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Sample records for human tumoral myeloid

  1. Vav promotes differentiation of human tumoral myeloid precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Bertagnolo, Valeria; Brugnoli, Federica; Mischiati, Carlo; Sereni, Alessia; Bavelloni, Alberto; Carini, Cinzia; Capitani, Silvano . E-mail: cps@unife.it

    2005-05-15

    Vav is one of the genetic markers that correlate with the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. In T and B cells, it appears crucial for both development and functions, while, in non-lymphoid hematopoietic cells, Vav seems not involved in cell maturation, but rather in the response of mature cells to agonist-dependent proliferation and phagocytosis. We have previously demonstrated that the amount and the tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav are up-regulated in both whole cells and nuclei of tumoral promyelocytes induced to granulocytic maturation by ATRA and that tyrosine-phosphorylated Vav does not display any ATRA-induced GEF activity but contributes to the regulation of PI 3-K activity. In this study, we report that Vav accumulates in nuclei of ATRA-treated APL-derived cells and that the down-modulation of Vav prevents differentiation of tumoral promyelocytes, indicating that it is a key molecule in ATRA-dependent myeloid maturation. On the other hand, the overexpression of Vav induces an increased expression of surface markers of granulocytic differentiation without affecting the maturation-related changes of the nuclear morphology. Consistent with an effect of Vav on the transcriptional machinery, array profiling shows that the inhibition of the Syk-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav reduces the number of ATRA-induced genes. Our data support the unprecedented notion that Vav plays crucial functions in the maturation process of myeloid cells, and suggest that Vav can be regarded as a potential target for the therapeutic treatment of myeloproliferative disorders.

  2. Regulation of p21 by TWIST2 contributes to its tumor-suppressor function in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Ma, W; Cui, J; Yao, H; Zhou, H; Ge, Y; Xiao, L; Hu, X; Liu, B-H; Yang, J; Li, Y-Y; Chen, S; Eaves, C J; Wu, D; Zhao, Y

    2015-06-01

    TWIST2 has a dual function in tumors. Its implication in the initiation and metastasis of various solid tumors is well established, and its tumor-suppressor role in murine osteosarcoma cells has been reported recently. However, the function of TWIST2 and its underlying mechanisms in human normal and malignant hematopoiesis remain unclear. In the present study, we found that TWIST2 directly regulated p21 in human hematopoietic cells and whose silence promoted cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. Hypermethylation of TWIST2 occurred to 23 out of the 75 adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and resulted in the impaired expression of both TWIST2 and p21. Conversely, TWIST2 overexpression inhibited the growth of AML cells partially through its direct activation of p21 with intact HLH (helix-loop-helix) domain. The microarray data and gene expression validation showed that TWIST2 was sufficient to activate known tumor-suppressor genes, whereas suppress known oncogenes, which further supported its inhibitory effect against AML cells. Taken together, our data have identified a novel TWIST2-p21 axis that modulates the cell cycle of both normal and leukemic cells and demonstrated that the direct regulation of p21 by TWIST2 has a role in its tumor-suppressor function in AML.

  3. Enhanced myeloid differentiation factor 88 promotes tumor metastasis via induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jia, R-J; Cao, L; Zhang, L; Jing, W; Chen, R; Zhu, M-H; Guo, S-W; Wu, G-B; Fan, X-Y; Wang, H; Zhang, Y-Y; Zhou, X-Y; Zhao, J; Guo, Y-J

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after curative resection. Therefore, it is critical to understand the mechanisms underlying tumor metastasis in HCC. We have previously shown that elevated expression of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) may promote tumor growth and metastasis in HCC. In this study, we reported that enhanced expression of MyD88 promoted epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) properties and tumor-initiating capabilities in HCC cells. MyD88 was found to be able to interact with p85, a regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K), independent of TLR/IL-1R-mediated response and caused PI3-K/v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (Akt) activation, which resulted in subsequent phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and stabilization of Snail, a critical EMT mediator. Consistently, we observed a significant correlation between MyD88 expression and p-Akt levels in a cohort of HCC patients, and found that the combination of these two parameters have better prognostic value for HCC patients. Taken together, these results suggest that elevated MyD88 may facilitate HCC metastasis by promoting EMT properties and tumor-initiating capabilities via PI3-K/Akt pathway.

  4. Myeloid-derived cells are key targets of tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Aranda, Fernando; Berraondo, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations recruited by cancer cells to promote growth and metastasis. Among cells comprising the tumor stroma, myeloid-derived cells play pleiotropic roles in supporting tumorigenesis at distinct stages of tumor development. The tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell contingent is composed of mast cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Such cells are capable of evading the hostile tumor environment typically prone to immune cell destruction and can even promote angiogenesis, chronic inflammation, and invasion. This paper briefly summarizes the different myeloid-derived subsets that promote tumor development and the strategies that have been used to counteract the protumorigenic activity of these cells. These strategies include myeloid cell depletion, reduction of recruitment, and inactivation or remodeling of cell phenotype. Combining drugs designed to target tumor myeloid cells with immunotherapies that effectively trigger antitumor adaptive immune responses holds great promise in the development of novel cancer treatments. PMID:25050208

  5. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts. PMID:26325033

  6. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts.

  7. Molecular pathobiology of human cervical high-grade lesions: paracrine STAT3 activation in tumor-instructed myeloid cells drives local MMP-9 expression.

    PubMed

    Schröer, Nadine; Pahne, Jennifer; Walch, Barbara; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Smola, Sigrun

    2011-01-01

    In many tumors, the switch from precancerous lesions to malignancy critically relies on expression of the matrix-metalloprotease MMP-9, which is predominantly provided by infiltrating inflammatory cells. Our study defines a novel molecular cascade, how human neoplastic cells instruct tumor-associated myeloid cells to produce MMP-9. In biopsies of human papillomavirus-associated precancerous cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN III lesions), we show broad activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and coexpression of MMP-9 in perivascular inflammatory cells. For the first time, we establish a causative link between tumor-mediated paracrine STAT3 activation and MMP-9 production by human tumor-instructed monocytes, whereas NF-κB activation is dispensable for this response. Our data provide evidence that STAT3 does not directly induce MMP-9 but first leads to a strong production of the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2) in the nanogram range. In a second phase, autocrine stimulation of the CCR2 receptor in the tumor-instructed monocytes amplifies MMP-9 expression via intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. These findings elucidate a critical mechanism in the molecular pathobiology of cervical carcinogenesis at the switch to malignancy. Particularly in tumors, which are associated with infectious agents, STAT3-driven inflammation may be pivotal to promote carcinogenesis, while at the same time limit NF-κB-dependent immune responses and thus rejection of the infected preneoplastic cells. The molecular cascade defined in this study provides the basis for a rational design of future adjuvant therapies of cervical precancerous lesions.

  8. Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia a Liquid Tumor?

    PubMed Central

    Ohanian, Maro; Faderl, Stefan; Ravandi, Farhad; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge; Estrov, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    Extramedullary manifestations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were described as early as the 19th century. However, the incidence, clinical significance, and pathobiology of extramedullary AML remain ill defined. We reviewed case reports, retrospective case series, pilot studies, and imaging studies of extramedullary leukemia (EML) to determine its frequency, characteristics, clinical presentation, and significance. EML precedes or accompanies development of AML and occurs during or following treatment, even during remission. Although imaging studies are rarely conducted and the true incidence of EML has yet to be verified, authors have reported several estimates based on retrospective and autopsy studies. The incidence of EML in patients with AML of all ages is estimated to be about 9% and EML in children with AML was detected in 40% of patients at diagnosis. The combination of positron emission tomography and computed tomography were the most sensitive and reliable techniques of detecting and monitoring EML. Based on our literature review, the frequency of EML is likely underreported. The well-documented nature of EML in AML patients suggests that AML can manifest as a solid tumor. The extent to which EML accompanies AML and whether EML is derived from bone marrow are unknown. Furthermore, questions remain regarding the role of the microenvironment, which may or may not facilitate the survival and proliferation of EML, and the implications of these interactions with regard to minimal residual disease, tumor cell quiescence, and relapse. Therefore, prospective studies of detection and characterization of EML in AML patients are warranted. PMID:23280377

  9. Tumor-derived IL-35 promotes tumor growth by enhancing myeloid cell accumulation and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Liu, Jin-Qing; Liu, Zhenzhen; Shen, Rulong; Zhang, Guoqiang; Xu, Jianping; Basu, Sujit; Feng, Youmei; Bai, Xue-Feng

    2013-03-01

    IL-35 is a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines that is comprised of an IL-12 p35 subunit and an IL-12 p40-related protein subunit, EBV-induced gene 3 (EBI3). IL-35 functions through IL-35R and has a potent immune-suppressive activity. Although IL-35 was demonstrated to be produced by regulatory T cells, gene-expression analysis revealed that it is likely to have a wider distribution, including expression in cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that IL-35 is produced in human cancer tissues, such as large B cell lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and melanoma. To determine the roles of tumor-derived IL-35 in tumorigenesis and tumor immunity, we generated IL-35-producing plasmacytoma J558 and B16 melanoma cells and observed that the expression of IL-35 in cancer cells does not affect their growth and survival in vitro, but it stimulates tumorigenesis in both immune-competent and Rag1/2-deficient mice. Tumor-derived IL-35 increases CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid cell accumulation in the tumor microenvironment and, thereby, promotes tumor angiogenesis. In immune-competent mice, spontaneous CTL responses to tumors are diminished. IL-35 does not directly inhibit tumor Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell activation, differentiation, and effector functions. However, IL-35-treated cancer cells had increased expression of gp130 and reduced sensitivity to CTL destruction. Thus, our study indicates novel functions for IL-35 in promoting tumor growth via the enhancement of myeloid cell accumulation, tumor angiogenesis, and suppression of tumor immunity.

  10. miRNA dynamics in tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells modulating tumor progression in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mühlberg, Leonie; Kühnemuth, Benjamin; Costello, Eithne; Shaw, Victoria; Sipos, Bence; Huber, Magdalena; Griesmann, Heidi; Krug, Sebastian; Schober, Marvin; Gress, Thomas M; Michl, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid cells including tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are known as important mediators of tumor progression in solid tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Infiltrating myeloid cells have been identified not only in invasive tumors, but also in early pre-invasive pancreatic intraepithelial precursor lesions (PanIN). The functional dynamics of myeloid cells during carcinogenesis is largely unknown. We aimed to systematically elucidate phenotypic and transcriptional changes in infiltrating myeloid cells during carcinogenesis and tumor progression in a genetic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Using murine pancreatic myeloid cells isolated from the genetic mouse model at different time points during carcinogenesis, we examined both established markers of macrophage polarization using RT-PCR and FACS as well as transcriptional changes focusing on miRNA profiling. Myeloid cells isolated during carcinogenesis showed a simultaneous increase of established markers of M1 and M2 polarization during carcinogenesis, indicating that phenotypic changes of myeloid cells during carcinogenesis do not follow the established M1/M2 classification. MiRNA profiling revealed distinct regulations of several miRNAs already present in myeloid cells infiltrating pre-invasive PanIN lesions. Among them miRNA-21 was significantly increased in myeloid cells surrounding both PanIN lesions and invasive cancers. Functionally, miRNA-21-5p and -3p altered expression of the immune-modulating cytokines CXCL-10 and CCL-3 respectively. Our data indicate that miRNAs are dynamically regulated in infiltrating myeloid cells during carcinogenesis and mediate their functional phenotype by facilitating an immune-suppressive tumor-promoting micro-milieu. PMID:27471627

  11. Tumor-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous, immune-suppressive leukocyte population that develops systemically and infiltrates tumors. MDSCs can restrain the immune response through different mechanisms including essential metabolite consumption, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production, as well as display of inhibitory surface molecules that alter T-cell trafficking and viability. Moreover, MDSCs play a role in tumor progression, acting directly on tumor cells and promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. Many biological and pharmaceutical drugs affect MDSC expansion and functions in preclinical tumor models and patients, often reversing host immune dysfunctions and allowing a more effective tumor immunotherapy.

  12. In situ analysis of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells and myeloid dendritic cells in human colorectal cancer tissue and tumor-draining lymph node

    PubMed Central

    GAI, XIAO-DONG; LI, CHUN; SONG, YANG; LEI, YAN-MING; YANG, BAO-XUE

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important in the maintenance of tumor immunity tolerance. Myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) are antigen-presenting cells (APCs) specialized to initiate and regulate immunity. Tregs and mDCs are suspected of influencing the interaction between the tumor and immune system, and thus the course of tumors. However, the implication and interaction of their concurrent infitration in colorectal cancer (CRC) remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine FOXP3+ Tregs and CD11c+ mDCs infiltration in CRC and tumor-draining lymph node (TDLN) and to explore the clinical and pathological implication of suppressor and effector immune cell subsets. Immunohistochemical assay was conducted to assess FOXP3+ Tregs and CD11c+ mDCs infiltration in tumor tissue and in metastasis-free TDLN (mfTDLN) and metastatic TDLN (mTDLN). The results showed that FOXP3+ Tregs and CD11c+ mDCs infiltration was higher in tumor tissue compared to adjacent normal mucosa (P<0.001). FOXP3+ Tregs infiltration was associated with advanced tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage and lymph node metastasis (P<0.001 and P<0.001, for TNM stage and lymph node metastasis, respectively), whereas less CD11c+ mDCs infiltration of tumor in situ was associated with deeper tumor invasion, advanced TNM stages and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05, P<0.001 and P<0.001, for tumor invasion depth, TNM stages and lymph node metastasis, respectively). Compared to mfTDLN, mTDLN was significantly enriched in FOXP3+ Tregs (P<0.001) and reduced in CD11c+ mDCs (P<0.001). The statistical analysis demonstrated no significant correlations in Tregs and mDCs infiltration. These results suggest that more FOXP3+ Tregs and less CD11c+ mDCs infiltration have stronger prognostic significance in CRC. The presence of tumor cells in mTDLN may contribute to a tolerogenic milieu and facilitate the survival of metastatic tumor cells. PMID:24648920

  13. The tumor microenvironment shapes lineage, transcriptional, and functional diversity of infiltrating myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Elpek, Kutlu G; Cremasco, Viviana; Shen, Hua; Harvey, Christopher J; Wucherpfennig, Kai W; Goldstein, Daniel R; Monach, Paul A; Turley, Shannon J

    2014-07-01

    Myeloid cells play important regulatory roles within the tumor environment by directly promoting tumor progression and modulating the function of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and as such, they represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. Although distinct subsets of tumor-associated myeloid cells have been identified, a broader analysis of the complete myeloid cell landscape within individual tumors and also across different tumor types has been lacking. By establishing the developmental and transcriptomic signatures of infiltrating myeloid cells from multiple primary tumors, we found that tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN), while present within all tumors analyzed, exhibited strikingly different frequencies, gene expression profiles, and functions across cancer types. We also evaluated the impact of anatomic location and circulating factors on the myeloid cell composition of tumors. The makeup of the myeloid compartment was determined by the tumor microenvironment rather than the anatomic location of tumor development or tumor-derived circulating factors. Protumorigenic and hypoxia-associated genes were enriched in TAMs and TANs compared with splenic myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Although all TANs had an altered expression pattern of secretory effector molecules, in each tumor type they exhibited a unique cytokine, chemokine, and associated receptor expression profile. One such molecule, haptoglobin, was uniquely expressed by 4T1 TANs and identified as a possible diagnostic biomarker for tumors characterized by the accumulation of myeloid cells. Thus, we have identified considerable cancer-specific diversity in the lineage, gene expression, and function of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells. PMID:24801837

  14. Myeloid cell signatures in tumor microenvironment predicts therapeutic response in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achyut, Bhagelu R; Arbab, Ali S

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment (TME) consists of several immune and nonimmune cell populations including tumor cells. For many decades, experimental studies have depicted profound contribution of TME toward cancer progression and metastasis development. Several therapeutic strategies have been tested against TME through preclinical studies and clinical trials. Unfortunately, most of them have shown transient effect, and have largely failed due to aggressive tumor growth and without improving survival. Solid tumors are known to have a strong myeloid component (eg, tumor-associated macrophages) in tumor development. Recent data suggest that therapeutic responses in tumor are characterized by alterations in immune cell signatures, including tumor-associated myeloid cells. Polarized tumor-associated myeloid cells (M1–M2) are critical in impairing therapeutic effect and promoting tumor growth. The present review is intended to compile all the literatures related to the emerging contribution of different populations of myeloid cells in the development of tumor and therapeutic failures. Finally, we have discussed targeting of myeloid cell populations as a combination therapy with chemo-, targeted-, or radiation therapies. PMID:27042097

  15. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell heterogeneity in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Solito, Samantha; Marigo, Ilaria; Pinton, Laura; Damuzzo, Vera; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    The dynamic interplay between cancer and host immune system often affects the process of myelopoiesis. As a consequence, tumor-derived factors sustain the accumulation and functional differentiation of myeloid cells, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which can interfere with T cell-mediated responses. Since both the phenotype and mechanisms of action of MDSCs appear to be tumor-dependent, it is important not only to determine the presence of all MDSC subsets in each cancer patient, but also which MDSC subsets have clinical relevance in each tumor environment. In this review, we describe the differences between MDSC populations expanded within different tumor contexts and evaluate the prognostic significance of MDSC expansion in peripheral blood and within tumor masses of neoplastic patients.

  16. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site

    PubMed Central

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  17. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site.

    PubMed

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric; Trautmann, Alain; Bercovici, Nadège

    2015-09-29

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  18. Myeloid PTEN deficiency impairs tumor-immune surveillance via immune-checkpoint inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuttke, M; Sahin, E; Pisoni, J; Percig, S; Vogel, A; Kraemmer, D; Hanzl, L; Brunner, J S; Paar, H; Soukup, K; Halfmann, A; Dohnal, A M; Steiner, C W; Blüml, S; Basilio, J; Hochreiter, B; Salzmann, M; Hoesel, B; Lametschwandtner, G; Eferl, R; Schmid, J A; Schabbauer, G

    2016-07-01

    Tumor-host interaction is determined by constant immune surveillance, characterized by tumor infiltration of myeloid and lymphoid cells. A malfunctioning or diverted immune response promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Recent advances had been made, by treating of certain tumor types, such as melanoma, with T-cell checkpoint inhibitors. This highlights the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between tumors and their environment, in particular myeloid and lymphoid cells. Our aim was to study the contribution of the myeloid PI3K/PTEN-signaling pathway in the regulation of tumor-immune surveillance in murine models of cancer. We made use of conditional PTEN-deficient mice, which exhibit sustained activation of the PI3K-signaling axis in a variety of myeloid cell subsets such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). In colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC), mice deficient in myeloid PTEN showed a markedly higher tumor burden and decreased survival. We attributed this observation to the increased presence of immune-modulatory conventional CD8α(+) DCs in the spleen, whereas other relevant myeloid cell subsets were largely unaffected. Notably, we detected enhanced surface expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 on these DCs. As a consequence, tumoricidal T-cell responses were hampered or redirected. Taken together, our findings indicated an unanticipated role for the PI3K/PTEN-signaling axis in the functional regulation of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Our data pointed at potential, indirect, tumoricidal effects of subclass-specific PI3K inhibitors, which are currently under clinical investigation for treatment of tumors, via myeloid cell activation. PMID:27622019

  19. Myeloid PTEN deficiency impairs tumor-immune surveillance via immune-checkpoint inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuttke, M.; Sahin, E.; Pisoni, J.; Percig, S.; Vogel, A.; Kraemmer, D.; Hanzl, L.; Brunner, J. S.; Paar, H.; Soukup, K.; Halfmann, A.; Dohnal, A. M.; Steiner, C. W.; Blüml, S.; Basilio, J.; Hochreiter, B.; Salzmann, M.; Hoesel, B.; Lametschwandtner, G.; Eferl, R.; Schmid, J. A.; Schabbauer, G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor–host interaction is determined by constant immune surveillance, characterized by tumor infiltration of myeloid and lymphoid cells. A malfunctioning or diverted immune response promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Recent advances had been made, by treating of certain tumor types, such as melanoma, with T-cell checkpoint inhibitors. This highlights the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between tumors and their environment, in particular myeloid and lymphoid cells. Our aim was to study the contribution of the myeloid PI3K/PTEN-signaling pathway in the regulation of tumor-immune surveillance in murine models of cancer. We made use of conditional PTEN-deficient mice, which exhibit sustained activation of the PI3K-signaling axis in a variety of myeloid cell subsets such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). In colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC), mice deficient in myeloid PTEN showed a markedly higher tumor burden and decreased survival. We attributed this observation to the increased presence of immune-modulatory conventional CD8α+ DCs in the spleen, whereas other relevant myeloid cell subsets were largely unaffected. Notably, we detected enhanced surface expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 on these DCs. As a consequence, tumoricidal T-cell responses were hampered or redirected. Taken together, our findings indicated an unanticipated role for the PI3K/PTEN-signaling axis in the functional regulation of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Our data pointed at potential, indirect, tumoricidal effects of subclass-specific PI3K inhibitors, which are currently under clinical investigation for treatment of tumors, via myeloid cell activation. PMID:27622019

  20. T Cells Contribute to Tumor Progression by Favoring Pro-Tumoral Properties of Intra-Tumoral Myeloid Cells in a Mouse Model for Spontaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Jonathan; Douguet, Laetitia; Garcette, Marylène; Kato, Masashi; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Bercovici, Nadège; Lucas, Bruno; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle

    2011-01-01

    Tumors affect myelopoeisis and induce the expansion of myeloid cells with immunosuppressive activity. In the MT/ret model of spontaneous metastatic melanoma, myeloid cells are the most abundant tumor infiltrating hematopoietic population and their proportion is highest in the most aggressive cutaneous metastasis. Our data suggest that the tumor microenvironment favors polarization of myeloid cells into type 2 cells characterized by F4/80 expression, a weak capacity to secrete IL-12 and a high production of arginase. Myeloid cells from tumor and spleen of MT/ret mice inhibit T cell proliferation and IFNγ secretion. Interestingly, T cells play a role in type 2 polarization of myeloid cells. Indeed, intra-tumoral myeloid cells from MT/ret mice lacking T cells are not only less suppressive towards T cells than corresponding cells from wild-type MT/ret mice, but they also inhibit more efficiently melanoma cell proliferation. Thus, our data support the existence of a vicious circle, in which T cells may favor cancer development by establishing an environment that is likely to skew myeloid cell immunity toward a tumor promoting response that, in turn, suppresses immune effector cell functions. PMID:21633700

  1. The influence of myeloid-derived suppressor cells on angiogenesis and tumor growth after cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Su, Xiaosan; Yang, Liu; Qiao, Fei; Fang, Yu; Yu, Lu; Yang, Qian; Wang, Yiyin; Yin, Yanfeng; Chen, Rui; Hong, Zhipeng

    2016-06-01

    While myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been reported to participate in the promotion of angiogenesis and tumor growth, little is known about their presence and function during perioperative period. Here, we demonstrated that human MDSCs expressing CD11b(+), CD33(+) and HLA-DR(-) significantly increased in lung cancer patients after thoracotomy. CD11b(+) CD33(+) HLA-DR(-) MDSCs isolated 24 hr after surgery from lung cancer patients were more efficient in promoting angiogenesis and tumor growth than MDSCs isolated before surgical operation in allograft tumor model. In addition, CD11b(+) CD33(+) HLA-DR(-) MDSCs produced high levels of MMP-9. Using an experimental lung metastasis mouse model, we demonstrated that the numbers of metastases on lung surface and Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) MDSCs at postoperative period were enhanced in proportion to the degree of surgical manipulation. We also examined that syngeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) significantly inhibited the induction and proliferation of Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) MDSCs and further prevented lung metastasis formation in the mice undergoing laparotomy. Taken together, our results suggest that postoperatively induced MDSCs were qualified with potent proangiogenic and tumor-promotive ability and this cell population should be considered as a target for preventing postoperative tumor metastasis. PMID:26756887

  2. Wilms tumor 1 mutations in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rampal, Raajit; Figueroa, Maria E.

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) has long been implicated in acute myeloid leukemia. It has been described to be both overexpressed and mutated in different forms of acute myeloid leukemia, and overexpression has been reported to play a prognostic role in this disease. However, the precise mechanism through which WT1 may play a role in leukemogenesis has remained elusive. In recent years, new evidence has emerged that points towards a novel role of WT1 mutations in the deregulation of epigenetic programs in leukemic cells through its interaction with TET proteins. Herein we review the current status of the field and its therapeutic and prognostic implications in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27252512

  3. Systemic Agonistic Anti-CD40 Treatment of Tumor-Bearing Mice Modulates Hepatic Myeloid-Suppressive Cells and Causes Immune-Mediated Liver Damage.

    PubMed

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Ma, Chi; Duffy, Austin G; Eggert, Tobias; Hawk, Nga; Kleiner, David E; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2015-05-01

    Immune-stimulatory mAbs are currently being evaluated as antitumor agents. Although overall toxicity from these agents appears to be moderate, liver toxicities have been reported and are not completely understood. We studied the effect of systemic CD40 antibody treatment on myeloid cells in the spleen and liver. Naïve and tumor-bearing mice were treated systemically with agonistic anti-CD40 antibody. Immune cell subsets in the liver and spleen, serum transaminases, and liver histologies were analyzed after antibody administration. Nox2(-/-), Cd40(-/-), and bone marrow chimeric mice were used to study the mechanism by which agonistic anti-CD40 mediates its effects in vivo. Suppressor function of murine and human tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) was studied upon CD40 ligation. Agonistic CD40 antibody caused liver damage within 24 hours after injection in two unrelated tumor models and mice strains. Using bone marrow chimeras, we demonstrate that CD40 antibody-induced hepatitis in tumor-bearing mice was dependent on the presence of CD40-expressing hematopoietic cells. Agonistic CD40 ligation-dependent liver damage was induced by the generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, agonistic CD40 antibody resulted in increased CD80-positive and CD40-positive liver CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) immature myeloid cells. CD40 ligation on tumor-induced murine and human CD14(+)HLA-DR(low) peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with cancer reduced their immune suppressor function. Collectively, agonistic CD40 antibody treatment activated tumor-induced myeloid cells, caused myeloid-dependent hepatotoxicity, and ameliorated the suppressor function of murine and human MDSC. Collectively, our data suggest that CD40 may mature immunosuppressive myeloid cells and thereby cause liver damage in mice with an accumulation of tumor-induced hepatic MDSC. PMID:25637366

  4. Systemic Agonistic Anti-CD40 Treatment of Tumor-Bearing Mice Modulates Hepatic Myeloid-Suppressive Cells and Causes Immune-Mediated Liver Damage.

    PubMed

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Ma, Chi; Duffy, Austin G; Eggert, Tobias; Hawk, Nga; Kleiner, David E; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2015-05-01

    Immune-stimulatory mAbs are currently being evaluated as antitumor agents. Although overall toxicity from these agents appears to be moderate, liver toxicities have been reported and are not completely understood. We studied the effect of systemic CD40 antibody treatment on myeloid cells in the spleen and liver. Naïve and tumor-bearing mice were treated systemically with agonistic anti-CD40 antibody. Immune cell subsets in the liver and spleen, serum transaminases, and liver histologies were analyzed after antibody administration. Nox2(-/-), Cd40(-/-), and bone marrow chimeric mice were used to study the mechanism by which agonistic anti-CD40 mediates its effects in vivo. Suppressor function of murine and human tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) was studied upon CD40 ligation. Agonistic CD40 antibody caused liver damage within 24 hours after injection in two unrelated tumor models and mice strains. Using bone marrow chimeras, we demonstrate that CD40 antibody-induced hepatitis in tumor-bearing mice was dependent on the presence of CD40-expressing hematopoietic cells. Agonistic CD40 ligation-dependent liver damage was induced by the generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, agonistic CD40 antibody resulted in increased CD80-positive and CD40-positive liver CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) immature myeloid cells. CD40 ligation on tumor-induced murine and human CD14(+)HLA-DR(low) peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with cancer reduced their immune suppressor function. Collectively, agonistic CD40 antibody treatment activated tumor-induced myeloid cells, caused myeloid-dependent hepatotoxicity, and ameliorated the suppressor function of murine and human MDSC. Collectively, our data suggest that CD40 may mature immunosuppressive myeloid cells and thereby cause liver damage in mice with an accumulation of tumor-induced hepatic MDSC.

  5. Tumor angiogenesis mediated by myeloid cells is negatively regulated by CEACAM1.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rongze; Kujawski, Maciej; Pan, Hao; Shively, John E

    2012-05-01

    Bv8 (prokineticin 2) expressed by Gr1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells is critical for VEGF-independent tumor angiogenesis. Although granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to be a key inducer of Bv8 expression, the basis for Bv8 production in driving tumor angiogenesis is undefined. Because the cell adhesion molecule CEACAM1, which is highly expressed on Gr1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells, is known to regulate G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) signaling, we hypothesized that CEACAM1 would regulate Bv8 production in these cells. In support of this hypothesis, we found that Bv8 expression was elevated in Gr1(+)CD11b(+) cells from Ceacam1-deficient mice implanted with B16 melanoma, increasing the infiltration of Gr1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells in melanoma tumors and enhancing their growth and angiogenesis. Furthermore, treatment with anti-Gr1 or anti-Bv8 or anti-G-CSF monoclonal antibody reduced myeloid cell infiltration, tumor growth, and angiogenesis to levels observed in tumor-bearing wild-type (WT) mice. Reconstitution of CEACAM1-deficient mice with WT bone marrow cells restored tumor infiltration of Gr1(+)CD11b(+) cells along with tumor growth and angiogenesis to WT levels. Treatment of tumor-bearing WT mice with anti-CEACAM1 antibody limited tumor outgrowth and angiogenesis, albeit to a lesser extent. Tumor growth in Ceacam1-deficient mice was not affected significantly in Rag(-/-) background, indicating that CEACAM1 expression in T and B lymphocytes had a negligible role in this pathway. Together, our findings show that CEACAM1 negatively regulates Gr1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cell-dependent tumor angiogenesis by inhibiting the G-CSF-Bv8 signaling pathway.

  6. MYC oncogene in myeloid neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Delgado, M Dolores; Albajar, Marta; Gomez-Casares, M Teresa; Batlle, Ana; León, Javier

    2013-02-01

    MYC is a transcription factor that regulates many critical genes for cell proliferation, differentiation, and biomass accumulation. MYC is one of the most prevalent oncogenes found to be altered in human cancer, being deregulated in about 50 % of tumors. Although MYC deregulation has been more frequently associated to lymphoma and lymphoblastic leukemia than to myeloid malignancies, a body of evidence has been gathered showing that MYC plays a relevant role in malignancies derived from the myeloid compartment. The myeloid leukemogenic activity of MYC has been demonstrated in different murine models. Not surprisingly, MYC has been found to be amplified or/and deregulated in the three major types of myeloid neoplasms: acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloproliferative neoplasms, including chronic myeloid leukemia. Here, we review the recent literature describing the involvement of MYC in myeloid tumors.

  7. Effect of tumor-derived cytokines and growth factors on differentiation and immune suppressive features of myeloid cells in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2006-01-01

    It is well established that cancers affect differentiation of dendritic cells and promote systemic expansion of immune suppressive immature myeloid cells. This phenomenon may represent a mechanism of tumor escape from immune attack and could have significant impact on tumor progression. In this review we discuss the role of different tumor-derived factors, which were implicated in abnormal myeloid cell differentiation. The role of reactive oxygen species as well as JAK/STAT signaling in mechanisms of the effects of tumor-derived factors on myeloid cells is also discussed. PMID:16983515

  8. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. Myeloid cell TRAF3 regulates immune responses and inhibits inflammation and tumor development in mice1

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Almin I.; Moore, Carissa R.; Luo, Chang; Kreider, Benjamin Z.; Liu, Yan; Morse, Herbert C.; Xie, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid cells, including granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, are crucial players in innate immunity and inflammation. These cells constitutively or inducibly express a number of receptors of the TNF receptor and Toll-like receptor (TLR) families, whose signals are transduced by TRAF molecules. In vitro studies showed that TRAF3 is required for TLR-induced type I interferon production, but the in vivo function of TRAF3 in myeloid cells remains unknown. Here we report the generation and characterization of myeloid cell-specific TRAF3-deficient (M-TRAF3−/−) mice, which allowed us to gain insights into the in vivo functions of TRAF3 in myeloid cells. We found that TRAF3 ablation did not affect the maturation or homeostasis of myeloid cells in young adult mice, even though TRAF3-deficient macrophages and neutrophils exhibited constitutive NF-κB2 activation. However, in response to injections with LPS (a bacterial mimic) or polyI:C (a viral mimic), M-TRAF3−/− mice exhibited an altered profile of cytokine production. M-TRAF3−/− mice immunized with T cell-independent (TI) and -dependent (TD) antigens displayed elevated TI IgG3 as well as TD IgG2b responses. Interestingly, 15–22 month old M-TRAF3−/− mice spontaneously developed chronic inflammation or tumors, often affecting multiple organs. Taken together, our findings indicate that TRAF3 expressed in myeloid cells regulates immune responses in myeloid cells and acts to inhibit inflammation and tumor development in mice. PMID:25422508

  10. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor promotes tumor growth and metastasis by inducing Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kendra D.; Templeton, Dennis J.; Cross, Janet V.

    2012-01-01

    The Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF), an inflammatory cytokine, is overexpressed in many solid tumors and is associated with poor prognosis. We previously identified inhibitors of MIF within a class of natural products with demonstrated anti-cancer activities. We therefore sought to determine how MIF contributes to tumor growth and progression. We show here that, in murine tumors including the 4T1 model of aggressive, spontaneously metastatic breast cancer in immunologically intact mice, tumor-derived MIF promotes tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis through control of inflammatory cells within the tumor. Specifically, MIF increases the prevalence of a highly immune suppressive subpopulation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) within the tumor. In vitro, MIF promotes differentiation of myeloid cells into the same population of MDSCs. Pharmacologic inhibition of MIF reduces MDSC accumulation in the tumor similar to MIF depletion, and blocks the MIF-dependent in vitro differentiation of MDSCs. Our results demonstrate that MIF is a therapeutically targetable mechanism for control of tumor growth and metastasis through regulation of the host immune response, and support the potential utility of MIF inhibitors, either alone or in combination with standard tumor-targeting therapeutic or immunotherapy approaches. PMID:23125418

  11. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice.

    PubMed

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A; Marignani, Paola A; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D; Marshall, Jean S

    2016-07-01

    Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1(-/-)/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression. PMID:27622015

  12. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A.; Marignani, Paola A.; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D.; Marshall, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1−/−/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression. PMID:27622015

  13. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A.; Marignani, Paola A.; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D.; Marshall, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1−/−/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression.

  14. mTOR masters monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice with allografts or tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tingting; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Hao; Li, yang; Shao, Lijuan; Wang, Ruoyu; Lu, Jun; Yang, Zhongzhou; Wang, Junjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    CD11b+ Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play critical roles in controlling the processes of tumors, infections, autoimmunity and graft rejection. Immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RPM), targeting on the key cellular metabolism molecule mTOR, is currently used in clinics to treat patients with allo-grafts, autoimmune diseases and tumors. However, the effect of RPM on MDSCs has not been studied. RPM significantly decreases the cell number and the immunosuppressive ability on T cells of CD11b+ Ly6Chigh monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs) in both allo-grafts-transplanted and tumor-bearing mice respectively. Mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of mTOR have poor M-MDSCs after grafting with allo-skin tissue or a tumor. Grafting of allo-skin or tumors significantly activates glycolysis pathways in myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow, which is inhibited by RPM or mTOR deletion. 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of the glycolytic pathway, inhibits M-MDSC differentiation from precursors, while enhancing glycolysis by metformin significantly rescues the RPM-caused deficiency of M-MDSCs. Therefore, we offer evidence supporting that mTOR is an intrinsic factor essential for the differentiation and immunosuppressive function of M-MDSCs and that these metabolism-relevant medicines may impact MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression or immune tolerance induction, which is of considerable clinical importance in treating graft rejection, autoimmune diseases and cancers. PMID:26833095

  15. Loss of Snail2 favors skin tumor progression by promoting the recruitment of myeloid progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Villarejo, Ana; Molina-Ortiz, Patricia; Montenegro, Yenny; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Morales, Saleta; Santos, Vanesa; Gridley, Tom; Pérez-Moreno, Mirna A.; Peinado, Héctor; Portillo, Francisco; Calés, Carmela; Cano, Amparo

    2015-01-01

    Snail2 is a zinc finger transcription factor involved in driving epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Snail2 null mice are viable, but display defects in melanogenesis, gametogenesis and hematopoiesis, and are markedly radiosensitive. Here, using mouse genetics, we have studied the contributions of Snail2 to epidermal homeostasis and skin carcinogenesis. Snail2 −/− mice presented a defective epidermal terminal differentiation and, unexpectedly, an increase in number, size and malignancy of tumor lesions when subjected to the two-stage mouse skin chemical carcinogenesis protocol, compared with controls. Additionally, tumor lesions from Snail2 −/− mice presented a high inflammatory component with an elevated percentage of myeloid precursors in tumor lesions that was further increased in the presence of the anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone. In vitro studies in Snail2 null keratinocytes showed that loss of Snail2 leads to a decrease in proliferation indicating a non-cell autonomous role for Snail2 in the skin carcinogenic response observed in vivo. Bone marrow (BM) cross-reconstitution assays between Snail2 wild-type and null mice showed that Snail2 absence in the hematopoietic system fully reproduces the tumor behavior of the Snail2 null mice and triggers the accumulation of myeloid precursors in the BM, blood and tumor lesions. These results indicate a new role for Snail2 in preventing myeloid precursors recruitment impairing skin chemical carcinogenesis progression. PMID:25784375

  16. αB-Crystallin regulates expansion of CD11b+Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells during tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Dieterich, Lothar C.; Schiller, Petter; Huang, Hua; Wawrousek, Eric F.; Loskog, Angelica; Wanders, Alkwin; Moons, Lieve; Dimberg, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The molecular chaperone αB-crystallin has emerged as a target for cancer therapy due to its expression in human tumors and its role in regulating tumor angiogenesis. αB-crystallin also reduces neuroinflammation, but its role in other inflammatory conditions has not been investigated. Here, we examined whether αB-crystallin regulates inflammation associated with tumors and ischemia. We found that CD45+ leukocyte infiltration is 3-fold increased in tumors and ischemic myocardium in αB-crystallin-deficient mice. Notably, αB-crystallin is prominently expressed in CD11b+ Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells (IMCs), known as regulators of angiogenesis and immune responses, while lymphocytes and mature granulocytes show low αB-crystallin expression. αB-Crystallin deficiency results in a 3-fold higher accumulation of CD11b+ Gr-1+ IMCs in tumors and a significant rise in CD11b+ Gr-1+ IMCs in spleen and bone marrow. Similarly, we noted a 2-fold increase in CD11b+ Gr-1+ IMCs in chronically inflamed livers in αB-crystallin-deficient mice. The effect of αB-crystallin on IMC accumulation is limited to pathological conditions, as CD11b+ Gr-1+ IMCs are not elevated in naive mice. Through ex vivo differentiation of CD11b+ Gr-1+ cells, we provide evidence that αB-crystallin regulates systemic expansion of IMCs through a cell-intrinsic mechanism. Our study suggests a key role of αB-crystallin in limiting expansion of CD11b+ Gr-1+ IMCs in diverse pathological conditions.—Dieterich, L. C., Schiller, P., Huang, H., Wawrousek, E. F., Loskog, A., Wanders, A., Moons, L., Dimberg, A. αB-Crystallin regulates expansion of CD11b+Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells during tumor progression. PMID:23033322

  17. Profoundly Reduced CD1c+ Myeloid Dendritic Cell HLA-DR and CD86 Expression and Increased Tumor Necrosis Factor Production in Experimental Human Blood-Stage Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Minigo, Gabriela; Burel, Julie; Tipping, Peta E.; Piera, Kim A.; Amante, Fiona H.; Engwerda, Christian R.; Good, Michael F.; Doolan, Denise L.; Anstey, Nicholas M.; McCarthy, James S.; Woodberry, Tonia

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinels of the immune system that uniquely prime naive cells and initiate adaptive immune responses. CD1c (BDCA-1) myeloid DCs (CD1c+ mDCs) highly express HLA-DR, have a broad Toll-like receptor (TLR) repertoire, and secrete immune modulatory cytokines. To better understand immune responses to malaria, CD1c+ mDC maturation and cytokine production were examined in healthy volunteers before and after experimental intravenous Plasmodium falciparum infection with 150- or 1,800-parasite-infected red blood cells (pRBCs). After either dose, CD1c+ mDCs significantly reduced HLA-DR expression in prepatent infections. Circulating CD1c+ mDCs did not upregulate HLA-DR after pRBC or TLR ligand stimulation and exhibited reduced CD86 expression. At peak parasitemia, CD1c+ mDCs produced significantly more tumor necrosis factor (TNF), whereas interleukin-12 (IL-12) production was unchanged. Interestingly, only the 1,800-pRBC dose caused a reduction in the circulating CD1c+ mDC count with evidence of apoptosis. The 1,800-pRBC dose produced no change in T cell IFN-γ or IL-2 production at peak parasitemia or at 3 weeks posttreatment. Overall, CD1c+ mDCs are compromised by P. falciparum exposure, with impaired HLA-DR and CD86 expression, and have an increased capacity for TNF but not IL-12 production. A first prepatent P. falciparum infection is sufficient to modulate CD1c+ mDC responsiveness, likely contributing to hampered effector T cell cytokine responses and assisting parasite immune evasion. PMID:26902728

  18. Profoundly Reduced CD1c+ Myeloid Dendritic Cell HLA-DR and CD86 Expression and Increased Tumor Necrosis Factor Production in Experimental Human Blood-Stage Malaria Infection.

    PubMed

    Loughland, Jessica R; Minigo, Gabriela; Burel, Julie; Tipping, Peta E; Piera, Kim A; Amante, Fiona H; Engwerda, Christian R; Good, Michael F; Doolan, Denise L; Anstey, Nicholas M; McCarthy, James S; Woodberry, Tonia

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinels of the immune system that uniquely prime naive cells and initiate adaptive immune responses. CD1c (BDCA-1) myeloid DCs (CD1c(+) mDCs) highly express HLA-DR, have a broad Toll-like receptor (TLR) repertoire, and secrete immune modulatory cytokines. To better understand immune responses to malaria, CD1c(+) mDC maturation and cytokine production were examined in healthy volunteers before and after experimental intravenous Plasmodium falciparum infection with 150- or 1,800-parasite-infected red blood cells (pRBCs). After either dose, CD1c(+) mDCs significantly reduced HLA-DR expression in prepatent infections. Circulating CD1c(+) mDCs did not upregulate HLA-DR after pRBC or TLR ligand stimulation and exhibited reduced CD86 expression. At peak parasitemia, CD1c(+) mDCs produced significantly more tumor necrosis factor (TNF), whereas interleukin-12 (IL-12) production was unchanged. Interestingly, only the 1,800-pRBC dose caused a reduction in the circulating CD1c(+) mDC count with evidence of apoptosis. The 1,800-pRBC dose produced no change in T cell IFN-γ or IL-2 production at peak parasitemia or at 3 weeks posttreatment. Overall, CD1c(+) mDCs are compromised by P. falciparum exposure, with impaired HLA-DR and CD86 expression, and have an increased capacity for TNF but not IL-12 production. A first prepatent P. falciparum infection is sufficient to modulate CD1c(+) mDC responsiveness, likely contributing to hampered effector T cell cytokine responses and assisting parasite immune evasion.

  19. Infiltrating S100A8+ myeloid cells promote metastatic spread of human breast cancer and predict poor clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Drews-Elger, Katherine; Iorns, Elizabeth; Dias, Alexandra; Miller, Philip; Ward, Toby M; Dean, Sonja; Clarke, Jennifer; Campion-Flora, Adriana; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Rae, James M; Thomas, Dafydd; Berry, Deborah; El-Ashry, Dorraya; Lippman, Marc E

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms by which breast cancer (BrC) can successfully metastasize are complex and not yet fully understood. Our goal was to identify tumor-induced stromal changes that influence metastatic cell behavior, and may serve as better targets for therapy. To identify stromal changes in cancer-bearing tissue, dual-species gene expression analysis was performed for three different metastatic BrC xenograft models. Results were confirmed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and protein knockdown. These results were validated in human clinical samples at the mRNA and protein level by retrospective analysis of cohorts of human BrC specimens. In pre-clinical models of BrC, systemic recruitment of S100A8+ myeloid cells-including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs)-was promoted by tumor-derived factors. Recruitment of S100A8+ myeloid cells was diminished by inhibition of tumor-derived factors or depletion of MDSCs, resulting in fewer metastases and smaller primary tumors. Importantly, these MDSCs retain their ability to suppress T cell proliferation upon co-culture. Secretion of macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF) activated the recruitment of S100A8+ myeloid cells systemically. Inhibition of MIF, or depletion of MDSCs resulted in delayed tumor growth and lower metastatic burden. In human BrC specimens, increased mRNA and protein levels of S100A8+ infiltrating cells are highly associated with poor overall survival and shorter metastasis free survival of BrC patients, respectively. Furthermore, analysis of nine different human gene expression datasets confirms the association of increased levels of S100A8 transcripts with an increased risk of death. Recruitment of S100A8+ myeloid cells to primary tumors and secondary sites in xenograft models of BrC enhances cancer progression independent of their suppressive activity on T cells. In clinical samples, infiltrating S100A8+ cells are associated with poor overall survival. Targeting these molecules or associated pathways

  20. [Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia Following Etoposide Based Chemotherapy in Germ Cell Tumor].

    PubMed

    Okumura, Yoshinaga; Oae, Masashi; Shiraishi, Yusuke; Soda, Takeshi; Kanamaru, Hiroshi; Arima, Nobuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    A 27-year-old man visited our hospital with painless swelling of the left scrotum. Hematologic studies showed the following levels of lactate dehydrogenase, 3,171 IU/l ; alpha-fetoprotein, 2.2 ng/ml ; and β- human chorionic gonadotropin, 0.4 ng/ml, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a mass of 10×8 ×4 cm in the left testis, and that of 3.5×3.0×5.0 cm in the left renal hilar lymph node, without any other metastasis. Left high inguinal orchiectomy was performed, and histopathological examination revealed mixed form with seminoma and teratoma. He was diagnosed to have a left germ cell tumor with left renal hilar lymph node metastases, pT1, N3, M0, stage II C, indicating poor prognosis with IGCCC. The patient received four cycles of chemotherapy, COMPE regimen (CDDP, VCR, MTX, PEP, VP-16 [etoposide]). After lactate dehydrogenase, alpha-fetoprotein, and β -human chorionic gonadotropin all normalized, retroperitoneal lymph node dissection was performed. Histopathological examination revealed only a mature teratoma. Two and half years later, hematologic studies showed blast transformation. Bone marrow biopsy revealed acute myeloblastic lymphoma (M2). The patient received one cycle of AraC and daunorubicin, one cycle of high dose AraC, and three cycles of AraC and mitoxantrone. After chemotherapy, he has maintained a disease-free status for 11 years. In this case, etoposide, a topoisomerase II inhibitor, was the presumed cause of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia. After administering chemotherapeutic agents especially etoposide, it is important to check blood count periodically for a long time. PMID:27320120

  1. The Hematopoietic Differentiation and Production of Mature Myeloid Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung-Dal; Vodyanik, Maxim; Slukvin, Igor I.

