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Sample records for human tumor types

  1. Type I IFNs induce anti-tumor polarization of tumor associated neutrophils in mice and human.

    PubMed

    Andzinski, Lisa; Kasnitz, Nadine; Stahnke, Stephanie; Wu, Ching-Fang; Gereke, Marcus; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Schilling, Bastian; Brandau, Sven; Weiss, Siegfried; Jablonska, Jadwiga

    2016-04-15

    The importance of tumor associated neutrophils (TANs) in cancer development is in the meantime well established. Numerous of clinical data document the adverse prognostic effects of neutrophil infiltration in solid tumors. However, certain tumor therapies need functional neutrophils to be effective, suggesting altered neutrophil polarization associated with different outcomes for cancer patients. Therefore, modulation of neutrophilic phenotypes represents a potent therapeutic option, but factors mediating neutrophil polarization are still poorly defined. In this manuscript we provide evidence that type I IFNs alter neutrophilic phenotype into anti-tumor, both in mice and human. In the absence of IFN-β, pro-tumor properties, such as reduced tumor cytotoxicity with low neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) expression, low ICAM1 and TNF-α expression, dominated neutrophil phenotypes in primary lesion and premetastatic lung. Interestingly, such neutrophils have significantly prolonged life-span. Notably, interferon therapy in mice altered TAN polarization towards anti-tumor N1. Similar changes in neutrophil activation could be observed in melanoma patients undergoing type I IFN therapy. Altogether, these data highlight the therapeutic potential of interferons, suggesting optimization of its clinical use as potent anti-tumor agent. PMID:26619320

  2. Tumor Types

    MedlinePlus

    ... acoustic neuroma is also known as a schwannoma, vestibular schwannoma, or neurilemmoma. Characteristics Arises from cells that ... multiple CNS tumors, including neurofibromas, multiple meningiomas, bilateral vestibular schwannomas, optic nerve gliomas, and spinal cord tumors. ...

  3. Mitochondrially targeted wild-type p53 induces apoptosis in a solid human tumor xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Gustavo; Crawford, Howard C.; Vaseva, Angelina; Moll, Ute M.

    2013-01-01

    Classic but also novel roles of p53 are becoming increasingly well characterized. We previously showed that ex vivo retroviral transfer of mitochondrially targeted wild type p53 (mitop53) in the Eμ-myc mouse lymphoma model efficiently induces tumor cell killing in vivo. In an effort to further explore the therapeutic potential of mitop53 for its pro-apoptotic effect in solid tumors, we generated replication-deficient recombinant human Adenovirus type 5 vectors. We show here that adenoviral delivery of mitop53 by intratumoral injection into HCT116 human colon carcinoma xenograft tumors in nude mice is surprisingly effective, resulting in tumor cell death of comparable potency to conventional p53. These apoptotic effects in vivo were confirmed by Ad5-mitop53 mediated cell death of HCT116 cells in culture. Together, these data provide encouragement to further explore the potential for novel mitop53 proteins in cancer therapy to execute the shortest known circuitry of p53 death signaling. PMID:18719383

  4. A novel type of human alpha-amylase produced in lung carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Tomita, N; Horii, A; Doi, S; Yokouchi, H; Shiosaki, K; Higashiyama, M; Matsuura, N; Ogawa, M; Mori, T; Matsubara, K

    1989-03-15

    A novel type of alpha-amylase was detected in a lung carcinoid tissue after surveying the cDNA library constructed from this tumor mRNA. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the amylase expressed in this carcinoid tumor has 13 and 6 amino acid substitutions when compared with salivary amylase (Amy1) and pancreatic amylase (Amy2), respectively. The nucleotide sequence homologies of cDNAs between this carcinoid amylase and amy1, amy2 are 97.5% and 98.2%, respectively. The nucleotide sequence comparison strongly suggests that this new amylase is the product of the amy3 gene that has been detected in human genome [Emi et al., Gene 62 (1988) 229-235] PMID:2701942

  5. Effects of botulinum toxin type D on secretion of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, K.; Spriggs, D.; Ohno, T.; Kufe, D.

    1989-05-01

    Botulinum toxins are potent neurotoxins which block the release of neurotransmitters. The effects of these toxins on hematopoietic cells, however, are unknown. Monocytes secrete a variety of polypeptide growth factors, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In the study reported here, the effects of botulinum toxin type D on the secretion of TNF from human monocytes were examined. The results demonstrate that biotulinum toxin type D inhibits the release of TNF from monocytes activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Botulinum toxin type D had no detectable effect on intracellular TNF levels in LPS-treated monocytes, indicating that the effects of this toxin involve the secretory process. This inhibitory effect of botulinum toxin type D on TNF secretion from LPS-treated monocytes was partially reversed by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate or introduction of guanosine 5'-(/gamma/-thio)t-riphosphate into these cells. The results demonstrate that TNF secretion is regulated by at least two distinct guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, one responsible for the activation of phospholiphase C and another which acts as a substrate for botulinum toxin type D. ADP-ribosylation of monocyte membranes by botulinum toxin type D demonstrated the presence of three substrates with M/sub r/s of 45,000, 21,000, and 17,000. While the role of these substrates in exocytosis is unknown, the results suggest that the M/sub r/ 21,000 substrate is involved in a process other than TNF secretion.

  6. Type 1 IGF receptor translocates to the nucleus of human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Aleksic, Tamara; Chitnis, Meenali M.; Perestenko, Olga V.; Gao, Shan; Thomas, Peter H.; Turner, Gareth D.; Protheroe, Andrew S.; Howarth, Mark; Macaulay, Valentine M.

    2010-01-01

    The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) is a transmembrane glycoprotein comprising two extracellular α subunits and two β subunits with tyrosine kinase activity. The IGF-1R is frequently upregulated in cancers, and signals from the cell surface to promote proliferation and cell survival. Recent attention has focused on the IGF-1R as a target for cancer treatment. Here we report that the nuclei of human tumor cells contain IGF-1R, detectable using multiple antibodies to α- and β- subunit domains. Cell surface IGF-1R translocates to the nucleus following clathrin-mediated endocytosis, regulated by IGF levels. The IGF-1R is unusual among transmembrane receptors that undergo nuclear import, in that both α and β subunits traffic to the nucleus. Nuclear IGF-1R is phosphorylated in response to ligand, and undergoes IGF-induced interaction with chromatin, suggesting direct engagement in transcriptional regulation. The IGF-dependence of these phenomena indicate a requirement for the receptor kinase, and indeed IGF-1R nuclear import and chromatin binding can be blocked by a novel IGF-1R kinase inhibitor. Nuclear IGF-1R is detectable in primary renal cancer cells, formalin-fixed tumors, preinvasive lesions in the breast, and non-malignant tissues characterized by a high proliferation rate. In clear cell renal cancer, nuclear IGF-1R is associated with adverse prognosis. Our findings suggest that IGF-1R nuclear import has biological significance, may contribute directly to IGF-1R function, and may influence the efficacy of IGF-1R inhibitory drugs. PMID:20710042

  7. A Novel Semi-Supervised Methodology for Extracting Tumor Type-Specific MRS Sources in Human Brain Data

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Martorell, Sandra; Ruiz, Héctor; Vellido, Alfredo; Olier, Iván; Romero, Enrique; Julià-Sapé, Margarida; Martín, José D.; Jarman, Ian H.; Arús, Carles; Lisboa, Paulo J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinical investigation of human brain tumors often starts with a non-invasive imaging study, providing information about the tumor extent and location, but little insight into the biochemistry of the analyzed tissue. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy can complement imaging by supplying a metabolic fingerprint of the tissue. This study analyzes single-voxel magnetic resonance spectra, which represent signal information in the frequency domain. Given that a single voxel may contain a heterogeneous mix of tissues, signal source identification is a relevant challenge for the problem of tumor type classification from the spectroscopic signal. Methodology/Principal Findings Non-negative matrix factorization techniques have recently shown their potential for the identification of meaningful sources from brain tissue spectroscopy data. In this study, we use a convex variant of these methods that is capable of handling negatively-valued data and generating sources that can be interpreted as tumor class prototypes. A novel approach to convex non-negative matrix factorization is proposed, in which prior knowledge about class information is utilized in model optimization. Class-specific information is integrated into this semi-supervised process by setting the metric of a latent variable space where the matrix factorization is carried out. The reported experimental study comprises 196 cases from different tumor types drawn from two international, multi-center databases. The results indicate that the proposed approach outperforms a purely unsupervised process by achieving near perfect correlation of the extracted sources with the mean spectra of the tumor types. It also improves tissue type classification. Conclusions/Significance We show that source extraction by unsupervised matrix factorization benefits from the integration of the available class information, so operating in a semi-supervised learning manner, for discriminative source identification and brain

  8. Metabolomics of human breast cancer: new approaches for tumor typing and biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, and the development of new technologies for better understanding of the molecular changes involved in breast cancer progression is essential. Metabolic changes precede overt phenotypic changes, because cellular regulation ultimately affects the use of small-molecule substrates for cell division, growth or environmental changes such as hypoxia. Differences in metabolism between normal cells and cancer cells have been identified. Because small alterations in enzyme concentrations or activities can cause large changes in overall metabolite levels, the metabolome can be regarded as the amplified output of a biological system. The metabolome coverage in human breast cancer tissues can be maximized by combining different technologies for metabolic profiling. Researchers are investigating alterations in the steady state concentrations of metabolites that reflect amplified changes in genetic control of metabolism. Metabolomic results can be used to classify breast cancer on the basis of tumor biology, to identify new prognostic and predictive markers and to discover new targets for future therapeutic interventions. Here, we examine recent results, including those from the European FP7 project METAcancer consortium, that show that integrated metabolomic analyses can provide information on the stage, subtype and grade of breast tumors and give mechanistic insights. We predict an intensified use of metabolomic screens in clinical and preclinical studies focusing on the onset and progression of tumor development. PMID:22546809

  9. Intratumoral spread of wild-type adenovirus is limited after local injection of human xenograft tumors: virus persists and spreads systemically at late time points.

    PubMed

    Sauthoff, Harald; Hu, Jing; Maca, Cielo; Goldman, Michael; Heitner, Sheila; Yee, Herman; Pipiya, Teona; Rom, William N; Hay, John G

    2003-03-20

    Oncolytic replicating adenoviruses are a promising new modality for the treatment of cancer. Despite the assumed biologic advantage of continued viral replication and spread from infected to uninfected cancer cells, early clinical trials demonstrate that the efficacy of current vectors is limited. In xenograft tumor models using immune-incompetent mice, wild-type adenovirus is also rarely able to eradicate established tumors. This suggests that innate immune mechanisms may clear the virus or that barriers within the tumor prevent viral spread. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinetics of viral distribution and spread after intratumoral injection of virus in a human tumor xenograft model. After intratumoral injection of wild-type virus, high levels of titratable virus persisted within the xenograft tumors for at least 8 weeks. Virus distribution within the tumors as determined by immunohistochemistry was patchy, and virus-infected cells appeared to be flanked by tumor necrosis and connective tissue. The close proximity of virus-infected cells to the tumor-supporting structure, which is of murine origin, was clearly demonstrated using a DNA probe that specifically hybridizes to the B1 murine DNA repeat. Importantly, although virus was cleared from the circulation 6 hr after intratumoral injection, after 4 weeks systemic spread of virus was detected. In addition, vessels of infected tumors were surrounded by necrosis and an advancing rim of virus-infected tumor cells, suggesting reinfection of the xenograft tumor through the vasculature. These data suggest that human adenoviral spread within tumor xenografts is impaired by murine tumor-supporting structures. In addition, there is evidence for continued viral replication within the tumor, with subsequent systemic dissemination and reinfection of tumors via the tumor vasculature. Despite the limitations of immune-incompetent models, an understanding of the interactions between the virus and the tumor

  10. RNA of simian sarcoma-associated virus type 1 produced in human tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fidanián, H M; Drohán, W N; Baluda, M A

    1975-01-01

    Simian sarcoma-associated virus type 1 propagated in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells exhibited characteristics typical of oncornaviruses but seemed to have several aberrant properties. It had a buoyant density of 1.14 g/cm3, had RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity, seemed to be labile to high salt concentrations, and contained little 50 to 60S RNA but relatively large amounts of human ribosomal RNA. In addition to 50 to 60S RNA, purified virions contained smaller RNA molecules with sedimentation coefficients of 28 to 30S, 18 TO 20S, and 4 to 10S. Unlike the 50 to 60S RNA species, the smaller virion-associated RNAs lacked polyadenylic acid, and the 28 to 30S RNA had an average base composition similar to that of human ribosomal RNA. Upon heat denaturation, the native 50 to 60S RNA genome yielded polyadenylic acid-containing 28 to 30S subunits that degraded in to 18 to 20S molecules upon further heat treatment. The 50 to 60S viral RNA had a guanine plus cytosine content of 56%. PMID:46285

  11. Negative growth regulation in a glioblastoma tumor cell line that conditionally expresses human wild-type p53

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, W.E.; Shields, M.T.; Amin, M.; Sauve, G.J. ); Appella, E.; Romano, J.W.; Ullrich, S.J. )

    1990-08-01

    To investigate the effect that human wild-type p53 (wt-p53) expression has on cell proliferation the authors constructed a recombinant plasmid, pM47, in which wt-p53 cDNA is under transcriptional control of the hormone-inducible mouse mammary tumor virus promoter linked to the dominant biochemical selection marker gene Eco gpt. The pM47 plasmid was introduced into T98G cells derived from a human glioblastomas multiforme tumor, and a stable clonal cell line, GM47.23, was derived that conditionally expressed wt-p53 following exposure to dexamethasone. The authors show that induction of wt-p53 expression in exponentially growing cells inhibits cell cycle progression and that the inhibitory effect is reversible upon removal of the inducer or infection with simian virus 40. Moreover, when growth-arrested cells are stimulated to proliferate, induction of wt-p53 expression inhibits G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} progression into S phase and the cells accumulate with a DNA content equivalent to cells arrested in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. Taken together, these studies suggest that wt-p53 may play a negative role in growth regulation.

  12. Human L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1): characterization of function and expression in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, O; Kanai, Y; Chairoungdua, A; Kim, D K; Segawa, H; Nii, T; Cha, S H; Matsuo, H; Fukushima, J; Fukasawa, Y; Tani, Y; Taketani, Y; Uchino, H; Kim, J Y; Inatomi, J; Okayasu, I; Miyamoto, K; Takeda, E; Goya, T; Endou, H

    2001-10-01

    System L is a major nutrient transport system responsible for the transport of large neutral amino acids including several essential amino acids. We previously identified a transporter (L-type amino acid transporter 1: LAT1) subserving system L in C6 rat glioma cells and demonstrated that LAT1 requires 4F2 heavy chain (4F2hc) for its functional expression. Since its oncofetal expression was suggested in the rat liver, it has been proposed that LAT1 plays a critical role in cell growth and proliferation. In the present study, we have examined the function of human LAT1 (hLAT1) and its expression in human tissues and tumor cell lines. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes with human 4F2hc (h4F2hc), hLAT1 transports large neutral amino acids with high affinity (K(m)= approximately 15- approximately 50 microM) and L-glutamine and L-asparagine with low affinity (K(m)= approximately 1.5- approximately 2 mM). hLAT1 also transports D-amino acids such as D-leucine and D-phenylalanine. In addition, we show that hLAT1 accepts an amino acid-related anti-cancer agent melphalan. When loaded intracellularly, L-leucine and L-glutamine but not L-alanine are effluxed by extracellular substrates, confirming that hLAT1 mediates an amino acid exchange. hLAT1 mRNA is highly expressed in the human fetal liver, bone marrow, placenta, testis and brain. We have found that, while all the tumor cell lines examined express hLAT1 messages, the expression of h4F2hc is varied particularly in leukemia cell lines. In Western blot analysis, hLAT1 and h4F2hc have been confirmed to be linked to each other via a disulfide bond in T24 human bladder carcinoma cells. Finally, in in vitro translation, we show that hLAT1 is not a glycosylated protein even though an N-glycosylation site has been predicted in its extracellular loop, consistent with the property of the classical 4F2 light chain. The properties of the hLAT1/h4F2hc complex would support the roles of this transporter in providing cells with essential

  13. Transactivation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeats by cell surface tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Tadmori, W; Mondal, D; Tadmori, I; Prakash, O

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is expressed in secreted and cell surface (csTNF-alpha) forms by activated monocytic and T cells. In this report, we demonstrate that csTNF-alpha may predominantly regulate the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) activation in the promonocytic cell line U937 and in the Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cell line BH1. Anti-TNF-alpha antibody suppressed both the constitutive expression of the HIV-1 LTR in BH1 cells and the expression induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in U937 cells. This suppression was found to be mediated via csTNF-alpha. No correlation between the HIV-1 LTR activation and the secretion of TNF-alpha was evident in these cell lines. Suppression of TNF-alpha secretion by cyclosporin A or by a serine protease inhibitor did not suppress the HIV-1 LTR activation. These observations suggest a novel biological role for csTNF-alpha in the immunopathogenesis of AIDS. PMID:1942242

  14. LKB1 tumor suppressor and salt-inducible kinases negatively regulate human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Treatment options are limited and prophylactic agents are not available. We have previously demonstrated an essential role for CREB-regulating transcriptional coactivators (CRTCs) in HTLV-1 transcription. Results In this study we report on the negative regulatory role of LKB1 tumor suppressor and salt-inducible kinases (SIKs) in the activation of HTLV-1 long terminal repeats (LTR) by the oncoprotein Tax. Activation of LKB1 and SIKs effectively blunted Tax activity in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, whereas compromising these kinases, but not AMP-dependent protein kinases, augmented Tax function. Activated LKB1 and SIKs associated with Tax and suppressed Tax-induced LTR activation by counteracting CRTCs and CREB. Enforced expression of LKB1 or SIK1 in cells transfected with HTLV-1 molecular clone pX1MT repressed proviral transcription. On the contrary, depletion of LKB1 in pX1MT-transfected cells and in HTLV-1-transformed T cells boosted the expression of Tax. Treatment of HTLV-1 transformed cells with metformin led to LKB1/SIK1 activation, reduction in Tax expression, and inhibition of cell proliferation. Conclusions Our findings revealed a new function of LKB1 and SIKs as negative regulators of HTLV-1 transcription. Pharmaceutical activation of LKB1 and SIKs might be considered as a new strategy in anti-HTLV-1 and anti-ATL therapy. PMID:23577667

  15. The retinoblastoma gene in human pituitary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, V.L.; Arnold, A.; Alexander, J.M.; Klibanski, A. )

    1993-09-01

    Functional inactivation of the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor gene is important in the pathogenesis of many human tumors. Recently, the frequent occurrence of pituitary tumors was reported in mice genetically engineered to have one defective RB allele, a genetic background analogous to that of patients with familial retinoblastoma. The molecular pathogenesis of human pituitary tumors is largely unknown, and the potential role of RB gene inactivation in these neoplasms has not been examined. Consequently, the authors studied 20 human pituitary tumors (12 clinically nonfunctioning tumors, 4 somatotroph adenomas, 2 prolactinomas, and 2 corticotrophy adenomas) for tumor-specific allelic loss of the RB gene using a highly informative polymorphic locus within the gene. Control leukocyte DNA samples from 18 of these 20 patients were heterozygous at this locus, permitting genetic evaluation of their paired tumor specimens. In contrast to the pituitary tumors in the mouse model, none of these 18 human tumors exhibited RB allelic loss. These findings indicate that RB gene inactivation probably does not play an important role in the pathogenesis of common types of human pituitary tumors. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  16. trans activation of the tumor necrosis factor alpha promoter by the human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax1 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, H; Shakhov, A N; Jongeneel, C V

    1992-01-01

    In a cotransfection assay, the human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax1 gene product specifically activated transcription from the mouse tumor necrosis factor alpha promoter. The activation patterns of 5' deletion mutants, artificial enhancer constructs, and point mutations in the promoter indicate that the major Tax1-responsive element is a site at position -655 which binds the NF-kappa B/rel and NF-GMa transcription factors. Images PMID:1527856

  17. Analysis of the growth properties and physical state of the human papillomavirus type 16 genome in cell lines derived from primary cervical tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, L.; Mikumo, R.; Mark, H. F.; Lauchlan, S.

    1993-01-01

    We have established three cell lines from keratinizing and nonkeratinizing cervical carcinomas with distinct growth properties in vitro and in vivo. Each cell line contained human papillomavirus type 16 DNA sequences, but the lines differed in the physical state of the viral genome present in the cells. A high copy number of episomal human papillomavirus type 16 DNA sequences was detected in the TC-140 line derived from a keratinizing cervical cancer. This cell line had an aneuploid karyotype, did not grow in soft agarose, and formed benign cystlike nodules in nude mice, similar in morphology to well-differentiated areas of the primary tumor. Only integrated human papillomavirus type 16 sequences were detected in the TC-146A and TC-146B lines established from a nonkeratinizing large-cell cervical carcinoma. These cell lines exhibited reduced sensitivity to transforming growth factor-beta 1 and produced invasive, but not progressively growing, tumors in nude mice. These cell lines should complement existing in vitro models of cervical carcinogenesis and provide useful tools for understanding the importance of virus integration in the transformation process as well as the cellular and molecular basis for tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8395773

  18. Coamplification in tumors of KRAS2, type 2 inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate receptor gene, and a novel human gene, KRAG

    SciTech Connect

    Heighway, J.; Betticher, D.C.; Altermatt, H.J.

    1996-07-01

    Analysis of a region of DNA, coamplified in tumors with KRAS2, resulted in the identification of the human homologue of the mouse KRAG gene. The gene was widely expressed in range of cell lines, tumors, and normal tissue and demonstrated a high degree of alternate splicing. A human KRAG cDNA sequence, with a structure similar to that encoded by the amplified gene in mouse Y1 adrenal carcinoma cells, was isolated by RT-PCR. The predicted amino acid similarity between the two sequences was 91%, and hydrophobicity plots suggested a structure closely resembling that of transmembrane 4 superfamily members. Identification of a PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism allele-specific splicing differences in tumors. Northern analysis of mRNA derived from a range of tissues suggested high level expression in muscle and confirmed alternate splicing. To facilitate the analysis of exon junctions, a YAC clone encoding the genomic sequence was identified. This allowed the localization of KRAG to human chromosome 12p11.2. Isolation of one end of this nonchimeric clone demonstrated a perfect match with a 247-bp sequence within the 3{prime} untranslated region of the type 2 1,4,5-inositol triphosphate receptor gene. Multiplex PCR confirmed the inclusion of both genes. Multiplex PCR confirmed the inclusion of both genes in the KRAS2 amplicon in human malignancy, suggesting that either may contribute to the malignant phenotypes. 35 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of the human Wilms' tumor gene (WT1). Cell type-specific enhancer and promiscuous promoter.

    PubMed

    Fraizer, G C; Wu, Y J; Hewitt, S M; Maity, T; Ton, C C; Huff, V; Saunders, G F

    1994-03-25

    The Wilms' tumor gene, WT1, is expressed in few tissues, mainly the developing kidney, genitourinary system, and mesothelium, and in immature hematopoietic cells. To develop an understanding of the role of WT1 in development and tumorigenesis, we have identified transcriptional regulatory elements that function in transient reporter gene constructs transfected into kidney and hematopoietic cell lines. We found three transcription start sites of the WT1 gene and have identified an essential promoter region by deletion analysis. The WT1 promoter is a member of the GC-rich, TATA-less, and CCAAT-less class of polymerase II promoters. Whereas the WT1 promoter is similar to other tumor suppressor gene promoters, the WT1 expression pattern (unlike Rb and p53) is tissue-restricted. The WT1 GC-rich promoter is promiscuous, functioning in all cell lines tested, independent of WT1 expression. This finding suggests that the promoter is not tissue-specific, but that tissue-specific expression of WT1 is modulated by additional regulatory elements. Indeed, we have identified a transcriptional enhancer located 3' of the WT1 gene > 50 kilobases downstream from the promoter. This orientation-independent enhancer increases the basal transcription rate of the WT1 promoter in the human erythroleukemia cell line K562, but not in any of the other cell lines tested. PMID:8132626

  20. Potent inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 induce nuclear accumulation of wild-type p53 and nucleolar fragmentation in human untransformed and tumor-derived cells.

    PubMed

    David-Pfeuty, T

    1999-12-01

    The cdk2 gene has been identified as a human cdc2/CDC28-related gene that encodes a protein kinase essential for the G1/S transition in mammalian cells, but not for the G2/M transition, which requires Cdk1, another p34cdc2/CDC28 homolog. Novel potential functions of Cdk2 have been uncovered by using two potent and specific inhibitors of its kinase activity, roscovitine and olomoucine, on human wt p53-expresser untransformed and tumor-derived cells. At concentrations equal or superior to respectively 30- and 20-fold their in vitro IC50 values for cyclin B/Cdk1, cyclin A/Cdk2 and cyclin E/Cdk2, the Cdk inhibitors precipitately induce a dramatic nuclear accumulation of wt p53 and a delocalization of nucleolin from the nucleolus in all interphase cells, whatever their cell cycle status, acting in this way like the DNA-damaging drug, mitomycin C (7 microg/ml). These early events are soon followed by a nucleolar fragmentation in both normal and tumor cells in the presence of the Cdk inhibitors but not in the presence of the DNA-damaging drug. Yet, treatment with either type of compounds eventually triggers rapidly the death of the tumor cells and, much more slowly, that of the normal cells. The Cdk inhibitors, however, stimulate cell death from any stage of the cell cycle, whereas the DNA-damaging drug kills more efficaciously S phase cells. These observations provide a hint that the Cdk2 kinase might be involved in controlling the nuclear levels of the tumor suppressor wt p53 protein and in maintaining the nucleolar integrity and function, linking in this way the cell division cycle machinery to survival functions and overall cell metabolism via the control of nucleocytoplasmic transport and of ribosome production. PMID:10602500

  1. Viral-cellular junction fragment from a human papillomavirus type 16-positive tumor is competent in transformation of NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Le, J.Y.; Defendi, V.

    1988-11-01

    A 4.4-kilobase DNA fragment (T4.4) from a human tumor was found to be competent to fully transform NIH 3T3 cells. This competency resides in the whole hybrid DNA fragment, since the separate viral or cellular DNA sequences were not active. Abundant E6-E7 transcripts were found in the transformed cells. When the cellular fragments were substituted with polyadenylation sequences from polyomavirus or simian virus 40 DNA, little or no restoration of transforming activity was observed. In experiments in which an exogenous reporting gene, that for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, was used, the possibility was excluded that the cellular flanking sequences act as a traditional enhancer; yet, when the cellular sequences were placed downstream of a cloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression vector (pSV2 CAT), activity of the reference gene was clearly enhanced. These results indicate that DNA containing human papillomavirus type 16 open reading frames E6 and E7 isolated from the genome of a human tumor has transforming potential, but this potential is realized when the viral DNA is joined to cellular sequences, and that the cellular sequences function in a more complex way than by simply providing polyadenylation signals.

  2. Cytogenetics of human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Finkernagel, S.W.; Kletz, T.; Day-Salvatore, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome studies of 55 brain tumors, including meningiomas, gliomas, astrocyomas and pituatary adenomas, were performed. Primary and first passage cultures were successfully obtained in 75% of these samples with an average of 18 G-banded metaphases analyzed per tumor. 44% of all the brain tumors showed numerical and or structural abnormalities. 46% of the primary and 38% of the first passage cultures showed similar numerical gains/losses and complex karyotypic changes. The most frequent numerical abnormalities (n {ge} 5) included loss of chromosomes 10, 22, and Y. The structural abnormalities most often seen involved 1p, 2, 5, 7, 17q and 19. This is an ongoing study which will attempt to correlate tumor type with specific karyotypic changes and to see if any of the observed chromosomal abnormalities provide prognostic indicators.

  3. A novel type of cellular senescence that can be enhanced in mouse models and human tumor xenografts to suppress prostate tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Alimonti, Andrea; Nardella, Caterina; Chen, Zhenbang; Clohessy, John G.; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Trotman, Lloyd C.; Cheng, Ke; Varmeh, Shohreh; Kozma, Sara C.; Thomas, George; Rosivatz, Erika; Woscholski, Rudiger; Cognetti, Francesco; Scher, Howard I.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Irreversible cell growth arrest, a process termed cellular senescence, is emerging as an intrinsic tumor suppressive mechanism. Oncogene-induced senescence is thought to be invariably preceded by hyperproliferation, aberrant replication, and activation of a DNA damage checkpoint response (DDR), rendering therapeutic enhancement of this process unsuitable for cancer treatment. We previously demonstrated in a mouse model of prostate cancer that inactivation of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (Pten) elicits a senescence response that opposes tumorigenesis. Here, we show that Pten-loss–induced cellular senescence (PICS) represents a senescence response that is distinct from oncogene-induced senescence and can be targeted for cancer therapy. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we determined that PICS occurs rapidly after Pten inactivation, in the absence of cellular proliferation and DDR. Further, we found that PICS is associated with enhanced p53 translation. Consistent with these data, we showed that in mice p53-stabilizing drugs potentiated PICS and its tumor suppressive potential. Importantly, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of PTEN drives senescence and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo in a human xenograft model of prostate cancer. Taken together, our data identify a type of cellular senescence that can be triggered in nonproliferating cells in the absence of DNA damage, which we believe will be useful for developing a “pro-senescence” approach for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:20197621

  4. MRI and MRS of human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bob L; Hu, Jiani

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of human brain tumors, including the primary applications and basic terminology involved. Readers who wish to know more about this broad subject should seek out the referenced books (1. Tofts (2003) Quantitative MRI of the brain. Measuring changes caused by disease. Wiley; Bradley and Stark (1999) 2. Magnetic resonance imaging, 3rd Edition. Mosby Inc; Brown and Semelka (2003) 3. MRI basic principles and applications, 3rd Edition. Wiley-Liss) or reviews (4. Top Magn Reson Imaging 17:127-36, 2006; 5. JMRI 24:709-724, 2006; 6. Am J Neuroradiol 27:1404-1411, 2006).MRI is the most popular means of diagnosing human brain tumors. The inherent difference in the magnetic resonance (MR) properties of water between normal tissues and tumors results in contrast differences on the image that provide the basis for distinguishing tumors from normal tissues. In contrast to MRI, which provides spatial maps or images using water signals of the tissues, proton MRS detects signals of tissue metabolites. MRS can complement MRI because the observed MRS peaks can be linked to inherent differences in biochemical profiles between normal tissues and tumors.The goal of MRI and MRS is to characterize brain tumors, including tumor core, edge, edema, volume, types, and grade. The commonly used brain tumor MRI protocol includes T2-weighted images and T1-weighted images taken both before and after the injection of a contrast agent (typically gadolinium: Gd). The commonly used MRS technique is either point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) or stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM). PMID:19381963

  5. Experimental chemotherapy of human tumors heterotransplanted in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Giovanella, B C

    1980-01-01

    Human tumors heterotransplanted in nude mice offer the most realistic model for experimental chemotherapy of human neoplasms. Almost all the known human malignancies have been successfully transplanted in the nudes, although the rate of takes varies considerably between different tumor types. So far, a good correlation has been observed between the results obtained treating with the same drug the same tumor in the patient and in the nude mouse. Our experience in this field is, however, still too limited for the direct extrapolation of chemotherapeutic results obtained in the nudes to human tumors. PMID:6998362

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype C Tat Fails To Induce Intracellular Calcium Flux and Induces Reduced Tumor Necrosis Factor Production from Monocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Grant R.; Watkins, Jennifer D.; Singh, Kumud K.; Loret, Erwann P.; Spector, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    Over 50% of all human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections worldwide are caused by subtype C strains, yet most research to date focuses on subtype B, the subtype most commonly found in North America and Europe. The HIV-1 trans-acting regulatory protein (Tat) is essential for regulating productive replication of HIV-1. Tat is secreted by HIV-infected cells and alters several functions of uninfected bystander cells. One such function is that, by acting at the cell membrane, subtype B Tat stimulates the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) from human monocytes and can act as a chemoattractant. In this study, we show that the mutation of a cysteine to a serine at residue 31 of Tat commonly found in subtype C variants significantly inhibits the abilities of the protein to bind to chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2), induce intracellular calcium flux, stimulate TNF and CCL2 production, and inhibit its chemoattractant properties. We also show that TNF is important in mediating some effects of extracellular Tat. This report therefore demonstrates the important functional differences between subtype C and subtype B Tat and highlights the need for further investigation into the different strains of HIV-1. PMID:17376903

  7. Posttranslational modification at the N terminus of the human adenovirus type 12 E1A 235R tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A transforming region, which encodes immortalization, partial cell transformation, and gene activation functions, expresses two early mRNAs, 13S and 12S. Multiple-T antigen species with different electrophoretic mobilities are formed from each mRNA, presumably by unknown posttranslational modifications. The adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) 13S and 12S mRNAs encode E1A T antigens of 266 and 235 amino acid residues (266R and 235R), respectively. To study possible posttranslational processing at the N and C termini and to distinguish between the Ad12 266R and 235R T antigens, we prepared antibodies targeted to synthetic peptides encoded at the common C (peptide 204) and N (peptide 202) termini of the 266R and 235R T antigens and at the unique internal domain of the 266R T antigen (peptide 206). The specificity of each anti-peptide antibody was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of the 266R and 235R T antigens produced in Escherichia coli. Immunoprecipitation analysis of the E1A T antigens synthesized in Ad12-infected KB cells revealed the following. Antibody to the common C terminus recognized three T antigens with apparent Mrs of 43,000, 42,000, and 39,000 (43K, 42K, and 39K). All three forms were phosphorylated and were present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The 43K and 42K T antigens were rapidly synthesized during a 10-min pulse with [35S]methionine in Ad12-infected cells. The 43K T antigen had a half-life of 20 min, the 42K T antigen had a longer half-life of about 40 min, and the 39K T antigen became the predominant E1A T antigen. Antibodies to the unique region immunoprecipitated the 43K T antigen but not the 42K and 39K T antigens. Antibody to the N terminus immunoprecipitated the 43K and 42K T antigens but not the 39K T antigen, suggesting that the 39K T antigen possessed a modified N terminus. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis showed that the 43K and 42K T antigens contain methionine at residues 1 and 5, as predicted from the

  8. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1-infected T lymphocytes impair catabolism and uptake of glutamate by astrocytes via Tax-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Szymocha, R; Akaoka, H; Dutuit, M; Malcus, C; Didier-Bazes, M; Belin, M F; Giraudon, P

    2000-07-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of a chronic progressive myelopathy called tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). In this disease, lesions of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with perivascular infiltration by lymphocytes. We and others have hypothesized that these T lymphocytes infiltrating the CNS may play a prominent role in TSP/HAM. Here, we show that transient contact of human or rat astrocytes with T lymphocytes chronically infected by HTLV-1 impairs some of the major functions of brain astrocytes. Uptake of extracellular glutamate by astrocytes was significantly decreased after transient contact with infected T cells, while the expression of the glial transporters GLAST and GLT-1 was decreased. In two-compartment cultures avoiding direct cell-to-cell contact, similar results were obtained, suggesting possible involvement of soluble factors, such as cytokines and the viral protein Tax-1. Recombinant Tax-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) decreased glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Tax-1 probably acts by inducing TNF-alpha, as the effect of Tax-1 was abolished by anti-TNF-alpha antibody. The expression of glutamate-catabolizing enzymes in astrocytes was increased for glutamine synthetase and decreased for glutamate dehydrogenase, the magnitudes of these effects being correlated with the level of Tax-1 transcripts. In conclusion, Tax-1 and cytokines produced by HTLV-1-infected T cells impair the ability of astrocytes to manage the steady-state level of glutamate, which in turn may affect neuronal and oligodendrocytic functions and survival. PMID:10864655

  9. Cell-type Selective Phototoxicity Achieved with Chlorophyll-a Derived Photosensitizers in a Co-culture System of Primary Human Tumor and Normal Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Erin C.; Bowman, Mary J.; Pandey, Ravindra K.; Henderson, Barbara W.; Baumann, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    The ATP-dependent transporter ABCG2 exports certain photosensitizers (PS) from cells, implying that the enhanced expression of ABCG2 by cancer cells may confer resistance to photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated by those PS. In 35 patient-derived primary cultures of lung epithelial and stromal cells, PS with different subcellular localization and affinity for ABCG2 displayed cell-type specific retention both independent and dependent on ABCG2. In the majority of cases, the ABCG2 substrate 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) was lost from fibroblastic cells more rapidly than from their epithelial counterparts, even in the absence of detectable ABCG2 expression, facilitating selective eradication by PDT of epithelial over fibroblastic cells in tumor/stroma co-cultures. Pairwise comparison of normal and transformed epithelial cells also identified tumor cells with elevated or reduced retention of HPPH, depending on ABCG2. Enhanced ABCG2 expression led to the selective PDT survival of tumor cells in tumor/stroma co-cultures. This survival pattern was reversible through HPPH derivatives that are not ABCG2 substrates or the ABCG2 inhibitor imatinib mesylate. PS retention, not differences in subcellular distribution or cell signaling responses, was determining cell type selective death by PDT. These data suggest that up-front knowledge of tumor characteristics, specifically ABCG2 status, could be helpful in individualized PDT treatment design. PMID:21883244

  10. Inverse relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 early gene expression and cell differentiation in nude mouse epithelial cysts and tumors induced by HPV-positive human cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Dürst, M; Bosch, F X; Glitz, D; Schneider, A; zur Hausen, H

    1991-01-01

    Two human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16)-immortalized human keratinocyte cell lines (HPK) were shown to have retained the ability for differentiation after subcutaneous injection into nude mice. These properties were maintained even at late passage. HPK cells gave rise to transiently growing cysts which exhibited an epitheliumlike architecture. Moreover, differentiation-specific markers such as cytokeratin 10, involucrin, and filaggrin were shown to be expressed in an ordered succession. RNA-RNA in situ hybridization revealed heterogeneous and low levels of HPV 16 E6-E7 RNA in the basal layer of the cysts. In contrast, in progressively growing tumors induced by HPK cells containing an activated ras oncogene (EJ-ras) or in tumors induced by the cervical carcinoma cell line CaSki, high levels of E6-E7-specific RNA could be detected. Irrespective of the growth potential of these cell lines in nude mice, viral transcription was always more evident in the basal layer and in proliferatively active cells rather than in differentiated cells. This contrasts with viral gene expression in HPV 16 positive low-grade cervical dysplasia, in which abundant viral transcriptional activity was mapped to the upper third of the epithelium. It is suggested that the physical state of the viral DNA, i.e., integrated viral DNA in the cell lines as opposed to extrachromosomal DNA in low-grade cervical dysplasia, may influence viral gene regulation. Images PMID:1846200

  11. Phosphorylation in vitro of Escherichia coli-produced 235R and 266R tumor antigens encoded by human adenovirus type 12 early transformation region 1A.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Loewenstein, P M; Green, M

    1985-01-01

    The tumor (T) antigens encoded by the human adenovirus early transforming region 1A (E1A) are gene regulatory proteins whose functions can immortalize cells. We have recently described the synthesis in Escherichia coli and the purification of the complete T antigens encoded by the adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) E1A 12S mRNA (235-residue [235R] T antigen) and 13S mRNA (266R T antigen). In this study, we show that the Ad12 E1A T antigens are extensively phosphorylated in Ad12-infected mammalian cells but are not phosphorylated in E. coli. Inasmuch as posttranslational phosphorylation at specific amino acid sites may be important for biological activity, we have studied the phosphorylation of the E. coli-produced T antigens in vitro by using a kinase activity isolated from cultured human KB cells. The kinase was purified about 300-fold and appears to be a cyclic AMP-independent, Ca2+-independent protein kinase requiring only ATP and Mg2+ for activity. To determine which amino acids are phosphorylated and whether phosphorylation in vitro occurs at the same amino acid sites that are phosphorylated in vivo, the Ad12 E1A T-antigen species synthesized by infected cells were metabolically labeled with 32Pi and compared with the E. coli-produced E1A T antigens labeled in vitro with [gamma-32P]ATP by using the partially purified kinase. Partial V8 proteolysis analysis gave similar patterns for in vivo- and in vitro-phosphorylated T antigen. Two-dimensional maps of tryptic phosphopeptides and of chymotryptic phosphopeptides suggested that mainly the same amino acid sites are phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo and that phosphorylation occurred at multiple sites distributed throughout the T-antigen molecule. Serine was the only amino acid that was phosphorylated both in vivo and in vitro, and, surprisingly, most serines appeared to be phosphorylated. The feasibility of faithfully phosphorylating T antigens in vitro suggests that the E. coli-produced Ad12 E1A 235R and 266R T antigens

  12. Modeling Breast Tumor Development with a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in breast cancer growth and progression to metastasis. Here, we describe a method to examine stromal-epithelial interactions during tumor formation and progression utilizing human-derived mammary epithelial cells and breast stromal cells. This method outlines the isolation of each cell type from reduction mammoplasty tissue, the culture and genetic modification of both epithelial and stromal cells using lentiviral technology, and the method of humanizing and implantation of transformed epithelial cells into the cleared mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice. This model system may be a useful tool to dissect signaling interactions that contribute to invasive tumor behavior and therapeutic resistance. PMID:27581027

  13. Persistent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in human fetal glial cells reactivated by T-cell factor(s) or by the cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta.

    PubMed Central

    Tornatore, C; Nath, A; Amemiya, K; Major, E O

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of the brain has been associated with a severe dementing illness in children and adults. However, HIV-1 antigens are most frequently found in macrophages and microglial cells. To determine the extent of susceptibility of neuroglial cells to infection, the HIV-1 genome was introduced into cells cultured from human fetal brain tissue. Astroglial cells rapidly transcribed the viral genome producing high levels of p24 protein and infectious virions which peaked two to three days posttransfection. Thereafter HIV-1 genome expression progressively diminished and a persistent phase of infection developed during which neither virus nor viral proteins could be demonstrated by immunodetection methods. Cocultivation with CD4+ T cells at any time during the persistent infection resulted in resumption of p24 synthesis and virus multiplication. The release of persistence did not require direct cell-cell contact between the glial and T cells, since separation of the two cell types across a permeable membrane resulted in a delayed but similar resumption of p24 synthesis and virus multiplication. The persistently infected glial cells could also be stimulated to produce viral p24 protein if either tumor necrosis factor alpha or interleukin-1 beta was added to the medium without T cells present. These results suggest that astrocytes may serve as an undetected reservoir for HIV-1 and disseminate the virus to other susceptible cells in the brain upon triggering by some cellular or biochemical signal. Images PMID:1920627

  14. Identification of Hydroxysteroid (17β) dehydrogenase type 12 (HSD17B12) as a CD8+ T-cell-defined human tumor antigen of human carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Visus, Carmen; Ito, Diasuke; Dhir, Rajiv; Szczepanski, Miroslaw J.; Chang, Yoo Jung; Latimer, Jean J.; Grant, Stephen G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxysteroid (17β) dehydrogenase type 12 (HSD17B12) is a multifunctional isoenzyme functional in the conversion of estrone to estradiol (E2), and elongation of long-chain fatty acids, in particular the conversion of palmitic to archadonic (AA) acid, the precursor of sterols and the inflammatory mediator, prostaglandin E2. Its overexpression together with that of COX-2 in breast carcinoma is associated with a poor prognosis. We have identified the HSD17B12114–122 peptide (IYDKIKTGL) as a naturally presented HLA-A*0201 (HLA-A2)-restricted CD8+ T-cell-defined epitope. The HSD17B12114–122 peptide, however, is poorly immunogenic in its in vitro ability to induce peptide-specific CD8+ T cells. Acting as an “optimized peptide”, a peptide (TYDKIKTGL), which is identical to the HSD17B12114–122 peptide except for threonine at residue 1, was required for inducing in vitro the expansion of CD8+ T-cell effectors cross-reactive against the HSD17B12114–122 peptide. In IFN-γ ELISPOT assays, these effector cells recognize HSD17B12114–122 peptide-pulsed target cells, as well as HLA-A2+ squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and breast carcinoma cell lines overexpressing HSD17B12 and naturally presenting the epitope. Whereas growth inhibition of a breast carcinoma cell line induced by HSD17B12 knockdown was only reversed by AA, in a similar manner, the growth inhibition of the SCCHN PCI-13 cell line by HSD17B12 knockdown was reversed by E2 and AA. Our findings provide the basis for future studies aimed at developing cancer vaccines for targeting HSD17B12, which apparently can be functional in critical metabolic pathways involved in inflammation and cancer. PMID:21409596

  15. Identification of inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II as a novel tumor resistance biomarker in human laryngeal cancer HEp-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Yun, Hong Shik; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Lee, Kee-Ho; Kang, Chang-Mo; Lee, Su-Jae; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Although tumor resistance remains a significant impediment to successful radiotherapy, associated regulatory markers and detailed molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well defined. In this study, we identified inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) as a novel marker of radioresistance by systematically analyzing Unigene libraries of laryngeal cancer. INPP4B was highly expressed in radioresistant laryngeal cancer cells and was induced by treatment with either radiation or anticancer drugs in various types of cancer cells. Ectopic INPP4B overexpression increased radioresistance and anticancer drug resistance by suppressing apoptosis in HEp-2 cells. Conversely, INPP4B depletion with small interfering RNA resensitized HEp-2 as well as A549 and H1299 cells to radiation- and anticancer drug-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, radiation-induced INPP4B expression was blocked by inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). INPP4B depletion significantly attenuated radiation-induced increases in Akt phosphorylation, indicating an association of INPP4B-mediated radioresistance with Akt survival signaling. Taken together, our data suggest that ERK-dependent induction of INPP4B triggers the development of a tumor-resistance phenotype via Akt signaling and identify INPP4B as a potentially important target molecule for resolving the radioresistance of cancer cells. PMID:22895072

  16. Isoliquiritigenin Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Xenograft Tumor Growth of Human Lung Cancer Cells by Targeting Both Wild Type and L858R/T790M Mutant EGFR*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Keun; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Jong Eun; Singh, Puja; Lee, Sung-Young; Jeong, Chul-Ho; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Chen, Hanyong; Chi, Young-In; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Lee, Nam Hyouck; Lee, Charles C.; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Bode, Ann M.; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with diverse genetic alterations including mutation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Isoliquiritigenin (ILQ), a chalcone derivative, possesses anticancer activities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ILQ on the growth of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells and elucidated its underlying mechanisms. Treatment with ILQ inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in both TKI-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells. ILQ-induced apoptosis was associated with the cleavage of caspase-3 and poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase, increased expression of Bim, and reduced expression of Bcl-2. In vitro kinase assay results revealed that ILQ inhibited the catalytic activity of both wild type and double mutant (L858R/T790M) EGFR. Treatment with ILQ inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells stably transfected with either wild type or double-mutant EGFR with or without EGF stimulation. ILQ also reduced the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in both TKI-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells, and attenuated the kinase activity of Akt1 and ERK2 in vitro. ILQ directly interacted with both wild type and double-mutant EGFR in an ATP-competitive manner. A docking model study showed that ILQ formed two hydrogen bonds (Glu-762 and Met-793) with wild type EGFR and three hydrogen bonds (Lys-745, Met-793, and Asp-855) with mutant EGFR. ILQ attenuated the xenograft tumor growth of H1975 cells, which was associated with decreased expression of Ki-67 and diminished phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2. Taken together, ILQ suppresses NSCLC cell growth by directly targeting wild type or mutant EGFR. PMID:25368326

  17. Molecular imaging of human tumor cells that naturally overexpress type 2 cannabinoid receptors using a quinolone-based near-infrared fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Shao, Pin; Zhang, Shaojuan; Ling, Xiaoxi; Bai, Mingfeng

    2014-07-01

    Cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2R) hold promise as therapeutic targets for treating diverse diseases, such as cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, pain, inflammation, osteoporosis, psychiatric disorders, addiction, and immune disorders. However, the fundamental role of CBR in the regulation of diseases remains unclear, largely due to a lack of reliable imaging tools for the receptors. The goal of this study was to develop a CBR-targeted molecular imaging probe and evaluate the specificity of the probe using human tumor cells that naturally overexpress CBR. To synthesize the CBR-targeted probe (NIR760-Q), a conjugable CBR ligand based on the quinolone structure was first prepared, followed by bioconjugation with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, NIR760. In vitro fluorescence imaging and competitive binding studies showed higher uptake of NIR760-Q than free NIR760 dye in Jurkat human acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In addition, the high uptake of NIR760-Q was significantly inhibited by the blocking agent, 4-quinolone-3-carboxamide, indicating specific binding of NIR760-Q to the target receptors. These results indicate that the NIR760-Q has potential in diagnostic imaging of CBR positive cancers and elucidating the role of CBR in the regulation of disease progression.

  18. Multiple tumor types appear in a transgenic mouse with the ras oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Cardiff, R. D.; Leder, A.; Kuo, A.; Pattengale, P. K.; Leder, P.

    1993-01-01

    A transgenic mouse strain with the zeta-globin promoter and the vHa-ras oncogene develops an array of mesenchymal and epithelial neoplasms described here. The predominate mesenchymal tumors were dermal spindle cell tumors, which resembled malignant fibrous histiocytomas found in humans. They were associated with hepatosplenomegaly and developed beneath squamous papillomas. The hepatosplenomegaly was associated with infiltrates of cells that tended toward myelocytic or monocytic differentiation. Other epithelial tumors included keratoacanthomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Squamous cysts, some with squamous cell carcinomas, of the salivary glands and mammary carcinomas were also found. Odontogenic tumors, which sometimes differentiated into ameloblastomas, were one of the more unusual tumor types observed. Other, less frequent tumors were also noted. The tumors described here are a potentially valuable experimental resource that may lead to an understanding of malignant fibrous histiocytoma-like lesions, odontogenic tumors, and tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8475993

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates tumor angiogenesis of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Sunamura, Makoto; Duda, Dan G; Ghattas, Maivel H; Lozonschi, Lucian; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Yamauchi, Jun-Ichiro; Matsuno, Seiki; Shibahara, Shigeki; Abraham, Nader G

    2003-01-01

    Angiogenesis is necessary for the continued growth of solid tumors, invasion and metastasis. Several studies clearly showed that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in angiogenesis. In this study, we used the vital microscope system, transparent skinfold model, lung colonization model and transduced pancreatic cancer cell line (Panc-1)/human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) cells, to precisely analyze, for the first time, the effect of hHO-1 gene on tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Our results revealed that HO-1 stimulates angiogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma in severe combined immune deficient mice. Overexpression of human hHO-1 after its retroviral transfer into Panc-1 cells did not interfere with tumor growth in vitro. While in vivo the development of tumors was accelerated upon transfection with hHO-1. On the other hand, inhibition of heme oxygenase (HO) activity by stannous mesoporphyrin was able transiently to delay tumor growth in a dose dependent manner. Tumor angiogenesis was markedly increased in Panc-1/hHO-1 compared to mock transfected and wild type. Lectin staining and Ki-67 proliferation index confirmed these results. In addition hHO-1 stimulated in vitro tumor angiogenesis and increased endothelial cell survival. In a lung colonization model, overexpression of hHO-1 increased the occurrence of metastasis, while inhibition of HO activity by stannous mesoporphyrin completely inhibited the occurrence of metastasis. In conclusion, overexpression of HO-1 genes potentiates pancreatic cancer aggressiveness, by increasing tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis and that the inhibition of the HO system may be of useful benefit for the future treatment of the disease. PMID:14517400

  20. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor with KIT mutation in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Namgung, Hwan

    2011-10-01

    Multiple jejunalgastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) were found in a 52-year-old woman with a history of neurofibromatosis type 1. These tumors were composed of interlacing fascicles of uniform spindle cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for CD117, CD34 and negative for S-100, smooth muscle actin. Molecular analysis for activating mutations of KIT and PDGFRA was performed in two tumors. Contrary to sporadic GISTs, the NF1-associated GISTs are characterized by rare mutations of KIT or PDGFRA. But, one missense point mutation (Trp557Gly) was identified in KIT exon 11 of the extramural portion of the largest tumor in this case. The intramural portion of the largest tumor and the other tumor had wild type KIT and PDGFRA. PMID:22111084

  1. Tumor biology in estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2-negative breast cancer: Mind the menopausal status

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is not one disease, but can be categorized into four major molecular subtypes according to hormone receptor [estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR)] and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) expression status. Ki67 labeling index and/or multigene assays are used to classify ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer into luminal A and luminal B (HER2-negative) subtypes. To date, most studies analyzing predictive or prognostic factors in ER-positive breast cancer have been performed in postmenopausal women, mainly using patients and samples in adjuvant aromatase inhibitor trials. In contrast, even the clinical roles of PgR and Ki67 have been little analyzed so far in premenopausal women. PgR is one of the estrogen-responsive genes, and it has been reported that plasma estradiol levels are related to expression levels of estrogen-responsive genes including PGR in ER-positive breast cancer. In this article, biological differences, especially differences in expression of PgR and Ki67 in ER-positive breast cancer between pre- and postmenopausal women are discussed. Clinical roles of PgR and Ki67 in ER-positive breast cancer differ between pre- and postmenopausal women. We suggest that the mechanisms of development and estrogen-dependent growth of ER-positive breast cancer might differ according to menopausal status. PMID:26677435

  2. Human antiglioma monoclonal antibodies from patients with astrocytic tumors.

    PubMed

    Dan, M D; Schlachta, C M; Guy, J; McKenzie, R G; Dorscheid, D R; Sandor, V A; Villemure, J G; Price, G B

    1992-04-01

    The current management of malignant gliomas is unsatisfactory compared to that of other solid tumors; the expected median survival period is less than 1 year with the patient undergoing conventional surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy treatment. Immunological reagents could be a useful adjunct. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from patients with astrocytic tumors might recognize subtle antigenic specificities that would differ from those recognized by xenogeneic (murine) systems. Five hybridomas, designated as BT27/1A2, BT27/2A3, BT32/A6, BT34/A5, and BT54/B8, were produced from the fusion of peripheral blood lymphocytes of four patients with astrocytic tumors to the human myeloma-like cell line TM-H2-SP2. This cell line has a 46, XX karyotype and is negative for hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. All five human monoclonal antibodies produced 2.4 to 44 micrograms/ml of immunoglobulin M, had a similar but not identical pattern of reactivity against a panel of human tumor cell lines, and failed to react with normal human astrocytes. Labeling of four neuroectodermal tumor explant cultures by BT27/2A3 was demonstrated by flow cytometry. Karyotyping of three of the five hybridomas demonstrated that two were pseudodiploid (2-3n) and one hypodiploid (less than 2n). The monoclonality of the hybridomas was evaluated by Southern blot analysis of JH gene rearrangements, revealing two types of rearrangements for each hybridoma, both consistent with monoclonality. Preliminary antigen characterization indicated that at least four of the five human monoclonal antibodies were directed to cell-surface glycolipids. PMID:1545260

  3. PDE5 inhibitors enhance celecoxib killing in multiple tumor types.

    PubMed

    Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Tavallai, Seyedmehrad; Webb, Timothy; Samuel, Peter; Conley, Adam; Binion, Brittany; Young, Harold F; Poklepovic, Andrew; Spiegel, Sarah; Dent, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The present studies determined whether clinically relevant phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors interacted with a clinically relevant NSAID, celecoxib, to kill tumor cells. Celecoxib and PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion to kill multiple tumor cell types. Celecoxib and sildenafil killed ex vivo primary human glioma cells as well as their associated activated microglia. Knock down of PDE5 recapitulated the effects of PDE5 inhibitor treatment; the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME suppressed drug combination toxicity. The effects of celecoxib were COX2 independent. Over-expression of c-FLIP-s or knock down of CD95/FADD significantly reduced killing by the drug combination. CD95 activation was dependent on nitric oxide and ceramide signaling. CD95 signaling activated the JNK pathway and inhibition of JNK suppressed cell killing. The drug combination inactivated mTOR and increased the levels of autophagy and knock down of Beclin1 or ATG5 strongly suppressed killing by the drug combination. The drug combination caused an ER stress response; knock down of IRE1α/XBP1 enhanced killing whereas knock down of eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP suppressed killing. Sildenafil and celecoxib treatment suppressed the growth of mammary tumors in vivo. Collectively our data demonstrate that clinically achievable concentrations of celecoxib and sildenafil have the potential to be a new therapeutic approach for cancer. PMID:25303541

  4. PDE5 Inhibitors Enhance Celecoxib Killing in Multiple Tumor Types

    PubMed Central

    BOOTH, LAURENCE; ROBERTS, JANE L.; CRUICKSHANKS, NICHOLA; TAVALLAI, SEYEDMEHRAD; WEBB, TIMOTHY; SAMUEL, PETER; CONLEY, ADAM; BINION, BRITTANY; YOUNG, HAROLD F.; POKLEPOVIC, ANDREW; SPIEGEL, SARAH; DENT, PAUL

    2015-01-01

    The present studies determined whether clinically relevant phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors interacted with a clinically relevant NSAID, celecoxib, to kill tumor cells. Celecoxib and PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion to kill multiple tumor cell types. Celecoxib and sildenafil killed ex vivo primary human glioma cells as well as their associated activated microglia. Knock down of PDE5 recapitulated the effects of PDE5 inhibitor treatment; the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME suppressed drug combination toxicity. The effects of celecoxib were COX2 independent. Over-expression of c-FLIP-s or knock down of CD95/FADD significantly reduced killing by the drug combination. CD95 activation was dependent on nitric oxide and ceramide signaling. CD95 signaling activated the JNK pathway and inhibition of JNK suppressed cell killing. The drug combination inactivated mTOR and increased the levels of autophagy and knock down of Beclin1 or ATG5 strongly suppressed killing by the drug combination. The drug combination caused an ER stress response; knock down of IRE1α/XBP1 enhanced killing whereas knock down of eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP suppressed killing. Sildenafil and celecoxib treatment suppressed the growth of mammary tumors in vivo. Collectively our data demonstrate that clinically achievable concentrations of celecoxib and sildenafil have the potential to be a new therapeutic approach for cancer. PMID:25303541

  5. PTEN: Multiple Functions in Human Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Michele; Falcone, Italia; Conciatori, Fabiana; Cesta Incani, Ursula; Del Curatolo, Anais; Inzerilli, Nicola; Nuzzo, Carmen M. A.; Vaccaro, Vanja; Vari, Sabrina; Cognetti, Francesco; Ciuffreda, Ludovica

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is the most important negative regulator of the PI3K signaling pathway. In addition to its canonical, PI3K inhibition-dependent functions, PTEN can also function as a tumor suppressor in a PI3K-independent manner. Indeed, the PTEN network regulates a broad spectrum of biological functions, modulating the flow of information from membrane-bound growth factor receptors to nuclear transcription factors, occurring in concert with other tumor suppressors and oncogenic signaling pathways. PTEN acts through its lipid and protein phosphatase activity and other non-enzymatic mechanisms. Studies conducted over the past 10 years have expanded our understanding of the biological role of PTEN, showing that in addition to its ability to regulate proliferation and cell survival, it also plays an intriguing role in regulating genomic stability, cell migration, stem cell self-renewal, and tumor microenvironment. Changes in PTEN protein levels, location, and enzymatic activity through various molecular mechanisms can generate a continuum of functional PTEN levels in inherited syndromes, sporadic cancers, and other diseases. PTEN activity can indeed, be modulated by mutations, epigenetic silencing, transcriptional repression, aberrant protein localization, and post-translational modifications. This review will discuss our current understanding of the biological role of PTEN, how PTEN expression and activity are regulated, and the consequences of PTEN dysregulation in human malignant tumors. PMID:25763354

  6. Germ cell tumors of the testis overexpress wild-type p53.

    PubMed Central

    Guillou, L.; Estreicher, A.; Chaubert, P.; Hurlimann, J.; Kurt, A. M.; Metthez, G.; Iggo, R.; Gray, A. C.; Jichlinski, P.; Leisinger, H. J.; Benhattar, J.

    1996-01-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that testicular germ cell tumors express high levels of wild-type p53 protein. To clarify and confirm this unexpected result, we have investigated seminomatous and nonseminomatous germ cell tumors at the genomic, mRNA, and protein levels. Thirty-five tumors were examined for p53 overexpression using antibodies directed against the p53 (PAb1801, PAb240, and CM1), mdm2 (IF2), and p21Waf1/Clp1 (EA10) proteins. Thirty-two tumors were screened for p53 mutations by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Eighteen tumors were screened with a functional assay that tests the transcriptional competence of human p53 protein expressed in yeast. On frozen sections, 100, 65, 35, 73, and 0% of tumors reacted with the CM1, PAb240, PAb1801, IF2, and EA10 antibodies, respectively. No p53 mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism or by functional assay. The fact that many tumors overexpress wild-type p53 but not mdm2 rules out mdm2 overexpression as a general explanation for the presence of wild-type p53 in these tumors. The absence of p21 overexpression suggests that p53 may be unable to activate transcription of critical target genes, which may explain why the presence of wild-type p53 is tolerated in this tumor type, although the mechanism for this transcriptional inactivity remains to be established. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8863671

  7. [Combination therapy with natural type human tumor necrosis factor (MHR-24) and human lymphoblastoid interferon-alpha (MOR-22) against renal cell carcinoma--a multiclinic cooperative, early phase II study. Subcommittee on Urogenital Malignancy, Committee on MHR-24 against Tumors].

    PubMed

    Niijima, T; Akaza, H; Koyanagi, T; Togashi, M; Kumamoto, Y; Funyu, T; Suzuki, T; Orikasa, S; Yoshikawa, K; Koiso, K

    1992-10-01

    The combination therapy with natural type human tumor necrosis factor (n-TNF; MHR-24) and human lymphoblastoid interferon-alpha (n-IFN-alpha; MOR-22) was investigated for antitumor effect against renal cell carcinoma in a multiclinic cooperative study throughout Japan. The "Response criteria of Japan Society for Cancer Therapy" were followed for the handling of subjects and the evaluation of antitumor effect. MHR-24 was administered at a daily dosage of 5,000-10,000 JRU by intravenous drip and MOR-22 at a dosage of 5,000,000 IU daily was administered intramuscularly at the same time. Both drugs were administered for 4 weeks or longer. A total of 36 patients were enrolled as subjects in the study. None of them were classified as ineligible. Five patients, were classified as imperfectly evaluable, and 31, as evaluable for the results of treatment. The responses in the evaluable patients were partial response (PR) in 4 patients, minor response (MR) in 3 patients, no change (NC) in 14 patients and progressive disease (PD) in 10 patients, with a response rate of 12.9%. Adverse reactions to the therapy were investigated in all 36 patients. The frequent subjective and objective reactions that occurred were fever, rigors and shivering, anorexia, and generalized malaise, and the frequent abnormal laboratory findings were leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, elevation of GOT, and elevation of GPT. PMID:1481783

  8. N -Methyl- N -nitrosourea-induced Renal Tumors in Rats: Immunohistochemical Comparison to Human Wilms Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Emoto, Yuko; Kimura, Ayako; Uehara, Norihisa; Yuri, Takashi; Shikata, Nobuaki; Tsubura, Airo

    2013-01-01

    N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced renal tumors in rats and Wilms tumors in humans were compared. Renal mesenchymal tumors (RMTs) and nephroblastomas (blastemal and epithelial components) in female Lewis rats treated with a single intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg MNU at birth and Wilms tumors (blastemal, epithelial and mesenchymal components) in humans were analyzed for the expression of pancytokeratin (CK), vimentin, p63, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), desmin, S-100, CD57, CD117/c-kit, Wilms tumor 1 protein (WT1) and β-catenin. The mesenchymal components of rat RMTs and human Wilms tumors expressed vimentin, SMA and β-catenin. The blastemal components of rat nephroblastomas and human Wilms tumors expressed vimentin, CD117/c-kit and β-catenin. The epithelial components of rat nephroblastomas and human Wilms tumors expressed vimentin and β-catenin. WT1 was expressed in different cellular components of rat tumors as compared with human Wilms tumors; the expression was seen in mesenchymal tumors and blastemal components of nephroblastomas in rats and epithelial components in human Wilms tumors. CK, p63 and CD57 were not expressed in rat RMTs or nephroblastomas, while CK and WT1 were expressed in epithelial components and CD57 was expressed in blastemal and epithelial components of human Wilms tumors. Rat and human tumors were universally negative for the expression of desmin and S-100. The immunohistochemical characteristics of rat renal tumors and human Wilms tumors may provide valuable information on the differences in renal oncogenesis and biology between the two species. PMID:23914056

  9. Treating Tumors by Molecular Profile, Not Type.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Preliminary findings from MyPathway, an ongoing phase II basket trial, indicate that matching molecular abnormalities of patients' tumors to relevant targeted therapies-albeit outside a given drug's FDA-approved indication-is both feasible and promising. Notably, patients with HER2-amplified colorectal, bladder, and biliary cancers responded well to the combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. PMID:27277257

  10. Cimetidine induces apoptosis of human salivary gland tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Masakatsu; Tanaka, Shin; Suzuki, Seiji; Kusama, Kaoru; Kaneko, Tadayoshi; Sakashita, Hideaki

    2007-03-01

    It has been reported that cimetidine, a histamine type-2 receptor (H2R) antagonist, inhibits the growth of glandular tumors such as colorectal cancer. However, its effects against salivary gland tumors are still unknown. We demonstrated previously that human salivary gland tumor (HSG) cells spontaneously express the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and also that HSG cell proliferation could be controlled via a homophilic (NCAM-NCAM) binding mechanism and that NCAM may be associated with perineural invasion by malignant salivary gland tumors. In the present study, we investigated the effects of cimetidine via the expression of NCAM on tumor growth and perineural/neural invasion in salivary gland tumor cells. Expression of both NCAM mRNA and protein was found to decrease in a dose-dependent manner upon treatment with cimetidine for 24 h. The MTT assay and confocal laser microscopy clearly showed that HSG cells underwent apoptosis after treatment with cimetidine. Activation of caspases 3, 7, 8 and 9 was observed in HSG cells after cimetidine treatment, thus confirming that the apoptosis was induced by the activated caspases. Apaf-1 activity was also detected in HSG cells in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with cimetidine. We also found that the cimetidine-mediated down-regulation of NCAM expression in HSG cells did not occur via blocking of the histamine receptor, even though H2R expression was observed on HSG cells, as two other H2R antagonists, famotidine and ranitidine, did not show similar effects. We demonstrated for the first time that cimetidine can induce significant apoptosis of salivary gland tumor cells, which express NCAM, at least in part by down-regulation of NCAM expression on the cells. These findings suggest that the growth, development and perineural/neural invasion of salivary gland tumor cells can be blocked by cimetidine administration through down-regulation of NCAM expression, as well as induction of apoptosis. PMID:17273750

  11. Targeting multiple types of tumors using NKG2D-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Cook, W. James; Zhang, Tong; Sentman, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) hold great potential for cancer therapy. Actively targeting IONPs to tumor cells can further increase therapeutic efficacy and decrease off-target side effects. To target tumor cells, a natural killer (NK) cell activating receptor, NKG2D, was utilized to develop pan-tumor targeting IONPs. NKG2D ligands are expressed on many tumor types and its ligands are not found on most normal tissues under steady state conditions. The data showed that mouse and human fragment crystallizable (Fc) -fusion NKG2D (Fc-NKG2D) coated IONPs (NKG2D/NPs) can target multiple NKG2D ligand positive tumor types in vitro in a dose dependent manner by magnetic cell sorting. Tumor targeting effect was robust even under a very low tumor cell to normal cell ratio and targeting efficiency correlated with NKG2D ligand expression level on tumor cells. Furthermore, the magnetic separation platform utilized to test NKG2D/NP specificity has the potential to be developed into high throughput screening strategies to identify ideal fusion proteins or antibodies for targeting IONPs. In conclusion, NKG2D/NPs can be used to target multiple tumor types and magnetic separation platform can facilitate the proof-of-concept phase of tumor targeting IONP development. PMID:25371538

  12. Targeting multiple types of tumors using NKG2D-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Cook, W. James; Zhang, Tong; Sentman, Charles L.

