug development efforts.

  6. Methionyl-tRNA synthetase from Caenorhabditis elegans: A specific multidomain organization for convergent functional evolution

    PubMed Central

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Legouis, Renaud; Negrutskii, Boris; Mirande, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) is a multidomain protein that specifically binds tRNAMet and catalyzes the synthesis of methionyl-tRNAMet. The minimal, core enzyme found in Aquifex aeolicus is made of a catalytic domain, which catalyzes the aminoacylation reaction, and an anticodon-binding domain, which promotes tRNA–protein association. In eukaryotes, additional domains are appended in cis or in trans to the core enzyme and increase the stability of the tRNA–protein complexes. Eventually, as observed for MetRS from Homo sapiens, the C-terminal appended domain causes a slow release of aminoacyl-tRNA and establishes a limiting step in the global aminoacylation reaction. Here, we report that MetRS from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans displays a new type of structural organization. Its very C-terminal appended domain is related to the oligonucleotide binding-fold-based tRNA-binding domain (tRBD) recovered at the C-terminus of MetRS from plant, but, in the nematode enzyme, this domain is separated from the core enzyme by an insertion domain. Gel retardation and tRNA aminoacylation experiments show that MetRS from nematode is functionally related to human MetRS despite the fact that their appended tRBDs have distinct structural folds, and are not orthologs. Thus, functional convergence of human and nematode MetRS is the result of parallel and convergent evolution that might have been triggered by the selective pressure to invent processivity of tRNA handling in translation in higher eukaryotes. PMID:20954242

  7. tRNA synthase suppression activates de novo cysteine synthesis to compensate for cystine and glutathione deprivation during ferroptosis.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kenichi; Stockwell, Brent R

    2016-03-01

    Glutathione is a major endogenous reducing agent in cells, and cysteine is a limiting factor in glutathione synthesis. Cysteine is obtained by uptake or biosynthesis, and mammalian cells often rely on either one or the other pathway. Because of the scarcity of glutathione, blockade of cysteine uptake causes oxidative cell death known as ferroptosis. A new study suggests that tRNA synthetase suppression activates the endogenous biosynthesis of cysteine, compensates such cysteine loss, and thus makes cells resistant to ferroptosis.

  8. Mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase mutations underlie fatal infantile Alpers encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Elo, Jenni M; Yadavalli, Srujana S; Euro, Liliya; Isohanni, Pirjo; Götz, Alexandra; Carroll, Christopher J; Valanne, Leena; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Uusimaa, Johanna; Paetau, Anders; Caruso, Eric M; Pihko, Helena; Ibba, Michael; Tyynismaa, Henna; Suomalainen, Anu

    2012-10-15

    Next-generation sequencing has turned out to be a powerful tool to uncover genetic basis of childhood mitochondrial disorders. We utilized whole-exome analysis and discovered novel compound heterozygous mutations in FARS2 (mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA synthetase), encoding the mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetase (mtPheRS) in two patients with fatal epileptic mitochondrial encephalopathy. The mutations affected highly conserved amino acids, p.I329T and p.D391V. Recently, a homozygous FARS2 variant p.Y144C was reported in a Saudi girl with mitochondrial encephalopathy, but the pathogenic role of the variant remained open. Clinical features, including postnatal onset, catastrophic epilepsy, lactic acidemia, early lethality and neuroimaging findings of the patients with FARS2 variants, resembled each other closely, and neuropathology was consistent with Alpers syndrome. Our structural analysis of mtPheRS predicted that p.I329T weakened ATP binding in the aminoacylation domain, and in vitro studies with recombinant mutant protein showed decreased affinity of this variant to ATP. Furthermore, p.D391V and p.Y144C were predicted to disrupt synthetase function by interrupting the rotation of the tRNA anticodon stem-binding domain from a closed to an open form. In vitro characterization indicated reduced affinity of p.D391V mutant protein to phenylalanine, whereas p.Y144C disrupted tRNA binding. The stability of p.I329T and p.D391V mutants in a refolding assay was impaired. Our results imply that the three FARS2 mutations directly impair aminoacylation function and stability of mtPheRS, leading to a decrease in overall tRNA charging capacity. This study establishes a new genetic cause of infantile mitochondrial Alpers encephalopathy and reports a new mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase as a cause of mitochondrial disease.

  9. MiSynPat: An integrated knowledge base linking clinical, genetic, and structural data for disease-causing mutations in human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Moulinier, Luc; Ripp, Raymond; Castillo, Gaston; Poch, Olivier; Sissler, Marie

    2017-10-01

    Numerous mutations in each of the mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) have been implicated in human diseases. The mutations are autosomal and recessive and lead mainly to neurological disorders, although with pleiotropic effects. The processes and interactions that drive the etiology of the disorders associated with mitochondrial aaRSs (mt-aaRSs) are far from understood. The complexity of the clinical, genetic, and structural data requires concerted, interdisciplinary efforts to understand the molecular biology of these disorders. Toward this goal, we designed MiSynPat, a comprehensive knowledge base together with an ergonomic Web server designed to organize and access all pertinent information (sequences, multiple sequence alignments, structures, disease descriptions, mutation characteristics, original literature) on the disease-linked human mt-aaRSs. With MiSynPat, a user can also evaluate the impact of a possible mutation on sequence-conservation-structure in order to foster the links between basic and clinical researchers and to facilitate future diagnosis. The proposed integrated view, coupled with research on disease-related mt-aaRSs, will help to reveal new functions for these enzymes and to open new vistas in the molecular biology of the cell. The purpose of MiSynPat, freely available at http://misynpat.org, is to constitute a reference and a converging resource for scientists and clinicians. © 2017 The Authors. Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Small noncoding RNAs in cells transformed by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1: a role for a tRNA fragment as a primer for reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Ruggero, Katia; Guffanti, Alessandro; Corradin, Alberto; Sharma, Varun Kumar; De Bellis, Gianluca; Corti, Giorgio; Grassi, Angela; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ciminale, Vincenzo; D'Agostino, Donna M

    2014-04-01

    The present study employed mass sequencing of small RNA libraries to identify the repertoire of small noncoding RNAs expressed in normal CD4(+) T cells compared to cells transformed with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). The results revealed distinct patterns of microRNA expression in HTLV-1-infected CD4(+) T-cell lines with respect to their normal counterparts. In addition, a search for virus-encoded microRNAs yielded 2 sequences that originated from the plus strand of the HTLV-1 genome. Several sequences derived from tRNAs were expressed at substantial levels in both uninfected and infected cells. One of the most abundant tRNA fragments (tRF-3019) was derived from the 3' end of tRNA-proline. tRF-3019 exhibited perfect sequence complementarity to the primer binding site of HTLV-1. The results of an in vitro reverse transcriptase assay verified that tRF-3019 was capable of priming HTLV-1 reverse transcriptase. Both tRNA-proline and tRF-3019 were detected in virus particles isolated from HTLV-1-infected cells. These findings suggest that tRF-3019 may play an important role in priming HTLV-1 reverse transcription and could thus represent a novel target to control HTLV-1 infection. Small noncoding RNAs, a growing family of regulatory RNAs that includes microRNAs and tRNA fragments, have recently emerged as key players in many biological processes, including viral infection and cancer. In the present study, we employed mass sequencing to identify the repertoire of small noncoding RNAs in normal T cells compared to T cells transformed with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), a retrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. The results revealed a distinct pattern of microRNA expression in HTLV-1-infected cells and a tRNA fragment (tRF-3019) that was packaged into virions and capable of priming HTLV-1 reverse transcription, a key event in the retroviral life cycle. These findings

  11. Covalent enzyme-RNA complex: a tRNA modification that prevents a covalent enzyme interaction also prevents aminoacylation.

    PubMed Central

    Starzyk, R; Schoemaker, H; Schimmel, P

    1985-01-01

    Previous work indicates that aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases make a transient covalent adduct with cognate tRNAs, through Michael addition of an enzyme nucleophile to the carbon-6 position of uridine 8. We report the selective reduction of the 5,6 double bond of 4-thiouridine at position 8 in Escherichia coli tyrosine tRNA, so as to prevent formation of the presumed covalent enzyme-nucleic acid adduct. The completely reduced tRNA molecules are inactivated for aminoacylation. With partial reduction, a mixed pool of active and inactive molecules is created and the degree of inactivation exactly matches the extent of 4-thiouridine reduction. The active molecules recovered from this mixed pool are specifically unaltered at position 8. The results are consistent with the view that the covalent enzyme-RNA adduct is an obligatory intermediate for aminoacylation of this tRNA. Images PMID:3881761

  12. Cocrystal structure of a T-box riboswitch Stem I domain in complex with its cognate tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinwei; Ferré-D’Amaré, Adrian R.

    2013-01-01

    In Gram-positive bacteria, T-box riboswitches regulate expression of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and other proteins in response to fluctuating tRNA aminoacylation levels under various nutritional states1. T-boxes reside in the 5’-untranslated regions (UTRs) of the mRNAs they regulate, and comprise two conserved domains. Stem I harbors the specifier trinucleotide that base-pairs with the anticodon of cognate tRNA. 3’ to Stem I is the antiterminator domain, which base-pairs with the tRNA acceptor end and evaluates its aminoacylation state2. Despite high phylogenetic conservation and widespread occurrence in pathogens, the structural basis of tRNA recognition3,4 by this riboswitch remains ill-defined. Here, we demonstrate that the ~100-nucleotide T-box Stem I is necessary and sufficient for specific, high-affinity (Kd ~150 nM) tRNA binding, and report its structure in complex with cognate tRNA at 3.2 Å resolution. Stem I recognizes the overall architecture of tRNA in addition to its anticodon, something accomplished by large ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) like the ribosome or proteins such as ARSs5, but unprecedented for a compact mRNA domain. The C-shaped Stem I cradles the L-shaped tRNA forming an extended (1604 Å2) intermolecular interface. In addition to the specifier-anticodon interaction, two interdigitated T-loops near the apex of Stem I stack on the tRNA elbow in a manner analogous to those of the J11/12-J12/11 motif6 of RNase P and the L1 stalk7 of the ribosomal E-site. Since these RNPs and T-boxes are unrelated, this strategy to recognize an universal tRNA feature likely evolved convergently. Mutually induced fit of Stem I and the tRNA exploiting the intrinsic flexibility of tRNA and its conserved post-transcriptional modifications results in high shape complementarity, which in addition to providing specificity and affinity, globally organizes the T-box to orchestrate tRNA-dependent transcription regulation. PMID:23892783

  13. Drosophila as a platform to predict the pathogenicity of novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase mutations in CMT.

    PubMed

    Leitão-Gonçalves, Ricardo; Ermanoska, Biljana; Jacobs, An; De Vriendt, Els; Timmerman, Vincent; Lupski, James R; Callaerts, Patrick; Jordanova, Albena

    2012-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the major form of inherited peripheral neuropathy in humans. CMT is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and four aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases have been implicated in disease etiology. Mutations in the YARS gene encoding a tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) lead to Dominant Intermediate CMT type C (DI-CMTC). Three dominant YARS mutations were so far associated with DI-CMTC. To further expand the spectrum of CMT causing genetic defects in this tRNA synthetase, we performed DNA sequencing of YARS coding regions in a cohort of 181 patients with various types of peripheral neuropathy. We identified a novel K265N substitution that in contrast to all previously described mutations is located at the anticodon recognition domain of the enzyme. Further genetic analysis revealed that this variant represents a benign substitution. Using our recently developed DI-CMTC Drosophila model, we tested in vivo the pathogenicity of this new YARS variant. We demonstrated that the developmental and behavioral defects induced by all DI-CMTC causing mutations were not present upon ubiquitous or panneuronal TyrRS K265N expression. Thus, in line with our genetic studies, functional analysis confirmed that the K265N substitution does not induce toxicity signs in Drosophila. The consistency observed throughout this work underscores the robustness of our DI-CMTC animal model and identifies Drosophila as a valid read-out platform to ascertain the pathogenicity of novel mutations to be identified in the future.

  14. Export and transport of tRNA are coupled to a multi-protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, C; Willkomm, D K; Grünweller, A; Vollbrandt, T; Sommer, S; Busch, S; Pfeiffer, T; Brinkmann, J; Hartmann, R K; Müller, P K

    2000-01-01

    Vigilin is a ubiquitous multi heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K homologous (KH)-domain protein. Here we demonstrate that purified recombinant human vigilin binds tRNA molecules with high affinity, although with limited specificity. Nuclear microinjection experiments revealed for the first time that the immuno-affinity-purified nuclear vigilin core complex (VCC(N)) as well as recombinant vigilin accelerate tRNA export from the nucleus in human cells. The nuclear tRNA receptor exportin-t is part of the VCC(N). Elongation factor (EF)-1alpha is enriched in VCC(N) and its cytoplasmic counterpart VCC(C), whereas EF-1beta, EF-1gamma and EF-1delta are basically confined to the VCC(C). Our results suggest further that vigilin and exportin-t might interact during tRNA export, provide evidence that the channeled tRNA cycle is already initiated in the nucleus, and illustrate that intracellular tRNA trafficking is associated with discrete changes in the composition of cellular cytoplasmic multi-protein complexes containing tRNA. PMID:10657246

  15. Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase, an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase for genetic code expansion

    PubMed Central

    Crnković, Ana; Suzuki, Tateki; Söll, Dieter; Reynolds, Noah M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic code expansion (GCE) has become a central topic of synthetic biology. GCE relies on engineered aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and a cognate tRNA species to allow codon reassignment by co-translational insertion of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. Introduction of such amino acids increases the chemical diversity of recombinant proteins endowing them with novel properties. Such proteins serve in sophisticated biochemical and biophysical studies both in vitro and in vivo, they may become unique biomaterials or therapeutic agents, and they afford metabolic dependence of genetically modified organisms for biocontainment purposes. In the Methanosarcinaceae the incorporation of the 22nd genetically encoded amino acid, pyrrolysine (Pyl), is facilitated by pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and the cognate UAG-recognizing tRNAPyl. This unique aaRS•tRNA pair functions as an orthogonal translation system (OTS) in most model organisms. The facile directed evolution of the large PylRS active site to accommodate many ncAAs, and the enzyme’s anticodon-blind specific recognition of the cognate tRNAPyl make this system highly amenable for GCE purposes. The remarkable polyspecificity of PylRS has been exploited to incorporate >100 different ncAAs into proteins. Here we review the Pyl-OT system and selected GCE applications to examine the properties of an effective OTS. PMID:28239189

  16. The N Terminus of Pro-endothelial Monocyte-activating Polypeptide II (EMAP II) Regulates Its Binding with the C Terminus, Arginyl-tRNA Synthetase, and Neurofilament Light Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiming; Malinin, Nikolay L.; Awasthi, Niranjan; Schwarz, Roderich E.; Schwarz, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Pro-endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide II (EMAP II), one component of the multi-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex, plays multiple roles in physiological and pathological processes of protein translation, signal transduction, immunity, lung development, and tumor growth. Recent studies have determined that pro-EMAP II has an essential role in maintaining axon integrity in central and peripheral neural systems where deletion of the C terminus of pro-EMAP II has been reported in a consanguineous Israeli Bedouin kindred suffering from Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease. We hypothesized that the N terminus of pro-EMAP II has an important role in the regulation of protein-protein interactions. Using a GFP reporter system, we defined a putative leucine zipper in the N terminus of human pro-EMAP II protein (amino acid residues 1–70) that can form specific strip-like punctate structures. Through GFP punctum analysis, we uncovered that the pro-EMAP II C terminus (amino acids 147–312) can repress GFP punctum formation. Pulldown assays confirmed that the binding between the pro-EMAP II N terminus and its C terminus is mediated by a putative leucine zipper. Furthermore, the pro-EMAP II 1–70 amino acid region was identified as the binding partner of arginyl-tRNA synthetase, a polypeptide of the multi-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex. We also determined that the punctate GFP pro-EMAP II 1–70 amino acid aggregate colocalizes and binds to the neurofilament light subunit protein that is associated with pathologic neurofilament network disorganization and degeneration of motor neurons. These findings indicate the structure and binding interaction of pro-EMAP II protein and suggest a role of this protein in pathological neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25724651

  17. [Anti-synthetase syndrome].

    PubMed

    Novak, Srdan

    2012-01-01

    Antysynthetase syndrome is considered as a group ofidiopathic inflammatory myositis with charcteristic serologic hallmark--antibodies which recognise the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetasses (ARS). Clinical picture of those patients contains myositis and/or intersticial lung disease (ILD) and/or arthritis and/or fever and/or Raynaud phenomenon and sometimes characteristic look of mechanic's hands. Myositis can be overt, sometimes even absent, while IBP is major cause of morbidity and determines the outcome of the disease. Untill now eight different any-synthetase autoantibodies are recognised, and most frequent are findings of anti-histidyl-tRNa synthetase antibodies. Patients with other ARS autoantibodies usually have severe ILD. Drug of choice are steroids in dosage of 1 mg/kg with immunosupresive agent (azatioprin or methotrexate) while in severe IBP cyclophosphamide is needed. Recently succsesful treatment with rituximab in combination with cyclophosphamide is reported.

  18. Methylated nucleosides in tRNA and tRNA methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    To date, more than 90 modified nucleosides have been found in tRNA and the biosynthetic pathways of the majority of tRNA modifications include a methylation step(s). Recent studies of the biosynthetic pathways have demonstrated that the availability of methyl group donors for the methylation in tRNA is important for correct and efficient protein synthesis. In this review, I focus on the methylated nucleosides and tRNA methyltransferases. The primary functions of tRNA methylations are linked to the different steps of protein synthesis, such as the stabilization of tRNA structure, reinforcement of the codon-anticodon interaction, regulation of wobble base pairing, and prevention of frameshift errors. However, beyond these basic functions, recent studies have demonstrated that tRNA methylations are also involved in the RNA quality control system and regulation of tRNA localization in the cell. In a thermophilic eubacterium, tRNA modifications and the modification enzymes form a network that responses to temperature changes. Furthermore, several modifications are involved in genetic diseases, infections, and the immune response. Moreover, structural, biochemical, and bioinformatics studies of tRNA methyltransferases have been clarifying the details of tRNA methyltransferases and have enabled these enzymes to be classified. In the final section, the evolution of modification enzymes is discussed. PMID:24904644

  19. Structures of Trypanosoma brucei Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase with Urea-Based Inhibitors Provide Guidance for Drug Design against Sleeping Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Cho Yeow; Kim, Jessica E.; Wetzel, Allan B.; de van der Schueren, Will J.; Shibata, Sayaka; Ranade, Ranae M.; Liu, Jiyun; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Gillespie, J. Robert; Buckner, Frederick S.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2014-01-01

    Methionyl-tRNA synthetase of Trypanosoma brucei (TbMetRS) is an important target in the development of new antitrypanosomal drugs. The enzyme is essential, highly flexible and displaying a large degree of changes in protein domains and binding pockets in the presence of substrate, product and inhibitors. Targeting this protein will benefit from a profound understanding of how its structure adapts to ligand binding. A series of urea-based inhibitors (UBIs) has been developed with IC50 values as low as 19 nM against the enzyme. The UBIs were shown to be orally available and permeable through the blood-brain barrier, and are therefore candidates for development of drugs for the treatment of late stage human African trypanosomiasis. Here, we expand the structural diversity of inhibitors from the previously reported collection and tested for their inhibitory effect on TbMetRS and on the growth of T. brucei cells. The binding modes and binding pockets of 14 UBIs are revealed by determination of their crystal structures in complex with TbMetRS at resolutions between 2.2 Å to 2.9 Å. The structures show binding of the UBIs through conformational selection, including occupancy of the enlarged methionine pocket and the auxiliary pocket. General principles underlying the affinity of UBIs for TbMetRS are derived from these structures, in particular the optimum way to fill the two binding pockets. The conserved auxiliary pocket might play a role in binding tRNA. In addition, a crystal structure of a ternary TbMetRS•inhibitor•AMPPCP complex indicates that the UBIs are not competing with ATP for binding, instead are interacting with ATP through hydrogen bond. This suggests a possibility that a general ‘ATP-engaging’ binding mode can be utilized for the design and development of inhibitors targeting tRNA synthetases of other disease-causing pathogen. PMID:24743796

  20. Structures of Trypanosoma brucei methionyl-tRNA synthetase with urea-based inhibitors provide guidance for drug design against sleeping sickness.

    PubMed

    Koh, Cho Yeow; Kim, Jessica E; Wetzel, Allan B; de van der Schueren, Will J; Shibata, Sayaka; Ranade, Ranae M; Liu, Jiyun; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Gillespie, J Robert; Buckner, Frederick S; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Hol, Wim G J

    2014-04-01

    Methionyl-tRNA synthetase of Trypanosoma brucei (TbMetRS) is an important target in the development of new antitrypanosomal drugs. The enzyme is essential, highly flexible and displaying a large degree of changes in protein domains and binding pockets in the presence of substrate, product and inhibitors. Targeting this protein will benefit from a profound understanding of how its structure adapts to ligand binding. A series of urea-based inhibitors (UBIs) has been developed with IC50 values as low as 19 nM against the enzyme. The UBIs were shown to be orally available and permeable through the blood-brain barrier, and are therefore candidates for development of drugs for the treatment of late stage human African trypanosomiasis. Here, we expand the structural diversity of inhibitors from the previously reported collection and tested for their inhibitory effect on TbMetRS and on the growth of T. brucei cells. The binding modes and binding pockets of 14 UBIs are revealed by determination of their crystal structures in complex with TbMetRS at resolutions between 2.2 Å to 2.9 Å. The structures show binding of the UBIs through conformational selection, including occupancy of the enlarged methionine pocket and the auxiliary pocket. General principles underlying the affinity of UBIs for TbMetRS are derived from these structures, in particular the optimum way to fill the two binding pockets. The conserved auxiliary pocket might play a role in binding tRNA. In addition, a crystal structure of a ternary TbMetRS•inhibitor•AMPPCP complex indicates that the UBIs are not competing with ATP for binding, instead are interacting with ATP through hydrogen bond. This suggests a possibility that a general 'ATP-engaging' binding mode can be utilized for the design and development of inhibitors targeting tRNA synthetases of other disease-causing pathogen.

  1. tRNA regulation of gene expression: Interactions of an mRNA 5′-UTR with a regulatory tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Audrey R.; Henkin, Tina M.; Agris, Paul F.

    2006-01-01

    Many genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and other amino acid–related products in Gram-positive bacteria, including important pathogens, are regulated through interaction of unacylated tRNA with the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of the mRNA. Each gene regulated by this mechanism responds specifically to the cognate tRNA, and specificity is determined by pairing of the anticodon of the tRNA with a codon sequence in the “Specifier Loop” of the 5′-UTR. For the 5′-UTR to function in gene regulation, the mRNA folding interactions must be sufficiently stable to present the codon sequence for productive binding to the anticodon of the matching tRNA. A model bimolecular system was developed in which the interaction between two half molecules (“Common” and “Specifier”) would reconstitute the Specifier Loop region of the 5′-UTR of the Bacillus subtilis glyQS gene, encoding GlyRS mRNA. Gel mobility shift analysis and fluorescence spectroscopy yielded experimental K ds of 27.6 ± 1.0 μM and 10.5 ± 0.7 μM, respectively, for complex formation between Common and Specifier half molecules. The reconstituted 5′-UTR of the glyQS mRNA bound the anticodon stem and loop of tRNAGly (ASLGlyGCC) specifically and with a significant affinity (K d = 20.2 ± 1.4 μM). Thus, the bimolecular 5′-UTR and ASLGlyGCC models mimic the RNA–RNA interaction required for T box gene regulation in vivo. PMID:16741230

  2. Clinical significance of serum 2,5-oligoadenylate synthetase and soluble interleukin-2 receptor in hemophiliacs positive and negative for human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, J; Gotoh, M; Gohchi, K; Tsukamoto, M; Saitoh, N; Kinoshita, T

    1994-01-01

    We measured serum 2,5-oligoadenylate synthetase (2,5-AS) levels and soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) levels in human immune deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-positive and HIV-1-negative hemophiliacs in order to clarify the clinical significance of these parameters in hemophiliacs. Serum 2,5-AS levels were measured by a radioimmunosorbent assay, and sIL-2R levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean serum 2,5-AS levels were higher in AIDS-related-complex and AIDS patients, asymptomatic carriers, and HIV-1-negative hemophiliacs than in hepatitis C virus-positive patients and healthy controls. Serial determinations showed that the 2,5-AS levels tended to increase in HIV-1-positive patients, especially those with AIDS-related complex or AIDS, although it showed a substantial decrease in the terminal stage. The serum sIL-2R levels were higher in HIV-1-positive patients, HIV-1-negative patients, and hepatitis C virus-positive patients than in controls. Serial studies showed little change in the HIV-1-positive and HIV-1-negative groups, although sIL-2R levels showed a tendency to decrease with zidovudine treatment. On the basis of the present results, we may well conclude that 2,5-AS and sIL-2R are not specific markers for hemophiliacs with HIV-1 infection. However, serial measurement of these markers can still be useful for assessing the progression of AIDS and the prognosis for patients with AIDS, as well as for monitoring the response to zidovudine. PMID:7496937

  3. Altered alpha subunits in phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases from p-fluorophenylalanine-resistant strains of Escherichis coli.

    PubMed

    Hennecke, H; Böck, A

    1975-07-01

    Three different phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases have been purified to near homogeneity, one from a wild-type strain of Escherichia coli and the others from two independently isolated p-fluorophenyalanine-resistant strains. The mutant enzymes were not able to use p-fluorophenylalanine as a substrate for activation and attachment to tRNA. They proved to be indistinguishable from the wild-type enzyme by several electrophoretic and immunological criteria. The alpha and beta subunits of all three enzymes have been prepared by a method described in this paper. The isolated subunits per se did not reveal any significant enzyme activity, but combined they were able to form active phenylalanyl tRNA synthetase after a defined reconstitution process. Mixed reconstitution experiments between wild-type and mutant subunits indicate that the mutant alpha subunit is responsible for p-fluorophenylalanine resistance and therefore seems to carry the phenylalanine-binding site or to participate in its formation.

  4. tRNA acceptor stem and anticodon bases form independent codes related to protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Charles W.; Wolfenden, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases recognize tRNA anticodon and 3′ acceptor stem bases. Synthetase Urzymes acylate cognate tRNAs even without anticodon-binding domains, in keeping with the possibility that acceptor stem recognition preceded anticodon recognition. Representing tRNA identity elements with two bits per base, we show that the anticodon encodes the hydrophobicity of each amino acid side-chain as represented by its water-to-cyclohexane distribution coefficient, and this relationship holds true over the entire temperature range of liquid water. The acceptor stem codes preferentially for the surface area or size of each side-chain, as represented by its vapor-to-cyclohexane distribution coefficient. These orthogonal experimental properties are both necessary to account satisfactorily for the exposed surface area of amino acids in folded proteins. Moreover, the acceptor stem codes correctly for β-branched and carboxylic acid side-chains, whereas the anticodon codes for a wider range of such properties, but not for size or β-branching. These and other results suggest that genetic coding of 3D protein structures evolved in distinct stages, based initially on the size of the amino acid and later on its compatibility with globular folding in water. PMID:26034281

  5. Structural diversity and protein engineering of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Perona, John J; Hadd, Andrew

    2012-11-06

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are the enzymes that ensure faithful transmission of genetic information in all living cells, and are central to the developing technologies for expanding the capacity of the translation apparatus to incorporate nonstandard amino acids into proteins in vivo. The 24 known aaRS families are divided into two classes that exhibit functional evolutionary convergence. Each class features an active site domain with a common fold that binds ATP, the amino acid, and the 3'-terminus of tRNA, embellished by idiosyncratic further domains that bind distal portions of the tRNA and enhance specificity. Fidelity in the expression of the genetic code requires that the aaRS be selective for both amino acids and tRNAs, a substantial challenge given the presence of structurally very similar noncognate substrates of both types. Here we comprehensively review central themes concerning the architectures of the protein structures and the remarkable dual-substrate selectivities, with a view toward discerning the most important issues that still substantially limit our capacity for rational protein engineering. A suggested general approach to rational design is presented, which should yield insight into the identities of the protein-RNA motifs at the heart of the genetic code, while also offering a basis for improving the catalytic properties of engineered tRNA synthetases emerging from genetic selections.

  6. Mod5 protein binds to tRNA gene complexes and affects local transcriptional silencing

    PubMed Central

    Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Pai, Dave A.; Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Wozniak, Glenn G.; Good, Paul D.; Miller, Erin L.; McLeod, Ian X.; Yates, John R.; Hopper, Anita K.; Engelke, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The tRNA gene-mediated (tgm) silencing of RNA polymerase II promoters is dependent on subnuclear clustering of the tRNA genes, but genetic analysis shows that the silencing requires additional mechanisms. We have identified proteins that bind tRNA gene transcription complexes and are required for tgm silencing but not required for gene clustering. One of the proteins, Mod5, is a tRNA modifying enzyme that adds an N6-isopentenyl adenosine modification at position 37 on a small number of tRNAs in the cytoplasm, although a subpopulation of Mod5 is also found in the nucleus. Recent publications have also shown that Mod5 has tumor suppressor characteristics in humans as well as confers drug resistance through prion-like misfolding in yeast. Here, we show that a subpopulation of Mod5 associates with tRNA gene complexes in the nucleolus. This association occurs and is required for tgm silencing regardless of whether the pre-tRNA transcripts are substrates for Mod5 modification. In addition, Mod5 is bound to nuclear pre-tRNA transcripts, although they are not substrates for the A37 modification. Lastly, we show that truncation of the tRNA transcript to remove the normal tRNA structure also alleviates silencing, suggesting that synthesis of intact pre-tRNAs is required for the silencing mechanism. These results are discussed in light of recent results showing that silencing near tRNA genes also requires chromatin modification. PMID:23898186

  7. Mod5 protein binds to tRNA gene complexes and affects local transcriptional silencing.

    PubMed

    Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Pai, Dave A; Haeusler, Rebecca A; Wozniak, Glenn G; Good, Paul D; Miller, Erin L; McLeod, Ian X; Yates, John R; Hopper, Anita K; Engelke, David R

    2013-08-13

    The tRNA gene-mediated (tgm) silencing of RNA polymerase II promoters is dependent on subnuclear clustering of the tRNA genes, but genetic analysis shows that the silencing requires additional mechanisms. We have identified proteins that bind tRNA gene transcription complexes and are required for tgm silencing but not required for gene clustering. One of the proteins, Mod5, is a tRNA modifying enzyme that adds an N6-isopentenyl adenosine modification at position 37 on a small number of tRNAs in the cytoplasm, although a subpopulation of Mod5 is also found in the nucleus. Recent publications have also shown that Mod5 has tumor suppressor characteristics in humans as well as confers drug resistance through prion-like misfolding in yeast. Here, we show that a subpopulation of Mod5 associates with tRNA gene complexes in the nucleolus. This association occurs and is required for tgm silencing regardless of whether the pre-tRNA transcripts are substrates for Mod5 modification. In addition, Mod5 is bound to nuclear pre-tRNA transcripts, although they are not substrates for the A37 modification. Lastly, we show that truncation of the tRNA transcript to remove the normal tRNA structure also alleviates silencing, suggesting that synthesis of intact pre-tRNAs is required for the silencing mechanism. These results are discussed in light of recent results showing that silencing near tRNA genes also requires chromatin modification.

  8. Conservation of the relative tRNA composition in healthy and cancerous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mahlab, Shelly; Tuller, Tamir; Linial, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Elongation in protein translation is strongly dependent on the availability of mature transfer RNAs (tRNAs). The relative concentrations of the tRNA isoacceptors determine the translation efficiency in unicellular organisms. However, the degree of correspondence of codons and the relevant tRNA isoacceptors serves as an estimator for translation efficiency in all organisms. In this study, we focus on the translational capacity of the human proteome. We show that the correspondence between the codon usage and tRNAs can be improved by combining experimental measurements with the genomic copy number of isoacceptor groups. We show that there are technologies of tRNA measurements that are useful for our analysis. However, fragments of tRNAs do not agree with translational capacity. It was shown that there is a significant increase in the absolute levels of tRNA genes in cancerous cells in comparison to healthy cells. However, we find that the relative composition of tRNA isoacceptors in healthy, cancerous, or transformed cells remains almost identical. This result may indicate that maintaining the relative tRNA composition in cancerous cells is advantageous via its stabilizing of the effectiveness of translation. PMID:22357911

  9. Mitochondrial tRNA sequences as unusual replication origins: pathogenic implications for Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé; Krishnan, Neeraja M; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2006-12-07

    The heavy strand of vertebrate mitochondrial genomes accumulates deaminations proportionally to the time it spends single-stranded during replication. A previous study showed that the strength of genome-wide deamination gradients originating from tRNA gene's locations increases with their capacities to form secondary structures resembling mitochondrial origins of light strand replication (OL), suggesting an alternative function for tRNA sequences. We hypothesize that this function is frequently pathogenic for those tRNA genes that normally do not form OL-like structures, because this could cause excess mutations in genome regions unadapted to tolerate them. In human mitochondrial genomes, pathogenic tRNA variants usually form less OL-like structures than non-pathogenic ones in cases where the normal non-pathogenic tRNA variant can function as OL, as evolutionary analyses reveal. For tRNAs lacking the putative OL-like functioning capacity, pathogenic variants form more OL-like secondary structures, particularly structures that might invoke bi-directional replication (true for 14 among 21 tRNA species, p<0.05, sign test; significantly at p<0.05 (1 tailed test) for 7 tRNA species), but not more unidirectional replication invoking structures. Accounting for the functional cloverleaf-like structure-forming capacities of tRNAs yields similar results. Rare, non-pathogenic tRNA mutants tend to form more OL-like structures than the common, non-pathogenic ones, suggesting weak directional selection also among non-pathogenic variants. The duration spent single stranded by a region of the heavy strand (D(ssH)) during replication, estimated by integrating over all regions that can function as OL in Homo sapiens mitochondrial genomes, increases with distance of that region from the Dloop. This suggests convergence of single-strandedness during replication and transcription, and explains conserved locations of tRNA species in mitochondrial genomes and bacterial operons. These

  10. Global tRNA misacylation induced by anaerobiosis and antibiotic exposure broadly increases stress resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Michael H.; Waldbauer, Jacob R.; Zhang, Lichun; Pan, Tao

    2016-01-01

    High translational fidelity is commonly considered a requirement for optimal cellular health and protein function. However, recent findings have shown that inducible mistranslation specifically with methionine engendered at the tRNA charging level occurs in mammalian cells, yeast and archaea, yet it was unknown whether bacteria were capable of mounting a similar response. Here, we demonstrate that Escherichia coli misacylates non-methionyl-tRNAs with methionine in response to anaerobiosis and antibiotic exposure via the methionyl–tRNA synthetase (MetRS). Two MetRS succinyl-lysine modifications independently confer high tRNA charging fidelity to the otherwise promiscuous, unmodified enzyme. Strains incapable of tRNA mismethionylation are less adept at growth in the presence of antibiotics and stressors. The presence of tRNA mismethionylation and its potential role in mistranslation within the bacterial domain establishes this response as a pervasive biological mechanism and connects it to diverse cellular functions and modes of fitness. PMID:27672035

  11. Different sequence signatures in the upstream regions of plant and animal tRNA genes shape distinct modes of regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gong; Lukoszek, Radoslaw; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Ignatova, Zoya

    2011-04-01

    In eukaryotes, the transcription of tRNA genes is initiated by the concerted action of transcription factors IIIC (TFIIIC) and IIIB (TFIIIB) which direct the recruitment of polymerase III. While TFIIIC recognizes highly conserved, intragenic promoter elements, TFIIIB binds to the non-coding 5'-upstream regions of the tRNA genes. Using a systematic bioinformatic analysis of 11 multicellular eukaryotic genomes we identified a highly conserved TATA motif followed by a CAA-motif in the tRNA upstream regions of all plant genomes. Strikingly, the 5'-flanking tRNA regions of the animal genomes are highly heterogeneous and lack a common conserved sequence signature. Interestingly, in the animal genomes the tRNA species that read the same codon share conserved motifs in their upstream regions. Deep-sequencing analysis of 16 human tissues revealed multiple splicing variants of two of the TFIIIB subunits, Bdp1 and Brf1, with tissue-specific expression patterns. These multiple forms most likely modulate the TFIIIB-DNA interactions and explain the lack of a uniform signature motif in the tRNA upstream regions of animal genomes. The anticodon-dependent 5'-flanking motifs provide a possible mechanism for independent regulation of the tRNA transcription in various human tissues.

  12. Structure of Leishmania major methionyl-tRNA synthetase in complex with intermediate products methionyladenylate and pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Larson, Eric T; Kim, Jessica E; Zucker, Frank H; Kelley, Angela; Mueller, Natascha; Napuli, Alberto J; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Buckner, Frederick S; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Merritt, Ethan A; Hol, Wim G J

    2011-03-01

    Leishmania parasites cause two million new cases of leishmaniasis each year with several hundreds of millions of people at risk. Due to the paucity and shortcomings of available drugs, we have undertaken the crystal structure determination of a key enzyme from Leishmania major in hopes of creating a platform for the rational design of new therapeutics. Crystals of the catalytic core of methionyl-tRNA synthetase from L. major (LmMetRS) were obtained with the substrates MgATP and methionine present in the crystallization medium. These crystals yielded the 2.0 Å resolution structure of LmMetRS in complex with two products, methionyladenylate and pyrophosphate, along with a Mg(2+) ion that bridges them. This is the first class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) structure with pyrophosphate bound. The residues of the class I aaRS signature sequence motifs, KISKS and HIGH, make numerous contacts with the pyrophosphate. Substantial differences between the LmMetRS structure and previously reported complexes of Escherichia coli MetRS (EcMetRS) with analogs of the methionyladenylate intermediate product are observed, even though one of these analogs only differs by one atom from the intermediate. The source of these structural differences is attributed to the presence of the product pyrophosphate in LmMetRS. Analysis of the LmMetRS structure in light of the Aquifex aeolicus MetRS-tRNA(Met) complex shows that major rearrangements of multiple structural elements of enzyme and/or tRNA are required to allow the CCA acceptor triplet to reach the methionyladenylate intermediate in the active site. Comparison with sequences of human cytosolic and mitochondrial MetRS reveals interesting differences near the ATP- and methionine-binding regions of LmMetRS, suggesting that it should be possible to obtain compounds that selectively inhibit the parasite enzyme.

  13. Probing the substrate-binding sites of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with the procion dye green HE-4BD.

    PubMed Central

    McArdell, J E; Duffield, M; Atkinson, T

    1989-01-01

    A reactive bis-dichloro derivative of the Procion dye Green HE-4BD was shown to inactivate irreversibly methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MTS) from Escherichia coli and also tryptophyl-tRNA synthetase (WTS) and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (YTS) from Bacillus stearothermophilus at pH 8.5 and 37 degrees C. At a 5-fold excess of reactive dye over enzyme subunit concentration MTS was quantitatively inactivated within 20 min in the ATP/pyrophosphate exchange assay, whereas WTS and YTS show an 80% loss of activity over the same time period. The inactivation is affected by the addition of substrates, which either protect (WTS and YTS) or promote (YTS with tyrosine) the dye-mediated enzyme inactivation. Green HE-4BD-OH was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of MTS with respect to MgATP, methionine and tRNA substrates. PMID:2658972

  14. A non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Alexander Machado; Polycarpo, Carla; Martins, Orlando Bonifácio; Söll, Dieter

    2006-07-01

    The tRNA-dependent transamidation pathway is the essential route for Asn-tRNA(Asn) formation in organisms that lack an asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase. This pathway relies on a nondiscriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (ND-AspRS encoded by aspS), an enzyme with relaxed tRNA specificity, to form Asp-tRNA(Asn). The misacylated tRNA is then converted to Asn-tRNA(Asn) by the action of an Asp-tRNA(Asn) amidotransferase. Here we show that Asn-tRNA(Asn) formation in the extreme halophile Halobacterium salinarum also occurs by this transamidation mechanism, and we explore the property of the haloarchaeal AspRS to aspartylate tRNA(Asn) in vivo and in vitro. Transformation of the E. coli trpA34 strain with the H. salinarum aspS and tRNA(Asn) genes led to restoration of tryptophan prototrophy by missense suppression of the trpA34 mutant with heterologously in vivo formed Asp-tRNA(Asn). The haloarchaeal AspRS works well at low and high (0.1-3 M) salt concentrations but it is unable to use Escherichia coli tRNA as substrate. We show that mutations of two amino acids (H26 and P84) located in the AspRS anticodon binding domain limit the specificity of this nondiscriminating enzyme towards tRNA(Asn). Thus, as was observed in an archaeal discriminating AspRS and a bacterial ND-AspRS, amino acids in these positions influence the enzyme's tRNA selection.