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol for hematopoietic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and generation of mature myeloid cells from hPSCs through expansion and differentiation of hPSC-derived lin-CD34+CD43+CD45+ multipotent progenitors. The protocol is comprised of three major steps: (i) induction of hematopoietic differentiation by coculture of hPSCs with OP9 bone marrow stromal cells, (ii) short-term expansion of multipotent myeloid progenitors with a high dose of GM-CSF, and (iii) directed differentiation of myeloid progenitors into neutrophils, eosinophils, dendritic cells (DCs), Langerhans cells (LCs), macrophages, and osteoclasts. The generation of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors from hPSCs requires 9 days of culture, and an additional 2 days are needed to expand myeloid progenitors. Differentiation of myeloid progenitors into mature myeloid cells requires an additional 5–19 days of culture with cytokines, depending on the cell type. PMID:21372811

  2. Role of myeloid human cytomegalovirus infection in children's idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan; Zhao, Lei; Mei, Hong; Zhang, Shu-Ling; Huang, Zhi-Hua

    2007-01-01

    This project explores the specificity of myeloid human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in pathogenesis of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Eighty-one subjects with ITP were observed. HCMV early antigen and related myeloid cells in bone marrow, and platelet, HCMV IgM, and IgG in blood were tested. The results presented potent evidence that myeloid HCMV infection is a specific factor in children's ITP: patients of ITP with myeloid HCMV infection had a tendency for exacerbation, refractoriness, and chronic advance. However, HCMV did not affect the quantity of megakaryocyte, which showed the complicated relationships between HCMV and ITP.

  3. BEX1 acts as a tumor suppressor in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, Oscar; Li, Tianfeng; Su, Xianwei; Sun, Jianmin; Kabir, Nuzhat N; Levander, Fredrik; Zhao, Hui; Lu, Gang; Rönnstrand, Lars; Kazi, Julhash U

    2015-08-28

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease of the myeloid lineage. About 35% of AML patients carry an oncogenic FLT3 mutant making FLT3 an attractive target for treatment of AML. Major problems in the development of FLT3 inhibitors include lack of specificity, poor response and development of a resistant phenotype upon treatment. Further understanding of FLT3 signaling and discovery of novel regulators will therefore help to determine additional pharmacological targets in FLT3-driven AML. In this report, we identified BEX1 as a novel regulator of oncogenic FLT3-ITD-driven AML. We showed that BEX1 expression was down-regulated in a group of AML patients carrying FLT3-ITD. Loss of BEX1 expression resulted in poor overall survival (hazard ratio, HR = 2.242, p = 0.0011). Overexpression of BEX1 in mouse pro-B and myeloid cells resulted in decreased FLT3-ITD-dependent cell proliferation, colony and tumor formation, and in increased apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. BEX1 localized to the cytosolic compartment of cells and significantly decreased FLT3-ITD-induced AKT phosphorylation without affecting ERK1/2 or STAT5 phosphorylation. Our data suggest that the loss of BEX1 expression in FLT3-ITD driven AML potentiates oncogenic signaling and leads to decreased overall survival of the patients. PMID:26046670

  4. Transmission of endoplasmic reticulum stress and pro-inflammation from tumor cells to myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Navin R.; Rodvold, Jeffrey; Sepulveda, Homero; Rossi, Steven; Drew, Angela F.; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic, infectious, and tumor cell-intrinsic noxae can all evoke the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in tumor cells, which is critical for tumor cell growth and cancer progression. Evidence exists that the ER stress response can drive a proinflammatory program in tumor cells and macrophages but, to our knowledge, a role for the tumor ER stress response in influencing macrophages and inflammation in the tumor microenvironment has not been suggested. Here we show that macrophages cultured in conditioned medium from ER-stressed tumor cells become activated, and themselves undergo ER stress with the up-regulation of Grp78, Gadd34, Chop, and Xbp-1 splicing, suggesting a general activation of the ER stress-signaling pathways. Furthermore, these macrophages recapitulate, amplify and expand the proinflammatory response of tumor cells. We term this phenomenon “transmissible” ER stress. Although neither Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 nor interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R) signaling is involved, a reduction was observed in the transmission of ER stress to TLR4 KO macrophages, consistent with the fact that a second signal through TLR4 combined with exposure to tumor ER stress-conditioned medium results in a faster ER stress response and an enhancement of proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. The injection of tumor ER stress-conditioned medium into WT mice elicited a generalized ER stress response in the liver. We suggest that transmissible ER stress is a mechanism through which tumor cells can control myeloid cells by directing them toward a proinflammatory phenotype, thus facilitating tumor progression. PMID:21464300

  5. Mechanism regulating reactive oxygen species in tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Cesar A; Cotter, Matthew J; Cheng, Pingyan; Cheng, Fendong; Kusmartsev, Sergei; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V; McCaffrey, Judith C; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2009-05-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major component of the immune suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that one of the major mechanisms of MDSC-induced immune suppression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. In this study, we observed a substantial up-regulation of ROS by MDSC in all of seven different tumor models and in patients with head and neck cancer. The increased ROS production by MDSC is mediated by up-regulated activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX2). MDSC from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher expression of NOX2 subunits, primarily p47(phox) and gp91(phox), compared with immature myeloid cells from tumor-free mice. Expression of NOX2 subunits in MDSC was controlled by the STAT3 transcription factor. In the absence of NOX2 activity, MDSC lost the ability to suppress T cell responses and quickly differentiated into mature macrophages and dendritic cells. These findings expand our fundamental understanding of the biology of MDSC and may also open new opportunities for therapeutic regulation of these cells in cancer.

  6. Mechanism regulating reactive oxygen species in tumor induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells1

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Cotter, Matthew J.; Cheng, Pingyan; Cheng, Fendong; Kusmartsev, Sergei; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V.; McCaffrey, Judith C.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major component of the immune suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that one of the major mechanisms of MDSC-induced immune suppression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. In this study we observed a substantial up-regulation of ROS by MDSC in all of seven different tumor models and in patients with head and neck cancer. The increased ROS production by MDSC is mediated by up-regulated activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX2). MDSC from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher expression of NOX2 subunits, primarily p47phox and gp91phox, compared to immature myeloid cells from tumor-free mice. Expression of NOX2 subunits in MDSC was controlled by the STAT3 transcription factor. In the absence of NOX2 activity, MDSC lost the ability to suppress T-cell responses and quickly differentiated into mature macrophages and dendritic cells. These findings expand our fundamental understanding of the biology of MDSC and may also open new opportunities for therapeutic regulation of these cells in cancer. PMID:19380816

  7. Real-time imaging of myeloid cells dynamics in ApcMin/+ intestinal tumors by spinning disk confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bonnans, Caroline; Lohela, Marja; Werb, Zena

    2014-10-06

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant immune cells within tumors and have been shown to promote tumor progression. Modern intravital imaging techniques enable the observation of live cellular behavior inside the organ but can be challenging in some types of cancer due to organ and tumor accessibility such as intestine. Direct observation of intestinal tumors has not been previously reported. A surgical procedure described here allows direct observation of myeloid cell dynamics within the intestinal tumors in live mice by using transgenic fluorescent reporter mice and injectable tracers or antibodies. For this purpose, a four-color, multi-region, micro-lensed spinning disk confocal microscope that allows long-term continuous imaging with rapid image acquisition has been used. Apc(Min/+) mice that develop multiple adenomas in the small intestine are crossed with c-fms-EGFP mice to visualize myeloid cells and with ACTB-ECFP mice to visualize intestinal epithelial cells of the crypts. Procedures for labeling different tumor components, such as blood vessels and neutrophils, and the procedure for positioning the tumor for imaging through the serosal surface are also described. Time-lapse movies compiled from several hours of imaging allow the analysis of myeloid cell behavior in situ in the intestinal microenvironment.

  8. Real-time Imaging of Myeloid Cells Dynamics in ApcMin/+ Intestinal Tumors by Spinning Disk Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Werb, Zena

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant immune cells within tumors and have been shown to promote tumor progression. Modern intravital imaging techniques enable the observation of live cellular behavior inside the organ but can be challenging in some types of cancer due to organ and tumor accessibility such as intestine. Direct observation of intestinal tumors has not been previously reported. A surgical procedure described here allows direct observation of myeloid cell dynamics within the intestinal tumors in live mice by using transgenic fluorescent reporter mice and injectable tracers or antibodies. For this purpose, a four-color, multi-region, micro-lensed spinning disk confocal microscope that allows long-term continuous imaging with rapid image acquisition has been used. ApcMin/+ mice that develop multiple adenomas in the small intestine are crossed with c-fms-EGFP mice to visualize myeloid cells and with ACTB-ECFP mice to visualize intestinal epithelial cells of the crypts. Procedures for labeling different tumor components, such as blood vessels and neutrophils, and the procedure for positioning the tumor for imaging through the serosal surface are also described. Time-lapse movies compiled from several hours of imaging allow the analysis of myeloid cell behavior in situ in the intestinal microenvironment. PMID:25350573

  9. CD45 Phosphatase Inhibits STAT3 Transcription Factor Activity in Myeloid Cells and Promotes Tumor-Associated Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinit; Cheng, Pingyan; Condamine, Thomas; Mony, Sridevi; Languino, Lucia R; McCaffrey, Judith C; Hockstein, Neil; Guarino, Michael; Masters, Gregory; Penman, Emily; Denstman, Fred; Xu, Xiaowei; Altieri, Dario C; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2016-02-16

    Recruitment of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and differentiation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the major factors contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. We demonstrated that differentiation of TAMs in tumor site from monocytic precursors was controlled by downregulation of the activity of the transcription factor STAT3. Decreased STAT3 activity was caused by hypoxia and affected all myeloid cells but was not observed in tumor cells. Upregulation of CD45 tyrosine phosphatase activity in MDSCs exposed to hypoxia in tumor site was responsible for downregulation of STAT3. This effect was mediated by the disruption of CD45 protein dimerization regulated by sialic acid. Thus, STAT3 has a unique function in the tumor environment in controlling the differentiation of MDSC into TAM, and its regulatory pathway could be a potential target for therapy. PMID:26885857

  10. Human fibrocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells express IDO and promote tolerance via Treg-cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Zoso, Alessia; Mazza, Emilia M C; Bicciato, Silvio; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo; Serafini, Paolo; Inverardi, Luca

    2014-11-01

    By restraining T-cell activation and promoting Treg-cell expansion, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tolerogenic DCs can control self-reactive and antigraft effector T cells in autoimmunity and transplantation. Their therapeutic use and characterization, however, is limited by their scarce availability in the peripheral blood of tumor-free donors. In the present study, we describe and characterize a novel population of human myeloid suppressor cells, named fibrocytic MDSC, which are differentiated from umbilical cord blood precursors by 4-day culture with FDA-approved cytokines (recombinant human-GM-CSF and recombinant human-G-CSF). This MDSC subset, characterized by the expression of MDSC-, DC-, and fibrocyte-associated markers, promotes Treg-cell expansion and induces normoglycemia in a xenogeneic mouse model of Type 1 diabetes. In order to exert their protolerogenic function, fibrocytic MDSCs require direct contact with activated T cells, which leads to the production and secretion of IDO. This new myeloid subset may have an important role in the in vitro and in vivo production of Treg cells for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, and in either the prevention or control of allograft rejection.

  11. Analysis of splenic Gr-1int immature myeloid cells in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiko; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Ishida, Hideaki; Itoh, Yasushi; Noda, Yoichi; Ogasawara, Kazumasa

    2008-01-01

    It is known that the number of ImC, expressing myeloid markers, CD11b and Gr-1, increase with tumor growth and ImC play a role in the escape of tumor cells from immunosurveillance in tumor-bearing mice and cancer patients. However, the mechanisms by which ImC suppress immune responses in tumor-bearing mice have not been completely elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the function of splenic ImC freshly isolated from tumor-bearing mice and splenic ImC differentiated in vitro by GM-CSF. Freshly isolated splenic ImC were divided into two groups depending on Gr-1 expression, Gr-1 high (Gr-1hi) and intermediate (Gr-1int). Freshly isolated splenic Gr-1int ImC, but not Gr-1hi ImC, from tumor-bearing mice reduced production of IFN-gamma in CD8+ T cells, but neither splenic Gr-1int ImC nor Gr-1hi ImC isolated from naive mice did. Both Gr-1int and Gr-1hi ImC differentiated in vitro by GM-CSF inhibited production of IFN-gamma in both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. In addition, the differentiated Gr-1int ImC, one-third of which were CD11c+F4/80+ cells, and their culture supernatants suppressed proliferative responses of T cells stimulated by CD3 ligation, but the differentiated Gr-1hi ImC and their culture supernatants did not. These results suggest that Gr-1int ImC are altered to immune-suppressive cells in tumor circumstances and that they are differentiated by GM-CSF progressively into CD11c+F4/80+ cells with further suppressive activity against T cells.

  12. Analyzing tumor heterogeneity and driver genes in single myeloid leukemia cells with SBCapSeq.

    PubMed

    Mann, Karen M; Newberg, Justin Y; Black, Michael A; Jones, Devin J; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Kodama, Takahiro; Ward, Jerrold M; Rust, Alistair G; van der Weyden, Louise; Yew, Christopher Chin Kuan; Waters, Jill L; Leung, Marco L; Rogers, Keith; Rogers, Susan M; McNoe, Leslie A; Selvanesan, Luxmanan; Navin, Nicholas; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Mann, Michael B

    2016-09-01

    A central challenge in oncology is how to kill tumors containing heterogeneous cell populations defined by different combinations of mutated genes. Identifying these mutated genes and understanding how they cooperate requires single-cell analysis, but current single-cell analytic methods, such as PCR-based strategies or whole-exome sequencing, are biased, lack sequencing depth or are cost prohibitive. Transposon-based mutagenesis allows the identification of early cancer drivers, but current sequencing methods have limitations that prevent single-cell analysis. We report a liquid-phase, capture-based sequencing and bioinformatics pipeline, Sleeping Beauty (SB) capture hybridization sequencing (SBCapSeq), that facilitates sequencing of transposon insertion sites from single tumor cells in a SB mouse model of myeloid leukemia (ML). SBCapSeq analysis of just 26 cells from one tumor revealed the tumor's major clonal subpopulations, enabled detection of clonal insertion events not detected by other sequencing methods and led to the identification of dominant subclones, each containing a unique pair of interacting gene drivers along with three to six cooperating cancer genes with SB-driven expression changes. PMID:27479497

  13. Interaction of Rotavirus with Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Narváez, Carlos F.; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that very few rotavirus (RV)-specific T cells that secrete gamma interferon circulate in recently infected and seropositive adults and children. Here, we have studied the interaction of RV with myeloid immature (IDC) and mature dendritic cells (MDC) in vitro. RV did not induce cell death of IDC or MDC and induced maturation of between 12 and 48% of IDC. Nonetheless, RV did not inhibit the maturation of IDC or change the expression of maturation markers on MDC. After treatment with RV, few IDC expressed the nonstructural viral protein NSP4. In contrast, a discrete productive viral infection was shown in MDC of a subset of volunteers, and between 3 and 46% of these cells expressed NSP4. RV-treated IDC secreted interleukin 6 (IL-6) (but not IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or transforming growth factor beta), and MDC released IL-6 and small amounts of IL-10 and IL-12p70. The patterns of cytokines secreted by T cells stimulated by staphylococcal enterotoxin B presented by MDC infected with RV or uninfected were comparable. The frequencies and patterns of cytokines secreted by memory RV-specific T cells evidenced after stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with RV were similar to those evidenced after stimulation of PBMC with RV-infected MDC. Finally, IDC treated with RV strongly stimulated naive allogeneic CD4+ T cells to secrete Th1 cytokines. Thus, although RV does not seem to be a strong maturing stimulus for DC, it promotes their capacity to prime Th1 cells. PMID:16282452

  14. Chronic intake of high fish oil diet induces myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Xia, Sheng; Li, Xiaoping; Cheng, Lu; Han, Mutian; Zhang, Miaomiao; Liu, Xia; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Minghui; Shao, Qixiang; Qi, Ling

    2014-07-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids enriched fish oil exerts beneficial anti-inflammatory effects in animal models with acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), comprised of myeloid progenitors and precursors of myeloid cells, play vital roles in cancer. How fish oil affects the generation of MDSCs and the tumor development remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that dietary intake of high fish oil diet suppresses CD8(+) T cells activation and proliferation in vivo via elevated levels of MDSCs. Mechanistically, high fish oil diet induces the expression of immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 and promotes myelopoiesis in the spleen as well as other peripheral tissues. The immature myeloid cells in the spleen exhibit morphological and functional characteristics of MDSCs with the capability to downregulate CD8(+) T cells activation. Depletion of MDSCs using anti-Gr-1 antibody decreases the growth of subcutaneously transferred B16 melanoma in mice on high fish oil diet. Interestingly, diet-induced production of MDSCs is not solely dependent of the spleen, as splenectomy has no effect on the tumor progress. Our data show that the liver functions as an alternative extramedullary hematopoiesis organ to support MDSCs differentiation and maintain tumor growth. Taken together, our study provides a novel insight into the physiological effects of fish oil and points to MDSCs as a possible mediator linking dietary fish oil intake and immunosuppression in cancer immunosurveillance.

  15. Induction of apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cells by remote exposure of resistive barrier cold plasma.

    PubMed

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Anderson, Heather; Gonzales, Xavier F

    2014-03-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), an ambient temperature ionized gas, is gaining extensive interest as a promising addition to anti-tumor therapy primarily due to the ability to generate and control delivery of electrons, ions, excited molecules, UV photons, and reactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to a specific site. The heterogeneous composition of CAP offers the opportunity to mediate several signaling pathways that regulate tumor cells. Consequently, the array of CAP generated products has limited the identification of the mechanisms of action on tumor cells. The aim of this work is to assess the cell death response of human myeloid leukemia cells by remote exposure to CAP generated RNS by utilizing a novel resistive barrier discharge system that primarily produces RNS. The effect of variable treatments of CAP generated RNS was tested in THP-1 cell (human monocytic leukemia cell line), a model for hematological malignancy. The number of viable cells was evaluated with erythrosine-B staining, while apoptosis and necrosis was assessed by endonuclease cleavage observed by agarose gel electrophoresis and detection of cells with the exclusionary dye propidium iodide and fluorescently labeled annexin-V by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Our observations indicate that treatment dosage levels of 45 s of exposure to CAP emitted RNS-induced apoptotic cell death and for higher dosage conditions of ≥50 s of exposure to CAP induced necrosis. Overall the results suggest that CAP emitted RNS play a significant role in the anti-tumor potential of CAP.

  16. A monoclonal antibody reactive with normal and leukemic human myeloid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J D; Linch, D; Sabbath, K; Larcom, P; Schlossman, S F

    1984-01-01

    Anti-MY9 is an IgG2b murine monoclonal antibody selected for reactivity with immature normal human myeloid cells. The MY9 antigen is expressed by blasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes in the bone marrow, and by monocytes in the peripheral blood. Erythrocytes, lymphocytes and platelets are MY9 negative. All myeloid colony-forming cells (CFU-GM), a fraction of erythroid burst-forming cells (BFU-E) and multipotent progenitors (CFU-GEMM) are MY9 positive. This antigen is further expressed by the leukemic cells of a majority of patients with AML and myeloid CML-BC. Leukemic stem cells (leukemic colony-forming cells, L-CFC) from most patients tested were also MY9 positive. In contrast, MY9 was not detected on lymphocytic leukemias. Anti-MY9 may be a valuable reagent for the purification of hematopoietic colony-forming cells and for the diagnosis of myeloid-lineage leukemias.

  17. Zebrafish as a Model for the Study of Human Myeloid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Hsieh, Meng-Shan; Liao, Heng-An; Yang, Yi-Ju; Ho, Yi-Jung; Lin, Liang-In

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid malignancies are heterogeneous disorders characterized by uncontrolled proliferation or/and blockage of differentiation of myeloid progenitor cells. Although a substantial number of gene alterations have been identified, the mechanism by which these abnormalities interact has yet to be elucidated. Over the past decades, zebrafish have become an important model organism, especially in biomedical research. Several zebrafish models have been developed to recapitulate the characteristics of specific myeloid malignancies that provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of these diseases and allow the evaluation of novel small molecule drugs. This report will focus on illustrative examples of applications of zebrafish models, including transgenesis, zebrafish xenograft models, and cell transplantation approaches, to the study of human myeloid malignancies. PMID:26064935

  18. HPV16-associated tumors control myeloid cell homeostasis in lymphoid organs, generating a suppressor environment for T cells.

    PubMed

    Stone, Simone Cardozo; Rossetti, Renata Ariza Marques; Bolpetti, Aline; Boccardo, Enrique; Souza, Patricia Savio de Araujo; Lepique, Ana Paula

    2014-10-01

    Tumors are complex structures containing different types of cells and molecules. The importance of the tumor microenvironment in tumor progression, growth, and maintenance is well-established. However, tumor effects are not restricted to the tumor microenvironment. Molecules secreted by, as well as cells that migrate from tumors, may circulate and reach other tissues. This may cause a series of systemic effects, including modulation of immune responses, and in some cases, leukocytosis and metastasis promotion. Leukocytosis has been described as a poor prognostic factor in patients with cervical cancer. The main etiological factor for cervical cancer development is persistent infection with high oncogenic risk HPV. Our laboratory has been exploring the effects of high oncogenic risk, HPV-associated tumors on lymphoid organs of the host. In the present study, we observed an increase in myeloid cell proliferation and alteration in cell signaling in APCs in the spleen of tumor-bearing mice. In parallel, we characterized the cytokines secreted in the inflammatory and tumor cell compartments in the tumor microenvironment and in the spleen of tumor-bearing mice. We show evidence of constitutive activation of the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway in the tumor, including TAMs, and in APCs in the spleen. We also observed that IL-10 is a central molecule in the tolerance toward tumor antigens through control of NF-κB activation, costimulatory molecule expression, and T cell proliferation. These systemic effects over myeloid cells are robust and likely an important problem to be addressed when considering strategies to improve anti-tumor T cell responses.

  19. HIF-1α regulates function and differentiation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Cesar A; Condamine, Thomas; Lu, Lily; Cotter, Matthew J; Youn, Je-In; Cheng, Pingyan; Cho, Hyun-Il; Celis, Esteban; Quiceno, David G; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V; McCaffrey, Judith C; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2010-10-25

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a major component of the immune-suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. We demonstrate that although MDSCs from peripheral lymphoid organs and the tumor site share similar phenotype and morphology, these cells display profound functional differences. MDSC from peripheral lymphoid organs suppressed antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells but failed to inhibit nonspecific T cell function. In sharp contrast, tumor MDSC suppressed both antigen-specific and nonspecific T cell activity. The tumor microenvironment caused rapid and dramatic up-regulation of arginase I and inducible nitric oxide synthase in MDSC, which was accompanied by down-regulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase and reactive oxygen species in these cells. In contrast to MDSC from the spleen, MDSC from the tumor site rapidly differentiated into macrophages. Exposure of spleen MDSC to hypoxia resulted in the conversion of these cells to nonspecific suppressors and their preferential differentiation to macrophages. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1α was found to be primarily responsible for the observed effects of the tumor microenvironment on MDSC differentiation and function. Thus, hypoxia via HIF-1α dramatically alters the function of MDSC in the tumor microenvironment and redirects their differentiation toward tumor-associated macrophages, hence providing a mechanistic link between different myeloid suppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  20. HIF-1α regulates function and differentiation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Condamine, Thomas; Lu, Lily; Cotter, Matthew J.; Youn, Je-In; Cheng, Pingyan; Cho, Hyun-Il; Celis, Esteban; Quiceno, David G.; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V.; McCaffrey, Judith C.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a major component of the immune-suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. We demonstrate that although MDSCs from peripheral lymphoid organs and the tumor site share similar phenotype and morphology, these cells display profound functional differences. MDSC from peripheral lymphoid organs suppressed antigen-specific CD8+ T cells but failed to inhibit nonspecific T cell function. In sharp contrast, tumor MDSC suppressed both antigen-specific and nonspecific T cell activity. The tumor microenvironment caused rapid and dramatic up-regulation of arginase I and inducible nitric oxide synthase in MDSC, which was accompanied by down-regulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate–oxidase and reactive oxygen species in these cells. In contrast to MDSC from the spleen, MDSC from the tumor site rapidly differentiated into macrophages. Exposure of spleen MDSC to hypoxia resulted in the conversion of these cells to nonspecific suppressors and their preferential differentiation to macrophages. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1α was found to be primarily responsible for the observed effects of the tumor microenvironment on MDSC differentiation and function. Thus, hypoxia via HIF-1α dramatically alters the function of MDSC in the tumor microenvironment and redirects their differentiation toward tumor-associated macrophages, hence providing a mechanistic link between different myeloid suppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:20876310

  1. Significance of murine retroviral mutagenesis for identification of disease genes in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Erkeland, Stefan J; Verhaak, Roel G W; Valk, Peter J M; Delwel, Ruud; Löwenberg, Bob; Touw, Ivo P

    2006-01-15

    Retroviral insertion mutagenesis is considered a powerful tool to identify cancer genes in mice, but its significance for human cancer has remained elusive. Moreover, it has recently been debated whether common virus integrations are always a hallmark of tumor cells and contribute to the oncogenic process. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with a variable response to treatment. Recurrent cytogenetic defects and acquired mutations in regulatory genes are associated with AML subtypes and prognosis. Recently, gene expression profiling (GEP) has been applied to further risk stratify AML. Here, we show that mouse leukemia genes identified by retroviral insertion mutagenesis are more frequently differentially expressed in distinct subclasses of adult and pediatric AML than randomly selected genes or genes located more distantly from a virus integration site. The candidate proto-oncogenes showing discriminative expression in primary AML could be placed in regulatory networks mainly involved in signal transduction and transcriptional control. Our data support the validity of retroviral insertion mutagenesis in mice for human disease and indicate that combining these murine screens for potential proto-oncogenes with GEP in human AML may help to identify critical disease genes and novel pathogenetic networks in leukemia.

  2. Delineation of Natural Killer Cell Differentiation from Myeloid Progenitors in Human.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingfeng; Ye, Weijian; Jian Tan, Wei; Mei Yong, Kylie Su; Liu, Min; Qi Tan, Shu; Loh, Eva; Te Chang, Kenneth; Chye Tan, Thiam; Preiser, Peter R; Chen, Jianzhu

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of natural killer (NK) cell development in human is incomplete partly because of limited access to appropriate human tissues. We have developed a cytokine-enhanced humanized mouse model with greatly improved reconstitution and function of human NK cells. Here we report the presence of a cell population in the bone marrow of the cytokine-treated humanized mice that express both NK cell marker CD56 and myeloid markers such as CD36 and CD33. The CD56(+)CD33(+)CD36(+) cells are also found in human cord blood, fetal and adult bone marrow. Although the CD56(+)CD33(+)CD36(+) cells do not express the common NK cell functional receptors and exhibit little cytotoxic and cytokine-producing activities, they readily differentiate into mature NK cells by acquiring expression of NK cell receptors and losing expression of the myeloid markers. Further studies show that CD33(+)CD36(+) myeloid NK precursors are derived from granulo-myelomonocytic progenitors. These results delineate the pathway of human NK cell differentiation from myeloid progenitors in the bone marrow and suggest the utility of humanized mice for studying human hematopoiesis. PMID:26456148

  3. The developmental program of human dendritic cells is operated independently of conventional myeloid and lymphoid pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Niiro, Hiroaki; Iino, Tadafumi; Yoshida, Shuro; Saito, Noriyuki; Onohara, Shinya; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Minagawa, Hiroko; Fujii, Shin-ichiro; Shultz, Leonard D.; Harada, Mine

    2007-01-01

    Two distinct dendritic cell (DC) subsets, conventional DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), have been shown to develop via either the myeloid or the lymphoid pathway in murine hematopoiesis. Lineage-specific phenotypes or functions of “myeloid” and “lymphoid” DCs, however, still remain elusive. Furthermore, such analysis has been particularly difficult in humans, due to lack of an assay system appropriate for the analysis of human stem and progenitor cell differentiation. Here, using a highly efficient xenotransplantation model, we extensively analyze the origin and the molecular signature of human DCs. Purified human common myeloid progenitors (CMPs) and common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) were intravenously transplanted into nonobese diabetic–severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD-scid)/IL2rγnull newborn mice. CMPs and CLPs displayed significant expansion in the xenogeneic host, and human cDC and pDC progeny were isolatable. Strikingly, each human DC subset possessed indistinguishable expression patterns of surface phenotype and gene transcripts regardless of their CMP or CLP origin, even at the genome-wide level. Thus, cDC and pDC normally develop after cells have committed to the myeloid or the lymphoid lineage in human hematopoiesis, while their transcriptional signatures are well preserved irrespective of their lineage origin. We propose that human DCs use unique and flexible developmental programs that cannot be categorized into the conventional myeloid or lymphoid pathway. PMID:17664352

  4. Novel role for tumor-induced expansion of myeloid-derived cells in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Alex G; Cuenca, Angela L; Winfield, Robert D; Joiner, Dallas N; Gentile, Lori; Delano, Matthew J; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M; Scumpia, Philip O; Matheny, Michael K; Scarpace, Philip J; Vila, Lizette; Efron, Philip A; LaFace, Drake M; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2014-06-15

    Cancer progression is associated with inflammation, increased metabolic demand, infection, cachexia, and eventually death. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) commonly expand during cancer and are associated with adaptive immune suppression and inflammatory metabolite production. We propose that cancer-induced cachexia is driven at least in part by the expansion of MDSCs. MDSC expansion in 4T1 mammary carcinoma-bearing hosts is associated with induction of a hepatic acute-phase protein response and altered host energy and fat metabolism, and eventually reduced survival to polymicrobial sepsis and endotoxemia. Similar results are also seen in mice bearing a Lewis lung carcinoma and a C26 colon adenocarcinoma. However, a similar cachexia response is not seen with equivalent growth of the 66C4 subclone of 4T1, in which MDSC expansion does not occur. Importantly, reducing MDSC numbers in 4T1-bearing animals can ameliorate some of these late responses and reduce susceptibility to inflammation-induced organ injury and death. In addition, administering MDSCs from both tumor- and nontumor-bearing mice can produce an acute-phase response. Thus, we propose a previously undescribed mechanism for the development of cancer cachexia, whereby progressive MDSC expansion contributes to changes in host protein and energy metabolism and reduced resistance to infection.

  5. CSF1R signaling blockade stanches tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and improves the efficacy of radiotherapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingying; Escamilla, Jemima; Mok, Stephen; David, John; Priceman, Saul; West, Brian; Bollag, Gideon; McBride, William; Wu, Lily

    2013-05-01

    Radiotherapy is used to treat many types of cancer, but many treated patients relapse with local tumor recurrence. Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells (TIM), including CD11b (ITGAM)(+)F4/80 (EMR1)+ tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), and CD11b(+)Gr-1 (LY6G)+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), respond to cancer-related stresses and play critical roles in promoting tumor angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and immunosuppression. In this report, we used a prostate cancer model to investigate the effects of irradiation on TAMs and MDSCs in tumor-bearing animals. Unexpectedly, when primary tumor sites were irradiated, we observed a systemic increase of MDSCs in spleen, lung, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood. Cytokine analysis showed that the macrophage colony-stimulating factor CSF1 increased by two-fold in irradiated tumors. Enhanced macrophage migration induced by conditioned media from irradiated tumor cells was completely blocked by a selective inhibitor of CSF1R. These findings were confirmed in patients with prostate cancer, where serum levels of CSF1 increased after radiotherapy. Mechanistic investigations revealed the recruitment of the DNA damage-induced kinase ABL1 into cell nuclei where it bound the CSF1 gene promoter and enhanced CSF1 gene transcription. When added to radiotherapy, a selective inhibitor of CSF1R suppressed tumor growth more effectively than irradiation alone. Our results highlight the importance of CSF1/CSF1R signaling in the recruitment of TIMs that can limit the efficacy of radiotherapy. Furthermore, they suggest that CSF1 inhibitors should be evaluated in clinical trials in combination with radiotherapy as a strategy to improve outcomes.

  6. Interaction between arsenic trioxide and human primary cells: emphasis on human cells of myeloid origin.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Antoine, Francis; Girard, Denis

    2009-03-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3); ATO) is considered to be one of the most potent drugs in cancer chemotherapy and is highly effective in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). It is well established that treatment of APL patients with ATO is associated with the disappearance of the PML-RARalpha fusion transcript, the characteristic APL gene product of the chromosomal translocation t(15;17). Although its mode of action is still not fully understood, ATO is known to induce cell apoptosis via generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of caspases. Several reports have indicated that ATO acts principally by inducing cell apoptosis not only in APL, but in a variety of non-APL cells including myeloma cells, chronic myeloid leukemia cells and cells of immune origin, including B or T lymphocytes, macrophages and, more recently, neutrophils. There is an increasing amount of data, including some from our laboratory, concerning the interaction between ATO and human primary cells. The focus of this review will be to cover the role of ATO in human immune primary cells with special emphasis on cells of myeloid origin.

  7. A novel subset of B7-H3+CD14+HLA-DR−/low myeloid-derived suppressor cells are associated with progression of human NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guangbo; Huang, Haitao; Zhu, Yibei; Yu, Gehua; Gao, Xin; Xu, Yunyun; Liu, Cuiping; Hou, Jianquan; Zhang, Xueguang

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) potently inhibit antitumor immune responses, and thereby promoti tumor progression and metastasis. However, the nature of human tumor-infiltrating MDSC remains poorly characterized. Here, we find B7-H3 is exclusively expressed on a subset of intratumoral CD14+HLA-DR−/low MDSC but absent from adjacent normal lung tissues of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Cytokine analysis revealed that B7-H3+CD14+HLA-DR−/low MDSC (B7-H3+MDSC) produced higher levels of IL-10 and TNFα but lower levels of IL-1β and IL-6 when compared with B7-H3−CD14+HLA-DR−/low myeloid-derived suppressor cells (B7-H3−MDSC). In a murine lung cancer model, B7-H3+MDSCs were found only in the tumor microenvironment and their frequencies increased during tumor progression. Clinical data analysis indicated that a higher frequency of B7-H3+MDSCs was associated with reduced recurrence-free survival in patients with NSCLC. Taken together, we identify a novel subset of MDSCs within the tumor microenvironment that fosters tumor progression. PMID:25949876

  8. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C.; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity. PMID:25717144

  9. Galactomutarotase (GALM) and Other Galactose-Related Genes Are Rapidly Induced by Retinoic Acid in Human Myeloid Cells†

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Tongkun; Chen, Qiuyan; Zhang, Yao; Zolfaghari, Reza; Ross, A. Catharine

    2008-01-01

    Aldose-1-epimerase (mutarotase) catalyzes the interconversion of α and β hexoses, which is essential for normal carbohydrate metabolism and the production of complex oligosaccharides. Galactose mutarotase (GALM) has been well characterized at the protein level but information is lacking on the regulation of GALM gene expression. We report herein that all-trans-retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of vitamin A that is known to induce myeloid lineage cell differentiation into macrophage-like cells, induces a rapid and robust regulation of GALM mRNA expression in human myeloid cells. All-trans-RA at a physiological concentration (20 nM), or Am580, a ligand selective for the nuclear retinoid receptor RARα, increased GALM mRNA in THP-1 cells, with significantly increased expression in 2 h, increasing further to an ~8-fold elevation after 6–40 h (P< 0.005). In contrast, tumor necrosis factor-α did not increase GALM mRNA expression, although it is capable of inducing cell differentiation. RA also increased GALM mRNA in U937 and HL-60 cells. The increase in GALM mRNA by RA was blocked by pretreating THP-1 cells with actinomycin D, but not by cycloheximide. GALM protein and mutarotase activity were also increased time dependently in RA-treated THP-1 cells. In addition to GALM, several other genes in the biosynthetic pathway of galactosyl-containing complex oligosaccharides were more highly expressed in RA-treated THP-1 cells, including B4GALT5, ST3GAL3, ST6GALNAC5, and GALNAC4S-6ST. Thus, the results of this study identify RA as a significant regulator of GALM and other galactose-related genes in myeloid-monocytic cells, which could affect energy utilization, synthesis of cell-surface glycoproteins or glycolipids involved in cell motility, adhesion, and/or functional properties. PMID:18052213

  10. Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma–Associated Semaphorin 4D Induces Expansion of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyu Lee; Webb, Tonya J.

    2016-01-01

    One of the mechanisms by which malignancies can induce immune suppression is through the production of cytokines that affect the maturation and differentiation of inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment. Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) is a proangiogenic cytokine produced by several malignancies, which has been described in the regulation of the immune system. In the present study, we examined the role of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)–secreted Sema4D on myeloid cell differentiation. CD33+ cells cultured in HNSCC cell line–derived conditioned medium differentiated into myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) (CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR−/low). The addition of anti-Sema4D Ab to HNSCC conditioned medium significantly reduced the expansion of the MDSC population. Similarly, knockdown of Sema4D in an HNSCC cell line resulted in a loss of MDSC function as shown by a decrease in the production of the immune-suppressive cytokines arginase-1, TGF-β, and IL-10 by MDSC, concomitant with recovery of T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production following stimulation of CD3/CD28. Importantly, CD33+ myeloid and T cells cultured in conditioned medium of HNSCC cells in which Sema4D was knocked down promoted antitumor inflammatory profile, through recovery of the effector T cells (CD4+T-bet+ and CD8+T-bet+), as well as a decrease in regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+FOXP3+). We also showed that Sema4D was comparable to GM-CSF in its induction of MDSC. Collectively, this study describes a novel immunosuppressive role for Sema4D in HNSCC through induction of MDSC, and it highlights Sema4D as a therapeutic target for future studies to enhance the antitumorigenic inflammatory response in HNSCC and other epithelial malignancies. PMID:26740106

  11. Galactomutarotase and other galactose-related genes are rapidly induced by retinoic acid in human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Pai, Tongkun; Chen, Qiuyan; Zhang, Yao; Zolfaghari, Reza; Ross, A Catharine

    2007-12-25

    Aldose-1-epimerase (mutarotase) catalyzes the interconversion of alpha and beta hexoses, which is essential for normal carbohydrate metabolism and the production of complex oligosaccharides. Galactose mutarotase (GALM) has been well characterized at the protein level, but information is lacking on the regulation of GALM gene expression. We report herein that all-trans-retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of vitamin A that is known to induce myeloid lineage cell differentiation into macrophage-like cells, induces a rapid and robust regulation of GALM mRNA expression in human myeloid cells. all-trans-RA at a physiological concentration (20 nM), or Am580, a ligand selective for the nuclear retinoid receptor RARalpha, increased GALM mRNA in THP-1 cells, with significantly increased expression in 2 h, increasing further to an approximately 8-fold elevation after 6-40 h (P < 0.005). In contrast, tumor necrosis factor-alpha did not increase GALM mRNA expression, although it is capable of inducing cell differentiation. RA also increased GALM mRNA in U937 and HL-60 cells. The increase in GALM mRNA by RA was blocked by pretreating THP-1 cells with actinomycin D but not by cycloheximide. GALM protein and mutarotase activity were also increased time dependently in RA-treated THP-1 cells. In addition to GALM, several other genes in the biosynthetic pathway of galactosyl-containing complex oligosaccharides were more highly expressed in RA-treated THP-1 cells, including B4GALT5, ST3GAL3, ST6GALNAC5, and GALNAC4S-6ST. Thus, the results of this study identify RA as a significant regulator of GALM and other galactose-related genes in myeloid-monocytic cells, which could affect energy utilization and synthesis of cell-surface glycoproteins or glycolipids involved in cell motility, adhesion, and/or functional properties.

  12. The Transcription Factor Wilms Tumor 1 Confers Resistance in Myeloid Leukemia Cells against the Proapoptotic Therapeutic Agent TRAIL (Tumor Necrosis Factor α-related Apoptosis-inducing Ligand) by Regulating the Antiapoptotic Protein Bcl-xL*

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Hima; Seifert, Theresea; Bachier, Carlos; Rao, Manjeet; Tomlinson, Gail; Iyer, Swaminathan Padmanabhan; Bansal, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is considered a promising cancer therapeutic agent due to its ability to induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells, while sparing normal cells. However, many human tumors including acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are partially or completely resistant to monotherapy with TRAIL, limiting its therapeutic utility. Therefore, identification of factors that contribute to TRAIL resistance may facilitate future development of more effective TRAIL-based cancer therapies. Here, we report a previously unknown role for WT1 in mediating TRAIL resistance in leukemia. Knockdown of WT1 with shRNA rendered TRAIL-resistant myeloid leukemia cells sensitive to TRAIL-induced cell death, and re-expression of shRNA-resistant WT1 restored TRAIL resistance. Notably, TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in WT1-silenced cells was largely due to down-regulation of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL. Moreover, WT1 expression strongly correlated with overexpression of Bcl-xL in AML cell lines and blasts from AML patients. Furthermore, we found that WT1 transactivates Bcl-xL by directly binding to its promoter. We previously showed that WT1 is a novel client protein of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Consistent with this, pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 resulted in reduced WT1 and Bcl-xL expression leading to increased sensitivity of leukemia cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, our results suggest that WT1-dependent Bcl-xL overexpression contributes to TRAIL resistance in myeloid leukemias. PMID:22898820

  13. Myeloid zinc-finger 1 (MZF-1) suppresses prostate tumor growth through enforcing ferroportin-conducted iron egress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Zhang, Z; Yang, K; Du, J; Xu, Y; Liu, S

    2015-07-01

    Although previous studies suggest that myeloid zinc-finger 1 (MZF-1) is a multifaceted transcription factor that may function as either an oncogene or a tumor suppressor, the molecular bases determining its different traits remain elusive. Increasing evidence suggests that disorders in iron metabolism affect tumorigenesis and tumor behaviors, and that excess tumor iron stimulates tumor progression through various mechanisms such as enhancing DNA replication and energy metabolism. Ferroportin (FPN) is the only known iron exporter in mammalian cells, and it determines global iron egress out of cells. FPN reduction leads to decreased iron efflux and increased intracellular iron that consequentially aggravates the oncogenic effects of iron. MZF-1 was recently identified as a transcription factor that regulates FPN expression. Thus far, however, the molecular mechanisms underlying the MZF-1-FPN signaling in cancers are largely unknown. Here, we found a significant reduction of FPN levels in prostate tumors relative to adjacent tissues, and demonstrated a crucial role of FPN in tumor growth through controlling tumor iron concentration. Inhibition of MZF-1 expression led to reduced FPN concentration, coupled with resultant intracellular iron retention, increased iron-related cellular activities and enhanced tumor cell growth. In contrast, increase of MZF-1 expression restrained tumor cell growth by promoting FPN-driven iron egress. Importantly, we demonstrated that AP4 and c-Myb jointly modulated MZF-1 transcription, and that miR-492 was also directly involved in regulating MZF-1 concentration through binding to the 3' untranslated regions of its mRNA. These results correlate with reduced AP4 and c-Myb expression and elevated miR-492 expression found in prostate tumors as compared with adjacent tissues that resulted in diminished MZF-1 and FPN. Moreover, we demonstrated that alterations of AP4, c-Myb and miR-492 levels significantly affected tumor cell growth. Targeting

  14. Characterizing primary human microglia: A comparative study with myeloid subsets and culture models.

    PubMed

    Melief, J; Sneeboer, M A M; Litjens, M; Ormel, P R; Palmen, S J M C; Huitinga, I; Kahn, R S; Hol, E M; de Witte, L D

    2016-11-01

    The biology of microglia has become subject to intense study, as they are widely recognized as crucial determinants of normal and pathologic brain functioning. While they are well studied in animal models, it is still strongly debated what specifies most accurately the phenotype and functioning of microglia in the human brain. In this study, we therefore isolated microglia from postmortem human brain tissue of corpus callosum (CC) and frontal cortex (CTX). The cells were phenotyped for a panel of typical microglia markers and genes involved in myeloid cell biology. Furthermore, their response to pro- and anti-inflammatory stimuli was assessed. The microglia were compared to key human myeloid cell subsets, including monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and several commonly used microglial cell models. Protein and mRNA expression profiles partly differed between microglia isolated from CC and frontal cortex and were clearly distinct from other myeloid subsets. Microglia responded to both pro- (LPS or poly I:C) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4 or dexamethasone) stimuli. Interestingly, pro-inflammatory responses differed between microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages, as the former responded more strongly to poly I:C and the latter more strongly to LPS. Furthermore, we defined a large phenotypic discrepancy between primary human microglia and currently used microglial cell models and cell lines. In conclusion, we further delineated the unique and specific features that discriminate human microglia from other myeloid subsets, and we show that currently used cellular models only partly reflect the phenotype of primary human microglia. GLIA 2016;64:1857-1868.

  15. Functions of flt3 in zebrafish hematopoiesis and its relevance to human acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    He, Bai-Liang; Shi, Xiangguo; Man, Cheuk Him; Ma, Alvin C. H.; Ekker, Stephen C.; Chow, Howard C. H.; So, Chi Wai Eric; Choi, William W. L.; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Yiyue

    2014-01-01

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is expressed in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) but its role during embryogenesis is unclear. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), internal tandem duplication (ITD) of FLT3 at the juxtamembrane (JMD) and tyrosine kinase (TKD) domains (FLT3-ITD+) occurs in 30% of patients and is associated with inferior clinical prognosis. TKD mutations (FLT3-TKD+) occur in 5% of cases. We made use of zebrafish to examine the role of flt3 in developmental hematopoiesis and model human FLT3-ITD+ and FLT3-TKD+ AML. Zebrafish flt3 JMD and TKD were remarkably similar to their mammalian orthologs. Morpholino knockdown significantly reduced the expression of l-plastin (pan-leukocyte), csf1r, and mpeg1 (macrophage) as well as that of c-myb (definitive HSPCs), lck, and rag1 (T-lymphocyte). Expressing human FLT3-ITD in zebrafish embryos resulted in expansion and clustering of myeloid cells (pu.1+, mpo+, and cebpα+) which were ameliorated by AC220 and associated with stat5, erk1/2, and akt phosphorylation. Human FLT3-TKD (D835Y) induced significant, albeit modest, myeloid expansion resistant to AC220. This study provides novel insight into the role of flt3 during hematopoiesis and establishes a zebrafish model of FLT3-ITD+ and FLT3-TKD+ AML that may facilitate high-throughput screening of novel and personalized agents. PMID:24591202

  16. Inhibition of A20 expression in tumor microenvironment exerts anti-tumor effect through inducing myeloid-derived suppressor cells apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Bin; Wei, Xiawei; Luo, Min; Yu, Jiayun; Tong, Aiping; Ma, Xuelei; Ye, Tinghong; Deng, Hongxin; Sang, Yaxiong; Liang, Xiao; Ma, Yu; Wu, Qinjie; Du, Wei; Du, Jing; Gao, Xiang; Wen, Yi; Fu, Ping; Shi, Huashan; Luo, Shuntao; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are known to play important roles in the development of immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. A20 is a zinc-finger protein which could negatively regulate apoptosis in several cell types. However, the role of A20 in tumor microenvironment remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that A20 was over-expressed in MDSCs. The treatment of tumor-bearing mice with small interfering RNA targeting A20 (si-A20) inhibited the growth of tumors. The infiltration of MDSCs was dramatically reduced after si-A20 treatment, as compared to control groups, whereas the numbers of dendritic cells and macrophages were not affected. Also, injection of si-A20 improved T cell mediated tumor-specific immune response. Depletion of MDSCs with anti-Gr1 antibody showed similar antitumor effect and improved T cell response. TNF-α was highly expressed after si-A20 injection. Furthermore, si-A20 induced apoptosis of MDSCs in the presence of TNF-α both in vivo and in vitro. Cleaved Caspase-3 and Caspase-8 were elevated with the activation of JNK pathway after the induction of MDSC apoptosis by si-A20. Thus, our findings suggested that knockdown of A20 in tumor site inhibited tumor growth at least through inducing the apoptosis of MDSCs. A20 might be a potential target in anticancer therapy. PMID:26561336

  17. Newly recruited CD11b+, GR-1+, Ly6C(high) myeloid cells augment tumor-associated immunosuppression immediately following the therapeutic administration of oncolytic reovirus.