    2014-11-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) hold great potential for cancer therapy. Actively targeting IONPs to tumor cells can further increase therapeutic efficacy and decrease off-target side effects. To target tumor cells, a natural killer (NK) cell activating receptor, NKG2D, was utilized to develop pan-tumor targeting IONPs. NKG2D ligands are expressed on many tumor types and its ligands are not found on most normal tissues under steady state conditions. The data showed that mouse and human fragment crystallizable (Fc)-fusion NKG2D (Fc-NKG2D) coated IONPs (NKG2D/NPs) can target multiple NKG2D ligand positive tumor types in vitro in a dose dependent manner by magnetic cell sorting. Tumor targeting effect was robust even under a very low tumor cell to normal cell ratio and targeting efficiency correlated with NKG2D ligand expression level on tumor cells. Furthermore, the magnetic separation platform utilized to test NKG2D/NP specificity has the potential to be developed into high throughput screening strategies to identify ideal fusion proteins or antibodies for targeting IONPs. In conclusion, NKG2D/NPs can be used to target multiple tumor types and magnetic separation platform can facilitate the proof-of-concept phase of tumor targeting IONP development.

  13. Conserved Expression Signatures between Medaka and Human Pigment Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred; Kneitz, Susanne; Wilde, Brigitta; Wagner, Toni; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Spaink, Herman P.; Meierjohann, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in gene expression are a hallmark of cancer cells. Differential tumor-specific transcript levels of single genes or whole sets of genes may be critical for the neoplastic phenotype and important for therapeutic considerations or useful as biomarkers. As an approach to filter out such relevant expression differences from the plethora of changes noted in global expression profiling studies, we searched for changes of gene expression levels that are conserved. Transcriptomes from massive parallel sequencing of different types of melanoma from medaka were generated and compared to microarray datasets from zebrafish and human melanoma. This revealed molecular conservation at various levels between fish models and human tumors providing a useful strategy for identifying expression signatures strongly associated with disease phenotypes and uncovering new melanoma molecules. PMID:22693581

  14. Tumor type influences the effectiveness of pleurodesis in malignant effusions.

    PubMed

    Bielsa, Silvia; Hernández, Paula; Rodriguez-Panadero, Francisco; Taberner, Teresa; Salud, Antonieta; Porcel, José M

    2011-04-01

    Pleurodesis is commonly indicated for symptom relief in patients with malignant pleural effusions. A number of factors may influence pleurodesis outcome, but whether tumor type is one of them is a matter of debate. This study investigates the impact of tumor type on the efficacy of bedside doxycycline and thoracoscopic talc poudrage pleurodesis in order to determine which patients may benefit most from these procedures. A retrospective study of 138 and 450 doxycycline and talc poudrage pleurodesis procedures, respectively, evaluated their overall successes and failures, according to primary tumor types. In addition, a logistic regression model addressed whether the pleurodesis outcome in different tumor types was influenced by or attributable to pleural tumor burden. In the talc group, patients with lung cancer and mesothelioma had significantly lower complete response rates (63 and 61%, respectively) as compared with breast (77%) and other metastatic effusions (74%, p = 0.012). In the doxycycline group, the data followed the same trend in that complete response rates were lower in patients with lung carcinomas (31%) than in those with breast cancer (54%) or metastases from other primary sites (74%, p = 0.001). The regression analysis showed pleural burden and tumor type as independent predictors of pleurodesis failure in the talc group. The tumor type involving the pleural surfaces influences the success of a pleurodesis, regardless of the sclerosing agent used. Malignant effusions due to mesothelioma and lung cancer are particularly prone to a failed procedure. PMID:21331598

  15. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  16. Beneficial effect of a sturgeon-based bioactive compound on gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, matrix metalloproteinases and type-10 collagen in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, R; Marotta, F; Jain, S; Rastmanesh, R; Allegri, F; Celep, G; Lorenzetti, A; Polimeni, A; Yadav, H

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of a marine bioactive compound containing high-purity caviar-derived DNA, collagen elastin and protein extracts from sturgeon (LD-1227, Caviarlieri, Laboratoires Dom, Switzerland) on IL-1beta-induced activation and production of TNFalpha and MMP-13 in human osteo-arthritis (OA) chondrocytes and intracellular signaling factors. Human chondrocytes were derived from OA cartilage and stimulated with IL-1beta. Gene expression of TNFalpha, MMP-13, MMP-1 and Col10A1 was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. TNFalpha protein in culture medium was determined using cytokine-specific ELISA. Western immunoblotting was used to analyze the MMP-13 production in the culture medium and the activation of NF-kB. DNA binding activity of NF-kB p65 was determined using a highly sensitive and specific ELISA. MMP-13 activity in the culture medium was assayed by gelatine zymography. LD-1227 significantly decreased IL-1beta-stimulated gene expression and production of TNFalpha, MMP-1, MMP-13 and Col10A1 in human chondrocytes. The inhibitory effect of LD-1227 on the IL-1beta-induced expression of these genes was mediated at least in part via suppression of NF-kB p65. These data show that LD-1227 can inhibit IL-1beta-induced proliferation and inflammatory reactions via inhibited activation of the transcription factor NF-kB pathway in human chondrocytes derived from OA patients. These novel pharmacological actions of LD-1227 on IL-1beta-stimulated human OA chondrocytes provide suggestions that this marine biology compound may inhibit cartilage degradation by suppressing IL-1beta-mediated activation and the catabolic response in human chondrocytes. PMID:23034253

  17. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S; Dipersio, John F; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  18. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  19. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Wei, Jian J.; Mazar, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients’ personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients’ samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers. PMID:26476081

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase-mediation of tumor targeting human recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hui; Shao, Xin; Zeng, Liang; Wang, Fa; Huang, Di-Nan; Hou, Gan

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to use genetic engineering in order to establish an efficient tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α fusion protein with low toxicity, which may be used to target tumors. Four types of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated tumor targeting human recombinant TNF-α (rhTNF-α) fusion protein vectors were constructed. These were subsequently introduced into Escherichia coli. rhTNF-α fusion protein with a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tag was purified using GST resin affinity chromatography, and GST-tags were digested using factor Xa. The cytotoxic effects of the fusion protein on L929 cells were determined using MTT assays. At a concentration of 1 pM, the GST-tagged fusion protein exerted no cytotoxic effects on the cells, compared with the negative control cells (P=0.975>0.05). However, at a concentration of 1000 pM, the deblocking fusion protein exerted greater cytotoxic effects on L929 cells, compared with positive control cells (P<0.05). Treatment with the fusion protein also induced cell apoptosis in the nasopharyngeal cancer cell line, CNE-2Z, which secretes high levels of MMP-1. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that MMP-mediated rhTNF-α fusion protein induces CNE-2Z cells apoptosis. rhTNF-α exhibits high efficacy and tumor cell targeting capability, with low toxicity effects on healthy cells. PMID:25891416

  1. Regulation of Transport Pathways in Tumor Vessels: Role of Tumor Type and Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Susan K.; Monsky, Wayne L.; Yuan, Fan; Roberts, W. Gregory; Griffith, Linda; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    1998-04-01

    Novel anti-neoplastic agents such as gene targeting vectors and encapsulated carriers are quite large (approximately 100-300 nm in diameter). An understanding of the functional size and physiological regulation of transvascular pathways is necessary to optimize delivery of these agents. Here we analyze the functional limits of transvascular transport and its modulation by the microenvironment. One human and five murine tumors including mammary and colorectal carcinomas, hepatoma, glioma, and sarcoma were implanted in the dorsal skin-fold chamber or cranial window, and the pore cutoff size, a functional measure of transvascular gap size, was determined. The microenvironment was modulated: (i) spatially, by growing tumors in subcutaneous or cranial locations and (ii) temporally, by inducing vascular regression in hormone-dependent tumors. Tumors grown subcutaneously exhibited a characteristic pore cutoff size ranging from 200 nm to 1.2 μ m. This pore cutoff size was reduced in tumors grown in the cranium or in regressing tumors after hormone withdrawal. Vessels induced in basic fibroblast growth factor-containing gels had a pore cutoff size of 200 nm. Albumin permeability was independent of pore cutoff size. These results have three major implications for the delivery of therapeutic agents: (i) delivery may be less efficient in cranial tumors than in subcutaneous tumors, (ii) delivery may be reduced during tumor regression induced by hormonal ablation, and (iii) permeability to a molecule is independent of pore cutoff size as long as the diameter of the molecule is much less than the pore diameter.

  2. Differential expression of SKALP/Elafin in human epidermal tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Alkemade, H. A.; Molhuizen, H. O.; van Vlijmen-Willems, I. M.; van Haelst, U. J.; Schalkwijk, J.

    1993-01-01

    Recently we described a new epidermal serine proteinase inhibitor, skin-derived antileukoproteinase (SKALP), also known as elafin. SKALP/elafin was found to be absent in normal human epidermis, but can be induced in vitro and in vivo under hyperproliferative conditions. Here we studied the expression of SKALP/elafin in several types of epidermal tumors (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, actinic keratosis, and keratoacanthoma). Using immunohistochemical staining SKALP/elafin appeared to be differentially expressed in these tumors. Functional measurements of anti-proteinase activity, and Western blotting of tumor extracts confirmed our findings at the histological level. In well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, SKALP/elafin messenger RNA was demonstrated by non-radioactive in situ hybridization. We conclude that SKALP/elafin is a marker for abnormal or disturbed squamous differentiation. A possible role of SKALP/elafin in the control of tumor cell invasion is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8256855

  3. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Xinyu; Han, Xingpeng; Zhang, Fang; He, Miao; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhao, Hong

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  4. Human tumor antigens identified with monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    AlSedairy, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    MoAbLc1 (IgM) and MoAbLc2 (IgG/sub 2a/) were produced against human lung carcinoma cell line (ChaGo). Lc1 recognizes a approx. = 330-kd/approx. = 310-kd glycoprotein complexes, and Lc2 recognizes a approx. = 60-kd/approx. = 47-kd protein complex. With a panel of cell lines of different tissue origin, Lc1 showed a more restricted reactivity to ChaGo; it cross-reacted with another lung carcinoma cell line (SK-Lc-2) and two breast carcinoma cell lines, but failed to react with cell lines of fetal lung, of colon, esophageal, prostate, stomach, and ovarian carcinomas, of B and T lymphoblastoid cells, neuroblastomas, glioblastoma, astrocytoma, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes. New and improved methods were developed for the production of indium-111-labeled MoAbs for tumor imaging. To facilitate the application of bicyclic anhydride diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (BADTPA) to In-111 labeling of antibodies, we have modified the original method by using C-14-labeled BADTPA, which allows precise quantitation of DTPA molecules incorporated. A new heterobifunctional reagent, 2,6-dioxo-N-(carboxyl)morpholine (DCM) was synthesized for chelating In-111 to MoAbs, and demonstrated higher retention of immunoreactivity of the labeled antibody.

  5. Tumor vascular disruption using various radiation types

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of disrupting a tumor’s vascular structure with various radiation types and radionuclides is investigated. Calculated absorbed dose profiles for photons and 4He ions suggest that low-energy beta-gamma and alpha emitting radionuclides can deposit sufficient absorbed dose to disrupt a tumor’s vascular structure while minimizing the dose outside the blood vessel. Candidate radionuclides uniformly distributed in microspheres are theoretically investigated with respect to their vascular disruption potential and to offer an alternative to 90Y microsphere therapy. Requisite activities of candidate low-energy beta-gamma and alpha emitting radionuclides to facilitate vascular disruption are calculated. PMID:24749005

  6. Does nutrition support stimulate tumor growth in humans?

    PubMed

    Bossola, Maurizio; Pacelli, Fabio; Rosa, Fausto; Tortorelli, Antonio; Doglietto, Giovan Battista

    2011-04-01

    Many studies have been conducted to ascertain if nutrition support (NS), either as parenteral nutrition (PN) or enteral nutrition (EN), stimulates tumor growth and causes cancer progression, but after almost 30 years, the question remains at least in part unresolved. In this study, previous studies were reviewed to evaluate the effect of NS on tumor growth, tumor proliferation, tumor apoptosis, and cancer-related survival in humans. MEDLINE and PubMed were searched using combinations of the following keywords: PN, EN, tumor growth, tumor proliferation, tumor apoptosis, arginine, ω-3 fatty acids, and glutamine. Unfortunately, the effect of nutrition support on tumor growth has been assessed only in terms of tumor proliferation, whereas the interferences on tumor apoptosis have never been determined. Overall, the results seem conflicting and inconclusive. Similarly, it remains unknown if PN or EN enriched with specific nutrients such as arginine, ω-3 fatty acids, and glutamine can affect tumor growth in humans. It is hoped that further studies will elucidate if NS with conventional or specific nutrients stimulates tumor proliferation, interferes with tumor apoptosis, and causes cancer progression. PMID:21447771

  7. Degradation of the Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor by the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7 Oncoprotein Is Important for Functional Inactivation and Is Separable from Proteasomal Degradation of E7

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Sonia L.; Stremlau, Matt; He, Xi; Basile, John R.; Münger, Karl

    2001-01-01

    The steady-state level and metabolic half-life of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein pRB are decreased in cells that express high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 proteins. Here we show that pRB degradation is a direct activity of E7 and does not reflect a property of cell lines acquired during the selection process for E7 expression. An amino-terminal domain of E7 that does not directly contribute to pRB binding but is required for transformation is also necessary for E7-mediated pRB degradation. Treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome not only blocks E7-mediated pRB degradation but also causes the stabilization of E7. Mutagenic analyses, however, reveal that the processes of proteasomal degradation of E7 and pRB are not linked processes. HPV type 16 E7 also targets the pRB-related proteins p107 and p130 for destabilization by a proteasome-dependent mechanism. Using the SAOS2 flat-cell assay as a biological indicator for pRB function, we demonstrate that pRB degradation, not solely binding, is important for the E7-induced inactivation of pRB. PMID:11462030

  8. Establishment and Characterization of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Xenograft.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoying; Zhang, Le; Serra, Stefano; Law, Calvin; Wei, Alice; Stockley, Tracy L; Ezzat, Shereen; Asa, Sylvia L

    2016-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are increasing in incidence yet the cause of these tumors remains unknown. Familial associations have shed light on the genetic basis of some of these tumors, but sporadic tumors seem to have primarily epigenetic dysregulation. The rarity of cell lines and animal models has been a barrier to studies of treatment modalities. We set out to develop a xenograft model of gastrointestinal NETs. Primary human NETs were collected at the time of surgery under sterile conditions and xenografted into the flanks of immunodeficient mice. Tumor growth was measured and when tumors reached 1500 mm(3), they were excised and half was re-xenografted through multiple generations. The other half was bisected; a part was frozen and a part was fixed for morphologic and immunohistochemical characterization as well as molecular validation of fidelity of a successful xenograft. Of 106 human NETs, seven were successfully engrafted of which only one tumor was successfully propagated for eight passages. Two years later, the tumor retains its neuroendocrine features and similarity to the original primary human tumor. It has retained expression of keratin as well as chromogranin A reactivity. The establishment of a NET xenograft provides a model for further study of the biological behavior of these tumors and can be used to examine the in vivo effects of various medical and targeted radiotherapeutic agents on tumor growth. PMID:27067082

  9. Ribosome Profiling Reveals a Cell-Type-Specific Translational Landscape in Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Christian; Sims, Jennifer S.; Hornstein, Nicholas; Mela, Angeliki; Garcia, Franklin; Lei, Liang; Gass, David A.; Amendolara, Benjamin; Bruce, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Glioma growth is driven by signaling that ultimately regulates protein synthesis. Gliomas are also complex at the cellular level and involve multiple cell types, including transformed and reactive cells in the brain tumor microenvironment. The distinct functions of the various cell types likely lead to different requirements and regulatory paradigms for protein synthesis. Proneural gliomas can arise from transformation of glial progenitors that are driven to proliferate via mitogenic signaling that affects translation. To investigate translational regulation in this system, we developed a RiboTag glioma mouse model that enables cell-type-specific, genome-wide ribosome profiling of tumor tissue. Infecting glial progenitors with Cre-recombinant retrovirus simultaneously activates expression of tagged ribosomes and delivers a tumor-initiating mutation. Remarkably, we find that although genes specific to transformed cells are highly translated, their translation efficiencies are low compared with normal brain. Ribosome positioning reveals sequence-dependent regulation of ribosomal activity in 5′-leaders upstream of annotated start codons, leading to differential translation in glioma compared with normal brain. Additionally, although transformed cells express a proneural signature, untransformed tumor-associated cells, including reactive astrocytes and microglia, express a mesenchymal signature. Finally, we observe the same phenomena in human disease by combining ribosome profiling of human proneural tumor and non-neoplastic brain tissue with computational deconvolution to assess cell-type-specific translational regulation. PMID:25122893

  10. Maximum recovery potential of human tumor cells may predict clinical outcome in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Beckett, M.

    1987-05-01

    We studied inherent radiosensitivity/resistance (D0), ability to accumulate sublethal damage (n) and repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) in established human tumor cell lines as well as early passage human tumor cell lines derived from patients with known outcome following radiotherapy. Survival 24 hrs after treatment of human tumor cells with X rays in plateau phase cultures is a function of initial damage (D0, n), as well as recovery over 24 hrs (PLDR). A surviving fraction greater than .1 24 hrs following treatment with 7 Gy in plateau phase cultures is associated with tumor cell types (melanoma, osteosarcoma) with a high probability of radiotherapy failure or tumor cells derived from patients who actually failed radiotherapy. Therefore, total cellular recovery following radiation may be an important determinant of radiocurability. Accurate assays of radiotherapy outcome may need to account for all these radiobiological parameters.

  11. Quantitative analysis of MDR1 (multidrug resistance) gene expression in human tumors by polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, K.E.; Beck, C.; Holzmayer, T.A.; Chin, J.E.; Roninson, I.B. ); Wunder, J.S.; Andrulis, I.L. ); Gazdar, A.F. ); Willman, C.L.; Griffith, B. ); Von Hoff, D.D. )

    1990-09-01

    The resistance of tumor cells ot chemotheraprutic drugs is a major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy. In human cells, expression of the MDR1 gene, encoding a transmembrane efflux pump (P-glycoprotein), leads to decreased intracellular accumulation and resistance to a variety of lipophilic drugs (multidrug resistance; MDR). The levels of MDR in cell lines selected in bitro have been shown to correlate with the steady-state levels of MDR1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein. In cells with a severalfold increase in cellular drug resistance, MDR1 expression levels are close to the limits of detection by conventional assays. MDR1 expression has been frequently observed in human tumors after chemotherapy and in some but not all types of clinically refactory tumors untreated with chemotherapeutic drugs. The authors have devised a highly sensitive, specific, and quantitative protocol for measuring the levels of MDR1 mRNA in clincal samples, based on the polymerase chain reaction. They have used this assay to measure MDR1 gene expression in MDR cell lines and >300 normal tissues, tumor-derived cell lines, and clinical specimens of untreated tumors of the types in which MDR1 expression was rarely observed by standard assays. Low levels of MDR1 expression were found by polymerase chain reaction in most solid tumors and leukemias tested. The frequency of samples without detectable MDR1 expression varied among different types of tumors; MDR1-negative samples were ost common among tumor types known to be relatively responsive to chemotherapy.

  12. Comparative Epigenomics of Human and Mouse Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Demircan, Berna; Dyer, Lisa M.; Gerace, Mallory; Lobenhofer, Edward K.; Robertson, Keith D.; Brown, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Gene silencing by aberrant epigenetic chromatin alteration is a well-recognized event contributing to tumorigenesis. While genetically engineered tumor-prone mouse models have proven a powerful tool in understanding many aspects of carcinogenesis, to date few studies have focused on epigenetic alterations in mouse tumors. To uncover epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) in mouse mammary tumor cells, we conducted initial genome-wide screening by combining the treatment of cultured cells with the DNA demethylating drug 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-azadC) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) with expression microarray. By conducting this initial screen on EMT6 cells and applying protein function and genomic structure criteria to genes identified as upregulated in response to 5-azadC/TSA, we were able to identify 2 characterized breast cancer TSGs (Timp3 and Rprm) and 4 putative TSGs (Atp1B2, Dusp2, FoxJ1 and Smpd3) silenced in this line. By testing a panel of ten mouse mammary tumor lines, we determined that each of these genes is commonly hypermethylated, albeit with varying frequency. Furthermore, by examining a panel of human breast tumor lines and primary tumors we observed that the human orthologs of ATP1B2, FOXJ1 and SMPD3 are aberrantly hypermethylated in the human disease while DUSP2 was not hypermethylated in primary breast tumors. Finally, we examined hypermethylation of several genes targeted for epigenetic silencing in human breast tumors in our panel of ten mouse mammary tumor lines. We observed that the orthologs of Cdh1, RarB, Gstp1, RassF1 genes were hypermethylated, while neither Dapk1 nor Wif1 were aberrantly methylated in this panel of mouse tumor lines. From this study, we conclude that there is significant, but not absolute, overlap in the epigenome of human and mouse mammary tumors. PMID:18836996

  13. Frequency and type of toenail tumors in the dromedary camel

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, M.I.; Al-Kubati, S.A.; Telfah, M.N.; Rashid, J.; Hashmi, S.

    2013-01-01

    A total of 275 dromedary camels (16 males and 259 females) of local “Arabiyat” breed suffering from different types and degrees of severity of toenail tumors were surgically treated. Histopathological examination of the tissue samples removed from 50 tumor-like growths (2 males and 48 females) revealed three types of tumors; squamous cell carcinoma (70%), spiny keratoderma (22%) and fibroma (8%). An increased incidence of tumors was recorded in the medial when compared to the lateral toenails in both sexes. In females, the incidence in the medial toenails was 90/259 (34.75%) and 71/259 (27.41%) in the right and left forelimbs respectively when compared to the lateral toenails which was 25/259 (9.65%) and 5/259 (1.93%) for the respective right and left forelimbs. In the hind limbs, this ratio was 29/259 (11.20%) and 20/259 (7.72%) for right and left medial toenails respectively, whereas it was 17/259 (6.56%) and 2/259 (0.77%) for the right and left lateral toenails respectively. Similar to the observations in female camels, male camels also showed a higher incidence of these tumors in the medial when compared to the lateral toenails in both fore and hind limbs. Based on these findings, we conclude that in the dromedary camels, the medial toenails of the fore limbs are most commonly affected with tumors; with the most common tumor being the squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26623314

  14. A Prodrug-type, MMP-2-targeting Nanoprobe for Tumor Detection and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaping; Lin, Tingting; Zhang, Wenyuan; Jiang, Yifan; Jin, Hongyue; He, Huining; Yang, Victor C.; Chen, Yi; Huang, Yongzhuo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated proteases (TAPs) have been intensively studied because of their critical roles in cancer development. As a case in point, expression of matrix metalloproteases (MMP) is significantly up-regulated in tumorigenesis, invasion, and metastasis among a majority of cancers. Here we present a prodrug-type, MMP-2-responsive nanoprobe system with high efficiency and low toxicity for detecting MMP-2-overexpressed tumors. The nanoprobe system is featured by its self-assembled fabrication and FRET effect. This prodrug-type nanoprobe is selectively activated by MMP-2, and thus useful for detection of the MMP-2-overexpressed cells and tumors. The nanoprobe system works successfully in various animal tumor models, including human fibrosarcoma and subcutaneous glioma xenograft. Furthermore, in order to overcome the blood brain barrier (BBB) and achieve brain tumor targeting, a transferrin-receptor targeting peptide (T7 peptide) is strategically incorporated into the nanoprobe. The T7-functionalized nanoprobe is capable of detecting the orthotopic brain tumor, with clear, real-time in vivo imaging. This method is promising for in vivo detection of brain tumor, and real-time monitor of a TAP (i.e., MMP-2). PMID:26000052

  15. Establishment and characterization of five new human renal tumor xenografts.

    PubMed Central

    Beniers, A. J.; Peelen, W. P.; Schaafsma, H. E.; Beck, J. L.; Ramaekers, F. C.; Debruyne, F. M.; Schalken, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Ten different human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) primary tumors were xenografted into BALB/c nu/nu mice. Five of the tumors (NU-10, NU-12, NU-20, NU-22, and NU-28) gave rise to serially transplantable tumors that were further characterized. Histology, DNA index, immunohistochemical characteristics, growth rate, and clonogenic potential were followed from primary tumor to the 5th to 15th transplant passage. Only one of the tumors (NU-20) showed remarkable instability for all tested parameters in the first five transplant passages. Histology of the other tumors was essentially the same to the histology of the primary tumors, although differences between human and host-derived vessels were apparent. DNA index values in general showed a trend toward an aneuploid character of the xenografts. Immunohistochemical analyses showed a loss of intensity of staining but a concomitant rise in the fraction of positively staining cells with antibodies against cytokeratins, vimentin, tumor-associated antigens, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigens. Human leukocyte antigen class II antigen expression showed a loss of intensity as well as a decrease in the fraction of positive cells. Tumor doubling time was lowest in transplant passage number 0, and stable growth was noticed in transplant passages 1 through 4. Clonogenic potential of four of the lines was higher for the xenografts than for the primary tumors. The authors conclude that, on xenografting, histologic characteristics of the primary tumor are essentially conserved. Progression in the first transplant passages, however, results in tumors with a more aggressive character. Images Figure 1 PMID:1739137

  16. Detection of Human Polyomavirus 7 in human thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rennspiess, Dorit; Pujari, Sreedhar; Keijzers, Marlies; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A.; Hochstenbag, Monique; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Kurz, Anna Kordelia; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Haugg, Anke; Pastrana, Diana V.; Buck, Christopher B.; De Baets, Marc H.; zur Hausen, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although the molecular genetics possibly underlying the pathogenesis of human thymoma have been extensively studied, its etiology remains poorly understood. Since murine polyomavirus consistently induces thymomas in mice, we assessed the presence of the novel human polyomavirus 7 (HPyV7) in human thymic epithelial tumors. Methods HPyV7-DNA Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), DNA-PCR and immuno-histochemistry (IHC) were performed in 37 thymomas. Of these, 26 were previously diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG). In addition, 20 thymic hyperplasias and 20 fetal thymic tissues were tested. Results HPyV7-FISH revealed specific nuclear hybridization signals within the neoplastic epithelial cells of 23 thymomas (62.2%). With some exceptions, the HPyV7-FISH data correlated with the HPyV7-DNA PCR. By IHC large T antigen (LTAg) expression of HPyV7 was detected, and double staining confirmed its expression in the neoplastic epithelial cells. Eighteen of the 26 MG-positive and 7 of the 11 MG-negative thymomas were HPyV7-positive. 40% of the 20 hyperplastic thymi were HPyV7-positive by PCR as confirmed by FISH and IHC in the follicular lymphocytes. All 20 fetal thymi tested HPyV7-negative. Conclusions The presence of HPyV7-DNA and LTAg expression in the majority of thymomas possibly link HPyV7 to human thymomagenesis. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the possible associations of HPyV7 and MG. PMID:25526237

  17. Detection of Human Papillomavirus-16 E6-Oncoprotein in Epithelial Ovarian Tumors Samples of Iraqi Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Fahem Mohsin; Kadhim, Haider Sabah; Mousa Al Khuzaee, Liqaa Riadh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causal factor for cervical cancer. However, the role of HPV infection in ovarian cancer is unclear. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the presence of human papillomavirus-16 (HPV-16) in ovarian tumor tissues. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective study, which included 61 Archived human ovarian tumor tissues embedded in paraffin blocks. The ovarian tumor tissues were divided into four groups. The first group was the malignant ovarian epithelial tumor group; it included 31 cases with invasive surface epithelial ovarian tumors. The second group was the borderline epithelial ovarian tumor group: it included four cases with borderline intermediate malignancy. The third group was the benign epithelial ovarian tumors group: it included 18 cases with benign epithelial ovarian tumors. The fourth group had functional ovarian cystic lesions: it included eight cases with non-neoplastic functional ovarian cysts. Sections were made from each of the paraffin embedded blocks and examined using immunohistochemistry to detect HPV 16-E6-oncoprotein in ovarian tumor tissues. Results: Out of the eight cases with functional cysts only one case (12.5%) expressed HPV. No HPV expression was seen in cases with benign and borderline tumors. Out of the 31 cases with one malignant surface epithelial ovarian tumor only three (9.67%) cases expressed HPV. There was no significant statistical difference in HPV expression among neoplastic and non-neoplastic ovarian tumors included in the present study (P= 0.476). Conclusions: HPV type 16 was detected in only 9.67% of malignant epithelial tumors. It appears that HPV infection plays a relatively minor role in the pathogenesis of ovarian carcinomas. PMID:25485061

  18. High Expression of Ecto-Nucleotidases CD39 and CD73 in Human Endometrial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Aliagas, Elisabet; Vidal, August; Texidó, Laura; Ponce, Jordi; Condom, Enric; Martín-Satué, Mireia

    2014-01-01

    One of the strategies used by tumors to evade immunosurveillance is the accumulation of extracellular adenosine, which has immunosupressive and tumor promoting effects. The study of the mechanisms leading to adenosine formation at the tumor interstitium are therefore of great interest in oncology. The dominant pathway generating extracellular adenosine in tumors is the dephosphorylation of ATP by ecto-nucleotidases. Two of these enzymes acting sequentially, CD39 and CD73, efficiently hydrolyze extracellular ATP to adenosine. They have been found to play a crucial role in a variety of tumors, but there were no data concerning endometrial cancer, the most frequent of the invasive tumors of the female genital tract. The aim of the present work is to study the expression of CD39 and CD73 in human endometrial cancer. We have analyzed protein and gene expression, as well as enzyme activity, in type I endometrioid adenocarcinomas and type II serous adenocarcinomas and their nonpathological endometrial counterparts. High levels of both enzymes were found in tumor samples, with significantly increased expression of CD39 in type II serous tumors, which also coincided with the higher tumor grade. Our results reinforce the involvement of the adenosinergic system in cancer, emphasizing the relevance of ecto-nucleotidases as emerging therapeutic targets in oncology. PMID:24707115

  19. Malignant Triton Tumors in Sisters with Clinical Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Alina, Basnet; Sebastian, Jofre A.; Gerardo, Capo

    2015-01-01

    Malignant triton tumors (MTTs) are rare and aggressive sarcomas categorized as a subgroup of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). MTTs arise from Schwann cells of peripheral nerves or existing neurofibromas and have elements of rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. We report the occurrence of MTTs in two sisters. The first patient is a 36-year-old female who presented with left sided chest wall swelling. She also had clinical features consistent with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). Debulking of the mass showed high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with skeletal muscle differentiation (MTT). The patient was treated with ifosfamide and adriamycin along with radiation. Four years after treatment, she still has no evidence of disease recurrence. Her sister subsequently presented to us at the age of 42 with left sided lateral chest wall pain. Imaging showed a multicompartmental retroperitoneal cystic mass with left psoas involvement. The tumor was resected and, similarly to her sister, it showed high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation (MTT). The patient was started on chemotherapy and radiation as described above. PMID:26114002

  20. Lactate Activates HIF-1 in Oxidative but Not in Warburg-Phenotype Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Saedeleer, Christophe J.; Copetti, Tamara; Porporato, Paolo E.; Verrax, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Cancer can be envisioned as a metabolic disease driven by pressure selection and intercellular cooperativeness. Together with anaerobic glycolysis, the Warburg effect, formally corresponding to uncoupling glycolysis from oxidative phosphorylation, directly participates in cancer aggressiveness, supporting both tumor progression and dissemination. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key contributor to glycolysis. It stimulates the expression of glycolytic transporters and enzymes supporting high rate of glycolysis. In this study, we addressed the reverse possibility of a metabolic control of HIF-1 in tumor cells. We report that lactate, the end-product of glycolysis, inhibits prolylhydroxylase 2 activity and activates HIF-1 in normoxic oxidative tumor cells but not in Warburg-phenotype tumor cells which also expressed lower basal levels of HIF-1α. These data were confirmed using genotypically matched oxidative and mitochondria-depleted glycolytic tumor cells as well as several different wild-type human tumor cell lines of either metabolic phenotype. Lactate activates HIF-1 and triggers tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo, an activity that we found to be under the specific upstream control of the lactate transporter monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) expressed in tumor cells. Because MCT1 also gates lactate-fueled tumor cell respiration and mediates pro-angiogenic lactate signaling in endothelial cells, MCT1 inhibition is confirmed as an attractive anticancer strategy in which a single drug may target multiple tumor-promoting pathways. PMID:23082126

  1. Therapeutic advances for the tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, type 2, and schwannomatosis.

    PubMed

    Blakeley, Jaishri O; Plotkin, Scott R

    2016-05-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), and schwannomatosis (SWN) are tumor-suppressor syndromes. Each syndrome is an orphan disease; however, the tumors that arise within them represent the most common tumors of the nervous system worldwide. Systematic investigation of the pathways impacted by the loss of function of neurofibromin (encoded byNF1) and merlin (encoded byNF2) have led to therapeutic advances for patients with NF1 and NF2. In the syndrome of SWN, the genetic landscape is more complex, with 2 known causative genes (SMARCB1andLZTR1) accounting for up to 50% of familial SWN patients. The understanding of the molecular underpinnings of these syndromes is developing rapidly and offers more therapeutic options for the patients. In addition, common sporadic cancers harbor somatic alterations inNF1(ie, glioblastoma, breast cancer, melanoma),NF2(ie, meningioma, mesothelioma) andSMARCB1(ie, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors) such that advances in management of syndromic tumors may benefit patients both with and without germline mutations. In this review, we discuss the clinical and genetic features of NF1, NF2 and SWN, the therapeutic advances for the tumors that arise within these syndromes and the interaction between these rare tumor syndromes and the common tumors that share these mutations. PMID:26851632

  2. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy at 14 Tesla and Correlative Histopathology of Human Brain Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples. PMID:22110653

  3. Isolation of Mouse and Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Swierczak, Agnieszka; Sugano, Gaël; Smith, Harriet; Wiechmann, Lisa; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex network of cells that support tumor progression and malignancy. It has been demonstrated that tumor cells can educate the immune system to promote a tumor-friendly environment. Among all these immune cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are well represented and their presence in mouse models has been shown to promote tumor progression and metastasis. These effects are through the stimulation of angiogenesis, enhancement of tumor cell invasion and intravasation, immunosuppression, and at the metastatic site tumor cell extravasation and growth. However, the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Furthermore there is limited information on TAMs derived from human cancers. For this reason it is important to be able to extract TAMs from tumors in order to compare their phenotypes, functions, and transcriptomes with normal resident tissue macrophages. Isolation of these cells is challenging due to the lack of markers and standardized protocols. Here we show an optimized protocol for the efficient isolation and extraction of resident macrophages and TAMs from human and mouse tissues by using multicolor flow cytometry. These protocols allow for the extraction of thousands of macrophages in less than 5 h from tissues as small as half a gram. The isolated macrophages can then be used for both “omics” and in vitro studies. PMID:27325269

  4. Isolation of Mouse and Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Swierczak, Agnieszka; Sugano, Gaël; Smith, Harriet; Wiechmann, Lisa; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex network of cells that support tumor progression and malignancy. It has been demonstrated that tumor cells can educate the immune system to promote a tumor-friendly environment. Among all these immune cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are well represented and their presence in mouse models has been shown to promote tumor progression and metastasis. These effects are through the stimulation of angiogenesis, enhancement of tumor cell invasion and intravasation, immunosuppression, and at the metastatic site tumor cell extravasation and growth. However, the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Furthermore there is limited information on TAMs derived from human cancers. For this reason it is important to be able to extract TAMs from tumors in order to compare their phenotypes, functions, and transcriptomes with normal resident tissue macrophages. Isolation of these cells is challenging due to the lack of markers and standardized protocols. Here we show an optimized protocol for the efficient isolation and extraction of resident macrophages and TAMs from human and mouse tissues by using multicolor flow cytometry. These protocols allow for the extraction of thousands of macrophages in less than 5 h from tissues as small as half a gram. The isolated macrophages can then be used for both "omics" and in vitro studies. PMID:27325269

  5. X-ray sensitivity of human tumor cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Nove, J.; Little, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    Clonally-derived cells from ten human malignant tumors considered radiocurable (breast, neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma) or non-radiocurable (osteosarcoma, hypernephroma, glioblastoma, melanoma) were studied in cell culture and their in vitro x-ray survival curve parameters determined (anti n, D/sub 0/). There were no significant differences among the tumor cell lines suggesting that survival parameters in vitro do not explain differences in clinical radiocurability. Preliminary investigation with density inhibited human tumor cells indicate that such an approach may yield information regarding inherent cellular differences in radiocurability.

  6. Recent advances in managing human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Stefano; Colombo, Sarah; Pompilio, Madia; Formillo, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is detected in a subset of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, most frequently in tumors in the Waldeyer's ring (palatine tonsil and base of tongue). Several studies suggest that patients with HPV-positive tumors have better survival with either concurrent chemoradiation therapy or surgery followed by radiation compared with HPV-negative patients. However, some possible confounding clinicopathologic variables may challenge the validity of this statement, for example, some authors used the TNM (tumor, node, metastasis) grouping stage while others used the primary tumor (T stage), and other studies have demonstrated that tumors with advanced T stage were less likely to be infected with HPV. A large clinical trial with stratification of patients according to all known tumor prognostic factors is crucial to solve the question. PMID:20948869

  7. Multicolor microRNA FISH effectively differentiates tumor types

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Masry, Paul A.; McGeary, Sean E.; Miller, Jason B.; Hafner, Markus; Li, Zhen; Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Morozov, Pavel; Brown, Miguel; Gogakos, Tasos; Mobin, Mehrpouya B.; Snorrason, Einar L.; Feilotter, Harriet E.; Zhang, Xiao; Perlis, Clifford S.; Wu, Hong; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Feng, Huichen; Shuda, Masahiro; Moore, Patrick S.; Tron, Victor A.; Chang, Yuan; Tuschl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are excellent tumor biomarkers because of their cell-type specificity and abundance. However, many miRNA detection methods, such as real-time PCR, obliterate valuable visuospatial information in tissue samples. To enable miRNA visualization in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, we developed multicolor miRNA FISH. As a proof of concept, we used this method to differentiate two skin tumors, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), with overlapping histologic features but distinct cellular origins. Using sequencing-based miRNA profiling and discriminant analysis, we identified the tumor-specific miRNAs miR-205 and miR-375 in BCC and MCC, respectively. We addressed three major shortcomings in miRNA FISH, identifying optimal conditions for miRNA fixation and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) retention using model compounds and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses, enhancing signal amplification and detection by increasing probe-hapten linker lengths, and improving probe specificity using shortened probes with minimal rRNA sequence complementarity. We validated our method on 4 BCC and 12 MCC tumors. Amplified miR-205 and miR-375 signals were normalized against directly detectable reference rRNA signals. Tumors were classified using predefined cutoff values, and all were correctly identified in blinded analysis. Our study establishes a reliable miRNA FISH technique for parallel visualization of differentially expressed miRNAs in FFPE tumor tissues. PMID:23728175

  8. Infrared Spectra of Human Breast Tumor Tissue and Experimental Animal Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Belkov, M. V.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Pekhnyo, V. I.; Kozachkova, A. N.; Tsarik, H. V.; Kutsenko, I. P.; Sharykina, N. I.; Butra, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used Fourier transform IR spectroscopy methods to conduct comparative studies of human breast tumors and sarcoma 180 tumor grafted into mice. The IR spectral parameters used to identify tumor tissue in mice with the sarcoma 180 strain proved to be identical to the parameters for human breast tissue in cancer. In the presence of a malignant tumor in humans, the most intense C=O vibrational bands in the protein molecules are observed in the interval 1710-1680 cm-1. For a benign tumor, in the IR spectra of breast tissue the intense bands are located in the interval 1670-1650 cm-1. We spectroscopically monitored the diagnosis and the chemotherapy process using the model of sarcoma 180 in mice. As the therapeutic drugs, we used synthesized coordination compounds based on palladium complexes with diphosphonic acid derivatives. We demonstrate the promising potential of palladium complexes with zoledronic acid as an effective cytostatic. In therapy using a palladium complex with zoledronic acid, the effect of tumor growth inhibition is accompanied by a change in its spectral characteristics. The parameters of the IR spectra for tumor tissue after treatment are close to those of the IR spectra for healthy tissue.

  9. Identification of neutral tumor evolution across cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Chris P; Graham, Trevor A; Sottoriva, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Despite extraordinary efforts to profile cancer genomes, interpreting the vast amount of genomic data in the light of cancer evolution remains challenging. Here we demonstrate that neutral tumor evolution results in a power-law distribution of the mutant allele frequencies reported by next-generation sequencing of tumor bulk samples. We find that the neutral power-law fits with high precision 323 of 904 cancers from 14 types, selected from different cohorts. In malignancies identified as neutral, all clonal selection occurred prior to the onset of cancer growth and not in later-arising subclones, resulting in numerous passenger mutations that are responsible for intra-tumor heterogeneity. Reanalyzing cancer sequencing data within the neutral framework allowed the measurement, in each patient, of both the in vivo mutation rate and the order and timing of mutations. This result provides a new way to interpret existing cancer genomic data and to discriminate between functional and non-functional intra-tumor heterogeneity. PMID:26780609

  10. CBX7 is a tumor suppressor in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Forzati, Floriana; Federico, Antonella; Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Abbate, Adele; Esposito, Francesco; Malapelle, Umberto; Sepe, Romina; Palma, Giuseppe; Troncone, Giancarlo; Scarfò, Marzia; Arra, Claudio; Fedele, Monica; Fusco, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    The CBX7 gene encodes a polycomb group protein that is known to be downregulated in many types of human cancers, although the role of this protein in carcinogenesis remains unclear. To shed light on this issue, we generated mice null for Cbx7. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from these mice had a higher growth rate and reduced susceptibility to senescence compared with their WT counterparts. This was associated with upregulated expression of multiple cell cycle components, including cyclin E, which is known to play a key role in lung carcinogenesis in humans. Adult Cbx7-KO mice developed liver and lung adenomas and carcinomas. In in vivo and in vitro experiments, we demonstrated that CBX7 bound to the CCNE1 promoter in a complex that included HDAC2 and negatively regulated CCNE1 expression. Finally, we found that the lack of CBX7 protein expression in human lung carcinomas correlated with CCNE1 overexpression. These data suggest that CBX7 is a tumor suppressor and that its loss plays a key role in the pathogenesis of cancer. PMID:22214847

  11. Definition of genetic events directing the development of distinct types of brain tumors from postnatal neural stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Falk; Meyer, Katharina; Braun, Sebastian; Ek, Sara; Spang, Rainer; Pfenninger, Cosima V; Artner, Isabella; Prost, Gaëlle; Chen, Xinbin; Biegel, Jaclyn A; Judkins, Alexander R; Englund, Elisabet; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2012-07-01

    Although brain tumors are classified and treated based upon their histology, the molecular factors involved in the development of various tumor types remain unknown. In this study, we show that the type and order of genetic events directs the development of gliomas, central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid-like tumors from postnatal mouse neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC/NPC). We found that the overexpression of specific genes led to the development of these three different brain tumors from NSC/NPCs, and manipulation of the order of genetic events was able to convert one established tumor type into another. In addition, loss of the nuclear chromatin-remodeling factor SMARCB1 in rhabdoid tumors led to increased phosphorylation of eIF2α, a central cytoplasmic unfolded protein response (UPR) component, suggesting a role for the UPR in these tumors. Consistent with this, application of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib led to an increase in apoptosis of human cells with reduced SMARCB1 levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that the order of genetic events determines the phenotypes of brain tumors derived from a common precursor cell pool, and suggest that the UPR may represent a therapeutic target in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors. PMID:22719073

  12. Definition of Genetic Events Directing the Development of Distinct Types of Brain Tumors from Postnatal Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hertwig, Falk; Meyer, Katharina; Braun, Sebastian; Ek, Sara; Spang, Rainer; Pfenninger, Cosima V.; Artner, Isabella; Prost, Gaëlle; Chen, Xinbin; Biegel, Jaclyn A.; Judkins, Alexander R.; Englund, Elisabet; Nuber, Ulrike A.

    2012-01-01

    Although brain tumors are classified and treated based upon their histology, the molecular factors involved in the development of various tumor types remain unknown. In this study, we show that the type and order of genetic events directs the development of gliomas, central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid-like tumors from postnatal mouse neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC/NPC). We found that the overexpression of specific genes led to the development of these three different brain tumors from NSC/NPCs, and manipulation of the order of genetic events was able to convert one established tumor type into another. In addition, loss of the nuclear chromatin-remodeling factor SMARCB1 in rhabdoid tumors led to increased phosphorylation of eIF2α, a central cytoplasmic unfolded protein response (UPR) component, suggesting a role for the UPR in these tumors. Consistent with this, application of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib led to an increase in apoptosis of human cells with reduced SMARCB1 levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that the order of genetic events determines the phenotypes of brain tumors derived from a common precursor cell pool, and suggest that the UPR may represent a therapeutic target in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors. PMID:22719073

  13. A Locus on Chromosome 8 Controlling Tumor Regionality -- a New Type of Tumor Diversity in the Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Lei; Hutson, Alan; Demant, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Regional specificity of lung tumor formation has rarely been studied in mouse or human. By using crosses of strains semi-congenic for lung cancer susceptibility locus Sluc20, we have analyzed the genetic influences of Sluc20 and five other loci on tumor regionality in the mouse lung. We have mapped Sluc20 to a 27.92MB proximal region of chromosome 8 and found that it controls the number and load of only those tumors that surround or are directly adjacent to the bronchi or bronchioli (peribronchial tumors). These tumors lie outside the bronchial basement membrane and tend to reach a larger size than the tumors at other locations in the lung. Similarly to tumors of alveolar lineage at other locations, peribronchial tumors stain with SP-C but not CC-10 antibody. The effects of Sluc20 alleles are additive as the number of peribronchial tumors in heterozygotes is intermediate. These findings reveal that tumor regionality in the mouse lung, which represents a novel level of lung tumor heterogeneity, is under specific genetic control. The identification of genes controlling lung tumor regionality will provide novel insights into biology of lung tumors and potentially improve the possibilities of individualized prognosis and treatment in human lung cancer. PMID:19847808

  14. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gudkov, Sergey V.; Shilyagina, Natalya Yu.; Vodeneev, Vladimir A.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed. PMID:26729091

  15. Identification of neutral tumor evolution across cancer types.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marc J; Werner, Benjamin; Barnes, Chris P; Graham, Trevor A; Sottoriva, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Despite extraordinary efforts to profile cancer genomes, interpreting the vast amount of genomic data in the light of cancer evolution remains challenging. Here we demonstrate that neutral tumor evolution results in a power-law distribution of the mutant allele frequencies reported by next-generation sequencing of tumor bulk samples. We find that the neutral power law fits with high precision 323 of 904 cancers from 14 types and from different cohorts. In malignancies identified as evolving neutrally, all clonal selection seemingly occurred before the onset of cancer growth and not in later-arising subclones, resulting in numerous passenger mutations that are responsible for intratumoral heterogeneity. Reanalyzing cancer sequencing data within the neutral framework allowed the measurement, in each patient, of both the in vivo mutation rate and the order and timing of mutations. This result provides a new way to interpret existing cancer genomic data and to discriminate between functional and non-functional intratumoral heterogeneity. PMID:26780609

  16. [Salivary gland-type lung tumor: An update].

    PubMed

    Gibault, Laure; Badoual, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    "Salivary gland-type" tumors arising from the bronchi and lung are rare but not exceptional entities. They are mostly represented by malignant entities such as cystic adenoid carcinoma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma and epithelial/myoepithelial carcinoma. Benign tumors are rare, mainly encompassing pleomorphic adenomas, which are to differentiate from mucous gland adenomas, another entity arising specifically from the peri-bronchial glands. These tumours develop in the proximal bronchi and are not associated with smoke abuse. Their main treatment is surgery. It is important to differentiate them from other broncho-pulmonary tumours as they do not share the same prognosis and therapeutic. This article will review the WHO 2015 classification of these tumours as well as recent updates from the literature to help define diagnosis criteria for these uncommon entities. PMID:26774826

  17. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  18. SKI knockdown inhibits human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dahu; Lin, Qiushi; Box, Neil; Roop, Dennis; Ishii, Shunsuke; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Fan, Tao; Hornyak, Thomas J; Reed, Jon A; Stavnezer, Ed; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Medrano, Estela E

    2009-12-01

    The SKI protein represses the TGF-beta tumor suppressor pathway by associating with the Smad transcription factors. SKI is upregulated in human malignant melanoma tumors in a disease-progression manner and its overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which SKI antagonizes TGF-beta signaling in vivo have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that human melanoma cells in which endogenous SKI expression was knocked down by RNAi produced minimal orthotopic tumor xenograft nodules that displayed low mitotic rate and prominent apoptosis. These minute tumors exhibited critical signatures of active TGF-beta signaling including high levels of nuclear Smad3 and p21(Waf-1), which are not found in the parental melanomas. To understand how SKI promotes tumor growth we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches and found that simultaneously to blocking the TGF-beta-growth inhibitory pathway, SKI promotes the switch of Smad3 from tumor suppression to oncogenesis by favoring phosphorylations of the Smad3 linker region in melanoma cells but not in normal human melanocytes. In this context, SKI is required for preventing TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of the oncogenic protein c-MYC, and for inducing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, a mediator of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Together, the results indicate that SKI exploits multiple regulatory levels of the TGF-beta pathway and its deficiency restores TGF-beta tumor suppressor and apoptotic activities in spite of the likely presence of oncogenic mutations in melanoma tumors. PMID:19845874

  19. Stimulatory versus suppressive effects of GM-CSF on tumor progression in multiple cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Hong, In-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, also called CSF-2) is best known for its critical role in immune modulation and hematopoiesis. A large body of experimental evidence indicates that GM-CSF, which is frequently upregulated in multiple types of human cancers, effectively marks cancer cells with a ‘danger flag' for the immune system. In this context, most studies have focused on its function as an immunomodulator, namely its ability to stimulate dendritic cell (DC) maturation and monocyte/macrophage activity. However, recent studies have suggested that GM-CSF also promotes immune-independent tumor progression by supporting tumor microenvironments and stimulating tumor growth and metastasis. Although some studies have suggested that GM-CSF has inhibitory effects on tumor growth and metastasis, an even greater number of studies show that GM-CSF exerts stimulatory effects on tumor progression. In this review, we summarize a number of findings to provide the currently available information regarding the anticancer immune response of GM-CSG. We then discuss the potential roles of GM-CSF in the progression of multiple types of cancer to provide insights into some of the complexities of its clinical applications. PMID:27364892

  20. Stimulatory versus suppressive effects of GM-CSF on tumor progression in multiple cancer types.

    PubMed

    Hong, In-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, also called CSF-2) is best known for its critical role in immune modulation and hematopoiesis. A large body of experimental evidence indicates that GM-CSF, which is frequently upregulated in multiple types of human cancers, effectively marks cancer cells with a 'danger flag' for the immune system. In this context, most studies have focused on its function as an immunomodulator, namely its ability to stimulate dendritic cell (DC) maturation and monocyte/macrophage activity. However, recent studies have suggested that GM-CSF also promotes immune-independent tumor progression by supporting tumor microenvironments and stimulating tumor growth and metastasis. Although some studies have suggested that GM-CSF has inhibitory effects on tumor growth and metastasis, an even greater number of studies show that GM-CSF exerts stimulatory effects on tumor progression. In this review, we summarize a number of findings to provide the currently available information regarding the anticancer immune response of GM-CSG. We then discuss the potential roles of GM-CSF in the progression of multiple types of cancer to provide insights into some of the complexities of its clinical applications. PMID:27364892

  1. Human Tumor Antigens and Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vigneron, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    With the recent developments of adoptive T cell therapies and the use of new monoclonal antibodies against the immune checkpoints, immunotherapy is at a turning point. Key players for the success of these therapies are the cytolytic T lymphocytes, which are a subset of T cells able to recognize and kill tumor cells. Here, I review the nature of the antigenic peptides recognized by these T cells and the processes involved in their presentation. I discuss the importance of understanding how each antigenic peptide is processed in the context of immunotherapy and vaccine delivery. PMID:26161423

  2. Lrig1 Expression in Human Sebaceous Gland Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pünchera, Jöri; Barnes, Laurent; Kaya, Gürkan

    2016-01-01

    Background Sebaceous glands contribute significantly to the barrier functions of the skin. However, little is known about their homeostasis and tumorigenesis. Recently, increased expression of stem cell marker Lrig1 has been reported in sebaceous carcinoma-like tumors of K14ΔNLef1 transgenic mice. In this study, we analyzed the Lrig1 expression in human sebaceous tumors. Methods Twenty-eight formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sebaceous tumor specimens (7 sebaceous hyperplasias, 7 sebaceous adenomas, 10 sebaceomas and 4 sebaceous carcinomas) were stained with anti-Lrig1, anti-CD44v3 and anti-Ki67 antibody. Results Four (100%) sebaceous carcinomas, 8 (80%) sebaceomas, 3 (43%) sebaceous adenomas and no sebaceous hyperplasia showed Lrig1 overexpression. Discussion and Conclusion Lrig1 is a known tumor suppressor gene and is usually considered to be an indicator of poorly aggressive tumors. In human sebaceous tumors, the stronger Lrig1 staining in sebaceous carcinoma compared to other sebaceous tumors might be a feature of an advanced stage in tumorigenesis and a bad prognosis. In our study, 100% of sebaceous carcinomas revealed Lrig1 overexpression. We propose that Lrig1 may be used as a possible new marker of poorly differentiated sebaceous carcinoma. PMID:27504445

  3. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  4. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary We analyzed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, mRNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously-defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at > 10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the Luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein expression-defined subgroups, possibly contributed by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signaling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/p-HER2/HER1/p-HER1 signature within the HER2-Enriched expression subtype. Comparison of Basal-like breast tumors with high-grade Serous Ovarian tumors showed many molecular commonalities, suggesting a related etiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biologic finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biologic subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:23000897

  5. Bioengineered models of solid human tumors for cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Marturano-Kruik, Alessandro; Villasante, Aranzazu; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Summary The lack of controllable in vitro models that can recapitulate the features of solid tumors such as Ewing’s sarcoma limits our understanding of the tumor initiation and progression and impedes the development of new therapies. Cancer research still relies of the use of simple cell culture, tumor spheroids, and small animals. Tissue-engineered tumor models are now being grown in vitro to mimic the actual tumors in patients. Recently, we have established a new protocol for bioengineering the Ewing’s sarcoma, by infusing tumor cell aggregates into the human bone engineered from the patient’s mesenchymal stem cells. The bone niche allows crosstalk between the tumor cells, osteoblasts and supporting cells of the bone, extracellular matrix and the tissue microenvironment. The bioreactor platform used in these experiments also allows the implementation of physiologically relevant mechanical signals. Here, we describe a method to build an in vitro model of Ewing’s sarcoma that mimics the key properties of the native tumor and provides the tissue context and physical regulatory signals. PMID:27115504

  6. C-type Lectin Receptors for Tumor Eradication: Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Unger, Wendy W. J.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells are key regulators in directing immune responses and therefore are under extensive research for the induction of anti-tumor responses. DCs express a large array of receptors by which they scan their surroundings for recognition and uptake of pathogens. One of the receptor-families is the C-type lectins (CLR), which bind carbohydrate structures and internalize antigens upon recognition. Intracellular routing of antigen through CLR enhances loading and presentation of antigen through MHC class I and II, inducing antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation and skewing T-helper cells. These characteristics make CLRs very interesting targets for DC-based immunotherapy. Profound research has been done on targeting specific tumor antigens to CLR using either antibodies or the natural ligands such as glycan structures. In this review we will focus on the current data showing the potency of CLR-targeting and discuss improvements that can be achieved to enhance anti-tumor activity in the near future. PMID:24212951

  7. The expression of SPARC in human tumors is consistent with its role during cell competition

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Evgeniya

    2011-01-01

    In Drosophila, the elimination of viable but suboptimal cells is mediated by cell competition, ensuring that these cells do not accumulate during development. In addition, certain genes such as the Drosophila homologue of human c-myc (dmyc) are able to transform cells into supercompetitors, which eliminate neighboring wild-type cells by apoptosis and overproliferate leaving total cell numbers unchanged. We have recently identified Drosophila SPARC as an early marker transcriptionally upregulated in loser cells that provides a transient protection by inhibiting caspase activation in outcompeted cells. Here, we explore whether the expression of SPARC in human tumors is consistent with a role for cell competition during human cancer and find that, consistent with the existence of competitive interactions between cancer and normal cells, SPARC is upregulated at the tumor-host boundaries in several types of human cancer. PMID:21655431

  8. A GSO tweezers-type coincidence detector for tumor detection.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Higashi, Tatsuya; Senda, Michio

    2013-07-01

    A Gd2SiO5 (GSO) tweezers-type coincidence detector was developed and tested for tumor detection in procedures such as (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-guided surgery. The detector consists of a pair of GSO scintillators, a pair of metal-packaged small-sized photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), and a coincidence circuit. Because the GSO scintillators are located on the tips of tweezers, a target organ such as a lymph node or the colon can be easily positioned between them. The size of a single GSO was 8 × 14 × 14 mm. The results show that the energy resolution was 30 % full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and the timing resolution was 6 ns FWHM for 511-keV gamma photons. The point-spread function perpendicular to the detector was 4.5 mm FWHM, and the point-spread function parallel to the detector was 7.5 mm FWHM. The absolute sensitivity of the coincidence detector was 0.6% at the center of the detector when the two GSOs were 5 mm apart. Background counts due to the accidental and scatter coincidence were 2 cps up to 48 MBq from the positron source contained in a 20-cm-diameter, 20-cm-high cylindrical phantom. From these results, we conclude that the proposed tweezers-type coincidence detector is useful for tumor detection by the use of FDG, such as that in radio-guided surgery. PMID:23283753

  9. Intranasal Immunization with synthetic peptides corresponding to the E6 and E7 oncoproteins of Human Papillomavirus type 16 induces systemic and mucosal cellular immune responses and tumor protection

    PubMed Central

    Manuri, Pallavi R.; Nehete, Bharti; Nehete, Pramod N.; Reisenauer, Rose; Wardell, Seth; Courtney, Amy N.; Gambhira, Ratish; Lomada, Dakshyani; Chopra, Ashok K.; Sastry, K. Jagannadha

    2007-01-01

    The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of the high-risk HPV type16 represent ideal targets for HPV vaccine development, they being consistently expressed in cervical cancer lesions. Since HPV-16 is primarily transmitted through genital mucosal route, mucosal immune responses constitute an essential feature for vaccination strategies against HPV-associated lesions. We present here evidence showing that mucosal immunization of mice by the intranasal route with a mixture of peptides E744–62 and E643–57 from the E7 and E6 oncoproteins of HPV-16, respectively, using a mutant cholera toxin adjuvant (CT-2*), primed strong antigen-specific cellular immune responses in systemic and mucosal tissues. Significant levels of IFN-γ production by both CD4 and CD8 cells were observed along with CTL responses that were effective against both peptide-pulsed targets as well as syngeneic tumor cells (TC-1) expressing the cognate E6 and E7 proteins. Furthermore, mice immunized with the peptide mixture and CT-2* effectively resisted TC-1 tumor challenge. These results together with our earlier observations that T cell responses to these peptides correlate with recurrence-free survival in women after ablative treatment for HPV-associated cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, support the potential of these E6 and E7 peptides for inclusion in vaccine formulations. PMID:17291642

  10. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Uva, Paolo; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Watters, James; Loboda, Andrey; Kulkarni, Amit; Castle, John; Palombo, Fabio; Viti, Valentina; Mesiti, Giuseppe; Zappulli, Valentina; Marconato, Laura; Abramo, Francesca; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Lahm, Armin; La Monica, Nicola; de Rinaldis, Emanuele

    2009-01-01

    Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies. PMID:19327144

  11. Epigenetic silencing of the kinase tumor suppressor WNK2 is tumor-type and tumor-grade specific

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Peter; Hong, Chibo; Lal, Anita; Wong, Judith M.; McDermott, Michael W.; Bollen, Andrew W.; Plass, Christoph; Held, William A.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.; Costello, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    Both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms contribute to meningioma development by altering gene expression and protein function. To determine the relative contribution of each mechanism to meningioma development, we used an integrative approach measuring copy number and DNA methylation changes genomewide. We found that genetic alterations affected 1.9%, 7.4%, and 13.3% of the 691 loci studied, whereas epigenetic mechanisms affected 5.4%, 9.9%, and 10.3% of these loci in grade I, II, and III meningiomas, respectively. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms rarely involved the same locus in any given tumor. The predilection for epigenetic rather than genetic silencing was exemplified at the 5′ CpG island of WNK2, a serine-threonine kinase gene on chromosome 9q22.31. WNK2 is known to negatively regulate epidermal growth factor receptor signaling via inhibition of MEK1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1), and point mutations have been reported in WNK1, WNK2, WNK3, and WNK4. In meningiomas, WNK2 was aberrantly methylated in 83% and 71% of grade II and III meningiomas, respectively, but rarely in a total of 209 tumors from 13 other tumor types. Aberrant methylation of the CpG island was associated with decreased expression in primary tumors. WNK2 could be reactivated with a methylation inhibitor in IOMM-Lee, a meningioma cell line with a densely methylated WNK2 CpG island and lack of WNK2 expression. Expression of exogenous WNK2 inhibited colony formation, implicating it as a potential cell growth suppressor. These findings indicate that epigenetic mechanisms are common across meningiomas of all grades and that for specific genes such as WNK2, epigenetic alteration may be the dominant, grade-specific mechanism of gene inactivation. PMID:19001526

  12. Prospective clinical trial of a human tumor cloning system.

    PubMed

    Von Hoff, D D; Clark, G M; Stogdill, B J; Sarosdy, M F; O'Brien, M T; Casper, J T; Mattox, D E; Page, C P; Cruz, A B; Sandbach, J F

    1983-04-01

    A prospective clinical trial was performed to evaluate the usefulness of a human tumor cloning system for selecting single-agent chemotherapy for patients with advanced cancers. Six hundred four single-agent trials were performed in the 470 patients whose tumors were submitted for drug sensitivity testing. Only 246 of these 604 trials (41%) could be directed by the cloning system results because of inadequate tumor growth and other difficulties. In these 246 prospective trials, there was a 60% true positive and an 85% true negative rate for predicting for response or lack of response of an individual patient's tumor to the single agent. There was also a relationship between the percentage of decrease in survival of tumor colony-forming units and the probability of a clinical response of the patient's tumor to the same drug used in vivo. Despite these encouraging findings, work to improve tumor growth and additional prospective clinical trials of the system are needed before the system can be recommended for routine clinical use. PMID:6339044

  13. Thymidine analogues to assess microperfusion in human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Hilde L.; Ljungkvist, Anna S.; Rijken, Paul F.; Sprong, Debbie; Bussink, Jan; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Haustermans, Karin M.; Begg, Adrian C. . E-mail: a.begg@nki.nl

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To validate the use of the thymidine analogues as local perfusion markers in human tumors (no labeling indicates no perfusion) by comparison with the well-characterized perfusion marker Hoechst 33342. Methods and Materials: Human tumor xenografts from gliomas and head-and-neck cancers were injected with iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) and the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342. In frozen sections, each blood vessel was scored for the presence of IdUrd/BrdUrd labeling and Hoechst in surrounding cells. The percentage of analogue-negative vessels was compared with the fraction of Hoechst-negative vessels. Collocalization of the two markers was also scored. Results: We found considerable intertumor variation in the fraction of perfused vessels, measured by analogue labeling, both in the human tumor xenografts and in a series of tumor biopsies from head-and-neck cancer patients. There was a significant correlation between the Hoechst-negative and IdUrd/BrdUrd-negative vessels in the xenografts (r 85, p = 0.0004), despite some mismatches on a per-vessel basis. Conclusions: Thymidine analogues can be successfully used to rank tumors according to their fraction of perfused vessels. Whether this fraction correlates with the extent of acute hypoxia needs further confirmation.