  15. Maf1-mediated regulation of yeast RNA polymerase III is correlated with CCA addition at the 3' end of tRNA precursors.

    PubMed

    Foretek, Dominika; Nuc, Przemysław; Żywicki, Marek; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Kudla, Grzegorz; Boguta, Magdalena

    2016-08-27

    In eukaryotic cells tRNA synthesis is negatively regulated by the protein Maf1, conserved from yeast to humans. Maf1 from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mediates repression of trna transcription when cells are transferred from medium with glucose to medium with glycerol, a non-fermentable carbon source. The strain with deleted gene encoding Maf1 (maf1Δ) is viable but accumulates tRNA precursors. In this study tRNA precursors were analysed by RNA-Seq and Northern hybridization in wild type strain and maf1Δ mutant grown in glucose medium or upon shift to repressive conditions. A negative effect of maf1Δ mutant on the addition of the auxiliary CCA nucleotides to the 3' end of pre-tRNAs was observed in cells shifted to unfavourable growth conditions. This effect was reduced by overexpression of the yeast CCA1 gene encoding ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferase. The CCA sequence at the 3' end is important for export of tRNA precursors from the nucleus and essential for tRNA charging with amino acids. Data presented here indicate that CCA-addition to intron-containing end-processed tRNA precursors is a limiting step in tRNA maturation when there is no Maf1 mediated RNA polymerase III (Pol III) repression. The correlation between CCA synthesis and Pol III regulation by Maf1 could be important in coordination of tRNA transcription, processing and regulation of translation.

  16. Multistep modeling of protein structure: application towards refinement of tyr-tRNA synthetase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Shibata, M.; Roychoudhury, M.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    The scope of multistep modeling (MSM) is expanding by adding a least-squares minimization step in the procedure to fit backbone reconstruction consistent with a set of C-alpha coordinates. The analytical solution of Phi and Psi angles, that fits a C-alpha x-ray coordinate is used for tyr-tRNA synthetase. Phi and Psi angles for the region where the above mentioned method fails, are obtained by minimizing the difference in C-alpha distances between the computed model and the crystal structure in a least-squares sense. We present a stepwise application of this part of MSM to the determination of the complete backbone geometry of the 321 N terminal residues of tyrosine tRNA synthetase to a root mean square deviation of 0.47 angstroms from the crystallographic C-alpha coordinates.

  17. Multistep modeling of protein structure: application towards refinement of tyr-tRNA synthetase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Shibata, M.; Roychoudhury, M.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    The scope of multistep modeling (MSM) is expanding by adding a least-squares minimization step in the procedure to fit backbone reconstruction consistent with a set of C-alpha coordinates. The analytical solution of Phi and Psi angles, that fits a C-alpha x-ray coordinate is used for tyr-tRNA synthetase. Phi and Psi angles for the region where the above mentioned method fails, are obtained by minimizing the difference in C-alpha distances between the computed model and the crystal structure in a least-squares sense. We present a stepwise application of this part of MSM to the determination of the complete backbone geometry of the 321 N terminal residues of tyrosine tRNA synthetase to a root mean square deviation of 0.47 angstroms from the crystallographic C-alpha coordinates.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions glutathione synthetase deficiency glutathione synthetase ...

  19. The T-loop region of animal mitochondrial tRNA(Ser)(AGY) is a main recognition site for homologous seryl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, T; Yotsumoto, Y; Ikeda, K; Watanabe, K

    1992-01-01

    Recognition sites of bovine mitochondrial serine tRNA specific for condons AGY [tRNA(Ser) (AGY)] by the cognate mitochondrial seryl-tRNA synthetase were studied using a range of tRNA(Ser)(AGY) variants which were obtained by the in vitro transcription of synthetic tRNA genes with T7 RNA polymerase. Base replacements in the anticodon and discriminator sites did not affect serine acceptance. However, deletion and/or replacement in the T-loop region completely deprived the variants of their charging activities. Point mutation experiments in this region also showed that the adenosine residue in the middle of the T-loop (position 58), which is involved in tertiary interaction between the T-loop and the truncated D-arm [de Bruijn and Klug, 1983] played a significant role in the recognition process by the synthetase. PMID:1375735

  20. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations and disease.

    PubMed

    Yarham, John W; Elson, Joanna L; Blakely, Emma L; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt-) tRNA (MTT) gene mutations are an important cause of human morbidity and are associated with a wide range of pathology, from isolated organ-specific diseases such as myopathy or hearing loss, through to multisystem disorders with encephalopathy, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and life-threatening cardiomyopathy. Our understanding of how MTT mutations cause disease remains poor and progress has been hampered by the complex interaction of genotype with phenotype that can result in patients who harbor the same mutation exhibiting starkly contrasting phenotypes, whereas other (genetically heterogeneous) patients manifest clinically identical syndromes. A further complexity is the highly polymorphic nature of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which must temper any reflex assumptions of pathogenicity for novel MTT substitutions. Nevertheless significant progress is being made and we shall review the methods employed to identify and characterize MTT mutations as pathogenic. Also important is our understanding of the molecular processes involved and we shall discuss the data available on two of the most studied MTT mutations (m.8344A > G and m.3243A > G) as well as other potential pathogenic mechanisms. Knowledge of factors influencing the inheritance of MTT mutations, and therefore the likelihood of disease transmission, is of particular importance to female patients. At present, the factors determining transmission remain elusive, but we shall examine several possible mechanisms and discuss the evidence for each. Finally, a number of different yeast and mouse models are currently used to investigate mitochondrial disease and we will assess the importance of and difficulties associated with each model as well as the future of possible therapies for patients with mitochondrial disease.

  1. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs of human genes required for mitochondrial tRNA modification cause similar electron transport chain defects but different nuclear responses.

    PubMed

    Navarro-González, Carmen; Moukadiri, Ismaïl; Villarroya, Magda; López-Pascual, Ernesto; Tuck, Simon; Armengod, M-Eugenia

    2017-07-01

    Several oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) diseases are caused by defects in the post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs). Mutations in MTO1 or GTPBP3 impair the modification of the wobble uridine at position 5 of the pyrimidine ring and cause heart failure. Mutations in TRMU affect modification at position 2 and cause liver disease. Presently, the molecular basis of the diseases and why mutations in the different genes lead to such different clinical symptoms is poorly understood. Here we use Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism to investigate how defects in the TRMU, GTPBP3 and MTO1 orthologues (designated as mttu-1, mtcu-1, and mtcu-2, respectively) exert their effects. We found that whereas the inactivation of each C. elegans gene is associated with a mild OXPHOS dysfunction, mutations in mtcu-1 or mtcu-2 cause changes in the expression of metabolic and mitochondrial stress response genes that are quite different from those caused by mttu-1 mutations. Our data suggest that retrograde signaling promotes defect-specific metabolic reprogramming, which is able to rescue the OXPHOS dysfunction in the single mutants by stimulating the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle flux through complex II. This adaptive response, however, appears to be associated with a biological cost since the single mutant worms exhibit thermosensitivity and decreased fertility and, in the case of mttu-1, longer reproductive cycle. Notably, mttu-1 worms also exhibit increased lifespan. We further show that mtcu-1; mttu-1 and mtcu-2; mttu-1 double mutants display severe growth defects and sterility. The animal models presented here support the idea that the pathological states in humans may initially develop not as a direct consequence of a bioenergetic defect, but from the cell's maladaptive response to the hypomodification status of mt-tRNAs. Our work highlights the important association of the defect-specific metabolic rewiring with the pathological phenotype

  2. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs of human genes required for mitochondrial tRNA modification cause similar electron transport chain defects but different nuclear responses

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-González, Carmen; Moukadiri, Ismaïl; Villarroya, Magda; Tuck, Simon; Armengod, M.-Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    Several oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) diseases are caused by defects in the post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs). Mutations in MTO1 or GTPBP3 impair the modification of the wobble uridine at position 5 of the pyrimidine ring and cause heart failure. Mutations in TRMU affect modification at position 2 and cause liver disease. Presently, the molecular basis of the diseases and why mutations in the different genes lead to such different clinical symptoms is poorly understood. Here we use Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism to investigate how defects in the TRMU, GTPBP3 and MTO1 orthologues (designated as mttu-1, mtcu-1, and mtcu-2, respectively) exert their effects. We found that whereas the inactivation of each C. elegans gene is associated with a mild OXPHOS dysfunction, mutations in mtcu-1 or mtcu-2 cause changes in the expression of metabolic and mitochondrial stress response genes that are quite different from those caused by mttu-1 mutations. Our data suggest that retrograde signaling promotes defect-specific metabolic reprogramming, which is able to rescue the OXPHOS dysfunction in the single mutants by stimulating the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle flux through complex II. This adaptive response, however, appears to be associated with a biological cost since the single mutant worms exhibit thermosensitivity and decreased fertility and, in the case of mttu-1, longer reproductive cycle. Notably, mttu-1 worms also exhibit increased lifespan. We further show that mtcu-1; mttu-1 and mtcu-2; mttu-1 double mutants display severe growth defects and sterility. The animal models presented here support the idea that the pathological states in humans may initially develop not as a direct consequence of a bioenergetic defect, but from the cell’s maladaptive response to the hypomodification status of mt-tRNAs. Our work highlights the important association of the defect-specific metabolic rewiring with the pathological

  3. Emerging roles of tRNA in adaptive translation, signalling dynamics and disease.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Sebastian; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-02-01

    tRNAs, nexus molecules between mRNAs and proteins, have a central role in translation. Recent discoveries have revealed unprecedented complexity of tRNA biosynthesis, modification patterns, regulation and function. In this Review, we present emerging concepts regarding how tRNA abundance is dynamically regulated and how tRNAs (and their nucleolytic fragments) are centrally involved in stress signalling and adaptive translation, operating across a wide range of timescales. Mutations in tRNAs or in genes affecting tRNA biogenesis are also linked to complex human diseases with surprising heterogeneity in tissue vulnerability, and we highlight cell-specific aspects that modulate the disease penetrance of tRNA-based pathologies.

  4. Metazoan tRNA introns generate stable circular RNAs in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhipeng; Filonov, Grigory S.; Noto, John J.; Schmidt, Casey A.; Hatkevich, Talia L.; Wen, Ying; Jaffrey, Samie R.; Matera, A. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a class of abundant circular noncoding RNAs that are produced during metazoan tRNA splicing. These transcripts, termed tRNA intronic circular (tric)RNAs, are conserved features of animal transcriptomes. Biogenesis of tricRNAs requires anciently conserved tRNA sequence motifs and processing enzymes, and their expression is regulated in an age-dependent and tissue-specific manner. Furthermore, we exploited this biogenesis pathway to develop an in vivo expression system for generating “designer” circular RNAs in human cells. Reporter constructs expressing RNA aptamers such as Spinach and Broccoli can be used to follow the transcription and subcellular localization of tricRNAs in living cells. Owing to the superior stability of circular vs. linear RNA isoforms, this expression system has a wide range of potential applications, from basic research to pharmaceutical science. PMID:26194134

  5. tRNA Biology in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Salinas-Giegé, Thalia; Giegé, Richard; Giegé, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of eukaryotic cells. They are considered as semi-autonomous because they have retained genomes inherited from their prokaryotic ancestor and host fully functional gene expression machineries. These organelles have attracted considerable attention because they combine bacterial-like traits with novel features that evolved in the host cell. Among them, mitochondria use many specific pathways to obtain complete and functional sets of tRNAs as required for translation. In some instances, tRNA genes have been partially or entirely transferred to the nucleus and mitochondria require precise import systems to attain their pool of tRNAs. Still, tRNA genes have also often been maintained in mitochondria. Their genetic arrangement is more diverse than previously envisaged. The expression and maturation of mitochondrial tRNAs often use specific enzymes that evolved during eukaryote history. For instance many mitochondria use a eukaryote-specific RNase P enzyme devoid of RNA. The structure itself of mitochondrial encoded tRNAs is also very diverse, as e.g., in Metazoan, where tRNAs often show non canonical or truncated structures. As a result, the translational machinery in mitochondria evolved adapted strategies to accommodate the peculiarities of these tRNAs, in particular simplified identity rules for their aminoacylation. Here, we review the specific features of tRNA biology in mitochondria from model species representing the major eukaryotic groups, with an emphasis on recent research on tRNA import, maturation and aminoacylation. PMID:25734984

  6. Rosiglitazone Inhibits Acyl-CoA Synthetase Activity and Fatty Acid Partitioning to Diacylglycerol and Triacylglycerol via a Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor-γ–Independent Mechanism in Human Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Askari, Bardia; Kanter, Jenny E.; Sherrid, Ashley M.; Golej, Deidre L.; Bender, Andrew T.; Liu, Joey; Hsueh, Willa A.; Beavo, Joseph A.; Coleman, Rosalind A.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2010-01-01

    Rosiglitazone is an insulin-sensitizing agent that has recently been shown to exert beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. In addition to peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, rosiglitazone can affect other targets, such as directly inhibiting recombinant long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL)-4 activity. Because it is unknown if ACSL4 is expressed in vascular cells involved in atherosclerosis, we investigated the ability of rosiglitazone to inhibit ACSL activity and fatty acid partitioning in human and murine arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages. Human and murine SMCs and human macrophages expressed Acsl4, and rosiglitazone inhibited Acsl activity in these cells. Furthermore, rosiglitazone acutely inhibited partitioning of fatty acids into phospholipids in human SMCs and inhibited fatty acid partitioning into diacylglycerol and triacylglycerol in human SMCs and macrophages through a PPAR-γ–independent mechanism. Conversely, murine macrophages did not express ACSL4, and rosiglitazone did not inhibit ACSL activity in these cells, nor did it affect acute fatty acid partitioning into cellular lipids. Thus, rosiglitazone inhibits ACSL activity and fatty acid partitioning in human and murine SMCs and in human macrophages through a PPAR-γ–independent mechanism likely to be mediated by ACSL4 inhibition. Therefore, rosiglitazone might alter the biological effects of fatty acids in these cells and in atherosclerosis. PMID:17259370

  7. Structural probing of a pathogenic tRNA dimer

    PubMed Central

    ROY, MARC D.; WITTENHAGEN, LISA M.; KELLEY, SHANA O.

    2005-01-01

    The A3243G mutation within the human mitochondrial (hs mt) tRNALeu(UUR) gene is associated with maternally inherited deafness and diabetes (MIDD) and other mitochondrial encephalopathies. One of the most pronounced structural effects of this mutation is the disruption of the native structure through stabilization of a high-affinity dimeric complex. We conducted a series of studies that address the structural properties of this tRNA dimer, and we assessed its formation under physiological conditions. Enzymatic probing was used to directly define the dimeric interface for the complex, and a discrete region of the D-stem and loop of hs mt tRNALeu(UUR) was identified. The dependence of dimerization on magnesium ions and temperature was also tested. The formation of the tRNA dimer is influenced by temperature, with dimerization becoming more efficient at physiological temperature. Complexation of the mutant tRNA is also affected by the amount of magnesium present, and occurs at concentrations present intracellularly. Terbium probing experiments revealed a specific metal ion-binding site localized at the site of the A3243G mutation that is unique to the dimer structure. This metal ion-binding site presents a striking parallel to dimeric complexes of viral RNAs, which use the same hexanucleotide sequence for complexation and feature a similarly positioned metal ion-binding site within the dimeric structure. Taken together, these results indicate that the unique dimeric complex formed by the hs mt tRNALeu(UUR) A3243G mutant exhibits interesting similarities to biological RNA dimers, and may play a role in the loss of function caused by this mutation in vivo. PMID:15701731

  8. Evolution meets disease: penetrance and functional epistasis of mitochondrial tRNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Ferrín, Gustavo; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Gallardo, M Esther; Viscomi, Carlo; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Zeviani, Massimo; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Enríquez, José Antonio

    2011-04-01

    About half of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations causing diseases in humans occur in tRNA genes. Particularly intriguing are those pathogenic tRNA mutations than can reach homoplasmy and yet show very different penetrance among patients. These mutations are scarce and, in addition to their obvious interest for understanding human pathology, they can be excellent experimental examples to model evolution and fixation of mitochondrial tRNA mutations. To date, the only source of this type of mutations is human patients. We report here the generation and characterization of the first mitochondrial tRNA pathological mutation in mouse cells, an m.3739G>A transition in the mitochondrial mt-Ti gene. This mutation recapitulates the molecular hallmarks of a disease-causing mutation described in humans, an m.4290T>C transition affecting also the human mt-Ti gene. We could determine that the pathogenic molecular mechanism, induced by both the mouse and the human mutations, is a high frequency of abnormal folding of the tRNA(Ile) that cannot be charged with isoleucine. We demonstrate that the cells harboring the mouse or human mutant tRNA have exacerbated mitochondrial biogenesis triggered by an increase in mitochondrial ROS production as a compensatory response. We propose that both the nature of the pathogenic mechanism combined with the existence of a compensatory mechanism can explain the penetrance pattern of this mutation. This particular behavior can allow a scenario for the evolution of mitochondrial tRNAs in which the fixation of two alleles that are individually deleterious can proceed in two steps and not require the simultaneous mutation of both.

  9. The modular structure of Escherichia coli threonyl-tRNA synthetase as both an enzyme and a regulator of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Caillet, Joël; Nogueira, Teresa; Masquida, Benoît; Winter, Flore; Graffe, Monique; Dock-Brégeon, Anne-Catherine; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan; Westhof, Eric; Ehresmann, Bernard; Ehresmann, Chantal; Romby, Pascale; Springer, Mathias

    2003-02-01

    In addition to its role in tRNA aminoacylation, Escherichia coli threonyl-tRNA synthetase is a regulatory protein which binds a site, called the operator, located in the leader of its own mRNA and inhibits translational initiation by competing with ribosome binding. This work shows that the two essential steps of regulation, operator recognition and inhibition of ribosome binding, are performed by different domains of the protein. The catalytic and the C-terminal domain of the protein are involved in binding the two anticodon arm-like structures in the operator whereas the N-terminal domain of the enzyme is responsible for the competition with the ribosome. This is the first demonstration of a modular structure for a translational repressor and is reminiscent of that of transcriptional regulators. The mimicry between the operator and tRNA, suspected on the basis of previous experiments, is further supported by the fact that identical regions of the synthetase recognize both the operator and the tRNA anticodon arm. Based on these results, and recent structural data, we have constructed a computer-derived molecular model for the operator-threonyl-tRNA synthetase complex, which sheds light on several essential aspects of the regulatory mechanism.

  10. Correction of the consequences of mitochondrial 3243A>G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene causing the MELAS syndrome by tRNA import into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Karicheva, Olga Z; Kolesnikova, Olga A; Schirtz, Tom; Vysokikh, Mikhail Y; Mager-Heckel, Anne-Marie; Lombès, Anne; Boucheham, Abdeldjalil; Krasheninnikov, Igor A; Martin, Robert P; Entelis, Nina; Tarassov, Ivan

    2011-10-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial DNA are often associated with incurable human neuromuscular diseases. Among these mutations, an important number have been identified in tRNA genes, including 29 in the gene MT-TL1 coding for the tRNA(Leu(UUR)). The m.3243A>G mutation was described as the major cause of the MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes). This mutation was reported to reduce tRNA(Leu(UUR)) aminoacylation and modification of its anti-codon wobble position, which results in a defective mitochondrial protein synthesis and reduced activities of respiratory chain complexes. In the present study, we have tested whether the mitochondrial targeting of recombinant tRNAs bearing the identity elements for human mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase can rescue the phenotype caused by MELAS mutation in human transmitochondrial cybrid cells. We demonstrate that nuclear expression and mitochondrial targeting of specifically designed transgenic tRNAs results in an improvement of mitochondrial translation, increased levels of mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory complexes subunits, and significant rescue of respiration. These findings prove the possibility to direct tRNAs with changed aminoacylation specificities into mitochondria, thus extending the potential therapeutic strategy of allotopic expression to address mitochondrial disorders.

  11. Revised nomenclature for the mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase gene family.

    PubMed

    Mashek, Douglas G; Bornfeldt, Karin E; Coleman, Rosalind A; Berger, Johannes; Bernlohr, David A; Black, Paul; DiRusso, Concetta C; Farber, Steven A; Guo, Wen; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Khodiyar, Varsha; Kuypers, Frans A; Maltais, Lois J; Nebert, Daniel W; Renieri, Alessandra; Schaffer, Jean E; Stahl, Andreas; Watkins, Paul A; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Yamamoto, Tokuo T

    2004-10-01

    By consensus, the acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) community, with the advice of the human and mouse genome nomenclature committees, has revised the nomenclature for the mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases. ACS is the family root name, and the human and mouse genes for the long-chain ACSs are termed ACSL1,3-6 and Acsl1,3-6, respectively. Splice variants of ACSL3, -4, -5, and -6 are cataloged. Suggestions for naming other family members and for the nonmammalian acyl-CoA synthetases are made.

  12. Archaeal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases interact with the ribosome to recycle tRNAs.

    PubMed

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Greber, Basil J; Franke, Vedran; Hodnik, Vesna; Anderluh, Gregor; Ban, Nenad; Weygand-Durasevic, Ivana

    2014-04-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are essential enzymes catalyzing the formation of aminoacyl-tRNAs, the immediate precursors for encoded peptides in ribosomal protein synthesis. Previous studies have suggested a link between tRNA aminoacylation and high-molecular-weight cellular complexes such as the cytoskeleton or ribosomes. However, the structural basis of these interactions and potential mechanistic implications are not well understood. To biochemically characterize these interactions we have used a system of two interacting archaeal aaRSs: an atypical methanogenic-type seryl-tRNA synthetase and an archaeal ArgRS. More specifically, we have shown by thermophoresis and surface plasmon resonance that these two aaRSs bind to the large ribosomal subunit with micromolar affinities. We have identified the L7/L12 stalk and the proteins located near the stalk base as the main sites for aaRS binding. Finally, we have performed a bioinformatics analysis of synonymous codons in the Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus genome that supports a mechanism in which the deacylated tRNAs may be recharged by aaRSs bound to the ribosome and reused at the next occurrence of a codon encoding the same amino acid. These results suggest a mechanism of tRNA recycling in which aaRSs associate with the L7/L12 stalk region to recapture the tRNAs released from the preceding ribosome in polysomes.

  13. T box riboswitches in Actinobacteria: Translational regulation via novel tRNA interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Anna V.; Grundy, Frank J.; Henkin, Tina M.

    2015-01-01

    The T box riboswitch regulates many amino acid-related genes in Gram-positive bacteria. T box riboswitch-mediated gene regulation was shown previously to occur at the level of transcription attenuation via structural rearrangements in the 5′ untranslated (leader) region of the mRNA in response to binding of a specific uncharged tRNA. In this study, a novel group of isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase gene (ileS) T box leader sequences found in organisms of the phylum Actinobacteria was investigated. The Stem I domains of these RNAs lack several highly conserved elements that are essential for interaction with the tRNA ligand in other T box RNAs. Many of these RNAs were predicted to regulate gene expression at the level of translation initiation through tRNA-dependent stabilization of a helix that sequesters a sequence complementary to the Shine–Dalgarno (SD) sequence, thus freeing the SD sequence for ribosome binding and translation initiation. We demonstrated specific binding to the cognate tRNAIle and tRNAIle-dependent structural rearrangements consistent with regulation at the level of translation initiation, providing the first biochemical demonstration, to our knowledge, of translational regulation in a T box riboswitch. PMID:25583497

  14. A Comprehensive tRNA Deletion Library Unravels the Genetic Architecture of the tRNA Pool

    PubMed Central

    Bloom-Ackermann, Zohar; Navon, Sivan; Gingold, Hila; Towers, Ruth; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Dahan, Orna

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering the architecture of the tRNA pool is a prime challenge in translation research, as tRNAs govern the efficiency and accuracy of the process. Towards this challenge, we created a systematic tRNA deletion library in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aimed at dissecting the specific contribution of each tRNA gene to the tRNA pool and to the cell's fitness. By harnessing this resource, we observed that the majority of tRNA deletions show no appreciable phenotype in rich medium, yet under more challenging conditions, additional phenotypes were observed. Robustness to tRNA gene deletion was often facilitated through extensive backup compensation within and between tRNA families. Interestingly, we found that within tRNA families, genes carrying identical anti-codons can contribute differently to the cellular fitness, suggesting the importance of the genomic surrounding to tRNA expression. Characterization of the transcriptome response to deletions of tRNA genes exposed two disparate patterns: in single-copy families, deletions elicited a stress response; in deletions of genes from multi-copy families, expression of the translation machinery increased. Our results uncover the complex architecture of the tRNA pool and pave the way towards complete understanding of their role in cell physiology. PMID:24453985

  15. Crystal structure of a 4-thiouridine synthetase–RNA complex reveals specificity of tRNA U8 modification

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Piotr; Naumann, Peter-Thomas; Erwin, Whitney M.; Lauhon, Charles T.; Ficner, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    In prokaryotes and archaea transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) stability as well as cellular UV protection relies on the post-transcriptional modification of uracil at position 8 (U8) of tRNAs by the 4-thiouridine synthetase ThiI. Here, we report three crystal structures of ThiI from Thermotoga maritima in complex with a truncated tRNA. The RNA is mainly bound by the N-terminal ferredoxin-like domain (NFLD) and the THUMP domain of one subunit within the ThiI homo-dimer thereby positioning the U8 close to the catalytic center in the pyrophosphatase domain of the other subunit. The recognition of the 3’-CCA end by the THUMP domain yields a molecular ruler defining the specificity for U8 thiolation. This first structure of a THUMP/NFLD-RNA complex might serve as paradigm for the RNA recognition by THUMP domains of other proteins. The ternary ThiI–RNA–ATP complex shows no significant structural changes due to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding, but two different states of active site loops are observed independent of the nucleotide loading state. Thereby conformational changes of the active site are coupled with conformational changes of the bound RNA. The ThiI–RNA complex structures indicate that full-length tRNA has to adopt a non-canonical conformation upon binding to ThiI. PMID:24705700

  16. Essentiality of threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t6A), a universal tRNA modification, in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Thiaville, Patrick C.; Yacoubi, Basma El; Köhrer, Caroline; Thiaville, Jennifer J.; Deutsch, Chris; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; Bacusmo, Jo Marie; Armengaud, Jean; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Wetzel, Collin; Cao, Xiaoyu; Limbach, Patrick A.; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t6A) is a modified nucleoside universally conserved in tRNAs in all three kingdoms of life. The recently discovered genes for t6A synthesis, including tsaC and tsaD, are essential in model prokaryotes but not essential in yeast. These genes had been identified as antibacterial targets even before their functions were known. However, the molecular basis for this prokaryotic-specific essentiality has remained a mystery. Here, we show that t6A is a strong positive determinant for aminoacylation of tRNA by bacterial-type but not by eukaryotic-type isoleucyl-tRNA synthetases and might also be a determinant for the essential enzyme tRNAIle-lysidine synthetase. We confirm that t6A is essential in Escherichia coli and a survey of genome-wide essentiality studies shows that genes for t6A synthesis are essential in most prokaryotes. This essentiality phenotype is not universal in Bacteria as t6A is dispensable in Deinococcus radiodurans, Thermus thermophilus, Synechocystis PCC6803 and Streptococcus mutans. Proteomic analysis of t6A- D. radiodurans strains revealed an induction of the proteotoxic stress response and identified genes whose translation is most affected by the absence of t6A in tRNAs. Thus, although t6A is universally conserved in tRNAs, its role in translation might vary greatly between organisms. PMID:26337258

  17. The selective tRNA aminoacylation mechanism based on a single G•U pair.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Masahiro; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Chong, Yeeting Esther; Guo, Min; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Gamper, Howard; Hou, Ya-Ming; Schimmel, Paul; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-06-26

    Ligation of tRNAs with their cognate amino acids, by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, establishes the genetic code. Throughout evolution, tRNA(Ala) selection by alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) has depended predominantly on a single wobble base pair in the acceptor stem, G3•U70, mainly on the kcat level. Here we report the crystal structures of an archaeal AlaRS in complex with tRNA(Ala) with G3•U70 and its A3•U70 variant. AlaRS interacts with both the minor- and the major-groove sides of G3•U70, widening the major groove. The geometry difference between G3•U70 and A3•U70 is transmitted along the acceptor stem to the 3'-CCA region. Thus, the 3'-CCA region of tRNA(Ala) with G3•U70 is oriented to the reactive route that reaches the active site, whereas that of the A3•U70 variant is folded back into the non-reactive route. This novel mechanism enables the single wobble pair to dominantly determine the specificity of tRNA selection, by an approximate 100-fold difference in kcat.

  18. The selective tRNA aminoacylation mechanism based on a single G•U pair

    PubMed Central

    Naganuma, Masahiro; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Chong, Yeeting Esther; Guo, Min; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Gamper, Howard; Hou, Ya-Ming; Schimmel, Paul; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Ligation of tRNAs with their cognate amino acids, by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, establishes the genetic code. Throughout evolution, tRNAAla selection by alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) has depended predominantly on a single wobble base pair in the acceptor stem, G3•U70, mainly on the kcat level. Here we report the crystal structures of an archaeal AlaRS in complex with tRNAAla with G3•U70 and its A3•U70 variant. AlaRS interacts with both the minor- and major-groove sides of G3•U70, widening the major groove. The geometry difference between G3•U70 and A3•U70 is transmitted along the acceptor stem to the 3′-CCA region. Thus, the 3′-CCA region of tRNAAla with G3•U70 is oriented to the reactive route that reaches the active site, whereas that of the A3•U70 variant is folded back into the “non-reactive route”. This novel mechanism enables the single wobble pair to dominantly determine the specificity of tRNA selection, by an approximate 100-fold difference in kcat. PMID:24919148

  19. In vivo selection of lethal mutations reveals two functional domains in arginyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Geslain, R; Martin, F; Delagoutte, B; Cavarelli, J; Gangloff, J; Eriani, G

    2000-01-01

    Using random mutagenesis and a genetic screening in yeast, we isolated 26 mutations that inactivate Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS). The mutations were identified and the kinetic parameters of the corresponding proteins were tested after purification of the expression products in Escherichia coli. The effects were interpreted in the light of the crystal structure of ArgRS. Eighteen functional residues were found around the arginine-binding pocket and eight others in the carboxy-terminal domain of the enzyme. Mutations of these residues all act by strongly impairing the rates of tRNA charging and arginine activation. Thus, ArgRS and tRNA(Arg) can be considered as a kind of ribonucleoprotein, where the tRNA, before being charged, is acting as a cofactor that activates the enzyme. Furthermore, by using different tRNA(Arg) isoacceptors and heterologous tRNA(Asp), we highlighted the crucial role of several residues of the carboxy-terminal domain in tRNA recognition and discrimination. PMID:10744027

  20. Recombinant expression, purification, and crystallization of the glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase from Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    van Rooyen, Jason M; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Belrhali, Hassan

    2015-06-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases play a critical role in protein synthesis by providing precursor transfer-RNA molecules correctly charged with their cognate amino-acids. The essential nature of these enzymes make them attractive targets for designing new drugs against important pathogenic protozoans like Toxoplasma. Because no structural data currently exists for a protozoan glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (QRS), an understanding of its potential as a drug target and its function in the assembly of the Toxoplasma multi-aminoacyl tRNA (MARS) complex is therefore lacking. Here we describe the optimization of expression and purification conditions that permitted the recovery and crystallization of both domains of the Toxoplasma QRS enzyme from a heterologous Escherichia coli expression system. Expression of full-length QRS was only achieved after the addition of an N-terminal histidine affinity tag and the isolated protein was active on both cellular and in vitro produced Toxoplasma tRNA. Taking advantage of the proteolytic susceptibility of QRS to cleavage into component domains, N-terminal glutathione S-transferase (GST) motif-containing domain fragments were isolated and crystallization conditions discovered. Isolation of the C-terminal catalytic domain was accomplished after subcloning the domain and optimizing expression conditions. Purified catalytic domain survived cryogenic storage and yielded large diffraction-quality crystals over-night after optimization of screening conditions. This work will form the basis of future structural studies into structural-functional relationships of both domains including potential targeted drug-design studies and investigations into the assembly of the Toxoplasma MARS complex.

  1. Genome recoding by tRNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Tuorto, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    RNA modifications are emerging as an additional regulatory layer on top of the primary RNA sequence. These modifications are particularly enriched in tRNAs where they can regulate not only global protein translation, but also protein translation at the codon level. Modifications located in or in the vicinity of tRNA anticodons are highly conserved in eukaryotes and have been identified as potential regulators of mRNA decoding. Recent studies have provided novel insights into how these modifications orchestrate the speed and fidelity of translation to ensure proper protein homeostasis. This review highlights the prominent modifications in the tRNA anticodon loop: queuosine, inosine, 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine, wybutosine, threonyl–carbamoyl–adenosine and 5-methylcytosine. We discuss the functional relevance of these modifications in protein translation and their emerging role in eukaryotic genome recoding during cellular adaptation and disease. PMID:27974624

  2. Crystal structure of a eukaryote/archaeon-like protyl-tRNA synthetase and its complex with tRNAPro(CGG).

    PubMed

    Yaremchuk, A; Cusack, S; Tukalo, M

    2000-09-01

    Prolyl-tRNA synthetase (ProRS) is a class IIa synthetase that, according to sequence analysis, occurs in different organisms with one of two quite distinct structural architectures: prokaryote-like and eukaryote/archaeon-like. The primary sequence of ProRS from the hypothermophilic eubacterium Thermus thermophilus (ProRSTT) shows that this enzyme is surprisingly eukaryote/archaeon-like. We describe its crystal structure at 2.43 angstom resolution, which reveals a feature that is unique among class II synthetases. This is an additional zinc-containing domain after the expected class IIa anticodon-binding domain and whose C-terminal extremity, which ends in an absolutely conserved tyrosine, folds back into the active site. We also present an improved structure of ProRSTT complexed with tRNAPro(CGG) at 2.85 angstom resolution. This structure represents an initial docking state of the tRNA in which the anticodon stem-loop is engaged, particularly via the tRNAPro-specific bases G35 and G36, but the 3' end does not enter the active site. Considerable structural changes in tRNA and/or synthetase, which are probably induced by small substrates, are required to achieve the conformation active for aminoacylation.

  3. Crystal structure of the N-terminal anticodon-binding domain of the nondiscriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Songsiriritthigul, Chomphunuch; Suebka, Suwimon; Chen, Chun Jung; Fuengfuloy, Pitchayada; Chuawong, Pitak

    2017-02-01

    The N-terminal anticodon-binding domain of the nondiscriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (ND-AspRS) plays a crucial role in the recognition of both tRNA(Asp) and tRNA(Asn). Here, the first X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of this enzyme (ND-AspRS1-104) from the human-pathogenic bacterium Helicobacter pylori is reported at 2.0 Å resolution. The apo form of H. pylori ND-AspRS1-104 shares high structural similarity with the N-terminal anticodon-binding domains of the discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (D-AspRS) from Escherichia coli and ND-AspRS from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, allowing recognition elements to be proposed for tRNA(Asp) and tRNA(Asn). It is proposed that a long loop (Arg77-Lys90) in this H. pylori domain influences its relaxed tRNA specificity, such that it is classified as nondiscriminating. A structural comparison between D-AspRS from E. coli and ND-AspRS from P. aeruginosa suggests that turns E and F (78GAGL81 and 83NPKL86) in H. pylori ND-AspRS play a crucial role in anticodon recognition. Accordingly, the conserved Pro84 in turn F facilitates the recognition of the anticodons of tRNA(Asp) ((34)GUC(36)) and tRNA(Asn) ((34)GUU(36)). The absence of the amide H atom allows both C and U bases to be accommodated in the tRNA-recognition site.

  4. Adenosine tetraphosphoadenosine drives a continuous ATP-release assay for aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and other adenylate-forming enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Adrian J; Potter, Nicola J; Fishwick, Colin W G; Roper, David I; Dowson, Christopher G

    2013-10-18

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are essential for the correct linkage of amino acids to cognate tRNAs to maintain the fidelity of protein synthesis. Tractable, continuous assays are valuable for characterizing the functions of synthetases and for their exploitation as drug targets. We have exploited the unexplored ability of these enzymes to consume adenosine tetraphosphoadenosine (diadenosine 5',5‴ P(1) P(4) tetraphosphate; Ap4A) and produce ATP to develop such an assay. We have used this assay to probe the stereoselectivity of isoleucyl-tRNA(Ile) and Valyl-tRNA(Val) synthetases and the impact of tRNA on editing by isoleucyl-tRNA(Ile) synthetase (IleRS) and to identify analogues of intermediates of these enzymes that might allow targeting of multiple synthetases. We further report the utility of Ap4A-based assays for identification of synthetase inhibitors with nanomolar to millimolar affinities. Finally, we demonstrate the broad application of Ap4A utilization with a continuous Ap4A-driven RNA ligase assay.

  5. Kinetic Analysis of tRNA Methylfransferases

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ya-Ming; Masuda, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules contain many chemical modifications that are introduced after transcription. A major form of these modifications is methyl transfer to bases and backbone groups, using S-adenosyl methionine (AdoMet) as the methyl donor. Each methylation confers a specific advantage to tRNA in structure or in function. A remarkable methylation is to the G37 base on the 3' side of the anticodon to generate m1G37-tRNA, which suppresses frameshift errors during protein synthesis and is therefore essential for cell growth in all three domains of life. This methylation is catalyzed by TrmD in bacteria and by Trm5 in eukaryotes and archaea. Although TrmD and Trm5 catalyze the same methylation reaction, kinetic analysis reveal that these two enzymes are unrelated to each other and are distinct in their reaction mechanism. This chapter summarizes the kinetic assays that are used to reveal the distinction between TrmD and Trm5. Three types of assays are described, the steady-state, the pre-steady-state, and the single turnover assays, which collectively provide the basis for mechanistic investigation of AdoMet-dependent methyl transfer reactions. PMID:26253967

  6. RNA versatility governs tRNA function: Why tRNA flexibility is essential beyond the translation cycle.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Claus-D

    2016-05-01

    tRNAs undergo multiple conformational changes during the translation cycle that are required for tRNA translocation and proper communication between the ribosome and translation factors. Recent structural data on how destabilized tRNAs utilize the CCA-adding enzyme to proofread themselves put a spotlight on tRNA flexibility beyond the translation cycle. In analogy to tRNA surveillance, this review finds that other processes also exploit versatile tRNA folding to achieve, amongst others, specific aminoacylation, translational regulation by riboswitches or a block of bacterial translation. tRNA flexibility is thereby not restricted to the hinges utilized during translation. In contrast, the flexibility of tRNA is distributed all over its L-shape and is actively exploited by the tRNA-interacting partners to discriminate one tRNA from another. Since the majority of tRNA modifications also modulate tRNA flexibility it seems that cells devote enormous resources to tightly sense and regulate tRNA structure. This is likely required for error-free protein synthesis.