    PubMed

    Clements, Derek R; Sterea, Andra M; Kim, Youra; Helson, Erin; Dean, Cheryl A; Nunokawa, Anna; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Sharif, Tanveer; Marcato, Paola; Gujar, Shashi A; Lee, Patrick W K

    2015-05-01

    Tumor-associated immunosuppression aids cancer cells to escape immune-mediated attack and subsequent elimination. Recently, however, many oncolytic viruses, including reovirus, have been reported to overturn such immunosuppression and promote the development of a clinically desired antitumor immunity, which is known to promote favorable patient outcomes. Contrary to this existing paradigm, in this article we demonstrate that reovirus augments tumor-associated immunosuppression immediately following its therapeutic administration. Our data show that reovirus induces preferential differentiation of highly suppressive CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), Ly6C(high) myeloid cells from bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells. Furthermore, reovirus administration in tumor-bearing hosts drives time-dependent recruitment of CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), Ly6C(high) myeloid cells in the tumor milieu, which is further supported by virus-induced increased expression of numerous immune factors involved in myeloid-derived suppressor cell survival and trafficking. Most importantly, CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), Ly6C(high) myeloid cells specifically potentiate the suppression of T cell proliferation and are associated with the absence of IFN-γ response in the tumor microenvironment early during oncotherapy. Considering that the qualitative traits of a specific antitumor immunity are largely dictated by the immunological events that precede its development, our findings are of critical importance and must be considered while devising complementary interventions aimed at promoting the optimum efficacy of oncolytic virus-based anticancer immunotherapies. PMID:25825443

  18. Induction of complete and molecular remissions in acute myeloid leukemia by Wilms’ tumor 1 antigen-targeted dendritic cell vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.; Van de Velde, Ann; Van Driessche, Ann; Cools, Nathalie; Anguille, Sébastien; Ladell, Kristin; Gostick, Emma; Vermeulen, Katrien; Pieters, Katrien; Nijs, Griet; Stein, Barbara; Smits, Evelien L.; Schroyens, Wilfried A.; Gadisseur, Alain P.; Vrelust, Inge; Jorens, Philippe G.; Goossens, Herman; de Vries, I. Jolanda; Price, David A.; Oji, Yusuke; Oka, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Haruo; Berneman, Zwi N.

    2010-01-01

    Active immunization using tumor antigen-loaded dendritic cells holds promise for the adjuvant treatment of cancer to eradicate or control residual disease, but so far, most dendritic cell trials have been performed in end-stage cancer patients with high tumor loads. Here, in a phase I/II trial, we investigated the effect of autologous dendritic cell vaccination in 10 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The Wilms’ tumor 1 protein (WT1), a nearly universal tumor antigen, was chosen as an immunotherapeutic target because of its established role in leukemogenesis and superior immunogenic characteristics. Two patients in partial remission after chemotherapy were brought into complete remission after intradermal administration of full-length WT1 mRNA-electroporated dendritic cells. In these two patients and three other patients who were in complete remission, the AML-associated tumor marker returned to normal after dendritic cell vaccination, compatible with the induction of molecular remission. Clinical responses were correlated with vaccine-associated increases in WT1-specific CD8+ T cell frequencies, as detected by peptide/HLA-A*0201 tetramer staining, and elevated levels of activated natural killer cells postvaccination. Furthermore, vaccinated patients showed increased levels of WT1-specific IFN-γ–producing CD8+ T cells and features of general immune activation. These data support the further development of vaccination with WT1 mRNA-loaded dendritic cells as a postremission treatment to prevent full relapse in AML patients. PMID:20631300

  19. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    ; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Peritonitis activates transcription of the human prolactin locus in myeloid cells in a humanized transgenic rat model.

    PubMed

    Semprini, Sabrina; McNamara, Anne V; Awais, Raheela; Featherstone, Karen; Harper, Claire V; McNeilly, Judith R; Patist, Amanda; Rossi, Adriano G; Dransfield, Ian; McNeilly, Alan S; Davis, Julian R E; White, Michael R H; Mullins, John J

    2012-06-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is mainly expressed in the pituitary in rodents, whereas in humans, expression is observed in many extrapituitary sites, including lymphocytes. Due to the lack of adequate experimental models, the function of locally produced PRL in the immune system is largely unknown. Using transgenic rats that express luciferase under the control of extensive human PRL regulatory regions, we characterized immune cell responses to thioglycollate (TG)-induced peritonitis. Resident populations of myeloid cells in the peritoneal cavity of untreated rats expressed barely detectable levels of luciferase. In contrast, during TG-induced peritonitis, cell-specific expression in both neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages in peritoneal exudates increased dramatically. Elevated luciferase expression was also detectable in peripheral blood and bone marrow CD11b(+) cells. Ex vivo stimulation of primary myeloid cells showed activation of the human extrapituitary promoter by TNF-α, lipopolysaccharide, or TG. These findings were confirmed in human peripheral blood monocytes, showing that the transgenic rat provided a faithful model for the human gene. Thus, the resolution of an inflammatory response is associated with dramatic activation of the PRL gene promoter in the myeloid lineage.

  1. αB-Crystallin regulates expansion of CD11b⁺Gr-1⁺ immature myeloid cells during tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Lothar C; Schiller, Petter; Huang, Hua; Wawrousek, Eric F; Loskog, Angelica; Wanders, Alkwin; Moons, Lieve; Dimberg, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The molecular chaperone αB-crystallin has emerged as a target for cancer therapy due to its expression in human tumors and its role in regulating tumor angiogenesis. αB-crystallin also reduces neuroinflammation, but its role in other inflammatory conditions has not been investigated. Here, we examined whether αB-crystallin regulates inflammation associated with tumors and ischemia. We found that CD45(+) leukocyte infiltration is 3-fold increased in tumors and ischemic myocardium in αB-crystallin-deficient mice. Notably, αB-crystallin is prominently expressed in CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) immature myeloid cells (IMCs), known as regulators of angiogenesis and immune responses, while lymphocytes and mature granulocytes show low αB-crystallin expression. αB-Crystallin deficiency results in a 3-fold higher accumulation of CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) IMCs in tumors and a significant rise in CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) IMCs in spleen and bone marrow. Similarly, we noted a 2-fold increase in CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) IMCs in chronically inflamed livers in αB-crystallin-deficient mice. The effect of αB-crystallin on IMC accumulation is limited to pathological conditions, as CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) IMCs are not elevated in naive mice. Through ex vivo differentiation of CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) cells, we provide evidence that αB-crystallin regulates systemic expansion of IMCs through a cell-intrinsic mechanism. Our study suggests a key role of αB-crystallin in limiting expansion of CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) IMCs in diverse pathological conditions.

  2. The Role of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Patients with Solid Tumors: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Wang, Guoping; Yuan, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Targeting immune cells or factors are effective for patients with solid tumors. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are known to have immunosuppressive functions, and the levels of MDSCs in patients with solid tumor are assumed to have prognostic values. This meta-analysis aimed at evaluating the relationship between MDSCs and the prognosis of patients with solid tumors. We searched articles in PUBMED and EMBASE comprehensively, updated to March 2016. Eight studies with 442 patients were included in the meta-analysis. We analyzed pooled hazard ratios (HRs) for overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and progression-free survival (PFS). The results showed that MDSCs were associated with poor OS (HR, 1.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.42–2.66; P < 0.0001) in patients with solid tumors. PFS/RFS (HR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.16–2.97; P = 0.01) also indicated the association between MDSCs and prognosis. The HRs and 95% CIs for OS in Asian and non-Asian patients were 2.53 (95% CI 1.61–3.42, p < 0.00001) and 1.67 (95% CI 1.14–2.46, p < 0.0001), respectively. We further analyzed the data according to tumor types. The combined HRs and 95% CIs for OS were 1.26 (95% CI 1.10–1.44, p = 0.0003) for gastrointestinal (GI) cancer, 2.59 (95% CI 1.69–3.98, p < 0.0001) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 1.86 (95% CI 1.26–2.75, p = 0.002) for other tumor types. In conclusion, MDSCs had a fine prognostic value for OS and PFS/RFS in patients with solid tumors. MDSCs could be used as biomarkers to evaluate prognosis in clinical practice. PMID:27780254

  3. Ex vivo generation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells that model the tumor immunosuppressive environment in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dufait, Inès; Schwarze, Julia Katharina; Liechtenstein, Therese; Leonard, Wim; Jiang, Heng; Escors, David

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of cells that accumulate in tumor-bearing subjects and which strongly inhibit anti-cancer immune responses. To study the biology of MDSC in colorectal cancer (CRC), we cultured bone marrow cells in conditioned medium from CT26 cells, which are genetically modified to secrete high levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. This resulted in the generation of high numbers of CD11b+ Ly6G+ granulocytic and CD11b+ Ly6C+ monocytic MDSC, which closely resemble those found within the tumor but not the spleen of CT26 tumor-bearing mice. Such MDSC potently inhibited T-cell responses in vitro, a process that could be reversed upon blocking of arginase-1 or inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). We confirmed that inhibition of arginase-1 or iNOS in vivo resulted in the stimulation of cytotoxic T-cell responses. A delay in tumor growth was observed upon functional repression of both enzymes. These data confirm the role of MDSC as inhibitors of T-cell-mediated immune responses in CRC. Moreover, MDSC differentiated in vitro from bone marrow cells using conditioned medium of GM-CSF-secreting CT26 cells, represent a valuable platform to study/identify drugs that counteract MDSC activities. PMID:25869209

  4. Tasquinimod modulates tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and improves the antitumor immune response to PD-L1 blockade in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakhlé, Jessica; Pierron, Valérie; Bauchet, Anne-Laure; Plas, Pascale; Thiongane, Amath; Meyer-Losic, Florence; Schmidlin, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The infiltration of myeloid cells helps tumors to overcome immune surveillance and imparts resistance to cancer immunotherapy. Thus, strategies to modulate the effects of these immune cells may offer a potential therapeutic benefit. We report here that tasquinimod, a novel immunotherapy which targets S100A9 signaling, reduces the immunosuppressive properties of myeloid cells in preclinical models of bladder cancer (BCa). As single anticancer agent, tasquinimod treatment was effective in preventing early stage tumor growth, but did not achieve a clear antitumor effect in advanced tumors. Investigations of this response revealed that tasquinimod induces an increase in the expression of a negative regulator of T cell activation, Programmed-death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). This markedly weakens its antitumor immunity, yet provokes an “inflamed” milieu rendering tumors more prone to T cell-mediated immune attack by PD-L1 blockade. Interestingly, the combination of tasquinimod with an Anti-PD-L1 antibody enhanced the antitumor immune response in bladder tumors. This combination synergistically modulated tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, thereby strongly affecting proliferation and activation of effector T cells. Together, our data provide insight into the rational combination of therapies that activate both innate and adaptive immune system, such as the association of S100A9-targeting agents with immune checkpoints inhibitors, to improve the response to cancer immunotherapeutic agents in BCa. PMID:27471612

  5. Paving the Road to Tumor Development and Spreading: Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells are Ruling the Fate

    PubMed Central

    Meirow, Yaron; Kanterman, Julia; Baniyash, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Cancer development is dependent on intrinsic cellular changes as well as inflammatory factors in the tumor macro and microenvironment. The inflammatory milieu nourishes the tumor and contributes to cancer progression. Numerous studies, including ours, have demonstrated that the tumor microenvironment is immunosuppressive, impairing the anticancer immune responses. Chronic inflammation was identified as the key process responsible for this immunosuppression via induction of immature myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Upon a prolonged immune response, MDSCs are polarized toward immunosuppressive cells meant to control the exacerbated immune response. In cancer, the chronic inflammatory response renders the MDSCs harmful. Polarized MDSCs suppress T-cells and natural killer cells, as well as antigen-presenting cells, abrogating the beneficial immune response. These changes in the immunological milieu could also lead to high frequency of mutations, enhanced cancer cell stemness, and angiogenesis, directly supporting tumor initiation, growth, and spreading. The presence of MDSCs in cancer poses a serious obstacle in a variety of immune-based therapies, which rely on the stimulation of antitumor immune responses. Cumulative data, including our own, suggest that the selection of an appropriate and effective anticancer therapy must take into consideration the host’s immune status as well as tumor-related parameters. Merging biomarkers for immune monitoring into the traditional patient’s categorization and follow-up can provide new predictive and diagnostic tools to the clinical practice. Chronic inflammation and MDSCs could serve as novel targets for therapeutic interventions, which can be combined with conventional cancer treatments such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and cancer cell-targeted and immune-based therapies. Intervention in environmental and tumor-specific inflammatory mechanisms will allow better clinical management of cancer toward more efficient

  6. Evaluation of myeloid cells (tumor-associated tissue eosinophils and mast cells) infiltration in different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Debta, Priyanka; Debta, Fakir Mohan; Chaudhary, Minal; Bussari, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Background: The multifunctional involvement and infiltration of myeloid cells (tumor-associated tissue eosinophils [TATE] and mast cells) can provide a unique opportunity to define relevant effectors functions that may represent novel, therapeutic options for modulation of tumor onset/growth. Aim: Our study aimed to evaluate infiltration of myeloid cells (TATE and Mast cells) infiltration in different grades (WHO grading) of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Materials and Methods: Total 30 cases of OSCC were selected for this study. Hematoxylin and eosin stain and toluidine blue special stain, to evaluate TATE and the mast cells infiltration, were used. Three-year follow-up of OSCC cases was done. Result: Among 30 cases, 63.33% cases of OSCC showed TATE-positive and 36.66% cases showed TATE-negative. Regarding mast cells infiltration, 66.66% OSCC cases showed mast cells positive and 33.33% cases did not show significant mast cells infiltration. We found significant association of TATE and mast cells infiltration in OSCC cases. These myeloid cells infiltration significantly associated with age of patients but did not show any significant association with gender, site, and habit of cases. When we compared these cells infiltration with clinical stages and different histological grades of tumor, we found their infiltration is decreasing, from Stages 1 to Stage 3 of tumor and from well to poorly differentiated carcinoma. We have also found the less infiltration of these myeloid in recurrence cases of OSCC. Conclusion: As the infiltration of TATE and mast cells are correlated, along with evaluation of TATE, we should also evaluate the presence of mast cells infiltration in OSCC. The assessment of myeloid cells could become, in the future, useful for therapeutic approaches in this subset of the patient. PMID:27688609

  7. Evaluation of myeloid cells (tumor-associated tissue eosinophils and mast cells) infiltration in different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Debta, Priyanka; Debta, Fakir Mohan; Chaudhary, Minal; Bussari, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Background: The multifunctional involvement and infiltration of myeloid cells (tumor-associated tissue eosinophils [TATE] and mast cells) can provide a unique opportunity to define relevant effectors functions that may represent novel, therapeutic options for modulation of tumor onset/growth. Aim: Our study aimed to evaluate infiltration of myeloid cells (TATE and Mast cells) infiltration in different grades (WHO grading) of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Materials and Methods: Total 30 cases of OSCC were selected for this study. Hematoxylin and eosin stain and toluidine blue special stain, to evaluate TATE and the mast cells infiltration, were used. Three-year follow-up of OSCC cases was done. Result: Among 30 cases, 63.33% cases of OSCC showed TATE-positive and 36.66% cases showed TATE-negative. Regarding mast cells infiltration, 66.66% OSCC cases showed mast cells positive and 33.33% cases did not show significant mast cells infiltration. We found significant association of TATE and mast cells infiltration in OSCC cases. These myeloid cells infiltration significantly associated with age of patients but did not show any significant association with gender, site, and habit of cases. When we compared these cells infiltration with clinical stages and different histological grades of tumor, we found their infiltration is decreasing, from Stages 1 to Stage 3 of tumor and from well to poorly differentiated carcinoma. We have also found the less infiltration of these myeloid in recurrence cases of OSCC. Conclusion: As the infiltration of TATE and mast cells are correlated, along with evaluation of TATE, we should also evaluate the presence of mast cells infiltration in OSCC. The assessment of myeloid cells could become, in the future, useful for therapeutic approaches in this subset of the patient.

  8. Gene expression profiling of human fibrocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (f-MDSCs).

    PubMed

    Mazza, Emilia Maria Cristina; Zoso, Alessia; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo; Serafini, Paolo; Inverardi, Luca; Bicciato, Silvio

    2014-12-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been shown to control self-reactive and anti-graft effector T-cells in autoimmunity and transplantation, but their therapeutic use is limited by their scarce availability in the peripheral blood of tumor-free donors. We isolated and characterized a novel population of myeloid suppressor cells, named fibrocytic MDSC (f-MDSC), which are differentiated from umbilical cord blood (UCB) precursors (Zoso et al., 2014). This MDSC subset promotes regulatory T-cell expansion and induces normoglycemia in a xenogeneic model of type 1 diabetes. Here we describe in details the experimental design and the bioinformatics analyses of the gene expression dataset used to investigate the molecular mechanisms at the base of MDSC tolerogenic and suppressive properties. We also provide an R code to easily access the data and perform the quality controls and basic analyses relevant to this dataset. Raw and pre-processed data are available at Gene Expression Omnibus under accession GSE52376.

  9. Gene expression profiling of human fibrocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (f-MDSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Emilia Maria Cristina; Zoso, Alessia; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo; Serafini, Paolo; Inverardi, Luca; Bicciato, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been shown to control self-reactive and anti-graft effector T-cells in autoimmunity and transplantation, but their therapeutic use is limited by their scarce availability in the peripheral blood of tumor-free donors. We isolated and characterized a novel population of myeloid suppressor cells, named fibrocytic MDSC (f-MDSC), which are differentiated from umbilical cord blood (UCB) precursors (Zoso et al., 2014). This MDSC subset promotes regulatory T-cell expansion and induces normoglycemia in a xenogeneic model of type 1 diabetes. Here we describe in details the experimental design and the bioinformatics analyses of the gene expression dataset used to investigate the molecular mechanisms at the base of MDSC tolerogenic and suppressive properties. We also provide an R code to easily access the data and perform the quality controls and basic analyses relevant to this dataset. Raw and pre-processed data are available at Gene Expression Omnibus under accession GSE52376. PMID:26484135

  10. Inhibition of the differentiation of human myeloid cell lines by redox changes induced through glutathione depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, F; Agosti, V; Morrone, G; Morra, F; Cuomo, C; Russo, T; Venuta, S; Cimino, F

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of redox changes in vivo on the differentiation of two human myeloid cell lines, HL-60 and KG-1. The glutathione-depleting agent diethyl maleate (DEM) prevented the development of differentiated features in response to phorbol esters, including adherence of the cells to plastic surfaces and repression of the myeloperoxidase and CD34 genes. Moreover, DEM abolished phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced activation of the transcription factors AP-1 and Egr-1, suggesting that inhibition of differentiation may be due, at least in part, to redox modifications of these proteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7519845

  11. Identification of CD13+CD36+ cells as a common progenitor for erythroid and myeloid lineages in human bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ling; Gao, Zhigang; Zhu, Jianqiong; Rodgers, Griffin P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To identify bi-potential precursor cells of erythroid and myeloid development in human bone marrow. Materials and Methods Cells co-expressing CD13 and CD36 (CD13+CD36+) were investigated by analyzing cell surface marker expression during erythroid development (induced with a combination of cytokines plus erythropoietin [EPO]), or myeloid development (induced with the same cocktail of cytokines plus granulocyte-colony stimulating factor [G-CSF]) of bone marrow derived CD133 cells in liquid cultures. CD13+CD36+ subsets were also isolated on the 14th day of cultures and further evaluated for their hematopoietic clonogenic capacity in methylcellulose. Results Colony-forming analysis of sorted CD13+CD36+ cells of committed erythroid and myeloid lineages demonstrated that these cells were able to generate erythroid, granulocyte, and mixed erythroid –granulocyte colonies. In contrast, CD13+CD36− or CD13−CD36+ cells exclusively committed to granulocyte/monocyte or erythroid colonies, respectively, but failed to form mixed erythroid –granulocyte colonies; no colonies were detected in CD13−CD36− cells with lineage-supporting cytokines. In addition, our data confirmed that EPO induced both erythroid and myeloid commitment, while G-CSF only supported the differentiation of the myeloid lineage. Conclusions The present data identify some CD13+CD36+ cells as bi-potential precursors of erythroid and myeloid commitment in normal hematopoiesis. They provide a physiological explanation for the cell identification of myeloid and erythroid lineages observed in hematopoietic diseases. This unique fraction of CD13+CD36+ cells may be useful for further studies on regulating erythroid and myeloid differentiation during normal and malignant hematopoiesis. PMID:17588473

  12. Targeting myeloid-derived suppressor cells with colony stimulating factor-1 receptor blockade can reverse immune resistance to immunotherapy in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-expressing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Zamarin, Dmitriy; Lesokhin, Alexander; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) promotes immunosuppression by direct action on effector T cells and Tregs and through recruitment, expansion and activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Targeting of MDSCs is clinically being explored as a therapeutic strategy, though optimal targeting strategies and biomarkers predictive of response are presently unknown. Maturation and tumor recruitment of MDSCs are dependent on signaling through the receptor tyrosine kinase CSF-1R on myeloid cells. Here, we show that MDSCs are the critical cell population in IDO-expressing B16 tumors in mediating accelerated tumor outgrowth and resistance to immunotherapy. Using a clinically relevant drug, we show that inhibition of CSF-1R signaling can functionally block tumor-infiltrating MDSCs and enhance anti-tumor T cell responses. Furthermore, inhibition of CSF-1R sensitizes IDO-expressing tumors to immunotherapy with T cell checkpoint blockade, and combination of CSF-1R blockade with IDO inhibitors potently elicits tumor regression. These findings provide evidence for a critical and functional role for MDSCs on the in vivo outcome of IDO-expressing tumors. PMID:27211548

  13. Targeting myeloid-derived suppressor cells with colony stimulating factor-1 receptor blockade can reverse immune resistance to immunotherapy in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-expressing tumors.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, Rikke B; Zamarin, Dmitriy; Lesokhin, Alexander; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2016-04-01

    Tumor indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) promotes immunosuppression by direct action on effector T cells and Tregs and through recruitment, expansion and activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Targeting of MDSCs is clinically being explored as a therapeutic strategy, though optimal targeting strategies and biomarkers predictive of response are presently unknown. Maturation and tumor recruitment of MDSCs are dependent on signaling through the receptor tyrosine kinase CSF-1R on myeloid cells. Here, we show that MDSCs are the critical cell population in IDO-expressing B16 tumors in mediating accelerated tumor outgrowth and resistance to immunotherapy. Using a clinically relevant drug, we show that inhibition of CSF-1R signaling can functionally block tumor-infiltrating MDSCs and enhance anti-tumor T cell responses. Furthermore, inhibition of CSF-1R sensitizes IDO-expressing tumors to immunotherapy with T cell checkpoint blockade, and combination of CSF-1R blockade with IDO inhibitors potently elicits tumor regression. These findings provide evidence for a critical and functional role for MDSCs on the in vivo outcome of IDO-expressing tumors. PMID:27211548

  14. Pegylated Gold Nanoparticles Induce Apoptosis in Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Chuen; Yang, Yuh-Cheng; Yang, Kai-Chien; Shieh, Hui-Ru; Wang, Tao-Yeuan; Hwu, Yeukuang

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have several potential biological applications as well as excellent biocompatibility. AuNPs with surface modification using polyethylene glycol (PEG-AuNPs) can facilitate easy conjugation with various biological molecules of interest. To examine the anticancer bioactivity of PEG-AuNPs, we investigated their effect on human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells. The results indicated that PEG-AuNPs markedly inhibited the viability and impaired the cell membrane integrity of K562 cells. The particles caused morphological changes typical of cell death, and a marked increase in the sub-G1 population in DNA histogram, indicating apoptosis. In addition, PEG-AuNPs reduced the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, a hallmark of the involvement of intrinsic apoptotic pathway in K562 cells. Observation of ultrastructure under a transmission electron microscope revealed that the internalized PEG-AuNPs were distributed into cytoplasmic vacuoles and damaged mitochondria, and subsequently accumulated in areas surrounding the nuclear membrane. In conclusion, PEG-AuNPs may have the potential to inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in human chronic myeloid leukemia cells. PMID:24790990

  15. A proteomic chronology of gene expression through the cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Tony; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shlien, Adam; Soroka, Dominique; Mills, Allie; Emanuele, Michael J; Stratton, Michael R; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have enabled the analysis of cellular protein and RNA levels with unprecedented depth and sensitivity, allowing for an unbiased re-evaluation of gene regulation during fundamental biological processes. Here, we have chronicled the dynamics of protein and mRNA expression levels across a minimally perturbed cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells using centrifugal elutriation combined with mass spectrometry-based proteomics and RNA-Seq, avoiding artificial synchronization procedures. We identify myeloid-specific gene expression and variations in protein abundance, isoform expression and phosphorylation at different cell cycle stages. We dissect the relationship between protein and mRNA levels for both bulk gene expression and for over ∼6000 genes individually across the cell cycle, revealing complex, gene-specific patterns. This data set, one of the deepest surveys to date of gene expression in human cells, is presented in an online, searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01630.001 PMID:24596151

  16. Lewis x/CD15 expression in human myeloid cell differentiation is regulated by sialidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Gadhoum, Samah Zeineb; Sackstein, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The glycan determinant Lewis x (Lex/CD15) is a distinguishing marker for human myeloid cells and mediates neutrophil adhesion to dendritic cells. Despite broad interest in this structure, the mechanism(s) underlying Lex/CD15 expression remain relatively uncharacterized. Accordingly, we investigated the molecular basis of increasing Lex/CD15 expression associated with human myeloid cell differentiation. Flow cytometric analysis of differentiating cells together with biochemical studies employing inhibitors of glycan synthesis and of sialidases showed that increased Lex/CD15 expression was not due to de novo biosynthesis of Lex/CD15, but resulted predominantly from induction of α(2,3) sialidase activity, yielding Lex/CD15 from cell surface sLex/CD15s. This differentiation-associated conversion of surface sLex/CD15s to Lex/CD15 occurs predominantly on glycoproteins. Heretofore, modulation of post-translational glycan modifications has been attributed solely to dynamic variation(s) in glycosyltransferase expression. Our results unveil a new paradigm, demonstrating a critical role for post-Golgi membrane glycosidase activity in the “biosynthesis” of a key glycan determinant. PMID:18953356

  17. MicroRNA-320a acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting BCR/ABL oncogene in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Xishan, Zhu; Ziying, Lin; Jing, Du; Gang, Liu

    2015-07-31

    Accumulating evidences demonstrated that the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with tumorigenesis, tumor progression, metastasis and relapse in cancers, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We found that miR-320a expression was reduced in K562 and in CML cancer stem cells. Moreover, we found that miR-320a inhibited K562 cell migration, invasion, proliferation and promoted apoptosis by targeting BCR/ABL oncogene. As an upstream regulator of BCR/ABL, miR-320a directly targets BCR/ABL. The enhanced expression of miR-320a inhibited the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and NF-κB; however, the expression of phosphorylated PI3K, AKT and NF-κB were restored by the overexpression of BCR/ABL. In K562, infected with miR-320a or transfected with SiBCR/ABL, the protein levels of fibronectin, vimentin, and N-cadherin were decreased, but the expression of E-cadherin was increased. The expression of mesenchymal markers in miR-320a-expressing cells was restored to normal levels by the restoration of BCR/ABL expression. Generally speaking, miR-320a acts as a novel tumor suppressor gene in CML and miR-320a can decrease migratory, invasive, proliferative and apoptotic behaviors, as well as CML EMT, by attenuating the expression of BCR/ABL oncogene.

  18. MerTK Is a Functional Regulator of Myelin Phagocytosis by Human Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Healy, Luke M; Perron, Gabrielle; Won, So-Yoon; Michell-Robinson, Mackenzie A; Rezk, Ayman; Ludwin, Samuel K; Moore, Craig S; Hall, Jeffery A; Bar-Or, Amit; Antel, Jack P

    2016-04-15

    Multifocal inflammatory lesions featuring destruction of lipid-rich myelin are pathologic hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. Lesion activity is assessed by the extent and composition of myelin uptake by myeloid cells present in such lesions. In the inflamed CNS, myeloid cells are comprised of brain-resident microglia, an endogenous cell population, and monocyte-derived macrophages, which infiltrate from the systemic compartment. Using microglia isolated from the adult human brain, we demonstrate that myelin phagocytosis is dependent on the polarization state of the cells. Myelin ingestion is significantly enhanced in cells exposed to TGF-β compared with resting basal conditions and markedly reduced in classically activated polarized cells. Transcriptional analysis indicated that TGF-β-treated microglia closely resembled M0 cells. The tyrosine kinase phagocytic receptor MerTK was one of the most upregulated among a select number of differentially expressed genes in TGF-β-treated microglia. In contrast, MerTK and its known ligands, growth arrest-specific 6 and Protein S, were downregulated in classically activated cells. MerTK expression and myelin phagocytosis were higher in CNS-derived microglia than observed in monocyte-derived macrophages, both basally and under all tested polarization conditions. Specific MerTK inhibitors reduced myelin phagocytosis and the resultant anti-inflammatory biased cytokine responses for both cell types. Defining and modulating the mechanisms that regulate myelin phagocytosis has the potential to impact lesion and disease evolution in multiple sclerosis. Relevant effects would include enhancing myelin clearance, increasing anti-inflammatory molecule production by myeloid cells, and thereby permitting subsequent tissue repair. PMID:26962228

  19. Effects of lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing on human chronic myeloid leukemia cells and leukemia mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinyan; Yang, Wenzhong; Han, Jia; Xiong, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing on human chronic myeloid leukemia cells (K562) and the growth of chronic myeloid leukemia mice as well as to explore the potential mechanisms. Methods: Unbtreated K562 cells (CON), blank lentivirus transfected K562 cells (NC) and K562 cells expressing STAT3 siRNA (STAT3 siRNA) were injected into SCID mice to establish the chronic myeloid leukemia model in mice. The growth, peripheral white blood cell count and spleen index in these mice were determined. Results: In vitro experiment showed, when compared with control group, the interference efficiency of STAT3 expression was as high as 97.5% in K562 cells. Western blot assay revealed that the expression of c-Myc, Bcl-xL and Cyclin D1 reduced by 17.01%, 7.3% and 6.82%, respectively, showing significant difference when compared with control group (P < 0.01). These findings were consistent with those from fluorescence quantitative PCR. In vivo experiment showed the body weight of mice reduced progressively and the peripheral white blood cell count increased gradually in control group, accompanied by dragging hind limbs and progressive enlargement of the spleen. The body weight remained unchanged, peripheral white blood cell count reduced gradually and the spleen did not enlarge in mice treated with STAT3 siRNA expressing cells. Conclusion: Lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing may inhibit the expression of its downstream genes (c-Myc, Bcl-xL and Cyclin D1) related to cell proliferation, apoptosis and cycle to suppress the malignant biological behaviors, and STAT3 silencing also inhibit the leukemogenic potency of K562 cells in mice. PMID:25550912

  20. MerTK Is a Functional Regulator of Myelin Phagocytosis by Human Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Healy, Luke M; Perron, Gabrielle; Won, So-Yoon; Michell-Robinson, Mackenzie A; Rezk, Ayman; Ludwin, Samuel K; Moore, Craig S; Hall, Jeffery A; Bar-Or, Amit; Antel, Jack P

    2016-04-15

    Multifocal inflammatory lesions featuring destruction of lipid-rich myelin are pathologic hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. Lesion activity is assessed by the extent and composition of myelin uptake by myeloid cells present in such lesions. In the inflamed CNS, myeloid cells are comprised of brain-resident microglia, an endogenous cell population, and monocyte-derived macrophages, which infiltrate from the systemic compartment. Using microglia isolated from the adult human brain, we demonstrate that myelin phagocytosis is dependent on the polarization state of the cells. Myelin ingestion is significantly enhanced in cells exposed to TGF-β compared with resting basal conditions and markedly reduced in classically activated polarized cells. Transcriptional analysis indicated that TGF-β-treated microglia closely resembled M0 cells. The tyrosine kinase phagocytic receptor MerTK was one of the most upregulated among a select number of differentially expressed genes in TGF-β-treated microglia. In contrast, MerTK and its known ligands, growth arrest-specific 6 and Protein S, were downregulated in classically activated cells. MerTK expression and myelin phagocytosis were higher in CNS-derived microglia than observed in monocyte-derived macrophages, both basally and under all tested polarization conditions. Specific MerTK inhibitors reduced myelin phagocytosis and the resultant anti-inflammatory biased cytokine responses for both cell types. Defining and modulating the mechanisms that regulate myelin phagocytosis has the potential to impact lesion and disease evolution in multiple sclerosis. Relevant effects would include enhancing myelin clearance, increasing anti-inflammatory molecule production by myeloid cells, and thereby permitting subsequent tissue repair.

  1. Potential differentiation of tumor bearing mouse CD11b+Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells into both suppressor macrophages and immunostimulatory dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Narita, Yoshinori; Wakita, Daiko; Ohkur, Takayuki; Chamoto, Kenji; Nishimura, Takashi

    2009-02-01

    Evaluation of immunosuppressive tumor-escape mechanisms in tumor-bearing hosts is of great importance for the development of an efficient tumor immunotherapy. We document here the functional characteristics of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) immature myeloid cells (ImC), which increase abnormally in tumor-bearing mice. Although it has been reported that ImC exhibit a strong immunosuppressive activity against T cell responses, we demonstrate that ImC derived from tumor-bearing mouse spleens (TB-SPL) did not exhibit a strong inhibitory activity against CTL generation in MLR. However, ImC isolated from TB-SPL and induced to differentiate into CD11b(+)Gr-1(+)F4/80(+) suppressor macrophages (MPhi) under the influence of tumor-derived factors were immunosuppressive. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that ImC isolated from TB-SPL had a capability of differentiating into immunostimulatory dendritic cells (DC1) supportive of the generation of IFN-gamma producing CTL if the ImC were cultured with Th1 cytokines plus GM-CSF and IL-3. Thus, our findings indicate that tumor bearing mouse-derived CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) ImC are not committed to development into immunosuppressor cells but have dual differentiation ability into both immunosuppressive myeloid cells and immunostimulatory DC1.

  2. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models.

    PubMed

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Jaques, Jenny; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone marrow retroviral transduction models followed by transplantation. With the advancement of immunodeficient xenograft models, it has become possible to use human stem/progenitor cells for in vivo studies as well as cells directly derived from CML patients. These models not only mimic CML but also have been instrumental in uncovering various fundamental mechanisms of CML disease progression and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance. With the availability of iPSC technology, it has become feasible to derive, maintain, and expand CML subclones that are at least genetically identical to those in patients. The following review provides an overview of all murine as well as human xenograft models for CML established till date. PMID:27642303

  3. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Vellenga, Edo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone marrow retroviral transduction models followed by transplantation. With the advancement of immunodeficient xenograft models, it has become possible to use human stem/progenitor cells for in vivo studies as well as cells directly derived from CML patients. These models not only mimic CML but also have been instrumental in uncovering various fundamental mechanisms of CML disease progression and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance. With the availability of iPSC technology, it has become feasible to derive, maintain, and expand CML subclones that are at least genetically identical to those in patients. The following review provides an overview of all murine as well as human xenograft models for CML established till date.

  4. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Vellenga, Edo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone marrow retroviral transduction models followed by transplantation. With the advancement of immunodeficient xenograft models, it has become possible to use human stem/progenitor cells for in vivo studies as well as cells directly derived from CML patients. These models not only mimic CML but also have been instrumental in uncovering various fundamental mechanisms of CML disease progression and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance. With the availability of iPSC technology, it has become feasible to derive, maintain, and expand CML subclones that are at least genetically identical to those in patients. The following review provides an overview of all murine as well as human xenograft models for CML established till date. PMID:27642303

  5. Development of mature and functional human myeloid subsets in HSC engrafted NOD/SCID/IL2rγKO mice

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Saito, Yoriko; Kunisawa, Jun; Kurashima, Yosuke; Wake, Taichi; Suzuki, Nahoko; Shultz, Leonard D.; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Fumihiko

    2012-01-01

    While physiological development of human lymphoid subsets has become well documented in humanized mice, in vivo development of human myeloid subsets in a xenotransplantation setting has remained unevaluated. Therefore, we investigated in vivo differentiation and function of human myeloid subsets in NOD/SCID/IL2rγnull (NSG) mouse recipients transplanted with purified lineage−CD34+CD38− cord blood hematopoietic stem cells. At four to six months post-transplantation, we identified the development of human neutrophils, basophils, mast cells, monocytes, as well as conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in the recipient hematopoietic organs. The tissue distribution and morphology of these human myeloid cells were similar to those identified in humans. Following cytokine stimulation in vitro, phosphorylation of STAT molecules was observed in neutrophils and monocytes. In vivo administration of human G-CSF resulted in the recruitment of human myeloid cells into the recipient circulation. Flow cytometry and confocal imaging demonstrated that human bone marrow monocytes and alveolar macrophages in the recipients displayed intact phagocytic function. Human BM-derived monocytes/macrophages were further confirmed to exhibit phagocytosis and killing of Salmonella Typhimurium upon the IFN-γ stimulation. These findings demonstrate the development of mature and functionally intact human myeloid subsets in vivo in the NSG recipients. In vivo human myelopoiesis established in the NSG humanized mouse system may facilitate the investigation of human myeloid cell biology including in vivo analyses of infectious diseases and therapeutic interventions. PMID:22611244

  6. Cytogenetics of human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Finkernagel, S.W.; Kletz, T.; Day-Salvatore, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome studies of 55 brain tumors, including meningiomas, gliomas, astrocyomas and pituatary adenomas, were performed. Primary and first passage cultures were successfully obtained in 75% of these samples with an average of 18 G-banded metaphases analyzed per tumor. 44% of all the brain tumors showed numerical and or structural abnormalities. 46% of the primary and 38% of the first passage cultures showed similar numerical gains/losses and complex karyotypic changes. The most frequent numerical abnormalities (n {ge} 5) included loss of chromosomes 10, 22, and Y. The structural abnormalities most often seen involved 1p, 2, 5, 7, 17q and 19. This is an ongoing study which will attempt to correlate tumor type with specific karyotypic changes and to see if any of the observed chromosomal abnormalities provide prognostic indicators.

  7. Characterization of resistance to rhabdovirus and retrovirus infection in a human myeloid cell line.

    PubMed

    Boso, Guney; Somia, Nikunj V

    2015-01-01

    Viruses interact with various permissive and restrictive factors in host cells throughout their replication cycle. Cell lines that are non-permissive to viral infection have been particularly useful in discovering host cell proteins involved in viral life cycles. Here we describe the characterization of a human myeloid leukemia cell line, KG-1, that is resistant to infection by retroviruses and a Rhabdovirus. We show that KG-1 cells are resistant to infection by Vesicular Stomatits Virus as well as VSV Glycoprotein (VSVG) pseudotyped retroviruses due to a defect in binding. Moreover our results indicate that entry by xenotropic retroviral envelope glycoprotein RD114 is impaired in KG-1 cells. Finally we characterize a post- entry block in the early phase of the retroviral life cycle in KG-1 cells that renders the cell line refractory to infection. This cell line will have utility in discovering proteins involved in infection by VSV and HIV-1.

  8. MicroRNA-320a acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting BCR/ABL oncogene in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Xishan, Zhu; Ziying, Lin; Jing, Du; Gang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidences demonstrated that the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with tumorigenesis, tumor progression, metastasis and relapse in cancers, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We found that miR-320a expression was reduced in K562 and in CML cancer stem cells. Moreover, we found that miR-320a inhibited K562 cell migration, invasion, proliferation and promoted apoptosis by targeting BCR/ABL oncogene. As an upstream regulator of BCR/ABL, miR-320a directly targets BCR/ABL. The enhanced expression of miR-320a inhibited the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and NF-κB; however, the expression of phosphorylated PI3K, AKT and NF-κB were restored by the overexpression of BCR/ABL. In K562, infected with miR-320a or transfected with SiBCR/ABL, the protein levels of fibronectin, vimentin, and N-cadherin were decreased, but the expression of E-cadherin was increased. The expression of mesenchymal markers in miR-320a-expressing cells was restored to normal levels by the restoration of BCR/ABL expression. Generally speaking, miR-320a acts as a novel tumor suppressor gene in CML and miR-320a can decrease migratory, invasive, proliferative and apoptotic behaviors, as well as CML EMT, by attenuating the expression of BCR/ABL oncogene. PMID:26228085

  9. Immuno-PET Imaging of Engineered Human T Cells in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Mall, Sabine; Yusufi, Nahid; Wagner, Ricarda; Klar, Richard; Bianchi, Henrique; Steiger, Katja; Straub, Melanie; Audehm, Stefan; Laitinen, Iina; Aichler, Michaela; Peschel, Christian; Ziegler, Sibylle; Mustafa, Mona; Schwaiger, Markus; D'Alessandria, Calogero; Krackhardt, Angela M

    2016-07-15

    Sensitive in vivo imaging technologies applicable to the clinical setting are still lacking for adoptive T-cell-based immunotherapies, an important gap to fill if mechanisms of tumor rejection or escape are to be understood. Here, we propose a highly sensitive imaging technology to track human TCR-transgenic T cells in vivo by directly targeting the murinized constant TCR beta domain (TCRmu) with a zirconium-89 ((89)Zr)-labeled anti-TCRmu-F(ab')2 fragment. Binding of the labeled or unlabeled F(ab')2 fragment did not impair functionality of transgenic T cells in vitro and in vivo Using a murine xenograft model of human myeloid sarcoma, we monitored by Immuno-PET imaging human central memory T cells (TCM), which were transgenic for a myeloid peroxidase (MPO)-specific TCR. Diverse T-cell distribution patterns were detected by PET/CT imaging, depending on the tumor size and rejection phase. Results were confirmed by IHC and semiquantitative evaluation of T-cell infiltration within the tumor corresponding to the PET/CT images. Overall, these findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for an imaging approach that is readily tractable for clinical translation. Cancer Res; 76(14); 4113-23. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27354381

  10. Immunosuppressive activity of human neuroblastoma tumor gangliosides.

    PubMed

    Floutsis, G; Ulsh, L; Ladisch, S

    1989-01-15

    Gangliosides are shed in substantial amounts by some tumors, including human neuroblastoma, and these molecules modulate experimental tumor formation in vivo. We now demonstrate that neuroblastoma tumor gangliosides have potent immunoregulatory activity. Gangliosides of every one of 17 tumors studied were highly inhibitory for the normal in vitro human lymphoproliferative responses to the soluble antigen, tetanus toxoid; 30 nmol ganglioside/ml caused 43% to greater than 99% inhibition and the mean concentration causing 50% inhibition was only 17.3 nmol/ml. Furthermore, gangliosides isolated from clinically more aggressive tumors (Stage III or IV) were up to twice as immunosuppressive as those of the generally less aggressive tumors (Stage I or II) (p less than 0.05). Taken together with the lack of immunosuppressive activity of normal plasma gangliosides, the potent activity of neuroblastoma gangliosides supports the hypothesis that one mechanism by which these shed molecules may act to enhance tumor formation in vivo is through abrogation of the host cellular immune response at the site of tumor formation.

  11. Connexin expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cells: Identification of patient subsets based on protein and global gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    REIKVAM, HÅKON; RYNINGEN, ANITA; SÆTERDAL, LARS RUNE; NEPSTAD, INA; FOSS, BRYNJAR; BRUSERUD, ØYSTEIN

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells support both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Τhis support is mediated through the local cytokine network and by direct cell-cell interactions mediated via adhesion molecules and the formation of gap junctions by connexins. Previous studies on connexins in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have mainly focused on the investigation of leukemia cell lines. In the present study, we therefore investigated the expression of various connexins at the protein (i.e., cell surface expression) and mRNA level in primary human AML cells. The cell surface expression of the connexins, Cx26, Cx32, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45, varied considerably between patients, and detectable levels were observed only for subsets of patients. On the whole, Cx43 and Cx45 showed the highest cell surface expression. Connexin expression was dependent on AML cell differentiation, but showed no association with cytogenetic abnormalities or mutations of the fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) or nucleophosmin (NPM)‑1 genes. By contrast, only Cx45 showed a significant variation between patients at the mRNA level. A high Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon-γ], whereas a low Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of protein functions (i.e., ligase activity, protein folding and catabolism). There was no significant correlation observed between the connexin mRNA and protein levels. Thus, differences in connexin expression can be used to subclassify AML patients. Differences in connexin cell surface expression profiles are not reflected at the mRNA level and have to be directly examined, whereas variations in Cx45 mRNA expression are associated with differences in cell signaling and the regulation of protein functions. PMID:25529637

  12. Connexin expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cells: identification of patient subsets based on protein and global gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Reikvam, Håkon; Ryningen, Anita; Sæterdal, Lars Rune; Nepstad, Ina; Foss, Brynjar; Bruserud, Øystein

    2015-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells support both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Τhis support is mediated through the local cytokine network and by direct cell‑cell interactions mediated via adhesion molecules and the formation of gap junctions by connexins. Previous studies on connexins in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have mainly focused on the investigation of leukemia cell lines. In the present study, we therefore investigated the expression of various connexins at the protein (i.e., cell surface expression) and mRNA level in primary human AML cells. The cell surface expression of the connexins, Cx26, Cx32, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45, varied considerably between patients, and detectable levels were observed only for subsets of patients. On the whole, Cx43 and Cx45 showed the highest cell surface expression. Connexin expression was dependent on AML cell differentiation, but showed no association with cytogenetic abnormalities or mutations of the fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) or nucleophosmin (NPM)‑1 genes. By contrast, only Cx45 showed a significant variation between patients at the mRNA level. A high Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of the mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)‑17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon‑γ], whereas a low Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of protein functions (i.e., ligase activity, protein folding and catabolism). There was no significant correlation observed between the connexin mRNA and protein levels. Thus, differences in connexin expression can be used to subclassify AML patients. Differences in connexin cell surface expression profiles are not reflected at the mRNA level and have to be directly examined, whereas variations in Cx45 mRNA expression are associated with differences in cell signaling and the regulation of protein functions.

