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Sample records for human tumor spheroid

  1. Radiosensitivity of different human tumor cells lines grown as multicellular spheroids determined from growth curves and survival data

    SciTech Connect

    Schwachoefer, J.H.C.; Crooijmans, R.P.; van Gasteren, J.J.; Hoogenhout, J.; Jerusalem, C.R.; Kal, H.B.; Theeuwes, A.G. )

    1989-11-01

    Five human tumor cell lines were grown as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) to determine whether multicellular tumor spheroids derived from different types of tumors would show tumor-type dependent differences in response to single-dose irradiation, and whether these differences paralleled clinical behavior. Multicellular tumor spheroids of two neuroblastoma, one lung adenocarcinoma, one melanoma, and a squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue, were studied in terms of growth delay, calculated cell survival, and spheroid control dose50 (SCD50). Growth delay and cell survival analysis for the tumor cell lines showed sensitivities that correlated well with clinical behavior of the tumor types of origin. Similar to other studies on melanoma multicellular tumor spheroids our spheroid control dose50 results for the melanoma cell line deviated from the general pattern of sensitivity. This might be due to the location of surviving cells, which prohibits proliferation of surviving cells and hence growth of melanoma multicellular tumor spheroids. This study demonstrates that radiosensitivity of human tumor cell lines can be evaluated in terms of growth delay, calculated cell survival, and spheroid control dose50 when grown as multicellular tumor spheroids. The sensitivity established from these evaluations parallels clinical behavior, thus offering a unique tool for the in vitro analysis of human tumor radiosensitivity.

  2. Response of human neuroblastoma and melanoma multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) to single dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.M.; Labs, L.M.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    The growth characteristics of 6 human cell line derived multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) were studied. Melanoma MTS (C32, HML-A, HML-B) were slow growing with baseline growth rates of 13.9 to 27.3 microns diameter/day. Neuroblastoma MTS (Lan-1, NB-100, NB-134) grew rapidly, with baseline growth rates of 32.1 to 40.3 microns diameter/day, that is, 1.2 to 2.9 times as fast as the melanomas. Delay constants were calculated for all six lines. The neuroblastomas were more sensitive to radiation than melanomas, as reflected in a greater value for the radiation-induced growth delay constant. One neuroblastoma line, Lan-1, was highly radioresponsive; that is, after a subcurative dose of radiation, the MTS diameter decreased beyond the original diameter, which was followed by recovery and regrowth. Irrespective of these initial changes in diameter, growth delay sensitivity (value of delay constant) was the same for Lan-1 and NB-100, an MTS line that did not show the responsive pattern.

  3. Protein transfection study using multicellular tumor spheroids of human hepatoma Huh-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takuma; Tanaka, Masakazu; Oba, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Several protein transfection reagents are commercially available and are powerful tools for elucidating function of a protein in a cell. Here we described protein transfection studies of the commercially available reagents, Pro-DeliverIN, Xfect, and TuboFect, using Huh-7 multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) as a three-dimensional in vitro tumor model. A cellular uptake study using specific endocytosis inhibitors revealed that each reagent was internalized into Huh-7 MCTS by different mechanisms, which were the same as monolayer cultured Huh-7 cells. A certain amount of Pro-DeliverIN and Xfect was uptaken by Huh-7 cells through caveolae-mediated endocytosis, which may lead to transcytosis through the surface-first layered cells of MCTS. The results presented here will help in the choice and use of protein transfection reagents for evaluating anti-tumor therapeutic proteins against MCTS models.

  4. Semiautomatic growth analysis of multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Rodday, Bjoern; Hirschhaeuser, Franziska; Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are routinely employed as three-dimensional in vitro models to study tumor biology. Cultivation of MCTS in spinner flasks provides better growing conditions, especially with regard to the availability of nutrients and oxygen, when compared with microtiter plates. The main endpoint of drug response experiments is spheroid size. It is common practice to analyze spheroid size manually with a microscope and an ocular micrometer. This requires removal of some spheroids from the flask, which entails major limitations such as loss of MCTS and the risk of contamination. With this new approach, the authors present an efficient and highly reproducible method to analyze the size of complete MCTS populations in culture containers with transparent, flat bottoms. MCTS sediments are digitally scanned and spheroid volumes are calculated by computerized image analysis. The equipment includes regular office hardware (personal computer, flatbed scanner) and software (Adobe Photoshop, Microsoft Excel, ImageJ). The accuracy and precision of the method were tested using industrial precision steel beads with known diameter. In summary, in comparison with other methods, this approach provides benefits in terms of semiautomation, noninvasiveness, and low costs.

  5. Interaction of human malignant melanoma (ST-ML-12) tumor spheroids with endothelial cell monolayers. Damage to endothelium by oxygen-derived free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Offner, F. A.; Wirtz, H. C.; Schiefer, J.; Bigalke, I.; Klosterhalfen, B.; Bittinger, F.; Mittermayer, C.; Kirkpatrick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Clinical and experimental observations suggest that tumor-induced endothelial cell injury may be one of several initial events in the establishment of tumor metastases. To test this hypothesis, the authors have analyzed the interaction of malignant melanoma (ST-ML-12) multicenter tumor spheroids with endothelial cell monolayers in a three-dimensional coculture system. After 1.5 hours of interaction, the authors observed a toxic effect on endothelial cells in the perispheroid region. The latter was demonstrated by testing membrane integrity with the fluorescent probes acridine orange/ethidium bromide and resulted in sensitivity to shear stress of the damaged cells. The endothelium then underwent a regenerative cycle to replace the denuded halo. Addition of the oxygen radical-scavenging enzyme superoxide dismutase to the culture medium prevented this endothelial cell damage in a dose-dependent manner for up to 12 hours. By contrast, catalase, deferoxamine mesylate, allopurinol, and the proteinase inhibitors soybean trypsin inhibitor and aprotinin were not protective under the same conditions. The endothelial damage was dependent on the attachment of the spheroids. Medium conditioned by ST-ML-12-spheroids proved to be ineffective. A similar, but less prominent, deleterious effect was seen when human peritoneal mesothelial cells were used in place of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Spheroids of the uroepithelial cell line HU-609 were used as control. No toxicity was observed in these cocultures. Melanin biosynthesis is associated with the production of oxygen-derived free radicals. The results suggest a possible implication of these free radicals in metastasis formation of malignant melanoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1519667

  6. Survivin isoform Delta Ex3 regulates tumor spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Magali; Ceballos-Cancino, Gisela; Callaghan, Richard; Maldonado, Vilma; Patiño, Nelly; Ruíz, Víctor; Meléndez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2012-05-01

    Survivin is an important member of the Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) family and has essential roles in apoptosis and cell cycle progression. This gene is commonly upregulated in human cancer and provides an exciting diagnostic and therapeutic target. Survivin is expressed as several isoforms that are generated by alternative splicing, and some of these present antagonistic activities. Currently, information regarding the regulation of these isoforms is lacking. In this study, we sought to analyze survivin Delta Ex3 expression in a three-dimensional model of avascular tumors and its overexpression effects in processes such as proliferation, clonogenicity and apoptosis. We found a positive correlation between spheroid growth and survivin Delta Ex3 expression during the exponential phase. We demonstrated that this isoform not only decreased apoptosis but also inhibited tumor spheroid formation by decreasing proliferation and clonogenic survival. These results point toward a dual and antagonistic effect of this spliced survivin isoform in cancer development.

  7. Diffusion and binding of monoclonal antibody TNT-1 in multicellular tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, F.M.; Hansen, E.B.; Taylor, C.R.; Epstein, A.L. )

    1991-02-06

    Tumor spheroids of HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma and A375 melanoma were established to investigate the uptake and clearance kinetics of TNT-1, a monoclonal antibody that targets necrotic cells of tumors. Our data reveal that there was rapid uptake of TNT-1 and its F(ab')2 fragment in both spheroid models, whereas an antibody of irrelevant specificity, Lym-1, and its F(ab')2 fragment bound poorly to the spheroids. Unlike previously reported monoclonal antibodies to tumor cell-surface antigens, TNT-1 showed (1) a linear uptake that increased over time without saturation in tumor spheroids and (2) an unexpected uptake by a subpopulation of cells in the viable outer rim of the spheroids. These preclinical studies provide important information concerning the therapeutic potential of TNT monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of cancer and micrometastases.

  8. Surface acoustic streaming in microfluidic system for rapid multicellular tumor spheroids generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlHasan, Layla; Qi, Aisha; Al-Aboodi, Aswan; Rezk, Amged; Shilton, Richie R.; Chan, Peggy P. Y.; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we developed a novel and rapid method to generate in vitro three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroids using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. A SAW device with single-phase unidirectional transducer electrodes (SPUTD) on lithium niobate substrate was fabricated using standing UV photolithography and wet-etching techniques. To generate spheroids, the SAW device was loaded with medium containing human breast carcinoma (BT474) cells, an oscillating electrical signal at resonant frequency was supplied to the SPUDT to generate acoustic radiation in the medium. Spheroids with uniform size and shape can be obtained using this method in less than 1 minute, and the size of the spheroids can be controlled through adjusting the seeding density. The resulting spheroids were used for further cultivation and were monitored using an optical microscope in real time. The viability and actin organization of the spheroids were assessed using live/dead viability staining and actin cytoskeleton staining, respectively. Compared to spheroids generated using the liquid overlay method, the SAW generated spheroids exhibited higher circularity and higher viability. The F-actin filaments of spheroids appear to aggregate compared to that of untreated cells, indicating that mature spheroids can be obtained using this method. This spheroid generating method can be useful for a variety of biological studies and clinical applications.

  9. Sialylation transmogrifies human breast and pancreatic cancer cells into 3D multicellular tumor spheroids using cyclic RGD-peptide induced self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Akasov, Roman; Haq, Sabah; Haxho, Fiona; Samuel, Vanessa; Burov, Sergey V; Markvicheva, Elena; Neufeld, Ronald J; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2016-10-04

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) have been at the forefront of cancer research, designed to mimic tumor-like developmental patterns in vitro. Tumor growth in vivo is highly influenced by aberrant cell surface-specific sialoglycan structures on glycoproteins. Aberrant sialoglycan patterns that facilitate MTS formation are not well defined. Matrix-free spheroids from breast MCF-7 and pancreatic PANC1 cancer cell lines and their respective tamoxifen (TMX) and gemcitabine (Gem) resistant variants were generated using the RGD platform of cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys peptide modified with 4-carboxybutyl-triphenylphosphonium bromide (cyclo-RGDfK (TPP)). MCF-7 and MCF-7 TMX cells formed tight spheroids both in the classical agarose-and RGD-based platforms while all PANC1 cells formed loose aggregates. Using lectin histochemistry staining, sialidase assay, neuraminidase (Vibrio cholerae) and oseltamivir phosphate (OP) neuraminidase inhibitor treatments, MCF-7 and PANC1 cells and their drug-resistant variants expressed different sialic acid (SA) content on their cell surfaces. α-2,3- and α-2,6-sialic acid surface residues facilitated spheroid formation under cyclo-RGDfK(TPP)-induced self-assembly. Pretreatment with α-2,3- SA specific Maackia amurensis (MAL-II) lectin, α-2,6-SA specific Sambucus nigra (SNA) lectin, and exogenous α-2,6-SA specific neuraminidase (Vibrio cholerae) dose-dependently reduced spheroid volume. OP enhanced cell aggregation and compaction forming spheroids. PANC1 and MDA-MB231 xenograft tumors from untreated and OP-treated RAGxCγ double mutant mice expressed significantly higher levels of α-2,3- SA over α-2,6-SA. MCF-7 spheroids also expressed a high α-2,3-SA to α-2,6-SA ratio. These results suggest that the relative levels of specific sialoglycan structures on the cell surface correlate with the ability of cancer cells to form avascular multicellular tumor spheroids and in vivo xenograft tumors.

  10. Sialylation transmogrifies human breast and pancreatic cancer cells into 3D multicellular tumor spheroids using cyclic RGD-peptide induced self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Akasov, Roman; Haq, Sabah; Haxho, Fiona; Samuel, Vanessa; Burov, Sergey V.; Markvicheva, Elena; Neufeld, Ronald J.; Szewczuk, Myron R.

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) have been at the forefront of cancer research, designed to mimic tumor-like developmental patterns in vitro. Tumor growth in vivo is highly influenced by aberrant cell surface-specific sialoglycan structures on glycoproteins. Aberrant sialoglycan patterns that facilitate MTS formation are not well defined. Matrix-free spheroids from breast MCF-7 and pancreatic PANC1 cancer cell lines and their respective tamoxifen (TMX) and gemcitabine (Gem) resistant variants were generated using the RGD platform of cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys peptide modified with 4-carboxybutyl-triphenylphosphonium bromide (cyclo-RGDfK (TPP)). MCF-7 and MCF-7 TMX cells formed tight spheroids both in the classical agarose-and RGD-based platforms while all PANC1 cells formed loose aggregates. Using lectin histochemistry staining, sialidase assay, neuraminidase (Vibrio cholerae) and oseltamivir phosphate (OP) neuraminidase inhibitor treatments, MCF-7 and PANC1 cells and their drug-resistant variants expressed different sialic acid (SA) content on their cell surfaces. α-2,3- and α-2,6-sialic acid surface residues facilitated spheroid formation under cyclo-RGDfK(TPP)-induced self-assembly. Pretreatment with α-2,3- SA specific Maackia amurensis (MAL-II) lectin, α-2,6-SA specific Sambucus nigra (SNA) lectin, and exogenous α-2,6-SA specific neuraminidase (Vibrio cholerae) dose-dependently reduced spheroid volume. OP enhanced cell aggregation and compaction forming spheroids. PANC1 and MDA-MB231 xenograft tumors from untreated and OP-treated RAGxCγ double mutant mice expressed significantly higher levels of α-2,3- SA over α-2,6-SA. MCF-7 spheroids also expressed a high α-2,3-SA to α-2,6-SA ratio. These results suggest that the relative levels of specific sialoglycan structures on the cell surface correlate with the ability of cancer cells to form avascular multicellular tumor spheroids and in vivo xenograft tumors. PMID:27608845

  11. Single and Combination Drug Screening with Aqueous Biphasic Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Shahi Thakuri, Pradip; Tavana, Hossein

    2017-03-01

    Spheroids of cancer cells represent a physiologic model of solid tumors for cancer drug screening. Despite this known benefit, difficulties with generating large quantities of uniformly sized spheroids in standard plates, individually addressing spheroids with drug compounds, and quantitatively analyzing responses of cancer cells have hindered the use of spheroids in high-throughput screening applications. Recently, we addressed this challenge by using an aqueous two-phase system technology to generate a spheroid within an aqueous drop immersed in a second, immiscible aqueous phase. Integrating this approach with robotics resulted in convenient formation, maintenance, and drug treatment of spheroids. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of high-throughput compound screening against colon cancer spheroids using 25 anticancer compounds. Using a strictly standardized mean difference and based on a preliminary testing with each compound, we select effective compounds for further dose-response testing. Finally, we use molecular inhibitors to target upregulated protein kinases and use them for drug combination studies against spheroids. We quantitatively analyze the combination treatment results using statistical metrics to identify synergy between pairs of inhibitors in compromising viability of colon cancer cells. This study demonstrates the utility of our spheroid culture technology for identification of effective drug compounds, dose-response analysis, and combination drug treatments.

  12. The production of 3D tumor spheroids for cancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sant, Shilpa; Johnston, Paul A

    2017-03-01

    New cancer drug approval rates are ≤5% despite significant investments in cancer research, drug discovery and development. One strategy to improve the rate of success of new cancer drugs transitioning into the clinic would be to more closely align the cellular models used in the early lead discovery with pre-clinical animal models and patient tumors. For solid tumors, this would mandate the development and implementation of three dimensional (3D) in vitro tumor models that more accurately recapitulate human solid tumor architecture and biology. Recent advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have provided new techniques for 3D spheroid generation and a variety of in vitro 3D cancer models are being explored for cancer drug discovery. Although homogeneous assay methods and high content imaging approaches to assess tumor spheroid morphology, growth and viability have been developed, the implementation of 3D models in HTS remains challenging due to reasons that we discuss in this review. Perhaps the biggest obstacle to achieve acceptable HTS assay performance metrics occurs in 3D tumor models that produce spheroids with highly variable morphologies and/or sizes. We highlight two methods that produce uniform size-controlled 3D multicellular tumor spheroids that are compatible with cancer drug research and HTS; tumor spheroids formed in ultra-low attachment microplates, or in polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate hydrogel microwell arrays. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Cytotoxicity of RSU 1069 in spheroids and murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Olive, P L; Durand, R E; Chaplin, D J

    1987-09-01

    Hypoxia following treatment with the alkylating nitroimidazole, RSU 1069, greatly enhanced cell killing in the Lewis lung tumor and Chinese hamster V79 spheroids. When mice were injected with RSU-1069 and tumors were excised after 3 hr to measure colony formation in soft agar, significant cell killing was observed. However, if tumors were excised 18 hr after drug injection, viability was increased, and cell killing was confined to cells distant from the blood supply. In subsequent experiments, viability observed at 3 hr could be greatly increased if the tumors were cooled to 4 degrees C immediately after excision, and were then rapidly disaggregated. This suggested that the hypoxia which occurred after animal sacrifice and during the tumor disaggregation procedure was sufficient to account for the additional cell killing at early times after drug injection. Results using V79 spheroids similarly suggest that tumor excision soon after injection of RSU 1069 can give false information on RSU 1069 toxicity if efforts are not made to prevent tumor hypoxia during processing. In spheroids, hypoxia-induced toxicity after aerobic exposure decreased as the time between RSU 1069 exposure and hypoxic incubation increased; spheroid cells exposed to RSU 1069 under air lost sensitivity to subsequent hypoxic incubation with a half-time of about 10 hr, representing the time for cell turnover and/or repair from damage produced under aerobic conditions.

  14. The organotypic multicellular spheroid is a relevant three-dimensional model to study adenovirus replication and penetration in human tumors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Grill, Jacques; Lamfers, Martine L M; van Beusechem, Victor W; Dirven, Clemens M; Pherai, D Shareen; Kater, Mathijs; Van der Valk, Paul; Vogels, Ronald; Vandertop, W Peter; Pinedo, Herbert M; Curiel, David T; Gerritsen, Winald R

    2002-11-01

    The use of adenoviruses for gene transfer and as oncolytic agents is currently receiving widespread attention. As specific constraints to adenovirus distribution and spread cannot be studied in cell cultures, there is a need for an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) model mimicking the in vivo biology of tumors. We studied the interactions between tumor and adenoviruses using multicellular spheroids grown from primary brain tumor material. Using beta-galactosidase and luciferase reporter genes expressed by replication-defective adenoviruses, we showed that infection was restricted to the first layer of cells. Using a replication-competent adenovirus expressing the luciferase gene, we showed that transgene expression in the spheroid was considerably enhanced and that viral spreading deep into the 3D structure took place. In addition, a tetrazolium salt-based metabolic assay could be used to compare the oncolytic activity of different concentrations of replication-competent adenoviruses. We can conclude that organotypic spheroids offer a versatile in vitro system for studying distribution, spread, and oncolysis by adenoviruses in a clinically relevant model.

  15. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications.

  16. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications. PMID:26877244

  17. Continuously perfused microbubble array for 3D tumor spheroid model

    PubMed Central

    Agastin, Sivaprakash; Giang, Ut-Binh T.; Geng, Yue; DeLouise, Lisa A.; King, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-cellular tumor spheroids (MCTSs) have been established as a 3D physiologically relevant tumor model for drug testing in cancer research. However, it is difficult to control the MCTS testing parameters and the entire process is time-consuming and expensive. To overcome these limitations, we developed a simple microfluidic system using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microbubbles to culture tumor spheroids under physiological flow. The flow characteristics such as streamline directions, shear stress profile, and velocity profile inside the microfluidic system were first examined computationally using a COMSOL simulation. Colo205 tumor spheroids were created by a modified hanging drop method and maintained inside PDMS microbubble cavities in perfusion culture. Cell viability inside the microbubbles was examined by live cell staining and confocal imaging. E-selectin mediated cell sorting of Colo205 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines on functionalized microbubble and PDMS surfaces was achieved. Finally, to validate this microfluidic system for drug screening purposes, the toxicity of the anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin, on Colo205 cells in spheroids was tested and compared to cells in 2D culture. Colo205 spheroids cultured in flow showed a threefold increase in resistance to doxorubicin compared to Colo205 monolayer cells cultured under static conditions, consistent with the resistance observed previously in other MCTS models. The advantages presented by our microfluidic system, such as the ability to control the size uniformity of the spheroids and to perform real-time imaging on cells in the growth platform, show potential for high throughput drug screening development. PMID:21716809

  18. Photoluminescent carbon nanotubes interrogate the permeability of multicellular tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Janki; Roxbury, Daniel; Paknejad, Navid; Heller, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have been extensively investigated for cancer drug delivery and imaging applications. Nanoparticles that show promise in two-dimensional cell culture systems often fail in more complex environments, possibly due to the lack of penetration in dense, three-dimensional structures. Multicellular tumor spheroids are an emerging model system to investigate interactions of nanoparticles with 3D in vitro cell culture environments. Using the intrinsic near-infrared emission of semiconducting carbon nanotubes to optically reconstruct their localization within a three-dimensional volume, we resolved the relative permeability of two different multicellular tumor spheroids. Nanotube photoluminescence revealed that nanotubes rapidly internalized into MCF-7 breast cancer cell-derived spheroids, whereas they exhibited little penetration into spheroids derived from SK-136, a cell line that we developed from murine liver cancer. Characterization of the spheroids by electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry revealed large differences in the extracellular matrix and interstitial spacing, which correlated directly with nanotube penetration. This platform portends a new approach to characterize the permeability of living multicellular environments. PMID:26456974

  19. In Vitro, Matrix-Free Formation Of Solid Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Marley, Garry M.

    1993-01-01

    Cinostatic bioreactor promotes formation of relatively large solid tumor spheroids exhibiting diameters from 750 to 2,100 micrometers. Process useful in studying efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents and of interactions between cells not constrained by solid matrices. Two versions have been demonstrated; one for anchorage-independent cells and one for anchorage-dependent cells.

  20. Tensile Forces Originating from Cancer Spheroids Facilitate Tumor Invasion.

    PubMed

    Kopanska, Katarzyna S; Alcheikh, Yara; Staneva, Ralitza; Vignjevic, Danijela; Betz, Timo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of tumors and the tumor environment provide important information for the progression and characterization of cancer. Tumors are surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM) dominated by collagen I. The geometrical and mechanical properties of the ECM play an important role for the initial step in the formation of metastasis, presented by the migration of malignant cells towards new settlements as well as the vascular and lymphatic system. The extent of this cell invasion into the ECM is a key medical marker for cancer prognosis. In vivo studies reveal an increased stiffness and different architecture of tumor tissue when compared to its healthy counterparts. The observed parallel collagen organization on the tumor border and radial arrangement at the invasion zone has raised the question about the mechanisms organizing these structures. Here we study the effect of contractile forces originated from model tumor spheroids embedded in a biomimetic collagen I matrix. We show that contractile forces act immediately after seeding and deform the ECM, thus leading to tensile radial forces within the matrix. Relaxation of this tension via cutting the collagen does reduce invasion, showing a mechanical relation between the tensile state of the ECM and invasion. In turn, these results suggest that tensile forces in the ECM facilitate invasion. Furthermore, simultaneous contraction of the ECM and tumor growth leads to the condensation and reorientation of the collagen at the spheroid's surface. We propose a tension-based model to explain the collagen organization and the onset of invasion by forces originating from the tumor.

  1. Changes in subcellular distribution of topoisomerase IIalpha correlate with etoposide resistance in multicell spheroids and xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Oloumi, A; MacPhail, S H; Johnston, P J; Banáth, J P; Olive, P L

    2000-10-15

    The outer cells of Chinese hamster V79 spheroids are about 10 times more resistant than monolayers to DNA damage and cell killing by the topoisomerase (topo) II inhibitor etoposide. Although the amount and catalytic activity of topo IIalpha are identical for monolayers or the outer cells of spheroids, and the cell proliferation rate is the same, our previous results indicated that phosphorylation of topo IIalpha is at least 10 times higher in V79 monolayers than in spheroids. Because phosphorylation of topo IIalpha has been associated with nuclear translocation, we examined subcellular distribution of Topo IIalpha in monolayers, spheroids, and xenograft tumors using immunohistochemistry. Topo IIalpha was located predominantly in the nucleus of V79, human SiHa, and rat C6 monolayers but was found mainly in the cytoplasm of the proliferating outer cells of spheroids formed from these cell lines. Conversely, the outer cells of WiDr human colon carcinoma spheroids showed predominantly nuclear localization of topo IIalpha, and only WiDr cells showed no increase in resistance to etoposide when grown as spheroids. Cells sorted from xenografts resembled the spheroids in terms of sensitivity to etoposide and location of topo IIalpha. When the outer cells of V79 spheroids were returned to monolayer growth, the rate of redistribution of topo IIalpha to the nucleus occurred with similar kinetics as the increase in sensitivity to killing by etoposide. Removal and return of individual outer V79 spheroid cells to suspension culture resulted in the translocation of topo IIalpha to the nucleus for the first 24 h, accompanied by an increase in sensitivity to DNA damage by etoposide. Therefore, the cytoplasmic topo IIalpha distribution in outer spheroid cells and tumors appears to correlate not with morphological changes associated with growth in suspension but rather with the presence of neighboring, noncycling cells.

  2. Quantification of in vitro mesenchymal stem cell invasion into tumor spheroids using selective plane illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühland, Svenja; Wechselberger, Alexandra; Spitzweg, Christine; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.; Harz, Hartmann

    2015-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) homing and integration into tumors are under evaluation for clinical application. This approach requires the identification of conditions for optimal tumor invasion. We describe a tool for the in vitro comparison of parameters influencing invasion. Human MSC added to experimental tumor spheroids variably migrates toward the center of the structure. To determine MSC distribution inside the three-dimensional specimen, spatial analysis was performed using selective plane illumination microscopy. A standardized method to quantify and compare the invasion potential of variably treated MSC into experimental tumor environments allows efficient screening for optimizing conditions.

  3. Synchrotron Radiation μ-X Ray Fluorescence on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burattini, E.; Cinque, G.; Bellisola, G.; Fracasso, G.; Monti, F.; Colombatti, M.

    2003-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation micro X-Ray Fluorescence (SR μ-XRF) was applied for the first time to map the trace element content on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS), i.e. human cell clusters used as an in vitro model for testing micrometastases responses to antitumoral drugs. In particular, immunotoxin molecules composed of a carrier protein (Transferrin) bound to a powerful cytotoxin (Ricin A), were here considered as representatives of a class of therapheutic macromolecules used in cancer theraphy. Spheroids included in polyacrylamide gel and placed inside quartz capillaries were studied at the ESRF ID22 beamline using a 15 keV monochromatic photon microbeam. Elemental maps (of Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb) on four groups of spheroids grown under different conditions were studied: untreated, treated only with the carrier molecule or with the toxin alone, and with the complete immunotoxin molecule (carrier+toxin). The results indicate that the distribution of Zn and, to some extent, Cu in the spheroid cells is homogeneous and independent of the treatment type. Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TR-XRF) was also applied to quantify the average trace element content in the spheroids. Future developments of the technique are finally outlined on the basis of these preliminary results.

  4. Synchrotron Radiation {mu}-X Ray Fluorescence on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Burattini, E.; Cinque, G.; Bellisola, G.; Fracasso, G.; Colombatti, M.; Monti, F.

    2003-01-24

    Synchrotron Radiation micro X-Ray Fluorescence (SR {mu}-XRF) was applied for the first time to map the trace element content on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS), i.e. human cell clusters used as an in vitro model for testing micrometastases responses to antitumoral drugs. In particular, immunotoxin molecules composed of a carrier protein (Transferrin) bound to a powerful cytotoxin (Ricin A), were here considered as representatives of a class of therapheutic macromolecules used in cancer theraphy. Spheroids included in polyacrylamide gel and placed inside quartz capillaries were studied at the ESRF ID22 beamline using a 15 keV monochromatic photon microbeam. Elemental maps (of Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb) on four groups of spheroids grown under different conditions were studied: untreated, treated only with the carrier molecule or with the toxin alone, and with the complete immunotoxin molecule (carrier+toxin). The results indicate that the distribution of Zn and, to some extent, Cu in the spheroid cells is homogeneous and independent of the treatment type. Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TR-XRF) was also applied to quantify the average trace element content in the spheroids. Future developments of the technique are finally outlined on the basis of these preliminary results.

  5. Emergent Properties of Tumor Microenvironment in a Real-Life Model of Multicell Tumor Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Milotti, Edoardo; Chignola, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are an important in vitro model of the pre-vascular phase of solid tumors, for sizes well below the diagnostic limit: therefore a biophysical model of spheroids has the ability to shed light on the internal workings and organization of tumors at a critical phase of their development. To this end, we have developed a computer program that integrates the behavior of individual cells and their interactions with other cells and the surrounding environment. It is based on a quantitative description of metabolism, growth, proliferation and death of single tumor cells, and on equations that model biochemical and mechanical cell-cell and cell-environment interactions. The program reproduces existing experimental data on spheroids, and yields unique views of their microenvironment. Simulations show complex internal flows and motions of nutrients, metabolites and cells, that are otherwise unobservable with current experimental techniques, and give novel clues on tumor development and strong hints for future therapies. PMID:21152429

  6. Comparative analysis of tumor spheroid generation techniques for differential in vitro drug toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Shreya; Rowley, Katelyn R.; Mehta, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are powerful in vitro models to perform preclinical chemosensitivity assays. We compare different methodologies to generate tumor spheroids in terms of resultant spheroid morphology, cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. We used two cancer cell lines (MCF7 and OVCAR8) to generate spheroids using i) hanging drop array plates; ii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates; iii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates with rotating mixing (nutator plates). Analysis of spheroid morphometry indicated that cellular compaction was increased in spheroids generated on nutator and hanging drop array plates. Collagen staining also indicated higher compaction and remodeling in tumor spheroids on nutator and hanging drop arrays compared to conventional liquid overlay. Consequently, spheroids generated on nutator or hanging drop plates had increased chemoresistance to cisplatin treatment (20-60% viability) compared to spheroids on ultra low attachment plates (10-20% viability). Lastly, we used a mathematical model to demonstrate minimal changes in oxygen and cisplatin diffusion within experimentally generated spheroids. Our results demonstrate that in vitro methods of tumor spheroid generation result in varied cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. PMID:26918944

  7. Multicellular tumor spheroid interactions with bone cells and bone

    SciTech Connect

    Wezeman, F.H.; Guzzino, K.M.; Waxler, B.

    1985-10-01

    In vitro coculture techniques were used to study HSDM1C1 murine fibrosarcoma multicellular tumor spheroid (HSDM1C1-MTS) interactions with mouse calvarial bone cells having osteoblastic characteristics and mouse bone explants. HSDM1C1-MTS attached to confluent bone cell monolayers and their attachment rate was quantified. HSDM1C1-MTS interaction with bone cells was further demonstrated by the release of /sup 3/H-deoxyuridine from prelabeled bone cells during coculture with multicellular tumor spheroids. HSDM1C1-MTS-induced cytotoxicity was mimicked by the addition of 10(-5) M prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) to /sup 3/H-deoxyuridine-labeled bone cells. The effects of low (10(-9) M) and high (10(-5) M) concentrations of PGE2 on bone cell proliferation were also studied. Higher concentrations of PGE2 inhibited bone cell proliferation. HSDM1C1-MTS resorbed living explants in the presence of indomethacin, suggesting that other tumor cell products may also participate in bone resorption. HSDM1C1-MTS caused direct bone resorption as measured by the significantly elevated release of /sup 45/Ca from prelabeled, devitalized calvaria. However, the growth of a confluent bone cell layer on devitalized, /sup 45/Ca-prelabeled calvaria resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of /sup 45/Ca released subsequent to the seeding of HSDM1C1-MTS onto the explants. Bone cells at the bone surface may act as a barrier against invasion and tumor cell-mediated bone resorption. Violation of this cellular barrier is achieved, in part, by tumor cell products.

  8. Glycolytic pyruvate regulates P-Glycoprotein expression in multicellular tumor spheroids via modulation of the intracellular redox state.

    PubMed

    Wartenberg, Maria; Richter, Madeleine; Datchev, André; Günther, Sebastian; Milosevic, Nada; Bekhite, Mohamed M; Figulla, Hans-Reiner; Aran, Josep M; Pétriz, Jordi; Sauer, Heinrich

    2010-02-01

    ABC transporters like P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1) are membrane proteins responsible for the transport of toxic compounds out of non-malignant cells and tumor tissue. To investigate the effect of glycolysis and the tissue redox state on P-gp expression in multicellular tumor spheroids derived from prostate adenocarcinoma cells (DU-145), glioma cells (Gli36), and the human cervix carcinoma cell line KB-3-1 transfected with a P-gp-EGFP fusion gene that allows monitoring of P-gp expression in living cells. During cell culture of DU-145, Gli36, and KB-3-1 tumor spheroids P-gp expression was observed as well as increased lactate and decreased pyruvate levels and expression of glycolytic enzymes. Inhibition of glycolysis for 24 h by either iodoacetate (IA) or 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DDG) downregulated P-gp expression which was reversed upon coincubation with the radical scavenger ebselen as shown by semi-quantitative immunohistochemisty in DU-145 and Gli36 tumor spheroids, and by EGFP fluorescence in KB-3-1 tumor spheroids. Consequently endogenous ROS generation in DU-145 tumor spheroids was increased in the presence of either IA or 2-DDG, which was abolished upon coincubation with ebselen. Exogenous addition of pyruvate significantly reduced ROS generation, increased P-gp expression as well as efflux of the P-gp substrate doxorubicin. Doxorubicin transport was significantly blunted by 2-DDG and IA, indicating that inhibition of glycolysis reversed the multidrug resistance phenotype. In summary our data demonstrate that P-gp expression in tumor spheroids is closely related to the glycolytic metabolism of tumor cells and can be downregulated by glycolysis inhibitors via mechanisms that involve changes in the cellular redox state. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Multiparametric Analysis of Oncology Drug Screening with Aqueous Two-Phase Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Shahi Thakuri, Pradip; Ham, Stephanie L; Luker, Gary D; Tavana, Hossein

    2016-11-07

    Spheroids present a biologically relevant three-dimensional model of avascular tumors and a unique tool for discovery of anticancer drugs. Despite being used in research laboratories for several decades, spheroids are not routinely used in the mainstream drug discovery pipeline primarily due to the difficulty of mass-producing uniformly sized spheroids and intense labor involved in handling, drug treatment, and analyzing spheroids. We overcome this barrier using a polymeric aqueous two-phase microtechnology to robotically microprint spheroids of well-defined size in standard 384-microwell plates. We use different cancer cells and show that resulting spheroids grow over time and display characteristic features of solid tumors. We demonstrate the feasibility of robotic, high-throughput screening of 25 standard chemotherapeutics and molecular inhibitors against tumor spheroids of three different cancer cell lines. This screening uses over 7000 spheroids to elicit high quality dose-dependent drug responses from spheroids. To quantitatively compare performance of different drugs, we employ a multiparametric scoring system using half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50), maximum inhibition (Emax), and area under the dose-response curve (AUC) to take into account both potency and efficacy parameters. This approach allows us to identify several compounds that effectively inhibit growth of spheroids and compromise cellular viability, and distinguish them from moderately effective and ineffective drugs. Using protein expression analysis, we demonstrate that spheroids generated with the aqueous two-phase microtechnology reliably resolve molecular targets of drug compounds. Incorporating this low-cost and convenient-to-use tumor spheroid technology in preclinical drug discovery will make compound screening with realistic tumor models a routine laboratory technique prior to expensive and tedious animal tests to dramatically improve testing throughput and efficiency and

  10. Tensile Forces Originating from Cancer Spheroids Facilitate Tumor Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kopanska, Katarzyna S.; Alcheikh, Yara; Staneva, Ralitza; Vignjevic, Danijela; Betz, Timo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of tumors and the tumor environment provide important information for the progression and characterization of cancer. Tumors are surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM) dominated by collagen I. The geometrical and mechanical properties of the ECM play an important role for the initial step in the formation of metastasis, presented by the migration of malignant cells towards new settlements as well as the vascular and lymphatic system. The extent of this cell invasion into the ECM is a key medical marker for cancer prognosis. In vivo studies reveal an increased stiffness and different architecture of tumor tissue when compared to its healthy counterparts. The observed parallel collagen organization on the tumor border and radial arrangement at the invasion zone has raised the question about the mechanisms organizing these structures. Here we study the effect of contractile forces originated from model tumor spheroids embedded in a biomimetic collagen I matrix. We show that contractile forces act immediately after seeding and deform the ECM, thus leading to tensile radial forces within the matrix. Relaxation of this tension via cutting the collagen does reduce invasion, showing a mechanical relation between the tensile state of the ECM and invasion. In turn, these results suggest that tensile forces in the ECM facilitate invasion. Furthermore, simultaneous contraction of the ECM and tumor growth leads to the condensation and reorientation of the collagen at the spheroid’s surface. We propose a tension-based model to explain the collagen organization and the onset of invasion by forces originating from the tumor. PMID:27271249

  11. Cell number per spheroid and electrical conductivity of nanowires influence the function of silicon nanowired human cardiac spheroids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yu; Richards, Dylan; Coyle, Robert C; Yao, Jenny; Xu, Ruoyu; Gou, Wenyu; Wang, Hongjun; Menick, Donald R; Tian, Bozhi; Mei, Ying

    2017-03-15

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) provide an unlimited cell source to treat cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of death worldwide. However, current hiPSC-CMs retain an immature phenotype that leads to difficulties for integration with adult myocardium after transplantation. To address this, we recently utilized electrically conductive silicon nanowires (e-SiNWs) to facilitate self-assembly of hiPSC-CMs to form nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids. Our previous results showed addition of e-SiNWs effectively enhanced the functions of the cardiac spheroids and improved the cellular maturation of hiPSC-CMs. Here, we examined two important factors that can affect functions of the nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids: (1) cell number per spheroid (i.e., size of the spheroids), and (2) the electrical conductivity of the e-SiNWs. To examine the first factor, we prepared hiPSC cardiac spheroids with four different sizes by varying cell number per spheroid (∼0.5k, ∼1k, ∼3k, ∼7k cells/spheroid). Spheroids with ∼3k cells/spheroid was found to maximize the beneficial effects of the 3D spheroid microenvironment. This result was explained with a semi-quantitative theory that considers two competing factors: 1) the improved 3D cell-cell adhesion, and 2) the reduced oxygen supply to the center of spheroids with the increase of cell number. Also, the critical role of electrical conductivity of silicon nanowires has been confirmed in improving tissue function of hiPSC cardiac spheroids. These results lay down a solid foundation to develop suitable nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids as an innovative cell delivery system to treat cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Rapid generation of single-tumor spheroids for high-throughput cell function and toxicity analysis.

    PubMed

    Ivascu, Andrea; Kubbies, Manfred

    2006-12-01

    Spheroids are widely used in biology because they provide an in vitro 3-dimensional (3D) model to study proliferation, cell death, differentiation, and metabolism of cells in tumors and the response of tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The methods of generating spheroids are limited by size heterogeneity, long cultivation time, or mechanical accessibility for higher throughput fashion. The authors present a rapid method to generate single spheroids in suspension culture in individual wells. A defined number of cells ranging from 1000 to 20,000 were seeded into wells of poly-HEMA-coated, 96-well, round-or conical-bottom plates in standard medium and centrifuged for 10 min at 1000 g. This procedure generates single spheroids in each well within a 24-h culture time with homogeneous sizes, morphologies, and stratification of proliferating cells in the rim and dying cells in the core region. Because a large number of tumor cell lines form only loose aggregates when cultured in 3D, the authors also performed a screen for medium additives to achieve a switch from aggregate to spheroid morphology. Small quantities of the basement membrane extract Matrigel, added to the culture medium prior to centrifugation, most effectively induced compact spheroid formation. The compact spheroid morphology is evident as early as 24 h after centrifugation in a true suspension culture. Twenty tumor cell lines of different lineages have been used to successfully generate compact, single spheroids with homogenous size in 96-well plates and are easily accessible for subsequent functional analysis.

  13. Delivery of Human Adipose Stem Cells Spheroids into Lockyballs

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Frederico D. A. S.; Gruber, Peter; Stuart, Mellannie P.; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Brakke, Ken; Kasyanov, Vladimir; da Silva, Jorge V. L.; Granjeiro, José M.; Mironov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Adipose stem cells (ASCs) spheroids show enhanced regenerative effects compared to single cells. Also, spheroids have been recently introduced as building blocks in directed self-assembly strategy. Recent efforts aim to improve long-term cell retention and integration by the use of microencapsulation delivery systems that can rapidly integrate in the implantation site. Interlockable solid synthetic microscaffolds, so called lockyballs, were recently designed with hooks and loops to enhance cell retention and integration at the implantation site as well as to support spheroids aggregation after transplantation. Here we present an efficient methodology for human ASCs spheroids biofabrication and lockyballs cellularization using micro-molded non-adhesive agarose hydrogel. Lockyballs were produced using two-photon polymerization with an estimated mechanical strength. The Young’s modulus was calculated at level 0.1362 +/-0.009 MPa. Interlocking in vitro test demonstrates high level of loading induced interlockability of fabricated lockyballs. Diameter measurements and elongation coefficient calculation revealed that human ASCs spheroids biofabricated in resections of micro-molded non-adhesive hydrogel had a more regular size distribution and shape than spheroids biofabricated in hanging drops. Cellularization of lockyballs using human ASCs spheroids did not alter the level of cells viability (p › 0,999) and gene fold expression for SOX-9 and RUNX2 (p › 0,195). The biofabrication of ASCs spheroids into lockyballs represents an innovative strategy in regenerative medicine, which combines solid scaffold-based and directed self-assembly approaches, fostering opportunities for rapid in situ biofabrication of 3D building-blocks. PMID:27829016

  14. Dynamic Change of Polarity in Primary Cultured Spheroids of Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma and Its Role in Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Hiroaki; Kondo, Jumpei; Sato, Yumi; Endo, Hiroko; Nakajima, Aya; Piulats, Jose M; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Itoh, Yu; Mizoguchi, Akira; Ohue, Masayuki; Inoue, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells possess apical-basal polarity, which governs the exchange of nutrients and waste. Perturbation of cell polarity appears to be a general feature of cancers, although most colorectal cancers are differentiated adenocarcinomas, in which polarity is maintained to some extent. Little is known about the role of dysregulated polarity in cancer. The cancer tissue-originated spheroid method was applied to the preparation and culture of spheroids. Spheroids were cultured in suspension or in type I collagen gel. Polarity was assessed by IHC of apical markers and electron microscopy. Two types of polarity status in spheroids were observed: apical-in, with apical membrane located at cavities inside the spheroids in type I collagen gel; and apical-out, with apical membrane located at the outermost layer of spheroids in suspension. These polarities were highly interchangeable. Inhibitors of Src and dynamin attenuated the polarity switch. In patients, clusters of cancer cells that invaded vessels had both apical-in and apical-out morphologic features, whereas primary and metastatic tumors had apical-in features. In a mouse liver metastasis model, apical-out spheroids injected into the portal vein became apical-in spheroids in the liver within a few days. Inhibitors of Src and dynamin significantly decreased liver metastasis. Polarity switching was observed in spheroids and human cancer. The polarity switch was critical in an experimental liver metastasis model.

  15. Tumor spheroid model for the biologically targeted radiotherapy of neuroblastoma micrometastases

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, K.A.; Mairs, R.; Murray, T.; Hilditch, T.E.; Wheldon, T.E.; Gregor, A.; Hann, I.M. )

    1990-02-01

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric malignancy with a poor prognosis at least partly attributable to an early pattern of dissemination. New approaches to treatment of micrometastases include targeted radiotherapy using radiolabeled antibodies or molecules which are taken up preferentially by tumor cells. Multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) resemble micrometastases during the avascular phase of their development. A human neuroblastoma cell line (NBl-G) was grown as MTS and incubated briefly with a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody ({sup 131}I-UJ13A) directed against neuroectodermal antigens. Spheroid response was evaluated in terms of regrowth delay or proportion sterilized. A dose-response relationship was demonstrated in terms of {sup 131}I activity or duration of incubation. Control experiments using unlabeled UJ13A, radiolabeled nonspecific antibody (T2.10), radiolabeled human serum albumin, and radiolabeled sodium iodide showed these to be relatively ineffective compared to {sup 131}I-UJ13A. The cell line NBl-G grown as MTS has also been found to preferentially accumulate the radiolabeled catecholamine precursor molecule m-({sup 131}I)iodobenzylguanidine compared to cell lines derived from other tumor types. NBl-G cells grown as MTS provide a promising laboratory model for targeted radiotherapy of neuroblastoma micrometastases using radiolabeled antibodies or m-iodobenzylguanidine.

  16. Tumor-derived spheroids: Relevance to cancer stem cells and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Ohata, Hirokazu; Sato, Ai; Yamawaki, Kaoru; Enomoto, Takayuki; Okamoto, Koji

    2017-03-01

    Recently, many types of in vitro 3-D culture systems have been developed to recapitulate the in vivo growth conditions of cancer. The cancer 3-D culture methods aim to preserve the biological characteristics of original tumors better than conventional 2-D monolayer cultures, and include tumor-derived organoids, tumor-derived spheroids, organotypic multicellular spheroids, and multicellular tumor spheroids. The 3-D culture methods differ in terms of cancer cell sources, protocols for cell handling, and the required time intervals. Tumor-derived spheroids are unique because they are purposed for the enrichment of cancer stem cells (CSCs) or cells with stem cell-related characteristics. These spheroids are grown as floating spheres and have been used as surrogate systems to evaluate the CSC-related characteristics of solid tumors in vitro. Because eradication of CSCs is likely to be of clinical importance due to their association with the malignant nature of cancer cells, such as tumorigenicity or chemoresistance, the investigation of tumor-derived spheroids may provide invaluable clues to fight against cancer. Spheroid cultures have been established from cancers including glioma, breast, colon, ovary, and prostate cancers, and their biological and biochemical characteristics have been investigated by many research groups. In addition to the investigation of CSCs, tumor-derived spheroids may prove to be instrumental for a high-throughput screening platform or for the cultivation of CSC-related tumor cells found in the circulation or body fluids. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  17. Apoptotic effect of atorvastatin in glioblastoma spheroids tumor cultured in fibrin gel.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Neda; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Saberi, Hooshang; Tajerian, Roksana; Ardakan, Mohammad Mehdi Mokhtari; Shirian, Sadegh; Ai, Arman; Ai, Jafar

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is one of the most common and highly aggressive primary brain tumors that thought to be of glial cells origin. The new available therapy for glioblastoma is based on better understanding of molecular malignant progression in this tumor. It is better to identify key molecular targets stimulating signaling pathways that lead to initiation of apoptosis for treatment of glioblastoma. Tumorigenesis broadly is controlled by tumor microenvironment and design of best biomimetic culture systems dependency on these conditions allow for in vitro and in vivo tumor modeling for studies of cancer cells behavior to drugs. We engineered three-dimensional (3D) human tumor models using U87 glioma cells in fibrin gel that mimic microenvironmental feature of glioblastoma in vivo. In this study, atorvastatin was used as a kind of statins for induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of migration and invasion in glioma cells. To reach for these aims, 3D model of glioma in fibrin gel was used with different concentrations of atorvastatin (1, 5, 10μM) to assay apoptotic genes expression by real time PCR and Tunel assay. After 24 and 48h exposing with different concentrations of atorvastatin, cell migration and invasion of tumor cells were investigated. The results showed atorvastatin induced apoptosis of glioma spheroids dose- dependently. The most likely mechanisms are the induction of apoptosis by caspase-8- caspase-3 signaling pathway. The invasion and migration of U87 spheroid cells decreased after 48h especially with 10μM concentration of atorvastatin. Finally these results suggest that this biomimetic model with fibrin may provide a vastly applicable 3D culture system to study the effect of anti-cancer drugs such as atrovastatin on tumor malignancy in vitro and in vivo and atorvastatin could be used as anticancer agent for glioblastoma treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Human Cardiac Progenitor Spheroids Exhibit Enhanced Engraftment Potential

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Donato; Gregoletto, Luca; Reano, Simone; Pietronave, Stefano; Merlin, Simone; Talmon, Maria; Novelli, Eugenio; Diena, Marco; Nicoletti, Carmine; Musarò, Antonio; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Follenzi, Antonia; Prat, Maria

    2015-01-01

    A major obstacle to an effective myocardium stem cell therapy has always been the delivery and survival of implanted stem cells in the heart. Better engraftment can be achieved if cells are administered as cell aggregates, which maintain their extra-cellular matrix (ECM). We have generated spheroid aggregates in less than 24 h by seeding human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) onto methylcellulose hydrogel-coated microwells. Cells within spheroids maintained the expression of stemness/mesenchymal and ECM markers, growth factors and their cognate receptors, cardiac commitment factors, and metalloproteases, as detected by immunofluorescence, q-RT-PCR and immunoarray, and expressed a higher, but regulated, telomerase activity. Compared to cells in monolayers, 3D spheroids secreted also bFGF and showed MMP2 activity. When spheroids were seeded on culture plates, the cells quickly migrated, displaying an increased wound healing ability with or without pharmacological modulation, and reached confluence at a higher rate than cells from conventional monolayers. When spheroids were injected in the heart wall of healthy mice, some cells migrated from the spheroids, engrafted, and remained detectable for at least 1 week after transplantation, while, when the same amount of cells was injected as suspension, no cells were detectable three days after injection. Cells from spheroids displayed the same engraftment capability when they were injected in cardiotoxin-injured myocardium. Our study shows that spherical in vivo ready-to-implant scaffold-less aggregates of hCPCs able to engraft also in the hostile environment of an injured myocardium can be produced with an economic, easy and fast protocol. PMID:26375957

  19. Characterizing 3D morphology of multicellular tumor spheroids using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongyang; Wang, Shunqiang; Kessel, Sarah; Rubinoff, Ian; Liu, Yaling; Li, Peter Y.; Qiu, Jean; Zhou, Chao

    2017-02-01

    There is strong evidence that the morphological parameters of multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS), particularly size, sphericity, and growth pattern, play a role in their cytochemical responses. Because tumor spheroids accurately represent the three-dimensional (3D) structure of in vivo tumors, they may also mimic in vivo cytochemical responses, thus lending them relevance to cancer research. Knowledge of MCTS attributes, including oxygen and nutrient gradients, hypoxia resistance, and drug response, assist specialists seeking the most efficient ways to treat cancer. Structural information on tumor spheroids can provide insight into these attributes, and become a valuable asset for treatment in vivo. Currently, high-resolution bioimaging modalities, most notably bright field imaging, phase contrast imaging, fluorescent microscopy, and confocal imaging, are being employed for this purpose. However, these modalities lack sufficient penetration depth to resolve the entire geometry of large spheroids (>200um). In response to this deficiency, we propose a potential high-throughput imaging platform using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to quantify MCTS morphology. OCT's high resolution and depth penetration allow us to obtain complete, high-detailed, 3D tumor reconstructions with accurate diameter measurements. Furthermore, a computer-based voxel counting method is used to quantify tumor volume, which is significantly more accurate than the estimations required by 2D-projection modalities. Thus, this imaging platform provides one of the most complete and robust evaluations of tumor spheroid morphology, and shows great potential for contribution to the study of cancer treatment and drug discovery.

  20. Tumor-associated macrophages drive spheroid formation during early transcoelomic metastasis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mingzhu; Li, Xia; Tan, Shu; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Bellone, Stefania; Xu, Xiaocao; Zhang, Haifeng; Santin, Alessandro D.; Lou, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) can influence ovarian cancer growth, migration, and metastasis, but the detailed mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer metastasis remain unclear. Here, we have shown a strong correlation between TAM-associated spheroids and the clinical pathology of ovarian cancer. Further, we have determined that TAMs promote spheroid formation and tumor growth at early stages of transcoelomic metastasis in an established mouse model for epithelial ovarian cancer. M2 macrophage–like TAMs were localized in the center of spheroids and secreted EGF, which upregulated αMβ2 integrin on TAMs and ICAM-1 on tumor cells to promote association between tumor cells and TAM. Moreover, EGF secreted by TAMs activated EGFR on tumor cells, which in turn upregulated VEGF/VEGFR signaling in surrounding tumor cells to support tumor cell proliferation and migration. Pharmacological blockade of EGFR or antibody neutralization of ICAM-1 in TAMs blunted spheroid formation and ovarian cancer progression in mouse models. These findings suggest that EGF secreted from TAMs plays a critical role in promoting early transcoelomic metastasis of ovarian cancer. As transcoelomic metastasis is also associated with many other cancers, such as pancreatic and colon cancers, our findings uncover a mechanism for TAM-mediated spheroid formation and provide a potential target for the treatment of ovarian cancer and other transcoelomic metastatic cancers. PMID:27721235

  1. High-Throughput 3D Tumor Spheroid Screening Method for Cancer Drug Discovery Using Celigo Image Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kessel, Sarah; Cribbes, Scott; Déry, Olivier; Kuksin, Dmitry; Sincoff, Eric; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2016-06-01

    Oncologists have investigated the effect of protein or chemical-based compounds on cancer cells to identify potential drug candidates. Traditionally, the growth inhibitory and cytotoxic effects of the drugs are first measured in 2D in vitro models, and then further tested in 3D xenograft in vivo models. Although the drug candidates can demonstrate promising inhibitory or cytotoxicity results in a 2D environment, similar effects may not be observed under a 3D environment. In this work, we developed an image-based high-throughput screening method for 3D tumor spheroids using the Celigo image cytometer. First, optimal seeding density for tumor spheroid formation was determined by investigating the cell seeding density of U87MG, a human glioblastoma cell line. Next, the dose-response effects of 17-AAG with respect to spheroid size and viability were measured to determine the IC50 value. Finally, the developed high-throughput method was used to measure the dose response of four drugs (17-AAG, paclitaxel, TMZ, and doxorubicin) with respect to the spheroid size and viability. Each experiment was performed simultaneously in the 2D model for comparison. This detection method allowed for a more efficient process to identify highly qualified drug candidates, which may reduce the overall time required to bring a drug to clinical trial.

  2. Exploring Drug Dosing Regimens In Vitro Using Real-Time 3D Spheroid Tumor Growth Assays.

    PubMed

    Lal-Nag, Madhu; McGee, Lauren; Titus, Steven A; Brimacombe, Kyle; Michael, Sam; Sittampalam, Gurusingham; Ferrer, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Two-dimensional monolayer cell proliferation assays for cancer drug discovery have made the implementation of large-scale screens feasible but only seem to reflect a simplified view that oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes are the genetic drivers of cancer cell proliferation. However, there is now increased evidence that the cellular and physiological context in which these oncogenic events occur play a key role in how they drive tumor growth in vivo and, therefore, in how tumors respond to drug treatments. In vitro 3D spheroid tumor models are being developed to better mimic the physiology of tumors in vivo, in an attempt to improve the predictability and efficiency of drug discovery for the treatment of cancer. Here we describe the establishment of a real-time 3D spheroid growth, 384-well screening assay. The cells used in this study constitutively expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP), which enabled the real-time monitoring of spheroid formation and the effect of chemotherapeutic agents on spheroid size at different time points of sphere growth and drug treatment. This real-time 3D spheroid assay platform represents a first step toward the replication in vitro of drug dosing regimens being investigated in vivo. We hope that further development of this assay platform will allow the investigation of drug dosing regimens, efficacy, and resistance before preclinical and clinical studies.

  3. Experimental anti-tumor therapy in 3-D: spheroids--old hat or new challenge?

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Juergen; Ebner, Reinhard; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A

    2007-01-01

    To give a state-of-the-art overview on the promise of three-dimensional (3-D) culture systems for anticancer drug development, with particular emphasis on multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS). Cell-based assays have become an integral component in many stages of routine anti-tumor drug testing. However, they are almost always based on homogenous monolayer or suspension cultures and thus represent a rather artificial cellular environment. 3-D cultures--such as the well established spheroid culture system--better reflect the in vivo behavior of cells in tumor tissues and are increasingly recognized as valuable advanced tools for evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. The present article summarizes past and current applications and particularly discusses technological challenges, required improvements and recent progress with the use of the spheroid model in experimental therapeutics, as a basis for sophisticated drug/therapy screening. A brief overview is given focusing on the nomenclature of spherical 3-D cultures, their potential to mimic many aspects of the pathophysiological situation in tumors, and currently available protocols for culturing and analysis. A list of spheroid-forming epithelial cancer cell lines of different origin is provided and the recent trend to use spheroids for testing combination treatment strategies is highlighted. Finally, various spheroid co-culture approaches are presented that have been established to study heterologous cell interactions in solid tumors and thereby are able to reflect the cellular tumor environment with increasing accuracy. The intriguing observation that in order to retain certain tumor initiating cell properties, some primary tumor cell populations must be maintained exclusively in 3-D culture is mentioned, adding a new but fascinating challenge for future therapeutic campaigns.

  4. Anti-gastric cancer activity in three-dimensional tumor spheroids of bufadienolides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jixia; Zhang, Xiuli; Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Yun; Hou, Tao; Wei, Lai; Qu, Lala; Shi, Liying; Liu, Yanfang; Zou, Lijuan; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids of cancer cells have been increasingly used to screen anti-tumor compounds, owing to their in vivo like microenvironment and structure as well as compatibility to high-throughput/high-content screening. Here we report the potency and efficacy of a family of bufadienolides to inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cell line HGC-27 in three-dimensional (3D) spheroidal models. Examining the morphological and growth patterns of several cell lines in round-bottomed ultra-low attachment microplate suggested that HGC-27 cells formed reproducibly multicellular spheroidal structures. Profiling of 15 natural bufadienolides isolated from toad skin indicated that 8 14-hydroxy bufadienolides displayed inhibitory activity of the growth of HGC-27 spheroids in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, compared to clinical drugs taxol and epirubicin, active bufadienolides were found to penetrate more effectively into the HGC-27 spheroids, but with a narrower effective concentration range and a shorter lasting inhibitory effect. Furthermore, compared to two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer assays, active bufadienolides exhibited weaker efficacy and different potency in 3D spheroid model, demonstrating the great potential of 3D multicellular cell spheroid models in anti-cancer drug discovery and development. PMID:27098119

  5. Comparing the effects of repetitive and chronic ALA mediated PDT on human glioma spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Marlon S.; Sun, Chung-Ho; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2007-02-01

    Following surgical removal of malignant brain tumors 80% of all cases develop tumor recurrence within 2 cm of the resected margin. The aim of postoperative therapy is therefore elimination of nests of tumor cells remaining in the margins of the resection cavity. However, it is unlikely that standard "one-shot" intraoperative PDT treatments can accomplish this goal. This is due mainly to the length of time required to deliver adequate light fluences to depths of 1-2 cm in the resection margin. Additionally, due to the short doubling time of malignant glioma cells, the kill rate per cell doubling indicates that it seems unlikely that a single relatively short treatment would be sufficient to prevent recurrence of the tumor. Multiple repetitive or chronic treatment protocols would therefore seem required. In repetitive PDT both phtosensitizer and light are given over relatively short treatment times (hours) with treatment repetition following relatively long intervals (weeks). In chronic PDT (also called metronomic), both the photosensitizer and light are delivered continuously at low rates for extended periods of time (days). The in vitro therapy response of human glioma spheroids to 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) mediated PDT in repetitive or chronic form were investigated. At 6J fluence, spheroid survival rates of 28 and 7% were observed for repetitive or chronic PDT protocols respectively. The results indicated that single chronic (24-48hrs) treatment) was more effective at inhibiting spheroid growth than PDT repeated at relatively long intervals (weeks) or daily fractionated PDT.

  6. A cell-instructive hydrogel to regulate malignancy of 3D tumor spheroids with matrix rigidity.

    PubMed

    Liang, Youyun; Jeong, Jaehyun; DeVolder, Ross J; Cha, Chaenyung; Wang, Fei; Tong, Yen Wah; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2011-12-01

    Three dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid models are becoming important biomedical tools for both fundamental and applied cancer studies, but current models do not account for different levels of cancer malignancy. Several studies have reported that the mechanical rigidity of a hydrogel plays a significant role in regulating the phenotypes of cancer cells adhered to the gel surface. This finding suggests that matrix rigidity should also modulate the malignancy of 3D tumor spheroids. However, the role of matrix stiffness is often confounded by concurrent changes in 3D matrix permeability. This study reports an advanced strategy to assemble 3D liver tumor spheroids with controlled intercellular organization, phenotypes, and angiogenic activities using hydrogels with controlled stiffness and minimal differences in molecular diffusivity. The elastic moduli of cell-encapsulated collagen gels were increased by stiffening interconnected collagen fibers with varied amounts of poly(ethylene glycol) di-(succinic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester). Interestingly, hepatocellular carcinoma cells encapsulated in a fat-like, softer hydrogel formed malignant cancer spheroids, while cells cultured in a liver-like, stiffer gel formed compact hepatoids with suppressed malignancy. Overall, both the hydrogel and the 3D tumor spheroids developed in this study will be greatly useful to better understand and regulate the emergent behaviors of various cancer cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A simple, low-cost staining method for rapid-throughput analysis of tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Eckerdt, Frank; Alvarez, Angel; Bell, Jonathan; Arvanitis, Constadina; Iqbal, Asneha; Arslan, Ahmet D; Hu, Bo; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Goldman, Stewart; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2016-01-01

    Tumor spheroids are becoming an important tool for the investigation of cancer stem cell (CSC) function in tumors; thus, low-cost and high-throughput methods for drug screening of tumor spheroids are needed. Using neurospheres as non-adherent three-dimensional (3-D) cultures, we developed a simple, low-cost acridine orange (AO)-based method that allows for rapid analysis of live neurospheres by fluorescence microscopy in a 96-well format. This assay measures the cross-section area of a spheroid, which corresponds to cell viability. Our novel method allows rapid screening of a panel of anti-proliferative drugs to assess inhibitory effects on the growth of cancer stem cells in 3-D cultures.

  8. Optical signature of multicellular tumor spheroid using index-mismatch-induced spherical aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corre, G.; Weiss, P.; Ducommun, B.; Lorenzo, C.

    2014-02-01

    The development of new cancer treatments and the early prediction of their therapeutic potential are often made difficult by the lack of predictive pharmacological models. The 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) model offers a level of complexity that recapitulates the three-dimensional organization of a tumor and appears to be fairly predictive of therapeutic efficiency. The use of spheroids in large-scale automated screening was recently reported to link the power of a high throughput analysis to the predictability of a 3D cell model. The spheroid has a radial symmetry; this simple geometry allows establishing a direct correlation between structure and function. The outmost layers of MCTS are composed of proliferating cells and form structurally uniform domain with an approximate thickness of 100 microns. The innermost layers are composed of quiescent cells. Finally, cells in the center of the spheroid can form a necrotic core. This latest region is structurally heterogeneous and is poorly characterized. These features make the spheroid a model of choice and a paradigm to study the optical properties of various epithelial tissues. In this study, we used an in-vitro optical technique for label-free characterization of multicellular systems based on the index- mismatch induced spherical aberrations. We achieve to monitor and characterize the optical properties of MCTS. This new and original approach might be of major interest for the development of innovative screening strategies dedicated to the identification of anticancer drugs.

  9. Improved Methods to Generate Spheroid Cultures from Tumor Cells, Tumor Cells & Fibroblasts or Tumor-Fragments: Microenvironment, Microvesicles and MiRNA

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Zheng; Kelly, Catherine J.; Yang, Xiang-Yang; Jenkins, W. Timothy; Toorens, Erik; Ganguly, Tapan; Evans, Sydney M.; Koch, Cameron J.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic and prognostic indicators are key components to achieve the goal of personalized cancer therapy. Two distinct approaches to this goal include predicting response by genetic analysis and direct testing of possible therapies using cultures derived from biopsy specimens. Optimally, the latter method requires a rapid assessment, but growing xenograft tumors or developing patient-derived cell lines can involve a great deal of time and expense. Furthermore, tumor cells have much different responses when grown in 2D versus 3D tissue environments. Using a modification of existing methods, we show that it is possible to make tumor-fragment (TF) spheroids in only 2–3 days. TF spheroids appear to closely model characteristics of the original tumor and may be used to assess critical therapy-modulating features of the microenvironment such as hypoxia. A similar method allows the reproducible development of spheroids from mixed tumor cells and fibroblasts (mixed-cell spheroids). Prior literature reports have shown highly variable development and properties of mixed-cell spheroids and this has hampered the detailed study of how individual tumor-cell components interact. In this study, we illustrate this approach and describe similarities and differences using two tumor models (U87 glioma and SQ20B squamous-cell carcinoma) with supporting data from additional cell lines. We show that U87 and SQ20B spheroids predict a key microenvironmental factor in tumors (hypoxia) and that SQ20B cells and spheroids generate similar numbers of microvesicles. We also present pilot data for miRNA expression under conditions of cells, tumors, and TF spheroids. PMID:26208323

  10. Core-shell hydrogel beads with extracellular matrix for tumor spheroid formation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L.; Grist, S. M.; Nasseri, S. S.; Ni, C.; Cheung, K. C.