  14. Bee venom inhibits growth of human cervical tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Lim; Park, Sang Ho; Kim, Tae Myoung; Jung, Yu Yeon; Park, Mi Hee; Oh, Sang Hyun; Yun, Hye Seok; Jun, Hyung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ung Soo; Yoon, Joo Hee; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-03-30

    We studied whether bee venom (BV) inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of death receptor (DR) expressions and inactivation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in mice. In vivo study showed that BV (1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth. Similar inhibitory effects of BV on cancer growth in primary human cervical cancer cells were also found. BV (1-5 μg/ml) also inhibited the growth of cancer cells, Ca Ski and C33Aby the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Agreed with cancer cell growth inhibition, expression of death receptors; FAS, DR3 and DR6, and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with BV in tumor mice, human cancer cell and human tumor samples as well as cultured cancer cells. In addition, deletion of FAS, DR3 and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV-induced cell growth inhibitory effects as well as NF-κB inactivation. These results suggest that BV inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of FAS, DR3 and DR6 expression via inhibition of NF-κB pathway. PMID:25730901

  15. The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor controls androgen signaling and human prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ankur; Yeow, Wen-Shuz; Ertel, Adam; Coleman, Ilsa; Clegg, Nigel; Thangavel, Chellappagounder; Morrissey, Colm; Zhang, Xiaotun; Comstock, Clay E S; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Gomella, Leonard; Knudsen, Erik S; Nelson, Peter S; Knudsen, Karen E

    2010-12-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB; encoded by RB1) is a tumor suppressor that is frequently disrupted in tumorigenesis and acts in multiple cell types to suppress cell cycle progression. The role of RB in tumor progression, however, is poorly defined. Here, we have identified a critical role for RB in protecting against tumor progression through regulation of targets distinct from cell cycle control. In analyses of human prostate cancer samples, RB loss was infrequently observed in primary disease and was predominantly associated with transition to the incurable, castration-resistant state. Further analyses revealed that loss of the RB1 locus may be a major mechanism of RB disruption and that loss of RB function was associated with poor clinical outcome. Modeling of RB dysfunction in vitro and in vivo revealed that RB controlled nuclear receptor networks critical for tumor progression and that it did so via E2F transcription factor 1-mediated regulation of androgen receptor (AR) expression and output. Through this pathway, RB depletion induced unchecked AR activity that underpinned therapeutic bypass and tumor progression. In agreement with these findings, disruption of the RB/E2F/nuclear receptor axis was frequently observed in the transition to therapy resistance in human disease. Together, these data reveal what we believe to be a new paradigm for RB function in controlling prostate tumor progression and lethal tumor phenotypes. PMID:21099110

  16. Single cells from human primary colorectal tumors exhibit polyfunctional heterogeneity in secretions of ELR+ CXC chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Adalsteinsson, Viktor; Tahirova, Narmin; Tallapragada, Naren; Yao, Xiaosai; Campion, Liam; Angelini, Alessandro; Douce, Thomas B.; Huang, Cindy; Bowman, Brittany; Williamson, Christina; Kwon, Douglas S.; Wittrup, K. Dane; Love, J. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is an inflammatory disease of tissue that is largely influenced by the interactions between multiple cell types, secreted factors, and signal transduction pathways. While single-cell sequencing continues to refine our understanding of the clonotypic heterogeneity within tumors, the complex interplay between genetic variations and non-genetic factors ultimately affects therapeutic outcome. Much has been learned through bulk studies of secreted factors in the tumor microenvironment, but the secretory behavior of single cells has been largely uncharacterized. Here we directly profiled the secretions of ELR+ CXC chemokines from thousands of single colorectal tumor and stromal cells, using an array of subnanoliter wells and a technique called microengraving to characterize both the rates of secretion of several factors at once and the numbers of cells secreting each chemokine. The ELR+ CXC chemokines are highly redundant, pro-angiogenic cytokines that signal via either or both of the CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptors, exerting profound impacts on tumor growth and progression. We find that human primary colorectal tumor and stromal cells exhibit polyfunctional heterogeneity in the combinations and magnitudes of secretions for these chemokines. In cell lines, we observe similar variance: phenotypes observed in bulk can be largely absent among the majority of single cells, and discordances exist between secretory states measured and gene expression for these chemokines among single cells. Together, these measures suggest secretory states among tumor cells are complex and can evolve dynamically. Most importantly, this study reveals new insight into the intratumoral phenotypic heterogeneity of human primary tumors. PMID:23995780

  17. Detecting cell-in-cell structures in human tumor samples by E-cadherin/CD68/CD45 triple staining.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongyan; Chen, Ang; Wang, Ting; Wang, Manna; Ning, Xiangkai; He, Meifang; Hu, Yazhuo; Yuan, Long; Li, Shichong; Wang, Qiwei; Liu, Hong; Chen, Zhaolie; Ren, Jun; Sun, Qiang

    2015-08-21

    Although Cell-in-cell structures (CICs) had been documented in human tumors for decades, it is unclear what types of CICs were formed largely due to low resolution of traditional way such as H&E staining. In this work, we employed immunofluorescent method to stain a panel of human tumor samples simultaneously with antibodies against E-cadherin for Epithelium, CD68 for Macrophage and CD45 for Leukocytes, which we termed as "EML method" based on the cells detected. Detail analysis revealed four types of CICs, with tumor cells or macrophage engulfing tumor cells or leukocytes respectively. Interestingly, tumor cells seem to be dominant over macrophage (93% vs 7%) as the engulfer cells in all CICs detected, whereas the overall amount of internalized tumor cells is comparable to that of internalized CD45+ leukocytes (57% vs 43%). The CICs profiles vary from tumor to tumor, which may indicate different malignant stages and/or inflammatory conditions. Given the potential impacts different types of CICs might have on tumor growth, we therefore recommend EML analysis of tumor samples to clarify the correlation of CICs subtypes with clinical prognosis in future researches. PMID:26109430

  18. Nitrosylhemoglobin in photodynamically stressed human tumors growing in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Jakubowska, Monika; Michalczyk-Wetula, Dominika; Pyka, Janusz; Susz, Anna; Urbanska, Krystyna; Płonka, Beata K; Kuleta, Patryk; Łącki, Piotr; Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Fiedor, Leszek; Płonka, Przemysław M

    2013-11-30

    The role of nitric oxide in human tumor biology and therapy has been the subject of extensive studies. However, there is only limited knowledge about the mechanisms of NO production and its metabolism, and about the role NO can play in modern therapeutic procedures, such as photodynamic therapy. Here, for the first time, we report the presence of nitrosylhemoglobin, a stable complex of NO, in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 tumors growing in situ in nude mice. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy we show that the level of nitrosylhemoglobin increases in the course of photodynamic therapy and that the phenomenon is local. Even the destruction of strongly vascularized normal liver tissue did not induce the paramagnetic signal, despite bringing about tissue necrosis. We conclude that photodynamic stress substantiates NO production and blood extravasation in situ, both processes on-going even in non-treated tumors, although at a lower intensity. PMID:23973529

  19. Oncogenic relevant defensins: expression pattern and proliferation characteristics of human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jochen; Kraus, Dominik; Reckenbeil, Jan; Probstmeier, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate gene expression levels of oncogenic relevant human defensins and their impact on proliferation rates of 29 cell lines derived from main types of different tumor origins. Differential gene expression analysis of human defensins was performed by real-time PCR experiments. The proliferation rate of tumor cells that had been cultivated in the absence or presence of biologically active peptides was analyzed with a lactate dehydrogenase assay kit. At least one member of the defensin family was expressed in each tumor cell line, whereby α-defensin (DEFA1), DEFA2, or DEFA3 transcripts could be ubiquitously detected. Cell lines of neural origin (glioma, neuroblastoma, and small-cell lung carcinoma) expressed far less human β-defensins (hBDs) in comparison to other tumor types. The expression level of a specific defensin in various cell lines could vary by more than five orders of magnitude. Compensatory mechanisms on the expression levels of the different defensins could not be strictly observed. Only in 3 out of 29 tumor cell lines the proliferation rate was affected after defensin stimulation. The variable appearance of defensins, as well as the cell line-restricted functional activity, argues for the integration of defensins in complex cellular and molecular networks that tolerate rather flexible expression patterns. PMID:26711780

  20. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in penile carcinomas in Argentina: analysis of primary tumors and lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Picconi, M A; Eiján, A M; Distéfano, A L; Pueyo, S; Alonio, L V; Gorostidi, S; Teyssié, A R; Casabé, A

    2000-05-01

    Among sexually transmitted diseases, infection by human papillomavirus (HPV) has become one of the most important. On the other hand, though epidemiological data show that some HPV types are closely associated with cervical cancer, few reports have been found with reference to penile carcinoma because of its rare occurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between HPV infection and penile cancer in Argentina. A retrospective study was carried out on 38 white men with penile squamous-cell carcinoma. Sixty-five archival fixed biopsies taken from 34 primary penile tumors, 25 nodal metastases, 1 skin "satellite" metastasis and 5 histologically normal lymph nodes were used as specimens. HPV detection and typing were carried out by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using generic primers, combined with single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. HPV DNA was found in 71% patients, corresponding 81% of them to "high risk" types, with predominance of HPV 18. Both primary tumors and metastases showed concordance of HPV occurrence and type in both lesions. In 3 patients, HPV 16 was detected not only in primary tumors and metastases, but also in histologically normal lymph nodes. Our data indicate that most penile carcinomas in Argentine patients are etiologically related to HPV, especially to "high risk" genital types. The agreement in HPV detection between primary tumors and metastases suggests a potential viral role in tumor progression. HPV detection in otherwise histologically normal lymph nodes might be useful as early marker of a metastatic process. PMID:10745234

  1. The diagnostic accuracy of multiparametric MRI to determine pediatric brain tumor grades and types.

    PubMed

    Koob, Mériam; Girard, Nadine; Ghattas, Badih; Fellah, Slim; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Scavarda, Didier

    2016-04-01

    Childhood brain tumors show great histological variability. The goal of this retrospective study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of multimodal MR imaging (diffusion, perfusion, MR spectroscopy) in the distinction of pediatric brain tumor grades and types. Seventy-six patients (range 1 month to 18 years) with brain tumors underwent multimodal MR imaging. Tumors were categorized by grade (I-IV) and by histological type (A-H). Multivariate statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of single and combined MR modalities, and of single imaging parameters to distinguish the different groups. The highest diagnostic accuracy for tumor grading was obtained with diffusion-perfusion (73.24 %) and for tumor typing with diffusion-perfusion-MR spectroscopy (55.76 %). The best diagnostic accuracy was obtained for tumor grading in I and IV and for tumor typing in embryonal tumor and pilocytic astrocytoma. Poor accuracy was seen in other grades and types. ADC and rADC were the best parameters for tumor grading and typing followed by choline level with an intermediate echo time, CBV for grading and Tmax for typing. Multiparametric MR imaging can be accurate in determining tumor grades (primarily grades I and IV) and types (mainly pilocytic astrocytomas and embryonal tumors) in children. PMID:26732081

  2. Effects of Charged Particles on Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kathryn D.; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Kaminuma, Takuya; Paz, Athena Evalour S.; Yoshida, Yukari; Liu, Qi; Willers, Henning; Takahashi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects, including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors, and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors, such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions, and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles. PMID:26904502

  3. The Relationship of Immune Cell Signatures to Patient Survival Varies within and between Tumor Types

    PubMed Central

    Linsley, Peter S.; Chaussabel, Damien; Speake, Cate

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing pre-existing anti-tumor immunity leads to therapeutic benefit for some patients, but why some tumors are more immunogenic than others remains unresolved. We took a unique systems approach to relate patient survival to immune gene expression in >3,500 tumor RNAseq profiles from a dozen tumor types. We found significant links between immune gene expression and patient survival in 8/12 tumor types, with tumors partitioned by gene expression comprising distinct molecular subtypes. T/NK cell genes were most clearly survival-related for melanoma, head and neck, and bladder tumors, whereas myeloid cell genes were most clearly survival-related with kidney and breast tumors. T/NK or myeloid cell gene expression was linked to poor prognosis in bladder and kidney tumors, respectively, suggesting tumor-specific immunosuppressive checkpoints. Our results suggest new biomarkers for existing cancer immunotherapies and identify targets for new immunotherapies. PMID:26398410

  4. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A.; Salomon, Matthew P.; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    What happens in the early, still undetectable human malignancy is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a “Big Bang” model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed sub-clones that are not subject to stringent selection, and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors revealed the absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH), and sub-clone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations, and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear born-to-be-bad, with sub-clone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH with significant clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  5. Angiogenic inhibitors delivered by the type III secretion system of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium safely shrink tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Yu, Bin; Cai, Chun-Hui; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2016-12-01

    Despite of a growing number of bacterial species that apparently exhibit intrinsic tumor-targeting properties, no bacterium is able to inhibit tumor growth completely in the immunocompetent hosts, due to its poor dissemination inside the tumors. Oxygen and inflammatory reaction form two barriers and restrain the spread of the bacteria inside the tumors. Here, we engineered a Salmonella typhimurium strain named ST8 which is safe and has limited ability to spread beyond the anaerobic regions of tumors. When injected systemically to tumor-bearing immunocompetent mice, ST8 accumulated in tumors at levels at least 100-fold greater than parental obligate anaerobic strain ST4. ST8/pSEndo harboring therapeutic plasmids encoding Endostatin fused with a secreted protein SopA could target vasculature at the tumor periphery, can stably maintain and safely deliver a therapeutic vector, release angiogenic inhibitors through a type III secretion system (T3SS) to interfere with the pro-angiogenic action of growth factors in tumors. Mice with murine CT26 colon cancer that had been injected with ST8/pSEndo showed efficient tumor suppression by inducing more severe necrosis and inhibiting blooding vessel density within tumors. Our findings provide a therapeutic platform for indirectly acting therapeutic strategies such as anti-angiogenesis and immune therapy. PMID:27558018

  6. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type O expression in the tumor niche correlates with reduced tumor growth, angiogenesis, circulating tumor cells and metastasis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao; Hou, Jiajie; Ren, Lidong; He, Jing; Sun, Beicheng; Sun, Lu-Zhe; Wang, Shui

    2015-04-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type O (PTPRO) has been recognized as a tumor suppressor in various types of cancer cells. However, little attention has been given to the role of PTPRO expression in the tumor microenvironment. We aimed to reveal the role of PTPRO in the breast cancer niche. Py8119 mouse breast cancer cells were implanted orthotopically into female wild-type or ptpro-/- C57Bl/6 mice. We observed that the loss of PTPRO in the tumor niche was correlated with larger tumor volume, more metastases, increased number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), less apoptosis and reduced necrosis rates in the orthotopic mouse model of breast cancer. The tumor microenvironment in the ptpro-/- mice also showed increased microvessel density. Moreover, an intracardiac injection mouse model was used to determine the role of PTPRO in the pre-metastatic niche. Notably, more metastases were observed in the mice of the ptpro-/- group. Taken together, PTPRO expression in the tumor niche prevents tumor growth and the formation of metastases of breast cancer, in part by attenuating tumor-associated angiogenesis and inducing the apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells. PMID:25646811

  7. Magnetic Fluorescent Nanoformulation for Intracellular Drug Delivery to Human Breast Cancer, Primary Tumors, and Tumor Biopsies: Beyond Targeting Expectations.

    PubMed

    El-Boubbou, Kheireddine; Ali, Rizwan; Bahhari, Hassan M; AlSaad, Khaled O; Nehdi, Atef; Boudjelal, Mohamed; AlKushi, Abdulmohsen

    2016-06-15

    We report the development of a chemotherapeutic nanoformulation made of polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized magnetofluorescent nanoparticles (Fl-PMNPs) loaded with anticancer drugs as a promising drug carrier homing to human breast cancer cells, primary tumors, and solid tumors. First, nanoparticle uptake and cell death were evaluated in three types of human breast cells: two metastatic cancerous MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells and nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. While Fl-PMNPs were not toxic to cells even at the highest concentrations used, Dox-loaded Fl-PMNPs showed significant potency, effectively killing the different breast cancer cells, albeit at different affinities. Interestingly and superior to free Dox, Dox-loaded Fl-PMNPs were found to be more effective in killing the metastatic cells (2- to 3-fold enhanced cytotoxicities for MDA-MB-231 compared to MCF-7), compared to the normal noncancerous MCF-10A cells (up to 8-fold), suggesting huge potentials as selective anticancer agents. Electron and live confocal microscopy imaging mechanistically confirmed that the nanoparticles were successfully endocytosed and packaged into vesicles inside the cytoplasm, where Dox is released and then translocated to the nucleus exerting its cytotoxic action and causing apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, commendable and enhanced penetration in 3D multilayered primary tumor cells derived from primary lesions as well as in patient breast tumor biopsies was observed, killing the tumor cells inside. The designed nanocarriers described here can potentially open new opportunities for breast cancer patients, especially in theranostic imaging and hyperthermia. While many prior studies have focused on targeting ligands to specific receptors to improve efficacies, we discovered that even with passive-targeted tailored delivery system enhanced toxic responses can be attained. PMID:27269304

  8. Diagnose human tumors by THz near-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua; Wang, Xiaozhou; Zhao, Tian; Yang, Jinwen

    2014-09-01

    Based on a THz pipe-based near-field imaging system, we demonstrated the capability of THz imaging to diagnose human breast and liver cancers. Through THz near-field mapping of the absorption constants of cancer tissues, the acquired images can not only clearly distinguish cancer from normal tissues fast, automatically, and correctly without pathological H&E staining, but also identify the distribution region of cancer, which matches well with the identification with pathological examination. Due to its capability to perform quantitative analysis, our study indicates the potential of the THz pipe-based near-field imaging for future automation on human tumor pathological examinations and for quick definition of the tumor margins during the surgical procedure such as breast-conserving surgery. With the help of THz imaging, we can expect to economize the use of hospital and human resources.

  9. Survivin, a novel target of the Hedgehog/GLI signaling pathway in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Vlčková, K; Ondrušová, L; Vachtenheim, J; Réda, J; Dundr, P; Zadinová, M; Žáková, P; Poučková, P

    2016-01-01

    Survivin, an important antiapoptotic protein, is expressed in tumors, whereas in normal tissues the expression of this protein is extremely low, defining a role for survivin as a cancer gene. Survivin exhibits multifunctional activity in tumor cells. However, why survivin expression is sharply and invariably restricted to tumor tissue remains unclear. Here, we identified 11 putative consensus binding sites for GLI transcription factors in the survivin promoter and characterized the promoter activity. Inhibitors of the Hedgehog/GLI pathway, cyclopamine and GANT61, decreased the promoter activity in reporter assays. ΔNGLI2 (which lacks the repressor domain) was the most potent vector in activating the survivin promoter–reporter. Moreover, GANT61, a GLI1/2 inhibitor, repressed endogenous survivin protein and mRNA expression in most cells across a large panel of tumor cell lines. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed GLI2 binding to the survivin promoter. The ectopic GLI2-evoked expression of endogenous survivin was observed in normal human fibroblasts. GANT61 decreased survivin level in nude mice tumors, mimicking the activity of GANT61 in cultured cells. The immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence of human tumors revealed a correlation between the tissue regions showing high GLI2 and survivin positivity. Thus, these results demonstrated that survivin is a classical transcriptional target of GLI2, a Hedgehog pathway signaling effector. This potentially reflects the high expression of survivin in human tumor cells. As the Hedgehog pathway is upregulated in virtually all types of cancer cells, these findings substantially contribute to the explanation of uniform survivin expression in tumors as a potential target for the development of a more effective treatment of cancers through the inhibition of GLI2 to restrain survivin activity. PMID:26775700

  10. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts express pro-inflammatory factors in human breast and ovarian tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Erez, Neta; Glanz, Sarah; Raz, Yael; Avivi, Camilla; Barshack, Iris

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express pro-inflammatory factors. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors correlates with tumor invasiveness. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors is associated with NF-κb activation in CAFs. -- Abstract: Inflammation has been established in recent years as a hallmark of cancer. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) support tumorigenesis by stimulating angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We previously demonstrated that CAFs also mediate tumor-enhancing inflammation in a mouse model of skin carcinoma. Breast and ovarian carcinomas are amongst the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in women and cancer-related inflammation is linked with both these tumor types. However, the role of CAFs in mediating inflammation in these malignancies remains obscure. Here we show that CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express high levels of the pro-inflammatory factors IL-6, COX-2 and CXCL1, previously identified to be part of a CAF pro-inflammatory gene signature. Moreover, we show that both pro-inflammatory signaling by CAFs and leukocyte infiltration of tumors are enhanced in invasive ductal carcinoma as compared with ductal carcinoma in situ. The pro-inflammatory genes expressed by CAFs are known NF-κB targets and we show that NF-κB is up-regulated in breast and ovarian CAFs. Our data imply that CAFs mediate tumor-promoting inflammation in human breast and ovarian tumors and thus may be an attractive target for stromal-directed therapeutics.

  11. Influence of Anti-Mouse Interferon Serum on the Growth and Metastasis of Tumor Cells Persistently Infected with Virus and of Human Prostatic Tumors in Athymic Nude Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Lola M.; Minato, Nagahiro; Gresser, Ion; Holland, John; Kadish, Anna; Bloom, Barry R.

    1981-02-01

    Baby hamster kidney or HeLa cells form tumors in 100% of athymic nude mice. When such cells are persistently infected (PI) with RNA viruses, such as mumps or measles virus, the tumor cells either fail to grow or form circumscribed benign nodules. Neither the parental nor the virus PI tumor cells form invasive or metastatic lesions in nude mice. Previous studies have indicated a correlation between the susceptibility of virus-PI tumor cells in vitro and the cytolytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells and their failure to grow in vivo. Because interferon (IF) is the principal regulatory molecule governing the differentiation of NK cells, it was possible to test the relevance of the IF--NK cell system in vivo to restriction of tumor growth by treatment of nude mice with anti-IF globulin. This treatment was shown to reduce both IF production and NK activity in spleen cells. Both parental and virus-PI tumor cells grew and formed larger tumors in nude mice treated with anti-IF globulin than in control nude mice. The viral-PI tumor cells and the uninfected parental cells formed tumors in treated mice that were highly invasive and often metastatic. Some human tumor types have been notoriously difficult to establish as tumor lines in nude mice (e.g., primary human prostatic carcinomas). When transplanted into nude mice treated either with anti-IF globulin or anti-lymphocyte serum, two prostatic carcinomas grew and produced neoplasms with local invasiveness and some metastases. The results are consistent with the view that interferon may be important in restricting the growth, invasiveness, and metastases of tumor cells by acting indirectly through components of the immune system, such as NK cells.

  12. FOXL2-induced follistatin attenuates activin A-stimulated cell proliferation in human granulosa cell tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jung-Chien; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Qiu, Xin; Fang, Lanlan; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Activin A stimulates cell proliferation in KGN human granulosa cell tumor-derived cell line. •Cyclin D2 mediates activin A-induced KGN cell proliferation. •FOXL2 induces follistatin expression in KGN cells. •FOXL2-induced follistatin attenuates activin A-stimulated KGN cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Human granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are rare, and their etiology remains largely unknown. Recently, the FOXL2 402C > G (C134W) mutation was found to be specifically expressed in human adult-type GCTs; however, its function in the development of human GCTs is not fully understood. Activins are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, which has been shown to stimulate normal granulosa cell proliferation; however, little is known regarding the function of activins in human GCTs. In this study, we examined the effect of activin A on cell proliferation in the human GCT-derived cell line KGN. We show that activin A treatment stimulates KGN cell proliferation. Treatment with the activin type I receptor inhibitor SB431542 blocks activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. In addition, our results show that cyclin D2 is induced by treatment with activin A and is involved in activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. Moreover, the activation of Smad signaling is required for activin A-induced cyclin D2 expression. Finally, we show that the overexpression of the wild-type FOXL2 but not the C134W mutant FOXL2 induced follistatin production. Treatment with exogenous follistatin blocks activin A-stimulated cell proliferation, and the overexpression of wild-type FOXL2 attenuates activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. These results suggest that FOXL2 may act as a tumor suppressor in human adult-type GCTs by inducing follistatin expression, which subsequently inhibits activin-stimulated cell proliferation.

  13. Identification of Novel Tumor-Associated Cell Surface Sialoglycoproteins in Human Glioblastoma Tumors Using Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Autelitano, François; Loyaux, Denis; Roudières, Sébastien; Déon, Catherine; Guette, Frédérique; Fabre, Philippe; Ping, Qinggong; Wang, Su; Auvergne, Romane; Badarinarayana, Vasudeo; Smith, Michael; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Goldman, Steven A.; Natesan, Sridaran; Ferrara, Pascual; August, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) remains clinical indication with significant “unmet medical need”. Innovative new therapy to eliminate residual tumor cells and prevent tumor recurrences is critically needed for this deadly disease. A major challenge of GBM research has been the identification of novel molecular therapeutic targets and accurate diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers. Many of the current clinical therapeutic targets of immunotoxins and ligand-directed toxins for high-grade glioma (HGG) cells are surface sialylated glycoproteins. Therefore, methods that systematically and quantitatively analyze cell surface sialoglycoproteins in human clinical tumor samples would be useful for the identification of potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for malignant gliomas. In this study, we used the bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategy (BOCR) in combination with label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (LFQ-MS) to characterize and accurately quantify the individual cell surface sialoproteome in human GBM tissues, in fetal, adult human astrocytes, and in human neural progenitor cells (NPCs). We identified and quantified a total of 843 proteins, including 801 glycoproteins. Among the 843 proteins, 606 (72%) are known cell surface or secreted glycoproteins, including 156 CD-antigens, all major classes of cell surface receptor proteins, transporters, and adhesion proteins. Our findings identified several known as well as new cell surface antigens whose expression is predominantly restricted to human GBM tumors as confirmed by microarray transcription profiling, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining. This report presents the comprehensive identification of new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the treatment of malignant gliomas using quantitative sialoglycoproteomics with clinically relevant, patient derived primary glioma cells. PMID:25360666

  14. [In vitro chemosensitivity of lung cancer and other chest tumors evaluated by human tumor colony assay].

    PubMed

    Lee, K; Kuze, F; Hashimura, T; Tanigawa, N

    1984-12-01

    In vitro chemosensitivity of lung cancer and other chest tumors was evaluated by human tumor colony assay (HTCA). From 61 specimens 33 (54%) grew more than 30 colonies from which evaluation of chemosensitivity could be performed. Of 41 specimens of lung cancer, 26 (63%) yielded adequate growth for drug testing. Nine out of 26 specimens of non-small cell lung cancer showed more than 50% reduction in colony formation, and in 4 of the 26 specimens, more than 70% reduction was obtained with more than one of the drugs tested. Specimens obtained from metastatic lesions of lung cancer showed higher plating efficiency and drug sensitivity than those from primary lesions. Plating efficiency of non-epithelial tumors was lower than that of epithelial tumors. HTCA has a potential value for screening anticancer agents against lung cancer and other chest tumors. However, the assay still has many problems to be resolved, such as difficulty in obtaining single-cell suspensions and poor plating efficiency. PMID:6095761

  15. Significance of rat mammary tumors for human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jose

    2015-02-01

    We have previously indicated that the ideal animal tumor model should mimic the human disease. This means that the investigator should be able to ascertain the influence of host factors on the initiation of tumorigenesis, mimic the susceptibility of tumor response based on age and reproductive history, and determine the response of the tumors induced to chemotherapy. The utilization of experimental models of mammary carcinogenesis in risk assessment requires that the influence of ovarian, pituitary, and placental hormones, among others, as well as overall reproductive events are taken into consideration, since they are important modifiers of the susceptibility of the organ to neoplastic development. Several species, such as rodents, dogs, cats, and monkeys, have been evaluated for these purposes; however, none of them fulfills all the criteria specified previously. Rodents, however, are the most widely used models; therefore, this work will concentrate on discussing the rat rodent model of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:25714400

  16. Sigma and opioid receptors in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.E.; Szuecs, M.; Mamone, J.Y.; Bem, W.T.; Rush, M.D.; Johnson, F.E.; Coscia, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Human brain tumors and nude mouse-borne human neuroblastomas and gliomas were analyzed for sigma and opioid receptor content. Sigma binding was assessed using ({sup 3}H) 1, 3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), whereas opioid receptor subtypes were measured with tritiated forms of the following: {mu}, (D-ala{sup 2}, mePhe{sup 4}, gly-ol{sup 5}) enkephalin (DAMGE); {kappa}, ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) or U69,593; {delta}, (D-pen{sup 2}, D-pen{sup 5}) enkephalin (DPDPE) or (D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5}) enkephalin (DADLE) with {mu} suppressor present. Binding parameters were estimated by homologous displacement assays followed by analysis using the LIGAND program. Sigma binding was detected in 15 of 16 tumors examined with very high levels found in a brain metastasis from an adenocarcinoma of lung and a human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) passaged in nude mice. {kappa} opioid receptor binding was detected in 4 of 4 glioblastoma multiforme specimens and 2 of 2 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but not in the other brain tumors analyzed.

  17. The Dual Role of TGFβ in Human Cancer: From Tumor Suppression to Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lebrun, Jean-Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) superfamily encompasses widespread and evolutionarily conserved polypeptide growth factors that regulate and orchestrate growth and differentiation in all cell types and tissues. While they regulate asymmetric cell division and cell fate determination during early development and embryogenesis, TGFβ family members play a major regulatory role in hormonal and immune responses, cell growth, cell death and cell immortalization, bone formation, tissue remodeling and repair, and erythropoiesis throughout adult life. The biological and physiological functions of TGFβ, the founding member of this family, and its receptors are of central importance to human diseases, particularly cancer. By regulating cell growth, death, and immortalization, TGFβ signaling pathways exert tumor suppressor effects in normal cells and early carcinomas. Thus, it is not surprising that a high number of human tumors arise due to mutations or deletions in the genes coding for the various TGFβ signaling components. As tumors develop and progress, these protective and cytostatic effects of TGFβ are often lost. TGFβ signaling then switches to promote cancer progression, invasion, and tumor metastasis. The molecular mechanisms underlying this dual role of TGFβ in human cancer will be discussed in depth in this paper, and it will highlight the challenge and importance of developing novel therapeutic strategies specifically aimed at blocking the prometastatic arm of the TGFβ signaling pathway without affecting its tumor suppressive effects. PMID:27340590

  18. Absence of human cytomegalovirus infection in childhood brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Sardi, Iacopo; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Becciani, Sabrina; Facchini, Ludovica; Guidi, Milena; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Moriondo, Maria; Baroni, Gianna; Stival, Alessia; Farina, Silvia; Genitori, Lorenzo; de Martino, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common human pathogen which induces different clinical manifestations related to the age and the immune conditions of the host. HCMV infection seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of adult glioblastomas. The aim of our study was to detect the presence of HCMV in high grade gliomas and other pediatric brain tumors. This hypothesis might have important therapeutic implications, offering a new target for adjuvant therapies. Among 106 pediatric patients affected by CNS tumors we selected 27 patients with a positive HCMV serology. The serological analysis revealed 7 patients with positive HCMV IGG (≥14 U/mL), whom had also a high HCMV IgG avidity, suggesting a more than 6 months-dated infection. Furthermore, HCMV IGM were positive (≥22 U/mL) in 20 patients. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in all the 27 samples. Despite a positive HCMV serology, confirmed by ELISA, no viral DNA was shown at the PCR analysis in the patients' neoplastic cells. At immunohistochemistry, no expression of HCMV antigens was observed in tumoral cells. Our results are in agreement with recent results in adults which did not evidence the presence of HCMV genome in glioblastoma lesions. We did not find any correlation between HCMV infection and pediatric CNS tumors. PMID:26396923

  19. Absence of human cytomegalovirus infection in childhood brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Iacopo; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Becciani, Sabrina; Facchini, Ludovica; Guidi, Milena; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Moriondo, Maria; Baroni, Gianna; Stival, Alessia; Farina, Silvia; Genitori, Lorenzo; de Martino, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common human pathogen which induces different clinical manifestations related to the age and the immune conditions of the host. HCMV infection seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of adult glioblastomas. The aim of our study was to detect the presence of HCMV in high grade gliomas and other pediatric brain tumors. This hypothesis might have important therapeutic implications, offering a new target for adjuvant therapies. Among 106 pediatric patients affected by CNS tumors we selected 27 patients with a positive HCMV serology. The serological analysis revealed 7 patients with positive HCMV IGG (≥14 U/mL), whom had also a high HCMV IgG avidity, suggesting a more than 6 months-dated infection. Furthermore, HCMV IGM were positive (≥22 U/mL) in 20 patients. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in all the 27 samples. Despite a positive HCMV serology, confirmed by ELISA, no viral DNA was shown at the PCR analysis in the patients’ neoplastic cells. At immunohistochemistry, no expression of HCMV antigens was observed in tumoral cells. Our results are in agreement with recent results in adults which did not evidence the presence of HCMV genome in glioblastoma lesions. We did not find any correlation between HCMV infection and pediatric CNS tumors. PMID:26396923

  20. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    PubMed Central

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely “functional,” i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing’s syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn’s syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  1. Cysteine Dioxygenase 1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene Silenced by Promoter Methylation in Multiple Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Brait, Mariana; Ling, Shizhang; Nagpal, Jatin K.; Chang, Xiaofei; Park, Hannah Lui; Lee, Juna; Okamura, Jun; Yamashita, Keishi; Sidransky, David; Kim, Myoung Sook

    2012-01-01

    The human cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1) gene is a non-heme structured, iron-containing metalloenzyme involved in the conversion of cysteine to cysteine sulfinate, and plays a key role in taurine biosynthesis. In our search for novel methylated gene promoters, we have analyzed differential RNA expression profiles of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines with or without treatment of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Among the genes identified, the CDO1 promoter was found to be differentially methylated in primary CRC tissues with high frequency compared to normal colon tissues. In addition, a statistically significant difference in the frequency of CDO1 promoter methylation was observed between primary normal and tumor tissues derived from breast, esophagus, lung, bladder and stomach. Downregulation of CDO1 mRNA and protein levels were observed in cancer cell lines and tumors derived from these tissue types. Expression of CDO1 was tightly controlled by promoter methylation, suggesting that promoter methylation and silencing of CDO1 may be a common event in human carcinogenesis. Moreover, forced expression of full-length CDO1 in human cancer cells markedly decreased the tumor cell growth in an in vitro cell culture and/or an in vivo mouse model, whereas knockdown of CDO1 increased cell growth in culture. Our data implicate CDO1 as a novel tumor suppressor gene and a potentially valuable molecular marker for human cancer. PMID:23028699

  2. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary (Hypercalcemic Type): Malignant Rhabdoid Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kascak, Peter; Zamecnik, Michal; Bystricky, Branislav

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of malignant rhabdoid tumor (ovarian small cell carcinoma of hypercalcemic type) in a 24-year-old female with fulminant course. Clinically, hypercalcemia was not found at the time of primary diagnosis. However, it appeared later during the course of tumor progression. Histologically, the tumor showed classical features of small cell carcinoma of hypercalcemic type. Therapy included radical surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite this intensive therapy, the disease recurred and the patient died 10 months after the diagnosis. We discuss the diagnosis and therapy of this tumor, as well as its recent classification as malignant rhabdoid tumor. PMID:27462229

  3. EWS-FLI-1-targeted cytotoxic T-cell killing of multiple tumor types belonging to the Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Christopher H.; Liu, Fangjun; Porter, Ryan M.; O’Sullivan, Regina P.; Merghoub, Taha; Lunsford, Elaine P.; Robichaud, Kyle; Van Valen, Frans; Lessnick, Stephen L.; Gebhardt, Mark C.; Wells, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors (ESFTs) comprises a group of aggressive, malignant bone and soft tissue tumors that predominantly affect children and young adults. These tumors frequently share expression of the EWS-FLI-1 translocation, which is central to tumor survival but not present in healthy cells. In this study, we examined EWS-FLI-1 antigens for their capacity to induce immunity against a range of ESFT types. Design Computer prediction analysis of peptide binding, HLA-A2.1 stabilization assays, and induction of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes (CTL) in immunized HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice were used to assess the immunogenicity of native and modified peptides derived from the fusion region of EWS-FLI-1 type 1. CTL-killing of multiple ESFT family members in vitro, and control of established xenografts in vivo, was assessed. We also examined whether these peptides could induce human CTLs in vitro. Results EWS-FLI-1 type 1 peptides were unable to stabilize cell surface HLA-A2.1 and induced weak CTL activity against Ewing Sarcoma cells. In contrast, peptides with modified anchor residues induced potent CTL killing of Ewing Sarcoma cells presenting endogenous (native) peptides. The adoptive transfer of CTL specific for the modified peptide YLNPSVDSV resulted in enhanced survival of mice with established Ewing Sarcoma xenografts. YLNPSVDSV-specific CTL displayed potent killing of multiple ESFT types in vitro: Ewing Sarcoma, pPNET, Askin’s Tumor, and Biphenotypic Sarcoma. Stimulation of human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells with YLNPSVDSV peptide resulted in potent CTL-killing. Conclusions These data show that YLNPSVDSV peptide is a promising antigen for ESFT immunotherapy and warrants further clinical development. PMID:22879388

  4. Growing tumors induce a local STING dependent Type I IFN response in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Andzinski, Lisa; Spanier, Julia; Kasnitz, Nadine; Kröger, Andrea; Jin, Lei; Brinkmann, Melanie M; Kalinke, Ulrich; Weiss, Siegfried; Jablonska, Jadwiga; Lienenklaus, Stefan

    2016-09-15

    The importance of endogenous Type I IFNs in cancer immune surveillance is well established by now. Their role in polarization of tumor-associated neutrophilic granulocytes into anti-tumor effector cells has been recently demonstrated. Yet, the cellular source of Type I IFNs as well as the mode of induction is not clearly defined. Here, we demonstrate that IFN-β is induced by growing murine tumors. Induction is mainly mediated via STING-dependent signaling pathways, suggesting tumor derived DNA as trigger. Transcription factors IRF3 and IRF5 were activated under these conditions which is consistent with tumor infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs) being the major cellular source of IFN-β at the tumor site. Besides DCs, tumor cells themselves are induced to contribute to the production of IFN-β. Taken together, our data provide further information on immune surveillance by Type I IFNs and suggest novel potent cellular targets for future cancer therapy. PMID:27116225

  5. Absence of preferential uptake of ( sup 125 I)iododihydrorhodamine 123 by four human tumor xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, B.M.; Van den Abbeele, A.D.; Adelstein, S.J.; Kassis, A.I. )

    1989-11-01

    The biodistribution of ({sup 125}I)iododihydrorhodamine 123 has been studied over a 96-h period in four human tumor xenograft models: HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma, PC-3 prostate carcinoma, HT-1080 fibrosarcoma, and PaCa-2 pancreatic carcinoma. Elimination of radioactivity in the tumor-bearing nude mice was rapid during the first 24 h and slow thereafter. The lack of uptake in the thyroid indicated there was little, if any, deiodination of the molecule. Activity was found mainly in the liver and spleen. Accumulation of radioactivity was low in all four tumors examined. At 4 h postinjection, as well as at 24 and 48 h, however, the total radioactive content in each of the four tumors was directly proportional to the weight of the tumor sample. This correlation was independent of tumor type, route of injection (i.v./i.p.) or dose (1.2-6 microCi/mouse). This was not true for any of the normal tissues, suggesting that this accumulation may be governed by certain intrinsic characteristics of the cancers tested.

  6. [The activity of redox-regulatory systems in the tumor and its surrounding tissues in various histological types of tumor].

    PubMed

    Surikova, E I; Goroshinskaja, I A; Nerodo, G A; Frantsiyants, E M; Malejko, M L; Shalashnaja, E V; Kachesova, P; Nemashkalova, L A; Leonova, A V

    2016-01-01

    According to modern concepts cancer is a complex dynamic system having multiple relationships with both the immediate environment and with remote nonmalignant tissues and organs. Changes in the redox balance in them can result in disruption of the normal tissue control. Understanding of the biology of redox processes in a particular tumor and its surroundings, and of their functioning mechanisms is necessary for the development of new anti-cancer strategies based on the effects on the redox state of the tumor and surrounding tissue. Thus the aim of this work was to investigate activity of enzymatic systems influencing the redox state in the tumor tissue, peritumoral area and nonmalignant tissue (taken along the line of resection) for different histological types of tumors. The data obtained showed a similar level of reduced glutathione (GSH) in tumor tissues of gastric adenocarcinoma and vulvar squamous cell carcinoma, but its dynamics in the tissues surrounding the tumor was different. In contrast to the gastric adenocarcinoma the carcinoma of the vulva had a significant level of GSH and higher activity of glutathione dependent enzymes in the tumor tissue and its peritumoral area compared with the surrounding nonmalignant tissue. The results indicate that there are differences in the functioning of the redox regulatory systems in the tumor tissue and its surrounding tissues of various histological origin and localization, possibly due to different mechanisms involved in maintenance of the redox balance in the originally nonmalignant tissue. PMID:27143378

  7. Application of a human tumor colony-forming assay to new drug screening.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, R H; Wolpert-DeFilippes, M K; Kern, D H; Lieber, M M; Makuch, R W; Melnick, N R; Miller, W T; Salmon, S E; Simon, R M; Venditti, J M

    1985-05-01

    The applicability of a human tumor colony-forming assay to drug screening was investigated in terms of feasibility, validity, and potential for discovering new antitumor drugs. Feasibility was addressed in a pilot study during which basic methods, appropriate assay quality controls, and a standardized protocol for screening were developed. Considerable variability was noted in the availability and colony growth of different tumor types. The majority of the evaluable experiments utilized breast, colorectal, kidney, lung, melanoma, or ovarian tumors. For many tumor types, little evidence of growth was observed, or only rare specimens formed colonies. Colony-forming efficiencies ranged from 0.05 to 0.11% for the six most useful tumors listed above. A set of quality control measures was developed to address technical problems inherent in the assay. Testing of standard agents in the pilot study established that most of these agents could be detected as active. However, it also identified three assay limitations: compounds requiring systemic metabolic activation are inactive; medium constituents may block the activity of certain antimetabolites; and compounds without therapeutic efficacy may be positive in the assay. The assay categorized nontoxic clinically ineffective agents as true negatives with 97% accuracy. Of 79 compounds which were negative in the current National Cancer Institute prescreen (leukemia P388), 14 were active in the assay. Several demonstrated outstanding in vitro activity and are structurally unrelated to compounds already in development or in clinical trials. A subset of these active compounds were found to lack activity in a P388 in vitro colony-forming assay. This indication of differential cytotoxicity to human tumor cells makes this subset of compounds particularly interesting as antitumor drug leads. The demonstrated sensitivity to most standard agents, discrimination of nontoxic compounds, reproducibility of survival values within assays and

  8. Bone tumors in pre-modern skulls from human skeletal series of Joseon Dynasty

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Oh, Chang Seok; Kim, Yi-Suk; Kim, Yusu; Oh, Seung Whan; Park, Jun Bum; Lee, In Sun

    2015-01-01

    To date, there are still very few reports on benign-tumor cases based on East Asian skeletal series, even though other regions and continents have been well represented. In our study on the Joseon Human Skeletal Series, we identified benign bone tumors in two skeletons (cases Nos. 75 and 96). Our radiological analyses showed both cases to be homogeneous sclerotic bone masses aligned with the cranial vault suture. In a subsequent series of differential diagnoses, we determined both cases to be osteoma, the most common bone-tumor type reported for archaeological samples. Our study is the osteoarchaeological basis for this, the first-ever report on benign bone neoplasm in a pre-modern East Asian population. PMID:26417482

  9. VIS-NIR spectrum analysis for distinguishing tumor and normal human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Yu, Yuan; Tuchin, Valery V.; Chen, Yongjun; Wen, Xiang; Liu, Caihua; Wang, Jing; Xue, Xingbo; Zhu, Dan

    2012-03-01

    The high incidence and mortality of breast cancer require an effective method for early breast diagnosis. In order to investigate the optical differences among malignant tumor, benign tumor and normal human breast tissue, a commercial spectrophotometer combined with single integrating sphere was used to measure the optical properties of different types of breast tissue in the wavelength range of 400 nm to 2200 nm in vitro. The hematoxylin and eosin staining (H&E staining) are used as the standard, and to find the find possible optical markers from the corresponding absorption or scattering spectra. This work is not only used for in vitro rapid optical diagnosis, but very helpful to develop innovative optical diagnosis of breast tumor in vivo.

  10. Lysophosphatidic Acid Acyltransferase β (LPAATβ) Promotes the Tumor Growth of Human Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Rastegar, Farbod; Gao, Jian-Li; Shenaq, Deana; Luo, Qing; Shi, Qiong; Kim, Stephanie H.; Jiang, Wei; Wagner, Eric R.; Huang, Enyi; Gao, Yanhong; Shen, Jikun; Yang, Ke; He, Bai-Cheng; Chen, Liang; Zuo, Guo-Wei; Luo, Jinyong; Luo, Xiaoji; Bi, Yang; Liu, Xing; Li, Mi; Hu, Ning; Wang, Linyuan; Luther, Gaurav; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; He, Tong-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone with poorly characterized molecular pathways important in its pathogenesis. Increasing evidence indicates that elevated lipid biosynthesis is a characteristic feature of cancer. We sought to investigate the role of lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase β (LPAATβ, aka, AGPAT2) in regulating the proliferation and growth of human osteosarcoma cells. LPAATβ can generate phosphatidic acid, which plays a key role in lipid biosynthesis as well as in cell proliferation and survival. Although elevated expression of LPAATβ has been reported in several types of human tumors, the role of LPAATβ in osteosarcoma progression has yet to be elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings Endogenous expression of LPAATβ in osteosarcoma cell lines is analyzed by using semi-quantitative PCR and immunohistochemical staining. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of LPAATβ and silencing LPAATβ expression is employed to determine the effect of LPAATβ on osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration in vitro and osteosarcoma tumor growth in vivo. We have found that expression of LPAATβ is readily detected in 8 of the 10 analyzed human osteosarcoma lines. Exogenous expression of LPAATβ promotes osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration, while silencing LPAATβ expression inhibits these cellular characteristics. We further demonstrate that exogenous expression of LPAATβ effectively promotes tumor growth, while knockdown of LPAATβ expression inhibits tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft model of human osteosarcoma. Conclusions/Significance Our results strongly suggest that LPAATβ expression may be associated with the aggressive phenotypes of human osteosarcoma and that LPAATβ may play an important role in regulating osteosarcoma cell proliferation and tumor growth. Thus, targeting LPAATβ may be exploited as a novel therapeutic strategy for the clinical management of osteosarcoma. This is especially

  11. Expression of a multidrug-resistance gene in human tumors and tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Fojo, A.T.; Ueda, K.; Slamon, D.J.; Poplack, D.G.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I.

    1987-01-01

    The identification and cloning of a segment of a human multidrug resistance gene (mdr1) was reported recently. To examine, the molecular basis of one type of multidrug resistance, the authors have prepared RNA from human tumors and normal tissues and measured their content of mdr1 RNA. They find that the mdr1 gene is expressed at a very high level in the adrenal gland; at a high level in the kidney; at intermediate levels in the lung, liver, lower jejunum, colon, and rectum; and at low levels in many other tissues. The mdr1 gene is also expressed in several human tumors, including many but not all tumors derived from the adrenal gland and the colon. In addition, increased expression was detected in a few tumors at the time of relapse following initial chemotherapy. Although controlled clinical studies will be required, the results suggest that measurement of mdr1 RNA may prove to be a valuable tool in the design of chemotherapy protocols.

  12. Multiple Tumor Types May Originate from Bone Marrow-Derived Cells1*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunfang; Chen, Zhongwei; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Tao; Lu, Yuan

    2006-01-01

    Abstract It was believed that tumors originated from the transformation of their tissue-specific stem cells. However, bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs), which possess an unexpected degree of plasticity and often reside in other tissues, might also represent a potential source of malignancy. To study whether BMDCs play a role in the source of other tumors, BMDCs from mice were treated with 3-methycholanthrene until malignant transformation was achieved. Here we show that transformed BMDCs could form many tumor types, including epithelial tumors, neural tumors, muscular tumors, tumors of fibroblasts, blood vessel endothelial tumors, and tumors of poor differentiation in vivo. Moreover, a single transformed BMDC has the ability to self-renew, differentiate spontaneously into various types of tumor cells in vitro, express markers associated with multipotency, and form teratoma in vivo. These data suggest that multipotent cancer stem cells seemed to originate from transformed BMDCs. Conclusively, these findings reveal that BMDCs might be a source of many tumor types, even teratoma. In addition, multipotent cancer stem cells might originate from malignant transformed BMDCs. PMID:16984729

  13. Distinct types of tumors exhibit differential grade of inflammation and angiogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Viana, C T R; Campos, P P; Carvalho, L A; Cenedezi, J M; Lavall, L; Lopes, M T P; Ferreira, M A N D; Andrade, S P

    2013-03-01

    Inflammation, angiogenesis and cytokine production are common features of almost, if not all tumors. However, the extent of these processes induced by different types of tumors has not been evaluated. We investigated the growth pattern of the experimental metastatic tumors, B16F10 melanoma, CT26.WT colon and 4T1 mammary cells inoculated in the flank of syngeneic mice and determined the degree of inflammation, angiogenesis, and production level of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic cytokines within the tumors. In addition, we have analyzed vascular changes in the interface between the tumors and the adjacent cutaneous tissue and levels of relevant pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic cytokines systemically. The weight of tumors 15 days post-inoculation of 10(6) cells was markedly different. Melanomas were 2 and 10-fold heavier than colon and mammary tumors, respectively. Locally, CT26.WT tumor cells induced more vessels in cutaneous tissue adjacent to the tumors but systemically, the plasma levels of VEGF were higher (approximately 2-fold) in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice compared with the other two tumors. Mammary tumors presented the most prominent inflammatory content as assessed by a range of markers (inflammatory enzymes and cytokines). The vascular index, as determined by the intra-tumor amount of hemoglobin and number of vessels in hot spot areas, was also higher (approximately 2-fold) in melanomas compared with the other two tumors. These findings showing that distinct tumor types determine differential grade of inflammation, angiogenesis and host interaction in mice may provide new insights to tailor differential therapeutic approach based on the status of tumor biomarkers. PMID:23253264

  14. Magnetoacoustic imaging of human liver tumor with magnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gang; Cressman, Erik; He, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging technique under development to achieve imaging of electrical impedance contrast in biological tissues with spatial resolution close to ultrasound imaging. However, previously reported MAT-MI experimental results are obtained either from low salinity gel phantoms, or from normal animal tissue samples. In this study, we report the experimental study on the performance of the MAT-MI imaging method for imaging in vitro human liver tumor tissue. The present promising experimental results suggest the feasibility of MAT-MI to image electrical impedance contrast between the cancerous tissue and its surrounding normal tissues.

  15. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma with a syncytial-type multinucleated giant tumor cell component: implications for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Kum, Jennifer B; Goheen, Michael P; Cheng, Liang; Grignon, David J; Idrees, Muhammad T

    2014-04-01

    A component of syncytial-type multinucleated tumor giant cells is uncommon in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and the histogenesis, incidence, and clinical implications of this finding are not well understood. We retrieved 13 such tumors from our pathology archives in patients with a median age of 60years, comprising 1.5% of clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Stage was typically pT4 or pT3 (each 38%). Microscopically, all tumors included a component of low-grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma with usual features. Syncytial-type giant tumor cells possessed voluminous cytoplasm, usually granular and eosinophilic, and numerous nuclei similar to those of the mononuclear tumor cells. Transition between areas of mononuclear and multinucleated cells was sometimes abrupt. Other findings included necrosis (77%), hyaline globules (46%), emperipolesis (46%), and intranuclear cytoplasmic invaginations (23%). Immunohistochemical staining typically revealed both mononuclear and multinucleated cells to be positive for carbonic anhydrase IX, CD10, epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, and cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and negative for β human chorionic gonadotropin, TFE3, cathepsin K, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, HMB45, CD68, smooth muscle actin, and S100. Most patients with available information (7/9) were alive with metastatic disease at the most recent follow-up. Syncytial-type giant cells are an uncommon finding associated with aggressive clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Despite the unusual appearance of this tumor component, its immunoprofile supports an epithelial lineage and argues against trophoblastic, osteoclast-like, or histiocytic differentiation. Reactivity for typical clear cell renal cell carcinoma antigens facilitates discrimination from giant cells of epithelioid angiomyolipoma or other tumors, particularly in a biopsy specimen or a metastatic tumor. PMID:24499686

  16. Analysis of human tumor associated Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, J.; Noujaim, A.A.; MacLean, G.D.; Suresh, M.R.; Longenecker, B.M. )

    1990-08-01

    The Thomsen-Friedenrich (TF) antigen is a precursor structure of MN blood group antigens and is also expressed by about 90% of human carcinomas. The immunodominant group of TF antigen (beta-galactosyl(1-3)-alpha-N-acetylglactosamine) is present in cryptic form in normal RBC and is revealed by neuraminidase treatment. A murine monoclonal antibody (Mab 49H.8) developed against neuraminidase treated human RBC was reactive against a variety of human tumors. We have characterized the human tumor associated TF antigen detected by this antibody from a human transitional bladder carcinoma cell line (647V), a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (LS174T), and a pleural effusion fluid of a breast adenocarcinoma patient (PE 89). A heterologous sandwich radioimmunoassay for TF antigen was developed using Mab 49H.8 as the catcher and 125I-peanut agglutinin as the probe. Detergent extracts of 647V and LS174T cells, media conditioned by culturing these cells, and PE 89 were shown to contain the antigen by this assay. The specificity of the antigen capture by Mab 49H.8 in this assay was demonstrated by its selective inhibition by nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactoside, phenyl-beta-D-galactoside, and a TF hapten. Preliminary studies on TF antigen in serum samples using this assay showed that about 53.7% of the carcinoma samples contained an antigen concentration greater than 200 units/ml whereas for 90.9% of the normal samples the antigen concentration was below 200 units/ml. These studies demonstrated that the TF antigen is shed by the tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. The TF antigen was sensitive to treatment with alkali (0.1 M NaOH for 5 h at 37 degrees C) and periodate (10 mM sodium periodate for 1 h at room temperature), was resistant to acidic pH (50 mM acetate buffer, pH 4.5, for 5 h at 37 degrees C), and could be extracted with perchloric acid.

  17. IL-12 Delivered Intratumorally by Multilamellar Liposomes Reactivates Memory T Cells in Human Tumor Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R.; Purohit, Vivek S.; Pang, Wing Man; Iyer, Vandana; Odunsi, Kunle; Demmy, Todd L; Yokota, Sandra J.; Loyall, Jenni L.; Kelleher, Raymond J.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy; Bankert, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Using a novel loading technique, IL-12 is reported here to be efficiently encapsulated within large multilamellar liposomes. The preclinical efficacy of the cytokine loaded liposomes to deliver IL-12 into human tumors and to reactive tumor-associated T cells in situ is tested using a human tumor xenograft model. IL-12 is released in vivo from these liposomes in a biologically active form when injected into tumor xenografts that are established by the subcutaneous implantation of non-disrupted pieces of human lung, breast or ovarian tumors into immunodeficient mice. The histological architecture of the original tumor tissue, including tumor-associated leukocytes, tumor cells and stromal cells is preserved anatomically and the cells remain functionally responsive to cytokines in these xenografts. The local and sustained release of IL-12 into the tumor microenvironment reactivates tumor-associated quiescent effector memory T cells to proliferate, produce and release IFN-γ resulting in the killing of tumor cells in situ. Very little IL-12 is detected in the serum of mice for up to 5 days after an intratumoral injection of the IL-12 liposomes. We conclude that IL-12 loaded large multilamellar liposomes provide a safe method for the local and sustained delivery of IL-12 to tumors and a therapeutically effective way of reactivating existing tumor-associated T cells in human solid tumor microenvironments. The potential of this local in situ T cell re-stimulation to induce a systemic anti-tumor immunity is discussed. PMID:19395317

  18. T Cells and Stromal Fibroblasts in Human Tumor Microenvironments Represent Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Barnas, Jennifer L.; Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R.; Yokota, Sandra J.; Kelleher, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    The immune system of cancer patients recognizes tumor-associated antigens expressed on solid tumors and these antigens are able to induce tumor-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. Diverse immunotherapeutic strategies have been used in an attempt to enhance both antibody and T cell responses to tumors. While several tumor vaccination strategies significantly increase the number of tumor-specific lymphocytes in the blood of cancer patients, most vaccinated patients ultimately experience tumor progression. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with an effector memory phenotype infiltrate human tumor microenvironments, but most are hyporesponsive to stimulation via the T cell receptor (TCR) and CD28 under conditions that activate memory T cells derived from the peripheral blood of the cancer patients or normal donors. Attempts to identify cells and molecules responsible for the TCR signaling arrest of tumor-infiltrating T cells have focused largely upon the immunosuppressive effects of tumor cells, tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T cells. Here we review potential mechanisms by which human T cell function is arrested in the tumor microenvironment with a focus on the immunomodulatory effects of stromal fibroblasts. Determining in vivo which cells and molecules are responsible for the TCR arrest in human tumor-infiltrating T cells will be necessary to formulate and test strategies to prevent or reverse the signaling arrest of the human T cells in situ for a more effective design of tumor vaccines. These questions are now addressable using novel human xenograft models of tumor microenvironments. PMID:21209773

  19. Type 1 and type 2 cytokine dysregulation in human infectious, neoplastic, and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Lucey, D R; Clerici, M; Shearer, G M

    1996-01-01

    In the mid-1980s, Mosmann, Coffman, and their colleagues discovered that murine CD4+ helper T-cell clones could be distinguished by the cytokines they synthesized. The isolation of human Th1 and Th2 clones by Romagnani and coworkers in the early 1990s has led to a large number of reports on the effects of Th1 and Th2 on the human immune system. More recently, cells other than CD4+ T cells, including CD8+ T cells, monocytes, NK cells, B cells, eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and other cells, have been shown to be capable of producing "Th1" and "Th2" cytokines. In this review, we examine the literature on human diseases, using the nomenclature of type 1 (Th1-like) and type 2 (Th2-like) cytokines, which includes all cell types producing these cytokines rather than only CD4+ T cells. Type 1 cytokines include interleukin-2 (IL-2), gamma interferon, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor beta, while type 2 cytokines include IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-13. In general, type 1 cytokines favor the development of a strong cellular immune response whereas type 2 cytokines favor a strong humoral immune response. Some of these type 1 and type 2 cytokines are cross-regulatory. For example, gamma interferon and IL-12 decrease the levels of type 2 cytokines whereas IL-4 and IL-10 decrease the levels of type 1 cytokines. We use this cytokine perspective to examine human diseases including infections due to viruses, bacteria, parasites, and fungi, as well as selected neoplastic, atopic, rheumatologic, autoimmune, and idiopathic-inflammatory conditions. Clinically, type 1 cytokine-predominant responses should be suspected in any delayed-type hypersensitivity-like granulomatous reactions and in infections with intracellular pathogens, whereas conditions involving hypergammaglobulinemia, increased immunoglobulin E levels, and/or eosinophilia are suggestive of type 2 cytokine-predominant conditions. If this immunologic concept is relevant to human diseases, the potential exists for

  20. Label-free electrochemical detection of human methyltransferase from tumors.

    PubMed

    Furst, Ariel L; Muren, Natalie B; Hill, Michael G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2014-10-21

    The role of abnormal DNA methyltransferase activity in the development and progression of cancer is an essential and rapidly growing area of research, both for improved diagnosis and treatment. However, current technologies for the assessment of methyltransferase activity, particularly from crude tumor samples, limit this work because they rely on radioactivity or fluorescence and require bulky instrumentation. Here, we report an electrochemical platform that overcomes these limitations for the label-free detection of human DNA(cytosine-5)-methyltransferase1 (DNMT1) methyltransferase activity, enabling measurements from crude cultured colorectal cancer cell lysates (HCT116) and biopsied tumor tissues. Our multiplexed detection system involving patterning and detection from a secondary electrode array combines low-density DNA monolayer patterning and electrocatalytically amplified DNA charge transport chemistry to measure selectively and sensitively DNMT1 activity within these complex and congested cellular samples. Based on differences in DNMT1 activity measured with this assay, we distinguish colorectal tumor tissue from healthy adjacent tissue, illustrating the effectiveness of this two-electrode platform for clinical applications. PMID:25288757

  1. Human stem cells expressing novel TSP-1 variant have anti-angiogenic effect on brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    van Eekelen, Mark; Sasportas, Laura; Kasmieh, Randa; Yip, Stephen; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Louis, David N.; Weissleder, Ralph; Shah, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Novel therapeutic agents combined with innovative modes of delivery and non-invasive imaging of drug delivery, pharmacokinetics and efficacy are crucial in developing effective clinical anti-cancer therapies. In this study, we have created and characterized multiple novel variants of anti-angiogenic protein thrombospondin (aaTSP-1) that were comprised of unique regions of 3 type-I-repeats of TSP-1 and employed engineered human neural stem cells (hNSC) to provide sustained on-site delivery of secretable aaTSP-1 to tumor-vasculature. We show that hNSC-aaTSP-1 has anti-angiogenic effect on human brain and dermal microvascular endothelial cells co-cultured with established glioma cells and CD133+ glioma-initiating-cells. Using human glioma cells and hNSC engineered with different combinations of fluorescent and bioluminescent marker proteins and employing bioluminescence imaging and intravital-scanning microscopy, we show that aaTSP-1 targets the vascular-component of gliomas and a single administration of hNSC-aaTSP-1 markedly reduces tumor vessel-density that results in inhibition of tumor-progression and increased survival in mice bearing highly malignant human gliomas. We also show that therapeutic hNSC do not proliferate and remain in an un-differentiated state in the brains of glioma bearing mice. This study provides a platform for accelerated development of future cell based therapies for cancer. PMID:20305695

  2. Elimination of extrachromosomally amplified MYC genes from human tumor cells reduces their tumorigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Von Hoff, D D; McGill, J R; Forseth, B J; Davidson, K K; Bradley, T P; Van Devanter, D R; Wahl, G M

    1992-01-01

    Oncogene amplification has been observed in a broad spectrum of human tumors and has been associated with a poor prognosis for patients with several different types of malignancies. Importantly, at biopsy, the amplified genes localize to acentric extrachromosomal elements such as double-minute chromosomes (DMs) in the vast majority of cases. We show here that treatment of several human tumor cell lines with low concentrations of hydroxyurea accelerates the loss of their extrachromosomally amplified oncogenes. The decreases in MYC copy number in a human tumor cell line correlated with a dramatic reduction in cloning efficiency in soft agar and tumorigenicity in nude mice. No effect on gene copy number or tumorigenicity was observed for a closely related cell line containing the same number of chromosomally amplified MYC genes. One step involved in the accelerated loss of extrachromosomal elements is shown to involve their preferential entrapment of DMs within micronuclei. The data suggest that agents that accelerate the loss of extrachromosomally amplified genes could provide valuable tools for moderating the growth of a large number of human neoplasms. Images PMID:1518843

  3. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    SciTech Connect

    Nuovo, G.J. ); Pedemonte, B.M. )

    1990-03-02

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion.

  4. Maillard reaction products modulating the growth of human tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Marko, Doris; Habermeyer, Michael; Kemény, Monika; Weyand, Ulrike; Niederberger, Ellen; Frank, Oliver; Hofmann, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effect of a series of Maillard reaction products formed from carbohydrates under household heating conditions on the growth of human tumor cells in vitro. 4-Hydroxy-5-methyl-3-(2H)-furanone (1) was found to potently enhance the proliferation of human tumor cells. In contrast, the Maillard-type chromophores 2-(2-furyl)methylidene-4-hydroxy-5-methyl-2H-furan-3-one (2), 4-(2-furyl)-7-[(2-furyl)methylidene]-2-hydroxy-2H,7H,8aH-pyrano[2,3-b]- pyran-3-one (6), and 3-hydroxy-4[(E)-(2-furyl)methylidene]methyl-3-cyclopentene-1,2 dione (13) inhibited the growth of human tumor cells in vitro in the low micromolar range. GXF251L cells (gastric carcinoma), synchronized by serum deprivation, were retained in the G1-phase of the cell cycle after treatment with 2, 6, or 13 for 24 h. Concomitantly, a distinct sub-G1 peak was observed, indicative for apoptosis induction. DNA fragmentation was further investigated by ELISA using antibodies raised against histones and DNA. 2 induced a significant increase of fragmented DNA at concentrations > or = 30 microM. After treatment with compound 6, DNA fragmentation was observed at a higher concentration range (> or = 50 microM), whereas incubation with 13 resulted in a marked DNA fragmentation already at 20 microM. On the protein level, the activation of caspase 3, as an early marker for apoptosis induction, was determined. The results were almost identical to those obtained in the DNA fragmentation ELISA. In summary, Maillard reaction products potently modulating the growth of human tumor cells were identified. The Maillard-type chromophores 2, 6, and 13 were found to interfere with the proliferation of gastric carcinoma cells, causing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction. PMID:12693030

  5. A Novel Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Has Potent Anti-Tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiufen; Lu, Haizhen; Liang, Jing; Li, Jie; Zhang, Yu; Dong, Ying; Zhang, Youhui; Zhang, Shuren; Liu, Shangmei; Liu, Binlei

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are promising treatments for many kinds of solid tumors. In this study, we constructed a novel oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 2: oHSV2. We investigated the cytopathic effects of oHSV2 in vitro and tested its antitumor efficacy in a 4T1 breast cancer model. We compared its effect on the cell cycle and its immunologic impact with the traditional chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin. In vitro data showed that oHSV2 infected most of the human and murine tumor cell lines and was highly oncolytic. oHSV2 infected and killed 4T1 tumor cells independent of their cell cycle phase, whereas doxorubicin mainly blocked cells that were in S and G2/M phase. In vivo study showed that both oHSV2 and doxorubicin had an antitumor effect, though the former was less toxic. oHSV2 treatment alone not only slowed down the growth of tumors without causing weight loss but also induced an elevation of NK cells and mild decrease of Tregs in spleen. In addition, combination therapy of doxorubicin followed by oHSV2 increased survival with weight loss than oHSV2 alone. The data showed that the oncolytic activity of oHSV2 was similar to oHSV1 in cell lines examined and in vivo. Therefore, we concluded that our virus is a safe and effective therapeutic agent for 4T1 breast cancer and that the sequential use of doxorubicin followed by oHSV2 could improve antitumor activity without enhancing doxorubicin’s toxicity. PMID:24671154

  6. Generation and tumor recognition properties of two human monoclonal antibodies specific to cell surface anionic phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Bujak, Emil; Pretto, Francesca; Neri, Dario

    2015-08-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) and other anionic phospholipids, which become exposed on the surface of proliferating endothelial cells, tumor cells and certain leukocytes, have been used as targets for the development of clinical-stage biopharmaceuticals. One of these products (bavituximab) is currently being investigated in Phase 3 clinical trials. There are conflicting reports on the ability of bavituximab and other antibodies to recognize PS directly or through beta-2 glycoprotein 1, a serum protein that is not highly conserved across species. Here, we report on the generation and characterization of two fully human antibodies directed against phosphatidylserine. One of these antibodies (PS72) bound specifically to phosphatidylserine and to phosphatidic acid, but did not recognize other closely related phospholipids, while the other antibody (PS41) also bound to cardiolipin. Both PS72 and PS41 stained 8/9 experimental tumor models in vitro, but both antibodies failed to exhibit a preferential tumor accumulation in vivo, as revealed by quantitative biodistribution analysis. Our findings indicate that anionic phospholipids are exposed and accessible in most tumor types, but cast doubts about the possibility of efficiently targeting tumors in vivo with PS-specific reagents. PMID:25983040

  7. Gene expression profiling of the tumor microenvironment in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sulpice, Laurent; Desille, Mireille; Turlin, Bruno; Fautrel, Alain; Boudjema, Karim; Clément, Bruno; Coulouarn, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is the second most common type of malignant primary tumors in the liver. ICC is an aggressive cancer with a poor survival and limited therapeutic options. At the histological level, ICC is characterized by an abundant stroma (i.e. the tumor microenvironment that notably includes components of the extracellular matrix, stromal cells and soluble factors). Tumor microenvironment is known to play a key role in tumor onset and progression but it is poorly characterized at the molecular level. Thus, this study was specifically designed to identify genes that are significantly deregulated in the tumor microenvironment of human ICC. Here we provide a detailed description of the experimental design and methods used to acquire the genomic data deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under the accession number GSE45001. Our genomic dataset provides insights on the molecular pathways altered in the microenvironment of ICC and allows the identification of novel ICC biomarkers, as exemplified previously in Hepatology (PMID: 23775819). PMID:26981414

  8. Gene expression profiling of the tumor microenvironment in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sulpice, Laurent; Desille, Mireille; Turlin, Bruno; Fautrel, Alain; Boudjema, Karim; Clément, Bruno; Coulouarn, Cédric

    2016-03-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is the second most common type of malignant primary tumors in the liver. ICC is an aggressive cancer with a poor survival and limited therapeutic options. At the histological level, ICC is characterized by an abundant stroma (i.e. the tumor microenvironment that notably includes components of the extracellular matrix, stromal cells and soluble factors). Tumor microenvironment is known to play a key role in tumor onset and progression but it is poorly characterized at the molecular level. Thus, this study was specifically designed to identify genes that are significantly deregulated in the tumor microenvironment of human ICC. Here we provide a detailed description of the experimental design and methods used to acquire the genomic data deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under the accession number GSE45001. Our genomic dataset provides insights on the molecular pathways altered in the microenvironment of ICC and allows the identification of novel ICC biomarkers, as exemplified previously in Hepatology (PMID: 23775819). PMID:26981414

  9. Tenosynovial, Diffuse Type Giant Cell Tumor of the Temporomandibular Joint, Diagnosis and Management of a Rare Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bredell, Marius; Schucknecht, Bernhard; Bode-Lesniewska, Baete

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to describe a rare unusual case of primary mandibular condylar tenosynovial giant cell tumor of diffuse type with predominantly intraosseous growth and its management by resection and functional reconstruction with a vascularized costochondral graft. Clinical presentation was swelling in the right condylar area and limited mouth opening with radiological evidence of central bone destruction and magnetic resonance imaging showed central hemosiderin deposition. Fine needle aspiration did not lead to a diagnosis and an open biopsy had to be performed. Management consisted of tumor resection and reconstruction with a free vascularized costochondral graft. Tenosynovial diffuse type giant cell tumor of the temporomandibular joint is very rare. Complete resection leads to a low recurrence rate and reconstruction with a costochondral free vascularized flap leads to an excellent functional outcome. PMID:25699124

  10. Type I collagen aging impairs discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated tumor cell growth suppression.

    PubMed

    Saby, Charles; Buache, Emilie; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Courageot, Marie-Pierre; Van Gulick, Laurence; Garnotel, Roselyne; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Tumor cells are confronted to a type I collagen rich environment which regulates cell proliferation and invasion. Biological aging has been associated with structural changes of type I collagen. Here, we address the effect of collagen aging on cell proliferation in a three-dimensional context (3D).We provide evidence for an inhibitory effect of adult collagen, but not of the old one, on proliferation of human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells. This effect involves both the activation of the tyrosine kinase Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) and the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. DDR2 and SHP-2 were less activated in old collagen. DDR2 inhibition decreased SHP-2 phosphorylation in adult collagen and increased cell proliferation to a level similar to that observed in old collagen.In the presence of old collagen, a high level of JAK2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was observed while expression of the cell cycle negative regulator p21CIP1 was decreased. Inhibition of DDR2 kinase function also led to an increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and a decrease in p21CIP1 expression. Similar signaling profile was observed when DDR2 was inhibited in adult collagen. Altogether, these data suggest that biological collagen aging could increase tumor cell proliferation by reducingthe activation of the key matrix sensor DDR2. PMID:27121132

  11. A Novel Ex Vivo Method for Visualizing Live-Cell Calcium Response Behavior in Intact Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    The functional impact of intratumoral heterogeneity has been difficult to assess in the absence of a means to interrogate dynamic, live-cell biochemical events in the native tissue context of a human tumor. Conventional histological methods can reveal morphology and static biomarker expression patterns but do not provide a means to probe and evaluate tumor functional behavior and live-cell responsiveness to experimentally controlled stimuli. Here, we describe an approach that couples vibratome-mediated viable tissue sectioning with live-cell confocal microscopy imaging to visualize human parathyroid adenoma tumor cell responsiveness to extracellular calcium challenge. Tumor sections prepared as 300 micron-thick tissue slices retain viability throughout a >24 hour observation period and retain the native architecture of the parental tumor. Live-cell observation of biochemical signaling in response to extracellular calcium challenge in the intact tissue slices reveals discrete, heterogeneous kinetic waveform categories of calcium agonist reactivity within each tumor. Plotting the proportion of maximally responsive tumor cells as a function of calcium concentration yields a sigmoid dose-response curve with a calculated calcium EC50 value significantly elevated above published reference values for wild-type calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) sensitivity. Subsequent fixation and immunofluorescence analysis of the functionally evaluated tissue specimens allows alignment and mapping of the physical characteristics of individual cells within the tumor to specific calcium response behaviors. Evaluation of the relative abundance of intracellular PTH in tissue slices challenged with variable calcium concentrations demonstrates that production of the hormone can be dynamically manipulated ex vivo. The capability of visualizing live human tumor tissue behavior in response to experimentally controlled conditions opens a wide range of possibilities for personalized ex vivo

  12. The expression of the Hu (paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis/sensory neuronopathy) antigen in human normal and tumor tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Dalmau, J.; Furneaux, H. M.; Cordon-Cardo, C.; Posner, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Using immunohistochemistry or Western blot analysis, the authors have studied the expression of the Hu antigen (a neuronal protein identified by the serum of patients with small cell lung cancer and paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis/sensory neuronopathy) in normal human tissues and 115 tumors of different histologic types. In normal tissue, the Hu antigen is highly restricted to the nervous system. In lung tumors, the Hu antigen is restricted in its expression to all small cell carcinomas. A few other neuroendocrine-related tumors, especially neuroblastomas (50%), also express the antigen. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1415481

  13. Purification and characterization of an inhibitor (soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor) for tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin obtained from the serum ultrafiltrates of human cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gatanaga, Tetsuya; Whang, Chenduen; Cappuccini, F.; Lucci, J.A. III; Jeffes, E.W.B. ); Kohr, W. ); Lentz, R. ); Tomich, J. ); Yamamoto, R.S. ); Granger, G.A. Memorial Cancer Inst., Long Beach, CA )

    1990-11-01

    Serum ultrafiltrates (SUF) from human patients with different types of cancer contain a blocking factor (BF) that inhibits the cytolytic activity of human tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) in vitro. BF is a protein with a molecular mass of 28kDa on reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE). The active material was purified to homogeneity by a combination of affinity chromatography, PAGE, and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that BF is derived from the membrane TNF receptor. Purified BF blocks the lytic activity of recombinant human and mouse TNF-{alpha} and recombinant human lymphotoxin activity of TNF-{alpha} and recombinant human lymphotoxin on murine L929 cells in vitro. However, BF inhibits the lytic activity of TNF-{alpha} more effectively than it does that of lymphotoxin. The BF also inhibits the necrotizing activity of recombinant human TNF-{alpha} when coinjected into established cutaneous Meth A tumors in BALB/c mice. The BF may have an important role in (i) the regulation and control of TNF-{alpha} and lymphotoxin activity in cancer patients, (ii) interaction between the tumor and the host antitumor mechanisms, and (iii) use of systemically administered TNF-{alpha} in clinical trials with human cancer patients.