  13. Cancer-Associated Myeloid Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Vlaeminck, Yannick; González-Rascón, Anna; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells are critically involved in the pathophysiology of cancers. In the tumor microenvironment (TME), they comprise tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), neutrophils (TANs), dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which are further subdivided into a monocytic subset and a granulocytic subset. Some of these myeloid cells, in particular TAMs and TANs, are divided into type 1 or type 2 cells, according to the paradigm of T helper type 1 or type 2 cells. Type 1-activated cells are generally characterized as cells that aid tumor rejection, while all other myeloid cells are shown to favor tumor progression. Moreover, these cells are often at the basis of resistance to various therapies. Much research has been devoted to study the biology of myeloid cells. This endeavor has proven to be challenging, as the markers used to categorize myeloid cells in the TME are not restricted to particular subsets. Also from a functional and metabolic point of view, myeloid cells share many features. Finally, myeloid cells are endowed with a certain level of plasticity, which further complicates studying them outside their environment. In this article, we challenge the exclusive use of cell markers to unambiguously identify myeloid cell subsets in the TME. We further propose to divide myeloid cells into myeloid regulatory or stimulatory cells according to their pro- or antitumor function, because we contend that for therapeutic purposes it is not targeting the cell subsets but rather targeting their protumor traits; hence, myeloid regulatory cells will push antitumor immunotherapy to the next level. PMID:27065074

  14. Emotional Functioning and School Contentment in Adolescent Survivors of Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Infratentorial Astrocytoma, and Wilms Tumor.

    PubMed

    Jóhannsdóttir, Inga M; Moum, Torbjørn; Hjermstad, Marianne J; Wesenberg, Finn; Hjorth, Lars; Schrøder, Henrik; Lähteenmäki, Päivi M; Jónmundsson, Gudmundur; Loge, Jon H

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Cancer in childhood may disrupt normal developmental processes and cause psychosocial problems in adolescent survivors of childhood cancers (ACCSs). Previous studies report inconsistent findings. Study aims were to assess subjective well-being (SWB), psychological distress, and school contentment in survivors of three dissimilar childhood cancers. Patients and methods: Nordic patients treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), infratentorial astrocytoma (IA), and Wilms tumor (WT) in childhood from 1985 to 2001, aged ≥1 year at diagnosis, and aged 13-18 years at the time of study were eligible for this questionnaire-based survey that included items on SWB, psychological distress, school contentment, self-esteem, and personality traits; 65% (151/231) responded. An age-equivalent group from a Norwegian health survey (n=7910) served as controls. Results: The median age of ACCSs was 16 years; 52% were males. ACCSs reported better SWB (p=0.004) and self-esteem (p<0.001). They had fewer social problems in school (p=0.004) and their school contentment tended to be higher than controls. SWB and school contentment were positively influenced by self-esteem. However, ACCSs reported higher levels of psychological distress (p=0.002), mostly attributable to general worrying. No significant differences in outcomes were found across diagnoses, and time since diagnosis did not significantly affect the results. Conclusion: The overall emotional functioning of ACCSs was good, possibly due to changes in their perception of well-being after having survived a life-threatening disease. However, they seemed more worried than their peers. This may cause an additional strain at a vulnerable period in life.

  15. 6-Thioguanine-loaded polymeric micelles deplete myeloid-derived suppressor cells and enhance the efficacy of T cell immunotherapy in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Jeanbart, Laura; Kourtis, Iraklis C; van der Vlies, André J; Swartz, Melody A; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2015-08-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that suppress effector T cell responses and can reduce the efficacy of cancer immunotherapies. We previously showed that ultra-small polymer nanoparticles efficiently drain to the lymphatics after intradermal injection and target antigen-presenting cells, including Ly6c(hi) Ly6g(-) monocytic MDSCs (Mo-MDSCs), in skin-draining lymph nodes (LNs) and spleen. Here, we developed ultra-small polymer micelles loaded with 6-thioguanine (MC-TG), a cytotoxic drug used in the treatment of myelogenous leukemia, with the aim of killing Mo-MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and thus enhancing T cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. We found that 2 days post-injection in tumor-bearing mice (B16-F10 melanoma or E.G7-OVA thymoma), MC-TG depleted Mo-MDSCs in the spleen, Ly6c(lo) Ly6g(+) granulocytic MDSCs (G-MDSCs) in the draining LNs, and Gr1(int) Mo-MDSCs in the tumor. In both tumor models, MC-TG decreased the numbers of circulating Mo- and G-MDSCs, as well as of Ly6c(hi) macrophages, for up to 7 days following a single administration. MDSC depletion was dose dependent and more effective with MC-TG than with equal doses of free TG. Finally, we tested whether this MDSC-depleting strategy might enhance cancer immunotherapies in the B16-F10 melanoma model. We found that MC-TG significantly improved the efficacy of adoptively transferred, OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells in melanoma cells expressing OVA. These findings highlight the capacity of MC-TG in depleting MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment and show promise in promoting anti-tumor immunity when used in combination with T cell immunotherapies. PMID:25982370

  16. 6-Thioguanine-loaded polymeric micelles deplete myeloid-derived suppressor cells and enhance the efficacy of T cell immunotherapy in tumor-bearing mice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jeanbart, Laura; Kourtis, Iraklis C.; van der Vlies, André J.; Swartz, Melody A.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-16

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that suppress effector T cell responses and can reduce the efficacy of cancer immunotherapies. We previously showed that ultra-small polymer nanoparticles efficiently drain to the lymphatics after intradermal injection and target antigen-presenting cells, including Ly6chi Ly6g₋monocytic MDSCs (Mo-MDSCs), in skin-draining lymph nodes (LNs) and spleen. Here, we developed ultra-small polymer micelles loaded with 6-thioguanine (MC-TG), a cytotoxic drug used in the treatment of myelogenous leukemia, with the aim of killing Mo-MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and thus enhancing T cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. We found that 2 days post-injection inmore » tumor-bearing mice (B16-F10 melanoma or E.G7-OVA thymoma), MC-TG depleted Mo-MDSCs in the spleen, Ly6clo Ly6g+ granulocytic MDSCs (G-MDSCs) in the draining LNs, and Gr1int Mo-MDSCs in the tumor. In both tumor models, MC-TG decreased the numbers of circulating Mo- and G-MDSCs, as well as of Ly6chi macrophages, for up to 7 days following a single administration. MDSC depletion was dose dependent and more effective with MC-TG than with equal doses of free TG. Finally, we tested whether this MDSC-depleting strategy might enhance cancer immunotherapies in the B16-F10 melanoma model. We found that MC-TG significantly improved the efficacy of adoptively transferred, OVA-specific CD8+ T cells in melanoma cells expressing OVA. Ultimately, these findings highlight the capacity of MC-TG in depleting MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment and show promise in promoting anti-tumor immunity when used in combination with T cell immunotherapies.« less

  17. Association of SV40 with human tumors.

    PubMed

    Klein, George; Powers, Amy; Croce, Carlo

    2002-02-14

    In 1994, PCR and protein studies suggested that SV40 DNA sequences and proteins were present in 29/48 (60%) USA human mesothelioma samples. Sequence analysis confirmed that the sequences were homologous to SV40. One year later, SV40 was also found in 5/9 human mesotheliomas, and in 1996 SV40 was also reported to be present in 1/3 of the tumor specimens examined. These reports, in combination with an earlier study in 1992 which had detected SV40 in human brain tumors, raised concerns that SV40 was associated with certain types of human tumors, specifically mesothelioma, bone, and brain tumors. These findings raised concerns, because these tumor types are the same malignancies that had been observed in animals injected with SV40. However, a study in 1996 and a presentation made at the International Mesothelioma Interest Group, IMIG in 1997 failed to detect SV40 in mesotheliomas, suggesting the possibility that laboratory artifacts, such as PCR contamination, had caused the previous positive findings. In 1997, the FDA, the NIH, and the CDC organized an international conference in Bethesda to review the literature and to address the possibility that SV40 was present in, and was possibly the cause of, some human tumors. The results of that conference were reported the same year in a meeting review in Oncogene by Carbone and colleagues. Briefly, the consensus was that before accepting the possibility that SV40 was present in human tumors, a multi-laboratory study needed to be conducted. It was recommended that a blinded multi-laboratory study be directed by an independent scientist not previously associated with the controversial reports of SV40 in human specimens. It was also recommended that this study include laboratories that had reported positive findings as well as laboratories that had failed to detect SV40 in human specimens. Since 1997, about 30 independent reports have been published on this topic, including the multi-laboratory study. Evidence in favor and

  18. Metallothionein III (MT3) is a putative tumor suppressor gene that is frequently inactivated in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia by promoter hypermethylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the second most common form of leukemia in children. Aberrant DNA methylation patterns are a characteristic feature in various tumors, including AML. Metallothionein III (MT3) is a tumor suppresser reported to show promoter hypermethylated in various cancers. However, the expression and molecular function of MT3 in pediatric AML is unclear. Methods Eleven human leukemia cell lines and 41 pediatric AML samples and 20 NBM/ITP (Norma bone marrow/Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura) control samples were analyzed. Transcription levels of MT3 were evaluated by semi-quantitative and real-time PCR. MT3 methylation status was determined by methylation specific PCR (MSP) and bisulfite genomic sequencing (BSG). The molecular mechanism of MT3 was investigated by apoptosis assays and PCR array analysis. Results The MT3 promoter was hypermethylated in leukemia cell lines. More CpG’s methylated of MT3 was observed 39.0% pediatric AML samples compared to 10.0% NBM controls. Transcription of MT3 was also significantly decreased in AML samples compared to NBM/ITP controls (P < 0.001); patients with methylated MT3 exhibited lower levels of MT3 expression compared to those with unmethylated MT3 (P = 0.049). After transfection with MT3 lentivirus, proliferation was significantly inhibited in AML cells in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Annexin V assay showed that apoptosis was significantly upregulated MT3-overexpressing AML cells compared to controls. Real-time PCR array analysis revealed 34 dysregulated genes that may be implicated in MT3 overexpression and apoptosis in AML, including FOXO1. Conclusion MT3 may be a putative tumor suppressor gene in pediatric AML. Epigenetic inactivation of MT3 via promoter hypermethylation was observed in both AML cell lines and pediatric AML samples. Overexpression of MT3 may inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in AML cells. FOXO1 was dysregulated in MT3-overexpressing cells

  19. Potential role of curcumin and taurine combination therapy on human myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro.

    PubMed

    El-Houseini, Motawa E; Refaei, Mohammed Osman; Amin, Ahmed Ibrahim; Abol-Ftouh, Mahmoud A

    2013-10-01

    Curcumin and taurine are natural products that have been used in this study evaluating their therapeutic effect on myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro. Sixty patients with myeloid leukemia and 30 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. All patient groups were admitted to the Medical Oncology Department of the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. There were statistically significant differences between treated leukemic cells compared to normal mononuclear leukocytes in cell density, interferon-γ and immunophenotypic profile, mainly CD4+, CD8 + and CD25+. This work highlights the possibility of using curcumin and taurine as a potential useful therapy in the management of patients suffering from chronic and acute myeloid leukemias.

  20. Testicular myeloid sarcoma: case report

    PubMed Central

    Zago, Luzia Beatriz Ribeiro; Ladeia, Antônio Alexandre Lisbôa; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; de Oliveira, Leonardo Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid sarcomas are extramedullary solid tumors composed of immature granulocytic precursor cells. In association with acute myeloid leukemia and other myeloproliferative disorders, they may arise concurrently with compromised bone marrow related to acute myeloid leukemia, as a relapsed presentation, or occur as the first manifestation. The testicles are considered to be an uncommon site for myeloid sarcomas. No therapeutic strategy has been defined as best but may include chemotherapy, radiotherapy and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This study reports the evolution of a patient with testicular myeloid sarcoma as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. The patient initially refused medical treatment and died five months after the clinical condition started. PMID:23580888

  1. [Preliminary establishment of transplanted human chronic myeloid leukemia model in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Min; Ding, Xin; Zhang, Long-Zhen; Cen, Jian-Nong; Chen, Zi-Xing

    2011-12-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a malignant clonal disease derived from hematopoietic stem cells. CML stem cells were thought to be the root which could lead disease development and ultimately rapid change. However, a stable animal model for studying the characteristics of CML stem cells is currently lacking. This study was aimed to establish a transplanted human CML nude-mice model to further explore the biological behavior of CML stem cells in vivo, and to enrich CML stem cells in nude mice by series transplantation. The 4 - 6 weeks old BALB/c nude mice pretreated by splenectomy (S), cytoxan intraperitoneal injection (C) and sublethal irradiation (I) were transplanted intravenously with (5 - 7) × 10(7) of bone marrow mononuclear cells from CML patients in chronic phase. Alternatively, 4 - 6 weeks old BALB/c nude mice pretreated by lethal irradiation were transplanted intravenously with 5 × 10(6) homologous bone marrow cells of BALB/c nude mice together with (5 - 7) × 10(7) of bone marrow mononuclear cells from CML patients in chronic phase simultaneously. The leukemic cells engrafted and infiltrated in organs and bone marrow of the mice were tracked by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), plastic-embedded biopsy and flow cytometry. The results of these two methods were compared. The results showed that human CML cells engrafted and infiltrating into the bone marrow of two nude mice pretreated with SCI could be detected. In spite of the low successful rate, results suggested the feasibility of this method by using BALB/c nude mice as a human CML animal model. In contrast, in nude mice pretreated by the lethal dose irradiation, CML cells in the bone marrow could not be found. It is concluded that human bone marrow CML cells can results in leukemia in nude mice pretreated by SCI. Thus this study provides a new strategy for establishment of CML animal models which deserves further elaboration.

  2. MRI and MRS of human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bob L; Hu, Jiani

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of human brain tumors, including the primary applications and basic terminology involved. Readers who wish to know more about this broad subject should seek out the referenced books (1. Tofts (2003) Quantitative MRI of the brain. Measuring changes caused by disease. Wiley; Bradley and Stark (1999) 2. Magnetic resonance imaging, 3rd Edition. Mosby Inc; Brown and Semelka (2003) 3. MRI basic principles and applications, 3rd Edition. Wiley-Liss) or reviews (4. Top Magn Reson Imaging 17:127-36, 2006; 5. JMRI 24:709-724, 2006; 6. Am J Neuroradiol 27:1404-1411, 2006).MRI is the most popular means of diagnosing human brain tumors. The inherent difference in the magnetic resonance (MR) properties of water between normal tissues and tumors results in contrast differences on the image that provide the basis for distinguishing tumors from normal tissues. In contrast to MRI, which provides spatial maps or images using water signals of the tissues, proton MRS detects signals of tissue metabolites. MRS can complement MRI because the observed MRS peaks can be linked to inherent differences in biochemical profiles between normal tissues and tumors.The goal of MRI and MRS is to characterize brain tumors, including tumor core, edge, edema, volume, types, and grade. The commonly used brain tumor MRI protocol includes T2-weighted images and T1-weighted images taken both before and after the injection of a contrast agent (typically gadolinium: Gd). The commonly used MRS technique is either point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) or stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM).

  3. EM23, A Natural Sesquiterpene Lactone from Elephantopus mollis, Induces Apoptosis in Human Myeloid Leukemia Cells through Thioredoxin- and Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyu; Li, Manmei; Wang, Guocai; Shao, Fangyuan; Chen, Wenbo; Xia, Chao; Wang, Sheng; Li, Yaolan; Zhou, Guangxiong; Liu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Elephantopus mollis (EM) is a traditional herbal medicine with multiple pharmacological activities. However, the efficacy of EM in treating human leukemia is currently unknown. In the current study, we report that EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone isolated from EM, inhibits the proliferation of human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cells and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) HL-60 cells by inducing apoptosis. Translocation of membrane-associated phospholipid phosphatidylserines, changes in cell morphology, activation of caspases, and cleavage of PARP were concomitant with this inhibition. The involvement of the mitochondrial pathway in EM23-mediated apoptosis was suggested by observed disruptions in mitochondrial membrane potential. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23 caused a marked increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a ROS scavenger, almost fully reversed EM23-mediated apoptosis. In EM23-treated cells, the expression levels of thioredoxin (Trx) and thioredoxinreductase (TrxR), two components of the Trx system involved in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis, were significantly down-regulated. Concomitantly, Trx regulated the activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and its downstream regulatory targets, the p38, JNK, and ERK MAPKs. EM23-mediated activation of ASK1/MAPKs was significantly inhibited in the presence of NAC. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-mediated activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was suppressed by EM23, as suggested by the observed blockage of p65 nuclear translocation, phosphorylation, and reversion of IκBα degradation following EM23 treatment. Taken together, these results provide important insights into the anticancer activities of the EM component EM23 against human CML K562 cells and AML HL-60 cells. PMID:27064563

  4. EM23, A Natural Sesquiterpene Lactone from Elephantopus mollis, Induces Apoptosis in Human Myeloid Leukemia Cells through Thioredoxin- and Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Li, Manmei; Wang, Guocai; Shao, Fangyuan; Chen, Wenbo; Xia, Chao; Wang, Sheng; Li, Yaolan; Zhou, Guangxiong; Liu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Elephantopus mollis (EM) is a traditional herbal medicine with multiple pharmacological activities. However, the efficacy of EM in treating human leukemia is currently unknown. In the current study, we report that EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone isolated from EM, inhibits the proliferation of human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cells and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) HL-60 cells by inducing apoptosis. Translocation of membrane-associated phospholipid phosphatidylserines, changes in cell morphology, activation of caspases, and cleavage of PARP were concomitant with this inhibition. The involvement of the mitochondrial pathway in EM23-mediated apoptosis was suggested by observed disruptions in mitochondrial membrane potential. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23 caused a marked increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a ROS scavenger, almost fully reversed EM23-mediated apoptosis. In EM23-treated cells, the expression levels of thioredoxin (Trx) and thioredoxinreductase (TrxR), two components of the Trx system involved in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis, were significantly down-regulated. Concomitantly, Trx regulated the activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and its downstream regulatory targets, the p38, JNK, and ERK MAPKs. EM23-mediated activation of ASK1/MAPKs was significantly inhibited in the presence of NAC. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-mediated activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was suppressed by EM23, as suggested by the observed blockage of p65 nuclear translocation, phosphorylation, and reversion of IκBα degradation following EM23 treatment. Taken together, these results provide important insights into the anticancer activities of the EM component EM23 against human CML K562 cells and AML HL-60 cells. PMID:27064563

  5. GPR56 identifies primary human acute myeloid leukemia cells with high repopulating potential in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Caroline; Bergeron, Anne; Lavallée, Vincent-Philippe; Yeh, Jonathan; Gendron, Patrick; Norddahl, Gudmundur L; Krosl, Jana; Boivin, Isabel; Deneault, Eric; Simard, Jessica; Imren, Suzan; Boucher, Geneviève; Eppert, Kolja; Herold, Tobias; Bohlander, Stefan K; Humphries, Keith; Lemieux, Sébastien; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy; Barabé, Frédéric

    2016-04-21

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous hematologic malignancy, which is initiated and driven by a rare fraction of leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Despite the difficulties of identifying a common LSC phenotype, there is increasing evidence that high expression of stem cell gene signatures is associated with poor clinical outcome. Identification of functionally distinct subpopulations in this disease is therefore crucial to dissecting the molecular machinery underlying LSC self-renewal. Here, we combined next-generation sequencing technology with in vivo assessment of LSC frequencies and identified the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor 56 (GPR56) as a novel and stable marker for human LSCs for the majority of AML samples. High GPR56 expression was significantly associated with high-risk genetic subgroups and poor outcome. Analysis of GPR56 in combination with CD34 expression revealed engraftment potential of GPR56(+)cells in both the CD34(-)and CD34(+)fractions, thus defining a novel LSC compartment independent of the CD34(+)CD38(-)LSC phenotype. PMID:26834243

  6. α-Tomatine inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in HL-60 human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huarong; Chen, Shaohua; Van Doren, Jeremiah; Li, Dongli; Farichon, Chelsea; He, Yan; Zhang, Qiuyan; Zhang, Kun; Conney, Allan H; Goodin, Susan; Du, Zhiyun; Zheng, Xi

    2015-06-01

    α‑Tomatine is a glycoalkaloid that occurs naturally in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). In the present study, the effects of α‑tomatine on human myeloid leukemia HL‑60 cells were investigated. Treatment of HL‑60 cells with α‑tomatine resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration‑dependent manner. Tomatidine, the aglycone of tomatine had little effect on the growth and apoptosis of HL‑60 cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by α‑tomatine in HL‑60 cells was partially abrogated by addition of cholesterol indicating that interactions between α‑tomatine and cell membrane‑associated cholesterol may be important in mediating the effect of α‑tomatine. Activation of nuclear factor‑κB by the phorbol ester, 12‑O‑tetradecanoylphorbol‑13‑acetate failed to prevent apoptosis in HL‑60 cells treated with α‑tomatine. In animal experiments, it was found that treatment of mice with α‑tomatine inhibited the growth of HL‑60 xenografts in vivo. Results from the present study indicated that α‑tomatine may have useful anti‑leukemia activities. PMID:25625536

  7. α-tomatine inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in HL-60 human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, HUARONG; CHEN, SHAOHUA; VAN DOREN, JEREMIAH; LI, DONGLI; FARICHON, CHELSEA; HE, YAN; ZHANG, QIUYAN; ZHANG, KUN; CONNEY, ALLAN H; GOODIN, SUSAN; DU, ZHIYUN; ZHENG, XI

    2015-01-01

    α-tomatine is a glycoalkaloid that occurs naturally in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). In the present study, the effects of α-tomatine on human myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells were investigated. Treatment of HL-60 cells with α-tomatine resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Tomatidine, the aglycone of tomatine had little effect on the growth and apoptosis of HL-60 cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by α-tomatine in HL-60 cells was partially abrogated by addition of cholesterol indicating that interactions between α-tomatine and cell membrane-associated cholesterol may be important in mediating the effect of α-tomatine. Activation of nuclear factor-κB by the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate failed to prevent apoptosis in HL-60 cells treated with α-tomatine. In animal experiments, it was found that treatment of mice with α-tomatine inhibited the growth of HL-60 xenografts in vivo. Results from the present study indicated that α-tomatine may have useful anti-leukemia activities. PMID:25625536

  8. Myeloid leukemia risk assessment and dynamics of the granulocytopoietic system in acutely and continuously irradiated humans: modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, O A

    2015-05-01

    A dynamic modeling approach to the risk assessment of radiogenic myeloid leukemia is proposed. A basic tool of this approach is a biologically motivated mathematical model of the granulocytopoietic system, which is capable of predicting the dynamics of blood granulocytes and bone marrow granulocytopoietic cells in acutely and chronically irradiated humans. The performed modeling studies revealed that the dose dependence of the scaled maximal concentration of bone marrow granulocytopoietic cells with radiation-induced changes, which make a cell premalignant, and the dose dependence of the scaled integral of the concentration of these cells over the period of the response of the granulocytopoietic system to acute irradiation conform to the dose dependence of excess relative risk for myeloid leukemia among atomic bomb survivors in a wide range of doses and in a range of comparatively low doses, respectively. Additionally, the dose dependence of the scaled integral of the concentration of these cells over the period of the response of the granulocytopoietic system to continuous irradiation with the dose rate and durations, which were used in brachytherapy, conforms to the dose dependence of excess relative risk for leukemia among the respective groups of exposed patients. These modeling findings demonstrate the potential to use the proposed modeling approach for predicting the excess relative risk for myeloid leukemia among humans exposed to various radiation regimes. Obviously, this is especially important in the assessment of the risks for radiogenic myeloid leukemia among people residing in contaminated areas after an accident or explosion of a radiological device, among astronauts on long-term space missions, as well as among patients treated with radiotherapy. PMID:25811147

  9. Co-administration of the mTORC1/TORC2 inhibitor INK128 and the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL antagonist ABT-737 kills human myeloid leukemia cells through Mcl-1 down-regulation and AKT inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Mohamed; Aust, Mandy Mayo; Hawkins, Elisa; Parker, Rebecca E.; Ross, Masey; Kmieciak, Maciej; Reshko, Leonid Borisovich; Rizzo, Kathryn A.; Dumur, Catherine I.; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Grant, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Effects of concurrent inhibition of mTORC1/2 and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL in human acute myeloid leukemia cells were examined. Tetracycline-inducible Bcl-2/Bcl-xL dual knockdown markedly sensitized acute myeloid leukemia cells to the dual TORC1/2 inhibitor INK128 in vitro as well as in vivo. Moreover, INK128 co-administered with the Bcl-2/xL antagonist ABT-737 sharply induced cell death in multiple acute myeloid leukemia cell lines, including TKI-resistant FLT3-ITD mutants and primary acute myeloid leukemia blasts carrying various genetic aberrations e.g., FLT3, IDH2, NPM1, and Kras, while exerting minimal toxicity toward normal hematopoietic CD34+ cells. Combined treatment was particularly active against CD34+/CD38−/CD123+ primitive leukemic progenitor cells. The INK128/ABT-737 regimen was also effective in the presence of a protective stromal microenvironment. Notably, INK128 was more potent than the TORC1 inhibitor rapamycin in down-regulating Mcl-1, diminishing AKT and 4EBP1 phosphorylation, and potentiating ABT-737 activity. Mcl-1 ectopic expression dramatically attenuated INK128/ABT-737 lethality, indicating an important functional role for Mcl-1 down-regulation in INK128/ABT-737 actions. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that combined treatment markedly diminished Bax, Bak, and Bim binding to all major anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 members (Bcl-2/Bcl-xL/Mcl-1), while Bax/Bak knockdown reduced cell death. Finally, INK128/ABT-737 co-administration sharply attenuated leukemia growth and significantly prolonged survival in a systemic acute myeloid leukemia xenograft model. Analysis of subcutaneous acute myeloid leukemia-derived tumors revealed significant decrease in 4EBP1 phosphorylation and Mcl-1 protein level, consistent with results obtained in vitro. These findings demonstrate that co-administration of dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitors and BH3-mimetics exhibits potent anti-leukemic activity in vitro and in vivo, arguing that this strategy warrants attention in acute myeloid

  10. Molecular Pathways: Myeloid Complicity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stromnes, Ingunn M.; Greenberg, Philip D.; Hingorani, Sunil R.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-induced inflammation results in accumulation of myeloid cells. It has become increasingly evident that tumor-dependent factors condition myeloid cells toward an immunosuppressive and pro-tumorigenic phenotype. These myeloid cells include progenitors and progeny of monocytes, granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Myeloid cells are not simply bystanders in malignancy or barometers of disease burden. Reflecting their dynamic and plastic nature, myeloid cells manifesta continuum of cellular differentiation and are intimately involved at all stages of neoplastic progression. They can promote tumorigenesis through both immune-dependent and independent mechanisms and can dictate response to therapies. A greater understanding of the inherent plasticity and relationships among myeloid subsets is needed to inform therapeutic targeting. New clinical trials are being designed to modulate the activities of myeloid cells in cancer, which may be essential to maximize the efficacy of both conventional cytotoxic and immune-based therapies for solid tumors. PMID:25047706

  11. Properties of immature myeloid progenitors with nitric-oxide-dependent immunosuppressive activity isolated from bone marrow of tumor-free mice.

    PubMed

    Forghani, Parvin; Harris, Wayne; Giver, Cynthia R; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Galipeau, Jacques; Waller, Edmund K

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) from tumor-bearing mice are important negative regulators of anti-cancer immune responses, but the role for immature myeloid cells (IMCs) in non-tumor-bearing mice in the regulation of immune responses are poorly described. We studied the immune-suppressive activity of IMCs from the bone marrow (BM) of C57Bl/6 mice and the mechanism(s) by which they inhibit T-cell activation and proliferation. IMCs, isolated from BM by high-speed FACS, inhibited mitogen-induced proliferation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells in vitro. Cell-to-cell contact of T-cells with viable IMCs was required for suppression. Neither neutralizing antibodies to TGFβ1, nor genetic disruption of indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase, abrogated IMC-mediated suppressive activity. In contrast, suppression of T-cell proliferation was absent in cultures containing IMCs from interferon-γ (IFN-γ) receptor KO mice or T-cells from IFN-γ KO mice (on the C57Bl/6 background). The addition of NO inhibitors to co-cultures of T-cells and IMC significantly reduced the suppressive activity of IMCs. IFN-γ signaling between T-cells and IMCs induced paracrine Nitric Oxide (NO) release in culture, and the degree of inhibition of T-cell proliferation was proportional to NO levels. The suppressive activity of IMCs from the bone marrow of tumor-free mice was comparable with MDSCs from BALB/c bearing mice 4T1 mammary tumors. These results indicate that IMCs have a role in regulating T-cell activation and proliferation in the BM microenvironment.

  12. Myeloid derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Todd J.; Quatromoni, Jon G.; Karakasheva, Tatiana A.; Singhal, Sunil; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of achieving measurable response with cancer immunotherapy requires counteracting the immunosuppressive characteristics of tumors. One of the mechanisms that tumors utilize to escape immunosurveillance is the activation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Upon activation by tumor-derived signals, MDSCs inhibit the ability of the host to mount an anti-tumor immune response via their capacity to suppress both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Despite their relatively recent discovery and characterization, anti-MDSC agents have been identified, which may improve immunotherapy efficacy. PMID:23734336

  13. Acidic tumor microenvironment in human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Böhme, Ines; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin

    2016-09-01

    One characteristic of solid tumors such as malignant melanoma is the acidification of the tumor microenvironment. The deregulation of cancer cell metabolism is considered a main cause of extracellular acidosis. Here, cancer cells utilize aerobic glycolysis instead of oxidative phosphorylation even under normoxic conditions, as originally described by Otto Warburg. These metabolic alterations cause enhanced acid production, especially of lactate and carbon dioxide (CO2 ). The extensive production of acidic metabolites and the enhanced acid export to the extracellular space cause a consistent acidification of the tumor microenvironment, thus promoting the formation of an acid-resistant tumor cell population with increased invasive and metastatic potential. As melanoma is one of the deadliest and most metastatic forms of cancer, understanding the effects of this extracellular acidosis on human melanoma cells with distinct metastatic properties is important. The aim of this review was to summarize recent studies of the acidification of the tumor microenvironment, focusing on the specific effects of the acidic milieu on melanoma cells and to give a short overview of therapeutic approaches. PMID:27233233

  14. Potential role of curcumin and taurine combination therapy on human myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro.

    PubMed

    El-Houseini, Motawa E; Refaei, Mohammed Osman; Amin, Ahmed Ibrahim; Abol-Ftouh, Mahmoud A

    2013-10-01

    Curcumin and taurine are natural products that have been used in this study evaluating their therapeutic effect on myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro. Sixty patients with myeloid leukemia and 30 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. All patient groups were admitted to the Medical Oncology Department of the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. There were statistically significant differences between treated leukemic cells compared to normal mononuclear leukocytes in cell density, interferon-γ and immunophenotypic profile, mainly CD4+, CD8 + and CD25+. This work highlights the possibility of using curcumin and taurine as a potential useful therapy in the management of patients suffering from chronic and acute myeloid leukemias. PMID:23418874

  15. New Mouse Models to Investigate the Efficacy of Drug Combinations in Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hanyang; Woolfson, Adrian; Jiang, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) comprises a simple and effective paradigm for generating new insights into the cellular origin, pathogenesis, and treatment of many types of human cancer. In particular, mouse models of CML have greatly facilitated the understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms and pathogenesis of this disease and have led to the identification of new drug targets that in some cases offer the possibility of functional cure. There are currently three established CML mouse models: the BCR-ABL transgenic model, the BCR-ABL retroviral transduction/transplantation model, and the xenotransplant immunodeficient model. Each has its own unique advantages and disadvantages. Depending on the question of interest, some models may be more appropriate than others. In this chapter, we describe a newly developed xenotransplant mouse model to determine the efficacy of novel therapeutic agents, either alone or in combination. The model facilitates the evaluation of the frequency of leukemic stem cells with long-term leukemia-initiating activity, a critical subcellular population that causes disease relapse and progression, through the utilization of primary CD34(+) CML stem/progenitor cells obtained from CML patients at diagnosis and prior to drug treatment. We have also investigated the effectiveness of new combination treatment strategies designed to prevent the development of leukemia in vivo using BCR-ABL (+) blast crisis cells as a model system. These types of in vivo studies are important for the prediction of individual patient responses to drug therapy, and have the potential to facilitate the design of personalized combination therapy strategies. PMID:27581149

  16. 6-Thioguanine-loaded polymeric micelles deplete myeloid-derived suppressor cells and enhance the efficacy of T cell immunotherapy in tumor-bearing mice

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanbart, Laura; Kourtis, Iraklis C.; van der Vlies, André J.; Swartz, Melody A.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-16

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that suppress effector T cell responses and can reduce the efficacy of cancer immunotherapies. We previously showed that ultra-small polymer nanoparticles efficiently drain to the lymphatics after intradermal injection and target antigen-presenting cells, including Ly6chi Ly6gmonocytic MDSCs (Mo-MDSCs), in skin-draining lymph nodes (LNs) and spleen. Here, we developed ultra-small polymer micelles loaded with 6-thioguanine (MC-TG), a cytotoxic drug used in the treatment of myelogenous leukemia, with the aim of killing Mo-MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and thus enhancing T cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. We found that 2 days post-injection in tumor-bearing mice (B16-F10 melanoma or E.G7-OVA thymoma), MC-TG depleted Mo-MDSCs in the spleen, Ly6clo Ly6g+ granulocytic MDSCs (G-MDSCs) in the draining LNs, and Gr1int Mo-MDSCs in the tumor. In both tumor models, MC-TG decreased the numbers of circulating Mo- and G-MDSCs, as well as of Ly6chi macrophages, for up to 7 days following a single administration. MDSC depletion was dose dependent and more effective with MC-TG than with equal doses of free TG. Finally, we tested whether this MDSC-depleting strategy might enhance cancer immunotherapies in the B16-F10 melanoma model. We found that MC-TG significantly improved the efficacy of adoptively transferred, OVA-specific CD8+ T cells in melanoma cells expressing OVA. Ultimately, these findings highlight the capacity of MC-TG in depleting MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment and show promise in promoting anti-tumor immunity when used in combination with T cell immunotherapies.

  17. Overexpression of myeloid zinc finger 1 suppresses matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression and reduces invasiveness of SiHa human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Su-Ju; Hwang, Jin-Ming; Hsieh, Shu-Ching; Ying, Tsung-Ho; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

    2012-08-24

    Myeloid zinc finger 1 (MZF1) gene belongs to the Kruppel family of zinc finger transcription factors. MZF1 has been suggested to play an important role in the tumorigenesis, invasion, and apoptosis of various tumor cells. However, the role of MZF1 in human cervical cancer remains unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of MZF1 and its functional role in human cervical cancer cell migration and invasion, we experimented on stable SiHa cells overexpressing MZF1. We found that MZF1 overexpression inhibits the migratory and invasive abilities of SiHa cervical cancer cells. In addition, the overexpression of MZF1 significantly reduces MMP-2 protein and mRNA levels. Luciferase and ChIP assays suggested that MZF1 directly binds to MMP-2 gene regulatory sequences in vivo and suppresses MMP-2 promoter activity in vitro. This study shows that MZF-1 represses MMP-2 transcription and suggests that this repression may be linked to inhibition of human cervical cancer cell migration and metastasis.

  18. PTEN: Multiple Functions in Human Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Michele; Falcone, Italia; Conciatori, Fabiana; Cesta Incani, Ursula; Del Curatolo, Anais; Inzerilli, Nicola; Nuzzo, Carmen M. A.; Vaccaro, Vanja; Vari, Sabrina; Cognetti, Francesco; Ciuffreda, Ludovica

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is the most important negative regulator of the PI3K signaling pathway. In addition to its canonical, PI3K inhibition-dependent functions, PTEN can also function as a tumor suppressor in a PI3K-independent manner. Indeed, the PTEN network regulates a broad spectrum of biological functions, modulating the flow of information from membrane-bound growth factor receptors to nuclear transcription factors, occurring in concert with other tumor suppressors and oncogenic signaling pathways. PTEN acts through its lipid and protein phosphatase activity and other non-enzymatic mechanisms. Studies conducted over the past 10 years have expanded our understanding of the biological role of PTEN, showing that in addition to its ability to regulate proliferation and cell survival, it also plays an intriguing role in regulating genomic stability, cell migration, stem cell self-renewal, and tumor microenvironment. Changes in PTEN protein levels, location, and enzymatic activity through various molecular mechanisms can generate a continuum of functional PTEN levels in inherited syndromes, sporadic cancers, and other diseases. PTEN activity can indeed, be modulated by mutations, epigenetic silencing, transcriptional repression, aberrant protein localization, and post-translational modifications. This review will discuss our current understanding of the biological role of PTEN, how PTEN expression and activity are regulated, and the consequences of PTEN dysregulation in human malignant tumors. PMID:25763354

  19. Cytotoxic Capacity of IL-15-Stimulated Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Rhabdomyosarcoma in Humanized Preclinical Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Rettinger, Eva; Meyer, Vida; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Volk, Andreas; Kuçi, Selim; Willasch, Andre; Koscielniak, Ewa; Fulda, Simone; Wels, Winfried S.; Boenig, Halvard; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has become an important treatment modality for patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is also under investigation for soft tissue sarcomas. The therapeutic success is still limited by minimal residual disease (MRD) status ultimately leading to patients’ relapse. Adoptive donor lymphocyte infusions based on MRD status using IL-15-expanded cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells may prevent relapse without causing graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD). To generate preclinical data we developed mouse models to study anti-leukemic- and anti-tumor-potential of CIK cells in vivo. Immunodeficient mice (NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc−, NSG) were injected intravenously with human leukemic cell lines THP-1, SH-2 and with human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines RH41 and RH30 at minimal doses required for leukemia or tumor engraftment. Mice transplanted with THP-1 or RH41 cells were randomly assigned for analysis of CIK cell treatment. Organs of mice were analyzed by flow cytometry as well as quantitative polymerase chain reaction for engraftment of malignant cells and CIK cells. Potential of CIK cells to induce GvHD was determined by histological analysis. Tissues of the highest degree of THP-1 cell expansion included bone marrow followed by liver, lung, spleen, peripheral blood (PB), and brain. RH30 and RH41 engraftment mainly took place in liver and lung, but was also detectable in spleen and PB. In spite of delayed CIK cell expansion compared with malignant cells, CIK cells injected at equal amounts were sufficient for significant reduction of RH41 cells, whereas against fast-expanding THP-1 cells 250 times more CIK than THP-1 cells were needed to achieve comparable results. Our preclinical in vivo mouse models showed a reliable 100% engraftment of malignant cells which is essential for analysis of anti-cancer therapy. Furthermore our data demonstrated that IL-15-activated CIK cells have potent cytotoxic capacity against AML

  20. The human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 mediates in vitro cytarabine sensitivity in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hubeek, I; Stam, R W; Peters, G J; Broekhuizen, R; Meijerink, J P P; Wering, E R van; Gibson, B E S; Creutzig, U; Zwaan, C M; Cloos, J; Kuik, D J; Pieters, R; Kaspers, G J L

    2005-01-01

    Cytarabine (ara-C) is the most effective agent for the treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Aberrant expression of enzymes involved in the transport/metabolism of ara-C could explain drug resistance. We determined mRNA expression of these factors using quantitative-real-time-PCR in leukemic blasts from children diagnosed with de novo AML. Expression of the inactivating enzyme pyrimidine nucleotidase-I (PN-I) was 1.8-fold lower in FAB-M5 as compared to FAB-M1/2 (P=0.007). In vitro sensitivity to deoxynucleoside analogues was determined using the MTT-assay. Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1) mRNA expression and ara-C sensitivity were significantly correlated (rp=−0.46; P=0.001), with three-fold lower hENT1 mRNA levels in resistant patients (P=0.003). hENT1 mRNA expression also seemed to correlate inversely with the LC50 values of cladribine (rp=−0.30; P=0.04), decitabine (rp=−0.29; P=0.04) and gemcitabine (rp=−0.33; P=0.02). Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and cytidine deaminase (CDA) mRNA expression seemed to correlate with in vitro sensitivity to gemcitabine (rp=−0.31; P=0.03) and decitabine (rp=0.33; P=0.03), respectively. The dCK/PN-I ratio correlated inversely with LC50 values for gemcitabine (rp=−0.45, P=0.001) and the dCK/CDA ratio seemed to correlate with LC50 values for decitabine (rp=−0.29; 0.04). In conclusion, decreased expression of hENT1, which transports ara-C across the cell membrane, appears to be a major factor in ara-C resistance in childhood AML. PMID:16333246

  1. SECTM1 produced by tumor cells attracts human monocytes via CD7-mediated activation of the PI3K pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Ge, Yingbin; Xiao, Min; Lopez-Coral, Alfonso; Li, Ling; Roesch, Alexander; Huang, Catherine; Alexander, Peter; Vogt, Thomas; Xu, Xiaowei; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Lieu, Melissa; Belser, Eric; Liu, Rui; Somasundaram, Rajasekharan; Herlyn, Meenhard; Kaufman, Russel E

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have essential roles in tumor progression and metastasis. Tumor cells recruit myeloid progenitors and monocytes to the tumor site, where they differentiate into TAMs; however, this process is not well studied in humans. Here we show that human CD7, a T-cell and NK cell receptor, is highly expressed by monocytes and macrophages. Expression of CD7 decreases in M-CSF-differentiated macrophages and in melanoma-conditioned medium-induced macrophages (MCMI/Mφ) in comparison to monocytes. A ligand for CD7, SECTM1 (secreted and transmembrane protein 1), is highly expressed in many tumors, including melanoma cells. We show that SECTM1 binds to CD7 and significantly increases monocyte migration by activation of the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase) pathway. In human melanoma tissues, tumor-infiltrating macrophages expressing CD7 are present. These melanomas, with CD7-positive inflammatory cell infiltrations, frequently highly express SECTM1, including an N-terminal, soluble form, which can be detected in the sera of metastatic melanoma patients but not in normal sera. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CD7 is present on monocytes and tumor macrophages and that its ligand, SECTM1, is frequently expressed in corresponding melanoma tissues, possibly acting as a chemoattractant for monocytes to modulate the melanoma microenvironment.