    2015-01-01

    Creating multicellular tumor spheroids is critical for characterizing anticancer treatments since they may provide a better model of the tumor than conventional monolayer culture. Moreover, tumor cell interaction with the extracellular matrix can determine cell organization and behavior. In this work, a microfluidic system was used to form cell-laden core-shell beads which incorporate elements of the extracellular matrix and support the formation of multicellular spheroids. The bead core (comprising a mixture of alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane, with gelation by temperature control) and shell (comprising alginate hydrogel, with gelation by ionic crosslinking) were simultaneously formed through flow focusing using a cooled flow path into the microfluidic chip. During droplet gelation, the alginate acts as a fast-gelling shell which aids in preventing droplet coalescence and in maintaining spherical droplet geometry during the slower gelation of the collagen and reconstituted basement membrane components as the beads warm up. After droplet gelation, the encapsulated MCF-7 cells proliferated to form uniform spheroids when the beads contained all three components: alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane. The dose-dependent response of the MCF-7 cell tumor spheroids to two anticancer drugs, docetaxel and tamoxifen, was compared to conventional monolayer culture. PMID:25945144

  11. Targeted nanosensor aided three-dimensional pH mapping in tumor spheroids using two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Elbez, Remy; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-03-01

    Tumors are generally characterized by a pH lower than the surrounding tissues. The mapping of tumor pH is of great importance as it plays a critical role in drug delivery and its effectiveness. Here we present a pH mapping technique in tumor spheroids, using targeted, ratiometric, fluorescent, pH nano-sensor that is based on two-photon excitation. Spheroids are micro-tumors that are widely used as an in-vitro three dimensional tumor model to study the different properties of the tumor for the purpose of drug delivery, therapy etc. The nanosensor consists of 8-Hydroxypyrene- 1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS), a pH sensitive dye, encapsulated in polyacrylamide hydrogel nanoparticle matrix and F3 peptide, conjugated to the nanoparticle's surface. The nanosensor has an average size of 68nm and contains approximately 0.5% dye by weight. The fluorescence intensity ratio, at the two-photon excitation wavelengths of 900nm and 750nm, increases linearly in the pH range from 6.0 to 8.0 and is used to determine the pH of the local environment. Our study reveals the pH distribution inside human cervix cancer spheroids (of different sizes) during the various stages of their formation. This information can be used to develop more efficient drug delivery mechanisms. The two-photon excitation used for this purpose is especially useful as it drastically minimizes both photobleaching and autofluorescence, thus leading to an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio. It also enables deep tissue imaging due to higher photon penetration depth.

  12. Bridging the Gap between Mesoscopic and Macroscopic Models: The Case of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsanto, P. P.; Griffa, M.; Condat, C. A.; Delsanto, S.; Morra, L.

    2005-04-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are valuable experimental tools in cancer research. By introducing an intermediate model, we have been able to successfully relate mesoscopic and macroscopic descriptions of spheroid growth. Since these descriptions stem from completely different roots (cell dynamics, and energy conservation and scaling arguments, respectively), their consistency validates both approaches and allows us to establish a direct correspondence between parameters characterizing processes occurring at different scales. Our approach may find applications as an example of bridging the gap between models at different scale levels in other contexts.

  13. Three-Dimensional Culture Systems in Cancer Research: Focus on Tumor Spheroid Model

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sritama; Devi, Gayathri R

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells propagated in three-dimensional (3D) culture systems exhibit physiologically relevant cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, gene expression and signaling pathway profiles, heterogeneity and structural complexity that reflect in vivo tumors. In recent years, development of various 3D models have improved the study of host-tumor interaction and use of high-throughput screening platforms for anti-cancer drug discovery and development. This review attempts to summarize the various 3D culture systems, with an emphasis on the most well characterized and widely applied model - multicellular tumor spheroids. This review also highlights the various techniques to generate tumor spheroids, methods to characterize them, and its applicability in cancer research. PMID:27063403

  14. Metabolic Study of Breast MCF-7 Tumor Spheroids after Gamma Irradiation by 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Alessandra; Grande, Sveva; Luciani, Anna Maria; Mlynárik, Vladimír; Guidoni, Laura; Viti, Vincenza; Rosi, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are an important model system to investigate the response of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. They share more properties with the original tumor than cells cultured as 2D monolayers do, which helps distinguish the intrinsic properties of monolayer cells from those induced during cell aggregation in 3D spheroids. The paper investigates some metabolic aspects of small tumor spheroids of breast cancer and their originating MCF-7 cells, grown as monolayer, by means of high–resolution (HR) 1H NMR spectroscopy and MR microimaging before and after gamma irradiation. The spectra of spheroids were characterized by higher intensity of mobile lipids, mostly neutral lipids, and glutamine (Gln) signals with respect to their monolayer cells counterpart, mainly owing to the lower oxygen supply in spheroids. Morphological changes of small spheroids after gamma-ray irradiation, such as loss of their regular shape, were observed by MR microimaging. Lipid signal intensity increased after irradiation, as evidenced in both MR localized spectra of the single spheroid and in HR NMR spectra of spheroid suspensions. Furthermore, the intense Gln signal from spectra of irradiated spheroids remained unchanged, while the low Gln signal observed in monolayer cells increased after irradiation. Similar results were observed in cells grown in hypoxic conditions. The different behavior of Gln in 2D monolayers and in 3D spheroids supports the hypothesis that a lower oxygen supply induces both an upregulation of Gln synthetase and a downregulation of glutaminases with the consequent increase in Gln content, as already observed under hypoxic conditions. The data herein indicate that 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a useful tool for monitoring cell response to different constraints. The use of spheroid suspensions seems to be a feasible alternative to localized spectroscopy since similar effects were found after radiation treatment. PMID:27200293

  15. The use of optical trap and microbeam to investigate the mechanical and transport characteristics of tunneling nanotubes in tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Patheja, Pooja; Dasgupta, Raktim; Dube, Alok; Ahlawat, Sunita; Verma, Ravi Shanker; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-09-01

    The use of optical trap and microbeam for investigating mechanical and transport properties of inter cellular tunneling nanotubes (TnTs) in tumor spheroids has been demonstrated. TnTs in tumor spheroids have been visualized by manipulating TnT connected cells using optical tweezers. Functionality of the TnTs for transferring cytoplasmic vesicles and injected dye molecules by optoporation method has been studied. Further, the TnTs could be longitudinally stretched by manipulating the connected cells and their elastic response was studied. Manipulation of cells at the surface of tumor spheroid using optical tweezers and injection of fluorescent dye into a trapped cell using optoporation technique.

  16. Umbilical cord blood CD34+ progenitor-derived NK cells efficiently kill ovarian cancer spheroids and intraperitoneal tumors in NOD/SCID/IL2Rgnull mice

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstad-van Evert, Janneke S.; Cany, Jeannette; van den Brand, Dirk; Oudenampsen, Manon; Brock, Roland; Torensma, Ruurd; Bekkers, Ruud L.; Jansen, Joop H.; Massuger, Leon F.; Dolstra, Harry

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adoptive transfer of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells is an attractive therapy approach against ovarian carcinoma. Here, we evaluated the potency of highly active NK cells derived from human CD34+ haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) to infiltrate and mediate killing of human ovarian cancer spheroids using an in vivo-like model system and mouse xenograft model. These CD56+Perforin+ HSPC-NK cells were generated under stroma-free conditions in the presence of StemRegenin-1, IL-15, and IL-12, and exerted efficient cytolytic activity and IFNγ production toward ovarian cancer monolayer cultures. Live-imaging confocal microscopy demonstrated that these HSPC-NK cells actively migrate, infiltrate, and mediate tumor cell killing in a three-dimensional multicellular ovarian cancer spheroid. Infiltration of up to 30% of total HSPC-NK cells within 8 h resulted in robust tumor spheroid destruction. Furthermore, intraperitoneal HSPC-NK cell infusions in NOD/SCID-IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice bearing ovarian carcinoma significantly reduced tumor progression. These findings demonstrate that highly functional HSPC-NK cells efficiently destruct ovarian carcinoma spheroids in vitro and kill intraperitoneal ovarian tumors in vivo, providing great promise for effective immunotherapy through intraperitoneal HSPC-NK cell adoptive transfer in ovarian carcinoma patients. PMID:28919991

  17. Suicide gene therapy on spontaneous canine melanoma: correlations between in vivo tumors and their derived multicell spheroids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gil-Cardeza, M L; Villaverde, M S; Fiszman, G L; Altamirano, N A; Cwirenbaum, R A; Glikin, G C; Finocchiaro, L M E

    2010-01-01

    To validate the use of multicellular spheroids to predict the efficacy of herpes simplex thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSVtk/GCV) suicide gene therapy in the respective in vivo tumors, we established and characterized 15 melanoma-derived cell lines from surgically excised melanoma tumors. Three HSVtk-lipofected cell lines were not sensitive to GCV in any culture configuration, other five displayed similar sensitivity as monolayers or spheroids, and only one resulted more sensitive when grown as spheroids. Other six cell lines manifested a relative multicellular resistance (MCR) phenotype growing as spheroids, compared with the same cells growing as monolayers. The reverse correlation between the MCR and the monolayers survival to HSVtk/GCV suggests that one of the main causes of MCR would be the rapid cell repopulation after suicide gene treatment. The high correlation of MCR with the spheroids radial growth and with the mitotic index of the respective originary tumors supported this re-growth involvement. A remarkable finding was the high correlation in HSVtk/GCV sensitivity between in vivo tumor and the corresponding derived cell lines growing as spheroids (R(2) = 0.85). This strongly encourages the implementation of spheroids as highly realistic experimental model for optimizing and predicting the in vivo response of the respective tumors to therapeutic strategies.

  18. Effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on tumor cells viability and formation of multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakymchuk, Olena M.; Perepelytsina, Olena M.; Dobrydnev, Alexey V.; Sydorenko, Mychailo V.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the impact of different concentrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on cell viability of breast adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 line, and formation of multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS). Chemical composition and purity of nanotubes is controlled by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The strength and direction of the influence of SWCNTs on the tumor cell population was assessed by cell counting and measurement of the volume of multicellular tumor spheroids. Effect of SWCNTs on the formation of multicellular spheroids was compared with the results obtained by culturing tumor cells with ultra dispersed diamonds (UDDs). Our results demonstrated that SWCNTs at concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 50 μg/ml did not have cytotoxic influence on tumor cells; instead, they had weak cytostatic effect. The increasing of SWCNTs concentration to 100 to 200 μg/ml stimulated proliferation of tumor cells, especially in suspension fractions. The result of this influence was in formation of more MTS in cell culture with SWCNTs compared with UDDs and control samples. In result, the median volume of MTS after cultivation with SWCNTs at 100 to 200 μg/ml concentrations is 3 to 5 times greater than that in samples which were incubated with the UDDs and is 2.5 times greater than that in control cultures. So, if SWCNTs reduced cell adhesion to substrate and stimulated formation of tumor cell aggregates volume near 7 · 10-3 mm3, at the same time, UDDs reduced adhesion and cohesive ability of cells and stimulated generation of cell spheroids volume no more than 4 · 10-3 mm3. Our results could be useful for the control of cell growth in three-dimensional culture.

  19. Induction of hypoxia and necrosis in multicellular tumor spheroids is associated with resistance to chemotherapy treatment

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Diego; Ivanek, Robert; Turrini, Eleonora; Droeser, Raoul A.; Zajac, Paul; Fimognari, Carmela; Spagnoli, Giulio C.; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Mele, Valentina; Muraro, Manuele G.

    2017-01-01

    Culture of cancerous cells in standard monolayer conditions poorly mirrors growth in three-dimensional architectures typically observed in a wide majority of cancers of different histological origin. Multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) culture models were developed to mimic these features. However, in vivo tumor growth is also characterized by the presence of ischemic and necrotic areas generated by oxygenation gradients and differential access to nutrients. Hypoxia and necrosis play key roles in tumor progression and resistance to treatment. To provide in vitro models recapitulating these events in highly controlled and standardized conditions, we have generated colorectal cancer (CRC) cell spheroids of different sizes and analyzed their gene expression profiles and sensitivity to treatment with 5FU, currently used in therapeutic protocols. Here we identify three MCTS stages, corresponding to defined spheroid sizes, characterized by normoxia, hypoxia, and hypoxia plus necrosis, respectively. Importantly, we show that MCTS including both hypoxic and necrotic areas most closely mimic gene expression profiles of in vivo-developing tumors and display the highest resistance to 5FU. Taken together, our data indicate that MCTS may mimic in vitro generation of ischemic and necrotic areas in highly standardized and controlled conditions, thereby qualifying as relevant models for drug screening purposes. PMID:27965457

  20. Multicellular Tumor Spheroids as a Model for Assessing Delivery of Oligonucleotides in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Kyle; Ming, Xin; Juliano, Rudolph L

    2014-01-01

    Oligonucleotides have shown promise in selectively manipulating gene expression in vitro, but that success has not translated to the clinic for cancer therapy. A potential reason for this is that cells behave differently in monolayer than in the three-dimensional tumor, resulting in limited penetration and distribution of oligonucleotides in the tumor. This may be especially true when oligonucleotides are associated with nanocarriers such as lipoplexes and polyplexes, commonly used delivery vehicles for oligonucleotides. The multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a three-dimensional model that closely resembles small avascular tumors and micrometastases, has been utilized as an intermediate between monolayer culture and in vivo studies for the screening of small-molecule drugs. However, spheroids have been little used for the study of various oligonucleotide delivery formulations. Here, we have evaluated the uptake and efficacy of splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides using various delivery modalities in two- and three-dimensional culture models. We find that the size of the delivery agent dramatically influences penetration into the spheroid and thus the biological effect of the oligonucleotides. We hypothesize that the MCTS model will prove to be a useful tool in the future development of oligonucleotide delivery formulations. PMID:24618852

  1. High Quality Multicellular Tumor Spheroid Induction Platform Based on Anisotropic Magnetic Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shijia; Hu, Ke; Sun, Jianfei; Li, Yang; Guo, Zhaobin; Liu, Mei; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Feimin; Gu, Ning

    2017-03-29

    In recent years, multicellular spheroid (MCS) culture has been extensively studied both in fundamental research and application fields since it inherits much more characteristics from in vivo solid tumor than conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture. However, anticell adhesive MCS culture systems such as hanging drop allow certain cell lines only to form loose, irregular aggregates rather than MCS with physiological barriers and pathophysiological gradients, which failed to mimic in vivo solid tumor in these aspects. To address this issue, we improved our previously established anisotropic magnetic hydrogel platform, enabling it to generate multicellular spheroids with higher efficiency. The qualities of multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTSs) obtained on our platform and from classic 3D culture systems were compared in terms of morphology, biological molecule expression profiles, and drug resistance. In this novel platform, mature MCTSs with necrotic cores could be observed in 1 week. And results of molecular biological assays with real time-PCR and western-blot confirmed that MCTSs obtained from our platform performed higher cell pluripotency than those obtained from the hanging drop system. Moreover, a lower cell apoptosis ratio and better viability of cancer cells were observed on our platform both under culturing and drug treatment. In conclusion, higher quality of MCTSs obtained from this anisotropic magnetic hydrogel than classic hanging drop system validate its potential to be an in vitro platform of inducing tumor MCTS formation and drug efficacy evaluation.

  2. Multi-parametric imaging of tumor spheroids with ultra-bright and tunable nanoparticle O2 probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Borisov, Sergey M.; Jenkins, James; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-modal probes allow for flexible choice of imaging equipment when performing quenched-phosphorescence O2 measurements: one- or two-photon, PLIM or intensity-based ratiometric read-outs. Spectral and temporal (e.g. FLIMPLIM) discrimination can be used to image O2 together with pH, Ca2+, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell death markers or cell/organelle specific markers. However, the main challenge of existing nanoparticle probes is their limited diffusion across thick (> 20-50 μm) 3D cell models such as tumor spheroids. Here, we present new class of polymeric nanoparticle probes having tunable size, charge, cell-penetrating ability, and reporter dyes. Being spectrally similar to the recently described MM2, PA2 and other O2 probes, they are 5-10 times brighter, demonstrate improved ratiometric response and their surface chemistry can be easily modified. With cultures of 2D and 3D cell models (fibroblasts, PC12 aggregates, HCT116 human colon cancer spheroids) we found cell-specific staining by these probes. However, the efficient staining of model of interest can be tuned by changing number of positive and negative surface groups at nanoparticle, to allow most efficient loading. We also demonstrate how real-time monitoring of oxygenation can be used to select optimal spheroid production with low variability in size and high cell viability.

  3. High-throughput image analysis of tumor spheroids: a user-friendly software application to measure the size of spheroids automatically and accurately.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjin; Wong, Chung; Vosburgh, Evan; Levine, Arnold J; Foran, David J; Xu, Eugenia Y

    2014-07-08

    The increasing number of applications of three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids as an in vitro model for drug discovery requires their adaptation to large-scale screening formats in every step of a drug screen, including large-scale image analysis. Currently there is no ready-to-use and free image analysis software to meet this large-scale format. Most existing methods involve manually drawing the length and width of the imaged 3D spheroids, which is a tedious and time-consuming process. This study presents a high-throughput image analysis software application - SpheroidSizer, which measures the major and minor axial length of the imaged 3D tumor spheroids automatically and accurately; calculates the volume of each individual 3D tumor spheroid; then outputs the results in two different forms in spreadsheets for easy manipulations in the subsequent data analysis. The main advantage of this software is its powerful image analysis application that is adapted for large numbers of images. It provides high-throughput computation and quality-control workflow. The estimated time to process 1,000 images is about 15 min on a minimally configured laptop, or around 1 min on a multi-core performance workstation. The graphical user interface (GUI) is also designed for easy quality control, and users can manually override the computer results. The key method used in this software is adapted from the active contour algorithm, also known as Snakes, which is especially suitable for images with uneven illumination and noisy background that often plagues automated imaging processing in high-throughput screens. The complimentary "Manual Initialize" and "Hand Draw" tools provide the flexibility to SpheroidSizer in dealing with various types of spheroids and diverse quality images. This high-throughput image analysis software remarkably reduces labor and speeds up the analysis process. Implementing this software is beneficial for 3D tumor spheroids to become a routine in vitro model

  4. 3D tumor spheroids: an overview on the tools and techniques used for their analysis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Elisabete C; Moreira, André F; de Melo-Diogo, Duarte; Gaspar, Vítor M; Carvalho, Marco P; Correia, Ilídio J

    2016-12-01

    In comparison with 2D cell culture models, 3D spheroids are able to accurately mimic some features of solid tumors, such as their spatial architecture, physiological responses, secretion of soluble mediators, gene expression patterns and drug resistance mechanisms. These unique characteristics highlight the potential of 3D cellular aggregates to be used as in vitro models for screening new anticancer therapeutics, both at a small and large scale. Nevertheless, few reports have focused on describing the tools and techniques currently available to extract significant biological data from these models. Such information will be fundamental to drug and therapeutic discovery process using 3D cell culture models. The present review provides an overview of the techniques that can be employed to characterize and evaluate the efficacy of anticancer therapeutics in 3D tumor spheroids.

  5. Significantly increased expression of OCT4 and ABCG2 in spheroid body-forming cells of the human gastric cancer MKN-45 cell line.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianming; Wang, Lei; Ma, Lilin; Xu, Junfei; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Jie; Chen, Ruixin

    2013-10-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory hypothesizes that CSCs are the cause of tumor formation, recurrence and metastasis. Key to the study of CSCs is their isolation and identification. The present study investigated whether spheroid body-forming cells in the human gastric cancer (GC) MKN-45 cell line are enriched for CSC properties, and also assessed the expression of the candidate CSC markers, octamer-binding transcription factor-4 (OCT4) and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2) in the MKN-45 spheroid body cells. The MKN-45 cells were plated in a stem cell-conditioned culture system to allow for spheroid body formation. The expression levels of OCT4 and ABCG2 in the spheroid body cells were assessed by qPCR, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining, while the tumorigenicity of the spheroid body-forming cells was assessed by in vivo xenograft studies in nude mice. The MKN-45 cells were able to form spheroid bodies when cultured in stem cell-conditioned medium. The spheroid body-forming cells showed a significantly higher (P<0.01) expression of OCT4 and ABCG2 compared with the parental cells. These data suggest that the spheroid body cells from the MKN-45 GC cell line cultured in stem cell-conditioned medium possessed gastric CSC properties. The co-expression of OCT4 and ABCG2 by these cells may represent the presence of a subpopulation of gastric CSCs.

  6. Fibroblast spheroids as a model to study sustained fibroblast quiescence and their crosstalk with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Salmenperä, Pertteli; Karhemo, Piia-Riitta; Räsänen, Kati; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Vaheri, Antti

    2016-07-01

    Stromal fibroblasts have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Normal and quiescent fibroblasts have been shown to restrict and control cancer cell growth, while cancer-associated, i. e. activated fibroblasts have been shown to enhance proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. In this study we describe generation of quiescent fibroblasts in multicellular spheroids and their effects on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) growth in soft-agarose and xenograft models. Quiescent phenotype of fibroblasts was determined by global down-regulation of expression of genes related to cell cycle and increased expression of p27. Interestingly, microarray analysis showed that fibroblast quiescence was associated with similar secretory phenotype as seen in senescence and they expressed senescence-associated-β-galactosidase. Quiescent fibroblasts spheroids also restricted the growth of RT3 SCC cells both in soft-agarose and xenograft models unlike proliferating fibroblasts. Restricted tumor growth was associated with marginally increased tumor cell senescence and cellular differentiation, showed with senescence-associated-β-galactosidase and cytokeratin 7 staining. Our results show that the fibroblasts spheroids can be used as a model to study cellular quiescence and their effects on cancer cell progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cellular capsules as a tool for multicellular spheroid production and for investigating the mechanics of tumor progression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Alessandri, Kévin; Sarangi, Bibhu Ranjan; Gurchenkov, Vasily Valérïévitch; Sinha, Bidisha; Kießling, Tobias Reinhold; Fetler, Luc; Rico, Felix; Scheuring, Simon; Lamaze, Christophe; Simon, Anthony; Geraldo, Sara; Vignjević, Danijela; Doméjean, Hugo; Rolland, Leslie; Funfak, Anette; Bibette, Jérôme; Bremond, Nicolas; Nassoy, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering the multifactorial determinants of tumor progression requires standardized high-throughput preparation of 3D in vitro cellular assays. We present a simple microfluidic method based on the encapsulation and growth of cells inside permeable, elastic, hollow microspheres. We show that this approach enables mass production of size-controlled multicellular spheroids. Due to their geometry and elasticity, these microcapsules can uniquely serve as quantitative mechanical sensors to measure the pressure exerted by the expanding spheroid. By monitoring the growth of individual encapsulated spheroids after confluence, we dissect the dynamics of pressure buildup toward a steady-state value, consistent with the concept of homeostatic pressure. In turn, these confining conditions are observed to increase the cellular density and affect the cellular organization of the spheroid. Postconfluent spheroids exhibit a necrotic core cemented by a blend of extracellular material and surrounded by a rim of proliferating hypermotile cells. By performing invasion assays in a collagen matrix, we report that peripheral cells readily escape preconfined spheroids and cell–cell cohesivity is maintained for freely growing spheroids, suggesting that mechanical cues from the surrounding microenvironment may trigger cell invasion from a growing tumor. Overall, our technology offers a unique avenue to produce in vitro cell-based assays useful for developing new anticancer therapies and to investigate the interplay between mechanics and growth in tumor evolution. PMID:23980147

  8. Necrosis in DU145 prostate cancer spheroids induces COX-2/mPGES-1-derived PGE2 to promote tumor growth and to inhibit T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Sha, Weixiao; Olesch, Catherine; Hanaka, Hiromi; Rådmark, Olof; Weigert, Andreas; Brüne, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) supports the growth of a spectrum of cancers. The potential benefit of COX-2-inhibiting non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for cancer treatment is however limited by their well-known cardiovascular side-effects. Therefore, targeting microsomal PGE synthase 1 (mPGES-1), the downstream enzyme in the COX-2-dependent pathway of PGE2 production might be attractive, although conflicting data regarding a potential tumor-supporting function of mPGES-1 were reported. We determined the impact of mPGES-1 in human DU145 prostate cancer cell growth. Surprisingly, knockdown of mPGES-1 did not alter growth of DU145 monolayer cells, but efficiently inhibited the growth of DU145 multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS). Opposed to MCTS, monolayer cells did not secrete PGE2 due to a lack of COX-2 expression, which was induced during spheroid formation. Pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 and mPGES-1 supported the crucial role of PGE2 for growth of MCTS. The functionality of spheroid-derived PGE2 was demonstrated by its ability to inhibit cytotoxic T cell activation. When investigating mechanisms of spheroid-induced COX-2 induction, we observed that among microenvironmental factors neither glucose deprivation, hypoxia nor tumor cell apoptosis enhanced COX-2 expression. Interestingly, interfering with apoptosis in spheroids triggered a shift towards necrosis, thus augmenting COX-2 expression. We went on to demonstrate that necrotic cells induced COX-2 mRNA expression and PGE2 secretion from live tumor cells. In conclusion, necrosis-dependent COX-2 upregulation in MCTS promoted PGE2 -dependent tumor growth and inhibited activated cytotoxic T cells. Hence, blocking mPGES-1 as a therapeutic option may be considered for COX-2/mPGES-1-positive solid cancers.

  9. Tumor spheroid-based migration assays for evaluation of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Maria; Box, Carol; Zimmermann, Miriam; Eccles, Suzanne A

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration is a key hallmark of malignant cells that contributes to the progression of cancers from a primary, localized mass to an invasive and/or metastatic phenotype. Traditional methods for the evaluation of tumor cell migration in vitro generally employ two-dimensional (2D), homogeneous cultures that do not take into account tumor heterogeneity, three-dimensional (3D) cell-cell contacts between tumor and/or host cells or interactions with extracellular matrix proteins. Here we describe a 3D tumor spheroid-based migration assay which more accurately reflects the solid tumor microenvironment and can accommodate both extracellular matrix and host cell interactions. It is a rapid and highly reproducible 96-well plate-based technique and we demonstrate its utility for the evaluation of therapeutic agents/drugs with anti-migratory properties.

  10. Three-dimensional tissues using human pluripotent stem cell spheroids as biofabrication building blocks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haishuang; Li, Qiang; Lei, Yuguo

    2017-03-13

    A recently emerged approach for tissue engineering is to biofabricate tissues using cellular spheroids as building blocks. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), can be cultured to generate large numbers of cells and presumably be differentiated into all the cell types of human body in vitro, thus are ideal cell source for biofabrication. We previously developed a hydrogel-based cell culture system that can economically produce large numbers of hPSC spheroids. With hPSCs and this culture system, there are two potential methods to biofabricate a desired tissue. In Method 1, hPSC spheroids are first utilized to biofabricate a hPSC tissue that is subsequently differentiated into the desired tissue. In Method 2, hPSC spheroids are first converted into tissue spheroids in the hydrogel-based culture system and the tissue spheroids are then utilized to biofabricate the desired tissue. In this paper, we systematically measured the fusion rates of hPSC spheroids without and with differentiation toward cortical and midbrain dopaminergic neurons and found spheroids' fusion rates dropped sharply as differentiation progressed. We found Method 1 was appropriated for biofabricating neural tissues.

  11. Spheroid body-forming cells in the human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 possess cancer stem cell properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianming; Ma, Lilin; Xu, Junfei; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Jie; Chen, Ruixin; Zhou, Youlang

    2013-02-01

    The cancer stem cell theory hypothesizes that cancer stem cells (CSCs), which possess self-renewal and other stem cell properties, are regarded as the cause of tumor formation, recurrence and metastasis. The isolation and identification of CSCs could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies specifically targeting CSCs. In this study, we enriched gastric cancer stem cells through spheroid body formation by cultivating the human gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 in defined serum-free medium. The stemness characteristics of spheroid body-forming cells, including self-renewal, proliferation, chemoresistance, tumorigenicity of the MKN-45 spheroid body-forming cells were evaluated, and the expression levels of stemness genes and related proteins in the MKN-45 spheroid body-forming cells were assessed. Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining for the stem cell markers on spheroid body-forming cells was examined to evaluate the association between stemness factors (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog) and the proposed CSC marker CD44. Our data demonstrated that non-adherent spheroid body-forming cells from the gastric cancer cell line MKN-45 cultured in stem cell-conditioned medium possessed gastric CSC properties, such as persistent self-renewal, extensive proliferation, drug resistance, high tumorigenic capacity and overexpression of CSC-related genes and proteins (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and CD44), compared with the parental cells. More importantly, CD44-positive cells co-expressing the pluripotency genes Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog may represent gastric CSCs. Further experiments using more refined selection criteria such as a combination of two or multiple markers would be useful to specifically identify and purify CSCs.

  12. Leading malignant cells initiate collective epithelial cell invasion in a three-dimensional heterotypic tumor spheroid model.

    PubMed

    Carey, Shawn P; Starchenko, Alina; McGregor, Alexandra L; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2013-06-01

    Solid tumors consist of genetically and phenotypically diverse subpopulations of cancer cells with unique capacities for growth, differentiation, and invasion. While the molecular and microenvironmental bases for heterogeneity are increasingly appreciated, the outcomes of such intratumor heterogeneity, particularly in the context of tumor invasion and metastasis, remain poorly understood. To study heterotypic cell-cell interactions and elucidate the biological consequences of intratumor heterogeneity, we developed a tissue-engineered multicellular spheroid (MCS) co-culture model that recapitulates the cellular diversity and fully three-dimensional cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions that characterize human carcinomas. We found that "invasion-competent" malignant cells induced the collective invasion of otherwise "invasion-incompetent" epithelial cells, and that these two cell types consistently exhibited distinct leader and follower roles during invasion. Analysis of extracellular matrix (ECM) microarchitecture revealed that malignant cell invasion was accompanied by extensive ECM remodeling including matrix alignment and proteolytic track-making. Inhibition of cell contractility- and proteolysis-mediated matrix reorganization prevented leader-follower behavior and malignant cell-induced epithelial cell invasion. These results indicate that heterogeneous subpopulations within a tumor may possess specialized roles during tumor progression and suggest that complex interactions among the various subpopulations of cancer cells within a tumor may regulate critical aspects of tumor biology and affect clinical outcome.

  13. Predicting diffusive transport of cationic liposomes in 3-dimensional tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Wientjes, Michael G; Yeung, Bertrand Z; Lu, Ze; Wientjes, M Guillaume; Au, Jessie L S

    2014-10-28

    Nanotechnology is widely used in cancer research. Models that predict nanoparticle transport and delivery in tumors (including subcellular compartments) would be useful tools. This study tested the hypothesis that diffusive transport of cationic liposomes in 3-dimensional (3D) systems can be predicted based on liposome-cell biointerface parameters (binding, uptake, retention) and liposome diffusivity. Liposomes comprising different amounts of cationic and fusogenic lipids (10-30mol% DOTAP or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine, 1-20mol% DOPE or 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, +25 to +44mV zeta potential) were studied. We (a) measured liposome-cell biointerface parameters in monolayer cultures, and (b) calculated effective diffusivity based on liposome size and spheroid composition. The resulting parameters were used to simulate the liposome concentration-depth profiles in 3D spheroids. The simulated results agreed with the experimental results for liposomes comprising 10-30mol% DOTAP and ≤10mol% DOPE, but not for liposomes with higher DOPE content. For the latter, model modifications to account for time-dependent extracellular concentration decrease and liposome size increase did not improve the predictions. The difference among low- and high-DOPE liposomes suggests concentration-dependent DOPE properties in 3D systems that were not captured in monolayers. Taken together, our earlier and present studies indicate the diffusive transport of neutral, anionic and cationic nanoparticles (polystyrene beads and liposomes, 20-135nm diameter, -49 to +44mV) in 3D spheroids, with the exception of liposomes comprising >10mol% DOPE, can be predicted based on the nanoparticle-cell biointerface and nanoparticle diffusivity. Applying the model to low-DOPE liposomes showed that changes in surface charge affected the liposome localization in intratumoral subcompartments within spheroids.

  14. Mimicking the tumor microenvironment to regulate macrophage phenotype and assessing chemotherapeutic efficacy in embedded cancer cell/macrophage spheroid models.

    PubMed

    Tevis, Kristie M; Cecchi, Ryan J; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2017-03-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are critical stromal components intimately involved with the progression, invasion, and metastasis of cancer cells. To address the need for an in vitro system that mimics the clinical observations of TAM localizations and subsequent functional performance, a cancer cell/macrophage spheroid model is described. The central component of the model is a triple negative breast cancer spheroid embedded in a three-dimensional collagen gel. Macrophages are incorporated in two different ways. The first is a heterospheroid, a spheroid containing both tumor cells and macrophages. The heterospheroid mimics the population of TAMs infiltrated into the tumor mass, thus being exposed to hypoxia and metabolic gradients. In the second model, macrophages are diffusely seeded in the collagen surrounding the spheroid, thus modeling TAMs in the cancer stroma. The inclusion of macrophages as a heterospheroid changes the metabolic profile, indicative of synergistic growth. In contrast, macrophages diffusely seeded in the collagen bear the same profile regardless of the presence of a tumor cell spheroid. The macrophages in the heterospheroid secrete EGF, a cytokine critical to tumor/macrophage co-migration, and an EGF inhibitor decreases the metabolic activity of the heterospheroid, which is not observed in the other systems. The increased secretion of IL-10 indicates that the heterospheroid macrophages follow an M2/TAM differentiation pathway. Lastly, the heterospheroid exhibits resistance to paclitaxel. In summary, the collagen embedded heterospheroid model promotes TAM-like characteristics, and will be of utility in cancer biology and drug discovery.

  15. Transcriptome profile of the early stages of breast cancer tumoral spheroids.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Marín, Rosario; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna; Garcia-Venzor, Alfredo; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Torres, Carolina; Gaytan-Cervantes, Javier; Mitre-Aguilar, Irma B; Maldonado, Vilma

    2016-03-29

    Oxygen or nutrient deprivation of early stage tumoral spheroids can be used to reliably mimic the initial growth of primary and metastatic cancer cells. However, cancer cell growth during the initial stages has not been fully explored using a genome-wide approach. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the transcriptome of breast cancer cells during the initial stages of tumoral growth using RNAseq in a model of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS). Network analyses showed that a metastatic signature was enriched as several adhesion molecules were deregulated, including EPCAM, E-cadherin, integrins and syndecans, which were further supported by an increase in cell migration. Interestingly, we also found that the cancer cells at this stage of growth exhibited a paradoxical hyperactivation of oxidative mitochondrial metabolism. In addition, we found a large number of regulated (long non coding RNA) lncRNAs, several of which were co-regulated with neighboring genes. The regulatory role of some of these lncRNAs on mRNA expression was demonstrated with gain of function assays. This is the first report of an early-stage MTS transcriptome, which not only reveals a complex expression landscape, but points toward an important contribution of long non-coding RNAs in the final phenotype of three-dimensional cellular models.

  16. Transcriptome profile of the early stages of breast cancer tumoral spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco-Marín, Rosario; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna; Garcia-Venzor, Alfredo; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Torres, Carolina; Gaytan-Cervantes, Javier; Mitre-Aguilar, Irma B.; Maldonado, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen or nutrient deprivation of early stage tumoral spheroids can be used to reliably mimic the initial growth of primary and metastatic cancer cells. However, cancer cell growth during the initial stages has not been fully explored using a genome-wide approach. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the transcriptome of breast cancer cells during the initial stages of tumoral growth using RNAseq in a model of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS). Network analyses showed that a metastatic signature was enriched as several adhesion molecules were deregulated, including EPCAM, E-cadherin, integrins and syndecans, which were further supported by an increase in cell migration. Interestingly, we also found that the cancer cells at this stage of growth exhibited a paradoxical hyperactivation of oxidative mitochondrial metabolism. In addition, we found a large number of regulated (long non coding RNA) lncRNAs, several of which were co-regulated with neighboring genes. The regulatory role of some of these lncRNAs on mRNA expression was demonstrated with gain of function assays. This is the first report of an early-stage MTS transcriptome, which not only reveals a complex expression landscape, but points toward an important contribution of long non-coding RNAs in the final phenotype of three-dimensional cellular models. PMID:27021602

  17. Targeted labeling of an early-stage tumor spheroid in a chorioallantoic membrane model with upconversion nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Holz, Jasmin A.; Ding, Yadan; Liu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Youlin; Tu, Langping; Kong, Xianggui; Priem, Bram; Nadort, Annemarie; Lambrechts, Saskia A. G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Buma, Wybren Jan; Liu, Yichun; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    In vivo detection of cancer at an early-stage, i.e. smaller than 2 mm, is a challenge in biomedicine. In this work target labeling of an early-stage tumor spheroid (~500 μm) is realized for the first time in a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model with monoclonal antibody functionalized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs-mAb).In vivo detection of cancer at an early-stage, i.e. smaller than 2 mm, is a challenge in biomedicine. In this work target labeling of an early-stage tumor spheroid (~500 μm) is realized for the first time in a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model with monoclonal antibody functionalized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs-mAb). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experimental procedures for the sample preparation and characterization, Chick CAM model, 3-D multicellular tumor spheroids, UCNPs circulating in CAM. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05638h

  18. Canine mammary tumors contain cancer stem-like cells and form spheroids with an embryonic stem cell signature.

    PubMed

    Ferletta, Maria; Grawé, Jan; Hellmén, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the presence of tentative stem-like cells in the canine mammary tumor cell line CMT-U229. This cell line is established from an atypical benign mixed mammary tumor, which has the property of forming duct-like structures in collagen gels. Stem cells in mammary glands are located in the epithelium; therefore we thought that the CMT-U229 cell line would be suitable for detection of tentative cancer stem-like cells. Side population (SP) analyses by flow cytometry were performed with cells that formed spheroids and with cells that did not. Flow cytometric, single sorted cells were expanded and re-cultured as spheroids. The spheroids were paraffin embedded and characterized by immunohistochemistry. SP analyses showed that spheroid forming cells (retenate) as well as single cells (filtrate) contained SP cells. Sca1 positive cells were single cell sorted and thereafter the SP population increased with repeated SP analyses. The SP cells were positively labeled with the cell surface-markers CD44 and CD49f (integrin alpha6); however the expression of CD24 was low or negative. The spheroids expressed the transcription factor and stem cell marker Sox2, as well as Oct4. Interestingly, only peripheral cells of the spheroids and single cells were positive for Oct4 expression. SP cells are suggested to correspond to stem cells and in this study, we have enriched for tentative tumor stem-like cells derived from a canine mammary tumor. All the used markers indicate that the studied CMT-U229 cell line contains SP cells, which in particular have cancer stem-like cell characteristics.

  19. Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Cell Lines as a Three-Dimensional Model for the Study of Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chung; Vosburgh, Evan; Levine, Arnold J.; Cong, Lei; Xu, Eugenia Y.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare tumors, with an incidence of two per 100, 000 individuals per year, and they account for 0.5% of all human malignancies.1 Other than surgery for the minority of patients who present with localized disease, there is little or no survival benefit of systemic therapy. Therefore, there is a great need to better understand the biology of NETs, and in particular define new therapeutic targets for patients with nonresectable or metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. 3D cell culture is becoming a popular method for drug screening due to its relevance in modeling the in vivo tumor tissue organization and microenvironment.2,3 The 3D multicellular spheroids could provide valuable information in a more timely and less expensive manner than directly proceeding from 2D cell culture experiments to animal (murine) models. To facilitate the discovery of new therapeutics for NET patients, we have developed an in vitro 3D multicellular spheroids model using the human NET cell lines. The NET cells are plated in a non-adhesive agarose-coated 24-well plate and incubated under physiological conditions (5% CO2, 37 °C) with a very slow agitation for 16-24 hr after plating. The cells form multicellular spheroids starting on the 3rd or 4th day. The spheroids become more spherical by the 6th day, at which point the drug treatments are initiated. The efficacy of the drug treatments on the NET spheroids is monitored based on the morphology, shape and size of the spheroids with a phase-contrast light microscope. The size of the spheroids is estimated automatically using a custom-developed MATLAB program based on an active contour algorithm. Further, we demonstrate a simple method to process the HistoGel embedding on these 3D spheroids, allowing the use of standard histological and immunohistochemical techniques. This is the first report on generating 3D spheroids using NET cell lines to examine the effect of therapeutic drugs. We have also performed histology

  20. Relations between the penetration, binding and average concentration of cytostatic drugs in human tumour spheroids.

    PubMed

    Erlanson, M; Daniel-Szolgay, E; Carlsson, J

    1992-01-01

    A penetration assay based on freeze-drying and vapour fixation was applied to show the spatial distribution of non-bound and bound cytostatic drugs in cellular spheroids. Several studies have proposed that peripheral binding of drugs correlates with limited penetration. We showed that granular accumulation, mainly at the peripheral part of spheroids, might occur in parallel with good penetration. For example, this was the case in human glioma spheroids after incubation with Adriamycin for 15-30 min. Following treatment with actinomycin D, colon carcinoma spheroids exhibited rather good penetration but also showed granular accumulation mainly in their peripheral regions. Ara-C accumulated largely and homogeneously in the peripheral regions of colon carcinoma spheroids and this severely delayed penetration. It took about 1 h for ara-C in the central regions of the spheroids to reach the same concentration as in the culture medium. In contrast, ara-C easily penetrated glioma spheroids without accumulating noticeably at the periphery. Retention tests involving washing and further incubation in drug-free culture medium revealed that the areas demonstrating extensive accumulation most often retained the drug, indicating binding, whereas the concentration of drug in other areas decreased. The oil-centrifugation method, which was used for rapid separation of the spheroids from the drug-containing medium, showed that the average concentration of daunomycin in the spheroids exceeded that in the culture medium as early as after 15 min, by which time only limited penetration had occurred. We found that good penetration of ara-C correlated with a low average concentration in glioma spheroids, whereas limited penetration correlated with a high average concentration in colon carcinoma spheroids. The latter finding was attributable to the high accumulation of drug at the spheroid periphery. Thus, there was an inverse relationship between penetration and binding and between

  1. Cell proliferation kinetics and radiation response in 9L tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Sweigert, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Cell kinetic parameters, including population doubling-time, cell cycle time, and growth fraction, were measured in 9L gliosarcoma spheroids. These parameters were studied as the spheroids grew from 50 ..mu..m to over 900 ..mu..m in diameter. Experiments relating the cell kinetic parameters to the radiation response of 9L spheroids were also carried out. The major findings were that the average cell cycle time (T/sub c/), is considerably longer in large spheroids than in exponentially-growing monolayers, the radiosensitivity of noncycling (but still viable) cells in spheroids is not significantly different from that of cycling spheroid cells, and the radiation-induced division delay is approximately twice as long in spheroid cells as in monolayer cells given equal radiation doses. The cell loss factor for spheroids of various sizes was calculated, by using the measured kinetic parameters in the basic equations for growth of a cell population. 157 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Photoinduced effects of m-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin loaded lipid nanoemulsions on multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Hinger, Doris; Navarro, Fabrice; Käch, Andres; Thomann, Jean-Sébastien; Mittler, Frédérique; Couffin, Anne-Claude; Maake, Caroline

    2016-09-07

    Photosensitizers are used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) to destruct tumor cells, however, their limited solubility and specificity hampers routine use, which may be overcome by encapsulation. Several promising novel nanoparticulate drug carriers including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, metallic nanoparticles and lipid nanocomposites have been developed. However, many of them contain components that would not meet safety standards of regulatory bodies and due to difficulties of the manufacturing processes, reproducibility and scale up procedures these drugs may eventually not reach the clinics. Recently, we have designed a novel lipid nanostructured carrier, namely Lipidots, consisting of nontoxic and FDA approved ingredients as promising vehicle for the approved photosensitizer m-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC). In this study we tested Lipidots of two different sizes (50 and 120 nm) and assessed their photodynamic potential in 3-dimensional multicellular cancer spheroids. Microscopically, the intracellular accumulation kinetics of mTHPC were retarded after encapsulation. However, after activation mTHPC entrapped into 50 nm particles destroyed cancer spheroids as efficiently as the free drug. Cell death and gene expression studies provide evidence that encapsulation may lead to different cell killing modes in PDT. Since ATP viability assays showed that the carriers were nontoxic and that encapsulation reduced dark toxicity of mTHPC we conclude that our 50 nm photosensitizer carriers may be beneficial for clinical PDT applications.

  3. 3D high-content screening for the identification of compounds that target cells in dormant tumor spheroid regions

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Carsten; Riefke, Björn; Gründemann, Stephan; Krebs, Alice; Christian, Sven; Prinz, Florian; Osterland, Marc; Golfier, Sven; Räse, Sebastian; Ansari, Nariman; Esner, Milan; Bickle, Marc; Pampaloni, Francesco; Mattheyer, Christian; Stelzer, Ernst H.; Parczyk, Karsten; Prechtl, Stefan; Steigemann, Patrick

    2014-04-15

    Cancer cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions need to adapt to an unfavorable metabolic microenvironment. As distance from supplying blood vessels increases, oxygen and nutrient concentrations decrease and cancer cells react by stopping cell cycle progression and becoming dormant. As cytostatic drugs mainly target proliferating cells, cancer cell dormancy is considered as a major resistance mechanism to this class of anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, substances that target cancer cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions have the potential to enhance cytostatic-based chemotherapy of solid tumors. With three-dimensional growth conditions, multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) reproduce several parameters of the tumor microenvironment, including oxygen and nutrient gradients as well as the development of dormant tumor regions. We here report the setup of a 3D cell culture compatible high-content screening system and the identification of nine substances from two commercially available drug libraries that specifically target cells in inner MCTS core regions, while cells in outer MCTS regions or in 2D cell culture remain unaffected. We elucidated the mode of action of the identified compounds as inhibitors of the respiratory chain and show that induction of cell death in inner MCTS core regions critically depends on extracellular glucose concentrations. Finally, combinational treatment with cytostatics showed increased induction of cell death in MCTS. The data presented here shows for the first time a high-content based screening setup on 3D tumor spheroids for the identification of substances that specifically induce cell death in inner tumor spheroid core regions. This validates the approach to use 3D cell culture screening systems to identify substances that would not be detectable by 2D based screening in otherwise similar culture conditions. - Highlights: • Establishment of a novel method for 3D cell culture based high-content screening. • First reported high

  4. A new, fast and semi-automated size determination method (SASDM) for studying multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Monazzam, Azita; Razifar, Pasha; Lindhe, Orjan; Josephsson, Raymond; Långström, Bengt; Bergström, Mats

    2005-11-14

    Considering the width and importance of using Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS) in oncology research, size determination of MTSs by an accurate and fast method is essential. In the present study an effective, fast and semi-automated method, SASDM, was developed to determinate the size of MTSs. The method was applied and tested in MTSs of three different cell-lines. Frozen section autoradiography and Hemotoxylin Eosin (H&E) staining was used for further confirmation. SASDM was shown to be effective, user-friendly, and time efficient, and to be more precise than the traditional methods and it was applicable for MTSs of different cell-lines. Furthermore, the results of image analysis showed high correspondence to the results of autoradiography and staining. The combination of assessment of metabolic condition and image analysis in MTSs provides a good model to evaluate the effect of various anti-cancer treatments.

  5. A new, fast and semi-automated size determination method (SASDM) for studying multicellular tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Monazzam, Azita; Razifar, Pasha; Lindhe, Örjan; Josephsson, Raymond; Långström, Bengt; Bergström, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Background Considering the width and importance of using Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS) in oncology research, size determination of MTSs by an accurate and fast method is essential. In the present study an effective, fast and semi-automated method, SASDM, was developed to determinate the size of MTSs. The method was applied and tested in MTSs of three different cell-lines. Frozen section autoradiography and Hemotoxylin Eosin (H&E) staining was used for further confirmation. Results SASDM was shown to be effective, user-friendly, and time efficient, and to be more precise than the traditional methods and it was applicable for MTSs of different cell-lines. Furthermore, the results of image analysis showed high correspondence to the results of autoradiography and staining. Conclusion The combination of assessment of metabolic condition and image analysis in MTSs provides a good model to evaluate the effect of various anti-cancer treatments. PMID:16283948

  6. sup 131 I-anticarcinoembryonic antigen therapy of LS174T human colon adenocarcinoma spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Langmuir, V.K.; McGann, J.K.; Buchegger, F.; Sutherland, R.M. )

    1989-06-15

    LS174T human colon adenocarcinoma multicell spheroids were used to study the radiobiological aspects of radioimmunotherapy. The spheroids were incubated in 131I-anticarcinoembryonic antigen (B7) at an antibody concentration of 0.5 microgram/ml and at 131I concentrations of 2.5 and 7.5 microCi/ml. After incubation times of 90 h, clonogenic cells per spheroid were reduced by 1400-fold and 23-fold at the high and low 131I concentrations, respectively. 131I Nonspecific antibody (PX63) resulted in 2- and 1.2-fold reductions. Spheroid diameter was not significantly affected by therapy but histological examination revealed that there had been a significant reduction in the cell density, particularly near the spheroid surface. Using a theoretical model to estimate radiation dose, a radiation survival curve was constructed. The resulting curve was somewhat concave suggesting the presence of a resistant population of cells. It is likely that this observation is primarily due to the fact that the inner cells received a lower dose than the outer cells. A population of radiobiologically hypoxic cells in the inner portion of the spheroids may also have contributed to the decreasing slope of the curve as well as ongoing cell division leading to new cells which receive a lower radiation dose per cell cycle. Because of the ability to estimate radiation dose for a given biological effect, these types of experiments may allow predictions of the efficacy of radiolabeled antibody therapy for micrometastatic disease.

  7. Effect of antigen turnover rate and expression level on antibody penetration into tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Margaret E; Pawlowski, David; Wittrup, K Dane

    2008-07-01

    Poor tissue penetration is a significant obstacle to the development of successful antibody drugs for immunotherapy of solid tumors, and diverse alterations to the properties of antibody drugs have been made to improve penetration and homogeneity of exposure. However, in addition to properties of the antibody drug, mathematical models of antibody transport predict that the antigen expression level and turnover rate significantly influence penetration. As intrinsic antigen properties are likely to be difficult to modify, they may set inherent limits to penetration. Accordingly, in this study, we assess their contribution by evaluating the distance to which antibodies penetrate spheroids when these antigen properties are systematically varied. Additionally, the penetration profiles of antibodies against carcinoembryonic antigen and A33, two targets of clinical interest, are compared. The results agree well with the quantitative predictions of the model and show that localizing antibody to distal regions of tumors is best achieved by selecting slowly internalized targets that are not expressed above the level necessary for recruiting a toxic dose of therapeutic. Each antibody-bound antigen molecule that is turned over or present in excess incurs a real cost in terms of penetration depth-a limiting factor in the development of effective therapies for treating solid tumors.

  8. Asymptotic behavior of solutions of a free boundary problem modeling tumor spheroid with Gibbs-Thomson relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junde; Zhou, Fujun

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we study a free boundary problem modeling the growth of solid tumor spheroid. It consists of two elliptic equations describing nutrient diffusion and pressure distribution within tumor, respectively. The new feature is that nutrient concentration on the boundary is less than external supply due to a Gibbs-Thomson relation and the problem has two radial stationary solutions, which differs from widely studied tumor spheroid model with surface tension effect. We first establish local well-posedness by using a functional approach based on Fourier multiplier method and analytic semigroup theory. Then we investigate stability of each radial stationary solution. By employing a generalized principle of linearized stability, we prove that the radial stationary solution with a smaller radius is always unstable, and there exists a positive threshold value γ* of cell-to-cell adhesiveness γ, such that the radial stationary solution with a larger radius is asymptotically stable for γ >γ*, and unstable for 0 < γ <γ*.

  9. Microencapsulated Multicellular Tumor Spheroids as a Tool to Test Novel Anticancer Nanosized Drug Delivery Systems In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Privalova, Anna M; Uglanova, Svetlana V; Kuznetsova, Natalia R; Klyachko, Natalia L; Golovin, Yury I; Korenkov, Viktor V; Vodovozova, Elena L; Markvicheva, Elena A

    2015-07-01

    In the study, MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells were used to study cytotoxicity of novel anticancer nanosized formulations, such as docetaxel-loaded nanoemulsion and liposomal formulation of a lipophilic methotrexate (MTX) prodrug. In vitro study of cytotoxicity was carried out in 2 models, namely using 3D in vitro model based on multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) and 2D monolayer culture. MTS were generated by tumor cell cultivation within alginate-oligochitosan microcapsules. In the case of the monolayer culture, cell viability was found to be 25, 18 and 12% for the samples containing nanoemulsion at concentrations 20, 300 and 1000 nM of docetaxel, respectively, after 48 hs incubation. For MTS these values were higher, namely 33, 23 and 18%, respectively. Cytotoxicity of liposomal MTX prodrug-based formulation with final concentration of 1, 2, 10, 50, 100 and 1000 nM in both models was also studied. MTX liposomal formulation demonstrated lower cytotoxicity on MTS compared to intact MTX. Moreover, MTS were also more resistant to both liposomal formulation and intact MTX than the monolayer culture. Thus, at 1000 nM MTX in the liposomal form, cell viability in MTS was 1.4-fold higher than that in the monolayer culture. MTS could be proposed as a promising tool to test novel anticancer nanosized formulations in vitro.

  10. Homogeneous pancreatic cancer spheroids mimic growth pattern of circulating tumor cell clusters and macrometastases: displaying heterogeneity and crater-like structure on inner layer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hao; Ou, Bao-Chi; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Yin, Shuai; Lu, Ai-Guo; Oechsle, Eva; Thasler, Wolfgang E

    2017-05-11

    Pancreatic cancer 3D in vitro models including multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), single cell-derived tumor spheroid (SCTS), tissue-derived tumor spheroid, and organotypic models provided powerful platforms to mimic in vivo tumor. Recent work supports that circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters are more efficient in metastasis seeding than single CTCs. The purpose of this study is to establish 3D culture models which can mimic single CTC, monoclonal CTC clusters, and the expansion of macrometastases. Seven pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell lines were used to establish MCTS and SCTS using hanging drop and ultra-low attachment plates. Spheroid immunofluorescence staining, spheroid formation assay, immunoblotting, and literature review were performed to investigate molecular biomarkers and the morphological characteristics of pancreatic tumor spheroids. Single cells experienced different growth patterns to form SCTS, like signet ring-like cells, blastula-like structures, and solid core spheroids. However, golf ball-like hollow spheroids could also be detected, especially when DanG and Capan-1 cells were cultivated with fibroblast-conditioned medium (p < 0.05). The size of golf ball-like hollow spheroids hardly grew after getting matured. Only DanG and Capan-1 could establish SCTS- and MCTS-derived hollow spheroids using hanging drop plates and ultra-low attachment plates. Other PDA cell lines could also establish tumor spheroid with hanging drop plates by adding methylated cellulose. Tumor spheroids derived from pancreatic cancer cell line DanG possessed asymmetrically distributed proliferation center, immune-checkpoint properties. ß-catenin, Ki-67, and F-actin were active surrounding the crater-like structure distributing on the inner layer of viable rim cover of the spheroids, which was relevant to well-differentiated tumor cells. It is possible to establish 3D CTC cluster models from homogenous PDA cell lines using hanging drop and ultra-low attachment

  11. Formation of multicellular tumor spheroids induced by cyclic RGD-peptides and use for anticancer drug testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Akasov, Roman; Zaytseva-Zotova, Daria; Burov, Sergey; Leko, Maria; Dontenwill, Monique; Chiper, Manuela; Vandamme, Thierry; Markvicheva, Elena

    2016-06-15

    Development of novel anticancer formulations is a priority challenge in biomedicine. However, in vitro models based on monolayer cultures (2D) which are currently used for cytotoxicity tests leave much to be desired. More and more attention is focusing on 3D in vitro systems which can better mimic solid tumors. The aim of the study was to develop a novel one-step highly reproducible technique for multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) formation using synthetic cyclic RGD-peptides, and to demonstrate availability of the spheroids as 3D in vitro model for antitumor drug testing. Cell self-assembly effect induced by addition of both linear and cyclic RGD-peptides directly to monolayer cultures was studied for 12 cell lines of various origins, including tumor cells (e.i. U-87 MG, MCF-7, M-3, HCT-116) and normal cells, in particular L-929, BNL.CL2, HepG2. Cyclo-RGDfK and its modification with triphenylphosphonium cation (TPP), namely cyclo-RGDfK(TPP) in a range of 10-100μM were found to induce spheroid formation. The obtained spheroids were unimodal with mean sizes in a range of 60-120μm depending on cell line and serum content in culture medium. The spheroids were used as 3D in vitro model, in order to evaluate cytotoxicity effects of antitumor drugs (doxorubicin, curcumin, temozolomide). The developed technique could be proposed as a promising tool for in vitro test of novel antitumor drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Label-free mitosis detection in tumor spheroids using tissue dynamics imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ran; Jeong, Kwan; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2012-03-01

    The detection of cellular mitosis inside three-dimensional living tissue at depths up to 1 mm has been beyond the detection limits of conventional microscopies. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of motility contrast imaging and fluctuation spectroscopy to detect motional signatures that we attribute to mitotic events within groups of 100 cells in multicellular tumor spheroids. Motility contrast imaging is a coherence-domain speckle-imaging technique that uses low-coherence off-axis holography as a coherence gate to localize dynamic light scattering from selected depths inside tissue. Fluctuation spectroscopy is performed on a pervoxel basis to generate micro-spectrograms that display frequency content vs. time. Mitosis, especially in Telophase and Cytokinesis, is a relatively fast and high-amplitude phenomenon that should display energetic features within the micro-spectrograms. By choosing an appropriate frequency range and threshold, we detect energetic events with a density and rate that are comparable to the expected mitotic fraction in the UMR cell line. By studying these mitotic events in tumors of two different sizes, we show that micro-spectrograms contain characteristically different information content than macro-spectrograms (averaged over many voxels) in which the mitotic signatures (which are overall a low-probability event) are averaged out. The detection of mitotic fraction in thick living tissue has important consequences for the use of tissue-based assays for drug discovery.

  13. Low-temperature plasma-induced antiproliferative effects on multi-cellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plewa, Joseph-Marie; Yousfi, Mohammed; Frongia, Céline; Eichwald, Olivier; Ducommun, Bernard; Merbahi, Nofel; Lobjois, Valérie

    2014-04-01

    Biomedical applications of low-temperature plasmas are of growing interest, especially in the field of plasma-induced anti-tumor effects. The present work is aimed at investigating the regionalized antiproliferative effects of low-temperature plasmas on a multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics the 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. We report that a low-temperature plasma jet, using helium flow in open air, inhibits HCT116 colon carcinoma MCTS growth in a dose-dependent manner. This growth inhibition is associated with the loss of Ki67, and the regionalized accumulation of DNA damage detected by histone H2AX phosphorylation. This regionalized genotoxic effect leads to massive cell death and loss of the MCTS proliferative region. The use of reactive oxygen species (ROS), scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and plasma-conditioned media demonstrate that the ROS generated in the media after exposure to low-temperature plasma play a major role in these observed effects. These findings strengthen the interest in the use of MCTS for the evaluation of antiproliferative strategies, and open new perspectives for studies dedicated to demonstrate the potential of low-temperature plasma in cancer therapy.

  14. Time-resolved confocal analysis of antibody penetration into living, solid tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Myrdal, S; Foster, M

    1994-01-01

    The in vivo function of a biologically active molecule is governed in part by the dynamics of its distribution within its target tissue. To enhance our ability to probe living cells, we have endeavored to improve live confocal microscopy methods and to develop analytical methods that simplify the handling of the resulting complex data sets. To do this we attached a recently developed micro-incubation system to the stage of a Leica confocal laser scanning microscope and were able to maintain physiologic culture conditions over several hours. Axial stability was achieved by modifying the room air conditioning. Laser illumination was low enough to retain cell viability through several hours of continuous scanning. With this setup, planar, time-resolved data sets (xyt) were produced by continuously rescanning a single xy plane at the rate of one scan/min. As an alternative, volumetric data sets (xyz) were acquired by stepping the scanned plane through the z axis. In both types of data sets, a semi-quantitative determination of the concentration of a fluorescent reporter molecule (e.g., FITC) over a gray level range of 0.255 was recorded along with the positional information. Thus, concentration (as intensity of fluorescence, or i) gave a fourth variable by either scan method, resulting in high-density xyti or xyzi data sets. The biological model we used to examine these methods was the penetration of a FITC-labeled, anti-carcinoma monoclonal antibody into cultured spheroids of tumor cells bearing the antibody-binding epitope. In one case, the distribution of antibody-FITC conjugate was compared with that of a long wavelength membrane dye, DiIC18(5). Several different software analyses were compared, including examining xyt data sets as "volumes". We observed that by increasing the displayed resolution of one variable, the demonstrable resolution of the other variables was reduced. For example, with high temporal resolution, either quantitative or positional resolution

  15. Evaluation of anti-HER2 scFv-conjugated PLGA-PEG nanoparticles on 3D tumor spheroids of BT474 and HCT116 cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuy Duong Le, Thi; Pham, Thu Hong; Nghia Nguyen, Trong; Giang Ngo, Thi Hong; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Huan Le, Quang

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional culture cells (spheroids) are one of the multicellular culture models that can be applied to anticancer chemotherapeutic development. Multicellular spheroids more closely mimic in vivo tumor-like patterns of physiologic environment and morphology. In previous research, we designed docetaxel-loaded pegylated poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles conjugated with anti-HER2 single chain antibodies (scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG) and evaluated them in 2D cell culture. In this study, we continuously evaluate the cellular uptake and cytotoxic effect of scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG on a 3D tumor spheroid model of BT474 (HER2-overexpressing) and HCT116 (HER2-underexpressing) cancer cells. The results showed that the nanoparticle formulation conjugated with scFv had a significant internalization effect on the spheroids of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells as compared to the spheroids of HER2-underexpressing cancer cells. Therefore, cytotoxic effects of targeted nanoparticles decreased the size and increased necrotic score of HER2-overexpressing tumor spheroids. Thus, these scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG nanoparticles have potential for active targeting for HER2-overexpressing cancer therapy. In addition, BT474 and HCT116 spheroids can be used as a tumor model for evaluation of targeting therapies.

  16. Optimization of Albumin Secretion and Metabolic Activity of Cytochrome P450 1A1 of Human Hepatoblastoma HepG2 Cells in Multicellular Spheroids by Controlling Spheroid Size.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Tomoko; Tanaka, Yutaro; Nishikawa, Makiya; Ogino, Yuka; Kusamori, Kosuke; Mizuno, Narumi; Mizukami, Yuya; Shimizu, Kazunori; Konishi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2017-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids are useful as three-dimensional cell culture systems and for cell-based therapies. Their successful application requires an understanding of the consequences of spheroid size for cellular functions. In the present study, we prepared multicellular spheroids of different sizes using the human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells, as hepatocytes are frequently used for in vitro drug screening and cell-based therapy. Precise polydimethylsiloxane-based microwells with widths of 360, 450, 560, and 770 µm were fabricated using a micromolding technique. Incubation of HepG2 cells in cell culture plates containing the microwells resulted in the formation of HepG2 spheroids with average diameters of 195, 320, 493, and 548 µm. The cell number per spheroid positively correlated with its diameter, and the viability of HepG2 cells was 94% or above for all samples. The smallest HepG2 spheroids showed the highest albumin secretion. On the other hand, the metabolic activity of 7-ethoxyresorufin, a fluorometric substrate for CYP1A1, increased with increasing spheroid size. These results indicate that controlling spheroid size is important when preparing HepG2 spheroids and that the size of HepG2 spheroids greatly influences the cellular function of HepG2 cells in the spheroids.