  14. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  15. Nitric oxide involvement in the anti-tumor effect of mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts Iscador on human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mossalayi, M Djavad; Alkharrat, Abir; Malvy, Denis

    2006-06-01

    Lectins from different types of mistletoe (Viscum album, VA) have cytotoxic and immunomodulatory properties that may be relevant in the inhibition of tumor growth. The mechanism of this anti-tumoral activity remains unknown, although recent investigations point out the induction of anti-tumoral cytotoxic T cell activation. In this study therapeutically available mistletoe extracts (Iscador) prepared from Quercus (VA-Q), apple (Malus, VA-M) or pine (Pinus, VA-P) were used to investigate their capacity to induce tumor regression through the modulation of another T helper-1 (Th-1)-mediated anti-tumoral activity: the activation of macrophages. Macrophages are essential targets for both pro- or anti-inflammatory drugs and constitute an essential member of the anti-tumoral immune response. Freshly isolated human monocyte-derived macrophages are activated and various VA extracts are directly incorporated to cultures to assay their properties on the inflammatory and/or tumor cytotoxic responses. The data indicate that immunomodulatory activities of VA extracts differ according to their origin. VA-M and VA-P were able to increase anti-tumoral activity of activated human macrophages, with a possible role for nitric oxide in this effect. PMID:16927526

  16. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  17. Differential expression of type 2 3α/type 5 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (AKR1C3) in tumors of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Park, Aubrey L; Lin, Hsueh-Kung; Yang, Qing; Sing, Chor Wing; Fan, Michael; Mapstone, Timothy B; Gross, Naina L; Gumerlock, Mary K; Martin, Michael D; Rabb, Craig H; Fung, Kar-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Human aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1C3, type 2 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSC)/ type 5 17β-HSD, is known to be involved in steroids, prostaglandins, and lipid aldehydes metabolism. The expression of AKR1C3 has been demonstrated in hormone-dependent normal tissues such as breast, endometrium, prostate, and testis; and de -regulated AKR1C3 expression has been shown in breast carcinoma, endometrial hyperplasia, endometrial carcinoma, and prostate carcinoma. AKR1C3 expression has also been demonstrated in hormone-independent normal tissues (renal tubules and urothelium) and neoplastic tissues (renal cell carcinoma, Wilm's tumor, and urothelial cell carcinoma). Extensive expression of AKR1C3 in normal and neoplastic as well as hormone-dependent and hormone-independent tissues indicates that AKR1C3 may have functions beyond steroid hormone metabolism. In this report, we describe a widespread expression of AKR1C3 in glial neoplasms and meningiomas, with limited expression in medulloblastoma and no expression in Schwannoma. These tumors, except meningioma, are not classically considered to be sex hormone-dependent or related brain tumors. The current results corroborate our earlier observations that AKR1C3 is expressed in both sex hormone-dependent and hormone-independent malignancies. Similar to AKR1C3 distribution in Wilm’s tumor, we also demonstrate that expression of AKR1C3 is reduced in tumors with embryonic phenotypes. PMID:21151387

  18. Tumors displaying hybrid schwannoma and neurofibroma features in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Blake K; Alimchandani, Meghna; Mehta, Gautam U; Dewan, Ramita; Nesvick, Cody L; Miettinen, Markku; Heiss, John D; Asthagiri, Ashok R; Quezado, Martha; Germanwala, Anand V

    2016-01-01

    Although schwannoma and neurofibroma tumors are generally reported as distinct pathologic diagnoses, sporadic schwannoma/neurofibroma hybrid nerve sheath tumors have been reported in the general population with components of both entities. We report the clinicopathological features of these hybrid nerve sheath tumors in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). A retrospective review of nerve sheath tumor surgical specimens from patients with NF2 enrolled at the National Institutes of Health was performed. Those specimens reported to have schwannoma-like and neurofibromalike features were selected for further characterization by morphology, immunohistochemical panel (CD34, S100, neurofilament triplet protein (immunostain) (NFTP), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA)), and confirmation as hybrid tumors. Of 43 total NF2 patients undergoing resection of nerve sheath tumors, 11 specimens from 11 (26%) patients were found to be benign nerve sheath tumors exhibiting hybrid features of both neurofibroma and schwannoma. Immunohistochemical studies showed the schwannoma component to be S100+, CD 34- while the neurofibroma component was CD34+, variable S100+. Our experience emphasizes the importance of including this distinct tumor subtype, the schwannoma/neurofibroma hybrid tumor, in the differential diagnosis of nerve sheath tumors in NF2 patients and suggests that the relationship between neurofibroma and schwannoma tumors is closer than previously suspected.. PMID:26709712

  19. Moxifloxacin increases anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activity of irinotecan in human xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Debby; Halperin, Drora; Fabian, Ina; Tsarfaty, Galia; Askenasy, Nadir; Shalit, Itamar

    2010-04-15

    Camptothecins (CPTs) are topoisomerase I inhibitors chemotherapeutic agents used in combination chemotherapy. We showed previously that combination of moxifloxacin (MXF) and CPT induced inhibitory effects on topoisomerase I activity, on proliferation of HT-29 cells in vitro and enhanced apoptosis, compared to CPT alone. Analysis of secretion of the pro-angiogenic factors IL-8 and VEGF showed significant reduction by MXF. Using a murine model of human colon carcinoma xenograft, we compared the effects of MXF/CPT in vitro to MXF/irinotecan combination in vivo. We show that the MXF/CPT inhibitory effects observed in vitro are reflected in the inhibition of the progressive growth of HT-29 cells implanted in SCID mice. Using caliper measurements, Doppler ultrasonography, image analyses and immunohistochemistry of nuclear proteins (Ki-67) and vascular endothelial cells (CD-31) we show that addition of MXF (45mg/kg) to a relatively ineffective dose of irinotecan (20mg/kg), results in a 50% and 30% decrease, respectively, in tumor size and a decrease in Ki-67 staining. Power Doppler Ultrasound showed a significant, pronounced decrease in the number of blood vessels, as did CD-31 staining, indicating decreased blood flow in tumors in mice treated with MXF alone or MXF/irinotecan compared to irinotecan. These results suggest that the combination of MXF/irinotecan may result in enhanced anti-neoplastic/anti-angiogenic activity. PMID:20025849

  20. c-Myc depletion inhibits proliferation of human tumor cells at various stages of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Mannava, S; Grachtchouk, V; Zhuang, D; Soengas, MS; Gudkov, AV; Prochownik, EV; Nikiforov, MA

    2011-01-01

    A major role for c-Myc in the proliferation of normal cells is attributed to its ability to promote progression through G1 and into S phase of the cell cycle. The absolute requirement of c-Myc for cell cycle progression in human tumor cells has not been comprehensively addressed. In the present work, we used a lentiviral-based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector to stably reduce c-Myc expression in a large number of human tumor cell lines and in three different types of normal human cells. In all cases, cell proliferation was severely inhibited, with normal cells ultimately undergoing G0/G1 growth arrest. In contrast, tumor cells demonstrated a much more variable cell cycle response with cells from several lines accumulating in S or G2/M phases. Moreover, in some tumor lines, the phase of cell cycle arrest caused by inhibition of c-Myc could be altered by depleting tumor suppressor protein p53 or its transcriptional target p21CIP/WAF. Our data suggest that, as in the case of normal cells, c-Myc is essential for sustaining proliferation of human tumor cells. However its rate-limiting role in cell cycle control is variable and is reliant upon the status of other cell cycle regulators. PMID:17906696

  1. CD4-independent infection of human neural cells by human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Harouse, J M; Kunsch, C; Hartle, H T; Laughlin, M A; Hoxie, J A; Wigdahl, B; Gonzalez-Scarano, F

    1989-01-01

    A number of studies have indicated that central nervous system-derived cells can be infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). To determine whether CD4, the receptor for HIV-1 in lymphoid cells, was responsible for infection of neural cells, we characterized infectable human central nervous system tumor lines and primary fetal neural cells and did not detect either CD4 protein or mRNA. We then attempted to block infection with anti-CD4 antibodies known to block infection of lymphoid cells; we noted no effect on any of these cultured cells. The results indicate that CD4 is not the receptor for HIV-1 infection of the glioblastoma line U373-MG, medulloblastoma line MED 217, or primary human fetal neural cells. Images PMID:2786088

  2. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) of human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Michael; Bendall, Sean C.; Finck, Rachel; Hale, Matthew B.; Hitzman, Chuck; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Levenson, Richard M.; Lowe, John B.; Liu, Scot D.; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Nolan, Garry P.

    2014-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a tool for visualizing protein expression employed as part of the diagnostic work-up for the majority of solid tissue malignancies. Existing IHC methods use antibodies tagged with fluorophores or enzyme reporters that generate colored pigments. Because these reporters exhibit spectral and spatial overlap when used simultaneously, multiplexed IHC is not routinely used in clinical settings. We have developed a method that uses secondary ion mass spectrometry to image antibodies tagged with isotopically pure elemental metal reporters. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) is capable of analyzing up to 100 targets simultaneously over a five-log dynamic range. Here, we used MIBI to analyze formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human breast tumor tissue sections stained with ten labels simultaneously. The resulting data suggest that MIBI will provide new insights by integrating tissue microarchitecture with highly multiplexed protein expression patterns, and will be valuable for basic research, drug discovery and clinical diagnostics. PMID:24584119

  3. Human papillomavirus tumor infection in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ludmir, Ethan B.; Stephens, Sarah J.; Palta, Manisha; Willett, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has been recognized for over three decades. Recently, multiple meta-analyses have drawn upon existing literature to assess the strength of the HPV-ESCC linkage. Here, we review these analyses and attempt to provide a clinically-relevant overview of HPV infection in ESCC. HPV-ESCC detection rates are highly variable across studies. Geographic location likely accounts for a majority of the variation in HPV prevalence, with high-incidence regions including Asia reporting significantly higher HPV-ESCC infection rates compared with low-incidence regions such as Europe, North America, and Oceania. Based on our examination of existing data, the current literature does not support the notion that HPV is a prominent carcinogen in ESCC. We conclude that there is no basis to change the current clinical approach to ESCC patients with respect to tumor HPV status. PMID:26029456

  4. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  5. Hexabrachion proteins in embryonic chicken tissues and human tumors.

    PubMed

    Erickson, H P; Taylor, H C

    1987-09-01

    Cell cultures of chicken embryo and human fibroblasts produce a large extracellular matrix molecule with a six-armed structure that we called a hexabrachion (Erickson, H. P., and J. L. Iglesias, 1984, Nature (Lond.), 311:267-269. In the present work we have determined that the myotendinous (M1) antigen described by M. Chiquet and D. M. Fambrough in chicken tissues (1984, J. Cell Biol., 98:1926-1936), and the glioma mesenchymal extracellular matrix protein described by Bourdon et al. in human tumors (Bourdon, M. A., C. J. Wikstrand, H. Furthmayr, T. J. Matthews, and D. D. Bigner, 1983, Cancer Res. 43:2796-2805) have the structure of hexabrachions. We also demonstrate that the M1 antigen is present in embryonic brain, where it was previously reported absent, and have purified hexabrachions from brain homogenates. The recently described cytotactin (Grumet, M., S. Hoffman, K. L. Crossin, and G. M. Edelman, 1985, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 82:8075-8079) now appears to be identical to the chicken hexabrachion protein. In a search for functional roles, we looked for a possible cell attachment activity. A strong, fibronectin-like attachment activity was present in (NH4)2SO4 precipitates of cell supernatant and sedimented with hexabrachions in glycerol gradients. Hexabrachions purified by antibody adsorption, however, had lost this activity, suggesting that it was due to a separate factor associated with hexabrachions in the gradient fractions. The combined information in the several, previously unrelated studies suggests that hexabrachions may play a role in organizing localized regions of extracellular matrix. The protein is prominently expressed at specific times and locations during embryonic development, is retained in certain adult tissues, and is reexpressed in a variety of tumors. PMID:3654758

  6. Canine intracranial gliomas: Relationship between magnetic resonance imaging criteria and tumor type and grade

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, R.T.; Ober, C.P.; Anderson, K.L.; Feeney, D.A.; Naughton, J.F.; Ohlfest, J.R.; O’Sullivan, M.G.; Miller, M.A.; Constable, P.D.; Pluhar, G.E.

    2013-01-01

    Limited information is available to assist in the ante-mortem prediction of tumor type and grade for dogs with primary brain tumors. The objective of the current study was to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria related to the histopathological type and grade of gliomas in dogs. A convenience sample utilizing client-owned dogs (n=31) with gliomas was used. Medical records of dogs with intracranial lesions admitted to two veterinary referral hospitals were reviewed and cases with a complete brain MRI and definitive histopathological diagnosis were retrieved for analysis. Each MRI was independently interpreted by five investigators who were provided with standardized grading instructions and remained blinded to the histopathological diagnosis. Mild to no contrast enhancement, an absence of cystic structures (single or multiple), and a tumor location other than the thalamo-capsular region were independently associated with grade II tumors compared to higher grade tumors. In comparison to oligodendrogliomas, astrocytomas were independently associated with the presence of moderate to extensive peri-tumoral edema, a lack of ventricular distortion, and an isointense or hyperintense T1W-signal. When clinical and MRI features indicate that a glioma is most likely, certain MRI criteria can be used to inform the level of suspicion for low tumor grade, particularly poor contrast enhancement. Information obtained from the MRI of such dogs can also assist in predicting an astrocytoma or an oligodendroglioma, but no single imaging characteristic allows for a particular tumor type to be ruled out. PMID:24051197

  7. Phase I study of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha in patients with advanced malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, H H; Nagel, G A; Mull, R; Flener, R; Pfizenmaier, K

    1988-01-01

    A clinical phase I trial with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rTNF-alpha) was performed in 30 patients with advanced malignancies. The maximal tolerated dose (MTD) by 3 times weekly intramuscular (i.m.) application was 150 micrograms m-2. Main subjective toxicities including chills, fever, hypotension, fatigue, and anorexia were dose-related. In addition, transient changes in hematologic parameters and lipid metabolism were noted. Two out of 25 evaluated patients showed a minor tumor response after eight weeks of therapy. There was evidence for an improvement of in vivo immuneresponsiveness as revealed from positive delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin tests of 3 out of 6 pretherapeutically anergic patients. We conclude from this phase I trial that rTNF-alpha can be safely administered at doses up to 150 micrograms m-2 i.m., 3 times weekly, without evidence of cumulative toxicity in long-term treatment. PMID:3267369

  8. CFTR is a tumor suppressor gene in murine and human intestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Than, BLN; Linnekamp, JF; Starr, TK; Largaespada, DA; Rod, A; Zhang, Y; Bruner, V; Abrahante, J; Schumann, A; Luczak, T; Niemczyk, A; O’Sullivan, MG; Medema, JP; Fijneman, RJA; Meijer, GA; Van den Broek, E; Hodges, CA; Scott, PM; Vermeulen, L; Cormier, RT

    2016-01-01

    CFTR, the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, encodes for the CFTR protein that plays an essential role in anion regulation and tissue homeostasis of various epithelia. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract CFTR promotes chloride and bicarbonate secretion, playing an essential role in ion and acid–base homeostasis. Cftr has been identified as a candidate driver gene for colorectal cancer (CRC) in several Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based forward genetic screens in mice. Further, recent epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that CF patients are at high risk for developing tumors in the colon. To investigate the effects of CFTR dysregulation on GI cancer, we generated ApcMin mice that carried an intestinal-specific knockout of Cftr. Our results indicate that Cftr is a tumor suppressor gene in the intestinal tract as Cftr mutant mice developed significantly more tumors in the colon and the entire small intestine. In Apc+/+ mice aged to ~ 1 year, Cftr deficiency alone caused the development of intestinal tumors in >60% of mice. Colon organoid formation was significantly increased in organoids created from Cftr mutant mice compared with wild-type controls, suggesting a potential role of Cftr in regulating the intestinal stem cell compartment. Microarray data from the Cftr-deficient colon and the small intestine identified dysregulated genes that belong to groups of immune response, ion channel, intestinal stem cell and other growth signaling regulators. These associated clusters of genes were confirmed by pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). We also conducted RNA Seq analysis of tumors from Apc+/+ Cftr knockout mice and identified sets of genes dysregulated in tumors including altered Wnt β-catenin target genes. Finally we analyzed expression of CFTR in early stage human CRC patients stratified by risk of recurrence and found that loss of expression of CFTR was significantly associated with poor disease

  9. CFTR is a tumor suppressor gene in murine and human intestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Than, B L N; Linnekamp, J F; Starr, T K; Largaespada, D A; Rod, A; Zhang, Y; Bruner, V; Abrahante, J; Schumann, A; Luczak, T; Niemczyk, A; O'Sullivan, M G; Medema, J P; Fijneman, R J A; Meijer, G A; Van den Broek, E; Hodges, C A; Scott, P M; Vermeulen, L; Cormier, R T

    2016-08-11

    CFTR, the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene, encodes for the CFTR protein that plays an essential role in anion regulation and tissue homeostasis of various epithelia. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract CFTR promotes chloride and bicarbonate secretion, playing an essential role in ion and acid-base homeostasis. Cftr has been identified as a candidate driver gene for colorectal cancer (CRC) in several Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based forward genetic screens in mice. Further, recent epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that CF patients are at high risk for developing tumors in the colon. To investigate the effects of CFTR dysregulation on GI cancer, we generated Apc(Min) mice that carried an intestinal-specific knockout of Cftr. Our results indicate that Cftr is a tumor suppressor gene in the intestinal tract as Cftr mutant mice developed significantly more tumors in the colon and the entire small intestine. In Apc(+/+) mice aged to ~1 year, Cftr deficiency alone caused the development of intestinal tumors in >60% of mice. Colon organoid formation was significantly increased in organoids created from Cftr mutant mice compared with wild-type controls, suggesting a potential role of Cftr in regulating the intestinal stem cell compartment. Microarray data from the Cftr-deficient colon and the small intestine identified dysregulated genes that belong to groups of immune response, ion channel, intestinal stem cell and other growth signaling regulators. These associated clusters of genes were confirmed by pathway analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). We also conducted RNA Seq analysis of tumors from Apc(+/+) Cftr knockout mice and identified sets of genes dysregulated in tumors including altered Wnt β-catenin target genes. Finally we analyzed expression of CFTR in early stage human CRC patients stratified by risk of recurrence and found that loss of expression of CFTR was significantly associated with poor disease

  10. GENES FOR TUMOR MARKERS ARE CLUSTERED WITH CELLULAR PROTO-ONCOGENES ON HUMAN CHROMOSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative mapping positions of genes for polypeptides expressed abnormally in tumors (tumor markers) and cellular proto-oncogenes were analyzed and a remarkable degree of co-mapping of tumor marker genes with oncogenes in the human karyotype were found. It is proposed that abe...

  11. Role of cell type and animal species in tumor metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solban, Nicolas; Georgakoudi, Irene; Rice, William L.; Lin, Charles; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2004-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is now a reasonably well-known therapeutic option and is approved as a first line treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a non-oncologic condition. For most cancer applications PDT is approved mainly as a palliative or adjunctive treatment often when all other options have failed. As the modality evolves toward becoming a first-line or curative option, long-term effects of processes involved will need to be studied. Cellular and tissue responses to PDT are more complex than responses to the more conventional therapies, perhaps because PDT is inherently a binary (or ternary) therapy. In addition to the nature and localization of the photosensitizer (PS), the timing of illumination after administration, the mode of administration and the PS and light doses, the efficacy and selectivity of responses are also determined by the physiology and geometry of tumors, the inherent survivability of tumor cells (in circulation and other anatomic sites) and cellular and molecular responses to PDT. The overall outcome of photodynamic treatment in the long term is determined by a combination, in varying degrees, of all of the above factors. In order to enhance and broaden the application of PDT to complex anatomical sites, an understanding of these factors would be useful. In the laboratory, the outcome is also dependent on the specific animal models being studied. This manuscript discusses preliminary studies along these lines using a variety of tools and implications, if any, of the results obtained.

  12. Adrenomedullin Is a Cross-Talk Molecule that Regulates Tumor and Mast Cell Function during Human Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zudaire, Enrique; Martínez, Alfredo; Garayoa, Mercedes; Pío, Rubén; Kaur, Gurmeet; Woolhiser, Michael R.; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Hook, William A.; Siraganian, Reuben P.; Guise, Theresa A.; Chirgwin, John M.; Cuttitta, Frank

    2006-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that adrenomedullin (AM) plays a critical role as an autocrine/paracrine tumor cell survival factor. We now present evidence that AM is an important regulator of mast cell (MC) function and that this modulation is potentially involved in tumor promotion. AM induced histamine or β-hexosaminidase release from rat and human MCs through a receptor-independent pathway. AM was chemotactic for human MCs and stimulated mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and basic fibroblast growth factor in this cell type. Differentiated but not undifferentiated human MCs responded to hypoxic insult with elevated AM mRNA/protein expression. Using confocal microscopy, we identified AM-producing MCs in tumor infiltrates of human breast and lung cancer patients. In mixed culture assays the AM-producing human MC line HMC-1 augmented both anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of human lung cancer A549 cells, an effect that was suppressed by MC-targeted siRNA AM knockdown. Finally, HMC-1 cells induced in vivo angiogenesis as assessed by directed in vivo angiogenesis assay analysis; neutralizing anti-AM monoclonal antibody blocked this ability. Our collective data suggest a new role for AM as a cross-talk molecule that integrates tumor and MC communication, underlying a unique promotion mechanism of human cancers. PMID:16400030

  13. Direct tumor recognition by a human CD4+ T-cell subset potently mediates tumor growth inhibition and orchestrates anti-tumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Shiku, Hiroshi; Mineno, Junichi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells generally orchestrate and regulate immune cells to provide immune surveillance against malignancy. However, activation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is restricted at local tumor sites where antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are frequently dysfunctional, which can cause rapid exhaustion of anti-tumor immune responses. Herein, we characterize anti-tumor effects of a unique human CD4+ helper T-cell subset that directly recognizes the cytoplasmic tumor antigen, NY-ESO-1, presented by MHC class II on cancer cells. Upon direct recognition of cancer cells, tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells (TR-CD4) potently induced IFN-γ-dependent growth arrest in cancer cells. In addition, direct recognition of cancer cells triggers TR-CD4 to provide help to NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells by enhancing cytotoxic activity, and improving viability and proliferation in the absence of APCs. Notably, the TR-CD4 either alone or in collaboration with CD8+ T cells significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo in a xenograft model. Finally, retroviral gene-engineering with T cell receptor (TCR) derived from TR-CD4 produced large numbers of functional TR-CD4. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the role of TR-CD4 in tumor immunity, and suggest that approaches to utilize TR-CD4 will augment anti-tumor immune responses for durable therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients. PMID:26447332

  14. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Fang; Lin, Yi-Yu; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Liu, Ren-Shen; Pang, Fei; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1- tk) and luciferase ( luc). Both 131I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  15. Human alveolar epithelial type II cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Mao, Pu; Wu, Songling; Li, Jianchun; Fu, Wei; He, Weiqun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Slutsky, Arthur S; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Yimin

    2015-02-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells are a key structure and defender in the lung but also are the targets in many lung diseases, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, ventilator-induced lung injury, and pulmonary fibrosis. We sought to establish an optimized method for high yielding and long maintenance of characteristics of primary human AEII cells to facilitate the investigation of the mechanisms of lung diseases at the cellular and molecular levels. Adult human peripheral normal lung tissues of oncologic patients undergoing lung resection were collected. The AEII cells were isolated and identified by the expression of pro-surfactant protein (SP)C, epithelial sodium channel (αENaC) and cytokeratin (CK)-8, the lamellar bodies specific for AEII cells, and confirmed by the histology using electron microscopy. The phenotype of AEII cells was characterized by the expression of surfactant proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D), CK-8, KL-6, αENaC, and aquaporin (AQP)-3, which was maintained over 20 days. The biological activity of the primary human AEII cells producing SP-C, cytokines, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was vigorous in response to stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-α. We have modified previous methods and optimized a method for isolation of high purity and long maintenance of the human AEII cell phenotype in primary culture. This method provides an important tool for studies aiming at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of lung diseases exclusively in AEII cells. PMID:25677546

  16. Human alveolar epithelial type II cells in primary culture

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Pu; Wu, Songling; Li, Jianchun; Fu, Wei; He, Weiqun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Slutsky, Arthur S; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells are a key structure and defender in the lung but also are the targets in many lung diseases, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, ventilator-induced lung injury, and pulmonary fibrosis. We sought to establish an optimized method for high yielding and long maintenance of characteristics of primary human AEII cells to facilitate the investigation of the mechanisms of lung diseases at the cellular and molecular levels. Adult human peripheral normal lung tissues of oncologic patients undergoing lung resection were collected. The AEII cells were isolated and identified by the expression of pro-surfactant protein (SP)C, epithelial sodium channel (αENaC) and cytokeratin (CK)-8, the lamellar bodies specific for AEII cells, and confirmed by the histology using electron microscopy. The phenotype of AEII cells was characterized by the expression of surfactant proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D), CK-8, KL-6, αENaC, and aquaporin (AQP)-3, which was maintained over 20 days. The biological activity of the primary human AEII cells producing SP-C, cytokines, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was vigorous in response to stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-α. We have modified previous methods and optimized a method for isolation of high purity and long maintenance of the human AEII cell phenotype in primary culture. This method provides an important tool for studies aiming at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of lung diseases exclusively in AEII cells. PMID:25677546

  17. Early T cell signalling is reversibly altered in PD-1+ T lymphocytes infiltrating human tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Fang; Fouquet, Stéphane; Chapon, Maxime; Salmon, Hélène; Regnier, Fabienne; Labroquère, Karine; Badoual, Cécile; Damotte, Diane; Validire, Pierre; Maubec, Eve; Delongchamps, Nicolas B; Cazes, Aurélie; Gibault, Laure; Garcette, Marylène; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Zerbib, Marc; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle; Randriamampita, Clotilde; Trautmann, Alain; Bercovici, Nadège

    2011-01-01

    To improve cancer immunotherapy, a better understanding of the weak efficiency of tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes (TIL) is necessary. We have analyzed the functional state of human TIL immediately after resection of three types of tumors (NSCLC, melanoma and RCC). Several signalling pathways (calcium, phosphorylation of ERK and Akt) and cytokine secretion are affected to different extents in TIL, and show a partial spontaneous recovery within a few hours in culture. The global result is an anergy that is quite distinct from clonal anergy induced in vitro, and closer to adaptive tolerance in mice. PD-1 (programmed death -1) is systematically expressed by TIL and may contribute to their anergy by its mere expression, and not only when it interacts with its ligands PD-L1 or PD-L2, which are not expressed by every tumor. Indeed, the TCR-induced calcium and ERK responses were reduced in peripheral blood T cells transfected with PD-1. Inhibition by sodium stibogluconate of the SHP-1 and SHP-2 phosphatases that associate with several inhibitory receptors including PD-1, relieves part of the anergy apparent in TIL or in PD-1-transfected T cells. This work highlights some of the molecular modifications contributing to functional defects of human TIL. PMID:21408177

  18. PRMT1 regulates tumor growth and metastasis of human melanoma via targeting ALCAM.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Zhengwen; Ma, Tengxiao; Huo, Ran

    2016-07-01

    Overexpression of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) is associated with various types of cancer. The present study aimed to determine the expression level of PRMT1 in human melanoma and investigate its biological function. The clinical significance of PRMT1 was determined by screening the Oncomine database, and the increased expression of PRMT in melanoma was confirmed by western blot analysis. Furthermore, the current study demonstrated that PRMT1 was overexpressed in melanoma cell lines compared with human immortalized keratinocytes and PIG1 immortalized human melanocytes. Silencing PRMT1 in A375 and Hs294T cells significantly suppressed tumor growth and metastatic ability of the melanoma cell line compared with the negative control. These changes were in accordance with the upregulation of the cadherin 1 level and downregulation of several metastatic‑associated genes determined by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction array. Liquid chromatography‑mass spectrometry demonstrated that activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) may be a direct target of PRMT1, and the interaction was confirmed by co‑immunoprecipitation. Compared with negative controls, the protein level of ALCAM was decreased following the silencing of PRMT1, and re‑expression of ALCAM in A375/shPRMT1 or Hs294T/shPRMT1 cells using an expression vector restored the colony formation and metastatic ability of the cells. In conclusion, the current results indicated that PRMT1 is overexpressed in human melanoma, and may regulate tumor growth and metastasis via targeting ALCAM. PMID:27175582

  19. Relevance of Rabbit VX2 Tumor Model for Studies on Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A MicroRNA-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Aravalli, Rajagopal N.; Cressman, Erik N. K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small (~22 nt), noncoding RNA molecules that have critical cellular functions in proliferation, differentiation, angiogenesis and apoptosis. miRNA expression profiling has been used to create signatures of solid tumors and, in many cases, it has been shown to correlate with the severity of the disease. The rabbit VX2 tumor model has been used widely to study a number of human cancers. Our objective in this study is to generate an miRNA signature of the VX2 tumor and to identify miRNAs that are highly expressed in this aggressive tumor. In this study, we performed miRNA profiling of the rabbit VX2 tumor using a microarray that has probes for 1292 unique miRNAs. Their expression in tumor samples was quantified and analyzed. We found that 35 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated in the VX2 tumor. Among these, 13 human miRNAs and eight members of the let-7 family were previously identified in cancers. In addition, we show that the expression of three miRNAs (miR-923, miR-1275, and miR-1308) is novel for the rabbit VX2 tumor, and their expression was not previously shown to be associated with any type of cancer. For the first time, we show the miRNA signature profile for a solid tumor in a rabbit model. miRNAs highly expressed in the VX2 tumor may serve as novel candidates for molecular biomarkers and as potential drug targets. PMID:26690234

  20. Potentiation of platinum antitumor effects in human lung tumor xenografts by the angiogenesis inhibitor squalamine: effects on tumor neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Schiller, J H; Bittner, G

    1999-12-01

    Squalamine is a novel anti-angiogenic aminosterol that is postulated to inhibit neovascularization by selectively inhibiting the sodium-hydrogen antiporter exchanger. To determine how to most effectively use this agent in patients with cancer, we examined the antitumor effects of squalamine with or without cytotoxic agents in human lung cancer xenografts and correlated these observations with the degree of tumor neovascularization. No direct cytotoxic effects of squalamine against tumor cells were observed in vitro with or without cisplatin. Squalamine was effective in inhibiting the establishment of H460 human tumors in BALBc nude mice but was ineffective in inhibiting the growth of H460, CALU-6, or NL20T-A human tumor xenografts when administered i.p. to mice bearing established tumors. However, when combined with cisplatin or carboplatin, squalamine increased tumor growth delay by > or =1.5-fold in the three human lung carcinoma cell lines compared with cisplatin or carboplatin alone. No enhancement of antitumor activity was observed when squalamine was combined with paclitaxel, vinorelbine, gemcitabine, or docetaxel. Repeated cycles of squalamine plus cisplatin administration delayed H460 tumor growth >8.6-fold. Squalamine plus cisplatin reduced CD31 vessel formation by 25% compared with controls, squalamine alone, or cisplatin alone; however, no inhibition in CD31 vessel formation was observed when squalamine was combined with vinorelbine. These data demonstrate that the combination of squalamine and a platinum analog has significant preclinical antitumor activity against human lung cancer that is related to the anti-angiogenic effects of squalamine. PMID:10632372

  1. Epigenetic silencing of Th1 type chemokines shapes tumor immunity and immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Dongjun; Kryczek, Ilona; Nagarsheth, Nisha; Zhao, Lili; Wei, Shuang; Wang, Weimin; Sun, Yuqing; Zhao, Ende; Vatan, Linda; Szeliga, Wojciech; Kotarski, Jan; Tarkowski, Rafał; Dou, Yali; Cho, Kathleen; Hensley-Alford, Sharon; Munkarah, Adnan; Liu, Rebecca; Zou, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Summary Epigenetic silencing including histone modifications and DNA methylation is an important tumorigenic mechanism1 However, its role in cancer immunopathology and immunotherapy is poorly understood. Using ovarian cancers as our model, we found that enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2)-mediated histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1-mediated DNA methylation repress the tumor production of Th1-type chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10, and subsequently determine effector T cell trafficking to the tumor microenvironment. Treatment with epigenetic modulators removes the repression and increases effector T cell tumor infiltration, slows down tumor progression, and improves therapeutic efficacy of PD-L1 (B7-H1) checkpoint blockade2–4 and adoptive T cell transfusion5 in tumor bearing mice. Moreover, tumor EZH2 and DNMT1 are negatively associated with tumor infiltrating CD8+ T cells and patient outcome. Thus, epigenetic silencing of Th1-type chemokine is a novel tumor immune evasion mechanism. Selective epigenetic reprogramming alters T cell landscape6 in cancer and may enhance clinical efficacy of cancer therapy. PMID:26503055

  2. Enhanced In Vivo Tumor Detection by Active Tumor Cell Targeting Using Multiple Tumor Receptor-Binding Peptides Presented on Genetically Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Koo Chul; Ko, Ho Kyung; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-08-01

    Human ferritin heavy-chain nanoparticle (hFTH) is genetically engineered to present tumor receptor-binding peptides (affibody and/or RGD-derived cyclic peptides, named 4CRGD here) on its surface. The affibody and 4CRGD specifically and strongly binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor I (EGFR) and human integrin αvβ3, respectively, which are overexpressed on various tumor cells. Through in vitro culture of EGFR-overexpressing adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-468) and integrin-overexpressing glioblastoma cells (U87MG), it is clarified that specific interactions between receptors on tumor cells and receptor-binding peptides on engineered hFTH is critical in active tumor cell targeting. After labeling with the near-infrared fluorescence dye (Cy5.5) and intravenouse injection into MDA-MB-468 or U87MG tumor-bearing mice, the recombinant hFTHs presenting either peptide or both of affibody and 4CRGD are successfully delivered to and retained in the tumor for a prolonged period of time. In particular, the recombinant hFTH presenting both affibody and 4CRGD notably enhances in vivo detection of U87MG tumors that express heterogeneous receptors, integrin and EGFR, compared to the other recombinant hFTHs presenting either affibody or 4CRGD only. Like affibody and 4CRGD used in this study, other multiple tumor receptor-binding peptides can be also genetically introduced to the hFTH surface for actively targeting of in vivo tumors with heterogenous receptors. PMID:27356892

  3. Micro FT-IR Characterization Of Human Lung Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Enzo; Teodori, L.; Vergamini, Piergiorgio; Trinca, M. L.; Mauro, F.; Salvati, F.; Spremolla, Giuliano

    1989-12-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy has opened up a new approach to the analytical study of cell transformation. Investigations carried out in normal and leukemic lymphocytes have evidenced an increase in DNA with respect to proteic components in neoplastic cells.(1) The evaluation of the ratio of the integrated areas(A) of the bands at 1080 cm-1 (mainly DNA) and at 1540 cm-1 (proteic components) has allowed us to establish a parameter which indicates, for values above 1.5, the neoplastic nature of cells. Recently, this approach has been applied to the study of human lung tumor cells. Several monocellular suspension procedures of the tissue fragment (mechanical and/or chemical) were tested to obtain reproducible and reliable spectra able to differentiate clearly between normal and patological cells. Chemical treatment (EDTA, Pepsin, Collagenase, etc.) produced additional bands in the spectra of the cells causing distortion of the profiles of some absorptions, and as a result, mechanical treatment was preferred. The normal and neoplastic cells homogeneously distributed by cytospin preparation on BaF2 windows were examined by means of FT-IR microscopy. An examination of several microareas of each sample yielded reproducible spectra, with values of the A 1080 cm-1 / A 1540 cm-1 parameter within a very narrow range for each sample, even if certain differences still remained among the different cases, in good agreement with the results obtained for leukemic cells.(1) The value of this parameter was found to be lower for cells isolated from the normal area of lung, than in the case of those corresponding to the tumoral area, meaning that an increase occurs in DNA with respect to the proteic components. These insights, which provide a basis to obtain indications at the molecular level, can open up new possibilities in clinical practice, in order to obtain diagnosis confirmation, to detect early stages of disease and to offer additional indications in cases of dubious interpretation.

  4. Gastric-type Endocervical Adenocarcinoma: An Aggressive Tumor With Unusual Metastatic Patterns and Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Karamurzin, Yevgeniy S; Kiyokawa, Takako; Parkash, Vinita; Jotwani, Anjali R; Patel, Prusha; Pike, Malcolm C; Soslow, Robert A; Park, Kay J

    2015-11-01

    Gastric-type adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix (GAS) is a rare variant of mucinous endocervical adenocarcinoma not etiologically associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, with minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) at the well-differentiated end of the morphologic spectrum. These tumors are reported to have worse prognosis than usual HPV associated endocervical adenocarcinoma (UEA). A retrospective review of GAS was performed from the pathology databases of 3 institutions spanning 20 years. Stage, metastatic patterns, and overall survival were documented. Forty GAS cases were identified, with clinical follow-up data available for 38. The tumors were subclassified as MDA (n=13) and non-MDA GAS (n=27). Two patients were syndromic (1 Li-Fraumeni, 1 Peutz-Jeghers). At presentation, 59% were advanced stage (FIGO II to IV), 50% had lymph node metastases, 35% had ovarian involvement, 20% had abdominal disease, 39% had at least 1 site of metastasis at the time of initial surgery, and 12% of patients experienced distant recurrence. The metastatic sites included lymph nodes, adnexa, omentum, bowel, peritoneum, diaphragm, abdominal wall, bladder, vagina, appendix, and brain. Follow-up ranged from 1.4 to 136.0 months (mean, 33.9 mo); 20/38 (52.6%) had no evidence of disease, 3/38 (7.9%) were alive with disease, and 15/38 (39.5%) died of disease. Disease-specific survival at 5 years was 42% for GAS versus 91% for UEA. There were no survival differences between MDA and non-MDA GAS. GAS represents a distinct, biologically aggressive type of endocervical adenocarcinoma. The majority of patients present at advanced stage and pelvic, abdominal, and distant metastases are not uncommon. PMID:26457350

  5. Tumor necrosis factor-beta in human pregnancy and labor.

    PubMed

    Laham, N; Van Dunné, F; Abraham, L J; Farrugia, W; Bendtzen, K; Brennecke, S P; Rice, G E

    1997-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine tumor necrosis factor-beta (TNF-beta) concentration profiles in peripheral venous plasma and amniotic fluid during pregnancy and at the time of labor and to characterise TNF-beta mRNA expression and TNF-beta release from human gestational tissues. In addition, we investigated the expression of TNF-beta binding protein, lymphotoxin-beta (LT-beta), in human gestational tissues. The mean (+/-S.E.M.) TNF-beta concentrations in maternal plasma (TIL, 78 +/- 12 pg/ml, n = 7 vs. TNIL, 304 +/- 88 pg/ml, n = 7) and amniotic fluid (TIL, 8 +/- 5 pg/ml, n = 6 vs. TNIL, 73 +/- 20 pg/ml, n = 20) were significantly (P < 0.05) decreased in association with term labor-onset (TIL) compared to term not-in-labor (TNIL). TNF-beta concentration in maternal plasma and amniotic fluid did not change significantly either with preterm labor (PIL), or during pregnancy. Group-matched comparison of maternal plasma and amniotic fluid TNF-beta concentrations demonstrated that amniotic fluid TNF-beta concentrations were 6-8 fold lower than maternal plasma TNF-beta concentrations. Furthermore, no detectable TNF-beta was secreted from cultured human amniotic, choriodecidual and placental explants. Although, TNF-beta mRNA was detected in amnion, choriodecidual and placenta, LT-beta was similarly expressed in these tissues, suggesting that TNF-beta may be cell membrane bound. These data demonstrate that TNF-beta is present at low levels within the intrauterine environment and may suggest that TNF-beta is specifically inhibited at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:9185077

  6. A core human primary tumor angiogenesis signature identifies the endothelial orphan receptor ELTD1 as a key regulator of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Masiero, Massimo; Simões, Filipa Costa; Han, Hee Dong; Snell, Cameron; Peterkin, Tessa; Bridges, Esther; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Wu, Sherry Yen-Yao; Pradeep, Sunila; Li, Demin; Han, Cheng; Dalton, Heather; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Tuynman, Jurriaan B; Mortensen, Neil; Li, Ji-Liang; Patient, Roger; Sood, Anil K; Banham, Alison H; Harris, Adrian L; Buffa, Francesca M

    2013-08-12

    Limited clinical benefits derived from anti-VEGF therapy have driven the identification of new targets involved in tumor angiogenesis. Here, we report an integrative meta-analysis to define the transcriptional program underlying angiogenesis in human cancer. This approach identified ELTD1, an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor whose expression is induced by VEGF/bFGF and repressed by DLL4 signaling. Extensive analysis of multiple cancer types demonstrates significant upregulation of ELTD1 in tumor-associated endothelial cells, with a higher expression correlating with favorable prognosis. Importantly, ELTD1 silencing impairs endothelial sprouting and vessel formation in vitro and in vivo, drastically reducing tumor growth and greatly improving survival. Collectively, these results provide insight into the regulation of tumor angiogenesis and highlight ELTD1 as key player in blood vessel formation. PMID:23871637

  7. Frequent loss of heterozygosity and altered expression of the candidate tumor suppressor gene 'FAT' in human astrocytic tumors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We had earlier used the comparison of RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) DNA fingerprinting profiles of tumor and corresponding normal DNA to identify genetic alterations in primary human glial tumors. This has the advantage that DNA fingerprinting identifies the genetic alterations in a manner not biased for locus. Methods In this study we used RAPD-PCR to identify novel genomic alterations in the astrocytic tumors of WHO grade II (Low Grade Diffuse Astrocytoma) and WHO Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the altered region was studied by microsatellite and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Expression study of the gene identified at the altered locus was done by semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Results Bands consistently altered in the RAPD profile of tumor DNA in a significant proportion of tumors were identified. One such 500 bp band, that was absent in the RAPD profile of 33% (4/12) of the grade II astrocytic tumors, was selected for further study. Its sequence corresponded with a region of FAT, a putative tumor suppressor gene initially identified in Drosophila. Fifty percent of a set of 40 tumors, both grade II and IV, were shown to have Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) at this locus by microsatellite (intragenic) and by SNP markers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed low FAT mRNA levels in a major subset of tumors. Conclusion These results point to a role of the FAT in astrocytic tumorigenesis and demonstrate the use of RAPD analysis in identifying specific alterations in astrocytic tumors. PMID:19126244

  8. Control of cellular proliferation by modulation of oxidative phosphorylation in human and rodent fast-growing tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Enriquez, Sara . E-mail: rodsar@mail.cardiologia.org.mx; Vital-Gonzalez, Paola A.; Flores-Rodriguez, Fanny L.; Marin-Hernandez, Alvaro; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Moreno-Sanchez, Rafael

    2006-09-01

    The relationship between cell proliferation and the rates of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in HeLa (human) and AS-30D (rodent) tumor cells was evaluated. In glutamine plus glucose medium, both tumor lines grew optimally. Mitochondria were the predominant source of ATP in both cell types (66-75%), despite an active glycolysis. In glucose-free medium with glutamine, proliferation of both lines diminished by 30% but oxidative phosphorylation and the cytosolic ATP level increased by 50%. In glutamine-free medium with glucose, proliferation, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP concentration diminished drastically, although the cells were viable. Oligomycin, in medium with glutamine plus glucose, abolished growth of both tumor lines, indicating an essential role of mitochondrial ATP for tumor progression. The presumed mitochondrial inhibitors rhodamines 123 and 6G, and casiopeina II-gly, inhibited tumor cell proliferation and oxidative phosphorylation, but also glycolysis. In contrast, gossypol, iodoacetate and arsenite strongly blocked glycolysis; however, they did not affect tumor proliferation or mitochondrial metabolism. Growth of both tumor lines was highly sensitive to rhodamines and casiopeina II-gly, with IC{sub 5} values for HeLa cells lower than 0.5 {mu}M, whereas viability and proliferation of human lymphocytes were not affected by these drugs (IC{sub 5} > 30 {mu}M). Moreover, rhodamine 6G and casiopeina II-gly, at micromolar doses, prolonged the survival of animals bearing i.p. implanted AS-30D hepatoma. It is concluded that fast-growing tumor cells have a predominantly oxidative type of metabolism, which might be a potential therapeutic target.

  9. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson’s two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of “two-hit inactivation” in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:22515449

  10. [Update of human tumor clonogenic assay in carcinoma of the lung].

    PubMed

    Kanzawa, F

    1985-08-01

    The human tumor clonogenic assay (HTCA) is a double-layer agar technique, which provides an in vitro prediction of the response of an individual patient's tumor to an antitumor agent. This paper briefly provides an outline of HTCA and its potential use in chemotherapy on patients with lung cancer. In our experience with culturing 123 carcinomas of the lung, 105 specimens (85%) could be subject to more than 5 chemosensitivity tests each by modifying the preparation method of single cell suspension in this system. Growth rate was improved in all types of primary human lung cancer with reasonable consistency. Further, metastatic tumors were capable of being successfully grown in a high percentage of cases, which was comparable to the results obtained for other kinds of tumors. There was no correlation of growth or cloning efficiency with histology, source, or previous chemotherapy. Using 50% or more inhibition on to colony formation as the criterion for chemosensitivity, response rates to vindesine or mitomycin C were 19% or 16%, respectively. The in vitro response rates of these or almost all other antitumor drugs seemed to be comparable to the clinical responses reported by various investigators. Correlation between in vitro chemosensitivity in HTCA and clinical response has been evaluated by various investigators, and the pooled data have demonstrated a good association between in vitro drug sensitivity and clinical response or lack of response. In lung cancer, HTCA had a 57% true positive rate and an 85% true negative rate for the prediction of drug sensitivity and resistance, respectively, of cancer patients to specific chemotherapeutic drugs. Although the system still has to undergo modification to resolve a number of theoretical and practical problems, it has potential uses in lung cancer chemotherapy. PMID:2992395

  11. Intact Cohesion, Anaphase, and Chromosome Segregation in Human Cells Harboring Tumor-Derived Mutations in STAG2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Sik; He, Xiaoyuan; Orr, Bernardo; Wutz, Gordana; Hill, Victoria; Peters, Jan-Michael; Compton, Duane A.; Waldman, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations of the cohesin complex subunit STAG2 are present in diverse tumor types. We and others have shown that STAG2 inactivation can lead to loss of sister chromatid cohesion and alterations in chromosome copy number in experimental systems. However, studies of naturally occurring human tumors have demonstrated little, if any, correlation between STAG2 mutational status and aneuploidy, and have further shown that STAG2-deficient tumors are often euploid. In an effort to provide insight into these discrepancies, here we analyze the effect of tumor-derived STAG2 mutations on the protein composition of cohesin and the expected mitotic phenotypes of STAG2 mutation. We find that many mutant STAG2 proteins retain their ability to interact with cohesin; however, the presence of mutant STAG2 resulted in a reduction in the ability of regulatory subunits WAPL, PDS5A, and PDS5B to interact with the core cohesin ring. Using AAV-mediated gene targeting, we then introduced nine tumor-derived mutations into the endogenous allele of STAG2 in cultured human cells. While all nonsense mutations led to defects in sister chromatid cohesion and a subset induced anaphase defects, missense mutations behaved like wild-type in these assays. Furthermore, only one of nine tumor-derived mutations tested induced overt alterations in chromosome counts. These data indicate that not all tumor-derived STAG2 mutations confer defects in cohesion, chromosome segregation, and ploidy, suggesting that there are likely to be other functional effects of STAG2 inactivation in human cancer cells that are relevant to cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26871722

  12. Nucleolin antagonist triggers autophagic cell death in human glioblastoma primary cells and decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model

    PubMed Central

    d'Angelo, Michele; Cristiano, Loredana; Galzio, Renato; Destouches, Damien; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Dhez, Anne Chloé; Astarita, Carlo; Cinque, Benedetta; Fidoamore, Alessia; Rosati, Floriana; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Courty, José; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Nucleolin (NCL) is highly expressed in several types of cancer and represents an interesting therapeutic target. It is expressed at the plasma membrane of tumor cells, a property which is being used as a marker for several human cancer including glioblastoma. In this study we investigated targeting NCL as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of this pathology. To explore this possibility, we studied the effect of an antagonist of NCL, the multivalent pseudopeptide N6L using primary culture of human glioblastoma cells. In this system, N6L inhibits cell growth with different sensitivity depending to NCL localization. Cell cycle analysis indicated that N6L-induced growth reduction was due to a block of the G1/S transition with down-regulation of the expression of cyclin D1 and B2. By monitoring autophagy markers such as p62 and LC3II, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced after N6L treatment. In addition, N6L-treatment of mice bearing tumor decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model and increase mice survival. The results obtained indicated an anti-proliferative and pro-autophagic effect of N6L and point towards its possible use as adjuvant agent to the standard therapeutic protocols presently utilized for glioblastoma. PMID:26540346

  13. Nucleolin antagonist triggers autophagic cell death in human glioblastoma primary cells and decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Elisabetta; Antonosante, Andrea; d'Angelo, Michele; Cristiano, Loredana; Galzio, Renato; Destouches, Damien; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Dhez, Anne Chloé; Astarita, Carlo; Cinque, Benedetta; Fidoamore, Alessia; Rosati, Floriana; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Courty, José; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-12-01

    Nucleolin (NCL) is highly expressed in several types of cancer and represents an interesting therapeutic target. It is expressed at the plasma membrane of tumor cells, a property which is being used as a marker for several human cancer including glioblastoma. In this study we investigated targeting NCL as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of this pathology. To explore this possibility, we studied the effect of an antagonist of NCL, the multivalent pseudopeptide N6L using primary culture of human glioblastoma cells. In this system, N6L inhibits cell growth with different sensitivity depending to NCL localization. Cell cycle analysis indicated that N6L-induced growth reduction was due to a block of the G1/S transition with down-regulation of the expression of cyclin D1 and B2. By monitoring autophagy markers such as p62 and LC3II, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced after N6L treatment. In addition, N6L-treatment of mice bearing tumor decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model and increase mice survival. The results obtained indicated an anti-proliferative and pro-autophagic effect of N6L and point towards its possible use as adjuvant agent to the standard therapeutic protocols presently utilized for glioblastoma. PMID:26540346

  14. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) inhibits human colon tumor growth by promoting apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuguang; Li, Bingji; Liu, Jie; He, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has recently been suggested in several epithelial cancers, either pro-tumor or anti-tumor. However, the role of TSLP in colon cancer remains unknown. We here found significantly decreased TSLP levels in tumor tissues compared with tumor-surrounding tissues of patients with colon cancer and TSLP levels negatively correlated with the clinical staging score of colon cancer. TSLPR, the receptor of TSLP, was expressed in all three colon cancer cell lines investigated and colon tumor tissues. The addition of TSLP significantly enhanced apoptosis of colon cancer cells in a TSLPR-dependent manner. Interestingly, TSLP selectively induced the apoptosis of colon cancer cells, but not normal colonic epithelial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TSLP induced JNK and p38 activation and initiated apoptosis mainly through the extrinsic pathway, as caspase-8 inhibitor significantly reversed the apoptosis-promoting effect of TSLP. Finally, using a xenograft mouse model, we demonstrated that peritumoral administration of TSLP greatly reduced tumor growth accompanied with extensive tumor apoptotic response, which was abolished by tumor cell-specific knockdown of TSLPR. Collectively, our study reveals a novel anti-tumor effect of TSLP via direct promotion of the apoptosis of colon cancer cells, and suggests that TSLP could be of value in treating colon cancer. PMID:26919238

  15. Multiple metastases from histologically benign intraarticular diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Asano, Naofumi; Yoshida, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Eisuke; Yamaguchi, Takehiko; Kawai, Akira

    2014-11-01

    Diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumor (D-TGCT) is a relatively rare mesenchymal tumor. It is a locally aggressive but virtually nonmetastasizing neoplasm and thus regarded as benign. Only a few D-TGCTs with benign histology have been reported to metastasize. We report an extremely rare case of benign D-TGCT in which multiple metastases developed 9 years after surgery for the primary tumor. The present case suggests that conventional D-TGCT has the potential to form distant metastases, albeit exceptionally rarely, and that this probable implantation phenomenon can be managed conservatively. PMID:25130396

  16. Important miRs of Pathways in Different Tumor Types

    PubMed Central

    Wuchty, Stefan; Arjona, Dolores; Bauer, Peter O.

    2013-01-01

    We computationally determined miRs that are significantly connected to molecular pathways by utilizing gene expression profiles in different cancer types such as glioblastomas, ovarian and breast cancers. Specifically, we assumed that the knowledge of physical interactions between miRs and genes indicated subsets of important miRs (IM) that significantly contributed to the regression of pathway-specific enrichment scores. Despite the different nature of the considered cancer types, we found strongly overlapping sets of IMs. Furthermore, IMs that were important for many pathways were enriched with literature-curated cancer and differentially expressed miRs. Such sets of IMs also coincided well with clusters of miRs that were experimentally indicated in numerous other cancer types. In particular, we focused on an overlapping set of 99 overall important miRs (OIM) that were found in glioblastomas, ovarian and breast cancers simultaneously. Notably, we observed that interactions between OIMs and leading edge genes of differentially expressed pathways were characterized by considerable changes in their expression correlations. Such gains/losses of miR and gene expression correlation indicated miR/gene pairs that may play a causal role in the underlying cancers. PMID:23358700

  17. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fecher, David; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Buck, Andreas; Bundschuh, Ralph; Nietzer, Sarah; Dandekar, Gudrun; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Lückerath, Katharina; Steinke, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and –testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future. PMID:27501455

  18. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fecher, David; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Buck, Andreas; Bundschuh, Ralph; Nietzer, Sarah; Dandekar, Gudrun; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Lückerath, Katharina; Steinke, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and -testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future. PMID:27501455

  19. Fibroblasts—a key host cell type in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Strell, Carina; Rundqvist, Helene

    2012-01-01

    Tumor initiation, growth, invasion, and metastasis occur as a consequence of a complex interplay between the host environment and cancer cells. Fibroblasts are now recognized as a key host cell type involved in host–cancer signaling. This review discusses some recent studies that highlight the roles of fibroblasts in tumor initiation, early progression, invasion, and metastasis. Some clinical studies describing the prognostic significance of fibroblast-derived markers and signatures are also discussed. PMID:22509805

  20. Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor in Human Acute Cardiac Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Arbustini, Eloisa; Grasso, Maurizia; Diegoli, Marta; Bramerio, Manuela; Foglieni, Andrea Scotti; Albertario, Marco; Martinelli, Luigi; Gavazzi, Antonello; Goggi, Claudio; Campana, Carlo; Vigano, Mario

    1991-01-01

    The authors performed an immunohistochemical study on expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) in endomyocardial biopsies from human cardiac allografts. TNFα immunoreactivity was found in 45% biopsies with mild acute rejection, in 83% biopsies with focal moderate rejection, in 80% biopsies with diffuse moderate rejection. Biopsies with absent rejection did not show immunoreactive cells. In mild rejection, positive cells were few and scanty monocytes and macrophages (MAC-387 and LN5 positive cells) and T lymphocytes (UCHL-1/CD45 RO positive cells) (up to 20% of all infiltrating cells). Expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens on infiltrating and endothelial cells occurred earlier and independent of TNFα reactivity. Number of immunoreactive cells increased in moderate rejection (up to 50%). Immunoreactivity was also present in nonpigmented macrophages in part of the biopsies with resolving rejection (45%). The authors conclude that TNFα is expressed in acute cardiac rejection by immunologically activated inflammatory cells. Immunoreactive cells increase in number with increasing severity of the reaction. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:1928295

  1. Functional involvement of human discs large tumor suppressor in cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Unno, Kenji; Hanada, Toshihiko; Chishti, Athar H.

    2008-10-15

    Cytokinesis is the final step of cell division that completes the separation of two daughter cells. We found that the human discs large (hDlg) tumor suppressor homologue is functionally involved in cytokinesis. The guanylate kinase (GUK) domain of hDlg mediates the localization of hDlg to the midbody during cytokinesis, and over-expression of the GUK domain in U2OS and HeLa cells impaired cytokinesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from dlg mutant mice contained an increased number of multinucleated cells and showed reduced proliferation in culture. A kinesin-like motor protein, GAKIN, which binds directly to the GUK domain of hDlg, exhibited a similar intracellular distribution pattern with hDlg throughout mitosis and localized to the midbody during cytokinesis. However, the targeting of hDlg and GAKIN to the midbody appeared to be independent of each other. The midbody localization of GAKIN required its functional kinesin-motor domain. Treatment of cells with the siRNA specific for hDlg and GAKIN caused formation of multinucleated cells and delayed cytokinesis. Together, these results suggest that hDlg and GAKIN play functional roles in the maintenance of midbody architecture during cytokinesis.

  2. Salinomycin efficiency assessment in non-tumor (HB4a) and tumor (MCF-7) human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Andressa Megumi; D Epiro, Gláucia Fernanda Rocha; Marques, Lilian Areal; Semprebon, Simone Cristine; Sartori, Daniele; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    The search for anticancer drugs has led researchers to study salinomycin, an ionophore antibiotic that selectively destroys cancer stem cells. In this study, salinomycin was assessed in two human cell lines, a breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and a non-tumor breast cell line (HB4a), to verify its selective action against tumor cells. Real-time assessment of cell proliferation showed that HB4a cells are more resistant to salinomycin than MCF-7 tumor cell line, and these data were confirmed in a cytotoxicity assay. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values show the increased sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to salinomycin. In the comet assay, only MCF-7 cells showed the induction of DNA damage. Flow cytometric analysis showed that cell death by apoptosis/necrosis was only induced in the MCF-7 cells. The increased expression of GADD45A and CDKN1A genes was observed in all cell lines. Decreased expression of CCNA2 and CCNB1 genes occurred only in tumor cells, suggesting G2/M cell cycle arrest. Consequently, cell death was activated in tumor cells through strong inhibition of the antiapoptotic genes BCL-2, BCL-XL, and BIRC5 genes in MCF-7 cells. These data demonstrate the selectivity of salinomycin in killing human mammary tumor cells. The cell death observed only in MCF-7 tumor cells was confirmed by gene expression analysis, where there was downregulation of antiapoptotic genes. These data contribute to clarifying the mechanism of action of salinomycin as a promising antitumor drug and, for the first time, we observed the higher resistance of HB4a non-tumor breast cells to salinomycin. PMID:26932586

  3. Tightly bound zinc in human immunodeficiency virus type 1, human T-cell leukemia virus type I, and other retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Bess, J W; Powell, P J; Issaq, H J; Schumack, L J; Grimes, M K; Henderson, L E; Arthur, L O

    1992-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) were purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation in the presence of 1 mM EDTA. Pelleted gradient fractions were analyzed for total protein, total Gag capsid protein, and total zinc. Zinc was found to copurify and concentrate with the virus particles. Through successive cycles of resuspending in buffer containing EDTA and repelleting, the zinc content remained constant at about 1.7 mol of zinc per mol of Gag protein. Proteins from purified virus (HIV-1 and HTLV-I) were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, blotted to polyvinylidene fluoride paper, and probed with 65ZnCl2. Viral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins (HIV-1 p7NC and HTLV-I p15NC) bound 65Zn2+. Other retroviruses, including simian immunodeficiency virus, equine infectious anemia virus, bovine leukemia virus, Moloney murine leukemia virus, mouse mammary tumor virus, and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, were found to contain amounts of zinc per milligram of total protein similar to those found in HIV-1 and HTLV-I. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that retroviral NC proteins function as zinc finger proteins in mature viruses. Images PMID:1731111

  4. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  5. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  6. Mutation analysis of large tumor suppressor genes LATS1 and LATS2 supports a tumor suppressor role in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian; Bachman, John; Lai, Zhi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, human cancer genome projects provide unprecedented opportunities for the discovery of cancer genes and signaling pathways that contribute to tumor development. While numerous gene mutations can be identified from each cancer genome, what these mutations mean for cancer is a challenging question to address, especially for those from less understood putative new cancer genes. As a powerful approach, in silico bioinformatics analysis could efficiently sort out mutations that are predicted to damage gene function. Such an analysis of human large tumor suppressor genes, LATS1 and LATS2, has been carried out and the results support a role of hLATS1//2 as negative growth regulators and tumor suppressors. PMID:25482410

  7. Urokinase and type I plasminogen activator inhibitor production by normal human hepatocytes: modulation by inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Busso, N; Nicodeme, E; Chesne, C; Guillouzo, A; Belin, D; Hyafil, F

    1994-07-01

    We examined the effects of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and transforming growth factor-beta) on the plasminogen activator system (urokinase, tissue-type plasminogen activator, type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor) in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. We show that interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha increase urokinase-type plasminogen activator production, reinforcing the concept that increased urokinase production is associated with inflammatory processes. By contrast, the same agents (i.e., interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) do not stimulate plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 production. This latter observation rules out hepatocytes as a major cellular source of plasmatic plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 during acute-phase-related responses. Among the inflammatory agents used, transforming growth factor-beta was found to be the most effective modulator of both urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, inducing severalfold increases of activity of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, antigen and the corresponding mRNA and increasing plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 antigen and mRNA levels. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 modulation by transforming growth factor-beta may play a critical role in hepatic pathophysiology. PMID:8020888

  8. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C.; Heth, Jason A.; Maher, Cormac O.; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D.; Freudiger, Christian W.; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a non-destructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. Here we show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ=0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density and protein:lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density and protein:lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Importantly, quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26468325

  9. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C; Heth, Jason A; Maher, Cormac O; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D; Freudiger, Christian W; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A

    2015-10-14

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a nondestructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. We show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ = 0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26468325

  10. Characterization of NADPH oxidase 5 expression in human tumors and tumor cell lines with a novel mouse monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Smitha; Wu, Yongzhong; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Anver, Miriam R.; Butcher, Donna; Jiang, Guojian; Meitzler, Jennifer L.; Liu, Han; Juhasz, Agnes; Lu, Jiamo; Roy, Krishnendu K.; Doroshow, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species generated by NADPH oxidase 5 (Nox5) have been implicated in physiological and pathophysiological signaling pathways, including cancer development and progression. However, because immunological tools are lacking, knowledge of the role of Nox5 in tumor biology has been limited; the expression of Nox5 protein across tumors and normal tissues is essentially unknown. Here, we report the characterization and use of a mouse monoclonal antibody against a recombinant Nox5 protein (600–746) for expression profiling of Nox5 in human tumors by tissue microarray analysis. Using our novel antibody, we also report the detection of endogenous Nox5 protein in human UACC-257 melanoma cells. Immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, and immunohistochemical techniques were employed to demonstrate Nox5 localization throughout UACC-257 cells, with perinuclear enhancement. Tissue microarray analysis revealed, for the first time, substantial Nox5 overexpression in several human cancers including those of prostate, breast, colon, lung, brain, and ovary as well as in malignant melanoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma; expression in most non-malignant tissues was negative to weak. This validated mouse monoclonal antibody will promote further exploration of the functional significance of Nox5 in human pathophysiology, including tumor cell growth and proliferation. PMID:23851018

  11. Dynamic holographic endoscopy--ex vivo investigations of malignant tumors in the human stomach.

    PubMed

    Avenhaus, Wolfgang; Kemper, Björn; Knoche, Sabine; Domagk, Dirk; Poremba, Christopher; von Bally, Gert; Domschke, Wolfram

    2005-01-01

    Laser holographic interferometry is based on the superimposition of the holograms of different motional states of an object on a single holographic storing medium. Using a combination of holographic interferometry and endoscopic imaging, we tried to detect areas of focally disturbed tissue elasticity in gastric cancer preparations. By connecting a mobile electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) camera system (light source: double frequency Nd:YAG laser, lambda = 532 nm) to different types of endoscopes, ex vivo experiments were performed on ten formalin fixed human stomachs, nine containing adenocarcinomas and one with a gastric lymphoma. Linking the endoscopic ESPI camera complex to a fast image processing system, the method of double pulse exposure image subtraction was applied at a video frame rate of 12.5 Hz. Speckle correlation patterns and corresponding phase difference distributions resulting from gastric wall deformation by gentle touch with a guide wire were analyzed. Tumor-free gastric areas showed high-contrast concentric fringes around the point of stimulation. In contrast, fringe patterns and filtered phase difference distributions corresponding to the areas of malignancy in all the cases were characterized by largely parallel lines, indicating that stimulation of rigid tumor tissue primarily led to tilting. Our ex vivo investigations of malignant gastric tumors show that the application of dynamic holographic endoscopy makes it possible to distinguish areas of malignancy from surrounding healthy tissue based on the differences in tissue elasticity. PMID:15726298

  12. Effector T cell subclasses associate with tumor burden in neurofibromatosis type 1 patients.

    PubMed

    Farschtschi, Said; Park, Su-Jin; Sawitzki, Birgit; Oh, Su-Jun; Kluwe, Lan; Mautner, Victor F; Kurtz, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a hereditary tumor syndrome caused by mutations of the NF1 gene and resulting dysregulation of the Ras-pathway. In addition to peripheral nerve tumors, affected tissues include the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular system. The immune system has recently been suggested as a possible modulator NF1-related phenotypes. Therefore, we determined the immune phenotype in NF1 patients and investigated its relationship with the phenotypic severity of NF1-related tumor manifestations. We quantified global leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations of peripheral blood from 37 NF1 patients and 21 healthy controls by flow cytometry. To associate immune phenotype with tumor phenotype, all NF1 patients underwent whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and total internal tumor volume was calculated. The immunophenotypes were compared among four NF1 groups with different total internal tumor burdens and between NF1 patients and non-NF1 subjects. We found that NF1 patients show a generalized lymphopenia. Closer analysis revealed that the CD8(+)/CD27(-) and CD8(+)/CD57(+) effector T cell fractions strongly increase in NF1 patients with low tumor load and decrease to levels below control in patients with high tumor load. Moreover, increased production of IL2, IFN-γ and TNF-α was found in T cells of NF1 patients upon phorbol-12-myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation compared to healthy controls. The data indicate that decreasing CD8(+)/CD57(+) and CD27(-) T cell fractions correspond to increasing tumor load in NF1 patients, potentially making these populations useful marker for internal tumor burden. PMID:27448806

  13. Steroid Tumor Environment in Male and Female Mice Model of Canine and Human Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; Silvan, Gema; Illera, Maria J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Reuben, James M.; Illera, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares clinical and histopathological characteristics with human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and has been proposed as a good model for studying the human disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of female and male mice to reproduce IMC and IBC tumors and identify the hormonal tumor environment. To perform the study sixty 6–8-week-old male and female mice were inoculated subcutaneously with a suspension of 106IPC-366 and SUM149 cells. Tumors and serum were collected and used for hormonal analysis. Results revealed that IPC-366 reproduced tumors in 90% of males inoculated after 2 weeks compared with 100% of females that reproduced tumor at the same time. SUM149 reproduced tumors in 40% of males instead of 80% of females that reproduced tumors after 4 weeks. Both cell lines produce distant metastasis in lungs being higher than the metastatic rates in females. EIA analysis revealed that male tumors had higher T and SO4E1 concentrations compared to female tumors. Serum steroid levels were lower than those found in tumors. In conclusion, IBC and IMC male mouse model is useful as a tool for IBC research and those circulating estrogens and intratumoral hormonal levels are crucial in the development and progression of tumors. PMID:27195300

  14. Steroid Tumor Environment in Male and Female Mice Model of Canine and Human Inflammatory Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; Silvan, Gema; Illera, Maria J; Woodward, Wendy A; Reuben, James M; Illera, Juan C

    2016-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares clinical and histopathological characteristics with human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and has been proposed as a good model for studying the human disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of female and male mice to reproduce IMC and IBC tumors and identify the hormonal tumor environment. To perform the study sixty 6-8-week-old male and female mice were inoculated subcutaneously with a suspension of 10(6)IPC-366 and SUM149 cells. Tumors and serum were collected and used for hormonal analysis. Results revealed that IPC-366 reproduced tumors in 90% of males inoculated after 2 weeks compared with 100% of females that reproduced tumor at the same time. SUM149 reproduced tumors in 40% of males instead of 80% of females that reproduced tumors after 4 weeks. Both cell lines produce distant metastasis in lungs being higher than the metastatic rates in females. EIA analysis revealed that male tumors had higher T and SO4E1 concentrations compared to female tumors. Serum steroid levels were lower than those found in tumors. In conclusion, IBC and IMC male mouse model is useful as a tool for IBC research and those circulating estrogens and intratumoral hormonal levels are crucial in the development and progression of tumors. PMID:27195300

  15. Ambient mass spectrometry for the intraoperative molecular diagnosis of human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Eberlin, Livia S; Norton, Isaiah; Orringer, Daniel; Dunn, Ian F; Liu, Xiaohui; Ide, Jennifer L; Jarmusch, Alan K; Ligon, Keith L; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Golby, Alexandra J; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y R; Cooks, R Graham

    2013-01-29

    The main goal of brain tumor surgery is to maximize tumor resection while preserving brain function. However, existing imaging and surgical techniques do not offer the molecular information needed to delineate tumor boundaries. We have developed a system to rapidly analyze and classify brain tumors based on lipid information acquired by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). In this study, a classifier was built to discriminate gliomas and meningiomas based on 36 glioma and 19 meningioma samples. The classifier was tested and results were validated for intraoperative use by analyzing and diagnosing tissue sections from 32 surgical specimens obtained from five research subjects who underwent brain tumor resection. The samples analyzed included oligodendroglioma, astrocytoma, and meningioma tumors of different histological grades and tumor cell concentrations. The molecular diagnosis derived from mass-spectrometry imaging corresponded to histopathology diagnosis with very few exceptions. Our work demonstrates that DESI-MS technology has the potential to identify the histology type of brain tumors. It provides information on glioma grade and, most importantly, may help define tumor margins by measuring the tumor cell concentration in a specimen. Results for stereotactically registered samples were correlated to preoperative MRI through neuronavigation, and visualized over segmented 3D MRI tumor volume reconstruction. Our findings demonstrate the potential of ambient mass spectrometry to guide brain tumor surgery by providing rapid diagnosis, and tumor margin assessment in near-real time. PMID:23300285

  16. Human tumor-derived genomic DNA transduced into a recipient cell induces tumor-specific immune responses ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Theresa L.; Gambotto, Andrea; Albers, Andreas; Stanson, Joanna; Cohen, Edward P.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a DNA-based vaccination strategy evaluated ex vivo with human cells. The vaccine was prepared by transferring tumor-derived genomic DNA to PCI-13 cells, a highly immunogenic tumor cell line (“recipient cell”), which had been genetically modified to secrete IL-2 (PCI-13/IL-2). PCI-13 cells expressed class I MHC determinants (HLA-A2) shared with the tumor from which the DNA was obtained as well as allogeneic determinants. DNA from a gp100+ melanoma cell line was transduced into gp100− PCI-13/IL-2 cells (PCI-13/IL-2/DNA). A T cell line specific for the gp100 epitope responded to PCI-13/IL-2/DNA cells by IFN-γ-secretion measured in enzyme-linked immunospot assays. The T cell line also recognized the gp100 epitope presented by dendritic cells that ingested PCI-13/IL-2/DNA cells, which had been induced by UVB irradiation to undergo apoptosis. After up-take and processing of apoptotic PCI-13/IL-2/DNA cells, the dendritic cells primed normal peripheral blood lymphocytes to generate effector T cells specific for the tumor donating the DNA. The results indicate that tumor epitopes encoded in such DNA are expressed in recipient cells and can induce tumor-specific T cells. The findings support translation of this vaccination strategy to a phase I trial in patients with cancer. PMID:12080146

  17. Accessing key steps of human tumor progression in vivo by using an avian embryo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Martin; Javerzat, Sophie; Gilges, Delphine; Meyre, Aurélie; de Lafarge, Benjamin; Eichmann, Anne; Bikfalvi, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    Experimental in vivo tumor models are essential for comprehending the dynamic process of human cancer progression, identifying therapeutic targets, and evaluating antitumor drugs. However, current rodent models are limited by high costs, long experimental duration, variability, restricted accessibility to the tumor, and major ethical concerns. To avoid these shortcomings, we investigated whether tumor growth on the chick chorio-allantoic membrane after human glioblastoma cell grafting would replicate characteristics of the human disease. Avascular tumors consistently formed within 2 days, then progressed through vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-dependent angiogenesis, associated with hemorrhage, necrosis, and peritumoral edema. Blocking of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling pathways by using small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors abrogated tumor development. Gene regulation during the angiogenic switch was analyzed by oligonucleotide microarrays. Defined sample selection for gene profiling permitted identification of regulated genes whose functions are associated mainly with tumor vascularization and growth. Furthermore, expression of known tumor progression genes identified in the screen (IL-6 and cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61) as well as potential regulators (lumican and F-box-only 6) follow similar patterns in patient glioma. The model reliably simulates key features of human glioma growth in a few days and thus could considerably increase the speed and efficacy of research on human tumor progression and preclinical drug screening. angiogenesis | animal model alternatives | glioblastoma

  18. Growth promoting effect of recombinant interleukin I and tumor necrosis factor for human astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Giulian, D.; Dinarello, C.A.; Brown, D.C.; Lachman, L.B.