  7. Magnesium dependence of the measured equilibrium constants of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Airas, R Kalervo

    2007-12-01

    The apparent equilibrium constants (K') for six reactions catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases from Escherichia coli were measured, the equations for the magnesium dependence of the equilibrium constants were derived, and best-fit analyses between the measured and calculated values were used. The K' values at 1 mM Mg(2+) ranged from 0.49 to 1.13. The apparent equilibrium constants increased with increasing Mg(2+) concentrations. The values were 2-3 times higher at 20 mM Mg(2+) than at 1 mM Mg(2+), and the dependence was similar in the class I and class II synthetases. The main reason for the Mg(2+) dependence is the existence of PP(i) as two magnesium complexes, but only one of them is the real product. AMP exists either as free AMP or as MgAMP, and therefore also has some effect on the measured equilibrium constant. However, these dependences alone cannot explain the measured results. The measured dependence of the K' on the Mg(2+) concentration is weaker than that caused by PP(i) and AMP. Different bindings of the Mg(2+) ions to the substrate tRNA and product aminoacyl-tRNA can explain this observation. The best-fit analysis suggests that tRNA reacts as a magnesium complex in the forward aminoacylation direction but this given Mg(2+) ion is not bound to aminoacyl-tRNA at the start of the reverse reaction. Thus Mg(2+) ions seem to have an active catalytic role, not only in the activation of the amino acid, but in the posttransfer steps of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase reaction, too.

  8. Stochastic context-free grammars for tRNA modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Y; Brown, M; Hughey, R; Mian, I S; Sjölander, K; Underwood, R C; Haussler, D

    1994-01-01

    Stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs) are applied to the problems of folding, aligning and modeling families of tRNA sequences. SCFGs capture the sequences' common primary and secondary structure and generalize the hidden Markov models (HMMs) used in related work on protein and DNA. Results show that after having been trained on as few as 20 tRNA sequences from only two tRNA subfamilies (mitochondrial and cytoplasmic), the model can discern general tRNA from similar-length RNA sequences of other kinds, can find secondary structure of new tRNA sequences, and can produce multiple alignments of large sets of tRNA sequences. Our results suggest potential improvements in the alignments of the D- and T-domains in some mitochondrial tRNAs that cannot be fit into the canonical secondary structure. PMID:7800507

  9. Nucleotide sequence of Neurospora crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gillum, A M; Hecker, L I; Silberklang, M; Schwartzbach, S D; RajBhandary, U L; Barnett, W E

    1977-01-01

    Initiator methionine tRNA from the cytoplasm of Neurospora crassa has been purified and sequenced. The sequence is: pAGCUGCAUm1GGCGCAGCGGAAGCGCM22GCY*GGGCUCAUt6AACCCGGAGm7GU (or D) - CACUCGAUCGm1AAACGAG*UUGCAGCUACCAOH. Similar to initiator tRNAs from the cytoplasm of other eukaryotes, this tRNA also contains the sequence -AUCG- instead of the usual -TphiCG (or A)- found in loop IV of other tRNAs. The sequence of the N. crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA is quite different from that of the corresponding mitochondrial initiator tRNA. Comparison of the sequence of N. crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA to those of yeast, wheat germ and vertebrate cytoplasmic initiator tRNA indicates that the sequences of the two fungal tRNAs are no more similar to each other than they are to those of other initiator tRNAs. Images PMID:146192

  10. Redesigning the stereospecificity of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Thomas; Ye-Lehmann, Shixin; Palmai, Zoltan; Amara, Najette; Wydau-Dematteis, Sandra; Bigan, Erwan; Druart, Karen; Moch, Clara; Plateau, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    D-Amino acids are largely excluded from protein synthesis, yet they are of great interest in biotechnology. Unnatural amino acids have been introduced into proteins using engineered aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), and this strategy might be applicable to D-amino acids. Several aaRSs can aminoacylate their tRNA with a D-amino acid; of these, tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) has the weakest stereospecificity. We use computational protein design to suggest active site mutations in Escherichia coli TyrRS that could increase its D-Tyr binding further, relative to L-Tyr. The mutations selected all modify one or more sidechain charges in the Tyr binding pocket. We test their effect by probing the aminoacyl-adenylation reaction through pyrophosphate exchange experiments. We also perform extensive alchemical free energy simulations to obtain L-Tyr/D-Tyr binding free energy differences. Agreement with experiment is good, validating the structural models and detailed thermodynamic predictions the simulations provide. The TyrRS stereospecificity proves hard to engineer through charge-altering mutations in the first and second coordination shells of the Tyr ammonium group. Of six mutants tested, two are active towards D-Tyr; one of these has an inverted stereospecificity, with a large preference for D-Tyr. However, its activity is low. Evidently, the TyrRS stereospecificity is robust towards charge rearrangements near the ligand. Future design may have to consider more distant and/or electrically neutral target mutations, and possibly design for binding of the transition state, whose structure however can only be modeled.

  11. Differential inhibition of adenylylated and deadenylylated forms of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a drug discovery platform.

    PubMed

    Theron, A; Roth, R L; Hoppe, H; Parkinson, C; van der Westhuyzen, C W; Stoychev, S; Wiid, I; Pietersen, R D; Baker, B; Kenyon, C P

    2017-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is a ubiquitous central enzyme in nitrogen metabolism that is controlled by up to four regulatory mechanisms, including adenylylation of some or all of the twelve subunits by adenylyl transferase. It is considered a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of tuberculosis, being essential for the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and is found extracellularly only in the pathogenic Mycobacterium strains. Human glutamine synthetase is not regulated by the adenylylation mechanism, so the adenylylated form of bacterial glutamine synthetase is of particular interest. Previously published reports show that, when M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase is expressed in Escherichia coli, the E. coli adenylyl transferase does not optimally adenylylate the M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase. Here, we demonstrate the production of soluble adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase in E. coli by the co-expression of M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase and M. tuberculosis adenylyl transferase. The differential inhibition of adenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase and deadenylylated M. tuberulosis glutamine synthetase by ATP based scaffold inhibitors are reported. Compounds selected on the basis of their enzyme inhibition were also shown to inhibit M. tuberculosis in the BACTEC 460TB™ assay as well as the intracellular inhibition of M. tuberculosis in a mouse bone-marrow derived macrophage assay.

  12. Plasmodium falciparum mitochondria import tRNAs along with an active phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arvind; Sharma, Amit

    2015-02-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum protein translation enzymes aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are an emergent family of drug targets. The aaRS ensemble catalyses transfer of amino acids to cognate tRNAs, thus providing charged tRNAs for ribosomal consumption. P. falciparum proteome expression relies on a total of 36 aaRSs for the three translationally independent compartments of cytoplasm, apicoplast and mitochondria. In the present study, we show that, of this set of 36, a single genomic copy of mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (mFRS) is targeted to the parasite mitochondria, and that the mFRS gene is exclusive to malaria parasites within the apicomplexan phyla. Our protein cellular localization studies based on immunofluorescence data show that, along with mFRS, P. falciparum harbours two more phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (FRS) assemblies that are localized to its apicoplast and cytoplasm. The 'extra' mFRS is found in mitochondria of all asexual blood stage parasites and is competent in aminoacylation. We show further that the parasite mitochondria import tRNAs from the cytoplasmic tRNA pool. Hence drug targeting of FRSs presents a unique opportunity to potentially stall protein production in all three parasite translational compartments.

  13. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promotes cancer cell proliferation by augmenting tRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Ekta; Kumar, Pavanish; Liu, Chia Yi; Akıncılar, Semih Can; Raju, Anandhkumar; Lakshmanan, Manikandan; Maury, Julien Jean Pierre; Qiang, Yu; Li, Shang; Tan, Ern Yu; Hui, Kam M.; Loh, Yuin Han

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional reactivation of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) reconstitutes telomerase activity in the majority of human cancers. Here, we found that ectopic TERT expression increases cell proliferation, while acute reductions in TERT levels lead to a dramatic loss of proliferation without any change in telomere length, suggesting that the effects of TERT could be telomere independent. We observed that TERT determines the growth rate of cancer cells by directly regulating global protein synthesis independently of its catalytic activity. Genome-wide TERT binding across 5 cancer cell lines and 2 embryonic stem cell lines revealed that endogenous TERT, driven by mutant promoters or oncogenes, directly associates with the RNA polymerase III (pol III) subunit RPC32 and enhances its recruitment to chromatin, resulting in increased RNA pol III occupancy and tRNA expression in cancers. TERT-deficient mice displayed marked delays in polyomavirus middle T oncogene–induced (PyMT-induced) mammary tumorigenesis, increased survival, and reductions in tRNA levels. Ectopic expression of either RPC32 or TERT restored tRNA levels and proliferation defects in TERT-depleted cells. Finally, we determined that levels of TERT and tRNA correlated in breast and liver cancer samples. Together, these data suggest the existence of a unifying mechanism by which TERT enhances translation in cells to regulate cancer cell proliferation. PMID:27643433

  14. Hepatocytes explanted in the spleen preferentially express carbamoylphosphate synthetase rather than glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Lamers, W H; Been, W; Charles, R; Moorman, A F

    1990-10-01

    Urea cycle enzymes and glutamine synthetase are essential for NH3 detoxification and systemic pH homeostasis in mammals. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase, the first and flux-determining enzyme of the cycle, is found only in a large periportal compartment, and glutamine synthetase is found only in a small, complementary pericentral compartment. Because it is not possible to manipulate experimentally the intrahepatic distribution of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and glutamine synthetase, we looked for conditions in which explanted hepatocytes would exhibit either the carbamoylphosphate synthetase phenotype or glutamine synthetase phenotype. In the spleen hepatocytes either settle as individual cells or in small agglomerates. The dispersed cells only express the carbamoylphosphate synthetase phenotype. Within the agglomerates, sinusoids that drain on venules develop. Hepatocytes surrounding the venules stain only weakly for carbamoylphosphate synthetase but are strongly positive for glutamine synthetase. These observations were made for explanted embryonic hepatocytes (no prior expression of either carbamoylphosphate synthetase or glutamine synthetase), neonatal hepatocytes (compartments of gene expression not yet established) and adult periportal and pericentral hepatocytes.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency is an inherited disorder that ...

  16. Limitations to the development of recombinant human embryonic kidney 293E cells using glutamine synthetase-mediated gene amplification: Methionine sulfoximine resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Da Young; Noh, Soo Min; Lee, Gyun Min

    2016-08-10

    To investigate the feasibility of glutamine synthetase (GS)-mediated gene amplification in HEK293 cells for the high-level stable production of therapeutic proteins, HEK293E cells were transfected by the GS expression vector containing antibody genes and were selected at various methionine sulfoximine (MSX) concentrations in 96-well plates. For a comparison, CHOK1 cells were transfected by the same GS expression vector and selected at various MSX concentrations. Unlike CHOK1 cells, HEK293E cells producing high levels of antibodies were not selected at all. For HEK293E cells, the number of wells with the cell pool did not decrease with an increase in the concentration of MSX up to 500μM MSX. A q-RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the antibody genes in the HEK293E cells, unlike the CHOK1 cells, were not amplified after increasing the MSX concentration. It was found that the GS activity in HEK293E cells was much higher than that in CHOK1 cells (P<0.05). In a glutamine-free medium, the GS activity of HEK293E cells was approximately 4.8 times higher than that in CHOK1 cells. Accordingly, it is inferred that high GS activity of HEK293E cells results in elevated resistance to MSX and therefore hampers GS-mediated gene amplification by MSX. Thus, in order to apply the GS-mediated gene amplification system to HEK293 cells, the endogenous GS expression level in HEK293 cells needs to be minimized by knock-out or down-regulation methods.

  17. The Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus halodurans Aspartyl-tRNA Synthetases Retain Recognition of tRNA(Asn).

    PubMed

    Nair, Nilendra; Raff, Hannah; Islam, Mohammed Tarek; Feen, Melanie; Garofalo, Denise M; Sheppard, Kelly

    2016-02-13

    Synthesis of asparaginyl-tRNA (Asn-tRNA(Asn)) in bacteria can be formed either by directly ligating Asn to tRNA(Asn) using an asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) or by synthesizing Asn on the tRNA. In the latter two-step indirect pathway, a non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (ND-AspRS) attaches Asp to tRNA(Asn) and the amidotransferase GatCAB transamidates the Asp to Asn on the tRNA. GatCAB can be similarly used for Gln-tRNA(Gln) formation. Most bacteria are predicted to use only one route for Asn-tRNA(Asn) formation. Given that Bacillus halodurans and Bacillus subtilis encode AsnRS for Asn-tRNA(Asn) formation and Asn synthetases to synthesize Asn and GatCAB for Gln-tRNA(Gln) synthesis, their AspRS enzymes were thought to be specific for tRNA(Asp). However, we demonstrate that the AspRSs are non-discriminating and can be used with GatCAB to synthesize Asn. The results explain why B. subtilis with its Asn synthetase genes knocked out is still an Asn prototroph. Our phylogenetic analysis suggests that this may be common among Firmicutes and 30% of all bacteria. In addition, the phylogeny revealed that discrimination toward tRNA(Asp) by AspRS has evolved independently multiple times. The retention of the indirect pathway in B. subtilis and B. halodurans likely reflects the ancient link between Asn biosynthesis and its use in translation that enabled Asn to be added to the genetic code.

  18. A Deoxynivalenol-Activated Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase Gene from Wheat Encodes a Nuclear Localized Protein and Protects Plants Against Fusarium Pathogens and Mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Dong-Yun; Yi, Shu-Yuan; Liu, Rong-Jing; Qu, Bo; Huang, Tao; He, Wei-Jie; Li, Cheng; Li, He-Ping; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum is the fungal pathogen that causes globally important diseases of cereals and produces mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON). Owing to the dearth of available sources of resistance to Fusarium pathogens, characterization of novel genes that confer resistance to mycotoxins and mycotoxin-producing fungi is vitally important for breeding resistant crop varieties. In this study, a wheat methionyl-tRNA synthetase (TaMetRS) gene was identified from suspension cell cultures treated with DON. It shares conserved aminoacylation catalytic and tRNA anticodon binding domains with human MetRS and with the only previously characterized plant MetRS, suggesting that it functions in aminoacylation in the cytoplasm. However, the TaMetRS comprises a typical nuclear localization signal and cellular localization studies with a TaMetRS::GFP fusion protein showed that TaMetRS is localized in the nucleus. Expression of TaMetRS was activated by DON treatment and by infection with a DON-producing F. graminearum strain in wheat spikes. No such activation was observed following infection with a non-DON-producing F. graminearum strain. Expression of TaMetRS in Arabidopsis plants conferred significant resistance to DON and F. graminearum. These results indicated that this DON-activated TaMetRS gene may encode a novel type of MetRS in plants that has a role in defense and detoxification.

  19. CCA addition to tRNA: implications for tRNA quality control.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ya-Ming

    2010-04-01

    The CCA sequence is conserved at the 3' end of all mature tRNA molecules to function as the site of amino acid attachment. This sequence is acquired and maintained by stepwise nucleotide addition by the ubiquitous CCA enzyme, which is an unusual RNA polymerase that does not use a nucleic acid template for nucleotide addition. Crystal structural work has divided CCA enzymes into two structurally distinct classes, which differ in the mechanism of template-independent nucleotide selection. Recent kinetic work of the class II E. coli CCA enzyme has demonstrated a rapid and uniform rate constant for the chemistry of nucleotide addition at each step of CCA synthesis, although the enzyme uses different determinants to control the rate of each step. Importantly, the kinetic work reveals that, at each step of CCA synthesis, E. coli CCA enzyme has an innate ability to discriminate against tRNA backbone damage. This discrimination suggests the possibility of a previously unrecognized quality control mechanism that would prevent damaged tRNA from CCA maturation and from entering the ribosome machinery of protein synthesis. This quality control is relevant to cellular stress conditions that damage tRNA backbone and predicts a role of CCA addition in stress response.

  20. tRNA travels from the cytoplasm to organelles

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Mary Anne T.; Hopper, Anita K.

    2011-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) encoded by the nuclear genome are surprisingly dynamic. Although tRNAs function in protein synthesis occurring on cytoplasmic ribosomes, tRNAs can transit from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and then again return to the cytoplasm by a process known as the tRNA retrograde process. Subsets of the cytoplasmic tRNAs are also imported into mitochondria and function in mitochondrial protein synthesis. The numbers of tRNA species that are imported into mitchondria differ among organisms, ranging from just a few to the entire set needed to decode mitochondrially encoded mRNAs. For some tRNAs, import is dependent on the mitochondrial protein import machinery, whereas the majority of tRNA mitochondrial import is independent of this machinery. Although cytoplasmic proteins and proteins located on the mitochondrial surface participating in the tRNA import process have been described for several organisms, the identity of these proteins differ among organisms. Likewise, the tRNA determinants required for mitochondrial import differ among tRNA species and organisms. Here, we present an overview and discuss the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanisms involved in the tRNA retrograde process and continue with an overview of tRNA import into mitochondria. Finally, we highlight areas of future research to understand the function and regulation of movement of tRNAs between the cytoplasm and organelles. PMID:21976284

  1. Human Fatty Acid Transport Protein 2a/Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase 1 (FATP2a/Acsvl1) Has a Preference in Mediating the Channeling of Exogenous n-3 Fatty Acids into Phosphatidylinositol*

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Elaina M.; Cerny, Ronald L.; Watkins, Paul A.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Black, Paul N.

    2011-01-01

    The trafficking of fatty acids across the membrane and into downstream metabolic pathways requires their activation to CoA thioesters. Members of the fatty acid transport protein/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (FATP/Acsvl) family are emerging as key players in the trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into the cell and in intracellular fatty acid homeostasis. We have expressed two naturally occurring splice variants of human FATP2 (Acsvl1) in yeast and 293T-REx cells and addressed their roles in fatty acid transport, activation, and intracellular trafficking. Although both forms (FATP2a (Mr 70,000) and FATP2b (Mr 65,000 and lacking exon3, which encodes part of the ATP binding site)) were functional in fatty acid import, only FATP2a had acyl-CoA synthetase activity, with an apparent preference toward very long chain fatty acids. To further address the roles of FATP2a or FATP2b in fatty acid uptake and activation, LC-MS/MS was used to separate and quantify different acyl-CoA species (C14–C24) and to monitor the trafficking of different classes of exogenous fatty acids into intracellular acyl-CoA pools in 293T-REx cells expressing either isoform. The use of stable isotopically labeled fatty acids demonstrated FATP2a is involved in the uptake and activation of exogenous fatty acids, with a preference toward n-3 fatty acids (C18:3 and C22:6). Using the same cells expressing FATP2a or FATP2b, electrospray ionization/MS was used to follow the trafficking of stable isotopically labeled n-3 fatty acids into phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. The expression of FATP2a resulted in the trafficking of C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA into both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol but with a distinct preference for phosphatidylinositol. Collectively these data demonstrate FATP2a functions in fatty acid transport and activation and provides specificity toward n-3 fatty acids in which the corresponding n-3 acyl-CoAs are preferentially trafficked into acyl-CoA pools

  2. Regulation of active site coupling in glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Resto, Melissa; Gerratana, Barbara

    2009-05-21

    NAD{sup +} is an essential metabolite both as a cofactor in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis and as a regulator of cellular processes. In contrast to humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD{sup +} biosynthesis is absolutely dependent on the activity of a multifunctional glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} at the synthetase domain using ammonia derived from L-glutamine in the glutaminase domain. Here we report the kinetics and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis NAD{sup +} synthetase. The kinetics data strongly suggest tightly coupled regulation of the catalytic activities. The structure, the first of a glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, reveals a homooctameric subunit organization suggesting a tight dependence of catalysis on the quaternary structure, a 40-{angstrom} intersubunit ammonia tunnel and structural elements that may be involved in the transfer of information between catalytic sites.

  3. Testosterone and its dimers alter tRNA morphology.

    PubMed

    Chanphai, P; Agudelo, D; Vesper, A R; Bérubé, G; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2017-02-05

    The morphology of tRNA was studied upon conjugation with testosterone and its aliphatic and aromatic dimers, using multiple spectroscopic methods, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and molecular modeling. Structural analysis showed that testosterone binds tRNA through A62, A64, C60, C61, C63, G51, U50 and U59 bases. The binding affinity was testosterone dimer-aromatic>testosterone dimer-aliphatic>testosterone. The steroid loading efficacy was 35-45%. Transmission electron microscopy showed major changes in tRNA morphology upon testosterone interaction with an increase in the diameter of the tRNA aggregate, indicating encapsulation of testosterone by tRNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The CCA-end of P-tRNA Contacts Both the Human RPL36AL and the A-site Bound Translation Termination Factor eRF1 at the Peptidyl Transferase Center of the Human 80S Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Hountondji, Codjo; Bulygin, Konstantin; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Woisard, Anne; Tuffery, Pierre; Nakayama, Jun-Ichi; Frolova, Ludmila; Nierhaus, Knud H; Karpova, Galina; Baouz, Soria

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that the E-site specific protein RPL36AL present in human ribosomes can be crosslinked with the CCA-end of a P-tRNA in situ. Here we report the following: (i) We modeled RPL36AL into the structure of the archaeal ortholog RPL44E extracted from the known X-ray structure of the 50S subunit of Haloarcula marismortui. Superimposing the obtained RPL36AL structure with that of P/E tRNA observed in eukaryotic 80S ribosomes suggested that RPL36AL might in addition to its CCA neighbourhood interact with the inner site of the tRNA elbow similar to an interaction pattern known from tRNA•synthetase pairs. (ii) Accordingly, we detected that the isolated recombinant protein RPL36AL can form a tight binary complex with deacylated tRNA, and even tRNA fragments truncated at their CCA end showed a high affinity in the nanomolar range supporting a strong interaction outside the CCA end. (iii) We constructed programmed 80S complexes containing the termination factor eRF1 (stop codon UAA at the A-site) and a 2',3'-dialdehyde tRNA (tRNAox) analog at the P-site. Surprisingly, we observed a crosslinked ternary complex containing the tRNA, eRF1 and RPL36AL crosslinked both to the aldehyde groups of tRNAox at the 2'- and 3'-positions of the ultimate A. We also demonstrated that, upon binding to the ribosomal A-site, eRF1 induces an alternative conformation of the ribosome and/or the tRNA, leading to a novel crosslink of tRNAox to another large-subunit ribosomal protein (namely L37) rather than to RPL36AL, both ribosomal proteins being labeled in a mutually exclusive fashion. Since the human 80S ribosome in complex with P-site bound tRNAox and A-site bound eRF1 corresponds to the post-termination state of the ribosome, the results represent the first biochemical evidence for the positioning of the CCA-arm of the P-tRNA in close proximity to both RPL36AL and eRF1 at the end of the translation process.

  5. CTP synthetase and its role in phospholipid synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Fang; Carman, George M.

    2008-01-01

    CTP synthetase is a cytosolic-associated glutamine amidotransferase enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent transfer of the amide nitrogen from glutamine to the C-4 position of UTP to form CTP. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the reaction product CTP is an essential precursor of all membrane phospholipids that are synthesized via the Kennedy (CDP-choline and CDP-ethanolamine branches) and CDP-diacylglycerol pathways. The URA7 and URA8 genes encode CTP synthetase in S. cerevisiae, and the URA7 gene is responsible for the majority of CTP synthesized in vivo. The CTP synthetase enzymes are allosterically regulated by CTP product inhibition. Mutations that alleviate this regulation result in an elevated cellular level of CTP and an increase in phospholipid synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. The URA7-encoded enzyme is phosphorylated by protein kinases A and C, and these phosphorylations stimulate CTP synthetase activity and increase cellular CTP levels and the utilization of the Kennedy pathway. The CTPS1 and CTPS2 genes that encode human CTP synthetase enzymes are functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae, and rescue the lethal phenotype of the ura7Δ ura8Δ double mutant that lacks CTP synthetase activity. The expression in yeast has revealed that the human CTPS1-encoded enzyme is also phosphorylated and regulated by protein kinases A and C. PMID:18439916

  6. Mutation in the structural gene for seryl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase of Escherichia coli which affects formation of its gene product at high temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, R J; Konigsberg, W

    1980-01-01

    The rate of formation of seryl-transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) synthetase activity was temperature dependent in a temperature-sensitive mutant of Escherichia coli (K28) with an altered seryl-tRNA synthetase structural gene and in a class of spontaneous revertants derived from it. These revertants, which were selected by their ability to grow at 45 degrees C, had high levels of the thermolabile enzyme. The rate of formation of seryl-tRNA synthetase activity in the mutant and in the revertants fell from 100% to near zero with a 4 degrees C temperature range from 40 to 44 degrees C. The temperature-dependent rate of formation of seryl-tRNA synthetase activity was reversible. Dropping the temperature from 44 to 37 degrees C resulted, after a 2- to 3-min delay, in a resumption of the initial rate of formation of enzyme activity. The results could not be accounted for by in vivo or in vitro degradation of the active enzyme. Addition of rifampin just before the temperature shift down from 44 to 37 degrees C inhibited the appearance of seryl-tRNA synthetase activity at the lower temperature. Explanations which might account for these phenomena are proposed. PMID:6988407

  7. Prolyl-tRNA synthetase inhibition promotes cell death in SK-MEL-2 cells through GCN2-ATF4 pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Arita, Takeo; Morimoto, Megumi; Yamamoto, Yukiko; Miyashita, Hitoshi; Kitazawa, Satoshi; Hirayama, Takaharu; Sakamoto, Sou; Miyamoto, Kazumasa; Adachi, Ryutaro; Iwatani, Misa; Hara, Takahito

    2017-07-08

    Protein translation is highly activated in cancer tissues through oncogenic mutations and amplifications, and this can support survival and aberrant proliferation. Therefore, blocking translation could be a promising way to block cancer progression. The process of charging a cognate amino acid to tRNA, a crucial step in protein synthesis, is mediated by tRNA synthetases such as prolyl tRNA synthetase (PRS). Interestingly, unlike pan-translation inhibitors, we demonstrated that a novel small molecule PRS inhibitor (T-3861174) induced cell death in several tumor cell lines including SK-MEL-2 without complete suppression of translation. Additionally, our findings indicated that T-3861174-induced cell death was caused by activation of the GCN2-ATF4 pathway. Furthermore, the PRS inhibitor exhibited significant anti-tumor activity in several xenograft models without severe body weight losses. These results indicate that PRS is a druggable target, and suggest that T-3861174 is a potential therapeutic agent for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. tRNA Shifts the G-quadruplex-Hairpin Conformational Equilibrium in RNA towards the Hairpin Conformer.

    PubMed

    Rode, Ambadas B; Endoh, Tamaki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2016-11-07

    Non-coding RNAs play important roles in cellular homeostasis and are involved in many human diseases including cancer. Intermolecular RNA-RNA interactions are the basis for the diverse functions of many non-coding RNAs. Herein, we show how the presence of tRNA influences the equilibrium between hairpin and G-quadruplex conformations in the 5' untranslated regions of oncogenes and model sequences. Kinetic and equilibrium analyses of the hairpin to G-quadruplex conformational transition of purified RNA as well as during co-transcriptional folding indicate that tRNA significantly shifts the equilibrium toward the hairpin conformer. The enhancement of relative translation efficiency in a reporter gene assay is shown to be due to the tRNA-mediated shift in hairpin-G-quadruplex equilibrium of oncogenic mRNAs. Our findings suggest that tRNA is a possible therapeutic target in diseases in which RNA conformational equilibria is dysregulated.

  9. CMT-associated mutations in glycyl- and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases exhibit similar pattern of toxicity and share common genetic modifiers in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ermanoska, Biljana; Motley, William W; Leitão-Gonçalves, Ricardo; Asselbergh, Bob; Lee, LaTasha H; De Rijk, Peter; Sleegers, Kristel; Ooms, Tinne; Godenschwege, Tanja A; Timmerman, Vincent; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Jordanova, Albena

    2014-08-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are ubiquitously expressed proteins that charge tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. By ensuring the fidelity of protein synthesis, these enzymes are essential for the viability of every cell. Yet, mutations in six tRNA synthetases specifically affect the peripheral nerves and cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. The CMT-causing mutations in tyrosyl- and glycyl-tRNA synthetases (YARS and GARS, respectively) alter the activity of the proteins in a range of ways (some mutations do not impact charging function, while others abrogate it), making a loss of function in tRNA charging unlikely to be the cause of disease pathology. It is currently unknown which cellular mechanisms are triggered by the mutant enzymes and how this leads to neurodegeneration. Here, by expressing two pathogenic mutations (G240R, P234KY) in Drosophila, we generated a model for GARS-associated neuropathy. We observed compromised viability, and behavioral, electrophysiological and morphological impairment in flies expressing the cytoplasmic isoform of mutant GARS. Their features recapitulated several hallmarks of CMT pathophysiology and were similar to the phenotypes identified in our previously described Drosophila model of YARS-associated neuropathy. Furthermore, CG8316 and CG15599 - genes identified in a retinal degeneration screen to modify mutant YARS, also modified the mutant GARS phenotypes. Our study presents genetic evidence for common mutant-specific interactions between two CMT-associated aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, lending support for a shared mechanism responsible for the synthetase-induced peripheral neuropathies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Argonaute 2 Binds Directly to tRNA Genes and Promotes Gene Repression in cis

    PubMed Central

    Woolnough, Jessica L.; Atwood, Blake L.

    2015-01-01

    To further our understanding of the RNAi machinery within the human nucleus, we analyzed the chromatin and RNA binding of Argonaute 2 (AGO2) within human cancer cell lines. Our data indicated that AGO2 binds directly to nascent tRNA and 5S rRNA, and to the genomic loci from which these RNAs are transcribed, in a small RNA- and DICER-independent manner. AGO2 chromatin binding was not observed at non-TFIIIC-dependent RNA polymerase III (Pol III) genes or at extra-TFIIIC (ETC) sites, indicating that the interaction is specific for TFIIIC-dependent Pol III genes. A genome-wide analysis indicated that loss of AGO2 caused a global increase in mRNA expression level among genes that flank AGO2-bound tRNA genes. This effect was shown to be distinct from that of the disruption of DICER, DROSHA, or CTCF. We propose that AGO2 binding to tRNA genes has a novel and important regulatory role in human cells. PMID:25918241

  11. Substrate and Enzyme Functional Groups Contribute to Translational Quality Control by Bacterial Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Das, Mom; Hadad, Christopher M.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases activate specific amino acid substrates and attach them via an ester linkage to cognate tRNA molecules. In addition to cognate proline, prolyl-tRNA synthetase (ProRS) can activate cysteine and alanine and misacylate tRNAPro. Editing of the misacylated aminoacyl-tRNA is required for error-free protein synthesis. An editing domain (INS) appended to bacterial ProRS selectively hydrolyzes Ala-tRNAPro, whereas Cys-tRNAPro is cleared by a freestanding editing domain, YbaK, through a unique mechanism involving substrate sulfhydryl chemistry. The detailed mechanism of catalysis by INS is currently unknown. To understand the alanine specificity and mechanism of catalysis by INS, we have explored several possible mechanisms of Ala-tRNAPro deacylation via hybrid QM/MM calculations. Experimental studies were also performed to test the role of several residues in the INS active site, as well as various substrate functional groups in catalysis. Our results support a critical role for the tRNA 2′-OH group in substrate binding and catalytic water activation. A role is also proposed for the protein’s conserved GXXXP loop in transition state stabilization and for the main chain atoms of Gly261 in a proton relay that contributes substantially to catalysis. PMID:22458656

  12. Handling tRNA introns, archaeal way and eukaryotic way

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihisa, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    Introns are found in various tRNA genes in all the three kingdoms of life. Especially, archaeal and eukaryotic genomes are good sources of tRNA introns that are removed by proteinaceous splicing machinery. Most intron-containing tRNA genes both in archaea and eukaryotes possess an intron at a so-called canonical position, one nucleotide 3′ to their anticodon, while recent bioinformatics have revealed unusual types of tRNA introns and their derivatives especially in archaeal genomes. Gain and loss of tRNA introns during various stages of evolution are obvious both in archaea and eukaryotes from analyses of comparative genomics. The splicing of tRNA molecules has been studied extensively from biochemical and cell biological points of view, and such analyses of eukaryotic systems provided interesting findings in the past years. Here, I summarize recent progresses in the analyses of tRNA introns and the splicing process, and try to clarify new and old questions to be solved in the next stages. PMID:25071838

  13. Small-angle X-ray Solution Scattering Study of the Multi-aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Complex Reveals an Elongated and Multi-armed particle*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, José; Renault, Louis; Pérez, Javier; Mirande, Marc

    2013-01-01

    In animal cells, nine aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are associated with the three auxiliary proteins p18, p38, and p43 to form a stable and conserved large multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex (MARS), whose molecular mass has been proposed to be between 1.0 and 1.5 MDa. The complex acts as a molecular hub for coordinating protein synthesis and diverse regulatory signal pathways. Electron microscopy studies defined its low resolution molecular envelope as an overall rather compact, asymmetric triangular shape. Here, we have analyzed the composition and homogeneity of the native mammalian MARS isolated from rabbit liver and characterized its overall internal structure, size, and shape at low resolution by hydrodynamic methods and small-angle x-ray scattering in solution. Our data reveal that the MARS exhibits a much more elongated and multi-armed shape than expected from previous reports. The hydrodynamic and structural features of the MARS are large compared with other supramolecular assemblies involved in translation, including ribosome. The large dimensions and non-compact structural organization of MARS favor a large protein surface accessibility for all its components. This may be essential to allow structural rearrangements between the catalytic and cis-acting tRNA binding domains of the synthetases required for binding the bulky tRNA substrates. This non-compact architecture may also contribute to the spatiotemporal controlled release of some of its components, which participate in non-canonical functions after dissociation from the complex. PMID:23836901

  14. The structural basis of cysteine aminoacylation of tRNAPro by prolyl-tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Kamtekar, Satwik; Kennedy, W. Dexter; Wang, Jimin; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Söll, Dieter; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2003-01-01

    Cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase is an essential enzyme required for protein synthesis. Genes encoding this protein have not been identified in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, or Methanopyrus kandleri. It has previously been proposed that the prolyl-tRNA synthetase (ProRS) enzymes in these organisms recognize either proline or cysteine and can aminoacylate their cognate tRNAs through a dual-specificity mechanism. We report five crystal structures at resolutions between 2.6 and 3.2 Å: apo M. jannaschii ProRS, and M. thermautotrophicus ProRS in apo form and in complex with cysteinyl-sulfamoyl-, prolyl-sulfamoyl-, and alanyl-sulfamoyl-adenylates. These aminoacyl-adenylate analogues bind to a single active-site pocket and induce an identical set of conformational changes in loops around the active site when compared with the ligand-free conformation of ProRS. The cysteinyl- and prolyl-adenylate analogues have similar, nanomolar affinities for M. thermautotrophicus ProRS. Homology modeling of tRNA onto these adenylate complexes places the 3′-OH of A76 in an appropriate position for the transfer of any of the three amino acids to tRNA. Thus, these structures explain recent biochemical experiments showing that M. jannaschii ProRS misacylates tRNAPro with cysteine, and argue against the proposal that these archaeal ProRS enzymes possess the dual capacity to aminoacylate both tRNAPro and tRNACys with their cognate amino acids. PMID:12578991

  15. Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Tsai, Fong-Ying

    1993-10-26

    The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

  16. Nonredox thiolation in tRNA occurring via sulfur activation by a [4Fe-4S] cluster.

    PubMed

    Arragain, Simon; Bimai, Ornella; Legrand, Pierre; Caillat, Sylvain; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Touati, Nadia; Binet, Laurent; Atta, Mohamed; Fontecave, Marc; Golinelli-Pimpaneau, Béatrice

    2017-07-11

    Sulfur is present in several nucleosides within tRNAs. In particular, thiolation of the universally conserved methyl-uridine at position 54 stabilizes tRNAs from thermophilic bacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea and is required for growth at high temperature. The simple nonredox substitution of the C2-uridine carbonyl oxygen by sulfur is catalyzed by tRNA thiouridine synthetases called TtuA. Spectroscopic, enzymatic, and structural studies indicate that TtuA carries a catalytically essential [4Fe-4S] cluster and requires ATP for activity. A series of crystal structures shows that (i) the cluster is ligated by only three cysteines that are fully conserved, allowing the fourth unique iron to bind a small ligand, such as exogenous sulfide, and (ii) the ATP binding site, localized thanks to a protein-bound AMP molecule, a reaction product, is adjacent to the cluster. A mechanism for tRNA sulfuration is suggested, in which the unique iron of the catalytic cluster serves to bind exogenous sulfide, thus acting as a sulfur carrier.

  17. Achieving error-free translation; the mechanism of proofreading of threonyl-tRNA synthetase at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Rees, Bernard; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Bey, Gilbert; Caillet, Joel; Moras, Dino

    2004-11-05

    The fidelity of aminoacylation of tRNA(Thr) by the threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) requires the discrimination of the cognate substrate threonine from the noncognate serine. Misacylation by serine is corrected in a proofreading or editing step. An editing site has been located 39 A away from the aminoacylation site. We report the crystal structures of this editing domain in its apo form and in complex with the serine product, and with two nonhydrolyzable analogs of potential substrates: the terminal tRNA adenosine charged with serine, and seryl adenylate. The structures show how serine is recognized, and threonine rejected, and provide the structural basis for the editing mechanism, a water-mediated hydrolysis of the mischarged tRNA. When the adenylate analog binds in the editing site, a phosphate oxygen takes the place of one of the catalytic water molecules, thereby blocking the reaction. This rules out a correction mechanism that would occur before the binding of the amino acid on the tRNA.

  18. Structural modeling of tissue-specific mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS2) defects predicts differential effects on aminoacylation.

    PubMed

    Euro, Liliya; Konovalova, Svetlana; Asin-Cayuela, Jorge; Tulinius, Már; Griffin, Helen; Horvath, Rita; Taylor, Robert W; Chinnery, Patrick F; Schara, Ulrike; Thorburn, David R; Suomalainen, Anu; Chihade, Joseph; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of mitochondrial protein synthesis is dependent on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mtARSs) and the mitochondrial DNA-encoded tRNAs. The recent advances in whole-exome sequencing have revealed the importance of the mtARS proteins for mitochondrial pathophysiology since nearly every nuclear gene for mtARS (out of 19) is now recognized as a disease gene for mitochondrial disease. Typically, defects in each mtARS have been identified in one tissue-specific disease, most commonly affecting the brain, or in one syndrome. However, mutations in the AARS2 gene for mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (mtAlaRS) have been reported both in patients with infantile-onset cardiomyopathy and in patients with childhood to adulthood-onset leukoencephalopathy. We present here an investigation of the effects of the described mutations on the structure of the synthetase, in an effort to understand the tissue-specific outcomes of the different mutations. The mtAlaRS differs from the other mtARSs because in addition to the aminoacylation domain, it has a conserved editing domain for deacylating tRNAs that have been mischarged with incorrect amino acids. We show that the cardiomyopathy phenotype results from a single allele, causing an amino acid change R592W in the editing domain of AARS2, whereas the leukodystrophy mutations are located in other domains of the synthetase. Nevertheless, our structural analysis predicts that all mutations reduce the aminoacylation activity of the synthetase, because all mtAlaRS domains contribute to tRNA binding for aminoacylation. According to our model, the cardiomyopathy mutations severely compromise aminoacylation whereas partial activity is retained by the mutation combinations found in the leukodystrophy patients. These predictions provide a hypothesis for the molecular basis of the distinct tissue-specific phenotypic outcomes.

  19. Evolutionary history of Arabidopsis thaliana aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dual-targeted proteins.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Marcelo M; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetases (aaRS) are key players in translation and act early in protein synthesis by mediating the attachment of amino acids to their cognate tRNA molecules. In plants, protein synthesis may occur in three subcellular compartments (cytosol, mitochondria, and chloroplasts), which requires multiple versions of the protein to be correctly delivered to its proper destination. The organellar aaRS are nuclear encoded and equipped with targeting information at the N-terminal sequence, which enables them to be specifically translocated to their final location. Most of the aaRS families present organellar proteins that are dual targeted to mitochondria and chloroplasts. Here, we examine the dual targeting behavior of aaRS from an evolutionary perspective. Our results show that Arabidopsis thaliana aaRS sequences are a result of a horizontal gene transfer event from bacteria. However, there is no evident bias indicating one single ancestor (Cyanobacteria or Proteobacteria). The dual-targeted aaRS phylogenetic relationship was characterized into two different categories (paralogs and homologs) depending on the state recovered for both dual-targeted and cytosolic proteins. Taken together, our results suggest that the dual-targeted condition is a gain-of-function derived from gene duplication. Selection may have maintained the original function in at least one of the copies as the additional copies diverged.