  17. Development of a human three-dimensional organotypic skin-melanoma spheroid model for in vitro drug testing

    PubMed Central

    Vörsmann, H; Groeber, F; Walles, H; Busch, S; Beissert, S; Walczak, H; Kulms, D

    2013-01-01

    Despite remarkable efforts, metastatic melanoma (MM) still presents with significant mortality. Recently, mono-chemotherapies are increasingly replenished by more cancer-specific combination therapies involving death ligands and drugs interfering with cell signaling. Still, MM remains a fatal disease because tumors rapidly develop resistance to novel therapies thereby regaining tumorigenic capacity. Although genetically engineered mouse models for MM have been developed, at present no model is available that reliably mimics the human disease and is suitable for studying mechanisms of therapeutic obstacles including cell death resistance. To improve the increasing requests on new therapeutic alternatives, reliable human screening models are demanded that translate the findings from basic cellular research into clinical applications. By developing an organotypic full skin equivalent, harboring melanoma tumor spheroids of defined sizes we have invented a cell-based model that recapitulates both the 3D organization and multicellular complexity of an organ/tumor in vivo but at the same time accommodates systematic experimental intervention. By extending our previous findings on melanoma cell sensitization toward TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) by co-application of sublethal doses of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVB) or cisplatin, we show significant differences in the therapeutical outcome to exist between regular two-dimensional (2D) and complex in vivo-like 3D models. Of note, while both treatment combinations killed the same cancer cell lines in 2D culture, skin equivalent-embedded melanoma spheroids are potently killed by TRAIL+cisplatin treatment but remain almost unaffected by the TRAIL+UVB combination. Consequently, we have established an organotypic human skin-melanoma model that will facilitate efforts to improve therapeutic outcomes for malignant melanoma by providing a platform for the investigation of cytotoxic treatments and

  18. Impact of multicellular tumor spheroids as an in vivo-like tumor model on anticancer drug response

    PubMed Central

    GALATEANU, BIANCA; HUDITA, ARIANA; NEGREI, CAROLINA; ION, RODICA-MARIANA; COSTACHE, MARIETA; STAN, MIRIANA; NIKITOVIC, DRAGANA; HAYES, A. WALLACE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.; GINGHINA, OCTAV

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer is higher in men than in women, amounting to 15% of cancer-related diseases as a whole. As such, undesirable effects, arising from the administration of current chemotherapeutic agents (the FOLFIRI/FOLFOX combinations), which are exerted on the remaining non-cancerous tissues and/or cells, have contributed to the occurrence of resistance to multiple drugs, thus markedly reducing their efficacy. However, the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents may be improved and their action may be more selectively targeted to diseased tissues/cells by means of developing biotechnologies and nano-techniques. Thus, the current focus is on creating biological tissue and related tumor models, by means of three-dimensional (3D) spheres, in an attempt to bridge the gap between results obtained in the pre-clinical phase and promising outcomes obtained in clinical trials. For this purpose, the characterization and use of so-called ‘multicellular tumor spheroids’, may prove to be invaluable. In this study, we focus on describing the efficacy of a model 3D system as compared to the traditional 2D tumor spheres in determining drug response, highlighting a potentially greater effect of the drugs following the encapsulation of respective liposomes. The results obtained demonstrate the successful preparation of a suspension of liposomes loaded with folinic acid, oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and loaded with meso-tetra (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin. Following its use on HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, an important comparative reduction was noted in the viability of the HT-29 cells, demonstrating the efficacy of multicellular tumor spheroids carrying liposomes loaded with therapeutic drugs. These findings indicate that the method of drug encapsulation in liposomes may improve the treatment efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27035518

  19. Azo-Based Iridium(III) Complexes as Multicolor Phosphorescent Probes to Detect Hypoxia in 3D Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lingli; Li, Guanying; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Yu; Jin, Chengzhi; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important characteristic of malignant solid tumors and is considered as a possible causative factor for serious resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. The exploration of novel fluorescent probes capable of detecting hypoxia in solid tumors will aid tumor diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we reported the design and synthesis of a series of “off-on” phosphorescence probes for hypoxia detection in adherent and three-dimensional multicellular spheroid models. All of the iridium(III) complexes incorporate an azo group as an azo-reductase reactive moiety to detect hypoxia. Reduction of non-phosphorescent probes Ir1-Ir8 by reductases under hypoxic conditions resulted in the generation of highly phosphorescent corresponding amines for detection of hypoxic regions. Moreover, these probes can penetrate into 3D multicellular spheroids over 100 μm and image the hypoxic regions. Most importantly, these probes display a high selectivity for the detection of hypoxia in 2D cells and 3D multicellular spheroids. PMID:26423609

  20. Azo-Based Iridium(III) Complexes as Multicolor Phosphorescent Probes to Detect Hypoxia in 3D Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lingli; Li, Guanying; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Yu; Jin, Chengzhi; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Hypoxia is an important characteristic of malignant solid tumors and is considered as a possible causative factor for serious resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. The exploration of novel fluorescent probes capable of detecting hypoxia in solid tumors will aid tumor diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we reported the design and synthesis of a series of “off-on” phosphorescence probes for hypoxia detection in adherent and three-dimensional multicellular spheroid models. All of the iridium(III) complexes incorporate an azo group as an azo-reductase reactive moiety to detect hypoxia. Reduction of non-phosphorescent probes Ir1-Ir8 by reductases under hypoxic conditions resulted in the generation of highly phosphorescent corresponding amines for detection of hypoxic regions. Moreover, these probes can penetrate into 3D multicellular spheroids over 100 μm and image the hypoxic regions. Most importantly, these probes display a high selectivity for the detection of hypoxia in 2D cells and 3D multicellular spheroids.

  1. Azo-Based Iridium(III) Complexes as Multicolor Phosphorescent Probes to Detect Hypoxia in 3D Multicellular Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingli; Li, Guanying; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Yu; Jin, Chengzhi; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Hypoxia is an important characteristic of malignant solid tumors and is considered as a possible causative factor for serious resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. The exploration of novel fluorescent probes capable of detecting hypoxia in solid tumors will aid tumor diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we reported the design and synthesis of a series of "off-on" phosphorescence probes for hypoxia detection in adherent and three-dimensional multicellular spheroid models. All of the iridium(III) complexes incorporate an azo group as an azo-reductase reactive moiety to detect hypoxia. Reduction of non-phosphorescent probes Ir1-Ir8 by reductases under hypoxic conditions resulted in the generation of highly phosphorescent corresponding amines for detection of hypoxic regions. Moreover, these probes can penetrate into 3D multicellular spheroids over 100 μm and image the hypoxic regions. Most importantly, these probes display a high selectivity for the detection of hypoxia in 2D cells and 3D multicellular spheroids.

  2. Spectroscopic imaging system for high-throughput viability assessment of ovarian spheroids or microdissected tumor tissues (MDTs) in a microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Georges-Robillard, A.; Masse, M.; Kendall-Dupont, J.; Strupler, M.; Patra, B.; Jermyn, M.; Mes-Masson, A.-M.; Leblond, F.; Gervais, T.

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing effort in the biomicrosystems community to develop a personalized treatment response assay for cancer patients using primary cells, patient-derived spheroids, or live tissues on-chip. Recently, our group has developed a technique to cut tumors in 350 μm diameter microtissues and keep them alive on-chip, enabling multiplexed in vitro drug assays on primary tumor tissue. Two-photon microscopy, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry are the current standard to assay tissue chemosensitivity on-chip. While these techniques provide microscopic and molecular information, they are not adapted for high-throughput analysis of microtissues. We present a spectroscopic imaging system that allows rapid quantitative measurements of multiple fluorescent viability markers simultaneously by using a liquid crystal tunable filter to record fluorescence and transmittance spectra. As a proof of concept, 24 spheroids composed of ovarian cancer cell line OV90 were formed in a microfluidic chip, stained with two live cell markers (CellTrackerTM Green and Orange), and imaged. Fluorescence images acquired were normalized to the acquisition time and gain of the camera, dark noise was removed, spectral calibration was applied, and spatial uniformity was corrected. Spectral un-mixing was applied to separate each fluorophore's contribution. We have demonstrated that rapid and simultaneous viability measurements on multiple spheroids can be achieved, which will have a significant impact on the prediction of a tumor's response to multiple treatment options. This technique may be applied as well in drug discovery to assess the potential of a drug candidate directly on human primary tissue.

  3. A Novel Computer-Assisted Approach to evaluate Multicellular Tumor Spheroid Invasion Assay

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros Castillo, Liliana R.; Oancea, Andrei-Dumitru; Stüllein, Christian; Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTSs) embedded in a matrix are re-emerging as a powerful alternative to monolayer-based cultures. The primary information gained from a three-dimensional model is the invasiveness of treatment-exposed MCTSs through the acquisition of light microscopy images. The amount and complexity of the acquired data and the bias arisen by their manual analysis are disadvantages calling for an automated, high-throughput analysis. We present a universal algorithm we developed with the scope of being robust enough to handle images of various qualities and various invasion profiles. The novelty and strength of our algorithm lie in: the introduction of a multi-step segmentation flow, where each step is optimized for each specific MCTS area (core, halo, and periphery); the quantification through the density of the two-dimensional representation of a three-dimensional object. This latter offers a fine-granular differentiation of invasive profiles, facilitating a quantification independent of cell lines and experimental setups. Progression of density from the core towards the edges influences the resulting density map thus providing a measure no longer dependent on the sole area size of MCTS, but also on its invasiveness. In sum, we propose a new method in which the concept of quantification of MCTS invasion is completely re-thought. PMID:27731418

  4. A Novel Computer-Assisted Approach to evaluate Multicellular Tumor Spheroid Invasion Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros Castillo, Liliana R.; Oancea, Andrei-Dumitru; Stüllein, Christian; Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne

    2016-10-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTSs) embedded in a matrix are re-emerging as a powerful alternative to monolayer-based cultures. The primary information gained from a three-dimensional model is the invasiveness of treatment-exposed MCTSs through the acquisition of light microscopy images. The amount and complexity of the acquired data and the bias arisen by their manual analysis are disadvantages calling for an automated, high-throughput analysis. We present a universal algorithm we developed with the scope of being robust enough to handle images of various qualities and various invasion profiles. The novelty and strength of our algorithm lie in: the introduction of a multi-step segmentation flow, where each step is optimized for each specific MCTS area (core, halo, and periphery); the quantification through the density of the two-dimensional representation of a three-dimensional object. This latter offers a fine-granular differentiation of invasive profiles, facilitating a quantification independent of cell lines and experimental setups. Progression of density from the core towards the edges influences the resulting density map thus providing a measure no longer dependent on the sole area size of MCTS, but also on its invasiveness. In sum, we propose a new method in which the concept of quantification of MCTS invasion is completely re-thought.

  5. Optimization of radioimmunotherapy using human malignant melanoma multicell spheroids as a model

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.S.; Crivici, A.; MacGregor, W.D.; Unger, M.W. )

    1989-06-15

    In vitro multicell spheroids from a human melanoma cell line and the human colon cancer cell line HT29, used as control, have been established as a model of poorly vascularized micrometastases in vivo. The antimelanoma monoclonal antibody 96.5 was radiolabeled with 131I at specific radioactivities from 1.85 to 3.96 GBq/mg. Cytotoxicity of 131I-96.5 to the spheroids, at an initial size of 300 microns in diameter, was investigated as a function of concentration of 131I-96.5 in the incubation medium, specific radioactivity, and treatment time. Spheroid growth delay and clonogenic survival of cells disaggregated from the spheroids at various times after treatment were used as end points. Therapeutic effects increased with the concentration of 131I-96.5 within the range 0.2 to 2 mg/liter (0.34 to 3.4 GBq/liter) at a fixed specific radioactivity. The effects increased with specific radioactivity at a fixed concentration of 131I-96.5. Difference in therapeutic effect was also observed between treatment times of 8 and 24 h. Radiation doses to the melanoma spheroids varied from 10 to 16 Gy. Unlabeled 96.5 at 2 mg/liter or 131I-iodide at 1.7 GBq/liter did not affect the growth of the melanoma spheroids. The HT29 spheroids, however, only suffered slight cytotoxicity at 1 or 2 mg/liter of 131I-96.5 and for a treatment time of 24 h despite comparable radiosensitivity of HT29 cells and melanoma cells to high-dose-rate radiation. Similar cytotoxicity was observed in the HT29 group treated with 131I-iodide at 1.7 GBq/liter. Present findings therefore demonstrate preferential and adequate killing of the melanoma spheroids by 131I-96.5 at 0.5 mg/liter and 3.96 GBq/mg in 8 h.

  6. A 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic field does not damage MG-63 three-dimensional tumor spheroids but induces changes in their invasive properties.

    PubMed

    Santini, Maria Teresa; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Ferrante, Antonella; Indovina, Paola; Donelli, Gianfranco; Indovina, Pietro Luigi

    2006-02-01

    The possibility that a sinusoidal 50 Hz magnetic field with a magnetic flux density of 1 mT can damage MG-63 osteosarcoma spheroids and induce variations in the invasive properties of these three-dimensional model systems after 2 days of exposure was investigated. Specifically, possible damage induced by these fields was examined by determining changes in spheroid surface morphology (light microscopy), growth (spheroid diameter and protein content determination), lactate dehydrogenase release, and reduced glutathione amount. Possible changes in the invasive properties were studied by invasion chambers. The results show no induction of cell damage by ELF fields while invasion chamber assays demonstrate a significant increase in the invasive potential of exposed spheroids. In order to determine if the fibronectin or hyaluronan receptors are involved, Western blot analysis was conducted on these two proteins. No significant variations were observed in either receptor in MG-63 multicellular tumor spheroids.

  7. Activated hepatic stellate cells play pivotal roles in hepatocellular carcinoma cell chemoresistance and migration in multicellular tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yeonhwa; Kim, Se-hyuk; Kim, Kang Mo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Joon; Seo, Haeng Ran

    2016-01-01

    Most Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are resistant to conventional chemotherapeutic agents and remain an unmet medical need. Recently, multiple studies on the crosstalk between HCC and their tumor microenvironment have been conducted to overcome chemoresistance in HCC. In this study, we formed multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) to elucidate the mechanisms of environment-mediated chemoresistance in HCC. We observed that hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in MCTS significantly increased the compactness of spheroids and exhibited strong resistance to sorafenib and cisplatin relative to other types of stromal cells. Increased collagen 1A1 (COL1A1) expression was apparent in activated HSCs but not in fibroblasts or vascular endothelial cells in MCTS. Additionally, COL1A1 deficiency, which was increased by co-culture with HSCs, decreased the cell-cell interactions and thereby increased the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer therapies in MCTS. Furthermore, losartan, which can inhibit collagen I synthesis, attenuated the compactness of spheroids and increased the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer therapies in MCTS. Meanwhile, activated HSCs facilitated HCC migration by upregulating matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) in MCTS. Collectively, crosstalk between HCC cells and HSCs promoted HCC chemoresistance and migration by increasing the expression of COL1A1 and MMP9 in MCTS. Hence, targeting HSCs might represent a promising therapeutic strategy for liver cancer therapy. PMID:27853186

  8. Advances in establishment and analysis of three-dimensional tumor spheroid-based functional assays for target validation and drug evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is overwhelming evidence that in vitro three-dimensional tumor cell cultures more accurately reflect the complex in vivo microenvironment than simple two-dimensional cell monolayers, not least with respect to gene expression profiles, signaling pathway activity and drug sensitivity. However, most currently available three-dimensional techniques are time consuming and/or lack reproducibility; thus standardized and rapid protocols are urgently needed. Results To address this requirement, we have developed a versatile toolkit of reproducible three-dimensional tumor spheroid models for dynamic, automated, quantitative imaging and analysis that are compatible with routine high-throughput preclinical studies. Not only do these microplate methods measure three-dimensional tumor growth, but they have also been significantly enhanced to facilitate a range of functional assays exemplifying additional key hallmarks of cancer, namely cell motility and matrix invasion. Moreover, mutual tissue invasion and angiogenesis is accommodated by coculturing tumor spheroids with murine embryoid bodies within which angiogenic differentiation occurs. Highly malignant human tumor cells were selected to exemplify therapeutic effects of three specific molecularly-targeted agents: PI-103 (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor), 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) (heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor) and CCT130234 (in-house phospholipase C (PLC)γ inhibitor). Fully automated analysis using a Celigo cytometer was validated for tumor spheroid growth and invasion against standard image analysis techniques, with excellent reproducibility and significantly increased throughput. In addition, we discovered key differential sensitivities to targeted agents between two-dimensional and three-dimensional cultures, and also demonstrated enhanced potency of some agents against cell migration/invasion compared with

  9. Co-culture of 3D tumor spheroids with fibroblasts as a model for epithelial–mesenchymal transition in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun Kyung; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2015-07-15

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) acts as a facilitator of metastatic dissemination in the invasive margin of malignant tumors where active tumor–stromal crosstalks take place. Co-cultures of cancer cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are often used as in vitro models of EMT. We established a tumor–fibroblast proximity co-culture using HT-29 tumor spheroids (TSs) with CCD-18co fibroblasts. When co-cultured with TSs, CCD-18co appeared activated, and proliferative activity as well as cell migration increased. Expression of fibronectin increased whereas laminin and type I collagen decreased in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to TSs alone, closely resembling the margin of in vivo xenograft tissue. Active TGFβ1 in culture media significantly increased in TS co-cultures but not in 2D co-cultures of cancer cells–fibroblasts, indicating that 3D context-associated factors from TSs may be crucial to crosstalks between cancer cells and fibroblasts. We also observed in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts increased expression of α-SMA, EGFR and CTGF; reduced expression of membranous β-catenin and E-cadherin, together suggesting an EMT-like changes similar to a marginal region of xenograft tissue in vivo. Overall, our in vitro TS–fibroblast proximity co-culture mimics the EMT-state of the invasive margin of in vivo tumors in early metastasis. - Highlights: • An adjacent co-culture of tumor spheroids and fibroblasts is presented as EMT model. • Activation of fibroblasts and increased cell migration were shown in co-culture. • Expression of EMT-related factors in co-culture was similar to that in tumor tissue. • Crosstalk between spheroids and fibroblasts was demonstrated by secretome analysis.

  10. Generation of a tumor spheroid in a microgravity environment as a 3D model of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Bernadette; Messina, Jane L; Heller, Richard

    2009-10-01

    An in vitro 3D model was developed utilizing a synthetic microgravity environment to facilitate studying the cell interactions. 2D monolayer cell culture models have been successfully used to understand various cellular reactions that occur in vivo. There are some limitations to the 2D model that are apparent when compared to cells grown in a 3D matrix. For example, some proteins that are not expressed in a 2D model are found up-regulated in the 3D matrix. In this paper, we discuss techniques used to develop the first known large, free-floating 3D tissue model used to establish tumor spheroids. The bioreactor system known as the High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARVs) was used to provide a microgravity environment. The HARVs promoted aggregation of keratinocytes (HaCaT) that formed a construct that served as scaffolding for the growth of mouse melanoma. Although there is an emphasis on building a 3D model with the proper extracellular matrix and stroma, we were able to develop a model that excluded the use of matrigel. Immunohistochemistry and apoptosis assays provided evidence that this 3D model supports B16.F10 cell growth, proliferation, and synthesis of extracellular matrix. Immunofluorescence showed that melanoma cells interact with one another displaying observable cellular morphological changes. The goal of engineering a 3D tissue model is to collect new information about cancer development and develop new potential treatment regimens that can be translated to in vivo models while reducing the use of laboratory animals.

  11. Visualizing the effect of tumor microenvironments on radiation-induced cell kinetics in multicellular spheroids consisting of HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaida, Atsushi; Miura, Masahiko

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •We visualized radiation-induced cell kinetics in spheroids. •HeLa-Fucci cells were used for detection of cell-cycle changes. •Radiation-induced G2 arrest was prolonged in the spheroid. •The inner and outer cell fractions behaved differently. -- Abstract: In this study, we visualized the effect of tumor microenvironments on radiation-induced tumor cell kinetics. For this purpose, we utilized a multicellular spheroid model, with a diameter of ∼500 μm, consisting of HeLa cells expressing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (Fucci). In live spheroids, a confocal laser scanning microscope allowed us to clearly monitor cell kinetics at depths of up to 60 μm. Surprisingly, a remarkable prolongation of G2 arrest was observed in the outer region of the spheroid relative to monolayer-cultured cells. Scale, an aqueous reagent that renders tissues optically transparent, allowed visualization deeper inside spheroids. About 16 h after irradiation, a red fluorescent cell fraction, presumably a quiescent G0 cell fraction, became distinct from the outer fraction consisting of proliferating cells, most of which exhibited green fluorescence indicative of G2 arrest. Thereafter, the red cell fraction began to emit green fluorescence and remained in prolonged G2 arrest. Thus, for the first time, we visualized the prolongation of radiation-induced G2 arrest in spheroids and the differences in cell kinetics between the outer and inner fractions.

  12. Arum Palaestinum with isovanillin, linolenic acid and β-sitosterol inhibits prostate cancer spheroids and reduces the growth rate of prostate tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Cole, Caitlin; Burgoyne, Thomas; Lee, Annie; Stehno-Bittel, Lisa; Zaid, Gene

    2015-08-05

    Arum palaestinum is a plant commonly found in the Middle East that is ingested as an herbal remedy to fight cancer. However, no studies have examined the direct effect of the plant/plant extract on tumor growth in an animal model. Verified prostate cancer cells were plated as 3D spheroids to determine the effect of extract from boiled Arum Palaestinum Boiss roots. In addition, male NU/NU mice (8 weeks old) with xenograft tumors derived from the prostate cancer cell line were treated daily with 1000 mg/kg body weight gavage of the suspension GZ17. The tumor growth was measured repeatedly with calipers and the excised tumors were weighed at the termination of the 3 week study. Control mice (10 mice in each group) received vehicle in the same manner and volume. The number of live prostate cancer cells declined in a dose/dependent manner with a 24 h exposure to the extract at doses of 0.015 to 6.25 mg/mL. A fortified version of the extract (referred to as GZ17) that contained higher levels of isovanillin, linolenic acid and β-sitosterol had a stronger effect on the cell death rate, shifting the percentage of dead cells from 30 % to 55 % at the highest dose while the vehicle control had no effect on cell numbers. When GZ17 was applied to non-cancer tissue, in this case, human islets, there was no cell death at doses that were toxic to treated cancer cells. Preliminary toxicity studies were conducted on rats using an up-down design, with no signs of toxic effect at the highest dose. NU/NU mice with xenograft prostate tumors treated with GZ17 had a dramatic inhibition of tumor progression, while tumors in the control group grew steadily through the 3 weeks. The rate of tumor volume increase was 73 mm(3)/day for the vehicle group and 24 mm(3)/day for the GZ17 treated mice. While there was a trend towards lower excised tumor weight at study termination in the GZ17 treatment group, there was no statistical difference. Fortified Arum palaestinum Boiss caused a reduction in

  13. Spheroidal formation preserves human stem cells for prolonged time under ambient conditions for facile storage and transportation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Yan, Li; Miao, Zhengqiang; Li, Enqin; Wong, Koon Ho; Xu, Ren-He

    2017-07-01

    Human stem cells are vulnerable to unfavorable conditions, and their transportation relies on costly and inconvenient cryopreservation. We report here that human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in spheroids survived ambient conditions (AC) many days longer than in monolayer. Under AC, the viability of MSC in spheroids remained >90% even after seven days, whereas MSC in monolayer mostly died fast. AC-exposed MSC spheroids, after recovery under normal monolayer culture conditions with controlled carbon dioxide and humidity contents, resumed typical morphology and proliferation, and retained differentiating and immunosuppressive capabilities. RNA-sequencing and other assays demonstrate that reduced cell metabolism and proliferation correlates to the enhanced survival of AC-exposed MSC in spheroids versus monolayer. Moreover, AC-exposed MSC, when injected as either single cells or spheroids, retained therapeutic effects in vivo in mouse colitis models. Spheroidal formation also prolonged survival and sustained pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells kept under AC. Therefore, this work offers an alternative and relatively simple method termed spheropreservation versus the conventional method cryopreservation. It shall remarkably simplify long-distance transportation of stem cells of these and probably also other types within temperature-mild areas, and facilitate therapeutic application of MSC as spheroids without further processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Photobleaching and phototoxicity of KillerRed in tumor spheroids induced by continuous wave and pulsed laser illumination.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Daria S; Shirmanova, Marina V; Dudenkova, Varvara V; Subochev, Pavel V; Turchin, Ilya V; Zagaynova, Elena V; Lukyanov, Sergey A; Shakhov, Boris E; Kamensky, Vladislav A

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate photobleaching of the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed in tumor spheroids upon pulsed and continuous wave (CW) laser irradiation and to analyze the mechanisms of cancer cell death after the treatment. We observed the light-dose dependent mechanism of KillerRed photobleaching over a wide range of fluence rates. Loss of fluorescence was limited to 80% at light doses of 150 J/cm(2) and more. Based on the bleaching curves, six PDT regimes were applied for irradiation using CW and pulsed regimes at a power density of 160 mW/cm(2) and light doses of 140 J/cm(2) , 170 J/cm(2) and 200 J/cm(2). Irradiation of KillerRed-expressing spheroids in the pulsed mode (pulse duration 15 ns, pulse repetition rate 10 Hz) induced predominantly apoptotic cell death, while in the case of CW mode the cancer cells underwent necrosis. In general, these results improve our understanding of photobleaching mechanisms in GFP-like proteins and show the importance of appropriate selection of treatment mode for PDT with KillerRed. Representative fluorescence image of two KillerRed-expressing spheroids before and immediately after CW irradiation.

  15. Spheroid formation of human thyroid cancer cells under simulated microgravity: a possible role of CTGF and CAV1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) formed scaffold-free under microgravity are of high interest for research and medicine. Their formation mechanism can be studied in space in real microgravity or on Earth using ground-based facilities (GBF), which simulate microgravity. On Earth, these experiments are more cost-efficient and easily performable. However, each GBF might exert device-specific and altered superimposingly gravity-dependent effects on the cells. Results FTC-133 human thyroid cancer cells were cultivated on a 2D clinostat (CN) and a random positioning machine (RPM) and compared with corresponding 1 g control cells. Harvested cell samples were investigated by microscopy, quantitative realtime-PCR and Multi-Analyte Profiling. Spheroid formation and growth occurred during 72 h of cultivation on both devices. Cytokine secretion and gene activation patterns frequently altered in different ways, when the cells were cultured either on the RPM or the CN. A decreased expression of CAV1 and CTGF in MCTS compared to adherent cells was observed after cultivation on both machines. Conclusion The development of MCTS proceeds similarly on the RPM and the CN resembling the situation observed under real microgravity conditions, while no MCTS formation was observed at 1 g under identical experimental conditions. Simultaneously, changes in the regulation of CTGF and CAV1 appeared in a comparable manner on both machines. A relationship between these molecules and MCTS formation is discussed. PMID:24885050

  16. Nanosecond ratio imaging of redox states in tumor cell spheroids using light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schickinger, Sarah; Bruns, Thomas; Wittig, Rainer; Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2013-12-01

    A new concept of three-dimensional imaging of tumor cell spheroids by light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy and nanosecond ratio imaging is described. Due to its low light dose and alternative excitation by two laser wavelengths (391 and 470 nm), this method maintains cell viability and permits recording of real-time kinetics. A genetically encoded sensor permits measurement of the redox state of glutathione and visualization of the impact of oxygen radicals. The pharmaceutically relevant system is tested upon addition of an oxidizing agent (H2O2), as well as upon addition of the apoptosis-inducing agent staurosporine.

  17. Paired image- and FACS-based toxicity assays for high content screening of spheroid-type tumor cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Trumpi, Kari; Egan, David A; Vellinga, Thomas T; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; Kranenburg, Onno

    2015-01-01

    Novel spheroid-type tumor cell cultures directly isolated from patients' tumors preserve tumor characteristics better than traditionally grown cell lines. However, such cultures are not generally used for high-throughput toxicity drug screens. In addition, the assays that are commonly used to assess drug-induced toxicity in such screens usually measure a proxy for cell viability such as mitochondrial activity or ATP-content per culture well, rather than actual cell death. This generates considerable assay-dependent differences in the measured toxicity values. To address this problem we developed a robust method that documents drug-induced toxicity on a per-cell, rather than on a per-well basis. The method involves automated drug dispensing followed by paired image- and FACS-based analysis of cell death and cell cycle changes. We show that the two methods generate toxicity data in 96-well format which are highly concordant. By contrast, the concordance of these methods with frequently used well-based assays was generally poor. The reported method can be implemented on standard automated microscopes and provides a low-cost approach for accurate and reproducible high-throughput toxicity screens in spheroid type cell cultures. Furthermore, the high versatility of both the imaging and FACS platforms allows straightforward adaptation of the high-throughput experimental setup to include fluorescence-based measurement of additional cell biological parameters.

  18. Modelling kidney disease with CRISPR-mutant kidney organoids derived from human pluripotent epiblast spheroids.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Benjamin S; Brooks, Craig R; Lam, Albert Q; Fu, Hongxia; Morizane, Ryuji; Agrawal, Vishesh; Saad, Abdelaziz F; Li, Michelle K; Hughes, Michael R; Werff, Ryan Vander; Peters, Derek T; Lu, Junjie; Baccei, Anna; Siedlecki, Andrew M; Valerius, M Todd; Musunuru, Kiran; McNagny, Kelly M; Steinman, Theodore I; Zhou, Jing; Lerou, Paul H; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2015-10-23

    Human-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived kidney cells (hPSC-KCs) have important potential for disease modelling and regeneration. Whether the hPSC-KCs can reconstitute tissue-specific phenotypes is currently unknown. Here we show that hPSC-KCs self-organize into kidney organoids that functionally recapitulate tissue-specific epithelial physiology, including disease phenotypes after genome editing. In three-dimensional cultures, epiblast-stage hPSCs form spheroids surrounding hollow, amniotic-like cavities. GSK3β inhibition differentiates spheroids into segmented, nephron-like kidney organoids containing cell populations with characteristics of proximal tubules, podocytes and endothelium. Tubules accumulate dextran and methotrexate transport cargoes, and express kidney injury molecule-1 after nephrotoxic chemical injury. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of podocalyxin causes junctional organization defects in podocyte-like cells. Knockout of the polycystic kidney disease genes PKD1 or PKD2 induces cyst formation from kidney tubules. All of these functional phenotypes are distinct from effects in epiblast spheroids, indicating that they are tissue specific. Our findings establish a reproducible, versatile three-dimensional framework for human epithelial disease modelling and regenerative medicine applications.

  19. Modelling kidney disease with CRISPR-mutant kidney organoids derived from human pluripotent epiblast spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin S.; Brooks, Craig R.; Lam, Albert Q.; Fu, Hongxia; Morizane, Ryuji; Agrawal, Vishesh; Saad, Abdelaziz F.; Li, Michelle K.; Hughes, Michael R.; Werff, Ryan Vander; Peters, Derek T.; Lu, Junjie; Baccei, Anna; Siedlecki, Andrew M.; Valerius, M. Todd; Musunuru, Kiran; McNagny, Kelly M.; Steinman, Theodore I.; Zhou, Jing; Lerou, Paul H.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Human-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived kidney cells (hPSC-KCs) have important potential for disease modelling and regeneration. Whether the hPSC-KCs can reconstitute tissue-specific phenotypes is currently unknown. Here we show that hPSC-KCs self-organize into kidney organoids that functionally recapitulate tissue-specific epithelial physiology, including disease phenotypes after genome editing. In three-dimensional cultures, epiblast-stage hPSCs form spheroids surrounding hollow, amniotic-like cavities. GSK3β inhibition differentiates spheroids into segmented, nephron-like kidney organoids containing cell populations with characteristics of proximal tubules, podocytes and endothelium. Tubules accumulate dextran and methotrexate transport cargoes, and express kidney injury molecule-1 after nephrotoxic chemical injury. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of podocalyxin causes junctional organization defects in podocyte-like cells. Knockout of the polycystic kidney disease genes PKD1 or PKD2 induces cyst formation from kidney tubules. All of these functional phenotypes are distinct from effects in epiblast spheroids, indicating that they are tissue specific. Our findings establish a reproducible, versatile three-dimensional framework for human epithelial disease modelling and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26493500

  20. Monitoring the effects of doxorubicin on 3D-spheroid tumor cells in real-time

    PubMed Central

    Baek, NamHuk; Seo, Ok Won; Kim, MinSung; Hulme, John; An, Seong Soo A

    2016-01-01

    Recently, increasing numbers of cell culture experiments with 3D spheroids presented better correlating results in vivo than traditional 2D cell culture systems. 3D spheroids could offer a simple and highly reproducible model that would exhibit many characteristics of natural tissue, such as the production of extracellular matrix. In this paper numerous cell lines were screened and selected depending on their ability to form and maintain a spherical shape. The effects of increasing concentrations of doxorubicin (DXR) on the integrity and viability of the selected spheroids were then measured at regular intervals and in real-time. In total 12 cell lines, adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial (A549), muscle (C2C12), prostate (DU145), testis (F9), pituitary epithelial-like (GH3), cervical cancer (HeLa), HeLa contaminant (HEp2), embryo (NIH3T3), embryo (PA317), neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y), osteosarcoma U2OS, and embryonic kidney cells (293T), were screened. Out of the 12, 8 cell lines, NIH3T3, C2C12, 293T, SH-SY5Y, A549, HeLa, PA317, and U2OS formed regular spheroids and the effects of DXR on these structures were measured at regular intervals. Finally, 5 cell lines, A549, HeLa, SH-SY5Y, U2OS, and 293T, were selected for real-time monitoring and the effects of DXR treatment on their behavior were continuously recorded for 5 days. A potential correlation regarding the effects of DXR on spheroid viability and ATP production was measured on days 1, 3, and 5. Cytotoxicity of DXR seemed to occur after endocytosis, since the cellular activities and ATP productions were still viable after 1 day of the treatment in all spheroids, except SH-SY5Y. Both cellular activity and ATP production were halted 3 and 5 days from the start of the treatment in all spheroids. All cell lines maintained their spheroid shape, except SHSY-5, which behaved in an unpredictable manner when exposed to toxic concentrations of DXR. Cytotoxic effects of DXR towards SH-SY5Y seemed to cause degradation of

  1. 3D tumor spheroid models for in vitro therapeutic screening: a systematic approach to enhance the biological relevance of data obtained

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Michele; Piccinini, Filippo; Arienti, Chiara; Zamagni, Alice; Santi, Spartaco; Polico, Rolando; Bevilacqua, Alessandro; Tesei, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The potential of a spheroid tumor model composed of cells in different proliferative and metabolic states for the development of new anticancer strategies has been amply demonstrated. However, there is little or no information in the literature on the problems of reproducibility of data originating from experiments using 3D models. Our analyses, carried out using a novel open source software capable of performing an automatic image analysis of 3D tumor colonies, showed that a number of morphology parameters affect the response of large spheroids to treatment. In particular, we found that both spheroid volume and shape may be a source of variability. We also compared some commercially available viability assays specifically designed for 3D models. In conclusion, our data indicate the need for a pre-selection of tumor spheroids of homogeneous volume and shape to reduce data variability to a minimum before use in a cytotoxicity test. In addition, we identified and validated a cytotoxicity test capable of providing meaningful data on the damage induced in large tumor spheroids of up to diameter in 650 μm by different kinds of treatments. PMID:26752500

  2. Hypoxia-Responsive Cobalt Complexes in Tumor Spheroids: Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Edward S; Kaur, Amandeep; Bishop, David P; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Kuchel, Philip W; Grieve, Stuart M; Figtree, Gemma A; Renfrew, Anna K; Bonnitcha, Paul D; New, Elizabeth J

    2017-08-21

    Dense tumors are resistant to conventional chemotherapies due to the unique tumor microenvironment characterized by hypoxic regions that promote cellular dormancy. Bioreductive drugs that are activated in response to this hypoxic environment are an attractive strategy for therapy with anticipated lower harmful side effects in normoxic healthy tissue. Cobalt bioreductive pro-drugs that selectively release toxic payloads upon reduction in hypoxic cells have shown great promise as anticancer agents. However, the bioreductive response in the tumor microenvironment must be better understood, as current techniques for monitoring bioreduction to Co(II) such as X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure provide limited information on speciation and require synchrotron radiation sources. Here, we present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an accessible and powerful technique to monitor bioreduction by treating the cobalt complex as an MRI contrast agent and monitoring the change in water signal induced by reduction from diamagnetic Co(III) to paramagnetic Co(II). Cobalt pro-drugs built upon the tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine ligand scaffold with varying charge were investigated for distribution and activity in a 3D tumor spheroid model by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and MRI. In addition, paramagnetic (1)H NMR spectroscopy of spheroids enabled determination of the speciation of activated Co(II)TPAx complexes. This study demonstrates the utility of MRI and associated spectroscopy techniques for understanding bioreductive cobalt pro-drugs in the tumor microenvironment and has broader implications for monitoring paramagnetic metal-based therapies.

  3. Applications of a new In vivo tumor spheroid based shell-less chorioallantoic membrane 3-D model in bioengineering research

    PubMed Central

    De Magalhães, Nzola; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Berns, Michael; Cristini, Vittorio; Chen, Zhongping; Stupack, Dwayne; Lowengrub, John

    2010-01-01

    The chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a classical in vivo biological model in studies of angiogenesis. Combined with the right tumor system and experimental configuration this classical model can offer new approaches to investigating tumor processes. The increase in development of biotechnological devices for cancer diagnosis and treatment, calls for more sophisticated tumor models that can easily adapt to the technology, and provide a more accurate, stable and consistent platform for rapid quantitative and qualitative analysis. As we discuss a variety of applications of this novel in vivo tumor spheroid based shell-less CAM model in biomedical engineering research, we will show that it is extremely versatile and easily adaptable to an array of biomedical applications. The model is particularly useful in quantitative studies of the progression of avascular tumors into vascularized tumors in the CAM. Its environment is more stable, flat and has a large working area and wider field of view excellent for imaging and longitudinal studies. Finally, rapid data acquisition, screening and validation of biomedical devices and therapeutics are possible with the short experimental window. PMID:21243108

  4. Cytoprotective and Antioxidant Effects of Steen Solution on Human Lung Spheroids and Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pagano, F; Nocella, C; Sciarretta, S; Fianchini, L; Siciliano, C; Mangino, G; Ibrahim, M; De Falco, E; Carnevale, R; Chimenti, I; Frati, G

    2017-07-01

    Respiratory diseases represent a major healthcare burden worldwide. Lung transplantation (LTx) is the "gold standard" for end-stage patients, strongly limited by shortage of available/suitable donor lungs. Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has significantly increased the number of lungs suitable for transplantation. Steen solution is used for EVLP, but the mechanisms involved in its beneficial properties remain to be clarified. We investigated the effects of Steen solution in an in vitro protocol of cold starvation and normothermic recovery on human lung spheroids, named pneumospheres (PSs), containing epithelial/basal cells, and on endothelial human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Steen solution significantly preserved the viability of PSs, reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) release by PSs and HUVECs, decreased NADPH-oxidase (NOX) activity in PSs, and reduced inflammatory cytokines expression levels in HUVECs. Steen solution was able to specifically reduce NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) isoform activation, particularly in PSs, as detected by soluble-NOX2 peptide and p47-phosphorylation. Interestingly, a specific NOX2 inhibitor could partly mimic the pro-survival effect of Steen on PSs. We provide the first evidence that Steen solution can preserve lung epithelial/progenitor cells viability partially through NOX2 downregulation, and exert antioxidant effects on parenchymal cells, with consequent ROS reduction. These results suggest that NOX2 inhibition might be an additional strategy to reduce cellular damage during LTx procedures. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  5. Characterization of primary human hepatocyte spheroids as a model system for drug-induced liver injury, liver function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Catherine C.; Hendriks, Delilah F. G.; Moro, Sabrina M. L.; Ellis, Ewa; Walsh, Joanne; Renblom, Anna; Fredriksson Puigvert, Lisa; Dankers, Anita C. A.; Jacobs, Frank; Snoeys, Jan; Sison-Young, Rowena L.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Nordling, Åsa; Mkrtchian, Souren; Park, B. Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Goldring, Christopher E. P.; Lauschke, Volker M.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Liver biology and function, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and liver diseases are difficult to study using current in vitro models such as primary human hepatocyte (PHH) monolayer cultures, as their rapid de-differentiation restricts their usefulness substantially. Thus, we have developed and extensively characterized an easily scalable 3D PHH spheroid system in chemically-defined, serum-free conditions. Using whole proteome analyses, we found that PHH spheroids cultured this way were similar to the liver in vivo and even retained their inter-individual variability. Furthermore, PHH spheroids remained phenotypically stable and retained morphology, viability, and hepatocyte-specific functions for culture periods of at least 5 weeks. We show that under chronic exposure, the sensitivity of the hepatocytes drastically increased and toxicity of a set of hepatotoxins was detected at clinically relevant concentrations. An interesting example was the chronic toxicity of fialuridine for which hepatotoxicity was mimicked after repeated-dosing in the PHH spheroid model, not possible to detect using previous in vitro systems. Additionally, we provide proof-of-principle that PHH spheroids can reflect liver pathologies such as cholestasis, steatosis and viral hepatitis. Combined, our results demonstrate that the PHH spheroid system presented here constitutes a versatile and promising in vitro system to study liver function, liver diseases, drug targets and long-term DILI. PMID:27143246

  6. 3D in vitro co-culture models based on normal cells and tumor spheroids formed by cyclic RGD-peptide induced cell self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Akasov, Roman; Gileva, Anastasia; Zaytseva-Zotova, Daria; Burov, Sergey; Chevalot, Isabelle; Guedon, Emmanuel; Markvicheva, Elena

    2017-01-01

    To design novel 3D in vitro co-culture models based on the RGD-peptide-induced cell self-assembly technique. Multicellular spheroids from M-3 murine melanoma cells and L-929 murine fibroblasts were obtained directly from monolayer culture by addition of culture medium containing cyclic RGD-peptide. To reach reproducible architecture of co-culture spheroids, two novel 3D in vitro models with well pronounced core-shell structure from tumor spheroids and single mouse fibroblasts were developed based on this approach. The first was a combination of a RGD-peptide platform with the liquid overlay technique with further co-cultivation for 1-2 days. The second allowed co-culture spheroids to generate within polyelectrolyte microcapsules by cultivation for 2 weeks. M-3 cells (a core) and L-929 fibroblasts (a shell) were easily distinguished by confocal microscopy due to cell staining with DiO and DiI dyes, respectively. The 3D co-culture spheroids are proposed as a tool in tumor biology to study cell-cell interactions as well as for testing novel anticancer drugs and drug delivery vehicles.

  7. Three-dimensional spheroid culture of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells promotes cell yield and stemness maintenance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Guo, Gang; Li, Li; Chen, Fei; Bao, Ji; Shi, Yu-Jun; Bu, Hong

    2015-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation is a promising treatment of many diseases. However, conventional techniques with cells being cultured as a monolayer result in slow cell proliferation and insufficient yield to meet clinical demands. Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems are gaining attention with regard to recreating a complex microenvironment and to understanding the conditions experienced by cells. Our aim is to establish a novel 3D system for the culture of human umbilical cord MSCs (hUC-MSCs) within a real 3D microenvironment but with no digestion or passaging. Primary hUC-MSCs were isolated and grown in serum-free medium (SFM) on a suspension Rocker system. Cell characteristics including proliferation, phenotype and multipotency were recorded. The therapeutic effects of 3D-cultured hUC-MSCs on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced acute liver failure in mouse models were examined. In the 3D Rocker system, hUC-MSCs formed spheroids in SFM and maintained high viability and active proliferation. Compared with monolayer culture, the 3D-culture system yielded more hUC-MSCs cells within the same volume. The spheroids expressed higher levels of stem cell markers and displayed stronger multipotency. After transplantation into mouse, 3D hUC-MSCs significantly promoted the secretion of interferon-γ and interleukin-6 but inhibited that of tumor necrosis factor-α, thereby alleviating liver necrosis and promoting regeneration following CCl4 injury. The 3D culture of hUC-MSCs thus promotes cell yield and stemness maintenance and represents a promising strategy for hUC-MSCs expansion on an industrial scale with great potential for cell therapy and biotechnology.

  8. In vitro and in vivo antitumor effects of the VO-chrysin complex on a new three-dimensional osteosarcoma spheroids model and a xenograft tumor in mice.

    PubMed

    León, Ignacio E; Cadavid-Vargas, Juan F; Resasco, Agustina; Maschi, Fabricio; Ayala, Miguel A; Carbone, Cecilia; Etcheverry, Susana B

    2016-12-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary tumor of bone, occurring predominantly in the second decade of life. High-dose cytotoxic chemotherapy and surgical resection have improved prognosis, with long-term survival for patients with localized disease. Vanadium is an ultra-trace element that after being absorbed accumulates in bone. Besides, vanadium compounds have been studied during recent years to be considered as representative of a new class of non-platinum antitumor agents. Moreover, flavonoids are a wide family of polyphenolic compounds that display many interesting biological effects. Since coordination of ligands to metals can improve the pharmacological properties, we report herein, for the first time, the in vitro and in vivo effects of an oxidovanadium(IV) complex with the flavonoid chrysin on the new 3D human osteosarcoma and xenograft osteosarcoma mice models. The pharmacological results show that VOchrys inhibited the cell viability affecting the shape and volume of the spheroids and VOchrys suppressed MG-63 tumor growth in the nude mice without inducing toxicity and side effects. As a whole, the results presented herein demonstrate that the antitumor action of the complex was very promissory on human osteosarcoma models, whereby suggesting that VOchrys is a potentially good candidate for future use in alternative antitumor treatments.

  9. Silica bioreplication preserves three-dimensional spheroid structures of human pluripotent stem cells and HepG2 cells

    DOE PAGES

    Lou, Yan-Ru; Kanninen, Liisa; Kaehr, Bryan; ...

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures produce more in vivo-like multicellular structures such as spheroids that cannot be obtained in two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. Thus, they are increasingly employed as models for cancer and drug research, as well as tissue engineering. It has proven challenging to stabilize spheroid architectures for detailed morphological examination. Here we overcome this issue using a silica bioreplication (SBR) process employed on spheroids formed from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells cultured in the nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) hydrogel. The cells in the spheroids are more round and tightly interacting with each other than thosemore » in 2D cultures, and they develop microvilli-like structures on the cell membranes as seen in 2D cultures. Furthermore, SBR preserves extracellular matrix-like materials and cellular proteins. In conclusion, these findings provide the first evidence of intact hPSC spheroid architectures and similar fine structures to 2D-cultured cells, providing a pathway to enable our understanding of morphogenesis in 3D cultures.« less

  10. Silica bioreplication preserves three-dimensional spheroid structures of human pluripotent stem cells and HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yan-Ru; Kanninen, Liisa; Kaehr, Bryan; Townson, Jason L.; Niklander, Johanna; Harjumäki, Riina; Jeffrey Brinker, C.; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures produce more in vivo-like multicellular structures such as spheroids that cannot be obtained in two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. Thus, they are increasingly employed as models for cancer and drug research, as well as tissue engineering. It has proven challenging to stabilize spheroid architectures for detailed morphological examination. Here we overcome this issue using a silica bioreplication (SBR) process employed on spheroids formed from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells cultured in the nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) hydrogel. The cells in the spheroids are more round and tightly interacting with each other than those in 2D cultures, and they develop microvilli-like structures on the cell membranes as seen in 2D cultures. Furthermore, SBR preserves extracellular matrix-like materials and cellular proteins. These findings provide the first evidence of intact hPSC spheroid architectures and similar fine structures to 2D-cultured cells, providing a pathway to enable our understanding of morphogenesis in 3D cultures. PMID:26323570

  11. Silica bioreplication preserves three-dimensional spheroid structures of human pluripotent stem cells and HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Yan-Ru; Kanninen, Liisa; Kaehr, Bryan; Townson, Jason L.; Niklander, Johanna; Harjumäki, Riina; Jeffrey Brinker, C.; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures produce more in vivo-like multicellular structures such as spheroids that cannot be obtained in two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. Thus, they are increasingly employed as models for cancer and drug research, as well as tissue engineering. It has proven challenging to stabilize spheroid architectures for detailed morphological examination. Here we overcome this issue using a silica bioreplication (SBR) process employed on spheroids formed from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells cultured in the nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) hydrogel. The cells in the spheroids are more round and tightly interacting with each other than those in 2D cultures, and they develop microvilli-like structures on the cell membranes as seen in 2D cultures. Furthermore, SBR preserves extracellular matrix-like materials and cellular proteins. In conclusion, these findings provide the first evidence of intact hPSC spheroid architectures and similar fine structures to 2D-cultured cells, providing a pathway to enable our understanding of morphogenesis in 3D cultures.

  12. Role of E-cadherin in the induction of apoptosis of HPV16-positive CaSki cervical cancer cells during multicellular tumor spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Haga, Takeshi; Uchide, Noboru; Tugizov, Sharof; Palefsky, Joel M

    2008-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are three dimensional cell culture systems induced by suspension culture. MCTS are widely used in cancer research because of their similarity to solid tumors. CaSki cells are derived from a metastatic cervical cancer containing human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16). Cell death of CaSki cells in MCTS has been previously reported, and our model is used to better characterize the mechanisms of cell death of HPV16-positive keratinocytes. In this study, we found that apoptosis of CaSki cells was induced by suspension culture along with the formation of MCTS after 24 h of incubation. In suspended CaSki cells, monoclonal antibodies blocking E-cadherin function inhibited MCTS formation and suppressed suspension-induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot for E-cadherin detected upregulation of the authentic 120 kDa band from MCTS of CaSki cells as well as a shorter 100 kDa band. Addition of EGF, whose receptor is known to form a complex with E-cadherin, abrogated apoptosis of suspended CaSki cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell contact, directly or indirectly, mediates the signal to undergo apoptosis of CaSki cells during MCTS formation, and thus provides new information on the role of E-cadherin in cervical cancer cell apoptosis.

  13. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin cytotoxicity on three-dimensional spheroid tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Baek, NamHuk; Seo, Ok Won; Lee, Jaehwa; Hulme, John; An, Seong Soo A

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultivation is a powerful technique for monitoring and understanding diverse cellular mechanisms in developmental cancer and neuronal biology, tissue engineering, and drug development. 3D systems could relate better to in vivo models than two-dimensional (2D) cultures. Several factors, such as cell type, survival rate, proliferation rate, and gene and protein expression patterns, determine whether a particular cell line can be adapted to a 3D system. The 3D system may overcome some of the limitations of 2D cultures in terms of cell–cell communication and cell networks, which are essential for understanding differentiation, structural organization, shape, and extended connections with other cells or organs. Here, the effect of the anticancer drug cisplatin, also known as cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) or CDDP, on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation was investigated using 3D spheroid-forming cells and real-time monitoring for 7 days. First, 12 cell lines were screened for their ability to form 3D spheroids: prostate (DU145), testis (F9), embryonic fibroblast (NIH-3T3), muscle (C2C12), embryonic kidney (293T), neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y), adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial cell (A549), cervical cancer (HeLa), HeLa contaminant (HEp2), pituitary epithelial-like cell (GH3), embryonic cell (PA317), and osteosarcoma (U-2OS) cells. Of these, eight cell lines were selected: NIH-3T3, C2C12, 293T, SH-SY5Y, A549, HeLa, PA317, and U-2OS; and five underwent real-time monitoring of CDDP cytotoxicity: HeLa, A549, 293T, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS. ATP generation was blocked 1 day after addition of 50 μM CDDP, but cytotoxicity in HeLa, A549, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS cells could be visualized only 4 days after treatment. In 293T cells, CDDP failed to kill entirely the culture and ATP generation was only partially blocked after 1 day. This suggests potential CDDP resistance of 293T cells or metabolic clearance of the drug. Real-time monitoring and ATP

  14. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or −80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors. PMID:26898904

  15. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-02-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or -80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors.

  16. Evaluation of the shape, viability, stemness and osteogenic differentiation of cell spheroids formed from human gingiva-derived stem cells and osteoprecursor cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Il; Ko, Youngkyung; Park, Jun-Beom

    2017-06-01

    The present study was performed to create stem cell spheroids from human gingiva-derived stem cells and osteoprecursor cells and to evaluate the maintenance of the stemness, the viability and osteogenic differentiation of the cell spheroids. Gingiva-derived stem cells were isolated, and a total of 6×10(5) stem cells and osteoprecursor cells were seeded into concave micromolds at various ratios. Gingiva-derived stem cells and/or osteoprecursor cells formed spheroids in concave microwells. The spheroids demonstrated a smaller diameter when the number of osteoprecursor cells seeded was lower. The majority of cells in the spheroids were identified to be live cells and the cell spheroids preserved viability throughout the experimental period. The cell spheroids, which contained stem cells, were positive for stem-cell markers. Cell spheroids in concave microwells demonstrated a statistically significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity as time progressed (P<0.05). A statistically significant difference in phosphatase activity was observed in the stem cell alone group when compared with the osteoprecursor cell group at day 5 (P<0.05). Mineralized extracellular deposits were observed in each group after Alizarin Red S staining. Within the limits of the present study, cell spheroids from gingival cells and osteoprecursor cells maintained shape, viability, stemness and osteogenic differentiation potential.

  17. Interaction of human trophoblast cells with gland-like endometrial spheroids: a model system for trophoblast invasion.

    PubMed

    Buck, V U; Gellersen, B; Leube, R E; Classen-Linke, I

    2015-04-01

    Do maternal endometrial epithelial cell (EEC) differentiation and polarity impact the invasive capacity of extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells during early human implantation? In a three dimensional (3D) confrontation co-culture the invasiveness of the human trophoblast cell line AC-1M88 was inversely correlated with the degree of differentiation and polarization of human endometrial adenocarcinoma cell spheroids. In a previous study desmosomal and adherens junction proteins were shown to spread from a subapically restricted lateral position to the entire lateral membrane in human glandular EECs during the implantation window of the menstrual cycle. Whether this change in EEC junction localization has an impact on the interaction of EVT cells with glandular EECs during early human implantation is not known. A new 3D cell culture system was developed in order to mimic early implantation events in humans. As a model for the invasion of endometrial glands by EVT cells, spheroids of three differently differentiated and polarized endometrial adenocarcinoma cell lines were confronted with an EVT cell line in co-culture experiments. Three human adenocarcinoma EEC lines were chosen for this study because of their differences in differentiation and polarization: HEC-1-A, which is well differentiated and highly polarized, Ishikawa, which is well differentiated and moderately polarized, and RL95-2, which is moderately differentiated and poorly polarized. When the cell lines were grown in reconstituted basement membrane, they formed gland-like, multicellular spheroids. The degree of polarization within the different EEC spheroids was assessed by 3D confocal immunofluorescence microscopy detecting the basal membrane protein integrin α6, the apical tight junction-associated protein ZO-1 and the desmosomal plaque protein desmoplakin 1/2 (Dsp). Cells of the human EVT cell line AC-1M88, which is a fusion cell line of primary EVT cells and choriocarcinoma-derived JEG-3 cells, were

  18. Utility of human hepatocyte spheroids without feeder cells for evaluation of hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Takuo; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Jomura, Tomoko; Idota, Yoko; Koyama, Satoshi; Yano, Kentaro; Kojima, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the utility of three-dimensionally cultured hepatocytes (spheroids) without feeder cells (Sph(f-)) for the prediction of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in humans. Sph(f-) and spheroids cultured on feeder cells (Sph(f+)) were exposed to the hepatotoxic drugs flutamide, diclofenac, isoniazid and chlorpromazine at various concentrations for 14 days, and albumin secretion and cumulative leakages of toxicity marker enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GTP), were measured. The cumulative AST, LDH or γ-GTP leakages from Sph(f-) were similar to or greater than those from Sph(f+) for all drugs tested, although ALT leakages showed no consistent difference between Sph(f+) and Sph(f-). In the case of Sph(f-), significant correlations among all the toxicity markers except for γ-GTP were observed. As regards the drug concentrations causing 1.2-fold elevation of enzyme leakage (F1.2), no consistent difference between Sph(f+) and Sph(f-) was found, although several F1.2 values were undetermined, especially in Sph(f+). The IC50 of albumin secretion and F1.2 of AST leakage from Sph(f-) were equal to or lower than those of Sph(f+) for all the tested drugs. These results indicate that feeder cells might contribute to resistance to hepatotoxicity, suggesting DILI could be evaluated more accurately by using Sph(f-). We suggest that long-term exposure of Sph(f-) to drugs might be a versatile method to predict and reproduce clinical chronic toxicity, especially in response to repeated drug administration.

  19. II. Capsular vaso-mimicry formed by transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted ectopically into mouse dorsal skin fold: implications for cellular mechanisms of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Most cancer patients die of metastatic disease, not primary tumors, while biological mechanisms leading to metastases remain unclear and effective therapies are missing. Using a mouse dorsal skin chamber model we had observed that tumor growth and vasculature formation could be influenced by the way in vitro cultured (avascular) spheroids of N202 breast tumor cells were implanted; co-implantation of lactating breast tissue created stimulating microenvironment, whereas the absence of the graft resulted in temporary tumor dormancy. This report addressed the issue of cellular mechanisms of the vasculogenic switch that ended the dormancy. In situ ultrastructural analysis revealed that the tumors survived in ectopic microenvironment until some of host and tumor stem cells evolved independently into cells initiating the vasculogenic switch. The tumor cells that survived and proliferated under hypoxic conditions for three weeks were supported by erythrogenic autophagy of others. However, the host microenvironment first responded as it would to non-immunogenic foreign bodies, i.e., by encapsulating the tumor spheroids with collagen-producing fibroblasts. That led to a form of vaso-mimicry consisting of tumor cells amid tumor-derived erythrosomes (synonym of erythrocytes), megakaryocytes and platelets, and encapsulating them all, the host fibroblasts. Such capsular vaso-mimicry could potentially facilitate metastasis by fusing with morphologically similar lymphatic vessels or veins. Once incorporated into the host circulatory system, tumor cells could be carried away passively by blood flow, regardless of their genetic heterogeneity. The fake vascular segment would have permeability properties different from genuine vascular endothelium. The capsular vaso-mimicry was different from vasculogenic mimicry earlier observed in metastases-associated malignant tumors where channels formed by tumor cells were said to contain circulating blood. Structures similar to the vasculogenic

  20. II. Capsular vaso-mimicry formed by transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted ectopically into mouse dorsal skin fold: implications for cellular mechanisms of metastasis.

    PubMed

    Witkiewicz, Halina; Oh, Phil; Schnitzer, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Most cancer patients die of metastatic disease, not primary tumors, while biological mechanisms leading to metastases remain unclear and effective therapies are missing. Using a mouse dorsal skin chamber model we had observed that tumor growth and vasculature formation could be influenced by the way in vitro cultured (avascular) spheroids of N202 breast tumor cells were implanted; co-implantation of lactating breast tissue created stimulating microenvironment, whereas the absence of the graft resulted in temporary tumor dormancy. This report addressed the issue of cellular mechanisms of the vasculogenic switch that ended the dormancy. In situ ultrastructural analysis revealed that the tumors survived in ectopic microenvironment until some of host and tumor stem cells evolved independently into cells initiating the vasculogenic switch. The tumor cells that survived and proliferated under hypoxic conditions for three weeks were supported by erythrogenic autophagy of others. However, the host microenvironment first responded as it would to non-immunogenic foreign bodies, i.e., by encapsulating the tumor spheroids with collagen-producing fibroblasts. That led to a form of vaso-mimicry consisting of tumor cells amid tumor-derived erythrosomes (synonym of erythrocytes), megakaryocytes and platelets, and encapsulating them all, the host fibroblasts. Such capsular vaso-mimicry could potentially facilitate metastasis by fusing with morphologically similar lymphatic vessels or veins. Once incorporated into the host circulatory system, tumor cells could be carried away passively by blood flow, regardless of their genetic heterogeneity. The fake vascular segment would have permeability properties different from genuine vascular endothelium. The capsular vaso-mimicry was different from vasculogenic mimicry earlier observed in metastases-associated malignant tumors where channels formed by tumor cells were said to contain circulating blood. Structures similar to the vasculogenic

  1. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Santos, Carlos Antonio N.; Junior, Antonio Palumbo; Souza, Pedro A. V. R.; Canellas, Catarine G. L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Nasciutti, Luiz E.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-05-17

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg. incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 {mu}m diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed.

  2. Biodistribution and photodynamic effects of polyvinylpyrrolidone-hypericin using multicellular spheroids composed of normal human urothelial and T24 transitional cell carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandepitte, Joachim; Roelants, Mieke; Cleynenbreugel, Ben Van; Hettinger, Klaudia; Lerut, Evelyne; van Poppel, Hendrik; de Witte, Peter A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-hypericin is a potent photosensitizer that is used in the urological clinic to photodiagnose with high-sensitivity nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). We examined the differential accumulation and therapeutic effects of PVP-hypericin using spheroids composed of a human urothelial cell carcinoma cell line (T24) and normal human urothelial (NHU) cells. The in vitro biodistribution was assessed using fluorescence image analysis of 5-μm cryostat sections of spheroids that were incubated with PVP-hypericin. The results show that PVP-hypericin accumulated to a much higher extent in T24 spheroids as compared to NHU spheroids, thereby reproducing the clinical situation. Subsequently, spheroids were exposed to different PDT regimes with a light dose ranging from 0.3 to 18J/cm2. When using low fluence rates, only minor differences in cell survival were seen between normal and malignant spheroids. High light fluence rates induced a substantial difference in cell survival between the two spheroid types, killing ~80% of the cells present in the T24 spheroids. It was concluded that further in vivo experiments are required to fully evaluate the potential of PVP-hypericin as a phototherapeutic for NMIBC, focusing on the combination of the compound with methods that enhance the oxygenation of the urothelium.

  3. Looking into Living Cell Systems: Planar Waveguide Microfluidic NMR Detector for in Vitro Metabolomics of Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kalfe, Ayten; Telfah, Ahmad; Lambert, Jörg; Hergenröder, Roland

    2015-07-21

    The complex cell metabolism and its link to oncogenic signaling pathways have received huge interest within the last few years. But the lack of advanced analytical tools for the investigation of living cell metabolism is still a challenge to be faced. Therefore, we designed and fabricated a novel miniaturized microslot NMR detector with on-board heater integrated with a microfluidic device as NMR sample holder. For the first time, a tumor spheroid of 500 μm diameter and consisting of 9000 cells has been studied noninvasively and online for 24 h. The dynamic processes of production and degradation of 23 intra- and extracellular metabolites were monitored. Remarkably high concentrations of lactate and alanine were observed, being an indicator for a shift from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism. In summary, this methodical development has proven to be a successful analytical tool for the elucidation of cellular functions and their corresponding biochemical pathways. Additionally, the planar geometry of the microslot NMR detector allows the hyphenation with versatile lab-on-a chip (LOC) technology. This opens a new window for metabolomics studies on living cells and can be implemented into new application fields in biotechnology and life sciences.

  4. Development of a valve-based cell printer for the formation of human embryonic stem cell spheroid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Faulkner-Jones, Alan; Greenhough, Sebastian; King, Jason A; Gardner, John; Courtney, Aidan; Shu, Wenmiao

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, the use of a simple inkjet technology for cell printing has triggered tremendous interest and established the field of biofabrication. A key challenge has been the development of printing processes which are both controllable and less harmful, in order to preserve cell and tissue viability and functions. Here, we report on the development of a valve-based cell printer that has been validated to print highly viable cells in programmable patterns from two different bio-inks with independent control of the volume of each droplet (with a lower limit of 2 nL or fewer than five cells per droplet). Human ESCs were used to make spheroids by overprinting two opposing gradients of bio-ink; one of hESCs in medium and the other of medium alone. The resulting array of uniform sized droplets with a gradient of cell concentrations was inverted to allow cells to aggregate and form spheroids via gravity. The resulting aggregates have controllable and repeatable sizes, and consequently they can be made to order for specific applications. Spheroids with between 5 and 140 dissociated cells resulted in spheroids of 0.25-0.6 mm diameter. This work demonstrates that the valve-based printing process is gentle enough to maintain stem cell viability, accurate enough to produce spheroids of uniform size, and that printed cells maintain their pluripotency. This study includes the first analysis of the response of human embryonic stem cells to the printing process using this valve-based printing setup.