    1986-03-01

    Human IL I has been demonstrated to stimulate the growth of rat astrocytes in vitro. To determine if IL I has a similar growth promoting effect upon human brain cells, two astrocytoma cell lines were tested for their ability to incorporate /sup 3/H-thymidine in response to various types of IL I and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). The U373 astrocytoma was found to respond mitogenically to human native IL I, human recombinant IL I, rat IL I and murine recombinant IL I. The cell line failed to respond to recombinant IL 2 and recombinant ..cap alpha.. and ..gamma.. interferon. The sensitivity of the U373 cells paralleled the murine thymocyte assay for IL I. Interestingly, the U373 responded mitogenically to recombinant TNF prepared by two different companies, thus indicating that TNF stimulates proliferation of this cell line and does not lead to cell death. In the murine thymocyte assay for IL I, TNF was not active. The results indicate that 1) both IL I and TNF are mitogenic for a human astrocytoma cell line and 2) the U373 cells may be used to assay both IL I and TNF in a highly sensitive mitogenic assay.

  19. Activation of human papillomavirus type 18 gene expression by herpes simplex virus type 1 viral transactivators and a phorbol ester

    SciTech Connect

    Gius, D.; Laimins, L.A.

    1989-02-01

    Several viral trans-activators and a tumor promoter were examined for the ability to activate human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) gene expression. A plasmid containing the HPV-18 noncoding region placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene was cotransfected with different herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) genes into several cell lines. Both HSV-1 TIF and ICPO activated HPV-18 expression; however, activation by TIF was observed only in epithelial cells, while ICPO stimulated expression in a wide variety of cells. The element activated by both TIF and ICOP was mapped to a 229-base-pair fragment which also contains an HPV-18 epithelial cell-preferred enhancer. The inclusion of a papillomavirus E2 trans-activator with TIF and ICOP further increased HPV-18 expression. In contrast, the HSV-1 ICP4 and ICP27 genes, as well as the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tat genes, were found to have no effect on HPV-18 expression. In transient assays, the addition of the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) also activated HPV-18 expression. The region of HPV-18 activated by TPA was localized to a sequence which is homologous to other TPA-responsive elements.

  20. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor in Neurofibromatosis Type I : Unusual Presentation of Intraabdominal or Intrathoracic Mass

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Gwang; Sung, Woo Jin; Kim, Dong Hwan; Kim, Young Hwan; Lee, Kyu Bo

    2005-01-01

    A malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is an extremely rare soft tissue tumor in the general population. On the other hand, there is a higher incidence of MPNST in patients with neurofibromatosis type I (von Recklinghausen's disease). The common sites are the extremities, trunk, head and neck. However, an intraabdominal or intrathoracic manifestation is uncommon. This paper reports two patients, a 31 year-old woman with multiple neurofibromatosis presenting as an intraabdominal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and a 33 year-old woman with an intrathoracic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The patients were treated with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. However, one patient died as a result of disease progression 21 months after the diagnosis and the other patient is currently being treated with radiotherapy. PMID:15906964

  1. Primary Pulmonary Salivary Gland-type Tumors: A Review and Update.

    PubMed

    Falk, Nadja; Weissferdt, Annikka; Kalhor, Neda; Moran, Cesar A

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary salivary gland-type tumors (SGT) comprise a very small proportion of primary lung neoplasms. The most common tumors among this group are mucoepidermoid carcinoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma. Contrary to the head and neck region, benign SGT such as pleomorphic adenomas are exceedingly rare in the pulmonary system. More recently, 2 additional SGT, namely hyalinizing clear cell carcinoma and salivary duct-like carcinoma were recognized as primary lung tumors expanding the spectrum of SGT that have been described to originate in the tracheobronchial system. Primary pulmonary SGT must be clinically excluded from metastatic salivary gland neoplasms as their morphology is indistinguishable from that of their salivary gland counterparts. Little is known about the clinical behavior and best treatment approach for these unusual tumors. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of primary pulmonary SGT with particular emphasis on morphologic characteristics and latest developments in terms of immunohistochemical and molecular techniques. PMID:26645458

  2. Variation of uptake of anti-CEA monoclonal antibody with tumor type and mass

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.E.; Philben, V.J.; Jakowatz, J.G.; Beatty, B.G.; Vlahos, W.G.; Paxton, R.J.; Shively, J.E.; Beatty, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    A nude mouse model xenografted with 3 human tumor (T) was studied with an anti-carcinoembryonic (..cap alpha..-CEA) monoclonal antibody (MoAb). The MoAb was labeled with In-111 using a bi-functional chelation technique. In vitro cross-reactivity with human blood (B) and liver (L) cells was minimal. Human colon tumors were WIDR, SW403 an LS174T. The murine carcinoma EMT6 was used as a control. In all cases only 62.5 ngm of ..cap alpha..-CEA charged at 10 ..mu..Ci/..mu..gm was given to each animal. The corresponding value in humans, 200 ..mu..gm, is probably subimmunogenic. Organ distribution in percent injected dose/gm (% ID/gm) and images were obtained at 48 h post-injection of the MoAb. CEA levels (mgm/gm of T) were measured for each tumor using the same MoAb (T 84.66). Variation of % ID/gm with LS174T mass (m) was also determined. Uptake by EMT6 was 2.4 +- 0.2 % ID/gm. LS174T uptake varied approximately as the inverse of tumor mass. The authors conclude that tumor accumulation of ..cap alpha..-CEA MoAb is not directly correlated with the amount of CEA in the lesion. The best uptake, T/B and T/L values occurred with LS174T; this was also borne out by the 48 h images. Because of the smaller average SW403 mass, this result cannot readily be explained as a tumor size effect.

  3. Amblyomin-X induces ER stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and caspase activation in human melanoma and pancreatic tumor cell.

    PubMed

    Morais, Katia L P; Pacheco, Mario Thiego Fernandes; Berra, Carolina Maria; Bosch, Rosemary V; Sciani, Juliana Mozer; Chammas, Roger; de Freitas Saito, Renata; Iqbal, Asif; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana Marisa

    2016-04-01

    During the last two decades, new insights into proteasome function and its role in several human diseases made it a potential therapeutic target. In this context, Amblyomin-X is a Kunitz-type FXa inhibitor similar to endogenous tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and is a novel proteasome inhibitor. Herein, we have demonstrated Amblyomin-X cytotoxicity to different tumor cells lines such as pancreatic (Panc1, AsPC1BxPC3) and melanoma (SK-MEL-5 and SK-MEL-28). Of note, Amblyomin-X was not cytotoxic to normal human fibroblast cells. In addition, Amblyomin-X promoted accumulation of ER stress markers (GRP78 and GADD153) in sensitive (SK-MEL-28) and bortezomib-resistant (Mia-PaCa-2) tumor cells. The intracellular calcium concentration [Ca(2+)] i was slightly modulated in human tumor cells (SK-MEL-28 and Mia-PaCa-2) after 24 h of Amblyomin-X treatment. Furthermore, Amblyomin-X induced mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome-c release, PARP cleavage, and activation of caspase cascade in both human tumor (SK-MEL-28 and Mia-PaCa-2) cells. These investigations might help in further understanding of the antitumor properties of Amblyomin-X. PMID:27015684

  4. Potentiation of a tumor cell susceptibility to autologous CTL killing by restoration of wild-type p53 function.

    PubMed

    Thiery, Jérôme; Dorothée, Guillaume; Haddada, Hedi; Echchakir, Hamid; Richon, Catherine; Stancou, Rodica; Vergnon, Isabelle; Benard, Jean; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Chouaib, Salem

    2003-06-15

    Inactivation of p53 has been implicated in many types of tumors particularly in non-small cell lung carcinoma, one of the most common cancers in which p53 mutation has been frequently identified. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of p53 status on the regulation of tumor susceptibility to specific CTL-mediated cell death. For this purpose, we used a cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone, Heu127, able to lyse the human autologous lung carcinoma cell line, IGR-Heu, in a HLA-A2-restricted manner. Direct genomic DNA sequencing revealed that IGR-Heu expresses a mutated p53 at codon 132 of the exon 5 which results in the loss of p53 capacity to induce the expression of the p53-regulated gene product p21(waf/CIP1). Initial experiments demonstrated that IGR-Heu was resistant to Fas, TNF, and TRAIL apoptotic pathways. This correlated with the lack of p55 TNFRI, Fas, DR4, and DR5 expression. The effect of wild-type (wt) p53 restoration on the sensitization of IGR-Heu to autologous CTL clone lysis was investigated following infection of the tumor cell line with a recombinant adenovirus encoding the wt p53 (Adwtp53). We demonstrate that the restoration of wt p53 expression and function resulted in a significant potentiation of target cell susceptibility to CTL-mediated lysis. The wt p53-induced optimization of tumor cell killing by specific CTL involves at least in part Fas-mediated pathway via induction of CD95 expression by tumor cells but does not appear to interfere with granzyme B cytotoxic pathway. PMID:12794118

  5. Variation in KRAS driver substitution distributions between tumor types is determined by both mutation and natural selection

    PubMed Central

    Ostrow, Sheli L.; Simon, Einav; Prinz, Elad; Bick, Tova; Shentzer, Talia; Nagawkar, Sima S.; Sabo, Edmond; Ben-Izhak, Ofer; Hershberg, Ruth; Hershkovitz, Dov

    2016-01-01

    Different tumor types vary greatly in their distribution of driver substitutions. Here, we analyzed how mutation and natural selection contribute to differences in the distribution of KRAS driver substitutions between lung, colon and pancreatic adenocarcinomas. We were able to demonstrate that both differences in mutation and differences in selection drive variation in the distribution of KRAS driver substitutions between tumor types. By accounting for the effects of mutation on the distribution of KRAS driver substitutions, we could identify specific KRAS driver substitutions that are more favored by selection in specific tumor types. Such driver substitutions likely improve fitness most when they occur within the context of the tumor type in which they are preferentially favored. Fitting with this, we found that driver substitutions that are more favored by natural selection in a specific type of tumor tend to associate with worse clinical outcomes specifically in that type of tumor. PMID:26902163

  6. More than 97% of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) was found with chrysotile asbestos & relatively smooth round tumor outline, and less than 3% was found with HPV-18 and tremolite asbestos & irregular sawtooth-like zigzag outline in breast cancer tissues in over 500 mammograms of female patients: their implications in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Jones, Marilyn K; Nihrane, Abdallah; Duvvi, Harsha; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu

    2013-01-01

    In the past, Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV-16) was considered to be the main cause of cancer in the oropharynx and genital organs. Cervical cancer of the uterus is the most well-known cancer associated with HPV-16. Among the oncogenic HPVs, types 16 and 18 are most responsible for the majority of the HPV-caused cancers. Recently, using EMF Resonance Phenomenon between 2 identical substances, we non-invasively measured HPV-16 and HPV-18 among 25 physicians and 25 dentists and found that all 50 have HPV-16 in oral cavities and oropharynx but not HPV-18. However most dentists have a stronger infection than physicians. Among them were 2 female dentists with breast cancer containing HPV-16 and strong infections of HPV-16 in the oral cavities and oropharynx. When the author checked their breast cancer positive areas as well as the mammograms of cancer positive areas, Chrysotile Asbestos co-existed with an infection of HPV-16. We then examined over 500 published mammograms of women with malignant breast cancer published by other institutes, and we found HPV-16 in more than 97% and HPV-18 in less than 3% of the breast cancer mammograms examined. Less than 0.4% of cases were found as a variety of combination of HPV-16 & HPV-18. We also discovered that breast cancer with HPV-16 always co-exists with increased Chrysotile Asbestos deposits, and the outline of the breast cancer positive area is a relatively smooth and round or oval shape, and breast cancer with HPV-18 always co-exists with increased Tremolite Asbestos, where the tumor outline is an irregular saw-tooth like zigzag pattern. Based on these findings, better methods of diagnosis, treatment and prevention with a vaccine can be developed. PMID:24494324

  7. Activation of proto-oncogenes in human and mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Anderson, M.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in several nations. Epidemiological studies have indicated that 85% of all lung cancer deaths and 30% of all cancer deaths in the US are associated with tobacco smoking. Various chemicals in tobacco smoke are thought to react with DNA and to ultimately yield heritable mutations. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung tumorigenesis, the authors have analyzed proto-oncogene activation in a series of human lung tumors from smokers and spontaneously occurring and chemically induced lung tumors in mice. Approximately 86% of the human lung tumors and > 90% of the mouse lung tumors were found to contain activated oncogenes. ras Oncogenes activated by point mutations were detected in many of the human lung adenocarcinomas and virtually all of the mouse lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The mutation profiles of the activated K-ras genes detected in the chemically induced mouse lung tumors suggest that the observed mutations result from genotoxic effects of the chemicals. Comparison of the K-ras mutations observed in the human lung adenocarcinomas with mutation profiles observed in the mouse lung tumors suggest that bulky hydrophobic DNA adducts may be responsible for the majority of the mutations observed in the activated human K-ras genes. Other data indicate that approximately 20% of human lung tumors contain potentially novel transforming genes that may also be targets for mutagens in cigarette smoke.

  8. Human Ovarian Cancer Stroma Contains Luteinized Theca Cells Harboring Tumor Suppressor Gene GT198 Mutations*

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Min; Zhang, Hao; Jaafar, Lahcen; Risinger, John I.; Huang, Shuang; Mivechi, Nahid F.; Ko, Lan

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a highly lethal gynecological cancer, and its causes remain to be understood. Using a recently identified tumor suppressor gene, GT198 (PSMC3IP), as a unique marker, we searched for the identity of GT198 mutant cells in ovarian cancer. GT198 has germ line mutations in familial and early onset breast and ovarian cancers and recurrent somatic mutations in sporadic fallopian tube cancers. GT198 protein has been shown as a steroid hormone receptor coregulator and also as a crucial factor in DNA repair. In this study, using GT198 as a marker for microdissection, we find that ovarian tumor stromal cells harboring GT198 mutations are present in various types of ovarian cancer including high and low grade serous, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell, and granulosa cell carcinomas and in precursor lesions such as inclusion cysts. The mutant stromal cells consist of a luteinized theca cell lineage at various differentiation stages including CD133+, CD44+, and CD34+ cells, although the vast majority of them are differentiated overexpressing steroidogenic enzyme CYP17, a theca cell-specific marker. In addition, wild type GT198 suppresses whereas mutant GT198 protein stimulates CYP17 expression. The chromatin-bound GT198 on the human CYP17 promoter is decreased by overexpressing mutant GT198 protein, implicating the loss of wild type suppression in mutant cells. Together, our results suggest that GT198 mutant luteinized theca cells overexpressing CYP17 are common in ovarian cancer stroma. Because first hit cancer gene mutations would specifically mark cancer-inducing cells, the identification of mutant luteinized theca cells may add crucial evidence in understanding the cause of human ovarian cancer. PMID:24097974

  9. Tenascin-W is a better cancer biomarker than tenascin-C for most human solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tenascins are large glycoproteins found in the extracellular matrix of many embryonic and adult tissues. Tenascin-C is a well-studied biomarker known for its high overexpression in the stroma of most solid cancers. Tenascin-W, the least studied member of the family, is highly expressed in the stroma of colon and breast tumors and in gliomas, but not in the corresponding normal tissues. Other solid tumors have not been analyzed. The present study was undertaken to determine whether tenascin-W could serve as a cancer-specific extracellular matrix protein in a broad range of solid tumors. Methods We analyzed the expression of tenascin-W and tenascin-C by immunoblotting and by immunohistochemistry on multiple frozen tissue microarrays of carcinomas of the pancreas, kidney and lung as well as melanomas and compared them to healthy tissues. Results From all healthy adult organs tested, only liver and spleen showed detectable levels of tenascin-W, suggesting that tenascin-W is absent from most human adult organs under normal, non-pathological conditions. In contrast, tenascin-W was detectable in the majority of melanomas and their metastases, as well as in pancreas, kidney, and lung carcinomas. Comparing lung tumor samples and matching control tissues for each patient revealed a clear overexpression of tenascin-W in tumor tissues. Although the number of samples examined is too small to draw statistically significant conclusions, there seems to be a tendency for increased tenascin-W expression in higher grade tumors. Interestingly, in most tumor types, tenascin-W is also expressed in close proximity to blood vessels, as shown by CD31 co-staining of the samples. Conclusions The present study extends the tumor biomarker potential of tenascin-W to a broad range of solid tumors and shows its accessibility from the blood stream for potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:22947174

  10. Comprehensive identification of mutational cancer driver genes across 12 tumor types

    PubMed Central

    Tamborero, David; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; Perez-Llamas, Christian; Deu-Pons, Jordi; Kandoth, Cyriac; Reimand, Jüri; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad; Bader, Gary D.; Ding, Li; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    With the ability to fully sequence tumor genomes/exomes, the quest for cancer driver genes can now be undertaken in an unbiased manner. However, obtaining a complete catalog of cancer genes is difficult due to the heterogeneous molecular nature of the disease and the limitations of available computational methods. Here we show that the combination of complementary methods allows identifying a comprehensive and reliable list of cancer driver genes. We provide a list of 291 high-confidence cancer driver genes acting on 3,205 tumors from 12 different cancer types. Among those genes, some have not been previously identified as cancer drivers and 16 have clear preference to sustain mutations in one specific tumor type. The novel driver candidates complement our current picture of the emergence of these diseases. In summary, the catalog of driver genes and the methodology presented here open new avenues to better understand the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. PMID:24084849

  11. A Case of Malignant Peripheral Sheath Tumor Arising from Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min Ju; Kang, Hoon; Kim, Hyung Ok

    2008-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a term encompassing tumors previously diagnosed as malignant schwannoma, malignant neurilemmoma, neurogenic sarcoma, and neurofibrosarcoma The occurrence rate of MPNST in neurofibromatosis type 1 patients is known to be about 4.6%. Tumors occurring in this particular group have a worse prognosis in that they occur at an earlier age, are more centrally located, tend to be of a larger size and show more metastases and recurrences. We present a typical case of MPNST in a 36-year-old man with NF type 1, which occurred on the left buttock. A PET-CT showed findings of possible inguinal lymph node metastasis and a lymph node biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. The patient was treated with wide surgical resection and is undergoing adjuvant radiation therapy. PMID:27303156

  12. Expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in human adrenal tumors and cell lines: antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Brown, J W; Schally, A V; Erler, A; Gebauer, L; Treszl, A; Young, L; Fishman, L M; Engel, J B; Willenberg, H S; Petersenn, S; Eisenhofer, G; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Bornstein, S R

    2009-09-15

    Peptide analogues targeting various neuropeptide receptors have been used effectively in cancer therapy. A hallmark of adrenocortical tumor formation is the aberrant expression of peptide receptors relating to uncontrolled cell proliferation and hormone overproduction. Our microarray results have also demonstrated a differential expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in tumor subtypes of human pheochromocytoma. In light of these findings, we performed a comprehensive analysis of relevant receptors in both human adrenomedullary and adrenocortical tumors and tested the antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues targeting these receptors. Specifically, we examined the receptor expression of somatostatin-type-2 receptor, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor or GHRH receptor splice variant-1 (SV-1) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor at the mRNA and protein levels in normal human adrenal tissues, adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tumors, and cell lines. Cytotoxic derivatives of somatostatin AN-238 and, to a lesser extent, AN-162, reduced cell numbers of uninduced and NGF-induced adrenomedullary pheochromocytoma cells and adrenocortical cancer cells. Both the splice variant of GHRH receptor SV-1 and the LHRH receptor were also expressed in adrenocortical cancer cell lines but not in the pheochromocytoma cell line. The GHRH receptor antagonist MZ-4-71 and LHRH antagonist Cetrorelix both significantly reduced cell growth in the adrenocortical cancer cell line. In conclusion, the expression of receptors for somatostatin, GHRH, and LHRH in the normal human adrenal and in adrenal tumors, combined with the growth-inhibitory effects of the antitumor peptide analogues, may make possible improved treatment approaches to adrenal tumors. PMID:19717419

  13. Chemically-induced mouse lung tumors: applications to human health assessments [Poster 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to discuss issues related to the use of mouse lung tumor data in human health assessments. Naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbenzene were chosen for the anal...

  14. Chemically-induced Mouse Lung Tumors: Applications to Human Health Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to better understand the mouse lung tumor data’s role in human health assessments. Three environmental chemicals - naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbe...

  15. GT198 Expression Defines Mutant Tumor Stroma in Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zheqiong; Peng, Min; Cheng, Liang; Jones, Kimya; Maihle, Nita J; Mivechi, Nahid F; Ko, Lan

    2016-05-01

    Human breast cancer precursor cells remain to be elucidated. Using breast cancer gene product GT198 (PSMC3IP; alias TBPIP or Hop2) as a unique marker, we revealed the cellular identities of GT198 mutant cells in human breast tumor stroma. GT198 is a steroid hormone receptor coactivator and a crucial factor in DNA repair. Germline mutations in GT198 are present in breast and ovarian cancer families. Somatic mutations in GT198 are present in ovarian tumor stromal cells. Herein, we show that human breast tumor stromal cells carry GT198 somatic mutations and express cytoplasmic GT198 protein. GT198(+) stromal cells share vascular smooth muscle cell origin, including myoepithelial cells, adipocytes, capillary pericytes, and stromal fibroblasts. Frequent GT198 mutations are associated with GT198(+) tumor stroma but not with GT198(-) tumor cells. GT198(+) progenitor cells are mostly capillary pericytes. When tested in cultured cells, mutant GT198 induces vascular endothelial growth factor promoter, and potentially promotes angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Our results suggest that multiple lineages of breast tumor stromal cells are mutated in GT198. These findings imply the presence of mutant progenitors, whereas their descendants, carrying the same GT198 mutations, are collectively responsible for forming breast tumor microenvironment. GT198 expression is, therefore, a specific marker of mutant breast tumor stroma and has the potential to facilitate diagnosis and targeted treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:27001628

  16. A humanized leucine zipper-TRAIL hybrid induces apoptosis of tumors both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Spellman, Paul; Savinov, Alexei; Strongin, Alex Y

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that stimulating apoptosis in malignant cells without inflicting collateral damage to the host's normal tissues is a promising cancer therapy. Chemo- and radiation therapies that, especially if combined, induce apoptosis in tumor cells have been used for treating cancer patients for decades. These treatments, however, are limited in their ability to discriminate between malignant and non-malignant cells and, therefore, produce substantial healthy tissue damage and subsequent toxic side-effects. In addition, as a result of these therapies, many tumor types acquire an apoptosis-resistant phenotype and become more aggressive and metastatic. Tumor necrosis factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) has been considered a promising and reliable selective inducer of apoptosis in cancerous cells. TRAIL, however, is not uniformly effective in cancer and multiple cancer cell types are considered resistant to natural TRAIL. To overcome this deficiency of TRAIL, we have earlier constructed a yeast-human hybrid leucine zipper-TRAIL in which the yeast GCN4-pII leucine zipper was fused to human TRAIL (GCN4-TRAIL). This construct exhibited a significantly improved anti-tumor apoptotic activity and safety, but is potentially immunogenic in humans. Here, we report a novel, potent, and fully human ATF7 leucine zipper-TRAIL (ATF7-TRAIL) fusion construct that is expected to have substantially lower immunogenicity. In solution, ATF7-TRAIL exists solely as a trimer with a Tm of 80°C and is active against cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model. Our data suggest that our re-engineered TRAIL is a promising candidate for further evaluation as an antitumor agent. PMID:25849628

  17. Comprehensive Glycomics of a Multistep Human Brain Tumor Model Reveals Specific Glycosylation Patterns Related to Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazue; Kimura, Taichi; Piao, Jinhua; Tanaka, Shinya; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells frequently express glycans at different levels and/or with fundamentally different structures from those expressed by normal cells, and therefore elucidation and manipulation of these glycosylations may provide a beneficial approach to cancer therapy. However, the relationship between altered glycosylation and causal genetic alteration(s) is only partially understood. Here, we employed a unique approach that applies comprehensive glycomic analysis to a previously described multistep tumorigenesis model. Normal human astrocytes were transformed via the serial introduction of hTERT, SV40ER, H-RasV12, and myrAKT, thereby mimicking human brain tumor grades I-IV. More than 160 glycans derived from three major classes of cell surface glycoconjugates (N- and O-glycans on glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids) were quantitatively explored, and specific glycosylation patterns related to malignancy were systematically identified. The sequential introduction of hTERT, SV40ER, H-RasV12, and myrAKT led to (i) temporal expression of pauci-mannose/mono-antennary type N-glycans and GD3 (hTERT); (ii) switching from ganglio- to globo-series glycosphingolipids and the appearance of Neu5Gc (hTERT and SV40ER); (iii) temporal expression of bisecting GlcNAc residues, α2,6-sialylation, and stage-specific embryonic antigen-4, accompanied by suppression of core 2 O-glycan biosynthesis (hTERT, SV40ER and Ras); and (iv) increased expression of (neo)lacto-series glycosphingolipids and fucosylated N-glycans (hTERT, SV40ER, Ras and AKT). These sequential and transient glycomic alterations may be useful for tumor grade diagnosis and tumor prognosis, and also for the prediction of treatment response. PMID:26132161

  18. The human prohibitin (PHB) gene family and its somatic mutations in human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takaaki; Sakamoto, Takashi; Takita, Ken-ichi; Saito, Hiroko; Okui, Keiko; Nakamura, Yusuke )

    1993-09-01

    Five cosmid clones, isolated by procedures to screen genomic libraries for homologous variants of the human prohibitin gene (PHB), were analyzed to determine their genomic structures. Four of these (PHBP1-4) were found to be processed pseudogenes, each located on a different chromosome from their counter-parts on chromosome 17q21. The DNA sequence of one clone (PHBP1, on chromosome 6q25) shared a 91.3% identity at the nucleotide level with the cDNA of functional prohibitin. A large number of human tumors of the breast, ovary, liver, and lung were examined for somatic mutations in the PHB gene. Although mutations were observed in a few sporadic breast cancers, none were identified in any of the other cancers. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Human tumor necrosis factor alpha gene regulation by virus and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Goldfeld, A E; Doyle, C; Maniatis, T

    1990-01-01

    We have identified a region of the human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene promoter that is necessary for maximal constitutive, virus-induced, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced transcription. This region contains three sites that match an NF-kappa B binding-site consensus sequence. We show that these three sites specifically bind NF-kappa B in vitro, yet each of these sites can be deleted from the TNF-alpha promoter with little effect on the induction of the gene by virus or LPS. Moreover, when multimers of these three sites are placed upstream from a truncated TNF-alpha promoter, or a heterologous promoter, an increase in the basal level of transcription is observed that is influenced by sequence context and cell type. However, these multimers are not sufficient for virus or LPS induction of either promoter. Thus, unlike other virus- and LPS-inducible promoters that contain NF-kappa B binding sites, these sites from the TNF-alpha promoter are neither required nor sufficient for virus or LPS induction. Comparison of the sequence requirements of virus induction of the human TNF-alpha gene in mouse L929 and P388D1 cells reveals significant differences, indicating that the sequence requirements for virus induction of the gene are cell type-specific. However, the sequences required for virus and LPS induction of the gene in a single cell type, P388D1, overlap. Images PMID:2263628

  20. Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibitors Increase Herceptin Transport and Treatment Efficacy in Mouse Metastatic Brain Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Satoshi; Konda, Bindu; Patil, Rameshwar; Ding, Hui; Espinoza, Andres; Wawrowsky, Kolja A.; Patil, Chirag; Ljubimov, Alexander V.; Black, Keith L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chemotherapeutic drugs and newly developed therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are adequately delivered to most solid and systemic tumors. However, drug delivery into primary brain tumors and metastases is impeded by the blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB), significantly limiting drug use in brain cancer treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the effect of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors in nude mice on drug delivery to intracranially implanted human lung and breast tumors as the most common primary tumors forming brain metastases, and studied underlying mechanisms of drug transport. In vitro assays demonstrated that PDE5 inhibitors enhanced the uptake of [14C]dextran and trastuzumab (Herceptin®, a humanized monoclonal antibody against HER2/neu) by cultured mouse brain endothelial cells (MBEC). The mechanism of drug delivery was examined using inhibitors for caveolae-mediated endocytosis, macropinocytosis and coated pit/clathrin endocytosis. Inhibitor analysis strongly implicated caveolae and macropinocytosis endocytic pathways involvement in the PDE5 inhibitor-enhanced Herceptin uptake by MBEC. Oral administration of PDE5 inhibitor, vardenafil, to mice with HER2-positive intracranial lung tumors led to an increased tumor permeability to high molecular weight [14C]dextran (2.6-fold increase) and to Herceptin (2-fold increase). Survival time of intracranial lung cancer-bearing mice treated with Herceptin in combination with vardenafil was significantly increased as compared to the untreated, vardenafil- or Herceptin-treated mice (p<0.01). Log-rank survival analysis of mice bearing HER2-positive intracranial breast tumor also showed a significant survival increase (p<0.02) in the group treated with Herceptin plus vardenafil as compared to other groups. However, vardenafil did not exert any beneficial effect on survival of mice bearing intracranial breast tumor with low HER2 expression and co-treated with Herceptin (p>0.05). Conclusions

  1. MOUSE SKIN TUMORS AND HUMAN LUNG CANCER: RELATIONSHIPS WITH COMPLEX ENVIRONMENTAL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historically, mouse skin tumorigenesis has been used to evaluate the tumorigenic effects of complex mixtures including human respiratory carcinogens. his study examines the quantitative relationships between tumor induction in SENCAR mouse skin and the induction of respiratory ca...

  2. Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling drives human schwann cell transformation, progression, and tumor maintenance.

    PubMed

    Watson, Adrienne L; Rahrmann, Eric P; Moriarity, Branden S; Choi, Kwangmin; Conboy, Caitlin B; Greeley, Andrew D; Halfond, Amanda L; Anderson, Leah K; Wahl, Brian R; Keng, Vincent W; Rizzardi, Anthony E; Forster, Colleen L; Collins, Margaret H; Sarver, Aaron L; Wallace, Margaret R; Schmechel, Stephen C; Ratner, Nancy; Largaespada, David A

    2013-06-01

    Genetic changes required for the formation and progression of human Schwann cell tumors remain elusive. Using a Sleeping Beauty forward genetic screen, we identified several genes involved in canonical Wnt signaling as potential drivers of benign neurofibromas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). In human neurofibromas and MPNSTs, activation of Wnt signaling increased with tumor grade and was associated with downregulation of β-catenin destruction complex members or overexpression of a ligand that potentiates Wnt signaling, R-spondin 2 (RSPO2). Induction of Wnt signaling was sufficient to induce transformed properties in immortalized human Schwann cells, and downregulation of this pathway was sufficient to reduce the tumorigenic phenotype of human MPNST cell lines. Small-molecule inhibition of Wnt signaling effectively reduced the viability of MPNST cell lines and synergistically induced apoptosis when combined with an mTOR inhibitor, RAD-001, suggesting that Wnt inhibition represents a novel target for therapeutic intervention in Schwann cell tumors. PMID:23535903

  3. Flow cytometric monitoring of hormone receptor expression in human solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Awtar

    2002-05-01

    Hormone receptor expression in human breast and prostate tumors is of diagnostic and therapeutic importance. With the availability of anti-estrogen, androgen and progesterone antibodies, immunohistochemistry has become a standard tool for determination of receptor expression in human tumor biopsies. However, this method is dependent on examination of a small number of cells under a microscope and the data obtained in most cases is not quantitative. As most of the commercially used anti-hormone antibodies have nuclear specificity, we have developed methods for isolation and antigen unmasking of nuclei from formalin fixed/paraffin embedded archival human tumors. After immunostaining with the antibodies and propidium iodide (for DNA content and cell cycle analysis), nuclei are analyzed by multiparametric laser flow cytometry for hormone receptor expression, DNA content, aneuploidy and cell cycle determination. These multiparametric methods are especially important for retrospective studies seeking to correlate hormone receptor expression with clinical response to anti-hormonal therapy of human breast and prostate tumors.

  4. Recurrent TERT promoter mutations identified in a large-scale study of multiple tumor types are associated with increased TERT expression and telomerase activation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Zhaohui; He, Xu-Jun; Diplas, Bill H.; Yang, Rui; Killela, Patrick J.; Liang, Junbo; Meng, Qun; Ye, Zai-Yuan; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xiao-Ting; Xu, Li; He, Xiang-Lei; Zhao, Zhong-Sheng; Xu, Wen-Juan; Wang, Hui-Ju; Ma, Ying-Yu; Xia, Ying-Jie; Li, Li; Zhang, Ru-Xuan; Jin, Tao; Zhao, Zhong-Kuo; Xu, Ji; Yu, Sheng; Wu, Fang; Wang, Si-Zhen; Jiao, Yu-Chen; Yan, Hai; Tao, Hou-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Background Several somatic mutation hotspots were recently identified in the TERT promoter region in human cancers. Large scale studies of these mutations in multiple tumor types are limited, in particular in Asian populations. This study aimed to: analyze TERT promoter mutations in multiple tumor types in a large Chinese patient cohort, investigate novel tumor types and assess the functional significance of the mutations. Methods TERT promoter mutation status was assessed by Sanger sequencing for 13 different tumor types and 799 tumor tissues from Chinese cancer patients. Thymic epithelial tumors, gastrointestinal leiomyoma, and gastric schwannoma were included, for which the TERT promoter has not been previously sequenced. Functional studies included TERT expression by RT-qPCR, telomerase activity by the TRAP assay, and promoter activity by the luciferase reporter assay. Results TERT promoter mutations were highly frequent in glioblastoma (83.9%), urothelial carcinoma (64.5%), oligodendroglioma (70.0%), medulloblastoma (33.3%), and hepatocellular carcinoma (31.4%). C228T and C250T were the most common mutations. In urothelial carcinoma, several novel rare mutations were identified. TERT promoter mutations were absent in GIST, thymic epithelial tumors, gastrointestinal leiomyoma, gastric schwannoma, cholangiocarcinoma, gastric and pancreatic cancer. TERT promoter mutations highly correlated with upregulated TERT mRNA expression and telomerase activity in adult gliomas. These mutations differentially enhanced the transcriptional activity of the TERT core promoter. Conclusions TERT promoter mutations are frequent in multiple tumor types and have similar distributions in Chinese cancer patients. The functional significance of these mutations reflect the importance to telomere maintenance and hence tumorigenesis, making them potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25843513

  5. Absence of tumor growth stimulation in a panel of 16 human tumor cell lines by mistletoe extracts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maier, Gerhard; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert

    2002-04-01

    Extracts of Viscum album (mistletoe) are widely used as complementary cancer therapies in Europe. The mistletoe lectins have been identified as the main active principle of mistletoe extracts. They have been shown to exhibit cytotoxic effects as well as immunomodulatory activities. The latter is exemplified by induction of cytokine secretion and increased activity of natural killer cells. Recent reports, however, indicated possible tumor growth stimulation by mistletoe extracts. Therefore, the three aqueous mistletoe extracts (Iscador M special, Iscador Qu special and Iscador P) were evaluated for antiproliferative and/or stimulatory effects in a panel of 16 human tumor cell lines in vitro using a cellular proliferation assay. The results show no evidence of stimulation of tumor growth by any of the three Iscador preparations, comprising central nervous system, gastric, non-small cell lung, mammary, prostate, renal and uterine cancer cell lines, as well as cell lines from hematological malignancies and melanomas. On the contrary, Iscador preparations containing a high lectin concentration (Iscador M special and Iscador Qu special) showed antitumor activity in the mammary cancer cell line MAXF 401NL at the 15 microg/ml dose level with a more than 70% growth inhibition compared to untreated control cells. In addition, a slight antitumor activity (growth inhibition 30-70%) was found in three tumor cell lines for Iscador M special and in seven tumor cell lines for Iscador Qu special, respectively. Iscador P, which contains no mistletoe lectin I, showed no antiproliferative activity. PMID:11984083

  6. Inhibition of subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumor cells in nude mice by LRIG1.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; He, X J; Xu, H Q; Chen, Z W; Fan, H H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the inhibition of subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumor cells in nude mice by LRIG1 and its mechanism. For this study, athymic nude mice were injected with either normal pituitary tumor RC-4B/C cells or LRIG1-transfected RC-4B/C cells. We then calculated the volume inhibition rate of the tumors, as well as the apoptosis index of tumor cells and the expression of Ras, Raf, AKt, and ERK mRNA in tumor cells. Tumor cell morphological and structural changes were also observed under electron microscope. Our data showed that subcutaneous tumor growth was slowed or even halted in LRIG1-transfected tumors. The tumor volumes were significantly different between the two groups of mice (χ2 = 2.14, P < 0.05). The tumor apoptosis index was found to be 8.72% in the control group and 39.7% in LRIG1-transfected mice (χ2 = 7.59, P < 0.05). The levels of Ras, Raf, and AKt mRNA in LRIG1-transfected RC-4B/C cells were significantly reduced after transfection (P < 0.01). Transfected subcutaneous tumor cells appeared to be in early or late apoptosis under an electron microscope, while only a few subcutaneous tumor cells appeared to be undergoing apoptosis in the control group. In conclusion, the LRIG1 gene is able to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis in subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumors in nude mice. The mechanism of LRIG1 may involve the inhibition of the PI3K/ Akt and Ras/Raf/ERK signal transduction pathways. PMID:27173312

  7. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Lessi, Francesca; Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-07-30

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma. PMID:26214095

  8. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus

    PubMed Central

    Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-01-01

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma. PMID:26214095

  9. Third harmonic generation imaging for fast, label-free pathology of human brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, N. V.; Wesseling, P.; Hamer, P. C. de Witt; Noske, D. P.; Galgano, G. D.; Mansvelder, H. D.; Baayen, J. C.; Groot, M. L.

    2016-01-01

    In brain tumor surgery, recognition of tumor boundaries is key. However, intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries by the neurosurgeon is difficult. Therefore, there is an urgent need for tools that provide the neurosurgeon with pathological information during the operation. We show that third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy provides label-free, real-time images of histopathological quality; increased cellularity, nuclear pleomorphism, and rarefaction of neuropil in fresh, unstained human brain tissue could be clearly recognized. We further demonstrate THG images taken with a GRIN objective, as a step toward in situ THG microendoscopy of tumor boundaries. THG imaging is thus a promising tool for optical biopsies. PMID:27231629

  10. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... be removed because of their location or harmful effect on the surrounding normal brain tissue. If a tumor is cancer , possible treatments may include: Chemotherapy Radiation Surgery Targeted cancer therapy Biologic therapy Other treatment options

  11. XeCl excimer laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy for human cerebral tumor diagnosis: preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrillier, Sigrid; Hor, Frederic; Desgeorges, Michel; Ettori, Dominique; Sitbon, Jean R.

    1993-09-01

    Three-hundred-eight nm laser-induced autofluorescence spectra of the normal human brain, astrocytoma grade IV and glioblastoma grade IV specimens, have been recorded in vitro two hours after surgical resection. Typical fluorescence spectra for normal (N) and malignant (M) tissue show 4 maxima at about 352, 362, 383, and 460 nm. These spectra are analyzed in detail. Subtle differences in normalized spectra of N and M tissues appear to be large enough for diagnosis. Several criteria such as maxima and minima absolute intensity and intensity ratios at typical wavelengths are computed and used to classify the tissue. This preliminary study shows that fluorescence spectroscopy with 308 nm UV excitation could be a valid technique for discriminating tumor types. However, it should be noted that these measurements are made in vitro. Living tissues may have different spectral characteristics, therefore future in vivo investigations must be performed.

  12. Interindividual concordance of methylation profiles in human genes for tumor necrosis factors alpha and beta.

    PubMed Central

    Kochanek, S; Toth, M; Dehmel, A; Renz, D; Doerfler, W

    1990-01-01

    The DNA in mammalian genomes is characterized by complex patterns of DNA methylation that reflect the states of all genetic activities of that genome. The modified nucleotide 5-methyldeoxycytidine (5mdC) can affect the interactions of specific proteins with DNA sequence motifs. The most extensively studied effect of sequence-specific methylations is that of the long-term silencing of eukaryotic (mammalian) promoters. We have initiated studies on the methylation status of parts of the human genome to view patterns of DNA methylation as indicators for genetic activities. In this report, analyses using both restriction enzyme--Southern blotting and the very precise genomic sequencing technique have been done. The genes for tumor necrosis factors (TNF) alpha and beta--in particular, their 5'-upstream and promoter regions--have been investigated in DNA isolated from human lymphocytes, granulocytes, and sperm. The results are characterized by a remarkable interindividual concordance of DNA methylation in specific human cell types. The patterns are identical in the DNA from one cell type for different individuals even of different genetic origins but different in the DNA from different cell types. As an example, in the DNA from human granulocytes of 15 different individuals (ages 20-48 yr, both sexes), 5mdC residues have been localized by the genomic sequencing technique in three identical sequence positions in the 5'-upstream region and in one downstream position of the gene encoding TNF-alpha. The promoter of this gene is free of 5mdC, and TNF-alpha is expressed in human granulocytes. The TNF-beta promoter is methylated in granulocytes from 9 different individuals, and TNF-beta is not expressed. In human lymphocytes, the main source of TNF-beta, the TNF-beta promoter is free of 5mdC residues. All 5'-CG-3' sites studied in the TNF-alpha and -beta genes are methylated in DNA from human sperm. In human cell lines HL-60, Jurkat, and RPMI 1788, the extent of DNA methylation

  13. Modulation of tumor growth by inhibitory Fcγ receptor expressed by human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cassard, Lydie; Cohen-Solal, Joël F.G.; Galinha, Annie; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Mathiot, Claire; Galon, Jérôme; Dorval, Thierry; Bernheim, Alain; Fridman, Wolf H.; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    The efficacy of anti-tumor IgG reflects the balance between opposing signals mediated by activating and inhibitory Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) expressed by effector cells. Here, we show that human malignant melanoma cells express the inhibitory low-affinity Fcγ receptor FcγRIIB1 in 40% of tested metastases. When melanoma cells were grafted in nude mice, a profound inhibition of FcγRIIB1 tumor growth that required the intracytoplasmic region of the receptor was observed. IgG immune complexes (ICs) may be required for this inhibition, since sera from nude mice bearing tumors contained IgG that decreased the proliferation of FcγRIIB1-positive cells in vitro, and tumor development of FcγRIIB1-positive melanoma lines was not inhibited in antibody-defective severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Passive immunization of SCID mice with anti–ganglioside GD2 antibody resulted in significant inhibition of growth of FcγRIIB1-positive tumors in an intracytoplasmic-dependent manner. Altogether, these data suggest that human melanoma cells express biologically active inhibitory FcγRIIB1, which regulates their development upon direct interaction with anti-tumor antibodies. Therefore, FcγR expression on human tumors may be one component of the efficacy of antibody-mediated therapies, and FcγR-positive tumors could be the most sensitive candidates for such treatments. PMID:12438452

  14. Cytomegalovirus in human brain tumors: Role in pathogenesis and potential treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia; Johnsen, John Inge

    2015-01-01

    During the last years increasing evidence implies that human cytomegalovirus (CMV) can be attributed to human malignancies arising from numerous tissues. In this perspective, we will review and discuss the potential mechanisms through which CMV infection may contribute to brain tumors by affecting tumor cell initiation, progression and metastasis formation. Recent evidence also suggests that anti-CMV treatment results in impaired tumor growth of CMV positive xenografts in animal models and potentially increased survival in CMV positive glioblastoma patients. Based on these observations and the high tumor promoting capacity of this virus, the classical and novel antiviral therapies against CMV should be revisited as they may represent a great promise for halting tumor progression and lower cancer deaths. PMID:25699229

  15. Rearrangement of a common cellular DNA domain on chromosome 4 in human primary liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, C.; Garreau, F.; Bougueleret, L.; Cariani, E.; Thiers, V.; Croissant, O.; Hadchouel, M.; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C. ); Grzeschik, K.H. )

    1988-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA integration has been shown to occur frequently in human hepatocellular carcinomas. The authors have investigated whether common cellular DNA domains might be rearranged, possibly by HBV integration, in human primary liver tumors. Unique cellular DNA sequences adjacent to an HBV integration site were isolated from a patient with hepatitis B surface antigen-positive hepatocellular carcinoma. These probes detected rearrangement of this cellular region of chromosomal DNA in 3 of 50 additional primary liver tumors studied. Of these three tumor samples, two contained HBV DNA, without an apparent link between the viral DNA and the rearranged allele; HBV DNA sequences were not detected in the third tumor sample. By use of a panel of somatic cell hybrids, these unique cellular DNA sequences were shown to be located on chromosome 4. Therefore, this region of chromosomal DNA might be implicated in the formation of different tumors at one step of liver cell transformation, possible related to HBV integration.

  16. [Microvascular architecture of human tumors transplanted in nude mice--its relationship to sensitivity to antineoplastic agents].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, M; Kubota, T; Hanatani, Y; Maruyama, K; Tsuyuki, K; Nakada, M; Asanuma, F; Ishibiki, K; Abe, O

    1982-08-01

    Microangiographic study was performed with ten human tumors serially transplanted into nude mice to clarify the role of tumor vessels on the chemosensitivity of the human tumors. Five gastric carcinomas, two colon carcinomas, one breast carcinoma, one cholangiocarcinoma, and one hemangiopericytoma were used for the experiments. Seven tumors revealed hypervascular network of vessels, whereas hypovascular patterns of tumor vessels were observed in the other three tumors. It was found that the histologically differentiated tumors were hypervascular and undifferentiated tumors were hypovascular, with statistically significant differences (p less than 0.05). Each tumor possessed the vascular network similar to human tumors originated from the same organs. No discernible changes of microangiographic features were noticed by serial transfers. As the chemosensitivities of these tumors depended mainly on their original tissues, these chemosensitivities could not be explained only by tumor vascularities or drug transferences. However, in the tumors with similar chemosensitive spectra, less susceptible tumors were observed to possess the irregular vascular networks in comparison with sensitive strains. From these considerations, tumor vessels were thought to have some role on vascular flow and drug transference which affected chemosensitivity of human tumors. PMID:7184456

  17. Imaging of bone tumors using a monoclonal antibody raised against human osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, N.C.; Perkins, A.C.; Pimm, M.V.; Wastie, M.; Hopkins, J.S.; Dowling, F.; Baldwin, R.W.; Hardcastle, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    The radiolabeled monoclonal antibody 791T/36 raised against a human osteosarcoma was injected into 20 patients with known or suspected bone tumors. Gamma camera images were acquired at 48 or 72 hours after injection, and assessed for antibody localization. Positive images were obtained in all five osteosarcomas and four other primary malignant sarcomas. Two of the four other primary bone tumors gave positive images. Three patients with trauma had negative images as did one patient with Paget's disease. Two patients with suppurative disease gave positive images. The antibody localized in the majority of malignant sarcomas tested. In one tumor where tissue was available, a tumor:non-tumor ratio of 2.8:1 was measured. Repeat imaging was performed in five patients. Immunoscintigraphy using the monoclonal antibody 791T/36 has shown tumor localization in patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  18. Tumor necrosis treatment of ME-180 human cervical carcinoma model with sup 131 I-labeled TNT-1 monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.M.; Taylor, C.R.; Epstein, A.L. )

    1989-08-15

    In contrast to normal tissues, many malignant tumors contain a high proportion of dead and dying cells. The loss of membrane integrity that accompanies cellular degeneration permits macromolecules, including antibodies, to freely enter the cell cytoplasm. Based upon these observations, it was hypothesized that monoclonal antibodies to intracellular antigens, which are integral structural components and are retained by degenerating cells, may be used to target a wide range of human malignancies. Previous studies by our laboratory utilizing these principles have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging four different histological types of human cancer in a nude mouse model, using monoclonal antibodies directed against insoluble intranuclear antigens. The present study describes the application of this approach, designated tumor necrosis treatment, for the radioimmunotherapy of transplantable ME-180 human cervical carcinomas in the nude mouse. Groups of tumor-bearing nude mice received three weekly treatments of 150 or 300 microCi of 131I-labeled experimental (TNT-1) or control (Lym-1) monoclonal antibodies. Detailed biodistribution data, dosimetric evaluations, and therapeutic results are presented to demonstrate the effective and preferential targeting of 131I-labeled TNT-1 monoclonal antibody within the tumor. In the experimental groups, the dose delivered to the tumor was sufficient to induce clinical regressions in 88% of treated animals, without evidence of toxicity to normal tissues. Complete regressions were obtained in 25% of the mice treated with high dose TNT-1. Microscopic examination of the implantation sites of these mice demonstrated the presence of acute radiation damage and residual keratin-positive tumor cells showing marked evidence of degeneration.

  19. Lung Epithelial Cell-Specific Expression of Human Lysosomal Acid Lipase Ameliorates Lung Inflammation and Tumor Metastasis in Lipa(-/-) Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Ding, Xinchun; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL), a key enzyme in the metabolic pathway of neutral lipids, has a close connection with inflammation and tumor progression. One major manifestation in LAL-deficient (Lipa(-/-)) mice is an increase of tumor growth and metastasis associated with expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In the lung, LAL is highly expressed in alveolar type II epithelial cells. To assess how LAL in lung epithelial cells plays a role in this inflammation-related pathogenic process, lung alveolar type II epithelial cell-specific expression of human LAL (hLAL) in Lipa(-/-) mice was established by crossbreeding of CCSP-driven rtTA transgene and (TetO)7-CMV-hLAL transgene into Lipa(-/-) mice (CCSP-Tg/KO). hLAL expression in lung epithelial cells not only reduced tumor-promoting myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the lung, but also down-regulated the synthesis and secretion of tumor-promoting cytokines and chemokines into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of Lipa(-/-) mice. hLAL expression reduced the immunosuppressive functions of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells, inhibited bone marrow cell transendothelial migration, and inhibited endothelial cell proliferation and migration in Lipa(-/-) mice. As a result, hLAL expression in CCSP-Tg/KO mice corrected pulmonary damage, and inhibited tumor cell proliferation and migration in vitro, and tumor metastasis to the lung in vivo. These results support a concept that LAL is a critical metabolic enzyme in lung epithelial cells that regulates lung homeostasis, immune response, and tumor metastasis. PMID:27461363

  20. Over-expression of HOX-8, the human homologue of the mouse Hox-8 homeobox gene, in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Tanaka, M; Iwase, T; Naito, Y; Sugimura, H; Kino, I

    1993-07-15

    A human ovarian yolk sac tumor cDNA library was screened for homeobox genes with an oligonucleotide probe under low stringent condition. Three homeobox genes were isolated, two of which were identified as HHO.c1 and HB24. The third was highly homologous with the mouse Hox-8 gene and was designated as HOX-8. Studies on RNAs from 25 human tumor tissues and cell lines showed that the profile of HOX-8 expression was different from those of HHO.c1 and HB24. The expression of HOX-8 was not detected in hematopoietic tumor cells, in which HHO.c1 and HB24 were highly expressed. HOX-8 was expressed at higher levels in a variety of tumors of epithelial origin than in their corresponding normal tissues more frequently than HHO.c1 and HB24. All three homeobox genes were highly expressed in a yolk sac tumor, an immature tumor of gonadal origin. These results suggest that HOX-8 plays a more important role in human tumors of epithelial origin than those of hematopoietic origin. PMID:7687426

  1. The activation of human gene MAGE-1 in tumor cells is correlated with genome-wide demethylation.

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, C; De Backer, O; Faraoni, I; Lurquin, C; Brasseur, F; Boon, T

    1996-01-01

    Human gene MAGE-1 encodes tumor-specific antigens that are recognized on melanoma cells by autologous cytolytic T lymphocytes. This gene is expressed in a significant proportion of tumors of various histological types, but not in normal tissues except male germ-line cells. We reported previously that reporter genes driven by the MAGE-1 promoter are active not only in the tumor cell lines that express MAGE-1 but also in those that do not. This suggests that the critical factor causing the activation of MAGE-1 in certain tumors is not the presence of the appropriate transcription factors. The two major MAGE-1 promoter elements have an Ets binding site, which contains a CpG dinucleotide. We report here that these CpG are demethylated in the tumor cell lines that express MAGE-1, and are methylated in those that do not express the gene. Methylation of these CpG inhibits the binding of transcription factors, as seen by mobility shift assay. Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine activated gene MAGE-1 not only in tumor cell lines but also in primary fibroblasts. Finally, the overall level of CpG methylation was evaluated in 20 different tumor cell lines. It was inversely correlated with the expression of MAGE-1. We conclude that the activation of MAGE-1 in cancer cells is due to the demethylation of the promoter. This appears to be a consequence of a genome-wide demethylation process that occurs in many cancers and is correlated with tumor progression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8692960

  2. Combining magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular genomics offers better accuracy in brain tumor typing and prediction of survival than either methodology alone.

    PubMed

    Astrakas, Loukas; Blekas, Konstantinos D; Constantinou, Caterina; Andronesi, Ovidiu C; Mindrinos, Michael N; Likas, Aristidis C; Rahme, Laurence G; Black, Peter M; Marcus, Karen J; Tzika, A Aria

    2011-04-01

    Recent advents in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques permit subsequent microarray analysis over the entire human transcriptome in the same tissue biopsies. However, extracting information from such immense quantities of data is limited by difficulties in recognizing and evaluating the relevant patterns of apparent gene expression in the context of the existing knowledge of phenotypes by histopathology. Using a quantitative approach derived from a knowledge base of pathology findings, we present a novel methodology used to process genome-wide transcription and MRS data. This methodology was tested to examine metabolite and genome-wide profiles in MRS and RNA in 55 biopsies from human subjects with brain tumors with ~100% certainty. With the guidance of histopathology and clinical outcome, 15 genes with the assistance of 15 MRS metabolites were able to be distinguished by tumor categories and the prediction of survival was better than when either method was used alone. This new method, combining MRS, genomics, statistics and biological content, improves the typing and understanding of the complexity of human brain tumors, and assists in the search for novel tumor biomarkers. It is an important step for novel drug development, it generates testable hypotheses regarding neoplasia and promises to guide human brain tumor therapy provided improved in vivo methods for monitoring response to therapy are developed. PMID:21274507

  3. Tumor therapy in mice via antigen targeting to a novel, DC-restricted C-type lectin

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, David; Mourão-Sá, Diego; Joffre, Olivier P.; Schulz, Oliver; Rogers, Neil C.; Pennington, Daniel J.; Carlyle, James R.; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2008-01-01

    The mouse CD8α+ DC subset excels at cross-presentation of antigen, which can elicit robust CTL responses. A receptor allowing specific antigen targeting to this subset and its equivalent in humans would therefore be useful for the induction of antitumor CTLs. Here, we have characterized a C-type lectin of the NK cell receptor group that we named DC, NK lectin group receptor-1 (DNGR-1). DNGR-1 was found to be expressed in mice at high levels by CD8+ DCs and at low levels by plasmacytoid DCs but not by other hematopoietic cells. Human DNGR-1 was also restricted in expression to a small subset of blood DCs that bear similarities to mouse CD8α+ DCs. The selective expression pattern and observed endocytic activity of DNGR-1 suggested that it could be used for antigen targeting to DCs. Consistent with this notion, antigen epitopes covalently coupled to an antibody specific for mouse DNGR-1 were selectively cross-presented by CD8α+ DCs in vivo and, when given with adjuvants, induced potent CTL responses. When the antigens corresponded to tumor-expressed peptides, treatment with the antibody conjugate and adjuvant could prevent development or mediate eradication of B16 melanoma lung pseudometastases. We conclude that DNGR-1 is a novel, highly specific marker of mouse and human DC subsets that can be exploited for CTL cross-priming and tumor therapy. PMID:18497879

  4. CRLX101 nanoparticles localize in human tumors and not in adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue after intravenous dosing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew J.; Wiley, Devin T.; Zuckerman, Jonathan E.; Webster, Paul; Chao, Joseph; Lin, James; Yen, Yun; Davis, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics are being used to treat patients with solid tumors. Whereas nanoparticles have been shown to preferentially accumulate in solid tumors of animal models, there is little evidence to prove that intact nanoparticles localize to solid tumors of humans when systemically administered. Here, tumor and adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue biopsies are obtained through endoscopic capture from patients with gastric, gastroesophageal, or esophageal cancer who are administered the nanoparticle CRLX101. Both the pre- and postdosing tissue samples adjacent to tumors show no definitive evidence of either the nanoparticle or its drug payload (camptothecin, CPT) contained within the nanoparticle. Similar results are obtained from the predosing tumor samples. However, in nine of nine patients that were evaluated, CPT is detected in the tumor tissue collected 24–48 h after CRLX101 administration. For five of these patients, evidence of the intact deposition of CRLX101 nanoparticles in the tumor tissue is obtained. Indications of CPT pharmacodynamics from tumor biomarkers such as carbonic anhydrase IX and topoisomerase I by immunohistochemistry show clear evidence of biological activity from the delivered CPT in the posttreatment tumors. PMID:27001839

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human macrophages modulates the cytokine response to Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed Central

    Kandil, O; Fishman, J A; Koziel, H; Pinkston, P; Rose, R M; Remold, H G

    1994-01-01

    The present studies examined production of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), and IL-6 by human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to Pneumocystis carinii in vitro and the impact of concurrent macrophage infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on these cytokine responses. Macrophages were infected with the HIV-1 BaL monocytotropic strain for 10 to 14 days and then exposed to P. carinii. At various times following P. carinii treatment, culture supernatants were harvested to assess the cytokine profile. Addition of P. carinii to HIV-uninfected macrophages resulted in augmented production of IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IL-1 beta protein. By contrast, in HIV-infected macrophages exposed to P. carinii, only the release of IL-6 was increased compared with that for HIV-uninfected macrophages, while the levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta decreased. This altered response was confirmed at the molecular level for TNF-alpha mRNA. Preventing physical contact between P. carinii and macrophages by a membrane filter inhibited all cytokine release. Substituting P. carinii with a preparation of P. carinii 95- to 115-kDa major membrane glycoprotein A yielded a response similar to that obtained by addition of intact P. carinii. These results suggest that HIV-1 infection of human macrophages modulates cytokine responses to P. carinii. Images PMID:8300221

  6. Polarized Dendritic Cells as Cancer Vaccines: Directing Effector-type T Cells to Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kalinski, Pawel; Okada, Hideho

    2010-01-01

    Ex-vivo-generation and antigen loading of dendritic cells (DCs) from cancer patients helps to bypass the dysfunction of endogenous DCs. It also allows to control the process of DC maturation and to imprint in maturing DCs several functions essential for induction of effective forms of cancer immunity. Recent reports from several groups including ours demonstrate that distinct conditions of DC generation and maturation can prime DCs for preferential interaction with different (effector versus regulatory) subsets of immune cells. Moreover, differentially-generated DCs have been shown to imprint different effector mechanisms in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells (delivery of “signal three”) and to induce their different homing properties (delivery of “signal four”). These developments allow for selective induction of tumor-specific T cells with desirable effector functions and tumor-relevant homing properties and to direct the desirable types of immune cells to tumors. PMID:20409732

  7. A Spectrum of Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Human Mammary Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colcher, D.; Horan Hand, P.; Nuti, M.; Schlom, J.

    1981-05-01

    Splenic lymphocytes of mice, immunized with membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic human mammary carcinoma tissues, were fused with the NS-1 non-immunoglobulin-secreting murine myeloma cell line. This resulted in the generation of hybridoma cultures secreting immunoglobulins reactive in solid-phase radioimmunoassays with extracts of metastatic mammary carcinoma cells from involved livers, but not with extracts of apparently normal human liver. As a result of further screening of immunoglobulin reactivities and double cloning of cultures, 11 monoclonal antibodies were chosen that demonstrated reactivities with human mammary tumor cells and not with apparently normal human tissues. These monoclonal antibodies could be placed into at least five major groups on the basis of their differential binding to the surface of various live human mammary tumor cells in culture, to extracts of mammary tumor tissues, or to tissue sections of mammary tumor cells studied by the immunoperoxidase technique. Whereas a spectrum of reactivities to mammary tumors was observed with the 11 monoclonal antibodies, no reactivity was observed to apparently normal cells of the following human tissues: breast, lymph node, lung, skin, testis, kidney, thymus, bone marrow, spleen, uterus, thyroid, intestine, liver, bladder, tonsils, stomach, prostate, and salivary gland. Several of the antibodies also demonstrated a ``pancarcinoma'' reactivity, showing binding to selected non-breast carcinomas. None of the monoclonal antibodies showed binding to purified ferritin or carcinoembryonic antigen. Monoclonal antibodies of all five major groups, however, demonstrated binding to human metastatic mammary carcinoma cells both in axillary lymph nodes and at distal sites.