  20. An ENU-induced mutation in mouse glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) causes peripheral sensory and motor phenotypes creating a model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Achilli, Francesca; Bros-Facer, Virginie; Williams, Hazel P.; Banks, Gareth T.; AlQatari, Mona; Chia, Ruth; Tucci, Valter; Groves, Michael; Nickols, Carole D.; Seburn, Kevin L.; Kendall, Rachel; Cader, Muhammed Z.; Talbot, Kevin; van Minnen, Jan; Burgess, Robert W.; Brandner, Sebastian; Martin, Joanne E.; Koltzenburg, Martin; Greensmith, Linda; Nolan, Patrick M.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations in the enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) cause motor and sensory axon loss in the peripheral nervous system in humans, described clinically as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D or distal spinal muscular atrophy type V. Here, we characterise a new mouse mutant, GarsC201R, with a point mutation that leads to a non-conservative substitution within GARS. Heterozygous mice with a C3H genetic background have loss of grip strength, decreased motor flexibility and disruption of fine motor control; this relatively mild phenotype is more severe on a C57BL/6 background. Homozygous mutants have a highly deleterious set of features, including movement difficulties and death before weaning. Heterozygous animals have a reduction in axon diameter in peripheral nerves, slowing of nerve conduction and an alteration in the recovery cycle of myelinated axons, as well as innervation defects. An assessment of GARS levels showed increased protein in 15-day-old mice compared with controls; however, this increase was not observed in 3-month-old animals, indicating that GARS function may be more crucial in younger animals. We found that enzyme activity was not reduced detectably in heterozygotes at any age, but was diminished greatly in homozygous mice compared with controls; thus, homozygous animals may suffer from a partial loss of function. The GarsC201R mutation described here is a contribution to our understanding of the mechanism by which mutations in tRNA synthetases, which are fundamentally important, ubiquitously expressed enzymes, cause axonopathy in specific sets of neurons. PMID:19470612

  1. An ENU-induced mutation in mouse glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) causes peripheral sensory and motor phenotypes creating a model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Achilli, Francesca; Bros-Facer, Virginie; Williams, Hazel P; Banks, Gareth T; AlQatari, Mona; Chia, Ruth; Tucci, Valter; Groves, Michael; Nickols, Carole D; Seburn, Kevin L; Kendall, Rachel; Cader, Muhammed Z; Talbot, Kevin; van Minnen, Jan; Burgess, Robert W; Brandner, Sebastian; Martin, Joanne E; Koltzenburg, Martin; Greensmith, Linda; Nolan, Patrick M; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) cause motor and sensory axon loss in the peripheral nervous system in humans, described clinically as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2D or distal spinal muscular atrophy type V. Here, we characterise a new mouse mutant, Gars(C201R), with a point mutation that leads to a non-conservative substitution within GARS. Heterozygous mice with a C3H genetic background have loss of grip strength, decreased motor flexibility and disruption of fine motor control; this relatively mild phenotype is more severe on a C57BL/6 background. Homozygous mutants have a highly deleterious set of features, including movement difficulties and death before weaning. Heterozygous animals have a reduction in axon diameter in peripheral nerves, slowing of nerve conduction and an alteration in the recovery cycle of myelinated axons, as well as innervation defects. An assessment of GARS levels showed increased protein in 15-day-old mice compared with controls; however, this increase was not observed in 3-month-old animals, indicating that GARS function may be more crucial in younger animals. We found that enzyme activity was not reduced detectably in heterozygotes at any age, but was diminished greatly in homozygous mice compared with controls; thus, homozygous animals may suffer from a partial loss of function. The Gars(C201R) mutation described here is a contribution to our understanding of the mechanism by which mutations in tRNA synthetases, which are fundamentally important, ubiquitously expressed enzymes, cause axonopathy in specific sets of neurons.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... use of biotin, a B vitamin found in foods such as liver, egg yolks, and milk. Holocarboxylase synthetase attaches biotin to certain enzymes that are essential for the normal production and breakdown of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates in ...

  3. tRNA nucleotide 47: an evolutionary enigma.

    PubMed

    Cermakian, N; McClain, W H; Cedergren, R

    1998-08-01

    A previous analysis of tRNA sequences suggested a correlation between the absence of a nucleotide at position 47 (nt 47) in the extra loop and the presence of a U13:G22 base pair in the D-stem. We have evaluated the significance of this correlation by determining the in vivo activity of tRNAs containing either a C13:G22 or a U13:G22 pair in tRNA molecules with or without nt 47. Although this correlation might reflect some malfunction of tRNAs lacking nt 47, but containing the C13:G22, assays of the in vivo suppressor activity showed that this tRNA is actually more active than the tRNA with the features found in the database, i.e., a U13:G22 base pair and no nt 47. Moreover, analogous constructs with a GGC anticodon permitted the growth of an Escherichia coli strain deleted for tRNA(Ala)GGC genes equally well. On the other hand, long-term growth experiments with competing E. coli strains harboring the tRNA lacking nt 47, either with the C13:G22 or the U13:G22 base pair demonstrated that the U13:G22 tRNA overtook the C13:G22 strain even when the starting proportion of strains favored the C13:G22 strain. Thus, the preference for the U13:G22 tRNA lacking nt 47 in the sequence database is most likely due to factors that come into play during extended growth or latency rather than to the ability of the tRNA to engage in protein synthesis.

  4. Unique pathway of expression of an opal suppressor phosphoserine tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.J.; De La Pena, P.; Tobian, J.A.; Zasloff, M.; Hatfield, D.

    1987-09-01

    An opal suppressor phosphoserine tRNA gene is present in single copy in the genomes of higher vertebrates. The authors have shown that the product of this gene functions as a suppressor in an in vitro assay, and they have proposed that it may donate a modified amino acid directly to protein in response to specific UGA codons. In this report, they show through in vitro and in vivo studies that the human and Xenopus opal suppressor phosphoserine tRNAs are synthesized by a pathway that is, to the best of our knowledge, unlike that of nay know eukaryotic tRNA. The primary transcript of this gene does not contain a 5'-leader sequence; and, therefore, transcription of this suppressor is initiated at the first nucleotide within the coding sequence. The 5'-terminal triphosphate, present on the primary transcript, remains intact through 3'-terminal maturation and through subsequent transport of the tRNA to the cytoplasm. The unique biosynthetic pathway of this opal suppressor may underlie its distinctive role in eukaryotic cells.

  5. Structural basis for tRNA modification by Elp3 from Dehalococcoides mccartyi

    PubMed Central

    Glatt, Sebastian; Onuma, Osita F.; Baudin, Florence; Graziadei, Andrea; Taverniti, Valerio; Lin, Ting-Yu; Baymann, Frauke; Seraphin, Bertrand; Breunig, Karin D.; Müller, Christoph W.

    2016-01-01

    During translation elongation decoding is based on the recognition of codons by corresponding tRNA anticodon triplets. Molecular mechanisms that regulate global protein synthesis via specific base modifications in tRNA anticodons have recently received increasing attention. The conserved eukaryotic Elongator complex specifically modifies uridines located in the wobble base position of tRNAs. Here, we present the crystal structure of Dehalococcoides mccartyi Elp3 (DmcElp3) at 2.15 Å resolution. Our results reveal the unexpected arrangement of Elp3 lysine acetyl transferase (KAT) and radical S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) domains that share a large interface to form a composite active site and tRNA binding pocket with an iron sulfur cluster located in the dimerization interface of two DmcElp3 molecules. Structure-guided mutagenesis studies of yeast Elp3 confirm the relevance of our findings for eukaryotic Elp3s and for understanding Elongator’s role in the onset of various neurodegenerative diseases and cancer in humans. PMID:27455459

  6. Vanderwaltozyma polyspora possesses two glycyl-tRNA synthetase genes: one constitutive and one inducible.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chin-I; Chen, Yueh-Lin; Chen, Shun-Jia; Chou, Chi-Mao; Chen, Chin-Yu; Wang, Chien-Chia

    2015-03-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are housekeeping enzymes essential for protein synthesis. We herein present evidence that the yeast Vanderwaltozyma polyspora possesses two paralogous glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) genes-GRS1 and GRS2. Paradoxically, GRS1 provided functions in both the cytoplasm and mitochondria, while GRS2 was essentially silent under normal growth conditions. Expression of GRS2 could be activated by stresses such as high pH or ethanol and most effectively by high temperature. The expressed GlyRS2 protein was exclusively found in the cytoplasm and more stable under heat-shock conditions (37°C) than under normal growth conditions (30°C) in vivo. In addition, GRS2 effectively rescued the cytoplasmic defect of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae GRS1 knockout strain when expressed from a constitutive promoter. Moreover, the purified GlyRS2 enzyme was fairly active at both 30°C and 37°C in glycylation of yeast tRNA in vitro. However, unexpectedly, the purified GlyRS2 enzyme was practically inactive at temperature above 40°C in vitro. Our study suggests that GRS2 is an inducible gene that acts under stress conditions where GlyRS1 may be insufficient, unavailable, or rendered inactive.

  7. Non-discriminating and discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetases differ in the anticodon-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Christophe; Roy, Hervé; Blaise, Mickael; Giegé, Richard; Kern, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    In most organisms, tRNA aminoacylation is ensured by 20 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs). In eubacteria, however, synthetases can be duplicated as in Thermus thermophilus, which contains two distinct AspRSs. While AspRS-1 is specific, AspRS-2 is non-discriminating and aspartylates tRNAAsp and tRNAAsn. The structure at 2.3 Å resolution of AspRS-2, the first of a non-discriminating synthetase, was solved. It differs from that of AspRS-1 but has resemblance to that of discriminating and archaeal AspRS from Pyrococcus kodakaraensis. The protein presents non-conventional features in its OB-fold anticodon-binding domain, namely the absence of a helix inserted between two β-strands of this fold and a peculiar L1 loop differing from the large loops known to interact with tRNAAsp identity determinant C36 in conventional AspRSs. In AspRS-2, this loop is small and structurally homologous to that in AsnRSs, including conservation of a proline. In discriminating Pyrococcus AspRS, the L1 loop, although small, lacks this proline and is not superimposable with that of AspRS-2 or AsnRS. Its particular status is demonstrated by a loop-exchange experiment that renders the Pyrococcus AspRS non-discriminating. PMID:12660169

  8. Molecular basis of the inhibition of human aromatase (estrogen synthetase) by flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens: A site-directed mutagenesis study.

    PubMed

    Kao, Y C; Zhou, C; Sherman, M; Laughton, C A; Chen, S

    1998-02-01

    Flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens are plant chemicals and are known to be competitive inhibitors of cytochrome P450 aromatase with respect to the androgen substrate. Aromatase is the enzyme that converts androgen to estrogen; therefore, these plant chemicals are thought to be capable of modifying the estrogen level in women. In this study, the inhibition profiles of four flavones [chrysin (5, 7-dihydroxyflavone), 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), and galangin (3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone)], two isoflavones [genistein (4,5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone) and biochanin A (5,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxyisoflavone)], one flavanone [naringenin (4, 5,7-trihydroxyflavanone)], and one naphthoflavone (alpha-naphthoflavone) on the wild-type and six human aromatase mutants (I133Y, P308F, D309A, T310S, I395F, and I474Y) were determined. In combination with computer modeling, the binding characteristics and the structure requirement for flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens to inhibit human aromatase were obtained. These compounds were found to bind to the active site of aromatase in an orientation in which rings A and C mimic rings D and C of the androgen substrate, respectively. This study also provides a molecular basis as to why isoflavones are significantly poorer inhibitors of aromatase than flavones.

  9. Molecular basis of the inhibition of human aromatase (estrogen synthetase) by flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens: A site-directed mutagenesis study.

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Y C; Zhou, C; Sherman, M; Laughton, C A; Chen, S

    1998-01-01

    Flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens are plant chemicals and are known to be competitive inhibitors of cytochrome P450 aromatase with respect to the androgen substrate. Aromatase is the enzyme that converts androgen to estrogen; therefore, these plant chemicals are thought to be capable of modifying the estrogen level in women. In this study, the inhibition profiles of four flavones [chrysin (5, 7-dihydroxyflavone), 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), and galangin (3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone)], two isoflavones [genistein (4,5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone) and biochanin A (5,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxyisoflavone)], one flavanone [naringenin (4, 5,7-trihydroxyflavanone)], and one naphthoflavone (alpha-naphthoflavone) on the wild-type and six human aromatase mutants (I133Y, P308F, D309A, T310S, I395F, and I474Y) were determined. In combination with computer modeling, the binding characteristics and the structure requirement for flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens to inhibit human aromatase were obtained. These compounds were found to bind to the active site of aromatase in an orientation in which rings A and C mimic rings D and C of the androgen substrate, respectively. This study also provides a molecular basis as to why isoflavones are significantly poorer inhibitors of aromatase than flavones. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9435150

  10. Mutations in LARS2, encoding mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase, lead to premature ovarian failure and hearing loss in Perrault syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Sarah B; Gersak, Ksenija; Michaelson-Cohen, Rachel; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K; Malach, Daniel; Klevit, Rachel E; King, Mary-Claire; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat

    2013-04-04

    The genetic causes of premature ovarian failure (POF) are highly heterogeneous, and causative mutations have been identified in more than ten genes so far. In two families affected by POF accompanied by hearing loss (together, these symptoms compose Perrault syndrome), exome sequencing revealed mutations in LARS2, encoding mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase: homozygous c.1565C>A (p.Thr522Asn) in a consanguineous Palestinian family and compound heterozygous c.1077delT and c.1886C>T (p.Thr629Met) in a nonconsanguineous Slovenian family. LARS2 c.1077delT leads to a frameshift at codon 360 of the 901 residue protein. LARS2 p.Thr522Asn occurs in the LARS2 catalytic domain at a site conserved from bacteria through mammals. LARS2 p.Thr629Met occurs in the LARS2 leucine-specific domain, which is adjacent to a catalytic loop critical in all species but for which primary sequence is not well conserved. A recently developed method of detecting remote homologies revealed threonine at this site in consensus sequences derived from multiple-species alignments seeded by human and E. coli residues at this region. Yeast complementation indicated that LARS2 c.1077delT is nonfunctional and that LARS2 p.Thr522Asn is partially functional. LARS2 p.Thr629Met was functional in this assay but might be insufficient as a heterozygote with the fully nonfunctional LARS2 c.1077delT allele. A known C. elegans strain with the protein-truncating alteration LARS-2 p.Trp247Ter was confirmed to be sterile. After HARS2, LARS2 is the second gene encoding mitochondrial tRNA synthetase to be found to harbor mutations leading to Perrault syndrome, further supporting a critical role for mitochondria in the maintenance of ovarian function and hearing. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. tRNA is entrapped in similar, but distinct, nuclear and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes, both of which contain vigilin and elongation factor 1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, C; Grünweller, A; Willkomm, D K; Pfeiffer, T; Hartmann, R K; Müller, P K

    1998-01-01

    Vigilin, which is found predominantly in cells and tissues with high levels of protein biosynthesis, was isolated in its native form from human HEp-2 cells (A.T.C.C. CCL23) by immunoaffinity chromatography. Here we demonstrate that vigilin is part of a novel large tRNA-binding ribonucleoprotein complex (tRNP), found not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nuclei of human cells. Compositional differences in the protein pattern were detected between the nuclear and cytoplasmic tRNPs, although some properties of the purified nuclear tRNP, such as tRNA protection against nuclease attack, were identical with those of the cytoplasmic tRNP. By using either a pool of total human nuclear RNA or radioactively labelled yeast tRNAAsp in rebinding experiments, we could show that tRNA is specifically recaptured by the RNA-depleted, vigilin-containing nuclear complex. We could also show that vigilin is capable of binding tRNA in vitro. Another tRNA-binding protein is elongation factor 1 alpha, which appears to be enriched in the cytoplasmic and nuclear tRNP complexes. This suggests that the cytoplasmic tRNP may be involved in the channelled tRNA cycle in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. Our results also suggest that the nuclear vigilin-containing tRNP may be related to the nuclear export of tRNA. PMID:9445390

  12. Yeast Los1p Has Properties of an Exportin-Like Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Factor for tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Hellmuth, Klaus; Lau, Denise M.; Bischoff, F. Ralf; Künzler, Markus; Hurt, Ed; Simos, George

    1998-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Los1p, which is genetically linked to the nuclear pore protein Nsp1p and several tRNA biogenesis factors, was recently grouped into the family of importin/karyopherin-β-like proteins on the basis of its sequence similarity. In a two-hybrid screen, we identified Nup2p as a nucleoporin interacting with Los1p. Subsequent purification of Los1p from yeast demonstrates its physical association not only with Nup2p but also with Nsp1p. By the use of the Gsp1p-G21V mutant, Los1p was shown to preferentially bind to the GTP-bound form of yeast Ran. Furthermore, overexpression of full-length or N-terminally truncated Los1p was shown to have dominant-negative effects on cell growth and different nuclear export pathways. Finally, Los1p could interact with Gsp1p-GTP, but only in the presence of tRNA, as revealed in an indirect in vitro binding assay. These data confirm the homology between Los1p and the recently identified human exportin for tRNA and reinforce the possibility of a role for Los1p in nuclear export of tRNA in yeast. PMID:9774653

  13. A miRNA-tRNA mix-up: tRNA origin of proposed miRNA.

    PubMed

    Schopman, Nick C T; Heynen, Stephan; Haasnoot, Joost; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    The rapid release of new data from DNA genome sequencing projects has led to a variety of misannotations in public databases. Our results suggest that next generation sequencing approaches are particularly prone to such misannotations. Two related miRNA candidates did recently enter the miRBase database, miR-1274b and miR-1274a, but they share identical 18-nucleotide stretches with tRNA (Lys3) and tRNA (Lys5) , respectively. The possibility that the small RNA fragments that led to the description of these two miRNAs originated from the two tRNAs was examined. The ratio of the miR-1274b:miR-1274a fragments does closely resemble the known tRNA lys3:lys5 ratio in the cell. Furthermore, the proposed miRNA hairpins have a very low prediction score and the proposed miRNA genes are in fact endogenous retroviral elements. We searched for other miRNA-mimics in the human genome and found more examples of tRNA-miRNA mimicry. We propose that the corresponding miRNAs should be validated in more detail, as the small RNA fragments that led to their description are likely derived from tRNA processing.

  14. Co-evolution of mitochondrial tRNA import and codon usage determines translational efficiency in the green alga Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Thalia; Duby, Francéline; Larosa, Véronique; Coosemans, Nadine; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Motte, Patrick; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Remacle, Claire

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondria from diverse phyla, including protozoa, fungi, higher plants, and humans, import tRNAs from the cytosol in order to ensure proper mitochondrial translation. Despite the broad occurrence of this process, our understanding of tRNA import mechanisms is fragmentary, and crucial questions about their regulation remain unanswered. In the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas, a precise correlation was found between the mitochondrial codon usage and the nature and amount of imported tRNAs. This led to the hypothesis that tRNA import might be a dynamic process able to adapt to the mitochondrial genome content. By manipulating the Chlamydomonas mitochondrial genome, we introduced point mutations in order to modify its codon usage. We find that the codon usage modification results in reduced levels of mitochondrial translation as well as in subsequent decreased levels and activities of respiratory complexes. These effects are linked to the consequential limitations of the pool of tRNAs in mitochondria. This indicates that tRNA mitochondrial import cannot be rapidly regulated in response to a novel genetic context and thus does not appear to be a dynamic process. It rather suggests that the steady-state levels of imported tRNAs in mitochondria result from a co-evolutive adaptation between the tRNA import mechanism and the requirements of the mitochondrial translation machinery.

  15. On origin of genetic code and tRNA before translation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Synthesis of proteins is based on the genetic code - a nearly universal assignment of codons to amino acids (aas). A major challenge to the understanding of the origins of this assignment is the archetypal "key-lock vs. frozen accident" dilemma. Here we re-examine this dilemma in light of 1) the fundamental veto on "foresight evolution", 2) modular structures of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and 3) the updated library of aa-binding sites in RNA aptamers successfully selected in vitro for eight amino acids. Results The aa-binding sites of arginine, isoleucine and tyrosine contain both their cognate triplets, anticodons and codons. We have noticed that these cases might be associated with palindrome-dinucleotides. For example, one-base shift to the left brings arginine codons CGN, with CG at 1-2 positions, to the respective anticodons NCG, with CG at 2-3 positions. Formally, the concomitant presence of codons and anticodons is also expected in the reverse situation, with codons containing palindrome-dinucleotides at their 2-3 positions, and anticodons exhibiting them at 1-2 positions. A closer analysis reveals that, surprisingly, RNA binding sites for Arg, Ile and Tyr "prefer" (exactly as in the actual genetic code) the anticodon(2-3)/codon(1-2) tetramers to their anticodon(1-2)/codon(2-3) counterparts, despite the seemingly perfect symmetry of the latter. However, since in vitro selection of aa-specific RNA aptamers apparently had nothing to do with translation, this striking preference provides a new strong support to the notion of the genetic code emerging before translation, in response to catalytic (and possibly other) needs of ancient RNA life. Consistently with the pre-translation origin of the code, we propose here a new model of tRNA origin by the gradual, Fibonacci process-like, elongation of a tRNA molecule from a primordial coding triplet and 5'DCCA3' quadruplet (D is a base-determinator) to the eventual 76 base-long cloverleaf

  16. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.

  17. Modelling of vitamin A binding to tRNA.

    PubMed

    N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Bourassa, P; Mandeville, J S; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2014-10-01

    The binding sites of retinol and retinoic acid with tRNA are located in aqueous solution at physiological conditions using constant tRNA concentration and various retinoid contents. FTIR, CD, fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modelling were used to determine retinoid binding sites, the binding constant and the effects of retinol and retinoic acid complexation on tRNA conformation and aggregation. Structural analysis showed that retinol and retinoic acid bind tRNA via G-C and A-U base pairs with overall binding constants of Kret-tRNA=2.0 (±0.40)×10(4)M(-1) and Kretac-tRNA=6.0 (±1)×10(4)M(-1). The number of binding sites occupied by retinoids on tRNA were 1.4 for retinol-tRNA and 1.7 for retinoic acid-tRNA complexes. Hydrophobic interactions were also observed at high retinol and retinoic acid contents. Molecular modelling showed the participation of several nucleobases in retinoid-tRNA complexation with free binding energy of -4.36 for retinol-tRNA and -4.53kcal/mol for retinoic acid-tRNA adducts.

  18. Reverse Translocation of tRNA in the Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Shinichiro; Walker, Sarah E.; Fredrick, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Summary A widely held view is that directional movement of tRNA in the ribosome is determined by an intrinsic mechanism and driven thermodynamically by transpeptidation. Here, we show that, in certain ribosomal complexes, the pretranslocation (PRE) state is thermodynamically favored over the posttranslocation (POST) state. Spontaneous and efficient conversion from the POST to PRE state is observed when EF-G is depleted from ribosomes in the POST state or when tRNA is added to the E site of ribosomes containing P-site tRNA. In the latter assay, the rate of tRNA movement is increased by streptomycin and neomycin, decreased by tetracycline, and not affected by the acylation state of the tRNA. In one case, we provide evidence that complex conversion occurs by reverse translocation (i.e., direct movement of the tRNAs from the E and P sites to the P and A sites, respectively). These findings have important implications for the energetics of translocation. PMID:17189194

  19. Cloning and characterization of the C. elegans histidyl-tRNA synthetase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Amaar, Y G; Baillie, D L

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we report the cloning and sequencing of the C. elegans histidyl-tRNA synthetase gene. The complete genomic sequence, and most of the cDNA sequence, of this gene is now determined. The gene size including flanking and coding regions is 2230 nucleotides long. Three small introns (45-50 bp long) are found to interrupt the open reading frame. The open reading frame translates to 523 amino acids. This putative protein sequence shows extensive homology with the human and yeast histidyl-tRNA the histidyl-tRNA synthetase gene is a single copy gene. Hence, it is very likely that it encodes both the cytoplasmic and the mitochondrial histidyl-tRNA synthetases. It is likely to be trans-spliced since it contains a trans-splice site in its 5' untranslated region. PMID:8414990

  20. Aquifex aeolicus tRNA (Gm18) methyltransferase has unique substrate specificity. TRNA recognition mechanism of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Susumu; Watanabe, Kazunori; Kim, Jong-Myong; Ogasawara, Tomio; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Endo, Yaeta

    2003-07-04

    Transfer RNA (guanosine-2')-methyltransferase (Gm-methylase) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to 2'-OH of G18 in the D-loop of tRNA. Based on their mode of tRNA recognition, Gm-methylases can be divided into the following two types: type I having broad specificity toward the substrate tRNA, and type II that methylates only limited tRNA species. Protein synthesized by in vitro cell-free translation revealed that Gm-methylase encoded in the Aquifex aeolicus genome is a novel type II enzyme. Experiments with chimeric tRNAs and mini- and micro-helix RNAs showed that the recognition region of this enzyme is included within the D-arm structure of tRNALeu and that a bulge is essentially required. Variants of tRNALeu, tRNASer, and tRNAPhe revealed that a combination of certain base pairs in the D-stem is strongly recognized by the enzyme, that 4 bp in the D-stem enhance methyl acceptance activity, and that the Py16Py17G18G19 sequence is important for efficient methyl transfer. The methyl acceptance activities of all the A. aeolicus tRNA genes, which can be classified into 14 categories on the basis of their D-arm structure, were tested. The results clearly showed that the substrate recognition mechanism elucidated by the variant experiments was applicable to their native substrates.

  1. Fatty Acid Synthetase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harold P.; Volkmann, Carol M.; Chao, Fu-Chuan

    1967-01-01

    A light particle fraction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, obtained from the crude ribosomal material, and containing the fatty acid synthetase, consisted primarily of 27S and 47S components. This fraction has a protein-ribonucleic acid ratio of about 13. Electron micrographs showed particles ranging in diameter between 100 and 300 A in this material. By use of density gradient analysis, the fatty acid synthetase was found in the 47S component. This component contained particles which were predominantly 300 A in diameter and which were considerably flatter than ribosomes, and it consisted almost entirely of protein. Images PMID:6025308

  2. Semisynthetic tRNA complement mediates in vitro protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenling; Stein, Viktor; Tnimov, Zakir; Mureev, Sergey; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2015-04-08

    Genetic code expansion is a key objective of synthetic biology and protein engineering. Most efforts in this direction are focused on reassigning termination or decoding quadruplet codons. While the redundancy of genetic code provides a large number of potentially reassignable codons, their utility is diminished by the inevitable interaction with cognate aminoacyl-tRNAs. To address this problem, we sought to establish an in vitro protein synthesis system with a simplified synthetic tRNA complement, thereby orthogonalizing some of the sense codons. This quantitative in vitro peptide synthesis assay allowed us to analyze the ability of synthetic tRNAs to decode all of 61 sense codons. We observed that, with the exception of isoacceptors for Asn, Glu, and Ile, the majority of 48 synthetic Escherichia coli tRNAs could support protein translation in the cell-free system. We purified to homogeneity functional Asn, Glu, and Ile tRNAs from the native E. coli tRNA mixture, and by combining them with synthetic tRNAs, we formulated a semisynthetic tRNA complement for all 20 amino acids. We further demonstrated that this tRNA complement could restore the protein translation activity of tRNA-depleted E. coli lysate to a level comparable to that of total native tRNA. To confirm that the developed system could efficiently synthesize long polypeptides, we expressed three different sequences coding for superfolder GFP. This novel semisynthetic translation system is a powerful tool for tRNA engineering and potentially enables the reassignment of at least 9 sense codons coding for Ser, Arg, Leu, Pro, Thr, and Gly.

  3. Methionyl-tRNA synthetase overexpression is associated with poor clinical outcomes in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Jung, Ji Ye; Kim, Arum; Kim, Kwangsoo; Chang, Yoon Soo

    2017-07-05

    Methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MRS) plays a critical role in initiating translation by transferring Met to the initiator tRNA (tRNAi(Met)) and protection against ROS-mediated damage, suggesting that its overexpression is related to cancer growth and drug resistance. In this study, the clinical implication of MRS expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was evaluated. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses were performed using tissue lysates and formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks from wild type C57BL/6, LSL-Kras G12D, and LSL-Kras G12D:p53(fl/fl) mice. For human studies, 12 paired adjacent normal appearing lung tissue lysates and cancer tissue lysates, in addition to 231 FFPE tissue samples, were used. MRS was weakly expressed in the spleen and intestinal epithelium and only marginally expressed in the kidney, liver, and lungs of wild type C57BL/6 mice. On the other hand, MRS was strongly expressed in the neoplastic region of lung tissue from LSL-Kras G12D and LSL-Kras G12D:p53(fl/fl) mice. Immunoblot analysis of the human normal appearing adjacent and lung cancer paired tissue lysates revealed cancer-specific MRS overexpression, which was related to mTORC1 activity. IHC analysis of the 231 FFPE lung cancer tissue samples showed that MRS expression was frequently detected in the cytoplasm of lung cancer cells (179 out of 231, 77.4%), with a small proportion (73 out of 231, 31.6%) also showing nuclear expression. The proportion of cases with positive MRS expression was higher in the advanced pStage subgroup (P = 0.018, χ(2)-test) and cases with MRS expression also had shorter DFS (161.6 vs 142.3, P = 0.014, log-rank test). Taken together, MRS is frequently overexpressed in NSCLC. Moreover, MRS is related to mTORC1 activity and its overexpression is associated with poor clinical outcomes, indicating that it has potential as a putative therapeutic target.

  4. A dual-specificity aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase in the deep-rooted eukaryote Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Bunjun, Shipra; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Graham, David; Min, Bokkee; Kitabatake, Makoto; Wang, Alice L.; Wang, Ching C.; Vivarès, Christian P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Söll, Dieter

    2000-01-01

    Cysteinyl-tRNA (Cys-tRNA) is essential for protein synthesis. In most organisms the enzyme responsible for the formation of Cys-tRNA is cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (CysRS). The only known exceptions are the euryarchaea Methanococcus jannaschii and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, which do not encode a CysRS. Deviating from the accepted concept of one aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase per amino acid, these organisms employ prolyl-tRNA synthetase as the enzyme that carries out Cys-tRNA formation. To date this dual-specificity prolyl-cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (ProCysRS) is only known to exist in archaea. Analysis of the preliminary genomic sequence of the primitive eukaryote Giardia lamblia indicated the presence of an archaeal prolyl-tRNA synthetase (ProRS). Its proS gene was cloned and the gene product overexpressed in Escherichia coli. By using G. lamblia, M. jannaschii, or E. coli tRNA as substrate, this ProRS was able to form Cys-tRNA and Pro-tRNA in vitro. Cys-AMP formation, but not Pro-AMP synthesis, was tRNA-dependent. The in vitro data were confirmed in vivo, as the cloned G. lamblia proS gene was able to complement a temperature-sensitive E. coli cysS strain. Inhibition studies of CysRS activity with proline analogs (thiaproline and 5′-O-[N-(l-prolyl)-sulfamoyl]adenosine) in a Giardia S-100 extract predicted that the organism also contains a canonical CysRS. This prediction was confirmed by cloning and analysis of the corresponding cysS gene. Like a number of archaea, Giardia contains two enzymes, ProCysRS and CysRS, for Cys-tRNA formation. In contrast, the purified Saccharomyces cerevisiae and E. coli ProRS enzymes were unable to form Cys-tRNA under these conditions. Thus, the dual specificity is restricted to the archaeal genre of ProRS. G. lamblia's archaeal-type prolyl- and alanyl-tRNA synthetases refine our understanding of the evolution and interaction of archaeal and eukaryal translation systems. PMID:11078517

  5. Amino acid signature enables proteins to recognize modified tRNA.

    PubMed

    Spears, Jessica L; Xiao, Xingqing; Hall, Carol K; Agris, Paul F

    2014-02-25

    Human tRNA(Lys3)UUU is the primer for HIV replication. The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein, NCp7, facilitates htRNA(Lys3)UUU recruitment from the host cell by binding to and remodeling the tRNA structure. Human tRNA(Lys3)UUU is post-transcriptionally modified, but until recently, the importance of those modifications in tRNA recognition by NCp7 was unknown. Modifications such as the 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine at anticodon wobble position-34 and 2-methylthio-N(6)-threonylcarbamoyladenosine, adjacent to the anticodon at position-37, are important to the recognition of htRNA(Lys3)UUU by NCp7. Several short peptides selected from phage display libraries were found to also preferentially recognize these modifications. Evolutionary algorithms (Monte Carlo and self-consistent mean field) and assisted model building with energy refinement were used to optimize the peptide sequence in silico, while fluorescence assays were developed and conducted to verify the in silico results and elucidate a 15-amino acid signature sequence (R-W-Q/N-H-X2-F-Pho-X-G/A-W-R-X2-G, where X can be most amino acids, and Pho is hydrophobic) that recognized the tRNA's fully modified anticodon stem and loop domain, hASL(Lys3)UUU. Peptides of this sequence specifically recognized and bound modified htRNA(Lys3)UUU with an affinity 10-fold higher than that of the starting sequence. Thus, this approach provides an effective means of predicting sequences of RNA binding peptides that have better binding properties. Such peptides can be used in cell and molecular biology as well as biochemistry to explore RNA binding proteins and to inhibit those protein functions.

  6. A recurrent loss-of-function alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) mutation in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2N (CMT2N).

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Heather M; Sakaguchi, Reiko; Giblin, William; Wilson, Thomas E; Biesecker, Leslie; Lupski, James R; Talbot, Kevin; Vance, Jeffery M; Züchner, Stephan; Lee, Yi-Chung; Kennerson, Marina; Hou, Ya-Ming; Nicholson, Garth; Antonellis, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease comprises a heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, and impaired sensation in the extremities. Four genes encoding an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) have been implicated in CMT disease. ARSs are ubiquitously expressed, essential enzymes that ligate amino acids to cognate tRNA molecules. Recently, a p.Arg329His variant in the alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) gene was found to segregate with dominant axonal CMT type 2N (CMT2N) in two French families; however, the functional consequence of this mutation has not been determined. To investigate the role of AARS in CMT, we performed a mutation screen of the AARS gene in patients with peripheral neuropathy. Our results showed that p.Arg329His AARS also segregated with CMT disease in a large Australian family. Aminoacylation and yeast viability assays showed that p.Arg329His AARS severely reduces enzyme activity. Genotyping analysis indicated that this mutation arose on three distinct haplotypes, and the results of bisulfite sequencing suggested that methylation-mediated deamination of a CpG dinucleotide gives rise to the recurrent p.Arg329His AARS mutation. Together, our data suggest that impaired tRNA charging plays a role in the molecular pathology of CMT2N, and that patients with CMT should be directly tested for the p.Arg329His AARS mutation.

  7. A conserved and essential basic region mediates tRNA binding to the Elp1 subunit of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Elongator complex

    PubMed Central

    Di Santo, Rachael; Bandau, Susanne; Stark, Michael J R

    2014-01-01

    Elongator is a conserved, multi-protein complex discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, loss of which confers a range of pleiotropic phenotypes. Elongator in higher eukaryotes is required for normal growth and development and a mutation in the largest subunit of human Elongator (Elp1) causes familial dysautonomia, a severe recessive neuropathy. Elongator promotes addition of mcm5 and ncm5 modifications to uridine in the tRNA anticodon ‘wobble’ position in both yeast and higher eukaryotes. Since these modifications are required for the tRNAs to function efficiently, a translation defect caused by hypomodified tRNAs may therefore underlie the variety of phenotypes associated with Elongator dysfunction. The Elp1 carboxy-terminal domain contains a highly conserved arginine/lysine-rich region that resembles a nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Using alanine substitution mutagenesis, we show that this region is essential for Elongator's function in tRNA wobble uridine modification. However, rather than acting to determine the nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution of Elongator, we find that the basic region plays a critical role in a novel interaction between tRNA and the Elp1 carboxy-terminal domain. Thus the conserved basic region in Elp1 may be essential for tRNA wobble uridine modification by acting as tRNA binding motif. PMID:24750273

  8. A conserved and essential basic region mediates tRNA binding to the Elp1 subunit of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Elongator complex.

    PubMed

    Di Santo, Rachael; Bandau, Susanne; Stark, Michael J R

    2014-06-01

    Elongator is a conserved, multi-protein complex discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, loss of which confers a range of pleiotropic phenotypes. Elongator in higher eukaryotes is required for normal growth and development and a mutation in the largest subunit of human Elongator (Elp1) causes familial dysautonomia, a severe recessive neuropathy. Elongator promotes addition of mcm(5) and ncm(5) modifications to uridine in the tRNA anticodon 'wobble' position in both yeast and higher eukaryotes. Since these modifications are required for the tRNAs to function efficiently, a translation defect caused by hypomodified tRNAs may therefore underlie the variety of phenotypes associated with Elongator dysfunction. The Elp1 carboxy-terminal domain contains a highly conserved arginine/lysine-rich region that resembles a nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Using alanine substitution mutagenesis, we show that this region is essential for Elongator's function in tRNA wobble uridine modification. However, rather than acting to determine the nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution of Elongator, we find that the basic region plays a critical role in a novel interaction between tRNA and the Elp1 carboxy-terminal domain. Thus the conserved basic region in Elp1 may be essential for tRNA wobble uridine modification by acting as tRNA binding motif.

  9. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in medicine and disease

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Peng; Fox, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) are essential and ubiquitous ‘house-keeping’ enzymes responsible for charging amino acids to their cognate tRNAs and providing the substrates for global protein synthesis. Recent studies have revealed a role of multiple ARSs in pathology, and their potential use as pharmacological targets and therapeutic reagents. The ongoing discovery of genetic mutations in human ARSs is increasing exponentially and can be considered an important determinant of disease etiology. Several chemical compounds target bacterial, fungal and human ARSs as antibiotics or disease-targeting medicines. Remarkably, ongoing exploration of noncanonical functions of ARSs has shown important contributions to control of angiogenesis, inflammation, tumourigenesis and other important physiopathological processes. Here, we summarize the roles of ARSs in human diseases and medicine, focusing on the most recent and exciting discoveries. PMID:23427196

  10. A universal plate format for increased throughput of assays that monitor multiple aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase activities

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Kirk; Waas, William; Druzina, Zhanna; Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases are intensely studied enzymes because of their importance in the establishment of the genetic code and their connection to disease and medicine. During the advancement of this field, several assays were developed. Despite many innovations, the sensitivity, simplicity, and reliability of the radiometric assays (that were among the first to be developed) have ensured their continued use. Four activities are measured by these assays: active site titration, amino acid activation, aminoacylation, and post-transfer editing (deacylation). In an effort to maintain the advantage of these assays, while enhancing throughput, reducing waste, and improving data quality, a universal 96-well filter plate format was developed. This format facilitates the assays for all 4 of the widely studied activities. PMID:17603003

  11. A universal plate format for increased throughput of assays that monitor multiple aminoacyl transfer RNA synthetase activities.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Kirk; Waas, William; Druzina, Zhanna; Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul

    2007-09-01

    Aminoacyl transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetases are intensely studied enzymes because of their importance in the establishment of the genetic code and their connection to disease and medicine. During the advancement of this field, several assays were developed. Despite many innovations, the sensitivity, simplicity, and reliability of the radiometric assays (which were among the first to be developed) have ensured their continued use. Four activities are measured by these assays: active site titration, amino acid activation, aminoacylation, and posttransfer editing (deacylation). In an effort to maintain the advantage of these assays while enhancing throughput, reducing waste, and improving data quality, a universal 96-well filter plate format was developed. This format facilitates the assays for all four of the widely studied activities.