  5. Pathways Regulating Spheroid Formation of Human Follicular Thyroid Cancer Cells under Simulated Microgravity Conditions: A Genetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Riwaldt, Stefan; Bauer, Johann; Wehland, Markus; Slumstrup, Lasse; Kopp, Sascha; Warnke, Elisabeth; Dittrich, Anita; Magnusson, Nils E.; Pietsch, Jessica; Corydon, Thomas J.; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Microgravity induces three-dimensional (3D) growth in numerous cell types. Despite substantial efforts to clarify the underlying mechanisms for spheroid formation, the precise molecular pathways are still not known. The principal aim of this paper is to compare static 1g-control cells with spheroid forming (MCS) and spheroid non-forming (AD) thyroid cancer cells cultured in the same flask under simulated microgravity conditions. We investigated the morphology and gene expression patterns in human follicular thyroid cancer cells (UCLA RO82-W-1 cell line) after a 24 h-exposure on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM) and focused on 3D growth signaling processes. After 24 h, spheroid formation was observed in RPM-cultures together with alterations in the F-actin cytoskeleton. qPCR indicated more changes in gene expression in MCS than in AD cells. Of the 24 genes analyzed VEGFA, VEGFD, MSN, and MMP3 were upregulated in MCS compared to 1g-controls, whereas ACTB, ACTA2, KRT8, TUBB, EZR, RDX, PRKCA, CAV1, MMP9, PAI1, CTGF, MCP1 were downregulated. A pathway analysis revealed that the upregulated genes code for proteins, which promote 3D growth (angiogenesis) and prevent excessive accumulation of extracellular proteins, while genes coding for structural proteins are downregulated. Pathways regulating the strength/rigidity of cytoskeletal proteins, the amount of extracellular proteins, and 3D growth may be involved in MCS formation. PMID:27070589

  6. Imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon vector-mediated gene expression in human glioma spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kaestle, Christine; Winkeler, Alexandra; Richter, Raphaela; Sauer, Heinrich; Hescheler, Jürgen; Fraefel, Cornel; Wartenberg, Maria; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2011-06-01

    Vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) have great potential for transducing therapeutic genes into the central nervous system; however, inefficient distribution of vector particles in vivo may limit their therapeutic potential in patients with gliomas. This study was performed to investigate the extent of HSV-1 amplicon vector-mediated gene expression in a three-dimensional glioma model of multicellular spheroids by imaging highly infectious HSV-1 virions expressing green fluorescent protein (HSV-GFP). After infection or microscopy-guided vector injection of glioma spheroids at various spheroid sizes, injection pressures and injection times, the extent of HSV-1 vector-mediated gene expression was investigated via laser scanning microscopy. Infection of spheroids with HSV-GFP demonstrated a maximal depth of vector-mediated GFP expression at 70 to 80 μm. A > 80% transduction efficiency was reached only in small spheroids with a diameter of < 150 μm. Guided vector injection into the spheroids showed transduction efficiencies ranging between < 10 and > 90%. The results demonstrated that vector-mediated gene expression in glioma spheroids was strongly dependent on the mode of vector application-injection pressure and injection time being the most important parameters. The assessment of these vector application parameters in tissue models will contribute to the development of safe and efficient gene therapy protocols for clinical application.

  7. The effect of adriamycin and 4'-deoxydoxorubicin on cell survival of human lung tumour cells grown in monolayer and as spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kerr, D J; Wheldon, T E; Kerr, A M; Freshney, R I; Kaye, S B

    1986-09-01

    Using growth delay and clonogenic cell survival as end points, we have shown that the 3-dimensional structure of human lung tumour spheroids confers a degree of resistance to the anthracyclines adriamycin and 4'-deoxydoxorubicin, relative to cells grown as monolayer. 4'-deoxydoxorubicin induces a longer growth delay and greater clonogenic cell kill than adriamycin in spheroids, although it is no more cytotoxic in monolayer (exponential and plateau phase). There is a log linear relationship between clonogenic cell survival and duration of adriamycin exposure in monolayers, and biphasic curve with a lesser degree of cell kill for disaggregated spheroid cells. Using fluorescent microscopy we have demonstrated, qualitatively, that the more lipophilic analogue partitions into the spheroid more rapidly and to a greater degree than adriamycin. It is possible that adriamycin penetration is a relatively important aspect of spheroid drug resistance, which may be related to intraspheroidal pH gradients, and that we have partially overcome this by using a lipophilic analogue.

  8. Differential penetration of targeting agents into multicellular spheroids derived from human neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mairs, R.J.; Angerson, W.J.; Babich, J.W.; Murray, T. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have used a multicellular tumour spheroid model for determination of the penetration of various targeting agents of potential use in the treatment of neuroblastoma. Both the radiopharmaceutical meta-iodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) and the {beta} subunit of nerve growth factor ({beta}-NGF) distributed uniformly throughout spheroids, though the latter was poorly concentrated relative to mIBG. In contrast, the anti-neuroectodermal monoclonal antibody. UJ13A bound only to peripheral cell layers with little accumulation in the spheroid interior. Differential penetration of targeting agents may influence the choice of conjugated radionuclide which is likely to achieve maximum therapeutic benefit.

  9. The effect of co-delivery of paclitaxel and curcumin by transferrin-targeted PEG-PE-based mixed micelles on resistant ovarian cancer in 3-D spheroids and in vivo tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sarisozen, Can; Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular 3D cancer cell culture (spheroids) resemble to in vivo tumors in terms of shape, cell morphology, growth kinetics, gene expression and drug response. However, these characteristics cause very limited drug penetration into deeper parts of the spheroids. In this study, we used multi drug resistant (MDR) ovarian cancer cell spheroid and in vivo tumor models to evaluate the co-delivery of paclitaxel (PCL) and a potent NF-κB inhibitor curcumin (CUR). PCL and CUR were co-loaded into the polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) based polymeric micelles modified with Transferrin (TF) as the targeting ligand. Cytotoxicity, cellular association and accumulation into the deeper layers were investigated in the spheroids and compared with the monolayer cell culture. Comparing to non-targeted micelles, flow cytometry and confocal imaging proved significantly deeper and higher micelle penetration into the spheroids with TF-targeting. Both in monolayers and spheroids, PCL cytotoxicity was significantly increased when co-delivered with CUR in non-targeted micelles or as single agent in TF-targeted micelles, whereas TF-modification of co-loaded micelles did not further enhance the cytotoxicity. In vivo tumor inhibition studies showed good correlation with the 3D cell culture experiments, which suggests the current spheroid model can be used as an intermediate model for evaluation of co-delivery of anticancer compounds in targeted micelles. PMID:25016976

  10. [SPREADING OF TISSUE SPHEROIDS FROM PRIMARY HUMAN FIBROBLASTS ON THE SURFACE OF MICROFIBROUS ELECTROSPUN POLYURETHANE MATRIX (A scanning electron microscopic study)].

    PubMed

    Kudan, Ye V; Pereira, F D A S; Parfenov, V A; Kasyanov, V A; Khesuani, Yu D; Bulanova, Ye A; Mironov, V A

    2015-01-01

    Tissue spheroids biofabricated from primary human fibroblasts using non-adhesive agarose forms, were placed by 3D bioprinter on the surface of microfibrous electrospun matrix. It was demonstrated that tissue spheroids attached to the surface of matrix during several hours and then gradually spread for several days which indicates high level of biocompatibiity of electrospun microfibrous polyurethane matrix. During this activity, human fibroblasts used processes of leading cell borders for initial step of attachment to matrix filaments. Tissue constructions formed during spreading of tissue spheroids on the surface of electrospun microfibrous polyurethane matrix seem to be a perspective technology platform for development of new methods of biofabrication and 3D bioprinting.

  11. Directed Induction of Functional Multi-ciliated Cells in Proximal Airway Epithelial Spheroids from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Satoshi; Gotoh, Shimpei; Tateishi, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Korogi, Yohei; Nagasaki, Tadao; Matsumoto, Hisako; Muro, Shigeo; Hirai, Toyohiro; Ito, Isao; Tsukita, Sachiko; Mishima, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Summary Multi-ciliated airway cells (MCACs) play a role in mucociliary clearance of the lung. However, the efficient induction of functional MCACs from human pluripotent stem cells has not yet been reported. Using carboxypeptidase M (CPM) as a surface marker of NKX2-1+-ventralized anterior foregut endoderm cells (VAFECs), we report a three-dimensional differentiation protocol for generating proximal airway epithelial progenitor cell spheroids from CPM+ VAFECs. These spheroids could be induced to generate MCACs and other airway lineage cells without alveolar epithelial cells. Furthermore, the directed induction of MCACs and of pulmonary neuroendocrine lineage cells was promoted by adding DAPT, a Notch pathway inhibitor. The induced MCACs demonstrated motile cilia with a “9 + 2” microtubule arrangement and dynein arms capable of beating and generating flow for mucociliary transport. This method is expected to be useful for future studies on human airway disease modeling and regenerative medicine. PMID:26724905

  12. Glioblastoma spheroids produce infiltrative gliomas in the rat brainstem.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiping; Luther, Neal; Singh, Ranjodh; Boockvar, John A; Souweidane, Mark M; Greenfield, Jeffrey P

    2017-03-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is universally fatal without proven therapy other than radiation therapy for palliation. Representative animal models will play an essential role in the preclinical stage of future therapy development. To address the shortage of representative models, we created a novel infiltrative brainstem glioma model in rats based on glioblastoma spheroids. Cells dissociated from glioblastoma spheroids grown from surgical specimens were implanted into the brainstem of NIH nude rats. Animals were serially assessed clinically and radiographically with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tumors were further characterized using histology, immunohistochemistry, and cytogenetics. Tumor generation was successful in all animals receiving glioblastoma spheroid cells. The rats survived 17-25 weeks before severe symptoms developed. The tumors showed as diffuse hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images. Histologically, they demonstrated cellular heterogeneity, and infiltrative and invasive features, with cells engorging vascular structures. The tumors were shown to comprise immature human origin glial tumor cells, with human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene amplification and gain. This study showed that cells from glioblastoma spheroids produced infiltrative gliomas in rat brainstem. The rat brainstem gliomas are radiographically and histologically accurate compared to DIPG. These tumors develop over several months that would allow sequential clinical and radiographic assessments of therapeutic interventions. This study demonstrated in principle the feasibility of developing patient-specific animal models based on putative cancer stem cells from biopsy or resection samples.

  13. The use of nanoimprinted scaffolds as 3D culture models to facilitate spontaneous tumor cell migration and well-regulated spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yukie; Waki, Atsuo; Yoshida, Kaori; Kakezuka, Anna; Kobayashi, Maki; Namiki, Hideo; Kuroda, Yusei; Kiyono, Yasushi; Yoshii, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Takako; Asai, Tatsuya; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Gelovani, Juri G; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2011-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures are essential for drug development and tumor research. However, the limitations of 2D cultures are widely recognized, and a better technique is needed. Recent studies have indicated that a strong physical contact between cells and 2D substrates induces cellular characteristics that differ from those of tumors growing in vivo. 3D cell cultures using various substrates are then developing; nevertheless, conventional approaches have failed in maintenance of cellular proliferation and viability, uniformity, reproducibility, and/or simplicity of these assays. Here, we developed a 3D culture system with inorganic nanoscale scaffolding using nanoimprinting technology (nano-culture plates), which reproduced the characteristics of tumor cells growing in vivo. Diminished cell-to-substrate physical contact facilitated spontaneous tumor cell migration, intercellular adhesion, and multi-cellular 3D-spheroid formation while maintaining cellular proliferation and viability. The resulting multi-cellular spheroids formed hypoxic core regions similar to tumors growing in vivo. This technology allows creating uniform and highly-reproducible 3D cultures, which is easily applicable for microscopic and spectrophotometric assays, which can be used for high-throughput/high-content screening of anticancer drugs and should accelerate discovery of more effective anticancer therapies.

  14. Developing multi-cellular tumor spheroid model (MCTS) in the chitosan/collagen/alginate (CCA) fibrous scaffold for anticancer drug screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Zheng; Zhu, Yu-Xia; Ma, Hui-Chao; Chen, Si-Nan; Chao, Ji-Ye; Ruan, Wen-Ding; Wang, Duo; Du, Feng-guang; Meng, Yue-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a 3D MCTS-CCA system was constructed by culturing multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) in the chitosan/collagen/alginate (CCA) fibrous scaffold for anticancer drug screening. The CCA scaffolds were fabricated by spray-spinning. The interactions between the components of the spray-spun fibers were evidenced by methods of Coomassie Blue stain, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Co-culture indicated that MCF-7 cells showed a spatial growth pattern of multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) in the CCA fibrous scaffold with increased proliferation rate and drug-resistance to MMC, ADM and 5-Aza comparing with the 2D culture cells. Significant increases of total viable cells were found in 3D MCTS groups after drug administration by method of apoptotic analysis. Glucose-lactate analysis indicated that the metabolism of MCTS in CCA scaffold was closer to the tumor issue in vivo than the monolayer cells. In addition, MCTS showed the characteristic of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) which is subverted by carcinoma cells to facilitate metastatic spread. These results demonstrated that MCTS in CCA scaffold possessed a more conservative phenotype of tumor than monolayer cells, and anticancer drug screening in 3D MCTS-CCA system might be superior to the 2D culture system.

  15. Development of complex-shaped liver multicellular spheroids as a human-based model for nanoparticle toxicity assessment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dubiak-Szepietowska, Monika; Karczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Jönsson-Niedziółka, Martin; Winckler, Thomas; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2016-03-01

    The emergence of human-based models is incontestably required for the study of complex physiological pathways and validation of reliable in vitro methods as alternative for in vivo studies in experimental animals for toxicity assessment. With this objective, we have developed and tested three dimensional environments for cells using different types of hydrogels including transglutaminase-cross-linked gelatin, collagen type I, and growth-factor depleted Matrigel. Cells grown in Matrigel exhibited the greatest cell proliferation and spheroid diameter. Moreover, analysis of urea and albumin biosynthesis revealed that the created system allowed the immortalized liver cell line HepG2 to re-establish normal hepatocyte-like properties which were not observed under the conditions of conventional cell cultures. This study presents a scalable technology for production of complex-shaped liver multicellular spheroids as a system which improves the predictive value of cell-based assays for safety and risk assessment. The time- and dose-dependent toxicity of nanoparticles demonstrates a higher cytotoxic effect when HepG2 cells grown as monolayer than embedded in hydrogels. The experimental setup provided evidence that the cell environment has significant influence on cell sensitivity and that liver spheroid is a useful and novel tool to examine nanoparticle dosing effect even at the level of in vitro studies. Therefore, this system can be applied to a wide variety of potentially hostile compounds in basic screening to provide initial warning of adverse effects and trigger subsequent analysis and remedial actions.

  16. A Novel Multiparametric Drug-Scoring Method for High-Throughput Screening of 3D Multicellular Tumor Spheroids Using the Celigo Image Cytometer.

    PubMed

    Cribbes, Scott; Kessel, Sarah; McMenemy, Scott; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor models have been increasingly used to investigate and characterize cancer drug compounds. The ability to perform high-throughput screening of 3D multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) can highly improve the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of discovering potential cancer drug candidates. Previously, the Celigo Image Cytometer has demonstrated a novel method for high-throughput screening of 3D multicellular tumor spheroids. In this work, we employed the Celigo Image Cytometer to examine the effects of 14 cancer drug compounds on 3D MCTS of the glioblastoma cell line U87MG in 384-well plates. Using parameters such as MCTS diameter and invasion area, growth and invasion were monitored for 9 and 3 d, respectively. Furthermore, fluorescent staining with calcein AM, propidium iodide, Hoechst 33342, and caspase 3/7 was performed at day 9 posttreatment to measure viability and apoptosis. Using the kinetic and endpoint data generated, we created a novel multiparametric drug-scoring system for 3D MCTS that can be used to identify and classify potential drug candidates earlier in the drug discovery process. Furthermore, the combination of quantitative and qualitative image data can be used to delineate differences between drugs that induce cytotoxic and cytostatic effects. The 3D MCTS-based multiparametric scoring method described here can provide an alternative screening method to better qualify tested drug compounds.

  17. Three Dimensional Human Neuro-Spheroid Model of Alzheimer’s Disease Based on Differentiated Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Kyu; Velazquez Sanchez, Clara; Chen, Mei; Morin, Peter J.; Wells, John M.; Hanlon, Eugene B.

    2016-01-01

    The testing of candidate drugs to slow progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) requires clinical trials that are lengthy and expensive. Efforts to model the biochemical milieu of the AD brain may be greatly facilitated by combining two cutting edge technologies to generate three-dimensional (3D) human neuro-spheroid from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) derived from AD subjects. We created iPSC from blood cells of five AD patients and differentiated them into 3D human neuronal culture. We characterized neuronal markers of our 3D neurons by immunocytochemical staining to validate the differentiation status. To block the generation of pathologic amyloid β peptides (Aβ), the 3D-differentiated AD neurons were treated with inhibitors targeting β-secretase (BACE1) and γ-secretases. As predicted, both BACE1 and γ-secretase inhibitors dramatically decreased Aβ generation in iPSC-derived neural cells derived from all five AD patients, under standard two-dimensional (2D) differentiation conditions. However, BACE1 and γ-secretase inhibitors showed less potency in decreasing Aβ levels in neural cells differentiated under 3D culture conditions. Interestingly, in a single subject AD1, we found that BACE1 inhibitor treatment was not able to significantly reduce Aβ42 levels. To investigate underlying molecular mechanisms, we performed proteomic analysis of 3D AD human neuronal cultures including AD1. Proteomic analysis revealed specific reduction of several proteins that might contribute to a poor inhibition of BACE1 in subject AD1. To our knowledge, this is the first iPSC-differentiated 3D neuro-spheroid model derived from AD patients’ blood. Our results demonstrate that our 3D human neuro-spheroid model can be a physiologically relevant and valid model for testing efficacy of AD drug. PMID:27684569

  18. Bone regeneration in calvarial defects in a rat model by implantation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell spheroids.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Katsuko S; Suzuki, Yukako; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Ushida, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) condensation contributes to membrane ossification by enhancing their osteodifferentiation. We investigated bone regeneration in rats using the human bone marrow-derived MSC-spheroids prepared by rotation culture, without synthetic or exogenous biomaterials. Bilateral calvarial defects (8 mm) were created in nude male rats; the left-sided defects were implanted with MSC-spheroids, β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules, or β-TCP granules + MSC-spheroids, while the right-sided defects served as internal controls. Micro-computed tomography and immunohistochemical staining for osteocalcin/osteopontin indicated formation of new, full-thickness bones at the implantation sites, but not at the control sites in the MSC-spheroid group. Raman spectroscopy revealed similarity in the spectral properties of the repaired bone and native calvarial bone. Mechanical performance of the bones in the MSC-implanted group was good (50 and 60% those of native bones, respectively). All tests showed poor bone regeneration in the β-TCP and β-TCP + MSC-spheroid groups. Thus, significant bone regeneration was achieved with MSC-spheroid implantation into bone defects, justifying further investigation.

  19. Study on the effects of nylon-chitosan-blended membranes on the spheroid-forming activity of human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Hsiao, Wen-Chu; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Yu, Hsin-Su; Tsai, Tsen-Fang; Lai, Juin-Yih; Young, Tai-Horng

    2006-10-01

    Though reported limitedly in tissue engineering, modification of cellular functions can be achieved by culturing them into multicellular spheroids. We have shown melanocytes form spheroids on chitosan surface. However, how biomaterials promote spheroid formation has never been systemically investigated. In this work, nylon, which inhibits melanocyte spheroid formation, and chitosan, which promotes melanocyte spheroid formation, are used to prepare nylon/chitosan-blended membranes. Membranes composed of pure nylon, pure chitosan and various ratios of nylon and chitosan are employed to examine their effects on spheroid formation. Melanocytes show better adhesion to nylon membranes than that to chitosan membranes. In blended membranes, as more nylon is incorporated, cell adhesion increases and the trend for spheroid formation decreases. Melanocytes can only form spheroids on membranes with poorer cell adhesion. Examining the surface of the blended membranes shows phase separation of nylon and chitosan. As nylon content increases, the nylon phase on the membrane surface increases and thereby enhances cell adhesion. The opposite trend for cell adhesion and spheroid formation substantiates our hypothesis of spheroid formation on biomaterials: a balance between cell-substrate interaction and cell-cell interaction. The decrease in cell-substrate interaction tilts the balance to a state more favorable for spheroid formation. Our work can serve as a model to investigate the relative strengths of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions and also pave way to design blended membranes with desired physical properties while preserving the spheroid-forming activity.

  20. Biocompatible nanoparticles sensing the matrix metallo-proteinase 2 for the on-demand release of anticancer drugs in 3D tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Marco; Guarnieri, Daniela; Biondi, Marco; Belli, Valentina; Profeta, Martina; Raiola, Luca; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-11-01

    The balance between dose-dependent tolerability, effectiveness and toxicity of systemically administered antitumor drugs is extremely delicate. This issue highlights the striking need for targeted release of chemotherapeutic drugs within tumors. In this work, a smart strategy of drug targeting to tumors relying upon biodegradable/biocompatible nanoparticles releasing cytotoxic drugs after sensing physiological variations intrinsic to the very nature of tumor tissues is exploited. Here, the well-known over-expression of matrix metallo-proteinase 2 (MMP2) enzyme in tumors has been chosen as a trigger for the release of a cytotoxic drug. Nanoparticles made up of a biodegradable poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)--block--polyethylene glycol (PEG) copolymer (namely PELGA), blended with a tumor-activated prodrug (TAP) composed of a MMP2-sensitive peptide bound to doxorubicin (Dox) and to PLGA chain have been produced. The obtained devices are able to release Dox specifically upon MMP2 cleavage of the TAP. More interestingly, they can sense the differences in the expression levels of endogenous MMP2 protein, thus modulating drug penetration within a three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid matrix, accordingly. Therefore, the proposed nanoparticles hold promise as a useful tool for in vivo investigations aimed at an improved therapeutic efficacy of the conjugated drug payload. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Spheroid-based drug screen: considerations and practical approach.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Juergen; Seidel, Claudia; Ebner, Reinhard; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A

    2009-01-01

    Although used in academic research for several decades, 3D culture models have long been regarded expensive, cumbersome and unnecessary in drug development processes. Technical advances, coupled with recent observations showing that gene expression in 3D is much closer to clinical expression profiles than those seen in 2D, have renewed attention and generated hope in the feasibility of maturing organotypic 3D systems to therapy test platforms with greater power to predict clinical efficacies. Here we describe a standardized setup for reproducible, easy-handling culture, treatment and routine analysis of multicellular spheroids, the classical 3D culture system resembling many aspects of the pathophysiological situation in human tumor tissue. We discuss essential conceptual and practical considerations for an adequate establishment and use of spheroid-based drug screening platforms and also provide a list of human carcinoma cell lines, partly on the basis of the NCI-DTP 60-cell line screen, that produce treatable spheroids under identical culture conditions. In contrast to many other settings with which to achieve similar results, the protocol is particularly useful to be integrated into standardized large-scale drug test routines as it requires a minimum number of defined spheroids and a limited amount of drug. The estimated time to run the complete screening protocol described herein--including spheroid initiation, drug treatment and determination of the analytical end points (spheroid integrity, and cell survival through the acid phosphatase assay)--is about 170 h. Monitoring of spheroid growth kinetics to determine growth delay and regrowth, respectively, after drug treatment requires long-term culturing (> or =14 d).

  2. [Papillomaviruses and human tumors].

    PubMed

    Vonka, V; Hamsíková, E; Sobotková, E; Smahel, M; Kitasato, H; Sainerová, H; Ludvíková, V; Zák, R; Kanka, J; Kolár, Z; Kovarík, J

    2000-12-01

    The report summarizes the main results obtained in the course of our research project. The results of immunological and epidemiological studies provide further proofs that human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the etiological agents in cervical neoplasia. In addition, they raise hopes that immunological methods may be utilized in diagnostics of cervical cancer and for monitoring the clinical course of this disease in the near future. Since the etiological relationship between HPV and cervical carcinoma seems to be proven beyond reasonable doubt, the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines has become the dominant of the contemporary HPV reseach. For studying immune reactions against HPV-induced tumours we developed a model of HPV16-transformed rodent cells.

  3. Human eccrine sweat gland cells reconstitute polarized spheroids when subcutaneously implanted with Matrigel in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Mingjun; Chen, Liyun; Li, Xuexue; Zhang, Bingna

    2016-10-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that maintenance of cell polarity plays a pivotal role in the regulation of glandular homeostasis and function. We examine the markers for polarity at different time points to investigate the formation of cell polarity during 3D reconstitution of eccrine sweat glands. Mixtures of eccrine sweat gland cells and Matrigel were injected subcutaneously into the inguinal regions of nude mice. At 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 weeks post-implantation, Matrigel plugs were removed and immunostained for basal collagen IV, lateral β-catenin, lateroapical ZO-1 and apical F-actin. The results showed that the cell polarity of the spheroids appeared in sequence. Formation of basal polarity was prior to lateral, apical and lateroapical polarity. Collagen IV was detected basally at 2 weeks, β-catenin laterally and ZO-1 lateroapically at 3 weeks, and F-actin apically at 4 weeks post-implantation. At week 5 and week 6, the localization and the positive percentage of collagen IV, β-catenin, ZO-1 or F-actin in spheroids was similar to that in native eccrine sweat glands. We conclude that the reconstituted 3D eccrine sweat glands are functional or potentially functional.

  4. The effect of adriamycin and 4'-deoxydoxorubicin on cell survival of human lung tumour cells grown in monolayer and as spheroids.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, D. J.; Wheldon, T. E.; Kerr, A. M.; Freshney, R. I.; Kaye, S. B.

    1986-01-01

    Using growth delay and clonogenic cell survival as end points, we have shown that the 3-dimensional structure of human lung tumour spheroids confers a degree of resistance to the anthracyclines adriamycin and 4'-deoxydoxorubicin, relative to cells grown as monolayer. 4'-deoxydoxorubicin induces a longer growth delay and greater clonogenic cell kill than adriamycin in spheroids, although it is no more cytotoxic in monolayer (exponential and plateau phase). There is a log linear relationship between clonogenic cell survival and duration of adriamycin exposure in monolayers, and biphasic curve with a lesser degree of cell kill for disaggregated spheroid cells. Using fluorescent microscopy we have demonstrated, qualitatively, that the more lipophilic analogue partitions into the spheroid more rapidly and to a greater degree than adriamycin. It is possible that adriamycin penetration is a relatively important aspect of spheroid drug resistance, which may be related to intraspheroidal pH gradients, and that we have partially overcome this by using a lipophilic analogue. Images Figure 7 PMID:3756078

  5. Quantitative Determination of Irinotecan and the Metabolite SN-38 by Nanoflow Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry in Different Regions of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Hummon, Amanda B.

    2015-04-01

    A new and simple method was developed to evaluate the distribution of therapeutics in three-dimensional multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) by combining serial trypsinization and nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS). This methodology was validated with quantitative measurements of irinotecan and its bioactive metabolite, SN-38, in distinct spatial regions of HCT 116 MCTS. Irinotecan showed a time-dependent permeability into MCTS with most of the drug accumulating in the core after 24 h of treatment. The amount of SN-38 detected was 30 times lower than that of the parent drug, and was more abundant in the outer rim and intermediate regions of MCTS where proliferating cells were present. This method can be used to investigate novel and established drugs. It enables investigation of drug penetration properties and identification of metabolites with spatial specificity in MCTS. The new approach has great value in facilitating the drug evaluation process.

  6. New-generation taxoid SB-T-1214 inhibits stem cell-related gene expression in 3D cancer spheroids induced by purified colon tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Growing evidence suggests that the majority of tumors are organized hierarchically, comprising a population of tumor-initiating, or cancer stem cells (CSCs) responsible for tumor development, maintenance and resistance to drugs. Previously we have shown that the CD133high/CD44high fraction of colon cancer cells is different from their bulk counterparts at the functional, morphological and genomic levels. In contrast to the majority of colon cancer cells expressing moderate levels of CD133, CD44 and CD166, cells with a high combined expression of CD133 and CD44 possessed several characteristic stem cell features, including profound self-renewal capacity in vivo and in vitro, and the ability to give rise to different cell phenotypes. The present study was undertaken for two aims: a) to determine stem cell-related genomic characteristics of floating 3D multicellular spheroids induced by CD133high/CD44high colon cancer cells; and b) to evaluate CSC-specific alterations induced by new-generation taxoid SB-T-1214. Results Selected CSC phenotype was isolated from three independent invasive colon cancer cell lines, HCT116, HT29 and DLD-1. A stem cell-specific PCR array assay (SABiosciences) revealed that colonospheres induced by purified CD133high/CD44high expressing cells display profound up-regulation of stem cell-related genes in comparison with their bulk counterparts. The FACS analysis has shown that the 3D colonospheres contained some minority cell populations with high levels of expression of Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and c-Myc, which are essential for stem cell pluripotency and self-renewal. Single administration of the SB-T-1214 at concentration 100 nM-1 μM for 48 hr not only induced growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death in these three types of colon cancer spheroids in 3D culture, but also mediated massive inhibition of the stem cell-related genes and significant down-regulation of the pluripotency gene expression. PCR array and FACS data were confirmed

  7. Stanniocalcin-1 Reduces Tumor Size in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Bonnie H. Y.; Shek, Felix H.; Lee, Nikki P.; Wong, Chris K. C.

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence has revealed high expression levels of stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) in different types of human cancers. Numerous experimental studies using cancer cell lines demonstrated the involvement of STC1 in inflammatory and apoptotic processes; however the role of STC1 in carcinogenesis remains elusive. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) an exemplified model of inflammation-related cancer, represents a paradigm of studying the association between STC1 and tumor development. Therefore, we conducted a statistical analysis on the expression levels of STC1 using clinicopathological data from 216 HCC patients. We found that STC1 was upregulated in the tumor tissues and its expression levels was positively correlated with the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Intriguingly tumors with greater expression levels of STC1 (tumor/normal ≥ 2) were significantly smaller than the lower level (tumor/normal<2) samples (p = 0.008). A pharmacological approach was implemented to reveal the functional correlation between STC1 and the ILs in the HCC cell-lines. IL-6 and IL-8 treatment of Hep3B cells induced STC1 expression. Lentiviral-based STC1 overexpression in Hep3B and MHCC-97L cells however showed inhibitory action on the pro-migratory effects of IL-6 and IL-8 and reduced size of tumor spheroids. The inhibitory effect of STC1 on tumor growth was confirmed in vivo using the stable STC1-overexpressing 97L cells on a mouse xenograft model. Genetic analysis of the xenografts derived from the STC1-overexpressing 97L cells, showed upregulation of the pro-apoptotic genes interleukin-12 and NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3. Collectively, the anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic functions of STC1 were suggested to relate its inhibitory effect on the growth of HCC cells. This study supports the notion that STC1 may be a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory tumors in HCC patients. PMID:26469082

  8. Inhibitory effect of tumor cell-derived lactic acid on human T cells.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Karin; Hoffmann, Petra; Voelkl, Simon; Meidenbauer, Norbert; Ammer, Julia; Edinger, Matthias; Gottfried, Eva; Schwarz, Sabine; Rothe, Gregor; Hoves, Sabine; Renner, Kathrin; Timischl, Birgit; Mackensen, Andreas; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni; Andreesen, Reinhard; Krause, Stefan W; Kreutz, Marina

    2007-05-01

    A characteristic feature of tumors is high production of lactic acid due to enhanced glycolysis. Here, we show a positive correlation between lactate serum levels and tumor burden in cancer patients and examine the influence of lactic acid on immune functions in vitro. Lactic acid suppressed the proliferation and cytokine production of human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) up to 95% and led to a 50% decrease in cytotoxic activity. A 24-hour recovery period in lactic acid-free medium restored CTL function. CTLs infiltrating lactic acid-producing multicellular tumor spheroids showed a reduced cytokine production. Pretreatment of tumor spheroids with an inhibitor of lactic acid production prevented this effect. Activated T cells themselves use glycolysis and rely on the efficient secretion of lactic acid, as its intracellular accumulation disturbs their metabolism. Export by monocarboxylate transporter-1 (MCT-1) depends on a gradient between cytoplasmic and extracellular lactic acid concentrations and consequently, blockade of MCT-1 resulted in impaired CTL function. We conclude that high lactic acid concentrations in the tumor environment block lactic acid export in T cells, thereby disturbing their metabolism and function. These findings suggest that targeting this metabolic pathway in tumors is a promising strategy to enhance tumor immunogenicity.

  9. Rapid Generation of In Vitro Multicellular Spheroids for the Study of Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Phung, Yen T.; Barbone, Dario; Broaddus, V. Courtney; Ho, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments present significant barriers to penetration by antibodies and immunoconjugates and are difficult to study in vitro. Cells cultured as monolayers typically exhibit less resistance to therapy than those grown in vivo. Therefore, it is important to develop an alternative research model that better represents in vivo tumors. We have developed a protocol to produce multicellular spheroids, a simple and more relevant model of in vivo tumors that allows for further investigations of the microenvironmental effects on drug penetration and tumor cell killing. The protocol is used to produce in vitro three-dimensional tumor spheroids from established human cancer cell lines and primary cancer cells isolated from patients without the use of any extracellular components. To study the ability of tumor-targeting immunoconjugates to penetrate these tumor spheroids in vitro, we have used an immunotoxin targeting mesothelin, a surface protein expressed in malignant mesotheliomas. This method for producing consistent, reproducible 3D spheroids may allow for improved testing of novel monoclonal antibodies and other agents for their ability to penetrate solid tumors for cancer therapy. PMID:22043235

  10. Primary human hepatocytes from metabolic-disordered children recreate highly differentiated liver-tissue-like spheroids on alginate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Bierwolf, Jeanette; Lutgehetmann, Marc; Deichmann, Steffen; Erbes, Johannes; Volz, Tassilo; Dandri, Maura; Cohen, Smadar; Nashan, Bjoern; Pollok, Joerg-Matthias

    2012-07-01

    Human hepatocyte transplantation has not been routinely established as an alternative to liver transplantation in liver disease due to low cell engraftment rates. Preimplantation in vitro engineering of liver tissue using primary human hepatocytes on three-dimensional scaffolds could be an alternative model. Alginate bioscaffolds were seeded with 1×10(6) hepatocytes freshly isolated from the livers of three children suffering from different metabolic disorders. During a culture period of 14 days only a marginal loss of hepatocytes was observed via measurement of DNA content per scaffold. Formation of hepatocyte spheroids was detected from day 3 onward using transmission light microscopy. Biochemical assays for albumin, α1-antitrypsin, and urea revealed excellent metabolic function with its maximum at day 7. Low lactate dehydrogenase enzyme release demonstrated minor cellular membrane damage. Hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid Schiff staining displayed high cell viability and well-preserved glycogen storage until day 7. Immunofluorescent staining of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4, zonula occludens protein 1, and cytokeratin 18 revealed highly differentiated hepatocytes in spheroids with a tissue-like structure on scaffolds. Fluorescent labeling of cytochrome P450 and bile canaliculi demonstrated detoxification ability as well as a well-shaped bile canaliculi network. Almost constant expression levels in most target genes were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of TUNEL reaction implicated a safe scaffold-dissolving procedure. Our results indicate that alginate scaffolds provide a favorable microenvironment for liver neo-tissue recreation and regeneration. Further, we demonstrate that livers from children with inherited metabolic disorders could serve as an alternative cell source for in vitro experiments.

  11. [Study on the interface of human hepatocyte L-02 polypropylene:simple culture method of human hepatocyte with spheroidal aggregate culture].

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng-hong; Han, Bao-san; Gao, Chang-you; Ma, Zu-wei; Zhao, Zhi-ming; Wang, Yong; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Gui-di; Yang, Mei-juan

    2004-09-07

    To found new interface of human hepatocyte/poly propylene with good cytocompatibility for made polypropylene hollow fibers bioreactor of bioartificial liver in future. Using the macromolecular hydroperoxide groups on the polypropylene membrane surface as initiators, acrylamides were polymerized on the polypropylene membranes, under induction by both UV irradiation and Fe2+ reduction. Growth characteristics of human hepatocyte L-02 were detected when it was cultured on polystyrene, polypropylene and modified polypropylene membrane surface. Water contact angle measurement of the polypropylene and the modified polypropylene membranes decreased from (72 +/- 5) degrees to (30 +/- 4) degrees , which indicated that the hydrophilicity of the membrane was improved obviously after the grafting modification. Human hepatocyte L-02 could not adhere and spread on modified polypropylene membrane surface, and grown in spheroidal aggregate with higher density and higher proliferation ratio measured by MTT method. Acrylamide polymerized on the polypropylene membranes is a good method which not only improved human hepatocytes cytocompatibility but also found a new simple culture method with spheroidal aggregate culture of human hepatocyte.

  12. Increasing 3D Matrix Rigidity Strengthens Proliferation and Spheroid Development of Human Liver Cells in a Constant Growth Factor Environment.

    PubMed

    Bomo, Jérémy; Ezan, Frédéric; Tiaho, François; Bellamri, Medjda; Langouët, Sophie; Theret, Nathalie; Baffet, Georges

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical forces influence the growth and shape of virtually all tissues and organs. Recent studies show that increased cell contractibility, growth and differentiation might be normalized by modulating cell tensions. Particularly, the role of these tensions applied by the extracellular matrix during liver fibrosis could influence the hepatocarcinogenesis process. The objective of this study is to determine if 3D stiffness could influence growth and phenotype of normal and transformed hepatocytes and to integrate extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness to tensional homeostasis. We have developed an appropriate 3D culture model: hepatic cells within three-dimensional collagen matrices with varying rigidity. Our results demonstrate that the rigidity influenced the cell phenotype and induced spheroid clusters development whereas in soft matrices, Huh7 transformed cells were less proliferative, well-spread and flattened. We confirmed that ERK1 played a predominant role over ERK2 in cisplatin-induced death, whereas ERK2 mainly controlled proliferation. As compared to 2D culture, 3D cultures are associated with epithelial markers expression. Interestingly, proliferation of normal hepatocytes was also induced in rigid gels. Furthermore, biotransformation activities are increased in 3D gels, where CYP1A2 enzyme can be highly induced/activated in primary culture of human hepatocytes embedded in the matrix. In conclusion, we demonstrated that increasing 3D rigidity could promote proliferation and spheroid developments of liver cells demonstrating that 3D collagen gels are an attractive tool for studying rigidity-dependent homeostasis of the liver cells embedded in the matrix and should be privileged for both chronic toxicological and pharmacological drug screening. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Microenvironment Induced Spheroid to Sheeting Transition of Immortalized Human Keratinocytes (HaCaT) Cultured in Microbubbles Formed in Polydimethylsiloxane

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Giang, Ut-Binh; King, Michael R.; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2011-01-01

    this morphology transition in microbubbles is supported by the observation that spheroids do not form when cells - seeded into microbubbles or onto PDMS cured in 96 well plates - are cultured in media conditioned by HaCaT cells grown in standard tissue culture plate. We observed that the addition of TGF-β1 to the growth media induced cells to proliferate in a sheeting morphology from the onset both on PDMS cured in 96-well plates and in microbubbles. TGF-β1 is a morphogen known to regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Studies of the role of Ca2+ concentration and changes in Ecadherin expression additionally support an EMT-like HaCaT morphology transition. These findings taken together validate the microbubble compartment as a unique cell culture platform that can potentially transform investigative studies in cell biology and in particular the tumor microenvironment. Targeting the tumor microenvironment is an emerging area of anti-cancer therapy. PMID:21724250

  14. Viable head and neck tumor spheroids stimulate in vitro autologous monocyte MCP-1 secretion through soluble substances and CD14/lectin-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Olsnes, Carla; Heimdal, John-Helge; Kross, Kenneth W; Olofsson, Jan; Aarstad, Hans Jørgen

    2005-12-01

    Biopsies from carcinoma tissue and benign control mucosa from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients were used to establish fragment (F)-spheroids in vitro. We have previously shown that autologous monocytes co-cultured with F-spheroids in vitro augment their secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). Presently, the aims of the present work were to study whether the metabolic activity, secreted products and/or specific receptor/ligand on the surface of the F-spheroids and monocytes are necessary for stimulation of the monocyte MCP-1 secretion upon F-spheroid co-culture. Actinomycin D (1 mug/ml for 24 h) pre-treatment of the F-spheroids abolished the monocyte MCP-1 co-culture response. Co-culture of monocytes and F-spheroids separated by a semi-permeable membrane showed a decreased, but still present, monocyte MCP-1 co-culture response. Conditioned medium from F-spheroids stimulated allogenous monocytes to secrete MCP-1. The addition of glucose or galactose, but not mannose, to co-cultures partially inhibited the monocyte MCP-1 co-culture response. The addition of anti-CD14 antibody diminished the MCP-1 co-culture response. In conclusion, the monocyte MCP-1 co-culture response is dependent on metabolically active spheroids, secreted stimuli, and is augmented by direct contact with F-spheroids, possibly via lectin-like receptors and the CD14 receptor.

  15. Co-expression of CD44 and ABCG2 in spheroid body-forming cells of gastric cancer cell line MKN45.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianming; Ma, Lilin; Xu, Junfei; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Jie; Chen, Ruixin; Zhou, Youlang

    2013-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory hypothesizes that CSCs are regarded as the cause of tumor formation, recurrence and metastasis. This study aimed to investigate whether spheroid body-forming cells in human gastric cancer cell were enriched for CSC properties, and to assess the expression of candidate CSC markers, cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) and adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter G 2 (ABCG2) in the MKN45 spheroid body cells. Human gastric cancer cell line MKN45 were plated in stem cell conditioned culture system allowed for spheroid body forming. The expression levels of CD44 and ABCG2 in the spheroid body cells were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining, and the tumorigenicity of the spheroid body-forming cells were assessed by in vivo xenograft studies in nude mice. The MKN45 cells could form spheroid bodies cultured in stem cell conditioned medium. The spheroid body-forming cells showed a significantly greater (p <0.05) expression of CD44 and ABCG2 than the parental cells. Spheroid body cells from gastric cancer cell line MKN45 cultured in stem cell conditioned medium possessed gastric CSC properties. The cells co-expressed of CD44 and ABCG2 might represent a subpopulation of gastric CSCs.

  16. The retinoblastoma gene in human pituitary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, V.L.; Arnold, A.; Alexander, J.M.; Klibanski, A. )

    1993-09-01

    Functional inactivation of the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor gene is important in the pathogenesis of many human tumors. Recently, the frequent occurrence of pituitary tumors was reported in mice genetically engineered to have one defective RB allele, a genetic background analogous to that of patients with familial retinoblastoma. The molecular pathogenesis of human pituitary tumors is largely unknown, and the potential role of RB gene inactivation in these neoplasms has not been examined. Consequently, the authors studied 20 human pituitary tumors (12 clinically nonfunctioning tumors, 4 somatotroph adenomas, 2 prolactinomas, and 2 corticotrophy adenomas) for tumor-specific allelic loss of the RB gene using a highly informative polymorphic locus within the gene. Control leukocyte DNA samples from 18 of these 20 patients were heterozygous at this locus, permitting genetic evaluation of their paired tumor specimens. In contrast to the pituitary tumors in the mouse model, none of these 18 human tumors exhibited RB allelic loss. These findings indicate that RB gene inactivation probably does not play an important role in the pathogenesis of common types of human pituitary tumors. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Endogenous and xenobiotic metabolic stability of primary human hepatocytes in long-term 3D spheroid cultures revealed by a combination of targeted and untargeted metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Vorrink, Sabine U; Ullah, Shahid; Schmidt, Staffan; Nandania, Jatin; Velagapudi, Vidya; Beck, Olof; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lauschke, Volker M

    2017-03-06

    Adverse reactions or lack of response to medications are important concerns for drug development programs. However, faithful predictions of drug metabolism and toxicity are difficult because animal models show only limited translatability to humans. Furthermore, current in vitro systems, such as hepatic cell lines or primary human hepatocyte (PHH) 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures, can be used only for acute toxicity tests because of their immature phenotypes and inherent instability. Therefore, the migration to novel phenotypically stable models is of prime importance for the pharmaceutical industry. Novel 3-dimensional (3D) culture systems have been shown to accurately mimic in vivo hepatic phenotypes on transcriptomic and proteomic level, but information about their metabolic stability is lacking. Using a combination of targeted and untargeted high-resolution mass spectrometry, we found that PHHs in 3D spheroid cultures remained metabolically stable for multiple weeks, whereas metabolic patterns of PHHs from the same donors cultured as conventional 2D monolayers rapidly deteriorated. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic differences between donors were maintained in 3D spheroid cultures, enabling studies of interindividual variability in drug metabolism and toxicity. We conclude that the 3D spheroid system is metabolically stable and constitutes a suitable model for in vitro studies of long-term drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics.-Vorrink, S. U., Ullah, S., Schmid, S., Nandania, J., Velagapudi, V., Beck, O., Ingelman-Sundberg, M., Lauschke, V. M. Endogenous and xenobiotic metabolic stability of primary human hepatocytes in long-term 3D spheroid cultures revealed by a combination of targeted and untargeted metabolomics.

  18. Endogenous and xenobiotic metabolic stability of primary human hepatocytes in long-term 3D spheroid cultures revealed by a combination of targeted and untargeted metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Vorrink, Sabine U.; Ullah, Shahid; Schmidt, Staffan; Nandania, Jatin; Velagapudi, Vidya; Beck, Olof; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lauschke, Volker M.

    2017-01-01

    Adverse reactions or lack of response to medications are important concerns for drug development programs. However, faithful predictions of drug metabolism and toxicity are difficult because animal models show only limited translatability to humans. Furthermore, current in vitro systems, such as hepatic cell lines or primary human hepatocyte (PHH) 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures, can be used only for acute toxicity tests because of their immature phenotypes and inherent instability. Therefore, the migration to novel phenotypically stable models is of prime importance for the pharmaceutical industry. Novel 3-dimensional (3D) culture systems have been shown to accurately mimic in vivo hepatic phenotypes on transcriptomic and proteomic level, but information about their metabolic stability is lacking. Using a combination of targeted and untargeted high-resolution mass spectrometry, we found that PHHs in 3D spheroid cultures remained metabolically stable for multiple weeks, whereas metabolic patterns of PHHs from the same donors cultured as conventional 2D monolayers rapidly deteriorated. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic differences between donors were maintained in 3D spheroid cultures, enabling studies of interindividual variability in drug metabolism and toxicity. We conclude that the 3D spheroid system is metabolically stable and constitutes a suitable model for in vitro studies of long-term drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics.—Vorrink, S. U., Ullah, S., Schmid, S., Nandania, J., Velagapudi, V., Beck, O., Ingelman-Sundberg, M., Lauschke, V. M. Endogenous and xenobiotic metabolic stability of primary human hepatocytes in long-term 3D spheroid cultures revealed by a combination of targeted and untargeted metabolomics. PMID:28264975

  19. Human adipose stem cells maintain proliferative, synthetic and multipotential properties when suspension cultured as self-assembling spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, S K; Wang, X; Shang, H; Yun, S; Li, X; Feng, G; Khurgel, M; Katz, A J

    2012-01-01

    Adipose Derived Stromal/Stem Cells (ASCs) have been gaining recognition as extremely versatile cell source in tissue engineering. The usefulness of ASCs in biofabrication is further enhanced by our demonstration of unique properties of these cells when they are cultured as three dimensional cellular aggregates or spheroids. As described herein, three-dimensional formulations or self-assembling ASC spheroids develop their own extracellular matrix that serves to increase the robustness of the cells to mechanical stresses. The composition of the extracellular matrix can be altered based on the external environment of the spheroids and these constructs can be grown in a reproducible manner and to a consistent size. The spheroid formulation helps preserve the viability and developmental plasticity of ASCs even in defined, serum-free media conditions. For the first time, we show that multiple generations of adherent ASCs produced from these spheroids retain their developmental plasticity and their ability to differentiate into multiple cell/tissue types. These demonstrated properties support the fact that culture expanded ASCs are an excellent candidate cellular material for “organ printing” – the approach of developing complex tissue structures from a standardized cell “ink” or cell formulation. PMID:22522924

  20. Effects of fractionated radiation therapy on human brain tumor multicellular spheriods

    SciTech Connect

    Jih-Tsun Ho; Sarkar, A.; Kendal, L.E.; Hoshino, T.; Marton, L.J.; Deen, D.F. )

    1993-01-15

    We investigated the cytotoxic effects of fractionated radiation therapy on multicellular spheriods of human malignant glioma cell lines U-87 MG, U-251 MG, and U-373 MG. Graded doses of x-rays were administered in 1, 3, 8, 15, and 30 fractions over 15 days. The isoeffect dose for a 1 log cell kill ranged from 4-4.5 Gy for a single fraction to 7-8 Gy for an 8-fraction protocol; no additional dose-sparing was achieved with more fractions. Therefore, the effects of individual doses (1.56 Gy) of the 8-fraction protocol were studied in U-251 MG spheroids. A cell survival assay showed that the first dose of radiation killed 30-50% of the cells; subsequent doses usually killed fewer cells. The cell kill after all 8 doses was about 1.0 log. No consistent relationship between the intracellular glutathione level and fraction number was observed. The 24-hour labeling index of the spheroids did not decrease until after the second fraction. Thus, the higher cell kill of the first dose does not seem to be related to cell cycle synchrony. Multinuclear and mononuclear giant cells were limited almost entirely to the periphery of the spheriods and increased with the number of radiation fractions. We conclude that multicellular spheroids can be used to study the biological effects of fractionated radiation therapy on human brain tumor cells. Although this model cannot be used to evaluate the effect of radiation on normal tissue, it may be useful in developing more effective radiation therapy protocols for human brain tumors. 36 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Glutathione Levels in Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gamcsik, Michael P.; Kasibhatla, Mohit S.; Teeter, Stephanie D.; Colvin, O. Michael

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes clinical studies in which glutathione was measured in tumor tissue from patients with brain, breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, head and neck and lung cancer. Glutathione tends to be elevated in breast, ovarian, head and neck and lung cancer and lower in brain and liver tumors compared to disease-free tissue. Cervical, colorectal, gastric and esophageal cancers show both higher and lower levels of tumor glutathione. Some studies show an inverse relationship between patient survival and tumor glutathione. Based on this survey, we recommend approaches that may improve the clinical value of glutathione as a biomarker. PMID:22900535

  2. [Histological features of tumor-bearing tissues formed by human fibroblasts after reprograming by Piwil2].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guangping; Wu, Xin; He, Dawei; Fu, Yiyao; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Deying; Lin, Tao; Wei, Guanghui

    2015-08-01

    To observe the histological features of tumor-bearing tissues formed by human fibroblasts after reprograming by spermatogonial stem cell self-renewal key regulating gene Piwil2 (Piwil2-iCSC). Piwil2-iCSC tumor spheroids-like colonies were selected for tumor formation assay in four nude mice. Pathological features of Piwil2-iCSC tumors were observed by histology. Stem cell markers and common triploblastic markers were detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay and immunohistochemistry. Germ cell tumor markers were detected by immunohistochemical examination. Two weeks after inoculation, subcutaneous tumors were formed in all the four nude mice with a tumor formation rate of 100%. In the Piwil2-iCSC tumor tissues, Piwil2-GFP(+) cells showed high-density nuclear expression and were widely observed in DAPI-stained sections. Numerous mitotic figure of the neoplastic cells were seen (>10 cells/field of vision under high magnification) in HE-stained sections. Enlarged abnormal cell nuclei were observed. RT-PCR assay showed that Piwil2-iCSC tumors still expressed Piwil2 and some self-renewal and pluripotent markers of stem cells and some markers of triploblastic differentiation. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the tumors expressed stem cell markers, triploblastic markers and germ cell tumor markers AFP and HCG. Piwil2-iCSC tumors are probably undifferentiated embryonic small cell carcinoma, most likely to be immature teratoma, mixed with yolk sac tumor and choriocarcinoma components. It can be used as a useful model for the research of origin or genesis mechanism of cancer stem cells and the treatment of relevant tumors.

  3. The efficacy of nafamostat mesilate on the performance of a hybrid-artificial liver using a polyurethane foam/porcine hepatocyte spheroid culture system in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Y; Shimada, M; Tsujita, E; Rikimaru, T; Ijima, H; Nakazawa, K; Sakiyama, R; Fukuda, J; Funatsu, K; Sugimachi, K

    2001-01-01

    Nafamostat mesilate (FUT) is a protease inhibitor of complement activation. The present study investigates whether FUT protects porcine hepatocytes from being injured by human plasma in a multi-capillary polyurethane foam packed-bed culture system (MC-PUF) such as the hybrid-artificial liver (PUF-HAL). Human plasmas with 1 mM of added ammonia were perfused using a small-scale PUF-HAL with porcine hepatocytes. FUT was continuously infused (10 microg/ml, 50 microg/ml). The ammonia detoxification was maintained in human plasma for 24 hours and for 48 hours with FUT which suppressed the rapid increase of asparaginic acid aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). After 60 hours of perfusion, hepatocyte spheroids completely collapsed in the human plasma, but a small amount of hepatocyte spheroid was maintained by FUT. The effect of FUT was slightly greater at 50 microg/ml than at 10 microg/ml. Our results suggest that FUT has protective effects against porcine hepatocytes in human plasma, and our PUF-HAL using porcine hepatocytes can function in human plasma for about 48 hours with FUT.

  4. Cytogenetics of human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Finkernagel, S.W.; Kletz, T.; Day-Salvatore, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome studies of 55 brain tumors, including meningiomas, gliomas, astrocyomas and pituatary adenomas, were performed. Primary and first passage cultures were successfully obtained in 75% of these samples with an average of 18 G-banded metaphases analyzed per tumor. 44% of all the brain tumors showed numerical and or structural abnormalities. 46% of the primary and 38% of the first passage cultures showed similar numerical gains/losses and complex karyotypic changes. The most frequent numerical abnormalities (n {ge} 5) included loss of chromosomes 10, 22, and Y. The structural abnormalities most often seen involved 1p, 2, 5, 7, 17q and 19. This is an ongoing study which will attempt to correlate tumor type with specific karyotypic changes and to see if any of the observed chromosomal abnormalities provide prognostic indicators.

  5. Human hematopoietic tumors in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Sordillo, P P; Hansen, H; Jhanwar, S C; Beck, J; Lieberman, P; Helson, L

    1981-01-01

    Despite the difficulty in establishing human hematopoietic tumors in nude mice, four human lymphomas were successfully heterotransplanted and passaged serially in our laboratory. Additional immunosuppression with chemotherapy, whole-body radiation or splenectomy was not required for establishment of these tumors. All four of these tumors were of the non-Hodgkin's lymphoma type. In each case the tumors in the nude mice were histologically identical to the biopsy specimens from the patient in whom they were derived. Attempts to transplant tumor from 17 patients with Hodgkin's disease or 4 patients with immunoblastic lymphadenopathy were unsuccessful. Tumors from 2 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia and 1 with hairy cell leukemia could be grown in nude mice conditioned with whole-body radiation or cytosine arabinoside, but these tumors could not be passaged to other nude mice. Cell surface markers were determined on the four serially passaged lymphomas. These surface markers were similar to the markers on the original tumors, even after long periods of mouse-to-mouse passage. In 1 patient with fevers, night sweats and mediastinal mass in whom a diagnosis had not been made after several biopsies, examination of tumor tissue that had been transplanted from the patient to the nude mouse clearly established the diagnosis of lymphoma.

  6. Cytogenetic diversity in primary human tumors.

    PubMed

    Wolman, S R; Camuto, P M; Perle, M A

    1988-02-01

    Cytogenetic patterns from primary short-term culture of breast cancer, renal carcinoma, and tumors of the central nervous system are presented to illustrate the range of karyotypic diversity of human solid tumors as well as their biologic differences in culture systems that support their growth. These studies have illustrated several major issues. 1) Results vary with the tissue of origin: primary cultures from breast are almost uniformly diploid, while renal tumors are near-diploid, mosaic, and show clonal aberrations; and CNS tumors are heterogeneous: some diploid, some near-diploid and some highly aneuploid. 2) Results after short-term culture are selective, representing subpopulations from the heterogeneous cells that are detected on direct analysis of fresh tumors by cytogenetics or flow cytometry (FCM). It is not yet clear whether prognosis depends on the dominant population of the primary tumor or alternatively should be influenced by detection of small aneuploid subpopulations. 3) Evidence from all three tumor types supports the interpretation that cytogenetically normal diploid cells constitute part of some tumor populations, and may be better adapted to routine growth in culture than aneuploid subpopulations from the same primary tumors. These cells may also compose a major portion of the viable population of tumors in vivo and, therefore, could represent a useful model for studies of tumorigenesis and therapeutic regimens.

  7. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp.) are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Methods Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 oC for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231) and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A). Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. Results More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 oC hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil treatment. Boswellia sacra

  8. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Suhail, Mahmoud M; Wu, Weijuan; Cao, Amy; Mondalek, Fadee G; Fung, Kar-Ming; Shih, Pin-Tsen; Fang, Yu-Ting; Woolley, Cole; Young, Gary; Lin, Hsueh-Kung

    2011-12-15

    Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp.) are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 °C for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231) and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A). Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 °C hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil treatment. Boswellia sacra essential oil

  9. Cleavage of E-Cadherin and β-Catenin by Calpain Affects Wnt Signaling and Spheroid Formation in Suspension Cultures of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Konze, Sarah A.; van Diepen, Laura; Schröder, Anke; Olmer, Ruth; Möller, Hanna; Pich, Andreas; Weißmann, Robert; Kuss, Andreas W.; Zweigerdt, Robert; Buettner, Falk F. R.

    2014-01-01

    The envisioned clinical and industrial use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives has given major momentum to the establishment of suspension culture protocols that enable the mass production of cells. Understanding molecular changes accompanying the transfer from adherent to suspension culture is of utmost importance because this information can have a direct effect on the development of optimized culture conditions. In this study we assessed the gene expression of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells grown in surface-adherent culture (two-dimensional) versus free-floating suspension culture spheroids (three-dimensional). We combined a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with deep-sequencing-based transcriptomics. Cells in three-dimensional culture showed reduced expression of proteins forming structural components of cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix junctions. However, fully unexpected, we found up-regulation of secreted inhibitors of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and, concomitantly, a reduction in the level of active β-catenin and in the expression of Wnt target genes. In Western blot analyses the cysteine protease calpain was shown to cleave E-cadherin and β-catenin under three-dimensional culture conditions. Our data allowed the development of a model in which calpain cleavage of E-cadherin induces the disintegration of focal cell contacts and generates a 100-kDa E-cadherin fragment required for the formation of three-dimensional cell–cell contacts in spheroids. The parallel release of β-catenin and its potential activation by calpain cleavage are counterbalanced by the overexpression of soluble Wnt pathway inhibitors. According to this model, calpain has a key function in the interplay between E-cadherin and β-catenin-mediated intercellular adhesion and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Supporting this model, we show that

  10. Organ printing: tissue spheroids as building blocks.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Visconti, Richard P; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Forgacs, Gabor; Drake, Christopher J; Markwald, Roger R

    2009-04-01

    Organ printing can be defined as layer-by-layer additive robotic biofabrication of three-dimensional functional living macrotissues and organ constructs using tissue spheroids as building blocks. The microtissues and tissue spheroids are living materials with certain measurable, evolving and potentially controllable composition, material and biological properties. Closely placed tissue spheroids undergo tissue fusion - a process that represents a fundamental biological and biophysical principle of developmental biology-inspired directed tissue self-assembly. It is possible to engineer small segments of an intraorgan branched vascular tree by using solid and lumenized vascular tissue spheroids. Organ printing could dramatically enhance and transform the field of tissue engineering by enabling large-scale industrial robotic biofabrication of living human organ constructs with "built-in" perfusable intraorgan branched vascular tree. Thus, organ printing is a new emerging enabling technology paradigm which represents a developmental biology-inspired alternative to classic biodegradable solid scaffold-based approaches in tissue engineering.

  11. Human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs) cultured as spheroids are self-activated to produce prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) that directs stimulated macrophages into an anti-inflammatory phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ylöstalo, Joni H.; Bartosh, Thomas J.; Coble, Katie; Prockop, Darwin J.

    2012-01-01

    Culturing cells in 3D provides an insight into their characteristics in vivo. We previously reported that human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs) cultured as 3D spheroids acquire enhanced anti-inflammatory properties. Here we explored the effects of hMSC spheroids on macrophages that are critical cells in the regulation of inflammation. Conditioned medium from hMSC spheroids inhibited LPS-stimulated macrophages from secreting pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, CXCL2, IL6, IL12p40, and IL23. Conditioned medium also increased the secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL10 and IL1ra by the stimulated macrophages, and augmented expression of CD206, a marker of alternatively activated M2 macrophages. The principal anti-inflammatory activity in conditioned medium had a small molecular weight, and microarray data suggested that it was PGE2. This was confirmed by the observations that PGE2 levels were markedly elevated in hMSC spheroid-conditioned medium, and that the anti-inflammatory activity was abolished by an inhibitor of COX-2, a silencing RNA for COX-2, and an antibody to PGE2. The anti-inflammatory effects of the PGE2 on stimulated macrophages were mediated by the EP4 receptor. Spheroids formed by human adult dermal fibroblasts produced low levels of PGE2 and displayed negligible anti-inflammatory effects on stimulated macrophages, suggesting the features as unique to hMSCs. Moreover, production of PGE2 by hMSC spheroids was dependent on the activity of caspases and NFκB activation in the hMSCs. The results indicated that hMSCs in 3D-spheroid cultures are self-activated, in part by intracellular stress responses, to produce PGE2 that can change stimulated macrophages from a primarily pro-inflammatory M1 phenotype to a more anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype. PMID:22865689

  12. Metabolic heterogeneity in human lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Christopher T.; Faubert, Brandon; Yuan, Qing; Lev-Cohain, Naama; Jin, Eunsook; Kim, Jiyeon; Jiang, Lei; Ko, Bookyung; Skelton, Rachael; Loudat, Laurin; Wodzak, Michelle; Klimko, Claire; McMillan, Elizabeth; Butt, Yasmeen; Ni, Min; Oliver, Dwight; Torrealba, Jose; Malloy, Craig R.; Kernstine, Kemp; Lenkinski, Robert E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in the genetic and environmental parameters that influence cell metabolism in culture. Here, we assessed the impact of these factors on human NSCLC metabolism in vivo using intra-operative 13C-glucose infusions in nine NSCLC patients to compare metabolism between tumors and benign lung. While enhanced glycolysis and glucose oxidation were common among these tumors, we observed evidence for oxidation of multiple nutrients in each of them, including lactate as a potential carbon source. Moreover, metabolically heterogeneous regions were identified within and between tumors, and surprisingly, our data suggested potential contributions of non-glucose nutrients in well-perfused tumor areas. Our findings not only demonstrate the heterogeneity in tumor metabolism in vivo but also highlight the strong influence of the microenvironment on this feature. PMID:26853473

  13. The TCD[sub 50] and regrowth delay assay in human tumor xenografts: Differences and implications

    SciTech Connect

    Budach, W.; Budach, V.; Stuschke, M.; Dinges, S.; Sack, H. )

    1993-01-15

    The response to irradiation of five human xenograft cell lines - a malignant paraganglioma, a neurogenic sarcoma, a malignant histiocytoma, a primary lymphoma of the brain, and a squamous cell carcinoma - were tested in nude mice. All mice underwent 5 Gy whole body irradiation prior to xenotransplantation to minimize the residual immune response. The subcutaneous tumors were irradiated at a tumor volume of 120 mm[sup 3] under acutely hypoxic conditions with single doses between 8 Gy and 80 Gy depending on the expected radiation sensitivity of the tumor line. Endpoints of the study were the tumor control dose 50% (TCD[sub 50]) and the regrowth delay endpoints growth delay, specific growth delay, and the tumor bed effect corrected specific growth delay. Specific growth delay and corrected specific growth delay at 76% of the TCD[sub 50] was used in order to compare the data to previously published data from spheroids. The lowest TCD[sub 50] was found in the lymphoma with 24.9 Gy, whereas the TCD[sub 50] of the soft tissue sarcomas and the squamous cell carcinoma ranged from 57.8 Gy to 65.6 Gy. The isoeffective dose levels for the induction of 30 days growth delay, a specific growth delay of 3, and a corrected specific growth delay of 3 ranged from 15.5 Gy (ECL1) to 37.1 Gy (FADU), from 7.2 Gy (ENE2) to 45.6 Gy (EPG1) and from 9.2 Gy (ENE2) to 37.6 Gy (EPG1), respectively. The corrected specific growth delay at 76% of the TCD[sub 50] was correlated with the number of tumor rescue units per 100 cells in spheroids, which was available for three tumor lines, and with the tumor doubling time in xenografts (n = 5). The TCD[sub 50] values corresponded better to the clinical experience than the regrowth delay data. There was no correlation between TCD[sub 50] and any of the regrowth delay endpoints. This missing correlation was most likely a result of large differences in the number of tumor rescue units in human xenografts of the same size.