  2. SECTM1 Produced by Tumor Cells Attracts Human Monocytes Via CD7-mediated Activation of the PI3K Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Ge, Yingbin; Xiao, Min; Lopez-Coral, Alfonso; Li, Ling; Roesch, Alexander; Huang, Catherine; Alexander, Peter; Vogt, Thomas; Xu, Xiaowei; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Lieu, Melissa; Belser, Eric; Liu, Rui; Somasundaram, Rajasekharan; Herlyn, Meenhard; Kaufman, Russel E.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play essential roles in tumor progression and metastasis. Tumor cells recruit myeloid progenitors and monocytes to the tumor site, where they differentiate into TAMs; however, this process is not well studied in humans. Here we show that human CD7, a T cell and NK cell receptor, is highly expressed by monocytes and macrophages. Expression of CD7 decreases in M-CSF differentiated macrophages and in Melanoma-conditioned Medium Induced Macrophages (MCMI/Mϕ) in comparison to monocytes. A ligand for CD7, SECTM1 (Secreted and transmembrane protein 1), is highly expressed in many tumors, including melanoma cells. We show that SECTM1 binds to CD7 and significantly increases monocyte migration by activation of the PI3K pathway. In human melanoma tissues, tumor-infiltrating macrophages expressing CD7 are present. These melanomas, with CD7-positive inflammatory cell infiltrations, frequently highly express SECTM1, including an N-terminal, soluble form, which can be detected in the sera of metastatic melanoma patients but not in normal sera. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CD7 is present on monocytes and tumor macrophages, and that its ligand, SECTM1, is frequently expressed in corresponding melanoma tissues, possibly acting as a chemoattractant for monocytes to modulate the melanoma microenvironment. PMID:24157461

  3. MYC and PIM2 co-expression in mouse bone marrow cells readily establishes permanent myeloid cell lines that can induce lethal myeloid sarcoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su Hwa; Chung, Hee Yong

    2012-08-01

    The hematopoietic cell malignancy is one of the most prevalent type of cancer and the disease has multiple pathologic molecular signatures. Research on the origin of hematopoietic cancer stem cells and the mode of subsequent maintenance and differentiation needs robust animal models that can reproduce the transformation and differentiation event in vivo. Here, we show that co-transduction of MYC and PIM2 proto-oncogenes into mouse bone marrow cells readily establishes permanent cell lines that can induce lethal myeloid sarcoma in vivo. Unlike the previous doubly transgenic mouse model in which coexpression of MYC and PIM2 transgenes exclusively induced B cell lymphoma, we were able to show that the same combination of genes can also transform primary bone marrow myeloid cells in vitro resulting in permanent cell lines which induce myeloid sarcoma upon in vivo transplantation. By inducing cancerous transformation of fresh bone marrow cells in a controlled environment, the model we established will be useful for detailed study of the molecular events involved in initial transformation process of primary myeloid bone marrow cells and provides a model that can give insight to the molecular pathologic characteristics of human myeloid sarcoma, a rare presentation of solid tumors of undifferentiated myeloid blast cells associated with various types of myeloid leukemia. PMID:22843119

  4. A zebrafish model of Poikiloderma with Neutropenia recapitulates the human syndrome hallmarks and traces back neutropenia to the myeloid progenitor

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Elisa A.; Carra, Silvia; Fontana, Laura; Bresciani, Erica; Cotelli, Franco; Larizza, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Poikiloderma with Neutropenia (PN) is an autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by early-onset poikiloderma, pachyonychia, hyperkeratosis, bone anomalies and neutropenia, predisposing to myelodysplasia. The causative C16orf57/USB1 gene encodes a conserved phosphodiesterase that regulates the stability of spliceosomal U6-RNA. The involvement of USB1 in splicing has not yet allowed to unveil the pathogenesis of PN and how the gene defects impact on skin and bone tissues besides than on the haematological compartment. We established a zebrafish model of PN using a morpholino-knockdown approach with two different splicing morpholinos. Both usb1-depleted embryos displayed developmental abnormalities recapitulating the signs of the human syndrome. Besides the pigmentation and osteochondral defects, usb1-knockdown caused defects in circulation, manifested by a reduced number of circulating cells. The overall morphant phenotype was also obtained by co-injecting sub-phenotypic dosages of the two morpholinos and could be rescued by human USB1 RNA. Integrated in situ and real-time expression analyses of stage-specific markers highlighted defects of primitive haematopoiesis and traced back the dramatic reduction in neutrophil myeloperoxidase to the myeloid progenitors showing down-regulated pu.1 expression. Our vertebrate model of PN demonstrates the intrinsic requirement of usb1 in haematopoiesis and highlights PN as a disorder of myeloid progenitors associated with bone marrow dysfunction. PMID:26522474

  5. Myeloid Dysregulation in a Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Model of PTPN11-Associated Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Sevilla, Ana; Roman, Angel C; Lee, Dung-Fang; D'Souza, Sunita L; Pardo, Sherly; Riess, Ilan; Su, Jie; Cohen, Ninette; Schaniel, Christoph; Rodriguez, Nelson A; Baccarini, Alessia; Brown, Brian D; Cavé, Hélène; Caye, Aurélie; Strullu, Marion; Yalcin, Safak; Park, Christopher Y; Dhandapany, Perundurai S; Yongchao, Ge; Edelmann, Lisa; Bahieg, Sawsan; Raynal, Patrick; Flex, Elisabetta; Tartaglia, Marco; Moore, Kateri A; Lemischka, Ihor R; Gelb, Bruce D

    2015-10-20

    Somatic PTPN11 mutations cause juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). Germline PTPN11 defects cause Noonan syndrome (NS), and specific inherited mutations cause NS/JMML. Here, we report that hematopoietic cells differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) harboring NS/JMML-causing PTPN11 mutations recapitulated JMML features. hiPSC-derived NS/JMML myeloid cells exhibited increased signaling through STAT5 and upregulation of miR-223 and miR-15a. Similarly, miR-223 and miR-15a were upregulated in 11/19 JMML bone marrow mononuclear cells harboring PTPN11 mutations, but not those without PTPN11 defects. Reducing miR-223's function in NS/JMML hiPSCs normalized myelogenesis. MicroRNA target gene expression levels were reduced in hiPSC-derived myeloid cells as well as in JMML cells with PTPN11 mutations. Thus, studying an inherited human cancer syndrome with hiPSCs illuminated early oncogenesis prior to the accumulation of secondary genomic alterations, enabling us to discover microRNA dysregulation, establishing a genotype-phenotype association for JMML and providing therapeutic targets. PMID:26456833

  6. ChIP-seq Analysis of Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Anders, Lars; Li, Zhaodong

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors, chromatin-associated proteins and regulatory DNA elements are genetically and/or epigenetically altered in cancer, including Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML). This leads to deregulation of transcription that is often causally linked to the tumorigenic state. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation coupled with massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the key technology to study transcription as it allows in vivo whole-genome mapping of epigenetic modifications and interactions of proteins with DNA or chromatin. However, numerous DNA/chromatin-binding proteins, including EZH2, remain difficult to "ChIP," thus yielding genome-wide binding maps of only suboptimal quality. Here, we describe a ChIP-seq protocol optimized for high-quality protein-genome binding maps that have proven especially useful for studying difficult to 'ChIP' transcription regulatory factors in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and related malignancies. PMID:27581144

  7. Biological Analysis of Human CML Stem Cells; Xenograft Model of Chronic Phase Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sheela A

    2016-01-01

    Xenograft mouse models have been instrumental in expanding our knowledge of hematopoiesis and can provide a functional description of stem cells that possess engrafting potential. Here we describe methodology outlining one way of analyzing human malignant cells that are able to engraft immune compromised mice. Using models such as these will allow researchers to gain valuable insight into the primitive leukemic subtypes that evade current therapy regimes and are critical to understand, in order to eradicate malignancy. PMID:27581148

  8. Myeloid suppressor cells in cancer: recruitment, phenotype, properties, and mechanisms of immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Paolo; Borrello, Ivan; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2006-02-01

    Growing tumors acquire the ability to resist immune recognition and immune-mediated injury. Among several mechanisms, mouse and human tumors share the ability to alter the normal hematopoiesis, leading to accumulation of cells of the myelo-monoctytic lineage at the tumor site and in different primary and secondary lymphoid organs. These cells aid tumor development by providing molecules and factors essential for tumor growth and neovascularization but also exert a profound inhibitory activity on both tumor-specific and nonspecific T lymphocytes. The present article summarizes recent findings on the interaction between developing cancers and these recently described "myeloid suppressor cells". PMID:16168663

  9. Up-regulation of transferrin receptor gene expression by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Y; Kataoka, T; Towatari, M; Ito, T; Inoue, H; Ogura, M; Morishima, Y; Saito, H

    1990-12-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced surface transferrin receptor (TfR) expression in two human myeloid leukemia cell lines, NKM-1 and NOMO-1, which possess G-CSF receptors. Radioligand-binding assay revealed that 10 ng/ml G-CSF significantly increased TfR to 186 +/- 20 and 276 +/- 38% of control for NKM-1 cells and NOMO-1 cells, respectively, in a 24-h culture. Scatchard analysis showed the increase of transferrin (Tf)-binding sites but no change in the receptor affinity. The enhanced TfR expression was not mediated either by the kinetic change of receptor cycling or by cellular iron content. Immunoprecipitation with anti-TfR antibody was used, and the increased biosynthesis of the receptor was demonstrated in G-CSF-stimulated cells. Northern blot analysis showed a 2- to 3-fold increase of TfR mRNA of NKM-1 cells cultured in medium containing Tf and G-CSF, whereas the mRNA declined without G-CSF. The effect of G-CSF on the TfR mRNA was observed within 2 h, which preceded the increase of surface TfR and the transition to the S phase of the cell cycle. G-CSF also potentiated TfR expression in freshly obtained myeloid leukemia cells. The present study shows up-regulation of TfR expression by G-CSF in myeloid leukemia cells and provides evidence that the regulation is mediated by controlling the steady-state level of the mRNA. PMID:1701357

  10. The immune receptor Tim-3 mediates activation of PI3 kinase/mTOR and HIF-1 pathways in human myeloid leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Prokhorov, Alexandr; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Rüegg, Laura; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Varani, Luca; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-02-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim-3) is a plasma membrane-associated protein that is highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukaemia cells. As an acute myeloid leukaemia antigen, it could therefore be considered as a potential target for immune therapy and highly-specific drug delivery. However, a conceptual understanding of its biological role is required before consideration of this protein for therapeutic settings. Here, we reveal the detailed mechanism of action underlying the biological responses mediated by the Tim-3 receptor in myeloid cells. Our studies demonstrate that Tim-3 triggers growth factor type responses in acute myeloid leukaemia cells by activating a phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. In addition, the receptor activates hypoxic signalling pathways upregulating glycolysis and pro-angiogenic responses. These findings suggest that Tim-3 could be used as a potential therapeutic target for immune therapy and drug delivery in human acute myeloid leukaemia cells.

  11. Reconstitution of SCID mice with human lymphoid and myeloid cells after transplantation with human fetal bone marrow without the requirement for exogenous human cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, T R; Kim, A; Zhuang, X; Hachamovitch, M; Goldstein, H

    1994-08-16

    Investigation of human hematopoietic maturation has been hampered by the lack of in vivo models. Although engraftment of irradiated C.B-17 scid/scid (SCID) mice with human progenitor cells occurred after infusion with human pediatric bone marrow cells, significant engraftment of the mouse bone marrow with human cells was dependent upon continuous treatment with exogenous human cytokines. Furthermore, despite cytokine treatment, only minimal peripheral engraftment of these mice with human cells was observed. In the present study, after infusion of irradiated SCID mice with pre-cultured human fetal bone marrow cells (BM-SCID-hu mice), their bone marrow became significantly engrafted with human precursor cells and their peripheral lymphoid compartment became populated with human B cells and monocytes independently of the administration of extraneous human cytokines. Examination of the bone marrow of the BM-SCID-hu mice for human cytokine mRNA gene expression demonstrated human leukemia inhibitory factor mRNA and interleukin 7 mRNA in nine of nine BM-SCID-hu mice and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor mRNA in seven of eight BM-SCID-hu mice. This was an intriguing observation because these cytokines regulate different stages of human hematopoiesis. Since engraftment occurs in the absence of exogenous cytokine treatment, the BM-SCID-hu mouse model described should provide a useful in vivo system for studying factors important in the maturation of human myeloid and lymphoid cells in the bone marrow and the behavior of the mature human cells after dissemination into the peripheral lymphoid tissue.

  12. Reconstitution of SCID mice with human lymphoid and myeloid cells after transplantation with human fetal bone marrow without the requirement for exogenous human cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Kollmann, T R; Kim, A; Zhuang, X; Hachamovitch, M; Goldstein, H

    1994-01-01

    Investigation of human hematopoietic maturation has been hampered by the lack of in vivo models. Although engraftment of irradiated C.B-17 scid/scid (SCID) mice with human progenitor cells occurred after infusion with human pediatric bone marrow cells, significant engraftment of the mouse bone marrow with human cells was dependent upon continuous treatment with exogenous human cytokines. Furthermore, despite cytokine treatment, only minimal peripheral engraftment of these mice with human cells was observed. In the present study, after infusion of irradiated SCID mice with pre-cultured human fetal bone marrow cells (BM-SCID-hu mice), their bone marrow became significantly engrafted with human precursor cells and their peripheral lymphoid compartment became populated with human B cells and monocytes independently of the administration of extraneous human cytokines. Examination of the bone marrow of the BM-SCID-hu mice for human cytokine mRNA gene expression demonstrated human leukemia inhibitory factor mRNA and interleukin 7 mRNA in nine of nine BM-SCID-hu mice and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor mRNA in seven of eight BM-SCID-hu mice. This was an intriguing observation because these cytokines regulate different stages of human hematopoiesis. Since engraftment occurs in the absence of exogenous cytokine treatment, the BM-SCID-hu mouse model described should provide a useful in vivo system for studying factors important in the maturation of human myeloid and lymphoid cells in the bone marrow and the behavior of the mature human cells after dissemination into the peripheral lymphoid tissue. Images PMID:7914701

  13. Tumor-Promoting Effects of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Are Potentiated by Hypoxia-Induced Expression of miR-210.

    PubMed

    Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Janji, Bassam; Hu, Shijun; Wu, Joseph C; Martelli, Fabio; Bronte, Vincenzo; Chouaib, Salem

    2015-09-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) contribute significantly to the malignant characters conferred by hypoxic tumor microenvironments. However, selective biomarkers of MDSC function in this critical setting have not been defined. Here, we report that miR-210 expression is elevated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α) in MDSC localized to tumors, compared with splenic MDSC from tumor-bearing mice. In tumor MDSC, we determined that HIF1α was bound directly to a transcriptionally active hypoxia-response element in the miR-210 proximal promoter. miR-210 overexpression was sufficient to enhance MDSC-mediated T-cell suppression under normoxic conditions, while targeting hypoxia-induced miR-210 was sufficient to decrease MDSC function against T cells. Mechanistic investigations revealed that miR-210 modulated MDSC function by increasing arginase activity and nitric oxide production, without affecting reactive oxygen species, IL6, or IL10 production or expression of PD-L1. In splenic MDSC, miR-210 regulated Arg1, Cxcl12, and IL16 at the levels of both mRNA and protein, the reversal of which under normoxic conditions decreased T-cell-suppressive effects and IFNγ production. Interestingly, miR-210 overexpression or targeting IL16 or CXCL12 enhanced the immunosuppressive activity of MDSC in vivo, resulting in increased tumor growth. Taken together, these results provide a preclinical rationale to explore miR-210 inhibitory oligonucleotides as adjuvants to boost immunotherapeutic responses in cancer patients.

  14. Notch receptors in human choroid plexus tumors.

    PubMed

    Beschorner, R; Waidelich, J; Trautmann, K; Psaras, T; Schittenhelm, J

    2013-08-01

    Notch signaling plays a role in development and formation of the normal choroid plexus (nCP), and in formation of various tumors in humans. Activation of Notch3 has been reported to promote tumor growth in invasive gliomas and to initiate formation of choroid plexus tumors (CPT) in mice. We investigated the expression of all currently known Notch receptors (Notch 1-4) in 55 samples of nCP and 88 CPT, including 61 choroid plexus papillomas (CPP), 22 atypical CPP and 5 choroid plexus carcinomas by immunohistochemistry. Notch expression was semiquantitatively evaluated separately for membranous/cytoplasmic and for nuclear staining. In addition, we examined Her2 expression (EGFR2, Her2/neu, ErbB2, CD340) because of its functional link to Notch signaling. All samples were negative for Notch3. Membranous/cytoplasmic expression of Notch1 (p<0.0001) and Notch4 (p=0.046) was significantly higher, whereas Notch2 expression was significantly lower (p<0.0001) in nCP compared to CPT. Nuclear expression of Notch1, -2 and -4 was significantly higher in CPT compared to nCP (p<0.0001 each). Expression of Notch2 and Notch4 showed a shift from a prevailing membranous/cytoplasmic expression in nCP to a predominant nuclear expression in CPT. Her2 was weakly expressed in 42/84 CPT but only in 2/53 nCP (p=0.0001) and positively correlated with nuclear expression of Notch1, -2 and 4 in CPT. In summary, a shift between membranous/cytoplasmic (non-canonical signaling pathway) and nuclear expression (canonical signaling pathway) of Notch1, -2 and -4 and upregulation of Her2 indicate neoplastic transformation in human CP and may reveal new therapeutic approaches.

  15. Myeloid Sarcoma: Current Approach and Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Avni, Batia; Koren-Michowitz, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a rare disease that can present as an isolated extramedullary leukemic tumor, concurrently with or at relapse of acute myeloid leukemia. Owing to the rarity of this disorder, most of the literature comprises small retrospective studies and case reports. The aim of this review is to summarize the current published data regarding the clinical presentation, morphological, cytogenetic and molecular features, prognosis and treatment of myeloid sarcoma. PMID:23556098

  16. Finasteride Enhances the Generation of Human Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells by Up-Regulating the COX2/PGE2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yufeng; Lin, Yingtong; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Hui; Pan, Ting; Fu, Yongshui

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been known to be a key factor in the regulation of the immune system under numerous conditions such as tumors, infections, autoimmune diseases, and transplantations. In contrast to the proposed deleterious role of MDSCs in tumors and infections, MDSCs with their suppressive function are now proved to have the beneficial potential of suppressing the autoimmune response and promoting tolerance to transplantation. Therefore, the expansion of MDSCs could be a promising therapeutic strategy for many diseases. In this study, we aimed to identify FDA-approved drugs that could aid in the expansion of functional MDSCs. We performed a high-throughput screening (HTS) of FDA-approved drugs based on the in vitro human MDSC-differentiation system and identified finasteride (FIN) to have the best potency to aid the generation of human MDSCs. The FIN-induced MDSCs were quite similar to monocytic MDSCs with regard to their surface phenotype, morphology, immunosuppressive function, and related gene expression. Next, we aimed to determine the mechanism of action of FIN and found that FIN induced the expansion of MDSCs through up-regulation of the COX2/PGE2 pathway by enhancing the activity of COX2 promoter. In addition, the administration of indomethacin (IND), a COX2 inhibitor, abrogated the effect of FIN. Based on these results, we suggested that FIN could find applications in the future in the expansion of MDSCs. Further development of FIN-like compounds could be a novel strategy for generating functional MDSCs for immunosuppressive therapies in various immune disorder conditions. PMID:27253400

  17. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Wei, Jian J; Mazar, Andrew P

    2015-09-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients' personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients' samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers. PMID:26476081

  18. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Wei, Jian J.; Mazar, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients’ personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients’ samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers. PMID:26476081

  19. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Wei, Jian J; Mazar, Andrew P

    2015-09-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients' personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients' samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers.

  20. Antitumor activity of ethanol extract from Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves towards human acute myeloid leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhamanbaeva, G T; Murzakhmetova, M K; Tuleukhanov, S T; Danilenko, M P

    2014-12-01

    We studied the effects of ethanol extract from Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves on the growth and differentiation of human acute myeloid leukemia cells (KG-1a, HL60, and U937). The extract of Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves inhibited cell growth depending on the cell strain and extract dose. In a high concentration (100 μg/ml), the extract also exhibited a cytotoxic effect on HL60 cells. Hippophae rhamnoides L. leaves extract did not affect cell differentiation and did not modify the differentiating effect of calcitriol, active vitamin D metabolite. Inhibition of cell proliferation was paralleled by paradoxical accumulation of phase S cells (synthetic phase) with a reciprocal decrease in the count of G1 cells (presynthetic phase). The extract in a concentration of 100 μg/ml induced the appearance of cells with a subdiploid DNA content (sub-G1 phase cells), which indicated induction of apoptosis. The antiproliferative effect of Hippophae rhamnoides L. extract on acute myeloid leukemia cells was at least partially determined by activation of the S phase checkpoint, which probably led to deceleration of the cell cycle and apoptosis induction. PMID:25432283

  1. Opposing Roles of Dectin-1 Expressed on Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells and Myeloid Dendritic Cells in Th2 Polarization.

    PubMed

    Joo, HyeMee; Upchurch, Katherine; Zhang, Wei; Ni, Ling; Li, Dapeng; Xue, Yaming; Li, Xiao-Hua; Hori, Toshiyuki; Zurawski, Sandra; Liu, Yong-Jun; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2015-08-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) can induce and control host immune responses. DC subset-dependent functional specialties and their ability to display functional plasticity, which is mainly driven by signals via pattern recognition receptors, identify DCs as immune orchestrators. A pattern recognition receptor, Dectin-1, is expressed on myeloid DCs and known to play important roles in Th17 induction and activation during fungal and certain bacterial infections. In this study, we first demonstrate that human plasmacytoid DCs express Dectin-1 in both mRNA and protein levels. More interestingly, Dectin-1-activated plasmacytoid DCs promote Th2-type T cell responses, whereas Dectin-1-activated myeloid DCs decrease Th2-type T cell responses. Such contrasting outcomes of Th2-type T cell responses by the two DC subsets are mainly due to their distinct abilities to control surface OX40L expression in response to β-glucan. This study provides new insights for the regulation of host immune responses by Dectin-1 expressed on DCs. PMID:26123355

  2. Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentially Inhibit Cytokine Production by Peripheral Blood Monocytes Subpopulations and Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Laranjeira, Paula; Gomes, Joana; Pedrosa, Monia; Martinho, Antonio; Antunes, Brigida; Ribeiro, Tania; Santos, Francisco; Domingues, Rosario; Abecasis, Manuel; Trindade, Helder; Paiva, Artur

    2015-01-01

    The immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) rendered them an attractive therapeutic approach for immune disorders and an increasing body of evidence demonstrated their clinical value. However, the influence of MSC on the function of specific immune cell populations, namely, monocyte subpopulations, is not well elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of human bone marrow MSC on the cytokine and chemokine expression by peripheral blood classical, intermediate and nonclassical monocytes, and myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), stimulated with lipopolysaccharide plus interferon (IFN)γ. We found that MSC effectively inhibit tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α and macrophage inflammatory protein- (MIP-) 1β protein expression in monocytes and mDC, without suppressing CCR7 and CD83 protein expression. Interestingly, mDC exhibited the highest degree of inhibition, for both TNF-α and MIP-1β, whereas the reduction of TNF-α expression was less marked for nonclassical monocytes. Similarly, MSC decreased mRNA levels of interleukin- (IL-) 1β and IL-6 in classical monocytes, CCL3, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10 in classical and nonclassical monocytes, and IL-1β and CXCL10 in mDC. MSC do not impair the expression of maturation markers in monocytes and mDC under our experimental conditions; nevertheless, they hamper the proinflammatory function of monocytes and mDC, which may impede the development of inflammatory immune responses. PMID:26060498

  3. Genetically distinct leukemic stem cells in human CD34- acute myeloid leukemia are arrested at a hemopoietic precursor-like stage.

    PubMed

    Quek, Lynn; Otto, Georg W; Garnett, Catherine; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Karamitros, Dimitris; Stoilova, Bilyana; Lau, I-Jun; Doondeea, Jessica; Usukhbayar, Batchimeg; Kennedy, Alison; Metzner, Marlen; Goardon, Nicolas; Ivey, Adam; Allen, Christopher; Gale, Rosemary; Davies, Benjamin; Sternberg, Alexander; Killick, Sally; Hunter, Hannah; Cahalin, Paul; Price, Andrew; Carr, Andrew; Griffiths, Mike; Virgo, Paul; Mackinnon, Stephen; Grimwade, David; Freeman, Sylvie; Russell, Nigel; Craddock, Charles; Mead, Adam; Peniket, Andrew; Porcher, Catherine; Vyas, Paresh

    2016-07-25

    Our understanding of the perturbation of normal cellular differentiation hierarchies to create tumor-propagating stem cell populations is incomplete. In human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), current models suggest transformation creates leukemic stem cell (LSC) populations arrested at a progenitor-like stage expressing cell surface CD34. We show that in ∼25% of AML, with a distinct genetic mutation pattern where >98% of cells are CD34(-), there are multiple, nonhierarchically arranged CD34(+) and CD34(-) LSC populations. Within CD34(-) and CD34(+) LSC-containing populations, LSC frequencies are similar; there are shared clonal structures and near-identical transcriptional signatures. CD34(-) LSCs have disordered global transcription profiles, but these profiles are enriched for transcriptional signatures of normal CD34(-) mature granulocyte-macrophage precursors, downstream of progenitors. But unlike mature precursors, LSCs express multiple normal stem cell transcriptional regulators previously implicated in LSC function. This suggests a new refined model of the relationship between LSCs and normal hemopoiesis in which the nature of genetic/epigenetic changes determines the disordered transcriptional program, resulting in LSC differentiation arrest at stages that are most like either progenitor or precursor stages of hemopoiesis. PMID:27377587

  4. Genetically distinct leukemic stem cells in human CD34- acute myeloid leukemia are arrested at a hemopoietic precursor-like stage.

    PubMed

    Quek, Lynn; Otto, Georg W; Garnett, Catherine; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Karamitros, Dimitris; Stoilova, Bilyana; Lau, I-Jun; Doondeea, Jessica; Usukhbayar, Batchimeg; Kennedy, Alison; Metzner, Marlen; Goardon, Nicolas; Ivey, Adam; Allen, Christopher; Gale, Rosemary; Davies, Benjamin; Sternberg, Alexander; Killick, Sally; Hunter, Hannah; Cahalin, Paul; Price, Andrew; Carr, Andrew; Griffiths, Mike; Virgo, Paul; Mackinnon, Stephen; Grimwade, David; Freeman, Sylvie; Russell, Nigel; Craddock, Charles; Mead, Adam; Peniket, Andrew; Porcher, Catherine; Vyas, Paresh

    2016-07-25

    Our understanding of the perturbation of normal cellular differentiation hierarchies to create tumor-propagating stem cell populations is incomplete. In human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), current models suggest transformation creates leukemic stem cell (LSC) populations arrested at a progenitor-like stage expressing cell surface CD34. We show that in ∼25% of AML, with a distinct genetic mutation pattern where >98% of cells are CD34(-), there are multiple, nonhierarchically arranged CD34(+) and CD34(-) LSC populations. Within CD34(-) and CD34(+) LSC-containing populations, LSC frequencies are similar; there are shared clonal structures and near-identical transcriptional signatures. CD34(-) LSCs have disordered global transcription profiles, but these profiles are enriched for transcriptional signatures of normal CD34(-) mature granulocyte-macrophage precursors, downstream of progenitors. But unlike mature precursors, LSCs express multiple normal stem cell transcriptional regulators previously implicated in LSC function. This suggests a new refined model of the relationship between LSCs and normal hemopoiesis in which the nature of genetic/epigenetic changes determines the disordered transcriptional program, resulting in LSC differentiation arrest at stages that are most like either progenitor or precursor stages of hemopoiesis.

  5. Lung Epithelial Cell-Specific Expression of Human Lysosomal Acid Lipase Ameliorates Lung Inflammation and Tumor Metastasis in Lipa(-/-) Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Ding, Xinchun; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL), a key enzyme in the metabolic pathway of neutral lipids, has a close connection with inflammation and tumor progression. One major manifestation in LAL-deficient (Lipa(-/-)) mice is an increase of tumor growth and metastasis associated with expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In the lung, LAL is highly expressed in alveolar type II epithelial cells. To assess how LAL in lung epithelial cells plays a role in this inflammation-related pathogenic process, lung alveolar type II epithelial cell-specific expression of human LAL (hLAL) in Lipa(-/-) mice was established by crossbreeding of CCSP-driven rtTA transgene and (TetO)7-CMV-hLAL transgene into Lipa(-/-) mice (CCSP-Tg/KO). hLAL expression in lung epithelial cells not only reduced tumor-promoting myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the lung, but also down-regulated the synthesis and secretion of tumor-promoting cytokines and chemokines into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of Lipa(-/-) mice. hLAL expression reduced the immunosuppressive functions of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells, inhibited bone marrow cell transendothelial migration, and inhibited endothelial cell proliferation and migration in Lipa(-/-) mice. As a result, hLAL expression in CCSP-Tg/KO mice corrected pulmonary damage, and inhibited tumor cell proliferation and migration in vitro, and tumor metastasis to the lung in vivo. These results support a concept that LAL is a critical metabolic enzyme in lung epithelial cells that regulates lung homeostasis, immune response, and tumor metastasis. PMID:27461363

  6. Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours.

    PubMed

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-03-22

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated haematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells - macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes - are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour microenvironment alters myeloid cells and can convert them into potent immunosuppressive cells. Here, we consider myeloid cells as an intricately connected, complex, single system and we focus on how tumours manipulate the myeloid system to evade the host immune response.

  7. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Bernhard F; Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Prokhorov, Alexandr; Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-10-01

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells.

  8. Characterization of miRNomes in Acute and Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qian; Yang, Yadong; Wang, Hai; Li, Jie; Wang, Shaobin; Li, Yanming; Yang, Yaran; Cai, Kan; Ruan, Xiuyan; Yan, Jiangwei; Hu, Songnian; Fang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid leukemias are highly diverse diseases and have been shown to be associated with microRNA (miRNA) expression aberrations. The present study involved an in-depth miRNome analysis of two human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines, HL-60 and THP-1, and one human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell line, K562, via massively parallel signature sequencing. mRNA expression profiles of these cell lines that were established previously in our lab facilitated an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression patterns. miRNA expression profiling followed by differential expression analysis and target prediction suggested numerous miRNA signatures in AML and CML cell lines. Some miRNAs may act as either tumor suppressors or oncomiRs in AML and CML by targeting key genes in AML and CML pathways. Expression patterns of cell type-specific miRNAs could partially reflect the characteristics of K562, HL-60 and THP-1 cell lines, such as actin filament-based processes, responsiveness to stimulus and phagocytic activity. miRNAs may also regulate myeloid differentiation, since they usually suppress differentiation regulators. Our study provides a resource to further investigate the employment of miRNAs in human leukemia subtyping, leukemogenesis and myeloid development. In addition, the distinctive miRNA signatures may be potential candidates for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of myeloid leukemias. PMID:24755403

  9. A copper chelate selectively triggers apoptosis in myeloid-derived suppressor cells in a drug-resistant tumor model and enhances antitumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Paramita; Das, Satyajit; Banerjee, Kaushik; Sinha, Abhinaba; Roy, Susmita; Chatterjee, Mitali; Choudhuri, Soumitra Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), one of the major orchestrators of immunosuppressive network are present in the tumor microenvironment suppress antitumor immunity by subverting Th1 response in tumor site and considered as a great obstacle for advancement of different cancer immunotherapeutic protocols. Till date, various pharmacological approaches have been explored to modulate the suppressive functions of MDSCs in vivo. The present study describes our endeavor to explore a possibility of eradicating MDSCs by the application of a copper chelate, namely copper N-(2-hydroxy acetophenone) glycinate (CuNG), previously found to be a potential immunomodulator that can elicit antitumorogenic Th1 response in doxorubicin-resistant EAC (EAC/Dox) bearing mice. Herein, we demonstrated that CuNG treatment could reduce Gr-1+CD11b+ MDSC accumulation in ascitic fluid and spleen of EAC/Dox tumor model. Furthermore, we found that CuNG mediated reduction in MDSCs is associated with induction of Th1 response and reduction in Treg cells. Moreover, we observed that CuNG could deplete MDSCs by inducing Fas-FasL mediated apoptotic cell death where death receptor Fas expression is enhanced in MDSCs and FasL is provided by activated T cells. However, MDSC expansion from bone marrow cells and their differentiation was not affected by CuNG. Altogether, these findings suggest that the immunomodulatory property of CuNG is attributed to, at least in part, by its selective cytotoxic action on MDSCs. So, this preclinical study unveils a new mechanism of regulating MDSC levels in drug-resistant cancer model and holds promise of translating the findings into clinical settings.

  10. The immune receptor Tim-3 acts as a trafficker in a Tim-3/galectin-9 autocrine loop in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Rüegg, Laura; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Varani, Luca; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2016-07-01

    The immune receptor Tim-3 is often highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells where it acts as a growth factor and inflammatory receptor. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Tim-3 forms an autocrine loop with its natural ligand galectin-9 in human AML cells. However, the pathophysiological functions of Tim-3 in human AML cells remain unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Tim-3 is required for galectin-9 secretion in human AML cells. However, this effect is cell-type specific and was found so far to be applicable only to myeloid (and not, for example, lymphoid) leukemia cells. We concluded that AML cells might use Tim-3 as a trafficker for the secretion of galectin-9 which can then be possibly used to impair the anticancer activities of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells.

  11. The immune receptor Tim-3 acts as a trafficker in a Tim-3/galectin-9 autocrine loop in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Rüegg, Laura; Gibbs, Bernhard F.; Bardelli, Marco; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Varani, Luca; Berger, Steffen M.; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The immune receptor Tim-3 is often highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells where it acts as a growth factor and inflammatory receptor. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Tim-3 forms an autocrine loop with its natural ligand galectin-9 in human AML cells. However, the pathophysiological functions of Tim-3 in human AML cells remain unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Tim-3 is required for galectin-9 secretion in human AML cells. However, this effect is cell-type specific and was found so far to be applicable only to myeloid (and not, for example, lymphoid) leukemia cells. We concluded that AML cells might use Tim-3 as a trafficker for the secretion of galectin-9 which can then be possibly used to impair the anticancer activities of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. PMID:27622049

  12. The immune receptor Tim-3 acts as a trafficker in a Tim-3/galectin-9 autocrine loop in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Rüegg, Laura; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Varani, Luca; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2016-07-01

    The immune receptor Tim-3 is often highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells where it acts as a growth factor and inflammatory receptor. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Tim-3 forms an autocrine loop with its natural ligand galectin-9 in human AML cells. However, the pathophysiological functions of Tim-3 in human AML cells remain unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Tim-3 is required for galectin-9 secretion in human AML cells. However, this effect is cell-type specific and was found so far to be applicable only to myeloid (and not, for example, lymphoid) leukemia cells. We concluded that AML cells might use Tim-3 as a trafficker for the secretion of galectin-9 which can then be possibly used to impair the anticancer activities of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. PMID:27622049

  13. Complexity and Challenges in Defining Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Damuzzo, Vera; Pinton, Laura; Desantis, Giacomo; Solito, Samantha; Marigo, Ilaria; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Study of myeloid cells endowed with suppressive activity is an active field of research which has particular importance in cancer, in view of the negative regulatory capacity of these cells to the host's immune response. The expansion of these cells, called myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), has been documented in many models of tumor-bearing mice and in patients with tumors of various origin, and their presence is associated with disease progression and reduced survival. For this reason, monitoring this type of cell expansion is of clinical importance, and flow cytometry is the technique of choice for their identification. Over the years, it has been demonstrated that MDSCs comprise a group of immature myeloid cells belonging both to monocytic and granulocytic lineages, with several stages of differentiation; their occurrence depends on tumor-derived soluble factors, which guide their expansion and determine their block of differentiation. Because of their heterogeneous composition, accurate phenotyping of these cells requires a multicolor approach, so that the expansion of all MDSC subsets can be appreciated. This review article focuses on identifying MDSCs and discusses problems associated with phenotyping circulating and tumor-associated MDSCs in humans and in mouse models. © 2014 The Authors Cytometry Part B: Clinical Cytometry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25504825

  14. Complexity and challenges in defining myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Damuzzo, Vera; Pinton, Laura; Desantis, Giacomo; Solito, Samantha; Marigo, Ilaria; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2015-03-01

    Study of myeloid cells endowed with suppressive activity is an active field of research which has particular importance in cancer, in view of the negative regulatory capacity of these cells to the host's immune response. The expansion of these cells, called myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), has been documented in many models of tumor-bearing mice and in patients with tumors of various origin, and their presence is associated with disease progression and reduced survival. For this reason, monitoring this type of cell expansion is of clinical importance, and flow cytometry is the technique of choice for their identification. Over the years, it has been demonstrated that MDSCs comprise a group of immature myeloid cells belonging both to monocytic and granulocytic lineages, with several stages of differentiation; their occurrence depends on tumor-derived soluble factors, which guide their expansion and determine their block of differentiation. Because of their heterogeneous composition, accurate phenotyping of these cells requires a multicolor approach, so that the expansion of all MDSC subsets can be appreciated. This review article focuses on identifying MDSCs and discusses problems associated with phenotyping circulating and tumor-associated MDSCs in humans and in mouse models.

  15. Complexity and challenges in defining myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Damuzzo, Vera; Pinton, Laura; Desantis, Giacomo; Solito, Samantha; Marigo, Ilaria; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2014-11-26

    Study of myeloid cells endowed with suppressive activity is an active field of research which has particular importance in cancer, in view of the negative regulatory capacity of these cells to the host's immune response. The expansion of these cells, called myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), has been documented in many models of tumor-bearing mice and in patients with tumors of various origin, and their presence is associated with disease progression and reduced survival. For this reason, monitoring this type of cell expansion is of clinical importance, and flow cytometry is the technique of choice for their identification. Over the years, it has been demonstrated that MDSCs comprise a group of immature myeloid cells belonging both to monocytic and granulocytic lineages, with several stages of differentiation; their occurrence depends on tumor-derived soluble factors, which guide their expansion and determine their block of differentiation. Because of their heterogeneous composition, accurate phenotyping of these cells requires a multicolor approach, so that the expansion of all MDSC subsets can be appreciated. This review article focuses on identifying MDSCs and discusses problems associated with phenotyping circulating and tumor-associated MDSCs in humans and in mouse models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Immune checkpoint inhibitors enhance cytotoxicity of cytokine-induced killer cells against human myeloid leukaemic blasts.

    PubMed

    Poh, Su Li; Linn, Yeh Ching

    2016-05-01

    We studied whether blockade of inhibitory receptors on cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells by immune checkpoint inhibitors could increase its anti-tumour potency against haematological malignancies. CIK cultures were generated from seven normal donors and nine patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or multiple myeloma (MM). The inhibitory receptors B and T lymphocyte attenuator, CD200 receptor, lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3) and T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain-containing-3 (TIM-3) were present at variable percentages in most CIK cultures, while cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4), programmed death-1 (PD-1) and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR2DL1/2/3) were expressed at low level in most cultures. Without blockade, myeloid leukaemia cells were susceptible to autologous and allogeneic CIK-mediated cytotoxicity. Blockade of KIR, LAG-3, PD-1 and TIM-3 but not CTLA-4 resulted in remarkable increase in killing against these targets, even in those with poor baseline cytotoxicity. ALL and MM targets were resistant to CIK-mediated cytotoxicity, and blockade of receptors did not increase cytotoxicity to a meaningful extent. Combination of inhibitors against two receptors did not further increase cytotoxicity. Interestingly, potentiation of CIK killing by blocking antibodies was not predicted by expression of receptors on CIK and their respective ligands on the targets. Compared to un-activated T and NK cells, blockade potentiated the cytotoxicity of CIK cells to a greater degree and at a lower E:T ratio, but without significant increase in cytotoxicity against normal white cell. Our findings provide the basis for clinical trial combining autologous CIK cells with checkpoint inhibitors for patients with AML.

  17. RORC1 Regulates Tumor-Promoting "Emergency" Granulo-Monocytopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Laura; Sangaletti, Sabina; Consonni, Francesca Maria; Szebeni, Gabor; Morlacchi, Sara; Totaro, Maria Grazia; Porta, Chiara; Anselmo, Achille; Tartari, Silvia; Doni, Andrea; Zitelli, Francesco; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P; Sica, Antonio

    2015-08-10

    Cancer-driven granulo-monocytopoiesis stimulates expansion of tumor promoting myeloid populations, mostly myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). We identified subsets of MDSCs and TAMs based on the expression of retinoic-acid-related orphan receptor (RORC1/RORγ) in human and mouse tumor bearers. RORC1 orchestrates myelopoiesis by suppressing negative (Socs3 and Bcl3) and promoting positive (C/EBPβ) regulators of granulopoiesis, as well as the key transcriptional mediators of myeloid progenitor commitment and differentiation to the monocytic/macrophage lineage (IRF8 and PU.1). RORC1 supported tumor-promoting innate immunity by protecting MDSCs from apoptosis, mediating TAM differentiation and M2 polarization, and limiting tumor infiltration by mature neutrophils. Accordingly, ablation of RORC1 in the hematopoietic compartment prevented cancer-driven myelopoiesis, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:26267538

  18. Anesthetic agent propofol inhibits myeloid differentiation factor 88-dependent and independent signaling and mitigates lipopolysaccharide-mediated reactive oxygen species production in human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xuli; Lv, Fei; Fang, Bo; Liu, Song; Lv, Huangwei; He, Guannan; Ma, Hong; Cao, Yaming; Wang, Yue

    2014-12-01

    Engagement of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) can activate the myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/toll-interleukin-1-resistance domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) dependent pathways, inducing production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neutrophils. Propofol (PPF) has both anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the molecular mechanism by which PPF influences human neutrophil function is yet to be elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the influence of PPF on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced reactive oxygen species production in human neutrophils. We isolated neutrophils from the peripheral blood of 10 healthy male donors. Neither 1 µg/ml LPS nor 10-150 μmol/L PPF influenced the rate of neutrophil apoptosis, but PPF significantly inhibited LPS-mediated reactive oxygen species production in a dose-dependent manner. PPF inhibited LPS-induced expression of MyD88, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6, and TRIF, but not the expression of interferon regulatory factor 3 or phosphorylation of p47(phox), p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB, particularly in the neutrophils in which MyD88 or TRIF had been silenced by siRNA. The inhibitory effect of PPF on LPS-induced activation of p47(phox), p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-κB was partially antagonized by over-expression of MyD88 or TRIF in neutrophils. These observations provide insights into the mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory properties of PPF. PPF reduces LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils via inhibiting expression of MyD88 and TRIF signaling. PMID:25446563

  19. Tissue-engineered models of human tumors for cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Villasante, Aranzazu; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Drug toxicity often goes undetected until clinical trials, which are the most costly and dangerous phase of drug development. Both the cultures of human cells and animal studies have limitations that cannot be overcome by incremental improvements in drug-testing protocols. A new generation of bioengineered tumors is now emerging in response to these limitations, with potential to transform drug screening by providing predictive models of tumors within their tissue context, for studies of drug safety and efficacy. An area that could greatly benefit from these models is cancer research. Areas covered In this review, the authors first describe the engineered tumor systems, using Ewing's sarcoma as an example of human tumor that cannot be predictably studied in cell culture and animal models. Then, they discuss the importance of the tissue context for cancer progression and outline the biomimetic principles for engineering human tumors. Finally, they discuss the utility of bioengineered tumor models for cancer research and address the challenges in modeling human tumors for use in drug discovery and testing. Expert opinion While tissue models are just emerging as a new tool for cancer drug discovery, they are already demonstrating potential for recapitulating, in vitro, the native behavior of human tumors. Still, numerous challenges need to be addressed before we can have platforms with a predictive power appropriate for the pharmaceutical industry. Some of the key needs include the incorporation of the vascular compartment, immune system components, and mechanical signals that regulate tumor development and function. PMID:25662589

  20. Human papillomavirus infections and oral tumors.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, Stina

    2003-08-01

    In the past 20 years, there has been an increasing interest in human papillomaviruses (HPV) because of their potential role in the pathogenesis of malignant tumors. In 1983, we published the first evidence that HPV might be involved in oral squamous cell carcinomas. The identification of morphological similarities between oral and cervical mucosa lead us to this original proposal. In a recent meta-analysis, HPV was indeed confirmed as an independent risk factor for oral carcinoma. To date, totally more than 100 types of HPV have been identified. As in anogenital cancers, HPV type 16 is the most prevalent type in oral carcinomas. The benign oral lesions, associated with HPV infection, include squamous cell papilloma, condyloma acuminatum, verrucca vulgaris and focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH). Papillomas and condylomas are mostly caused by HPV type 6 or 11, while oral verrucas are associated with the skin types 2 or 4. A family history of FEH has been suggested. The FEH lesions are caused by HPV types 13 and 32, only detected in oral epithelium. In immunocompromised patients, benign HPV-induced lesions are characterized by atypical morphology and the simultaneous detection of multiple HPV types. Oral benign HPV lesions are mostly asymptomatic, and may persist or regress spontaneously.

  1. Inhibition of growth by p205: a nuclear protein and putative tumor suppressor expressed during myeloid cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dermott, Jonathan M; Gooya, John M; Asefa, Benyam; Weiler, Sarah R; Smith, Mark; Keller, Jonathan R

    2004-01-01

    p205 belongs to a family of interferon-inducible proteins called the IFI-200 family, which have been implicated in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. While p205 is induced in hematopoietic stem cells during myeloid cell differentiation, its function is not known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the role of p205 in regulating proliferation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and in nonhematopoietic cell lines. We found that p205 localizes to the nucleus in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cell lines. Transient expression of p205 in murine IL-3-dependent BaF3 and 32D-C123 progenitor cell lines inhibited IL-3-induced growth and proliferation. The closely related IFI-200 family members, p204 and p202, similarly inhibited IL-3-dependent progenitor cell proliferation. p205 also inhibited the proliferation and growth of normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. In nonhematopoietic cell lines, p205 and p204 expression inhibited NIH3T3 cell colony formation in vitro, and microinjection of p205 expression vectors into NIH3T3 fibroblasts inhibited serum-induced proliferation. We have determined the functional domains of p205 necessary for activity, which were identified as the N-terminal domain in apoptosis and interferon response (DAPIN)/PYRIN domain, and the C-terminal retinoblastoma protein (Rb)-binding motif. In addition, we have demonstrated that a putative ataxia telangiectasia, mutated (ATM) kinase phosphorylation site specifically regulates the activity of p205. Taken together, these data suggest that p205 is a potent cell growth regulator whose activity is mediated by its protein-binding domains. We propose that during myelomonocytic cell differentiation, induction of p205 expression contributes to cell growth arrest, thus allowing progenitor cells to differentiate. PMID:15342947

  2. Hematopoietic colony formation from human growth factor-dependent TF1 cells and human cord blood myeloid progenitor cells depends on SHP2 phosphatase function.

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, Hal E; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Gotoh, Akihiko; Braun, Stephen E; Lu, Li; Cooper, Scott; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Li, Xing Jun; Chan, Rebecca J

    2013-03-15

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase, SHP2, is widely expressed; however, previous studies demonstrated that hematopoietic cell development more stringently requires Shp2 expression compared to other tissues. Furthermore, somatic gain-of-function SHP2 mutants are commonly found in human myeloid leukemias. Given that pharmacologic inhibitors to SHP2 phosphatase activity are currently in development as putative antileukemic agents, we conducted a series of experiments examining the necessity of SHP2 phosphatase activity for human hematopoiesis. Anti-sense oligonucleotides to human SHP2 coding sequences reduced human cord blood- and human cell line, TF1-derived colony formation. Expression of truncated SHP2 bearing its Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, but lacking the phosphatase domain similarly reduced human cord blood- and TF1-derived colony formation. Mechanistically, expression of truncated SHP2 reduced the interaction between endogenous, full-length SHP2 with the adapter protein, Grb2. To verify the role of SHP2 phosphatase function in human hematopoietic cell development, human cord blood CD34+ cells were transduced with a leukemia-associated phosphatase gain-of-function SHP2 mutant or with a phosphatase dead SHP2 mutant, which indicated that increased phosphatase function enhanced, while decreased SHP2 phosphatase function reduced, human cord blood-derived colonies. Collectively, these findings indicate that SHP2 phosphatase function regulates human hematopoietic cell development and imply that the phosphatase component of SHP2 may serve as a pharmacologic target in human leukemias bearing increased SHP2 phosphatase activity.

  3. Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2005-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies have become part of standard cancer treatment. Chimeric and humanized antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumors. Although the humanized anti-CD33 antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with b-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45, and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukemic therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conversely, a-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumor cell kill while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33- calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions in relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. T-cell recognition of peptide antigens presented on the cell surface in combination with major histocompatibility complex antigen provides another potentially promising approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:16091194

  4. The prognostic effects of tumor infiltrating regulatory T cells and myeloid derived suppressor cells assessed by multicolor flow cytometry in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Mi; Ahn, Soo Min; Kang, Myung-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Choi, Min Gew; Lee, Joon Ho; Sohn, Tae Sung; Bae, Jae Moon; Kim, Sung; Kang, Eun-Suk

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic effects of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), especially regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid derived suppressing cells (MDSCs) are inconclusive in gastric cancers. We investigated the frequencies of TILs including CD8+ T cells, CD45+CD4+CD25± FOXP3+ Tregs, CD45+CD11b+ CD14+ HLA−DR− MDSCs in 28 gastric cancer tissues by using multicolor flow cytometry. In gastric cancer tissue, the percentage of Tregs among the CD4+ T cell subset was substantially increased compared to that of Tregs among peripheral blood CD4+ T cells from the controls. High frequency of CD8+ T cells among CD3+ T cells correlated with increased overall survival (OS) (p = 0.005). High frequency of Tregs among CD4+ T cells correlated with increased OS (p < 0.001), and disease-free survival (DFS) (p = 0.039) and was an independent prognostic factor in OS (Hazard ratio: 0.047; 95% confidence interval, 0.006-0.372; p = 0.004). High frequency of MDSCs among total examined cells correlated with decreased OS (p = 0.027) and was an independent prognostic factor in OS (Hazard ratio 8.601; 95% confidence interval, 1.240-59.678; p = 0.029). We have demonstrated that high levels of Tregs among tumor-infiltrating CD4+ T cells were favorable, but an increased proportion of MDSCs was an adverse independent prognostic factor in gastric cancer. Our results may provide important insights for future immunotherapy in gastric cancer. PMID:26799288

  5. Liver myeloid-derived suppressor cells expand in response to liver metastases in mice and inhibit the anti-tumor efficacy of anti-CEA CAR-T

    PubMed Central

    Burga, Rachel A.; Thorn, Mitchell; Point, Gary R.; Guha, Prajna; Nguyen, Cang T.; Licata, Lauren A.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Ayala, Alfred; Espat, N. Joseph; Junghans, Richard P.; Katz, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor modified T cell (CAR-T) technology, a promising immunotherapeutic tool, has not been applied specifically to treat liver metastases (LM). While CAR-T delivery to LM can be optimized by regional intrahepatic infusion, we propose that liver CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (L-MDSC) will inhibit the efficacy of CAR-T in the intrahepatic space. We studied anti-CEA CAR-T in a murine model of CEA+ LM and identified mechanisms through which L-MDSC expand and inhibit CAR-T function. We established CEA+ LM in mice and studied purified L-MDSC and responses to treatment with intrahepatic anti-CEA CAR-T infusions. L-MDSC expanded three-fold in response to LM and their expansion was dependent on GM-CSF, which was produced by tumor cells. L-MDSC utilized PD-L1 to suppress anti-tumor responses through engagement of PD-1 on CAR-T. GM-CSF, in cooperation with STAT3, promoted L-MDSC PD-L1 expression. CAR-T efficacy was rescued when mice received CAR-T in combination with MDSC depletion, GM-CSF neutralization to prevent MDSC expansion, or PD-L1 blockade. As L-MDSC suppressed anti-CEA CAR-T, infusion of anti-CEA CAR-T in tandem with agents targeting L-MDSC is a rational strategy for future clinical trials. PMID:25850344

  6. Application of flow cytometry to molecular medicine: detection of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptors in acute myeloid leukaemia blasts.