  12. Probing tRNA interaction with biogenic polyamines.

    PubMed

    Ouameur, Amin Ahmed; Bourassa, Philippe; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali

    2010-10-01

    Biogenic polyamines are found to modulate protein synthesis at different levels. This effect may be explained by the ability of polyamines to bind and influence the secondary structure of tRNA, mRNA, and rRNA. We report the interaction between tRNA and the three biogenic polyamines putrescine, spermidine, spermine, and cobalt(III)hexamine at physiological conditions, using FTIR spectroscopy, capillary electrophoresis, and molecular modeling. The results indicated that tRNA was stabilized at low biogenic polyamine concentration, as a consequence of polyamine interaction with the backbone phosphate group. The main tRNA reactive sites for biogenic polyamine at low concentration were guanine-N7/O6, uracil-O2/O4, adenine-N3, and 2'OH of the ribose. At high polyamine concentration, the interaction involves guanine-N7/O6, adenine-N7, uracil-O2 reactive sites, and the backbone phosphate group. The participation of the polycation primary amino group, in the interaction and the presence of the hydrophobic contact, are also shown. The binding affinity of biogenic polyamine to tRNA molecule was in the order of spermine > spermidine > putrescine with K(Spm) = 8.7 × 10(5) M(-1), K(Spd) = 6.1 × 10(5) M(-1), and K(Put) = 1.0 × 10(5) M(-1), which correlates with their positively charged amino group content. Hill analysis showed positive cooperativity for the biogenic polyamines and negative cooperativity for cobalt-hexamine. Cobalt(III)hexamine contains high- and low-affinity sites in tRNA with K(1) = 3.2 × 10(5) M(-1) and K(2) = 1.7 × 10(5) M(-1), that have been attributed to the interactions with guanine-N7 sites and the backbone PO(2) group, respectively. This mechanism of tRNA binding could explain the condensation phenomenon observed at high Co(III) content, as previously shown in the Co(III)-DNA complexes.

  13. Discovery of ATP-Competitive Inhibitors of tRNAIle Lysidine Synthetase (TilS) by High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Adam B; Plant, Helen; Walsh, Jarrod; Sylvester, Mark; Hu, Jun; Gao, Ning; Livchak, Stephania; Tentarelli, Sharon; Thresher, Jason

    2014-09-01

    A novel, ultrahigh-throughput, fluorescence anisotropy-based assay was developed and used to screen a 1.4-million-sample library for compounds that compete with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for binding to Escherichia coli tRNA(Ile) lysidine synthetase (TilS), an essential, conserved, ATP-dependent, tRNA-modifying enzyme of bacterial pathogens. TilS modifies a cytidine base in the anticodon loop of Ile2 tRNA by attaching lysine, thereby altering codon recognition of the CAU anticodon from AUG (methionine) to AUA (isoleucine). A scintillation proximity assay for the incorporation of lysine into Ile2 tRNA was used to eliminate false positives in the initial screen resulting from detection artifacts as well as compounds competitive with the fluorescent label instead of ATP, and to measure inhibitor potencies against E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa TilS isozymes. The tRNA(Ile) substrate for P. aeruginosa TilS was identified for the first time to enable these measurements. ATP-competitive binding of inhibitors was confirmed by one-dimensional ligand-observe nuclear magnetic resonance. A preliminary structure-activity relationship is shown for two inhibitor series.

  14. Crystal structures of three protozoan homologs of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Ethan A; Arakaki, Tracy L; Gillespie, Robert; Napuli, Alberto J; Kim, Jessica E; Buckner, Frederick S; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank; Hol, Wim G J

    2011-05-01

    Tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) is an essential enzyme that is recognizably conserved across all forms of life. It is responsible for activating and attaching tryptophan to a cognate tRNA(Trp) molecule for use in protein synthesis. In some eukaryotes this original core function has been supplemented or modified through the addition of extra domains or the expression of variant TrpRS isoforms. The three TrpRS structures from pathogenic protozoa described here represent three illustrations of this malleability in eukaryotes. The Cryptosporidium parvum genome contains a single TrpRS gene, which codes for an N-terminal domain of uncertain function in addition to the conserved core TrpRS domains. Sequence analysis indicates that this extra domain, conserved among several apicomplexans, is related to the editing domain of some AlaRS and ThrRS. The C. parvum enzyme remains fully active in charging tRNA(Trp) after truncation of this extra domain. The crystal structure of the active, truncated enzyme is presented here at 2.4Å resolution. The Trypanosoma brucei genome contains separate cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms of TrpRS that have diverged in their respective tRNA recognition domains. The crystal structure of the T. brucei cytosolic isoform is presented here at 2.8Å resolution. The Entamoeba histolytica genome contains three sequences that appear to be TrpRS homologs. However one of these, whose structure is presented here at 3.0Å resolution, has lost the active site motifs characteristic of the Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase catalytic domain while retaining the conserved features of a fully formed tRNA(Trp) recognition domain. The biological function of this variant E. histolytica TrpRS remains unknown, but, on the basis of a completely conserved tRNA recognition region and evidence for ATP but not tryptophan binding, it is tempting to speculate that it may perform an editing function. Together with a previously reported structure of an unusual Trp

  15. Inhibition of selenocysteine tRNA[Ser]Sec aminoacylation provides evidence that aminoacylation is required for regulatory methylation of this tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Carlson, Bradley A.; Xu, Xue-Ming; Zeng, Yu; Chen, Shawn; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Lee, Byeong Jae; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2011-01-01

    There are two isoforms of selenocysteine (Sec) tRNA[Ser]Sec that differ by a single methyl group, Um34. The non-Um34 isoform supports the synthesis of a subclass of selenoproteins, designated housekeeping, while the Um34 isoform supports the expression of another subclass, designated stress-related selenoproteins. Herein, we investigated the relationship between tRNA[Ser]Sec aminoacylation and Um34 synthesis which is the last step in the maturation of this tRNA. Mutation of the discriminator base at position 73 in tRNA[Ser]Sec dramatically reduced aminoacylation with serine, as did an inhibitor of seryl-tRNA synthetase, SB-217452. Although both the mutation and the inhibitor prevented Um34 synthesis, neither precluded the synthesis of any other of the known base modifications on tRNA[Ser]Sec following microinjection and incubation of the mutant tRNA[Ser]Sec transcript, or the wild type transcript along with inhibitor, in Xenopus oocytes. The data demonstrate that Sec tRNA[Ser]Sec must be aminoacylated for Um34 addition. The fact that selenium is required for Um34 methylation suggests that Sec must be attached to its tRNA for Um34 methylation. This would explain why selenium is essential for the function of Um34 methylase and provides further insights into the hierarchy of selenoprotein expression. PMID:21624347

  16. Ancient origin of the divergent forms of leucyl-tRNA synthetases in the Halobacteriales

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has greatly impacted the genealogical history of many lineages, particularly for prokaryotes, with genes frequently moving in and out of a line of descent. Many genes that were acquired by a lineage in the past likely originated from ancestral relatives that have since gone extinct. During the course of evolution, HGT has played an essential role in the origin and dissemination of genetic and metabolic novelty. Results Three divergent forms of leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) exist in the archaeal order Halobacteriales, commonly known as haloarchaea. Few haloarchaeal genomes have the typical archaeal form of this enzyme and phylogenetic analysis indicates it clusters within the Euryarchaeota as expected. The majority of sequenced halobacterial genomes possess a bacterial form of LeuRS. Phylogenetic reconstruction puts this larger group of haloarchaea at the base of the bacterial domain. The most parsimonious explanation is that an ancient transfer of LeuRS took place from an organism related to the ancestor of the bacterial domain to the haloarchaea. The bacterial form of LeuRS further underwent gene duplications and/or gene transfers within the haloarchaea, with some genomes possessing two distinct types of bacterial LeuRS. The cognate tRNALeu also reveals two distinct clusters for the haloarchaea; however, these tRNALeu clusters do not coincide with the groupings found in the LeuRS tree, revealing that LeuRS evolved independently of its cognate tRNA. Conclusions The study of leucyl-tRNA synthetase in haloarchaea illustrates the importance of gene transfer originating in lineages that went extinct since the transfer occurred. The haloarchaeal LeuRS and tRNALeu did not co-evolve. PMID:22694720

  17. U6 promoter-enhanced GlnUAG suppressor tRNA has higher suppression efficacy and can be stably expressed in 293 cells.

    PubMed

    Koukuntla, Ramesh; Ramsey, William J; Young, Won-Bin; Link, Charles J

    2013-02-01

    Almost one-third of all human genetic diseases are the result of nonsense mutations that can result in truncated proteins. Nonsense suppressor tRNAs (NSTs) were proposed as valuable tools for gene therapy of genetic diseases caused by premature termination codons (PTCs). Although various strategies have been adapted aiming to increase NST expression and efficacy, low suppression efficacies of NSTs and toxicity associated with stable expression of suppressor tRNAs have hampered the development of NST-mediated gene therapy. We have employed the U6 promoter to enhance Gln-Amber suppressor tRNA (GlnUAG) expression and to increase PTC suppression in mammalian cells. In an attempt to study the toxic effects of NSTs, a stable 293 cell line constitutively expressing a U6 promoter-enhanced GlnUAG tRNA was established. To examine whether any proteomic changes occurred in cells that constitutively express suppressor tRNA, whole cell proteins from cells with and without any suppressor tRNA expression were analyzed. The data obtained suggest that U6 promoter-enhanced GlnUAG tRNAs have higher suppression efficacies than multimers of the same suppressor tRNA without a U6 promoter. Proteomic analysis of cells constitutively expressing the GlnUAG suppressor tRNA indicates that stable expression of NSTs may not lead to significant read through of normal cellular proteins. Because most tRNAs have cell-specific differential expression, this technique will enable the expression of different kinds of suppressor tRNAs in various cell types at high, functionally relevant levels. The techniques developed in the present study may contribute to the further development of suppressor tRNA-mediated gene therapy. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Stimulation of Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis by Chloramphenicol in a rel+ Aminoacyl-Transfer Ribonucleic Acid Synthetase Mutant of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yegian, Charles D.; Vanderslice, Rebecca W.

    1971-01-01

    Escherichia coli strain 9D3 possesses a highly temperature-sensitive valyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) synthetase (EC 6.1.1.9). Since 9D3 is a rel+ strain, it cannot carry out net RNA synthesis at high temperature. A 100-μg amount of chloramphenicol (CAP) per ml added in the absence of valine cannot stimulate RNA synthesis. Either 300 μg of CAP or 100 μg of CAP plus 50 μg of valine per ml, however, promotes nearly maximal RNA synthesis. These results can be understood as follows. (i) Valyl-tRNA is required for net RNA synthesis, (ii) the synthetase lesion is incomplete, (iii) the rate of mutant acylation of tRNAval at high temperature is valine-dependent, and (iv) the CAP concentration determines the rate of residual protein synthesis. Data are also presented which demonstrate that the rate of net RNA synthesis can greatly increase long after the addition of CAP, if the amount of valyl-tRNA increases. PMID:4942766

  19. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase editing domain functions as a molecular rheostat to control codon ambiguity in Mycoplasma pathogens.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Palencia, Andrés; Lukk, Tiit; Li, Zhi; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida A; Cusack, Stephen; Martinis, Susan A; Boniecki, Michal T

    2013-03-05

    Mycoplasma leucyl-tRNA synthetases (LeuRSs) have been identified in which the connective polypeptide 1 (CP1) amino acid editing domain that clears mischarged tRNAs are missing (Mycoplasma mobile) or highly degenerate (Mycoplasma synoviae). Thus, these enzymes rely on a clearance pathway called pretransfer editing, which hydrolyzes misactivated aminoacyl-adenylate intermediate via a nebulous mechanism that has been controversial for decades. Even as the sole fidelity pathway for clearing amino acid selection errors in the pathogenic M. mobile, pretransfer editing is not robust enough to completely block mischarging of tRNA(Leu), resulting in codon ambiguity and statistical proteins. A high-resolution X-ray crystal structure shows that M. mobile LeuRS structurally overlaps with other LeuRS cores. However, when CP1 domains from different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and origins were fused to this common LeuRS core, surprisingly, pretransfer editing was enhanced. It is hypothesized that the CP1 domain evolved as a molecular rheostat to balance multiple functions. These include distal control of specificity and enzyme activity in the ancient canonical core, as well as providing a separate hydrolytic active site for clearing mischarged tRNA.

  20. Peptide Synthetase Gene in Trichoderma virens

    PubMed Central

    Wilhite, S. E.; Lumsden, R. D.; Straney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    Trichoderma virens (synonym, Gliocladium virens), a deuteromycete fungus, suppresses soilborne plant diseases caused by a number of fungi and is used as a biocontrol agent. Several traits that may contribute to the antagonistic interactions of T. virens with disease-causing fungi involve the production of peptide metabolites (e.g., the antibiotic gliotoxin and siderophores used for iron acquisition). We cloned a 5,056-bp partial cDNA encoding a putative peptide synthetase (Psy1) from T. virens using conserved motifs found within the adenylate domain of peptide synthetases. Sequence similarities with conserved motifs of the adenylation domain, acyl transfer, and two condensation domains support identification of the Psy1 gene as a gene that encodes a peptide synthetase. Disruption of the native Psy1 gene through gene replacement was used to identify the function of this gene. Psy1 disruptants produced normal amounts of gliotoxin but grew poorly under low-iron conditions, suggesting that Psy1 plays a role in siderophore production. Psy1 disruptants cannot produce the major T. virens siderophore dimerum acid, a dipetide of acylated Nδ-hydroxyornithine. Biocontrol activity against damping-off diseases caused by Pythium ultimum and Rhizoctonia solani was not reduced by the Psy1 disruption, suggesting that iron competition through dimerum acid production does not contribute significantly to disease suppression activity under the conditions used. PMID:11679326

  1. Protozoan ALKBH8 oxygenases display both DNA repair and tRNA modification activities.

    PubMed

    Zdżalik, Daria; Vågbø, Cathrine B; Kirpekar, Finn; Davydova, Erna; Puścian, Alicja; Maciejewska, Agnieszka M; Krokan, Hans E; Klungland, Arne; Tudek, Barbara; van den Born, Erwin; Falnes, Pål Ø

    2014-01-01

    The ALKBH family of Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate dependent oxygenases comprises enzymes that display sequence homology to AlkB from E. coli, a DNA repair enzyme that uses an oxidative mechanism to dealkylate methyl and etheno adducts on the nucleobases. Humans have nine different ALKBH proteins, ALKBH1-8 and FTO. Mammalian and plant ALKBH8 are tRNA hydroxylases targeting 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-modified uridine (mcm5U) at the wobble position of tRNAGly(UCC). In contrast, the genomes of some bacteria encode a protein with strong sequence homology to ALKBH8, and robust DNA repair activity was previously demonstrated for one such protein. To further explore this apparent functional duality of the ALKBH8 proteins, we have here enzymatically characterized a panel of such proteins, originating from bacteria, protozoa and mimivirus. All the enzymes showed DNA repair activity in vitro, but, interestingly, two protozoan ALKBH8s also catalyzed wobble uridine modification of tRNA, thus displaying a dual in vitro activity. Also, we found the modification status of tRNAGly(UCC) to be unaltered in an ALKBH8 deficient mutant of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, indicating that bacterial ALKBH8s have a function different from that of their eukaryotic counterparts. The present study provides new insights on the function and evolution of the ALKBH8 family of proteins.

  2. AlkB homolog 3-mediated tRNA demethylation promotes protein synthesis in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yuko; Ooshio, Ikumi; Fusamae, Yasuyuki; Kitae, Kaori; Kawaguchi, Megumi; Jingushi, Kentaro; Hase, Hiroaki; Harada, Kazuo; Hirata, Kazumasa; Tsujikawa, Kazutake

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian AlkB homolog (ALKBH) family of proteins possess a 2-oxoglutarate- and Fe(II)-dependent oxygenase domain. A similar domain in the Escherichia coli AlkB protein catalyzes the oxidative demethylation of 1-methyladenine (1-meA) and 3-methylcytosine (3-meC) in both DNA and RNA. AlkB homolog 3 (ALKBH3) was also shown to demethylate 1-meA and 3-meC (induced in single-stranded DNA and RNA by a methylating agent) to reverse the methylation damage and retain the integrity of the DNA/RNA. We previously reported the high expression of ALKBH3 in clinical tumor specimens and its involvement in tumor progression. In this study, we found that ALKBH3 effectively demethylated 1-meA and 3-meC within endogenously methylated RNA. Moreover, using highly purified recombinant ALKBH3, we identified N6-methyladenine (N6-meA) in mammalian transfer RNA (tRNA) as a novel ALKBH3 substrate. An in vitro translation assay showed that ALKBH3-demethylated tRNA significantly enhanced protein translation efficiency. In addition, ALKBH3 knockdown in human cancer cells impaired cellular proliferation and suppressed the nascent protein synthesis that is usually accompanied by accumulation of the methylated RNAs. Thus, our data highlight a novel role for ALKBH3 in tumor progression via RNA demethylation and subsequent protein synthesis promotion. PMID:28205560

  3. A Nuclear Import Pathway for a Protein Involved in tRNA Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Jonathan S.; Pemberton, Lucy F.; Blobel, Günter

    1997-01-01

    A limited number of transport factors, or karyopherins, ferry particular substrates between the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm. We identified the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene YDR395w/SXM1 as a potential karyopherin on the basis of limited sequence similarity to known karyopherins. From yeast cytosol, we isolated Sxm1p in complex with several potential import substrates. These substrates included Lhp1p, the yeast homologue of the human autoantigen La that has recently been shown to facilitate maturation of pre-tRNA, and three distinct ribosomal proteins, Rpl16p, Rpl25p, and Rpl34p. Further, we demonstrate that Lhp1p is specifically imported by Sxm1p. In the absence of Sxm1p, Lhp1p was mislocalized to the cytoplasm. Sxm1p and Lhp1p represent the karyopherin and a cognate substrate of a unique nuclear import pathway, one that operates upstream of a major pathway of pre-tRNA maturation, which itself is upstream of tRNA export in wild-type cells. In addition, through its association with ribosomal proteins, Sxm1p may have a role in coordinating ribosome biogenesis with tRNA processing. PMID:9412461

  4. The Selenocysteine tRNA STAF-Binding Region is Essential for Adequate Selenocysteine tRNA Status, Selenoprotein Expression and Early Age Survival of Mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    STAF is a transcription activating factor for a number of RNA Pol III-and RNA Pol II-dependent genes including the selenocysteine (Sec) tRNA gene. Here, the role of STAF in regulating expression of Sec tRNA and selenoproteins was examined in an invivo model. Heterozygous inactivation of the Staf gen...

  5. Pathogenic mechanism of a human mitochondrial tRNAPhe mutation associated with myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jiqiang; Roy, Hervé; Qin, Daoming; Rubio, Mary Anne T; Alfonzo, Juan D; Fredrick, Kurt; Ibba, Michael

    2007-09-25

    Human mitochondrial tRNA (hmt-tRNA) mutations are associated with a variety of diseases including mitochondrial myopathies, diabetes, encephalopathies, and deafness. Because the current understanding of the precise molecular mechanisms of these mutations is limited, there is no efficient method to treat their associated mitochondrial diseases. Here, we use a variety of known mutations in hmt-tRNA(Phe) to investigate the mechanisms that lead to malfunctions. We tested the impact of hmt-tRNA(Phe) mutations on aminoacylation, structure, and translation elongation-factor binding. The majority of the mutants were pleiotropic, exhibiting defects in aminoacylation, global structure, and elongation-factor binding. One notable exception was the G34A anticodon mutation of hmt-tRNA(Phe) (mitochondrial DNA mutation G611A), which is associated with MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibers). In vitro, the G34A mutation decreases aminoacylation activity by 100-fold, but does not affect global folding or recognition by elongation factor. Furthermore, G34A hmt-tRNA(Phe) does not undergo adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing, ruling out miscoding as a possible mechanism for mitochondrial malfunction. To improve the aminoacylation state of the mutant tRNA, we modified the tRNA binding domain of the nucleus-encoded human mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase, which aminoacylates hmt-tRNA(Phe) with cognate phenylalanine. This variant enzyme displayed significantly improved aminoacylation efficiency for the G34A mutant, suggesting a general strategy to treat certain classes of mitochondrial diseases by modification of the corresponding nuclear gene.

  6. One ancestor for two codes viewed from the perspective of two complementary modes of tRNA aminoacylation

    PubMed Central

    Rodin, Andrei S; Szathmáry, Eörs; Rodin, Sergei N

    2009-01-01

    Background The genetic code is brought into action by 20 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. These enzymes are evenly divided into two classes (I and II) that recognize tRNAs from the minor and major groove sides of the acceptor stem, respectively. We have reported recently that: (1) ribozymic precursors of the synthetases seem to have used the same two sterically mirror modes of tRNA recognition, (2) having these two modes might have helped in preventing erroneous aminoacylation of ancestral tRNAs with complementary anticodons, yet (3) the risk of confusion for the presumably earliest pairs of complementarily encoded amino acids had little to do with anticodons. Accordingly, in this communication we focus on the acceptor stem. Results Our main result is the emergence of a palindrome structure for the acceptor stem's common ancestor, reconstructed from the phylogenetic trees of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. In parallel, for pairs of ancestral tRNAs with complementary anticodons, we present updated evidence of concerted complementarity of the second bases in the acceptor stems. These two results suggest that the first pairs of "complementary" amino acids that were engaged in primordial coding, such as Gly and Ala, could have avoided erroneous aminoacylation if and only if the acceptor stems of their adaptors were recognized from the same, major groove, side. The class II protein synthetases then inherited this "primary preference" from isofunctional ribozymes. Conclusion Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the genetic code per se (the one associated with the anticodons) and the operational code of aminoacylation (associated with the acceptor) diverged from a common ancestor that probably began developing before translation. The primordial advantage of linking some amino acids (most likely glycine and alanine) to the ancestral acceptor stem may have been selective retention in a protocell surrounded by a leaky membrane for use in nucleotide and coenzyme

  7. Purification of glutathionylspermidine and trypanothione synthetases from Crithidia fasciculata.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, K.; Nadeau, K.; Bradley, M.; Walsh, C.; Fairlamb, A. H.

    1992-01-01

    Two enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the trypanosomatid-specific dithiol trypanothione-glutathionylspermidine (Gsp) synthetase and trypanothione (TSH) synthetase--have been identified and purified individually from Crithidia fasciculata. The Gsp synthetase has been purified 93-fold and the TSH synthetase 52-fold to apparent homogeneity from a single DEAE fraction that contained both activities. This constitutes the first indication that the enzymatic conversion of two glutathione molecules and one spermidine to the N1,N8-bis(glutathionyl)spermidine (TSH) occurs in two discrete enzymatic steps. Gsp synthetase, which has a kcat of 600/min, shows no detectable TSH synthetase activity, whereas TSH synthetase does not make any detectable Gsp and has a kcat of 75/min. The 90-kDa Gsp synthetase and 82-kDa TSH synthetase are separable on phenyl Superose and remain separated on gel filtration columns in high salt (0.8 M NaCl). Active complexes can be formed under low to moderate salt conditions (0.0-0.15 M NaCl), consistent with a functional complex in vivo. PMID:1304372

  8. Dexamethasone regulates glutamine synthetase expression in rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase by glucocorticoids in rat skeletal muscles was studied. Administration of dexamethasone strikingly enhanced glutamine synthetase activity in plantaris and soleus muscles. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked to a significant extent by orally administered RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves dramatically increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. The induction of glutamine synthetase was selective in that glutaminase activity of soleus and plantaris muscles was not increased by dexamethasone. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment resulted in only a small increase in glutamine synthetase activity in the heart. Accordingly, there was only a slight change in glutamine synthetase mRNA level in this tissue. Thus, glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase gene expression in rat muscles at the transcriptional level via interaction with intracellular glutamine production by muscle and to mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  9. Prediction of uridine modifications in tRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Bharat; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2014-10-02

    In past number of methods have been developed for predicting post-translational modifications in proteins. In contrast, limited attempt has been made to understand post-transcriptional modifications. Recently it has been shown that tRNA modifications play direct role in the genome structure and codon usage. This study is an attempt to understand kingdom-wise tRNA modifications particularly uridine modifications (UMs), as majority of modifications are uridine-derived. A three-steps strategy has been applied to develop an efficient method for the prediction of UMs. In the first step, we developed a common prediction model for all the kingdoms using a dataset from MODOMICS-2008. Support Vector Machine (SVM) based prediction models were developed and evaluated by five-fold cross-validation technique. Different approaches were applied and found that a hybrid approach of binary and structural information achieved highest Area under the curve (AUC) of 0.936. In the second step, we used newly added tRNA sequences (as independent dataset) of MODOMICS-2012 for the kingdom-wise prediction performance evaluation of previously developed (in the first step) common model and achieved performances between the AUC of 0.910 to 0.949. In the third and last step, we used different datasets from MODOMICS-2012 for the kingdom-wise individual prediction models development and achieved performances between the AUC of 0.915 to 0.987. The hybrid approach is efficient not only to predict kingdom-wise modifications but also to classify them into two most prominent UMs: Pseudouridine (Y) and Dihydrouridine (D). A webserver called tRNAmod (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/trnamod/) has been developed, which predicts UMs from both tRNA sequences and whole genome.

  10. In vitro effects of metal pollution on Mediterranean sponges: species-specific inhibition of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Saby, Emilie; Justesen, Just; Kelve, Merike; Uriz, Maria J

    2009-09-14

    Heavy metals are among the main pollutants of the Mediterranean coastal waters where they can harm sublittoral biota. Filter-feeder, long-living invertebrates that remain fixed to the rocky bottom, such as sponges, are good targets to metal contamination studies since they may be exposed to potential low levels of contamination for years. Several molecular and biochemical mechanisms are developed by sponges to counteract the effects of noxious metals. As a result, some of the normal cell functions can be altered. Here we show that the main heavy metals that can be found in marine sublittoral waters (i.e. copper, iron, zinc and manganese) may alter the immune system of sponges by inhibiting the activity of the sponge 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (2-5A synthetase), which is an enzyme involved in the immune system of vertebrates. We selected the widespread Mediterranean sponges Geodia cydonium, Crella elegans and Chondrosia reniformis for the study. They exerted a high 2-5A synthetase activity and gave a unique profile of 2',5'-oligoadenylate product production. Several metals alter the 2-5A synthetase activity differently, in a species-specific manner. 2-5A synthetases from G. cydonium and C. elegans were inhibited by all the metal ions assayed. However, in C. reniformis, 2-5A synthetase was either activated or inhibited by the same ions depending on their final concentrations. Like in humans, metal contamination may have an effect on the OAS activity and thus it might alter the sponge immune system. However, since the effects are species-specific, 2-5A synthetase cannot be used as general biomarker of metal pollutions.

  11. Elevated levels of interferon-induced 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase in generalized persistent lymphadenopathy and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Read, S E; Williams, B R; Coates, R A; Evans, W K; Fanning, M M; Garvey, M B; Shepherd, F A

    1985-09-01

    The levels of the 2'-5' oligoadenylate enzyme synthetase in extracts of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from individuals with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex (ARC) were measured and compared with synthetase levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMs) from healthy heterosexual and homosexual controls. The mean basal synthetase level in heterosexual and homosexual controls was 14 +/- 13 and 12 +/- 9 pmol per hr/10(5) PBMs, respectively. Thirteen individuals with AIDS had a mean basal level of 129 +/- 75 pmol. Serial levels were persistently elevated in six of these individuals over a one- to 10-month period. Twelve of the 13 individuals had antibodies to human T cell lymphotrophic virus-III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV). Thirty-three individuals with ARC had a mean basal synthetase level of 68 +/- 84 pmol. Thirty-two of the 33 had antibodies to HTLV-III/LAV. Eleven (33%) have had consistently normal synthetase levels (less than 2 SD above the mean for the homosexual controls, i.e., 30 pmol) over a three- to nine-month follow-up period. Fourteen (42%) had persistently elevated levels over the same period; four (29%) of these developed AIDS during the follow-up period. Eight have had fluctuating levels but have remained clinically well. These studies suggest that persistently elevated synthetase levels in individuals with ARC and antibodies to HTLV-III/LAV indicate progressive virus-induced disease activity. Elevated synthetase levels may be an important prognostic indicator of increased risk of progression to AIDS.

  12. The effect of chemical modification of 3-(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)uridine on tRNA function.

    PubMed

    Friedman, S

    1979-08-10

    The minor base 3-(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)uridine (acp3U) in Escherichia coli tRNAPhe was acylated with the N-hydroxysuccinimide esters of acetic, phenoxy-acetic, and naphthoxyacetic acid, as well as the ester of 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl (dansyl)-glycine. The derivatives of tRNAPhe formed were all capable of accepting phenylalanine. There were only minor effects on the kinetic parameters of these derivatives for E. coli phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase. There was no effect on the ability of tRNAPhe to participate in poly(U)- or poly(ACU)-directed polypeptide synthesis or in the poly(U)-stimulated binding to E. coli ribosomes. The rate of photodynamic cross-linking of 4-Srd 8 to Cyd 13 was decreased in tRNAs containing the acetyl and dansyl-glycyl derivatives of acp3U, indicating that acylation of this base may perturb the tertiary structure of the tRNA. This base in tRNAPhe does not appear to play any role in the known biological functions of tRNAPhe.

  13. Specificity determinants for the two tRNA substrates of the cyclodipeptide synthase AlbC from Streptomyces noursei

    PubMed Central

    Moutiez, Mireille; Seguin, Jérôme; Fonvielle, Matthieu; Belin, Pascal; Jacques, Isabelle Béatrice; Favry, Emmanuel; Arthur, Michel; Gondry, Muriel

    2014-01-01

    Cyclodipeptide synthases (CDPSs) use two aminoacyl-tRNA substrates in a sequential ping-pong mechanism to form a cyclodipeptide. The crystal structures of three CDPSs have been determined and all show a Rossmann-fold domain similar to the catalytic domain of class-I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs). Structural features and mutational analyses however suggest that CDPSs and aaRSs interact differently with their tRNA substrates. We used AlbC from Streptomyces noursei that mainly produces cyclo(l-Phe-l-Leu) to investigate the interaction of a CDPS with its substrates. We demonstrate that Phe-tRNAPhe is the first substrate accommodated by AlbC. Its binding to AlbC is dependent on basic residues located in the helix α4 that form a basic patch at the surface of the protein. AlbC does not use all of the Leu-tRNALeu isoacceptors as a second substrate. We show that the G1-C72 pair of the acceptor stem is essential for the recognition of the second substrate. Substitution of D163 located in the loop α6–α7 or D205 located in the loop β6–α8 affected Leu-tRNALeu isoacceptors specificity, suggesting the involvement of these residues in the binding of the second substrate. This is the first demonstration that the two substrates of CDPSs are accommodated in different binding sites. PMID:24782519

  14. tRNA hopping: enhancement by an expanded anticodon.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, M; Gesteland, R F; Atkins, J F

    1989-01-01

    At a low level wild-type tRNA(1Val) inserts a single amino acid (valine) for the five nucleotide sequence GUGUA which has overlapping valine codons. Mutants of tRNA(1Val) with an insertion of A or U between positions 34 and 35 of their anticodons have enhanced reading of the quintuplet sequences. We propose that this decoding occurs by a hopping mechanism rather than by quintuplet pairing. Such hopping involves disengagement of the paired codon and anticodon with the mRNA slipping two (or more) bases along the ribosomal--peptidyl tRNA complex and subsequently re-pairing at a second codon--the landing site. The mutant with the anticodon sequence 3'CAAU5' 'hops' over the stop codon in the mRNA sequence GUG UAA GUU with the insertion of a single amino acid (valine). In contrast, in reading the same sequence, the mutant with the anticodon 3'CAUU5' hops onto the stop with the insertion of two valine residues. It is likely that in some instances of hopping alternate anticodon bases are used for the initial pairing and at the landing site. PMID:2686986

  15. Interaction of tRNA with antitumor polyamine analogues.

    PubMed

    N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Ahmed Ouameur, A; Thomas, T; Thomas, T J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2009-08-01

    We studied the interaction between tRNA and three polyamine analogues (1,11-diamino-4,8-diazaundecane.4HCl (333), 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane.4HCl (BE-333), and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane.5HCl (BE-3333)) using FTIR, UV-visible, and CD spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic evidence showed that polyamine analogues bound tRNA via guanine N7, adenine, uracil O2, and the backbone phosphate (PO2-) groups, while the most reactive sites for biogenic polyamines were guanine N7/O6, adenine N7, uracil O2, and sugar 2'-OH groups as well as the backbone phosphate group. The binding constants of polyamine analogue-tRNA recognition were lower than those of the biogenic polyamine-tRNA complexes, with K333 = 2.8 (+/-0.5) x 10(4), K(BE-333) = 3.7 (+/-0.7) x 10(4), K(BE-3333) = 4.0 (+/-0.9) x 10(4), K(spm) = 8.7 (+/-0.9) x 10(5), K(spd) = 6.1 (+/-0.7) x 10(5), and K(put) = 1.0 (+/-0.3) x 10(5) mol/L. tRNA remained in the A-family conformation; however, it aggregated at high polyamine analogue concentrations.

  16. Structural analysis of the active site geometry of N5-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M; Firestine, Steven M

    2008-12-16

    N(5)-Carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (N(5)-CAIR synthetase) converts 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR), MgATP, and bicarbonate into N(5)-CAIR, MgADP, and P(i). The enzyme is required for de novo purine biosynthesis in microbes yet is not found in humans suggesting that it represents an ideal and unexplored target for antimicrobial drug design. Here we report the X-ray structures of N(5)-CAIR synthetase from Escherichia coli with either MgATP or MgADP/P(i) bound in the active site cleft. These structures, determined to 1.6-A resolution, provide detailed information regarding the active site geometry before and after ATP hydrolysis. In both structures, two magnesium ions are observed. Each of these is octahedrally coordinated, and the carboxylate side chain of Glu238 bridges them. For the structure of the MgADP/P(i) complex, crystals were grown in the presence of AIR and MgATP. No electron density was observed for AIR, and the electron density corresponding to the nucleotide clearly revealed the presence of ADP and P(i) rather than ATP. The bound P(i) shifts by approximately 3 A relative to the gamma-phosphoryl group of ATP and forms electrostatic interactions with the side chains of Arg242 and His244. Since the reaction mechanism of N(5)-CAIR synthetase is believed to proceed via a carboxyphosphate intermediate, we propose that the location of the inorganic phosphate represents the binding site for stabilization of this reactive species. Using the information derived from the two structures reported here, coupled with molecular modeling, we propose a catalytic mechanism for N(5)-CAIR synthetase.

  17. Regulation of a glutamyl-tRNA synthetase by the heme status

    PubMed Central

    Levicán, Gloria; Katz, Assaf; de Armas, Merly; Núñez, Harold; Orellana, Omar

    2007-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA (Glu-tRNA), formed by Glu-tRNA synthetase (GluRS), is a substrate for protein biosynthesis and tetrapyrrole formation by the C5 pathway. In this route Glu-tRNA is transformed to δ-aminolevulinic acid, the universal precursor of tetrapyrroles (e.g., heme and chlorophyll) by the action of Glu-tRNA reductase (GluTR) and glutamate semialdehyde aminotransferase. GluTR is a target of feedback regulation by heme. In Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, an acidophilic bacterium that expresses two GluRSs (GluRS1 and GluRS2) with different tRNA specificity, the intracellular heme level varies depending on growth conditions. Under high heme requirement for respiration increased levels of GluRS and GluTR are observed. Strikingly, when intracellular heme is in excess, the cells respond by a dramatic decrease of GluRS activity and the level of GluTR. The recombinant GluRS1 enzyme is inhibited in vitro by hemin, but NADPH restores its activity. These results suggest that GluRS plays a major role in regulating the cellular level of heme. PMID:17360620

  18. Substrate tRNA Recognition Mechanism of Eubacterial tRNA (m1A58) Methyltransferase (TrmI)*

    PubMed Central

    Takuma, Hiroyuki; Ushio, Natsumi; Minoji, Masayuki; Kazayama, Ai; Shigi, Naoki; Hirata, Akira; Tomikawa, Chie; Ochi, Anna; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    TrmI generates N1-methyladenosine at position 58 (m1A58) in tRNA. The Thermus thermophilus tRNAPhe transcript was methylated efficiently by T. thermophilus TrmI, whereas the yeast tRNAPhe transcript was poorly methylated. Fourteen chimeric tRNA transcripts derived from these two tRNAs revealed that TrmI recognized the combination of aminoacyl stem, variable region, and T-loop. This was confirmed by 10 deletion tRNA variants: TrmI methylated transcripts containing the aminoacyl stem, variable region, and T-arm. The requirement for the T-stem itself was confirmed by disrupting the T-stem. Disrupting the interaction between T- and D-arms accelerated the methylation, suggesting that this disruption is included in part of the reaction. Experiments with 17 point mutant transcripts elucidated the positive sequence determinants C56, purine 57, A58, and U60. Replacing A58 with inosine and 2-aminopurine completely abrogated methylation, demonstrating that the 6-amino group in A58 is recognized by TrmI. T. thermophilus tRNAGGUThrGGUThr contains C60 instead of U60. The tRNAGGUThr transcript was poorly methylated by TrmI, and replacing C60 with U increased the methylation, consistent with the point mutation experiments. A gel shift assay revealed that tRNAGGUThr had a low affinity for TrmI than tRNAPhe. Furthermore, analysis of tRNAGGUThr purified from the trmI gene disruptant strain revealed that the other modifications in tRNA accelerated the formation of m1A58 by TrmI. Moreover, nucleoside analysis of tRNAGGUThr from the wild-type strain indicated that less than 50% of tRNAGGUThr contained m1A58. Thus, the results from the in vitro experiments were confirmed by the in vivo methylation patterns. PMID:25593312

  19. Site Directed Mutagenesis of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Glutathione Synthetase Produces an Enzyme with Homoglutathione Synthetase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dworeck, Tamara; Zimmermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Three different His-tagged, mutant forms of the fission yeast glutathione synthetase (GSH2) were derived by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in E. coli DH5α and affinity purified in a two-step procedure. Analysis of enzyme activity showed that it was possible to shift the substrate specificity of GSH2 from Gly (km 0,19; wild-type) to β-Ala or Ser. One mutation (substitution of Ile471, Cy472 to Met and Val and Ala 485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro) increased the affinity of GSH2 for β-Ala (km 0,07) and lowered the affinity for Gly (km 0,83), which is a characteristic of the enzyme homoglutathione synthetase found in plants. Substitution of Ala485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro only, increased instead the affinity of GSH2 for Ser (km 0,23) as a substrate, while affinity to Gly was preserved (km 0,12). This provides a new biosynthetic pathway for hydroxymethyl glutathione, which is known to be synthesized from glutathione and Ser in a reaction catalysed by carboxypeptidase Y. The reported findings provide further insight into how specific amino acids positioned in the GSH2 active site facilitate the recognition of different amino acid substrates, furthermore they support the evolutionary theory that homoglutathione synthetase evolved from glutathione synthetase by a single gene duplication event. PMID:23091597

  20. In vivo modification of Azotobacter chroococcum glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Centeno, M C; Cejudo, F J; Paneque, A

    1994-03-15

    A monospecific anti-(glutamine synthetase) antibody raised against glutamine synthetase of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 immunoreacted with glutamine synthetase from the N2-fixing heterotrophic bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum. In Western-blotting experiments this antibody recognized a single protein of a molecular mass of 59 kDa corresponding to glutamine synthetase subunit. This protein was in vivo-labelled in response to addition of ammonium, both [3H]adenine and H(3)32PO4 preincubation of the cells being equally effective. Nevertheless, the amount of glutamine synthetase present in A. chroococcum was independent of the available nitrogen source. Modified, inactive glutamine synthetase was re-activated by treatment with snake-venom phosphodiesterase but not by alkaline phosphatase. L-Methionine-DL-sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, prevented the enzyme from being covalently modified. We conclude that, in A. chroococcum, glutamine synthetase is adenylylated in response to ammonium and that for the modification to take place ammonium must be metabolized.