  14. The STAT3-miRNA-92-Wnt Signaling Pathway Regulates Spheroid Formation and Malignant Progression in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Wei; Yang, Shu-Ting; Chien, Ming-Hsien; Hua, Kuo-Tai; Wu, Chin-Jui; Hsiao, S M; Lin, Hao; Hsiao, Michael; Su, Jen-Liang; Wei, Lin-Hung

    2017-04-15

    Ovarian cancer spheroids constitute a metastatic niche for transcoelomic spread that also engenders drug resistance. Spheroid-forming cells express active STAT3 signaling and display stem cell-like properties that may contribute to ovarian tumor progression. In this study, we show that STAT3 is hyperactivated in ovarian cancer spheroids and that STAT3 disruption in this setting is sufficient to relieve chemoresistance. In an NSG murine model of human ovarian cancer, STAT3 signaling regulated spheroid formation and self-renewal properties, whereas STAT3 attenuation reduced tumorigenicity. Mechanistic investigations revealed that Wnt signaling was required for STAT3-mediated spheroid formation. Notably, the Wnt antagonist DKK1 was the most strikingly upregulated gene in response to STAT3 attenuation in ovarian cancer cells. STAT3 signaling maintained stemness and interconnected Wnt/β-catenin signaling via the miR-92a/DKK1-regulatory pathways. Targeting STAT3 in combination with paclitaxel synergistically reduced peritoneal seeding and prolonged survival in a murine model of intraperitoneal ovarian cancer. Overall, our findings define a STAT3-miR-92a-DKK1 pathway in the generation of cancer stem-like cells in ovarian tumors, with potential therapeutic applications in blocking their progression. Cancer Res; 77(8); 1955-67. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Differentiation of synovial CD-105(+) human mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocyte-like cells through spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Arufe, M C; De la Fuente, A; Fuentes-Boquete, I; De Toro, Francisco J; Blanco, Francisco J

    2009-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into several cell lineages, some of which can generate bone, cartilage, or adipose tissue. The presence of MSCs in the synovial membrane was recently reported. Data from comparative studies of MSCs derived from various mesenchymal tissues suggest that MSCs from synovial membranes have a superior chondrogenesis capacity. Previous chondrogenic differentiation studies have used the total population of MSCs, including cells with several MSC markers, such as CD44, CD90, CD105, or CD73. However the chondrogenic capacity of an individual population of MSCs has not been examined. Our aim was to study the chondrogenic capacity of the cellular MSC subset, CD105(+), derived from synovial membrane tissues of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and normal donors. The tissues were digested with a cocktail of collagenase/dispase and the isolated MSCs were seeded into plates. The subpopulation of CD105(+)-MSCs was separated using a magnetic separator. The MSCs were then differentiated towards chondrocyte-like cells using a specific medium to promote spheroid formation. Spheroids were collected after 14, 28, and 46 days in chondrogenic medium and stained with hematoxylin, eosin, Safranin O or Alcian blue to evaluate the extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study collagen types I (COLI) and II (COLII) and aggrecan expression. Phenotypic characterization of the isolated CD105(+)-MSCs shows that these cells are also positive for CD90 and CD44, but negatives for CD34 and CD45. In addition, this cellular subset expressed Sox-9. Spheroids appeared after 7 days in culture in the presence of chondrogenic medium. Our studies show no differences between MSCs obtained from OA and normal synovial membranes during chondrogenesis. The morphological analysis of spheroids revealed characteristics typical of chondrocyte cells. The intensity of Safranin O, Alcian blue and aggrecan staining was positive and constant

  16. Versican regulates metastasis of epithelial ovarian carcinoma cells and spheroids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epithelial ovarian carcinoma is a deadly disease characterized by overt peritoneal metastasis. Individual cells and multicellular aggregates, or spheroids, seed these metastases, both commonly found in ascites. Mechanisms that foster spheroid attachment to the peritoneal tissues preceding formation of secondary lesions are largely unknown. Methods Cell culture models of SKOV-3, OVCAR3, OVCAR4, Caov-3, IGROV-1, and A2780 were used. In this report the role of versican was examined in adhesion of EOC spheroids and cells to peritoneal mesothelial cell monolayers in vitro as well as in formation of peritoneal tumors using an in vivo xenograft mouse model. Results The data demonstrate that versican is instrumental in facilitating cell and spheroid adhesion to the mesothelial cell monolayers, as its reduction with specific shRNAs led to decreased adhesion. Furthermore, spheroids with reduced expression of versican failed to disaggregate to complete monolayers when seeded atop monolayers of peritoneal mesothelial cells. Failure of spheroids lacking versican to disaggregate as efficiently as controls could be attributed to a reduced cell migration that was observed in the absence of versican expression. Importantly, both spheroids and cells with reduced expression of versican demonstrated significantly impaired ability to generate peritoneal tumors when injected intraperitoneally into athymic nude mice. Conclusions Taken together these data suggest that versican regulates the development of peritoneal metastasis originating from cells and spheroids. PMID:24999371

  17. Transcriptional, functional and mechanistic comparisons of stem cell-derived hepatocytes, HepaRG cells and 3D human hepatocyte spheroids as predictive in vitro systems for drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Bell, Catherine C; Lauschke, Volker M; Vorrink, Sabine U; Palmgren, Henrik; Duffin, Roger; Andersson, Tommy B; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2017-01-30

    Reliable and versatile hepatic in vitro systems for the prediction of drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity are essential constituents of preclinical safety assessment pipelines for new medicines. Here, we compared three emerging cell systems, hepatocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS-Hep), HepaRG cells and 3D primary human hepatocyte (PHH) spheroids at transcriptional and functional levels in a multi-center study to evaluate their potential as predictive models for drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed widespread gene expression differences between the three cell models, with 8,148 out of 17,462 analyzed genes (47%) being differentially expressed. Expression levels of genes involved in the metabolism of endogenous as well as xenobiotic compounds were significantly elevated in PHH spheroids, whereas genes involved in cell division and endocytosis were significantly upregulated in HepaRG and hiPS-Hep cells, respectively. Consequently, PHH spheroids were more sensitive to a panel of drugs with distinctly different toxicity mechanisms, an effect that was amplified by long-term exposure using repeated treatments. Importantly, toxicogenomic analyses revealed that transcriptomic changes in PHH spheroids were in compliance with cholestatic, carcinogenic or steatogenic in vivo toxicity mechanisms at clinically relevant drug concentrations. Combined, the data reveal important phenotypic differences between the three cell systems and suggest that PHH spheroids can be used for functional investigations of drug-induced liver injury in vivo in man.

  18. Nanoengineered implant as a new platform for regenerative nanomedicine using 3D well-organized human cell spheroids.

    PubMed

    Keller, Laetitia; Idoux-Gillet, Ysia; Wagner, Quentin; Eap, Sandy; Brasse, David; Schwinté, Pascale; Arruebo, Manuel; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    In tissue engineering, it is still rare today to see clinically transferable strategies for tissue-engineered graft production that conclusively offer better tissue regeneration than the already existing technologies, decreased recovery times, and less risk of complications. Here a novel tissue-engineering concept is presented for the production of living bone implants combining 1) a nanofibrous and microporous implant as cell colonization matrix and 2) 3D bone cell spheroids. This combination, double 3D implants, shows clinical relevant thicknesses for the treatment of an early stage of bone lesions before the need of bone substitutes. The strategy presented here shows a complete closure of a defect in nude mice calvaria after only 31 days. As a novel strategy for bone regenerative nanomedicine, it holds great promises to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of living bone implants.

  19. Nanoengineered implant as a new platform for regenerative nanomedicine using 3D well-organized human cell spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Laetitia; Idoux-Gillet, Ysia; Wagner, Quentin; Eap, Sandy; Brasse, David; Schwinté, Pascale; Arruebo, Manuel; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    In tissue engineering, it is still rare today to see clinically transferable strategies for tissue-engineered graft production that conclusively offer better tissue regeneration than the already existing technologies, decreased recovery times, and less risk of complications. Here a novel tissue-engineering concept is presented for the production of living bone implants combining 1) a nanofibrous and microporous implant as cell colonization matrix and 2) 3D bone cell spheroids. This combination, double 3D implants, shows clinical relevant thicknesses for the treatment of an early stage of bone lesions before the need of bone substitutes. The strategy presented here shows a complete closure of a defect in nude mice calvaria after only 31 days. As a novel strategy for bone regenerative nanomedicine, it holds great promises to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of living bone implants. PMID:28138241

  20. Surface Tension Guided Hanging-Drop: Producing Controllable 3D Spheroid of High-Passaged Human Dermal Papilla Cells and Forming Inductive Microtissues for Hair-Follicle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bojie; Miao, Yong; Wang, Jin; Fan, Zhexiang; Du, Lijuan; Su, Yongsheng; Liu, Bingcheng; Hu, Zhiqi; Xing, Malcolm

    2016-03-09

    Human dermal papilla (DP) cells have been studied extensively when grown in the conventional monolayer. However, because of great deviation from the real in vivo three-dimensional (3D) environment, these two-dimensional (2D) grown cells tend to lose the hair-inducible capability during passaging. Hence, these 2D caused concerns have motivated the development of novel 3D culture techniques to produce cellular microtissues with suitable mimics. The hanging-drop approach is based on surface tension-based technique and the interaction between surface tension and gravity field that makes a convergence of liquid drops. This study used this technique in a converged drop to form cellular spheroids of dermal papilla cells. It leads to a controllable 3Dspheroid model for scalable fabrication of inductive DP microtissues. The optimal conditions for culturing high-passaged (P8) DP spheroids were determined first. Then, the morphological, histological and functional studies were performed. In addition, expressions of hair-inductive markers including alkaline phosphatase, α-smooth muscle actin and neural cell adhesion molecule were also analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, immunostaining and immunoblotting. Finally, P8-DP microtissues were coimplanted with newborn mouse epidermal cells (EPCs) into nude mice. Our results indicated that the formation of 3D microtissues not only endowed P8-DP microtissues many similarities to primary DP, but also confer these microtissues an enhanced ability to induce hair-follicle (HF) neogenesis in vivo. This model provides a potential to elucidate the native biology of human DP, and also shows the promising for the controllable and scalable production of inductive DP cells applied in future follicle regeneration.

  1. Light Scattering by Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ya-Ming; Ji, Xia

    Nowadays, with the development of technology, particles with size at nanoscale have been synthesized in experiments. It is noticed that anisotropy is an unavoidable problem in the production of nanospheres. Besides, nonspherical nanoparticles have also been extensively used in experiments. Comparing with spherical model, spheroidal model can give a better description for the characteristics of nonspherical particles. Thus the study of analytical solution for light scattering by spheroidal particles has practical implications. By expanding incident, scattered, and transmitted electromagnetic fields in terms of appropriate vector spheroidal wave functions, an analytic solution is obtained to the problem of light scattering by spheroids. Unknown field expansion coefficients can be determined with the combination of boundary conditions and rotational-translational addition theorems for vector spheroidal wave functions. Based on the theoretical derivation, a Fortran code has been developed to calculate the extinction cross section and field distribution, whose results agree well with those obtain by FDTD simulation. This research is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China No. 91230203.

  2. Respiration rate in human pituitary tumor explants.

    PubMed

    Anniko, M; Bagger-Sjöbäck, D; Hultborn, R

    1982-01-01

    Studies on the respiration rate of human pituitary tumor tissue have so far been lacking in the literature. This study presents the results from four adenomas causing acromegaly, all with different clinical degrees of the disease. Determination of oxygen uptake was performed in vitro with a spectrophotorespirometric system. Pieces of the tumors were explanted to an organ culture system with a high degree of stability. The secretion rate of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) was determined. After 4-8 days in vitro, specimens were analyzed for respiration rate. This was approximately 1-1.5 microliters O2/h/micrograms dry weight. The activity of the pituitary tumor tissue was characterized by both the hormone secretion rate and the respiration rate. Particularly active foci were found to occur in the adenoma tissue. Depending on the individual tumor, the GH secretion rate was approximately 0.1-100 pmol/micrograms dry weight/h and PRL secretion rate approximately 0.4-18 micrograms/micrograms dry weight/h. The respiration rate--as is also the hormone secretion rate--is dependent on the time in vitro prior to analysis. The respiration rate in individual tumors is a parameter which does not reflect GH or PRL serum levels or clinical activity of the disease.

  3. PlGF Knockdown Decreases Tumorigenicity and Stemness Properties of Spheroid Body Cells Derived from Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Fatemeh; Akrami, Hassan

    2017-04-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor family regulates some cell processes such as survival, growth of vascular endothelial cells, invasiveness, and also involves in pathological angiogenesis and metastasis in most cancers. Cancer stem cells are believed to be the main reason for the tumor relapse and resistance to therapy. These cells have various characteristics as same as normal tissue-specific adult stem cells including self-renewability and potent to differentiate into various cell types. However, the function of PlGF in gastric cancer stem cells is not well understood. We have investigated the effect of PlGF knockdown on the tumorigenicity and stem cell properties of spheroid body cells derived from two human gastric cancer cell lines. In this study, we isolated spheroid body cells which have stemness properties from MKN-45 and AGS without using growth factors. Validation of spheroid body cells was confirmed by various methods. Then the effects of PlGF knockdown were investigated on in vitro tumorigenicity, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis, and transcription levels of stemness markers of spheroid body cells. Our findings indicated that isolation of spheroid body cells from MKN-45 and AGS cells without using growth factors is an easy and inexpensive method to isolate cancer stem cells and knockdown of PlGF in spheroid body cells reduced in vitro tumorigenicity and stemness properties of spheroid body cells such as Self-renewal ability, colony forming, migratory, and MMPs activities and decreased ability to differentiation and angiogenesis. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 851-859, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Generation of Homogenous Three-Dimensional Pancreatic Cancer Cell Spheroids Using an Improved Hanging Drop Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Matthew J.; Colbert, Kevin; Keshishian, Vazrik; Ho, Jason; Corr, Stuart J.; Curley, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro characterization of tumor cell biology or of potential anticancer drugs is usually performed using tumor cell lines cultured as a monolayer. However, it has been previously shown that three-dimensional (3D) organization of the tumor cells is important to provide insights on tumor biology and transport of therapeutics. Several methods to create 3D tumors in vitro have been proposed, with hanging drop technique being the most simple and, thus, most frequently used. However, in many cell lines this method has failed to form the desired 3D tumor structures. The aim of this study was to design and test an easy-to-use and highly reproducible modification of the hanging drop method for tumor sphere formation by adding methylcellulose polymer. Most pancreatic cancer cells do not form cohesive and manageable spheres when the original hanging drop method is used, thus we investigated these cell lines for our modified hanging drop method. The spheroids produced by this improved technique were analyzed by histology, light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that using the proposed simple method; we were able to produce uniform spheroids for all five of the tested human pancreatic cancer cell lines; Panc-1, BxPC-3, Capan-1, MiaPaCa-2, and AsPC-1. We believe that this method can be used as a reliable and reproducible technique to make 3D cancer spheroids for use in tumor biology research and evaluation of therapeutic responses, and for the development of bio-artificial tissues. PMID:26830354

  5. Transcriptional, Functional, and Mechanistic Comparisons of Stem Cell–Derived Hepatocytes, HepaRG Cells, and Three-Dimensional Human Hepatocyte Spheroids as Predictive In Vitro Systems for Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Catherine C.; Vorrink, Sabine U.; Palmgren, Henrik; Duffin, Rodger; Andersson, Tommy B.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Reliable and versatile hepatic in vitro systems for the prediction of drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity are essential constituents of preclinical safety assessment pipelines for new medicines. Here, we compared three emerging cell systems—hepatocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, HepaRG cells, and three-dimensional primary human hepatocyte (PHH) spheroids—at transcriptional and functional levels in a multicenter study to evaluate their potential as predictive models for drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed widespread gene expression differences between the three cell models, with 8148 of 17,462 analyzed genes (47%) being differentially expressed. Expression levels of genes involved in the metabolism of endogenous as well as xenobiotic compounds were significantly elevated in PHH spheroids, whereas genes involved in cell division and endocytosis were significantly upregulated in HepaRG cells and hepatocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, respectively. Consequently, PHH spheroids were more sensitive to a panel of drugs with distinctly different toxicity mechanisms, an effect that was amplified by long-term exposure using repeated treatments. Importantly, toxicogenomic analyses revealed that transcriptomic changes in PHH spheroids were in compliance with cholestatic, carcinogenic, or steatogenic in vivo toxicity mechanisms at clinically relevant drug concentrations. Combined, the data reveal important phenotypic differences between the three cell systems and suggest that PHH spheroids can be used for functional investigations of drug-induced liver injury in vivo in humans. PMID:28137721

  6. Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) kills human glioblastoma cells in brain xenografts by an apoptosis-like mechanism and prolongs survival.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gronli, Janne; Mork, Sverre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-03-15

    Malignant brain tumors present a major therapeutic challenge because no selective or efficient treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate that intratumoral administration of human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) prolongs survival in a human glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft model, by selective induction of tumor cell apoptosis. HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that is formed from alpha-lactalbumin when the protein changes its tertiary conformation and binds oleic acid as a cofactor. HAMLET induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cells in vitro, but the therapeutic effect in vivo has not been examined. In this study, invasively growing human GBM tumors were established in nude rats (Han:rnu/rnu Rowett, n = 20) by transplantation of human GBM biopsy spheroids. After 7 days, HAMLET was administered by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery for 24 h into the tumor area; and alpha-lactalbumin, the native, folded variant of the same protein, was used as a control. HAMLET reduced the intracranial tumor volume and delayed the onset of pressure symptoms in the tumor-bearing rats. After 8 weeks, all alpha-lactalbumin-treated rats had developed pressure symptoms, but the HAMLET-treated rats remained asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed large differences in tumor volume (456 versus 63 mm(3)). HAMLET caused apoptosis in vivo in the tumor but not in adjacent intact brain tissue or in nontransformed human astrocytes, and no toxic side effects were observed. The results identify HAMLET as a new candidate in cancer therapy and suggest that HAMLET should be additionally explored as a novel approach to controlling GBM progression.

  7. Reproducibility of Uniform Spheroid Formation in 384-Well Plates: The Effect of Medium Evaporation.

    PubMed

    Das, Viswanath; Fürst, Tomáš; Gurská, Soňa; Džubák, Petr; Hajdúch, Marián

    2016-10-01

    Spheroid cultures of cancer cells reproduce the spatial dimension-induced in vivo tumor traits more effectively than the conventional two-dimensional cell cultures. With growing interest in spheroids for high-throughput screening (HTS) assays, there is an increasing demand for cost-effective miniaturization of reproducible spheroids in microtiter plates (MPs). However, well-to-well variability in spheroid size, shape, and growth is a frequently encountered problem with almost every culture method that has prevented the transfer of spheroids to the HTS platform. This variability partly arises due to increased susceptibility of MPs to edge effects and evaporation-induced changes in the growth of spheroids. In this study, we examined the effect of evaporation on the reproducibility of spheroids of tumor and nontumor cell lines in 384-well plates, and show that culture conditions that prevent evaporation-induced medium loss result in the formation of uniform spheroids across the plate. Additionally, we also present a few technical improvements to increase the scalability of the liquid-overlay spheroid culturing technique in MPs, together with a simple software routine for the quantification of spheroid size. We believe that these cost-effective improvements will aid in further improvement of spheroid cultures for HTS drug discovery.

  8. Diversity of cell-mediated adhesions in breast cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Ivascu, Andrea; Kubbies, Manfred

    2007-12-01

    Due to their three dimensional (3D) architecture, multicellular tumor spheroids mimic avascular tumor areas comprising the establishment of diffusion gradients, reduced proliferation rates and increased drug resistance. We have shown recently that the spontaneous formation of spheroids is restricted to a limited number of cell lines whereas the majority grow only as aggregates of cells with loose cell-cell contacts when cultured in 3D. However, by the addition of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM, Matrigel), aggregates can be transformed into spheroids with diffusion barriers and development of quiescent therapy-resistant cells. In this report, we investigated adhesion molecules responsible for rBM-driven versus spontaneous spheroid formation in a diverse population of eight breast tumor cell lines relevant for in vitro and in vivo antitumor drug testing. Inhibition of spheroid formation was monitored in the presence of adhesion molecule functional blocking antibodies and after siRNA-mediated down-regulation of E- and N-cadherin and integrin beta1 adhesion receptors. We identified that E-cadherin mediates the spontaneous formation of spheroids in MCF7, BT-474, T-47D and MDA-MB-361 cells, whereas N-cadherin is responsible for tight packing of MDA-MB-435S cells. In contrast, the matrix protein-induced transformation of 3D aggregates into spheroids in MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 cells is mediated primarily by the collagen I/integrin beta1 interaction with no cadherin involvement. A combination of both, homophilic E-cadherin and integrin beta1/collagen I interaction establishes spheroids in MDA-MB-468 cells. These findings indicate that an evolutionary diverse and complex pattern of interacting cell surface proteins exists in breast cancer cells that determines the 3D growth characteristic in vitro, thereby influencing small molecule or antibody permeation in preclinical in vitro and in vivo tumor models.

  9. Metabolism of steroids by human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Weidenfeld, J; Schiller, H

    1984-01-01

    Hormonal steroids or their precursors can be metabolized in the CNS to products with altered hormonal activity. The importance of the intracerebral transformation of steroids has been demonstrated, particularly with regard to neuroendocrine regulation and sexual behavior. These studies were carried out on normal brain tissues, but the ability of neoplastic tissues of CNS origin to metabolize steroids is unknown. We investigated the in vitro metabolism of tritiated pregnenolone, testosterone, and estradiol-17 beta by homogenates of four brain tumors defined as astrocytomas. In three tumors of cortical origin, removed from adult patients, the only enzymic activity found was the conversion of estradiol to estrone. In one tumor of cerebellar origin removed from an 11-year-old boy, the following conversions were found: pregnenolone to progesterone, testosterone to either androstenedione or estradiol, and estradiol to estrone. These results demonstrate that human astrocytomas can transform steroids to compounds with modified hormonal activity. These compounds formed by the tumorous tissue can affect brain function, which may be of clinical significance. Furthermore, these results may add important parameters for biochemical characterization of neoplastic brain tissues.

  10. Heterogeneity in multicell spheroids induced by alterations in the external oxygen and glucose concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Freyer, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Multicell tumor spheroids are currently being used as in vitro models for investigations of tumor therapy, based on the concept that spheroids exhibit many of the growth characteristics and cell subpopulations of tumors in vivo. At present, the factors which regulate cell proliferation, clonogenicity and viability in spheroids are unknown, as are the effects of alterations in these critical factors on therapeutic results. The symmetrical structure of the EMT6/Ro spheroid and the ease of manipulating the external environment are key features of this spheroid system which are used to investigate the role of oxygen and glucose in the control of spheroid growth and the development of cell subpopulations. A technique is developed for selectivity dissociating a spheroid population into fractions of cells originating from known locations in the spheroid structure. Characterization of these cell subpopulations demonstrates that outer cells are similar to an exponential cell population, while inner region cells are not proliferating and have a reduced cell volume and clonogenic capacity. Oxygen and glucose concentrations at critical depths in the spheroid were determined. It is concluded that the oxygen and glucose supply to cells in spheroids is critical in determining the initial onset of central necrosis. 217 references, 32 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

  11. Differential spheroid formation by oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Carlin; Lee, Casey; Atakilit, Amha; Siu, Amanda; Ramos, Daniel M

    2014-12-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) make up 96% of all oral cancers. Most laboratory SCC studies grow cells as a monolayer, which does not accurately represent the disease in vivo. We used a more relevant multicellular spheroid (MCS) model to study this disease. The SCC9β6KDFyn cell line, which expresses full-length β6 and a kinase dead Fyn formed the largest MCS. Cell adhesive properties are dynamic and N-cadherin was increased in the largest MCS. c-Raf mediates the survival of tumor cells and was consistently expressed both in monolayers and in the MCS by SCC9β6D1 cells which lack the β6 cytoplasmic tail and, do not activate Fyn. SCC9β6KDFyn cells also express high levels of c-Raf when grown as spheroids in which Fyn suppression stimulates MCS formation. Tumor microenvironment and growth patterns modulate cell behavior and suppression of Fyn kinase may promote MCS growth.

  12. [Oncolytic virotherapy for human solid tumors].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2009-05-01

    Replication-selective tumor-specific viruses present a novel approach for treatment of neoplastic disease. Telomerase activation is considered to be a critical step in carcinogenesis, and its activity correlates closely with human telomerase reverse transcriptase(hTERT)expression. We constructed an attenuated adenovirus 5 vector(Telomelysin, OBP-301), in which the hTERT promoter element drives expression of E1 genes. Telomelysin replicated efficiently and induced marked cell killing in a panel of human cancer cell lines, whereas replication as well as cytotoxicity was highly attenuated in normal human cells lacking telomerase activity. We further modified the E3 region of OBP-301 to contain green fluorescent protein(GFP)gene for monitoring viral replication(TelomeScan, OBP-401). When TelomeScan was intratumorally injected into human tumors orthotopically implanted into the rectum in mice, para-aortic lymph node metastasis could be visualized at laparotomy with a three-chip color cooled charged-coupled device camera. This article reviews recent highlights in this rapidly evolving field of cancer therapeutic and diagnostic approaches using telomerase-specific oncolytic adenoviruses.

  13. Differential tumor microenvironment in human ovarian cystic tumors.

    PubMed

    Tavares Murta, Beatriz Martins; Cunha, Fernando de Queiróz; Miranda, Rodrigo; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido

    2004-01-01

    Cells and soluble mediators obtained from tumor effusions are useful in evaluating the tumor microenvironment. Our aim was to examine cytologically and to quantify the leukocyte infiltrate, nitric oxide, cytokines and tumor markers in the intracystic fluid from patients with a cystic adnexal mass, for a possible differentiation between benign and malignant findings. Sixty-six women who had their cystic fluids collected were prospectively divided into benign tumor (22, 33.3%), malignant tumor (10, 15.2%) or other gynecological alterations (34, 51.5%). Cytology, total and differential leukocyte counts were determined by light microscopy. Tumor markers, cytokines and nitric oxide were assayed in the supernatants using the Immulite system, ELISA and Griess reaction, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the cytological analysis was 66.7% and 97.7%, respectively. The levels of CA 19.9, CA 15.3, alpha-fetoprotein, carcinoembryonic antigen, progesterone and beta-HCG were significantly higher in the benign and/or malignant group than in the other gynecological alterations. Also, the local concentrations of CA 15.3 and beta-HCG were significantly higher in malignant than in benign tumors. In malignant tumors, increased leukocyte counts and higher concentrations of IL-6, IL-10 and nitric oxide were detected than in benign tumors or other gynecological alterations. In malignant tumors, the microenvironment could be differentiated from benign tumors or other gynecological alterations by cystic fluid analysis.

  14. Sodium iodide symporter/radioactive iodine system has more efficient antitumor effect in three-dimensional spheroids.

    PubMed

    Mitrofanova, Elena; Hagan, Christy; Qi, Jianguo; Seregina, Tatiana; Link, Charles

    2003-01-01

    The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is a plasma membrane protein that mediates active uptake of inorganic iodide from plasma into thyroid cells. Expression of the NIS gene in tumor cells may provide a novel mechanism for treating cancer. Previously, we cloned cDNA of rat NIS into the retroviral vector LXSN, transduced human and murine tumor cells, and demonstrated 50-60% killing effect of 131I in cells expressing NIS. However, monolayer cultures of cancer cells cannot adequately represent some aspects of the growth and microenvironmental conditions of three-dimensional (3D) solid tumors. On the other hand, animal models are time consuming and costly and not always reasonable for the first estimation of scientific approaches. An in vitro model of multicellular tumor spheroids growing as a 3D-structure provides an important link between monolayer cell cultures and animal experiments. This model is especially crucial for suicide systems utilizing radioisotopes as the killing agent because the deposition of radiation energy causes DNA damage in cells more effectively in 3D-structure. In this study we used a retroviral vector for introduction of the rat NIS gene into DU145 prostate cancer cells. The liquid-overlay technique was exploited to create a tumor spheroid model. We established that uptake of 125I in monolayer culture cells containing the NIS was 40- to 50-fold greater than in DU145 cells without NIS. Using a clonogenic assay for monolayer culture, we demonstrated a 50-70% killing effect of 131I on DU145 cells expressing the NIS gene. The same dose of 131I resulted in complete death of tumor spheroids composed of the DU145-NIS cells. Our data demonstrates significant anti-tumor efficacy of novel radioisotope concentrator gene therapy in a multicellular spheroid model, thus proving to be a useful link between the in vitro system and in vivo animal model.

  15. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation <10% intraexperiment, <20% interexperiment). A proof-of-principle drug screen was performed on human colorectal adenocarcinoma spheroids to demonstrate the ability to recapitulate physiologically relevant phenomena such as insulin-induced drug resistance. With automatable and flexible liquid handling, and a wide range of in situ sample preparation and analysis capabilities, the digital microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis.

  16. Modeling human tumor angiogenesis in a three-dimensional culture system.

    PubMed

    Seano, Giorgio; Chiaverina, Giulia; Gagliardi, Paolo Armando; di Blasio, Laura; Sessa, Roberto; Bussolino, Federico; Primo, Luca

    2013-05-23

    The intrinsic complexity of the process of vessel formation limits the efficacy of cellular assays for elucidation of its molecular and pharmacologic mechanisms. We developed an ex vivo three-dimensional (3D) assay of sprouting angiogenesis with arterial explants from human umbilical cords. In this assay, human arterial rings were embedded in basement membrane extract gel, leading to a network of capillarylike structures upon vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A stimulation. The angiogenic outgrowth consisted of endothelial cells, which actively internalized acetylated-low-density lipoprotein, surrounded by pericytes. Computer-assisted quantification of this vascular network demonstrated considerable sensitivity of this assay to several angiogenic inhibitors, including kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. We also performed targeted gene knockdown on this model by directly infecting explanted umbilical arteries with lentiviruses carrying short-hairpin RNA. Downregulation of VEGFR2 resulted in a significant reduction of the sprouting capability, demonstrating the relevance of human vascular explants for functional genomics studies. Furthermore, a modification of this assay led to development of a 3D model of tumor-driven angiogenesis, in which angiogenic outgrowth was sustained by spheroids of prostate cancer cells in absence of exogenous growth factors. The human arterial ring assay bridges the gap between in vitro endothelial cell and animal model, and is a powerful system for identification of genes and drugs that regulate human angiogenesis.

  17. Integrated and Quantitative Proteomics of Human Tumors.

    PubMed

    Yakkioui, Y; Temel, Y; Chevet, E; Negroni, L

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative proteomics represents a powerful approach for the comprehensive analysis of proteins expressed under defined conditions. These properties have been used to investigate the proteome of disease states, including cancer. It has become a major subject of studies to apply proteomics for biomarker and therapeutic target identification. In the last decades, technical advances in mass spectrometry have increased the capacity of protein identification and quantification. Moreover, the analysis of posttranslational modification (PTM), especially phosphorylation, has allowed large-scale identification of biological mechanisms. Even so, increasing evidence indicates that global protein quantification is often insufficient for the explanation of biology and has shown to pose challenges in identifying new and robust biomarkers. As a consequence, to improve the accuracy of the discoveries made using proteomics in human tumors, it is necessary to combine (i) robust and reproducible methods for sample preparation allowing statistical comparison, (ii) PTM analyses in addition to global proteomics for additional levels of knowledge, and (iii) use of bioinformatics for decrypting protein list. Herein, we present technical specificities for samples preparation involving isobaric tag labeling, TiO2-based phosphopeptides enrichment and hydrazyde-based glycopeptides purification as well as the key points for the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the protein lists. The method is based on our experience with tumors analysis derived from hepatocellular carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, human embryonic intervertebral disk, and chordoma experiments.

  18. Vorinostat Eliminates Multicellular Resistance of Mesothelioma 3D Spheroids via Restoration of Noxa Expression

    PubMed Central

    Barbone, Dario; Cheung, Priscilla; Battula, Sailaja; Busacca, Sara; Gray, Steven G.; Longley, Daniel B.; Bueno, Raphael; Sugarbaker, David J.; Fennell, Dean A.; Broaddus, V. Courtney

    2012-01-01

    When grown in 3D cultures as spheroids, mesothelioma cells acquire a multicellular resistance to apoptosis that resembles that of solid tumors. We have previously found that resistance to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in 3D can be explained by a lack of upregulation of Noxa, the pro-apoptotic BH3 sensitizer that acts via displacement of the Bak/Bax-activator BH3-only protein, Bim. We hypothesized that the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat might reverse this block to Noxa upregulation in 3D. Indeed, we found that vorinostat effectively restored upregulation of Noxa protein and message and abolished multicellular resistance to bortezomib in the 3D spheroids. The ability of vorinostat to reverse resistance was ablated by knockdown of Noxa or Bim, confirming the essential role of the Noxa/Bim axis in the response to vorinostat. Addition of vorinostat similarly increased the apoptotic response to bortezomib in another 3D model, the tumor fragment spheroid, which is grown from human mesothelioma ex vivo. In addition to its benefit when used with bortezomib, vorinostat also enhanced the response to cisplatin plus pemetrexed, as shown in both 3D models. Our results using clinically relevant 3D models show that the manipulation of the core apoptotic repertoire may improve the chemosensitivity of mesothelioma. Whereas neither vorinostat nor bortezomib alone has been clinically effective in mesothelioma, vorinostat may undermine chemoresistance to bortezomib and to other therapies thereby providing a rationale for combinatorial strategies. PMID:23300762

  19. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Wei, Jian J; Mazar, Andrew P

    2015-09-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients' personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients' samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prolate spheroidal quantum cloak

    SciTech Connect

    Syue, Cheng-De; Lin, De-Hone

    2015-04-15

    To understand the propagation behavior of an oblique incident matter wave in a three-dimensional non-spherical quantum cloak, we perform the transformation design for the prolate spheroidal coordinate system and obtain a quantum cloak with an ellipsoidal shape. The mass parameters and effective potential for the creation of a perfect prolate spheroidal invisibility region are given. The analytic representations of the cloaked matter wave and probability current in the cloaking shell are presented. Special attention is paid to the discussions of the probability current in the cloaking shell for only that current can manifestly exhibit how the wave vector of the matter wave is curved, rotated, and guided in the cloaking shell to flow around the non-spherically invisible region. With the current analysis, one shows that the presented cloak can perfectly guide the matter wave in the situation of any oblique incidence. The proposed prolate spheroidal cloak for matter waves provides the first non-spherically three-dimensional setup for quantum cloaking.

  1. Aluminium-phthalocyanine chloride nanoemulsions for anticancer photodynamic therapy: Development and in vitro activity against monolayers and spheroids of human mammary adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Muehlmann, Luis Alexandre; Rodrigues, Mosar Corrêa; Longo, João Paulo Figueiró; Garcia, Mônica Pereira; Py-Daniel, Karen Rapp; Veloso, Aline Bessa; de Souza, Paulo Eduardo Narciso; da Silva, Sebastião William; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes

    2015-05-13

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) combines light, molecular oxygen and a photosensitizer to induce oxidative stress in target cells. Certain hydrophobic photosensitizers, such as aluminium-phthalocyanine chloride (AlPc), have significant potential for antitumor PDT applications. However, hydrophobic molecules often require drug-delivery systems, such as nanostructures, to improve their pharmacokinetic properties and to prevent aggregation, which has a quenching effect on the photoemission properties in aqueous media. As a result, this work aims to develop and test the efficacy of an AlPc in the form of a nanoemulsion to enable its use in anticancer PDT. The nanoemulsion was developed using castor oil and Cremophor ELP®, and a monodisperse population of nanodroplets with a hydrodynamic diameter of approximately 25 nm was obtained. While free AlPc failed to show significant activity against human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells in an in vitro PDT assay, the AlPc in the nanoemulsion showed intense photodynamic activity. Photoactivated AlPc exhibited a 50 % cytotoxicity concentration (CC50) of 6.0 nM when applied to MCF-7 cell monolayers and exerted a powerful cytotoxic effect on MCF-7 cell spheroids. Through the use of spontaneous emulsification, a stable AlPc nanoemulsion was developed that exhibits strong in vitro photodynamic activity on cancer cells.

  2. Three-dimensional growth of human endothelial cells in an automated cell culture experiment container during the SpaceX CRS-8 ISS space mission - The SPHEROIDS project.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Jessica; Gass, Samuel; Nebuloni, Stefano; Echegoyen, David; Riwaldt, Stefan; Baake, Christin; Bauer, Johann; Corydon, Thomas J; Egli, Marcel; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    Human endothelial cells (ECs) were sent to the International Space Station (ISS) to determine the impact of microgravity on the formation of three-dimensional structures. For this project, an automatic experiment unit (EU) was designed allowing cell culture in space. In order to enable a safe cell culture, cell nourishment and fixation after a pre-programmed timeframe, the materials used for construction of the EUs were tested in regard to their biocompatibility. These tests revealed a high biocompatibility for all parts of the EUs, which were in contact with the cells or the medium used. Most importantly, we found polyether ether ketones for surrounding the incubation chamber, which kept cellular viability above 80% and allowed the cells to adhere as long as they were exposed to normal gravity. After assembling the EU the ECs were cultured therein, where they showed good cell viability at least for 14 days. In addition, the functionality of the automatic medium exchange, and fixation procedures were confirmed. Two days before launch, the ECs were cultured in the EUs, which were afterwards mounted on the SpaceX CRS-8 rocket. 5 and 12 days after launch the cells were fixed. Subsequent analyses revealed a scaffold-free formation of spheroids in space.

  3. Epigenetic inactivation of CHFR in human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Toyota, Minoru; Sasaki, Yasushi; Satoh, Ayumi; Ogi, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Takefumi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mita, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Itoh, Fumio; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.; Jair, Kam-Wing; Schuebel, Kornel E.; Imai, Kohzoh; Tokino, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Cell-cycle checkpoints controlling the orderly progression through mitosis are frequently disrupted in human cancers. One such checkpoint, entry into metaphase, is regulated by the CHFR gene encoding a protein possessing forkhead-associated and RING finger domains as well as ubiquitin–ligase activity. Although defects in this checkpoint have been described, the molecular basis and prevalence of CHFR inactivation in human tumors are still not fully understood. To address this question, we analyzed the pattern of CHFR expression in a number of human cancer cell lines and primary tumors. We found CpG methylation-dependent silencing of CHFR expression in 45% of cancer cell lines, 40% of primary colorectal cancers, 53% of colorectal adenomas, and 30% of primary head and neck cancers. Expression of CHFR was precisely correlated with both CpG methylation and deacetylation of histones H3 and H4 in the CpG-rich regulatory region. Moreover, CpG methylation and thus silencing of CHFR depended on the activities of two DNA methyltransferases, DNMT1 and DNMT3b, as their genetic inactivation restored CHFR expression. Finally, cells with CHFR methylation had an intrinsically high mitotic index when treated with microtubule inhibitor. This means that cells in which CHFR was epigenetically inactivated constitute loss-of-function alleles for mitotic checkpoint control. Taken together, these findings shed light on a pathway by which mitotic checkpoint is bypassed in cancer cells and suggest that inactivation of checkpoint genes is much more widespread than previously suspected. PMID:12810945

  4. [Cultivation and characterization of tumor spheres generated from human colorectal cancer cell lines].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji-Tao; Gong, Ri-Xiang; Chen, Xiang-Zheng; Zhou, Hai-Jun; Zhu, Ya-Jie; Liu, Su-Rui; Huang, Juan; Bi, Feng

    2009-09-01

    To study on the cultivation method for tumor spheres from colorectal cancer cell lines and identify whether resulting Colo205 spheroid cells display cancer stem cell characteristics. Lovo, Colo205 and SW480 cells were seeded in serum free medium (SFM) with EGF and bFGF. Flow cytometry analysis, cell invasion assay and xenograft experiment were applied to examine the cell surface marker expression pattern, cell invasive ability and in vivo tumorigenicity of both Colo205 spheres and parental cells. CD44 expression of tumor spheroid cells was also analyzed after cultured with serum supplemented medium by flow cytometry. CD44, Musashi-1 and Oct4 mRNA were detected in these two cells by RT-PCR. Tumor spheres could be generated from three colorectal cancer cell lines in SFM. The formation and proliferation of tumor spheres were benefited from fresh SFM, cell dissociation reagent Accutase and the floating status of cancer cells. The overwhelming majority of spheroid cells were CD44+ cells. But CD44+ cells were gradually decreased when spheres cultured with serum supplemented medium. Colo205 spheres have higher Musashi-1 and Oct4 mRNA expression, tumor-initiating capability and invasive ability compared with those of parental cells. Tumor spheres in which enrich cancer stem cells can be generated and matained from colorectal cancer cell lines in SFM on floating-culture condition.

  5. Serological analysis of human tumor antigens: molecular definition and implications.

    PubMed

    Türeci, O; Sahin, U; Pfreundschuh, M

    1997-08-01

    Specific vaccines for the immunotherapy of human neoplasms require specific human tumor antigens. While efforts to identify such antigens by the analysis of the T-cell repertoire have yielded few antigens, the application of SEREX, the serological identification of antigens by recombinant expression cloning, has brought a cornucopia of new antigens. Several specific antigens have been identified in each tumor tested, suggesting that many human tumors elicit multiple immune responses in the autologous host. The frequency of human tumor antigens, which can be readily defined at the molecular level, facilitates the identification of T-cell-dependent antigens and provides a basis for peptide and gene-therapeutic vaccine strategies.

  6. Experimental chemotherapy of human tumors heterotransplanted in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Giovanella, B C

    1980-01-01

    Human tumors heterotransplanted in nude mice offer the most realistic model for experimental chemotherapy of human neoplasms. Almost all the known human malignancies have been successfully transplanted in the nudes, although the rate of takes varies considerably between different tumor types. So far, a good correlation has been observed between the results obtained treating with the same drug the same tumor in the patient and in the nude mouse. Our experience in this field is, however, still too limited for the direct extrapolation of chemotherapeutic results obtained in the nudes to human tumors.

  7. Organ printing: Tissue spheroids as building blocks☆

    PubMed Central

    Mironov, Vladimir; Visconti, Richard P.; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Forgacs, Gabor; Drake, Christopher J.; Markwald, Roger R.

    2013-01-01

    Organ printing can be defined as layer-by-layer additive robotic biofabrication of three-dimensional functional living macrotissues and organ constructs using tissue spheroids as building blocks. The microtissues and tissue spheroids are living materials with certain measurable, evolving and potentially controllable composition, material and biological properties. Closely placed tissue spheroids undergo tissue fusion — a process that represents a fundamental biological and biophysical principle of developmental biology-inspired directed tissue self-assembly. It is possible to engineer small segments of an intraorgan branched vascular tree by using solid and lumenized vascular tissue spheroids. Organ printing could dramatically enhance and transform the field of tissue engineering by enabling large-scale industrial robotic biofabrication of living human organ constructs with “built-in” perfusable intraorgan branched vascular tree. Thus, organ printing is a new emerging enabling technology paradigm which represents a developmental biology-inspired alternative to classic biodegradable solid scaffold-based approaches in tissue engineering. PMID:19176247

  8. miRNA expression profile in multicellular breast cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; Garcia-Venzor, Alfredo; Muñoz-Galindo, Laura; Lizarraga-Sanchez, Floria; Favela-Orozco, Andrei; Chavez-Gutierrez, Edwin; Krötzsch, Edgar; Salgado, Rosa M; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Maldonado, Vilma

    2017-10-01

    Multicellular Tumor Spheroids develop a heterogeneous micromilieu and different cell populations, thereby constituting a cancer model with intermediate characteristics between in vitro bi-dimensional cultures and in vivo tumors. Multicellular Tumor Spheroids also acquire tumor aggressiveness features due to transcription modulation of coding and non-coding RNA. Utilizing microarray analyses, we evaluated the microRNAs expression profile in MCF-7 breast cancer cells cultured as Multicellular Tumor Spheroids. The expression data was used to predict associated cellular and molecular functions using different software tools. The biological importance of two dysregulated miRNAs (miR-221-3p and miR-187) was studied by functional assays. Finally, the clinical relevance of these dysregulated miRNAs was explored using previously reported data. Thirty-three dysregulated microRNAs were found in MCF-7 Multicellular Tumor Spheroids. miRNA expression changes were closely linked with growth, proliferation, and cell development. miRNA-221-3p and miR-187 were implicated in the acquisition of migration/invasion capacities, sensitivity to the deprivation of growth factors, cell cycle phase regulation, and cell death. A panel of 5 miRNAs, including miR-187, showed a good predictive value in discriminating between low and high-risk groups of breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Automated, Multiplexed Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy Platform for Continuous Monitoring of Microtissue Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Bürgel, Sebastian C; Diener, Laurin; Frey, Olivier; Kim, Jin-Young; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2016-11-15

    Microtissue spheroids in microfluidic devices are increasingly used to establish novel in vitro organ models of the human body. As the spheroids are comparably sizable, it is difficult to monitor larger numbers of them by optical means. Therefore, electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) emerges as a viable alternative to probing spheroid properties. Current spheroid EIS systems are, however, not suitable for investigating multiple spheroids in parallel over extended time in an automated fashion. Here we address this issue by presenting an automated, multiplexed EIS (AMEIS) platform for impedance analysis in a microfluidic setting. The system was used to continuously monitor the effect of the anticancer drug fluorouracil (5-FU) on HCT116 cancer spheroids. Simultaneous EIS monitoring of up to 15 spheroids was performed in parallel over 4 days at a temporal resolution of 2 min without any need for pumps. The measurements were continuous in nature, and the setup was kept in a standard incubator under controlled conditions during the measurements. A baseline normalization method to improve robustness and to reduce the influence of slow changes in the medium conductivity on the spheroid EIS readings has been developed and validated by experiments and means of a finite-element model. The same method and platform was then used for online monitoring of cardiac spheroids. The beating frequency of each cardiac spheroid could be read out in a completely automated fashion. The developed system constitutes a promising method for simultaneously evaluating drug impact and/or toxic effects on multiple microtissue spheroids.

  10. Characterization of Gene Expression in Human Breast Tumor Endothelium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    to UV-induced apoptosis in primary culture of canine mammary gland tumors (7), and SFRP2 decreased apoptosis in cardiomyocytes exposed to hypoxia(8...microdissection (LCM) of vascular cells from frozen human breast tumors and normal breast tissue for genomic analysis. We found SFRP2 to have 6 fold increased...vascular cells from frozen human breast tumors , where the RNA was of high quality and sufficient for genomic analysis(6). We found 55 genes with > 4

  11. Kinematic dynamos in spheroidal geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivers, D. J.

    2017-10-01

    The kinematic dynamo problem is solved numerically for a spheroidal conducting fluid of possibly large aspect ratio with an insulating exterior. The solution method uses solenoidal representations of the magnetic field and the velocity by spheroidal toroidal and poloidal fields in a non-orthogonal coordinate system. Scaling of coordinates and fields to a spherical geometry leads to a modified form of the kinematic dynamo problem with a geometric anisotropic diffusion and an anisotropic current-free condition in the exterior, which is solved explicitly. The scaling allows the use of well-developed spherical harmonic techniques in angle. Dynamo solutions are found for three axisymmetric flows in oblate spheroids with semi-axis ratios 1≤a/c≤25. For larger aspect ratios strong magnetic fields may occur in any region of the spheroid, depending on the flow, but the external fields for all three flows are weak and concentrated near the axis or periphery of the spheroid.

  12. Detection and analysis of human serum albumin nanoparticles within phagocytic cells at the resolution of individual live cell or single 3D multicellular spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrimzon, Elena; Zurgil, Naomi; Sobolev, Maria; Shafran, Yana; Langer, Klaus; Zlatev, Iavor; Wronski, Robert; Windisch, Manfred; von Briesen, Hagen; Schmidt, Reinhold; Pietrzik, Claus; Deutsch, Mordechai

    2015-12-01

    Since nanoparticles (NPs) have shown great potential in various biomedical applications, live cell response to NPs should be thoroughly explored prior to their in vivo use. In the current study, live cell array (LCA) methodology and unique cell-based assays were used to study the interaction of magnetite (HSA-Mag NP) loaded human serum albumin NPs with phagocytic cells. The LCA enabled cell culturing during HSA-Mag NP accumulation and monolayer or spheroid formation, concomitantly with on-line monitoring of NP internalization. These platforms were also utilized for imaging intercellular links between living cells preloaded with HSA-Mag NP in 2D and 3D resolution. HSA-Mag NP uptake by cells was quantified by imaging, and analyzed using time-resolved measurements. Image analysis of the individual cells in cell populations showed accumulation of HSA-Mag NP by promonocytes and glial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. High variability of NP accumulation in individual cells within cell populations, as well as cell subgroups, was evident in both cell types. Following 24 h interaction, uptake of HSA-Mag NP was about 10 times more efficient in glial cells than in activated promonocytes. The presented assays may facilitate detection and analysis of the amount of NPs within individual cells, as well as the rate of NP accumulation and processing in different subsets of living cells. Such data are crucial for estimating predicted drug dosage delivered by NPs, as well as to study possible mechanisms for NP interference with live cells.

  13. Eosinophil Cell Lines in a Tri-Cell Multicellular Tumor Spheroid (MTS)/Endothelium Complex: Down Regulation of Adhesion and Integrin Molecules-Implications of Metastasis Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    Figure 4. Presence of IL-5 in cultured supernatants of eosinophil cell lines II. Cultured supernatants from the allergy /asthma positive, breast cancer...Current tremendous immunoregulatory capacity. The controversy understanding. J Allergy Clin Immunol 85: 422-436,1990. around the prognostic valhe of...attachment and infiltration of ensinophils into the core of the properties of eosinophi! granule major basic protein for tumor cells. tat Arch Allergy

  14. Enhanced angiogenic effect of adipose-derived stromal cell spheroid with low-level light therapy in hindlimb ischemia mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, In-Su; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2014-02-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are attractive cell source for tissue engineering. However, one obstacle to this approach is that the transplanted ASC population can decline rapidly in the recipient tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) spheroid in a hindlimb ischemia animal model. LLLT, hASCs spheroid and hASCs spheroid transplantation with LLLT (spheroid + LLLT) were applied to the ischemic hindlimbs in athymic mice. The survival, differentiation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth (VEGF) of spheroid ASCs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The spheroid + LLLT group enhanced the tissue regeneration, including angiogenesis, compared with other groups. The spheroid contributed tissue regeneration via differentiation and secretion of growth factors. In the spheroid + LLLT group, the survival of spheroid hASCs was increased by the decreased apoptosis of spheroid hASCs in the ischemic hindlimb. The secretion of growth factors was stimulated in the spheroid + LLLT group compared with the ASCs group and spheroid group. These data suggest that LLLT is an effective biostimulator of spheroid hASCs in tissue regeneration that enhances the survival of ASCs and stimulates the secretion of growth factors in the ischemic hindlimb.

  15. Spheroidal Wave Functions in Electromagnetic Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Le-Wei; Kang, Xiao-Kang; Leong, Mook-Seng

    2001-11-01

    The flagship monograph addressing the spheroidal wave function and its pertinence to computational electromagnetics Spheroidal Wave Functions in Electromagnetic Theory presents in detail the theory of spheroidal wave functions, its applications to the analysis of electromagnetic fields in various spheroidal structures, and provides comprehensive programming codes for those computations. The topics covered in this monograph include: Spheroidal coordinates and wave functions Dyadic Green's functions in spheroidal systems EM scattering by a conducting spheroid EM scattering by a coated dielectric spheroid Spheroid antennas SAR distributions in a spheroidal head model The programming codes and their applications are provided online and are written in Mathematica 3.0 or 4.0. Readers can also develop their own codes according to the theory or routine described in the book to find subsequent solutions of complicated structures. Spheroidal Wave Functions in Electromagnetic Theory is a fundamental reference for scientists, engineers, and graduate students practicing modern computational electromagnetics or applied physics.

  16. Pancreastatin producing cell line from human pancreatic islet cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, A; Tateishi, K; Tsuru, M; Jimi, A; Wakasugi, H; Ikeda, Y; Kono, A

    1990-04-30

    It has been characterized that cell line QGP-1 derived from human non-functioning pancreatic islet cell tumor produces human pancreastatin. Exponentially growing cultures produced 5.7 fmol of pancreastatin/10(6) cells/hr. Human pancreastatin immunoreactivities in plasma and tumor after xenografting with QGP-1 into nude mouse were 92.7 fmol/ml and 160.2 pmol/g wet weight, respectively. Immunocytochemical study revealed both chromogranin A and pancreastatin immunoreactive cells in the tumor. Gel filtrations of culture medium and tumor extract identified heterogenous molecular forms of PST-LI which eluted as large and smaller molecular species. These results suggest that plasma pancreastatin levels may be useful as a tumor marker of endocrine tumor of the pancreas, and the pancreastatin producing cell line may be useful for studies of the mechanism of secretions and processing of chromogranin A and pancreastatin.

  17. Spheroid formation of human thyroid cancer cells in an automated culturing system during the Shenzhou-8 Space mission.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Jessica; Ma, Xiao; Wehland, Markus; Aleshcheva, Ganna; Schwarzwälder, Achim; Segerer, Jürgen; Birlem, Maria; Horn, Astrid; Bauer, Johann; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2013-10-01

    Human follicular thyroid cancer cells were cultured in Space to investigate the impact of microgravity on 3D growth. For this purpose, we designed and constructed a cell container that can endure enhanced physical forces, is connected to fluid storage chambers, performs media changes and cell harvesting automatically and supports cell viability. The container consists of a cell suspension chamber, two reserve tanks for medium and fixative and a pump for fluid exchange. The selected materials proved durable, non-cytotoxic, and did not inactivate RNAlater. This container was operated automatically during the unmanned Shenzhou-8 Space mission. FTC-133 human follicular thyroid cancer cells were cultured in Space for 10 days. Culture medium was exchanged after 5 days in Space and the cells were fixed after 10 days. The experiment revealed a scaffold-free formation of extraordinary large three-dimensional aggregates by thyroid cancer cells with altered expression of EGF and CTGF genes under real microgravity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genes Expressed in Human Tumor Endothelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Croix, Brad; Rago, Carlo; Velculescu, Victor; Traverso, Giovanni; Romans, Katharine E.; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Lal, Anita; Riggins, Gregory J.; Lengauer, Christoph; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2000-08-01

    To gain a molecular understanding of tumor angiogenesis, we compared gene expression patterns of endothelial cells derived from blood vessels of normal and malignant colorectal tissues. Of over 170 transcripts predominantly expressed in the endothelium, 79 were differentially expressed, including 46 that were specifically elevated in tumor-associated endothelium. Several of these genes encode extracellular matrix proteins, but most are of unknown function. Most of these tumor endothelial markers were expressed in a wide range of tumor types, as well as in normal vessels associated with wound healing and corpus luteum formation. These studies demonstrate that tumor and normal endothelium are distinct at the molecular level, a finding that may have significant implications for the development of anti-angiogenic therapies.

  19. Tumor-induced remote ECM network orientation steers angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Balcioglu, Hayri E.; van de Water, Bob; Danen, Erik H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we use automated sequential microprinting of tumor and endothelial cells in extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds to study its mechanical aspects. Quantitative reflection microscopy shows that tumor spheroids induce radial orientation of the surrounding collagen fiber network up to a distance of five times their radius. Across a panel of ~20 different human tumor cell lines, remote collagen orientation is correlated with local tumor cell migration behavior. Tumor induced collagen orientation requires contractility but is remarkably resistant to depletion of collagen-binding integrins. Microvascular endothelial cells undergo directional migration towards tumor spheroids once they are within the tumor-oriented collagen fiber network. Laser ablation experiments indicate that an intact physical connection of the oriented network with the tumor spheroid is required for mechanical sensing by the endothelial cells. Together our findings indicate that, in conjunction with described activities of soluble angiogenic factors, remote physical manipulation of the ECM network by the tumor can help to steer angiogenesis. PMID:26931404

  20. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  1. Tumor Endothelial Inflammation Predicts Clinical Outcome in Diverse Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Filippo, Matthew; Labay, Edwardine; Beckett, Michael A.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Liang, Hua; Darga, Thomas E.; Perakis, Samantha; Khan, Sajid A.; Sutton, Harold G.; Zhang, Wei; Khodarev, Nikolai N.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial cells contribute to the pathogenesis of numerous human diseases by actively regulating the stromal inflammatory response; however, little is known regarding the role of endothelial inflammation in the growth of human tumors and its influence on the prognosis of human cancers. Methods Using an experimental model of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-mediated inflammation, we characterized inflammatory gene expression in immunopurified tumor-associated endothelial cells. These genes formed the basis of a multivariate molecular predictor of overall survival that was trained and validated in four types of human cancer. Results We report that expression of experimentally derived tumor endothelial genes distinguished pathologic tissue specimens from normal controls in several human diseases associated with chronic inflammation. We trained these genes in human cancer datasets and defined a six-gene inflammatory signature that predicted significantly reduced overall survival in breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, and glioma. This endothelial-derived signature predicted outcome independently of, but cooperatively with, standard clinical and pathological prognostic factors. Consistent with these findings, conditioned culture media from human endothelial cells stimulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines accelerated the growth of human colon and breast tumors in immunodeficient mice as compared with conditioned media from untreated endothelial cells. Conclusions This study provides the first prognostic cancer gene signature derived from an experimental model of tumor-associated endothelial inflammation. These findings support the notion that activation of inflammatory pathways in non-malignant tumor-infiltrating endothelial cells contributes to tumor growth and progression in multiple human cancers. Importantly, these results identify endothelial-derived factors that could serve as potential targets for therapy in diverse human cancers

  2. Pulsed Ultrasound Enhances Nanoparticle Penetration into Breast Cancer Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Grainger, Stephanie J.; Serna, Juliana Valencia; Sunny, Steffi; Zhou, Yun; Deng, Cheri X.; El-Sayed, Mohamed E.H.

    2010-01-01

    Effective treatment of solid tumors requires homogenous distribution of anticancer drugs within the entire tumor volume to deliver lethal concentrations to resistant cancer cells and tumor-initiating cancer stem cells. However, penetration of small molecular weight chemotherapeutic agents and drug-loaded polymeric and lipid particles into the hypoxic and necrotic regions of solid tumors remains a significant challenge. This article reports the results of pulsed ultrasound enhanced penetration of nano-sized fluorescent particles into MCF-7 breast cancer spheroids (300-350 μm diameter) as a function of particle size and charge. With pulsed ultrasound application in the presence of microbubbles, small (20 nm) particles achieve 6-20 folds higher penetration and concentration in the spheroid's core compared to those not exposed to ultrasound. Increase in particle size to 40 nm and 100 nm results in their effective penetration into the spheroid's core to 9 and 3 folds, respectively. In addition, anionic carboxylate particles achieved higher penetration (2.3, 3.7, and 4.7 folds) into the core (0.25r) of MCF-7 breast cancer spheroids compared to neutral (2.2, 1.9, and 2.4 folds) and cationic particles (1.5, 1.4 and 1.9 folds) upon US exposure for 30, 60, and 90 seconds under the same experimental conditions. These results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing pulsed ultrasound to increase the penetration of nano-sized particles into MCF-7 spheroids mimicking tumor tissue. The effects of particle properties on the penetration enhancement were also illustrated. PMID:20957996

  3. Identification of a cancer stem cell in human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheila K; Clarke, Ian D; Terasaki, Mizuhiko; Bonn, Victoria E; Hawkins, Cynthia; Squire, Jeremy; Dirks, Peter B

    2003-09-15

    Most current research on human brain tumors is focused on the molecular and cellular analysis of the bulk tumor mass. However, there is overwhelming evidence in some malignancies that the tumor clone is heterogeneous with respect to proliferation and differentiation. In human leukemia, the tumor clone is organized as a hierarchy that originates from rare leukemic stem cells that possess extensive proliferative and self-renewal potential, and are responsible for maintaining the tumor clone. We report here the identification and purification of a cancer stem cell from human brain tumors of different phenotypes that possesses a marked capacity for proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation. The increased self-renewal capacity of the brain tumor stem cell (BTSC) was highest from the most aggressive clinical samples of medulloblastoma compared with low-grade gliomas. The BTSC was exclusively isolated with the cell fraction expressing the neural stem cell surface marker CD133. These CD133+ cells could differentiate in culture into tumor cells that phenotypically resembled the tumor from the patient. The identification of a BTSC provides a powerful tool to investigate the tumorigenic process in the central nervous system and to develop therapies targeted to the BTSC.

  4. In vivo potential of recombinant granulysin against human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wasaby, Sameer; de Miguel, Diego; Aporta, Adriana; Naval, Javier; Conde, Blanca; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Anel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    9 kDa granulysin is a protein present in the granules of human CTL and NK cells, with cytolytic activity against microbes and tumors. Previous work from our group demonstrated that this granulysin isoform induced apoptosis in vitro on hematological tumor cells and on primary tumor cells from B-CLL patients. In the present work, recombinant 9 kDa granulysin was used as an anti-tumoral agent to study its in vivo effect on tumor development in athymic “nude” mice models bearing human breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 or multiple myeloma NCI-H929–derived xenografts. Granulysin prevented the in vivo development of detectable MDA-MB-231-derived tumors. In addition, recombinant granulysin was able to completely eradicate NCI-H929-derived tumors. All granulysin-treated tumors exhibited signs of apoptosis induction and an increased NK cell infiltration inside the tumor tissue comparing to control ones. Moreover, no in vivo deleterious effects of the recombinant 9 kDa granulysin doses used in this study were observed on the skin or on the internal organs of the animals. In conclusion, granulysin was able to inhibit the progression of MDA-MB-231-derived xenografts and also to eradicate multiple myeloma NCI-H929-derived xenografts. This work opens the door to the initiation of preclinical and possibly clinical studies for the use of 9 kDa granulysin as a new anti-tumoral treatment. PMID:26405603

  5. Human Tumor-Infiltrating Myeloid Cells: Phenotypic and Functional Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Louise A.; Doherty, Glen A.; Sheahan, Kieran; Ryan, Elizabeth J.

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of human tumor-resident myeloid cells is, for the most part, based on a large body of work in murine models or studies enumerating myeloid cells in patient tumor samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC). This has led to the establishment of the theory that, by and large, tumor-resident myeloid cells are either “protumor” M2 macrophages or myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). This concept has accelerated our understanding of myeloid cells in tumor progression and enabled the elucidation of many key regulatory mechanisms involved in cell recruitment, polarization, and activation. On the other hand, this paradigm does not embrace the complexity of the tumor-resident myeloid cell phenotype (IHC can only measure 1 or 2 markers per sample) and their possible divergent function in the hostile tumor microenvironment. Here, we examine the criteria that define human tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell subsets and provide a comprehensive and critical review of human myeloid cell nomenclature in cancer. We also highlight new evidence characterizing their contribution to cancer pathogenesis based on evidence derived from clinical studies drawing comparisons with murine studies where necessary. We then review the mechanisms in which myeloid cells are regulated by tumors in humans and how these are being targeted therapeutically. PMID:28220123

  6. Infrared Spectra of Human Breast Tumor Tissue and Experimental Animal Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Belkov, M. V.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Pekhnyo, V. I.; Kozachkova, A. N.; Tsarik, H. V.; Kutsenko, I. P.; Sharykina, N. I.; Butra, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used Fourier transform IR spectroscopy methods to conduct comparative studies of human breast tumors and sarcoma 180 tumor grafted into mice. The IR spectral parameters used to identify tumor tissue in mice with the sarcoma 180 strain proved to be identical to the parameters for human breast tissue in cancer. In the presence of a malignant tumor in humans, the most intense C=O vibrational bands in the protein molecules are observed in the interval 1710-1680 cm-1. For a benign tumor, in the IR spectra of breast tissue the intense bands are located in the interval 1670-1650 cm-1. We spectroscopically monitored the diagnosis and the chemotherapy process using the model of sarcoma 180 in mice. As the therapeutic drugs, we used synthesized coordination compounds based on palladium complexes with diphosphonic acid derivatives. We demonstrate the promising potential of palladium complexes with zoledronic acid as an effective cytostatic. In therapy using a palladium complex with zoledronic acid, the effect of tumor growth inhibition is accompanied by a change in its spectral characteristics. The parameters of the IR spectra for tumor tissue after treatment are close to those of the IR spectra for healthy tissue.

  7. Tumor Initiation in Human Malignant Melanoma and Potential Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Frank, Markus H.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, have been identified in several human malignancies, including human malignant melanoma. The frequency of malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMICs), which are identified by their expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member ABCB5, correlates with disease progression in human patients. Furthermore, targeted MMIC ablation through ABCB5 inhibits tumor initiation and growth in preclinical xenotransplantation models, pointing to potential therapeutic promise of the CSC concept. Recent advances also show that CSCs can exert pro-angiogenic roles in tumor growth and serve immunomodulatory functions related to the evasion of host anti-tumor immunity. Thus, MMICs might initiate and sustain tumorigenic growth not only as a result of CSC-intrinsic self-renewal, differentiation and proliferative capacity, but also based on pro-tumorigenic interactions with the host environment. PMID:20184545

  8. Tumor initiation in human malignant melanoma and potential cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Frank, Markus H

    2010-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, have been identified in several human malignancies, including human malignant melanoma. The frequency of malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMICs), which are identified by their expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member ABCB5, correlates with disease progression in human patients. Furthermore, targeted MMIC ablation through ABCB5 inhibits tumor initiation and growth in preclinical xenotransplantation models, pointing to potential therapeutic promise of the CSC concept. Recent advances also show that CSCs can exert pro-angiogenic roles in tumor growth and serve immunomodulatory functions related to the evasion of host anti-tumor immunity. Thus, MMICs might initiate and sustain tumorigenic growth not only as a result of CSC-intrinsic self-renewal, differentiation and proliferative capacity, but also based on pro-tumorigenic interactions with the host environment.