  8. Decreased expression of miR-874 and its tumor suppressive function in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, X J; Xia, M; Bi, W P

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of miRNAs is associated with cancer development and progression. For example, aberrant expression of miR-874 has been found in some types of cancer. However, miR-874 expression and its clinical significance in colorectal cancer (CRC) have not yet been explored. The aim of the current study was to explore the effects of miR-874 in CRC tumorigenesis and development. Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR was performed to evaluate miR-874 levels in CRC cell lines and in 135 pairs of primary human CRC specimens and adjacent noncancerous tissues. The association of miR-874 expression with clinicopathological factors and prognosis was also analyzed. Furthermore, the effects of miR-874 on the biological behavior of CRC cells in vitro were investigated. Our results revealed that miR-874 expression was significantly downregulated in CRC cancer tissues and cell lines. Decreased miR-874 expression was significantly associated with larger tumor size, deeper invasion depth, and advanced TNM stage in vivo. Additionally, low miR-874 expression in CRC was an independent predictor of poor survival. Moreover, overexpression of miR-874 inhibited cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, and promoted cell apoptosis of the SW620 CRC cell line in vitro. Taken together, these findings indicate that miR-874 may act as a tumor suppressor in CRC, and may serve as a novel therapeutic target for miR-based therapy. PMID:27173188

  9. Activation of endogenous human stem cell-associated retroviruses (SCARs) and therapy-resistant phenotypes of malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-07-01

    Recent reports revealed consistent activation of specific endogenous retroviral elements in human preimplantation embryos and embryonic stem cells. Activity of stem cell associated retroviruses (SCARs) has been implicated in seeding thousands of human-specific regulatory sequences in the hESC genome. Activation of specific SCARs has been demonstrated in patients diagnosed with multiple types of cancer, autoimmune diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders, and appears associated with clinically lethal therapy resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes in a sub-set of cancer patients diagnosed with different types of malignant tumors. A hallmark feature of human-specific SCAR integration sites is deletions of ancestral DNA. Analysis of human-specific genetic loci of SCARs' stemness networks in tumor samples of TCGA cohorts representing 29 cancer types suggests that this approach may facilitate identification of pan-cancer genomic signatures of clinically-lethal disease defined by the presence of somatic non-silent mutations, gene-level copy number changes, and transcripts and proteins' expression of SCAR-regulated host genes. Present analyses indicate that multiple lines of strong circumstantial evidence support the hypothesis that activation of SCARs' networks may play an important role in cancer progression and metastasis, perhaps contributing to the emergence of clinically-lethal therapy-resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes. PMID:27084523

  10. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha in human leukocytes stimulated by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, S M; Tabuni, A; Kornfeld, H; Reardon, C C; Golenbock, D T

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a key mediator of inflammation and may promote human immunodeficiency virus replication in latently infected cells. Since cryptococcosis often is associated with aberrations in the host inflammatory response and occurs preferentially in persons with AIDS, we defined the conditions under which human leukocytes produce TNF-alpha when stimulated by Cryptococcus neoformans. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) produced comparable amounts of TNF-alpha following stimulation with C. neoformans and lipopolysaccharide. Detectable TNF-alpha release in response to C. neoformans occurred only when fungi with small-sized capsules were used and complement-sufficient serum was added. Fractionation of PBMC established that monocytes were the predominant source of TNF-alpha. TNF-alpha gene expression and release occurred significantly later in PBMC stimulated with C. neoformans than in PBMC stimulated with LPS. C. neoformans was also a potent inducer of TNF-alpha from freshly isolated bronchoalveolar macrophages (BAM). Upon in vitro culture, BAM and monocytes bound greater numbers of fungal cells, yet their capacity to produce TNF-alpha following cryptococcal stimulation declined by 74 to 100%. However, this decline was reversed if the BAM and monocytes were cultured with gamma interferon. These data establish that C. neoformans can potently stimulate TNF-alpha release from human leukocytes. However, several variables profoundly affected the amount of TNF-alpha released, including the type of leukocyte and its state of activation, the size of the cryptococcal capsule, and the availability of opsonins. PMID:8168965

  11. A human brain tumor-derived PDGFR-alpha deletion mutant is transforming.

    PubMed

    Clarke, I D; Dirks, P B

    2003-02-01

    Aberrant receptor tyrosine kinase signaling plays an important role in the molecular pathogenesis of brain tumors. We have been studying a previously identified human glioblastoma-derived PDGFR-alpha mutant that has an in-frame deletion in the extracellular domain, causing loss of exons 8 and 9 (PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9)). In the primary tumor, this deletion mutant receptor was shown to be amplified and overexpressed. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression, activity, localization, and transformation properties of this deletion mutant. In the absence of serum, or PDGF-AA, PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) was phosphorylated on tyrosine residues, indicating ligand-independent autoactivation. Localization by staining and cell surface biotinylation studies revealed expression of the deletion mutant predominantly in the cytoplasm, with very little present on the cell surface. To determine if PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) was oncogenic, we transfected wild-type and mutant receptors into Rat1 cells and performed analyses of cell growth, in vitro transformation, and subcutaneous growth in the nude mouse. PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9)-expressing cells displayed enhanced cell growth and survival in low serum, and formed foci in monolayer cultures. PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9)-expressing Rat1 cells were also tumorigenic when injected subcutaneously into nude mice. Expression of PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) was also associated with increased c-Jun phosphorylation in the absence of PDGF ligand, demonstrating also that the mutant receptor is associated with altered intracellular signaling. These data demonstrate that PDGFR-alpha(delta8,9) is transforming, and it is the first demonstration of a naturally occurring tumor-derived mutant PDGFR-alpha with oncogenic properties. PMID:12569364

  12. The Methanol Extract of Angelica sinensis Induces Cell Apoptosis and Suppresses Tumor Growth in Human Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wen-Lin; Harn, Horng-jyh; Hung, Pei-Hsiu; Hsieh, Ming-Chang; Chang, Kai-Fu; Huang, Xiao-Fan; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Lee, Ming-Shih; Tsai, Nu-Man

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly vascularized and invasive neoplasm. The methanol extract of Angelica sinensis (AS-M) is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat several diseases, such as gastric mucosal damage, hepatic injury, menopausal symptoms, and chronic glomerulonephritis. AS-M also displays potency in suppressing the growth of malignant brain tumor cells. The growth suppression of malignant brain tumor cells by AS-M results from cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. AS-M upregulates expression of cyclin kinase inhibitors, including p16, to decrease the phosphorylation of Rb proteins, resulting in arrest at the G0-G1 phase. The expression of the p53 protein is increased by AS-M and correlates with activation of apoptosis-associated proteins. Therefore, the apoptosis of cancer cells induced by AS-M may be triggered through the p53 pathway. In in vivo studies, AS-M not only suppresses the growth of human malignant brain tumors but also significantly prolongs patient survival. In addition, AS-M has potent anticancer effects involving cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and antiangiogenesis. The in vitro and in vivo anticancer effects of AS-M indicate that this extract warrants further investigation and potential development as a new antibrain tumor agent, providing new hope for the chemotherapy of malignant brain cancer. PMID:24319475

  13. Neurofibromatosis type 1 associated with pheochromocytoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumors: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    PAN, DONGFENG; LIANG, PEIFENG; XIAO, HONGYAN

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder associated with neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene mutation, which generates an increased risk of variety of tumor types. The current study reports a case involving NF1, pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). A 56-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and polypnea. Clinical investigation revealed multiple diffuse soft-tissue lesions throughout his body, and pigmented macules on the skin. Imaging analyses revealed thoracic scoliosis, multiple subcutaneous nodules in the abdomen and trunk, and a 7.0×7.7×8.9-cm oval-shaped, cystic mass in the left upper abdominal cavity. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that S-100 protein and synaptophysin were highly expressed in adrenal gland neoplasm, whilst CD117 and CD34 were highly expressed in small intestine tumors. The overall clinical and pathological finding suggested a diagnosis of NF1, giant PHEO and small intestinal stromal tumor. In addition, a literature review was conducted to identify the specific clinical features of patients with this condition. Only 11 similar cases have been reported worldwide. In the present study, paroxysmal hypertension occurred in the majority of patients, and GISTs tended to be located in the small intestine. In addition, the present study demonstrated that many of the patients had a poor prognosis. Therefore, the present study indicates that NF1-PHEO-GIST is a special type tumor with varied clinical symptoms, which may be associated with an increased risk for poor prognosis; however, more studies are required to confirm this. PMID:27347193

  14. Bromocriptine induces parapoptosis as the main type of cell death responsible for experimental pituitary tumor shrinkage

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeri, Claudia Mariela Petiti, Juan Pablo; Valle Sosa, Liliana del; Gutierrez, Silvina; Paul, Ana Lucia de; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; Torres, Alicia Ines

    2009-10-01

    Bromocriptine (Bc) produces pituitary tumoral mass regression which induces the cellular death that was classically described as apoptosis. However, recent works have related that other mechanisms of cell death could also be involved in the maintenance of physiological and pathological pituitary homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the different types of cell death in the involution induced by Bc in experimental rat pituitary tumors. The current study demonstrated that Bc induced an effective regression of estrogen induced pituitary tumors by a mechanism identified as parapoptosis. This alternative cell death was ultrastructurally recognized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and an increased cell electron density, represented around 25% of the total pituitary cells counted. Furthermore, the results obtained from biochemical assays did not correspond to the criteria of apoptosis or necrosis. We also investigated the participation of p38, ERK1/2 and PKC{delta} in the parapoptotic pathway. An important observation was the significant increase in phosphorylated forms of these MAPKs, the holoenzyme and catalytic fragments of PKC{delta} in nuclear fractions after Bc administration compared to control and estrogen treated rats. Furthermore, the immunolocalization at ultrastructural level of these kinases showed a similar distribution pattern, with a prevalent localization at nuclear level in lactotrophs from Bc treated rats. In summary, we determined that parapoptosis is the predominant cell death type involved in the regression of pituitary tumors in response to Bc treatment, and may cause the activation of PKC{delta}, ERK1/2 and p38.

  15. Effectivity of pazopanib treatment in orthotopic models of human testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cisplatin (CDDP) resistance in testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) is still a clinical challenge, and one associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this work was to test pazopanib, an anti-tumoral and anti-angiogenic multikinase inhibitor, and its combination with lapatinib (an anti-ErbB inhibitor) in mouse orthotopic models of human testicular GCTs. Methods We used two different models of human testicular GCTs orthotopically grown in nude mice; a CDDP-sensitive choriocarcinoma (TGT38) and a new orthotopic model generated from a metastatic GCT refractory to first-line CDDP chemotherapy (TGT44). Nude mice implanted with these orthotopic tumors were treated with the inhibitors and the effect on tumoral growth and angiogenesis was evaluated. Results TGT44 refractory tumor had an immunohistochemical profile similar to the original metastasis, with characteristics of yolk sac tumor. TGT44 did not respond when treated with cisplatin. In contrast, pazopanib had an anti-angiogenic effect and anti-tumor efficacy in this model. Pazopanib in combination with lapatinib in TGT38, an orthotopic model of choriocarcinoma had an additive effect blocking tumor growth. Conclusions We present pazopanib as a possible agent for the alternative treatment of CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-refractory GCT patients, alone or in combination with anti-ErbB therapies. PMID:23937707

  16. Suppressive effects of tumor cell-derived 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine on human T cells.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Frederik C; Singer, Katrin; Poller, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Luise; Strobl, Carolin D; Limm, Katharina; Ritter, Axel P; Gottfried, Eva; Völkl, Simon; Jacobs, Benedikt; Peter, Katrin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Dettmer, Katja; Oefner, Peter J; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Kreutz, Marina P; Aigner, Michael; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment represents one of the main obstacles for immunotherapy of cancer. The tumor milieu is among others shaped by tumor metabolites such as 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Increased intratumoral MTA levels result from a lack of the MTA-catabolizing enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in tumor cells and are found in various tumor entities. Here, we demonstrate that MTA suppresses proliferation, activation, differentiation, and effector function of antigen-specific T cells without eliciting cell death. Conversely, if MTA is added to highly activated T cells, MTA exerts cytotoxic effects on T cells. We identified the Akt pathway, a critical signal pathway for T cell activation, as a target of MTA, while, for example, p38 remained unaffected. Next, we provide evidence that MTA exerts its immunosuppressive effects by interfering with protein methylation in T cells. To confirm the relevance of the suppressive effects of exogenously added MTA on human T cells, we used an MTAP-deficient tumor cell-line that was stably transfected with the MTAP-coding sequence. We observed that T cells stimulated with MTAP-transfected tumor cells revealed a higher proliferative capacity compared to T cells stimulated with Mock-transfected cells. In conclusion, our findings reveal a novel immune evasion strategy of human tumor cells that could be of interest for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27622058

  17. Identification of internalizing human single chain antibodies targeting brain tumor sphere cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Hashizume, Rintaro; James, C. David; Berger, Mitchel S.; Liu, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor and there is no curative treatment to date. Resistance to conventional therapies and tumor recurrence pose major challenges to treatment and management of this disease, and therefore new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. Previous studies by other investigators have shown that a subpopulation of GBM cells can grow as neurosphere-like cells when cultured in restrictive media, and exhibit enhanced tumor initiating ability and resistance to therapy. We report here the identification of internalizing human single chain antibodies (scFvs) targeting GBM tumor sphere cells. We selected a large naive phage antibody display library on the glycosylation-dependent CD133 epitope-positive subpopulation of GBM cells grown as tumor spheres and identified internalizing scFvs that target tumor sphere cells broadly, as well as scFvs that target the CD133 positive subpopulation. These scFvs were found to be efficiently internalized by GBM tumor sphere cells. One scFv GC4 inhibited self-renewal of GBM tumor sphere cells in vitro. We have further developed a full-length human IgG1 based on this scFv and found that it potently inhibits proliferation of GBM tumor sphere cells and GBM cells grown in regular non-selective media. Taken together, these results show that internalizing human scFvs targeting brain tumor sphere cells can be readily identified from a phage antibody display library, which could be useful for further development of novel therapies that target subpopulations of GBM cells to combat recurrence and resistance to treatment. PMID:20587664

  18. Transport processes in biological systems: Tumoral cells and human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    The entropy generation approach has been developed for the analysis of complex systems, with particular regards to biological systems, in order to evaluate their stationary states. The entropy generation is related to the transport processes related to exergy flows. Moreover, cancer can be described as an open complex dynamic and self-organizing system. Consequently, it is used as an example useful to evaluate the different thermo-chemical quantities of the transport processes in normal and in tumoral cells systems.

  19. Expansion of human tumor infiltrating lymphocytes for use in immunotherapy trials.

    PubMed

    Topalian, S L; Muul, L M; Solomon, D; Rosenberg, S A

    1987-08-24

    The potential utility of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in the adoptive immunotherapy of human tumors has been suggested by murine experiments showing these cells to be 50-100 times more powerful than LAK cells in treating advanced metastatic disease. A method for the large-scale expansion of human TIL for the use of these cells in clinical trials is described in this report. TIL were successfully expanded on an experimental scale from 24 of 25 consecutive human tumors, including six melanomas, ten sarcomas, and eight adenocarcinomas. Tumors were digested enzymatically to yield single cell suspensions which were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium with 10% human serum and 1000 U/ml recombinant interleukin-2. Lymphocytes constituted from 3% to 74% of single cell tumor suspensions, and expanded from 2.9-fold to 9.1 X 10(8)-fold over a culture period ranging from 14 to 100 days. Nine of 24 TIL cultures lysed fresh autologous tumor targets in 4 h chromium release assays. Cell surface phenotyping identified cultured TIL as activated cytotoxic/suppressor T cells. Subsequently, large-scale expansion of TIL was successful in generating more than 10(10) lymphocytes in five of eight consecutive cases. Clinical trials employing the adoptive transfer of expanded TIL to patients with metastatic disease have begun. PMID:3305708

  20. Tumor-Associated Neutrophils Show Phenotypic and Functional Divergence in Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shilpi; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-07-11

    Studies in murine cancer models have demonstrated the phenotypic and functional divergence of neutrophils; however, their role in pro- or anti-tumor responses in human remains elusive. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Singhal et al. report the existence of specialized subsets of neutrophils in human lung cancer with diverging functions. PMID:27411583

  1. The Significance of the Discordant Occurrence of Lens Tumors in Humans versus Other Species

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Daniel M.; Phelps, Paul O.; Surapaneni, Krishna R.; Thuro, Bradley A.; Potter, Heather D.; Ikeda, Akihiro; Teixeira, Leandro B. C.; Dubielzig, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine in which species and under what conditions lens tumors occur. Design A review of data bases of available human and veterinary ocular pathological material and the previously reported literature. Participants Approximately 18,000 patients who had ocular surgical specimens submitted and studied at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (UWSMPH) between 1920 and 2014 and 45,000 ocular veterinary cases from the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin (COPLOW) between 1983 and 2014. Methods Material in two major archived collections at the University of Wisconsin medical and veterinary schools were studied for occurrence of lens tumors. Tumor was defined as “a new growth of tissue characterized by progressive, uncontrolled proliferation of cells.” In addition, cases presented at 3 major eye pathology societies (Verhoeff-Zimmerman Ophthalmic Pathology Society, Eastern Ophthalmic Pathology Society, and The Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Ophthalmic Alumni Society) from 1975 through 2014 were reviewed. Finally, a careful search of the literature was carried out. Approval from the IRB to carry out this study was obtained. Main Outcome Measures The presence of tumors of the lens. Results The database search and literature review failed to find an example of a lens tumor in humans. In contrast, examples of naturally occurring lens tumors were found in cats, dogs, rabbits, and birds. 4.5% of feline intraocular and adnexal neoplasms (234/5153) in the veterinary school database were designated as feline ocular post-traumatic sarcoma (FOPTS), a tumor previously demonstrated to be of lens epithelial origin. Similar tumors were seen in rabbit eyes, a bird, and in a dog. All four species with lens tumors had a history of either ocular trauma or protracted uveitis. The literature search also revealed cases where lens tumors were induced in zebrafish, rainbow trout, hamsters, and mice, by

  2. Combination Therapy with Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate and Doxorubicin in Human Prostate Tumor Modeling Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stearns, Mark E.; Amatangelo, Michael D.; Varma, Devika; Sell, Chris; Goodyear, Shaun M.

    2010-01-01

    The polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in combination with doxorubicin (Dox) exhibits a synergistic activity in blocking the growth and colony-forming ability of human prostate cell lines in vitro. EGCG has been found to disrupt the mitochondrial membrane potential, induce vesiculation of mitochondria, and induce elevated poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and apoptosis. EGCG in combination with low levels of Dox had a synergistic effect in blocking tumor cell growth. In vivo tumor modeling studies with a highly metastatic tumor line, PC-3ML cells, revealed that EGCG (228 mg/kg or 200 μmol/L) appeared to sensitize tumors to Dox. EGCG combined with low levels of Dox (0.14 mg/kg or 2 μmol/L) blocked tumor growth by PC-3ML cells injected intraperitoneally (ie, in CB17 severe combined immunodeficiencies) and significantly increased mouse survival rates. Similarly, relatively low levels of EGCG (57 mg/kg or 50 μmol/L) plus Dox (0.07 mg/kg or 1 μmol/L) eradicated established tumors (ie, in nonobese diabetic–severe combined immunodeficiencies) that were derived from CD44hi tumor-initiating cells isolated from PCa-20a cells. Flow cytometry results showed that EGCG appeared to enhance retention of Dox by tumor cells to synergistically inhibit tumor growth and eradicate tumors. These data suggest that localized delivery of high dosages of EGCG combined with low levels of Dox may have significant clinical application in the treatment of metastatic prostate and/or eradication of primary tumors derived from tumor-initiating cells. PMID:20971741

  3. Establishment of a human multiple myeloma xenograft model in the chicken to study tumor growth, invasion and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martowicz, Agnieszka; Kern, Johann; Gunsilius, Eberhard; Untergasser, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), a malignant plasma cell disease, remains incurable and novel drugs are required to improve the prognosis of patients. Due to the lack of the bone microenvironment and auto/paracrine growth factors human MM cells are difficult to cultivate. Therefore, there is an urgent need to establish proper in vitro and in vivo culture systems to study the action of novel therapeutics on human MM cells. Here we present a model to grow human multiple myeloma cells in a complex 3D environment in vitro and in vivo. MM cell lines OPM-2 and RPMI-8226 were transfected to express the transgene GFP and were cultivated in the presence of human mesenchymal cells and collagen type-I matrix as three-dimensional spheroids. In addition, spheroids were grafted on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos and tumor growth was monitored by stereo fluorescence microscopy. Both models allow the study of novel therapeutic drugs in a complex 3D environment and the quantification of the tumor cell mass after homogenization of grafts in a transgene-specific GFP-ELISA. Moreover, angiogenic responses of the host and invasion of tumor cells into the subjacent host tissue can be monitored daily by a stereo microscope and analyzed by immunohistochemical staining against human tumor cells (Ki-67, CD138, Vimentin) or host mural cells covering blood vessels (desmin/ASMA). In conclusion, the onplant system allows studying MM cell growth and angiogenesis in a complex 3D environment and enables screening for novel therapeutic compounds targeting survival and proliferation of MM cells. PMID:25993267

  4. Reactivating p53 functions by suppressing its novel inhibitor iASPP: a potential therapeutic opportunity in p53 wild-type tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Peixin; Ihira, Kei; Hamada, Junichi; Watari, Hidemichi; Yamada, Takahiro; Hosaka, Masayoshi; Hanley, Sharon J.B.; Kudo, Masataka; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    Although mutational inactivation of p53 is found in 50% of all human tumors, a subset of tumors display defective p53 function, but retain wild-type (WT) p53. Here, direct and indirect mechanisms leading to the loss of WT p53 activities are discussed. We summarize the oncogenic roles of iASPP, an inhibitor of WT p53, in promoting proliferation, invasion, drug or radiation-resistance and metastasis. From the therapeutic view, we highlight promising perspectives of microRNA-124, peptide and small molecules that reduce or block iASPP for the treatment of cancer. High iASPP expression enhances proliferation, aggressive behavior, the resistance to radiation/chemotherapy and correlates with poor prognosis in a range of human tumors. Overexpression of iASPP accelerates tumorigenesis and invasion through p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. MicroRNA-124 directly targets iASPP and represses the growth and invasiveness of cancer cells. The disruption of iASPP-p53 interaction by a p53-derived peptide A34 restores p53 function in cancer cells. The inhibition of iASPP phosphorylation with small molecules induces p53-dependent apoptosis and growth suppression. The mechanisms underlying aberrant expression of iASPP in human tumors should be further investigated. Reactivating WT p53 functions by targeting its novel inhibitor iASPP holds promise for potential therapeutic interventions in the treatment of WT p53-containing tumors. PMID:26343523

  5. MDM2 small-molecule antagonist RG7112 activates p53 signaling and regresses human tumors in preclinical cancer models.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Christian; Graves, Bradford; Packman, Kathryn; Filipovic, Zoran; Higgins, Brian; Xia, Mingxuan; Tardell, Christine; Garrido, Rosario; Lee, Edmund; Kolinsky, Kenneth; To, Kwong-Him; Linn, Michael; Podlaski, Frank; Wovkulich, Peter; Vu, Binh; Vassilev, Lyubomir T

    2013-04-15

    MDM2 negatively regulates p53 stability and many human tumors overproduce MDM2 as a mechanism to restrict p53 function. Thus, inhibitors of p53-MDM2 binding that can reactivate p53 in cancer cells may offer an effective approach for cancer therapy. RG7112 is a potent and selective member of the nutlin family of MDM2 antagonists currently in phase I clinical studies. RG7112 binds MDM2 with high affinity (K(D) ~ 11 nmol/L), blocking its interactions with p53 in vitro. A crystal structure of the RG7112-MDM2 complex revealed that the small molecule binds in the p53 pocket of MDM2, mimicking the interactions of critical p53 amino acid residues. Treatment of cancer cells expressing wild-type p53 with RG7112 activated the p53 pathway, leading to cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. RG7112 showed potent antitumor activity against a panel of solid tumor cell lines. However, its apoptotic activity varied widely with the best response observed in osteosarcoma cells with MDM2 gene amplification. Interestingly, inhibition of caspase activity did not change the kinetics of p53-induced cell death. Oral administration of RG7112 to human xenograft-bearing mice at nontoxic concentrations caused dose-dependent changes in proliferation/apoptosis biomarkers as well as tumor inhibition and regression. Notably, RG7112 was highly synergistic with androgen deprivation in LNCaP xenograft tumors. Our findings offer a preclinical proof-of-concept that RG7112 is effective in treatment of solid tumors expressing wild-type p53. PMID:23400593

  6. Human Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in Confiscated Gorilla

    PubMed Central

    Oxford, Kristie L.; Gardner-Roberts, David; Kinani, Jean-Felix; Spelman, Lucy; Barry, Peter A.; Cranfield, Michael R.; Lowenstine, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, we detected human herpes simplex virus type 1, which caused stomatitis, in a juvenile confiscated eastern lowland gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) that had a high degree of direct contact with human caretakers. Our findings confirm that pathogens can transfer between nonhuman primate hosts and humans. PMID:25341185

  7. Human herpes simplex virus type 1 in confiscated gorilla.

    PubMed

    Gilardi, Kirsten V K; Oxford, Kristie L; Gardner-Roberts, David; Kinani, Jean-Felix; Spelman, Lucy; Barry, Peter A; Cranfield, Michael R; Lowenstine, Linda J

    2014-11-01

    In 2007, we detected human herpes simplex virus type 1, which caused stomatitis, in a juvenile confiscated eastern lowland gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) that had a high degree of direct contact with human caretakers. Our findings confirm that pathogens can transfer between nonhuman primate hosts and humans. PMID:25341185

  8. Cytotoxic activity and absence of tumor growth stimulation of standardized mistletoe extracts in human tumor models in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kelter, Gerhard; Schierholz, Jörg M; Fischer, Imma U; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert

    2007-01-01

    Mistletoe extracts are widely used in complementary and alternative cancer therapy in Europe. The extracts possess cytotoxic, as well as immunostimulatory effects. However, some investigators have suggested that low doses of mistletoe extracts could also induce tumor growth. The mistletoe extracts Helixor A, Helixor M and Helixor P were investigated for growth inhibitory and stimulatory effects in a panel of 38 human tumor cell lines in vitro. Mistletoe lectin I (ML-1), adriamycin and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were used as reference compounds. All three mistletoe preparations showed cytotoxic activity [T/C (Test/Control) < 30%]: Helixor P was the most potent, followed by Helixor M and Helixor A with IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) values of 68.4, 114 and 133 microg/ml, respectively. The IC50 values of ML-1 and adriamycin were 0.026 and 0.069 microg/ml. None of the human tumor cell lines in the panel showed growth stimulation (T/C (Test/Control) > 125%) by the mistletoe extracts or ML-1, apart from two exceptions in the colon carcinoma cell line HCC-2998, in which Helixor M and ML-1 showed a marginal stimulation (TIC 128% and 131%, respectively) at one concentration only. Further investigations into the latter effect of Helixor M and ML-1 in the HCC-2998 line using five different proliferation assays, modified cell culture conditions and the identical production charge of mistletoe extract, as well as a new one, did not confirm the previous observation. It was concluded that the marginal stimulation found in the earlier experiments was a statistical coincidence. Helixor mistletoe preparations and ML-1 have cytotoxic activity and do not stimulate tumor cell proliferation in vitro which is in accordance with previous scientifically based observations on aqueous mistletoe extracts. PMID:17352237

  9. Intermediate-sized filaments and specific markers in a human salivary gland adenocarcinoma cell line and its nude mouse tumors.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Hayashi, Y; Yanagawa, T; Yoshida, H; Yura, Y; Azuma, M; Ueno, A

    1985-08-01

    The adenocarcinoma cell line HSG from human salivary gland, which proliferates in vitro or in nude mice, was examined by the immunoperoxidase method for the expression of three different types of intermediate-sized filaments (IFs) and of specific antigens such as carcinoembryonic antigen, S-100 protein, secretory component, lactoferrin, myosin, tropomyosin, and actin. The cultured HSG cells were found to express three different types of IFs defined by antibodies to keratin, vimentin, and desmin. In HSG cells proliferating in vitro at 34 degrees C and 37 degrees C but not at 39 degrees C, the expression of tropomyosin and carcinoembryonic antigen was observed, although myosin and S-100 protein were not detected. The expressions of actin, lactoferrin, and secretory component were restricted to cultured HSG cells at 39 degrees C and 37 degrees C, respectively. Transplantation of HSG cells into nude mice resulted in the establishment of a nude mouse system with malignant characteristics such as invasion and metastasis. The expression of IFs in the primary tumors was restricted to keratin and desmin IFs, whereas coexpression of keratin, vimentin, and desmin IFs was observed in some neoplastic cells present in the metastatic tumors in regional lymph nodes and lung. In addition, expression of actin, myosin, tropomyosin, and S-100 protein was found in the metastatic tumors, whereas myosin and S-100 protein were not detected in the primary tumors. Moreover, the metastatic tumors were almost occupied by the neoplastic cells with oncocytic changes, although oncocytic change was not found in the cultured HSG cells and their primary tumors. PMID:2410104

  10. Dystrophin is a tumor suppressor in human cancers with myogenic programs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexiang; Marino-Enriquez, Adrian; Bennett, Richard R; Zhu, Meijun; Shen, Yiping; Eilers, Grant; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Henze, Joern; Fletcher, Benjamin S; Gu, Zhizhan; Fox, Edward A; Antonescu, Cristina R; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Guo, Xiangqian; Raut, Chandrajit P; Demetri, George D; van de Rijn, Matt; Ordog, Tamas; Kunkel, Louis M; Fletcher, Jonathan A

    2014-06-01

    Many common human mesenchymal tumors, including gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) and leiomyosarcoma (LMS), feature myogenic differentiation. Here we report that intragenic deletion of the dystrophin-encoding and muscular dystrophy-associated DMD gene is a frequent mechanism by which myogenic tumors progress to high-grade, lethal sarcomas. Dystrophin is expressed in the non-neoplastic and benign counterparts of GIST, RMS and LMS tumors, and DMD deletions inactivate larger dystrophin isoforms, including 427-kDa dystrophin, while preserving the expression of an essential 71-kDa isoform. Dystrophin inhibits myogenic sarcoma cell migration, invasion, anchorage independence and invadopodia formation, and dystrophin inactivation was found in 96%, 100% and 62% of metastatic GIST, embryonal RMS and LMS samples, respectively. These findings validate dystrophin as a tumor suppressor and likely anti-metastatic factor, suggesting that therapies in development for muscular dystrophies may also have relevance in the treatment of cancer. PMID:24793134

  11. [Primary hepatic lymphoma of MALT-type: a tumor that can simulate a liver metastasis].

    PubMed

    Chatelain, D; Maes, C; Yzet, T; Brevet, M; Bounicaud, D; Plachot, J-P; Verhaeghe, P

    2006-02-01

    Primary hepatic lymphomas are rare tumors. We report a case of a 72 year-old woman with a past history of colonic adenocarcinoma who presented primary hepatic lymphoma of MALT-type. The patient had been operated on 3 years before for colonic adenocarcinoma, pT3N0, revealed by a bowel obstructive syndrome. She had been treated by chemotherapy for 6 months. During the follow-up, the computed tomography-scan (CT-scan) revealed the presence of a not well-demarcated mass in segment III of the liver, measuring 4 cm in diameter. The tumor was hypodense and was not enhanced on dynamic study. The mass was already present on the initial CT-scan. Left lobectomy was performed with the diagnosis of liver metastasis of the colonic adenocarcinoma. Surgical specimen showed a tumor composed of a dense infiltrate of small lymphocytes positive for B-cell markers on immunohistochemistry. The tumor contained reactive lymphoid follicles and there were numerous lympho-epithelial biliary lesions. The patient is alive and free of disease 2 years after the diagnosis. Primary hepatic lymphoma of MALT-type is a low-grade B cell lymphoma. Twenty-five cases had been reported in the literature so far. The patients were 16 females and 9 males, mean age 63.5 years. The pathogenesis is still unclear but half of the patients had a past history of chronic inflammatory liver disease (hepatitis B or C virus infection, ascaris infection, primary biliary cirrhosis) or malignant neoplasm. This tumor has a good prognosis; it is usually limited to the liver and surgical resection cures the patient in most cases. PMID:16246295

  12. Polymorphic Admixture Typing in Human Ethnic Populations

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Michael; Stephens, J. Claiborne; Winkler, Cheryl; Lomb, Deborah A.; Ramsburg, Mark; Boaze, Raleigh; Stewart, Claudia; Charbonneau, Lauren; Goldman, David; Albaugh, Bernard J.; Goedert, James J.; Beasley, R. Palmer; Hwang, Lu-Yu; Buchbinder, Susan; Weedon, Michael; Johnson, Patricia A.; Eichelberger, Mary; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    A panel of 257 RFLP loci was selected on the basis of high heterozygosity in Caucasian DNA surveys and equivalent spacing throughout the human genome. Probes from each locus were used in a Southern blot survey of allele frequency distribution for four human ethnic groups: Caucasian, African American, Asian (Chinese), and American Indian (Cheyenne). Nearly all RFLP loci were polymorphic in each group, albeit with a broad range of differing allele frequencies (δ). The distribution of frequency differences (δ values) was used for three purposes: (1) to provide estimates for genetic distance (differentiation) among these ethnic groups, (2) to revisit with a large data set the proportion of human genetic variation attributable to differentiation within ethnic groups, and (3) to identify loci with high δ values between recently admixed populations of use in mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium (MALD). Although most markers display significant allele frequency differences between ethnic groups, the overall genetic distances between ethnic groups were small (.066–.098), and <10% of the measured overall molecular genetic diversity in these human samples can be attributed to “racial” differentiation. The median δ values for pairwise comparisons between groups fell between .15 and .20, permitting identification of highly informative RFLP loci for MALD disease association studies. PMID:7942857

  13. The expression of BST2 in human and experimental mouse brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Derek A; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Han, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2011-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (grade IV astrocytoma) is a highly malignant brain tumor with poor treatment options and an average lifespan of 15 months after diagnosis. Previous work has demonstrated that BST2 (bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2; also known as PDCA-1, CD137 and HM1.24) is expressed by multiple myeloma, endometrial cancer and primary lung cancer cells. BST2 is expressed on the plasma membrane, which makes it an ideal target for immunotherapy. Accordingly, several groups have shown BST2 mAb to be effective for targeting tumor cells. In this report, we hypothesized that BST2 is expressed in human and mouse brain tumors and plays a critical role in brain tumor progression. We show that BST2 expression is upregulated at both the mRNA and protein level in high grade when compared to low grade human astrocytoma (p<0.05). To test the relevance of BST2, we utilized the intracranially (IC)-injected GL261 cell-based malignant brain tumor mouse model. We show that BST2 mRNA expression is increased in mouse brain IC-injected with GL261 cells, when compared to mouse brain IC-injected with saline at 3 weeks post-operative (p<0.05). Furthermore, BST2 immunofluorescence predominantly localized to mouse brain tumor cells. Finally, mice IC-injected with GL261 cells transduced with shRNA for BST2±preincubated with BST2 mAb show no difference in overall lifespan when compared to mice IC-injected with GL261 cells transduced with a scrambled shRNA±preincubated with BST2 mAb. Collectively, these data show that while BST2 expression increases during brain tumor progression in both human and mouse brain tumors, it has no apparent consequences to overall lifespan in an orthotopic mouse brain tumor model. PMID:21565182

  14. Eribulin mesylate reduces tumor microenvironment abnormality by vascular remodeling in preclinical human breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yusuke; Semba, Taro; Uesugi, Mai; Ozawa, Yoichi; Tohyama, Osamu; Uehara, Taisuke; Kimura, Takayuki; Watanabe, Hideki; Asano, Makoto; Kawano, Satoshi; Tizon, Xavier; McCracken, Paul J; Matsui, Junji; Aoshima, Ken; Nomoto, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshiya

    2014-10-01

    Eribulin mesylate is a synthetic macrocyclic ketone analog of the marine sponge natural product halichondrin B and an inhibitor of microtubule dynamics. Some tubulin-binding drugs are known to have antivascular (antiangiogenesis or vascular-disrupting) activities that can target abnormal tumor vessels. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analyses, here we show that eribulin induces remodeling of tumor vasculature through a novel antivascular activity in MX-1 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenograft models. Vascular remodeling associated with improved perfusion was shown by Hoechst 33342 staining and by increased microvessel density together with decreased mean vascular areas and fewer branched vessels in tumor tissues, as determined by immunohistochemical staining for endothelial marker CD31. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of normal host cells in the stroma of xenograft tumors showed that eribulin altered the expression of mouse (host) genes in angiogenesis signaling pathways controlling endothelial cell-pericyte interactions, and in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition pathway in the context of the tumor microenvironment. Eribulin also decreased hypoxia-associated protein expression of mouse (host) vascular endothelial growth factor by ELISA and human CA9 by immunohistochemical analysis. Prior treatment with eribulin enhanced the anti-tumor activity of capecitabine in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. These findings suggest that eribulin-induced remodeling of abnormal tumor vasculature leads to a more functional microenvironment that may reduce the aggressiveness of tumors due to elimination of inner tumor hypoxia. Because abnormal tumor microenvironments enhance both drug resistance and metastasis, the apparent ability of eribulin to reverse these aggressive characteristics may contribute to its clinical benefits. PMID:25060424

  15. Eribulin mesylate reduces tumor microenvironment abnormality by vascular remodeling in preclinical human breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yusuke; Semba, Taro; Uesugi, Mai; Ozawa, Yoichi; Tohyama, Osamu; Uehara, Taisuke; Kimura, Takayuki; Watanabe, Hideki; Asano, Makoto; Kawano, Satoshi; Tizon, Xavier; McCracken, Paul J; Matsui, Junji; Aoshima, Ken; Nomoto, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    Eribulin mesylate is a synthetic macrocyclic ketone analog of the marine sponge natural product halichondrin B and an inhibitor of microtubule dynamics. Some tubulin-binding drugs are known to have antivascular (antiangiogenesis or vascular-disrupting) activities that can target abnormal tumor vessels. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analyses, here we show that eribulin induces remodeling of tumor vasculature through a novel antivascular activity in MX-1 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenograft models. Vascular remodeling associated with improved perfusion was shown by Hoechst 33342 staining and by increased microvessel density together with decreased mean vascular areas and fewer branched vessels in tumor tissues, as determined by immunohistochemical staining for endothelial marker CD31. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of normal host cells in the stroma of xenograft tumors showed that eribulin altered the expression of mouse (host) genes in angiogenesis signaling pathways controlling endothelial cell–pericyte interactions, and in the epithelial–mesenchymal transition pathway in the context of the tumor microenvironment. Eribulin also decreased hypoxia-associated protein expression of mouse (host) vascular endothelial growth factor by ELISA and human CA9 by immunohistochemical analysis. Prior treatment with eribulin enhanced the anti-tumor activity of capecitabine in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. These findings suggest that eribulin-induced remodeling of abnormal tumor vasculature leads to a more functional microenvironment that may reduce the aggressiveness of tumors due to elimination of inner tumor hypoxia. Because abnormal tumor microenvironments enhance both drug resistance and metastasis, the apparent ability of eribulin to reverse these aggressive characteristics may contribute to its clinical benefits. PMID:25060424

  16. Strategies for Human Tumor Virus Discoveries: From Microscopic Observation to Digital Transcriptome Subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Mirvish, Ezra D.; Shuda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Over 20% of human cancers worldwide are associated with infectious agents, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Various methods have been used to identify human tumor viruses, including electron microscopic observations of viral particles, immunologic screening, cDNA library screening, nucleic acid hybridization, consensus PCR, viral DNA array chip, and representational difference analysis. With the Human Genome Project, a large amount of genetic information from humans and other organisms has accumulated over the last decade. Utilizing the available genetic databases, Feng et al. (2007) developed digital transcriptome subtraction (DTS), an in silico method to sequentially subtract human sequences from tissue or cellular transcriptome, and discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) from Merkel cell carcinoma. Here, we review the background and methods underlying the human tumor virus discoveries and explain how DTS was developed and used for the discovery of MCV. PMID:27242703

  17. Strategies for Human Tumor Virus Discoveries: From Microscopic Observation to Digital Transcriptome Subtraction.

    PubMed

    Mirvish, Ezra D; Shuda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Over 20% of human cancers worldwide are associated with infectious agents, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Various methods have been used to identify human tumor viruses, including electron microscopic observations of viral particles, immunologic screening, cDNA library screening, nucleic acid hybridization, consensus PCR, viral DNA array chip, and representational difference analysis. With the Human Genome Project, a large amount of genetic information from humans and other organisms has accumulated over the last decade. Utilizing the available genetic databases, Feng et al. (2007) developed digital transcriptome subtraction (DTS), an in silico method to sequentially subtract human sequences from tissue or cellular transcriptome, and discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) from Merkel cell carcinoma. Here, we review the background and methods underlying the human tumor virus discoveries and explain how DTS was developed and used for the discovery of MCV. PMID:27242703

  18. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor mRNA expression by human pituitary tumors in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J M; Klibanski, A

    1994-01-01

    An important question in the pathogenesis and regulation of human gonadotroph adenomas is whether heterogeneous gonadotropin responses to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) are due to dysregulation of GnRH receptor biosynthesis and/or cell-signaling pathways. We investigated gonadotropin responsiveness to pulsatile GnRH in 13 gonadotroph adenomas. All tumors had evidence of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) beta and alpha subunit biosynthesis using reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) techniques. Four tumors significantly increased gonadotropin and/or free subunit secretion during pulsatile 10(-8) M GnRH administration. The GnRH antagonist Antide (10(-6) to 10(-8) M) blocked secretory increases in all GnRH-responsive tumors. Gonadotropin and/or free subunit secretion increased after 60 mM KCl, confirming that GnRH nonresponsiveness was not due to intracellular gonadotropin depletion. We hypothesized that GnRH nonresponsiveness in these tumors may be due to GnRH receptor (GnRH-Rc) biosynthetic defects. RTPCR analyses detected GnRH-Rc transcripts only in responsive tumors and normal human pituitary. This is the first demonstration of a cell-surface receptor biosynthetic defect in human pituitary tumors. We conclude (a) one third of gonadotroph tumors respond to pulsatile GnRH in vitro, (b) GnRH-Rc mRNA is detected in human gonadotroph adenomas and predicts GnRH responsiveness, and (c) GnRH-Rc biosynthetic defects may underlie GnRH nonresponsiveness in gonadotroph tumors. Images PMID:8200967

  19. Genomic analysis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and human tumors: a rational approach to preclinical model selection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Wawrose, John S.; Gooding, William E.; Garraway, Levi A.; Lui, Vivian Wai Yan; Peyser, Noah D.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common type of cancer worldwide. The increasing amount of genomic information on human tumors and cell lines provides more biological data to design preclinical studies. We and others previously reported whole exome sequencing data of 106 HNSCC primary tumors. In 2012, high throughput genomic data and pharmacological profiling of anticancer drugs of hundreds of cancer cell lines were reported. Here we compared the genomic data of 39 HNSCC cell lines with the genomic findings in 106 HNSCC tumors. Amplification of eight genes (PIK3CA, EGFR, CCND2, KDM5A, ERBB2, PMS1, FGFR1 and WHSCIL1) and deletion of five genes (CDKN2A, SMAD4, NOTCH2, NRAS and TRIM33) were found in both HNSCC cell lines and tumors. Seventeen genes were only mutated in HNSCC cell lines (>10%) suggesting that these mutations may arise through immortalization in tissue culture. Conversely, 11 genes were only mutated in >10% of human HNSCC tumors. Several mutant genes in the EGFR pathway are shared both in cell lines and in tumors. Pharmacological profiling of eight anticancer agents in six HNSCC cell lines suggested that PIK3CA mutation may serve as a predictive biomarker for the drugs targeting the EGFR/PI3K pathway. These findings suggest that a correlation of gene mutations between HNSCC cell lines and human tumors may be used to guide the selection of preclinical models for translational research. PMID:24425785

  20. Dense type I collagen matrices that support cellular remodeling and microfabrication for studies of tumor angiogenesis and vasculogenesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Valerie L.; Zheng, Ying; Choi, Nak Won; Verbridge, Scott S.; Sutermaster, Bryan A.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Fischbach, Claudia; Stroock, Abraham D.

    2010-01-01

    Type I collagen is a favorable substrate for cell adhesion and growth and is remodelable by many tissue cells; these characteristics make it an attractive material for the study of dynamic cellular processes. Low mass fraction (1.0–3.0 mg/ml), hydrated collagen matrices used for three-dimensional cell culture permit cellular movement and remodeling, but their microstructure and mechanics fail to mimic characteristics of many extracellular matrices in vivo and limit the definition of fine-scale geometrical features (< 1 mm) within scaffolds. In this study, we worked with hydrated type I collagen at mass fractions between 3.0 and 20 mg/ml to define the range of densities over which the matrices support both microfabrication and cellular remodeling. We present pore and fiber dimensions based on confocal microscopy and longitudinal modulus and hydraulic permeability based on confined compression. We demonstrate faithful reproduction of simple pores of 50 µm-diameter over the entire range and formation of functional microfluidic networks for mass fractions greater than 10.0 mg/ml. We present quantitative characterization of the rate and extent of cellular remodelability using human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Finally, we present a co-culture with tumor cells and discuss the implications of integrating microfluidic control within scaffolds as a tool to study spatial and temporal signaling during tumor angiogenesis and vascularization of tissue-engineered constructs. PMID:20727585

  1. Metabolic shifts induced by human H460 cells in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linsheng; Wang, Yaqiong; Zheng, Tian; Cao, Bei; Li, Mengjie; Shi, Jian; Aa, Nan; Wang, Xinwen; Zhao, Chunyan; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2016-03-01

    Tumor markers are most popularly used in diagnosis of various cancers clinically. However, the confounding factors of individual background diversities, such as genetics, food preferences, living styles, physical exercises, etc., greatly challenge the identification of tumor markers. Study of the metabolic impact of inoculated tumors on model animals can facilitate the identification of metabolomic markers relevant to tumor insult. In this study, serum metabolites from nude mice (n = 14) inoculated with human H460 cells (human nonsmall cell lung carcinoma) were profiled using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mice with inoculated tumors showed an obviously different metabolic pattern from the control; identification of the discriminatory metabolites suggested the metabolic perturbation of free fatty acids, amino acids, glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle turnover. The significantly decreased TCA intermediates, free fatty acids, 3-hydroxybutyric acid and fluctuating amino acids (t-test, p < 0.05) in serum of tumor-bearing mice characterized the metabolic impact of local inoculated H460 tumor cells on the whole system. This indicates that they are candidate metabolomic markers for translational study of lung cancer, clinically. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26147780

  2. Small Cell Type of Esophageal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma Resembling a Submucosal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Chino, Osamu; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu; Ozawa, Soji; Shimada, Hideo; Nishi, Takayuki; Kise, Yoshifumi; Hara, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Soichiro; Kazuno, Akihito; Kajiwara, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    We report a rare case of primary small cell type esophageal neuroendocrine carcinoma with a unusual endoscopic form similar to a submucosal tumor with the results of the histological and immunohistochemical analyses. A 57-year-old woman with dysphagia was referred to our hospital for further examination and treatment, and was diagnosed as type 1s esophageal carcinoma in the middle thoracic esophagus. Endoscopy revealed a protruding esophageal carcinoma resembling a submucosal tumor with an irregular and nodular surface covered by non-neoplastic epithelium stained with iodine. Analysis of the esophageal biopsy specimen revealed poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Based on a diagnosis of type 1s carcinoma in the middle thoracic esophagus that was 5 cm in size longitudinally, a radical esophagectomy with three-field lymph node dissection was performed. The pathological examination with histological and immunohistochemical analysis of the resected specimen revealed a small cell type neuroendocrine carcinoma overlaid by a non-neoplastic epithelium, extending into the adventitia without lymph node metastasis (T3, N0, M0, Stage II). However, multiple metastases in the brain and lung developed 3 months postoperatively, and the patient died of the cancer 7 months after the operation. This was a rare case of a highly malignant primary small cell type esophageal neuroendocrine carcinoma showing extremely rare form. PMID:26150181

  3. Multiple Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, Makoto; Isogaki, Jun; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yajima, Kiyoshige; Okumura, Takuya; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Kawabe, Akihiro; Komiyama, Akira; Hirota, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are relatively common in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF 1) patients. Approximately 90% of GISTs associated with NF 1 are located in the small intestine, while sporadic GISTs are most commonly located in the stomach. Here we report an extremely rare case of an NF 1 patient with multiple gastric GITs (90 or more) but without multiple small intestinal tumors. A 63-year-old female patient who had a history of NF 1 underwent surgery for a gastric neuroendocrine tumor and gastric submucosal tumor (SMT). During the operation, multiple small nodules were identified on the serosal surface of the upper stomach. SMT and multiple nodules on the serosal surface were diagnosed as GISTs consisting of spindle cells positive for KIT, CD34, and DOG-1. Both GIST and the normal gastric mucosa showed no mutations not only in the c-kit gene (exons 8, 9, 11, 13, and 17) but also in the PDGFRA gene (exons 12, 14, and 18). This patient is being followed up without the administration of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. PMID:27375917

  4. Soft tissue perineurioma and other unusual tumors in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Ströbel, Philipp; Thiha, Aung; Sohns, Jan Martin; Mühlfeld, Christian; Küffer, Stefan; Felmerer, Gunther; Stepniewski, Adam; Pauli, Silke; Agaimy, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Perineurioma is a rare benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor featuring perineurial differentiation. Perineurioma occurs sporadically with only one reported case in the setting of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). We present a 6.7-cm soft tissue perineurioma of the lower leg in a 51-year-old man with proven NF-1. The tumor displayed whorled and fascicular pattern with infiltrative margins and expressed EMA, GLUT-1, claudin-1, and CD34. Electron microscopy confirmed diagnosis. Furthermore, lipomatosis, cutaneous angiomatous nodules, vasculopathy, and iliac spine lesion consistent with non-ossifying fibroma were observed. Tumor DNA revealed no NF2 mutations or chromosomal aberrations but a germline NF1-deletion (c.449_502delTGTT) was detected in his blood sample. His brother displayed neurofibromas, duodenal ganglioneuroma and colonic juvenile polyp, and his mother a neurofibroma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, and jejunal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST); both were affected by NF-1. In conclusion, perineurioma may rarely be NF-1 related and should be included in the spectrum of neoplasms occurring in this disorder. PMID:24294391

  5. Multiple Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Isogaki, Jun; Yajima, Kiyoshige; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Hirota, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are relatively common in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF 1) patients. Approximately 90% of GISTs associated with NF 1 are located in the small intestine, while sporadic GISTs are most commonly located in the stomach. Here we report an extremely rare case of an NF 1 patient with multiple gastric GITs (90 or more) but without multiple small intestinal tumors. A 63-year-old female patient who had a history of NF 1 underwent surgery for a gastric neuroendocrine tumor and gastric submucosal tumor (SMT). During the operation, multiple small nodules were identified on the serosal surface of the upper stomach. SMT and multiple nodules on the serosal surface were diagnosed as GISTs consisting of spindle cells positive for KIT, CD34, and DOG-1. Both GIST and the normal gastric mucosa showed no mutations not only in the c-kit gene (exons 8, 9, 11, 13, and 17) but also in the PDGFRA gene (exons 12, 14, and 18). This patient is being followed up without the administration of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. PMID:27375917

  6. Tumor control by human cytomegalovirus in a murine model of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Coquard, Laurie; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Russo, Laetitia; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Borg, Christophe; Pothier, Pierre; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Although viruses can cause cancer, other studies reported the regression of human tumors upon viral infections. We investigated the cytoreductive potential of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in a murine model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in severe-immunodeficient mice. Infection of HepG2 cells with HCMV resulted in the absence of tumor or in a limited tumor growth following injection of cells subcutaneously. By contrast all mice injected with uninfected HepG2 cells and with HepG2 cells infected with UV-treated HCMV did develop tumors without any significant restriction. Analysis of tumors indicated that in mice injected with HCMV-infected-HepG2 cells, but not in controls, a restricted cellular proliferation was observed parallel to a limited activation of the STAT3-cyclin D1 axis, decreased formation of colonies in soft agar, and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. We conclude that HCMV can provide antitumoral effects in a murine model of HCC which requires replicative virus at some stages that results in limitation of tumor cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis mediated through the intrinsic caspase pathway. PMID:27626063

  7. Morphological evidence of neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism) in human gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Caruso, R A; Muda, A O; Bersiga, A; Rigoli, L; Inferrera, C

    2002-01-01

    The phenomenon of neutrophil-tumor cell emperipolesis or phagocytosis has been documented by light microscopy in various human carcinomas, but little is known about the cellular pathological processes and the morphological changes involved. In an attempt to clarify the nature of this phenomenon, the authors' ultrastructural studies on the relationships among neutrophils and tumor cells in human gastric carcinomas are reviewed and analyzed. At the electron microscopy level, apoptotic neutrophils were found within vacuoles of adenocarcinoma cells in 2 cases. They showed either early apoptotic morphology with perinuclear chromatin aggregation but cytoplasm integrity or late apoptotic morphology with uniform, collapsed nucleus and tightly packed cytoplasmic granules. A light microscopy review of 200 cases of resected gastric carcinomas identified 22 cases (11%) that were characterized by neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism). TUNEL staining confirmed the presence of apoptotic neutrophils within the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. This study provides light and electron microscopic evidence of apoptotic neutrophils phagocytosed by gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The morphological features of neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism) would suggest a particular mechanism of tumor-immune escape in human gastric carcinoma. PMID:12396242

  8. Synergistic action of tiazofurin with hypoxanthine and allopurinol in human neuroectodermal tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Szekeres, T; Schuchter, K; Chiba, P; Ressmann, G; Lhotka, C; Gharehbaghi, K; Szalay, S M; Pillwein, K

    1993-12-01

    The activity of IMP dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.14), the key enzyme of de novo guanylate biosynthesis, was shown to be increased in tumor cells. Tiazofurin (TR), a potent and specific inhibitor of this enzyme, proved to be effective in the treatment of refractory granulocytic leukemia in blast crisis. We examined the effects of tiazofurin as a single agent and in combination with hypoxanthine and allopurinol in six different neuroectodermal tumor cell lines, the STA-BT-3 and 146-18 human glioblastoma cell lines, the SK-N-SH, LA-N-1 and LA-N-5 human neuroblastoma cell lines, and the STA-ET-1 Ewing tumor cell line. Tiazofurin inhibited tumor cell growth with IC50 values between 2.2 microM (LA-N-1 cell line) and 550 microM (LA-N-5 cells) and caused a significant decrease of intracellular GTP pools (GTP concentrations decreased to 39-79% of control). Incorporation of [8-14C]guanine into GTP pools was determined as a measure of guanylate salvage activity; incubation with 100 microM hypoxanthine caused a 62-96% inhibition of the salvage pathway. Incubation with tiazofurin (100 microM) and hypoxanthine (100 microM) synergistically inhibited tumor cell growth, and the addition of allopurinol (100 microM) strengthened these effects. Therefore, this drug combination, inhibiting guanylate de novo and salvage pathways, may prove useful in the treatment of human neuroectodermal tumors. PMID:7903533

  9. Tumor control by human cytomegalovirus in a murine model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Coquard, Laurie; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Russo, Laetitia; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Borg, Christophe; Pothier, Pierre; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Although viruses can cause cancer, other studies reported the regression of human tumors upon viral infections. We investigated the cytoreductive potential of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in a murine model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in severe-immunodeficient mice. Infection of HepG2 cells with HCMV resulted in the absence of tumor or in a limited tumor growth following injection of cells subcutaneously. By contrast all mice injected with uninfected HepG2 cells and with HepG2 cells infected with UV-treated HCMV did develop tumors without any significant restriction. Analysis of tumors indicated that in mice injected with HCMV-infected-HepG2 cells, but not in controls, a restricted cellular proliferation was observed parallel to a limited activation of the STAT3-cyclin D1 axis, decreased formation of colonies in soft agar, and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. We conclude that HCMV can provide antitumoral effects in a murine model of HCC which requires replicative virus at some stages that results in limitation of tumor cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis mediated through the intrinsic caspase pathway. PMID:27626063

  10. Tumor-associated mutations in a conserved structural motif alter physical and biochemical properties of human RAD51 recombinase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianhong; Morrical, Milagros D.; Donigan, Katherine A.; Weidhaas, Joanne B.; Sweasy, Joann B.; Averill, April M.; Tomczak, Jennifer A.; Morrical, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Human RAD51 protein catalyzes DNA pairing and strand exchange reactions that are central to homologous recombination and homology-directed DNA repair. Successful recombination/repair requires the formation of a presynaptic filament of RAD51 on ssDNA. Mutations in BRCA2 and other proteins that control RAD51 activity are associated with human cancer. Here we describe a set of mutations associated with human breast tumors that occur in a common structural motif of RAD51. Tumor-associated D149N, R150Q and G151D mutations map to a Schellman loop motif located on the surface of the RecA homology domain of RAD51. All three variants are proficient in DNA strand exchange, but G151D is slightly more sensitive to salt than wild-type (WT). Both G151D and R150Q exhibit markedly lower catalytic efficiency for adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis compared to WT. All three mutations alter the physical properties of RAD51 nucleoprotein filaments, with G151D showing the most dramatic changes. G151D forms mixed nucleoprotein filaments with WT RAD51 that have intermediate properties compared to unmixed filaments. These findings raise the possibility that mutations in RAD51 itself may contribute to genome instability in tumor cells, either directly through changes in recombinase properties, or indirectly through changes in interactions with regulatory proteins. PMID:25539919

  11. Vav promotes differentiation of human tumoral myeloid precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Bertagnolo, Valeria; Brugnoli, Federica; Mischiati, Carlo; Sereni, Alessia; Bavelloni, Alberto; Carini, Cinzia; Capitani, Silvano . E-mail: cps@unife.it

    2005-05-15

    Vav is one of the genetic markers that correlate with the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. In T and B cells, it appears crucial for both development and functions, while, in non-lymphoid hematopoietic cells, Vav seems not involved in cell maturation, but rather in the response of mature cells to agonist-dependent proliferation and phagocytosis. We have previously demonstrated that the amount and the tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav are up-regulated in both whole cells and nuclei of tumoral promyelocytes induced to granulocytic maturation by ATRA and that tyrosine-phosphorylated Vav does not display any ATRA-induced GEF activity but contributes to the regulation of PI 3-K activity. In this study, we report that Vav accumulates in nuclei of ATRA-treated APL-derived cells and that the down-modulation of Vav prevents differentiation of tumoral promyelocytes, indicating that it is a key molecule in ATRA-dependent myeloid maturation. On the other hand, the overexpression of Vav induces an increased expression of surface markers of granulocytic differentiation without affecting the maturation-related changes of the nuclear morphology. Consistent with an effect of Vav on the transcriptional machinery, array profiling shows that the inhibition of the Syk-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav reduces the number of ATRA-induced genes. Our data support the unprecedented notion that Vav plays crucial functions in the maturation process of myeloid cells, and suggest that Vav can be regarded as a potential target for the therapeutic treatment of myeloproliferative disorders.

  12. Effect of soy isoflavones on the growth of human breast tumors: findings from preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Youngjoo

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide, and many women with breast cancer live more than 5 years after their diagnosis. Breast cancer patients and survivors have a greater interest in taking soy foods and isoflavone supplements. However, the effect of isoflavones on breast cancer remains controversial. Thus, it is critical to determine if and when isoflavones are beneficial or detrimental to breast cancer patients. According to the available preclinical data, high concentrations of isoflavones inhibit the proliferation of breast cancer cells, regardless of their estrogen receptor (ER) status. In comparison, genistein, a major isoflavone, has stimulated tumor growth at low concentrations and mitigated tamoxifen efficacy in ER-positive breast cancer. Studies have indicated that the relative levels of genistein and estrogen at the target site are important to determine the genistein effect on the ER-positive tumor growth. However, studies using ovariectomized mice and subcutaneous xenograft models might not truly reflect estrogen concentrations in human breast tumors. Moreover, it may be an oversimplification that isoflavones stimulate hormone-dependent tumor growth due to their potential estrogenic effect since studies also suggest nonestrogenic anticancer effects of isoflavones and ER-independent anticancer activity of tamoxifen. Therefore, the concentrations of isoflavones and estrogen in human breast tumors should be considered better in future preclinical studies and the parameters that can estimate those levels in breast tumors are required in human clinical/epidemiological investigation. In addition, it will be important to identify the molecular mechanisms that either inhibit or promote the growth of breast cancer cells by soy isoflavones, and use those molecules to evaluate the relevance of the preclinical findings to the human disease and to predict the health effects of isoflavones in human breast tumors. PMID:25493176

  13. Expression of endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine kinases and growth factors in human brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Kaipainen, A.; Mentula, P.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Paetau, A.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1995-01-01

    Key growth factor-receptor interactions involved in angiogenesis are possible targets for therapy of CNS tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific endothelial cell mitogen that has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis, a requirement for solid tumor growth. The expression of VEGF, the closely related placental growth factor (PIGF), the newly cloned endothelial high affinity VEGF receptors KDR and FLT1, and the endothelial orphan receptors FLT4 and Tie were analyzed by in situ hybridization in normal human brain tissue and in the following CNS tumors: gliomas, grades II, III, IV; meningiomas, grades I and II; and melanoma metastases to the cerebrum. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in the majority of low grade tumors studied and was highly expressed in cells of malignant gliomas. Significantly elevated levels of Tie, KDR, and FLT1 mRNAs, but not FLT4 mRNA, were observed in malignant tumor endothelia, as well as in endothelia of tissues directly adjacent to the tumor margin. In comparison, there was little or no receptor expression in normal brain vasculature. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that these endothelial receptors are induced during tumor progression and may play a role in tumor angiogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7856749

  14. Warburg metabolism in tumor-conditioned macrophages promotes metastasis in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Penny, Hweixian Leong; Sieow, Je Lin; Adriani, Giulia; Yeap, Wei Hseun; See Chi Ee, Peter; San Luis, Boris; Lee, Bernett; Lee, Terence; Mak, Shi Ya; Ho, Ying Swan; Lam, Kong Peng; Ong, Choon Kiat; Huang, Ruby Y J; Ginhoux, Florent; Rotzschke, Olaf; Kamm, Roger D; Wong, Siew Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) face a clinically intractable disease with poor survival rates, attributed to exceptionally high levels of metastasis. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is pronounced at inflammatory foci within the tumor; however, the immunological mechanisms promoting tumor dissemination remain unclear. It is well established that tumors exhibit the Warburg effect, a preferential use of glycolysis for energy production, even in the presence of oxygen, to support rapid growth. We hypothesized that the metabolic pathways utilized by tumor-infiltrating macrophages are altered in PDAC, conferring a pro-metastatic phenotype. We generated tumor-conditioned macrophages in vitro, in which human peripheral blood monocytes were cultured with conditioned media generated from normal pancreatic or PDAC cell lines to obtain steady-state and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), respectively. Compared with steady-state macrophages, TAMs promoted vascular network formation, augmented extravasation of tumor cells out of blood vessels, and induced higher levels of EMT. TAMs exhibited a pronounced glycolytic signature in a metabolic flux assay, corresponding with elevated glycolytic gene transcript levels. Inhibiting glycolysis in TAMs with a competitive inhibitor to Hexokinase II (HK2), 2-deoxyglucose (2DG), was sufficient to disrupt this pro-metastatic phenotype, reversing the observed increases in TAM-supported angiogenesis, extravasation, and EMT. Our results indicate a key role for metabolic reprogramming of tumor-infiltrating macrophages in PDAC metastasis, and highlight the therapeutic potential of using pharmacologics to modulate these metabolic pathways. PMID:27622062

  15. Fbxw7 Tumor Suppressor: A Vital Regulator Contributes to Human Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jun; Ge, Ming-Hua; Ling, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rapidly accumulating data indicate that F-box/WD repeat-containing protein 7 (Fbxw7) is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancers and regulates a network of crucial oncoproteins. These studies have generated important new insights into tumorigenesis and may soon enable therapies targeting the Fbxw7 pathway. We searched PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Science databases (1973–2015, especially recent 5 years) for articles published in the English language using the key words “Fbxw7,” “Fbw7,” “hCDC4,” and “Sel-10,” and we reviewed recent developments in the search for Fbxw7. Fbxw7 coordinates the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of several critical cellular regulators, thereby controlling essential processes, such as cell cycle, differentiation, and apoptosis. Fbxw7 contains 3 isoforms (Fbxw7α, Fbxw7β, and Fbxw7γ), and they are differently regulated in subtract recognition. Besides those, Fbxw7 activity is controlled at different levels, resulting in specific and tunable regulation of the abundance and activity of its substrates in a variety of human solid tumor types, including glioma malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, osteosarcoma, melanoma as well as colorectal, lung, breast, gastric, liver, pancreatic, renal, prostate, endometrial, and esophageal cancers. Fbxw7 is strongly associated with tumorigenesis, and the mechanisms and consequences of Fbxw7 deregulation in cancers may soon enable the development of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26886596

  16. Fbxw7 Tumor Suppressor: A Vital Regulator Contributes to Human Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Ge, Ming-Hua; Ling, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Rapidly accumulating data indicate that F-box/WD repeat-containing protein 7 (Fbxw7) is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancers and regulates a network of crucial oncoproteins. These studies have generated important new insights into tumorigenesis and may soon enable therapies targeting the Fbxw7 pathway. We searched PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Science databases (1973-2015, especially recent 5 years) for articles published in the English language using the key words "Fbxw7," "Fbw7," "hCDC4," and "Sel-10," and we reviewed recent developments in the search for Fbxw7. Fbxw7 coordinates the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of several critical cellular regulators, thereby controlling essential processes, such as cell cycle, differentiation, and apoptosis. Fbxw7 contains 3 isoforms (Fbxw7α, Fbxw7β, and Fbxw7γ), and they are differently regulated in subtract recognition. Besides those, Fbxw7 activity is controlled at different levels, resulting in specific and tunable regulation of the abundance and activity of its substrates in a variety of human solid tumor types, including glioma malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, osteosarcoma, melanoma as well as colorectal, lung, breast, gastric, liver, pancreatic, renal, prostate, endometrial, and esophageal cancers. Fbxw7 is strongly associated with tumorigenesis, and the mechanisms and consequences of Fbxw7 deregulation in cancers may soon enable the development of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26886596

  17. Avastin® in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin significantly inhibits tumor angiogenesis and increases the survival rate of human A549 tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YING; XIA, XIZHENG; ZHOU, MINGKAI; LIU, XIAOJUN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Avastin® in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin (GP) on the tumor growth of A549 tumor-bearing mice and the potential anti-tumor mechanism. A total of 30 human A549 tumor-bearing nude mice were randomly divided into the Avastin, chemotherapy and combined treatment groups for treatment with an intraperitoneal injection of Avastin (5 mg/kg) (Avastin group); an intraperitoneal injection of gemcitabine (4 mg/kg) and cisplatin (4 mg/kg) (chemotherapy group); or intraperitoneal injections of Avastin and GP (combined treatment group). The mice were observed for 30 days and the tumor growth, survival and body weight of the mice in the three groups were analyzed. The protein level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the tumor tissues was analyzed by ELISA. The vascular density and structural changes of the tumor were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Compared with the Avastin and chemotherapy groups, the tumor growth of mice in the combined treatment group was significantly inhibited, and the survival rate of the mice was increased significantly. No difference in body weight was observed among the three groups of mice (P>0.05). The levels of VEGF in the combined treatment group tumor tissues were significantly reduced compared with those in the chemotherapy group tumor tissues (P<0.05). Furthermore, the vessel density of the tumor tissue in the combined treatment group was significantly reduced compared with that in the chemotherapy group (P<0.05), and the number of normal vessels in the combined treatment group tumors was significantly higher than that in the chemotherapy group tumors after 7 days of treatment (P<0.05). In conclusion, Avastin can significantly decrease the level of VEGF in tumor tissue, inhibit tumor angiogenesis and promote the normalization of tumor vascular structure, which may explain the enhanced efficacy of Avastin in combination with chemotherapy. PMID:26136956

  18. RAD51 variant proteins from human lung and kidney tumors exhibit DNA strand exchange defects.

    PubMed

    Silva, Michelle C; Morrical, Milagros D; Bryan, Katie E; Averill, April M; Dragon, Julie; Bond, Jeffrey P; Morrical, Scott W

    2016-06-01

    In human cells, error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks requires the DNA pairing and strand exchange activities of RAD51 recombinase. Activation of RAD51 recombination activities requires the assembly of RAD51 presynaptic filaments on the single-stranded DNA that forms at resected DSB ends. Mutations in proteins that control presynaptic filament assembly, such as BRCA2, and in RAD51 itself, are associated with human breast cancer. Here we describe the properties of two mutations in RAD51 protein that derive from human lung and kidney tumors, respectively. Sequence variants Q268P and Q272L both map to the DNA binding loop 2 (L2) region of RAD51, a motif that is involved in DNA binding and in the allosteric activation of ATP hydrolysis and DNA strand exchange activities. Both mutations alter the thermal stability, DNA binding, and ATPase properties of RAD51, however both variants retain intrinsic DNA strand exchange activity towards oligonucleotide substrates under optimized conditions. In contrast, both Q268P and Q272L variants exhibit drastically reduced DNA strand exchange activity in reaction mixtures containing long homologous ssDNA and dsDNA substrates and human RPA protein. Mixtures of wild-type and variant proteins also exhibit reduced DNA strand exchange activity, suggesting that heterozygous mutations could negatively affect DNA recombination and repair processes in vivo. Together, the findings of this study suggest that hypomorphic missense mutations in RAD51 protein could be drivers of genomic instability in cancer cells, and thereby contribute to the etiology of metastatic disease. PMID:27153211

  19. Identification of recurrent regulated alternative splicing events across human solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Danan-Gotthold, Miri; Golan-Gerstl, Regina; Eisenberg, Eli; Meir, Keren; Karni, Rotem; Levanon, Erez Y.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that involves aberrant gene expression regulation. Discriminating the modified expression patterns driving tumor biology from the many that have no or little contribution is important for understanding cancer molecular basis. Recurrent deregulation patterns observed in multiple cancer types are enriched for such driver events. Here, we studied splicing alterations in hundreds of matched tumor and normal RNA-seq samples of eight solid cancer types. We found hundreds of cassette exons for which splicing was altered in multiple cancer types and identified a set of highly frequent altered splicing events. Specific splicing regulators, including RBFOX2, MBNL1/2 and QKI, appear to account for many splicing alteration events in multiple cancer types. Together, our results provide a first global analysis of regulated splicing alterations in cancer and identify common events with a potential causative role in solid tumor development. PMID:25908786

  20. Human Kidney Injury Molecule-1 Is a Tissue and Urinary Tumor Marker of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Won K.; Alinani, Anwar; Wu, Chin-Lee; Michaelson, Dror; Loda, Massimo; McGovern, Francis J.; Thadhani, Ravi; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2005-01-01

    Human kidney injury molecule-1 (hKIM-1) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that is not detectable in normal kidney tissue but is expressed at high levels in human and rodent kidneys with dedifferentiated proximal tubule epithelial cells after ischemic or toxic injury. Therefore, it was hypothesized that renal tumors express hKIM-1 and release this protein into the urine. Forty renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and 484 nonrenal tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of hKIM-1 (group 1). Urine samples before nephrectomy and nephrectomy tissue samples were collected from an additional 42 patients with renal tumors, from 30 normal control subjects, and also from 10 patients with prostate carcinoma (group 2). In five additional patients with RCC, urine was collected before and after nephrectomy (group 3). Tissue was examined for expression of hKIM-1, and cell-free urine supernatants were analyzed for hKIM-1 by ELISA. Urinary hKIM-1 was normalized to the urinary creatinine concentration (UCr). Expression of hKIM-1 was present in 32 tissue sections (91%) of 35 clear cell RCC (group 1). In group 2, the normalized urinary hKIM-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with clear cell RCC (0.39 ± 0.08 ng/mg UCr; n = 21), compared with levels in patients with prostate carcinoma (0.12 ± 0.03 ng/mg UCr; P < 0.02; n = 10), or normal control subjects (0.05 ± 0.01 ng/mg UCr; P < 0.005; n = 30). Tissue sections from 28 (82%) of 34 primary RCC stained positively for the expression of hKIM-1. In all patients with a detectable prenephrectomy urinary hKIM-1 level, there was either complete disappearance or marked reduction after nephrectomy (group 3). In conclusion, the cleaved ectodomain of hKIM-1 can be detected in the urine of patients with RCC and may serve as a new biomarker for early detection of RCC. PMID:15744000

  1. Tumor tropism of intravenously injected human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells and their gene therapy application in a metastatic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Lam, Dang Hoang; Goh, Sally Sallee; Lee, Esther Xingwei; Zhao, Ying; Tay, Felix Chang; Chen, Can; Du, Shouhui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Shahbazi, Mohammad; Tham, Chee Kian; Ng, Wai Hoe; Toh, Han Chong; Wang, Shu

    2012-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells can serve as an accessible and reliable source for the generation of functional human cells for medical therapies. In this study, we used a conventional lentiviral transduction method to derive human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from primary human fibroblasts and then generated neural stem cells (NSCs) from the iPS cells. Using a dual-color whole-body imaging technology, we demonstrated that after tail vein injection, these human NSCs displayed a robust migratory capacity outside the central nervous system in both immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice and homed in on established orthotopic 4T1 mouse mammary tumors. To investigate whether the iPS cell-derived NSCs can be used as a cellular delivery vehicle for cancer gene therapy, the cells were transduced with a baculoviral vector containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene and injected through tail vein into 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. The transduced NSCs were effective in inhibiting the growth of the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor and the metastatic spread of the cancer cells in the presence of ganciclovir, leading to prolonged survival of the tumor-bearing mice. The use of iPS cell-derived NSCs for cancer gene therapy bypasses the sensitive ethical issue surrounding the use of cells derived from human fetal tissues or human embryonic stem cells. This approach may also help to overcome problems associated with allogeneic transplantation of other types of human NSCs. PMID:22311724

  2. At a crossroads: human DNA tumor viruses and the host DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Pavel A; Luftig, Micah A

    2011-07-01

    Human DNA tumor viruses induce host cell proliferation in order to establish the necessary cellular milieu to replicate viral DNA. The consequence of such viral-programmed induction of proliferation coupled with the introduction of foreign replicating DNA structures makes these viruses particularly sensitive to the host DNA damage response machinery. In fact, sensors of DNA damage are often activated and modulated by DNA tumor viruses in both latent and lytic infection. This article focuses on the role of the DNA damage response during the life cycle of human DNA tumor viruses, with a particular emphasis on recent advances in our understanding of the role of the DNA damage response in EBV, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and human papillomavirus infection. PMID:21927617

  3. Therapeutic Targeting of Tumor-Derived R-Spondin Attenuates β-Catenin Signaling and Tumorigenesis in Multiple Cancer Types.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Cecile; Raval, Janak; Axelrod, Fumiko; Bond, Chris; Cain, Jennifer; Dee-Hoskins, Cristina; Ma, Shirley; Fischer, Marcus M; Shah, Jalpa; Wei, Jie; Ji, May; Lam, Andrew; Stroud, Michelle; Yen, Wan-Ching; Yeung, Pete; Cancilla, Belinda; O'Young, Gilbert; Wang, Min; Kapoun, Ann M; Lewicki, John; Hoey, Timothy; Gurney, Austin

    2016-02-01

    Deregulation of the β-catenin signaling has long been associated with cancer. Intracellular components of this pathway, including axin, APC, and β-catenin, are frequently mutated in a range of human tumors, but the contribution of specific extracellular ligands that promote cancer development through this signaling axis remains unclear. We conducted a reporter-based screen in a panel of human tumors to identify secreted factors that stimulate β-catenin signaling. Through this screen and further molecular characterization, we found that R-spondin (RSPO) proteins collaborate with Wnt proteins to activate β-catenin. RSPO family members were expressed in several human tumors representing multiple malignancies, including ovarian, pancreatic, colon, breast, and lung cancer. We generated specific monoclonal antibody antagonists of RSPO family members and found that anti-RSPO treatment markedly inhibited tumor growth in human patient-derived tumor xenograft models, either as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy. Furthermore, blocking RSPO signaling reduced the tumorigenicity of cancer cells based on serial transplantation studies. Moreover, gene-expression analyses revealed that anti-RSPO treatment in responsive tumors strongly inhibited β-catenin target genes known to be associated with cancer and normal stem cells. Collectively, our results suggest that the RSPO family is an important stimulator of β-catenin activity in many human tumors and highlight a new effective approach for therapeutically modulating this fundamental signaling axis. PMID:26719531

  4. Functional genomic mRNA profiling of a large cancer data base demonstrates mesothelin overexpression in a broad range of tumor types.