  1. In vivo modification of Azotobacter chroococcum glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Centeno, M C; Cejudo, F J; Paneque, A

    1994-01-01

    A monospecific anti-(glutamine synthetase) antibody raised against glutamine synthetase of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 immunoreacted with glutamine synthetase from the N2-fixing heterotrophic bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum. In Western-blotting experiments this antibody recognized a single protein of a molecular mass of 59 kDa corresponding to glutamine synthetase subunit. This protein was in vivo-labelled in response to addition of ammonium, both [3H]adenine and H(3)32PO4 preincubation of the cells being equally effective. Nevertheless, the amount of glutamine synthetase present in A. chroococcum was independent of the available nitrogen source. Modified, inactive glutamine synthetase was re-activated by treatment with snake-venom phosphodiesterase but not by alkaline phosphatase. L-Methionine-DL-sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, prevented the enzyme from being covalently modified. We conclude that, in A. chroococcum, glutamine synthetase is adenylylated in response to ammonium and that for the modification to take place ammonium must be metabolized. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7908189

  2. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.].

  3. Characterization of Cereulide Synthetase, a Toxin-Producing Macromolecular Machine

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Diego A.; Magarvey, Nathan A.; Schmeing, T. Martin

    2015-01-01

    Cereulide synthetase is a two-protein nonribosomal peptide synthetase system that produces a potent emetic toxin in virulent strains of Bacillus cereus. The toxin cereulide is a depsipeptide, as it consists of alternating aminoacyl and hydroxyacyl residues. The hydroxyacyl residues are derived from keto acid substrates, which cereulide synthetase selects and stereospecifically reduces with imbedded ketoreductase domains before incorporating them into the growing depsipeptide chain. We present an in vitro biochemical characterization of cereulide synthetase. We investigate the kinetics and side chain specificity of α-keto acid selection, evaluate the requirement of an MbtH-like protein for adenylation domain activity, assay the effectiveness of vinylsulfonamide inhibitors on ester-adding modules, perform NADPH turnover experiments and evaluate in vitro depsipeptide biosynthesis. This work also provides biochemical insight into depsipeptide-synthesizing nonribosomal peptide synthetases responsible for other bioactive molecules such as valinomycin, antimycin and kutzneride. PMID:26042597

  4. Loss of a Conserved tRNA Anticodon Modification Perturbs Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    López, Ana; Castelló, María José; Gil, María José; Zheng, Bo; Chen, Peng; Vera, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    tRNA is the most highly modified class of RNA species, and modifications are found in tRNAs from all organisms that have been examined. Despite their vastly different chemical structures and their presence in different tRNAs, occurring in different locations in tRNA, the biosynthetic pathways of the majority of tRNA modifications include a methylation step(s). Recent discoveries have revealed unprecedented complexity in the modification patterns of tRNA, their regulation and function, suggesting that each modified nucleoside in tRNA may have its own specific function. However, in plants, our knowledge on the role of individual tRNA modifications and how they are regulated is very limited. In a genetic screen designed to identify factors regulating disease resistance and activation of defenses in Arabidopsis, we identified SUPPRESSOR OF CSB3 9 (SCS9). Our results reveal SCS9 encodes a tRNA methyltransferase that mediates the 2´-O-ribose methylation of selected tRNA species in the anticodon loop. These SCS9-mediated tRNA modifications enhance during the course of infection with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000, and lack of such tRNA modification, as observed in scs9 mutants, severely compromise plant immunity against the same pathogen without affecting the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway which regulates plant immune responses. Our results support a model that gives importance to the control of certain tRNA modifications for mounting an effective immune response in Arabidopsis, and therefore expands the repertoire of molecular components essential for an efficient disease resistance response. PMID:26492405

  5. FRET monitoring of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase.

    PubMed

    Alfermann, Jonas; Sun, Xun; Mayerthaler, Florian; Morrell, Thomas E; Dehling, Eva; Volkmann, Gerrit; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Yang, Haw; Mootz, Henning D

    2017-09-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are multidomain enzyme templates for the synthesis of bioactive peptides. Large-scale conformational changes during peptide assembly are obvious from crystal structures, yet their dynamics and coupling to catalysis are poorly understood. We have designed an NRPS FRET sensor to monitor, in solution and in real time, the adoption of the productive transfer conformation between phenylalanine-binding adenylation (A) and peptidyl-carrier-protein domains of gramicidin synthetase I from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. The presence of ligands, substrates or intermediates induced a distinct fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) readout, which was pinpointed to the population of specific conformations or, in two cases, mixtures of conformations. A pyrophosphate switch and lysine charge sensors control the domain alternation of the A domain. The phenylalanine-thioester and phenylalanine-AMP products constitute a mechanism of product inhibition and release that is involved in ordered assembly-line peptide biosynthesis. Our results represent insights from solution measurements into the conformational dynamics of the catalytic cycle of NRPSs.

  6. The microsomal dicarboxylyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Vamecq, J; de Hoffmann, E; Van Hoof, F

    1985-01-01

    Dicarboxylic acids are products of the omega-oxidation of monocarboxylic acids. We demonstrate that in rat liver dicarboxylic acids (C5-C16) can be converted into their CoA esters by a dicarboxylyl-CoA synthetase. During this activation ATP, which cannot be replaced by GTP, is converted into AMP and PPi, both acting as feedback inhibitors of the reaction. Thermolabile at 37 degrees C, and optimally active at pH 6.5, dicarboxylyl-CoA synthetase displays the highest activity on dodecanedioic acid (2 micromol/min per g of liver). Cell-fractionation studies indicate that this enzyme belongs to the hepatic microsomal fraction. Investigations about the fate of dicarboxylyl-CoA esters disclosed the existence of an oxidase, which could be measured by monitoring the production of H2O2. In our assay conditions this H2O2 production is dependent on and closely follows the CoA consumption. It appears that the chain-length specificity of the handling of dicarboxylic acids by this catabolic pathway (activation to acyl-CoA and oxidation with H2O2 production) parallels the pattern of the degradation of exogenous dicarboxylic acids in vivo. PMID:4062873

  7. An alanine tRNA gene cluster from Nephila clavipes.

    PubMed

    Luciano, E; Candelas, G C

    1996-06-01

    We report the sequence of a 2.3-kb genomic DNA fragment from the orb-web spider, Nephila clavipes (Nc). The fragment contains four regions of high homology to tRNA(Ala). The members of this irregularly spaced cluster of genes are oriented in the same direction and have the same anticodon (GCA), but their sequence differs at several positions. Initiation and termination signals, as well as consensus intragenic promoter sequences characteristic of tRNA genes, have been identified in all genes. tRNA(Ala) are involved in the regulation of the fibroin synthesis in the large ampullate Nc glands.

  8. tRNA concentration fine tunes protein solubility.

    PubMed

    Fedyunin, Ivan; Lehnhardt, Lothar; Böhmer, Nadine; Kaufmann, Paul; Zhang, Gong; Ignatova, Zoya

    2012-09-21

    Clusters of codons pairing to low-abundance tRNAs synchronize the translation with co-translational folding of single domains in multidomain proteins. Although proven with some examples, the impact of the ribosomal speed on the folding and solubility on a global, cell-wide level remains elusive. Here we show that upregulation of three low-abundance tRNAs in Escherichia coli increased the aggregation propensity of several cellular proteins as a result of an accelerated elongation rate. Intriguingly, alterations in the concentration of the natural tRNA pool compromised the solubility of various chaperones consequently rendering the solubility of some chaperone-dependent proteins.

  9. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mirando, Adam C; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K; Ebert, Alicia M; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S

    2015-08-14

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans.

  10. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Mirando, Adam C.; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F.; Baldor, Linda C.; Howe, Alan K.; Ebert, Alicia M.; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M.; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans. PMID:26271225

  11. Transfer RNA and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Jamie A.; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Robey-Bond, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) genes are “hotspots” for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase), mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers), and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing). Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease. PMID:24917879

  12. Evolutionary constraints on the plastid tRNA set decoding methionine and isoleucine

    PubMed Central

    Alkatib, Sibah; Fleischmann, Tobias T.; Scharff, Lars B.; Bock, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    The plastid (chloroplast) genomes of seed plants typically encode 30 tRNAs. Employing wobble and superwobble mechanisms, most codon boxes are read by only one or two tRNA species. The reduced set of plastid tRNAs follows the evolutionary trend of organellar genomes to shrink in size and coding capacity. A notable exception is the AUN codon box specifying methionine and isoleucine, which is decoded by four tRNA species in nearly all seed plants. However, three of these four tRNA genes were lost from the genomes of some parasitic plastid-containing lineages, possibly suggesting that less than four tRNA species could be sufficient to decode the triplets in the AUN box. To test this hypothesis, we have performed knockout experiments for the four AUN-decoding tRNAs in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plastids. We find that all four tRNA genes are essential under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions, possibly suggesting tRNA import into plastids of parasitic plastid-bearing species. Phylogenetic analysis of the four plastid tRNA genes reveals striking conservation of all those bacterial features that are involved in discrimination between the different tRNA species containing CAU anticodons. PMID:22553362

  13. Dynamics of Hydrated tRNA on Nanodiamond Surface Studied by Quasi-elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhindsa, Gurpreet; Mochalin, Vadym N.; O'Neill, Hugh; Gogotsi, Yury; Chu, Xiang Qiang

    2014-03-01

    Diamond is an outstanding material in many aspects, and nanodiamond (ND) inherits most of the superior properties of bulk diamond and delivers them at the nanoscale. ND has excellent properties that can be applied in biomedical field such as a good platform for drug delivery. In this study, we show that hydrated tRNA can be adsorbed on the surfaces of nanodiamonds and further demonstrate specific properties in its dynamics. We investigate the dynamics of the system by Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. The dynamics of hydrated tRNA on ND surfaces exhibits a logarithmic-like decay within the time range of 10 ps to 1 ns, which has also been observed in the freestanding proteins and other biopolymers. We further compare the dynamics of tRNA hydrated with D2O on ND surface with that of freestanding hydrated tRNA molecules. Our results show that the relaxational dynamics of tRNA on ND surface is much faster than that of the freestanding tRNA molecules. This gives the hint that the folded states of tRNA is modified by ND surfaces to engage faster dynamics. The difference in the dynamics of the hydration water modified by ND is another possible reason which causes the faster dynamics in tRNA on ND surface.

  14. Towards a comprehensive picture of alloacceptor tRNA remolding in metazoan mitochondrial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Sahyoun, Abdullah H.; Hölzer, Martin; Jühling, Frank; Höner zu Siederdissen, Christian; Al-Arab, Marwa; Tout, Kifah; Marz, Manja; Middendorf, Martin; Stadler, Peter F.; Bernt, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Remolding of tRNAs is a well-documented process in mitochondrial genomes that changes the identity of a tRNA. It involves a duplication of a tRNA gene, a mutation that changes the anticodon and the loss of the ancestral tRNA gene. The net effect is a functional tRNA that is more closely related to tRNAs of a different alloacceptor family than to tRNAs with the same anticodon in related species. Beyond being of interest for understanding mitochondrial tRNA function and evolution, tRNA remolding events can lead to artifacts in the annotation of mitogenomes and thus in studies of mitogenomic evolution. Therefore, it is important to identify and catalog these events. Here we describe novel methods to detect tRNA remolding in large-scale data sets and apply them to survey tRNA remolding throughout animal evolution. We identify several novel remolding events in addition to the ones previously mentioned in the literature. A detailed analysis of these remoldings showed that many of them are derived from ancestral events. PMID:26227972

  15. Novel Hybrid Virtual Screening Protocol Based on Molecular Docking and Structure-Based Pharmacophore for Discovery of Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors as Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi; He, Gu; Jiang, Qinglin; Han, Bo; Peng, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Methione tRNA synthetase (MetRS) is an essential enzyme involved in protein biosynthesis in all living organisms and is a potential antibacterial target. In the current study, the structure-based pharmacophore (SBP)-guided method has been suggested to generate a comprehensive pharmacophore of MetRS based on fourteen crystal structures of MetRS-inhibitor complexes. In this investigation, a hybrid protocol of a virtual screening method, comprised of pharmacophore model-based virtual screening (PBVS), rigid and flexible docking-based virtual screenings (DBVS), is used for retrieving new MetRS inhibitors from commercially available chemical databases. This hybrid virtual screening approach was then applied to screen the Specs (202,408 compounds) database, a structurally diverse chemical database. Fifteen hit compounds were selected from the final hits and shifted to experimental studies. These results may provide important information for further research of novel MetRS inhibitors as antibacterial agents. PMID:23839093

  16. Overexpression of human fatty acid transport protein 2/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) reveals distinct patterns of trafficking of exogenous fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Melton, Elaina M; Cerny, Ronald L; DiRusso, Concetta C; Black, Paul N

    2013-11-01

    In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4h. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The trafficking of exogenous C16:0 and C22:6 into PA was significant where there was 6.9- and 5.3-fold increased incorporation, respectively, over the control; C18:3 and C20:4 also trended to increase in the PA pool while there were no changes for C18:1 and C18:2. The trafficking of C18:3 into PC and PI trended higher and approached significance. In the case of C20:4, expression of

  17. Overexpression of human fatty acid transport protein 2/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) reveals distinct patterns of trafficking of exogenous fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, Elaina M.; Cerny, Ronald L.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Black, Paul N.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Roles of FATP2 in fatty acid transport/activation contribute to lipid homeostasis. •Use of 13C- and D-labeled fatty acids provide novel insights into FATP2 function. •FATP2-dependent trafficking of FA into phospholipids results in distinctive profiles. •FATP2 functions in the transport and activation pathways for exogenous fatty acids. -- Abstract: In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4 h. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The

  18. Overexpression of Human Fatty Acid Transport Protein 2/Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) Reveals Distinct Patterns of Trafficking of Exogenous Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Elaina M.; Cerny, Ronald L.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Black, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4hr. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The trafficking of exogenous C16:0 and C22:6 into PA was significant where there was 6.9- and 5.3-fold increased incorporation, respectively, over the control; C18:3 and C20:4 also trended to increase in the PA pool while there were no changes for C18:1 and C18:2. The trafficking of C18:3 into PC and PI trended higher and approached significance. In the case of C20:4, expression of

  19. Antitumor/Antifungal Celecoxib Derivative AR-12 is a Non-Nucleoside Inhibitor of the ANL-Family Adenylating Enzyme Acetyl CoA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AR-12/OSU-03012 is an antitumor celecoxib-derivative that has progressed to Phase I clinical trial as an anticancer agent and has activity against a number of infectious agents including fungi, bacteria and viruses. However, the mechanism of these activities has remained unclear. Based on a chemical-genetic profiling approach in yeast, we have found that AR-12 is an ATP-competitive, time-dependent inhibitor of yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase. AR-12-treated fungal cells show phenotypes consistent with the genetic reduction of acetyl CoA synthetase activity, including induction of autophagy, decreased histone acetylation, and loss of cellular integrity. In addition, AR-12 is a weak inhibitor of human acetyl CoA synthetase ACCS2. Acetyl CoA synthetase activity is essential in many fungi and parasites. In contrast, acetyl CoA is primarily synthesized by an alternate enzyme, ATP-citrate lyase, in mammalian cells. Taken together, our results indicate that AR-12 is a non-nucleoside acetyl CoA synthetase inhibitor and that acetyl CoA synthetase may be a feasible antifungal drug target. PMID:27088128

  20. Trans-acting RNA inhibits tRNA suppressor activity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Attardi, Domenica Gandini; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P

    2002-01-01

    We constructed two aptamers, each of which contains a 7-nt-long loop complementary to the anticodon loop of a suppressor tRNA. One of these aptamers can form a stable bimolecular complex with the suppressor tRNA in vitro and protects the 7 nt in the suppressor's anticodon loop from RNase S1. An Escherichia coli strain, carrying an amber mutation in the lac Z gene, produces beta-galactosidase only if the suppressor is present; the aptamer's coexpression in the cell inhibits the activity of the suppressor tRNA. Moreover, in E. coli extract, the aptamer partially inhibits the read-through of the stop codon on the part of the suppressor tRNA. These results point to a novel strategy that need not be limited to the suppressor tRNA. By constructing appropriate inducible aptamers, it may well be possible to effectively control translation in vivo. PMID:12166645

  1. The emerging complexity of the tRNA world: mammalian tRNAs beyond protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, Paul

    2017-09-06

    The discovery of the genetic code and tRNAs as decoders of the code transformed life science. However, after establishing the role of tRNAs in protein synthesis, the field moved to other parts of the RNA world. Now, tRNA research is blooming again, with demonstration of the involvement of tRNAs in various other pathways beyond translation and in adapting translation to environmental cues. These roles are linked to the presence of tRNA sequence variants known as isoacceptors and isodecoders, various tRNA base modifications, the versatility of protein binding partners and tRNA fragmentation events, all of which collectively create an incalculable complexity. This complexity provides a vast repertoire of tRNA species that can serve various functions in cellular homeostasis and in adaptation of cellular functions to changing environments, and it likely arose from the fundamental role of RNAs in early evolution.

  2. Quality Control Pathways for Nucleus-Encoded Eukaryotic tRNA Biosynthesis and Subcellular Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    tRNAs perform an essential role in translating the genetic code. They are long-lived RNAs that are generated via numerous posttranscriptional steps. Eukaryotic cells have evolved numerous layers of quality control mechanisms to ensure that the tRNAs are appropriately structured, processed, and modified. We describe the known tRNA quality control processes that check tRNAs and correct or destroy aberrant tRNAs. These mechanisms employ two types of exonucleases, CCA end addition, tRNA nuclear aminoacylation, and tRNA subcellular traffic. We arrange these processes in order of the steps that occur from generation of precursor tRNAs by RNA polymerase (Pol) III transcription to end maturation and modification in the nucleus to splicing and additional modifications in the cytoplasm. Finally, we discuss the tRNA retrograde pathway, which allows tRNA reimport into the nucleus for degradation or repair. PMID:25848089

  3. Distribution of Cytokinin-active Ribonucleosides in Wheat Germ tRNA Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Struxness, Leslie A.; Armstrong, Donald J.; Gillam, Ian; Tener, Gordon M.; Burrows, William J.; Skoog, Folke

    1979-01-01

    The distribution of cytokinin activity in wheat (Triticum aestivum) germ tRNA fractionated by BD-cellulose and RPC-5 chromatography has been examined. As in other organisms, the cytokinin moieties in wheat germ tRNA appear to be restricted to tRNA species that would be expected to respond to codons beginning with U. Only a few of the wheat germ tRNA species in this coding group actually contain cytokinin modifications. Cytokinin activity was associated with isoaccepting tRNASer species and with a minor tRNALeu species from wheat germ. All other wheat germ tRNA species corresponding to codons beginning with U were devoid of cytokinin activity in the tobacco callus bioassay. PMID:16660688

  4. Mechanism of 3'-Matured tRNA Discrimination from 3'-Immature tRNA by Class-II CCA-Adding Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Seisuke; Tomita, Kozo

    2016-06-07

    CCA-adding enzyme adds the 3'-CCA of tRNA, using CTP and ATP as substrates, and terminates RNA synthesis after completion of CCA addition, without using a nucleic acid template. The complex structure of class-II Thermotoga maritima CCA-adding enzyme and mature tRNA with 3'-CCA revealed the mechanisms by which the enzyme terminates RNA synthesis after completion of 3'-CCA addition, and discriminates 3'-mature tRNA from 3'-immature tRNA. After completion of 3'-CCA addition at the catalytic site, the 3'-CCA refolds and relocates to the release site, which is discrete from the catalytic site. The 3'-CCA forms a continuously stacked, stable conformation together with the enzyme. Consequently, the 3'-mature tRNA rotates relative to the surface of the enzyme, and only the 3'-mature tRNA is ready for release. The 3'-regions of immature tRNAs cannot form the stable stacking conformation in the release site; thus, the 3' end is relocated in the catalytic site, and the 3'-CCA is reconstructed.

  5. Genome-wide screen uncovers novel pathways for tRNA processing and nuclear–cytoplasmic dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingyan; Bao, Alicia; Chatterjee, Kunal; Wan, Yao; Hopper, Anita K.

    2015-01-01

    Transfer ribonucleic acids (tRNAs) are essential for protein synthesis. However, key gene products involved in tRNA biogenesis and subcellular movement remain to be discovered. We conducted the first comprehensive unbiased analysis of the role of nearly an entire proteome in tRNA biology and describe 162 novel and 12 previously known Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene products that function in tRNA processing, turnover, and subcellular movement. tRNA nuclear export is of particular interest because it is essential, but the known tRNA exporters (Los1 [exportin-t] and Msn5 [exportin-5]) are unessential. We report that mutations of CRM1 (Exportin-1), MEX67/MTR2 (TAP/p15), and five nucleoporins cause accumulation of unspliced tRNA, a hallmark of defective tRNA nuclear export. CRM1 mutation genetically interacts with los1Δ and causes altered tRNA nuclear–cytoplasmic distribution. The data implicate roles for the protein and mRNA nuclear export machineries in tRNA nuclear export. Mutations of genes encoding actin cytoskeleton components and mitochondrial outer membrane proteins also cause accumulation of unspliced tRNA, likely due to defective splicing on mitochondria. Additional gene products, such as chromatin modification enzymes, have unanticipated effects on pre-tRNA end processing. Thus, this genome-wide screen uncovered putative novel pathways for tRNA nuclear export and extensive links between tRNA biology and other aspects of cell physiology. PMID:26680305

  6. tRNA gene diversity in the three domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Fujishima, Kosuke; Kanai, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) is widely known for its key role in decoding mRNA into protein. Despite their necessity and relatively short nucleotide sequences, a large diversity of gene structures and RNA secondary structures of pre-tRNAs and mature tRNAs have recently been discovered in the three domains of life. Growing evidences of disrupted tRNA genes in the genomes of Archaea reveals unique gene structures such as, intron-containing tRNA, split tRNA, and permuted tRNA. Coding sequence for these tRNAs are either separated with introns, fragmented, or permuted at the genome level. Although evolutionary scenario behind the tRNA gene disruption is still unclear, diversity of tRNA structure seems to be co-evolved with their processing enzyme, so-called RNA splicing endonuclease. Metazoan mitochondrial tRNAs (mtRNAs) are known for their unique lack of either one or two arms from the typical tRNA cloverleaf structure, while still maintaining functionality. Recently identified nematode-specific V-arm containing tRNAs (nev-tRNAs) possess long variable arms that are specific to eukaryotic class II tRNASer and tRNALeu but also decode class I tRNA codons. Moreover, many tRNA-like sequences have been found in the genomes of different organisms and viruses. Thus, this review is aimed to cover the latest knowledge on tRNA gene diversity and further recapitulate the evolutionary and biological aspects that caused such uniqueness. PMID:24904642

  7. Major reorientation of tRNA substrates defines specificity of dihydrouridine synthases

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Robert T.; Jenkins, Huw T.; Peters, Daniel T.; Whelan, Fiona; Stowell, James; Aziz, Naveed; Kasatsky, Pavel; Rodnina, Marina V.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Konevega, Andrey L.; Antson, Alfred A.

    2015-01-01

    The reduction of specific uridines to dihydrouridine is one of the most common modifications in tRNA. Increased levels of the dihydrouridine modification are associated with cancer. Dihydrouridine synthases (Dus) from different subfamilies selectively reduce distinct uridines, located at spatially unique positions of folded tRNA, into dihydrouridine. Because the catalytic center of all Dus enzymes is conserved, it is unclear how the same protein fold can be reprogrammed to ensure that nucleotides exposed at spatially distinct faces of tRNA can be accommodated in the same active site. We show that the Escherichia coli DusC is specific toward U16 of tRNA. Unexpectedly, crystal structures of DusC complexes with tRNAPhe and tRNATrp show that Dus subfamilies that selectively modify U16 or U20 in tRNA adopt identical folds but bind their respective tRNA substrates in an almost reverse orientation that differs by a 160° rotation. The tRNA docking orientation appears to be guided by subfamily-specific clusters of amino acids (“binding signatures”) together with differences in the shape of the positively charged tRNA-binding surfaces. tRNA orientations are further constrained by positional differences between the C-terminal “recognition” domains. The exquisite substrate specificity of Dus enzymes is therefore controlled by a relatively simple mechanism involving major reorientation of the whole tRNA molecule. Such reprogramming of the enzymatic specificity appears to be a unique evolutionary solution for altering tRNA recognition by the same protein fold. PMID:25902496

  8. Major reorientation of tRNA substrates defines specificity of dihydrouridine synthases.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Robert T; Jenkins, Huw T; Peters, Daniel T; Whelan, Fiona; Stowell, James; Aziz, Naveed; Kasatsky, Pavel; Rodnina, Marina V; Koonin, Eugene V; Konevega, Andrey L; Antson, Alfred A

    2015-05-12

    The reduction of specific uridines to dihydrouridine is one of the most common modifications in tRNA. Increased levels of the dihydrouridine modification are associated with cancer. Dihydrouridine synthases (Dus) from different subfamilies selectively reduce distinct uridines, located at spatially unique positions of folded tRNA, into dihydrouridine. Because the catalytic center of all Dus enzymes is conserved, it is unclear how the same protein fold can be reprogrammed to ensure that nucleotides exposed at spatially distinct faces of tRNA can be accommodated in the same active site. We show that the Escherichia coli DusC is specific toward U16 of tRNA. Unexpectedly, crystal structures of DusC complexes with tRNA(Phe) and tRNA(Trp) show that Dus subfamilies that selectively modify U16 or U20 in tRNA adopt identical folds but bind their respective tRNA substrates in an almost reverse orientation that differs by a 160° rotation. The tRNA docking orientation appears to be guided by subfamily-specific clusters of amino acids ("binding signatures") together with differences in the shape of the positively charged tRNA-binding surfaces. tRNA orientations are further constrained by positional differences between the C-terminal "recognition" domains. The exquisite substrate specificity of Dus enzymes is therefore controlled by a relatively simple mechanism involving major reorientation of the whole tRNA molecule. Such reprogramming of the enzymatic specificity appears to be a unique evolutionary solution for altering tRNA recognition by the same protein fold.

  9. Origin, evolution, and mechanism of 5′ tRNA editing in chytridiomycete fungi

    PubMed Central

    LAFOREST, MARIE-JOSÉE; BULLERWELL, CHARLES E.; FORGET, LISE; LANG, B. FRANZ

    2004-01-01

    5′ tRNA editing has been demonstrated to occur in the mitochondria of the distantly related rhizopod amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and the chytridiomycete fungus Spizellomyces punctatus. In these organisms, canonical tRNA structures are restored by removing mismatched nucleotides at the first three 5′ positions and replacing them with nucleotides capable of forming Watson–Crick base pairs with their 3′ counterparts. This form of editing seems likely to occur in members of Amoebozoa other than A. castellanii, as well as in members of Heterolobosea. Evidence for 5′ tRNA editing has not been found to date, however, in any other fungus including the deeply branching chytridiomycete Allomyces macrogynus. We predicted that a similar form of tRNA editing would occur in members of the chytridiomycete order Monoblepharidales based on the analysis of complete mitochondrial tRNA complements. This prediction was confirmed by analysis of tRNA sequences using a tRNA circularization/ RT-PCR-based approach. The presence of partially and completely unedited tRNAs in members of the Monoblepharidales suggests the involvement of a 5′-to-3′ exonuclease rather than an endonuclease in removing the three 5′ nucleotides from a tRNA substrate. Surprisingly, analysis of the mtDNA of the chytridiomycete Rhizophydium brooksianum, which branches as a sister group to S. punctatus in molecular phylogenies, did not suggest the presence of editing. This prediction was also confirmed experimentally. The absence of tRNA editing in R. brooksianum raises the possibility that 5′ tRNA editing may have evolved twice independently within Chytridiomycota, once in the lineage leading to S. punctatus and once in the lineage leading to the Monoblepharidales. PMID:15247432

  10. tRNA evolution from the proto-tRNA minihelix world

    PubMed Central

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Kim, Yunsoo; Sanjay, Adithya; Burton, Zachary F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multiple models have been advanced for the evolution of cloverleaf tRNA. Here, the conserved archaeal tRNA core (75-nt) is posited to have evolved from ligation of three proto-tRNA minihelices (31-nt) and two-symmetrical 9-nt deletions within joined acceptor stems (93 – 18 = 75-nt). The primary evidence for this conclusion is that the 5-nt stem 7-nt anticodon loop and the 5-nt stem 7-nt T loop are structurally homologous and related by coding sequence. We posit that the D loop was generated from a third minihelix (31-nt) in which the stem and loop became rearranged after 9-nt acceptor stem deletions and cloverleaf folding. The most 3´-5-nt segment of the D loop and the 5-nt V loop are apparent remnants of the joined acceptor stems (14 – 9 = 5-nt). Before refolding in the tRNA cloverleaf, we posit that the 3′-5-nt segment of the D loop and the 5-nt V loop were paired, and, in the tRNA cloverleaf, frequent pairing of positions 29 (D loop) and 47 (V loop) remains (numbered on a 75-nt tRNA cloverleaf core). Amazingly, after >3.5 billion years of evolutionary pressure on the tRNA cloverleaf structure, a model can be constructed that convincingly describes the genesis of 75/75-nt conserved archaeal tRNA core positions. Judging from the tRNA structure, cloverleaf tRNA appears to represent at least a second-generation scheme (and possibly a third-generation scheme) that replaced a robust 31-nt minihelix protein-coding system, evidence for which is preserved in the cloverleaf structure. Understanding tRNA evolution provides insights into ribosome and rRNA evolution. PMID:27636862

  11. Glutamine Synthetase: Role in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Norenberg, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an ATP-dependent enzyme found in most species that synthesizes glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In brain, GS is exclusively located in astrocytes where it serves to maintain the glutamate-glutamine cycle, as well as nitrogen metabolism. Changes in the activity of GS, as well as its gene expression, along with excitotoxicity, have been identified in a number of neurological conditions. The literature describing alterations in the activation and gene expression of GS, as well as its involvement in different neurological disorders, however, is incomplete. This review summarizes changes in GS gene expression/activity and its potential contribution to the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders, including hepatic encephalopathy, ischemia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, and astroglial neoplasms. This review also explores the possibility of targeting GS in the therapy of these conditions.

  12. Mechanistic issues in asparagine synthetase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Richards, N G; Schuster, S M

    1998-01-01

    The enzymatic synthesis of asparagine is an ATP-dependent process that utilizes the nitrogen atom derived from either glutamine or ammonia. Despite a long history of kinetic and mechanistic investigation, there is no universally accepted catalytic mechanism for this seemingly straightforward carboxyl group activating enzyme, especially as regards those steps immediately preceding amide bond formation. This chapter considers four issues dealing with the mechanism: (a) the structural organization of the active site(s) partaking in glutamine utilization and aspartate activation; (b) the relationship of asparagine synthetase to other amidotransferases; (c) the way in which ATP is used to activate the beta-carboxyl group; and (d) the detailed mechanism by which nitrogen is transferred.

  13. Defects in tRNA Modification Associated with Neurological and Developmental Dysfunctions in Caenorhabditis elegans Elongator Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changchun; Tuck, Simon; Byström, Anders S.

    2009-01-01

    Elongator is a six subunit protein complex, conserved from yeast to humans. Mutations in the human Elongator homologue, hELP1, are associated with the neurological disease familial dysautonomia. However, how Elongator functions in metazoans, and how the human mutations affect neural functions is incompletely understood. Here we show that in Caenorhabditis elegans, ELPC-1 and ELPC-3, components of the Elongator complex, are required for the formation of the 5-carbamoylmethyl and 5-methylcarboxymethyl side chains of wobble uridines in tRNA. The lack of these modifications leads to defects in translation in C. elegans. ELPC-1::GFP and ELPC-3::GFP reporters are strongly expressed in a subset of chemosensory neurons required for salt chemotaxis learning. elpc-1 or elpc-3 gene inactivation causes a defect in this process, associated with a posttranscriptional reduction of neuropeptide and a decreased accumulation of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft. elpc-1 and elpc-3 mutations are synthetic lethal together with those in tuc-1, which is required for thiolation of tRNAs having the 5′methylcarboxymethyl side chain. elpc-1; tuc-1 and elpc-3; tuc-1 double mutants display developmental defects. Our results suggest that, by its effect on tRNA modification, Elongator promotes both neural function and development. PMID:19593383

  14. The enterococcal cytolysin synthetase has an unanticipated lipid kinase fold.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi-Hui; Tang, Weixin; Lukk, Tiit; Yu, Yi; Nair, Satish K; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2015-07-30

    The enterococcal cytolysin is a virulence factor consisting of two post-translationally modified peptides that synergistically kill human immune cells. Both peptides are made by CylM, a member of the LanM lanthipeptide synthetases. CylM catalyzes seven dehydrations of Ser and Thr residues and three cyclization reactions during the biosynthesis of the cytolysin large subunit. We present here the 2.2 Å resolution structure of CylM, the first structural information on a LanM. Unexpectedly, the structure reveals that the dehydratase domain of CylM resembles the catalytic core of eukaryotic lipid kinases, despite the absence of clear sequence homology. The kinase and phosphate elimination active sites that affect net dehydration are immediately adjacent to each other. Characterization of mutants provided insights into the mechanism of the dehydration process. The structure is also of interest because of the interactions of human homologs of lanthipeptide cyclases with kinases such as mammalian target of rapamycin.

  15. Dual binding sites for translocation catalysis by Escherichia coli glutathionylspermidine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Pai, Chien-Hua; Chiang, Bing-Yu; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Chong, Cheong-Meng; Yen, Fang-Jiun; Chen, Shoujun; Coward, James K; Wang, Andrew H-J; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2006-12-13

    Most organisms use glutathione to regulate intracellular thiol redox balance and protect against oxidative stress; protozoa, however, utilize trypanothione for this purpose. Trypanothione biosynthesis requires ATP-dependent conjugation of glutathione (GSH) to the two terminal amino groups of spermidine by glutathionylspermidine synthetase (GspS) and trypanothione synthetase (TryS), which are considered as drug targets. GspS catalyzes the penultimate step of the biosynthesis-amide bond formation between spermidine and the glycine carboxylate of GSH. We report herein five crystal structures of Escherichia coli GspS in complex with substrate, product or inhibitor. The C-terminal of GspS belongs to the ATP-grasp superfamily with a similar fold to the human glutathione synthetase. GSH is likely phosphorylated at one of two GSH-binding sites to form an acylphosphate intermediate that then translocates to the other site for subsequent nucleophilic addition of spermidine. We also identify essential amino acids involved in the catalysis. Our results constitute the first structural information on the biochemical features of parasite homologs (including TryS) that underlie their broad specificity for polyamines.

  16. Regulation of 2', 5'-oligoadenylate synthetase gene expression by interferons and platelet-derived growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Blanco, M.A. ); Lengyel, P. . Dept. of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry); Morrison, E.; BrownLee, C.; Stiles, C.D. ); Williams, B.R.G. )

    1989-03-01

    In murine BALB/c 3T3 cell cultures, either beta interferon or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) enhanced expression of the 2', 5-oligoadenylate synthetase mRNA and protein. The time course of induction in response to beta inteferon was similar to that in response to PDGF. Of several growth factors known to be present in clotted blood serum (i.e., epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, and PDGF), only PDGF enhanced expression of 2', 5-oligoadenylate synthetase. The linkage of an interferon response element-containing segment from the 5'-flanking region of a human or murine 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase gene made a heterologous gene responsive to interferon. The expression of such a gene construct in transfected cells was also induced by PDGF. Induction by PDGF was inhibited by mono- or polyclonal antibodies to murine interferon, which suggested that induction by PDGF requires interferon. Both PDGF and interferon induced nuclear factors that bound to this interferon response element-containing segment in vitro.

  17. Parallel loss of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and mtDNA-encoded tRNAs in Cnidaria.

    PubMed

    Haen, Karri M; Pett, Walker; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2010-10-01

    Unlike most animal mitochondrial (mt) genomes, which encode a set of 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs) sufficient for mt protein synthesis, those of cnidarians have only retained one or two tRNA genes. Whether the missing cnidarian mt-tRNA genes relocated outside the main mt chromosome or were lost remains unclear. It is also unknown what impact the loss of tRNA genes had on other components of the mt translational machinery. Here, we explored the nuclear genome of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis for the presence of mt-tRNA genes and their corresponding mt aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mt-aaRS). We detected no candidates for mt-tRNA genes and only two mt-aaRS orthologs. At the same time, we found that all but one cytosolic aaRS appear to be targeted to mitochondria. These results indicate that the loss of mt-tRNAs in Cnidaria is genuine and occurred in parallel with the loss of nuclear-encoded mt-aaRS. Our phylogenetic analyses of individual aaRS revealed that although the nearly total loss of mt-aaRS is rare, aaRS gene deletion and replacement have occurred throughout the evolution of Metazoa.

  18. A Phenotypic Based Target Screening Approach Delivers New Antitubercular CTP Synthetase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Marta; Szadocka, Sára; Degiacomi, Giulia; Orena, Beatrice S; Mori, Giorgia; Piano, Valentina; Boldrin, Francesca; Zemanová, Júlia; Huszár, Stanislav; Barros, David; Ekins, Sean; Lelièvre, Joel; Manganelli, Riccardo; Mattevi, Andrea; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Ballell, Lluis; Mikušová, Katarína; Chiarelli, Laurent R

    2017-06-09

    Despite its great potential, the target-based approach has been mostly unsuccessful in tuberculosis drug discovery, while whole cell phenotypic screening has delivered several active compounds. However, for many of these hits, the cellular target has not yet been identified, thus preventing further target-based optimization of the compounds. In this context, the newly validated drug target CTP synthetase PyrG was exploited to assess a target-based approach of already known, but untargeted, antimycobacterial compounds. To this purpose the publically available GlaxoSmithKline antimycobacterial compound set was assayed, uncovering a series of 4-(pyridin-2-yl)thiazole derivatives which efficiently inhibit the Mycobacterium tuberculosis PyrG enzyme activity, one of them showing low activity against the human CTP synthetase. The three best compounds were ATP binding site competitive inhibitors, with Ki values ranging from 3 to 20 μM, but did not show any activity against a small panel of different prokaryotic and eukaryotic kinases, thus demonstrating specificity for the CTP synthetases. Metabolic labeling experiments demonstrated that the compounds directly interfere not only with CTP biosynthesis, but also with other CTP dependent biochemical pathways, such as lipid biosynthesis. Moreover, using a M. tuberculosis pyrG conditional knock-down strain, it was shown that the activity of two compounds is dependent on the intracellular concentration of the CTP synthetase. All these results strongly suggest a role of PyrG as a target of these compounds, thus strengthening the value of this kind of approach for the identification of new scaffolds for drug development.

  19. TRYPTOPHANASE-TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHETASE SYSTEMS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI III.

    PubMed Central

    Freundlich, Martin; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1962-01-01

    Freundlich, Martin (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and Herman C. Lichstein. Tryptophanase-tryptophan synthetase systems in Escherichia coli. III. Requirements for enzyme synthesis. J. Bacteriol. 84:996–1006. 1962.—The requirements for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase in Escherichia coli during repression release were studied. The kinetics of the formation of tryptophan synthetase differed in the two strains examined; this was attributed to differences in the endogenous level of tryptophan in the bacterial cells. The formation of both enzymes was inhibited by chloramphenicol, and by the absence of arginine in an arginine-requiring mutant. These results are indicative of a requirement for protein synthesis for enzyme formation. Requirements for nucleic acid synthesis were examined by use of a uracil- and thymine-requiring mutant, and with purine and pyrimidine analogues. The results obtained suggest that some type of ribonucleic acid synthesis was necessary for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase. PMID:13959620

  20. Mutation in WDR4 impairs tRNA m(7)G46 methylation and causes a distinct form of microcephalic primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Ranad; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Guy, Michael P; Alomar, Rana; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Afifi, Hanan H; Ismail, Samira I; Emam, Bayoumi A; Phizicky, Eric M; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2015-09-28

    Primordial dwarfism is a state of extreme prenatal and postnatal growth deficiency, and is characterized by marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Two presumably unrelated consanguineous families presented with an apparently novel form of primordial dwarfism in which severe growth deficiency is accompanied by distinct facial dysmorphism, brain malformation (microcephaly, agenesis of corpus callosum, and simplified gyration), and severe encephalopathy with seizures. Combined autozygome/exome analysis revealed a novel missense mutation in WDR4 as the likely causal variant. WDR4 is the human ortholog of the yeast Trm82, an essential component of the Trm8/Trm82 holoenzyme that effects a highly conserved and specific (m(7)G46) methylation of tRNA. The human mutation and the corresponding yeast mutation result in a significant reduction of m(7)G46 methylation of specific tRNA species, which provides a potential mechanism for primordial dwarfism associated with this lesion, since reduced m(7)G46 modification causes a growth deficiency phenotype in yeast. Our study expands the number of biological pathways underlying primordial dwarfism and adds to a growing list of human diseases linked to abnormal tRNA modification.