  9. Canine tumors: a spontaneous animal model of human carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Salomé S; Carvalho, Sandra; Cabral, Joana; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2012-03-01

    The enormous biologic complexity of human cancer has stimulated the development of more appropriate experimental models that could resemble in a natural and spontaneous manner the physiopathologic aspects of cancer biology. Companion animals have many desired characteristics that fill the gap between in vitro and in vivo studies, and these characteristics have proven to be important in understanding many complex molecular aspects of human cancer. Spontaneous tumors in dogs share a wide variety of epidemiologic, biologic, and clinical features with human cancer, which makes this animal model both attractive and underused in oncology research. In this review, we summarize the importance of naturally occurring canine tumors as valuable tools for studying numerous aspects of human cancer as well as the potential use of this animal model for the development of new cancer treatments. We address specifically the use of canine mammary tumors as an increasingly powerful model to study human breast cancer.

  10. Exosomes from human colorectal cancer induce a tumor-like behavior in colonic mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Lugini, Luana; Valtieri, Mauro; Federici, Cristina; Cecchetti, Serena; Meschini, Stefania; Condello, Maria; Signore, Michele; Fais, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer cells, including colorectal cancer ones (CRC), release high amounts of nanovesicles (exosomes), delivering biochemical messages for paracrine or systemic crosstalk. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to play contradicting roles in tumor progression. Results CRC exosomes induce in cMSCs: i) atypical morphology, higher proliferation, migration and invasion; ii) formation of spheroids; iii) an acidic extracellular environment associated with iv) a plasma membrane redistribution of vacuolar H+-ATPase and increased expression of CEA. Colon cancer derived MSCs, which were isolated from tumor masses, produce umbilicated spheroids, a future frequently observed in the inner core of rapidly growing tumors and recapitulate the changes observed in normal colonic MSCs exposed to CRC exosomes. Materials and Methods Tissue specific colonic (c)MSCs were exposed to primary or metastatic CRC exosomes and analysed by light and electron microscopy, proliferation in 2D and 3D cultures, migration and invasion assays, Western blot and confocal microscopy for vacuolar H+-ATPase expression. Conclusions CRC exosomes are able to induce morphological and functional changes in colonic MSCs, which may favour tumor growth and its malignant progression. Our results suggest that exosomes are actively involved in cancer progression and that inhibiting tumor exosome release may represent a way to interfere with cancer. PMID:27418137

  11. Multifactorial Experimental Design to Optimize the Anti-Inflammatory and Proangiogenic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kaitlin C; Whitehead, Jacklyn; Falahee, Patrick C; Zhou, Dejie; Simon, Scott I; Leach, J Kent

    2017-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell therapies promote wound healing by manipulating the local environment to enhance the function of host cells. Aggregation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into three-dimensional spheroids increases cell survival and augments their anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic potential, yet there is no consensus on the preferred conditions for maximizing spheroid function in this application. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for forming MSC spheroids that simultaneously enhance their anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic nature. We applied a design of experiments (DOE) approach to determine the interaction between three input variables (number of cells per spheroid, oxygen tension, and inflammatory stimulus) on MSC spheroids by quantifying secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), two potent molecules in the MSC secretome. DOE results revealed that MSC spheroids formed with 40,000 cells per spheroid in 1% oxygen with an inflammatory stimulus (Spheroid 1) would exhibit enhanced PGE2 and VEGF production versus those formed with 10,000 cells per spheroid in 21% oxygen with no inflammatory stimulus (Spheroid 2). Compared to Spheroid 2, Spheroid 1 produced fivefold more PGE2 and fourfold more VEGF, providing the opportunity to simultaneously upregulate the secretion of these factors from the same spheroid. The spheroids induced macrophage polarization, sprout formation with endothelial cells, and keratinocyte migration in a human skin equivalent model-demonstrating efficacy on three key cell types that are dysfunctional in chronic non-healing wounds. We conclude that DOE-based analysis effectively identifies optimal culture conditions to enhance the anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic potential of MSC spheroids. Stem Cells 2017;35:1493-1504. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  12. Combined radiation and hyperthermia in superficial human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Marmor, J.B.; Hahn, G.M.

    1980-11-01

    Hyperthermia (42-43 C) appears to potentiate the effects of radiation therapy in experimental tumor models. In addition, some studies indicate that tumors may be sensitized to a greater extent than normal tissue. This study was designed to test whether the effectiveness of irradiating human tumors was enhanced significantly by concomitant heating. We also examined skin to see if heating enhanced the response to radiation of normal tissues. Nineteen patients with multiple metastatic superficial tumor masses of various histologies were studied. Two or more masses in the same patient were matched for size and location, so that one of the patient's own tumors was a control to monitor the effect of irradiation alone. One of the matched nodules was given hyperthermia (43 C) for 15 minutes before and 30 minutes after each radiation fraction. In seven of 15 evaluable patients the tumor that received heat in addition to radiation had a greater objective response than the tumor receiving radiation alone. Two patients had increased cutaneous reaction to radiation in the heated area; one of these was a severe desquamative reaction, which conformed to the size and shape of the ultrasound field. These results suggest that hyperthermia improves the objective response to radiation in some human tumors; in two cases it appeared to sensitize skin as well.

  13. Human papillomavirus capsids preferentially bind and infect tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kines, Rhonda C.; Cerio, Rebecca J.; Roberts, Jeffrey N.; Thompson, Cynthia D.; de Los Pinos, Elisabet; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.

    2015-01-01

    We previously determined that human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particles (VLPs) and pseudovirions (PsV) did not, respectively, bind to or infect intact epithelium of the cervicovaginal tract. However, they strongly bound heparin sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) on the basement membrane of disrupted epithelium and infected the keratinocytes that subsequently entered the disrupted site. We here report that HPV capsids (VLP and PsV) have the same restricted tropism for a wide variety of disrupted epithelial and mesothelial tissues, whereas intact tissues remain resistant to binding. However, the HPV capsids directly bind and infect most tumor-derived cell lines in vitro and have analogous tumor-specific properties in vivo, after local or intravenous injection, using orthotopic models for human ovarian and lung cancer, respectively. The pseudovirions also specifically infected implanted primary human ovarian tumors. Heparin and ι-carrageenan blocked binding and infection of all tumor lines tested, implying that tumor cell binding is HSPG-dependent. A survey using a panel of modified heparins indicate that N-sulfation and, to a lesser degree O-6 sulfation of the surface HSPG on the tumors are important for HPV binding. Therefore, it appears that tumor cells consistently evolve HSPG modification patterns that mimic the pattern normally found on the basement membrane but not on the apical surfaces of normal epithelial or mesothelial cells. Consequently, appropriately modified HPV VLPs and/or PsV could be useful reagents to detect and potentially treat a remarkably broad spectrum of cancers. PMID:26317490

  14. Human papillomavirus capsids preferentially bind and infect tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kines, Rhonda C; Cerio, Rebecca J; Roberts, Jeffrey N; Thompson, Cynthia D; de Los Pinos, Elisabet; Lowy, Douglas R; Schiller, John T

    2016-02-15

    We previously determined that human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particles (VLPs) and pseudovirions (PsV) did not, respectively, bind to or infect intact epithelium of the cervicovaginal tract. However, they strongly bound heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) on the basement membrane of disrupted epithelium and infected the keratinocytes that subsequently entered the disrupted site. We here report that HPV capsids (VLP and PsV) have the same restricted tropism for a wide variety of disrupted epithelial and mesothelial tissues, whereas intact tissues remain resistant to binding. However, the HPV capsids directly bind and infect most tumor-derived cell lines in vitro and have analogous tumor-specific properties in vivo, after local or intravenous injection, using orthotopic models for human ovarian and lung cancer, respectively. The pseudovirions also specifically infected implanted primary human ovarian tumors. Heparin and ι-carrageenan blocked binding and infection of all tumor lines tested, implying that tumor cell binding is HSPG-dependent. A survey using a panel of modified heparins indicates that N-sulfation and, to a lesser degree, O-6 sulfation of the surface HSPG on the tumors are important for HPV binding. Therefore, it appears that tumor cells consistently evolve HSPG modification patterns that mimic the pattern normally found on the basement membrane but not on the apical surfaces of normal epithelial or mesothelial cells. Consequently, appropriately modified HPV VLPs and/or PsV could be useful reagents to detect and potentially treat a remarkably broad spectrum of cancers. © 2015 UICC.

  15. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gudkov, Sergey V.; Shilyagina, Natalya Yu.; Vodeneev, Vladimir A.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed. PMID:26729091

  16. Ferrochelatase of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides

    PubMed Central

    Jones, M. S.; Jones, O. T. G.

    1970-01-01

    Extracts of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides contain two ferrochelatases: one is soluble and forms metalloporphyrins from deuteroporphyrin and haematoporphyrin; the other is particulate and forms metalloporphyrins from protoporphyrin, mesoporphyrin, deuteroporphyrin and haematoporphyrin. Neither enzyme incorporates Mg2+ into porphyrins or Fe2+ into porphyrin cytochrome c. By using the particulate enzyme, plots of 1/v versus 1/s when one substrate was varied and the other kept constant showed that neither substrate affected the Km of the other. The suggested sequential mechanism for the reaction is supported by derivative plots of slopes and intercepts. The Km for deuteroporphyrin was 21.3μm and that for Co2+ was 6.13μm. The enzyme incorporated Co2+, Fe2+, Zn2+, Ni2+ and Mn2+; Cd2+ was not incorporated and was an inhibitor, competitive with respect to Co2+, non-competitive with respect to deuteroporphyrin. The Ki for Cd2+ was 0.73μm. Ferrochelatase was inhibited by protohaem, non-competitively with respect to Co2+ or with respect to deuteroporphyrin. Inhibition by magnesium protoporphyrin was non-competitive with respect to deuteroporphyrin, uncompetitive with respect to Co2+. The inhibitory concentrations of the metalloporphyrins are lower than those required for the inhibition of δ-aminolaevulate synthetase by protohaem. Fe2+ is not incorporated aerobically into porphyrins unless an electron donor, succinate or NADH, is supplied; the low aerobic rate of metalloporphyrin synthesis obtained is insensitive to rotenone and antimycin. The rate of Fe3+ incorporation increases as anaerobic conditions are achieved. PMID:5500305

  17. Physiologically Low Oxygen Enhances Biomolecule Production and Stemness of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Shearier, Emily; Xing, Qi; Qian, Zichen; Zhao, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Multicellular human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) spheroids have been demonstrated to be valuable in a variety of applications, including cartilage regeneration, wound healing, and neoangiogenesis. Physiological relevant low oxygen culture can significantly improve in vitro hMSC expansion by preventing cell differentiation. We hypothesize that hypoxia-cultured hMSC spheroids can better maintain the regenerative properties of hMSCs. In this study, hMSC spheroids were fabricated using hanging drop method and cultured under 2% O2 and 20% O2 for up to 96 h. Spheroid diameter and viability were examined, as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) components and growth factor levels between the two oxygen tensions at different time points. Stemness was measured among the spheroid culture conditions and compared to two-dimensional cell cultures. Spheroid viability and structural integrity were studied using different needle gauges to ensure no damage would occur when implemented in vivo. Spheroid attachment and integration within a tissue substitute were also demonstrated. The results showed that a three-dimensional hMSC spheroid cultured at low oxygen conditions can enhance the production of ECM proteins and growth factors, while maintaining the spheroids' stemness and ability to be injected, attached, and potentially be integrated within a tissue.

  18. Loss of N-Cadherin Expression in Tumor Transplants Produced From As+3- and Cd+2-Transformed Human Urothelial (UROtsa) Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Sandquist, Elizabeth J.; Somji, Seema; Dunlevy, Jane R.; Garrett, Scott H.; Zhou, Xu Dong; Slusser-Nore, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background Epithelial to mesenchymal transition is a process in which a cell experiences a loss of epithelial cell characteristics and acquires a more mesenchymal cell phenotype. In cancer, epithelial to mesenchymal transition has been proposed to play an important role during specific stages of tumor progression. The role epithelial to mesenchymal transition and mesenchymal to epithelial transition might play in toxicant-induced urothelial cancer is unknown. Methods Real-time PCR, Western blotting, immuno-histochemistry and immuno-fluorescence were used to determine the expression of E- and N-cadherin in the UROtsa parent, the As+3- and Cd+2-transformed cell lines, the spheroids isolated from these cell lines as well as the tumor heterotransplants that were produced by the injection of the transformed cells into immune compromised mice. Results This study showed that N-cadherin expression was increased in 6 As+3- and 7 Cd+2- transformed cell lines generated from human urothelial cells (UROtsa). The expression varied within each cell line, with 10% to 95% of the cells expressing N-cadherin. Tumors produced from these cell lines showed no expression of the N-cadherin protein. Spheroids which are made up of putative cancer initiating cells produced from these cell lines showed only background expression of N-cadherin mRNA, increased expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 mRNA and produced tumors which did not express N-cadherin. There was no change in the expression of E-cadherin in the tumors, and the tumors formed by all the As+3 and Cd+2-transformed cell lines and cancer initiating cells stained intensely and uniformly for E-cadherin. Conclusions The finding that the cells expressing N-cadherin gave rise to tumors with no expression of N-cadherin is in agreement with the classical view of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition and N-cadherin are associated with dissemination and not with the ability to establish new tumor growth

  19. Tumor Suppression by MEG3 lncRNA in a Human Pituitary Tumor Derived Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Chunharojrith, Paweena; Nakayama, Yuki; Jiang, Xiaobing; Kery, Rachel E.; Ma, Jun; De La Hoz Ulloa, Cristine S.; Zhang, Xun; Zhou, Yunli; Klibanski, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Human clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFAs) account for approximately 40% of diagnosed pituitary tumors. Epigenetic mutations in tumor suppressive genes play an important role in NFA development. Maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3) is a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and we hypothesized that it is a candidate tumor suppressor whose epigenetic silencing is specifically linked to NFA development. In this study, we introduced MEG3 expression into PDFS cells, derived from a human NFA, using both inducible and constitutively active expression systems. MEG3 expression significantly suppressed xenograft tumor growth in vivo in nude mice. When induced in culture, MEG3 caused cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. In addition, inactivation of p53 completely abolished tumor suppression by MEG3, indicating that MEG3 tumor suppression is mediated by p53. In conclusion, our data support the hypothesis that MEG3 is a lncRNA tumor suppressor in the pituitary and its inactivation contributes to NFA development. PMID:26284494

  20. Robotic production of cancer cell spheroids with an aqueous two-phase system for drug testing.

    PubMed

    Ham, Stephanie Lemmo; Atefi, Ehsan; Fyffe, Darcy; Tavana, Hossein

    2015-04-23

    Cancer cell spheroids present a relevant in vitro model of avascular tumors for anti-cancer drug testing applications. A detailed protocol for producing both mono-culture and co-culture spheroids in a high throughput 96-well plate format is described in this work. This approach utilizes an aqueous two-phase system to confine cells into a drop of the denser aqueous phase immersed within the second aqueous phase. The drop rests on the well surface and keeps cells in close proximity to form a single spheroid. This technology has been adapted to a robotic liquid handler to produce size-controlled spheroids and expedite the process of spheroid production for compound screening applications. Spheroids treated with a clinically-used drug show reduced cell viability with increase in the drug dose. The use of a standard micro-well plate for spheroid generation makes it straightforward to analyze viability of cancer cells of drug-treated spheroids with a micro-plate reader. This technology is straightforward to implement both robotically and with other liquid handling tools such as manual pipettes.

  1. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  2. SKI knockdown inhibits human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dahu; Lin, Qiushi; Box, Neil; Roop, Dennis; Ishii, Shunsuke; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Fan, Tao; Hornyak, Thomas J; Reed, Jon A; Stavnezer, Ed; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Medrano, Estela E

    2009-12-01

    The SKI protein represses the TGF-beta tumor suppressor pathway by associating with the Smad transcription factors. SKI is upregulated in human malignant melanoma tumors in a disease-progression manner and its overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which SKI antagonizes TGF-beta signaling in vivo have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that human melanoma cells in which endogenous SKI expression was knocked down by RNAi produced minimal orthotopic tumor xenograft nodules that displayed low mitotic rate and prominent apoptosis. These minute tumors exhibited critical signatures of active TGF-beta signaling including high levels of nuclear Smad3 and p21(Waf-1), which are not found in the parental melanomas. To understand how SKI promotes tumor growth we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches and found that simultaneously to blocking the TGF-beta-growth inhibitory pathway, SKI promotes the switch of Smad3 from tumor suppression to oncogenesis by favoring phosphorylations of the Smad3 linker region in melanoma cells but not in normal human melanocytes. In this context, SKI is required for preventing TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of the oncogenic protein c-MYC, and for inducing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, a mediator of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Together, the results indicate that SKI exploits multiple regulatory levels of the TGF-beta pathway and its deficiency restores TGF-beta tumor suppressor and apoptotic activities in spite of the likely presence of oncogenic mutations in melanoma tumors.

  3. Generation and functional assessment of 3D multicellular spheroids in droplet based microfluidics platform.

    PubMed

    Sabhachandani, P; Motwani, V; Cohen, N; Sarkar, S; Torchilin, V; Konry, T

    2016-02-07

    Here we describe a robust, microfluidic technique to generate and analyze 3D tumor spheroids, which resembles tumor microenvironment and can be used as a more effective preclinical drug testing and screening model. Monodisperse cell-laden alginate droplets were generated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices that combine T-junction droplet generation and external gelation for spheroid formation. The proposed approach has the capability to incorporate multiple cell types. For the purposes of our study, we generated spheroids with breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 drug sensitive and resistant) and co-culture spheroids of MCF-7 together with a fibroblast cell line (HS-5). The device has the capability to house 1000 spheroids on chip for drug screening and other functional analysis. Cellular viability of spheroids in the array part of the device was maintained for two weeks by continuous perfusion of complete media into the device. The functional performance of our 3D tumor models and a dose dependent response of standard chemotherapeutic drug, doxorubicin (Dox) and standard drug combination Dox and paclitaxel (PCT) was analyzed on our chip-based platform. Altogether, our work provides a simple and novel, in vitro platform to generate, image and analyze uniform, 3D monodisperse alginate hydrogel tumors for various omic studies and therapeutic efficiency screening, an important translational step before in vivo studies.

  4. Influence of ionizing radiation on oxygen profiles in different types of multicellular spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Nylen, T.; Acker, H.; Boelling, B.H.; Holterman, G.; Carlsson, J. )

    1989-11-01

    Human glioma (U-118 MG and U-138 MG), human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29), human thyroid carcinoma (HTh 7), and hamster embryonic lung (V79-379A) spheroids were irradiated with either single doses of 16 or 40 Gy or fractionated doses of eight times 5 Gy. Oxygen profiles in the spheroids were measured with microelectrodes at different times following irradiation, and these profiles were then compared with the oxygen profiles measured in parallel cultured nonirradiated spheroids. No significant radiation-induced changes in the oxygen profiles were seen in any of the spheroids within the first few days after irradiation. The glioma spheroids did not show any significant increase in oxygen tension even after longer times; however, they were growth inhibited, and the number of S-phase cells was strongly suppressed. Increases in oxygen tension did occur in the HT-29 and V79-379A spheroids but only appeared more than a week after irradiation, when degeneration had started. Histological changes and decrease in diameter were seen in the spheroids that started to degenerate about 5 days after irradiation. Thus radiation doses in the therapeutic range did not, for the spheroids studied, produce rapid increases in the oxygen tension. When a change occurred, it appeared rather late and was probably a consequence of cell degeneration.

  5. Lrig1 Expression in Human Sebaceous Gland Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pünchera, Jöri; Barnes, Laurent; Kaya, Gürkan

    2016-01-01

    Background Sebaceous glands contribute significantly to the barrier functions of the skin. However, little is known about their homeostasis and tumorigenesis. Recently, increased expression of stem cell marker Lrig1 has been reported in sebaceous carcinoma-like tumors of K14ΔNLef1 transgenic mice. In this study, we analyzed the Lrig1 expression in human sebaceous tumors. Methods Twenty-eight formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sebaceous tumor specimens (7 sebaceous hyperplasias, 7 sebaceous adenomas, 10 sebaceomas and 4 sebaceous carcinomas) were stained with anti-Lrig1, anti-CD44v3 and anti-Ki67 antibody. Results Four (100%) sebaceous carcinomas, 8 (80%) sebaceomas, 3 (43%) sebaceous adenomas and no sebaceous hyperplasia showed Lrig1 overexpression. Discussion and Conclusion Lrig1 is a known tumor suppressor gene and is usually considered to be an indicator of poorly aggressive tumors. In human sebaceous tumors, the stronger Lrig1 staining in sebaceous carcinoma compared to other sebaceous tumors might be a feature of an advanced stage in tumorigenesis and a bad prognosis. In our study, 100% of sebaceous carcinomas revealed Lrig1 overexpression. We propose that Lrig1 may be used as a possible new marker of poorly differentiated sebaceous carcinoma. PMID:27504445

  6. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  7. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary We analyzed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, mRNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously-defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at > 10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the Luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein expression-defined subgroups, possibly contributed by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signaling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/p-HER2/HER1/p-HER1 signature within the HER2-Enriched expression subtype. Comparison of Basal-like breast tumors with high-grade Serous Ovarian tumors showed many molecular commonalities, suggesting a related etiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biologic finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biologic subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:23000897

  8. The Fundamental Manifold of Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2006-02-01

    We present a unifying empirical description of the structural and kinematic properties of all spheroids embedded in dark matter halos. We find that the intracluster stellar spheroidal components of galaxy clusters, which we call cluster spheroids (CSphs) and which are typically 100 times the size of normal elliptical galaxies, lie on a ``fundamental plane'' as tight as that defined by elliptical galaxies (rms in effective radius of ~0.07) but having a different slope. The slope, as measured by the coefficient of the logσ term, declines significantly and systematically between the fundamental planes of ellipticals, brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), and CSphs. We attribute this decline primarily to a continuous change in Me/Le, the mass-to-light ratio within the effective radius re, with spheroid scale. The magnitude of the slope change requires that it arise principally from differences in the relative distributions of luminous and dark matter, rather than from stellar population differences such as in age and metallicity. By expressing the Me/Le term as a function of σ in the simple derivation of the fundamental plane and requiring the behavior of that term to mimic the observed nonlinear relationship between logMe/Le and logσ, we simultaneously fit a two-dimensional manifold to the measured properties of dwarf elliptical and elliptical galaxies, BCGs, and CSphs. The combined data have an rms scatter in logre of 0.114 (0.099 for the combination of ellipticals, BCGs, and CSphs), which is modestly larger than each fundamental plane has alone, but which includes the scatter introduced by merging different studies done in different filters by different investigators. This ``fundamental manifold'' fits the structural and kinematic properties of spheroids that span a factor of 100 in σ and 1000 in re. While our mathematical form is neither unique nor derived from physical principles, the tightness of the fit leaves little room for improvement by other unification

  9. Spheroidizing of medium carbon steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James Michael

    2000-11-01

    An investigation has been made of spheroidization of medium carbon steels used in the bolt industry. Two process cycles were considered. One was the intercritical cycle, widely used in industry, in which the steel was heated above the A1 temperature for approximately 2 hours and then cooled to 688°C (1270°F) and held for various periods. The other was a subcritical cycle that involved heating to 704°C (1300°F) for various times. Wire samples were 0.4-in. diameter AISI 1541, considered high in manganese and difficult to spheroidize. Although AISI 4037 is considered easier to spheroidize, this alloy was also tested due to its extensive industrial use. It was found that the intercritical cycle produced a somewhat faster drop in hardness. However, one hour of the subcritical cycle yielded greater ductility than 32 hours of the intercritical process, as measured by tensile tests. Similar ductility results were achieved using a new flare test. The level of spheroidization was defined in this study to be the percentage of carbide particles with aspect ratios less than 3. The subcritical cycle produced the same level of spheroidization in 1/2 hour as that reached by the intercritical cycle in 32 hours. Faster spheroidization of cementite plates in the subcritical process appears to be due to the fine pearlite generated by the current practice of rapid cooling off the hot mill. This advantage is lost in the intercritical process because the original pearlite is dissolved above the A1 temperature.

  10. Telomerase activity in human brain tumors: astrocytoma and meningioma.

    PubMed

    Kheirollahi, Majid; Mehrazin, Masoud; Kamalian, Naser; Mohammadi-asl, Javad; Mehdipour, Parvin

    2013-05-01

    Somatic cells do not have telomerase activity but immortalized cell lines and more than 85 % of the cancer cells show telomerase activation to prevent the telomere from progressive shortening. The activation of this enzyme has been found in a variety of human tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, but only few studies on telomerase activity in human brain tumors have been reported. Here, we evaluated telomerase activity in different grades of human astrocytoma and meningioma brain tumors. In this study, assay for telomerase activity performed on 50 eligible cases consisted of 26 meningioma, 24 astrocytoma according to the standard protocols. In the brain tissues, telomerase activity was positive in 39 (65 %) of 50 patients. One sample t test showed that the telomerase activity in meningioma and astrocytoma tumors was significantly positive entirely (P < 0.001). Also, grade I of meningioma and low grades of astrocytoma (grades I and II) significantly showed telomerase activity. According to our results, we suggest that activation of telomerase is an event that starts mostly at low grades of brain including meningioma and astrocytoma tumors.

  11. Chemotherapeutic drugs and human tumor cells cytokine network

    PubMed Central

    Levina, Vera; Su, Yunyun; Nolen, Brian; Liu, Xiaoning; Gordin, Yuri; Lee, Melissa; Lokshin, Anna; Gorelik, Elieser

    2008-01-01

    The ability of human tumor cell lines to produce various cytokines, chemokines, angiogenic and growth factors was investigated using Luminex multiplex technology. Media conditioned by tumor cells protected tumor cells from drug-induced apoptosis and stimulated tumor cell proliferation. Antibodies neutralizing IL-6, CXCL8, CCL2 and CCL5 blocked this stimulation. Treatment of tumor cells with doxorubicin and cisplatin resulted in a substantial increase in the production of IL-6, CXCL8, CCL2, CCL5, BFGF, G-CSF, and VEGF. This stimulation was associated with drug-induced activation of NF-κB, AP-1, AP-2, CREB, HIF-1, STAT-1, STAT-3, STAT-5 and ATF-2 transcription factors and up-regulation of IL-6, CXCL8, FGF-2, CSF-3 and CCL5 gene expression. Treatment of tumor cells with doxorubicin and antibodies neutralizing G-CSF, CCL2 or CCL5 had higher inhibitory effects than each modality used alone. These results indicate that chemokines and growth factors produced by tumor by binding to the cognate receptors on tumor and stroma cells could provide proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals helping tumor to escape drug-mediated destruction. Clinical studies showed that antibodies neutralizing VEGF (Avastin/ Bevacizumab) or blocking HER2/neu signaling (Herceptin/ Trastuzumab) could increase the efficacy of chemotherapy although these beneficial effects have been limited. It is possible that drug-stimulated production of growth and pro-angiogenic factors could counterbalance the effects of antibody therapy. In addition, numerous growth factors and chemokines share angiogenic and growth-stimulating properties, and thus reduction of a single factor is insufficient to completely block tumor growth. Thus, a broad disruption of tumor cytokine network is needed to further increase the efficacy of cancer therapy. PMID:18697197

  12. Sensitive Detection of Viral Transcripts in Human Tumor Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Schelhorn, Sven-Eric; Fischer, Matthias; Tolosi, Laura; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Pfister, Herbert; Lengauer, Thomas; Berthold, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In excess of % of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates analyzed. Therefore, our

  13. Doublecortin is preferentially expressed in invasive human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Daou, Marie-Claire; Smith, Thomas W; Litofsky, N Scott; Hsieh, Chung C; Ross, Alonzo H

    2005-11-01

    Doublecortin (DCX) is required for neuroblastic migration during the development of the cerebral cortex. DCX is a microtubule-associated protein that plays a role in cellular motility. These facts led us to hypothesize that DCX is increased in invasive brain tumors. DCX expression was assessed in 69 paraffin-embedded brain tumors of neuroepithelial origin. In addition, mouse brain sections of the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus were used as positive controls for immunostaining, and specificity of antibody staining was demonstrated by peptide neutralization. DCX was highly expressed in both high-grade invasive tumors (glioblastoma, n=11; anaplastic astrocytoma/oligoastrocytoma, n=7; and medulloblastoma/PNET, n=6) and low-grade invasive tumors (oligodendroglioma, n=3; and astrocytoma/oligoastrocytoma, n=5). However, DCX was less intensely expressed in the circumscribed group of tumors (pilocytic astrocytoma, n=6; ependymoma/subependymoma, n=7; dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor, n=4; ganglioglioma, n=2; meningioma, n=9; and schwannoma, n=9). By the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel statistical test, the circumscribed group was significantly different from both the high-grade invasive group (P<0.0001) and the low-grade invasive group (P<0.0001). We conclude that DCX is preferentially expressed in invasive brain tumors. In addition, DCX immunostaining was stronger at the margin of the tumor than at the center. For a subset of these tumors, we also detected DCX mRNA and protein by Northern and Western blotting. DCX mRNA and protein was detected in glioma cell lines by Northern blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting. Collectively, the immunohistochemistry, Western blots and Northern blots conclusively demonstrate expression of DCX by human brain tumors.

  14. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro causes acquisition of multiple tumor cell characteristics in human pancreatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Wei; Tokar, Erik J; Kim, Andrew J; Bell, Matthew W; Waalkes, Michael P

    2012-09-01

    Cancer may be a stem cell (SC)-based disease involving formation of cancer SCs (CSCs) potentially arising from transformation of normal SCs. Cadmium has been linked to human pancreatic cancer. We studied cadmium exposure of human pancreatic ductal epithelial (HPDE) cells and whether SCs may be targeted in this process. We chronically exposed HPDE cells to low level cadmium (1 μM) for ≤ 29 weeks. Nonadherent spheroid formation was used to indicate CSC-like cell production, and we assessed tumor cell characteristics in such spheres. Assessed tumor cell characteristics including secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), invasion, and colony formation were fortified by evaluating expression of relevant genes by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and by Western blot. Increased MMP-9 secretion and overexpression of the pancreatic cancer marker S100P occurred in chronic (29 weeks of exposure) cadmium-exposed (CCE) cells. CCE cells also showed markedly higher colony formation and invasion, typical of cancer cells. Floating "spheres" of viable cells, known to contain an abundance of normal SCs or CSCs, form in vitro with many cell types. CCE cells produced 3-fold more spheres than control cells and were more invasive, secreted more MMP-9, and overexpressed markers for pancreatic SCs/CSCs (i.e., CXCR4, OCT4, CD44) and S100P, a marker for pancreatic cancer. CCE-derived spheres rapidly produced aggressive, highly branched, and poorly differentiated glandular-like structures in Matrigel. Chronic cadmium exposure produced multiple tumor cell characteristics in HPDE cells and CCE cell-derived spheres. These data support the plausibility of cadmium as a human pancreatic carcinogen.

  15. HMGA1-pseudogene expression is induced in human pituitary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Francesco; De Martino, Marco; D'Angelo, Daniela; Mussnich, Paula; Raverot, Gerald; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Fraggetta, Filippo; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Fusco, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have established that High Mobility Group A (HMGA) proteins play a pivotal role on the onset of human pituitary tumors. They are overexpressed in pituitary tumors, and, consistently, transgenic mice overexpressing either the Hmga1 or the Hmga2 gene develop pituitary tumors. In contrast with HMGA2, HMGA1 overexpression is not related to any rearrangement or amplification of the HMGA1 locus in these tumors. We have recently identified 2 HMGA1 pseudogenes, HMGA1P6 and HMGA1P7, acting as competitive endogenous RNA decoys for HMGA1 and other cancer related genes. Here, we show that HMGA1 pseudogene expression significantly correlates with HMGA1 mRNA levels in growth hormone and nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas likely inhibiting the repression of HMGA1 through microRNAs action. According to our functional studies, these HMGA1 pseudogenes enhance the proliferation and migration of the mouse pituitary tumor cell line, at least in part, through their upregulation. Our results point out that the overexpression of HMGA1P6 and HMGA1P7 could contribute to increase HMGA1 levels in human pituitary tumors, and then to pituitary tumorigenesis. PMID:25894544

  16. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Uva, Paolo; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Watters, James; Loboda, Andrey; Kulkarni, Amit; Castle, John; Palombo, Fabio; Viti, Valentina; Mesiti, Giuseppe; Zappulli, Valentina; Marconato, Laura; Abramo, Francesca; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Lahm, Armin; La Monica, Nicola; de Rinaldis, Emanuele

    2009-01-01

    Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies. PMID:19327144

  17. A serpin from human tumor cells with direct lymphoid immunomodulatory activity: mitogenic stimulation of human tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Packard, B Z; Lee, S S; Remold-O'Donnell, E; Komoriya, A

    1995-10-19

    A serum-free supernatant from an epidermal carcinoma cell line has previously been shown to contain mitogenic activity for human tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in culture [1]. From this conditioned medium we have now purified to homogeneity, as determined by SDS-PAGE analysis, a ca. 45 kDa protein which stimulates [3H]thymidine incorporation into the DNA of these human T-lymphocytes. Amino acid composition data and immunoreactivity of the purified protein as well as sequence analyses of 7 tryptic fragments obtained therefrom suggest a strong similarity with human monocyte/neutrophil elastase inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. We have previously identified and purified from the same conditioned medium a 36 kDa protein with myeloid immunomodulatory activity [2]. Taken together, these two reports support the role of tumor-derived soluble factors in tumor immunosurveillance.

  18. Establishment of a human glioblastoma stemlike brainstem rodent tumor model.

    PubMed

    Siu, I-Mei; Tyler, Betty M; Chen, James X; Eberhart, Charles G; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm; Olivi, Alessandro; Jallo, George I; Riggins, Gregory J; Gallia, Gary L

    2010-07-01

    Diffuse brainstem tumors are the most difficult type of pediatric CNS malignancy to treat. These inoperable lesions are treated with radiation alone or in combination with chemotherapy, and the survival rate is less than 10%. It is therefore essential to develop a reliable animal model to screen new therapeutic agents for the treatment of this type of tumor. A multipotent human glioblastoma stemlike neurosphere line, 060919, was established from a surgically resected glioblastoma specimen; when cells were implanted intracranially into athymic nude mice, they formed invasive, vascular tumors that exhibited the features of glioblastoma. Ten female Fischer 344 rats received an injection of 75,000 F98 rat glioma cells and 10 female athymic nude rats received an injection of 75,000 060919 human glioblastoma stemlike cells in the pontine tegmentum of the brainstem. A control group of 5 female Fischer rats received an injection of saline in the same location as the animals in the tumor groups. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated for survival, and brains were processed postmortem for histopathological investigation. Both F98 cells and 060919 cells grew in 100% of the animals injected. Median survival of animals injected with F98 was 15 days, consistent with the authors' previous reports on the establishment of the brainstem tumor model using the F98 rat glioma line. Median survival of animals injected with 060919 was 31 days. Histopathological analysis of the tumors confirmed the presence of brainstem lesions in animals that received brainstem injections of F98 and in animals that received brainstem injections of 060919. The 060919 brainstem tumors histologically resembled glioblastoma. Tumor take and median survival were consistent for animals injected in the brainstem with either the established F98 rat glioma cell line or the 060919 human glioblastoma stemlike neurosphere line. Histopathological features of the 060919 brainstem tumors resembled glioblastoma

  19. Bee venom inhibits growth of human cervical tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Myoung; Jung, Yu Yeon; Park, Mi Hee; Oh, Sang Hyun; Yun, Hye Seok; Jun, Hyung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ung Soo; Yoon, Joo Hee; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    We studied whether bee venom (BV) inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of death receptor (DR) expressions and inactivation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in mice. In vivo study showed that BV (1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth. Similar inhibitory effects of BV on cancer growth in primary human cervical cancer cells were also found. BV (1–5 μg/ml) also inhibited the growth of cancer cells, Ca Ski and C33Aby the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Agreed with cancer cell growth inhibition, expression of death receptors; FAS, DR3 and DR6, and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with BV in tumor mice, human cancer cell and human tumor samples as well as cultured cancer cells. In addition, deletion of FAS, DR3 and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV-induced cell growth inhibitory effects as well as NF-κB inactivation. These results suggest that BV inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of FAS, DR3 and DR6 expression via inhibition of NF-κB pathway. PMID:25730901

  20. Thymidine analogues to assess microperfusion in human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Hilde L.; Ljungkvist, Anna S.; Rijken, Paul F.; Sprong, Debbie; Bussink, Jan; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Haustermans, Karin M.; Begg, Adrian C. . E-mail: a.begg@nki.nl

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To validate the use of the thymidine analogues as local perfusion markers in human tumors (no labeling indicates no perfusion) by comparison with the well-characterized perfusion marker Hoechst 33342. Methods and Materials: Human tumor xenografts from gliomas and head-and-neck cancers were injected with iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) and the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342. In frozen sections, each blood vessel was scored for the presence of IdUrd/BrdUrd labeling and Hoechst in surrounding cells. The percentage of analogue-negative vessels was compared with the fraction of Hoechst-negative vessels. Collocalization of the two markers was also scored. Results: We found considerable intertumor variation in the fraction of perfused vessels, measured by analogue labeling, both in the human tumor xenografts and in a series of tumor biopsies from head-and-neck cancer patients. There was a significant correlation between the Hoechst-negative and IdUrd/BrdUrd-negative vessels in the xenografts (r 85, p = 0.0004), despite some mismatches on a per-vessel basis. Conclusions: Thymidine analogues can be successfully used to rank tumors according to their fraction of perfused vessels. Whether this fraction correlates with the extent of acute hypoxia needs further confirmation.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to surface molecules of mammalian tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, three dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture; therefore, MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells. Additionally, they provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules.

  2. Mechanical Control of Cell flow in Multicellular Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delarue, Morgan; Montel, Fabien; Caen, Ouriel; Elgeti, Jens; Siaugue, Jean-Michel; Vignjevic, Danijela; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François; Cappello, Giovanni

    2013-03-01

    Collective cell motion is observed in a wide range of biological processes. In tumors, physiological gradients of nutrients, growth factors, or even oxygen give rise to gradients of proliferation. We show using fluorescently labeled particles that these gradients drive a velocity field resulting in a cellular flow in multicellular spheroids. Under mechanical stress, the cellular flow is drastically reduced. We describe the results with a hydrodynamic model that considers only convection of the particles by the cellular flow.

  3. Acoustic scattering on spheroidal shapes near boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloh, Touvia

    2016-11-01

    A new expression for the Lamé product of prolate spheroidal wave functions is presented in terms of a distribution of multipoles along the axis of the spheroid between its foci (generalizing a corresponding theorem for spheroidal harmonics). Such an "ultimate" singularity system can be effectively used for solving various linear boundary-value problems governed by the Helmholtz equation involving prolate spheroidal bodies near planar or other boundaries. The general methodology is formally demonstrated for the axisymmetric acoustic scattering problem of a rigid (hard) spheroid placed near a hard/soft wall or inside a cylindrical duct under an axial incidence of a plane acoustic wave.

  4. Anti-metastatic effects of RAPTA-C conjugated polymeric micelles on two-dimensional (2D) breast tumor cells and three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongxu; Blunden, Bianca M; Scarano, Wei; Lu, Mingxia; Stenzel, Martina H

    2016-03-01

    Macromolecular ruthenium (Ru) complexes are a promising avenue to better, and more selective, chemotherapeutics to treat metastatic cancers. In our previous research, amphiphilic block copolymeric micelles carrying RAPTA-C (RuCl2(p-cymene)(PTA)) were demonstrated to improve the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of RAPTA-C (Blunden et al., 2013). However, the anti-metastatic effect of RAPTA-C conjugated polymeric micelles is yet to be established. In this work, we investigated the anti-metastatic effects of RAPTA-C conjugated micelles in both 2D and 3D in vitro breast tumor cell models in comparison with free RAPTA-C. RAPTA-C conjugated micelles showed an improved anti-metastatic effect compared with RAPTA-C for 2D cultured breast tumor cells. RAPTA-C micelles selectively targeted the metastatic tumor cells over the nontumorigenic CHO cells. 3D MCTS assays showed that RAPTA-C conjugated micelles showed a cell growth inhibition similar to that of ten times of the free drug. Further improvement of the RAPTA-C delivery vehicle may provide useful tools to harness ruthenium compounds for metastatic cancer therapy. The interest in ruthenium drugs stem from their anti-metastatic effect. In contrast to other metal-based drugs that inhibit the growth of tumor cells, ruthenium drugs seem less toxic, but have a pronounce effect on the migration of cancer cells. The ruthenium drug chosen here, RAPTA-C, is capable of inhibiting migration as shown in various assays here. In this publication, we could show for the first time that this effect is enhanced when the drug is delivered using micelles. Important in particular is that the effect is more pronounced in cancerous breast cancer cells while RAPTA-C delivered in micelles does not seem to show any effect on healthy cells. We believe that the presented micelles are suitable carriers for this anti-metastatic drug. The design of the micelle would also allow the encapsulation of other drugs in future studies creating a potentially

  5. Identifying the necrotic zone boundary in tumour spheroids with pair-correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Dini, S; Binder, B J; Fischer, S C; Mattheyer, C; Schmitz, A; Stelzer, E H K; Bean, N G; Green, J E F

    2016-10-01

    Automatic identification of the necrotic zone boundary is important in the assessment of treatments on in vitro tumour spheroids. This has been difficult especially when the difference in cell density between the necrotic and viable zones of a tumour spheroid is small. To help overcome this problem, we developed novel one-dimensional pair-correlation functions (PCFs) to provide quantitative estimates of the radial distance of the necrotic zone boundary from the centre of a tumour spheroid. We validate our approach on synthetic tumour spheroids in which the position of the necrotic zone boundary is known a priori It is then applied to nine real tumour spheroids imaged with light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy. PCF estimates of the necrotic zone boundary are compared with those of a human expert and an existing standard computational method. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Electron spin resonance microscopic imaging of oxygen concentration in cancer spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashem, Mada; Weiler-Sagie, Michal; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Neufeld, Gera; Neeman, Michal; Blank, Aharon

    2015-07-01

    Oxygen (O2) plays a central role in most living organisms. The concentration of O2 is important in physiology and pathology. Despite the importance of accurate knowledge of the O2 levels, there is very limited capability to measure with high spatial resolution its distribution in millimeter-scale live biological samples. Many of the current oximetric methods, such as oxygen microelectrodes and fluorescence lifetime imaging, are compromised by O2 consumption, sample destruction, invasiveness, and difficulty to calibrate. Here, we present a new method, based on the use of the pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) microimaging technique to obtain a 3D mapping of oxygen concentration in millimeter-scale biological samples. ESR imaging requires the incorporation of a suitable stable and inert paramagnetic spin probe into the desirable object. In this work, we use microcrystals of a paramagnetic spin probe in a new crystallographic packing form (denoted tg-LiNc-BuO). These paramagnetic species interact with paramagnetic oxygen molecules, causing a spectral line broadening that is linearly proportional to the oxygen concentration. Typical ESR results include 4D spatial-spectral images that give an indication about the oxygen concentration in different regions of the sample. This new oximetry microimaging method addresses all the problems mentioned above. It is noninvasive, sensitive to physiological oxygen levels, and easy to calibrate. Furthermore, in principle, it can be used for repetitive measurements without causing cell damage. The tissue model used in this research is spheroids of Human Colorectal carcinoma cell line (HCT-116) with a typical diameter of ∼600 μm. Most studies of the microenvironmental O2 conditions inside such viable spheroids carried out in the past used microelectrodes, which require an invasive puncturing of the spheroid and are also not applicable to 3D O2 imaging. High resolution 3D oxygen maps could make it possible to evaluate the

  7. Responsiveness of human prostate carcinoma bone tumors to interleukin-2 therapy in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Kocheril, S V; Grignon, D J; Wang, C Y; Maughan, R L; Montecillo, E J; Talati, B; Tekyi-Mensah, S; Pontes, J e; Hillman, G G

    1999-01-01

    We have tested an immunotherapy approach for the treatment of metastatic prostate carcinoma using a bone tumor model. Human PC-3 prostate carcinoma tumor cells were heterotransplanted into the femur cavity of athymic Balb/c nude mice. Tumor cells replaced marrow cells in the bone cavity, invaded adjacent bone and muscle tissues, and formed a palpable tumor at the hip joint. PC-3/IF cell lines, generated from bone tumors by serial in vivo passages, grew with faster kinetics in the femur and metastasized to inguinal lymph nodes. Established tumors were treated with systemic interleukin-2 (IL-2) injections. IL-2 significantly inhibited the formation of palpable tumors and prolonged mouse survival at nontoxic low doses. Histologically IL-2 caused vascular damage and infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes in the tumor as well as necrotic areas with apoptotic cells. These findings suggest destruction of tumor cells by systemic IL-2 therapy and IL-2 responsiveness of prostate carcinoma bone tumors.

  8. Formation of Adipose Stromal Vascular Fraction Cell-Laden Spheroids Using a Three-Dimensional Bioprinter and Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gettler, Brian C; Zakhari, Joseph S; Gandhi, Piyani S; Williams, Stuart K

    2017-09-01

    The therapeutic infusion of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells for the treatment of multiple diseases, has progressed to numerous human clinical trials; however, the often poor retention of the cells following implantation remains a common drawback of direct cell injection. One solution to cellular retention at the injection site has been the use of biogels to encapsulate cells within a microenvironment before and upon implantation. The current study utilized three-dimensional bioprinting technology to evaluate the ability to form SVF cell-laden spheroids with collagen I as a gel-forming biomatrix. A superhydrophobic surface was created to maintain the bioprinted structures in a spheroid shape. A hydrophilic disc was printed onto the hydrophobic surface to immobilize the spheroids during the gelation process. Conditions for the automated rapid formation of SVF cell-laden spheroids were explored, including time/pressure relationships for spheroid extrusion during bioprinting. The formed spheroids maintain SVF viability in both static culture and dynamic spinner culture. Spheroids also undergo a time-dependent contraction with the retention of angiogenic sprout phenotype over the 14-day culture period. The use of a biphilic surface exhibiting both superhydrophobicity to maintain the spheroid shape and a hydrophilicity to immobilize the spheroid during gel formation produces SVF cell-laden spheroids that can be immediately transplanted for therapeutic applications.

  9. Noncontact diffuse correlation tomography of human breast tumor

    PubMed Central

    He, Lian; Lin, Yu; Huang, Chong; Irwin, Daniel; Szabunio, Margaret M.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Our first step to adapt our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation tomography (ncDCT) system for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of blood flow distribution in human breast tumors is reported. A commercial 3-D camera was used to obtain breast surface geometry, which was then converted to a solid volume mesh. An ncDCT probe scanned over a region of interest on the mesh surface and the measured boundary data were combined with a finite element framework for 3-D image reconstruction of blood flow distribution. This technique was tested in computer simulations and in vivo human breasts with low-grade carcinoma. Results from computer simulations suggest that relatively high accuracy can be achieved when the entire tumor is within the sensitive region of diffuse light. Image reconstruction with a priori knowledge of the tumor volume and location can significantly improve the accuracy in recovery of tumor blood flow contrasts. In vivo imaging results from two breast carcinomas show higher average blood flow contrasts (5.9- and 10.9-fold) in the tumor regions compared to the surrounding tissues, which are comparable with previous findings using diffuse correlation spectroscopy. The ncDCT system has the potential to image blood flow distributions in soft and vulnerable tissues without distorting tissue hemodynamics. PMID:26259706

  10. Noncontact diffuse correlation tomography of human breast tumor.

    PubMed

    He, Lian; Lin, Yu; Huang, Chong; Irwin, Daniel; Szabunio, Margaret M; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-08-01

    Our first step to adapt our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation tomography (ncDCT) system for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of blood flow distribution in human breast tumors is reported. A commercial 3-D camera was used to obtain breast surface geometry, which was then converted to a solid volume mesh. An ncDCT probe scanned over a region of interest on the mesh surface and the measured boundary data were combined with a finite element framework for 3-D image reconstruction of blood flow distribution. This technique was tested in computer simulations and in vivo human breasts with low-grade carcinoma. Results from computer simulations suggest that relatively high accuracy can be achieved when the entire tumor is within the sensitive region of diffuse light. Image reconstruction with a priori knowledge of the tumor volume and location can significantly improve the accuracy in recovery of tumor blood flow contrasts. In vivo imaging results from two breast carcinomas show higher average blood flow contrasts (5.9- and 10.9-fold) in the tumor regions compared to the surrounding tissues, which are comparable with previous findings using diffuse correlation spectroscopy. The ncDCT system has the potential to image blood flow distributions in soft and vulnerable tissues without distorting tissue hemodynamics

  11. The Resazurin Reduction Assay Can Distinguish Cytotoxic from Cytostatic Compounds in Spheroid Screening Assays.

    PubMed

    Walzl, Angelika; Unger, Christine; Kramer, Nina; Unterleuthner, Daniela; Scherzer, Martin; Hengstschläger, Markus; Schwanzer-Pfeiffer, Dagmar; Dolznig, Helmut

    2014-08-01

    Spheroid-based cellular screening approaches represent a highly physiologic experimental setup to identify novel anticancer drugs and an innovative preclinical model to reduce the high failure rate of anticancer compounds in clinical trials. The resazurin reduction (RR) assay, known as the alamarBlue or CellTiter-Blue assay, is frequently used to determine cell viability/proliferation capacity in eukaryotic cells. Whether this assay is applicable to assess viability in multicellular spheroids has not been evaluated. We analyzed the RR assay to measure cytotoxic and/or cytostatic responses in tumor cell spheroids compared with conventional 2D cultures. We found that tight cell-cell interactions in compact spheroids hamper resazurin uptake and its subsequent reduction to resorufin, leading to lowered reduction activity in relation to the actual cellular health/cell number. Treatment with staurosporine disrupted close cell-cell contacts, which increased resazurin reduction compared with untreated controls. Loss of tight junctions by trypsinization or addition of EGTA or EDTA restored high resazurin reduction rates in untreated spheroids. In conclusion, the RR assay is unsuited to quantitatively measure cellular health/cell number in compact spheroids. However, it can be used to distinguish between cytotoxic versus cytostatic compounds in spheroids. Restoration of the correlation of cell viability/number to resazurin reduction capacity can be achieved by disruption of tight junctions.

  12. Claudin 4 Is Differentially Expressed between Ovarian Cancer Subtypes and Plays a Role in Spheroid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Kristin L. M.; Misemer, Benjamin; DeRycke, Melissa S.; Andersen, John D.; Harrington, Katherine M.; Kalloger, Steve E.; Gilks, C. Blake; Pambuccian, Stefan E.; Skubitz, Amy P. N.

    2011-01-01

    Claudin 4 is a cellular adhesion molecule that is frequently overexpressed in ovarian cancer and other epithelial cancers. In this study, we sought to determine whether the expression of claudin 4 is associated with outcome in ovarian cancer patients and may be involved in tumor progression. We examined claudin 4 expression in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, as well as by immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays (TMAs; n = 500), spheroids present in patients’ ascites, and spheroids formed in vitro. Claudin 4 was expressed in nearly 70% of the ovarian cancer tissues examined and was differentially expressed across ovarian cancer subtypes, with the lowest expression in clear cell subtype. No association was found between claudin 4 expression and disease-specific survival in any subtype. Claudin 4 expression was also observed in multicellular spheroids obtained from patients’ ascites. Using an in vitro spheroid formation assay, we found that NIH:OVCAR5 cells treated with shRNA against claudin 4 required a longer time to form compact spheroids compared to control NIH:OVCAR5 cells that expressed high levels of claudin 4. The inability of the NIH:OVCAR5 cells treated with claudin 4 shRNA to form compact spheroids was verified by FITC-dextran exclusion. These results demonstrate a role for claudin 4 and tight junctions in spheroid formation and integrity. PMID:21541062

  13. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A.; Salomon, Matthew P.; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    What happens in the early, still undetectable human malignancy is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a “Big Bang” model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed sub-clones that are not subject to stringent selection, and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors revealed the absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH), and sub-clone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations, and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear born-to-be-bad, with sub-clone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH with significant clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  14. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonial antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues which are not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. In brief, MCS combine the relevance or organized tissues with in vitro methodology making the MCS a good model system to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and thereby provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide an important base of scientific information for future comparative studies on the effects of hypergravity and simulated microgravity environments on cell-cell interactions. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g. cellular products) which may be useful for the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of one undergraduate and one graduate student; thus, it will also assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in gravitational biology research.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. Therefore MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide a base of scientific information necessary to expand the focus of the project in future years to microgravity and hypergravity-based environments. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g., cellular products) which may prove useful in the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of both undergraduate and graduate students; thus, it will assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in an area (gravitational biology) of interest to NASA.

  16. Metformin selectively affects human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Würth, Roberto; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Bajetto, Adirana; Corsaro, Alessandro; Parodi, Alessia; Sirito, Rodolfo; Massollo, Michela; Marini, Cecilia; Zona, Gianluigi; Fenoglio, Daniela; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Filaci, Gilberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory postulates that a small population of tumor-initiating cells is responsible for the development, progression and recurrence of several malignancies, including glioblastoma. In this perspective, tumor-initiating cells represent the most relevant target to obtain effective cancer treatment. Metformin, a first-line drug for type II diabetes, was reported to possess anticancer properties affecting the survival of cancer stem cells in breast cancer models. We report that metformin treatment reduced the proliferation rate of tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures isolated from four human glioblastomas. Metformin also impairs tumor-initiating cell spherogenesis, indicating a direct effect on self-renewal mechanisms. Interestingly, analyzing by FACS the antiproliferative effects of metformin on CD133-expressing subpopulation, a component of glioblastoma cancer stem cells, a higher reduction of proliferation was observed as compared with CD133-negative cells, suggesting a certain degree of cancer stem cell selectivity in its effects. In fact, glioblastoma cell differentiation strongly reduced sensitivity to metformin treatment. Metformin effects in tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures were associated with a powerful inhibition of Akt-dependent cell survival pathway, while this pathway was not affected in differentiated cells. The specificity of metformin antiproliferative effects toward glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells was confirmed by the lack of significant inhibition of normal human stem cells (umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells) in vitro proliferation after metformin exposure. Altogether, these data clearly suggest that metformin exerts antiproliferative activity on glioblastoma cells, showing a higher specificity toward tumor-initiating cells, and that the inhibition of Akt pathway may represent a possible intracellular target of this effect. PMID:23255107

  17. Human STEAP3 maintains tumor growth under hypoferric condition

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, Taichi; Baba, Eishi; Arita, Shuji; Komoda, Masato; Tamura, Shingo; Shirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Ariyama, Hiroshi; Takaishi, Shigeo; Kusaba, Hitoshi; and others

    2011-11-01

    Iron is essential in cellular proliferation and survival based on its crucial roles in DNA and ATP synthesis. Tumor cells proliferate rapidly even in patients with low serum iron, although their actual mechanisms are not well known. To elucidate molecular mechanisms of efficient tumor progression under the hypoferric condition, we studied the roles of six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate family member 3 (STEAP3), which was reported to facilitate iron uptake. Using Raji cells with low STEAP3 mRNA expression, human STEAP3-overexpressing cells were established. The impact of STEAP3 expression was analyzed about the amount of iron storage, the survival under hypoferric conditions in vitro and the growth of tumor in vivo. STEAP3 overexpression increased ferritin, an indicator of iron storage, in STEAP3-overexpressing Raji cells. STEAP3 gave Raji cells the resistance to iron deprivation-induced apoptosis. These STEAP3-overexpressing Raji cells preserved efficient growth even in hypoferric mice, while parental Raji cells grew less rapidly. In addition, iron deficiency enhanced STEAP3 mRNA expression in tumor cells. Furthermore, human colorectal cancer tissues exhibited more STEAP3 mRNA expression and iron storage compared with normal colon mucosa. These findings indicate that STEAP3 maintains iron storage in human malignant cells and tumor proliferation under the hypoferric condition. -- Highlights: {yields} STEAP3 expression results in increment of stored intracellular iron. {yields} Iron deprivation induces expression of STEAP3. {yields} Colorectal cancer expresses STEAP3 highly and stores iron much. {yields} STEAP3 expressing tumors preserves growth even in mice being hypoferremia.

  18. Tumor-driven Molecular Changes in Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Kucerova, Lucia; Zmajkovic, Jakub; Toro, Lenka; Skolekova, Svetlana; Demkova, Lucia; Matuskova, Miroslava

    2015-04-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) exert either tumor-stimulatory or tumor-inhibitory effect. The outcome of the tumor-MSC interaction is dictated by the tumor-specific activating signals. We analyzed the alterations in MSC phenotype in response to stimulation by tumor-secreted paracrine factors. Paracrine factors from human melanoma A375 and glioblastoma 8MGBA cells were used for prolonged culture of MSC to produce derived cells designated DIFF(A)-MSC or DIFF(G)-MSC, respectively. Derived cells were analyzed for the specific surface markers, the expression pattern of MSC markers and fibroblast-specific proteins. Changes in the cell phenotype were evaluated using scratch wound assay and tube formation in vitro; and xenotransplant growth in vivo. Our data show induced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor 2, CD146, fibroblast-specific protein, vimentin and endosialin in DIFF(A)-MSC cells. This indicates their differentiation towards the cells with features of tumor-associated fibroblasts upon stimulation with melanoma-secreted cytokines. Paracrine stimulation in DIFF(G)-MSC led to up-regulation of the genes involved in the MSC differentiation. MSC-specific surface marker characteristics were preserved in derived DIFF(A)-MSC and DIFF(G)-MSC cells. However, we observed increased proportion of CD146 and GD2 (neural ganglioside) positive cells and decreased expression of marker NG2 in the MSC exposed to tumor-conditioned medium. Melanoma-CM increased MSC migration, glioblastoma-CM compromised angiogenic capacity of MSC in vitro and the protumorigenic effect in vivo. Our data directly compare the pleiotropic effects mediated by the malignant cells on the MSC. Secreted paracrine factors from melanoma or glioblastoma differently changed molecular traits in MSC, which explains the dual role of MSC in tumor growth.

  19. Proteolytic Activity of Human Lymphoid Tumor Cells. Correlation with Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ribatti, Domenico; Ria, Roberto; Pellegrino, Antonio; Bruno, Michele; Merchionne, Francesca; Dammacco, Franco

    2000-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and production are associated with advanced-stage tumor and contribute to tumor progression, invasion and metastases. The current study was designed to determine the expression and production of MMP-2 (gelatinase A) and MMP-9 (gelatinase B) by human lymphoid tumor cells. Changes in expression and production were also investigated during tumor progression of multiple myeloma and mycosis fungoides. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that lymphoblastic leukemia B cells (SB cell line), multiple myeloma (MM) cells (U266 cell line) and lymphoblastic leukemia T cells (CEM and Jurkat cell lines) express constitutively the mRNA for MMP-2 and/or MMP-9. We demonstrated by gelatin-zymography of cell culture medium that both enzymes were secreted in their cleaved (activated) form. In situ hybridization of bone marrow plasma cells and gelatin- zymography of the medium showed that patients with active MM (diagnosis, relapse, leukemic progression) express higher levels of MMP-2 mRNA and protein than patients with non-active MM (complete/objective response, plateau) and with monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS). MMP-9 expression and secretion was similar in all patient groups. In patients with mycosis fungoides (MF), the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNAs was significantly upregulated with advancing stage, in terms of lesions both positive for one of two mRNAs and with the greatest intensity of expression. Besides MF cells, the MMP-2 and/or MMP-9 mRNAs were expressed by some stromal cell populations (microvascular endothelial cells, fibroblasts, macrophages), suggesting that these cells cooperate in the process of tumor invasion. Our studies identify MMPs as an important class of proteinases involved in the extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation by human lymphoid tumors, and suggest that MMPs inhibitors may lead to important new treatment for their control. PMID:11097203

  20. The role of angiogenesis, vascular maturation, regression and stroma infiltration in dormancy and growth of implanted MLS ovarian carcinoma spheroids.

    PubMed

    Gilead, Assaf; Meir, Gila; Neeman, Michal

    2004-02-10

    MLS ovarian epithelial carcinoma multicellular spheroids xenografted subcutaneously in CD-1 nude mice displayed growth delay, or dormancy, of up to 52 days. In the study reported here, implanted MLS spheroids were used for testing the role of angiogenesis and vascular maturation in triggering the initiation of tumor progression. The kinetics and impact of neovascular maturation and functionality, in dormancy, and growth of MLS spheroid xenografts were studied noninvasively by BOLD contrast MRI. MR data were supported by histologic staining for biotinylated albumin as a blood pool marker and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) as marker for perivascular mural cells. Although the tumor periphery showed higher levels of total and mature vasculature than normal skin, the fraction of mature out of the total vessels as detected by MRI vascular maturation index (VMI(MRI)) was significantly lower in the tumor both before and after tumor exit from dormancy. The neovasculature induced by the implanted spheroid was unstable and showed cycles of vessel growth and regression. Surprisingly, this instability was not restricted to the immature vessels, but rather included also regression of mature vessels. During dormancy, neovasculature was predominantly peripheral with no infiltration into the implanted spheroid. Infiltration of alpha-SMA positive stroma cells into the spheroid was associated with functional vascularization and tumor growth. Thus, stroma infiltration and vascular maturation are an important checkpoint linking the angiogenic switch with initiation of tumor progression. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Decoding NADPH oxidase 4 expression in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Meitzler, Jennifer L; Makhlouf, Hala R; Antony, Smitha; Wu, Yongzhong; Butcher, Donna; Jiang, Guojian; Juhasz, Agnes; Lu, Jiamo; Dahan, Iris; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Pircher, Haymo; Shah, Ajay M; Roy, Krishnendu; Doroshow, James H

    2017-10-01

    NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) is a redox active, membrane-associated protein that contributes to genomic instability, redox signaling, and radiation sensitivity in human cancers based on its capacity to generate H2O2 constitutively. Most studies of NOX4 in malignancy have focused on the evaluation of a small number of tumor cell lines and not on human tumor specimens themselves; furthermore, these studies have often employed immunological tools that have not been well characterized. To determine the prevalence of NOX4 expression across a broad range of solid tumors, we developed a novel monoclonal antibody that recognizes a specific extracellular region of the human NOX4 protein, and that does not cross-react with any of the other six members of the NOX gene family. Evaluation of 20 sets of epithelial tumors revealed, for the first time, high levels of NOX4 expression in carcinomas of the head and neck (15/19 patients), esophagus (12/18 patients), bladder (10/19 patients), ovary (6/17 patients), and prostate (7/19 patients), as well as malignant melanoma (7/15 patients) when these tumors were compared to histologically-uninvolved specimens from the same organs. Detection of NOX4 protein upregulation by low levels of TGF-β1 demonstrated the sensitivity of this new probe; and immunofluorescence experiments found that high levels of endogenous NOX4 expression in ovarian cancer cells were only demonstrable associated with perinuclear membranes. These studies suggest that NOX4 expression is upregulated, compared to normal tissues, in a well-defined, and specific group of human carcinomas, and that its expression is localized on intracellular membranes in a fashion that could modulate oxidative DNA damage. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Cell cycle arrest or survival signaling through αv integrins, activation of PKC and ERK1/2 lead to anoikis resistance of ovarian cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Carduner, Ludovic; Picot, Cédric R; Leroy-Dudal, Johanne; Blay, Lyvia; Kellouche, Sabrina; Carreiras, Franck

    2014-01-15

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer mainly due to spheroids organization of cancer cells that disseminate within the peritoneal cavity. We have investigated the molecular mechanisms by which ovarian cancer spheroids resist anoikis, choosing as models the 2 well-characterized human ovarian cancer cell lines IGROV1 and SKOV3. These cell lines have the propensity to float as clusters, and were isolated from tumor tissue and ascites, respectively. To form spheroids, IGROV1 and SKOV3 ovarian adenocarcinoma cells were maintained under anchorage-independent culture conditions, in which both lines survive at least a week. A short apoptotic period prior to a survival signaling commitment was observed for IGROV1 cells whereas SKOV3 cells entered G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. This difference in behavior was due to different signals. With regard to SKOV3 cells, activation of p38 and an increase in p130/Rb occurred once anchorage-independent culture was established. Analyses of the survival signaling pathway switched on by IGROV1 cells showed that activation of ERK1/2 was required to evade apoptosis, an effect partly dependent on PKC activation and αv integrins. αv-integrin expression is essential for survival through activation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The above data indicate that ovarian cancer cells can resist anoikis in the spheroid state by arrest in the cell cycle or through activation of αv-integrin-ERK-mediated survival signals. Such signaling might result in the selection of resistant cells within disseminating spheroids, favoring further relapse in ovarian cancers.