    PubMed

    Lamberts, Laetitia E; de Groot, Derk Jan A; Bense, Rico D; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N

    2015-09-29

    The membrane bound glycoprotein mesothelin (MSLN) is a highly specific tumor marker, which is currently exploited as target for drugs. There are only limited data available on MSLN expression by human tumors. Therefore we determined overexpression of MSLN across different tumor types with Functional Genomic mRNA (FGM) profiling of a large cancer database. Results were compared with data in articles reporting immunohistochemical (IHC) MSLN tumor expression. FGM profiling is a technique that allows prediction of biologically relevant overexpression of proteins from a robust data set of mRNA microarrays. This technique was used in a database comprising 19,746 tumors to identify for 41 tumor types the percentage of samples with an overexpression of MSLN compared to a normal background. A literature search was performed to compare the FGM profiling data with studies reporting IHC MSLN tumor expression. FGM profiling showed MSLN overexpression in gastrointestinal (12-36%) and gynecological tumors (20-66%), non-small cell lung cancer (21%) and synovial sarcomas (30%). The overexpression found in thyroid cancers (5%) and renal cell cancers (10%) was not yet reported with IHC analyses. We observed that MSLN amplification rate within esophageal cancer depends on the histotype (31% for adenocarcinomas versus 3% for squamous-cell carcinomas). Subset analysis in breast cancer showed MSLN amplification rates of 28% in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and 33% in basal-like breast cancer. Further subtype analysis of TNBCs showed the highest amplification rate (42%) in the basal-like 1 subtype and the lowest amplification rate (9%) in the luminal androgen receptor subtype. PMID:26172299

  5. Prolactin inhibits a major tumor-suppressive function of wild type BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Hui Ethan; Walker, Ameae M

    2016-06-01

    Even though mutations in the tumor suppressor, BRCA1, markedly increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer, most breast and ovarian cancers express wild type BRCA1. An important question is therefore how the tumor-suppressive function of normal BRCA1 is overcome during development of most cancers. Because prolactin promotes these and other cancers, we investigated the hypothesis that prolactin interferes with the ability of BRCA1 to inhibit the cell cycle. Examining six different cancer cell lines with wild type BRCA1, and making use of both prolactin and the growth-inhibiting selective prolactin receptor modulator, S179D PRL, we demonstrate that prolactin activation of Stat5 results in the formation of a complex between phospho-Stat5 and BRCA1. Formation of this complex does not interfere with nuclear translocation or binding of BRCA1 to the p21 promoter, but does interfere with the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate the p21 promoter. Overexpression of a dominant-negative Stat5 in prolactin-stimulated cells resulted in increased p21 expression. We conclude that prolactin inhibits a major tumor-suppressive function of BRCA1 by interfering with BRCA1's upregulation of expression of the cell cycle inhibitor, p21. PMID:26970274

  6. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining. PMID:26830089

  7. Discretization of Gene Expression Data Unmasks Molecular Subgroups Recurring in Different Human Cancer Types

    PubMed Central

    Soeldner, Robert; Egorov, Mark; Guenther, Rolf; Dehler, Silvia; Morys-Wortmann, Corinna; Moch, Holger; Henco, Karsten; Schraml, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Despite the individually different molecular alterations in tumors, the malignancy associated biological traits are strikingly similar. Results of a previous study using renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as a model pointed towards cancer-related features, which could be visualized as three groups by microarray based gene expression analysis. In this study, we used a mathematic model to verify the presence of these groups in RCC as well as in other cancer types. We developed an algorithm for gene-expression deviation profiling for analyzing gene expression data of a total of 8397 patients with 13 different cancer types and normal tissues. We revealed three common Cancer Transcriptomic Profiles (CTPs) which recurred in all investigated tumors. Additionally, CTPs remained robust regardless of the functions or numbers of genes analyzed. CTPs may represent common genetic fingerprints, which potentially reflect the closely related biological traits of human cancers. PMID:27537329

  8. Discretization of Gene Expression Data Unmasks Molecular Subgroups Recurring in Different Human Cancer Types.

    PubMed

    Beleut, Manfred; Soeldner, Robert; Egorov, Mark; Guenther, Rolf; Dehler, Silvia; Morys-Wortmann, Corinna; Moch, Holger; Henco, Karsten; Schraml, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Despite the individually different molecular alterations in tumors, the malignancy associated biological traits are strikingly similar. Results of a previous study using renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as a model pointed towards cancer-related features, which could be visualized as three groups by microarray based gene expression analysis. In this study, we used a mathematic model to verify the presence of these groups in RCC as well as in other cancer types. We developed an algorithm for gene-expression deviation profiling for analyzing gene expression data of a total of 8397 patients with 13 different cancer types and normal tissues. We revealed three common Cancer Transcriptomic Profiles (CTPs) which recurred in all investigated tumors. Additionally, CTPs remained robust regardless of the functions or numbers of genes analyzed. CTPs may represent common genetic fingerprints, which potentially reflect the closely related biological traits of human cancers. PMID:27537329

  9. Puberty and Plexiform Neurofibroma Tumor Growth in Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type I

    PubMed Central

    Dagalakis, Urania; Lodish, Maya; Dombi, Eva; Sinaii, Ninet; Sabo, Jessica; Baldwin, Andrea; Steinberg, Seth M.; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Widemann, Brigitte C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship between pubertal progression and change in PN burden over time in pediatric and young adult patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and plexiform neurofibromas (PN). Study design Analyses accounted for sex, age, race, and chemotherapy. Forty-one patients with NF1 (15 female, 26 male) were studied at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Tanner stage, testosterone, progesterone, estradiol, insulin-like growth factor −1, luteinizing hormone, and follicle stimulating hormone were assessed. Tumor volume was measured using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and lesion detection software developed at NIH. Patients were divided into two groups based upon whether they were actively progressing through puberty (n=16) or peri pubertal (n=25), and were followed for an average of 20 months. Tumor growth rates in the puberty and peri pubertal group were analyzed for a subset of patients. Results There was no statistically significant difference in tumor burden change over time (cc/kg/month) between the pubertal and peri pubertal group (−0.16 ± 0.34 vs. 0.03 ± 1.8, p=0.31), and in the PN growth rates pre and during puberty (p=0.90). Change in tumor volume/patient weight/time did not correlate with testosterone change/time in males or estradiol change/time in females. Conclusion These findings support that hormonal changes of puberty do not accelerate PN growth. Additional long-term follow up of patients is necessary to further characterize the interaction between puberty and tumor growth. PMID:24321536

  10. Okadaic acid: An additional non-phorbol-12-tetradecanoate-13-acetate-type tumor promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Suganuma, Masami; Fujiki, Hirota; Suguri, Hiroko; Yoshizawa, Shigeru; Hirota, Mitsuru; Nakayasu, Michie ); Ojika, Makoto; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Yamada, Kiyoyuki ); Sugimura, Takashi )

    1988-03-01

    Okadaic acid is a polyether compound of a C{sub 38} fatty acid, isolated from a black sponge, Halichondria okadai. Previous studies showed that okadaic acid is a skin irritant and induces ornithine decarboxylase in mouse skin 4 hr after its application to the skin. This induction was strongly inhibited by pretreatment of the skin with 13-cis-retinoic acid. A two-stage carcinogenesis experiment in mouse skin initiated by a single application of 100 {mu}g of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and followed by application of 10 {mu}g of okadaic acid twice a week revealed that okadaic acid is a potent additional tumor promoter: tumors developed in 93% of the mice treated with DMBA and okadaic acid by week 16. In contrast, tumors were found in only one mouse each in the groups treated with DMBA alone or okadaic acid alone. An average of 2.6 tumors per mouse was found in week 30 in the group treated with DMBA and okadaic acid. Unlike phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate (TPA), teleocidin, and aplysiatoxin, okadaic acid did not inhibit the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)TPA to a mouse skin particulate fraction when added up to 100 {mu}M or activate calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) in vitro when added up to 1.2 {mu}M. Therefore, the actions of okadaic acid and phorbol ester may be mediated in different ways. These results show that okadaic acid is a non-TPA-type tumor promoter in mouse skin carcinogenesis.

  11. The expression of BST2 in human and experimental mouse brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, Derek A.; Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Han, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (grade IV astrocytoma) is a highly malignant brain tumor with poor treatment options and an average lifespan of 15 months after diagnosis. Previous work has demonstrated that BST2 (bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2; also known as PDCA-1, CD137 and HM1.24) is expressed by multiple myeloma, endometrial cancer and primary lung cancer cells. BST2 is expressed on the plasma membrane, which makes it an ideal target for immunotherapy. Accordingly, several groups have shown BST2 mAb to be effective for targeting tumor cells. In this report, we hypothesized that BST2 is expressed in human and mouse brain tumors and plays a critical role in brain tumor progression. We show that BST2 mRNA expression is increased in mouse brain IC-injected with GL261 cells, when compared to mouse brain IC-injected with saline at 3 weeks post-operative (p < 0.05). To test the relevance of BST2, we utilized the intracranially (IC)-injected GL261 cell-based malignant brain tumor mouse model. We show that BST2 mRNA expression is increased in mouse brain IC-injected GL261 cells, when compared to mouse brain IC-injected saline at 3 weeks post-operative (p < 0.05). Furthermore, BST2 immunofluorescence predominantly localized to mouse brain tumor cells. Finally, mice IC-injected with GL261 cells transduced with shRNA for BST2 ± pre-incubation with BST2 mAb show no difference in overall lifespan when compared to mice IC-injected with GL261 cells transduced with a scrambled shRNA ± pre-incubation with BST2 mAb. Collectively, these data show that while BST2 expression increases during brain tumor progression in both human and mouse brain tumors, it has no apparent consequences to overall lifespan in an orthotopic mouse brain tumor model. PMID:21565182

  12. A Type-2 Fuzzy Image Processing Expert System for Diagnosing Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Zarinbal, M; Fazel Zarandi, M H; Turksen, I B; Izadi, M

    2015-10-01

    The focus of this paper is diagnosing and differentiating Astrocytomas in MRI scans by developing an interval Type-2 fuzzy automated tumor detection system. This system consists of three modules: working memory, knowledge base, and inference engine. An image processing method with three steps of preprocessing, segmentation and feature extraction, and approximate reasoning is used in inference engine module to enhance the quality of MRI scans, segment them into desired regions, extract the required features, and finally diagnose and differentiate Astrocytomas. However, brain tumors have different characteristics in different planes, so considering one plane of patient's MRI scan may cause inaccurate results. Therefore, in the developed system, several consecutive planes are processed. The performance of this system is evaluated using 95 MRI scans and the results show good improvement in diagnosing and differentiating Astrocytomas. PMID:26276018

  13. Bisected, complex N-glycans and galectins in mouse mammary tumor progression and human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Hazuki E; Koba, Wade R; Fine, Eugene J; Giricz, Orsi; Kenny, Paraic A; Stanley, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Bisected, complex N-glycans on glycoproteins are generated by the glycosyltransferase MGAT3 and cause reduced cell surface binding of galectins. Previously, we showed that MGAT3 reduces growth factor signaling and retards mammary tumor progression driven by the Polyoma middle T antigen (PyMT) expressed in mammary epithelium under the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. However, the penetrance of the tumor phenotype became variable in mixed FVB/N and C57BL/6 female mice and we therefore investigated a congenic C57BL/6 Mgat3−/−/MMTV-PyMT model. In the absence of MGAT3, C57BL/6 Mgat3−/−/MMTV-PyMT females exhibited accelerated tumor appearance and increased tumor burden, glucose uptake in tumors and lung metastasis. Nevertheless, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 or protein kinase B (AKT) was reduced in ∼20-week C57BL/6 MMTV-PyMT tumors lacking MGAT3. Activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), protein tyrosine kinase Src, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase were similar to that of controls. All the eight mouse galectin genes were expressed in mammary tumors and tumor epithelial cells (TECs), but galectin-2 and -12 were not detected by western analysis in tumors, and galectin-7 was not detected in 60% of the TEC lines. From microarray data reported for human breast cancers, at least 10 galectin and 7 N-glycan N-acetylglucosaminyl (GlcNAc)-transferase (MGAT) genes are expressed in tumor tissue, and expression often varies significantly between different breast cancer subtypes. Thus, in summary, while MGAT3 and bisected complex N-glycans retard mouse mammary tumor progression, genetic background may modify this effect; identification of key galectins that promote mammary tumor progression in mice is not straightforward because all the eight galectin genes are expressed; and high levels of MGAT3, galectin-4, -8, -10, -13 and -14 transcripts correlate with better relapse-free survival in human breast cancer. PMID:24037315

  14. Immortalized Human Schwann Cell Lines Derived From Tumors of Schwannomatosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Ostrow, Kimberly Laskie; Donaldson, Katelyn; Blakeley, Jaishri; Belzberg, Allan; Hoke, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomatosis, a rare form of neurofibromatosis, is characterized predominantly by multiple, often painful, schwannomas throughout the peripheral nervous system. The current standard of care for schwannomatosis is surgical resection. A major obstacle to schwannomatosis research is the lack of robust tumor cell lines. There is a great need for mechanistic and drug discovery studies of schwannomatosis, yet appropriate tools are not currently available. Schwannomatosis tumors are difficult to grow in culture as they survive only a few passages before senescence. Our lab has extensive experience in establishing primary and immortalized human Schwann cell cultures from normal tissue that retain their phenotypes after immortalization. Therefore we took on the challenge of creating immortalized human Schwann cell lines derived from tumors from schwannomatosis patients. We have established and fully characterized 2 schwannomatosis cell lines from 2 separate patients using SV40 virus large T antigen. One patient reported pain and the other did not. The schwannomatosis cell lines were stained with S100B antibodies to confirm Schwann cell identity. The schwannomatosis cells also expressed the Schwann cell markers, p75NTR, S100B, and NGF after multiple passages. Cell morphology was retained following multiple passaging and freeze/ thaw cycles. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to compare the cell lines with their respective parent tumors. No differences in key genes were detected, with the exception that several cell cycle regulators were upregulated in the schwannomatosis cell lines when compared to their parent tumors. This upregulation was apparently a product of cell culturing, as the schwannomatosis cells exhibited the same expression pattern of cell cycle regulatory genes as normal primary human Schwann cells. Cell growth was also similar between normal primary and immortalized tumor cells in culture. Accurate cell lines derived directly from human tumors

  15. Immortalized Human Schwann Cell Lines Derived From Tumors of Schwannomatosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ostrow, Kimberly Laskie; Donaldson, Katelyn; Blakeley, Jaishri; Belzberg, Allan; Hoke, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomatosis, a rare form of neurofibromatosis, is characterized predominantly by multiple, often painful, schwannomas throughout the peripheral nervous system. The current standard of care for schwannomatosis is surgical resection. A major obstacle to schwannomatosis research is the lack of robust tumor cell lines. There is a great need for mechanistic and drug discovery studies of schwannomatosis, yet appropriate tools are not currently available. Schwannomatosis tumors are difficult to grow in culture as they survive only a few passages before senescence. Our lab has extensive experience in establishing primary and immortalized human Schwann cell cultures from normal tissue that retain their phenotypes after immortalization. Therefore we took on the challenge of creating immortalized human Schwann cell lines derived from tumors from schwannomatosis patients. We have established and fully characterized 2 schwannomatosis cell lines from 2 separate patients using SV40 virus large T antigen. One patient reported pain and the other did not. The schwannomatosis cell lines were stained with S100B antibodies to confirm Schwann cell identity. The schwannomatosis cells also expressed the Schwann cell markers, p75NTR, S100B, and NGF after multiple passages. Cell morphology was retained following multiple passaging and freeze/ thaw cycles. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to compare the cell lines with their respective parent tumors. No differences in key genes were detected, with the exception that several cell cycle regulators were upregulated in the schwannomatosis cell lines when compared to their parent tumors. This upregulation was apparently a product of cell culturing, as the schwannomatosis cells exhibited the same expression pattern of cell cycle regulatory genes as normal primary human Schwann cells. Cell growth was also similar between normal primary and immortalized tumor cells in culture. Accurate cell lines derived directly from human tumors

  16. Squalamine treatment of human tumors in nu/nu mice enhances platinum-based chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Williams, J I; Weitman, S; Gonzalez, C M; Jundt, C H; Marty, J; Stringer, S D; Holroyd, K J; Mclane, M P; Chen, Q; Zasloff, M; Von Hoff, D D

    2001-03-01

    Squalamine, an antiangiogenic aminosterol, is presently undergoing Phase II clinical trials in cancer patients. To broaden our understanding of the clinical potential for squalamine, this agent was evaluated in nu/nu mouse xenograft models using the chemoresistant MV-522 human non-small cell lung carcinoma and the SD human neuroblastoma lines. Squalamine was studied alone and in combination with either cisplatin or paclitaxel plus carboplatin. Squalamine alone produced a modest MV-522 tumor growth inhibition (TGI) and yielded a TGI with cisplatin that was better than cisplatin alone. Squalamine also significantly enhanced the activity of paclitaxel/carboplatin combination therapy in the MV-522 tumor model. Squalamine similarly improved the effectiveness of cisplatin in producing TGI when screened against the SD human neuroblastoma xenograft. Xenograft tumor shrinkage was seen for the MV-522 tumor in combination treatments including squalamine, whereas no tumor shrinkage was seen when squalamine was omitted from the treatment regimen. To gain a greater understanding of the mechanism by which squalamine inhibited tumor growth in the xenograft studies, in vitro experiments were carried out with vascular endothelial growth factor-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture exposed to squalamine. Squalamine treatment was found to retard two cellular events necessary for angiogenesis, inducing disorganization of F-actin stress fibers and causing a concomitant reduction of detectable cell the surface molecular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin). We propose that the augmentation by squalamine of cytotoxicity from platinum-based therapies is attributable to interference by squalamine with the ability of stimuli to promote endothelial cell movement and cell-cell communication necessary for growth of new blood vessels in xenografts after chemotherapeutic injury to the tumor. PMID:11297269

  17. Detection of bovine papillomavirus type 14 DNA sequences in urinary bladder tumors in cattle.

    PubMed

    Roperto, Sante; Munday, John S; Corrado, Federica; Goria, Maria; Roperto, Franco

    2016-07-15

    Bovine papillomavirus type 14 (BPV-14) is a novel Deltapapillomavirus (δPV) which is most closely related to BPV-1, -2, and -13, well-known members of the δPV genus. So far BPV-14 has been detected in cutaneous neoplastic lesions in cattle and in feline sarcoids. As BPV-14 may share biological and pathological properties with BPV-1, -2 and -13, it has been hypothesized that, like other δPVs, BPV-14 could be associated with bovine bladder neoplasia. In this study, 50 tumors of the urinary bladder of cattle were diagnosed. DNA was extracted from all tumor samples as well as from 25 normal bladder samples and submitted to BPV-14 L1 PCR and subsequent amplicon sequencing analysis. BPV-14 L1 DNA sequences of specific 195bp amplicons were obtained from 17 of 50 (34%) tumor DNA isolates; no BPV-14 DNA was detected from 25 normal samples. Amplicons revealed a 99% homology with the corresponding BPV-14 L1 DNA region (GenBank accession number KP276343.1). Co-infections by two or three δPV types were also seen. This study reveals the presence of BPV-14 DNA alone or in combination with other δPV DNA in bovine bladder tumors alone and suggests that BPV-14 could also be involved in bladder neoplasia as its E5 oncoprotein has the potential to induce cell proliferation. Furthermore, this is the first study to show the presence of BPV-14 in Europe, suggesting that BPV-14, like other δPVs, has a worldwide distribution. PMID:27283849

  18. Helicobacter pylori typing as a tool for tracking human migration

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains from different geographic areas exhibit clear phylogeographical differentiation; therefore, the genotypes of H. pylori strains can serve as markers for the migration of human populations. Currently, the genotypes of two virulence factors of H. pylori, cagA and vacA, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) are widely used markers for genomic diversity within H. pylori populations. There are two types of cagA: the East Asian type and the Western type. In addition, the right end of the cag pathogenicity island is divided into five subtypes and there are distinct mosaic structures at the signal region and the middle region of vacA. Using combinations of the cagA, cag right end junction, and vacA genotypes, five major groups (East Asia type, South/Central Asia type, Iberian/Africa type and Europe type) have been defined according to geographical associations. MLST has revealed seven modern population types and six ancestral population types of H. pylori, and is a useful tool for mapping human migration patterns. Serial studies of large numbers of H. pylori strains, including strains isolated from aboriginal populations, show that MLST analysis provides more detailed information on human migration than does the analysis of human genetics. H. pylori infection is rapidly declining as a result of improvements in personal hygiene and quality of life. The molecular epidemiology of H. pylori infection has much to tell us and should be studied before it disappears entirely. PMID:19702588

  19. Helicobacter pylori typing as a tool for tracking human migration.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Y

    2009-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains from different geographic areas exhibit clear phylogeographical differentiation; therefore, the genotypes of H. pylori strains can serve as markers for the migration of human populations. Currently, the genotypes of two virulence factors of H. pylori, cagA and vacA, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) are widely used markers for genomic diversity within H. pylori populations. There are two types of cagA: the East Asian type and the Western type. In addition, the right end of the cag pathogenicity island is divided into five subtypes and there are distinct mosaic structures at the signal region and the middle region of vacA. Using combinations of the cagA, cag right end junction, and vacA genotypes, five major groups (East Asia type, South/Central Asia type, Iberian/Africa type and Europe type) have been defined according to geographical associations. MLST has revealed seven modern population types and six ancestral population types of H. pylori, and is a useful tool for mapping human migration patterns. Serial studies of large numbers of H. pylori strains, including strains isolated from aboriginal populations, show that MLST analysis provides more detailed information on human migration than does the analysis of human genetics. H. pylori infection is rapidly declining as a result of improvements in personal hygiene and quality of life. The molecular epidemiology of H. pylori infection has much to tell us and should be studied before it disappears entirely. PMID:19702588

  20. Expression of human selenoprotein genes selh, selk, selm, sels, selv, and gpx-6 in various tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Varlamova, E G; Goltyaev, M V; Fesenko, E E

    2016-05-01

    The expression level of the genes encoding six selenocysteine-containing human proteins was determined in the brain, cervical, liver, breast, prostate, and human fibrosarcoma cancer cells. It was found that a high level of expression in all studied types genes of tumor cells is characteristic for selh, selk, and selm genes, encoding SelH, SelK, and SelM proteins, respectively, whereas a complete lack of such expression was shown for gpx-6, selv, and sels genes. The results of this work can be regarded as a major prerequisite for further studies on the role of the three selenoproteins SelH, SelK, and SelM in the regulation of carcinogenesis processes associated with these types of cancer. PMID:27417721

  1. Expression analysis of secreted and cell surface genes of five transformed human cell lines and derivative xenograft tumors

    PubMed Central

    Stull, Robert A; Tavassoli, Roya; Kennedy, Scot; Osborn, Steve; Harte, Rachel; Lu, Yan; Napier, Cheryl; Abo, Arie; Chin, Daniel J

    2005-01-01

    Background Since the early stages of tumorigenesis involve adhesion, escape from immune surveillance, vascularization and angiogenesis, we devised a strategy to study the expression profiles of all publicly known and putative secreted and cell surface genes. We designed a custom oligonucleotide microarray containing probes for 3531 secreted and cell surface genes to study 5 diverse human transformed cell lines and their derivative xenograft tumors. The origins of these human cell lines were lung (A549), breast (MDA MB-231), colon (HCT-116), ovarian (SK-OV-3) and prostate (PC3) carcinomas. Results Three different analyses were performed: (1) A PCA-based linear discriminant analysis identified a 54 gene profile characteristic of all tumors, (2) Application of MANOVA (Pcorr < .05) to tumor data revealed a larger set of 149 differentially expressed genes. (3) After MANOVA was performed on data from individual tumors, a comparison of differential genes amongst all tumor types revealed 12 common differential genes. Seven of the 12 genes were identified by all three analytical methods. These included late angiogenic, morphogenic and extracellular matrix genes such as ANGPTL4, COL1A1, GP2, GPR57, LAMB3, PCDHB9 and PTGER3. The differential expression of ANGPTL4 and COL1A1 and other genes was confirmed by quantitative PCR. Conclusion Overall, a comparison of the three analyses revealed an expression pattern indicative of late angiogenic processes. These results show that a xenograft model using multiple cell lines of diverse tissue origin can identify common tumorigenic cell surface or secreted molecules that may be important biomarker and therapeutic discoveries. PMID:15836779

  2. Overexpression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor in breast cancer cells induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eunhye; Kim, Ji Young; Cho, Youngkwan; An, Hyunsook; Lee, Nahyun; Jo, Hunho; Ban, Changill; Seo, Jae Hong

    2016-06-01

    The angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1) has been implicated in diverse aspects of human disease, from the regulation of blood pressure and cardiovascular homeostasis to cancer progression. We sought to investigate the role of AGTR1 in cell proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), migration, invasion, angiogenesis and tumor growth in the breast cancer cell line MCF7. Stable overexpression of AGTR1 was associated with accelerated cell proliferation, concomitant with increased expression of survival factors including poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP), as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. AGTR1-overexpressing MCF7 cells were more aggressive than their parent line, with significantly increased activity in migration and invasion assays. These observations were associated with changes in EMT markers, including reduced E-cadherin expression and increased p-Smad3, Smad4 and Snail levels. Treatment with the AGTR1 antagonist losartan attenuated these effects. AGTR1 overexpression also accelerated tumor growth and increased Ki-67 expression in a xenograft model. This was associated with increased tumor angiogenesis, as evidenced by a significant increase in microvessels in the intratumoral and peritumoral areas, and enhanced tumor invasion, with the latter response associated with increased EMT marker expression and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) upregulation. In vivo administration of losartan significantly reduced both tumor growth and angiogenesis. Our findings suggest that AGTR1 plays a significant role in tumor aggressiveness, and its inhibition may have therapeutic implications. PMID:26975580

  3. A humanized anti-DLL4 antibody promotes dysfunctional angiogenesis and inhibits breast tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xuelian; Wang, Wenyi; Xu, Zhuobin; Wang, Shijing; Wang, Tong; Wang, Min; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Blockage of Delta-like 4 (DLL4)-directed Notch signaling induces excessive tip cell formation and endothelial proliferation resulting in dysfunctional angiogenesis in tumors. MMGZ01, as a murine anti-human DLL4 monoclonal antibody, specifically binds to human DLL4 and blocks Notch pathway. Here, the structure of MMGZ01 variable fragment (Fv) was established and framework region (FR) residues which supported complementarily determining region (CDR) loop conformation were identified. Important residues interactions were also identified through docking MMGZ01 Fv with antigen epitope in DLL4. To humanize the murine antibody, we modified MMGZ01 Fv through CDR grafting and the reconstructed antibody (H3L2) maintained similar structure and binding affinity to parental MMGZ01 after back mutation of 12 canonical murine residues in the FRs. Meanwhile, H3L2 promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation through inhibiting DLL4-directed Notch pathway. Moreover, in MDA-MB-231-bearing nude mice, H3L2 induced dysfunctional angiogenesis and tumor cell apoptosis and showed superior anti-tumor activity. In conclusion, H3L2 is an ideal humanized antibody that inhibits tumor growth through targeting DLL4-Notch pathway and has attracting potentials for clinical applications. PMID:27301650

  4. A humanized anti-DLL4 antibody promotes dysfunctional angiogenesis and inhibits breast tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xuelian; Wang, Wenyi; Xu, Zhuobin; Wang, Shijing; Wang, Tong; Wang, Min; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Blockage of Delta-like 4 (DLL4)-directed Notch signaling induces excessive tip cell formation and endothelial proliferation resulting in dysfunctional angiogenesis in tumors. MMGZ01, as a murine anti-human DLL4 monoclonal antibody, specifically binds to human DLL4 and blocks Notch pathway. Here, the structure of MMGZ01 variable fragment (Fv) was established and framework region (FR) residues which supported complementarily determining region (CDR) loop conformation were identified. Important residues interactions were also identified through docking MMGZ01 Fv with antigen epitope in DLL4. To humanize the murine antibody, we modified MMGZ01 Fv through CDR grafting and the reconstructed antibody (H3L2) maintained similar structure and binding affinity to parental MMGZ01 after back mutation of 12 canonical murine residues in the FRs. Meanwhile, H3L2 promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation through inhibiting DLL4-directed Notch pathway. Moreover, in MDA-MB-231-bearing nude mice, H3L2 induced dysfunctional angiogenesis and tumor cell apoptosis and showed superior anti-tumor activity. In conclusion, H3L2 is an ideal humanized antibody that inhibits tumor growth through targeting DLL4-Notch pathway and has attracting potentials for clinical applications. PMID:27301650

  5. Expression of neurotensin messenger RNA in a human carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Ishizuka, J; Townsend, C M; Rajaraman, S; Thompson, J C

    1991-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT), a distal gut peptide, has important regulatory and trophic effects throughout the gut; however the intracellular mechanisms that regulate the gene expression and release of human NT are not known. The purpose of this endeavor was to study a functioning human pancreatic carcinoid cell line (called BON) in vitro that expresses the NT gene, and to study the effect of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signal-transduction pathway on the expression and release of human NT. RNA was prepared from BON cell line (which has been established in this laboratory); the RNA was analyzed for NT mRNA expression by Northern hybridization with a complementary DNA probe. RNA blot analysis demonstrated that the NT gene is expressed in BON and is transcribed to two mRNAs of 1.0- and 1.5-kb sizes. In the second part of this study, BON cells were treated with either forskolin (FSK), which increases intracellular levels of cAMP, or with serotonin (5-HT), which reduces cAMP in BON cells. Forskolin produced a dose-dependent increase in NT peptide release and, furthermore, FSK (10(-6) mol/L) rapidly increased NT mRNA abundance 1 hour after addition; conversely, 5-HT (10(-5) mol/L) decreased NT mRNA at 1 hour. Neurotensin mRNA levels returned to control values by 3 hours after either FSK or 5-HT, which suggests that the transcript half-life for NT is relatively short. These findings show that the expression and peptide release of human NT is mediated, in part, by the cAMP signal-transduction pathway. Our human carcinoid cell line will provide a useful model to study the in vitro regulation of NT gene expression and peptide release. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1659338

  6. Variations in polyoma virus genotype in relation to tumor induction in mice. Characterization of wild type strains with widely differing tumor profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, C. J.; Freund, R.; Mandel, G.; Ballmer-Hofer, K.; Talmage, D. A.; Benjamin, T. L.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have explored the effects of variations in mouse polyoma virus genotype on patterns of tumor formation in the mouse. Four "wild type" virus strains were surveyed. Two were highly oncogenic, inducing multiple tumors of epithelial and mesenchymal origin, at high frequency and with short latency. The other two strains were weakly oncogenic, inducing fewer tumors, solely of mesenchymal origin, and after a long latency. These sharply contrasting tumor profiles were reproduced with virus stocks derived from molecularly cloned viral genomes. Though vastly different in their oncogenic properties, these cloned viruses proved equally effective in transforming established rat fibroblasts in culture and showed the same patterns of tumor antigen expression in cultured mouse cells. Complexes of polyoma middle T antigen and pp60c-src were demonstrated in extracts of epithelial tumors induced by a highly oncogenic virus strain. It is concluded that polyoma viral genetic determinants for tumor induction in the mouse are more complex than those previously defined by the use of cell transformation systems. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 PMID:2437801

  7. Radiation-induced lung fibrosis in a tumor-bearing mouse model is associated with enhanced Type-2 immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Wang, Yacheng; Mei, Zijie; Zhang, Shimin; Yang, Jie; Li, Xin; Yao, Ye; Xie, Conghua

    2016-01-01

    Lung fibrosis may be associated with Type-2 polarized inflammation. Herein, we aim to investigate whether radiation can initiate a Type-2 immune response and contribute to the progression of pulmonary fibrosis in tumor-bearing animals. We developed a tumor-bearing mouse model with Lewis lung cancer to receive either radiation therapy alone or radiation combined with Th1 immunomodulator unmethylated cytosine-phosphorothioate-guanine containing oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN). The Type-2 immune phenotype in tumors and the histological grade of lung fibrosis were evaluated in mice sacrificed three weeks after irradiation. Mouse lung tissues were analyzed for hydroxyproline and the expression of Type-1/Type-2 key transcription factors (T-bet/GATA-3). The concentration of Type-1/Type-2 cytokines in serum was measured by cytometric bead array. Lung fibrosis was observed to be more serious in tumor-bearing mice than in normal mice post-irradiation. The fibrosis score in irradiated tumor-bearing mice on Day 21 was 4.33 ± 0.82, which was higher than that of normal mice (2.00 ± 0.63; P < 0.05). Hydroxyproline and GATA-3 expression were increased in the lung tissues of tumor-bearing mice following irradiation. CpG-ODN attenuated fibrosis by markedly decreasing GATA-3 expression. Serum IL-13 and IL-5 were elevated, whereas INF-γ and IL-12 expression were decreased in irradiated tumor-bearing mice. These changes were reversed after CpG-ODN treatment. Thus, Type-2 immunity in tumors appeared to affect the outcome of radiation damage and might be of interest for future studies on developing approaches in which Type-1–related immunotherapy and radiotherapy are used in combination. PMID:26703457

  8. Overexpressed EDIL3 predicts poor prognosis and promotes anchorage-independent tumor growth in human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ming-Xuan; Wang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Xiao-Mei; He, Ping; Tian, Guang-Ang; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Li, Qing; Cao, Xiao-Yan; Huo, Yan-Miao; Yang, Min-Wei; Fu, Xue-Liang; Li, Jiao; Liu, De-Jun; Dai, Miao; Wen, Shan-Yun; Gu, Jian-Ren; Hong, Jie; Hua, Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Sun, Yong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal Growth Factor-like repeats and Discoidin I-Like Domains 3 (EDIL3), an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein associated with vascular morphogenesis and remodeling, is commonly upregulated in multiple types of human cancers and correlates with tumor progression. However, its expression pattern and underlying cellular functions in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remain largely unexplored. In current study, we observed that expression of EDIL3 was significantly up-regulated in PDAC compared with normal controls in both cell lines and clinical specimens. In addition, elevated EDIL3 expression was positively correlated with patients’ TNM stage and T classification. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that high EDIL3 expression was significantly associated with shorter overall survival times in PDAC patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed EDIL3 expression, age, lymph node metastasis and histological differentiation as independent prognostic factors in PDAC. Knockdown of EDIL3 showed no significant influence on cell viability, migration, invasion and starvation-induced apoptosis, but compromised anoikis resistance and anchorage independent tumor growth of PDAC cells. Meanwhile, treatment with recombinant EDIL3 protein markedly promoted anoikis resistance and anchorage independent tumor growth. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that altered protein expression of Bcl-2 family might contribute to the oncogenic activities of EDIL3. In conclusion, this study provides evidences that EDIL3 is a potential predictor and plays an important role in anchorage independent tumor growth of PDAC and EDIL3-related pathways might represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26735172

  9. Dendrotoxin-κ suppresses tumor growth induced by human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Ryu, Pan Dong

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels have been considered to be a regulator of membrane potential and neuronal excitability. Recently, accumulated evidence has indicated that several Kv channel subtypes contribute to the control of cell proliferation in various types of cells and are worth noting as potential emerging molecular targets of cancer therapy. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the Kv1.1-specific blocker, dendrotoxin-κ (DTX-κ), on tumor formation induced by the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 in a xenograft model. Kv1.1 mRNA and protein was expressed in A549 cells and the blockade of Kv1.1 by DTX-κ, reduced tumor formation in nude mice. Furthermore, treatment with DTX-κ significantly increased protein expression of p21Waf1/Cip1, p27Kip1, and p15INK4B and significantly decreased protein expression of cyclin D3 in tumor tissues compared to the control. These results suggest that DTX-κ has anti-tumor effects in A549 cells through the pathway governing G1-S transition. PMID:21368561

  10. Pancratistatin selectively targets cancer cell mitochondria and reduces growth of human colon tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Carly; Karnik, Aditya; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2011-01-01

    The naturally occurring Amaryllidaceae alkaloid pancratistatin exhibits potent apoptotic activity against a large panel of cancer cells lines and has an insignificant effect on noncancerous cell lines, although with an elusive cellular target. Many current chemotherapeutics induce apoptosis via genotoxic mechanisms and thus have low selectivity. The observed selectivity of pancratistatin for cancer cells promoted us to consider the hypothesis that this alkaloid targets cancer cell mitochondria rather than DNA or its replicative machinery. In this study, we report that pancratistatin decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and induced apoptotic nuclear morphology in p53-mutant (HT-29) and wild-type p53 (HCT116) colorectal carcinoma cell lines, but not in noncancerous colon fibroblast (CCD-18Co) cells. Interestingly, pancratistatin was found to be ineffective against mtDNA-depleted (ρ(0)) cancer cells. Moreover, pancratistatin induced cell death in a manner independent of Bax and caspase activation, and did not alter β-tubulin polymerization rate nor cause double-stranded DNA breaks. For the first time we report the efficacy of pancratistatin in vivo against human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts. Intratumor administration of pancratistatin (3 mg/kg) caused significant reduction in the growth of subcutaneous HT-29 tumors in Nu/Nu mice (n = 6), with no apparent toxicity to the liver or kidneys as indicated by histopathologic analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. Altogether, this work suggests that pancratistatin may be a novel mitochondria-targeting compound that selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells and significantly reduces tumor growth. PMID:21220492

  11. The roles of tumor- and metastasis-promoting carcinoma-associated fibroblasts in human carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Mezawa, Yoshihiro; Orimo, Akira

    2016-09-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) constitute a substantial proportion of the non-neoplastic mesenchymal cell compartment in various human tumors. These fibroblasts are phenotypically converted from their progenitors via interactions with nearby cancer cells during the course of tumor progression. The resulting CAFs, in turn, support the growth and progression of carcinoma cells. These fibroblasts have a major influence on the hallmarks of carcinoma and promote tumor malignancy through the secretion of tumor-promoting growth factors, cytokines and exosomes, as well as through the remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Coevolution of CAFs and carcinoma cells during tumorigenesis is therefore essential for progression into fully malignant tumors. Recent studies have revealed the molecular mechanisms underlying CAF functions, especially in tumor invasion, metastasis and drug resistance and have highlighted the significant heterogeneity among these cells. In this review, we summarize the impacts of recently identified roles of tumor-promoting CAFs and discuss the therapeutic implications of targeting the heterotypic interactions of these fibroblasts with carcinoma cells. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27506216

  12. Ciliated Adenosquamous Carcinoma: Expanding the Phenotypic Diversity of Human Papillomavirus-Associated Tumors.

    PubMed

    Radkay-Gonzalez, Lisa; Faquin, William; McHugh, Jonathan B; Lewis, James S; Tuluc, Madalina; Seethala, Raja R

    2016-06-01

    This study describes a unique subset of ciliated, human papillomavirus (HPV) related, adenosquamous carcinomas (AsqCA) of the head and neck that in contrast to most AsqCA, often show areas with lower grade cytonuclear features. They are comprised of largely non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma components with cystic change, gland formation, mucin production, and cilia in tumor cells. Seven cases of ciliated AsqCA were retrieved. Site distribution was as follows: palatine tonsil-3/7, base of tongue-1/7, and neck (unknown primary site)-3/7. Despite the occasional resemblance to mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), the tumors showed focal keratinizing morphology and atypia, and all tumors were negative for MAML2 rearrangements. Oropharyngeal and neck tumors were uniformly p16 positive and showed punctate staining by in situ hybridization for high risk HPV DNA. There were two distant metastases (lung), and one tumor related death. Thus, ciliated AsqCA are HPV-associated lesions that pose unique pitfalls, closely mimicking MEC and other salivary gland tumors. These tumors add to the list of those which defy the dogma that ciliated epithelium always equates to a benign process. PMID:26411881

  13. Human dermal mast cells contain and release tumor necrosis factor alpha, which induces endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, L J; Trinchieri, G; Waldorf, H A; Whitaker, D; Murphy, G F

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine that mediates endothelial leukocyte interactions by inducing expression of adhesion molecules. In this report, we demonstrate that human dermal mast cells contain sizeable stores of immunoreactive and biologically active TNF-alpha within granules, which can be released rapidly into the extracellular space upon degranulation. Among normal human dermal cells, mast cells are the predominant cell type that expresses both TNF-alpha protein and TNF-alpha mRNA. Moreover, induction of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 expression is a direct consequence of release of mast cell-derived TNF-alpha. These findings establish a role for human mast cells as "gatekeepers" of the dermal microvasculature and indicate that mast cell products other than vasoactive amines influence endothelium in a proinflammatory fashion. Images PMID:1709737

  14. A humanized antibody for imaging immune checkpoint ligand PD-L1 expression in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielson, Matthew; Lisok, Ala; Wharram, Bryan; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Azad, Babak Behnam; Pomper, Martin G.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint lead to tumor regression and improved survival in several cancers. PD-L1 expression in tumors may be predictive of response to checkpoint blockade therapy. Because tissue samples might not always be available to guide therapy, we developed and evaluated a humanized antibody for non-invasive imaging of PD-L1 expression in tumors. Radiolabeled [111In]PD-L1-mAb and near-infrared dye conjugated NIR-PD-L1-mAb imaging agents were developed using the mouse and human cross-reactive PD-L1 antibody MPDL3280A. We tested specificity of [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb in cell lines and in tumors with varying levels of PD-L1 expression. We performed SPECT/CT imaging, biodistribution and blocking studies in NSG mice bearing tumors with constitutive PD-L1 expression (CHO-PDL1) and in controls (CHO). Results were confirmed in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) (MDAMB231 and SUM149) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (H2444 and H1155) xenografts with varying levels of PD-L1 expression. There was specific binding of [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb to tumor cells in vitro, correlating with PD-L1 expression levels. In mice bearing subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors, there was specific and persistent high accumulation of signal intensity in PD-L1 positive tumors (CHO-PDL1, MDAMB231, H2444) but not in controls. These results demonstrate that [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb can detect graded levels of PD-L1 expression in human tumor xenografts in vivo. As a humanized antibody, these findings suggest clinical translation of radiolabeled versions of MPDL3280A for imaging. Specificity of NIR-PD-L1-mAb indicates the potential for optical imaging of PD-L1 expression in tumors in relevant pre-clinical as well as clinical settings. PMID:26848870

  15. Atrasentan (ABT-627) enhances perfusion and reduces hypoxia in a human tumor xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kwang Mo; Russell, James; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Cho, HyungJoon; Li, Xiao-Feng; Koutcher, Jason A.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2010-01-01

    The endothelin-1 antagonist, Atrasentan (ABT-627) was used to modify perfusion in the human tumor xenograft model, HT29, growing in nude mice. Atrasentan produced a significant increase in perfusion, as measured in vivo by Gd-DTPA DCE-MRI. Changes in tumor hypoxia were assessed by comparing the binding of two hypoxia tracers, pimonidazole and EF5 given before and after Atrasentan administration. In vehicle-treated controls, the distribution of EF5 and pimonidazole was very similar. However, Atrasentan treatment was associated with decreased uptake of the second hypoxia tracer (EF5), relative to the first (pimonidazole). Although Atrasentan had no independent effect on the growth of HT29 tumors, Atrasentan combined with 20 Gy radiation led to a modest but significant increase in tumor growth delay compared to radiation alone. PMID:19717985

  16. Correlation between retinoblastoma gene expression and differentiation in human testicular tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmeyer, T. Heinrich-Heine-Univ. of Duesseldorf ); Reissmann, P.; Slamon, D. ); Cordon-Cardo, C. ); Hartmann, M. ); Ackermann, R. )

    1991-08-01

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma gene (RB gene) is associated with the development of several human malignancies including retinoblastomas, come osteo- and soft tissue sarcomas, small cell lung cancer, and possibly breast and bladder cancers. To the authors' knowledge, this gene has not been evaluated in human germ-cell malignancies. In this study 67 primary testicular germ-cell tumors and 4 testicular non-germ-cell malignancies were examined to determine the prevalence and nature of RB gene alterations. Decreased expression of RB gene mRNA was found in all testicular germ-cell tumors examined. The RB protein could not be detected by immunohistochemical analysis in the undifferentiated cells of any germ-cell tumors whereas the differentiated malignant cells present in 14/15 teratocarcinomas expressed the protein. No gross alterations of the RB gene were found at DNA level in any of the examined specimens. This and the presence of the RB protein in the more differentiated tumor cells of teratocarcinomas suggest that changes in transcript levels rather than mutation(s) of the gene may be responsible for the absent of decreased RB expression in human germ-cell tumors. To date studies on the mechanism of RB regulation have demonstrated that it occurs at the protein level by phosphorylation of the p105 gene product. The findings presented here indicate that additional regulation might occur at the transcript level.

  17. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species’ regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF –p53 axis activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07702.001 PMID:26575287

  18. Epitope-mapped monoclonal antibodies as tools for functional and morphological analyses of the human urokinase receptor in tumor tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Luther, T.; Magdolen, V.; Albrecht, S.; Kasper, M.; Riemer, C.; Kessler, H.; Graeff, H.; Müller, M.; Schmitt, M.

    1997-01-01

    uPAR (CD87), the receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) facilitates tumor cell invasion and metastasis by focusing uPA proteolytic activity to the cell surface. As uPAR exists in various molecular forms, it is desirable to use well defined antibodies for analyses of uPAR antigen expression in human malignant tumors by immunological methods. Therefore, twelve monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against uPAR were generated by using nonglycosylated, recombinant human uPAR (spanning amino acids 1 to 284), expressed in Escherichia coli, as the immunogen. The reaction pattern of these MAbs with the immunogen and a series of carboxyl-terminally truncated versions of uPAR demonstrated that at least six different epitopes of uPAR are recognized. All MAbs reacted under reducing conditions in immunoblot analyses with E. coli-expressed uPA and also with highly glycosylated, functionally intact, recombinant human uPAR expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Seven of the MAbs recognized CHO uPAR under nonreducing conditions as well. By flow cytofluorometric analyses, three of these MAbs were shown to bind to native human uPAR present on the cell surface of monocytoid U937 cells with MAb IIIF10 being the best. Saturation of uPAR with uPA on U937 cells completely blocked interaction of MAb IIIF10 with uPAR (mapped epitope, amino acids 52 to 60 of domain I of uPAR). In turn, preincubation of U937 cells with MAb IIIF10 efficiently reduced binding of uPA to uPAR, indicating that the epitope detected by MAb IIIF10 is located within or closely to the uPA-binding site of uPAR, and thus, this site may be a target to influence uPA/uPAR-mediated proteolysis in tumors. Binding of MAbs IID7 or IIIB11 (mapped epitope, amino acids 125 to 132 of domain II of uPAR) to uPAR is not affected when uPAR is occupied by uPA. As these MAbs reacted strongly with cellular uPAR antigen in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor sections, the domain-II-specific antibodies IID7

  19. A genomics-based classification of human lung tumors.

    PubMed

    2013-10-30

    We characterized genome alterations in 1255 clinically annotated lung tumors of all histological subgroups to identify genetically defined and clinically relevant subtypes. More than 55% of all cases had at least one oncogenic genome alteration potentially amenable to specific therapeutic intervention, including several personalized treatment approaches that are already in clinical evaluation. Marked differences in the pattern of genomic alterations existed between and within histological subtypes, thus challenging the original histomorphological diagnosis. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed many of these reassigned subtypes. The reassignment eliminated almost all cases of large cell carcinomas, some of which had therapeutically relevant alterations. Prospective testing of our genomics-based diagnostic algorithm in 5145 lung cancer patients enabled a genome-based diagnosis in 3863 (75%) patients, confirmed the feasibility of rational reassignments of large cell lung cancer, and led to improvement in overall survival in patients with EGFR-mutant or ALK-rearranged cancers. Thus, our findings provide support for broad implementation of genome-based diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:24174329

  20. A Genomics-Based Classification of Human Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We characterized genome alterations in 1255 clinically annotated lung tumors of all histological subgroups to identify genetically defined and clinically relevant subtypes. More than 55% of all cases had at least one oncogenic genome alteration potentially amenable to specific therapeutic intervention, including several personalized treatment approaches that are already in clinical evaluation. Marked differences in the pattern of genomic alterations existed between and within histological subtypes, thus challenging the original histomorphological diagnosis. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed many of these reassigned subtypes. The reassignment eliminated almost all cases of large cell carcinomas, some of which had therapeutically relevant alterations. Prospective testing of our genomics-based diagnostic algorithm in 5145 lung cancer patients enabled a genome-based diagnosis in 3863 (75%) patients, confirmed the feasibility of rational reassignments of large cell lung cancer, and led to improvement in overall survival in patients with EGFR-mutant or ALK-rearranged cancers. Thus, our findings provide support for broad implementation of genome-based diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:24174329

  1. Identification of a human melanoma antigen recognized by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes associated with in vivo tumor rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Y; Eliyahu, S; Delgado, C H; Robbins, P F; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Yannelli, J R; Adema, G J; Miki, T; Rosenberg, S A

    1994-01-01

    The cultured T-cell line TIL1200, established from the tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) of a patient with advanced metastatic melanoma, recognized an antigen on most HLA-A2+ melanomas and on all HLA-A2+ cultured neonatal melanocytes in an HLA-A2 restricted manner but not on other types of tissues or cell lines tested. A cDNA encoding an antigen recognized by TIL1200 was isolated by screening an HLA-A2+ breast cancer cell line transfected with an expression cDNA library prepared from an HLA-A2+ melanoma cell line. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of this cDNA were almost identical to the genes encoding glycoprotein gp100 or Pmel17 previously registered in the GenBank. Expression of this gene was restricted to melanoma and melanocyte cell lines and retina but was not expressed on other fresh or cultured normal tissues or other types of tumor tested. The cell line transfected with this cDNA also expressed antigen recognized by the melanoma-specific antibody HMB45 that bound to gp100. A synthetic 10-amino acid peptide derived from gp100 was recognized by TIL1200 in the context of HLA-A2.1. Since the administration of TIL1200 plus interleukin 2 resulted in regression of metastatic cancer in the autologous patient, gp100 is a possible tumor rejection antigen and may be useful for the development of immunotherapies for patients with melanoma. Images PMID:8022805

  2. Fully humanized neutralizing antibodies to interleukin-8 (ABX-IL8) inhibit angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis of human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Suyun; Mills, Lisa; Mian, Badar; Tellez, Carmen; McCarty, Marya; Yang, X-D; Gudas, Jean M; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2002-07-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) has recently been shown to contribute to human melanoma progression by functioning as a mitogenic and angiogenic factor. In the present study, we investigated whether targeting IL-8 by a fully human anti-IL-8 antibody (ABX-IL8) could be a potential therapeutic strategy to control angiogenesis, growth, and metastasis of melanoma. The human melanoma cells A375SM (high IL-8 producer) and TXM-13 (intermediate IL-8 producer) were injected subcutaneously into nude mice, which were then treated with ABX-IL8 (1 mg/3 times weekly, i.p., for 3 weeks). Tumor growth of both melanomas in ABX-IL8-treated mice was significantly inhibited when compared with control IgG-treated animals. ABX-IL8 treatment also suppressed experimental metastasis when the melanoma cells were injected intravenously. IL-8 blockade by ABX-IL8 significantly inhibited the promoter activity and the collagenase activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in human melanoma cells, resulting in decreased invasion through reconstituted basement membrane in vitro. In vivo, ABX-IL8 treatment resulted in decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2, and decreased vascularization (angiogenesis) of tumors concomitant with increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Moreover, in an in vitro vessel formation assay, ABX-IL8 directly interfered with the tubule formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results point to the potential utility of ABX-IL8 as a modality to treat melanoma and other solid tumors either alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapy or other anti-tumor agents. PMID:12107097

  3. Extract of Cordyceps militaris inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth of human malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ruma, I Made Winarsa; Putranto, Endy Widya; Kondo, Eisaku; Watanabe, Risayo; Saito, Ken; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Ken-Ichi; Nakata, Susumu; Kaihata, Masaji; Murata, Hitoshi; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo

    2014-07-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor development and metastasis. Among several angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF) is important for tumor-derived angiogenesis and commonly overexpressed in solid tumors. Thus, many antitumor strategies targeting VEGF have been developed to inhibit cancer angiogenesis, offering insights into the successful treatment of solid cancers. However, there are a number of issues such as harmful effects on normal vascularity in clinical trials. Taking this into consideration, we employed Cordyceps militaris as an antitumor approach due to its biological safety in vivo. The herbal medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris has been reported to show potential anticancer properties including anti-angiogenic capacity; however, its concrete properties have yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the biological role of Cordyceps militaris extract in tumor cells, especially in regulating angiogenesis and tumor growth of a human malignant melanoma cell line. We demonstrated that Cordyceps militaris extract remarkably suppressed tumor growth via induction of apoptotic cell death in culture that links to the abrogation of VEGF production in melanoma cells. This was followed by mitigation of Akt1 and GSK-3β activation, while p38α phosphorylation levels were increased. Extract treatment in mouse model xenografted with human melanoma cells resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect with down-regulation of VEGF expression. The results suggest that suppression of tumor growth by Cordyceps militaris extract is, at least, mediated by its anti-angiogenicity and apoptosis induction capacities. Cordyceps militaris extract may be a potent antitumor herbal drug for solid tumors. PMID:24789042

  4. Telomerase antagonists GRN163 and GRN163L inhibit tumor growth and increase chemosensitivity of human hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Djojosubroto, Meta W; Chin, Allison C; Go, Ning; Schaetzlein, Sonja; Manns, Michael P; Gryaznov, Sergei; Harley, Calvin B; Rudolph, K Lenhard

    2005-11-01

    Most cancer cells have an immortal growth capacity as a consequence of telomerase reactivation. Inhibition of this enzyme leads to increased telomere dysfunction, which limits the proliferative capacity of tumor cells; thus, telomerase inhibition represents a potentially safe and universal target for cancer treatment. We evaluated the potential of two thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide inhibitors of telomerase, GRN163 and GRN163L, as drug candidates for the treatment of human hepatoma. GRN163 and GRN163L were tested in preclinical studies using systemic administration to treat flank xenografts of different human hepatoma cell lines (Hep3B and Huh7) in nude mice. The studies showed that both GRN163 and GRN163L inhibited telomerase activity and tumor cell growth in a dose-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. The potency and efficacy of the lipid-conjugated antagonist, GRN163L, was superior to the nonlipidated parent compound, GRN163. Impaired tumor growth in vivo was associated with critical telomere shortening, induction of telomere dysfunction, reduced rate of cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis in the treatment groups. In vitro, GRN163L administration led to higher prevalence of chromosomal telomere-free ends and DNA damage foci in both hepatoma cell lines. In addition, in vitro chemosensitivity assay showed that pretreatment with GRN163L increased doxorubicin sensitivity of Hep3B. In conclusion, our data support the development of GRN163L, a novel lipidated conjugate of the telomerase inhibitor GRN163, for systemic treatment of human hepatoma. In addition to limiting the proliferative capacity of hepatoma, GRN163L might also increase the sensitivity of this tumor type to conventional chemotherapy. PMID:16114043

  5. Infrared absorption spectra of human malignant tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skornyakov, I. V.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Butra, V. A.

    2008-05-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study the molecular structure of tissues from human organs removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material from breast, thyroid, and lung are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, a change occurs in the hydrogen bonds of protein macromolecules found in the tissue of the studied organs. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathology.

  6. Enabling transparent and collaborative computational analysis of 12 tumor types within The Cancer Genome Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Omberg, Larsson; Ellrott, Kyle; Yuan, Yuan; Kandoth, Cyriac; Wong, Chris; Kellen, Michael R; Friend, Stephen H; Stuart, Josh; Liang, Han; Margolin, Adam A

    2014-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas Pan-Cancer Analysis Working Group collaborated on the Synapse software platform to share and evolve data, results and methodologies while performing integrative analysis of molecular profiling data from 12 tumor types. The group’s work serves as a pilot case study that provides (i) a template for future large collaborative studies; (ii) a system to support collaborative projects; and (iii) a public resource of highly curated data, results and automated systems for the evaluation of community-developed models. PMID:24071850

  7. Glomus Tumor of the Thenar Eminence in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Scaravilli, Gabriele; Rossi, Roberto; Artiaco, Stefano; Merolla, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a disease characterized by increased tumorigenesis susceptibility, caused by mutations of the oncosuppressor gene NF1. The glomus tumor (GT) is a rare, very painful mesenchymal neoplasm, arising from the glomus body. In recent years, it has been highlighted the association between NF1 and GT. We report a case of a man aged 65 years, suffering from NF1, with intense pain at the thenar eminence of the right hand, successfully treated with the excision of the mass. PMID:25674553

  8. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors in Children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Pourtsidis, Apostolos; Baka, Margarita; Bouhoutsou, Despina; Varvoutsi, Maria; Synodinou, Maria; Giamarelou, Panagiota; Kosmidis, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare in children and account for approximately 5–10% of all soft tissue sarcomas in adults. MPNSTs may occur independently but individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have a significantly increased risk. Our aim is to present patients with MPNST treated in our department. Cases and Results. In this report we present 4 cases of MPNSTs (3 females: 13, 12, and 13 years old and 1 male: 10 years old) arising in patients with NF1. All of them presented with an enlarging mass and pain at diagnosis. Tumor was located in the buttock, the spinal cord, the trunk, and the left leg proximal to the heel. Wide excision of the tumor and radiotherapy were applied to all and adjuvant chemotherapy was given to three of them after the disease was progressed. All four died 32, 18, 10, and 22 months after diagnosis with progressive disease locally and pulmonary metastases in two of them. Conclusions. In conclusion, MPNSTs arising in patients with NF1 are high grade sarcomas with short survival. Individuals with NF1 should be followed closely in order to identify early the development of MPNSTs. Aggressive surgery and complete excision significantly improves disease-free survival. The usefulness of radiation therapy in MPNSTs is not determined although all patients will receive radiation therapy at some stage of the disease. The role of chemotherapy is unclear. PMID:25317349

  9. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors in children with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Pourtsidis, Apostolos; Doganis, Dimitrios; Baka, Margarita; Bouhoutsou, Despina; Varvoutsi, Maria; Synodinou, Maria; Giamarelou, Panagiota; Kosmidis, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare in children and account for approximately 5-10% of all soft tissue sarcomas in adults. MPNSTs may occur independently but individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) have a significantly increased risk. Our aim is to present patients with MPNST treated in our department. Cases and Results. In this report we present 4 cases of MPNSTs (3 females: 13, 12, and 13 years old and 1 male: 10 years old) arising in patients with NF1. All of them presented with an enlarging mass and pain at diagnosis. Tumor was located in the buttock, the spinal cord, the trunk, and the left leg proximal to the heel. Wide excision of the tumor and radiotherapy were applied to all and adjuvant chemotherapy was given to three of them after the disease was progressed. All four died 32, 18, 10, and 22 months after diagnosis with progressive disease locally and pulmonary metastases in two of them. Conclusions. In conclusion, MPNSTs arising in patients with NF1 are high grade sarcomas with short survival. Individuals with NF1 should be followed closely in order to identify early the development of MPNSTs. Aggressive surgery and complete excision significantly improves disease-free survival. The usefulness of radiation therapy in MPNSTs is not determined although all patients will receive radiation therapy at some stage of the disease. The role of chemotherapy is unclear. PMID:25317349

  10. Clinical value of tumor doubling estimations in multiple endocrine neoplasia type II.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C E; Talpos, G B; Block, M A; Norum, R A; Lloyd, R V; Tashjian, A H

    1984-12-01

    Experience with children with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type IIb has emphasized that medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) in MEN IIb is more aggressive than in MEN IIa. Earlier ages of onset and apparently more rapid growth of MTC in MEN IIb suggest that these tumors have earlier ages of conversion to malignant states and/or shorter doubling times. The age at which a hyperplastic C cell becomes a malignant cell and the true doubling time cannot be estimated presently. Maximum volume-doubling times of 35 and 75 days (21 to 26 doublings) were calculated from tumor size and age at operation in five patients with MEN IIb aged 2 to 5 years. Calculations in 20 patients with MEN IIa revealed maximum doubling times of 110 to 440 days, with ages ranging from 7 to 29 years and number of doubling ranging from 18 to 38. Positive provocative calcitonin tests in two adult patients with MEN IIa after 10 to 11 years of repeated negative tests suggest a minimum doubling time of 190 to 210 days. Such experience emphasizes that negative stimulated calcitonin tests less than 11 years after operation do not provide assurance of cures for MTC in MEN IIa although negative tests after more than 5 years for MEN IIb are encouraging. Calculations of volume doublings accounting for various-sized tumors are compatible with Knudson's two-mutational-event theory on the initiation of neoplasia. PMID:6150555

  11. Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment: The Protumor Effects of IL-17 Related to Cancer Type.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Joseph; Giustiniani, Jerome; Garbar, Christian; Antonicelli, Frank; Merrouche, Yacine; Bensussan, Armand; Bagot, Martine; Al-Dacak, Reem

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory process contributes to immune tolerance as well as to tumor progression and metastasis. By releasing extracellular signals, cancerous cells constantly shape their surrounding microenvironment through their interactions with infiltrating immune cells, stromal cells and components of extracellular matrix. Recently, the pro-inflammatory interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing T helper lymphocytes, the Th17 cells, and the IL-17/IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) axis gained special attention. The IL-17 family comprises at least six members, IL-17A, IL-17B, IL-17C, IL-17D, IL-17E (also called IL-25), and IL-17F. Secreted as disulfide-linked homo- or heterodimers, the IL-17 bind to the IL-17R, a type I cell surface receptor, of which there are five variants, IL-17RA to IL-17RE. This review focuses on the current advances identifying the promoting role of IL-17 in carcinogenesis, tumor metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy of diverse solid cancers. While underscoring the IL-17/IL-17R axis as promising immunotherapeutic target in the context of cancer managing, this knowledge calls upon further in vitro and in vivo studies that would allow the development and implementation of novel strategies to combat tumors. PMID:27589729

  12. Detection in human breast carcinomas of an antigen immunologically related to a group-specific antigen of mouse mammary tumor virus

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Tejada, R.; Keydar, I.; Ramanarayanan, M.; Ohno, T.; Fenoglio, C.; Spiegelman, S.