  1. A novel, enigmatic histone modification: biotinylation of histones by holocarboxylase synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Yousef I; Zempleni, Janos

    2008-12-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase catalyzes the covalent binding of biotin to histones in humans and other eukaryotes. Eleven biotinylation sites have been identified in histones H2A, H3, and H4. K12-biotinylated histone H4 is enriched in heterochromatin, repeat regions, and plays a role in gene repression. About 30% of the histone H4 molecules are biotinylated at K12 in histone H4 in human fibroblast telomeres. The abundance of biotinylated histones at distinct genomic loci depends on biotin availability. Decreased histone biotinylation decreases life span and stress resistance in Drosophila. Low enrichment of biotinylated histones at transposable elements impairs repression of these elements.

  2. tRNA conjugation with chitosan nanoparticles: An AFM imaging study.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, D; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-04-01

    The conjugation of tRNA with chitosan nanoparticles of different sizes 15,100 and 200 kDa was investigated in aqueous solution using multiple spectroscopic methods and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Structural analysis showed that chitosan binds tRNA via G-C and A-U base pairs as well as backbone PO2 group, through electrostatic, hydrophilic and H-bonding contacts with overall binding constants of KCh-15-tRNA=4.1 (±0.60)×10(3)M(-1), KCh-100-tRNA=5.7 (±0.8)×10(3)M(-1) and KCh-200-tRNA=1.2 (±0.3)×10(4)M(-1). As chitosan size increases more stable polymer-tRNA conjugate is formed. AFM images showed major tRNA aggregation and particle formation occurred as chitosan concentration increased. Even though chitosan induced major biopolymer structural changes, tRNA remains in A-family structure.

  3. Interaction of tRNA with domain II of 23S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Hill, W E; Tassanakajohn, A; Tapprich, W E

    1990-08-27

    The interaction of tRNA with domain II of 23S rRNA in E. coli ribosomes has been probed using short, complementary DNA oligodeoxyribonucleotides. Specifically, cDNA oligomers to the region 801-811 of the 23S rRNA were used to ascertain the interaction of this region with tRNA. It was found that when tRNA was bound to the P site, considerable competition occurred between tRNA and the cDNA oligomers which base paired with the nucleotides 807-811. However, A-site bound tRNA neither displaced, nor was displaced, by cDNA oligomers to this region. Additionally, the binding of tRNA lacking the CACCA nucleotides on the 3' terminus was unaffected by the presence a cDNA oligomer complementary to nucleotides 803-811, indicating that the cDNA-tRNA competition was dependent on the 3' terminal nucleotides of tRNA.

  4. Purification and properties of glutamine synthetase from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Ericson, M C

    1985-12-01

    The chloroplastic glutamine synthetase of spinach leaves has been purified to homogeneity using affinity chromatography. This involves a tandem ;reactive blue A-agarose' and ;reactive red-A-agarose' as the final step in the procedure. This procedure results in a yield of 18 milligrams of pure glutamine synthetase per kilogram of starting material. The purity of our enzyme has been demonstrated on both one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels.Purified glutamine synthetase has a molecular weight of 360,000 daltons and consists of eight 44,000 dalton subunits. The K(m) is 6.7 millimolar for glutamate, 1.8 millimolar for ATP (synthetase assay), and 37.6 millimolar for glutamine (transferase assay). The isoelectric point is 6.5 and the pH optima are 7.3 in the synthetase assay and 6.4 in the transferase assay. The irreversible, competitive inhibitors methionine sulfoxamine and phosphinothricin have K(i) values of 0.1 millimolar and 6.1 micromolar, respectively. Amino acid analysis has been carried out and the results compared with published analyses for other isoforms of glutamine synthetase.

  5. TRYPTOPHANASE-TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHETASE SYSTEMS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI I.

    PubMed Central

    Freundlich, Martin; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1962-01-01

    Freundlich, Martin (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and Herman C. Lichstein. Tryptophanase-tryptophan synthetase systems in Escherichia coli. I. Effect of tryptophan and related compounds. J. Bacteriol. 84:979–987. 1962.—The effect of tryptophan and related compounds on tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase formation in Escherichia coli was determined. Several of these compounds stimulated the formation of tryptophanase while concomitantly decreasing the production of synthetase. A number of tryptophan analogues were found to inhibit growth. The possible mode of action of these substances was examined further. 5-Hydroxytryptophan greatly inhibited the formation of synthetase and also reduced growth. Its inhibitory action on growth was attributed, at least partially, to the false feedback inhibition of anthranilic acid formation. Tryptamine was found to be a potent inhibitor of the activity of synthetase, as well as of the enzyme(s) involved in the synthesis of anthranilic acid from shikimic acid. However, growth reduction was only partially reversed by tryptophan. Indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-propionic acid decreased growth and increased the formation of synthetase six- to eightfold. The action of these compounds was ascribed to their ability to block the endogenous formation of tryptophan. PMID:13959621

  6. In vivo single-RNA tracking shows that most tRNA diffuses freely in live bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Plochowietz, Anne; Farrell, Ian; Smilansky, Zeev; Cooperman, Barry S.; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.

    2017-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) links messenger RNA nucleotide sequence with amino acid sequence during protein synthesis. Despite the importance of tRNA for translation, its subcellular distribution and diffusion properties in live cells are poorly understood. Here, we provide the first direct report on tRNA diffusion localization in live bacteria. We internalized tRNA labeled with organic fluorophores into live bacteria, applied single-molecule fluorescence imaging with single-particle tracking and localized and tracked single tRNA molecules over seconds. We observed two diffusive species: fast (with a diffusion coefficient of ∼8 μm2/s, consistent with free tRNA) and slow (consistent with tRNA bound to larger complexes). Our data indicate that a large fraction of internalized fluorescent tRNA (>70%) appears to diffuse freely in the bacterial cell. We also obtained the subcellular distribution of fast and slow diffusing tRNA molecules in multiple cells by normalizing for cell morphology. While fast diffusing tRNA is not excluded from the bacterial nucleoid, slow diffusing tRNA is localized to the cell periphery (showing a 30% enrichment versus a uniform distribution), similar to non-uniform localizations previously observed for mRNA and ribosomes. PMID:27625389

  7. Evolution of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase quaternary structure and activity: Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Sanni, A; Walter, P; Boulanger, Y; Ebel, J P; Fasiolo, F

    1991-01-01

    Phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases [L-phenylalanine:tRNAPhe ligase (AMP-forming), EC 6.1.1.20] from Escherichia coli, yeast cytoplasm, and mammalian cytoplasm have an unusual conserved alpha 2 beta 2 quaternary structure that is shared by only one other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. Both subunits are required for activity. We show here that a single mitochondrial polypeptide from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an active phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase. This protein (the MSF1 gene product) is active as a monomer. It has all three characteristic sequence motifs of the class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and its activity may result from the recruitment of additional sequences into an alpha-subunit-like structure. Images PMID:1924298

  8. Activation of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity on induction of HL-60 leukemia cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, E L; Nilson, L A

    1989-01-01

    A 27-fold increase in 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity, an enzyme associated with the antiproliferative actions of interferon (IFN), was observed after treatment of HL-60 human leukemia cells with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), an inducer of granulocytic differentiation of the cells. Enzyme activity was elevated after 24 h of exposure to DMSO, was maximal at 48 hours, and declined thereafter. A comparable increase was observed after treatment with 1 U of alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) per ml or 8 U of beta interferon (IFN-beta) per ml. Elevated levels of expression of other IFN-inducible genes, including type I histocompatibility antigen (HLA-B) mRNA and 2',5'-oligoadenylate phosphodiesterase activity, were also observed with DMSO treatment. DMSO-treated HL-60 cells had an increased amount of a 1.8-kilobase mRNA for oligoadenylate [oligo(A)] synthetase when compared with that of control cells; both DMSO- and IFN-treated HL-60 cells also expressed 1.6-, 3.4-, and 4.3-kilobase mRNA. The increase in both oligo(A) synthetase activity and mRNA levels was inhibited by polyclonal antiserum to human IFN-alpha; however, no IFN-alpha mRNA could be detected in the cells. Antiserum to IFN-beta or gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) had no effect on oligo(A) synthetase expression or activity nor was there any detectable IFN-beta 1 or IFN-beta 2 mRNA in the cells. The anti-IFN-alpha serum did not block the elevation of HLA-B mRNA in DMSO-treated cells. These observations suggest that the increased expression of oligo(A) synthetase in DMSO-treated cells may be mediated by the release of an IFN-alpha-like factor; however, the levels of any IFN-alpha mRNA produced in the cells were extremely low. Images PMID:2476665

  9. Ion concentration dependent tRNA folding energy landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rongzhong; Cho, Samuel

    2013-03-01

    The RNA folding is highly dependent on the ionic conditions of its environment in the cell because the surrounding ions electrostatically screen the charged phosphates that line the RNA backbone. Recent studies (Cho, Pincus, and Thirumalai, PNAS, 2007; Biyun, Cho, and Thirumalai, JACS, 2011) demonstrated that the coarse-grained model we use accurately captures the RNA folding mechanisms by incorporating a Debye-Huckel potential to screen the electrostatics. We compare the ion-concentration dependent tRNA folding mechanism to the classical thermodynamic melting profiles of Crothers and co-workers, and we observe excellent agreement. We also supported our findings by performing empirical force field MD simulations with CHARMM and AMBER, and we observe remarkably comparable qualitative similarities between the average base-base distances from simulations and the empirically measured base-stacking potentials from the well-known Turner's Rules.

  10. Nonribosomal peptide synthetase biosynthetic clusters of ESKAPE pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gulick, Andrew M

    2017-08-02

    Covering: up to 2017.Natural products are important secondary metabolites produced by bacterial and fungal species that play important roles in cellular growth and signaling, nutrient acquisition, intra- and interspecies communication, and virulence. A subset of natural products is produced by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs), a family of large, modular enzymes that function in an assembly line fashion. Because of the pharmaceutical activity of many NRPS products, much effort has gone into the exploration of their biosynthetic pathways and the diverse products they make. Many interesting NRPS pathways have been identified and characterized from both terrestrial and marine bacterial sources. Recently, several NRPS pathways in human commensal bacterial species have been identified that produce molecules with antibiotic activity, suggesting another source of interesting NRPS pathways may be the commensal and pathogenic bacteria that live on the human body. The ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter spp.) have been identified as a significant cause of human bacterial infections that are frequently multidrug resistant. The emerging resistance profile of these organisms has prompted calls from multiple international agencies to identify novel antibacterial targets and develop new approaches to treat infections from ESKAPE pathogens. Each of these species contains several NRPS biosynthetic gene clusters. While some have been well characterized and produce known natural products with important biological roles in microbial physiology, others have yet to be investigated. This review catalogs the NRPS pathways of ESKAPE pathogens. The exploration of novel NRPS products may lead to a better understanding of the chemical communication used by human pathogens and potentially to the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches.

  11. Dual targeting of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to the mitochondrion and complex plastid in chlorarachniophytes.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Burki, Fabien; Keeling, Patrick J

    2012-12-15

    In plants, many nucleus-encoded proteins are targeted to both mitochondria and plastids, and this process is generally mediated by ambiguous N-terminal targeting sequences that are recognized by receptors on both organelles. In many algae, however, plastids were acquired by secondarily engulfing green or red algae, which were retained within the endomembrane system. Protein targeting to these secondary plastids is more complex, and because they do not reside directly in the cytoplasm, dual targeting cannot function as it does in plant cells. Here we investigate dual targeting of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) in chlorarachniophytes, which are complex algae that possess secondary plastids and a relict nucleus derived from a green algal endosymbiont. Chlorarachniophytes have four genome-containing compartments, but almost all the aaRSs are nucleus-encoded and present in fewer than four copies (some as few as two), suggesting multiple targeting. We characterized the subcellular localization of two classes, HisRS (three copies) and GlyRS (two copies), using GFP fusion proteins. In both cases, one copy was dually targeted to mitochondria and plastids, but unlike plants this was mediated by translation initiation variants. We also found that the periplastidal compartment (the relict green algal cytoplasm) lacks both GlyRS and a cognate tRNA, suggesting that pre-charged host tRNAs are imported into this compartment. Leader analysis of other aaRSs suggests that alternative translation is a common strategy for dual targeting in these complex cells. Overall, dual targeting to mitochondria and plastids is a shared feature of plastid-bearing organisms, but the increased complexity of trafficking into secondary plastids requires a different strategy.

  12. Enhancement of lysyl-tRNA synthetase activity in the Enterobacteriaceae

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, E.W.; Hirshfield, I.

    1987-05-01

    Lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LRS) in E. coli is coded by two genes, one constitutive, and the other inducible; the latter is a cell stress protein. To determine if this system is wide spread in prokaryotes, the inducibility of LRS was first tested in eight members of the Enterobacteriaceae using cultural conditions known to induce the enzyme in E. coli K-12. Uninduced control cultures were grown to an O.D. of 0.2 at 580 nm in a supplemented minimal medium (SMM), pH 7.0 at 37/sup 0/C. Induction stimuli include: growth in SMM with 3mM Gly-L-Leu; growth in SMM as above, but with the initial pH adjusted to 5.0; or growth in Difco AC Broth to early stationary phase with a concomitant drop in the pH of the medium below 5.5. LRS activity was assayed in whole-cell sonic extracts by the aminoacylation of crude E. coli tRNA by /sup 14/C-lysine at pH 7.8 for three minutes. When E. aerogenes, K. pneumoniae, C. freundii, and S. typhimurium were grown in AC Broth, LRS activity was enhanced 2 to 4 fold. The enzyme is induced 2 to 4 fold in C. freundii and S. typhimurium upon growth at pH 5.0, whereas E. coli, K.; pneumoniae, and E. aerogenes show only a 1.5 fold induction. The peptide Gly-L-Leu enhanced LRS activity only in E. coli. LRS was not found to be inducible in S. marcescens, M. morganii, P. mirabilis, or P. vulgaris by any of the stimuli.

  13. Nucleotide triphosphate promiscuity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis dethiobiotin synthetase.

    PubMed

    Salaemae, Wanisa; Yap, Min Y; Wegener, Kate L; Booker, Grant W; Wilce, Matthew C J; Polyak, Steven W

    2015-05-01

    Dethiobiotin synthetase (DTBS) plays a crucial role in biotin biosynthesis in microorganisms, fungi, and plants. Due to its importance in bacterial pathogenesis, and the absence of a human homologue, DTBS is a promising target for the development of new antibacterials desperately needed to combat antibiotic resistance. Here we report the first X-ray structure of DTBS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtDTBS) bound to a nucleotide triphosphate (CTP). The nucleoside base is stabilized in its pocket through hydrogen-bonding interactions with the protein backbone, rather than amino acid side chains. This resulted in the unexpected finding that MtDTBS could utilise ATP, CTP, GTP, ITP, TTP, or UTP with similar Km and kcat values, although the enzyme had the highest affinity for CTP in competitive binding and surface plasmon resonance assays. This is in contrast to other DTBS homologues that preferentially bind ATP primarily through hydrogen-bonds between the purine base and the carboxamide side chain of a key asparagine. Mutational analysis performed alongside in silico experiments revealed a gate-keeper role for Asn175 in Escherichia coli DTBS that excludes binding of other nucleotide triphosphates. Here we provide evidence to show that MtDTBS has a broad nucleotide specificity due to the absence of the gate-keeper residue.

  14. The prokaryotic FAD synthetase family: a potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Ana; Ferreira, Patricia; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of cellular production of the flavin cofactors, flavin adenine mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide(FAD) will prevent the assembly of a large number of flavoproteins and flavoenzymes involved in key metabolic processes in all types of organisms. The enzymes responsible for FMN and FAD production in prokaryotes and eukaryotes exhibit various structural characteristics to catalyze the same chemistry, a fact that converts the prokaryotic FAD synthetase (FADS) in a potential drug target for the development of inhibitors endowed with anti-pathogenic activity. The first step before searching for selective inhibitors of FADS is to understand the structural and functional mechanisms for the riboflavin kinase and FMN adenylyltransferase activities of the prokaryotic enzyme, and particularly to identify their differential functional characteristics with regard to the enzymes performing similar functions in other organisms, particularly humans. In this paper, an overview of the current knowledge of the structure-function relationships in prokaryotic FADS has been presented, as well as of the state of the art in the use of these enzymes as drug targets.

  15. Chitin synthetase in encysting Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba invadens

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Gillin, F.D.

    1987-05-01

    Giardia lamblia (Gl) and Entamoeba invadens (Ei) are protozoan parasites with two morphologic stages in their life cycles. Motile trophozoites colonize the intestine of humans and reptiles respectively. Water resistant cysts, which can survive outside the host, transmit infection. In vitro cyst formation of Ei from trophozoites has been reported, and the authors have recently induced in vitro encystation of Gl. Although the cyst walls of both parasites contain chitin, it synthesis by encysting trophozoites has not been reported. The authors now show that encystation conditions greatly increase chitin synthetase (CS) specific activity (incorporation of /sup 3/H GlcNAc from UDP-GlcNAc into TCA-or alcohol-precipitable material). Extracts of encysting Gl incorporated 3.6 nmol/mg protein in 5 hr compared to < 0.005 in controls. Extracts of encysting Fi incorporated 4.8 n mol/mg protein, compared to 1.7 in the control. CS activity of both parasites requires preformed chitin. The Gl enzyme requires a reducing agent, is inhibited by digitonin and the CS inhibitors, polyoxin D and Nikkomycin, but not by tunicamycin. The product is digested by chitinase. Ei enzyme does not require a reducing agent and is stimulated by 1 mg/ml digitonin, but inhibited by higher concentrations. These studies demonstrate CS enzymes which may play important roles in encystation of Gl and Ei.

  16. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiongming; Marygold, Steven J; Gharib, Walid H; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, allowing them to decode the triplet code during translation. Through different mechanisms aaRSs also perform several non-canonical functions in transcription, translation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and inflammation. Drosophila has become a preferred system to model human diseases caused by mutations in aaRS genes, to dissect effects of reduced translation or non-canonical activities, and to study aminoacylation and translational fidelity. However, the lack of a systematic annotation of this gene family has hampered such studies. Here, we report the identification of the entire set of aaRS genes in the fly genome and we predict their roles based on experimental evidence and/or orthology. Further, we propose a new, systematic and logical nomenclature for aaRSs. We also review the research conducted on Drosophila aaRSs to date. Together, our work provides the foundation for further research in the fly aaRS field. PMID:26761199

  17. Secondary NAD+ deficiency in the inherited defect of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liyan; Ibrahim, Khalid; Stucki, Martin; Frapolli, Michele; Shahbeck, Noora; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter; Penberthy, W Todd; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Häberle, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency is an ultra-rare inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been described in only three patients so far. The disease is characterized by neonatal onset of severe encephalopathy, low levels of glutamine in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, chronic moderate hyperammonemia, and an overall poor prognosis in the absence of an effective treatment. Recently, enteral glutamine supplementation was shown to be a safe and effective therapy for this disease but there are no data available on the long-term effects of this intervention. The amino acid glutamine, severely lacking in this disorder, is central to many metabolic pathways in the human organism and is involved in the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) starting from tryptophan or niacin as nicotinate, but not nicotinamide. Using fibroblasts, leukocytes, and immortalized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from a patient carrying a GLUL gene point mutation associated with impaired GS activity, we tested whether glutamine deficiency in this patient results in NAD(+) depletion and whether it can be rescued by supplementation with glutamine, nicotinamide or nicotinate. The present study shows that congenital GS deficiency is associated with NAD(+) depletion in fibroblasts, leukocytes and PBSC, which may contribute to the severe clinical phenotype of the disease. Furthermore, it shows that NAD(+) depletion can be rescued by nicotinamide supplementation in fibroblasts and leukocytes, which may open up potential therapeutic options for the treatment of this disorder.

  18. Improved systematic tRNA gene annotation allows new insights into the evolution of mitochondrial tRNA structures and into the mechanisms of mitochondrial genome rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Jühling, Frank; Pütz, Joern; Bernt, Matthias; Donath, Alexander; Middendorf, Martin; Florentz, Catherine; Stadler, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are present in all types of cells as well as in organelles. tRNAs of animal mitochondria show a low level of primary sequence conservation and exhibit ‘bizarre’ secondary structures, lacking complete domains of the common cloverleaf. Such sequences are hard to detect and hence frequently missed in computational analyses and mitochondrial genome annotation. Here, we introduce an automatic annotation procedure for mitochondrial tRNA genes in Metazoa based on sequence and structural information in manually curated covariance models. The method, applied to re-annotate 1876 available metazoan mitochondrial RefSeq genomes, allows to distinguish between remaining functional genes and degrading ‘pseudogenes’, even at early stages of divergence. The subsequent analysis of a comprehensive set of mitochondrial tRNA genes gives new insights into the evolution of structures of mitochondrial tRNA sequences as well as into the mechanisms of genome rearrangements. We find frequent losses of tRNA genes concentrated in basal Metazoa, frequent independent losses of individual parts of tRNA genes, particularly in Arthropoda, and wide-spread conserved overlaps of tRNAs in opposite reading direction. Direct evidence for several recent Tandem Duplication-Random Loss events is gained, demonstrating that this mechanism has an impact on the appearance of new mitochondrial gene orders. PMID:22139921

  19. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  1. Mutations activating the yeast eIF-2 alpha kinase GCN2: isolation of alleles altering the domain related to histidyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, M; Wek, R C; Vazquez de Aldana, C R; Jackson, B M; Freeman, B; Hinnebusch, A G

    1992-01-01

    The protein kinase GCN2 stimulates expression of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 at the translational level by phosphorylating the alpha subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF-2 alpha) in amino acid-starved cells. Phosphorylation of eIF-2 alpha reduces its activity, allowing ribosomes to bypass short open reading frames present in the GCN4 mRNA leader and initiate translation at the GCN4 start codon. We describe here 17 dominant GCN2 mutations that lead to derepression of GCN4 expression in the absence of amino acid starvation. Seven of these GCN2c alleles map in the protein kinase moiety, and two in this group alter the presumed ATP-binding domain, suggesting that ATP binding is a regulated aspect of GCN2 function. Six GCN2c alleles map in a region related to histidyl-tRNA synthetases, and two in this group alter a sequence motif conserved among class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that directly interacts with the acceptor stem of tRNA. These results support the idea that GCN2 kinase function is activated under starvation conditions by binding uncharged tRNA to the domain related to histidyl-tRNA synthetase. The remaining GCN2c alleles map at the extreme C terminus, a domain required for ribosome association of the protein. Representative mutations in each domain were shown to depend on the phosphorylation site in eIF-2 alpha for their effects on GCN4 expression and to increase the level of eIF-2 alpha phosphorylation in the absence of amino acid starvation. Synthetic GCN2c double mutations show greater derepression of GCN4 expression than the parental single mutations, and they have a slow-growth phenotype that we attribute to inhibition of general translation initiation. The phenotypes of the GCN2c alleles are dependent on GCN1 and GCN3, indicating that these two positive regulators of GCN4 expression mediate the inhibitory effects on translation initiation associated with activation of the yeast eIF-2 alpha kinase GCN2. Images PMID:1448107

  2. Glutamine synthetase induced spinal seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Won; Yoon, Young Sul; Matsumoto, Masato; Huang, Wencheng; Ceraulo, Phil; Young, Wise

    2003-02-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a key enzyme in the regulation of glutamate neurotransmission in the central nervous system. It is responsible for converting glutamate to glutamine, consuming one ATP and NH3 in the process. Glutamate is neurotoxic when it accumulates in extracellular fluids. We investigated the effects of GS in both a spinal cord injury (SCI) model and normal rats. 0.1-ml of low (2- micro M) and high (55- micro M) concentrations of GS were applied, intrathecally, to the spinal cord of rats under pentobarbital anesthesia. Immediately after an intrathecal injection into the L1-L3 space, the rats developed convulsive movements. These movements initially consisted of myoclonic twitches of the paravertebral muscles close to the injection site, repeated tonic and clonic contractions and extensions of the hind limbs (hind limb seizures) that spread to the fore limbs, and finally rotational axial movements of the body. An EMG of the paravertebral muscles, fore and hind limbs, showed the extent of the muscle activities. GS (2- micro M) caused spinal seizures in the rats after the SCI, and GS (6- micro M) produced seizures in the uninjured anesthetized rats. Denatured GS (70 degrees C, 1 hour) also produced spinal seizures, although higher concentrations were required. We suggest that GS may be directly blocking the release of GABA, or the receptors, in the spinal cord.

  3. Chemical modification of E. coli glutamine synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    DiIanni, C.L.; Colanduoni, J.A.; Collins, R.; Villafranca, J.J.

    1986-05-01

    Thiourea trioxide partially inactivates E. coli glutamine synthetase (GS) (approx.25%) by reacting only with lysine residues, producing homoarginine. Thiourea dioxide totally inactivates GS by reacting with both lysine and histidine residues. The K/sub m/ values for thiourea trioxide modified enzyme are 0.21 mM for ATP and 10 mM for glutamate which are about threefold higher than for native GS. Using (/sup 14/C) thiourea trioxide, 2.3 +/- 0.2 moles of reagent were incorporated per monomer. The same number of homoarginine residues were found by amino acid analysis. Modification of GS with hydroxylamine results in total inactivation resulting from reaction with histidine. Fluorescence titrations indicate that substrate binding to the modified enzyme is weaker than to the native enzyme. EPR spectra of bound Mn/sup 2 +/ indicate that metal ion binding is unaffected by hydroxylamine modification. However, metal ion binding is weaker to the modified enzyme. Protection from hydroxylamine inactivation is observed with ATP + Glutamate, AMPPNP + Glutamate, and MgCl/sub 2/.

  4. Rabbit liver tRNA1Val:I. Primary structure and unusual codon recognition.

    PubMed

    Jank, P; Shindo-Okada, N; Nishimura, S; Gross, H J

    1977-06-01

    The major valine acceptor tRNA1Val from rabbit liver was purified and its nucleotide sequence determined by in vitro [32P] - labeling with T4 phage induced polynucleotide kinase and finger-printing techniques. Its primary structure was found to be identical with the major valine tRNA from mouse myeloma cells. According to the wobble hypothesis this tRNA, which exclusively has an IAC anticodon, should decode the valine codons GUU, GUC and GUA only. However, this tRNA recognizes all four valine codons with a surprising preference for GUG. It is unknown whether this is due to the lack of A37 modification next to the 3' end of the anticodon IAC. The nature of the inosine-guanosine interaction remains to be clarified.

  5. Structures of the Bacterial Ribosome in Classical and Hybrid States of tRNA Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dunkle, Jack A.; Wang, Leyi; Feldman, Michael B.; Pulk, Arto; Chen, Vincent B.; Kapral, Gary J.; Noeske, Jonas; Richardson, Jane S.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Cate, Jamie H. Doudna

    2011-09-06

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome controls the movement of tRNA and mRNA by means of large-scale structural rearrangements. We describe structures of the intact bacterial ribosome from Escherichia coli that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined to a resolution of {approx}3.2 angstroms by means of x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit site. The structures help to explain how the ratchet-like motion of the two ribosomal subunits contributes to the mechanisms of translocation, termination, and ribosome recycling.

  6. Dihydrofolate synthetase and folylpolyglutamate synthetase: direct evidence for intervention of acyl phosphate intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, R.V.; Shane, B.; McGuire, J.J.; Coward, J.K.

    1988-12-13

    The transfer of /sup 17/O and/or /sup 18/O from (COOH-/sup 17/O or -/sup 18/O) enriched substrates to inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/) has been demonstrated for two enzyme-catalyzed reactions involved in folate biosynthesis and glutamylation. COOH-/sup 18/O-labeled folate, methotrexate, and dihydropteroate, in addition to (/sup 17/O)-glutamate, were synthesized and used as substrates for folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) isolated from Escherichia coli, hog liver, and rat liver and for dihydrofolate synthetase (DHFS) isolated from E. coli. P/sub i/ was purified from the reaction mixtures and converted to trimethyl phosphate (TMP), which was then analyzed for /sup 17/O and /sup 18/O enrichment by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and/or mass spectroscopy. In the reactions catalyzed by the E. coli enzymes, both NMR and quantitative mass spectral analyses established that transfer of the oxygen isotope from the substrate /sup 18/O-enriched carboxyl group to P/sub i/ occurred, thereby providing strong evidence for an acyl phosphate intermediate in both the FPGS- and DHFS-catalyzed reactions. Similar oxygen-transfer experiments were carried out by use of two mammalian enzymes. The small amounts of P/sub i/ obtained from reactions catalyzed by these less abundant FPGS proteins precluded the use of NMR techniques. However, mass spectral analysis of the TMP derived from the mammalian FPGS-catalyzed reactions showed clearly that /sup 18/O transfer had occurred.

  7. Extensive and evolutionarily persistent mitochondrial tRNA editing in Velvet Worms (phylum Onychophora).

    PubMed

    Segovia, Romulo; Pett, Walker; Trewick, Steve; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial genomes of onychophorans (velvet worms) present an interesting problem: Some previous studies reported them lacking several transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, whereas others found that all their tRNA genes were present but severely reduced. To resolve this discrepancy, we determined complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of the onychophorans Oroperipatus sp. and Peripatoides sympatrica as well as cDNA sequences from 14 and 10 of their tRNAs, respectively. We show that tRNA genes in these genomes are indeed highly reduced and encode truncated molecules, which are restored to more conventional structures by extensive tRNA editing. During this editing process, up to 34 nucleotides are added to the tRNA sequences encoded in Oroperipatus sp. mtDNA, rebuilding the aminoacyl acceptor stem, the TΨC arm, and in some extreme cases, the variable arm and even a part of the anticodon stem. The editing is less extreme in P. sympatrica in which at least a part of the TΨC arm is always encoded in mtDNA. When the entire TΨC arm is added de novo in Oroperipatus sp., the sequence of this arm is either identical or similar among different tRNA species, yet the sequences show substantial variation for each tRNA. These observations suggest that the arm is rebuilt, at least in part, by a template-independent mechanism and argue against the alternative possibility that tRNA genes or their parts are imported from the nucleus. By contrast, the 3' end of the aminoacyl acceptor stem is likely restored by a template-dependent mechanism. The extreme tRNA editing reported here has been preserved for >140 My as it was found in both extant families of onychophorans. Furthermore, a similar type of tRNA editing may be present in several other groups of arthropods, which show a high degree of tRNA gene reduction in their mtDNA.

  8. Interaction of polyethyleneimine-anchored copper(II) complexes with tRNA studied by spectroscopy methods and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipraba, Jagadeesan; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam; Gandi, Devadas A; Thirunalasundari, Thyagarajan; Vignesh, Sivanandham; James, Rathinam A

    2017-05-01

    Ultraviolet-visible, emission and circular dichroism spectroscopic methods were used in transfer RNA (tRNA) interaction studies performed for polyethyleneimine-copper(II) complexes [Cu(phen)(l-Tyr)BPEI]ClO4 (where phen =1,10-phenanthroline, l-Tyr = l-tyrosine and BPEI = branched polyethyleneimine) with various degrees of coordination (x = 0.059, 0.149, 0.182) in the polymer chain. The results indicated that polyethyleneimine-copper(II) complexes bind with tRNA mostly through surface binding, although other binding modes, such as hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions, might also be present. Dye-exclusion, sulforhodamine B and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays of a polyethyleneimine-copper(II) complex with a higher degree of coordination against different cancer cell lines proved that the complex exhibited cytotoxic specificity and a significant cancer cell inhibition rate. Antimicrobial screening showed activity against some human pathogens. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Three-Dimensional Algebraic Models of the tRNA Code and 12 Graphs for Representing the Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    José, Marco V.; Morgado, Eberto R.; Guimarães, Romeu Cardoso; Zamudio, Gabriel S.; de Farías, Sávio Torres; Bobadilla, Juan R.; Sosa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional algebraic models, also called Genetic Hotels, are developed to represent the Standard Genetic Code, the Standard tRNA Code (S-tRNA-C), and the Human tRNA code (H-tRNA-C). New algebraic concepts are introduced to be able to describe these models, to wit, the generalization of the 2n-Klein Group and the concept of a subgroup coset with a tail. We found that the H-tRNA-C displayed broken symmetries in regard to the S-tRNA-C, which is highly symmetric. We also show that there are only 12 ways to represent each of the corresponding phenotypic graphs of amino acids. The averages of statistical centrality measures of the 12 graphs for each of the three codes are carried out and they are statistically compared. The phenotypic graphs of the S-tRNA-C display a common triangular prism of amino acids in 10 out of the 12 graphs, whilst the corresponding graphs for the H-tRNA-C display only two triangular prisms. The graphs exhibit disjoint clusters of amino acids when their polar requirement values are used. We contend that the S-tRNA-C is in a frozen-like state, whereas the H-tRNA-C may be in an evolving state. PMID:25370377

  10. Autosomal-Recessive Mutations in the tRNA Splicing Endonuclease Subunit TSEN15 Cause Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia and Progressive Microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Breuss, Martin W; Sultan, Tipu; James, Kiely N; Rosti, Rasim O; Scott, Eric; Musaev, Damir; Furia, Bansri; Reis, André; Sticht, Heinrich; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Reuter, Miriam S; Abou Jamra, Rami; Trotta, Christopher R; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-07-07

    The tRNA splicing endonuclease is a highly evolutionarily conserved protein complex, involved in the cleavage of intron-containing tRNAs. In human it consists of the catalytic subunits TSEN2 and TSEN34, as well as the non-catalytic TSEN54 and TSEN15. Recessive mutations in the corresponding genes of the first three are known to cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) types 2A-C, 4, and 5. Here, we report three homozygous TSEN15 variants that cause a milder version of PCH2. The affected individuals showed progressive microcephaly, delayed developmental milestones, intellectual disability, and, in two out of four cases, epilepsy. None, however, displayed the central visual failure seen in PCH case subjects where other subunits of the TSEN are mutated, and only one was affected by the extensive motor defects that are typical in other forms of PCH2. The three amino acid substitutions impacted the protein level of TSEN15 and the stoichiometry of the interacting subunits in different ways, but all resulted in an almost complete loss of in vitro tRNA cleavage activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that mutations in any known subunit of the TSEN complex can cause PCH and progressive microcephaly, emphasizing the importance of its function during brain development.

  11. Use of terbium as a probe of tRNA tertiary structure and folding.

    PubMed Central

    Hargittai, M R; Musier-Forsyth, K

    2000-01-01

    Lanthanide metals such as terbium have previously been shown to be useful for mapping metal-binding sites in RNA. Terbium binds to the same sites on RNA as magnesium, however, with a much higher affinity. Thus, low concentrations of terbium ions can easily displace magnesium and promote phosphodiester backbone scission. At higher concentrations, terbium cleaves RNA in a sequence-independent manner, with a preference for single-stranded, non-Watson-Crick base-paired regions. Here, we show that terbium is a sensitive probe of human tRNALys,3 tertiary structure and folding. When 1 microM tRNA is used, the optimal terbium ion concentration for detecting Mg2+-induced tertiary structural changes is 50-60 microM. Using these concentrations of RNA and terbium, a magnesium-dependent folding transition with a midpoint (KMg) of 2.6 mM is observed for unmodified human tRNALys,3. At lower Tb3+ concentrations, cleavage is restricted to nucleotides that constitute specific metal-binding pockets. This small chemical probe should also be useful for detecting protein induced structural changes in RNA. PMID:11105765

  12. Effect of PEG and mPEG-anthracene on tRNA aggregation and particle formation.

    PubMed

    Froehlich, E; Mandeville, J S; Arnold, D; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2012-01-09

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and its derivatives are synthetic polymers with major applications in gene and drug delivery systems. Synthetic polymers are also used to transport miRNA and siRNA in vitro. We studied the interaction of tRNA with several PEGs of different compositions, such as PEG 3350, PEG 6000, and mPEG-anthracene under physiological conditions. FTIR, UV-visible, CD, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to analyze the PEG binding mode, the binding constant, and the effects of polymer complexation on tRNA stability, aggregation, and particle formation. Structural analysis showed that PEG-tRNA interaction occurs via RNA bases and the backbone phosphate group with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic contacts. The overall binding constants of K(PEG 3350-tRNA)= 1.9 (±0.5) × 10(4) M(-1), K(PEG 6000-tRNA) = 8.9 (±1) × 10(4) M(-1), and K(mPEG-anthracene)= 1.2 (±0.40) × 10(3) M(-1) show stronger polymer-RNA complexation by PEG 6000 and by PEG 3350 than the mPEG-anthracene. AFM imaging showed that PEG complexes contain on average one tRNA with PEG 3350, five tRNA with PEG 6000, and ten tRNA molecules with mPEG-anthracene. tRNA aggregation and particle formation occurred at high polymer concentrations, whereas it remains in A-family structure.

  13. Flipping of the ribosomal A-site adenines provides a basis for tRNA selection

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Chugh, Jeetender; Casiano-Negroni, Anette; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomes control the missense error rate of ~10−4 during translation though quantitative contributions of individual mechanistic steps of the conformational changes yet to be fully determined. Biochemical and biophysical studies led to a qualitative tRNA selection model in which ribosomal A-site residues A1492 and A1493 (A1492/3) flip out in response to cognate tRNA binding, promoting the subsequent reactions, but not in the case of near cognate or non-cognate tRNA. However, this model was recently questioned by X-ray structures revealing conformations of extrahelical A1492/3 and domain closure of the decoding center in both cognate and near-cognate tRNA bound ribosome complexes, suggesting that the non-specific flipping of A1492/3 has no active role in tRNA selection. We explore this question by carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, aided with fluorescence and NMR experiments, to probe the free energy cost of extrahelical flipping of 1492/3 and the strain energy associated with domain conformational change. Our rigorous calculations demonstrate that the A1492/3 flipping is indeed a specific response to the binding of cognate tRNA, contributing 3 kcal/mol to the specificity of tRNA selection. Furthermore, the different A-minor interactions in cognate and near-cognate complexes propagate into the conformational strain and contribute another 4 kcal/mol in domain closure. The recent structure of ribosome with features of extrahelical A1492/3 and closed domain in near-cognate complex is reconciled by possible tautomerization of the wobble base pair in mRNA-tRNA. These results quantitatively rationalize other independent experimental observations and explain the ribosomal discrimination mechanism of selecting cognate versus near-cognate tRNA. PMID:24813122

  14. New computational methods reveal tRNA identity element divergence between Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Freyhult, Eva; Cui, Yuanyuan; Nilsson, Olle; Ardell, David H

    2007-10-01

    There are at least 21 subfunctional classes of tRNAs in most cells that, despite a very highly conserved and compact common structure, must interact specifically with different cliques of proteins or cause grave organismal consequences. Protein recognition of specific tRNA substrates is achieved in part through class-restricted tRNA features called tRNA identity determinants. In earlier work we used TFAM, a statistical classifier of tRNA function, to show evidence of unexpectedly large diversity among bacteria in tRNA identity determinants. We also created a data reduction technique called function logos to visualize identity determinants for a given taxon. Here we show evidence that determinants for lysylated isoleucine tRNAs are not the same in Proteobacteria as in other bacterial groups including the Cyanobacteria. Consistent with this, the lysylating biosynthetic enzyme TilS lacks a C-terminal domain in Cyanobacteria that is present in Proteobacteria. We present here, using function logos, a map estimating all potential identity determinants generally operational in Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria. To further isolate the differences in potential tRNA identity determinants between Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria, we created two new data reduction visualizations to contrast sequence and function logos between two taxa. One, called Information Difference logos (ID logos), shows the evolutionary gain or retention of functional information associated to features in one lineage. The other, Kullback-Leibler divergence Difference logos (KLD logos), shows recruitments or shifts in the functional associations of features, especially those informative in both lineages. We used these new logos to specifically isolate and visualize the differences in potential tRNA identity determinants between Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria. Our graphical results point to numerous differences in potential tRNA identity determinants between these groups. Although more differences in

  15. Structural Analysis of the Active Site Geometry of N[superscript 5]-Carboxyaminoimidazole Ribonucleotide Synthetase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Holden, Hazel M.; Firestine, Steven M.