  3. Long non-coding RNA taurine upregulated 1 enhances tumor-induced angiogenesis through inhibiting microRNA-299 in human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cai, H; Liu, X; Zheng, J; Xue, Y; Ma, J; Li, Z; Xi, Z; Li, Z; Bao, M; Liu, Y

    2017-01-19

    Angiogenesis is one of the critical biological elements affecting the development and progression of cancer. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important regulators and aberrantly expressed in various types of human cancer. Our previous studies indicated that lncRNA taurine upregulated 1 (TUG1) implicated in the regulation of blood-tumor barrier permeability; however, its role in glioblastoma angiogenesis still unclear. Here we demonstrated that TUG1 was up-expressed in human glioblastoma tissues and glioblastoma cell lines. Knockdown of TUG1 remarkably suppressed tumor-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation as well as reducing spheroid-based angiogenesis ability in vitro, which are the critical steps for tumor angiogenesis. Besides, knockdown of TUG1 significantly increased the expression of mircroRNA-299 (miR-299), which was down-expressed in glioblastoma tissues and glioblastoma cell lines. Bioinformatics analysis and luciferase reporter assay revealed that TUG1 influenced tumor angiogenesis via directly binding to the miR-299 and there was a reciprocal repression between TUG1 and miR-299 in the same RNA-induced silencing complex. Moreover, knockdown of TUG1 reduced the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), which was defined as a functional downstream target of miR-299. In addition, knockdown of TUG1, shown in the in vivo studies, has effects on suppressing tumor growth, reducing tumor microvessel density and decreasing the VEGFA expression by upregulating miR-299 in xenograft glioblastoma model. Overall, the results demonstrated that TUG1 enhances tumor-induced angiogenesis and VEGF expression through inhibiting miR-299. Also, the inhibition of TUG1 could provide a novel therapeutic target for glioblastoma treatment.

  4. Three dimensional spheroid cell culture for nanoparticle safety testing.

    PubMed

    Sambale, Franziska; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Stahl, Frank; Blume, Cornelia; Stiesch, Meike; Kasper, Cornelia; Bahnemann, Detlef; Scheper, Thomas

    2015-07-10

    Nanoparticles are widely employed for many applications and the number of consumer products, incorporating nanotechnology, is constantly increasing. A novel area of nanotechnology is the application in medical implants. The widespread use of nanoparticles leads to their higher prevalence in our environment. This, in turn, raises concerns regarding potential risks to humans. Previous studies have shown possible hazardous effects of some nanoparticles on mammalian cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) cultures. However, 2D in vitro cell cultures display several disadvantages such as changes in cell shape, cell function, cell responses and lack of cell-cell contacts. For this reason, the development of better models for mimicking in vivo conditions is essential. In the present work, we cultivated A549 cells and NIH-3T3 cells in three-dimensional (3D) spheroids and investigated the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO-NP) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP). The results were compared to cultivation in 2D monolayer culture. A549 cells in 3D cell culture formed loose aggregates which were more sensitive to the toxicity of ZnO-NP in comparison to cells grown in 2D monolayers. In contrast, NIH-3T3 cells showed a compact 3D spheroid structure and no differences in the sensitivity of the NIH-3T3 cells to ZnO-NP were observed between 2D and 3D cultures. TiO2-NP were non-toxic in 2D cultures but affected cell-cell interaction during 3D spheroid formation of A549 and NIH-3T3 cells. When TiO2-NP were directly added during spheroid formation in the cultures of the two cell lines tested, several smaller spheroids were formed instead of a single spheroid. This effect was not observed if the nanoparticles were added after spheroid formation. In this case, a slight decrease in cell viability was determined only for A549 3D spheroids. The obtained results demonstrate the importance of 3D cell culture studies for nanoparticle safety testing, since some effects cannot be revealed in 2D

  5. [Spheroid body myopathy: case report].

    PubMed

    Scola, Rosana Hermínia; Trentin, Alcides Júnior; Vaez, Rodrigo; Gignon, Vinicius de Faria; Costa, Thaís Gurgel; Werneck, Lineu Cesar

    2005-06-01

    Spheroid body myopathy is a rare illness classified in the group of the congenital myopathies as a desmin-related neuromuscular disorder, presenting dominant autosomical origin with the beginning of the symptoms in the adult phase. We report on a seven years old girl with facial paresia, generalized muscular hypotrophy and hypotony, generalized deep areflexia, proximal upper and lower limbs muscular strengh and distal upper limbs grade 3 and distal lower limbs grade 1. Needle electromyography evidenced increased conscription and potentials of motor unit of short duration and low amplitude, characterizing a myopathic standard. The muscle biopsy disclosed mixed standard to myopathy, denervation and inclusion bodies that are consistent to spheroid body myopathy. In this case, the patient presented, in advance, early beginning of the symptoms and there are no similar cases in the family.

  6. Significance of rat mammary tumors for human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jose

    2015-02-01

    We have previously indicated that the ideal animal tumor model should mimic the human disease. This means that the investigator should be able to ascertain the influence of host factors on the initiation of tumorigenesis, mimic the susceptibility of tumor response based on age and reproductive history, and determine the response of the tumors induced to chemotherapy. The utilization of experimental models of mammary carcinogenesis in risk assessment requires that the influence of ovarian, pituitary, and placental hormones, among others, as well as overall reproductive events are taken into consideration, since they are important modifiers of the susceptibility of the organ to neoplastic development. Several species, such as rodents, dogs, cats, and monkeys, have been evaluated for these purposes; however, none of them fulfills all the criteria specified previously. Rodents, however, are the most widely used models; therefore, this work will concentrate on discussing the rat rodent model of mammary carcinogenesis.

  7. Alterations of telomere length in human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kheirollahi, Majid; Mehrazin, Masoud; Kamalian, Naser; Mehdipour, Parvin

    2011-09-01

    Telomeres at the ends of human chromosomes consist of tandem hexametric (TTAGGG)n repeats, which protect them from degradation. At each cycle of cell division, most normal somatic cells lose approximately 50-100 bp of the terminal telomeric repeat DNA. Precise prediction of growth and estimation of the malignant potential of brain tumors require additional markers. DNA extraction was performed from the 51 frozen tissues, and a non-radioactive chemiluminescent assay was used for Southern blotting. One sample t-test shows highly significant difference in telomere length in meningioma and astrocytoma with normal range. According to our results, higher grades of meningioma and astrocytoma tumors show more heterogeneity in telomere length, and also it seems shortening process of telomeres is an early event in brain tumors.

  8. The p53 gene and protein in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, D.N. )

    1994-01-01

    Because p53 gene alterations are commonplace in human tumors and because p53 protein is involved in a number of important cellular pathways, p53 has become a topic of intensive investigation, both by basic scientists and clinicians. p53 was initially identified by two independent laboratories in 1979 as a 53 kilodalton (kD) protein that complexes with the large T antigen of SV40 virus. Shortly thereafter, it was shown that the E1B oncoprotein of adenovirus also binds p53. The binding of two different oncogenic viral tumor proteins to the same cellular protein suggested that p53 might be integral to tumorigenesis. The human p53 cDNA and gene were subsequently cloned in the mid-1980s, and analysis of p53 gene alterations in human tumors followed a few year later. During these 10 years, researchers grappling with the vagaries of p53 first characterized the gene as an oncogene, then as a tumor suppressor gene, and most recently as both a tumor suppressor gene and a so-called [open quotes]dominant negative[close quotes] oncogene. The last few years have seen an explosion in work on this single gene and its protein product. A review of a computerized medical database revealed approximately 650 articles on p53 in 1992 alone. p53 has assumed importance in neuro-oncology because p53 mutations and protein alterations are frequent in the common diffuse, fibrillary astrocytic tumors of adults. p53 mutations in astrocytomas were first described in 1989 and were followed by more extensive analyses of gene mutations and protein alterations in adult astrocytomas. The gene has also been studied in less common brain tumors. Elucidating the role of p53 in brain tumorigenesis will not only enhance understanding of brain tumor biology but may also contribute to improved diagnosis and therapy. This discussion reviews key aspects of the p53 gene and protein, and describe their emerging roles in central nervous system neoplasia. 102 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Scalable Differentiation of Human iPSCs in a Multicellular Spheroid-based 3D Culture into Hepatocyte-like Cells through Direct Wnt/β-catenin Pathway Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Pettinato, Giuseppe; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Fisher, Robert A; Mangino, Martin J.; Zhang, Ning; Wen, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute liver failure by cell transplantation is hindered by a shortage of human hepatocytes. Current protocols for hepatic differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) result in low yields, cellular heterogeneity, and limited scalability. In the present study, we have developed a novel multicellular spheroid-based hepatic differentiation protocol starting from embryoid bodies of hiPSCs (hiPSC-EBs) for robust mass production of human hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) using two novel inhibitors of the Wnt pathway. The resultant hiPSC-EB-HLCs expressed liver-specific genes, secreted hepatic proteins such as Albumin, Alpha Fetoprotein, and Fibrinogen, metabolized ammonia, and displayed cytochrome P450 activities and functional activities typical of mature primary hepatocytes, such as LDL storage and uptake, ICG uptake and release, and glycogen storage. Cell transplantation of hiPSC-EB-HLC in a rat model of acute liver failure significantly prolonged the mean survival time and resolved the liver injury when compared to the no-transplantation control animals. The transplanted hiPSC-EB-HLCs secreted human albumin into the host plasma throughout the examination period (2 weeks). Transplantation successfully bridged the animals through the critical period for survival after acute liver failure, providing promising clues of integration and full in vivo functionality of these cells after treatment with WIF-1 and DKK-1. PMID:27616299

  10. Sigma and opioid receptors in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.E.; Szuecs, M.; Mamone, J.Y.; Bem, W.T.; Rush, M.D.; Johnson, F.E.; Coscia, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Human brain tumors and nude mouse-borne human neuroblastomas and gliomas were analyzed for sigma and opioid receptor content. Sigma binding was assessed using ({sup 3}H) 1, 3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), whereas opioid receptor subtypes were measured with tritiated forms of the following: {mu}, (D-ala{sup 2}, mePhe{sup 4}, gly-ol{sup 5}) enkephalin (DAMGE); {kappa}, ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) or U69,593; {delta}, (D-pen{sup 2}, D-pen{sup 5}) enkephalin (DPDPE) or (D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5}) enkephalin (DADLE) with {mu} suppressor present. Binding parameters were estimated by homologous displacement assays followed by analysis using the LIGAND program. Sigma binding was detected in 15 of 16 tumors examined with very high levels found in a brain metastasis from an adenocarcinoma of lung and a human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) passaged in nude mice. {kappa} opioid receptor binding was detected in 4 of 4 glioblastoma multiforme specimens and 2 of 2 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but not in the other brain tumors analyzed.

  11. Alternating electric fields arrest cell proliferation in animal tumor models and human brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kirson, Eilon D.; Dbalý, Vladimír; Tovaryš, František; Vymazal, Josef; Soustiel, Jean F.; Itzhaki, Aviran; Mordechovich, Daniel; Steinberg-Shapira, Shirley; Gurvich, Zoya; Schneiderman, Rosa; Wasserman, Yoram; Salzberg, Marc; Ryffel, Bernhard; Goldsher, Dorit; Dekel, Erez; Palti, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    We have recently shown that low intensity, intermediate frequency, electric fields inhibit by an anti-microtubule mechanism of action, cancerous cell growth in vitro. Using implanted electrodes, these fields were also shown to inhibit the growth of dermal tumors in mice. The present study extends these findings to additional cell lines [human breast carcinoma; MDA-MB-231, and human non-small-cell lung carcinoma (H1299)] and to animal tumor models (intradermal B16F1 melanoma and intracranial F-98 glioma) using external insulated electrodes. These findings led to the initiation of a pilot clinical trial of the effects of TTFields in 10 patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). Median time to disease progression in these patients was 26.1 weeks and median overall survival was 62.2 weeks. These time to disease progression and OS values are more than double the reported medians of historical control patients. No device-related serious adverse events were seen after >70 months of cumulative treatment in all of the patients. The only device-related side effect seen was a mild to moderate contact dermatitis beneath the field delivering electrodes. We conclude that TTFields are a safe and effective new treatment modality which effectively slows down tumor growth in vitro, in vivo and, as demonstrated here, in human cancer patients. PMID:17551011

  12. Absence of human cytomegalovirus infection in childhood brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Iacopo; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Becciani, Sabrina; Facchini, Ludovica; Guidi, Milena; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Moriondo, Maria; Baroni, Gianna; Stival, Alessia; Farina, Silvia; Genitori, Lorenzo; de Martino, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common human pathogen which induces different clinical manifestations related to the age and the immune conditions of the host. HCMV infection seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of adult glioblastomas. The aim of our study was to detect the presence of HCMV in high grade gliomas and other pediatric brain tumors. This hypothesis might have important therapeutic implications, offering a new target for adjuvant therapies. Among 106 pediatric patients affected by CNS tumors we selected 27 patients with a positive HCMV serology. The serological analysis revealed 7 patients with positive HCMV IGG (≥14 U/mL), whom had also a high HCMV IgG avidity, suggesting a more than 6 months-dated infection. Furthermore, HCMV IGM were positive (≥22 U/mL) in 20 patients. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in all the 27 samples. Despite a positive HCMV serology, confirmed by ELISA, no viral DNA was shown at the PCR analysis in the patients’ neoplastic cells. At immunohistochemistry, no expression of HCMV antigens was observed in tumoral cells. Our results are in agreement with recent results in adults which did not evidence the presence of HCMV genome in glioblastoma lesions. We did not find any correlation between HCMV infection and pediatric CNS tumors. PMID:26396923

  13. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown. PMID:26649054

  14. Conserved Expression Signatures between Medaka and Human Pigment Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred; Kneitz, Susanne; Wilde, Brigitta; Wagner, Toni; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Spaink, Herman P.; Meierjohann, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in gene expression are a hallmark of cancer cells. Differential tumor-specific transcript levels of single genes or whole sets of genes may be critical for the neoplastic phenotype and important for therapeutic considerations or useful as biomarkers. As an approach to filter out such relevant expression differences from the plethora of changes noted in global expression profiling studies, we searched for changes of gene expression levels that are conserved. Transcriptomes from massive parallel sequencing of different types of melanoma from medaka were generated and compared to microarray datasets from zebrafish and human melanoma. This revealed molecular conservation at various levels between fish models and human tumors providing a useful strategy for identifying expression signatures strongly associated with disease phenotypes and uncovering new melanoma molecules. PMID:22693581

  15. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Parker, Terry L; Walker, David A; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B; Gellert, Paul R; Garnett, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money.

  16. Evaluation of The Combined Effects of Hyperthermia, Cobalt-60 Gamma Rays and IUdR on Cultured Glioblastoma Spheroid Cells and Dosimetry Using TLD-100.

    PubMed

    Neshasteh-Riz, Ali; Rahdani, Rozhin; Mostaar, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    In radiation treatment, the irradiation which is effective enough to control the tumors far exceeds normal-tissues tolerance. Thus to avoid such unfavourable outcomes, some methods sensitizing the tumor cells to radiation are used. Iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) is a halogenated thymidine analogue that known to be effective as a radiosensitizer in human cancer therapy. Improving the potential efficacy of radiation therapy after combining to hyperthermia depends on the magnitude of the differential sensitization of the hyperthermic effects or on the differential cytotoxicity of the radiation effects on the tumor cells. In this study, we evaluated the combined effects of IUdR, hyperthermia and gamma rays of (60)Co on human glioblastoma spheroids culture. In this experimental study,the cultured spheroids with 100µm diameter were treated by 1 µM IUdR, 43°C hyperthermia for an hour and 2 Gy gamma rays, respectively. The DNA damages induced in cells were compared using alkaline comet assay method, and dosimetry was then performed by TLD-100. Comet scores were calculated as mean ± standard error of mean (SEM) using one-way ANOVA. Comparison of DNA damages induced by IUdR and hyperthermia + gamma treatment showed 2.67- and 1.92-fold enhancement, respectively, as compared to the damages induced by radiation alone or radiation combined IUdR. Dosimetry results showed the accurate dose delivered to cells. Analysis of the comet tail moments of spheroids showed that the radiation treatments combined with hyperthermia and IUdR caused significant radiosensitization when compared to related results of irradiation alone or of irradiation with IUdR. These results suggest a potential clinical advantage of combining radiation with hyperthermia and indicate effectiveness of hyperthermia treatment in inducing cytotoxicity of tumor cells.

  17. Role of tumor endothelium in CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cell infiltration of human pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nummer, Daniel; Suri-Payer, Elisabeth; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Hubertus; Bonertz, Andreas; Galindo, Luis; Antolovich, Dalibor; Koch, Moritz; Büchler, Markus; Weitz, Jürgen; Schirrmacher, Volker; Beckhove, Philipp

    2007-08-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells have been detected in human carcinomas and may play a role in preventing the rejection of malignant cells. We quantified Treg cells and the expression of the addressins and the respective ligands that attract them in blood and in human pancreatic tumors and adjacent nonmalignant tissues from 47 patients. The capacity of Treg cells to adhere to and transmigrate through autologous endothelial cells was tested in vitro using spheroid adhesion assays and in vivo using a xenotransplant NOD/SCID model and in the presence and absence of antibodies to addressins. All statistical tests were two-sided. More Treg cells infiltrated pancreatic carcinomas than adjacent nonmalignant pancreatic tissues (120 cells per mm2 versus 80 cells per mm2, difference = 40 cells per mm2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 21.2 cells per mm2 to 52.1 cells per mm2; P<.001). In contrast to conventional CD4+ T cells, more blood-derived Treg cells adhered to (1.0% versus 5.2%, difference = 4.2%, 95% CI = 2.7% to 5.6%; P<.001) and transmigrated through (3332 cells versus 4976 cells, difference = 1644 cells, 95% CI = 708 cells to 2580 cells; P = .008) autologous tumor-derived endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo (458 cells versus 605 cells, difference = 147 cells, 95% CI = 50.8 to 237.2 cells; P = .04). Tumor-derived endothelial cells expressed higher levels of addressins--including mucosal adressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), CD62-E, and CD166--than endothelial cells from normal tissue. Experiments using antibodies to addressins showed that transmigration was mediated by interactions of addressins, including MAdCAM-1, VCAM-1, CD62-E, and CD166 with their respective ligands, beta7 integrin, CD62L, and CD166, which were expressed specifically on Treg cells. Tumor-induced expression of addressins on the surface of endothelial cells allows a selective transmigration of Treg cells from peripheral blood to tumor tissues.

  18. Activated protooncogenes in human lung tumors from smokers.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, S H; Anna, C K; Brown, K C; Wiest, J S; Beattie, E J; Pero, R W; Iglehart, J D; Anderson, M W

    1991-02-15

    Fourteen primary human lung tumor DNAs from smokers were analyzed for transforming activity by two DNA transfection assays. Activated protooncogenes were detected in 3 of 11 tumor DNAs by the NIH 3T3 focus assay, whereas activated protooncogenes were detected in 11 of 13 tumor DNAs by the NIH 3T3 cotransfection-nude mouse tumorigenicity assay. K- or NRAS genes activated by point mutation at codons 12 or 61 were detected in a large cell carcinoma, a squamous cell carcinoma, and 5 adenocarcinomas. An HRAS oncogene activated by a different mechanism was detected in an epidermoid carcinoma. One adenocarcinoma was found to contain an activated RAF gene. Two unidentified transforming genes were detected in a squamous cell carcinoma DNA and two adenocarcinoma DNAs. Eight of 10 lung adenocarcinomas that had formed metastases at the time of surgery were found to contain RAS oncogenes. No significant increase in metastasis was observed in the lung adenocarcinomas that contained one or more 6-kilobase EcoRI alleles of the LMYC gene. Overall, 12 of 14 (86%) of the lung tumor DNAs from smokers were found to contain activated protooncogenes. RAS oncogenes appear to play a role in the development of metastases in lung adenocarcinomas.

  19. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  20. Enzymatically prepared redox-responsive hydrogels as potent matrices for hepatocellular carcinoma cell spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Kousuke; Naito, Shono; Wakabayashi, Rie; Goto, Masahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2016-11-01

    Cellular spheroids have been received much attention in the biological and biomedical fields, especially as a base material for drug assays, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. Hydrogels have potential for scalable preparation of spheroids because they provide a spatial environment suitable for three-dimensional cell cultivation. Herein, the potential use of a redox-responsive hydrogel as a scaffold for preparation and recovery of spheroids is reported. A hydrogel composed of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), which can be degraded using cysteine as a reducing agent under mild conditions, is prepared by mixing an octa-thiolated PEG derivative (8-arm PEG-SH), horseradish peroxidase and a small phenolic compound (Glycyl-L-tyrosine). Human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are encapsulated in the hydrogel and cellular spheroids formed by proliferation within the scaffolds. After seven days of cultivation, the size of the HepG2 spheroids reached a diameter between ≈40 and 60 μm, depending on the 8-arm PEG-SH concentration. Liver-specific functions of the HepG2 spheroids such as albumin secretion and urea production are retained at higher levels than those of cells prepared from traditional two-dimensional mono layers. These results suggest that the system presented here has potential for preparation of cellular spheroids for tissue engineering applications.

  1. Detachably assembled microfluidic device for perfusion culture and post-culture analysis of a spheroid array.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yusuke; Hattori, Koji; Yanagawa, Fumiki; Sugiura, Shinji; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Nakazawa, Kohji

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidic devices permit perfusion culture of three-dimensional (3D) tissue, mimicking the flow of blood in vascularized 3D tissue in our body. Here, we report a microfluidic device composed of a two-part microfluidic chamber chip and multi-microwell array chip able to be disassembled at the culture endpoint. Within the microfluidic chamber, an array of 3D tissue aggregates (spheroids) can be formed and cultured under perfusion. Subsequently, detailed post-culture analysis of the spheroids collected from the disassembled device can be performed. This device facilitates uniform spheroid formation, growth analysis in a high-throughput format, controlled proliferation via perfusion flow rate, and post-culture analysis of spheroids. We used the device to culture spheroids of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells under two controlled perfusion flow rates. HepG2 spheroids exhibited greater cell growth at higher perfusion flow rates than at lower perfusion flow rates, and exhibited different metabolic activity and mRNA and protein expression under the different flow rate conditions. These results show the potential of perfusion culture to precisely control the culture environment in microfluidic devices. The construction of spheroid array chambers allows multiple culture conditions to be tested simultaneously, with potential applications in toxicity and drug screening. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Optimization of the formation of embedded multicellular spheroids of MCF-7 cells: How to reliably produce a biomimetic 3D model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenli; Li, Caibin; Baguley, Bruce C; Zhou, Fang; Zhou, Weisai; Shaw, John P; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Zimei; Liu, Jianping

    2016-12-15

    To obtain a multicellular MCF-7 spheroid model to mimic the three-dimensional (3D) of tumors, the microwell liquid overlay (A) and hanging-drop/agar (B) methods were first compared for their technical parameters. Then a method for embedding spheroids within collagen was optimized. For method A, centrifugation assisted cells form irregular aggregates but not spheroids. For method B, an extended sedimentation period of over 24 h for cell suspensions and increased viscosity of the culture medium using methylcellulose were necessary to harvest a dense and regular cell spheroid. When the number was less than 5000 cells/drop, embedded spheroids showed no tight cores and higher viability than the unembedded. However, above 5000 cells/drop, cellular viability of embedded spheroids was not significantly different from unembedded spheroids and cells invading through the collagen were in a sun-burst pattern with tight cores. Propidium Iodide staining indicated that spheroids had necrotic cores. The doxorubicin cytotoxicity demonstrated that spheroids were less susceptible to DOX than their monolayer cells. A reliable and reproducible method for embedding spheroids using the hanging-drop/agarose method within collagen is described herein. The cell culture model can be used to guide experimental manipulation of 3D cell cultures and to evaluate anticancer drug efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Human Dynactin-Associated Protein Transforms NIH3T3 Cells to Generate Highly Vascularized Tumors with Weak Cell-Cell Interaction.

    PubMed

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Wang, Weixiang; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Daisuke; Togo, Yuki; Tokuyama, Masahiro; Hosoi, Miho; Koseki, Koichi; Wada, Shu-Ichi; Nagai, Nobuo; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nomura, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Makoto; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Mizukami, Tamio

    2015-01-01

    Human dynactin-associated protein (dynAP) is a transmembrane protein that promotes AktSer473 phosphorylation. Here, we report the oncogenic properties of dynAP. In contrast to control NIH3T3 cells expressing LacZ (NIH3T3LacZ), NIH3T3dynAP cells vigorously formed foci in two-dimensional culture, colonies on soft agar, and spheroids in anchorage-deficient three-dimensional culture. NIH3T3dynAP cells injected into nude mice produced tumors with abundant blood vessels and weak cell-cell contacts. Expression of dynAP elevated the level of rictor (an essential subunit of mTORC2) and promoted phosphorylation of FOXO3aSer253. FOXO3a is a transcriptional factor that stimulates expression of pro-apoptotic genes and phosphorylation of FOXO3a abrogates its function, resulting in promoted cell survival. Knockdown of rictor in NIH3T3dynAP cells reduced AktSer473 phosphorylation and formation of foci, colony in soft agar and spheroid, indicating that dynAP-induced activation of the mTORC2/AktSer473 pathway for cell survival contributes to cell transformation. E-cadherin and its mRNA were markedly reduced upon expression of dynAP, giving rise to cells with higher motility, which may be responsible for the weak cell-cell adhesion in tumors. Thus, dynAP could be a new oncoprotein and a target for cancer therapy.

  4. Radiopotentiation of human brain tumor cells by sodium phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, T; Lu, R M; Hu, L J; Lamborn, K R; Prados, M D; Deen, D F

    1999-08-03

    Phenylacetate (PA) inhibits the growth of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo and shows promise as a relatively nontoxic agent for cancer treatment. A recent report shows that prolonged exposure of cells to low concentrations of PA can enhance the radiation response of brain tumor cells in vitro, opening up the possibility of using this drug to improve the radiation therapy of brain tumor patients. We investigated the cytotoxicity produced by sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) alone and in combination with X-rays in SF-767 human glioblastoma cells and in two medulloblastoma cell lines, Masden and Daoy. Exposure of all three cell lines to relatively low concentrations of NaPA for up to 5 days did not enhance the subsequent cell killing produced by X-irradiation. However, enhanced cell killing was achieved by exposing either oxic or hypoxic cells to relatively high drug concentrations ( > 50-70 mM) for 1 h immediately before X-irradiation. Because central nervous system toxicity can occur in humans at serum concentrations of approximately 6 mM PA, translation of these results into clinical trials will likely require local drug-delivery strategies to achieve drug concentrations that can enhance the radiation response. The safety of such an approach with this drug has not been demonstrated.

  5. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Xinyu; Han, Xingpeng; Zhang, Fang; He, Miao; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhao, Hong

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  6. Epigenetic regulation of putative tumor suppressor TGFBI in human leukemias.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hongbo; Liu, Jing; Guo, Dan; Liu, Peixiang; Zhao, Yongliang

    2014-01-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo data have demonstrated the TGFBI gene functions as a putative tumor suppressor and is frequently downregulated in human tumors of different histological types. The hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter, as one of the main regulatory mechanisms, is associated with TGFBI silencing. In this study, we used a methylation-specific PCR (MSP) method to evaluate the methylation status of the TGFBI promoter in human leukemias. Real-time RT-PCR and methylation-specific PCR approaches were performed to define the TGFBI expression and promoter methylation in human leukemia cell lines and clinical samples. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients, bisulfite-converted, and analyzed by the MSP method. Hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter occurred in leukemia cell lines and demethylation treatment reexpressed TGFBI at a substantially increased level in most of leukemia cell lines tested. Furthermore, a much higher level of CpG island methylation and a significantly lower TGFBI expression were also identified in clinical leukemia samples. The results suggest an important role of promoter methylation in regulating TGFBI expression in leukemia, which provides a useful diagnostic marker for clinical management of human leukemias.

  7. Advances in multicellular spheroids formation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, X.; Hartanto, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional multicellular spheroids (MCSs) have a complex architectural structure, dynamic cell–cell/cell–matrix interactions and bio-mimicking in vivo microenvironment. As a fundamental building block for tissue reconstruction, MCSs have emerged as a powerful tool to narrow down the gap between the in vitro and in vivo model. In this review paper, we discussed the structure and biology of MCSs and detailed fabricating methods. Among these methods, the approach in microfluidics with hydrogel support for MCS formation is promising because it allows essential cell–cell/cell–matrix interactions in a confined space. PMID:28202590

  8. A microfluidic platform for chemoresistive testing of multicellular pleural cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Ruppen, Janine; Cortes-Dericks, Lourdes; Marconi, Emanuele; Karoubi, Golnaz; Schmid, Ralph A; Peng, Renwang; Marti, Thomas M; Guenat, Olivier T

    2014-03-21

    This study reports on a microfluidic platform on which single multicellular spheroids from malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), an aggressive tumor with poor prognosis, can be loaded, trapped and tested for chemotherapeutic drug response. A new method to detect the spheroid viability cultured on the microfluidic chip as a function of the drug concentration is presented. This approach is based on the evaluation of the caspase activity in the supernatant sampled from the chip and tested using a microplate reader. This simple and time-saving method does only require a minimum amount of manipulations and was established for very low numbers of cells. This feature is particularly important in view of personalised medicine applications for which the number of cells obtained from the patients is low. MPM spheroids were continuously perfused for 48 hours with cisplatin, one of the standard chemotherapeutic drugs used to treat MPM. The 50% growth inhibitory concentration of cisplatin in perfused MPM spheroids was found to be twice as high as in spheroids cultured under static conditions. This chemoresistance increase might be due to the continuous support of nutrients and oxygen to the perfused spheroids.

  9. Shedding of mitotic cells from the surface of multicell spheroids during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, J.; Freyer, J.P.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    During the growth of EMT6/Ro mammary tumor multicell spheroids, a large number of cells are shed into the suspension medium. The rate of cell shedding was 218 cells per square millimeter of spheroid surface per hour, or up to 1.5% of the total spheroid cell content per hour. Shed cells had a clonogenic capacity equal to that of exponential monolayer cultures and were further characterized by volume distribution, mitotic index, flow cytofluorometry, and autoradiography. The results indicated that cells are released from the spheroid surface at mitosis, presumably due to a loosening of the cell-to-cell attachment during this cycle phase. These mitotic cells, when placed in monolayer culture, attached and grew synchronously with a cell cycle time of about 13 hours. Shed cells kept in suspension culture had a similar cell cycle time, but these cells reaggregated immediately after mitosis. The results indicated that cell shedding and reaggregation both occur near the time of mitosis and are intrinsic factors regulating the initiation and subsequent growth of multicell spheroids. Although these studies were done with spheroids cultured in vitro, shedding of mitotic cells may play an important role in the in vivo process of metastasis.

  10. High-content assays for characterizing the viability and morphology of 3D cancer spheroid cultures.

    PubMed

    Sirenko, Oksana; Mitlo, Trisha; Hesley, Jayne; Luke, Steve; Owens, Windsor; Cromwell, Evan F

    2015-09-01

    There is an increasing interest in using three-dimensional (3D) spheroids for modeling cancer and tissue biology to accelerate translation research. Development of higher throughput assays to quantify phenotypic changes in spheroids is an active area of investigation. The goal of this study was to develop higher throughput high-content imaging and analysis methods to characterize phenotypic changes in human cancer spheroids in response to compound treatment. We optimized spheroid cell culture protocols using low adhesion U-bottom 96- and 384-well plates for three common cancer cell lines and improved the workflow with a one-step staining procedure that reduces assay time and minimizes variability. We streamlined imaging acquisition by using a maximum projection algorithm that combines cellular information from multiple slices through a 3D object into a single image, enabling efficient comparison of different spheroid phenotypes. A custom image analysis method was implemented to provide multiparametric characterization of single-cell and spheroid phenotypes. We report a number of readouts, including quantification of marker-specific cell numbers, measurement of cell viability and apoptosis, and characterization of spheroid size and shape. Assay performance was assessed using established anticancer cytostatic and cytotoxic drugs. We demonstrated concentration-response effects for different readouts and measured IC50 values, comparing 3D spheroid results to two-dimensional cell cultures. Finally, a library of 119 approved anticancer drugs was screened across a wide range of concentrations using HCT116 colon cancer spheroids. The proposed methods can increase performance and throughput of high-content assays for compound screening and evaluation of anticancer drugs with 3D cell models.

  11. Scaffold-free Prevascularized Microtissue Spheroids for Pulp Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dissanayaka, W L; Zhu, L; Hargreaves, K M; Jin, L; Zhang, C

    2014-12-01

    Creating an optimal microenvironment that mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of natural pulp and securing an adequate blood supply for the survival of cell transplants are major hurdles that need to be overcome in dental pulp regeneration. However, many currently available scaffolds fail to mimic essential functions of natural ECM. The present study investigated a novel approach involving the use of scaffold-free microtissue spheroids of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) prevascularized by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in pulp regeneration. In vitro-fabricated microtissue spheroids were inserted into the canal space of tooth-root slices and were implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. Histological examination revealed that, after four-week implantation, tooth-root slices containing microtissue spheroids resulted in well-vascularized and cellular pulp-like tissues, compared with empty tooth-root slices, which were filled with only subcutaneous fat tissue. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that the tissue found in the tooth-root slices was of human origin, as characterized by the expression of human mitochondria, and contained odontoblast-like cells organized along the dentin, as assessed by immunostaining for nestin and dentin sialoprotein (DSP). Vascular structures formed by HUVECs in vitro were successfully anastomosed with the host vasculature upon transplantation in vivo, as shown by immunostaining for human CD31. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that prevascularized, scaffold-free, microtissue spheroids can successfully regenerate vascular dental pulp-like tissue and also highlight the significance of the microtissue microenvironment as an optimal environment for successful pulp-regeneration strategies. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  12. Scaffold-free Prevascularized Microtissue Spheroids for Pulp Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayaka, W.L.; Zhu, L.; Hargreaves, K.M.; Jin, L.; Zhang, C.

    2014-01-01

    Creating an optimal microenvironment that mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of natural pulp and securing an adequate blood supply for the survival of cell transplants are major hurdles that need to be overcome in dental pulp regeneration. However, many currently available scaffolds fail to mimic essential functions of natural ECM. The present study investigated a novel approach involving the use of scaffold-free microtissue spheroids of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) prevascularized by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in pulp regeneration. In vitro-fabricated microtissue spheroids were inserted into the canal space of tooth-root slices and were implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. Histological examination revealed that, after four-week implantation, tooth-root slices containing microtissue spheroids resulted in well-vascularized and cellular pulp-like tissues, compared with empty tooth-root slices, which were filled with only subcutaneous fat tissue. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that the tissue found in the tooth-root slices was of human origin, as characterized by the expression of human mitochondria, and contained odontoblast-like cells organized along the dentin, as assessed by immunostaining for nestin and dentin sialoprotein (DSP). Vascular structures formed by HUVECs in vitro were successfully anastomosed with the host vasculature upon transplantation in vivo, as shown by immunostaining for human CD31. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that prevascularized, scaffold-free, microtissue spheroids can successfully regenerate vascular dental pulp-like tissue and also highlight the significance of the microtissue microenvironment as an optimal environment for successful pulp-regeneration strategies. PMID:25201919

  13. Elucidation of spheroid formation with and without the extrusion step.

    PubMed

    Liew, Celine V; Chua, Siang Meng; Heng, Paul W S

    2007-02-09

    Spheroid formation mechanisms were investigated using extrusion-spheronization (ES) and rotary processing (RP). Using ES (cross-hatch), ES (teardrop), and RP (teardrop), spheroids with similar mass median diameter (MMD) and span were produced using equivalent formulation and spheronization conditions. During spheronization, the teardrop-studded rotating frictional surface, with increased peripheral tip speed and duration, produced spheroids of equivalent MMD and span to those produced by the cross-hatch rotating frictional plate surface. The roundness of these spheroids was also similar. RP required less water to produce spheroids of MMD similar to that of spheroids produced by ES. However, these RP spheroids were less spherical. Image analysis of 625 spheroids per batch indicated that the size distribution of RP spheroids had significantly greater SD, positive skewness, and kurtosis. Morphological examination of time-sampled spheroids produced by ES indicated that spheroid formation occurred predominantly by attrition and layering, while RP spheroids were formed by nucleation, agglomeration, layering, and coalescence. RP produced spheroids with higher crushing strength than that of ES-produced spheroids. The amount of moisture lost during spheronization for spheroids produced by ES had minimal influence on their eventual size. Differences in process and formulation parameters, in addition to size distribution and observed morphological changes, enabled a greater understanding of spheroid formation and methods to optimize spheroid production.

  14. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells improve motor functions and are neuroprotective in the 6-hydroxydopamine-rat model for Parkinson's disease when cultured in monolayer cultures but suppress hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal memory function when cultured in spheroids.

    PubMed

    Berg, Jürgen; Roch, Manfred; Altschüler, Jennifer; Winter, Christine; Schwerk, Anne; Kurtz, Andreas; Steiner, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Adult human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been reported to induce neuroprotective effects in models for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, these effects strongly depend on the most optimal application of the transplant. In the present study we compared monolayer-cultured (aMSC) and spheroid (sMSC) MSC following transplantation into the substantia nigra (SN) of 6-OHDA lesioned rats regarding effects on the local microenvironment, degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG as well as motor and memory function in the 6-OHDA-rat model for PD. aMSC transplantation significantly increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the SN, increased the levels of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and improved motor functions compared to untreated and sMSC treated animals. In contrast, sMSC grafting induced an increased local microgliosis, decreased TH levels in the SN and reduced numbers of newly generated cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) without yet affecting hippocampal learning and memory function. We conclude that the neuroprotective potential of adipose-derived MSC in the rat model of PD crucially depends on the applied cellular phenotype.

  15. Phagocytosis of dying tumor cells by human peritoneal mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Britta Janina; Lindau, Dennis; Ripper, Dagmar; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Glatzle, Jörg; Witte, Maria; Beck, Henning; Keppeler, Hildegard; Lauber, Kirsten; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Königsrainer, Alfred

    2011-05-15

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis is an advanced form of metastatic disease characterized by cancer cell dissemination onto the peritoneum. It is commonly observed in ovarian and colorectal cancers and is associated with poor patient survival. Novel therapies consist of cytoreductive surgery in combination with intraperitoneal chemotherapy, aiming at tumor cell death induction. The resulting dying tumor cells are considered to be eliminated by professional as well as semi-professional phagocytes. In the present study, we have identified a hitherto unknown type of 'amateur' phagocyte in this environment: human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HMCs). We demonstrate that HMCs engulf corpses of dying ovarian and colorectal cancer cells, as well as other types of apoptotic cells. Flow cytometric, confocal and electron microscopical analyses revealed that HMCs ingest dying cell fragments in a dose- and time-dependent manner and the internalized material subsequently traffics into late phagolysosomes. Regarding the mechanisms of prey cell recognition, our results show that HMCs engulf apoptotic corpses in a serum-dependent and -independent fashion and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that diverse opsonin receptor systems orchestrating dying cell clearance are expressed in HMCs at high levels. Our data strongly suggest that HMCs contribute to dying cell removal in the peritoneum, and future studies will elucidate in what manner this influences tumor cell dissemination and the antitumor immune response.

  16. A novel model for evaluating therapies targeting human tumor vasculature and human cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Ojeda, Daniela; McLean, Karen; Bai, Shoumei; Pulaski, Heather; Gong, Yusong; Silva, Ines; Skorecki, Karl; Tzukerman, Maty; Buckanovich, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Human tumor vessels express tumor vascular markers (TVMs), proteins that are not expressed in normal blood vessels. Antibodies targeting TVMs could act as potent therapeutics. Unfortunately, preclinical in vivo studies testing anti-human TVM therapies have been difficult to perform due to a lack of in vivo models with confirmed expression of human TVMs. We therefore evaluated TVM expression in a human embryonic stem cell derived teratoma (hESCT) tumor model previously shown to have human vessels. We now report that, in the presence of tumor cells, hESCT tumor vessels express human TVMs. The addition of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human tumor endothelial cells significantly increases the number of human tumor vessels. TVM induction is mostly tumor type specific with ovarian cancer cells inducing primarily ovarian TVMs while breast cancer cells induce breast cancer specific TVMs. We demonstrate the utility of this model to test an anti-human specific TVM immunotherapeutics; anti-human Thy-1 TVM immunotherapy results in central tumor necrosis and a three-fold reduction in human tumor vascular density. Finally, we tested the ability of the hESCT model, with human tumor vascular niche, to enhance the engraftment rate of primary human ovarian cancer stem-like cells (CSC). ALDH+ CSC from patients (n=6) engrafted in hESCT within 4–12 weeks whereas none engrafted in the flank. ALDH- ovarian cancer cells showed no engraftment in the hESCT or flank (n=3). Thus this model represents a useful tool to test anti-human TVM therapy and evaluate in vivo human CSC tumor biology. PMID:23576551

  17. Metabolic imaging in microregions of tumors and normal tissues with bioluminescence and photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Klieser, W.; Walenta, S.; Paschen, W.; Kallinowski, F.; Vaupel, P.

    1988-08-03

    A method has been developed for metabolic imaging on a microscopic level in tumors, tumor spheroids, and normal tissues. The technique makes it possible to determine the spatial distribution of glucose, lactate, and ATP in absolute terms at similar locations within tissues or cell aggregates. The substrate distributions are registered in serial cryostat sections from tissue cryobiopsies or from frozen spheroids with the use of bioluminescence reactions. The light emission is measured directly by a special imaging photon counting system enabling on-line image analysis. The technique has been applied to human breast cancer xenografts, to spheroids originating from a human colon adenocarcinoma, and to skeletal rat muscle. Preliminary data obtained indicate that heterogeneities in the substrate distributions measured are much more pronounced in tumors than in normal tissue. There was no obvious correlation among the three quantities measured at similar locations within the tissues. The distribution of ATP corresponded well with the histological structure of larger spheroids; values were low in the necrotic center and high in the viable rim of these cell aggregates.

  18. Phase transitions in tumor growth: IV relationship between metabolic rate and fractal dimension of human tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt-Mar, J. A.; Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Cocho, G.; Mansilla, R.; Martin, R. R.; Montero, S.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2017-05-01

    By the use of thermodynamics formalism of irreversible processes, complex systems theory and systems biology, it is derived a relationship between the production of entropy per unit time, the fractal dimension and the tumor growth rate for human tumors cells. The thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates that, the dissipation function is a Landau potential and also the Lyapunov function of the dynamical behavior of tumor growth, which indicate the directional character, stability and robustness of the phenomenon. The entropy production rate may be used as a quantitative index of the metastatic potential of tumors. The current theoretical framework will hopefully provide a better understanding of cancer and contribute to improvements in cancer treatment.

  19. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  20. Drug screening and grouping by sensitivity with a panel of primary cultured cancer spheroids derived from endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Kiyohara, Yumiko; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Kubota, Satoshi; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Endo, Hiroko; Ueda, Yutaka; Kimura, Toshihiro; Kimura, Tadashi; Kamiura, Shoji; Inoue, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Several molecular targeting drugs are being evaluated for endometrial cancer; selecting patients whose cancers are sensitive to these agents is of paramount importance. Previously, we developed the cancer tissue-originated spheroid method for primary cancer cells taken from patients' tumors as well as patient-derived xenografts. In this study, we successfully prepared and cultured cancer tissue-originated spheroids from endometrial cancers. Characteristics of the original tumors were well retained in cancer tissue-originated spheroids including morphology and expression of p53 or neuroendocrine markers. We screened 79 molecular targeting drugs using two cancer tissue-originated spheroid lines derived from endometrioid adenocarcinoma grade 3 and serous adenocarcinoma. Among several hits, we focused on everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor, and YM155, a survivin inhibitor. When sensitivity to everolimus or YM155 was assessed in 12 or 11 cancer tissue-originated spheroids, respectively, from different endometrial cancer patients, the sensitivity varied substantially. The cancer tissue-originated spheroids sensitive to everolimus showed remarkable suppression of proliferation. The phosphorylation status of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 downstream molecules before and after everolimus treatment did not predict the effect of the drug. In contrast, the cancer tissue-originated spheroids sensitive to YM155 showed remarkable cell death. The effect of YM155 was also confirmed in vivo. The histological type correlated with YM155 sensitivity; non-endometrioid adenocarcinomas were sensitive and endometrioid adenocarcinomas were resistant. Non-canonical autophagic cell death was the most likely cause of cell death in a sensitive cancer tissue-originated spheroid. Thus, sensitivity assays using cancer tissue-originated spheroids from endometrial cancers may be useful for screening drugs and finding biomarkers. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer

  1. Tumor Environmental Factors Glucose Deprivation and Lactic Acidosis Induce Mitotic Chromosomal Instability – An Implication in Aneuploid Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chunpeng; Hu, Xun

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic chromosomal instability (CIN) plays important roles in tumor progression, but what causes CIN is incompletely understood. In general, tumor CIN arises from abnormal mitosis, which is caused by either intrinsic or extrinsic factors. While intrinsic factors such as mitotic checkpoint genes have been intensively studied, the impact of tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor CIN is largely unknown. We investigate if glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis – two tumor microenvironmental factors – could induce cancer cell CIN. We show that glucose deprivation with lactic acidosis significantly increases CIN in 4T1, MCF-7 and HCT116 scored by micronuclei, or aneuploidy, or abnormal mitosis, potentially via damaging DNA, up-regulating mitotic checkpoint genes, and/or amplifying centrosome. Of note, the feature of CIN induced by glucose deprivation with lactic acidosis is similar to that of aneuploid human tumors. We conclude that tumor environmental factors glucose deprivation and lactic acidosis can induce tumor CIN and propose that they are potentially responsible for human tumor aneuploidy. PMID:23675453

  2. Sequence dependence of administration of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-2 in murine tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R J; Gauny, S; Chan, A; Landre, P; Winkelhake, J L

    1989-02-01

    Simultaneous administration of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rhTNF) and interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) has been shown to block tumor take in murine models. We investigated the effects of sequence and schedule of administration as a function of tumor burden with two tumor models (B16 and Meth A). rhTNF followed by rhIL-2 had extraordinary antitumor efficacy, but rhIL-2 followed by rhTNF was much less effective. Sequential rhTNF/rhIL-2 therapy resulted in complete tumor regression, whereas simultaneous therapy resulted in complete tumor regression, whereas simultaneous therapy resulted in only reduced growth rate. Experiments with genetically immunodeficient mice suggested that T cell factors may be required for synergistic antitumor activity.

  3. Constrained spheroids for prolonged hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wen Hao; Fang, Yu; Yan, Jie; Hong, Xin; Hari Singh, Nisha; Wang, Shu Rui; Nugraha, Bramasta; Xia, Lei; Fong, Eliza Li Shan; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2016-02-01

    Liver-specific functions in primary hepatocytes can be maintained over extended duration in vitro using spheroid culture. However, the undesired loss of cells over time is still a major unaddressed problem, which consequently generates large variations in downstream assays such as drug screening. In static culture, the turbulence generated by medium change can cause spheroids to detach from the culture substrate. Under perfusion, the momentum generated by Stokes force similarly results in spheroid detachment. To overcome this problem, we developed a Constrained Spheroids (CS) culture system that immobilizes spheroids between a glass coverslip and an ultra-thin porous Parylene C membrane, both surface-modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and galactose ligands for optimum spheroid formation and maintenance. In this configuration, cell loss was minimized even when perfusion was introduced. When compared to the standard collagen sandwich model, hepatocytes cultured as CS under perfusion exhibited significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions such as urea secretion, and CYP1A1 and CYP3A2 metabolic activity. We propose the use of the CS culture as an improved culture platform to current hepatocyte spheroid-based culture systems.

  4. Intravital imaging of a spheroid-based orthotopic model of melanoma in the mouse ear skin

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Keefe T.; Jones, Stephen W.; Brighton, Hailey E.; Bo, Tao; Cochran, Shelly D.; Sharpless, Norman E.; Bear, James E.

    2017-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a powerful tool that enables the visualization of fluorescently tagged tumor cells and their stromal interactions within tissues in vivo. We have developed an orthotopic model of implanting multicellular melanoma tumor spheroids into the dermis of the mouse ear skin without the requirement for invasive surgery. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this approach to observe the primary tumor, single cell actin dynamics, and tumor-associated vasculature. These methods can be broadly applied to investigate an array of biological questions regarding tumor cell behavior in vivo. PMID:28748125

  5. Multicellular spheroids from normal and neoplastic thyroid tissues as a suitable model to test the effects of multikinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cirello, Valentina; Vaira, Valentina; Grassi, Elisa Stellaria; Vezzoli, Valeria; Ricca, Dario; Colombo, Carla; Bosari, Silvano; Vicentini, Leonardo; Persani, Luca; Ferrero, Stefano; Fugazzola, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Multicellular three-dimensional (3D) spheroids represent an experimental model that is intermediate in its complexity between monolayer cultures and patients’ tumor. In the present study, we characterize multicellular spheroids from papillary (PTC) and follicular (FTC) thyroid cancers and from the corresponding normal tissues. We show that these 3D structures well recapitulate the features of the original tissues, in either the differentiated and “stem-like” components. As a second step, we were aimed to test the effects of a small multikinase inhibitor, SP600125 (SP), previously shown to efficiently induce cell death in undifferentiated thyroid cancer monolayer cultures. We demonstrate the potent effect of SP on cell growth and survival in our 3D multicellular cultures. SP exerts its main effects through direct and highly significant inhibition of the ROCK pathway, known to be involved in the regulation of cell migration and β-catenin turnover. Consistently, SP treatment resulted in a significant decrease in β-catenin levels with respect to basal conditions in tumor but not in normal spheroids, indicating that the effect is promisingly selective on tumor cells. In conclusion, we provide the morphological and molecular characterization of thyroid normal and tumor spheroids. In this 3D model we tested in vitro the effects of the multikinase inhibitor SP and further characterized its mechanism of action in both normal and tumor spheroids, thus making it an ideal candidate for developing new drugs against thyroid cancer. PMID:28039458

  6. Spheroidization of medium-carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.M.; Hosford, W.F.

    1997-02-01

    Spheroidization experiments were made on a medium-carbon AISI 4037 steel, using both intercritical and subcritical annealing cycles. The results indicate that in the subcritical cycle the spheroidization occurred much more quickly than expected, so that shorter times were sufficient to achieve high formability. On the other hand, the hardness dropped faster in the intercritical cycle. Although more work needs to be done, these results suggest that using a subcritical spheroidization process instead of an intercritical process could achieve considerable savings in time, energy, and cost.

  7. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis.

  8. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  9. Moxifloxacin increases anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activity of irinotecan in human xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Debby; Halperin, Drora; Fabian, Ina; Tsarfaty, Galia; Askenasy, Nadir; Shalit, Itamar

    2010-04-15

    Camptothecins (CPTs) are topoisomerase I inhibitors chemotherapeutic agents used in combination chemotherapy. We showed previously that combination of moxifloxacin (MXF) and CPT induced inhibitory effects on topoisomerase I activity, on proliferation of HT-29 cells in vitro and enhanced apoptosis, compared to CPT alone. Analysis of secretion of the pro-angiogenic factors IL-8 and VEGF showed significant reduction by MXF. Using a murine model of human colon carcinoma xenograft, we compared the effects of MXF/CPT in vitro to MXF/irinotecan combination in vivo. We show that the MXF/CPT inhibitory effects observed in vitro are reflected in the inhibition of the progressive growth of HT-29 cells implanted in SCID mice. Using caliper measurements, Doppler ultrasonography, image analyses and immunohistochemistry of nuclear proteins (Ki-67) and vascular endothelial cells (CD-31) we show that addition of MXF (45mg/kg) to a relatively ineffective dose of irinotecan (20mg/kg), results in a 50% and 30% decrease, respectively, in tumor size and a decrease in Ki-67 staining. Power Doppler Ultrasound showed a significant, pronounced decrease in the number of blood vessels, as did CD-31 staining, indicating decreased blood flow in tumors in mice treated with MXF alone or MXF/irinotecan compared to irinotecan. These results suggest that the combination of MXF/irinotecan may result in enhanced anti-neoplastic/anti-angiogenic activity.

  10. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of tumor-bearing mice treated with human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Aicher, K P; Dupon, J W; White, D L; Aukerman, S L; Moseley, M E; Juster, R; Rosenau, W; Winkelhake, J L; Brasch, R C

    1990-11-15

    Pharmacological effects of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) were studied in a mouse fibrosarcoma model using magnetic resonance imaging enhanced with a macromolecular contrast agent, albumin(gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid)35. TNF was administered i.v. in a dose of 150 micrograms/kg, 60 to 80 min prior to imaging. Contrast-enhanced and nonenhanced magnetic resonance images of TNF-treated (n = 10) and untreated (n = 8) Meth A fibrosarcomas were obtained at 2.0 Tesla using T1-weighted spin-echo pulse sequences. Serial images spanning an interval of 60 to 120 min after TNF administration showed that the TNF-treated tumors enhanced significantly more overall than did untreated tumors (43% versus 31%). The most marked differential tumor enhancement was observed in the tumor rim (59% versus 40%). Nontumorous tissue, including muscle and brain, revealed no significant enhancement differences between TNF-treated animals and controls. The observed tumor enhancement corresponded strongly with Evans blue staining; the TNF-treated tumors stained deep blue, while untreated tumors and normal tissues observed did not stain. The different enhancement and Evans blue staining patterns between TNF-treated tumors and untreated tumors are attributed to TNF-induced changes in tumor capillary integrity. The data indicate that TNF effects on tumors include an increased capillary permeability for macromolecules at early times after administration. The ability to detect changes in capillary permeability in vivo using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging may prove to be clinically useful to monitor tumor response to TNF.

  11. Induction of KIFC1 expression in gastric cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Oue, Naohide; Mukai, Shoichiro; Imai, Takeharu; Pham, Trang T B; Oshima, Takashi; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Yasui, Wataru

    2016-07-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common human cancers. Spheroid colony formation is an effective model for characterization of cancer stem cells. However, gene expression profiles of spheroid colonies obtained from GC cells have not been examined. We performed microarray analyses by Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array in spheroid body-forming and parental cells from MKN-45 and MKN-74 GC cell lines. Kinesin family member C1 (KIFC1) was expressed >2-fold higher in spheroid body-forming cells than in parental cells in both GC lines. Both the number and size of spheres from MKN-45 cells were significantly reduced upon KIFC1 siRNA-transfection compared with negative control siRNA-transfection. Immunohistochemical analysis of 114 GC tissue samples revealed that 42 (37%) of GC cases were positive for KIFC1 expression. GC cases positive for KIFC1 were found more frequently in stage III/IV cases than in stage I/II cases. GC cases positive for KIFC1 were found more frequently in intestinal type GC cases than in diffuse type GC cases. Furthermore, KIFC1-positive GC cases showed high Ki-67 labeling index. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that KIFC1 expression was not associated with survival. We found positive expression of KIFC1 in CD44‑positive GC and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1)-positive GC cells. Our results showed that KIFC1 is overexpressed in GC. Since knockdown of KIFC1 inhibited sphere formation, KIFC1 likely plays an important role in cancer stem cells.

  12. Expression of S100A2 and S100P in human eccrine sweat glands and their application in differentiating secretory coil-like from duct-like structures in the 3D reconstituted eccrine sweat spheroids.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Mingjun; Chen, Liyun; Zhang, Bingna; Zhang, Cuiping

    2017-03-28

    Secretory coils and ducts are two components of eccrine sweat glands with different structures and functions. In our previous study, we combined keratins and α-SMA to distinguish between secretory coils and ducts. However, the key deficiency of the method was that none of the antibodies used was specific for ducts. In this study, we first examined the co-localization of K5/K7, α-SMA/K14, K7/S100P and α-SMA/S100A2 by double-immunofluorescence staining to confirm the localization of S100P and S100A2 in native human eccrine sweat glands, and second we identified secretory coil-like and duct-like structures in the 3D reconstituted eccrine sweat gland spheroids by double-immunofluorescence staining for K7/S100P and α-SMA/S100A2. In native human eccrine sweat glands, S100A2 immunoreactivity was confined to the outer layer and S100P to the inner layer of the duct. In 12-week Matrigel plugs containing eccrine sweat gland cells, double-immunofluorescence staining for K7/S100P and α-SMA/S100A2 could easily distinguish duct-like structures from secretory coil-like structures. We conclude that S100A2 and S100P can be used as specific duct markers in eccrine sweat glands, and combined use of S100P or S100A2 with keratins enables easy to distinction between secretory coils and ducts.

  13. A spheroid weighted-axis converter of vestibular schwannoma size: maximum diameter and cisternal volume.

    PubMed

    Prendes, Brandon L; Groppo, Eli R; Reynolds, Catherine L; Parsa, Andrew T; Cheung, Steven W

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate spheroid models of vestibular schwannoma (VS) size for bidirectional conversion of maximum diameter in the cistern and 3-dimensional volume. Methodological study. Academic tertiary referral center. Magnetic resonance imaging studies from 91 patients with VS from 2003 to 2011 were analyzed. Linear measurements defining meatal and cisternal components were extracted. Geometrically based conformal models of tumor volume were compared with measured tumor volume using a semiautomated computerized tracing method. Models were inverted to predict maximum axial cisternal length at the level of the internal auditory canal (IAC). A spheroid-weighted axis converter (SWC) of VS size was identified by minimizing input measurement parameters while maximizing output prediction performance. Computation steps of tumor volumes were (1) meatal-measure tumor lengths along the IAC and at the porus acusticus and take the average of a cone and cylinder and (2) cisternal-measure maximum tumor length in the axial IAC plane, use the median major:minor axis ratio of 1.26:1 to estimate minor axis length, take the geometric mean of axial dimensions to estimate axis length in the coronal plane, and apply input lengths to a spheroid. Performance error of this SWC had interquartile ranges of 33% for volume and 2 to 3 mm for maximum cisternal length. Reporting variability of VS tumor size has made it difficult to reconcile outcomes studies. We propose an accessible tool for bidirectional conversion of volumetric and linear indices of tumor size to unlock potential for meta-analyses of disparate data sets.

  14. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  15. Experimental Focal Waveforms of a Prolate-Spheroidal Impulse-Radiating Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunc, S.; Baum, C. E.; Christodoulou, C. G.; Schamiloglu, E.

    Impulse-radiating antennas (IRAs) have been used for different applications and the basic motivation for developing IRA systems is to radiate large amplitude, large band ratio, undispersed pulses. This chapter discusses applying fast, high-electric-field pulses without direct contact for killing skin cancer, i.e., to irradiate them using a prolate-spheroidal IRA. This technique is less invasive than inserting electrodes near the tumor. Even though this chapter is devoted to discussion of the experimental aspect of this problem, analytical and numerical behaviors for the focal waveforms and spot sizes of two- and four-feed arm prolate-spheroidal IRAs are also explored for comparison.

  16. AnaSP: a software suite for automatic image analysis of multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Filippo

    2015-04-01

    Today, more and more biological laboratories use 3D cell cultures and tissues grown in vitro as a 3D model of in vivo tumours and metastases. In the last decades, it has been extensively established that multicellular spheroids represent an efficient model to validate effects of drugs and treatments for human care applications. However, a lack of methods for quantitative analysis limits the usage of spheroids as models for routine experiments. Several methods have been proposed in literature to perform high throughput experiments employing spheroids by automatically computing different morphological parameters, such as diameter, volume and sphericity. Nevertheless, these systems are typically grounded on expensive automated technologies, that make the suggested solutions affordable only for a limited subset of laboratories, frequently performing high content screening analysis. In this work we propose AnaSP, an open source software suitable for automatically estimating several morphological parameters of spheroids, by simply analyzing brightfield images acquired with a standard widefield microscope, also not endowed with a motorized stage. The experiments performed proved sensitivity and precision of the segmentation method proposed, and excellent reliability of AnaSP to compute several morphological parameters of spheroids imaged in different conditions. AnaSP is distributed as an open source software tool. Its modular architecture and graphical user interface make it attractive also for researchers who do not work in areas of computer vision and suitable for both high content screenings and occasional spheroid-based experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Establishment of human tumoral ependymal cell lines and coculture with tubular-like human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brisson, C; Lelong-Rebel, I; Mottolèse, C; Jouvet, A; Fèvre-Montange, M; Saint Pierre, G; Rebel, G; Belin, M F

    2002-10-01

    Ependymomas, rare neoplasms of the central nervous system, occur predominantly in children. They are highly vascularized, and histological findings show many perivascular rosettes of tumoral cells radially organized around capillaries. Treatment of ependymomas relies on surgery combined with radio- or chemotherapy, but the efficiency of chemotherapy is limited, probably because of their multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. Progress in the therapy of these neoplasms is dramatically limited by the absence of cell line models. We established conditions for the long-term culture of human tumoral ependymocytes and their 3D coculture in Matrigel with endothelial cells. Histological, immunological, and ultrastructural studies showed that the morphological features (microvilli, cilia, and caveolae) of these cultured cells were similar to those of the tumor in vivo. The cells expressed potential oncological markers related to the immature state of tumoral cells (nestin and Notch-1), their tumorigenicity [caveolae and epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R)], or the MDR phenotype [P-glycoprotein (P-gp)]. The expression of P-gp, EGF-R, and caveolin-1 by these tumoral ependymocytes could be useful in studies on new drugs. This coculture model might represent a new powerful tool to study new therapeutic delivery strategies in tumoral cells.

  18. Bar-spheroid interaction in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Weinberg, Martin D.

    1992-01-01

    N-body simulation and linear analysis is employed to investigate the secular evolution of barred galaxies, with emphasis on the interaction between bars and spheroidal components of galaxies. This interaction is argued to drive secular transfer of angular momentum from bars to spheroids, primarily through resonant coupling. A moderately strong bar, having mass within corotation about 0.3 times the enclosed spheroid mass, is predicted to shed all its angular momentum typically in less than about 10 exp 9 yr. Even shorter depletion time scales are found for relatively more massive bars. It is suggested either that spheroids around barred galaxies are structured so as to inhibit strong coupling with bars, or that bars can form by unknown processes long after disks are established. The present models reinforce the notion that bars can drive secular evolution in galaxies.

  19. Self-electrophoresis of spheroidal electrocatalytic swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourhani, Amir; Crespi, Vincent H.; Lammert, Paul E.; Borhan, Ali

    2015-09-01

    Using the method of matched asymptotic expansions, we derive a general expression for the speed of a prolate spheroidal electrocatalytic nanomotor in terms of interfacial potential and physical properties of the motor environment in the limit of small Debye length and Péclet number. This greatly increases the range of geometries that can be handled without resorting to numerical simulations, since a wide range of shapes from spherical to needle-like, and in particular the common cylindrical shape, can be well-approximated by prolate spheroids. For piecewise-uniform distribution of surface cation flux with fixed average absolute value, the mobility of a prolate spheroidal motor with a symmetric cation source/sink configuration is a monotonically decreasing function of eccentricity. A prolate spheroidal motor with an asymmetric sink/source configuration moves faster than its symmetric counterpart and can exhibit a non-monotonic dependence of motor speed on eccentricity for a highly asymmetric design.

  20. Retargeting T cells to GD2 pentasaccharide on human tumors using bispecific humanized antibody

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Cheng, Ming; Guo, Hongfen; Chen, Yuedan; Huse, Morgan; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-disialoganglioside GD2 IgG antibodies have shown clinical efficacy in solid tumors that lack human leukocyte antigens (e.g. neuroblastoma) by relying on Fc-dependent cytotoxicity. However, there are pain side effects secondary to complement activation. T-cell retargeting bispecific antibodies (BsAb) also have clinical potential, but it is thus far only effective against liquid tumors. In this study, a fully humanized hu3F8-BsAb was developed, in which the anti-CD3 huOKT3 single chain Fv fragment (ScFv) was linked to the carboxyl end of the anti-GD2 hu3F8 IgG1 light chain, and was aglycosylated at N297 of Fc to prevent complement activation and cytokine storm. In vitro, hu3F8-BsAb activated T cells through classic immunological synapses, inducing GD2-specific tumor cytotoxicity at femtomolar EC50 with >105-fold selectivity over normal tissues, releasing Th1 cytokines (TNFα, IFNγ and IL2) when GD2(+) tumors were present. In separate murine neuroblastoma and melanoma xenograft models, intravenous hu3F8-BsAb activated T cells in situ and recruited intravenous T cells for tumor ablation, significantly prolonging survival from local recurrence or from metastatic disease. Hu3F8-BsAb, but not control BsAb, drove T cells and monocytes to infiltrate tumor stroma. These monocytes were necessary for sustained T-cell proliferation and/or survival and contributed significantly to the antitumor effect. The in vitro and in vivo antitumor properties of hu3F8-BsAb and its safety profile support its further clinical development as a cancer therapeutic, and provide the rationale for exploring aglycosylated IgG-scFv as a structural platform for retargeting human T cells. PMID:25542634

  1. Multiplexed ion beam imaging of human breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Michael; Bendall, Sean C; Finck, Rachel; Hale, Matthew B; Hitzman, Chuck; Borowsky, Alexander D; Levenson, Richard M; Lowe, John B; Liu, Scot D; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Nolan, Garry P

    2014-04-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a tool for visualizing protein expression that is employed as part of the diagnostic workup for the majority of solid tissue malignancies. Existing IHC methods use antibodies tagged with fluorophores or enzyme reporters that generate colored pigments. Because these reporters exhibit spectral and spatial overlap when used simultaneously, multiplexed IHC is not routinely used in clinical settings. We have developed a method that uses secondary ion mass spectrometry to image antibodies tagged with isotopically pure elemental metal reporters. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) is capable of analyzing up to 100 targets simultaneously over a five-log dynamic range. Here, we used MIBI to analyze formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human breast tumor tissue sections stained with ten labels simultaneously. The resulting data suggest that MIBI can provide new insights into disease pathogenesis that will be valuable for basic research, drug discovery and clinical diagnostics.