    1978-01-01

    An antigen immunologically related to a group-specific antigen (gp52, a 52,000-dalton glycoprotein) of the mouse mammary tumor virus has been identified in paraffin sections of human breast cancers by means of the indirect immunoperoxidase technique. The specificity of the reaction with antibody against mouse mammary tumor virus was examined by absorption of the IgG with the following: (a) purified gp52; (b) a number of virus preparations (mouse mammary tumor virus, Rauscher leukemia virus, simian sarcoma virus, baboon endogenous virus, and Mason—Pfizer monkey virus); (c) normal plasma, leukocytes, breast tissue, milk, actin, collagen, and hyaluronic acid, all of human origin; (d) sheep erythrocytes and mucin. Only mouse mammary tumor virus (from C3H or Paris RIII strains and grown in either murine or feline cells) and purified gp52 eliminated the immunohistochemical reaction in the human breast tumors. Positive reactions were seen in 51 of 131 (39%) breast carcinomas of various histologic types, a minimal estimate in view of the limited number of sections from each tumor that could be examined. Negative reactions were obtained in all 119 benign breast lesions (cystic disease, fibroadenoma, papilloma, gynecomastia) and in all 18 normal breast tissues. With one exception, 99 carcinomas from 13 organs other than breast and 8 cystosarcomas were all negative. Images PMID:206905

  13. [INVITED] Time reversal optical tomography: Detecting and locating tumors in an ex vivo model human breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin; Alrubaiee, Mohammad; Gayen, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    Time reversal optical tomography (TROT), a recently introduced diffuse optical imaging approach, is used to detect, locate, and obtain cross-section images of tumors inside a "model human breast." The model cancerous breast is assembled as a semi-cylindrical slab of uniform thickness using ex vivo human breast tissues with two pieces of tumors embedded in it. The experimental arrangement used a 750-nm light beam from a Ti:sapphire laser to illuminate an end face (source plane) of the sample in a multi-source probing scheme. A multi-detector signal acquisition scheme measured transmitted light intensity distribution on the other end face (detector plane). The perturbations in light intensity distribution in the detector plane were analyzed using TROT to obtain locations of the tumor pieces in three dimensions and estimate their cross sections. The estimated locations and dimensions of targets are in good agreement with the results of a corroborating magnetic resonance imaging experiment.

  14. Progenitor Cell Line (hPheo1) Derived from a Human Pheochromocytoma Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Stastny, Victor; Click, Arielle; Ding, Liang-Hao; Mizrachi, Dario; Zou, Ying S.; Chari, Raj; Lam, Wan L.; Bachoo, Robert M.; Smith, Alice L.; Story, Michael D.; Sidhu, Stan; Robinson, Bruce G.; Nwariaku, Fiemu E.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Auchus, Richard J.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pheochromocytomas are rare tumors generally arising in the medullary region of the adrenal gland. These tumors release excessive epinephrine and norepinephrine resulting in hypertension and cardiovascular crises for which surgery is the only definitive treatment. Molecular mechanisms that control tumor development and hormone production are poorly understood, and progress has been hampered by the lack of human cellular model systems. To study pheochromocytomas, we developed a stable progenitor pheochromocytoma cell line derived from a primary human tumor. Methods After IRB approval and written informed consent, human pheochromocytoma tissue was excised, minced, dispersed enzymatically, and cultured in vitro. Primary pheochromocytoma cells were infected with a lentivirus vector carrying the catalytic subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). The hTERT immortalized cells (hPheo1) have been passaged >300 population doublings. The resulting cell line was characterized morphologically, biochemically and for expression of neuroendocrine properties. The expression of marker enzymes and proteins was assessed by immunofluorescence staining and immunoblotting. Telomerase activity was determined by using the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. Results We have established a human pheochromocytoma precursor cell line that expresses the neuroendocrine marker, chromogranin A, when differentiated in the presence of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), nerve growth factor (NGF), and dexamethasone. Phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) expression is also detected with this differentiation regimen. CD-56 (also known as NCAM, neural cell adhesion molecule) is expressed in these cells, but CD31 (also known as PECAM-1, a marker of endothelial cells) is negative. Conclusions We have maintained hTERT-immortalized progenitor cells derived from a pheochromocytoma (hPheo1) in culture for over 300 population doublings. This progenitor human

  15. DETECTION OF CIRCULATING TUMOR DNA IN EARLY AND LATE STAGE HUMAN MALIGNANCIES

    PubMed Central

    Bettegowda, Chetan; Sausen, Mark; Leary, Rebecca; Kinde, Isaac; Agrawal, Nishant; Bartlett, Bjarne; Wang, Hao; Luber, Brandon; Kinzler, Kenneth; Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The development of minimally-invasive methods to detect and monitor tumors continues to be a major challenge in oncology. We used digital PCR-based technologies to evaluate the ability of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) to detect tumors in 640 patients with various cancer types. In particular we studied the plasma of 14 medulloblastoma, 13 WHO grade 2-3 glioma and 14 WHO grade IV astrocytoma cases for levels of ctDNA. METHODS: The basis of our approach is to differentiate DNA shed by normal cells from DNA derived from tumor cells. In order to distinguish the two populations of cell-free DNA, we first identify a tumor-specific alteration. We then query for that exact mutation in matching plasma from the same patient to generate a personalized tumor biomarker. Only DNA derived from the tumor will harbor the genetic alteration. We initially use targeted, exomic, or whole genome sequencing to identify sequence or structural alterations in tumor tissues of 410 individuals. DNA was extracted from less than 5 ml of plasma in each case. The majority of plasma samples were queried for levels of ctDNA using a high fidelity next-generation sequencing approach coined Safe-SeqS. RESULTS: We found that at least one tumor-specific mutant molecule could be identified in <5 mL of plasma in >75% of patients with advanced ovarian, colorectal, bladder, gastroesophoageal, pancreatic, breast, melanoma, hepatocellular and head and neck cancers, but in less than 50% of primary brain, renal, prostate, or thyroid cancers. Approximately 40% of medulloblastoma and 10% of low or high grade glioma cases had detectable levels of ctDNA. In patients with localized non-CNS tumors, ctDNA was detected in 73%, 57%, 48% and 50% of patients with colorectal cancer, gastroesophageal cancer, pancreatic cancer, and breast adenocarcinoma, respectively. Finally, we assessed whether ctDNA could provide clues into the mechanisms underlying resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) blockade

  16. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach. Part I: Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    In this article, part I of a series, the forensic methods used in "typing" human blood, which as physical evidence is often found in the dried state, are outlined. Background information about individualization, antibody typing, fresh blood, dried blood, and additional systems is provided. (CW)

  17. Stereotaxic administrations of allogeneic human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells efficiently control the development of human glioblastoma brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Jarry, Ulrich; Chauvin, Cynthia; Joalland, Noémie; Léger, Alexandra; Minault, Sandrine; Robard, Myriam; Bonneville, Marc; Oliver, Lisa; Vallette, François M; Vié, Henri; Pecqueur, Claire; Scotet, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represents the most frequent and deadliest primary brain tumor. Aggressive treatment still fails to eliminate deep brain infiltrative and highly resistant tumor cells. Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, the major peripheral blood γδ T cell subset, react against a wide array of tumor cells and represent attractive immune effector T cells for the design of antitumor therapies. This study aims at providing a preclinical rationale for immunotherapies in GBM based on stereotaxic administration of allogeneic human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. The feasibility and the antitumor efficacy of stereotaxic Vγ9Vδ2 T cell injections have been investigated in orthotopic GBM mice model using selected heterogeneous and invasive primary human GBM cells. Allogeneic human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells survive and patrol for several days within the brain parenchyma following adoptive transfer and can successfully eliminate infiltrative GBM primary cells. These striking observations pave the way for optimized stereotaxic antitumor immunotherapies targeting human allogeneic Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in GBM patients. PMID:27471644

  18. Human gene transfer: Characterization of human tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes as vehicles for retroviral-mediated gene transfer in man

    SciTech Connect

    Kasid, A.; Morecki, S.; Aebersold, P.; Cornetta, K.; Culver, K.; Freeman, S.; Director, E.; Lotze, M.T.; Blaese, R.M.; Anderson, W.F.; Rosenberg, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are cells generated from tumor suspensions cultured in interleukin 2 that can mediate cancer regression when adoptively transferred into mice or humans. Since TILs proliferate rapidly in vitro, recirculate, and preferentially localize at the tumor site in vivo, they provide an attractive model for delivery of exogenous genetic material into man. To determine whether efficient gene transfer into TILs is feasible. The authors transduced human TILs with the bacterial gene for neomycin-resistance (Neo{sup R}) using the retroviral vector N2. The transduced TIL populations were stable and polyclonal with respect to the intact Neo{sup R} gene integration and expressed high levels of neomycin phosphotransferase activity. The Neo{sup R} gene insertion did not alter the in vitro growth pattern and interleukin 2 dependence of the transduced TILs. Analyses of T-cell receptor gene rearrangement for {beta}- and {gamma}-chain genes revealed the oligoclonal nature of the TIL populations with no major change in the DNA rearrangement patterns or the levels of mRNA expression of the {beta} and {gamma} chains following transduction and selection of TILs in the neomycin analog G418. Human TILs expressed mRNA for tumor necrosis factors ({alpha} and {beta}) and interleukin 2 receptor P55. This pattern of cytokine-mRNA expression was not significantly altered following the transduction of TILs. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of TILs as suitable cellular vehicles for the introduction of therapeutic genes into patients receiving autologous TILs.

  19. Investigation of independence in inter-animal tumor-type occurrences within the NTP rodent-bioassay database

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, K.T.; Seilkop, S.

    1993-05-01

    Statistically significant elevation in tumor incidence at multiple histologically distinct sites is occasionally observed among rodent bioassays of chemically induced carcinogenesis. If such data are to be relied on (as they have, e.g., by the US EPA) for quantitative cancer potency assessment, their proper analysis requires a knowledge of the extent to which multiple tumor-type occurrences are independent or uncorrelated within individual bioassay animals. Although difficult to assess in a statistically rigorous fashion, a few significant associations among tumor-type occurrences in rodent bioassays have been reported. However, no comprehensive studies of animal-specific tumor-type occurrences at death or sacrifice have been conducted using the extensive set of available NTP rodent-bioassay data, on which most cancer-potency assessment for environmental chemicals is currently based. This report presents the results of such an analysis conducted on behalf of the National Research Council`s Committee on Risk Assessment for Hazardous Air Pollutants. Tumor-type associations among individual animals were examined for {approximately}2500 to 3000 control and {approximately}200 to 600 treated animals using pathology data from 62 B6C3F1 mouse studies and 61 F/344N rat studies obtained from a readily available subset of the NTP carcinogenesis bioassay database. No evidence was found for any large correlation in either the onset probability or the prevalence-at-death or sacrifice of any tumor-type pair investigated in control and treated rats and niece, although a few of the small correlations present were statistically significant. Tumor-type occurrences were in most cases nearly independent, and departures from independence, where they did occur, were small. This finding is qualified in that tumor-type onset correlations were measured only indirectly, given the limited nature of the data analyzed.

  20. Cytokine profile of conditioned medium from human tumor cell lines after acute and fractionated doses of gamma radiation and its effect on survival of bystander tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sejal; Kumar, Amit; Laskar, S; Pandey, B N

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are known to play pivotal roles in cancer initiation, progression and pathogenesis. Accumulating evidences suggest differences in basal and stress-induced cytokine profiles of cancers with diverse origin. However, a comprehensive investigation characterising the cytokine profile of various tumor types after acute and fractionated doses of gamma-irradiation, and its effect on survival of bystander cells is not well known in literature. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytokine secretion profile of human tumor cell lines (HT1080, U373MG, HT29, A549 and MCF-7) either before (basal) or after acute (2, 6 Gy) and fractionated doses (3×2 Gy) of gamma-irradiation in culture medium obtained from these cells by multiplex bead array/ELISA. Moreover, clonogenic assays were performed to evaluate the effect of conditioned medium (CM) on the survival and growth of respective cells. Based on the screening of 28 analytes, our results showed that the basal profiles of these cell lines varied considerably in terms of the number and magnitude of secreted factors, which was minimum in MCF-7. Interestingly, TNF-α, IL-1β, PDGF-AA, TGF-β1, fractalkine, IL-8, VEGF and GCSF were found in CM of all the cell lines. However, secretion of certain cytokines was cell line-specific. Moreover, CM caused increase in clonogenic survival of respective tumor cells (in the order HT1080>U373MG>HT29>A549>MCF-7), which was correlated with the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, GMCSF and VEGF in their CM. After irradiation, the levels of most of the cytokines increased markedly in a dose dependent manner. The fold change in cytokine levels was lower in irradiated conditioned medium (ICM) of tumor cells collected after fractionated than respective acute dose, except in MCF-7. Interestingly, amongst these cell lines, the radiation-induced fold increase in cytokine levels was maximum in ICM of A549 cells. Moreover, bystander A549 cells treated with respective ICM showed dose dependent

  1. Revisiting a role for a mammary tumor retrovirus in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Salmons, Brian; Gunzburg, Walter H

    2013-10-01

    There remains great controversy as to whether mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), the etiological agent of mammary cancer in mice, or a closely related human retrovirus, plays a role in the development of breast cancer in humans. On one hand, retroviruses such as human T-cell lymphotropic virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are known causative agents of cancer (in the case of HIV, albeit, indirectly), but attempts to associate other retroviruses with human cancers have been difficult. A recent, high profile, example has been the postulated involvement of another mouse virus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus, in human prostate cancer, which is now thought to be due to contamination. Here, we review some of the more recent evidence for and against the involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer and suggest future studies that may allow a definitive answer to this conundrum. PMID:23580334

  2. S-Nitrosated human serum albumin dimer as novel nano-EPR enhancer applied to macromolecular anti-tumor drugs such as micelles and liposomes.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Ryo; Ishima, Yu; Ikeda, Mayumi; Kragh-Hansen, Ulrich; Fang, Jun; Nakamura, Hideaki; Chuang, Victor T G; Tanaka, Ryota; Maeda, Hitoshi; Kodama, Azusa; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2015-11-10

    The enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect is a unique phenomenon of solid tumors, and it can serve as a basis for the development of macromolecular anticancer therapy. We have previously found that recombinant human serum albumin dimer, and especially its S-nitrosated form (SNO-HSA-Dimer), is an enhancer of the EPR effect. In this study, we investigated the influence of SNO-HSA-Dimer on the anti-tumor effect of two types of macromolecular anti-tumor drugs, namely N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide polymer conjugated with zinc protoporphyrin, which forms micelles and can be used for fluorescence studies. The other was PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil), a typical example of a stealth liposome approved for medical usage. In mice having C26 tumors with highly permeable vasculature, SNO-HSA-Dimer increases tumor accumulation of the drugs by a factor 3-4 and thereby their anti-tumor effects. Experiments with Evans blue revealed increased EPR effect in all parts of the tumor. Furthermore, SNO-HSA-Dimer improves the anti-metastatic effects of Doxil and reduces its minor uptake in non-tumorous organs such as liver and kidney. Tumor accumulation of Doxil in B16 tumors, which are characterized by a low permeable vasculature, increased even more (6-fold) in the presence of SNO-HSA-Dimer, and the improved accumulation lead to decreased tumor volume and increased survival of the animals. The administration of SNO-HSA-Dimer itself is safe, because it has no effect on blood pressure, heart rate or on several biochemical parameters. The present findings indicate that SNO-HSA-Dimer is promising for enhancing the EPR effect and consequently the specific, therapeutic effects of macromolecular anticancer drugs. PMID:26302904

  3. Characterization of Cell-Type-Specific Drug Transport and Resistance of Breast Cancers Using Tumor-Microenvironment-on-Chip.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyeonggon; Klosterhoff, Brett S; Han, Bumsoo

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneous response and resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs pose a significant challenge for successful cancer treatments. In this study, an integrated experimental and theoretical analysis of cellular drug transport was developed. The experimental platform, called tumor-microenvironment-on-chip (T-MOC), is a microfluidic platform where cancer cells were cultured within a three-dimensional extracellular matrix perfused with interstitial fluid. Three types of human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and SUM-159PT) were cultured on this T-MOC platform, and their drug response and resistance to doxorubicin were characterized by time-lapse quantitative fluorescence microscopy. To study the effects of nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery, the transport and action of doxorubicin encapsulated nanoparticles were also examined. Based on the experimental data obtained, a theoretical model was developed to quantify and ultimately predict the cellular transport processes of drugs cell-type specifically. The results demonstrate that the cellular drug transport can be cell-type-specifically quantified by rate constants representing the uptake and efflux of doxorubicin across the cellular membrane. PMID:27228477

  4. The roles of Jumonji-type oxygenases in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Catrine; Tumber, Anthony; Che, KaHing; Cain, Peter; Nowak, Radoslaw; Gileadi, Carina; Oppermann, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The iron- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenases constitute a phylogenetically conserved class of enzymes that catalyze hydroxylation reactions in humans by acting on various types of substrates, including metabolic intermediates, amino acid residues in different proteins and various types of nucleic acids. The discovery of jumonji (Jmj), the founding member of a class of Jmj-type chromatin-modifying enzymes and transcriptional regulators, has culminated in the discovery of several branches of histone lysine demethylases, with essential functions in regulating the epigenetic landscape of the chromatin environment. This work has now been considerably expanded into other aspects of epigenetic biology and includes the discovery of enzymatic steps required for methyl-cytosine demethylation, as well as modification of RNA and ribosomal proteins. This overview aims to summarize the current knowledge on the human Jmj-type enzymes and their involvement in human pathological processes, including development, cancer, inflammation and metabolic diseases. PMID:24579949

  5. The Fractalkine-Receptor Axis Improves Human Colorectal Cancer Prognosis by Limiting Tumor Metastatic Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Erreni, Marco; Siddiqui, Imran; Marelli, Giulia; Grizzi, Fabio; Bianchi, Paolo; Morone, Diego; Marchesi, Federica; Celesti, Giuseppe; Pesce, Samantha; Doni, Andrea; Rumio, Cristiano; Roncalli, Massimo G; Laghi, Luigi; Mantovani, Alberto; Allavena, Paola

    2016-01-15

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequent neoplasia in Western countries, and its metastatic progression is a major cause of cancer-related death. In search of specific molecules upregulated in CRC, with possible clinical relevance, we performed a differential gene-profiling analysis in surgery-derived CRC samples and adjacent uninvolved intestinal mucosa. The chemokine CX3CL1 and its specific receptor CX3CR1 were significantly upregulated in tumors. Higher expression of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in 100 CRC tumor samples (stages I-III). Unexpectedly, high immune scores of CX3CL1 did not correlate with the density of tumor-infiltrating CD3(+) T cells or CD68(+) macrophages. Coexpression of ligand and receptor by tumor cells (axis-positive tumors) significantly associated with longer disease-free (p = 0.01) and disease-specific survival (p = 0.001). Conversely, axis-negative tumors (with low expression of both ligand and receptor) had increased risk of tumor relapse (p = 0.02), and increased likelihood of metachronous metastasis (p = 0.001), including after stage adjustment (p = 0.006). Transduction of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 in CRC tumor cell lines induced cell aggregation that strongly inhibited in vitro migration in chemotaxis assays. In a mouse model of spleen-liver metastases, cancer dissemination to liver was dramatically reduced in CX3CL1-CX3CR1-expressing tumors, and ligand-receptor interaction was confirmed in cancer cells in vivo by fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis. In conclusion, tumoral expression of the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 chemokine axis functions as a retention factor, increasing homotypic cell adhesion and limiting tumor spreading to metastatic sites. Lack or low levels of expression of CX3CL1-CX3CR1 by tumor cells identifies a group of CRC patients at increased risk of metastatic progression. PMID:26673138

  6. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Leten, Cindy; Trekker, Jesse; Struys, Tom; Roobrouck, Valerie D; Dresselaers, Tom; Vande Velde, Greetje; Lambrichts, Ivo; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683) in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1) outliers can be detected earlier, (2) GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3) a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents. PMID:26880961

  7. A comparative study of peanut agglutinin and amaranthin binding to human urinary bladder tumor glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Langkilde, N C; Orntoft, T F

    1995-01-01

    The reactivity of two T-antigen specific lectins, Amaranthin (ACA) and Peanut Agglutinin (PNA), was compared by immunohistochemical staining of serial sections of human bladder tumors and by Western Blot analysis of glycoproteins extracted from human bladder tumors prior to and after sialic acid removal. In low grade tumors ACA reacted prior to neuraminidase treatment. PNA on the other hand only showed positive reaction in these tumors after neuraminidase treatment. The two lectins showed identical staining patterns after neuraminidase treatment in tumors. In Western blottings both lectins detected a 28 kD glycoprotein. PNA also reacted with several other bands after neuraminidase treatment. The reactivity of ACA was not enhanced after neuraminidase treatment. In monosaccharide inhibition tests ACA- and PNA-binding to different T-antigens was most efficiently inhibited by GalNAc and Gal respectively. PNA binding was also inhibited by Glc, GlcNAc and GalNAc at higher concentrations, while the binding of ACA was only scarcely affected by Glc, GlcNAc and Gal. PMID:8578258

  8. Human Hemochromatosis Protein (HFE) Immunoperoxidase Stain Highlights Choriocarcinoma within Mixed Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jesse L; Talmon, Geoffrey A; Koepsell, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Identification of choriocarcinoma within a germ cell tumor can have major implications for the subsequent staging and treatment of testicular neoplasms. Immunoperoxidase staining greatly enhances the speed and sensitivity of identifying occult, though clinically significant, tumor components. In mixed germ cell tumors, staining for beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) has been historically used to assess for the presence and burden of choriocarcinoma. However, current β-hCG stains produce variable, intense staining of trophoblastic elements and surrounding tissues, clouding the assessment of true-positive staining. Human hemochromatosis protein (HFE) is a membrane bound mediator of iron transport expressed at high levels within placenta. Additionally, previous reports have demonstrated that choriocarcinoma cell lines express HFE, although in vivo expression had not been examined. To address whether HFE can stain trophoblastic elements, HFE immunohistochemistry was conducted in choriocarcinoma (n = 4), mixed germ cell tumors (n = 11), seminoma (n = 4), and placenta (n = 11). HFE consistently demonstrated cytoplasmic and membranous staining, highlighting both syncytiotrophoblasts and cytotrophoblasts within choriocarcinoma and placenta. Staining of intratumoral white blood cells was observed within seminomas and mixed germ cell tumors, corroborating prior reports stating that HFE highlights monocytes and macrophages. Taken together, HFE may serve as an alternative target from β-hCG for immunoperoxidase studies when highlighting choriocarcinoma. PMID:27034532

  9. Human Hemochromatosis Protein (HFE) Immunoperoxidase Stain Highlights Choriocarcinoma within Mixed Germ Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Talmon, Geoffrey A.; Koepsell, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of choriocarcinoma within a germ cell tumor can have major implications for the subsequent staging and treatment of testicular neoplasms. Immunoperoxidase staining greatly enhances the speed and sensitivity of identifying occult, though clinically significant, tumor components. In mixed germ cell tumors, staining for beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) has been historically used to assess for the presence and burden of choriocarcinoma. However, current β-hCG stains produce variable, intense staining of trophoblastic elements and surrounding tissues, clouding the assessment of true-positive staining. Human hemochromatosis protein (HFE) is a membrane bound mediator of iron transport expressed at high levels within placenta. Additionally, previous reports have demonstrated that choriocarcinoma cell lines express HFE, although in vivo expression had not been examined. To address whether HFE can stain trophoblastic elements, HFE immunohistochemistry was conducted in choriocarcinoma (n = 4), mixed germ cell tumors (n = 11), seminoma (n = 4), and placenta (n = 11). HFE consistently demonstrated cytoplasmic and membranous staining, highlighting both syncytiotrophoblasts and cytotrophoblasts within choriocarcinoma and placenta. Staining of intratumoral white blood cells was observed within seminomas and mixed germ cell tumors, corroborating prior reports stating that HFE highlights monocytes and macrophages. Taken together, HFE may serve as an alternative target from β-hCG for immunoperoxidase studies when highlighting choriocarcinoma. PMID:27034532

  10. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Leten, Cindy; Trekker, Jesse; Struys, Tom; Roobrouck, Valerie D.; Dresselaers, Tom; Vande Velde, Greetje; Lambrichts, Ivo; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683) in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1) outliers can be detected earlier, (2) GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3) a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents. PMID:26880961

  11. AMPK Promotes Aberrant PGC1β Expression To Support Human Colon Tumor Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Kurt W.; Das, Binita; Kim, Hyun Seok; Clymer, Beth K.; Gehring, Drew; Smith, Deandra R.; Costanzo-Garvey, Diane L.; Fernandez, Mario R.; Brattain, Michael G.; Kelly, David L.; MacMillan, John

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of cancer research is the identification of tumor-specific vulnerabilities that can be exploited for the development of therapies that are selectively toxic to the tumor. We show here that the transcriptional coactivators peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1β (PGC1β) and estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) are aberrantly expressed in human colon cell lines and tumors. With kinase suppressor of Ras 1 (KSR1) depletion as a reference standard, we used functional signature ontology (FUSION) analysis to identify the γ1 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as an essential contributor to PGC1β expression and colon tumor cell survival. Subsequent analysis revealed that a subunit composition of AMPK (α2β2γ1) is preferred for colorectal cancer cell survival, at least in part, by stabilizing the tumor-specific expression of PGC1β. In contrast, PGC1β and ERRα are not detectable in nontransformed human colon epithelial cells, and depletion of the AMPKγ1 subunit has no effect on their viability. These data indicate that Ras oncogenesis relies on the aberrant activation of a PGC1β-dependent transcriptional pathway via a specific AMPK isoform. PMID:26351140

  12. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Tumor Targeted Delivery of Gold Nanorods and Enhanced Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanlei; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Jingpu; Zhi, Xiao; Li, Chao; Zhang, Chunlei; Pan, Fei; Wang, Kan; Yang, Yuming; Martinez de la Fuentea, Jesus; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-02-23

    How to improve effective accumulation and intratumoral distribution of plasmonic gold nanoparticles has become a great challenge for photothermal therapy of tumors. Herein, we reported a nanoplatform with photothermal therapeutic effects by fabricating Au nanorods@SiO2@CXCR4 nanoparticles and loading the prepared nanoparticles into the human induced pluripotent stem cells(AuNRs-iPS). In virtue of the prominent optical properties of Au nanorods@SiO2@CXCR4 and remarkable tumor target migration ability of iPS cells, the Au nanorods delivery mediated by iPS cells via the nanoplatform AuNRs-iPS was found to have a prolonged retention time and spatially even distribution in MGC803 tumor-bearing nude mice observed by photoacoustic tomography and two-photon luminescence. On the basis of these improvements, the nanoplatform displayed a robust migration capacity to target the tumor site and to improve photothermal therapeutic efficacy on inhibiting the growth of tumors in xenograft mice under a low laser power density. The combination of gold nanorods with human iPS cells as a theranostic platform paves an alternative road for cancer theranostics and holds great promise for clinical translation in the near future. PMID:26761620

  13. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Profiling of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schweppe, Devin K.; Rigas, James R.; Gerber, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Within the molecular scope of NCSLC, a complex landscape of dysregulated cellular signaling has emerged, defined largely by mutations in select mediators of signal transduction, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma (ALK) kinases. Consequently, these mutant kinases become constitutively activated and targets for chemotherapeutic intervention. Encouragingly, small molecule inhibitors of these pathways have shown promise in clinical trials or are approved for clinical use. However, many protein kinases are dysregulated in NSCLC without genetic mutations. To quantify differences in tumor cell signaling that are transparent to genomic methods, we established a super-SILAC internal standard derived from NSCLC cell lines grown in vitro and labeled with heavy lysine and arginine, and deployed them in a phosphoproteomics workflow. We identified 9019 and 8753 phosphorylation sites in two separate tumors. Relative quantification of phosphopeptide abundance between tumor samples allowed for the determination of specific hubs and pathways differing between each tumor. Sites downstream of Ras showed decreased inhibitory phosphorylation (Raf/Mek) and increased activating phosphorylation (Erk1/2) in one tumor versus another. In this way, we were able to quantitatively access oncogenic kinase signaling in primary human tumors. PMID:23911959

  14. Interleukin-12-secreting human papillomavirus type 16-transformed cells provide a potent cancer vaccine that generates E7-directed immunity.

    PubMed

    Hallez, S; Detremmerie, O; Giannouli, C; Thielemans, K; Gajewski, T F; Burny, A; Leo, O

    1999-05-01

    The development of a vaccine that would be capable of preventing or curing the (pre)cancerous lesions induced by genital oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is the focus of much research. Many studies are presently evaluating vaccines based on the viral E6 and E7 oncoproteins, both of which are continually expressed by tumor cells. The success of a cancer vaccine relies, in large part, on the induction of a tumor-specific Th1-type immunity. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of B7-related and/or interleukin-12 (IL-12)-expressing, non-immunogenic murine HPV16-transformed BMK-16/myc cells, to achieve this goal. BMK-16/myc cells engineered to express surface B7-1 or B7-2 molecules remain tumorigenic in syngeneic BALB/c mice, suggesting that expression of these molecules alone is not sufficient to induce tumor regression. In contrast, mice injected with tumor cells engineered to secrete IL-12 remained tumor-free, demonstrating that IL-12 expression is sufficient to induce tumor rejection. IL-12-secreting BMK-16/myc cells were further shown to induce potent and specific long-term tumor resistance, even after irradiation. B7-1 was found to slightly but systematically improve anti-tumor immunity elicited by IL-12-secreting BMK-16/myc cells. Injection of irradiated B7-1/IL-12+ BMK-16/myc cells generates long-lasting, Th1-type, BMK-16/myc-directed immunity in tumor-resistant mice. These mice display a memory-type, E7-specific, cell-mediated immune response, which is potentially significant for clinical applications. PMID:10209958

  15. Human BCAS3 Expression in Embryonic Stem Cells and Vascular Precursors Suggests a Role in Human Embryogenesis and Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Siva, Kavitha; Venu, Parvathy; Mahadevan, Anita; S. K., Shankar; Inamdar, Maneesha S.

    2007-01-01

    Cancer is often associated with multiple and progressive genetic alterations in genes that are important for normal development. BCAS3 (Breast Cancer Amplified Sequence 3) is a gene of unknown function on human chromosome 17q23, a region associated with breakpoints of several neoplasms. The normal expression pattern of BCAS3 has not been studied, though it is implicated in breast cancer progression. Rudhira, a murine WD40 domain protein that is 98% identical to BCAS3 is expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells, erythropoiesis and angiogenesis. This suggests that BCAS3 expression also may not be restricted to mammary tissue and may have important roles in other normal as well as malignant tissues. We show that BCAS3 is also expressed in human ES cells and during their differentiation into blood vascular precursors. We find that BCAS3 is aberrantly expressed in malignant human brain lesions. In glioblastoma, hemangiopericytoma and brain abscess we note high levels of BCAS3 expression in tumor cells and some blood vessels. BCAS3 may be associated with multiple cancerous and rapidly proliferating cells and hence the expression, function and regulation of this gene merits further investigation. We suggest that BCAS3 is mis-expressed in brain tumors and could serve as a human ES cell and tumor marker. PMID:18030336

  16. Induction of type I IFN is required for overcoming tumor-specific T-cell tolerance after stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Horkheimer, Ian; Quigley, Michael; Zhu, Jiangao; Huang, Xiaopei; Chao, Nelson J; Yang, Yiping

    2009-05-21

    Tumor-specific T-cell tolerance represents one major mechanism of tumor-induced immune evasion. Myeloablative chemotherapy with stem cell transplantation may offer the best chance of achieving a state of minimal residual disease and, thus, minimize tumor-induced immune evasion. However, studies have shown that tumor-specific T-cell tolerance persists after transplantation. Here, we showed that CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (T(Reg)) cells play a critical role in tumor-specific CD8(+) T-cell tolerance after transplantation. Removal of T(Reg) cells from the donor lymphocyte graft did not overcome this tolerance because of rapid conversion of donor CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells into CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T(Reg) cells in recipients after transplantation, and depletion of T(Reg) cells in recipients was necessary for the reversal of tumor-specific tolerance. These results suggest that strategies capable of overcoming T-cell tolerance in recipients are required to promote antitumor immunity after transplantation. Toward this goal, we showed that dendritic cell (DC) vaccines coadministered with the TLR9 ligand, CpG could effectively overcome tumor-specific tolerance, leading to significant prolongation of tumor-free survival after transplantation. We further showed that CpG-induced type I interferon was critical for the reversal of tumor-specific tolerance in vivo. Collectively, these results may suggest effective immunotherapeutic strategies for treating cancer after stem cell transplantation. PMID:19279333

  17. The role of KLF4 in UVB-induced murine skin tumor development and its correlation with cyclin D1, p53, and p21(Waf1/Cip1) in epithelial tumors of the human skin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Jin; Youn, Sung Hwan; Back, Jung Ho; Park, Saebomi; Park, Eun Joo; Kim, Kwang Joong; Park, Hye Rim; Kim, Arianna L; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2011-04-01

    The zinc-finger-type transcriptional factor KLF4 is expressed in a variety of tissues including skin. KLF4 can function as either a tumor suppressor or an oncogene, depending on the type of tissue in which it is expressed, by modulating the expression of various factors. To understand the role of KLF4 in human skin cancer and also to evaluate the expression of cyclin D1, p53, and p21(Waf1/Cip1) in relation to the expression of KLF4, we evaluated the pattern of KLF4 expression during UVB-induced skin tumor development in SKH-1 hairless mice and in human skin cancer. We also determined whether there are correlations between the expression of KLF4, cyclin D1, p53, and p21 and non-melanoma skin tumors. KLF4 expression was found in the basal layer of non-irradiated control murine skin. Chronic UVB irradiation caused a progressive decrease in KLF4 expression, which was substantially decreased in UVB-induced murine skin tumors. In human precancerous lesions, KLF4 expression was maintained in 64.3% of Bowen's disease samples and 90.0% of AK samples. In contrast, KLF4 expression was significantly reduced in human cancer lesions (p = 0.004). A positive correlation was found between the expression of KLF4 and p21(Waf1/Cip1) in AK, whereas there was a negative correlation between the expression of cyclin D1 and p21(Waf1/Cip1) in Bowen's disease. Thus, our results suggest that KLF4 may function as a tumor suppressor in the skin and that the deregulated expression of KLF4 in the context of p21(Waf1/Cip1) and cyclin D1 expression may be involved in skin tumorigenesis. PMID:21132436

  18. Clinical effects of vinorelbine administration in the management of various malignant tumor types in dogs: 58 cases (1997–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Wouda, Raelene M.; Miller, Mairin E.; Chon, Esther; Stein, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of vinorelbine in the management of various malignant tumor types in dogs. Design Retrospective case series. Animals 58 dogs with malignant tumors, including pulmonary carcinoma (n = 31), histiocytic sarcoma (9), mast cell tumor (5), lymphoma (4), melanoma (2), and 7 other tumor types (1 each). Procedures Medical records of dogs treated with vinorelbine from December 1997 to December 2012 were reviewed for data regarding signalment, clinical signs, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic test results, diagnostic imaging results, vinorelbine doses and dose frequency, surgery and radiotherapy details when applicable, other chemotherapeutics administered, and outcomes. Descriptive, comparative, and survival statistics were computed for all dogs and for dogs by histologic subgroup of tumors. Results Vinorelbine was administered palliatively to 44 (76%) dogs. One (2%) dog had a complete response for 162 days, 5 (11%) dogs had a partial response for a median duration of 91 days, 19 (43%) dogs had stable disease for a median duration of 68 days, and 19 (43%) dogs developed progressive disease after a median duration of 21 days. Clinical benefit was more difficult to assess in the remaining 14 (24%) dogs that received vinorelbine as an adjuvant treatment. Overall median time to tumor progression was 103 days (range, 5 to 1,533 days). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Vinorelbine appeared to be effective in the treatment of several tumor types in dogs. Follow-up prospective studies of the clinical benefit of the drug in specific clinical scenarios will be necessary to support this conclusion. PMID:25970220

  19. Here, there be dragons: charting autophagy-related alterations in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Lebovitz, Chandra B; Bortnik, Svetlana B; Gorski, Sharon M

    2012-03-01

    Macroautophagy (or autophagy) is a catabolic cellular process that is both homeostatic and stress adaptive. Normal cells rely on basal levels of autophagy to maintain cellular integrity (via turnover of long-lived proteins and damaged organelles) and increased levels of autophagy to buoy cell survival during various metabolic stresses (via nutrient and energy provision through lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic components). Autophagy can function in both tumor suppression and tumor progression, and is under investigation in clinical trials as a novel target for anticancer therapy. However, its role in cancer pathogenesis has yet to be fully explored. In particular, it remains unknown whether in vitro observations will be applicable to human cancer patients. Another outstanding question is whether there exists tumor-specific selection for alterations in autophagy function. In this review, we survey reported mutations in autophagy genes and key autophagy regulators identified in human tumor samples and summarize the literature regarding expression levels of autophagy genes and proteins in various cancer tissues. Although it is too early to draw inferences from this collection of in vivo studies of autophagy-related alterations in human cancers, their results highlight the challenges that must be overcome before we can accurately assess the scope of autophagy's predicted role in tumorigenesis. PMID:22253413

  20. The retinoblastoma gene functions as a growth and tumor suppressor in human bladder carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Rei; Hashimoto, Tomoko; Hongji Xu; Shixu Hu; Bigo-Marshall, H.; Benedict, W.F. ); Matsui, Toshimitsu Kobe Univ. School of Medicine ); Miki, Toru; Aaronson, S.A. )

    1991-06-15

    The product of the human retinoblastoma gene (RB) is a nuclear phosphoprotein that is thought to function as a tumor suppressor. Mutations of RB frequently occur in human bladder carcinoma. To investigate the significance of the functional loss of this gene in bladder cancer, an RB expression plasmid (pBARB) under control of the human {beta}-actin promoter was transfected into the bladder carcinoma cell line HTB9, which lacks RB expression. Marker-selected transfectants that expressed RB protein were identified by immunoblotting and immunohistochemical staining. In selected clones, stable RB expression has persisted over 1 yr under standard culture conditions with 10% serum. However, RB expression caused major alterations of HTB9 growth properties both in vitro and in vivo. RB{sup +} tranfectants lacked the ability to form colonies in semi-solid medium, and their growth rate was significantly decreased in 3% serum. In addition, the tumorigenicity of these transfectants was markedly decreased. Tumors that formed in nude mice were much smaller and had a longer latency period but were indistinguishable microscopically from those produced by parental cells. Slower growing tumors were RB{sup +}, as measured by nuclear staining of their RB protein and by a normal RB protein pattern on immunoblots. These findings support the concept that the RB gene acts as both a growth and tumor suppressor in bladder cancer cells.

  1. A high-affinity human antibody that targets tumoral blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Tarli, L; Balza, E; Viti, F; Borsi, L; Castellani, P; Berndorff, D; Dinkelborg, L; Neri, D; Zardi, L

    1999-07-01

    Angiogenesis is a characteristic feature of many aggressive tumors and of other relevant disorders. Molecules capable of specifically binding to new-forming blood vessels, but not to mature vessels, could be used as selective vehicles and would, therefore, open diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. We have studied the distribution of the ED-B oncofetal domain of fibronectin, a marker of angiogenesis, in four different tumor animal models: the F9 murine teratocarcinoma, SKMEL-28 human melanoma, N592 human small cell lung carcinoma, and C51 human colon carcinoma. In all of these experimental models we observed accumulation of the fibronectin isoform containing the ED-B domain around neovascular structures when the tumors were in the exponentially growing phase, but not in the slow-growing phase. Then we performed biodistribution studies in mice bearing a subcutaneously implanted F9 murine teratocarcinoma, using a high-affinity human antibody fragment (L19) directed against the ED-B domain of fibronectin. Radiolabeled L19, but not an irrelevant anti-lysozyme antibody fragment (D1.3), efficiently localizes in the tumoral vessels. The maximal dose of L19 accumulated in the tumor was observed 3 hours after injection (8.2% injected dose per gram). By virtue of the rapid clearance of the antibody fragment from the circulation, tumor-to-blood ratios of 1.9, 3.7, and 11.8 were obtained at 3, 5, and 24 hours, respectively. The tumor-targeting performance of L19 was not dose-dependent in the 0.7 to 10 microg range of injected antibody. The integral of the radioactivity localized in tumoral vessels over 24 hours was greater than 70-fold higher than the integral of the radioactivity in blood over the same time period, normalized per gram of tissue or fluid. These findings quantitatively show that new-forming blood vessels can selectively be targeted in vivo using specific antibodies, and suggest that L19 may be of clinical utility for the immunoscintigraphic detection of

  2. Establishment of human colon cancer cell lines from fresh tumors versus xenografts: comparison of success rate and cell line features.

    PubMed

    Dangles-Marie, Virginie; Pocard, Marc; Richon, Sophie; Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Assayag, Franck; Saulnier, Patrick; Judde, Jean-Gabriel; Janneau, Jean-Louis; Auger, Nathalie; Validire, Pierre; Dutrillaux, Bernard; Praz, Françoise; Bellet, Dominique; Poupon, Marie-France

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining representative human colon cancer cell lines from fresh tumors is technically difficult. Using 32 tumor fragments from patients with colon cancer, the present study shows that prior xenograft leads to more efficient cell line establishment compared with direct establishment from fresh tumors (P < 0.05). From 26 tumor specimens, we successfully established 20 tumor xenografts in nude mice (77%); among 19 of these xenografts, 9 (47%) led to cell lines, including four from liver metastases. Only 3 of 31 tumor specimens (9.7%) grew immediately in vitro, and all were derived from primary tumors. To compare major phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of human colon cancer cell lines derived from the same tumor fragment using two protocols, the two pairs of cell lines obtained from 2 of 32 tumor fragments were extensively studied. They displayed similar morphology and were able to form compact spheroids. Chemosensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, CPT11, and L-OHP differed between cell lines obtained from patient tumors and those derived from xenografts. Matched cell lines shared a common core of karyotype alterations and distinctive additional chromosomal aberrations. Expression levels of genes selected for their role in oncogenesis evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR were found to be statistically correlated whatever the in vitro culture model used. In conclusion, xenotransplantation in mice of tumor fragments before establishment of cell lines enables generation of more novel human cancer cell lines for investigation of colon cancer cell biology, opening up the opportunity of reproducing the diversity of this disease. PMID:17210723

  3. The LKB1 Tumor Suppressor as a Biomarker in Mouse and Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Christopher G.; Zhang, Song; Zhao, Ni; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Sharpless, Norman E.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hayes, D. Neil; Castrillon, Diego H.

    2013-01-01

    Germline mutations in the LKB1 gene (also known as STK11) cause the Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome, and somatic loss of LKB1 has emerged as causal event in a wide range of human malignancies, including melanoma, lung cancer, and cervical cancer. The LKB1 protein is a serine-threonine kinase that phosphorylates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and other downstream targets. Conditional knockout studies in mouse models have consistently shown that LKB1 loss promotes a highly-metastatic phenotype in diverse tissues, and human studies have demonstrated a strong association between LKB1 inactivation and tumor recurrence. Furthermore, LKB1 deficiency confers sensitivity to distinct classes of anticancer drugs. The ability to reliably identify LKB1-deficient tumors is thus likely to have important prognostic and predictive implications. Previous research studies have employed polyclonal antibodies with limited success, and there is no widely-employed immunohistochemical assay for LKB1. Here we report an assay based on a rabbit monoclonal antibody that can reliably detect endogenous LKB1 protein (and its absence) in mouse and human formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. LKB1 protein levels determined through this assay correlated strongly with AMPK phosphorylation both in mouse and human tumors, and with mRNA levels in human tumors. Our studies fully validate this immunohistochemical assay for LKB1 in paraffin-embedded formalin tissue sections. This assay should be broadly useful for research studies employing mouse models and also for the development of human tissue-based assays for LKB1 in diverse clinical settings. PMID:24086281

  4. Establishment, characterization, and successful adaptive therapy against human tumors of NKG cell, a new human NK cell line.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Min; Ma, Juan; Chen, Yongyan; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhao, Weidong; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Haiming; Ling, Bin; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in adoptive cellular immunotherapy against certain human cancers. This study aims to establish a new human NK cell line and to study its role for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 54 patients to establish the NK cell line. A new human NK cell line, termed as NKG, was established from a Chinese male patient with rapidly progressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. NKG cells showed LGL morphology and were phenotypically identified as CD56(bright) NK cell with CD16(-), CD27(-), CD3(-), αβTCR(-), γδTCR(-), CD4(-), CD8(-), CD19(-), CD161(-), CD45(+), CXCR4(+), CCR7(+), CXCR1(-), and CX3CR1(-). NKG cells showed high expression of adhesive molecules (CD2, CD58, CD11a, CD54, CD11b, CD11c), an array of activating receptors (NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, NKG2D, NKG2C), and cytolysis-related receptors and molecules (TRAIL, FasL, granzyme B, perforin, IFN-γ). The cytotoxicity of NKG cells against tumor cells was higher than that of the established NK cell lines NK-92, NKL, and YT. NKG cell cytotoxicity depended on the presence of NKG2D and NKp30. When irradiated with 8 Gy, NKG cells were still with high cytotoxicity and activity in vitro and with safety in vivo, but without proliferation. Further, the irradiated NKG cells exhibited strong cytotoxicity against human primary ovarian cancer cells in vitro, and against human ovarian cancer in a mouse xenograft model. The adoptive transfer of NKG cells significantly inhibited the ovarian tumor growth, decreased the mortality rate and prolonged the survival, even in cases of advanced diseases. A number of NKG cells were detected in the ovarian tumor tissues during cell therapy. In use of the new human NK cell line, NKG would a promising cellular candidate for adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer. PMID:21669033

  5. Acanthamoeba royreba sp. n. from a human tumor cell culture.

    PubMed

    Willaert, E; Stevens, A R; Tyndall, R L

    1978-02-01

    A new species of Acanthamoeba was isolated from a culture of an established line of human choriocarcinoma cells. The identification of this strain, originally called the Oak Ridge strain, and the establishment of a new species for it were based on morphologic, serologic, and immunochemical studies. In general, the structure of the trophozoite did not differ significantly from that of other species of Acanthamoeba, except that a body which more closely resembled a centriole than material described previously as centriolar satellites was observed in trophozoites examined with the electron microscope. The dimensions of the trophozoite were the smallest among the species of Acanthamoeba. The cyst was typical of the genus, but differed from those of other species by its smaller size and the presence of numerous ostioles. Studies of the Oak Ridge strain by immunofluorescence using antisera developed against the isolate and Acanthamoeba culbertsoni, A. castellanii, A. polyphaga, A. rhysodes, A. astronyxis, and A. palestinensis revealed the antigenic uniqueness of the Oak Ridge strain. It was demonstrated by immunoelectrophoretic analyses of the soluble proteins of the Oak Ridge strain that shared approximately 1/2 of its antigenic structure with A. castellanii and A. culbertsoni. The antigenic differences of the isolate from other species of Acanthamoeba were deduced from comparison of the antigenic constitution of these species and the Oak Ridge strain with A. culbertsoni and A. castellanii. Although the strain was initially recognized by its cytopathogenicity for cultures, it did not produce acute infections in mice after intranasal inoculation of 1 X 10(4) ameba/mouse. The foregoing results constituted the basis for the establishment of the Oak Ridge strain as a new species, A. royreba sp. n., in the genus Acanthamoeba. PMID:566323

  6. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging on fresh human brain tumor biopsies at microscopic resolution.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bisbal, M Carmen; Martínez-Granados, Beatriz; Rovira, Vicente; Celda, Bernardo; Esteve, Vicent

    2015-09-01

    The metabolic composition and concentration knowledge provided by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) liquid and high-resolution magic angle spinning spectroscopy (HR-MAS) has a relevant impact in clinical practice during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitoring of human tumors. In addition, the combination of morphological and chemical information by MRI and MRS has been particularly useful for diagnosis and prognosis of tumor evolution. MRI spatial resolution reachable in human beings is limited for safety reasons and the demanding necessary conditions are only applicable on experimental model animals. Nevertheless, MRS and MRI can be performed on human biopsies at high spatial resolution, enough to allow a direct correlation between the chemical information and the histological features observed in such biopsies. Although HR-MAS is nowadays a well-established technique for spectroscopic analysis of tumor biopsies, with this approach just a mean metabolic profile of the whole sample can be obtained and thus the high histological heterogeneity of some important tumors is mostly neglected. The value of metabolic HR-MAS data strongly depends on a wide statistical analysis and usually the microanatomical rationale for the correlation between histology and spectroscopy is lost. We present here a different approach for the combined use of MRI and MRS on fresh human brain tumor biopsies with native contrast. This approach has been designed to achieve high spatial (18 × 18 × 50 μm) and spectral (0.031 μL) resolution in order to obtain as much spatially detailed morphological and metabolical information as possible without any previous treatment that can alter the sample. The preservation of native tissue conditions can provide information that can be translated to in vivo studies and additionally opens the possibility of performing other techniques to obtain complementary information from the same sample. PMID:26123440

  7. Apoptotic human neutrophil peptide-1 anti-tumor activity revealed by cellular biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Diana; Freire, João M; Pacheco, Teresa R; Barata, João T; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2015-02-01

    Cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although progress has been made regarding chemotherapeutic agents, new therapies that combine increased selectivity and efficacy with low resistance are still needed. In the search for new anticancer agents, therapies based on biologically active peptides, in particular, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), have attracted attention for their decreased resistance development and low cytotoxicity. Many AMPs have proved to be tumoricidal agents against human cancer cells, but their mode of action is still controversial. The existence of common properties shared by the membranes of bacteria and tumor cells points to similar lipid-targeting mechanisms in both cases. On the other hand, anticancer peptides (ACPs) also induce apoptosis and inhibit angiogenesis. Human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1) is an endogenous AMP that has been implicated in different cellular phenomena such as tumor proliferation. The presence of HNP-1 in the serum/plasma of oncologic patients turns this peptide into a potential tumor biomarker. The present work reveals the different effects of HNP-1 on the biophysical and nanomechanical properties of solid and hematological tumor cells. Studies on cellular morphology, cellular stiffness, and membrane ultrastructure and charge using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and zeta potential measurements show a preferential binding of HNP-1 to solid tumor cells from human prostate adenocarcinoma when compared to human leukemia cells. AFM also reveals induction of apoptosis with cellular membrane defects at very low peptide concentrations. Understanding ACPs mode(s) of action will certainly open innovative pathways for drug development in cancer treatment. PMID:25447543

  8. Dendritic Cells in the Context of Human Tumors: Biology and Experimental Tools.

    PubMed

    Volovitz, Ilan; Melzer, Susanne; Amar, Sarah; Bocsi, József; Bloch, Merav; Efroni, Sol; Ram, Zvi; Tárnok, Attila

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent and versatile antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the immune system. DC have an exceptional ability to comprehend the immune context of a captured antigen based on molecular signals identified from its vicinity. The analyzed information is then conveyed to other immune effector cells. Such capability enables DC to play a pivotal role in mediating either an immunogenic response or immune tolerance towards an acquired antigen. This review summarizes current knowledge on DC in the context of human tumors. It covers the basics of human DC biology, elaborating on the different markers, morphology and function of the different subsets of human DC. Human blood-borne DC are comprised of at least three subsets consisting of one plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and two to three myeloid DC (mDC) subsets. Some tissues have unique DC. Each subset has a different phenotype and function and may induce pro-tumoral or anti-tumoral effects. The review also discusses two methods fundamental to the research of DC on the single-cell level: multicolor flow cytometry (FCM) and image-based cytometry (IC). These methods, along with new genomics and proteomics tools, can provide high-resolution information on specific DC subsets and on immune and tumor cells with which they interact. The different layers of collected biological data may then be integrated using Immune-Cytomics modeling approaches. Such novel integrated approaches may help unravel the complex network of cellular interactions that DC carry out within tumors, and may help harness this complex immunological information into the development of more effective treatments for cancer. PMID:27007190

  9. Increased expression of CYP4Z1 promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wei; Chai, Hongyan; Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Xie, Xianfei; Zheng, Hao; Wang, Chenlong; Wang, Xue; Yang, Guifang; Cai, Xiaojun; Falck, John R.; Yang, Jing

    2012-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4Z1, a novel CYP4 family member, is over-expressed in human mammary carcinoma and associated with high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of CYP4Z1 in tumor progression is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer. Stable expression of CYP4Z1 in T47D and BT-474 human breast cancer cells significantly increased mRNA expression and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and decreased mRNA levels and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), without affecting cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro. Notably, the conditioned medium from CYP4Z1-expressing cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and promoted angiogenesis in the zebrafish embryo and chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In addition, there were lower levels of myristic acid and lauric acid, and higher contents of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in CYP4Z1-expressing T47D cells compared with vector control. CYP4Z1 overexpression significantly increased tumor weight and microvessel density by 2.6-fold and 1.9-fold in human tumor xenograft models, respectively. Moreover, CYP4Z1 transfection increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, while PI3K or ERK inhibitors and siRNA silencing reversed CYP4Z1-mediated changes in VEGF-A and TIMP-2 expression. Conversely, HET0016, an inhibitor of the CYP4 family, potently inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis with associated changes in the intracellular levels of myristic acid, lauric acid and 20-HETE. Collectively, these data suggest that increased CYP4Z1 expression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer partly via PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 activation. -- Highlights: ► CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes human breast cancer growth and angiogenesis. ► The pro-angiogenic effects of CYP4Z1 have

  10. Detection of human herpesvirus-6 in adult central nervous system tumors: predominance of early and late viral antigens in glial tumors.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John R; Santi, Maria Rita; Cornelison, Robbie; Sallinen, Satu-Leena; Haapasalo, Hannu; MacDonald, Tobey J

    2009-10-01

    The purpose is to determine the incidence of active and latent human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) infection in a large cohort of adult primary and recurrent CNS tumors. We screened a tissue microarray (TMA) containing more than 200 adult primary and recurrent CNS tumors with known clinical information for the presence of HHV-6 DNA by in situ hybridization (ISH) and protein by immunohistochemistry (IHC). One hundred six of 224 (47%) CNS tumors were positive for HHV-6 U57 Major Capsid Protein (MCP) gene by ISH compared to 0/25 non tumor control brain (P = 0.001). Fourteen of 30 (47%) tumors were HHV-6 MCP positive by nested PCR compared to 0/25 non-tumor brain controls (P = 0.001), revealing HHV-6 Variant A in 6 of 14 samples. HHV-6A/B early (p41) and late (gp116/64/54) antigens were detected by IHC in 66 of 277 (24%) (P = 0.003) and 84 of 282 (35%) (P = 0.002) tumors, respectively, suggesting active infection. HHV-6 p41 (P = 0.645) and gp116/64/54 (P = 0.198) antigen detection was independent of recurrent disease. Glial tumors were 3 times more positive by IHC compared to non glial tumors for both HHV-6 gp116/64/54 (P = 0.0002) and HHV-6 p41 (P = 0.004). Kaplan Meier survival analysis showed no effect of HHV-6 gp116/64/54 (P = 0.852) or HHV-6 p41 (P = 0.817) antigen detection on survival. HHV-6 early and late antigens are detected in adult primary and recurrent CNS tumors more frequently in glial tumors. We hypothesize that the glial-tropic features of HHV-6 may play an important modifying role in tumor biology that warrants further investigation. PMID:19424665

  11. Human Cytomegalovirus Up-Regulates Endothelin Receptor Type B: Implication for Vasculopathies?

    PubMed Central

    Yaiw, Koon-Chu; Mohammad, Abdul-Aleem; Costa, Helena; Taher, Chato; Badrnya, Sigrun; Assinger, Alice; Wilhelmi, Vanessa; Ananthaseshan, Sharan; Estekizadeh, Atosa; Davoudi, Belghis; Ovchinnikova, Olga; Shlyakhto, Eugene; Rafnsson, Arnar; Khan, Zahidul; Butler, Lynn; Rahbar, Afsar; Pernow, John; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Background. Both endothelin receptor type B ([ETBR], a G protein-coupled receptor that mediates the vascular effects of the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1) and human cytomegalovirus ([HCMV], a ubiquitous herpesvirus) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The effects of HCMV infection on ETBR expression are unknown. We hypothesized that HCMV may contribute to the pathogenesis of CVD via ETBR modulation. Methods. Human CMV effects on ETBR were studied in vitro in endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and ex vivo in human carotid plaque tissue specimens. Expression of ETBR and viral immediate-early were quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Functional consequences after ETBR blockade in ECs were examined by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide proliferation, wound healing, tube formation, and flow adhesion assays. Results. Human CMV is capable of upregulating both ETBR mRNA and protein expression in ECs and SMCs. The ETBR was also abundantly expressed in ECs, foam cells, and SMCs, and, more importantly, in HCMV-positive cells in human carotid plaques. Endothelin receptor type B blockade led to decreased proliferation and reduced tumor necrosis factor α-mediated leukocyte recruitment in both uninfected and HCMV-infected ECs. Direct HCMV infection was antimigratory and antiangiogenic in ECs. Conclusions. Human CMV may contribute to CVD via ETBR induction. PMID:26719843

  12. Willow Leaves' Extracts Contain Anti-Tumor Agents Effective against Three Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    El-Shemy, Hany A.; Aboul-Enein, Ahmed M.; Aboul-Enein, Khalid Mostafa; Fujita, Kounosuke

    2007-01-01

    Many higher plants contain novel metabolites with antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral properties. However, in the developed world almost all clinically used chemotherapeutics have been produced by in vitro chemical synthesis. Exceptions, like taxol and vincristine, were structurally complex metabolites that were difficult to synthesize in vitro. Many non-natural, synthetic drugs cause severe side effects that were not acceptable except as treatments of last resort for terminal diseases such as cancer. The metabolites discovered in medicinal plants may avoid the side effect of synthetic drugs, because they must accumulate within living cells. The aim here was to test an aqueous extract from the young developing leaves of willow (Salix safsaf, Salicaceae) trees for activity against human carcinoma cells in vivo and in vitro. In vivo Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma Cells (EACC) were injected into the intraperitoneal cavity of mice. The willow extract was fed via stomach tube. The (EACC) derived tumor growth was reduced by the willow extract and death was delayed (for 35 days). In vitro the willow extract could kill the majority (75%–80%) of abnormal cells among primary cells harvested from seven patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 13 with AML (acute myeloid leukemia). DNA fragmentation patterns within treated cells inferred targeted cell death by apoptosis had occurred. The metabolites within the willow extract may act as tumor inhibitors that promote apoptosis, cause DNA damage, and affect cell membranes and/or denature proteins. PMID:17264881

  13. Gut wall replacing type of gastrointestinal stromal tumor presenting as a perforation of the ileal diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Masako; Kunita, Akiko; Miwa, Yoshiyuki; Jimbo, Keiichi; Mori, Kazuhiko; Seto, Yasuyuki; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-11-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) usually form a well-circumscribed mass. Very rarely, however, sporadic GISTs show gut-wall replacing growth, similar to the diffuse hyperplasia of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) observed in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and hereditary GIST. Here we describe a patient with ileal perforation caused by this unusual type of GIST. An 82-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department with sudden abdominal pain. Following a provisional diagnosis of perforation of Meckel's diverticulum, he underwent segmental resection of the small intestine. Macroscopic examination revealed a diverticulum-like structure 2.5cm in size near the site of mesenteric attachment of the ileum. Histological examination showed diffuse and nodular proliferation of spindle cells positive for c-KIT and CD34 that had replaced the muscularis propria of the small intestine. Mutational analyses of the lesions revealed monoclonality of proliferating cells with a somatic mutation in c-kit exon 11 (p.Leu576Pro). Gut-wall replacing type of GIST should be recognized as a specific type of GIST causing diverticulum-like structures of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26298631

  14. Variant type of teratoma appearing as a primary solid dermoid tumor in the rectum: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Y; Tsunemi, K; Matsuda, T

    1995-01-01

    We report herein the rare case of a 39-year-old woman found to have a primary solid dermoid tumor in the rectum. The patient presented after noticing a small amount of anal bleeding, and physical examination revealed a walnut-sized hard tumor, palpable in the anterior rectum, located about 9 cm from the anal verge. Morphologic examinations revealed a polypoid lesion with some hair surrounded by rectal mucosa, and four biopsy specimens from the lesion showed normal squamous epithelium. The tumor, which measured 2.5 x 2.1 x 1.3 cm, was removed by endoscopic polypectomy. Microscopically, the tumor was diagnosed as a solid dermoid tumor without a cyst, a variant type of mature teratoma or dermoid cyst. Since 1914, only 12 such cases, including ours, have been reported in Japan. The clinical features and diagnostic and therapeutic methods applied thereto are discussed. PMID:7749293

  15. Induction of Anti-Tumor Immune Responses by Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with 177Lu-DOTATATE in a Murine Model of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yin; Pfeifer, Andreas Klaus; Myschetzky, Rebecca; Garbyal, Rajendra Singh; Rasmussen, Palle; Knigge, Ulrich; Bzorek, Michael; Kristensen, Michael Holmsgaard; Kjaer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a relatively new mode of internally targeted radiotherapy currently in clinical trials. In PRRT, ionizing radioisotopes conjugated to somatostatin analogues are targeted to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) via somatostatin receptors. Despite promising clinical results, very little is known about the mechanism of tumor control. By using NCI-H727 cells in an in vivo murine xenograft model of human NETs, we showed that 177Lu-DOTATATE PRRT led to increased infiltration of CD86+ antigen presenting cells into tumor tissue. We also found that following treatment with PRRT, there was significantly increased tumor infiltration by CD49b+/FasL+ NK cells potentially capable of tumor killing. Further investigation into the immunomodulatory effects of PRRT will be essential in improving treatment efficacy. PMID:26824927

  16. GATA2 is epigenetically repressed in human and mouse lung tumors and is not requisite for survival of KRAS mutant lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tessema, Mathewos; Yingling, Christin M.; Snider, Amanda M.; Do, Kieu; Juri, Daniel E.; Picchi, Maria A.; Zhang, Xiequn; Liu, Yushi; Leng, Shuguang; Tellez, Carmen S.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction GATA2 was recently described as a critical survival factor and therapeutic target for KRAS mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, whether this role is affected by epigenetic repression of GATA2 in lung cancer is unclear. Methods GATA2 expression and promoter CpG island methylation were evaluated using human and mouse NSCLC cell lines and tumor-normal pairs. In vitro assays were used to study GATA2 repression on cell survival and during tobacco carcinogen-induced transformation. Results GATA2 expression in KRAS wild-type (n=15) and mutant (n=10) NSCLC cell lines and primary lung tumors (n=24) was significantly lower, 1.3–33.6-fold (p=2.2×10−9), compared to corresponding normal lung. GATA2 promoter was unmethylated in normal lung (0/10) but frequently methylated in lung tumors (96%, 159/165) and NSCLC cell lines (97%, 30/31). This highly prevalent aberrant methylation was independently validated using TCGA data for 369 NSCLC tumor-normal pairs. In vitro studies using an established carcinogen-induced pre-malignancy model revealed that GATA2 expression was initially repressed by chromatin remodeling followed by cytosine methylation during transformation. Similarly, expression of Gata2 in NNK-induced mouse lung tumors (n=6) and cell lines (n=5) was 5-fold and 100-fold lower, respectively, than normal mouse lung. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of GATA2 in KRAS mutant [human (n=4) and murine (n=5)] and wild-type [human (n=4)] NSCLC cell lines showed that further reduction of expression (up to 95%) does not induce cell death. Conclusion GATA2 is epigenetically repressed in human and mouse lung tumors and its further inhibition is not a valid therapeutic strategy for KRAS mutant lung cancer. PMID:24807155

  17. Extension of the in vivo half-life of endostatin and its improved anti-tumor activities upon fusion to a humanized antibody against tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 in a mouse model of human colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Woo; Lee, Kyungmin; Lee, Dong Gwang; Cho, Young-Lai; Lee, Tae Sup; Na, Hee-Jun; Park, Young-Jun; Lee, Hee Gu; Jeong, Mun Sik; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Sang Chul; Lee, Hyo Jin; Kwon, Young-Guen; Hong, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Jang-Seong; Min, Jeong-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Endostatin is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor that exhibits potential anti-tumor efficacy in various preclinical animal models. However, its relatively short in vivo half-life and the long-term, frequent administration of high doses limit its widespread clinical use. In this study, we evaluated whether a fusion protein of murine endostatin (mEndo) to a humanized antibody against tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 (TAG-72), which is highly expressed in several human tumor tissues including colon cancer, can extend the serum half-life and improve the anti-tumor efficacy of endostatin by targeted delivery to the tumor mass. The fusion protein (3E8-mEndo) and mEndo showed improved anti-angiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo, predominantly by interfering with pro-angiogenic signaling triggered by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Moreover, in mice treated with 3E8-mEndo, we observed a markedly prolonged serum half-life and significantly inhibited tumor growth. The improved anti-tumor activity of 3E8-mEndo can be partially explained by increased local concentration in the tumor mass due to targeted delivery of 3E8-mEndo to implanted colon tumors. Collectively, our data clearly indicate that tumor-targeting antibody fusions to endostatin are a powerful strategy that improves the poor pharmacokinetic profile and anti-tumor efficacy of endostatin. PMID:25762629

  18. Common corruption of the mTOR signaling network in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Menon, S; Manning, B D

    2008-12-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is responsive to numerous extracellular and intracellular cues and, through the formation of two physically and functionally distinct complexes, has a central role in the homeostatic control of cell growth, proliferation and survival. Through the aberrant activation of mTOR signaling, the perception of cellular growth signals becomes disconnected from the processes promoting cell growth, and this underlies the pathophysiology of a number of genetic tumor syndromes and cancers. Here, we review the oncogenes and tumor suppressors comprising the regulatory network upstream of mTOR, highlight the human cancers in which mTOR is activated and discuss how dysregulated mTOR signaling provides tumors a selective growth advantage. In addition, we discuss why activation of mTOR, as a consequence of distinct oncogenic events, results in diverse clinical outcomes, and how the complexity of the mTOR signaling network might dictate therapeutic approaches. PMID:19956179

  19. Common corruption of the mTOR signaling network in human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Suchithra; Manning, Brendan D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) is responsive to numerous extracellular and intracellular cues and, through the formation of two physically and functionally distinct complexes, plays a central role in the homeostatic control of cell growth, proliferation and survival. Through aberrant activation of mTOR signaling, the perception of cellular growth signals becomes disconnected from the processes promoting cell growth, and this underlies the pathophysiology of a number of genetic tumor syndromes and cancers. Here, we review the oncogenes and tumor suppressors comprising the regulatory network upstream of mTOR, highlight the human cancers in which mTOR is activated, and discuss how dysregulated mTOR signaling gives tumors a selective growth advantage. In addition, we discuss why activation of mTOR, as a consequence of distinct oncogenic events, results in diverse clinical outcomes, and how the complexity of the mTOR signaling network might dictate therapeutic approaches. PMID:19956179

  20. A novel mechanism for the inhibition of type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase by tumor necrosis factor α: involvement of proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Takayuki; Araki, Osamu; Morimura, Tadashi; Tsunekawa, Katsuhiko; Mori, Masatomo; Murakami, Masami

    2013-01-01

    Thyroxine (T₄) needs to be converted to 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T₃) by iodothyronine deiodinase to exert its biological activity. Rec