    2009-09-11

    N{sub 5}-Carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase) converts 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR), MgATP, and bicarbonate into N{sub 5}-CAIR, MgADP, and P{sub i}. The enzyme is required for de novo purine biosynthesis in microbes yet is not found in humans suggesting that it represents an ideal and unexplored target for antimicrobial drug design. Here we report the X-ray structures of N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase from Escherichia coli with either MgATP or MgADP/P{sub i} bound in the active site cleft. These structures, determined to 1.6-{angstrom} resolution, provide detailed information regarding the active site geometry before and after ATP hydrolysis. In both structures, two magnesium ions are observed. Each of these is octahedrally coordinated, and the carboxylate side chain of Glu238 bridges them. For the structure of the MgADP/P{sub i} complex, crystals were grown in the presence of AIR and MgATP. No electron density was observed for AIR, and the electron density corresponding to the nucleotide clearly revealed the presence of ADP and P{sub i} rather than ATP. The bound P{sub i} shifts by approximately 3 {angstrom} relative to the {gamma}-phosphoryl group of ATP and forms electrostatic interactions with the side chains of Arg242 and His244. Since the reaction mechanism of N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase is believed to proceed via a carboxyphosphate intermediate, we propose that the location of the inorganic phosphate represents the binding site for stabilization of this reactive species. Using the information derived from the two structures reported here, coupled with molecular modeling, we propose a catalytic mechanism for N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase.

  16. P-body components, Dhh1 and Pat1, are involved in tRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hurto, Rebecca L.; Hopper, Anita K.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution of tRNA depends on the balance between tRNA nuclear export/re-export and retrograde tRNA nuclear import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of tRNA is sensitive to nutrient availability as cells deprived of various nutrients exhibit tRNA nuclear accumulation. Starvation induces numerous events that result in translational repression and P-body formation. This study investigated the possible coordination of these responses with tRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution. Dhh1 and Pat1 function in parallel to promote translation repression and P-body formation in response to starvation. Loss of both, Dhh1 and Pat1, results in a failure to repress translation and to induce P-body formation in response to glucose starvation. This study reports that nutrient deprived dhh1 pat1 cells also fail to accumulate tRNA within nuclei. Conversely, inhibition of translation initiation and induction of P-body formation by overproduction of Dhh1 or Pat1 cause tRNA nuclear accumulation in nutrient-replete conditions. Also, loss of the mRNA decapping activator, Lsm1, causes tRNA nuclear accumulation. However, the coordination between P-body formation, translation repression, and tRNA distribution is limited to the early part of the P-body formation/translation repression pathway as loss of mRNA decapping or 5′ to 3′ degradation does not influence tRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics. The data provide the first link between P-body formation/translation initiation and tRNA nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics. The current model is that Dhh1 and Pat1 function in parallel to promote starvation-induced tRNA nuclear accumulation. PMID:21398402

  17. Study of the Binding Energies between Unnatural Amino Acids and Engineered Orthogonal Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Truong, Tan M.; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2015-07-01

    We utilized several computational approaches to evaluate the binding energies of tyrosine (Tyr) and several unnatural Tyr analogs, to several orthogonal aaRSes derived from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases. The present study reveals the following: (1) AutoDock Vina and ROSETTA were able to distinguish binding energy differences for individual pairs of favorable and unfavorable aaRS-amino acid complexes, but were unable to cluster together all experimentally verified favorable complexes from unfavorable aaRS-Tyr complexes; (2) MD-MM/PBSA provided the best prediction accuracy in terms of clustering favorable and unfavorable enzyme-substrate complexes, but also required the highest computational cost; and (3) MM/PBSA based on single energy-minimized structures has a significantly lower computational cost compared to MD-MM/PBSA, but still produced sufficiently accurate predictions to cluster aaRS-amino acid interactions. Although amino acid-aaRS binding is just the first step in a complex series of processes to acylate a tRNA with its corresponding amino acid, the difference in binding energy, as shown by MD-MM/PBSA, is important for a mutant orthogonal aaRS to distinguish between a favorable unnatural amino acid (unAA) substrate from unfavorable natural amino acid substrates. Our computational study should assist further designing and engineering of orthogonal aaRSes for the genetic encoding of novel unAAs.

  18. Crystal structure of aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from Pyrococcus kodakaraensis KOD: archaeon specificity and catalytic mechanism of adenylate formation.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, E; Moulinier, L; Fujiwara, S; Imanaka, T; Thierry, J C; Moras, D

    1998-01-01

    The crystal structure of aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (AspRS) from Pyrococcus kodakaraensis was solved at 1.9 A resolution. The sequence and three-dimensional structure of the catalytic domain are highly homologous to those of eukaryotic AspRSs. In contrast, the N-terminal domain, whose function is to bind the tRNA anticodon, is more similar to that of eubacterial enzymes. Its structure explains the unique property of archaeal AspRSs of accommodating both tRNAAsp and tRNAAsn. Soaking the apo-enzyme crystals with ATP and aspartic acid both separately and together allows the adenylate formation to be followed. Due to the asymmetry of the dimeric enzyme in the crystalline state, different steps of the reaction could be visualized within the same crystal. Four different states of the aspartic acid activation reaction could thus be characterized, revealing the functional correlation of the observed conformational changes. The binding of the amino acid substrate induces movement of two invariant loops which secure the position of the peptidyl moiety for adenylate formation. An unambiguous spatial and functional assignment of three magnesium ion cofactors can be made. This study shows the important role of residues present in both archaeal and eukaryotic AspRSs, but absent from the eubacterial enzymes. PMID:9724658

  19. A conserved proline triplet in Val-tRNA synthetase and the origin of elongation factor P

    PubMed Central

    Starosta, Agata L.; Lassak, Jürgen; Peil, Lauri; Atkinson, Gemma C.; Woolstenhulme, Christopher J.; Virumäe, Kai; Buskirk, Allen; Tenson, Tanel; Remme, Jaanus; Jung, Kirsten; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial ribosomes stall on polyproline stretches and require the elongation factor P (EF-P) to relieve the arrest. Yet it remains unclear why evolution has favored the development of EF-P, rather than selecting against the occurrence of polyproline stretches in proteins. We have discovered that only a single polyproline stretch is invariant across all domains of life, namely, a proline triplet in ValS, the tRNA synthetase that charges tRNAVal with valine. Here we show that expression of ValS in vivo and in vitro requires EF-P and demonstrate that the proline triplet located in the active site of ValS is important for efficient charging of tRNAVal with valine, preventing formation of mischarged Thr-tRNAVal, as well as for efficient growth of E. coli in vivo. We suggest that the critical role of the proline triplet for ValS activity may explain why bacterial cells co-evolved the EF-P rescue system. PMID:25310979

  20. Study of the Binding Energies between Unnatural Amino Acids and Engineered Orthogonal Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wei; Truong, Tan M.; Ai, Hui-wang

    2015-01-01

    We utilized several computational approaches to evaluate the binding energies of tyrosine (Tyr) and several unnatural Tyr analogs, to several orthogonal aaRSes derived from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases. The present study reveals the following: (1) AutoDock Vina and ROSETTA were able to distinguish binding energy differences for individual pairs of favorable and unfavorable aaRS-amino acid complexes, but were unable to cluster together all experimentally verified favorable complexes from unfavorable aaRS-Tyr complexes; (2) MD-MM/PBSA provided the best prediction accuracy in terms of clustering favorable and unfavorable enzyme-substrate complexes, but also required the highest computational cost; and (3) MM/PBSA based on single energy-minimized structures has a significantly lower computational cost compared to MD-MM/PBSA, but still produced sufficiently accurate predictions to cluster aaRS-amino acid interactions. Although amino acid-aaRS binding is just the first step in a complex series of processes to acylate a tRNA with its corresponding amino acid, the difference in binding energy, as shown by MD-MM/PBSA, is important for a mutant orthogonal aaRS to distinguish between a favorable unnatural amino acid (unAA) substrate from unfavorable natural amino acid substrates. Our computational study should assist further designing and engineering of orthogonal aaRSes for the genetic encoding of novel unAAs. PMID:26220470

  1. Expanding the Genetic Code of Caenorhabditis elegans Using Bacterial aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase/tRNA Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Angela R.; She, Xingyu; Xiang, Zheng; Coin, Irene; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P.; Dillin, Andrew; Wang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    The genetic code specifies 20 common amino acids and is largely preserved in both single and multicellular organisms. Unnatural amino acids (Uaas) have been genetically incorporated into proteins by using engineered orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyltRNA synthetase (RS) pairs, enabling new research capabilities and precision inaccessible with common amino acids. We show here that Escherichia coli tyrosyl and leucyl amber suppressor tRNA/RS pairs can be evolved to incorporate different Uaas in response to the amber stop codon UAG into various proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans. To accurately report Uaa incorporation in worms, we found that it is crucial to integrate the UAG-containing reporter gene into the genome rather than to express it on an extrachromosomal array from which variable expression can lead to reporter activation independent of the amber-suppressing tRNA/RS. Synthesizing a Uaa in a dipeptide drives Uaa uptake and bioavailability. Uaa incorporation has dosage, temporal, tRNA copy, and temperature dependencies similar to endogenous amber suppression. Uaa incorporation efficiency was improved by impairing the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway through knockdown of smg-1. We have generated stable transgenic worms capable of genetically encoding Uaas, enabling Uaa exploitation to address complex biological problems within a metazoan. We anticipate our strategies will be generally extendable to other multicellular organisms. PMID:22554080

  2. Inhibitors of Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase Have Potent Activity against Giardia intestinalis Trophozoites

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Ranae M.; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Gillespie, J. Robert; Shibata, Sayaka; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Fan, Erkang

    2015-01-01

    The methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) is a novel drug target for the protozoan pathogen Giardia intestinalis. This protist contains a single MetRS that is distinct from the human cytoplasmic MetRS. A panel of MetRS inhibitors was tested against recombinant Giardia MetRS, Giardia trophozoites, and mammalian cell lines. The best compounds inhibited trophozoite growth at 500 nM (metronidazole did so at ∼5,000 nM) and had low cytotoxicity against mammalian cells, indicating excellent potential for further development as anti-Giardia drugs. PMID:26324270

  3. Cleavage of tRNA within the mature tRNA sequence by the catalytic RNA of RNase P: implication for the formation of the primer tRNA fragment for reverse transcription in copia retrovirus-like particles.

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Y; Sasaki, N; Ando-Yamagami, Y

    1990-01-01

    The retrovirus-like particles of Drosophila are intermediates of retrotransposition of the transposable element copia. In these particles, a 39-nucleotide-long fragment from the 5' region of Drosophila initiator methionine tRNA (tRNA(iMet) is used as the primer for copia minus-strand reverse transcription. To function as primer for this reverse transcription, the Drosophila tRNA(iMet) must be cleaved in vivo at the site between nucleotides 39 and 40. When a synthetic Drosophila tRNA(iMet) precursor was incubated with M1RNA, the catalytic RNA of Escherichia coli RNase P, other cleavages within the mature tRNA sequence were detected in addition to the efficient removal of the 5' leader sequence of this tRNA precursor. One of these cleavage sites is between nucleotides 39 and 40 of Drosophila tRNA(iMet). Based on this result, we propose a model for formation of the primer tRNA fragment for reverse transcription in copia retrovirus-like particles. Images PMID:1700426

  4. Exportin-5-mediated nuclear export of eukaryotic elongation factor 1A and tRNA.

    PubMed

    Calado, Angelo; Treichel, Nathalie; Müller, Eva-Christina; Otto, Albrecht; Kutay, Ulrike

    2002-11-15

    Transport of proteins and RNA into and out of the cell nucleus is mediated largely by a family of RanGTP-binding transport receptors. Export receptors (exportins) need to bind RanGTP for efficient loading of their export cargo. We have identified eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) and tRNA as RanGTP-dependent binding partners of exportin-5 (Exp5). Exp5 stimulates nuclear export of eEF1A when microinjected into the nucleus of Xenopus laevis oocytes. Surprisingly, the interaction between eEF1A and Exp5 is dependent on tRNA that can interact directly with Exp5 and, if aminoacylated, recruits eEF1A into the export complex. These data suggested to us that Exp5 might support tRNA export. Indeed, not only the canonical tRNA export receptor, exportin-t, but also Exp5 can drive nuclear export of tRNA. Taken together, we show that there exists an alternative tRNA export pathway which can be exploited to keep eEF1A out of the cell nucleus.

  5. tRNA fluorescent labeling at 3' end inducing an aminoacyl-tRNA-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Servillo, L; Balestrieri, C; Quagliuolo, L; Iorio, E L; Giovane, A

    1993-04-01

    A fluorescent tRNA derivative labeled at 3'-O position of the ultimate adenosine residue by reaction, under mild conditions, of tRNA with isatoic anhydride [3,1-benzoxazine-2,4(1H)-dione] was obtained. The labeling selectivity was determined by several criteria: digestion with RNase, followed by HPLC of the digest, produces only one labeled nucleoside, identified as 3'-O-anthraniloyladenosine; the ratio of the absorbance at 260 nm to 332 nm also suggests a 1:1 molar ratio between the nucleic acid and the fluorophore; finally, the incapacity of the labeled tRNA to be charged by the specific aminoacyltransferase further demonstrates the engagement of the 3'-O position. Although the 3'-O-anthraniloyl-labeled tRNA does not seem to be functionally active, as far as the aminoacyl charging activity is concerned, surprisingly we found that it is able to form the ternary complex with elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and GTP with an affinity consistently higher than uncharged tRNA. From fluorescence anisotropy measurements the ternary complex dissociation constant was estimated as 73 nM for Escherichia coli and 140 nM for yeast anthraniloyl-tRNA(Phe). These results may be interpreted in terms of the particular structure of the anthraniloyl group that makes the labeled tRNA similar to an aminoacyl-tRNA.

  6. Nuclear pore proteins are involved in the biogenesis of functional tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Simos, G; Tekotte, H; Grosjean, H; Segref, A; Sharma, K; Tollervey, D; Hurt, E C

    1996-01-01

    Los1p and Pus1p, which are involved in tRNA biogenesis, were found in a genetic screen for components interacting with the nuclear pore protein Nsp1p. LOS1, PUS1 and NSP1 interact functionally, since the combination of mutations in the three genes causes synthetic lethality. Pus1p is an intranuclear protein which exhibits a nucleotide-specific and intron-dependent tRNA pseudouridine synthase activity. Los1p was shown previously to be required for efficient pre-tRNA splicing; we report here that Los1p localizes to the nuclear pores and is linked functionally to several components of the tRNA biogenesis machinery including Pus1p and Tfc4p. When the formation of functional tRNA was analyzed by an in vivo assay, the los1(-) pus1(-) double mutant, as well as several thermosensitive nucleoporin mutants including nsp1, nup116, nup133 and nup85, exhibited loss of suppressor tRNA activity even at permissive temperatures. These data suggest that nuclear pore proteins are required for the biogenesis of functional tRNA. Images PMID:8641292

  7. Peculiarities of interaction of porphyrins with tRNA at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Dalyan, Y; Vardanyan, I; Chavushyan, A; Balayan, G

    2010-08-01

    The interaction of meso-tetra-(4N-oxyethylpyridyl)porphyrin (TOEPyP4) and its Zn(II)-, Cu(II)-, Mn(III)-derivatives with tRNA from E.Coli at low ionic strength (micro=0.02M) was studied using UV/Vis spectrophotometry and Circular Dichroism (CD) methods. An unusual Induced Circular Dichroism (ICD) spectra profile of the ZnTOEPyP4-tRNA complex is found. It is demonstrated that ZnTOEPyP4 is ordered in a stack, not only on helical sites, but also on loops of a hairpin form of tRNA. TOEPyP4 and CuTOEPyP4 are able to intercalate in the helical sites of this form of tRNA. MnTOEPyP4 interacts with tRNA via external non-ordered mechanism. It is established that all porphyrins are bound with tRNA more strongly than with DNA.

  8. A subset of conserved tRNA genes in plastid DNA of nongreen plants.

    PubMed

    Lohan, A J; Wolfe, K H

    1998-09-01

    The plastid genome of the nonphotosynthetic parasitic plant Epifagus virginiana contains only 17 of the 30 tRNA genes normally found in angiosperm plastid DNA. Although this is insufficient for translation, the genome is functional, so import of cytosolic tRNAs into plastids has been suggested. This raises the question of whether the tRNA genes that remain in E. virginiana plastid DNA are active or have just fortuitously escaped deletion. We report the sequences of 20 plastid tRNA loci from Orobanche minor, which shares a nonphotosynthetic ancestor with E. virginiana. The two species have 9 intact tRNA genes in common, the others being defunct in one or both species. The intron-containing trnLUAA gene is absent from E. virginiana, but it is intact, transcribed, and spliced in O. minor. The shared intact genes are better conserved than intergenic sequences, which indicates that these genes are being maintained by natural selection and, therefore, must be functional. For the most part, the tRNA species conserved in nonphotosynthetic plastids are also those that have never been found to be imported in plant mitochondria, which suggests that the same rules may govern tRNA import in the two organelles. A small photosynthesis gene, psbI, is still intact in O. minor, and computer simulations show that some small nonessential genes have an appreciable chance of escaping deletion.

  9. A subset of conserved tRNA genes in plastid DNA of nongreen plants.

    PubMed Central

    Lohan, A J; Wolfe, K H

    1998-01-01

    The plastid genome of the nonphotosynthetic parasitic plant Epifagus virginiana contains only 17 of the 30 tRNA genes normally found in angiosperm plastid DNA. Although this is insufficient for translation, the genome is functional, so import of cytosolic tRNAs into plastids has been suggested. This raises the question of whether the tRNA genes that remain in E. virginiana plastid DNA are active or have just fortuitously escaped deletion. We report the sequences of 20 plastid tRNA loci from Orobanche minor, which shares a nonphotosynthetic ancestor with E. virginiana. The two species have 9 intact tRNA genes in common, the others being defunct in one or both species. The intron-containing trnLUAA gene is absent from E. virginiana, but it is intact, transcribed, and spliced in O. minor. The shared intact genes are better conserved than intergenic sequences, which indicates that these genes are being maintained by natural selection and, therefore, must be functional. For the most part, the tRNA species conserved in nonphotosynthetic plastids are also those that have never been found to be imported in plant mitochondria, which suggests that the same rules may govern tRNA import in the two organelles. A small photosynthesis gene, psbI, is still intact in O. minor, and computer simulations show that some small nonessential genes have an appreciable chance of escaping deletion. PMID:9725858

  10. TFAM 1.0: an online tRNA function classifier

    PubMed Central

    Tåquist, Helena; Cui, Yuanyuan; Ardell, David H.

    2007-01-01

    We have earlier published an automated statistical classifier of tRNA function called TFAM. Unlike tRNA gene-finders, TFAM uses information from the total sequences of tRNAs and not just their anticodons to predict their function. Therefore TFAM has an advantage in predicting initiator tRNAs, the amino acid charging identity of nonstandard tRNAs such as suppressors, and the former identity of pseudo-tRNAs. In addition, TFAM predictions are robust to sequencing errors and useful for the statistical analysis of tRNA sequence, function and evolution. Earlier versions of TFAM required a complicated installation and running procedure, and only bacterial tRNA identity models were provided. Here we describe a new version of TFAM with both a Web Server interface and simplified standalone installation. New TFAM models are available including a proteobacterial model for the bacterial lysylated isoleucine tRNAs, making it now possible for TFAM to correctly classify all tRNA genes for some bacterial taxa. First-draft eukaryotic and archaeal models are also provided making initiator tRNA prediction easily accessible genes to any researcher or genome sequencing effort. The TFAM Web Server is available at http://tfam.lcb.uu.se PMID:17591612

  11. Functional linkage between the glutaminase and synthetase domains of carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase. Role of serine 44 in carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase-aspartate carbamoyltransferase-dihydroorotase (cad).

    PubMed

    Hewagama, A; Guy, H I; Vickrey, J F; Evans, D R

    1999-10-01

    Mammalian carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase is part of carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase-aspartate carbamoyltransferase-dihydroorotase (CAD), a multifunctional protein that also catalyzes the second and third steps of pyrimidine biosynthesis. Carbamoyl phosphate synthesis requires the concerted action of the glutaminase (GLN) and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domains of CAD. There is a functional linkage between these domains such that glutamine hydrolysis on the GLN domain does not occur at a significant rate unless ATP and HCO(3)(-), the other substrates needed for carbamoyl phosphate synthesis, bind to the synthetase domain. The GLN domain consists of catalytic and attenuation subdomains. In the separately cloned GLN domain, the catalytic subdomain is down-regulated by interactions with the attenuation domain, a process thought to be part of the functional linkage. Replacement of Ser(44) in the GLN attenuation domain with alanine increases the k(cat)/K(m) for glutamine hydrolysis 680-fold. The formation of a functional hybrid between the mammalian Ser(44) GLN domain and the Escherichia coli carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase large subunit had little effect on glutamine hydrolysis. In contrast, ATP and HCO(3)(-) did not stimulate the glutaminase activity, indicating that the interdomain linkage had been disrupted. In accord with this interpretation, the rate of glutamine hydrolysis and carbamoyl phosphate synthesis were no longer coordinated. Approximately 3 times more glutamine was hydrolyzed by the Ser(44) --> Ala mutant than that needed for carbamoyl phosphate synthesis. Ser(44), the only attenuation subdomain residue that extends into the GLN active site, appears to be an integral component of the regulatory circuit that phases glutamine hydrolysis and carbamoyl phosphate synthesis.

  12. Near-UV stress in salmonella typhimurium: 4-thiouridine in tRNA, ppGpp, and ApppGpp as components of an adaptive response

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.F.; Baker, J.C.; Ames, B.N.

    1988-05-01

    We have examined the role of 4-thiouridine in the responses of Salmonella typhimurium to near-UV irradiation. Mutants lacking 4-thiouridine (nuv) and mutants defective in the synthesis of ppGpp (guanosine 5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate) (relA) were found to be sensitive to killing by near-UV. Near-UV induced the synthesis of a set of proteins that were not induced in the nuv mutant. Some of these proteins were identified as oxidative defense proteins, and others were identified as ppGpp-inducible proteins. Over 100-fold increases in ApppGpp (adenoisine 5', 5'''-triphosphoguanosine-3'''-diphosphate, the adenylylated form of ppGpp) were observed in wild-type cells after near-UV irradiation but not in the 4-thiouridine-deficient mutant. These data support a model in which ppGpp and ApppGpp, a dinucleotide proposed to be synthesized by tRNA-aminoacyl synthetases as a response to the cross-linking of 4-thiouridine in tRNA by near-UV, induce the synthesis of proteins necessary for resistance to near-UV irradiation.

  13. Selenium Is Mobilized In Vivo from Free Selenocysteine and Is Incorporated Specifically into Formate Dehydrogenase H and tRNA Nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Lacourciere, Gerard M.

    2002-01-01

    Selenophosphate synthetase (SPS), the selD gene product from Escherichia coli, catalyzes the biosynthesis of monoselenophosphate, AMP, and orthophosphate in a 1:1:1 ratio from selenide and ATP. It was recently demonstrated that selenium delivered from selenocysteine by an E. coli NifS-like protein could replace free selenide in the in vitro SPS assay for selenophosphate formation (G. M. Lacourciere, H. Mihara, T. Kurihara, N. Esaki, and T. C. Stadtman, J. Biol. Chem. 275:23769-23773, 2000). During growth of E. coli in the presence of 0.1 μM 75SeO32− and increasing amounts of l-selenocysteine, a concomitant decrease in 75Se incorporation into formate dehydrogenase H and nucleosides of bulk tRNA was observed. This is consistent with the mobilization of selenium from l-selenocysteine in vivo and its use in selenophosphate formation. The ability of E. coli to utilize selenocysteine as a selenium source for selenophosphate biosynthesis in vivo supports the participation of the NifS-like proteins in selenium metabolism. PMID:11889101

  14. Atypical archaeal tRNA pyrrolysine transcript behaves towards EF-Tu as a typical elongator tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Théobald-Dietrich, Anne; Frugier, Magali; Giegé, Richard; Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered tRNAPyl is involved in specific incorporation of pyrrolysine in the active site of methylamine methyltransferases in the archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri. In solution probing experiments, a transcript derived from tRNAPyl displays a secondary fold slightly different from the canonical cloverleaf and interestingly similar to that of bovine mitochondrial tRNASer(uga). Aminoacylation of tRNAPyl transcript by a typical class II synthetase, LysRS from yeast, was possible when its amber anticodon CUA was mutated into a lysine UUU anticodon. Hydrolysis protection assays show that lysylated tRNAPyl can be recognized by bacterial elongation factor. This indicates that no antideterminant sequence is present in the body of the tRNAPyl transcript to prevent it from interacting with EF-Tu, in contrast with the otherwise functionally similar tRNASec that mediates selenocysteine incorporation. PMID:14872064

  15. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming) is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1) and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2). Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types. PMID:21867507

  16. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  17. Heterogeneity of Glutamine Synthetase Polypeptides in Phaseolus vulgaris L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Miguel; Porta, Helena; Padilla, Jaime; Folch, Jorge; Sánchez, Federico

    1984-01-01

    Glutamine synthetases from roots, nodules, and leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris L. have been purified to homogeneity and their polypeptide composition determined. The leaf enzyme is composed of six polypeptides. The cytosolic fraction contains two 43,000 dalton polypeptides and the chloroplastic enzyme is formed by four 45,000 dalton polypeptides. Root glutamine synthetase consists only of the same two polypeptides of 43,000 dalton that are present in the leaf enzyme. The nodule enzyme is formed by two polypeptides of 43,000 dalton, one is common to the leaf and root enzyme but the other is specific for N2-fixing nodule tissue. The two glutamine synthetase forms of the nodule contain a different proportion of the 43,000 dalton polypeptides. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:16663942

  18. Inhibition of Plant Glutamine Synthetases by Substituted Phosphinothricins

    PubMed Central

    Logusch, Eugene W.; Walker, Daniel M.; McDonald, John F.; Franz, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) utilizes various substituted glutamic acids as substrates. We have used this information to design herbicidal α- and γ-substituted analogs of phosphinothricin (l-2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)butanoic acid, PPT), a naturally occurring GS inhibitor and a potent herbicide. The substituted phosphinothricins inhibit cytosolic sorghum GS1 and chloroplastic GS2 competitively versusl-glutamate, with Ki values in the low micromolar range. At higher concentrations, these inhibitors inactivate glutamine synthetase, while dilution restores activity through enzyme-inhibitor dissociation. Herbicidal phosphinothricins exhibit low Ki values and slow enzyme turnover, as described by reactivation characteristics. Both the GS1 and GS2 isoforms of plant glutamine synthetase are similarly inhibited by the phosphinothricins, consistent with the broad-spectrum herbicidal activity observed for PPT itself as well as other active compounds in this series. PMID:16668090

  19. Analogs of natural aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase inhibitors clear malaria in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Novoa, Eva Maria; Camacho, Noelia; Tor, Anna; Wilkinson, Barrie; Moss, Steven; Marín-García, Patricia; Azcárate, Isabel G.; Bautista, José M.; Mirando, Adam C.; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Varon, Sònia; Royo, Miriam; Cortés, Alfred; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2014-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global health problem. Emerging resistance to existing antimalarial drugs drives the search for new antimalarials, and protein translation is a promising pathway to target. Here we explore the potential of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) family as a source of antimalarial drug targets. First, a battery of known and novel ARS inhibitors was tested against Plasmodium falciparum cultures, and their activities were compared. Borrelidin, a natural inhibitor of threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS), stands out for its potent antimalarial effect. However, it also inhibits human ThrRS and is highly toxic to human cells. To circumvent this problem, we tested a library of bioengineered and semisynthetic borrelidin analogs for their antimalarial activity and toxicity. We found that some analogs effectively lose their toxicity against human cells while retaining a potent antiparasitic activity both in vitro and in vivo and cleared malaria from Plasmodium yoelii-infected mice, resulting in 100% mice survival rates. Our work identifies borrelidin analogs as potent, selective, and unexplored scaffolds that efficiently clear malaria both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25489076

  20. Analogs of natural aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase inhibitors clear malaria in vivo.

    PubMed

    Novoa, Eva Maria; Camacho, Noelia; Tor, Anna; Wilkinson, Barrie; Moss, Steven; Marín-García, Patricia; Azcárate, Isabel G; Bautista, José M; Mirando, Adam C; Francklyn, Christopher S; Varon, Sònia; Royo, Miriam; Cortés, Alfred; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2014-12-23

    Malaria remains a major global health problem. Emerging resistance to existing antimalarial drugs drives the search for new antimalarials, and protein translation is a promising pathway to target. Here we explore the potential of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) family as a source of antimalarial drug targets. First, a battery of known and novel ARS inhibitors was tested against Plasmodium falciparum cultures, and their activities were compared. Borrelidin, a natural inhibitor of threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS), stands out for its potent antimalarial effect. However, it also inhibits human ThrRS and is highly toxic to human cells. To circumvent this problem, we tested a library of bioengineered and semisynthetic borrelidin analogs for their antimalarial activity and toxicity. We found that some analogs effectively lose their toxicity against human cells while retaining a potent antiparasitic activity both in vitro and in vivo and cleared malaria from Plasmodium yoelii-infected mice, resulting in 100% mice survival rates. Our work identifies borrelidin analogs as potent, selective, and unexplored scaffolds that efficiently clear malaria both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Enzymology of tRNA modification in the bacterial MnmEG pathway.

    PubMed

    Armengod, M-Eugenia; Moukadiri, Ismaïl; Prado, Silvia; Ruiz-Partida, Rafael; Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Villarroya, Magda; Lomas, Rodrigo; Garzón, María J; Martínez-Zamora, Ana; Meseguer, Salvador; Navarro-González, Carmen

    2012-07-01

    Among all RNAs, tRNA exhibits the largest number and the widest variety of post-transcriptional modifications. Modifications within the anticodon stem loop, mainly at the wobble position and purine-37, collectively contribute to stabilize the codon-anticodon pairing, maintain the translational reading frame, facilitate the engagement of the ribosomal decoding site and enable translocation of tRNA from the A-site to the P-site of the ribosome. Modifications at the wobble uridine (U34) of tRNAs reading two degenerate codons ending in purine are complex and result from the activity of two multi-enzyme pathways, the IscS-MnmA and MnmEG pathways, which independently work on positions 2 and 5 of the U34 pyrimidine ring, respectively, and from a third pathway, controlled by TrmL (YibK), that modifies the 2'-hydroxyl group of the ribose. MnmEG is the only common pathway to all the mentioned tRNAs, and involves the GTP- and FAD-dependent activity of the MnmEG complex and, in some cases, the activity of the bifunctional enzyme MnmC. The Escherichia coli MnmEG complex catalyzes the incorporation of an aminomethyl group into the C5 atom of U34 using methylene-tetrahydrofolate and glycine or ammonium as donors. The reaction requires GTP hydrolysis, probably to assemble the active site of the enzyme or to carry out substrate recognition. Inactivation of the evolutionarily conserved MnmEG pathway produces a pleiotropic phenotype in bacteria and mitochondrial dysfunction in human cell lines. While the IscS-MnmA pathway and the MnmA-mediated thiouridylation reaction are relatively well understood, we have limited information on the reactions mediated by the MnmEG, MnmC and TrmL enzymes and on the precise role of proteins MnmE and MnmG in the MnmEG complex activity. This review summarizes the present state of knowledge on these pathways and what we still need to know, with special emphasis on the MnmEG pathway.

  2. Recurrent Isolated Neonatal Hemolytic Anemia: Think About Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Signolet, Isabelle; Chenouard, Rachel; Oca, Florine; Barth, Magalie; Reynier, Pascal; Denis, Marie-Christine; Simard, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia (HA) of the newborn should be considered in cases of rapidly developing, severe, or persistent hyperbilirubinemia. Several causes of corpuscular hemolysis have been described, among which red blood cell enzyme defects are of particular concern. We report a rare case of red blood cell enzyme defect in a male infant, who presented during his first months of life with recurrent and isolated neonatal hemolysis. All main causes were ruled out. At 6.5 months of age, the patient presented with gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization; fortuitously, urine organic acid chromatography revealed a large peak of 5-oxoproline. Before the association between HA and 5-oxoprolinuria was noted, glutathione synthetase deficiency was suspected and confirmed by a low glutathione synthetase concentration and a collapse of glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes. Moreover, molecular diagnosis revealed 2 mutations in the glutathione synthetase gene: a previously reported missense mutation (c.[656A>G]; p.[Asp219Gly]) and a mutation not yet described in the binding site of the enzyme (c.[902T>C]; p.[Leu301Pro]). However, 15 days later, a control sample revealed no signs of 5-oxoprolinuria and the clinical history discovered administration of acetaminophen in the 48 hours before hospitalization. Thus, in this patient, acetaminophen exposure allowed the diagnosis of a mild form of glutathione synthetase deficiency, characterized by isolated HA. Early diagnosis is important because treatment with bicarbonate, vitamins C and E, and elimination of trigger factors are recommended to improve long-term outcomes. Glutathione synthetase deficiency should be screened for in cases of unexplained newborn HA. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. The binding sites for tRNA on eukaryotic ribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Leader, D P; Machray, G C

    1975-01-01

    We have studied the non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA to ribosomes from rat liver using deacylated tRNA to inhibit binding to the P-site and puromycin (5 x 10-minus3M) to inhibit binding to the A-site. We conclude that at a low concentration of magnesium ions (10mM) phe-tRNA is bound only at the A-site of 80S irbosomes, whereas at a high concentration of magnesium ions (40mM) phe-tRNA is also bound at the P-site. Studies with edeine indicate that, during non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA, eukaryotic ribosomes (in contrast to prokarotic ribosomes) have the A-site of the 60S subunit and the initiation site of the 40S subunit juxtaposed. This may account for the differences observed, in formation of diphenylalanyl-tRNA and phenylalanyl-puromycin, between phe-tRNA bound non-enzymically to the P-sites of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes. PMID:1098024

  4. The binding sites for tRNA on eukaryotic ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Leader, D P; Machray, G C

    1975-07-01

    We have studied the non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA to ribosomes from rat liver using deacylated tRNA to inhibit binding to the P-site and puromycin (5 x 10-minus3M) to inhibit binding to the A-site. We conclude that at a low concentration of magnesium ions (10mM) phe-tRNA is bound only at the A-site of 80S irbosomes, whereas at a high concentration of magnesium ions (40mM) phe-tRNA is also bound at the P-site. Studies with edeine indicate that, during non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA, eukaryotic ribosomes (in contrast to prokarotic ribosomes) have the A-site of the 60S subunit and the initiation site of the 40S subunit juxtaposed. This may account for the differences observed, in formation of diphenylalanyl-tRNA and phenylalanyl-puromycin, between phe-tRNA bound non-enzymically to the P-sites of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes.

  5. Mollusk genes encoding lysine tRNA (UUU) contain introns.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, M; Abe, Y; Saruta, Y; Okada, N

    1995-11-20

    New intron-containing genes encoding tRNAs were discovered when genomic DNA isolated from various animal species was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers based on sequences of rabbit tRNA(Lys). From sequencing analysis of the products of PCR, we found that introns are present in several genes encoding tRNA(Lys) in mollusks, such as Loligo bleekeri (squid) and Octopus vulgaris (octopus). These introns were specific to genes encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU) and were not present in genes encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU). In addition, the sequences of the introns were different from one another. To confirm the results of our initial experiments, we isolated and sequenced genes encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU) and tRNA(Lys)(UUU). The gene for tRNA(Lys)(UUU) from squid contained an intron, whose sequence was the same as that identified by PCR, and the gene formed a cluster with a corresponding pseudogene. Several DNA regions of 2.1 kb containing this cluster appeared to be tandemly arrayed in the squid genome. By contrast, the gene encoding tRNA(Lys)(CUU) did not contain an intron, as shown also by PCR. The tRNA(Lys)(UUU) that corresponded to the analyzed gene was isolated and characterized. The present study provides the first example of an intron-containing gene encoding a tRNA in mollusks and suggests the universality of introns in such genes in higher eukaryotes.

  6. The Kernel Energy Method: application to a tRNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lulu; Massa, Lou; Karle, Jerome

    2006-01-31

    The Kernel Energy Method (KEM) may be used to calculate quantum mechanical molecular energy by the use of several model chemistries. Simplification is obtained by mathematically breaking a large molecule into smaller parts, called kernels. The full molecule is reassembled from calculations carried out on the kernels. KEM is as yet untested for RNA, and such a test is the purpose here. The basic kernel for RNA is a nucleotide that in general may differ from those of DNA. RNA is a single strand rather than the double helix of DNA. KEM energy has been calculated for a tRNA, whose crystal structure is known, and which contains 2,565 atoms. The energy is calculated to be E = -108,995.1668 (a.u.), in the Hartree-Fock approximation, using a limited basis. Interaction energies are found to be consistent with the hydrogen-bonding scheme previously found. In this paper, the range of biochemical molecules, susceptible of quantum studies by means of the KEM, have been broadened to include RNA.

  7. A newly discovered tRNA(1Asp) gene (aspV) of Escherichia coli K12.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, T; Nagasawa, T; Takano, K; Sekiguchi, M

    1987-02-01

    We report a new tRNA(1Asp) gene near the dnaQ gene, which is located at 5 min on the Escherichia coli linkage map. We named it aspV. The sequence corresponding to the mature tRNA is identical with that of the two previously identified tRNA(1Asp) genes (aspT and aspU), but there is no homology in the sequences of their 3'- and 5'-flanking regions.

  8. Absence of queuine-containing tRNA in canine bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Lifsey, B.J. Jr.; Al-Ansari, H.; Farkas, W.R.

    1986-05-01

    Transfer RNA obtained from canine bone marrow does not contain queuine, a hypermodified derivative of guanine found in the anticodon of tRNA/sup His/, tRNA/sup Asn/, tRNA/sup Tyr/ and tRNA/sup Asp/. This observation is in contrast to rabbit and human bone marrow cells which do contain queuine. The absence of queuine containing isoacceptors in canine bone marrow was determined by reverse-phase chromatography. Queuine containing isoacceptors are present in canine liver and spleen but not in peripheral leukocytes and the rate of queuine incorporation into tRNA by bone marrow cells in culture is very slow compared to the rate of /sup 3/H thymidine uptake into DNA. The queuine insertion enzyme is present in canine bone marrow and has an equal affinity for both queuine and guanine with K/sub m/ = 1.30 x 10/sup -7/ M. The canine enzyme differs from the queuine insertion enzymes that were previously purified from mammalian sources in that it has a requirement for a metal. Co/sup 2 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ are most effective at restoring activity to the enzyme after it has been inactivated by dialysis. The absence of queuine containing isoacceptors in canine bone marrow is unique among normal mammalian tissues.

  9. The role of mitochondrial tRNA mutations in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lie; Chen, Zhi-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Kui; Le, Han-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Alternations in mitochondrial genome resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction have long been hypothesized to be involved in tumorigenesis. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) is known for its high frequencies of polymorphisms and mutations, however, the roles of these mutations and polymorphisms in lung cancer are among heated debates. To evaluate the possible roles of reported mt-tRNA mutations in lung cancer, we examine recent published paper concerning three mt-tRNA mutations with lung cancer: A7460G in tRNASer (UCN) gene, G5563A in tRNATrp gene and A12172G in tRNAHis gene. We perform the phylogenetic approach to investigate the deleterious roles of these mutations in lung cancer, moreover, we use bioinformatics tool to predict the secondary structure of mt-tRNAs with and without these mutations. In addition, through the application of pathogenicity scoring system, we find that only the A12172G mutation is regarded as a pathogenic mutation, whereas other mutations may act as neutral polymorphisms in human population. Thus, our