  2. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  3. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies and resonant orbital coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, J. R.; Miller, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    The structural properties of the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way may be strongly affected by their time-dependent interactions with the 'tidal' field of the Milky Way. A low Q resonance of the tidal driving force with collective oscillation modes of the dwarf system can produce many of the observed properties of the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies, including large velocity dispersions that would normally be interpreted as indicating large dynamical masses.

  4. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies and resonant orbital coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, J. R.; Miller, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    The structural properties of the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way may be strongly affected by their time-dependent interactions with the 'tidal' field of the Milky Way. A low Q resonance of the tidal driving force with collective oscillation modes of the dwarf system can produce many of the observed properties of the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies, including large velocity dispersions that would normally be interpreted as indicating large dynamical masses.

  5. Direct tumor recognition by a human CD4+ T-cell subset potently mediates tumor growth inhibition and orchestrates anti-tumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Shiku, Hiroshi; Mineno, Junichi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells generally orchestrate and regulate immune cells to provide immune surveillance against malignancy. However, activation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is restricted at local tumor sites where antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are frequently dysfunctional, which can cause rapid exhaustion of anti-tumor immune responses. Herein, we characterize anti-tumor effects of a unique human CD4+ helper T-cell subset that directly recognizes the cytoplasmic tumor antigen, NY-ESO-1, presented by MHC class II on cancer cells. Upon direct recognition of cancer cells, tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells (TR-CD4) potently induced IFN-γ-dependent growth arrest in cancer cells. In addition, direct recognition of cancer cells triggers TR-CD4 to provide help to NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells by enhancing cytotoxic activity, and improving viability and proliferation in the absence of APCs. Notably, the TR-CD4 either alone or in collaboration with CD8+ T cells significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo in a xenograft model. Finally, retroviral gene-engineering with T cell receptor (TCR) derived from TR-CD4 produced large numbers of functional TR-CD4. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the role of TR-CD4 in tumor immunity, and suggest that approaches to utilize TR-CD4 will augment anti-tumor immune responses for durable therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients. PMID:26447332

  6. Monitoring the Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathway in a 3D Spheroid Model.

    PubMed

    Mondesert, Odile; Frongia, Céline; Clayton, Olivia; Boizeau, Marie-Laure; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the DNA-Damage Response (DDR) activated pathway in multicellular tumor spheroid models is an important challenge as these 3D models have demonstrated their major relevance in pharmacological evaluation. Herein we present DDR-Act-FP, a fluorescent biosensor that allows detection of DDR activation through monitoring of the p21 promoter p53-dependent activation. We show that cells expressing the DDR-Act-FP biosensor efficiently report activation of the DDR pathway after DNA damage and its pharmacological manipulation using ATM kinase inhibitors. We also report the successful use of this assay to screen a small compound library in order to identify activators of the DDR response. Finally, using multicellular spheroids expressing the DDR-Act-FP we demonstrate that DDR activation and its pharmacological manipulation with inhibitory and activatory compounds can be efficiently monitored in live 3D spheroid model. This study paves the way for the development of innovative screening and preclinical evaluation assays.

  7. Human pancreatic cancer tumors are nutrient poor and tumor cells actively scavenge extracellular protein

    PubMed Central

    Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Nofal, Michel; Commisso, Cosimo; Hackett, Sean R.; Lu, Wenyun; Grabocka, Elda; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Miller, George; Drebin, Jeffrey A.; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Thompson, Craig B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Glucose and amino acids are key nutrients supporting cell growth. Amino acids are imported as monomers, but an alternative route induced by oncogenic KRAS involves uptake of extracellular proteins via macropinocytosis and subsequent lysosomal degradation of these proteins as a source of amino acids. In this study, we examined the metabolism of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a poorly vascularized lethal KRAS-driven malignancy. Metabolomic comparisons of human PDAC and benign adjacent tissue revealed that tumor tissue was low in glucose, upper glycolytic intermediates, creatine phosphate and the amino acids glutamine and serine, two major metabolic substrates. Surprisingly, PDAC accumulated essential amino acids. Such accumulation could arise from extracellular proteins being degraded through macropinocytosis in quantities necessary to meet glutamine requirements, which in turn produces excess of most other amino acids. Consistent with this hypothesis, active macropinocytosis is observed in primary human PDAC specimens. Moreover, in the presence of physiological albumin, we found that cultured murine PDAC cells grow indefinitely in media lacking single essential amino acids, and replicate once in the absence of free amino acids. Growth under these conditions was characterized by simultaneous glutamine depletion and essential amino acid accumulation. Overall, our findings argue that the scavenging of extracellular proteins is an important mode of nutrient uptake in PDAC. PMID:25644265

  8. A Model for Spheroid versus Monolayer Response of SK-N-SH Neuroblastoma Cells to Treatment with 15-Deoxy-PGJ2

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, Ann; Chen, Paula X.; Chen, Michelle; Huynh, Milan; Rheingold, Evan; Prosper, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have observed that response of tumor cells to treatment varies depending on whether the cells are grown in monolayer, as in vitro spheroids or in vivo. This study uses data from the literature on monolayer treatment of SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells with 15-deoxy-PGJ2 and couples it with data on growth rates for untreated SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells grown as multicellular spheroids. A linear model is constructed for untreated and treated monolayer data sets, which is tuned to growth, death, and cell cycle data for the monolayer case for both control and treatment with 15-deoxy-PGJ2. The monolayer model is extended to a five-dimensional nonlinear model of in vitro tumor spheroid growth and treatment that includes compartments of the cell cycle (G1, S, G2/M) as well as quiescent (Q) and necrotic (N) cells. Monolayer treatment data for 15-deoxy-PGJ2 is used to derive a prediction of spheroid response under similar treatments. For short periods of treatment, spheroid response is less pronounced than monolayer response. The simulations suggest that the difference in response to treatment of monolayer versus spheroid cultures observed in laboratory studies is a natural consequence of tumor spheroid physiology rather than any special resistance to treatment. PMID:28044089

  9. Tumor necrosis factor production by human sarcoid alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Bachwich, P. R.; Lynch, J. P.; Larrick, J.; Spengler, M.; Kunkel, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an oncolytic peptide that may also exert many other biologic effects. Experimentally, immunologically activated mononuclear phagocytes stimulated with endotoxin (LPS) produce TNF, while resting mononuclear phagocytes stimulated with LPS produce little TNF. To date, the ability of human alveolar macrophages (AMs) to produce TNF has not been clearly delineated. As pulmonary sarcoidosis is a granulomatous inflammatory disorder characterized by immunologically activated AMs, we investigated the production of TNF by AMs obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from 7 normal volunteers and 13 patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. The AMs were cultured with and without LPS, and TNF production was assessed by an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Unstimulated sarcoid and normal AMs produced little TNF, but LPS stimulation enhanced TNF production by both normal and sarcoid AMs. Furthermore, LPS-stimulated sarcoid AMs produced more TNF than normal AMs (84.9 +/- 16.7 versus 32.5 +/- 10.2 units/million cells, P less than 0.05). It is concluded that human AMs can produce TNF and that sarcoid AMs are primed and can produce significantly more TNF, compared with normal AMs. PMID:3799813

  10. Micro FT-IR Characterization Of Human Lung Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Enzo; Teodori, L.; Vergamini, Piergiorgio; Trinca, M. L.; Mauro, F.; Salvati, F.; Spremolla, Giuliano

    1989-12-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy has opened up a new approach to the analytical study of cell transformation. Investigations carried out in normal and leukemic lymphocytes have evidenced an increase in DNA with respect to proteic components in neoplastic cells.(1) The evaluation of the ratio of the integrated areas(A) of the bands at 1080 cm-1 (mainly DNA) and at 1540 cm-1 (proteic components) has allowed us to establish a parameter which indicates, for values above 1.5, the neoplastic nature of cells. Recently, this approach has been applied to the study of human lung tumor cells. Several monocellular suspension procedures of the tissue fragment (mechanical and/or chemical) were tested to obtain reproducible and reliable spectra able to differentiate clearly between normal and patological cells. Chemical treatment (EDTA, Pepsin, Collagenase, etc.) produced additional bands in the spectra of the cells causing distortion of the profiles of some absorptions, and as a result, mechanical treatment was preferred. The normal and neoplastic cells homogeneously distributed by cytospin preparation on BaF2 windows were examined by means of FT-IR microscopy. An examination of several microareas of each sample yielded reproducible spectra, with values of the A 1080 cm-1 / A 1540 cm-1 parameter within a very narrow range for each sample, even if certain differences still remained among the different cases, in good agreement with the results obtained for leukemic cells.(1) The value of this parameter was found to be lower for cells isolated from the normal area of lung, than in the case of those corresponding to the tumoral area, meaning that an increase occurs in DNA with respect to the proteic components. These insights, which provide a basis to obtain indications at the molecular level, can open up new possibilities in clinical practice, in order to obtain diagnosis confirmation, to detect early stages of disease and to offer additional indications in cases of dubious interpretation.

  11. Functional EpoR Pathway Utilization Is Not Detected in Primary Tumor Cells Isolated from Human Breast, Non-Small Cell Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Tumor Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Scott D.; Rossi, John M.; Paweletz, Katherine L.; Fitzpatrick, V. Dan; Begley, C. Glenn; Busse, Leigh; Elliott, Steve; McCaffery, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Several clinical trials in oncology have reported increased mortality or disease progression associated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. One hypothesis proposes that erythropoiesis-stimulating agents directly stimulate tumor proliferation and/or survival through cell-surface receptors. To test this hypothesis and examine if human tumors utilize the erythropoietin receptor pathway, the response of tumor cells to human recombinant erythropoietin was investigated in disaggregated tumor cells obtained from 186 patients with colorectal, breast, lung, ovarian, head and neck, and other tumors. A cocktail of well characterized tumor growth factors (EGF, HGF, and IGF-1) were analyzed in parallel as a positive control to determine whether freshly-isolated tumor cells were able to respond to growth factor activation ex vivo. Exposing tumor cells to the growth factor cocktail resulted in stimulation of survival and proliferation pathways as measured by an increase in phosphorylation of the downstream signaling proteins AKT and ERK. In contrast, no activation by human recombinant erythropoietin was observed in isolated tumor cells. Though tumor samples exhibited a broad range of cell-surface expression of EGFR, c-Met, and IGF-1R, no cell-surface erythropoietin receptor was detected in tumor cells from the 186 tumors examined (by flow cytometry or Western blot). Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents did not act directly upon isolated tumor cells to stimulate pathways known to promote proliferation or survival of human tumor cells isolated from primary and metastatic tumor tissues. PMID:25807104

  12. Expansion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) from human pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Hall, MacLean; Liu, Hao; Malafa, Mokenge; Centeno, Barbara; Hodul, Pamela J; Pimiento, José; Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Sarnaik, Amod A

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated whether tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) could be expanded from surgically resected tumors from pancreatic cancer patients. Tumors were resected from pancreatic cancer patients. Tumors were minced into fragments and cultured in media containing high dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) for up to 6 weeks. T cell phenotype, activation markers, and reactivity were measured. TIL expansion was measured in 19 patient samples. The majority of these TIL were CD4(+) T cells and were highly activated. Purified CD8(+) T cells produced IFN-γ in response to HLA-matched pancreatic tumor targets. PD-1 blockade and 4-1BB stimulation were demonstrated as effective strategies to improve effective TIL yield, including the production of tumor-reactive pancreatic TIL. TIL expanded from pancreatic tumors are functional and able to respond to pancreatic tumor associated antigens. PD-1 blockade, 41BB stimulation, and CD8(+) T cell enrichment are effective strategies to improve TIL yield and tumor reactivity. These results support the development of adoptive cell therapy strategies using TIL for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  13. Classification of subpopulations of cells within human primary brain tumors by single cell gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Möllerström, Elin; Rydenhag, Bertil; Andersson, Daniel; Lebkuechner, Isabell; Puschmann, Till B; Chen, Meng; Wilhelmsson, Ulrika; Ståhlberg, Anders; Malmgren, Kristina; Pekny, Milos

    2015-02-01

    Brain tumors are heterogeneous with respect to genetic and histological properties of cells within the tumor tissue. To study subpopulations of cells, we developed a protocol for obtaining viable single cells from freshly isolated human brain tissue for single cell gene expression profiling. We evaluated this technique for characterization of cell populations within brain tumor and tumor penumbra. Fresh tumor tissue was obtained from one astrocytoma grade IV and one oligodendroglioma grade III tumor as well as the tumor penumbra of the latter tumor. The tissue was dissociated into individual cells and the expression of 36 genes was assessed by reverse transcription quantitative PCR followed by data analysis. We show that tumor cells from both the astrocytoma grade IV and oligodendroglioma grade III tumor constituted cell subpopulations defined by their gene expression profiles. Some cells from the oligodendroglioma grade III tumor proper shared molecular characteristics with the cells from the penumbra of the same tumor suggesting that a subpopulation of cells within the oligodendroglioma grade III tumor consisted of normal brain cells. We conclude that subpopulations of tumor cells can be identified by using single cell gene expression profiling.

  14. Modification of Cyclic NGR Tumor Neovasculature-Homing Motif Sequence to Human Plasminogen Kringle 5 Improves Inhibition of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weiwei; Jin, Guanghui; Ma, Dingyuan; Wang, Feng; Fu, Tong; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Xiwen; Jia, Kunzhi; Marikar, Faiz M. M. T.; Hua, Zichun

    2012-01-01

    Background Blood vessels in tumors express higher level of aminopeptidase N (APN) than normal tissues. Evidence suggests that the CNGRC motif is an APN ligand which targets tumor vasculature. Increased expression of APN in tumor vascular endothelium, therefore, offers an opportunity for targeted delivery of NGR peptide-linked drugs to tumors. Methods/Principal Findings To determine whether an additional cyclic CNGRC sequence could improve endothelial cell homing and antitumor effect, human plasminogen kringle 5 (hPK5) was modified genetically to introduce a CNGRC motif (NGR-hPK5) and was subsequently expressed in yeast. The biological activity of NGR-hPK5 was assessed and compared with that of wild-type hPK5, in vitro and in vivo. NGR-hPK5 showed more potent antiangiogenic activity than wild-type hPK5: the former had a stronger inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration and cord formation of vascular endothelial cells, and produced a stronger antiangiogenic response in the CAM assay. To evaluate the tumor-targeting ability, both wild-type hPK5 and NGR-hPK5 were 99 mTc-labeled, for tracking biodistribution in the in vivo tumor model. By planar imaging and biodistribution analyses of major organs, NGR-hPK5 was found localized to tumor tissues at a higher level than wild-type hPK5 (approximately 3-fold). Finally, the effects of wild-type hPK5 and NGR-modified hPK5 on tumor growth were investigated in two tumor model systems. NGR modification improved tumor localization and, as a consequence, effectively inhibited the growth of mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and human colorectal adenocarcinoma (Colo 205) cells in tumor-bearing mice. Conclusions/Significance These studies indicated that the addition of an APN targeting peptide NGR sequence could improve the ability of hPK5 to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor growth. PMID:22590653

  15. Sphere-forming tumor cells possess stem-like properties in human fibrosarcoma primary tumors and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    LIU, WEI-DONG; ZHANG, TAO; WANG, CHUN-LEI; MENG, HONG-MEI; SONG, YU-WEN; ZHAO, ZHE; LI, ZHENG-MIN; LIU, JIANG-KUN; PAN, SHANG-HA; WANG, WEN-BO

    2012-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma is a malignant soft tissue tumor of mesenchymal origin. Despite advances in medical and surgical treatment, patient survival rates have remained poor. According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, tumors are comprised of heterogeneous cell populations that have different roles in tumor formation and growth. Cancer stem cells are a small cell subpopulation that exhibits stem-like properties to gain aggressiveness and recurrence. These cells have been identified in a variety of cancerous tumors, but not in human fibrosarcoma. In this study, we observed that HT1080 cells and primary fibrosarcoma cells formed spheres and showed higher self-renewal capacity, invasiveness and drug resistance compared with their adherent counterparts. Moreover, we demonstrated that the cells showed higher expression of the embryonic stem cell-related genes Nanog, Oct3/4, Sox2, Sox10 and their encoding proteins, as well as greater tumorigenic capacity in nude mice. In conclusion, our data suggest the presence of a stem-like cell population in human fibrosarcoma tumors, which provides more evidence for the cancer stem cell hypothesis and assistance in designing new therapeutic strategies against human fibrosarcoma. PMID:23205129

  16. Embedded multicellular spheroids as a biomimetic 3D cancer model for evaluating drug and drug-device combinations.

    PubMed

    Charoen, Kristie M; Fallica, Brian; Colson, Yolonda L; Zaman, Muhammad H; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2014-02-01

    Multicellular aggregates of cells, termed spheroids, are of interest for studying tumor behavior and for evaluating the response of pharmacologically active agents. Spheroids more faithfully reproduce the tumor macrostructure found in vivo compared to classical 2D monolayers. We present a method for embedding spheroids within collagen gels followed by quantitative and qualitative whole spheroid and single cell analyses enabling characterization over the length scales from molecular to macroscopic. Spheroid producing and embedding capabilities are demonstrated for U2OS and MDA-MB-231 cell lines, of osteosarcoma and breast adenocarcinoma origin, respectively. Finally, using the MDA-MB-231 tumor model, the chemotherapeutic response between paclitaxel delivery as a bolus dose, as practiced in the clinic, is compared to delivery within an expansile nanoparticle. The expansile nanoparticle delivery route provides a superior outcome and the results mirror those observed in a murine xenograft model. These findings highlight the synergistic beneficial results that may arise from the use of a drug delivery system, and the need to evaluate both drug candidates and delivery systems in the research and preclinical screening phases of a new cancer therapy development program. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects of zinc ions and eugenol during setting of ZOE in immortalized human oral keratinocytes grown as three-dimensional spheroids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of ZOE cement during setting in two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) cultures of immortalized human oral keratinocytes (IHOKs) with determining the extract components responsible for these effects. Extracts of mixed ZOE at different stages of setting were analyzed by a digital pH meter, ICP-MS, and GC-MS. Serial concentrations of extract and their mixture of ZnCl2, ZnSO4·H2O, and eugenol liquid were added to the 2D and 3D IHOK cultures to determine the half maximal effective concentration in investigating the cause of cytotoxicity by means of WST assay and to investigate mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines by RT-PCR. Zn(2+) and eugenol (4-19 ppm) were detected in the extracts. In the early setting stage, significant cytotoxicity was observed in the 2D and 3D IHOK cultures (P<0.05). The EC50 of Zn(2+) from ZnCl2 was 5-44 ppm in both cultures, whereas the EC50 of eugenol was not detectable under 100 ppm. Along with the lower levels of inflammatory cytokine gene expressions in the extract, treatment of the 2D IHOKs with Zn(2+) alone and treatment of the 3D IHOKs with Zn(2+) plus eugenol resulted in significantly lower expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 (P<0.05). The cytotoxic effect of ZOE on IHOKs was greater during the setting stage owing to the presence of Zn(2+). The anti-inflammatory response to ZOE was induced by a combination of Zn(2+) and eugenol. Cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects differed between the 2D and 3D IHOK cultures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson’s two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of “two-hit inactivation” in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:22515449

  19. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2012-04-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson's two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of 'two-hit inactivation' in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches in cancer therapy.

  20. Generation of an immortalized human CD4+ T cell clone inhibiting tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Pecher, G; Harnack, U; Günther, M; Hummel, M; Fichtner, I; Schenk, J A

    2001-05-18

    Tumor antigen-specific T cell clones represent a useful tool in tumor immunology; however, their long-term culture is limited. To generate an immortalized cytotoxic T cell clone against the human tumor antigen mucin, we exposed a previously generated T cell culture to Herpesvirus saimiri. We obtained an immortalized human CD4+ T cell clone, termed SITAM. Clonality of these cells was shown by analysis of the alpha/beta-T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire. Cytolytic activity was demonstrated against several mucin-expressing tumor cell lines and could not be detected against non-mucin-expressing cells. SITAM cells maintained their features stably for 2 years. Furthermore, growth of the tumor cell line Capan-2 in NOD/SCID mice was inhibited when SITAM cells were coinjected subcutaneously with tumor cells. SITAM cells provide an unlimited source of clonal T cells for analysis of tumor recognition and may be of help in TCR-targeted immunotherapy. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  1. Encapsulation of Adipose Stromal Vascular Fraction Cells in Alginate Hydrogel Spheroids Using a Direct-Write Three-Dimensional Printing System

    PubMed Central

    Touroo, Jeremy S.; Church, Kenneth H.; Hoying, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The study of tissue function in vitro has been aided by the development of three-dimensional culture systems that more accurately duplicate the complex cell components of tissues and organs. Bioprinting of cells provides a rapid tissue fabrication technique that can be used to evaluate normal and pathologic conditions in vitro as well as to construct complex three-dimensional tissue structures for implantation in regenerative medicine therapies. Studies were performed using a direct write three-dimensional bioprinting system to fabricate adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cell spheroids. Human fat–derived stromal vascular fraction cells were mixed in 1.5% (w/v) alginate solutions, and fabrication conditions were varied to produce an array of spheroids. The spheroids were placed in spinner culture, and spheroid integrity and encapsulated cell viability were assessed for 16 days. Results establish the ability to tightly control adipose SVF spheroids in the range of 800–1500 μm. Fabrication conditions were used to control spheroid size, and the results illustrate the ability to construct spheroids of precise size and shape. The adipose SVF cell population remains viable and the spheroid integrity was maintained for 16 days in suspension culture. The direct-write printing of adipose stromal vascular fraction cell containing spheroids provides a rapid fabrication technology to support in vitro microphysiologic system studies. PMID:24380055

  2. Nestin+cells forming spheroids aggregates resembling tumorspheres in experimental ENU-induced gliomas.

    PubMed

    García-Blanco, Alvaro; Bulnes, Susana; Pomposo, Iñigo; Carrasco, Alex; Lafuente, José Vicente

    2016-12-01

    Nestin+cells from spheroid aggregates display typical histopathological features compatible with cell stemness. Nestin and CD133+cells found in glioblastomas, distributed frequently around aberrant vessels, are considered as potential cancer stem cells. They are possible targets for antitumoral therapy because they lead the tumorigenesis, invasiveness and angiogenesis. However, little is known about their role and presence in low-grade gliomas. The aim of this work is to localize and characterize the distribution of these cells inside tumors during the development of experimental endogenous glioma. For this study, a single dose of Ethyl-nitrosourea was injected into pregnant rats. Double immunofluorescences were performed in order to identify stem-like and differentiated cells. Low-grade gliomas display Nestin+cells distributed throughout the tumor. More malignant gliomas show, in addition to that, a perivascular location with some Nestin+cells co-expressing CD133 or VEGF, and the intratumoral spheroid aggregates of Nestin/CD133+cells. These structures are encapsulated by well-differentiated VEGF/GFAP+cells. Spheroid aggregates increase in size in the most malignant stages. Spheroid aggregates have morphological and phenotypic similarities to in vitro neurospheres and could be an in vivo analogue of them. These arrangements could be a reservoir of undifferentiated cells formed to escape adverse microenvironments.

  3. Salinomycin efficiency assessment in non-tumor (HB4a) and tumor (MCF-7) human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Andressa Megumi; D Epiro, Gláucia Fernanda Rocha; Marques, Lilian Areal; Semprebon, Simone Cristine; Sartori, Daniele; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    The search for anticancer drugs has led researchers to study salinomycin, an ionophore antibiotic that selectively destroys cancer stem cells. In this study, salinomycin was assessed in two human cell lines, a breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and a non-tumor breast cell line (HB4a), to verify its selective action against tumor cells. Real-time assessment of cell proliferation showed that HB4a cells are more resistant to salinomycin than MCF-7 tumor cell line, and these data were confirmed in a cytotoxicity assay. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values show the increased sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to salinomycin. In the comet assay, only MCF-7 cells showed the induction of DNA damage. Flow cytometric analysis showed that cell death by apoptosis/necrosis was only induced in the MCF-7 cells. The increased expression of GADD45A and CDKN1A genes was observed in all cell lines. Decreased expression of CCNA2 and CCNB1 genes occurred only in tumor cells, suggesting G2/M cell cycle arrest. Consequently, cell death was activated in tumor cells through strong inhibition of the antiapoptotic genes BCL-2, BCL-XL, and BIRC5 genes in MCF-7 cells. These data demonstrate the selectivity of salinomycin in killing human mammary tumor cells. The cell death observed only in MCF-7 tumor cells was confirmed by gene expression analysis, where there was downregulation of antiapoptotic genes. These data contribute to clarifying the mechanism of action of salinomycin as a promising antitumor drug and, for the first time, we observed the higher resistance of HB4a non-tumor breast cells to salinomycin.

  4. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  5. Shedding of tumor necrosis factor receptors by activated human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The capacity of human neutrophils (PMN) to bind tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was rapidly lost when the cells were incubated in suspension with agents that can stimulate their migratory and secretory responses. Both physiological (poly)peptides (FMLP, C5a, CSF-GM) and pharmacologic agonists (PMN, calcium ionophore A23187) induced the loss of TNF receptors (TNF-R) from the cell surface. Half-maximal loss in TNF-R ensued after only approximately 2 min with 10(-7) M FMLP at 37 degrees C, and required only 10(-9) M FMLP during a 30-min exposure. However, there were no such changes even with prolonged exposure of PMN to FMLP at 4 degrees or 16 degrees C. Scatchard analysis revealed loss of TNF- binding sites without change in their affinity (Kd approximately 0.4 nM) as measured at incompletely modulating concentrations of FMLP, C5a, PMA, or A23187. The binding of anti-TNF-R mAbs to PMN decreased in parallel, providing independent evidence for the loss of TNF-R from the cell surface. At the same time, soluble TNF-R appeared in the medium of stimulated PMN. This inference was based on the PMN- and FMLP-dependent generation of a nonsedimentable activity that could inhibit the binding of TNF to fresh human PMN or to mouse macrophages, and the ability of mAbs specific for human TNF-R to abolish inhibition by PMN-conditioned medium of binding of TNF to mouse macrophages. Soluble TNF-R activity was associated with a protein of Mr approximately 28,000 by ligand blot analysis of cell-free supernatants of FMLP-treated PMN. Thus, some portion of the FMLP-induced loss of TNF-R from human PMN is due to shedding of TNF-R. Shedding was unaffected by inhibitors of serine and thiol proteases and could not be induced with phosphatidylinositol- specific phospholipase C. Loss of TNF-R from PMN first stimulated by other agents may decrease their responsiveness to TNF. TNF-R shed by PMN may be one source of the TNF-binding proteins found in body fluids, and may blunt the actions of the

  6. Ultrastructural characterization of macrophage-like mononuclear leukocytes in human astrocytic tumors.

    PubMed

    Arismendi-Morillo, Gabriel; Castellano-Ramírez, Alan; Medina, Zulamita

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the ultrastructural features of macrophage-like mononuclear leukocytes associated with human astrocytic tumors. Tumoral biopsies of 10 patients with a pathological diagnosis of astrocytic tumor by means of transmission electron microscopy were examined. The macrophage-like mononuclear leukocyte shows ultrastructural characteristics related with the physiologic phenotype of the alternatively activated macrophage (M2), localized principally around of tumoral vasculature and tumor milieu; classically activated macrophages (M1) in surrounding necrosis areas were observed. The presence of these two ultrastructural kinds of macrophage-like mononuclear leukocytes into different areas of the tumor denotes that cellular response of TAMs is dependent of microenvironment stimuli in different parts of a tumor. The process of transvascular emigration of monocyte/macrophage-like mononuclear leukocytes into tumor is presented. The preponderance of alternatively activated macrophage-like mononuclear leukocytes suggests disequilibrium between pro-tumoral leukocytes and anti-tumoral leukocytes. Therefore, macrophage polarization toward anti-tumoral macrophage-like mononuclear leukocytes would be a potential target for therapeutic manipulation in human astrocytic tumors.

  7. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fecher, David; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Buck, Andreas; Bundschuh, Ralph; Nietzer, Sarah; Dandekar, Gudrun; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Lückerath, Katharina; Steinke, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and –testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future. PMID:27501455

  8. Prevalent expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors and FGF2 in human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chandler, L A; Sosnowski, B A; Greenlees, L; Aukerman, S L; Baird, A; Pierce, G F

    1999-05-05

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) has potent mitogenic and angiogenic activities that have been implicated in tumor development and malignant progression. The biological effects of FGF2 and other members of the FGF ligand family are mediated by 4 transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors (FGFRs). To better understand the roles of FGFRs in cancer, the expression of FGF2 and each of the 4 FGFRs was assessed by RNase protection analysis of 60 human tumor cell lines, representing 9 tumor types. Expression of at least one FGFR isoform was detected in 90% and FGF2 mRNA in 35% of the cell lines. Our comprehensive analysis of FGF2 and FGFR expression in human tumor cell lines provides evidence that FGF signaling pathways are active in a majority of human tumor cell lines, and lends support to the development of anti-tumor strategies that target FGFRs.

  9. Terahertz spectroscopic investigation of human gastric normal and tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dibo; Li, Xian; Cai, Jinhui; Ma, Yehao; Kang, Xusheng; Huang, Pingjie; Zhang, Guangxin

    2014-09-01

    Human dehydrated normal and cancerous gastric tissues were measured using transmission time-domain terahertz spectroscopy. Based on the obtained terahertz absorption spectra, the contrasts between the two kinds of tissue were investigated and techniques for automatic identification of cancerous tissue were studied. Distinctive differences were demonstrated in both the shape and amplitude of the absorption spectra between normal and tumor tissue. Additionally, some spectral features in the range of 0.2~0.5 THz and 1~1.5 THz were revealed for all cancerous gastric tissues. To systematically achieve the identification of gastric cancer, principal component analysis combined with t-test was used to extract valuable information indicating the best distinction between the two types. Two clustering approaches, K-means and support vector machine (SVM), were then performed to classify the processed terahertz data into normal and cancerous groups. SVM presented a satisfactory result with less false classification cases. The results of this study implicate the potential of the terahertz technique to detect gastric cancer. The applied data analysis methodology provides a suggestion for automatic discrimination of terahertz spectra in other applications.

  10. Functional involvement of human discs large tumor suppressor in cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Unno, Kenji; Hanada, Toshihiko; Chishti, Athar H.

    2008-10-15

    Cytokinesis is the final step of cell division that completes the separation of two daughter cells. We found that the human discs large (hDlg) tumor suppressor homologue is functionally involved in cytokinesis. The guanylate kinase (GUK) domain of hDlg mediates the localization of hDlg to the midbody during cytokinesis, and over-expression of the GUK domain in U2OS and HeLa cells impaired cytokinesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from dlg mutant mice contained an increased number of multinucleated cells and showed reduced proliferation in culture. A kinesin-like motor protein, GAKIN, which binds directly to the GUK domain of hDlg, exhibited a similar intracellular distribution pattern with hDlg throughout mitosis and localized to the midbody during cytokinesis. However, the targeting of hDlg and GAKIN to the midbody appeared to be independent of each other. The midbody localization of GAKIN required its functional kinesin-motor domain. Treatment of cells with the siRNA specific for hDlg and GAKIN caused formation of multinucleated cells and delayed cytokinesis. Together, these results suggest that hDlg and GAKIN play functional roles in the maintenance of midbody architecture during cytokinesis.

  11. Assembly of Hepatocyte Spheroids Using Magnetic 3D Cell Culture for CYP450 Inhibition/Induction

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Pujan K.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2017-01-01

    There is a significant need for in vitro methods to study drug-induced liver injury that are rapid, reproducible, and scalable for existing high-throughput systems. However, traditional monolayer and suspension cultures of hepatocytes are difficult to handle and risk the loss of phenotype. Generally, three-dimensional (3D) cell culture platforms help recapitulate native liver tissue phenotype, but suffer from technical limitations for high-throughput screening, including scalability, speed, and handling. Here, we developed a novel assay for cytochrome P450 (CYP450) induction/inhibition using magnetic 3D cell culture that overcomes the limitations of other platforms by aggregating magnetized cells with magnetic forces. With this platform, spheroids can be rapidly assembled and easily handled, while replicating native liver function. We assembled spheroids of primary human hepatocytes in a 384-well format and maintained this culture over five days, including a 72 h induction period with known CYP450 inducers/inhibitors. CYP450 activity and viability in the spheroids were assessed and compared in parallel with monolayers. CYP450 activity was induced/inhibited in spheroids as expected, separate from any toxic response. Spheroids showed a significantly higher baseline level of CYP450 activity and induction over monolayers. Positive staining in spheroids for albumin and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP2) indicates the preservation of hepatocyte function within spheroids. The study presents a proof-of-concept for the use of magnetic 3D cell culture for the assembly and handling of novel hepatic tissue models. PMID:28524079

  12. Genes affected by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral insertions in mouse mammary tumors are deregulated or mutated in primary human mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert; Mudunuri, Uma; Bargo, Sharon; Raafat, Ahmed; McCurdy, David; Boulanger, Corinne; Lowther, William; Stephens, Robert; Luke, Brian T.; Stewart, Claudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of mutations is a contributing factor in the initiation of premalignant mammary lesions and their progression to malignancy and metastasis. We have used a mouse model in which the carcinogen is the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) which induces clonal premalignant mammary lesions and malignant mammary tumors by insertional mutagenesis. Identification of the genes and signaling pathways affected in MMTV-induced mouse mammary lesions provides a rationale for determining whether genetic alteration of the human orthologues of these genes/pathways may contribute to human breast carcinogenesis. A high-throughput platform for inverse PCR to identify MMTV-host junction fragments and their nucleotide sequences in a large panel of MMTV-induced lesions was developed. Validation of the genes affected by MMTV-insertion was carried out by microarray analysis. Common integration site (CIS) means that the gene was altered by an MMTV proviral insertion in at least two independent lesions arising in different hosts. Three of the new genes identified as CIS for MMTV were assayed for their capability to confer on HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells the ability for invasion, anchorage independent growth and tumor development in nude mice. Analysis of MMTV induced mammary premalignant hyperplastic outgrowth (HOG) lines and mammary tumors led to the identification of CIS restricted to 35 loci. Within these loci members of the Wnt, Fgf and Rspo gene families plus two linked genes (Npm3 and Ddn) were frequently activated in tumors induced by MMTV. A second group of 15 CIS occur at a low frequency (2-5 observations) in mammary HOGs or tumors. In this latter group the expression of either Phf19 or Sdc2 was shown to increase HC11 cells invasion capability. Foxl1 expression conferred on HC11 cells the capability for anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar and tumor development in nude mice. The published transcriptome and nucleotide sequence analysis of gene

  13. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C; Heth, Jason A; Maher, Cormac O; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D; Freudiger, Christian W; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A

    2015-10-14

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a nondestructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. We show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ = 0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery.

  14. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C.; Heth, Jason A.; Maher, Cormac O.; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D.; Freudiger, Christian W.; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a non-destructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. Here we show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ=0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density and protein:lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density and protein:lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Importantly, quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26468325

  15. Misorientations in spheroidal graphite: some new insights about spheroidal graphite growth in cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacaze, J.; Theuwissen, K.; Laffont, L.; Véron, M.

    2016-03-01

    Local diffraction patterning, orientation mapping and high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging have been used to characterize misorientations in graphite spheroids of cast irons. Emphasis is put here on bulk graphite, away from the nucleus as well as from the outer surface of the spheroids in order to get information on their growth during solidification. The results show that spheroidal graphite consists in conical sectors made of elementary blocks piled up on each other. These blocks are elongated along the prismatic a direction of graphite with the c axes roughly parallel to the radius of the spheroids. This implies that the orientation of the blocks rotates around the spheroid centre giving low angle tilting misorientations along tangential direction within each sector. Misorientations between neighbouring sectors are of higher values and their interfaces show rippled layers which are characteristic of defects in graphene. Along a radius of the spheroid, clockwise and anticlockwise twisting between blocks is observed. These observations help challenging some of the models proposed to explain spheroidal growth in cast ions.

  16. A multicellular spheroid array to realize spheroid formation, culture, and viability assay on a chip.

    PubMed

    Torisawa, Yu-suke; Takagi, Airi; Nashimoto, Yuji; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel multicellular spheroid culture system that facilitates the easy preparation and culture of a spheroid microarray for the long-term monitoring of cellular activity. A spheroid culture device with an array of pyramid-like microholes was constructed in a silicon chip that was equipped with elastomeric microchannels. A cell suspension was introduced via the microfluidic channel into the microstructure that comprised silicon microholes and elastomeric microwells. A single spheroid can be formed and localized precisely within each microstructure. Since the culture medium could be replaced via the microchannels, a long-term culture (of approximately 2 weeks) is available on the chip. Measurement of albumin production in the hepatoma cell line (HepG2) showed that the liver-specific functions were maintained for 2 weeks. Based on the cellular respiratory activity, the cellular viability of the spheroid array on the chip was evaluated using scanning electrochemical microscopy. Responses to four different chemical stimulations were simultaneously detected on the same chip, thus demonstrating that each channel could be evaluated independently under various stimulation conditions. Our spheroid culture system facilitated the understanding of spheroid formation, culture, and viability assay on a single chip, thus functioning as a useful drug-screening device for cancer and liver cells.

  17. Accumulation and toxicity of antibody-targeted doxorubicin-loaded PEG-PE micelles in ovarian cancer cell spheroid model

    PubMed Central

    Perche, Federico; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the evaluation of doxorubicin-loaded PEG-PE micelles targeting using an ovarian cancer cell spheroid model. Most ovarian cancer patients present at an advanced clinical stage and develop resistance to standard of care platinum/taxane therapy. Doxorubicin is also approved for ovarian cancer but had limited benefits in refractory patients. In this study, we used drug-resistant spheroid cultures of ovarian carcinoma to evaluate the uptake and cytotoxicity of an antibody-targeted doxorubicin formulation. Doxorubicin was encapsulated in polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) conjugated micelles. The doxorubicin-loaded PEG-PE micelles (MDOX) were further decorated with a cancer cell-specific monoclonal 2C5 antibody to obtain doxorubicin-loaded immunomicelles (2C5-MDOX). Targeting and resulting toxicity of doxorubicin-loaded PEG-PE micelles were evaluated in three dimensional cancer cell spheroids. Superior accumulation of 2C5-MDOX compared to free doxorubicin or untargeted MDOX in spheroids was evidenced both by flow cytometry, fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Interestingly, even higher toxicity was measured by lactate dehydrogenase release and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling of targeted doxorubicin micelles in Bcl-2 overexpressing adriamycin-resistant spheroids. Overall, these results support use of spheroids to evaluate tumor targeted drug delivery. PMID:22974689

  18. Nonlinear 3D Projection Printing of Concave Hydrogel Microstructures for Long-Term Multicellular Spheroid and Embryoid Body Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hribar, K.C; Finlay, D.; Ma, X.; Qu, X.; Ondeck, M. G.; Chung, P. H.; Zanella, F.; Engler, A. J.; Sheikh, F.; Vuori, K.; Chen, S.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term culture and monitoring of individual multicellular spheroids and embryoid bodies (EBs) remains a challenge for in vitro cell propogation. Here, we used a continuous 3D projection printing approach – with an important modification of nonlinear exposure — to generate concave hydrogel microstructures that permit spheroid growth and long-term maintenance, without the need for spheroid transfer. Breast cancer spheroids grown to 10 d in the concave structures showed hypoxic cores and signs of necrosis using immunofluorescent and histochemical staining, key features of the tumor microenvironment in vivo. EBs consisting of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) grown on the hydrogels demonstrated narrow size distribution and undifferentiated markers at 3 d, followed by signs of differentiation by the presence of cavities and staining of the three germ layers at 10 d. These findings demonstrate a new method for long-term (e.g. beyond spheroid formation at day 2, and with media exchange) 3D cell culture that should be able to assist in cancer spheroid studies as well as embryogenesis and patient-derived disease modeling with iPSC EBs. PMID:25900329

  19. Caudatin targets TNFAIP1/NF-κB and cytochrome c/caspase signaling to suppress tumor progression in human uterine cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi-Wen; Xie, Shun; Hu, Si-Yang; Liao, Tao; Liu, Pan; Peng, Ke-Hong; Yang, Xin-Zhou; He, Zhi-Li; Tang, Hong-Yan; Cui, Yuan; Peng, Xiao-Ning; Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Chang

    2016-10-01

    Caudatin, a C-21 steroidal glyco-side isolated from Chinese herbs, has a long history of use for the treatment of multiple diseases, including cancers. However, the precise mechanisms of actions of caudatin in human uterine cancer cells remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which caudatin inhibits cell growth in human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa) and endometrial carcinoma cell line (HEC-1A). Treatment with caudatin promoted cell morphology change, inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and spheroid formation, and induced cell apoptosis. Our results showed that the expression of tumor necrosis factor; α-induced protein 1 (TNFAIP1) was downregulated in uterine cancer cells and tissues compared to paired adjacent non-tumor uterine tissues. Further molecular mechanism study showed that caudatin can directly regulate TNFAIP1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner and also associated with the downregulation of NF-κB and upregulation of BAX/BcL-2 ratio and caspase-3. Moreover, we found that overexpression of TNFAIP1 inhibits the growth and invasion, and induces apoptosis in uterine cancer cells through inhibition of the NF-κB pathway, suggesting that TNFAIP1 may act as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. We found that caudatin inhibited tumorigenicity and upregulated TNFAIP1 in vivo. Taken together, caudatin impacts on cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis of uterine cancer cells by regulating several carcinogenesis-related processes, including a novel mechanism involving the targeting of TNFAIP1/NF-κB signaling. Our findings provide new insights into understanding the anticancer mechanisms of caudatin in human uterine cancer therapy.

  20. Prolate spheroidal harmonic expansion of gravitational field

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2014-06-01

    As a modification of the oblate spheroidal case, a recursive method is developed to compute the point value and a few low-order derivatives of the prolate spheroidal harmonics of the second kind, Q{sub nm} (y), namely the unnormalized associated Legendre function (ALF) of the second kind with its argument in the domain, 1 < y < ∞. They are required in evaluating the prolate spheroidal harmonic expansion of the gravitational field in addition to the point value and the low-order derivatives of P-bar {sub nm}(t), the 4π fully normalized ALF of the first kind with its argument in the domain, |t| ≤ 1. The new method will be useful in the gravitational field computation of elongated celestial objects.

  1. Screening of charged spheroidal colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Carlos; Téllez, Gabriel

    2010-10-01

    We study the effective screened electrostatic potential created by a spheroidal colloidal particle immersed in an electrolyte, within the mean field approximation, using Poisson-Boltzmann equation in its linear and nonlinear forms, and also beyond the mean field by means of Monte Carlo computer simulation. The anisotropic shape of the particle has a strong effect on the screened potential, even at large distances (compared to the Debye length) from it. To quantify this anisotropy effect, we focus our study on the dependence of the potential on the position of the observation point with respect with the orientation of the spheroidal particle. For several different boundary conditions (constant potential, or constant surface charge) we find that, at large distance, the potential is higher in the direction of the large axis of the spheroidal particle.

  2. Sulphur isotope ratios in the Canyon Diablo metallic spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwing, C. E.; Rees, C. E.; Thode, H. G.

    1983-09-01

    Nininger (1956) has discovered metallic spheroids in the soil surrounding Meteor Crater in Arizona. Nininger suggested that the spheroids condensed from the center of a homogeneous explosion-produced metallic vapor cloud. The present investigation is concerned with measurements of sulfur contents and delta S-34 values of metallic spheroids from the vicinity of Meteor Crater. It is found that the small metallic spheroids have lower sulfur contents and higher delta S-34 values than do the large spheroids. It is concluded that the observed isotopic patterns are unlikely to have arisen during desulfurization of the metallic liquid from which the spheroids were formed or during high temperature oxidation or the spheroids. The most likely process for the production of the observed delta S-34 values and sulfur contents is low temperature oxidation reactions experienced by the spheroids during their surface exposure following formation.

  3. Continuous long-term cytotoxicity monitoring in 3D spheroids of beetle luciferase-expressing hepatocytes by nondestructive bioluminescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Mayu; Fujita, Yasuko; Saito, Rumiko; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Nakajima, Yoshihiro

    2017-06-20

    Three-dimensional (3D) spheroids are frequently used in toxicological study because their morphology and function closely resemble those of tissue. As these properties are maintained over a long term, repeated treatment of the spheroids with a test object is possible. Generally, in the repeated treatment test to assess cytotoxicity in the spheroids, ATP assay, colorimetric measurement using pigments or high-content imaging analysis is performed. However, continuous assessment of cytotoxicity in the same spheroids using the above assays or analysis is impossible because the spheroids must be disrupted or killed. To overcome this technical limitation, we constructed a simple monitoring system in which cytotoxicity in the spheroids can be continuously monitored by nondestructive bioluminescence measurement. Mouse primary hepatocytes were isolated from transchromosomic (Tc) mice harboring a mouse artificial chromosome (MAC) vector expressing beetle luciferase Emerald Luc (ELuc) under the control of cytomegalovirus immediate early enhancer/chicken β-actin promoter/rabbit β-globin intron II (CAG) promoter, and used in 3D cultures. We confirmed that both luminescence and albumin secretion from the spheroids seeded in the 96-well format Cell-able(TM) were maintained for approximately 1 month. Finally, we repetitively treated the luminescent 3D spheroids with representative hepatotoxicants for approximately 1 month, and continuously and nondestructively measured bioluminescence every day. We successfully obtained daily changes of the dose-response bioluminescence curves for the respective toxicants. In this study, we constructed a monitoring system in which cytotoxicity in the same 3D spheroids was continuously and sensitively monitored over a long term. Because this system can be easily applied to other cells, such as human primary cells or stem cells, it is expected to serve as the preferred platform for simple and cost-effective long-term monitoring of cellular events

  4. Human Xenografts Are Not Rejected in a Naturally Occurring Immunodeficient Porcine Line: A Human Tumor Model in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Basel, Matthew T.; Balivada, Sivasai; Beck, Amanda P.; Kerrigan, Maureen A.; Pyle, Marla M.; Dekkers, Jack C.M.; Wyatt, Carol R.; Rowland, Robert R.R.; Anderson, David E.; Bossmann, Stefan H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Animal models for cancer therapy are invaluable for preclinical testing of potential cancer treatments; however, therapies tested in such models often fail to translate into clinical settings. Therefore, a better preclinical model for cancer treatment testing is needed. Here we demonstrate that an immunodeficient line of pigs can host and support the growth of xenografted human tumors and has the potential to be an effective animal model for cancer therapy. Wild-type and immunodeficient pigs were injected subcutaneously in the left ear with human melanoma cells (A375SM cells) and in the right ear with human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1). All immunodeficient pigs developed tumors that were verified by histology and immunohistochemistry. Nonaffected littermates did not develop tumors. Immunodeficient pigs, which do not reject xenografted human tumors, have the potential to become an extremely useful animal model for cancer therapy because of their similarity in size, anatomy, and physiology to humans. PMID:23514746

  5. Development of size-customized hepatocarcinoma spheroids as a potential drug testing platform using a sacrificial gelatin microsphere system.

    PubMed

    Leong, Wenyan; Kremer, Antje; Wang, Dong-An

    2016-06-01

    Sacrificial gelatin microspheres can be developed as a cell delivery vehicle for non-anchorage dependent cells - its incorporation into a macroscopic scaffold system not only allows the cells to be cultured in suspension within cavities left behind by the sacrificial material, it also allows scaffold-free tissue development to be confined within the cavities. In this study, dense and highly viable hepatocarcinoma spheroids were developed by means of encapsulation in sacrificial gelatin microspheres produced via a simple water-in-oil emulsion technique. By initial selection of microsphere size and distribution, spheroid size can be controlled for various applications such as uniform tumor spheroids as a reproducible three-dimensional drug screening and testing platform that better mimics the in vivo nature of tumors (instead of conventional monolayer culture), as this study has suggested as a proof-of-concept with chemotherapy drug Doxorubicin.

  6. Analytical study of spheroidal dust grains in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zahed, H.; Mahmoodi, J.; Sobhanian, S.

    2006-05-15

    Using the modified spheroidal equations, the potential of a spheroidal conducting grain, floated in a plasma, is calculated. The electric field and capacitance for both prolate and oblate spheroidal grains are investigated. The solutions, obtained up to the second-order approximation, show that the plasma screening causes the equipotential surfaces around the grain to be more elongated or flattened than the potential spheroids of the Laplace equation. This leads to the variation of the plasma concentration around the grain.

  7. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  8. The dwarf spheroidal galaxy Andromeda I

    SciTech Connect

    Mould, J.; Kristian, J. Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-05-01

    Images of Andromeda I in the visual and near-infrared show a giant branch characteristic of galactic globular clusters of intermediate metallicity. The distance of the galaxy is estimated from the tip of the giant branch to be 790 + or - 60 kpc. The physical dimensions and luminosity are similar to those of the dwarf spheroidal in Sculptor. There is no evidence for an intermediate age population in Andromeda I, and appropriate upper limits are specified. There is marginal evidence for a color gradient in the galaxy, a phenomenon not previously noted in a dwarf spheroidal. 21 refs.

  9. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  10. Isolation of mammary epithelial cells from three-dimensional mixed-cell spheroid co-culture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Buchsbaum, Rachel J

    2012-04-30

    -dimensional cultures of mixed cell populations (co-cultures)(16-22). With continued co-culture the cells form spheroids with the fibroblasts clustering in the interior and the epithelial cells largely on the exterior of the spheroids and forming multi-cellular projections into the matrix. Manipulation of the fibroblasts that leads to altered epithelial cell invasiveness can be readily quantified by changes in numbers and length of epithelial projections(23). Furthermore, we have devised a method for isolating epithelial cells out of three-dimensional co-culture that facilitates analysis of the effects of fibroblast exposure on epithelial behavior. We have found that the effects of co-culture persist for weeks after epithelial cell isolation, permitting ample time to perform multiple assays. This method is adaptable to cells of varying malignant potential and requires no specialized equipment. This technique allows for rapid evaluation of in vitro cell models under multiple conditions, and the corresponding results can be compared to in vivo animal tissue models as well as human tissue samples.

  11. Accessing key steps of human tumor progression in vivo by using an avian embryo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Martin; Javerzat, Sophie; Gilges, Delphine; Meyre, Aurélie; de Lafarge, Benjamin; Eichmann, Anne; Bikfalvi, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    Experimental in vivo tumor models are essential for comprehending the dynamic process of human cancer progression, identifying therapeutic targets, and evaluating antitumor drugs. However, current rodent models are limited by high costs, long experimental duration, variability, restricted accessibility to the tumor, and major ethical concerns. To avoid these shortcomings, we investigated whether tumor growth on the chick chorio-allantoic membrane after human glioblastoma cell grafting would replicate characteristics of the human disease. Avascular tumors consistently formed within 2 days, then progressed through vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-dependent angiogenesis, associated with hemorrhage, necrosis, and peritumoral edema. Blocking of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling pathways by using small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors abrogated tumor development. Gene regulation during the angiogenic switch was analyzed by oligonucleotide microarrays. Defined sample selection for gene profiling permitted identification of regulated genes whose functions are associated mainly with tumor vascularization and growth. Furthermore, expression of known tumor progression genes identified in the screen (IL-6 and cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61) as well as potential regulators (lumican and F-box-only 6) follow similar patterns in patient glioma. The model reliably simulates key features of human glioma growth in a few days and thus could considerably increase the speed and efficacy of research on human tumor progression and preclinical drug screening. angiogenesis | animal model alternatives | glioblastoma

  12. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... excessively in the body. Normally, the body controls cell growth and division. New cells are created to replace ... room for healthy replacements. If the balance of cell growth and death is disturbed, a tumor may form. ...

  13. Establishment and Genomic Characterization of Mouse Xenografts of Human Primary Prostate Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Priolo, Carmen; Agostini, Michelle; Vena, Natalie; Ligon, Azra H.; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Shin, Eyoung; Farsetti, Antonella; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Sicinska, Ewa; Loda, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Serum prostate-specific antigen screening has led to earlier detection and surgical treatment of prostate cancer, favoring an increasing incidence-to-mortality ratio. However, about one third of tumors that are diagnosed when still confined to the prostate can relapse within 10 years from the first treatment. The challenge is therefore to identify prognostic markers of aggressive versus indolent tumors. Although several preclinical models of advanced prostate tumors are available, a model that recapitulates the genetic and growth behavior of primary tumors is still lacking. Here, we report a complete histopathological and genomic characterization of xenografts derived from primary localized low- and high-grade human prostate tumors that were implanted under the renal capsule of immunodeficient mice. We obtained a tumor take of 56% and show that these xenografts maintained the histological as well as most genomic features of the parental tumors. Serum prostate-specific antigen levels were measurable only in tumor xenograft-bearing mice, but not in those implanted with either normal prostate tissue or in tumors that likely regressed. Finally, we show that a high proliferation rate, but not the pathological stage or the Gleason grade of the original tumor, was a fundamental prerequisite for tumor take in mice. This mouse xenograft model represents a useful preclinical model of primary prostate tumors for their biological characterization, biomarker discovery, and drug testing. PMID:20167861

  14. The role of L-type amino acid transporter 1 in human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Lin; Pan, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Summary L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is an L-type amino acid transporter and transports large neutral amino acids such as leucine, isoleucine, valine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, methionine, and histidine. LAT1 was found to be highly expressed especially in human cancer tissues, and up-regulated LAT1 can lead to dysfunction in human tumor cells. These findings suggest that LAT1 plays an important role in human tumors. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of LAT1 expression and its clinical significance and function in tumors. PMID:26668776

  15. Activation of proto-oncogenes in human and mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Anderson, M.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in several nations. Epidemiological studies have indicated that 85% of all lung cancer deaths and 30% of all cancer deaths in the US are associated with tobacco smoking. Various chemicals in tobacco smoke are thought to react with DNA and to ultimately yield heritable mutations. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung tumorigenesis, the authors have analyzed proto-oncogene activation in a series of human lung tumors from smokers and spontaneously occurring and chemically induced lung tumors in mice. Approximately 86% of the human lung tumors and > 90% of the mouse lung tumors were found to contain activated oncogenes. ras Oncogenes activated by point mutations were detected in many of the human lung adenocarcinomas and virtually all of the mouse lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The mutation profiles of the activated K-ras genes detected in the chemically induced mouse lung tumors suggest that the observed mutations result from genotoxic effects of the chemicals. Comparison of the K-ras mutations observed in the human lung adenocarcinomas with mutation profiles observed in the mouse lung tumors suggest that bulky hydrophobic DNA adducts may be responsible for the majority of the mutations observed in the activated human K-ras genes. Other data indicate that approximately 20% of human lung tumors contain potentially novel transforming genes that may also be targets for mutagens in cigarette smoke.

  16. Phenobarbital-mediated tumor promotion in transgenic mice with humanized CAR and PXR.

    PubMed

    Braeuning, Albert; Gavrilov, Alina; Brown, Susan; Wolf, C Roland; Henderson, Colin J; Schwarz, Michael

    2014-08-01

    The nuclear receptors CAR (constitutive androstane receptor) and possibly PXR (pregnane X receptor) mediate the hepatic effects of phenobarbital (PB) and similar-acting compounds. Although PB is a potent nongenotoxic tumor promoter in rodent liver, epidemiological data from epilepsy patients treated with phenobarbital do not show a specific role of PB in human liver cancer risk. That points to species differences in the susceptibility to tumor promotion by PB, which might be attributed to divergent functions of the PB receptors CAR and PXR in mice and humans. In the present study, male transgenic mice expressing human CAR and PXR were used to detect possible differences between wild-type (WT) and humanized mice in their response to CAR activation in a tumor initiation/promotion experiment with a single injection of the tumor initiator N-nitrosodiethylamine preceding chronic PB treatment for 10 months. Analysis of liver tumor burden revealed that PB strongly promoted the outgrowth of hepatocellular adenoma driven by activated β-catenin in WT mice, whereas the tumor-promoting effect of PB was much less pronounced in the humanized group. In conclusion, the present findings demonstrate that human CAR and PXR support tumor promotion by PB in mouse liver, but to a significantly lesser extent than the WT murine receptors. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Type, Density, and Location of Immune Cells Within Human Colorectal Tumors Predict Clinical Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galon, Jérôme; Costes, Anne; Sanchez-Cabo, Fatima; Kirilovsky, Amos; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Lagorce-Pagès, Christine; Tosolini, Marie; Camus, Matthieu; Berger, Anne; Wind, Philippe; Zinzindohoué, Franck; Bruneval, Patrick; Cugnenc, Paul-Henri; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Fridman, Wolf-Herman; Pagès, Franck

    2006-09-01

    The role of the adaptive immune response in controlling the growth and recurrence of human tumors has been controversial. We characterized the tumor-infiltrating immune cells in large cohorts of human colorectal cancers by gene expression profiling and in situ immunohistochemical staining. Collectively, the immunological data (the type, density, and location of immune cells within the tumor samples) were found to be a better predictor of patient survival than the histopathological methods currently used to stage colorectal cancer. The results were validated in two additional patient populations. These data support the hypothesis that the adaptive immune response influences the behavior of human tumors. In situ analysis of tumor-infiltrating immune cells may therefore be a valuable prognostic tool in the treatment of colorectal cancer and possibly other malignancies.

  18. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-11-17

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species' regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF -p53 axis activation.

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF TUMOR-SPECIFIC ANTIGENS IN HUMAN COLONIC CARCINOMATA BY IMMUNOLOGICAL TOLERANCE AND ABSORPTION TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Phil; Freedman, Samuel O.

    1965-01-01

    Two methods were used to demonstrate the presence of tumor-specific antigens in adenocarcinomata of the human colon: (a) rabbits were immunized with extracts of pooled colonic carcinomata, and the antitumor antisera thus produced were absorbed with a pooled extract of normal human colon and with human blood components; (b) newborn rabbits were made immunologically tolerant to normal colonic tissue at birth, and were then immunized with pooled tumor material in adult life. Normal and tumor tissues were obtained from the same human donors in order to avoid misinterpretation of results due to individual-specific antigenic differences. The antisera prepared by both methods were tested against normal and tumor antigens by the techniques of agar gel diffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, hemagglutination, PCA, and immunofluorescence. Distinct antibody activity directed against at least two qualitatively tumor-specific antigens, or antigenic determinants, was detected in the antisera prepared by both methods and at least two additional tumor antigens were detected exclusively in antisera prepared by the tolerance technique. Whether these additional antigens were qualitatively different from normal tissue antigens, or merely present in tumor tissue in higher concentrations than in normal tissue has not as yet been determined. Furthermore, it was shown that the tumor-specific antibodies were not directed against bacterial contaminants or against the unusually high concentrations of fibrin found in many neoplastic tissues. It was concluded from these results that the pooled tumor extracts contained tumor-specific antigens not present in normal colonic tissue. Identical tumor-specific antigens were also demonstrated in a number of individual colonic carcinomata obtained from different human donors. PMID:14270243

  20. Identification of genes differentially expressed in V79 cells grown as multicell spheroids.

    PubMed

    Oloumi, A; Lam, W; Banáth, J P; Olive, P L

    2002-06-01

    Growth of Chinese hamster V79 cells as multicell spheroids leads to an increase in resistance to killing by ionizing radiation and etoposide. Differential display was used to identify changes in gene expression that occur when cells are grown as spheroids. Differential display was performed using exponentially growing Chinese hamster V79 cells and the outer cell layer of V79 spheroids. Using six different pairs of primers, 20 altered bands were selected. Eight genes, confirmed using reverse Northerns, showed a match in a GenBank search. Antibodies against a calcium-binding protein, mts1, confirmed differential expression of this protein. Intracellular free calcium levels were measured using fluo-3 fluorescence, and the effect of a calcium-binding agent on etoposide resistance was examined using the comet assay. Genes upregulated in the outer cell layer of spheroids relative to monolayers included: (1) mts1 (S100A4), a calcium binding protein implicated in proliferation, metastasis, cell adhesion, and angiogenesis; (2) cytochrome c oxidase II; (3) B-ind1, a mediator of Rac-1 signaling; (4) TRAM, an endoplasmic reticulum protein. Genes downregulated in spheroids were: (5) phosphoglycerate kinase; (6) ARL-3, a ras-related GTP binding protein; (7) MHC class III complement 4A; and (8) 2,4-dienoyl-CoA. Immunohistochemistry confirmed overexpression of mts1 and another calcium-binding protein, calreticulin, in V79 outer spheroid cells relative to monolayers. C6 rat glioma and SiHa human cervical carcinoma cells that demonstrate a contact effect also showed upregulation of mts1 or calreticulin, while WiDr colon carcinoma cells that lack contact resistance showed no change in expression of either calcium binding protein. Intracellular free calcium levels were found to be almost two times lower in the outer cells of V79 spheroids compared to monolayers. V79 monolayer and outer spheroid cells treated with the calcium chelating agent BAPTA-AM showed a similar level of DNA

  1. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

    PubMed

    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  2. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  3. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  4. Fibroblast cell interactions with human melanoma cells affect tumor cell growth as a function of tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    Cornil, I; Theodorescu, D; Man, S; Herlyn, M; Jambrosic, J; Kerbel, R S

    1991-01-01

    It is known from a variety of experimental systems that the ability of tumor cells to grow locally and metastasize can be affected by the presence of adjacent normal tissues and cells, particularly mesenchymally derived stromal cells such as fibroblasts. However, the comparative influence of such normal cell-tumor cell interactions on tumor behavior has not been thoroughly investigated from the perspective of different stages of tumor progression. To address this question we assessed the influence of normal dermal fibroblasts on the growth of human melanoma cells obtained from different stages of tumor progression. We found that the in vitro growth of most (4 out of 5) melanoma cell lines derived from early-stage radial growth phase or vertical growth phase metastatically incompetent primary lesions is repressed by coculture with normal dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that negative homeostatic growth controls are still operative on melanoma cells from early stages of disease. On the other hand, 9 out of 11 melanoma cell lines derived from advanced metastatically competent vertical growth phase primary lesions, or from distant metastases, were found to be consistently stimulated to grow in the presence of dermal fibroblasts. Evidence was obtained to show that this discriminatory fibroblastic influence is mediated by soluble inhibitory and stimulatory growth factor(s). Taken together, these results indicate that fibroblast-derived signals can have antithetical growth effects on metastatic versus metastatically incompetent tumor subpopulations. This resultant conversion in responsiveness to host tissue environmental factors may confer upon small numbers of metastatically competent cells a growth advantage, allowing them to escape local growth constraints both in the primary tumor site and at distant ectopic tissue sites. PMID:2068080

  5. Transplantation of human renal cell carcinoma into NMRI nu/nu mice. III. Effect of irradiation on tumor acceptance and tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, U.; Huland, H.; Baisch, H.; Kloeppel, G.

    1985-07-01

    Irradiation of human renal cell carcinoma before radical tumor nephrectomy resulted in a significantly lower acceptance rate (1 of 7) in nude mice than for nonirradiated tumors (all of 13). The tumor tissue was transplanted into NMRI nu/nu mice immediately after nephrectomy. In this experimental system the authors demonstrated the reduced vitality of human tumor cells after irradiation. In a second series of experiments, 3 morphologically different human renal cell carcinomas were irradiated at various doses after establishment in nude mice. The irradiated tumor tissue was transplanted to the next passage. The morphology, proliferation rate and growth of these tumors were compared with those of nonirradiated controls. Radiation effect was dose dependent in the responding tumor types. The characteristics correlated with radiosensitivity were high proliferation rate (measured by flow cytometry), low cytologic grading and fast growth rate in the nude mice.

  6. Engagement of the Mannose Receptor by Tumoral Mucins Activates an Immune Suppressive Phenotype in Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Allavena, P.; Chieppa, M.; Bianchi, G.; Solinas, G.; Fabbri, M.; Laskarin, G.; Mantovani, A.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs) are abundantly present in the stroma of solid tumors and modulate several important biological processes, such as neoangiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion, and suppression of adaptive immune responses. Myeloid C-type lectin rec