    PubMed

    Cappellini, Alessandra; Mantovani, Irina; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Grafone, Tiziana; Martinelli, Giovanni; Cocco, Lucio; Martelli, Alberto M

    2005-12-01

    TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), a cytokine belonging to the TNF (tumor necrosis factor) family, is currently regarded as a potential anti-cancer agent. Nevertheless, several types of cancer cells display a low sensitivity to TRAIL or are completely resistant to this pro-apoptotic cytokine. TRAIL signalling is dependent on four receptors. Two of them, death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5), induce apoptosis, whereas decoy receptors 1 and 2 (DcR1 and DcR2) are unable to evoke cell death upon TRAIL binding. TRAIL resistance may be related to the expression of TRAIL decoy receptors. TRAIL has been proposed as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of haematological disorders, including acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Surprisingly, however, very limited information is available concerning the expression of TRAIL receptors in AML blasts. Here, we have evaluated, using flow cytometry, TRAIL receptor surface expression and sensitivity to TRAIL-dependent apoptosis of AML blasts from 30 patients. We observed frequent expression of TRAIL DcR1 and DcR2, while expression of DR4 and DR5 was less frequent. Nevertheless, the expression of DR4 or DR5 in leukaemic cells was always matched by a similar expression of one of the decoy receptors. Leukaemic blasts were invariably resistant, even to a high concentration (1000 ng/ml) of TRAIL. We suggest that AML blasts are resistant to TRAIL apoptosis in vitro. Therefore, it is unlikely that TRAIL alone might be used in the future as an innovative pharmacological agent for the treatment of AML.

  7. [A TIM-3/galectin-9 autocrine stimulatory loop drives self-renewal of human myeloid leukemia stem cells and leukemia progression].

    PubMed

    Kikushige, Yoshikane

    2016-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) originates from self-renewing leukemic stem cells (LSCs), an ultimate therapeutic target for AML. We previously reported that the T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3) is expressed on the LCS surface in most types of AML. Since only the TIM-3(+), i.e. not the TIM-3(-), fraction of human AML cells can reconstitute human AML in immunodeficient mice, we hypothesized that the TIM-3 has an essential function in maintaining AML LSCs. Herein, we show that TIM-3 and its ligand, galectin-9 (Gal-9), constitute an autocrine loop critical for human AML LSC development. Serum Gal-9 was significantly elevated in primary AML patients and in mice xenografted with human AML. Neutralization of Gal-9 inhibited xenogeneic reconstitution of human AML, as well as Gal-9 ligation of TIM-3 co-activated NF-κB and β-catenin signaling, suggesting that TIM-3 signaling is necessary for LSC self-renewal. Interestingly, identical changes were found to be involved in the progressive transformation of a variety of pre-leukemic disorders into myeloid leukemia. Thus, molecules constituting the TIM-3/Gal-9 autocrine loop are potential therapeutic targets applicable to most types of myeloid leukemia.

  8. [A TIM-3/galectin-9 autocrine stimulatory loop drives self-renewal of human myeloid leukemia stem cells and leukemia progression].

    PubMed

    Kikushige, Yoshikane

    2016-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) originates from self-renewing leukemic stem cells (LSCs), an ultimate therapeutic target for AML. We previously reported that the T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3) is expressed on the LCS surface in most types of AML. Since only the TIM-3(+), i.e. not the TIM-3(-), fraction of human AML cells can reconstitute human AML in immunodeficient mice, we hypothesized that the TIM-3 has an essential function in maintaining AML LSCs. Herein, we show that TIM-3 and its ligand, galectin-9 (Gal-9), constitute an autocrine loop critical for human AML LSC development. Serum Gal-9 was significantly elevated in primary AML patients and in mice xenografted with human AML. Neutralization of Gal-9 inhibited xenogeneic reconstitution of human AML, as well as Gal-9 ligation of TIM-3 co-activated NF-κB and β-catenin signaling, suggesting that TIM-3 signaling is necessary for LSC self-renewal. Interestingly, identical changes were found to be involved in the progressive transformation of a variety of pre-leukemic disorders into myeloid leukemia. Thus, molecules constituting the TIM-3/Gal-9 autocrine loop are potential therapeutic targets applicable to most types of myeloid leukemia. PMID:27169443

  9. Differential expression and biochemical activity of the immune receptor Tim-3 in healthy and malignant human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Varani, Luca; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-10-20

    The T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim-3) is a plasma membrane-associated receptor which is involved in a variety of biological responses in human immune cells. It is highly expressed in most acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells and therefore may serve as a possible target for AML therapy. However, its biochemical activities in primary human AML cells remain unclear. We therefore analysed the total expression and surface presence of the Tim-3 receptor in primary human AML blasts and healthy primary human leukocytes isolated from human blood. We found that Tim-3 expression was significantly higher in primary AML cells compared to primary healthy leukocytes. Tim-3 receptor molecules were distributed largely on the surface of primary AML cells, whereas in healthy leukocytes Tim-3 protein was mainly expressed intracellularly. In primary human AML blasts, both Tim-3 agonistic antibody and galectin-9 (a Tim-3 natural ligand) significantly upregulated mTOR pathway activity. This was in line with increased accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and secretion of VEGF and TNF-α. Similar results were obtained in primary human healthy leukocytes. Importantly, in both types of primary cells, Tim-3-mediated effects were compared with those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and stem cell factor (SCF). Tim-3 induced comparatively moderate responses in both AML cells and healthy leukocytes. However, Tim-3, like LPS, mediated the release of both TNF-α and VEGF, while SCF induced mostly VEGF secretion and did not upregulate TNF-α release.

  10. Heterogeneity of clonal expansion and maturation-linked mutation acquisition in hematopoietic progenitors in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Walter, R B; Laszlo, G S; Lionberger, J M; Pollard, J A; Harrington, K H; Gudgeon, C J; Othus, M; Rafii, S; Meshinchi, S; Appelbaum, F R; Bernstein, I D

    2014-10-01

    Recent technological advances led to an appreciation of the genetic complexity of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but underlying progenitor cells remain poorly understood because their rarity precludes direct study. We developed a co-culture method integrating hypoxia, aryl hydrocarbon receptor inhibition and micro-environmental support via human endothelial cells to isolate these cells. X-chromosome inactivation studies of the least mature precursors derived following prolonged culture of CD34(+)/CD33(-) cells revealed polyclonal growth in highly curable AMLs, suggesting that mutations necessary for clonal expansion were acquired in more mature progenitors. Consistently, in core-binding factor (CBF) leukemias with known complementing mutations, immature precursors derived following prolonged culture of CD34(+)/CD33(-) cells harbored neither mutation or the CBF mutation alone, whereas more mature precursors often carried both mutations. These results were in contrast to those with leukemias with poor prognosis that showed clonal dominance in the least mature precursors. These data indicate heterogeneity among progenitors in human AML that may have prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  11. Myeloid cells as target of fingolimod action in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Di Dario, Marco; Colombo, Emanuela; Govi, Chiara; De Feo, Donatella; Messina, Maria José; Romeo, Marzia; Sangalli, Francesca; Moiola, Lucia; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Martino, Gianvito; Martinelli, Vittorio; Comi, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To track the effects of fingolimod, an approved drug for multiple sclerosis (MS), on the activation of myeloid cells from the periphery to the CNS. Methods: In vitro and ex vivo immunologic studies coupled with flow cytometry were performed to evaluate the action of fingolimod on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)–induced expression of activation markers in human monocytes from healthy participants, participants with untreated MS, and participants with fingolimod-treated MS. In vivo administration of fingolimod during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was established to verify the activation state of splenic, CNS infiltrating, and CNS resident myeloid cells ex vivo at flow cytometer. Results: We found that in vitro exposure of human monocytes to fingolimod inhibited LPS-induced CD25 and CD150 expression and tumor necrosis factor–α (TNF-α) secretion without altering immune cell survival. Further, EAE treatment with fingolimod led to reduced amounts of TNF-α produced by myeloid cells in vivo in the spleen and CNS. Finally, while displaying normal induction of CD25 and CD150 levels at high LPS concentration, monocytes from patients with fingolimod-treated MS showed significantly higher activation threshold at suboptimal LPS stimulation than controls. Conclusions: The inhibition of myeloid cell activation may be part of the immunosuppressive action of fingolimod and take place in the periphery and in the CNS. PMID:26587553

  12. Effect of photodynamic therapy on a heterotransplanted human parotid tumor.

    PubMed

    Christensen, N R; Charabi, S; Johansen, L S; Rygaard, J; Balle, V H; Tos, M; Thomsen, J

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy on human parotid tumors we used tumor specimens obtained from parotid surgery on a consecutive group of patients. The tumors were transplanted into a subcutaneous pocket of nude mice. The original human tumors were pleomorphic adenoma (four), adenolymphoma (one), acinic cell carcinoma (one), sarcoma (one) and low-grade adenocarcinoma (one). The most aggressive growth was seen in the low-grade adenocarcinoma. We re-implanted this tumor on ten mice bilaterally, and treated the tumors with photodynamic therapy (PDT), resulting in a mean depth of tumor necrosis of 5.4 mm (1-10 mm). In three cases we found vital tumor cells in the periphery of the tumor after treatment, with several new blood vessels in the surrounding tissue, indicating a great potential for neo-angiogenesis in this tumor. In order to evaluate the possible nerve damage subsequent to the photodynamic therapy, the ischiadic nerve in 24 lower limbs of nude mice were investigated. In one case only the macroscopical and histological investigation revealed signs of nerve damage. The current study demonstrates that the nude mice implantation model is excellent to investigate growth in both malignant and benign parotid tumors, and to test new therapeutic modalities. Photodynamic therapy seems to have a possible role in the future management of the malignant lesions of the parotid gland, in cases where radical surgery for some reason is not achievable. PMID:10808112

  13. Genes Expressed in Human Tumor Endothelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Croix, Brad; Rago, Carlo; Velculescu, Victor; Traverso, Giovanni; Romans, Katharine E.; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Lal, Anita; Riggins, Gregory J.; Lengauer, Christoph; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2000-08-01

    To gain a molecular understanding of tumor angiogenesis, we compared gene expression patterns of endothelial cells derived from blood vessels of normal and malignant colorectal tissues. Of over 170 transcripts predominantly expressed in the endothelium, 79 were differentially expressed, including 46 that were specifically elevated in tumor-associated endothelium. Several of these genes encode extracellular matrix proteins, but most are of unknown function. Most of these tumor endothelial markers were expressed in a wide range of tumor types, as well as in normal vessels associated with wound healing and corpus luteum formation. These studies demonstrate that tumor and normal endothelium are distinct at the molecular level, a finding that may have significant implications for the development of anti-angiogenic therapies.

  14. Mechanisms responsible for nilotinib resistance in human chronic myeloid leukemia cells and reversal of resistance.

    PubMed

    Camgoz, Aylin; Gencer, Emel Basak; Ural, Ali Ugur; Baran, Yusuf

    2013-06-01

    Multidrug resistance remains a significant obstacle to successful chemotherapy. The ability to determine the possible resistance mechanisms and surmount the resistance is likely to improve chemotherapy. Nilotinib is a very effective drug in the treatment of imatinib-sensitive or -resistant patients. Although very successful hematologic and cytogenetic responses have been obtained in nilotinib-treated patients, in recent years cases showing resistance to nilotinib have been observed. We aimed to examine the mechanisms underlying nilotinib resistance and to provide new targets for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). There was an up-regulation of antiapoptotic BCR/ABL, GCS and SK-1 genes and MRP1 transporter gene and down-regulation of apoptotic Bax and CerS1 genes in nilotinib-resistant cells. There was no mutation in the nilotinib-binding region of BCR/ABL in resistant cells. Inhibiton of GCS and SK-1 restored nilotinib sensitivity. Targeting the proteins that are involved in nilotinib resistance in addition to the inhibition of BCR/ABL could be a better method of treatment in CML.

  15. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  16. CBFB and MYH11 in inv(16)(p13q22) of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Display Close Spatial Proximity in Interphase Nuclei of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weckerle, Allison B.; Santra, Madhumita; Ng, Maggie C.Y.; Koty, Patrick P.; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the mechanism of chromosomal translocations in cancer, we investigated the spatial proximity between CBFB and MYH11 genes involved in inv(16)(p13q22) found in acute myeloid leukemia patients. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for spatial genome organization in the formation of tumorigenic abnormalities. The non-random localization of chromosomes and, more specifically, of genes appears to play a role in the mechanism of chromosomal translocations. Here, two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal microscopy were used to measure the interphase distance between CBFB and MYH11 in hematopoietic stem cells, where inv(16)(p13q22) is believed to occur, leading to leukemia development. The measured distances in hematopoietic stem cells were compared to mesenchymal stem cells, peripheral blood lymphocytes and fibroblasts, as spatial genome organization is determined to be cell-type specific. Results indicate that CBFB and MYH11 are significantly closer in hematopoietic stem cells compared to all other cell types examined. Furthermore, the CBFB-MYH11 distance is significantly reduced compared to CBFB and a control locus in hematopoietic stem cells, although separation between CBFB and the control is ~70% of that between CBFB and MYH11 on metaphase chromosomes. Hematopoietic stem cells were also treated with fragile site-inducing chemicals since both genes contain translocation breakpoints within these regions. However, treatment with fragile site-inducing chemicals did not significantly affect the interphase distance. Consistent with previous studies, our results suggest that gene proximity may play a role in the formation of cancer-causing rearrangements, providing insight into the mechanism of chromosomal abnormalities in human tumors. PMID:21638519

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor regulates myeloid cell leukemia-1 expression through neuropilin-1-dependent activation of c-MET signaling in human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) is a member of the Bcl-2 family, which inhibits cell apoptosis by sequestering pro-apoptotic proteins Bim and Bid. Mcl-1 overexpression has been associated with progression in leukemia and some solid tumors including prostate cancer (PCa). However, the regulatory mechanism for Mcl-1 expression in PCa cells remains elusive. Results Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that Mcl-1 expression was elevated in PCa specimens with high Gleason grades and further significantly increased in bone metastasis, suggesting a pivotal role of Mcl-1 in PCa metastasis. We further found that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a novel regulator of Mcl-1 expression in PCa cells. Inhibition of endogenous Mcl-1 induced apoptosis, indicating that Mcl-1 is an important survival factor in PCa cells. Neuropilin-1 (NRP1), the "co-receptor" for VEGF165 isoform, was found to be highly expressed in PCa cells, and indispensible in the regulation of Mcl-1. Intriguingly, VEGF165 promoted physical interaction between NRP1 and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor c-MET, and facilitated c-MET phosphorylation via a NRP1-dependent mechanism. VEGF165 induction of Mcl-1 may involve rapid activation of Src kinases and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (Stat3). Importantly, NRP1 overexpression and c-MET activation were positively associated with progression and bone metastasis in human PCa specimens and xenograft tissues. Conclusions This study demonstrated that Mcl-1 overexpression is associated with PCa bone metastasis. Activation of VEGF165-NRP1-c-MET signaling could confer PCa cells survival advantages by up-regulating Mcl-1, contributing to PCa progression. PMID:20085644

  18. Regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and cytokine gene expression in myeloid cells by NF-kappa B/Rel transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Roulston, A; Lin, R; Beauparlant, P; Wainberg, M A; Hiscott, J

    1995-01-01

    CD4+ macrophages in tissues such as lung, skin, and lymph nodes, promyelocytic cells in bone marrow, and peripheral blood monocytes serve as important targets and reservoirs for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. HIV-1-infected myeloid cells are often diminished in their ability to participate in chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and intracellular killing. HIV-1 infection of myeloid cells can lead to the expression of surface receptors associated with cellular activation and/or differentiation that increase the responsiveness of these cells to cytokines secreted by neighboring cells as well as to bacteria or other pathogens. Enhancement of HIV-1 replication is related in part to increased DNA-binding activity of cellular transcription factors such as NF-kappa B. NF-kappa B binds to the HIV-1 enhancer region of the long terminal repeat and contributes to the inducibility of HIV-1 gene expression in response to multiple activating agents. Phosphorylation and degradation of the cytoplasmic inhibitor I kappa B alpha are crucial regulatory events in the activation of NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity. Both N- and C-terminal residues of I kappa B alpha are required for inducer-mediated degradation. Chronic HIV-1 infection of myeloid cells leads to constitutive NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity and provides an intranuclear environment capable of perpetuating HIV-1 replication. Increased intracellular stores of latent NF-kappa B may also result in rapid inducibility of NF-kappa B-dependent cytokine gene expression. In response to secondary pathogenic infections or antigenic challenge, cytokine gene expression is rapidly induced, enhanced, and sustained over prolonged periods in HIV-1-infected myeloid cells compared with uninfected cells. Elevated levels of several inflammatory cytokines have been detected in the sera of HIV-1-infected individuals. Secretion of myeloid cell-derived cytokines may both increase virus production and contribute to AIDS

  19. In vivo potential of recombinant granulysin against human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wasaby, Sameer; de Miguel, Diego; Aporta, Adriana; Naval, Javier; Conde, Blanca; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Anel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    9 kDa granulysin is a protein present in the granules of human CTL and NK cells, with cytolytic activity against microbes and tumors. Previous work from our group demonstrated that this granulysin isoform induced apoptosis in vitro on hematological tumor cells and on primary tumor cells from B-CLL patients. In the present work, recombinant 9 kDa granulysin was used as an anti-tumoral agent to study its in vivo effect on tumor development in athymic “nude” mice models bearing human breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 or multiple myeloma NCI-H929–derived xenografts. Granulysin prevented the in vivo development of detectable MDA-MB-231-derived tumors. In addition, recombinant granulysin was able to completely eradicate NCI-H929-derived tumors. All granulysin-treated tumors exhibited signs of apoptosis induction and an increased NK cell infiltration inside the tumor tissue comparing to control ones. Moreover, no in vivo deleterious effects of the recombinant 9 kDa granulysin doses used in this study were observed on the skin or on the internal organs of the animals. In conclusion, granulysin was able to inhibit the progression of MDA-MB-231-derived xenografts and also to eradicate multiple myeloma NCI-H929-derived xenografts. This work opens the door to the initiation of preclinical and possibly clinical studies for the use of 9 kDa granulysin as a new anti-tumoral treatment. PMID:26405603

  20. TGF{beta}-mediated formation of pRb-E2F complexes in human myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Xiaotang

    2008-05-02

    TGF{beta} is well known for its inhibitory effect on cell cycle G1 checkpoint kinases. However, its role in the control of pRb-E2F complexes is not well established. TGF{beta} inhibits phosphorylation of pRb at several serine and threonine residues and regulates the association of E2F transcription factors with pRb family proteins. Recent studies found that predominantly E2F-4, p130, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) are found to bind to corresponding E2F-responsive promoters in G0/G1 phase. As cells progress through mid-G1, p130-E2F4 complex are replaced by p107-E2F4 followed by activators E2F1, 2, and 3. pRb was not detectable in the promoters containing the E2F-responsive site in cycling cells but was associated with E2F4-p130 complexes or E2F4-p107 complexes during G0/G1 phase. In human myeloid leukemia cell line, MV4-11, TGF{beta} upregulated pRb-E2F-4 and p130-E2F-4, and downregulated p107-E2F-4 complexes. However, pRB-E2F1 and pRb-E2F3 complexes were found in proliferating cells but not in TGF{beta} arrested G1 cells. In addition, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assay (EMSA) could not detect pRb-E2F DNA-binding activities either in S or G1 phase but exhibited the existence of p107-E2F4 in proliferating cells and p130-E2F4 complexes in TGF{beta}-arrested G1 cells, respectively. Our data suggest that p107 and p130, but not pRb, and the repressor E2F, but not activator E2Fs, play a critical role in regulating E2F-responsive gene expression in TGF{beta}-mediated cell cycle control in human myeloid leukemia cells.

  1. TGFbeta-mediated formation of pRb-E2F complexes in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao Tang

    2008-05-01

    TGFbeta is well known for its inhibitory effect on cell cycle G1 checkpoint kinases. However, its role in the control of pRb-E2F complexes is not well established. TGFbeta inhibits phosphorylation of pRb at several serine and threonine residues and regulates the association of E2F transcription factors with pRb family proteins. Recent studies found that predominantly E2F-4, p130, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) are found to bind to corresponding E2F-responsive promoters in G0/G1 phase. As cells progress through mid-G1, p130-E2F4 complex are replaced by p107-E2F4 followed by activators E2F1, 2, and 3. pRb was not detectable in the promoters containing the E2F-responsive site in cycling cells but was associated with E2F4-p130 complexes or E2F4-p107 complexes during G0/G1 phase. In human myeloid leukemia cell line, MV4-11, TGFbeta upregulated pRb-E2F-4 and p130-E2F-4, and downregulated p107-E2F-4 complexes. However, pRB-E2F1 and pRb-E2F3 complexes were found in proliferating cells but not in TGFbeta arrested G1 cells. In addition, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assay (EMSA) could not detect pRb-E2F DNA-binding activities either in S or G1 phase but exhibited the existence of p107-E2F4 in proliferating cells and p130-E2F4 complexes in TGFbeta-arrested G1 cells, respectively. Our data suggest that p107 and p130, but not pRb, and the repressor E2F, but not activator E2Fs, play a critical role in regulating E2F-responsive gene expression in TGFbeta-mediated cell cycle control in human myeloid leukemia cells.

  2. Detection of Human Polyomavirus 7 in human thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rennspiess, Dorit; Pujari, Sreedhar; Keijzers, Marlies; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A.; Hochstenbag, Monique; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Kurz, Anna Kordelia; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Haugg, Anke; Pastrana, Diana V.; Buck, Christopher B.; De Baets, Marc H.; zur Hausen, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although the molecular genetics possibly underlying the pathogenesis of human thymoma have been extensively studied, its etiology remains poorly understood. Since murine polyomavirus consistently induces thymomas in mice, we assessed the presence of the novel human polyomavirus 7 (HPyV7) in human thymic epithelial tumors. Methods HPyV7-DNA Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), DNA-PCR and immuno-histochemistry (IHC) were performed in 37 thymomas. Of these, 26 were previously diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG). In addition, 20 thymic hyperplasias and 20 fetal thymic tissues were tested. Results HPyV7-FISH revealed specific nuclear hybridization signals within the neoplastic epithelial cells of 23 thymomas (62.2%). With some exceptions, the HPyV7-FISH data correlated with the HPyV7-DNA PCR. By IHC large T antigen (LTAg) expression of HPyV7 was detected, and double staining confirmed its expression in the neoplastic epithelial cells. Eighteen of the 26 MG-positive and 7 of the 11 MG-negative thymomas were HPyV7-positive. 40% of the 20 hyperplastic thymi were HPyV7-positive by PCR as confirmed by FISH and IHC in the follicular lymphocytes. All 20 fetal thymi tested HPyV7-negative. Conclusions The presence of HPyV7-DNA and LTAg expression in the majority of thymomas possibly link HPyV7 to human thymomagenesis. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the possible associations of HPyV7 and MG. PMID:25526237

  3. Heterogenous effects of bryostatin on human myeloid leukemia clonogenicity: dose and time scheduling dependency.

    PubMed

    van der Hem, K G; Schuurhuis, G J; Dräger, A M; Odding, J H; Huijgens, P C

    1996-09-01

    The potent anti-neoplastic actions displayed in vitro by bryostatins have led to the introduction of short-term bryostatin-1 infusions in phase I clinical trials. Because bryostatin (bryo) undergoes a rapid clearance in vivo, we were interested in its scheduling effects on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) clonogenicity. Therefore, we assessed the primary plating efficiency (PE1) of AML samples in response to several bryo concentrations after various preincubation periods in a semi-solid colony forming assay. Whereas continuous exposure to 10 nM bryo during the assay period reduced the PE1 in nearly all samples tested, preincubation of eight AML patients' specimens for 1, 2, 3 or 4 days with bryo in a dose range of 0.1-10 nM showed a heterogenous PE1 response. Stimulatory as well as inhibitory effects on leukemic clonogenic growth were seen within individual specimens depending on dose and preincubation time with no single incubation time or concentration that caused unequivocal common overall inhibition of clonogenic growth in most or all of the samples. Higher doses of bryo also failed to result in specific inhibition of leukemic cells: 4/8 samples showed an increased clonogenic response to 250 nM bryo whereas normal bone marrow progenitor cells were consistently inhibited in their clonogenicity at this dose. A marked similarity, i.e. undulatory effects with increasing bryo concentrations, was found for HL60 leukemic cells. In conclusion, the effects of bryo on clonogenic leukemia cell growth are strongly dependent on scheduling and dose varying between and within individual AML samples. These results caution against in vivo bryo pulse therapy, as currently applied, for treatment of AML. PMID:8947584

  4. Pharmacokinetic model-predicted anticancer drug concentrations in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Gallo, James M; Vicini, Paolo; Orlansky, Amy; Li, Shaolan; Zhou, Feng; Ma, Jianguo; Pulfer, Sharon; Bookman, Michel A; Guo, Ping

    2004-12-01

    In an era when molecular and targeted anticancer therapeutics is a major focus and when understanding drug dynamics in tumor is critical, it seems advantageous to be able to relate drug concentrations in tumors to corresponding biological end points. To that end, a novel method, based on physiologically based hybrid pharmacokinetic models, is presented to predict human tumor drug concentrations. Such models consist of a forcing function, describing the plasma drug concentration-time profile, which is linked to a model describing drug disposition in tumors. The hybrid models are originally derived from preclinical data and then scaled to humans. Integral to the scale-up procedure is the ability to derive human forcing functions directly from clinical pharmacokinetic data. Three examples of this approach are presented based on preclinical investigations with carboplatin, topotecan, and temozolomide. Translation of these preclinical hybrid models to humans used a Monte Carlo simulation technique that accounted for intrasubject and intersubject variability. Different pharmacokinetic end points, such as the AUC tumor, were extracted from the simulated human tumor drug concentrations to show how the predicted drug concentrations might be used to select drug-dosing regimens. It is believed that this modeling strategy can be used as an aid in the drug development process by providing key insights into drug disposition in tumors and by offering a foundation to optimize drug regimen design. PMID:15585640

  5. A rare case of myeloid sarcoma presenting as anal fissure

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; INTAGLIATA, E.; FIUMARA, P.F.; VILLARI, L.; MARCHESE, S.; CACCIOLA, E.

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a tumor composed of myeloblasts occurring at an extramedullary site. It may develop in patients with acute myeloid leukemia, myeloproliferative or myelodysplastic syndrome, sometimes preceding onset of the systemic disease. Frequent sites of myeloid sarcoma are bones or various soft tissues. Gastrointestinal involvement is very rare. We report a unique case of myeloid sarcoma presenting as a painful anal fissure, in a patient with a history of acute myeloid leukemia. The diagnosis was achieved by a surgical excisional biopsy and immunoistochemical staining. PMID:26712260

  6. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Hepatocellular carcinoma (hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  7. Differential responses of FLIPlong and FLIPshort overexpressing human myeloid leukemia cells to TNFα and TRAIL-initiated apoptotic signals

    PubMed Central

    Seal, Sudeshna; Hockenbery, David M.; Spaulding, Emily; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Abbassi, Nissa; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Objective Clonal marrow cells from patients with early myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) undergo apoptosis in response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Cells from advanced MDS are resistant to TRAIL. Two isoforms of the Flice inhibitory protein, FLIPshort(S) and FLIPlong(L), which modulate TRAIL signals, showed disease-stage- dependent differential regulation. Therefore, we aimed at characterizing potential differential effects of FLIPL and FLIPS, on TRAIL and TNFα–induced apoptosis in model leukemic cell lines. Methods Using lentiviral constructs, FLIPL and FLIPS, as well as a green fluorescent protein (GFP) control were overexpressed in ML-1 cells, which constitutively express very low levels of FLIP and are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction. Cells were then exposed to TRAIL or TNFα, and effects on the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis induction were assessed. Results Overexpression of FLIP reduced TRAIL and TNFα–induced apoptosis in ML-1 cells. However, while FLIPL completely abrogated apoptosis, FLIPS allowed for BID cleavage and caspase-3 activation. Concurrently there was a decline of Bcl-xL and XIAP in FLIPS cells followed by apoptosis. Further, inhibition of NF-κB activation in TNFα-treated cells resulted in profound apoptosis in FLIPS, but not in FLIPL overexpressing cells, consistent with the observations in patients with early stage MDS. Inhibition of NF-κB had only minimal effects on TRAIL signaling. Conclusion Thus, FLIPL and FLIPS exerted differential effects in myeloid leukemic cell lines in response to TRAIL and TNFα. It might be possible to therapeutically exploit those differences with effector molecules specific for the FLIP isoforms. PMID:18838202

  8. Isolation of Mouse and Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Swierczak, Agnieszka; Sugano, Gaël; Smith, Harriet; Wiechmann, Lisa; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex network of cells that support tumor progression and malignancy. It has been demonstrated that tumor cells can educate the immune system to promote a tumor-friendly environment. Among all these immune cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are well represented and their presence in mouse models has been shown to promote tumor progression and metastasis. These effects are through the stimulation of angiogenesis, enhancement of tumor cell invasion and intravasation, immunosuppression, and at the metastatic site tumor cell extravasation and growth. However, the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Furthermore there is limited information on TAMs derived from human cancers. For this reason it is important to be able to extract TAMs from tumors in order to compare their phenotypes, functions, and transcriptomes with normal resident tissue macrophages. Isolation of these cells is challenging due to the lack of markers and standardized protocols. Here we show an optimized protocol for the efficient isolation and extraction of resident macrophages and TAMs from human and mouse tissues by using multicolor flow cytometry. These protocols allow for the extraction of thousands of macrophages in less than 5 h from tissues as small as half a gram. The isolated macrophages can then be used for both "omics" and in vitro studies. PMID:27325269

  9. Isolation of Mouse and Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Swierczak, Agnieszka; Sugano, Gaël; Smith, Harriet; Wiechmann, Lisa; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex network of cells that support tumor progression and malignancy. It has been demonstrated that tumor cells can educate the immune system to promote a tumor-friendly environment. Among all these immune cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are well represented and their presence in mouse models has been shown to promote tumor progression and metastasis. These effects are through the stimulation of angiogenesis, enhancement of tumor cell invasion and intravasation, immunosuppression, and at the metastatic site tumor cell extravasation and growth. However, the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Furthermore there is limited information on TAMs derived from human cancers. For this reason it is important to be able to extract TAMs from tumors in order to compare their phenotypes, functions, and transcriptomes with normal resident tissue macrophages. Isolation of these cells is challenging due to the lack of markers and standardized protocols. Here we show an optimized protocol for the efficient isolation and extraction of resident macrophages and TAMs from human and mouse tissues by using multicolor flow cytometry. These protocols allow for the extraction of thousands of macrophages in less than 5 h from tissues as small as half a gram. The isolated macrophages can then be used for both “omics” and in vitro studies. PMID:27325269

  10. Recent progress in canine tumor vaccination: potential applications for human tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Denies, Sofie; Sanders, Niek N

    2012-11-01

    Tumor vaccination holds great promise for the treatment of cancer and research concerning tumor vaccination in dogs is of great interest for veterinary as well as human medicine. Indeed, cancer is the leading cause of death in adult dogs and companion animals are acknowledged as excellent preclinical models for human oncology. The license of the veterinary melanoma vaccine (Oncept™) and Provenge® for the treatment of prostate cancer in men established tumor vaccination as a valid treatment modality for cancer. Although the results with this and other vaccines are promising, there are still some hurdles to overcome. In this article, preclinical and clinical trials with tumor vaccines in dogs are discussed, as well as the surplus value of canine cancer patients for human medicine. PMID:23249236

  11. Growth-hormone-releasing factor immunoreactivity in human endocrine tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, D. G.; Quan, R.; Hoffman, A. R.; Webber, R. J.; Chang, J. K.; Bensch, K. G.

    1984-01-01

    Seventy-three human tumors and adjacent nonneoplastic tissues were analyzed immunohistochemically for the presence of growth-hormone-releasing factor (GRF). Four of 9 pancreatic endocrine tumors, 2 of 3 appendiceal carcinoids, and 1 of 5 cecal carcinoids were immunoreactive for GRF. One of the GRF-containing pancreatic tumors was associated with acromegaly. Histologically, the growth patterns of these tumors were variable, and the distribution of immunoreactive cells was patchy and irregular. There were no normal cells that contained GRF. These results indicate that GRF production by human tumors is more common than previously thought, although clinical acromegaly may not be apparent in patients who harbor such neoplasms. Images Figure 1 PMID:6093542

  12. Modeling Breast Tumor Development with a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in breast cancer growth and progression to metastasis. Here, we describe a method to examine stromal-epithelial interactions during tumor formation and progression utilizing human-derived mammary epithelial cells and breast stromal cells. This method outlines the isolation of each cell type from reduction mammoplasty tissue, the culture and genetic modification of both epithelial and stromal cells using lentiviral technology, and the method of humanizing and implantation of transformed epithelial cells into the cleared mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice. This model system may be a useful tool to dissect signaling interactions that contribute to invasive tumor behavior and therapeutic resistance. PMID:27581027

  13. X-ray sensitivity of human tumor cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Nove, J.; Little, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    Clonally-derived cells from ten human malignant tumors considered radiocurable (breast, neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma) or non-radiocurable (osteosarcoma, hypernephroma, glioblastoma, melanoma) were studied in cell culture and their in vitro x-ray survival curve parameters determined (anti n, D/sub 0/). There were no significant differences among the tumor cell lines suggesting that survival parameters in vitro do not explain differences in clinical radiocurability. Preliminary investigation with density inhibited human tumor cells indicate that such an approach may yield information regarding inherent cellular differences in radiocurability.

  14. Phase I clinical study of RG7356, an anti-CD44 humanized antibody, in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vey, Norbert; Delaunay, Jacques; Martinelli, Giovanni; Fiedler, Walter; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Prebet, Thomas; Gomez-Roca, Carlos; Papayannidis, Cristina; Kebenko, Maxim; Paschka, Peter; Christen, Randolph; Guarin, Ernesto; Bröske, Ann-Marie; Baehner, Monika; Brewster, Michael; Walz, Antje-Christine; Michielin, Francesca; Runza, Valeria; Meresse, Valerie; Recher, Christian

    2016-05-31

    RG7356, a recombinant anti-CD44 immunoglobulin G1 humanized monoclonal antibody, inhibits cell adhesion and has been associated with macrophage activation in preclinical models. We report results of a phase I dose-escalation study of RG7356 in relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML).Eligible patients with refractory AML, relapsed AML after induction chemotherapy, or previously untreated AML not eligible for intensive chemotherapy were enrolled and received intravenous RG7356 at dosages ≤ 2400 mg every other week or ≤ 1200 mg weekly or twice weekly; dose escalation started at 300 mg.Forty-four patients (median age, 69 years) were enrolled. One dose-limiting toxicity occurred (grade 3 hemolysis exacerbation) after one 1200 mg dose (twice-weekly cohort). The majority of adverse events were mild/moderate. Infusion-related reactions occurred in 64% of patients mainly during cycle 1. Two patients experienced grade 3 drug-induced aseptic meningitis. Pharmacokinetics increased supraproportionally, suggesting a target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) at ≥ 1200 mg. Two patients achieved complete response with incomplete platelet recovery or partial response, respectively. One patient had stable disease with hematologic improvement.RG7356 was generally safe and well tolerated. Maximum tolerated dose was not reached, but saturation of TMDD was achieved. The recommended dose for future AML evaluations is 2400 mg every other week. PMID:27081038

  15. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs. PMID:27582733

  16. Granulocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Accumulate in Human Placenta and Polarize toward a Th2 Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Köstlin, Natascha; Hofstädter, Kathrin; Ostermeir, Anna-Lena; Spring, Bärbel; Leiber, Anja; Haen, Susanne; Abele, Harald; Bauer, Peter; Pollheimer, Jürgen; Hartl, Dominik; Poets, Christian F; Gille, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Tolerance induction toward the semiallogeneic fetus is crucial to enable a successful pregnancy; its failure is associated with abortion or preterm delivery. Skewing T cell differentiation toward a Th2-dominated phenotype seems to be pivotal in maternal immune adaption, yet underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells that mediate T cell suppression and are increased in cord blood of healthy newborns and in peripheral blood of pregnant women. In this study, we demonstrate that granulocytic MDSCs (GR-MDSCs) accumulate in human placenta of healthy pregnancies but are diminished in patients with spontaneous abortions. Placental GR-MDSCs effectively suppressed T cell responses by expression of arginase I and production of reactive oxygen species and were activated at the maternal-fetal interface through interaction with trophoblast cells. Furthermore, GR-MDSCs isolated from placenta polarized CD4(+) T cells toward a Th2 cytokine response. These results highlight a potential role of GR-MDSCs in inducing and maintaining maternal-fetal tolerance and suggest them as a promising target for therapeutic manipulation of pregnancy complications. PMID:26712947

  17. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs. PMID:27582733

  18. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs.

  19. Efficient retroviral transduction of human B-lymphoid and myeloid progenitors: marked inhibition of their growth by the Pax5 transgene

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Rieko; Kitamura, Toshio; Tsuji, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    We applied a coculture system for the genetic manipulation of human B-lymphoid and myeloid progenitor cells using murine bone marrow stromal cell support, and investigated the effects of forced Pax5 expression in both cell types. Cytokine-stimulated cord blood CD34+ cells could be transduced at 85% efficiency and 95% cell viability by a single 24-h infection with RD114-pseudotyped retroviral vectors, produced by the packaging cell line Plat-F and bicistronic vector plasmids pMXs-Ig, pMYs-Ig, or pMCs-Ig, encoding EGFP. Infected CD34+ cells were seeded onto HESS-5 cells in the presence of stem cell factor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, allowing the extensive production of B progenitors and granulocytic cells. We examined the cell number and CD34, CD33, CD19, and CD20 lambda and kappa expressions by flow cytometry. Ectopic expression of Pax5 in CD34+ cells resulted in small myeloid progenitors coexpressing CD33 and CD19 and inhibited myeloid differentiation. After 6 weeks, the number of Pax5-transduced CD19+ cells was 40-fold lower than that of control cells. However, the expression of CD20 and the κ/λ chain on Pax5-transduced CD19+ cells suggests that the Pax5 transgene may not interfere with their differentiation. This report is the first to describe the effects of forced Pax5 expression in human hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:18415655

  20. Infrared Spectra of Human Breast Tumor Tissue and Experimental Animal Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Belkov, M. V.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Pekhnyo, V. I.; Kozachkova, A. N.; Tsarik, H. V.; Kutsenko, I. P.; Sharykina, N. I.; Butra, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used Fourier transform IR spectroscopy methods to conduct comparative studies of human breast tumors and sarcoma 180 tumor grafted into mice. The IR spectral parameters used to identify tumor tissue in mice with the sarcoma 180 strain proved to be identical to the parameters for human breast tissue in cancer. In the presence of a malignant tumor in humans, the most intense C=O vibrational bands in the protein molecules are observed in the interval 1710-1680 cm-1. For a benign tumor, in the IR spectra of breast tissue the intense bands are located in the interval 1670-1650 cm-1. We spectroscopically monitored the diagnosis and the chemotherapy process using the model of sarcoma 180 in mice. As the therapeutic drugs, we used synthesized coordination compounds based on palladium complexes with diphosphonic acid derivatives. We demonstrate the promising potential of palladium complexes with zoledronic acid as an effective cytostatic. In therapy using a palladium complex with zoledronic acid, the effect of tumor growth inhibition is accompanied by a change in its spectral characteristics. The parameters of the IR spectra for tumor tissue after treatment are close to those of the IR spectra for healthy tissue.

  1. Canine tumors: a spontaneous animal model of human carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Salomé S; Carvalho, Sandra; Cabral, Joana; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2012-03-01

    The enormous biologic complexity of human cancer has stimulated the development of more appropriate experimental models that could resemble in a natural and spontaneous manner the physiopathologic aspects of cancer biology. Companion animals have many desired characteristics that fill the gap between in vitro and in vivo studies, and these characteristics have proven to be important in understanding many complex molecular aspects of human cancer. Spontaneous tumors in dogs share a wide variety of epidemiologic, biologic, and clinical features with human cancer, which makes this animal model both attractive and underused in oncology research. In this review, we summarize the importance of naturally occurring canine tumors as valuable tools for studying numerous aspects of human cancer as well as the potential use of this animal model for the development of new cancer treatments. We address specifically the use of canine mammary tumors as an increasingly powerful model to study human breast cancer. PMID:22340765

  2. Molecular pathways: myeloid complicity in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; Greenberg, Philip D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-10-15

    Cancer-induced inflammation results in accumulation of myeloid cells. These myeloid cells include progenitors and progeny of monocytes, granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. It has become increasingly evident that tumor-dependent factors can condition myeloid cells toward an immunosuppressive and protumorigenic phenotype. Thus, myeloid cells are not simply bystanders in malignancy or barometers of disease burden. Reflecting their dynamic and plastic nature, myeloid cells manifest a continuum of cellular differentiation and are intimately involved at all stages of neoplastic progression. They can promote tumorigenesis through both immune-dependent and -independent mechanisms and can dictate response to therapies. A greater understanding of the inherent plasticity and relationships among myeloid subsets is needed to inform therapeutic targeting. New clinical trials are being designed to modulate the activities of myeloid cells in cancer, which may be essential to maximize the efficacy of both conventional cytotoxic and immune-based therapies for solid tumors. Clin Cancer Res; 20(20); 5157-70. ©2014 AACR.

  3. Molecular pathways: myeloid complicity in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; Greenberg, Philip D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-10-15

    Cancer-induced inflammation results in accumulation of myeloid cells. These myeloid cells include progenitors and progeny of monocytes, granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. It has become increasingly evident that tumor-dependent factors can condition myeloid cells toward an immunosuppressive and protumorigenic phenotype. Thus, myeloid cells are not simply bystanders in malignancy or barometers of disease burden. Reflecting their dynamic and plastic nature, myeloid cells manifest a continuum of cellular differentiation and are intimately involved at all stages of neoplastic progression. They can promote tumorigenesis through both immune-dependent and -independent mechanisms and can dictate response to therapies. A greater understanding of the inherent plasticity and relationships among myeloid subsets is needed to inform therapeutic targeting. New clinical trials are being designed to modulate the activities of myeloid cells in cancer, which may be essential to maximize the efficacy of both conventional cytotoxic and immune-based therapies for solid tumors. Clin Cancer Res; 20(20); 5157-70. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25047706

  4. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gudkov, Sergey V.; Shilyagina, Natalya Yu.; Vodeneev, Vladimir A.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed. PMID:26729091

  5. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors.

    PubMed

    Gudkov, Sergey V; Shilyagina, Natalya Yu; Vodeneev, Vladimir A; Zvyagin, Andrei V

    2015-12-28

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed.

  6. CCR5 susceptibility to ligand-mediated down-modulation differs between human T lymphocytes and myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Fox, James M; Kasprowicz, Richard; Hartley, Oliver; Signoret, Nathalie

    2015-07-01

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on leukocytes and a coreceptor used by HIV-1 to enter CD4(+) T lymphocytes and macrophages. Stimulation of CCR5 by chemokines triggers internalization of chemokine-bound CCR5 molecules in a process called down-modulation, which contributes to the anti-HIV activity of chemokines. Recent studies have shown that CCR5 conformational heterogeneity influences chemokine-CCR5 interactions and HIV-1 entry in transfected cells or activated CD4(+) T lymphocytes. However, the effect of CCR5 conformations on other cell types and on the process of down-modulation remains unclear. We used mAbs, some already shown to detect distinct CCR5 conformations, to compare the behavior of CCR5 on in vitro generated human T cell blasts, monocytes and MDMs and CHO-CCR5 transfectants. All human cells express distinct antigenic forms of CCR5 not detected on CHO-CCR5 cells. The recognizable populations of CCR5 receptors exhibit different patterns of down-modulation on T lymphocytes compared with myeloid cells. On T cell blasts, CCR5 is recognized by all antibodies and undergoes rapid chemokine-mediated internalization, whereas on monocytes and MDMs, a pool of CCR5 molecules is recognized by a subset of antibodies and is not removed from the cell surface. We demonstrate that this cell surface-retained form of CCR5 responds to prolonged treatment with more-potent chemokine analogs and acts as an HIV-1 coreceptor. Our findings indicate that the regulation of CCR5 is highly specific to cell type and provide a potential explanation for the observation that native chemokines are less-effective HIV-entry inhibitors on macrophages compared with T lymphocytes.

  7. Expanded numbers of circulating myeloid dendritic cells in patent human filarial infection reflect lower CCR1 expression.

    PubMed

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Mahapatra, Lily; Dembele, Benoit; Konate, Siaka; Metenou, Simon; Dolo, Housseini; Coulibaly, Michel E; Soumaoro, Lamine; Coulibaly, Siaka Y; Sanogo, Dramane; Seriba Doumbia, Salif; Diallo, Abdallah A; Traoré, Sekou F; Klion, Amy; Nutman, Thomas B; Mahanty, Siddhartha

    2010-11-15

    APC dysfunction has been postulated to mediate some of the parasite-specific T cell unresponsiveness seen in patent filarial infection. We have shown that live microfilariae of Brugia malayi induce caspase-dependent apoptosis in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. This study addresses whether apoptosis observed in vitro extends to patent filarial infections in humans and is reflected in the number of circulating myeloid DCs (mDCs; CD11c(-)CD123(lo)) in peripheral blood of infected microfilaremic individuals. Utilizing flow cytometry to identify DC subpopulations (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs [pDCs]) based on expression of CD11c and CD123, we found a significant increase in numbers of circulating mDCs (CD11c(+)CD123(lo)) in filaria-infected individuals compared with uninfected controls from the same filaria-endemic region of Mali. Total numbers of pDCs, monocytes, and lymphocytes did not differ between the two groups. To investigate potential causes of differences in mDC numbers between the two groups, we assessed chemokine receptor expression on mDCs. Our data indicate that filaria-infected individuals had a lower percentage of circulating CCR1(+) mDCs and a higher percentage of circulating CCR5(+) mDCs and pDCs. Finally, live microfilariae of B. malayi were able to downregulate cell-surface expression of CCR1 on monocyte-derived DCs and diminish their calcium flux in response to stimulation by a CCR1 ligand. These findings suggest that microfilaria are capable of altering mDC migration through downregulation of expression of some chemokine receptors and their signaling functions. These observations have major implications for regulation of immune responses to these long-lived parasites. PMID:20956349

  8. Sensitivity tests of tumors to cytostatic agents. II. Investigation on human tumors.

    PubMed

    Mattern, J; Kaufmann, M; Hinderer, H; Wayss, K; Volm, M

    1975-01-01

    Certain substances which influenced nucleic acid metabolism were found to have about the same cytostatic activity on human cells when measured in tissue culture experiments (cell numbers) or in short-term cultures (3-H-uridine incorporation in cell suspensions). By treatment with a dose of cytostatics corresponding to 10 times therapeutic dose, chemosensitive tumors can be distinguished from non-responsive tumors. By using this in vitro test system to investigate the sensitivities of 100 human tumors, it is shown that 28 of these tumors were responsive to adriamycin, daunomycin and Actinomycin D. Good agreement was observed between these in vitro results and the literature data on clinical therapy using these particular substances.

  9. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  10. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  11. Correlation of human Bub1 expression with tumor-proliferating activity in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Shigeishi, Hideo; Yoneda, Shingo; Taki, Masayuki; Nobumori, Takeshi; Ohta, Kouji; Higashikawa, Koichiro; Yasui, Wataru; Kamata, Nobuyuki

    2006-04-01

    Human Bub1 plays an important role at the spindle assembly check-point to prevent cell cycle progression following spindle damage. We examined the expression of Bub1 mRNA and protein in 21 human salivary gland tumors (7 pleomorphic adenomas, 2 warthin tumors, 5 mucoepidermoid carcinomas, 3 adenoid cystic carcinomas and 4 acinic cell carcinomas) and 3 normal submandibular glands using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or western blotting. The mean expression levels of Bub1 mRNA and protein were higher in malignant tumors (0.12+/-0.028/1.75+/-0.53) than normal submandibular glands (0.042+/-0.014/0.19+/-0.044) and benign tumors (0.058+/-0.01/0.97+/-0.44). We found a significant association between the level of Bub1 mRNA/protein expression and clinical stage in malignant tumors (Mann-Whitney U test, p=0.019/p=0.016). We analyzed its relation with the proliferative activity monitored by the Ki-67 labeling index by immunohistochemistry as well as the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) by Western blotting. A significant correlation was found between Bub1 mRNA/protein expression and the Ki-67 labeling index in salivary gland tumors (Spearman's correlation coefficient by rank test, p=0.026/p=0.002). These results indicate that increased expression of the human Bub1 gene is closely linked to abnormal cell proliferation in malignant conditions.

  12. Hybridization of a myeloid leukemia-derived human cell line (K562) with a human Burkitt's lymphoma line (P3HR-1).

    PubMed

    Klein, G; Zeuthen, J; Eriksson, I; Terasaki, P; Bernoco, M; Rosén, A; Masucci, G; Povey, S; Ber, R

    1980-04-01

    The myeloid leukemia-derived Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative human lymphoid cell line K562 was successfully hybridized with the EBV-carrying Burkitt's lymphoma line P3HR-1. Authenticity of the hybrid PUTKO-1 was established by chromosome and isoenzyme studies. A virtually complete hybrid PUTKO-1 carried the EBV genome derived from the lymphoma parent. It averaged 26 EBV DNA copies per cell and was 100% positive for Epstein-Barr virus-associated nuclear antigen (EBNA). In most respects, the hybrid resembled the K562 parent: It had a high Fc receptor concentration, high sensitivity to natural killer cells, absence of EBV C3 receptors, and deficiency of membrane-associated beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2M) and HLA, in parallel with intracellular synthesis and secretion of beta 2M to the medium. Unlike the P3HR-1 parent, the hybrid was completely nonpermissive for antigens of the EBV cycle, early antigen, and viral capsid antigen. None of the 3 inducing agents, 5-lodo-2'-deoxyuridine, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol 13-acetate, or sodium butyrate, caused any viral antigen synthesis in PUTKO-1 in contrast to the good inducibility of the parental P3HR-1 subline. Thus the myeloid parent restricted expression of EBV antigens except EBNA. This exception further supports the concept that EBNA is an autonomous function of the viral genome, independent of host cell control that regulates expression of antigens related to the viral cycle. On the contrary, extinction of viral antigens in this hybrid between 2 cell lineages supports our previous concept that the ability to produce viral antigens is similar to a differentiated B-cell property.

  13. Targeting STAT3 signaling reduces immunosuppressive myeloid cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lin-Lin; Yu, Guang-Tao; Deng, Wei-Wei; Mao, Liang; Liu, Jian-Feng; Ma, Si-Rui; Fan, Teng-Fei; Hall, Bradford; Kulkarni, Ashok B; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Cumulative evidence suggests that constitutively activated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) may contribute to sustaining immunosuppressive status, and that inhibiting STAT3 signaling represents a potential strategy to improve antitumor immunity. In the present study, we observed that high levels phosphorylated of STAT3 are significantly associated with the markers for both myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Additionally, we showed that targeting STAT3 signaling with a tolerable selective inhibitor S3I-201 significantly decreased immature myeloid cells such as MDSCs, TAMs and iDCs in genetically defined mice HNSCC model. These findings highlight that targeting STAT3 signaling may be effective to enhance antitumor immunity via myeloid suppressor cells in HNSCC. PMID:27467947

  14. Lrig1 Expression in Human Sebaceous Gland Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pünchera, Jöri; Barnes, Laurent; Kaya, Gürkan

    2016-01-01

    Background Sebaceous glands contribute significantly to the barrier functions of the skin. However, little is known about their homeostasis and tumorigenesis. Recently, increased expression of stem cell marker Lrig1 has been reported in sebaceous carcinoma-like tumors of K14ΔNLef1 transgenic mice. In this study, we analyzed the Lrig1 expression in human sebaceous tumors. Methods Twenty-eight formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sebaceous tumor specimens (7 sebaceous hyperplasias, 7 sebaceous adenomas, 10 sebaceomas and 4 sebaceous carcinomas) were stained with anti-Lrig1, anti-CD44v3 and anti-Ki67 antibody. Results Four (100%) sebaceous carcinomas, 8 (80%) sebaceomas, 3 (43%) sebaceous adenomas and no sebaceous hyperplasia showed Lrig1 overexpression. Discussion and Conclusion Lrig1 is a known tumor suppressor gene and is usually considered to be an indicator of poorly aggressive tumors. In human sebaceous tumors, the stronger Lrig1 staining in sebaceous carcinoma compared to other sebaceous tumors might be a feature of an advanced stage in tumorigenesis and a bad prognosis. In our study, 100% of sebaceous carcinomas revealed Lrig1 overexpression. We propose that Lrig1 may be used as a possible new marker of poorly differentiated sebaceous carcinoma. PMID:27504445

  15. Normal ABL1 is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic target in human and mouse leukemias expressing oncogenic ABL1 kinases.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Yashodhara; Koptyra, Mateusz; Hoser, Grazyna; Kantekure, Kanchan; Roy, Darshan; Gornicka, Barbara; Nieborowska-Skorska, Margaret; Bolton-Gillespie, Elisabeth; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Müschen, Markus; Valent, Peter; Wasik, Mariusz A; Richardson, Christine; Hantschel, Oliver; van der Kuip, Heiko; Stoklosa, Tomasz; Skorski, Tomasz

    2016-04-28

    Leukemias expressing constitutively activated mutants of ABL1 tyrosine kinase (BCR-ABL1, TEL-ABL1, NUP214-ABL1) usually contain at least 1 normal ABL1 allele. Because oncogenic and normal ABL1 kinases may exert opposite effects on cell behavior, we examined the role of normal ABL1 in leukemias induced by oncogenic ABL1 kinases. BCR-ABL1-Abl1(-/-) cells generated highly aggressive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)-blast phase-like disease in mice compared with less malignant CML-chronic phase-like disease from BCR-ABL1-Abl1(+/+) cells. Additionally, loss of ABL1 stimulated proliferation and expansion of BCR-ABL1 murine leukemia stem cells, arrested myeloid differentiation, inhibited genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis, and facilitated accumulation of chromosomal aberrations. Conversely, allosteric stimulation of ABL1 kinase activity enhanced the antileukemia effect of ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib and ponatinib) in human and murine leukemias expressing BCR-ABL1, TEL-ABL1, and NUP214-ABL1. Therefore, we postulate that normal ABL1 kinase behaves like a tumor suppressor and therapeutic target in leukemias expressing oncogenic forms of the kinase. PMID:26864341

  16. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  17. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary We analyzed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, mRNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously-defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at > 10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the Luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein expression-defined subgroups, possibly contributed by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signaling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/p-HER2/HER1/p-HER1 signature within the HER2-Enriched expression subtype. Comparison of Basal-like breast tumors with high-grade Serous Ovarian tumors showed many molecular commonalities, suggesting a related etiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biologic finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biologic subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:23000897

  18. Isolation and characterisation of Kasumi-1 human myeloid leukaemia cell line resistant to tumour necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ido, M.; Hayashi, K.; Kato, S.; Ogawa, H.; Komada, Y.; Zhau, Y. W.; Zhang, X. L.; Sakurai, M.; Suzuki, K.

    1996-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha induces apoptosis in a human acute myeloid leukaemia cell line, Kasumi-1. To examine the role of protein phosphorylation in signal transduction of TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis, a variant cell line resistant to TNF-alpha was established by an intermittent challenge of Kasumi-1 cells with increasing concentrations of TNF-alpha for 6 months. The mechanism of resistance to TNF-alpha appears to be in the post-receptor pathway because expression of p55 TNF receptor in the variant cells is increased compared with that of the parental Kasumi-1 cells. In renaturation assays, TNF-alpha induced a rapid activation of different protein kinases of different molecular weights, including the 50 kDa protein kinase (PK50) followed by the 35 kDa protein kinase (PK35), in the parental Kasumi-1 cells. The dose-response of TNF-alpha required to activate PK50 and PK35 was closely related to concentrations of TNF-alpha that induced apoptosis. Treatment of Kasumi-1 cells with ceramide also activated PK35. In TNF-resistant variant cells, activation of PK35 in response to TNF-alpha or ceramide was practically nil. These findings suggest that activation of PK35 through the ceramide pathway may play an important role in signal transduction of TNF-alpha in the Kasumi-1 cell line, while the decreased activation of PK35 may explain the insensitivity of the variant cells towards TNF-alpha. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8562342

  19. Endosomal localization of TLR8 confers distinctive proteolytic processing on human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Noriko; Funami, Kenji; Tatematsu, Megumi; Seya, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Misako

    2014-11-15

    Nucleic acid-sensing TLRs are involved in both antimicrobial immune responses and autoimmune inflammation. TLR8 is phylogenetically and structurally related to TLR7 and TLR9, which undergo proteolytic processing in the endolysosomes to generate functional receptors. Recent structural analyses of human TLR8 ectodomain and its liganded form demonstrated that TLR8 is also cleaved, and both the N- and C-terminal halves contribute to ligand binding. However, the structures and ssRNA recognition mode of endogenous TLR8 in human primary cells are largely unknown. In this study, we show that proteolytic processing of TLR8 occurs in human monocytes and macrophages in a different manner compared with TLR7/9 cleavage. The insertion loop between leucine-rich repeats 14 and 15 in TLR8 is indispensable for the cleavage and stepwise processing that occurs in the N-terminal fragment. Both furin-like proprotein convertase and cathepsins contribute to TLR8 cleavage in the early/late endosomes. TLR8 recognizes viral ssRNA and endogenous RNA, such as microRNAs, resulting in the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Hence, localization sites of the receptors are crucial for the nucleic acid-sensing mode and downstream signaling. PMID:25297876

  20. Artesunate suppresses tumor growth and induces apoptosis through the modulation of multiple oncogenic cascades in a chronic myeloid leukemia xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chulwon; Lee, Jong Hyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Sethi, Gautam; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, is one of the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Also, ART possesses anticancer potential albeit through incompletely understood molecular mechanism(s). Here, the effect of ART on various protein kinases, associated gene products, cellular response, and apoptosis was investigated. The in vivo effect of ART on the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in athymic nu/nu mice was also examined. In our preliminary experiments, we first observed that phosphorylation of p38, ERK, CREB, Chk-2, STAT5, and RSK proteins were suppressed upon ART exposure. Interestingly, ART induced the expression of SOCS-1 protein and depletion of SOCS-1 using siRNA abrogated the STAT5 inhibitory effect of the drug. Also various dephosphorylations caused by ART led to the suppression of various survival gene products and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation. Moreover, ART also substantially potentiated the apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents. Finally, when administered intraperitoneally, ART inhibited p38, ERK, STAT5, and CREB activation in tumor tissues and the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in mice without exhibiting any significant adverse effects. Overall, our results suggest that ART exerts its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects through suppression of multiple signaling cascades in CML both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25738364

  1. Myeloid sarcomas of the head and neck in pediatric patients with myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, David W; Punia, Jyotinder Nain; Owczarzak, Vicki L

    2016-09-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a rare extramedullary tumor composed of malignant myeloid cells that occur in the presence of myeloid leukemia. We report a case series of pediatric head and neck myeloid sarcomas representative of the epidemiology, symptomatology, laboratorial correlations, prognoses, and treatment of extramedullary leukemia. Presented are 3 cases involving patients ranging from 17 months to 11 years of age. Two patients were successfully treated with chemotherapy, and in the third patient, a large lytic lesion was treated palliatively with proton beam therapy. Knowledge and recognition of myeloid sarcomas is important as they can be locally invasive, and they may also be used as a diagnostic tool or a prognostic indicator for leukemia. PMID:27657319

  2. A TIM-3/Gal-9 Autocrine Stimulatory Loop Drives Self-Renewal of Human Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells and Leukemic Progression.

    PubMed

    Kikushige, Yoshikane; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Yuda, Junichiro; Jabbarzadeh-Tabrizi, Siamak; Shima, Takahiro; Takayanagi, Shin-ichiro; Niiro, Hiroaki; Yurino, Ayano; Miyawaki, Kohta; Takenaka, Katsuto; Iwasaki, Hiromi; Akashi, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Signaling mechanisms underlying self-renewal of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) are poorly understood, and identifying pathways specifically active in LSCs could provide opportunities for therapeutic intervention. T-cell immunoglobin mucin-3 (TIM-3) is expressed on the surface of LSCs in many types of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but not on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Here, we show that TIM-3 and its ligand, galectin-9 (Gal-9), constitute an autocrine loop critical for LSC self-renewal and development of human AML. Serum Gal-9 levels were significantly elevated in AML patients and in mice xenografted with primary human AML samples, and neutralization of Gal-9 inhibited xenogeneic reconstitution of human AML. Gal-9-mediated stimulation of TIM-3 co-activated NF-κB and β-catenin signaling, pathways known to promote LSC self-renewal. These changes were further associated with leukemic transformation of a variety of pre-leukemic disorders and together highlight that targeting the TIM-3/Gal-9 autocrine loop could be a useful strategy for treating myeloid leukemias. PMID:26279267

  3. Human intrathymic lineage commitment is marked by differential CD7 expression: identification of CD7− lympho-myeloid thymic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qian-Lin; George, Aswathi A.; Zhu, Judy; Barsky, Lora; Zielinska, Ewa; Wang, Xiuli; Price, Mary; Ge, Shundi

    2008-01-01

    The identity and lineage potential of the cells that initiate thymopoiesis remain controversial. The goal of these studies was to determine, at a clonal level, the immunophenotype and differentiation pathways of the earliest progenitors in human thymus. Although the majority of human CD34+lin− thymocytes express high levels of CD7, closer analysis reveals that a continuum of CD7 expression exists, and 1% to 2% of progenitors are CD7−. CD34+lin− thymocytes were fractionated by CD7 expression and tested for lineage potential in B-lymphoid, T-lymphoid, and myeloid-erythroid conditions. Progressive restriction in lineage potential correlated with CD7 expression, that is, the CD7hi fraction produced T and NK cells but lacked B and myelo-erythroid potential, the CD7int (CD10+) fraction produced B, T, and NK cells, but lacked myelo-erythroid potential. The CD7− fraction produced all lymphoid and myelo-erythroid lineages and expressed HSC-associated genes. However, CD34+lin−CD7− thymocytes also expressed early T lymphoid genes Tdt, pTα, and IL-7Rα and lacked engraftment capacity, suggesting the signals that direct lymphoid commitment and corresponding loss of HSC function are rapidly initiated on arrival of HSC in the human thymus. Thus, differential levels of CD7 identify the progressive stages of lineage commitment in human thymus, initiated from a primitive CD7− lympho-myeloid thymic progenitor. PMID:17959857

  4. HMGA1-pseudogene expression is induced in human pituitary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Francesco; De Martino, Marco; D'Angelo, Daniela; Mussnich, Paula; Raverot, Gerald; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Fraggetta, Filippo; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Fusco, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have established that High Mobility Group A (HMGA) proteins play a pivotal role on the onset of human pituitary tumors. They are overexpressed in pituitary tumors, and, consistently, transgenic mice overexpressing either the Hmga1 or the Hmga2 gene develop pituitary tumors. In contrast with HMGA2, HMGA1 overexpression is not related to any rearrangement or amplification of the HMGA1 locus in these tumors. We have recently identified 2 HMGA1 pseudogenes, HMGA1P6 and HMGA1P7, acting as competitive endogenous RNA decoys for HMGA1 and other cancer related genes. Here, we show that HMGA1 pseudogene expression significantly correlates with HMGA1 mRNA levels in growth hormone and nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas likely inhibiting the repression of HMGA1 through microRNAs action. According to our functional studies, these HMGA1 pseudogenes enhance the proliferation and migration of the mouse pituitary tumor cell line, at least in part, through their upregulation. Our results point out that the overexpression of HMGA1P6 and HMGA1P7 could contribute to increase HMGA1 levels in human pituitary tumors, and then to pituitary tumorigenesis. PMID:25894544

  5. Quercus Suber L. Cork Extracts Induce Apoptosis in Human Myeloid Leukaemia HL-60 Cells.

    PubMed

    Bejarano, Ignacio; Godoy-Cancho, Belén; Franco, Lourdes; Martínez-Cañas, Manuel A; Tormo, María A

    2015-08-01

    Quercus suber L. cork contains a diversity of phenolic compounds, mostly low molecular weight phenols. A rising number of reports support with convergent findings that polyphenols evoke pro-apoptotic events in cancerous cells. However, the literature related to the anti-cancer bioactivity of Q. suber L. cork extractives (QSE) is still limited. Herein, we aim to describe the antitumor potential displayed by cork extractives obtained by different extraction methods in the human promyelocytic leukaemia cells. In order to quantify the effects of QSE on cancer cells viability, phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase-3 activity, mitochondrial membrane potential and cell cycle were evaluated. The results indicated that the QSE present a time-dependent and dose-dependent cytotoxicity in the human promyelocytic leukaemia cells. Such a noxious effect leads these leukaemia cells to their death through apoptotic processes by altering the mitochondrial outer membrane potential, activating caspase-3 and externalizing phosphatidylserine. However, cells cycle progression was not affected by the treatments. This study contributes to open a new way to use this natural resource by exploiting its anti-cancer properties. Moreover, it opens new possibilities of application of cork by-products, being more efficient in the sector of cork-based agriculture. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Latent infection of myeloid progenitors by human cytomegalovirus protects cells from FAS-mediated apoptosis through the cellular IL-10/PEA-15 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jonathan C. H.; Sinclair, John

    2015-01-01

    Latent infection of primary CD34+ progenitor cells by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) results in their increased survival in the face of pro-apoptotic signals. For instance, we have shown previously that primary myeloid cells are refractory to FAS-mediated killing and that cellular IL-10 (cIL-10) is an important survival factor for this effect. However, how cIL-10 mediates this protection is unclear. Here, we have shown that cIL-10 signalling leading to upregulation of the cellular factor PEA-15 mediates latency-associated protection of CD34+ progenitor cells from the extrinsic death pathway. PMID:25957098

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates tumor angiogenesis of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Sunamura, Makoto; Duda, Dan G; Ghattas, Maivel H; Lozonschi, Lucian; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Yamauchi, Jun-Ichiro; Matsuno, Seiki; Shibahara, Shigeki; Abraham, Nader G

    2003-01-01

    Angiogenesis is necessary for the continued growth of solid tumors, invasion and metastasis. Several studies clearly showed that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in angiogenesis. In this study, we used the vital microscope system, transparent skinfold model, lung colonization model and transduced pancreatic cancer cell line (Panc-1)/human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) cells, to precisely analyze, for the first time, the effect of hHO-1 gene on tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Our results revealed that HO-1 stimulates angiogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma in severe combined immune deficient mice. Overexpression of human hHO-1 after its retroviral transfer into Panc-1 cells did not interfere with tumor growth in vitro. While in vivo the development of tumors was accelerated upon transfection with hHO-1. On the other hand, inhibition of heme oxygenase (HO) activity by stannous mesoporphyrin was able transiently to delay tumor growth in a dose dependent manner. Tumor angiogenesis was markedly increased in Panc-1/hHO-1 compared to mock transfected and wild type. Lectin staining and Ki-67 proliferation index confirmed these results. In addition hHO-1 stimulated in vitro tumor angiogenesis and increased endothelial cell survival. In a lung colonization model, overexpression of hHO-1 increased the occurrence of metastasis, while inhibition of HO activity by stannous mesoporphyrin completely inhibited the occurrence of metastasis. In conclusion, overexpression of HO-1 genes potentiates pancreatic cancer aggressiveness, by increasing tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis and that the inhibition of the HO system may be of useful benefit for the future treatment of the disease.

  8. Transcription factor RUNX1 promotes survival of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Goyama, Susumu; Schibler, Janet; Cunningham, Lea; Zhang, Yue; Rao, Yalan; Nishimoto, Nahoko; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Olsson, Andre; Wunderlich, Mark; Link, Kevin A.; Mizukawa, Benjamin; Grimes, H. Leighton; Kurokawa, Mineo; Liu, P. Paul; Huang, Gang; Mulloy, James C.

    2013-01-01

    RUNX1 is generally considered a tumor suppressor in myeloid neoplasms. Inactivating RUNX1 mutations have frequently been found in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no somatic RUNX1 alteration was found in AMLs with leukemogenic fusion proteins, such as core-binding factor (CBF) leukemia and MLL fusion leukemia, raising the possibility that RUNX1 could actually promote the growth of these leukemia cells. Using normal human cord blood cells and those expressing leukemogenic fusion proteins, we discovered a dual role of RUNX1 in myeloid leukemogenesis. RUNX1 overexpression inhibited the growth of normal cord blood cells by inducing myeloid differentiation, whereas a certain level of RUNX1 activity was required for the growth of AML1-ETO and MLL-AF9 cells. Using a mouse genetic model, we also showed that the combined loss of Runx1/Cbfb inhibited leukemia development induced by MLL-AF9. RUNX2 could compensate for the loss of RUNX1. The survival effect of RUNX1 was mediated by BCL2 in MLL fusion leukemia. Our study unveiled an unexpected prosurvival role for RUNX1 in myeloid leukemogenesis. Inhibiting RUNX1 activity rather than enhancing it could be a promising therapeutic strategy for AMLs with leukemogenic fusion proteins. PMID:23979164

  9. Noncontact diffuse correlation tomography of human breast tumor

    PubMed Central

    He, Lian; Lin, Yu; Huang, Chong; Irwin, Daniel; Szabunio, Margaret M.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Our first step to adapt our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation tomography (ncDCT) system for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of blood flow distribution in human breast tumors is reported. A commercial 3-D camera was used to obtain breast surface geometry, which was then converted to a solid volume mesh. An ncDCT probe scanned over a region of interest on the mesh surface and the measured boundary data were combined with a finite element framework for 3-D image reconstruction of blood flow distribution. This technique was tested in computer simulations and in vivo human breasts with low-grade carcinoma. Results from computer simulations suggest that relatively high accuracy can be achieved when the entire tumor is within the sensitive region of diffuse light. Image reconstruction with a priori knowledge of the tumor volume and location can significantly improve the accuracy in recovery of tumor blood flow contrasts. In vivo imaging results from two breast carcinomas show higher average blood flow contrasts (5.9- and 10.9-fold) in the tumor regions compared to the surrounding tissues, which are comparable with previous findings using diffuse correlation spectroscopy. The ncDCT system has the potential to image blood flow distributions in soft and vulnerable tissues without distorting tissue hemodynamics. PMID:26259706

  10. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A.; Salomon, Matthew P.; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    What happens in the early, still undetectable human malignancy is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a “Big Bang” model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed sub-clones that are not subject to stringent selection, and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors revealed the absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH), and sub-clone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations, and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear born-to-be-bad, with sub-clone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH with significant clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  11. Human kallikrein 13 expression in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Darling, M R; Jackson-Boeters, L; Daley, T D; Diamandis, E P

    2006-01-01

    The human kallikrein 13 protein (hK13) is expressed in many normal tissues. Petraki et al have previously described presence of hK13 in salivary gland tissue, localized to duct epithelia and some acinar cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether hK13 is expressed in salivary gland tissues and salivary gland tumors (both benign and malignant), in order to compare normal with tumor tissues. Pleomorphic adenomas (PA), adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC), polymorphous low grade adenocarcinomas (PLGA), acinic cell carcinomas (ACI), mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MEC) and adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified (ANOS) of both minor and major salivary glands were examined. The results of this study indicate that most salivary gland tumors show high levels of expression of hK13. Overall, staining in PA was significantly less than that seen in normal salivary gland tissue. PLGA, ACC and ANOS each stained significantly more than normal salivary gland tissue while MEC and ACI did not. Ductal cells and cells lining duct-like structures showed a higher intensity of staining than non-ductal cells in most tumors. Tumors which exhibited only non-ductal cells also exhibited cytoplasmic staining. In conclusion, we demonstrate the high expression of hK13 in several common salivary gland tumors.

  12. Dectin-2 Recognizes Mannosylated O-antigens of Human Opportunistic Pathogens and Augments Lipopolysaccharide Activation of Myeloid Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Alexandra; Lamprinaki, Dimitra; Bowles, Kristian M.; Katzenellenbogen, Ewa; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Whitfield, Chris; Nishimura, Takashi; Matsumoto, Naoki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Saijo, Shinobu; Kawasaki, Norihito

    2016-01-01

    LPS consists of a relatively conserved region of lipid A and core oligosaccharide and a highly variable region of O-antigen polysaccharide. Whereas lipid A is known to bind to the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD2) complex, the role of the O-antigen remains unclear. Here we report a novel molecular interaction between dendritic cell-associated C-type lectin-2 (Dectin-2) and mannosylated O-antigen found in a human opportunistic pathogen, Hafnia alvei PCM 1223, which has a repeating unit of [-Man-α1,3-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,3-]. H. alvei LPS induced higher levels of TNFα and IL-10 from mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs), when compared with Salmonella enterica O66 LPS, which has a repeat of [-Gal-α1,6-Gal-α1,4-[Glc-β1,3]GalNAc-α1,3-GalNAc-β1,3-]. In a cell-based reporter assay, Dectin-2 was shown to recognize H. alvei LPS. This binding was inhibited by mannosidase treatment of H. alvei LPS and by mutations in the carbohydrate-binding domain of Dectin-2, demonstrating that H. alvei LPS is a novel glycan ligand of Dectin-2. The enhanced cytokine production by H. alvei LPS was Dectin-2-dependent, because Dectin-2 knock-out BM-DCs failed to do so. This receptor cross-talk between Dectin-2 and TLR4 involved events including spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) activation and receptor juxtaposition. Furthermore, another mannosylated LPS from Escherichia coli O9a also bound to Dectin-2 and augmented TLR4 activation of BM-DCs. Taken together, these data indicate that mannosylated O-antigens from several Gram-negative bacteria augment TLR4 responses through interaction with Dectin-2. PMID:27358401

  13. Dectin-2 Recognizes Mannosylated O-antigens of Human Opportunistic Pathogens and Augments Lipopolysaccharide Activation of Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Alexandra; Lamprinaki, Dimitra; Bowles, Kristian M; Katzenellenbogen, Ewa; Knirel, Yuriy A; Whitfield, Chris; Nishimura, Takashi; Matsumoto, Naoki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Saijo, Shinobu; Kawasaki, Norihito

    2016-08-19

    LPS consists of a relatively conserved region of lipid A and core oligosaccharide and a highly variable region of O-antigen polysaccharide. Whereas lipid A is known to bind to the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD2) complex, the role of the O-antigen remains unclear. Here we report a novel molecular interaction between dendritic cell-associated C-type lectin-2 (Dectin-2) and mannosylated O-antigen found in a human opportunistic pathogen, Hafnia alvei PCM 1223, which has a repeating unit of [-Man-α1,3-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,3-]. H. alvei LPS induced higher levels of TNFα and IL-10 from mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs), when compared with Salmonella enterica O66 LPS, which has a repeat of [-Gal-α1,6-Gal-α1,4-[Glc-β1,3]GalNAc-α1,3-GalNAc-β1,3-]. In a cell-based reporter assay, Dectin-2 was shown to recognize H. alvei LPS. This binding was inhibited by mannosidase treatment of H. alvei LPS and by mutations in the carbohydrate-binding domain of Dectin-2, demonstrating that H. alvei LPS is a novel glycan ligand of Dectin-2. The enhanced cytokine production by H. alvei LPS was Dectin-2-dependent, because Dectin-2 knock-out BM-DCs failed to do so. This receptor cross-talk between Dectin-2 and TLR4 involved events including spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) activation and receptor juxtaposition. Furthermore, another mannosylated LPS from Escherichia coli O9a also bound to Dectin-2 and augmented TLR4 activation of BM-DCs. Taken together, these data indicate that mannosylated O-antigens from several Gram-negative bacteria augment TLR4 responses through interaction with Dectin-2. PMID:27358401

  14. Metformin selectively affects human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Würth, Roberto; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Bajetto, Adirana; Corsaro, Alessandro; Parodi, Alessia; Sirito, Rodolfo; Massollo, Michela; Marini, Cecilia; Zona, Gianluigi; Fenoglio, Daniela; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Filaci, Gilberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory postulates that a small population of tumor-initiating cells is responsible for the development, progression and recurrence of several malignancies, including glioblastoma. In this perspective, tumor-initiating cells represent the most relevant target to obtain effective cancer treatment. Metformin, a first-line drug for type II diabetes, was reported to possess anticancer properties affecting the survival of cancer stem cells in breast cancer models. We report that metformin treatment reduced the proliferation rate of tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures isolated from four human glioblastomas. Metformin also impairs tumor-initiating cell spherogenesis, indicating a direct effect on self-renewal mechanisms. Interestingly, analyzing by FACS the antiproliferative effects of metformin on CD133-expressing subpopulation, a component of glioblastoma cancer stem cells, a higher reduction of proliferation was observed as compared with CD133-negative cells, suggesting a certain degree of cancer stem cell selectivity in its effects. In fact, glioblastoma cell differentiation strongly reduced sensitivity to metformin treatment. Metformin effects in tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures were associated with a powerful inhibition of Akt-dependent cell survival pathway, while this pathway was not affected in differentiated cells. The specificity of metformin antiproliferative effects toward glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells was confirmed by the lack of significant inhibition of normal human stem cells (umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells) in vitro proliferation after metformin exposure. Altogether, these data clearly suggest that metformin exerts antiproliferative activity on glioblastoma cells, showing a higher specificity toward tumor-initiating cells, and that the inhibition of Akt pathway may represent a possible intracellular target of this effect. PMID:23255107

  15. Novel evidence that pituitary gonadotropins directly stimulate human leukemic cells-studies of myeloid cell lines and primary patient AML and CML cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Borkowska, Sylwia; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Tonn, Torsten; Rodriguez, Cesar; Moniuszko, Marcin; Bolkun, Lukasz; Koloczko, Janusz; Eljaszewicz, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Janina; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.; Kucia, Magda

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that normal hematopoietic stem cells express functional pituitary sex hormone (SexH) receptors. Here we report for the first time that pituitary-secreted gonadotrophins stimulate migration, adhesion, and proliferation of several human myeloid and lymphoid leukemia cell lines. Similar effects were observed after stimulation of human leukemic cell lines by gonadal SexHs. This effect seems to be direct, as the SexH receptors expressed by leukemic cells responded to stimulation by phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKTser473. Furthermore, in parallel studies we confirmed that human primary patient-derived AML and CML blasts also express several functional SexH receptors. These results shed more light on the potential role of SexHs in leukemogenesis and, in addition, provide further evidence suggesting a developmental link between hematopoiesis and the germline. PMID:26701888

  16. Nano-hole induction by nanodiamond and nanoplatinum liquid, DPV576, reverses multidrug resistance in human myeloid leukemia (HL60/AR)

    PubMed Central

    Ghoneum, Alia; Sharma, Shivani; Gimzewski, James

    2013-01-01

    Recently nanoparticles have been extensively studied and have proven to be a promising candidate for cancer treatment and diagnosis. In the current study, we examined the chemo-sensitizing activity of a mixture of nanodiamond (ND) and nanoplatinum (NP) solution known as DPV576, against multidrug-resistant (MDR) human myeloid leukemia (HL60/AR) and MDR-sensitive cells (HL60). Cancer cells were cultured with different concentrations of daunorubicin (DNR) (1 × 10 −9−1 × 10 −6 M) in the presence of selected concentrations of DPV576 (2.5%–10% v/v). Cancer cell survival was determined by MTT assay, drug accumulation by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and holes and structural changes by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Co-treatment of HL60/AR cells with DNR plus DPV576 resulted in the reduction of the IC50 to 1/4th. This was associated with increased incidences of holes inside the cells as compared with control untreated cells. On the other hand, HL60 cells did not show changes in their drug accumulation post-treatment with DPV576 and DNR. We conclude that DPV576 is an effective chemo-sensitizer as indicated by the reversal of HL60/AR cells to DNR and may represent a potential novel adjuvant for the treatment of chemo-resistant human myeloid leukemia. PMID:23888112

  17. Induced expression from the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat during differentiation of human myeloid cells is mediated through its transcriptional enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Reisman, D; Rotter, V

    1989-01-01

    Transcription from the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) long terminal repeat (LTR) is inhibited in murine stem cells and induced during maturation of these cells. We have investigated whether alterations in the activity of this viral regulatory element also occur during differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cells. The Mo-MuLV LTR and the simian virus 40 (SV40) early promoter were introduced into HL-60 promyelocytes on Epstein-Barr virus-derived chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression vectors. When these cells were induced to terminally differentiate, transcription from the Mo-MuLV LTR was induced approximately 10-fold. Expression from the SV40 promoter remained constant during differentiation of these cells. Replacing the SV40 transcriptional enhancer with the Mo-MuLV LTR transcriptional enhancer rendered the SV40 promoter inducible during differentiation. We conclude that sequences within the transcriptional enhancer of the Mo-MuLV LTR contain cis-acting elements responsible for induction of gene expression during differentiation of human myeloid cells. Images PMID:2477690

  18. Identification of Novel Tumor-Associated Cell Surface Sialoglycoproteins in Human Glioblastoma Tumors Using Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Autelitano, François; Loyaux, Denis; Roudières, Sébastien; Déon, Catherine; Guette, Frédérique; Fabre, Philippe; Ping, Qinggong; Wang, Su; Auvergne, Romane; Badarinarayana, Vasudeo; Smith, Michael; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Goldman, Steven A.; Natesan, Sridaran; Ferrara, Pascual; August, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) remains clinical indication with significant “unmet medical need”. Innovative new therapy to eliminate residual tumor cells and prevent tumor recurrences is critically needed for this deadly disease. A major challenge of GBM research has been the identification of novel molecular therapeutic targets and accurate diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers. Many of the current clinical therapeutic targets of immunotoxins and ligand-directed toxins for high-grade glioma (HGG) cells are surface sialylated glycoproteins. Therefore, methods that systematically and quantitatively analyze cell surface sialoglycoproteins in human clinical tumor samples would be useful for the identification of potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for malignant gliomas. In this study, we used the bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategy (BOCR) in combination with label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (LFQ-MS) to characterize and accurately quantify the individual cell surface sialoproteome in human GBM tissues, in fetal, adult human astrocytes, and in human neural progenitor cells (NPCs). We identified and quantified a total of 843 proteins, including 801 glycoproteins. Among the 843 proteins, 606 (72%) are known cell surface or secreted glycoproteins, including 156 CD-antigens, all major classes of cell surface receptor proteins, transporters, and adhesion proteins. Our findings identified several known as well as new cell surface antigens whose expression is predominantly restricted to human GBM tumors as confirmed by microarray transcription profiling, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining. This report presents the comprehensive identification of new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the treatment of malignant gliomas using quantitative sialoglycoproteomics with clinically relevant, patient derived primary glioma cells. PMID:25360666

  19. Inflammation- and tumor-induced anorexia and weight loss require MyD88 in hematopoietic/myeloid cells but not in brain endothelial or neural cells.

    PubMed

    Ruud, Johan; Wilhelms, Daniel Björk; Nilsson, Anna; Eskilsson, Anna; Tang, Yan-Juan; Ströhle, Peter; Caesar, Robert; Schwaninger, Markus; Wunderlich, Thomas; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Engblom, David; Blomqvist, Anders

    2013-05-01

    Loss of appetite is a hallmark of inflammatory diseases. The underlying mechanisms remain undefined, but it is known that myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), an adaptor protein critical for Toll-like and IL-1 receptor family signaling, is involved. Here we addressed the question of determining in which cells the MyD88 signaling that results in anorexia development occurs by using chimeric mice and animals with cell-specific deletions. We found that MyD88-knockout mice, which are resistant to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced anorexia, displayed anorexia when transplanted with wild-type bone marrow cells. Furthermore, mice with a targeted deletion of MyD88 in hematopoietic or myeloid cells were largely protected against LPS-induced anorexia and displayed attenuated weight loss, whereas mice with MyD88 deletion in hepatocytes or in neural cells or the cerebrovascular endothelium developed anorexia and weight loss of similar magnitude as wild-type mice. Furthermore, in a model for cancer-induced anorexia-cachexia, deletion of MyD88 in hematopoietic cells attenuated the anorexia and protected against body weight loss. These findings demonstrate that MyD88-dependent signaling within the brain is not required for eliciting inflammation-induced anorexia. Instead, we identify MyD88 signaling in hematopoietic/myeloid cells as a critical component for acute inflammatory-driven anorexia, as well as for chronic anorexia and weight loss associated with malignant disease.

  20. Hispolon induces apoptosis through JNK1/2-mediated activation of a caspase-8, -9, and -3-dependent pathway in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and inhibits AML xenograft tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Yang, Shun-Fa; Hsiao, Michael; Hua, Kuo-Tai; Lin, Chien-Huang; Chen, Hui-Yu; Chien, Ming-Hsien

    2013-10-23

    Hispolon is an active phenolic compound of Phellinus igniarius, a mushroom that was recently shown to have antioxidant and anticancer activities in various solid tumors. Here, the molecular mechanisms by which hispolon exerts anticancer effects in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells was investigated. The results showed that hispolon suppressed cell proliferation in the various AML cell lines. Furthermore, hispolon effectively induced apoptosis of HL-60 AML cells through caspases-8, -9, and -3 activations and PARP cleavage. Moreover, treatment of HL-60 cells with hispolon induced sustained activation of JNK1/2, and inhibition of JNK by JNK1/2 inhibitor or JNK1/2-specific siRNA significantly abolished the hispolon-induced activation of the caspase-8/-9/-3. In vivo, hispolon significantly reduced tumor growth in mice with HL-60 tumor xenografts. In hispolon-treated tumors, activation of caspase-3 and a decrease in Ki67-positive cells were observed. Our results indicated that hispolon may have the potential to serve as a therapeutic tool to treat AML. PMID:24093560

  1. Significance of rat mammary tumors for human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jose

    2015-02-01

    We have previously indicated that the ideal animal tumor model should mimic the human disease. This means that the investigator should be able to ascertain the influence of host factors on the initiation of tumorigenesis, mimic the susceptibility of tumor response based on age and reproductive history, and determine the response of the tumors induced to chemotherapy. The utilization of experimental models of mammary carcinogenesis in risk assessment requires that the influence of ovarian, pituitary, and placental hormones, among others, as well as overall reproductive events are taken into consideration, since they are important modifiers of the susceptibility of the organ to neoplastic development. Several species, such as rodents, dogs, cats, and monkeys, have been evaluated for these purposes; however, none of them fulfills all the criteria specified previously. Rodents, however, are the most widely used models; therefore, this work will concentrate on discussing the rat rodent model of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:25714400

  2. Human kallikrein 8 expression in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Darling, Mark R; Tsai, Sam; Jackson-Boeters, Linda; Daley, Thomas D; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2008-09-01

    The human kallikrein 8 protein (KLK8) is expressed in many normal tissues including esophagus, skin, testis, tonsil, kidney, breast, and salivary gland, and is found in biological fluids including breast milk, amniotic fluid, seminal fluid and serum. It has also been shown to be a biomarker and prognostic factor for breast cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether KLK8 is expressed in salivary gland tissues and salivary gland tumors (both benign and malignant), in order to compare normal with tumor tissues. Pleomorphic adenomas, adenoid cystic carcinomas, polymorphous low grade adenocarcinomas, acinic cell carcinomas, mucoepidermoid carcinomas, and adenocarcinomas NOS of both minor and major salivary glands were examined. The results of this study indicate that most salivary gland tumors show high levels of expression of KLK8.

  3. The p53 gene and protein in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, D.N. )

    1994-01-01

    Because p53 gene alterations are commonplace in human tumors and because p53 protein is involved in a number of important cellular pathways, p53 has become a topic of intensive investigation, both by basic scientists and clinicians. p53 was initially identified by two independent laboratories in 1979 as a 53 kilodalton (kD) protein that complexes with the large T antigen of SV40 virus. Shortly thereafter, it was shown that the E1B oncoprotein of adenovirus also binds p53. The binding of two different oncogenic viral tumor proteins to the same cellular protein suggested that p53 might be integral to tumorigenesis. The human p53 cDNA and gene were subsequently cloned in the mid-1980s, and analysis of p53 gene alterations in human tumors followed a few year later. During these 10 years, researchers grappling with the vagaries of p53 first characterized the gene as an oncogene, then as a tumor suppressor gene, and most recently as both a tumor suppressor gene and a so-called [open quotes]dominant negative[close quotes] oncogene. The last few years have seen an explosion in work on this single gene and its protein product. A review of a computerized medical database revealed approximately 650 articles on p53 in 1992 alone. p53 has assumed importance in neuro-oncology because p53 mutations and protein alterations are frequent in the common diffuse, fibrillary astrocytic tumors of adults. p53 mutations in astrocytomas were first described in 1989 and were followed by more extensive analyses of gene mutations and protein alterations in adult astrocytomas. The gene has also been studied in less common brain tumors. Elucidating the role of p53 in brain tumorigenesis will not only enhance understanding of brain tumor biology but may also contribute to improved diagnosis and therapy. This discussion reviews key aspects of the p53 gene and protein, and describe their emerging roles in central nervous system neoplasia. 102 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  5. Sigma and opioid receptors in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.E.; Szuecs, M.; Mamone, J.Y.; Bem, W.T.; Rush, M.D.; Johnson, F.E.; Coscia, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Human brain tumors and nude mouse-borne human neuroblastomas and gliomas were analyzed for sigma and opioid receptor content. Sigma binding was assessed using ({sup 3}H) 1, 3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), whereas opioid receptor subtypes were measured with tritiated forms of the following: {mu}, (D-ala{sup 2}, mePhe{sup 4}, gly-ol{sup 5}) enkephalin (DAMGE); {kappa}, ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) or U69,593; {delta}, (D-pen{sup 2}, D-pen{sup 5}) enkephalin (DPDPE) or (D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5}) enkephalin (DADLE) with {mu} suppressor present. Binding parameters were estimated by homologous displacement assays followed by analysis using the LIGAND program. Sigma binding was detected in 15 of 16 tumors examined with very high levels found in a brain metastasis from an adenocarcinoma of lung and a human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) passaged in nude mice. {kappa} opioid receptor binding was detected in 4 of 4 glioblastoma multiforme specimens and 2 of 2 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but not in the other brain tumors analyzed.

  6. Human kallikrein 6 expression in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Darling, M R; Jackson-Boeters, L; Daley, T D; Diamandis, E P

    2006-03-01

    Human kallikrein 6 (hK6), also known as zyme/protease M/neurosin), is expressed in many normal glandular tissues. The aim of this study was to determine whether hK6 is expressed in salivary gland tissues and salivary gland tumors (both benign and malignant), using an immunohistochemical method. Pleomorphic adenomas (PA), adenoid cystic carcinomas, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas, acinic cell carcinomas, mucoepidermoid carcinomas, and adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified of both minor and major salivary glands were examined. Cells lining duct-like structures and non-duct-like cells were scored. Only in PA of minor salivary gland origin was overall staining higher in duct-like than in non-duct-like cells. In all other tumors exhibiting both types of cells, hK6 staining was similar in both duct-like and non-duct-like cells. Tumors that exhibited non-duct-like cells only also exhibited cytoplasmic staining. Results of this study show that salivary gland tumors express hK6, apparently downregulated in comparison with normal salivary gland tissue, and that this expression is not specific for any of the tumors studied.

  7. A Case of Myeloid Sarcoma of Intestine.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung Won; Lee, Hang Lak; Lee, Kang Nyeong; Jun, Dae Won; Kim, In Young; Kim, Eunjin; Ahn, Hyein; Park, Chan Kum

    2016-09-25

    Myeloid sarcoma (MS) is an extramedullary involvement of immature myeloid proliferation. An isolated MS is defined as a myeloblastic tumor when it arises without any concomitant circulating disease. A diagnosis of MS is established using pathologic features including infiltration of myeloblasts and strong myeloperoxidase expression with negative cytokeratin immunohistochemical staining. We report a rare case of colonic MS without any peripheral blood abnormality. If the affected patient were left untreated, the MS could evolve into acute myeloid leukemia (AML) within one year. Several studies recommend the same regimens of chemotherapy as used for circulating AML to treat isolated MS. We focused on the diagnosis of MS in this study. The correct diagnosis of MS is important for adequate treatment. In conclusion, MS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intestinal tumor. PMID:27646584

  8. Cancer procoagulant in human tumor cells: evidence from melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Donati, M B; Gambacorti-Passerini, C; Casali, B; Falanga, A; Vannotti, P; Fossati, G; Semeraro, N; Gordon, S G

    1986-12-01

    It has repeatedly been proposed that fibrin plays a role in tumor growth and metastasis. Among tumor cell products or activities which may promote clot formation, cancer procoagulant (CP), a direct activator of coagulation factor X, has been suggested to be selectively associated with the malignant phenotype. We report here the enzymatic and immunological identification of this cysteine proteinase procoagulant in extracts and cells from human melanoma. CP activity was independent of both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of blood coagulation, using factor IX and factor VII deficient plasmas, and was inhibited by the cysteine proteinase inhibitors iodoacetamide and HgCl2. CP activity was detectable in extracts and cell suspensions from all 32 patients studied and was higher in extracts from metastases (14.8 +/- 3.9 units/mg protein) than from the primary tumors (3.7 +/- 1.0 units/mg protein). CP activity was not affected by an anti-apoprotein III antibody or by concanavalin A, a known inhibitor of thromboplastin. In contrast, no CP activity or antigen was detected in extracts from six benign melanocytic lesions. The procoagulant activity was dependent on factor VII and was inhibited by anti-apoprotein III antibody and by concanavalin A, properties that suggest that the procoagulant was tissue thromboplastin. These data indicate that CP can be expressed by human tumor cells and that, among melanotic lesions, its presence is associated with the malignant phenotype and its activity is particularly high in metastatic cells.

  9. Absence of human cytomegalovirus infection in childhood brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Iacopo; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Becciani, Sabrina; Facchini, Ludovica; Guidi, Milena; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Moriondo, Maria; Baroni, Gianna; Stival, Alessia; Farina, Silvia; Genitori, Lorenzo; de Martino, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common human pathogen which induces different clinical manifestations related to the age and the immune conditions of the host. HCMV infection seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of adult glioblastomas. The aim of our study was to detect the presence of HCMV in high grade gliomas and other pediatric brain tumors. This hypothesis might have important therapeutic implications, offering a new target for adjuvant therapies. Among 106 pediatric patients affected by CNS tumors we selected 27 patients with a positive HCMV serology. The serological analysis revealed 7 patients with positive HCMV IGG (≥14 U/mL), whom had also a high HCMV IgG avidity, suggesting a more than 6 months-dated infection. Furthermore, HCMV IGM were positive (≥22 U/mL) in 20 patients. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in all the 27 samples. Despite a positive HCMV serology, confirmed by ELISA, no viral DNA was shown at the PCR analysis in the patients’ neoplastic cells. At immunohistochemistry, no expression of HCMV antigens was observed in tumoral cells. Our results are in agreement with recent results in adults which did not evidence the presence of HCMV genome in glioblastoma lesions. We did not find any correlation between HCMV infection and pediatric CNS tumors. PMID:26396923

  10. Conserved Expression Signatures between Medaka and Human Pigment Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred; Kneitz, Susanne; Wilde, Brigitta; Wagner, Toni; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Spaink, Herman P.; Meierjohann, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in gene expression are a hallmark of cancer cells. Differential tumor-specific transcript levels of single genes or whole sets of genes may be critical for the neoplastic phenotype and important for therapeutic considerations or useful as biomarkers. As an approach to filter out such relevant expression differences from the plethora of changes noted in global expression profiling studies, we searched for changes of gene expression levels that are conserved. Transcriptomes from massive parallel sequencing of different types of melanoma from medaka were generated and compared to microarray datasets from zebrafish and human melanoma. This revealed molecular conservation at various levels between fish models and human tumors providing a useful strategy for identifying expression signatures strongly associated with disease phenotypes and uncovering new melanoma molecules. PMID:22693581

  11. Long intergenic non-coding RNA HOTAIRM1 regulates cell cycle progression during myeloid maturation in NB4 human promyelocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueqing; Weissman, Sherman M; Newburger, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    HOTAIRM1 is a long intergenic non-coding RNA encoded in the human HOXA gene cluster, with gene expression highly specific for maturing myeloid cells. Knockdown of HOTAIRM1 in the NB4 acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line retarded all-trans retinoid acid (ATRA)-induced granulocytic differentiation, resulting in a significantly larger population of immature and proliferating cells that maintained cell cycle progression from G1 to S phases. Correspondingly, HOTAIRM1 knockdown resulted in retained expression of many otherwise ATRA-suppressed cell cycle and DNA replication genes, and abated ATRA induction of cell surface leukocyte activation, defense response, and other maturation-related genes. Resistance to ATRA-induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase transition in knockdown cells was accompanied by retained expression of ITGA4 (CD49d) and decreased induction of ITGAX (CD11c). The coupling of cell cycle progression with temporal dynamics in the expression patterns of these integrin genes suggests a regulated switch to control the transit from the proliferative phase to granulocytic maturation. Furthermore, ITGAX was among a small number of genes showing perturbation in transcript levels upon HOTAIRM1 knockdown even without ATRA treatment, suggesting a direct pathway of regulation. These results indicate that HOTAIRM1 provides a regulatory link in myeloid maturation by modulating integrin-controlled cell cycle progression at the gene expression level. PMID:24824789

  12. Invariant NKT cells reduce the immunosuppressive activity of influenza A virus–induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    De Santo, Carmela; Salio, Mariolina; Masri, S. Hajar; Lee, Laurel Yong-Hwa; Dong, Tao; Speak, Anneliese O.; Porubsky, Stefan; Booth, Sarah; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Platt, Frances M.; Zambon, Maria; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Infection with influenza A virus (IAV) presents a substantial threat to public health worldwide, with young, elderly, and immunodeficient individuals being particularly susceptible. Inflammatory responses play an important role in the fatal outcome of IAV infection, but the mechanism remains unclear. We demonstrate here that the absence of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells in mice during IAV infection resulted in the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which suppressed IAV-specific immune responses through the expression of both arginase and NOS, resulting in high IAV titer and increased mortality. Adoptive transfer of iNKT cells abolished the suppressive activity of MDSCs, restored IAV-specific immune responses, reduced IAV titer, and increased survival rate. The crosstalk between iNKT and MDSCs was CD1d- and CD40-dependent. Furthermore, IAV infection and exposure to TLR agonists relieved the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Finally, we extended these results to humans by demonstrating the presence of myeloid cells with suppressive activity in the PBLs of individuals infected with IAV and showed that their suppressive activity is substantially reduced by iNKT cell activation. These findings identify what we believe to be a novel immunomodulatory role of iNKT cells, which we suggest could be harnessed to abolish the immunosuppressive activity of MDSCs during IAV infection. PMID:19033672

  13. High Expression of Human Homologue of Murine Double Minute 4 and the Short Splicing Variant, HDM4-S, in Bone Marrow in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Han, Xin; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Zhang, Yu Helen; You, M James; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E

    2016-08-01

    The human homologue of murine double minute 2 (HDM2) and HDM4 negatively regulate p53. HDM4 has not been assessed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We examined the expression of HDM4 and the short splicing variant, HDM4-S, in bone marrow samples obtained from 85 and 23 patients with AML and MDS, respectively, and 18 negative tumor staging bone marrow samples (used as the control). Immunohistochemical staining showed that HDM4 was overexpressed in 78 AML cases (92%) and 12 MDS cases (52%) compared with 1 stressed bone marrow sample (6%). Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis of 8 AML and 11 low-grade (LG)-MDS cases confirmed that HDM4 and HDM4-S mRNA expression were also elevated in all AML cases. HDM4 and HDM4-S mRNA expression was elevated in 3 (27%) and 10 (91%) LG-MDS cases, respectively. HDM4 and HDM4-S mRNA levels were higher in those with AML than in those with LG-MDS. In leukemia cell lines, HEL and U937 predominantly expressed HDM4-S. In contrast, NALM6 expressed HDM4 and HDM4-S. Downregulation of HDM4 expression by treatment with small interfering RNA in NALM6 and HEL cells induced p21 expression but not increased apoptotic activity. Our results indicate that HDM4 is a potential therapeutic target in patients with AML or MDS. PMID:27155969

  14. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Diagnosed by Intra-Oral Myeloid Sarcoma. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Papamanthos, Mattheos K.; Skulakis, Haralampos E.; Fericean, Angela-Monika A.; Zorba, Matina T.; Matiakis, Apostolos T.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma (MS) is a rare extramedullary malignant tumor composed of immature myeloid cells. It is strongly associated with a well known or covert acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myeloproliferative diseases or myelodysplastic syndromes. Intraoral MS scarcely occurs. An unusual case of acute myeloid leukaemia, which was diagnosed by mandibular MS that was developed in the alveolar socket after a dental extraction, is reported. The histological examination (including immunohistochemical analysis) of a subsequent biopsy showed infiltration of the oral mucosa by neoplastic cells. This lesion was therefore classified as acute myeloid leukaemia. The patient was referred to oncologists that confirmed the initial diagnosis. The patient underwent chemotherapy and the mandibular tumor disappeared. Forty days later, a relapse of the disease, which appeared as a great-ulcerated lesion, was developed in the hard palate. Thirty days after the second chemotherapy had finished, a new intraoral tumor was developed in the vestibular maxillary gingiva. Review of the literature shows no report of intraoral relapse and particularly multiple relapse of a MS that involves the oral cavity. Even though MS is encountered infrequently in the oral cavity, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of conditions (especially tumors) with a similar clinical appearance. PMID:20512638

  15. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells: general characteristics and relevance to clinical management of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goedegebuure, P.; Mitchem, J.B.; Porembka, M.R.; Tan, M.C.B.; Belt, B.A.; Wang-Gillam, A.; Gillanders, W.E.; Hawkins, W.G.; Linehan, D.C.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies describe a heterogeneous population of cells of the myeloid lineage, termed myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which are observed with increased prevalence in the peripheral blood and tumor microenvironment of cancer patients, including pancreatic cancer. Accumulation of MDSC in the peripheral circulation has been related to extent of disease, and correlates with stage. MDSC have primarily been implicated in promoting tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immunity. There is also compelling evidence MDSC are also involved in angiogenesis and metastatic spread. Two main subsets of MDSC have been identified in cancer patients: a monocytic subset, characterized by expression of CD14, and a granulocytic subset characterized by expression of CD15. Both subsets of MDSC actively suppress host immunity through a variety of mechanisms including production of reactive oxygen species and arginase. Just as in humans, accumulation of monocytic and granulocytic MDSC has been noted in the bone marrow, spleen, peripheral circulation, and tumors of tumor bearing mice. Successful targeting of MDSC in mice is associated with improved immune responses, delayed tumor growth, improved survival, and increased efficacy of vaccine therapy. By further elucidating mechanisms of MDSC recruitment and maintenance in the tumor environment, strategies could be developed to reverse immune tolerance to tumor. We discuss here what is currently known about MDSC as well as some potential strategies targeting MDSC in the context of our work on pancreatic cancer and recent literature. Due to the number of new reports on MDSC, the most pertinent ones have been selected. PMID:21599634

  16. Nobiletin suppresses the proliferation and induces apoptosis involving MAPKs and caspase-8/-9/-3 signals in human acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Lee, Wei-Jiunn; Yang, Shun-Fa; Tan, Peng; Chen, Hui-Yu; Lee, Liang-Ming; Chang, Junn-Liang; Lai, Gi-Ming; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Chien, Ming-Hsien

    2014-12-01

    Nobiletin, a compound isolated from citrus fruits, is a polymethoxylated flavone derivative that was shown to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities in various solid tumors. The anticancer effect of nobiletin on nonsolid tumor remains unclear. Herein, the molecular mechanisms by which nobiletin exerts its anticancer effects on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells were investigated. The results showed that nobiletin suppressed cell proliferation in various types of AML cell lines. Moreover, nobiletin induced cell-cycle arrest of HL-60 AML cells at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity. Furthermore, nobiletin effectively induced apoptosis of HL-60 cells through caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspases-3 activation concomitantly with a marked induction of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation, but without affecting expression levels of Bcl-2, Bax, or Bid. Taken together, our results suggest that nobiletin inhibited HL-60 cell proliferation through inducing cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and could serve as a potential additional chemotherapeutic agent for treating AML.

  17. Amino-acid substitutions at codon 13 of the N-ras oncogene in human acute myeloid leukaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Johannes L.; Toksoz, Deniz; Marshall, Christopher J.; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty; Veeneman, Gerrit H.; van der Eb, Alex J.; van Boom, Jacques H.; Janssen, Johannes W. G.; Steenvoorden, Ada C. M.

    1985-06-01

    DNAs from four out of five patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) tested by an in vivo selection assay in nude mice using transfected mouse NIH 3T3 cells were found to contain an activated N-ras oncogene. Using a set of synthetic oligonucleotide probes, we have detected a mutation at codon 13 in all four genes. The same codon is mutated in an additional AML DNA that is positive in the focus-formation assay on 3T3 cells. DNA from the peripheral blood of one patient in remission does not contain a codon 13 mutation.

  18. Mangiferin activates Nrf2-antioxidant response element signaling without reducing the sensitivity to etoposide of human myeloid leukemia cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ben-ping; Zhao, Jie; Li, Shan-shan; Yang, Li-jing; Zeng, Ling-lan; Chen, Yan; Fang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Mangiferin is glucosylxanthone extracted from plants of the Anacardiaceae and Gentianaceae families. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mangiferin on Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling and the sensitivity to etoposide of human myeloid leukemia cells in vitro. Methods: Human HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells and mononuclear human umbilical cord blood cells (MNCs) were examined. Nrf2 protein was detected using immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting. Binding of Nrf2 to ARE was examined with electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The level of NQO1 was assessed with real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. DCFH-DA was used to evaluate intracellular ROS level. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were analyzed using MTT and flow cytometry, respectively. Results: Mangiferin (50 μmol/L) significantly increased Nrf2 protein accumulation in HL-60 cells, particularly in the nucleus. Mangiferin also enhanced the binding of Nrf2 to an ARE, significantly up-regulated NQO1 expression and reduced intracellular ROS in HL60 cells. Mangiferin alone dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of HL-60 cells. Mangiferin (50 mol/L) did not attenuate etoposide-induced cytotoxicity in HL-60 cells, and combined treatment of mangiferin with low concentration of etoposide (0.8 μg/mL) even increased the cell inhibition rate. Nor did mangiferin change the rate of etoposide-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. In MNCs, mangiferin significantly relieved oxidative stress, but attenuated etoposide-induced cytotoxicity. Conclusion: Mangiferin is a novel Nrf2 activator that reduces oxidative stress and protects normal cells without reducing the sensitivity to etoposide of HL-60 leukemia cells in vitro. Mangiferin may be a potential chemotherapy adjuvant. PMID:24374812

  19. Small Molecule Inhibitors in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From the Bench to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Muneera; DiPersio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will eventually develop refractory or relapsed disease. In the absence of standard therapy for this population, there is currently an urgent unmet need for novel therapeutic agents. Targeted therapy with small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) represents a new therapeutic intervention that has been successful for the treatment of multiple tumors (e.g., gastrointestinal stromal tumors, chronic myelogenous leukemia). Hence, there has been great interest in generating selective small molecule inhibitors targeting critical pathways of proliferation and survival in AML. This review highlights a selective group of intriguing therapeutic agents and their presumed targets in both preclinical models and in early human clinical trials. PMID:25025370

  20. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  1. Molecular biological aspects on canine and human mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Rivera, P; von Euler, H

    2011-01-01

    The high incidence of mammary tumor disease reported in certain canine breeds suggests a significant genetic component, as has already been described in human familial breast cancer-in BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast cancer in particular. The identification of genetic risk factors is critical to improvements in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of these tumors. In recent years, there has been significant progress in developing the tools and reagents necessary to analyze the canine genome. This work has culminated in a high-quality draft genome sequence, as well as a single-nucleotide polymorphism map and single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays for genomewide association analysis. These tools provide an unprecedented opportunity to characterize the genetic influences in canine diseases such as cancer, eventually allowing for exploration of more effective therapies. Given the high homology between the canine genome sequence and its human counterpart--as well as the many similarities regarding the morphology, biological behavior, and clinical course of mammary tumors in both species--the dog has proven to be an excellent comparative model. This review highlights the comparative aspects regarding certain areas within molecular biology, and it discusses future perspectives. The findings in larger genomewide association analyses and cDNA expression arrays are described, and the BRCA1/BRCA2 complex is compared in detail between the 2 species. PMID:21147766

  2. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Xinyu; Han, Xingpeng; Zhang, Fang; He, Miao; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhao, Hong

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  3. Peripheral blood CD5-positive B lymphocytes (B-1a cells) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Veneri, Dino; Franchini, Massimo; de Sabata, Donata; Ledro, Silvia; Vella, Antonio; Ortolani, Riccardo; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Benedetti, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Background Only few data are available in literature regarding the reconstitution of B-1a cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation performed for haematological malignancies. Methods In this study we used flow cytometry to assess the reconstitution of the peripheral blood B-1a cell compartment after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Cytometric analyses were performed over time on 11 consecutive patients undergoing allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in our Haematology Unit and the results were compared with available data regarding B-1a cell reconstitution after allogeneic bone marrow stem cell transplantation. Results In spite of an earlier recovery of B-1a cells in the peripheral blood after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, the reconstitution of this B-cell subset was similar, regardless of the source of stem cells employed. Conclusions Further studies are necessary in order to clarify the origin of B-1a cells in humans in health and illness. PMID:19112737

  4. Thyroxine 5'-deiodinase in human anterior pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Itagaki, Y; Yoshida, K; Ikeda, H; Kaise, K; Kaise, N; Yamamoto, M; Sakurada, T; Yoshinaga, K

    1990-08-01

    The activity of T4 5'-monodeiodinase (5'D) in the pituitary was measured in 12 patients with pituitary adenoma (3 patients with acromegaly, 2 with prolactinoma, 1 with Cushing's disease, 1 with TSH-producing tumor, and 5 with nonfunctioning tumor) and, as a control, in a patient who died of parotid cancer. The pituitaries, obtained at operation or autopsy, were homogenized in 0.1 mol/L potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, and centrifuged at 800 x g. Supernatants were incubated with [125I]T4 and 20 mmol/L dithiothreitol (DTT) at 37C for 90 min. T4 5'-D was measured by the release of 125I- with the ion exchange method. The activity of T4 5'-D in the pituitaries from patients with prolactinoma and parotid cancer was dependent on protein concentration, incubation time, incubation temperature, and T4 concentration, and was labile to prior heating at 70 C for 30 min. T4 5'-D was not inhibited by 1 mmol/L propylthiouracil, but was inhibited 95% by 0.1 mmol/L iopanoic acid. The apparent Km and maximum velocity for T4 5'-D in homogenates of prolactinoma at 20 mmol/L DTT were 11 nmol/L and 1.54 pmol/mg protein.h, respectively. This reaction followed sequential-type reaction kinetics when the DTT concentration was varied. All other homogenates of pituitary tumors, except two nonfunctioning tumors, also demonstrated T4 5'-D activity. These results indicate that 1) the human pituitary express a low Km and PTU-insensitive T4 5'-D activity which is very similar to the type II enzyme activity in the rat pituitary; and 2) various types of pituitary tumor cells contain T4 5'-D activity.

  5. The role of natural killer cells in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Danier, Anna Carolyna Araújo; de Melo, Ricardo Pereira; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; Laguna-Abreu, Maria Theresa Cerávolo

    2011-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a neoplasia resulting from a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 producing the BCR-ABL hybrid known as the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph). In chronic myeloid leukemia a proliferation of malignant myeloid cells occurs in the bone marrow due to excessive tyrosine kinase activity. In order to maintain homeostasis, natural killer cells, by means of receptors, identify the major histocompatibility complex on the surface of tumor cells and subsequently induce apoptosis. The NKG2D receptor in the natural killer cells recognizes the transmembrane proteins related to major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes A and B (MICA and MICB), and it is by the interaction between NKG2D and MICA that natural killer cells exert cytotoxic activity against chronic myeloid leukemia tumor cells. However, in the case of chronic exposure of the NKG2D receptor, the MICA ligand releases soluble proteins called sMICA from the tumor cell surface, which negatively modulate NKG2D and enable the tumor cells to avoid lysis mediated by the natural killer cells. Blocking the formation of sMICA may be an important antitumor strategy. Treatment using tyrosine kinase inhibitors induces modulation of NKG2DL expression, which could favor the activity of the natural killer cells. However this mechanism has not been fully described in chronic myeloid leukemia. In the present study, we analyze the role of natural killer cells to reduce proliferation and in the cellular death of tumor cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:23049299

  6. Positron emission tomography in the study of human tumors.

    PubMed

    Beaney, R P

    1984-10-01

    To increase our understanding of cancer and improve cancer treatment on a rational basis we need to identify both qualitative and quantitative differences between normal and neoplastic tissue. The multimodality approach to cancer treatment includes radiotherapy, chemotherapy, hyperthermia, and immunotherapy. Most of the data on which we base our therapeutic strategies have been derived from in vitro studies or animal tumor models. More information is required on the physiology of in vivo human tumors and their response to therapy. Positron emission tomography allows the regional tissue concentration of a positron emitting radionuclide to be measured in absolute units. If valid tracer models can be formulated that accurately describe the fate of an administered "biological" tracer then the physiological process under investigation can be measured quantitatively. The sequential inhalation of C15O2, 15O2, and 11CO allows regional tissue blood flow, oxygen utilization and blood volume to be measured in absolute units. Tissue perfusion, a measure of nutrient (eg, oxygen) supply, drug delivery, or a means of heat dissipation, is of immense importance to oncologists. The oxygen-15 technique has been used not only to study regional blood flow and oxygen utilization in both tumor and normal tissue but also their response to therapeutic intervention. In those studies were tracer models are thought to be less than complete (eg, due to insufficient biological data) then only a semiquantitative or qualitative assessment of the pathophysiological state may be possible. In this respect, tumor function has been characterized by the rate of uptake of 18F-2-deoxyglucose. This technique has provided a means of tumor grading and differentiating between radiation-induced tissue necrosis and tumor recurrence. Metabolic imaging with labeled amino acids appears particularly useful in the delineation of tumor extent. Blood brain barrier integrity and the pharmacokinetics of cytotoxic drugs

  7. High-mobility group box protein 1 promotes the survival of myeloid-derived suppressor cells by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Parker, Katherine H; Horn, Lucas A; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are immune-suppressive cells that are elevated in most individuals with cancer, where their accumulation and suppressive activity are driven by inflammation. As myeloid-derived suppressor cells inhibit anti-tumor immunity and promote tumor progression, we are determining how their viability is regulated. Previous studies have established that the damage-associated molecular pattern molecule high-mobility group box protein 1 drives myeloid-derived suppressor cell accumulation and suppressive potency and is ubiquitously present in the tumor microenvironment. As high-mobility group box protein 1 also facilitates tumor cell survival by inducing autophagy, we sought to determine if high-mobility group box protein 1 regulates myeloid-derived suppressor cell survival through induction of autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy increased the quantity of apoptotic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, demonstrating that autophagy extends the survival and increases the viability of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Inhibition of high-mobility group box protein 1 similarly increased the level of apoptotic myeloid-derived suppressor cells and reduced myeloid-derived suppressor cell autophagy, demonstrating that in addition to inducing the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, high-mobility group box protein 1 sustains myeloid-derived suppressor cell viability. Circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells have a default autophagic phenotype, and tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells are more autophagic, consistent with the concept that inflammatory and hypoxic conditions within the microenvironment of solid tumors contribute to tumor progression by enhancing immune-suppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that in addition to previously recognized protumor effects, high-mobility group box protein 1 contributes to tumor progression by increasing myeloid-derived suppressor cell viability by

  8. IL-12 Delivered Intratumorally by Multilamellar Liposomes Reactivates Memory T Cells in Human Tumor Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R.; Purohit, Vivek S.; Pang, Wing Man; Iyer, Vandana; Odunsi, Kunle; Demmy, Todd L; Yokota, Sandra J.; Loyall, Jenni L.; Kelleher, Raymond J.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy; Bankert, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Using a novel loading technique, IL-12 is reported here to be efficiently encapsulated within large multilamellar liposomes. The preclinical efficacy of the cytokine loaded liposomes to deliver IL-12 into human tumors and to reactive tumor-associated T cells in situ is tested using a human tumor xenograft model. IL-12 is released in vivo from these liposomes in a biologically active form when injected into tumor xenografts that are established by the subcutaneous implantation of non-disrupted pieces of human lung, breast or ovarian tumors into immunodeficient mice. The histological architecture of the original tumor tissue, including tumor-associated leukocytes, tumor cells and stromal cells is preserved anatomically and the cells remain functionally responsive to cytokines in these xenografts. The local and sustained release of IL-12 into the tumor microenvironment reactivates tumor-associated quiescent effector memory T cells to proliferate, produce and release IFN-γ resulting in the killing of tumor cells in situ. Very little IL-12 is detected in the serum of mice for up to 5 days after an intratumoral injection of the IL-12 liposomes. We conclude that IL-12 loaded large multilamellar liposomes provide a safe method for the local and sustained delivery of IL-12 to tumors and a therapeutically effective way of reactivating existing tumor-associated T cells in human solid tumor microenvironments. The potential of this local in situ T cell re-stimulation to induce a systemic anti-tumor immunity is discussed. PMID:19395317

  9. Autocrine insulin-like growth factor-I signaling promotes growth and survival of human acute myeloid leukemia cells via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Doepfner, K T; Spertini, O; Arcaro, A

    2007-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling plays an important role in various human cancers. Therefore, the role of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) signaling in growth and survival of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells was investigated. Expression of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) and its ligand IGF-I were detected in a panel of human AML blasts and cell lines. IGF-I and insulin promoted the growth of human AML blasts in vitro and activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) pathways. IGF-I-stimulated growth of AML blasts was blocked by an inhibitor of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, downregulation of the class Ia PI3K isoforms p110beta and p110delta by RNA interference impaired IGF-I-stimulated Akt activation, cell growth and survival in AML cells. Proliferation of a panel of AML cell lines and blasts isolated from patients with AML was inhibited by the IGF-IR kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 or by an IGF-IR neutralizing antibody. In addition to its antiproliferative effects, NVP-AEW541 sensitized primary AML blasts and cell lines to etoposide-induced apoptosis. Together, our data describe a novel role for autocrine IGF-I signaling in the growth and survival of primary AML cells. IGF-IR inhibitors in combination with chemotherapeutic agents may represent a novel approach to target human AML.

  10. Interleukin-6 is a cofactor for the growth of myeloid cells from human bone marrow aspirates but does not affect the clonogenicity of myeloma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Borinaga, A M; Millar, B C; Bell, J B; Joffe, J K; Millar, J L; Gooding, R; Riches, P; McElwain, T J

    1990-12-01

    Several groups have claimed that IL-6 is a growth factor for human myeloma cells in vitro. Bone marrow aspirates from 30 patients at different stages of treatment with VAMP/high dose melphalan, were examined for myeloma colony formation (MY-CFUc) using a clonogenic assay in vitro. Myeloma cells from 16/30 patients produced MY-CFUc in our assay system, which uses heavily irradiated HL60 cells as an underlay in soft agar. These heavily irradiated cells were shown to be essential for the inhibition of granulocyte-macrophage colonies (GM-CFUc). The addition of recombinant human IL-6 (10 ng/plate) reduced the number of bone marrow samples which produced MY-CFUc from 16 to six. Furthermore, the addition of antibody to IL-6 (1 microgram/plate) failed to inhibit MY-CFUc from 6/7 samples. Conditioned medium from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC-CM) contains approximately 2 ng/ml IL-6 and can be used to stimulate the growth and maintenance of the B9 murine IL-6 dependent hybridoma cell line. Recombinant human IL-6 supported the growth of B9 cells in a clonogenic assay and growth was inhibited by anti-IL-6 in the presence of rhIL-6 or PBMC-CM. Mononuclear cells from a second group of myeloma patients were cultured in soft agar in a mixture of PBMC-CM and fresh growth medium. Nine of the 10 samples produced myeloid colonies which consisted of granulocytes, monocytes and macrophages and the number of colonies was reduced by at least 50% in 6/8 samples when anti-IL-6 was added to the cultures. In no instance were MY-CFUc produced. Also, conditioned medium from the bladder carcinoma cell line 5637, which is used routinely as a source of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), contains approximately 4 ng/ml IL-6. Although rhIL-6 failed to stimulate GM-CFUc in the absence of other growth factors, addition of anti-IL-6 to cultures containing a suboptimal amount of 5637-CM reduced the number of colonies by 50%. These data provide evidence that IL-6 is

  11. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  12. Pterostilbene Simultaneously Induced G0/G1-Phase Arrest and MAPK-Mediated Mitochondrial-Derived Apoptosis in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Chou, Ying-Erh; Tan, Peng; Lee, Wei-Jiunn; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Chen, Hui-Yu; Lin, Chien-Huang; Lee, Liang-Ming; Chien, Ming-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Background Pterostilbene (PTER) is a dimethylated analog of the phenolic phytoalexin, resveratrol, with higher anticancer activity in various tumors. Herein, the molecular mechanisms by which PTER exerts its anticancer effects against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells were investigated. Methodology and Principal Findings Results showed that PTER suppressed cell proliferation in various AML cell lines. PTER-induced G0/G1-phase arrest occurred when expressions of cyclin D3 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2/6 were inhibited. PTER-induced cell apoptosis occurred through activation of caspases-8-9/-3, and a mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP)-dependent pathway. Moreover, treatment of HL-60 cells with PTER induced sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)1/2, and inhibition of both MAPKs by their specific inhibitors significantly abolished the PTER-induced activation of caspases-8/-9/-3. Of note, PTER-induced cell growth inhibition was only partially reversed by the caspase-3-specific inhibitor, Z-DEVE-FMK, suggesting that this compound may also act through a caspase-independent pathway. Interestingly, we also found that PTER promoted disruption of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and release of activated cathepsin B. Conclusion Taken together, our results suggest that PTER induced HL-60 cell death via MAPKs-mediated mitochondria apoptosis pathway and loss of LMP might be another cause for cell apoptosis induced by PTER. PMID:25144448

  13. Autocrine growth factors for human tumor clonogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Hamburger, A W; White, C P

    1985-11-01

    A human epithelial-derived cell line, SW-13, releases a soluble substance that functions as an autocrine growth factor. SW-13 cells, derived from a human adenocarcinoma of the adrenal cortex, form a few small colonies when suspended in soft agar at low densities. The number of colonies increased significantly when either viable SW-13 cells or serum-free medium conditioned by SW-13 cells (CM) was added to agar underlayers. CM increased colony formation in a dose-dependent fashion. Clonal growth at low cell densities was dependent on the presence of both horse serum and SW-13 CM. Neither activity alone was capable of sustaining growth. Even when cells were plated at high densities CM could not substitute for serum, but could reduce the threshold serum concentration. The results suggest that autocrine and serum-derived factors act in concert to maintain clonal growth of epithelial tumor cells in soft agar.

  14. Functional Expression of TWEAK and the Receptor Fn14 in Human Malignant Ovarian Tumors: Possible Implication for Ovarian Tumor Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Ding, Chuanwei; Xu, Hai-bo; Qiu, Lihua; Di, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this current study was to investigate the expression of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) and its receptor fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) in human malignant ovarian tumors, and test TWEAK’s potential role on tumor progression in cell models in-vitro. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC), we found that TWEAK and its receptor Fn14 were expressed in human malignant ovarian tumors, but not in normal ovarian tissues or in borderline/benign epithelial ovarian tumors. High levels of TWEAK expression was detected in the majority of malignant tumors (36 out of 41, 87.80%). Similarly, 35 out of 41 (85.37%) malignant ovarian tumors were Fn14 positive. In these malignant ovarian tumors, however, TWEAK/Fn14 expression was not corrected with patients’ clinical subtype/stages or pathological features. In vitro, we demonstrated that TWEAK only inhibited ovarian cancer HO-8910PM cell proliferation in combination with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), whereas either TWEAK or TNF-α alone didn’t affect HO-8910PM cell growth. TWEAK promoted TNF-α production in cultured THP-1 macrophages. Meanwhile, conditioned media from TWEAK-activated macrophages inhibited cultured HO-8910PM cell proliferation and invasion. Further, TWEAK increased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production in cultured HO-8910PM cells to possibly recruit macrophages. Our results suggest that TWEAK/Fn14, by activating macrophages, could be ovarian tumor suppressors. The unique expression of TWEAK/Fn14 in malignant tumors indicates that it might be detected as a malignant ovarian tumor marker. PMID:23469193

  15. Diesel exhaust particle-treated human bronchial epithelial cells upregulate Jagged-1 and OX40L in myeloid dendritic cells via TSLP1

    PubMed Central

    Bleck, Bertram; Tse, Doris B.; Gordon, Terry; Ahsan, Mohammad R.; Reibman, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM), including diesel exhaust particles (DEP), promote the development of allergic disorders. Diesel exhaust particles increase oxidative stress and influence human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEC)-dendritic cell (DC) interactions via cytokines including thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Upregulation of TSLP results in Th2 responses. Using primary culture human bronchial epithelial cells (pHBEC) and human myeloid DC co-cultures we now show that DEP upregulation of Th2 responses occurred via HBEC-dependent mechanisms that resulted from oxidative stress. Moreover, DEP-treated HBEC and ambient-PM-treated HBEC upregulated OX40L and the Notch ligand Jagged-1 mRNA and expression on mDC. Upregulation of OX40L as well as Jagged-1 on mDC required HBEC and did not occur in the presence of n-acetylcysteine (NAC). Furthermore, OX40L and Jagged-1 upregulation was inhibited when HBEC expression of TSLP was silenced. Thus DEP-treatment of HBEC targeted two distinct pathways in mDC that were downstream of TSLP expression. Upregulation of OX40L and Jagged-1 by mDC resulted in mDC driven Th2 responses. These studies expand our understanding of the mechanism by which ambient pollutants alter mucosal immunity and promote disorders such as asthma. PMID:20974985

  16. HIF-2α protects human hematopoietic stem/progenitors and acute myeloid leukemic cells from apoptosis induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Rouault-Pierre, Kevin; Lopez-Onieva, Lourdes; Foster, Katie; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Lamrissi-Garcia, Isabelle; Serrano-Sanchez, Martin; Mitter, Richard; Ivanovic, Zoran; de Verneuil, Hubert; Gribben, John; Taussig, David; Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Mazurier, Frédéric; Bonnet, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are exposed to low levels of oxygen in the bone marrow niche, and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are the main regulators of cellular responses to oxygen variation. Recent studies using conditional knockout mouse models have unveiled a major role for HIF-1α in the maintenance of murine HSCs; however, the role of HIF-2α is still unclear. Here, we show that knockdown of HIF-2α, and to a much lesser extent HIF-1α, impedes the long-term repopulating ability of human CD34(+) umbilical cord blood cells. HIF-2α-deficient HSPCs display increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which subsequently stimulates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and triggers apoptosis by activation of the unfolded-protein-response (UPR) pathway. HIF-2α deregulation also significantly decreased engraftment ability of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Overall, our data demonstrate a key role for HIF-2α in the maintenance of human HSPCs and in the survival of primary AML cells. PMID:24095676

  17. High oxidative stress adversely affects NFκB mediated induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase in human neutrophils: Implications in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Awasthi, Deepika; Dubey, Megha; Nagarkoti, Sheela; Kumar, Ashutosh; Chandra, Tulika; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar; Tripathi, Anil Kumar; Dikshit, Madhu

    2016-08-31

    Increasing evidence support bimodal action of nitric oxide (NO) both as a promoter and as an impeder of oxygen free radicals in neutrophils (PMNs), however impact of high oxidative stress on NO generation is less explored. In the present study, we comprehensively investigated the effect of high oxidative stress on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO generation in human PMNs. Our findings suggest that PMA or diamide induced oxidative stress in PMNs from healthy volunteers, and high endogenous ROS in PMNs of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients attenuate basal as well as LPS/cytokines induced NO generation and iNOS expression in human PMNs. Mechanistically, we found that under high oxidative stress condition, S-glutathionylation of NFκB (p50 and p65 subunits) severely limits iNOS expression due to its reduced binding to iNOS promoter, which was reversed in presence of DTT. Furthermore, by using pharmacological inhibitors, scavengers and molecular approaches, we identified that enhanced ROS generation via NOX2 and mitochondria, reduced Grx1/2 expression and GSH level associated with NFκB S-glutathionylation in PMNs from CML patients. Altogether data obtained suggest that oxidative status act as an important regulator of NO generation/iNOS expression, and under enhanced oxidative stress condition, NOX2-mtROS-NFκB S-glutathionylation is a feed forward loop, which attenuate NO generation and iNOS expression in human PMNs. PMID:27264783

  18. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis.

  19. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  20. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  1. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  2. Mutational analysis of multiple tumor suppressor 1 (MTS1) gene in human primary breast tumors and established breast tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, L.; Sgroi, D.; Sterner, C.

    1994-09-01

    A putative tumor suppressor gene on the short arm of human chromosome 9 has been identified recently and named as multiple tumor suppressor 1 (MTS1). MTS1 is identical to the previously identified cyclin-dependent kinase-4 inhibitor gene p16, a cell cycle regulatory protein. Frequent homozygous deletions of MTS1 gene has been documented recently in cell lines derived from different types of tumors including breast tumors, suggesting that MTS1 is a tumor suppressor gene that is probably involved in a variety of human tumors. To determine the frequency of MTS1 mutations in primary breast tumors, we screened 39 primary breast tumors (16 lobular carcinoma and 23 ductal carcinoma) and 5 established breast tumor cell lines by utilizing single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. SSCP analysis was carried out for all 3 exons of the MTS1 gene utilizing primers in the flanking intronic sequences. Two of the five breast cancer tumor cell lines analyzed exhibited deletion of the entire MTS1 gene. However, only one of the thirty-nine primary breast tumors revealed a potential SSCP variation in exon 2 of the MTS1 gene which is currently characterized by sequencing. SSCP analysis also revealed two intragenic polymorphisms, one in exon 2 and one in the 3{prime} untranslated region, that could be used to assay allelic loss directly at the MTS1 locus. These results suggest that the mutation of the MTS1 gene may not be a critical genetic change in the formation of primary breast cancer, and the deletions observed in breast tumor cell lines may be due to product of cell growth in vitro.

  3. Allium compounds, dipropyl and dimethyl thiosulfinates as antiproliferative and differentiating agents of human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Merhi, Faten; Auger, Jacques; Rendu, Francine; Bauvois, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies support the premise that Allium vegetables may lower the risk of cancers. The beneficial effects appear related to the organosulfur products generated upon processing of Allium. Leukemia cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) display high proliferative capacity and have a reduced capacity of undergoing apoptosis and maturation. Whether the sulfur-containing molecules thiosulfinates (TS), diallyl TS (All2TS), dipropyl TS (Pr2TS) and dimethyl TS (Me2TS), are able to exert chemopreventative activity against AML is presently unknown. The present study was an evaluation of proliferation, cytotoxicity, differentiation and secretion of AML cell lines (U937, NB4, HL-60, MonoMac-6) in response to treatment with these TS and their related sulfides (diallylsulfide, diallyl disulfide, dipropyl disulfide, dimethyl disulfide). As assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, gelatin zymogaphy and RT-PCR, we showed that Pr2TS and Me2TS, but not All2TS and sulfides, 1) inhibited cell proliferation in dose- and time-dependent manner and this process was neither due to cytotoxicity nor apoptosis, 2) induced macrophage maturation, and 3) inhibited the levels of secreted MMP-9 (protein and activity) and TNF-α protein, without altering mRNA levels. By establishing for the first time that Pr2TS and Me2TS affect proliferation, differentiation and secretion of leukemic cell lines, this study provides the opportunity to explore the potential efficiency of these molecules in AML. PMID:19707466

  4. The development of a three-dimensional scaffold for ex vivo biomimicry of human acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Teresa Mortera; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Bismarck, Alexander; Panoskaltsis, Nicki

    2010-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a cancer of haematopoietic cells that develops in three-dimensional (3-D) bone marrow niches in vivo. The study of AML has been hampered by lack of appropriate ex vivo models that mimic this microenvironment. We hypothesised that fabrication and optimisation of suitable biomimetic scaffolds for culturing leukaemic cells ex vivo might facilitate the study of AML in its native 3-D niche. We evaluated the growth of three leukaemia subtype-specific cell lines, K-562, HL60 and Kasumi-6, on highly porous scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymeric materials, such as poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), polyurethane (PU), poly (methyl-methacrylate), poly (D, L-lactade), poly (caprolactone), and polystyrene. Our results show that PLGA and PU supported the best seeding efficiency and leukaemic growth. Furthermore, the PLGA and PU scaffolds were coated with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, collagen type I (62.5 or 125 microg/ml) and fibronectin (25 or 50 microg/ml) to provide biorecognition signals. The 3 leukaemia subtype-specific lines grew best on PU scaffolds coated with 62.5 microg/ml collagen type I over 6 weeks in the absence of exogenous growth factors. In conclusion, PU-collagen scaffolds may provide a practical model to study the biology and treatment of primary AML in an ex vivo mimicry.

  5. Predictive role of minimal residual disease and log clearance in acute myeloid leukemia: a comparison between multiparameter flow cytometry and Wilm's tumor 1 levels.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giovanni; Minervini, Maria Marta; Melillo, Lorella; di Nardo, Francesco; de Waure, Chiara; Scalzulli, Potito Rosario; Perla, Gianni; Valente, Daniela; Sinisi, Nicola; Cascavilla, Nicola

    2014-07-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) as well as the degree of log clearance similarly identifies patients with poor prognosis. No comparison was provided between the two approaches in order to identify the best one to monitor follow-up patients. In this study, MRD and clearance were assessed by both multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) and WT1 expression at different time points on 45 AML patients achieving complete remission. Our results by WT1 expression showed that log clearance lower than 1.96 after induction predicted the recurrence better than MRD higher than 77.0 copies WT1/10(4) ABL. Conversely, on MFC, MRD higher than 0.2 % after consolidation was more predictive than log clearance below 2.64. At univariate and multivariate analysis, positive MRD values and log clearance below the optimal cutoffs were associated with a shorter disease-free survival (DFS). At the univariate analysis, positive MRD values were also associated with overall survival (OS). Therefore, post-induction log clearance by WT1 and post-consolidation MRD by MFC represented the most informative approaches to identify the relapse. At the optimal timing of assessment, positive MRD and log-clearance values lower than calculated thresholds similarly predicted an adverse prognosis in AML.

  6. Retargeting T cells to GD2 pentasaccharide on human tumors using bispecific humanized antibody

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Cheng, Ming; Guo, Hongfen; Chen, Yuedan; Huse, Morgan; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-disialoganglioside GD2 IgG antibodies have shown clinical efficacy in solid tumors that lack human leukocyte antigens (e.g. neuroblastoma) by relying on Fc-dependent cytotoxicity. However, there are pain side effects secondary to complement activation. T-cell retargeting bispecific antibodies (BsAb) also have clinical potential, but it is thus far only effective against liquid tumors. In this study, a fully humanized hu3F8-BsAb was developed, in which the anti-CD3 huOKT3 single chain Fv fragment (ScFv) was linked to the carboxyl end of the anti-GD2 hu3F8 IgG1 light chain, and was aglycosylated at N297 of Fc to prevent complement activation and cytokine storm. In vitro, hu3F8-BsAb activated T cells through classic immunological synapses, inducing GD2-specific tumor cytotoxicity at femtomolar EC50 with >105-fold selectivity over normal tissues, releasing Th1 cytokines (TNFα, IFNγ and IL2) when GD2(+) tumors were present. In separate murine neuroblastoma and melanoma xenograft models, intravenous hu3F8-BsAb activated T cells in situ and recruited intravenous T cells for tumor ablation, significantly prolonging survival from local recurrence or from metastatic disease. Hu3F8-BsAb, but not control BsAb, drove T cells and monocytes to infiltrate tumor stroma. These monocytes were necessary for sustained T-cell proliferation and/or survival and contributed significantly to the antitumor effect. The in vitro and in vivo antitumor properties of hu3F8-BsAb and its safety profile support its further clinical development as a cancer therapeutic, and provide the rationale for exploring aglycosylated IgG-scFv as a structural platform for retargeting human T cells. PMID:25542634

  7. CXXC5 (Retinoid-Inducible Nuclear Factor, RINF) is a Potential Therapeutic Target in High-Risk Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Astori, Audrey; Fredly, Hanne; Aloysius, Thomas Aquinas; Bullinger, Lars; Mas, Véronique Mansat-De; de la Grange, Pierre; Delhommeau, François; Hagen, Karen Marie; Récher, Christian; Dusanter-Fourt, Isabelle; Knappskog, Stian; Lillehaug, Johan Richard

    2013-01-01

    The retinoid-responsive gene CXXC5 localizes to the 5q31.2 chromosomal region and encodes a retinoid-inducible nuclear factor (RINF) that seems important during normal myelopoiesis. We investigated CXXC5/RINF expression in primary human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells derived from 594 patients, and a wide variation in CXXC5/RINF mRNA levels was observed both in the immature leukemic myeloblasts and in immature acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, patients with low-risk cytogenetic abnormalities showed significantly lower levels compared to patients with high-risk abnormalities, and high RINF/CXXC5/ mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival for patients receiving intensive chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. This association with prognosis was seen both when investigating (i) an unselected patient population as well as for patients with (ii) normal cytogenetic and (iii) core-binding factor AML. CXXC5/RINF knockdown in AML cell lines caused increased susceptibility to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, and regulation of apoptosis also seemed to differ between primary human AML cells with high and low RINF expression. The association with adverse prognosis together with the antiapoptotic effect of CXXC5/RINF suggests that targeting of CXXC5/RINF should be considered as a possible therapeutic strategy, especially in high-risk patients who show increased expression in AML cells compared with normal hematopoietic cells. PMID:23988457

  8. Npm1 is a haploinsufficient suppressor of myeloid and lymphoid malignancies in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sportoletti, Paolo; Grisendi, Silvia; Majid, Samia M; Cheng, Ke; Clohessy, John G; Viale, Agnes; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2008-04-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1) gene has been heavily implicated in cancer pathogenesis both as a putative proto-oncogene and tumor suppressor gene. NPM1 is the most frequently mutated gene in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), while deletion of 5q, where NPM1 maps, is frequent in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We have previously shown that mice heterozygous for Npm1 (Npm1+/-) develop a hematologic syndrome with features of human MDS. Here we analyzed Npm1+/- mutants to determine their susceptibility to cancer. Npm1+/- mice displayed a greater propensity to develop malignancies compared with Npm1+/+ mice. The Npm1+/- cohort frequently developed hematologic malignancies of both myeloid and lymphoid origin with myeloid malignancies displaying the highest incidence. Malignant cells retained the wild-type allele with normal localization and expression of Npm1 at the protein level, suggesting that complete Npm1 loss is not a prerequisite for tumorigenesis. Our results conclusively demonstrate that Npm1 acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor in the hematopoietic compartment.

  9. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) of human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Michael; Bendall, Sean C.; Finck, Rachel; Hale, Matthew B.; Hitzman, Chuck; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Levenson, Richard M.; Lowe, John B.; Liu, Scot D.; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Nolan, Garry P.

    2014-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a tool for visualizing protein expression employed as part of the diagnostic work-up for the majority of solid tissue malignancies. Existing IHC methods use antibodies tagged with fluorophores or enzyme reporters that generate colored pigments. Because these reporters exhibit spectral and spatial overlap when used simultaneously, multiplexed IHC is not routinely used in clinical settings. We have developed a method that uses secondary ion mass spectrometry to image antibodies tagged with isotopically pure elemental metal reporters. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) is capable of analyzing up to 100 targets simultaneously over a five-log dynamic range. Here, we used MIBI to analyze formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human breast tumor tissue sections stained with ten labels simultaneously. The resulting data suggest that MIBI will provide new insights by integrating tissue microarchitecture with highly multiplexed protein expression patterns, and will be valuable for basic research, drug discovery and clinical diagnostics. PMID:24584119

  10. Multiplexed ion beam imaging of human breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Michael; Bendall, Sean C; Finck, Rachel; Hale, Matthew B; Hitzman, Chuck; Borowsky, Alexander D; Levenson, Richard M; Lowe, John B; Liu, Scot D; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Nolan, Garry P

    2014-04-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a tool for visualizing protein expression that is employed as part of the diagnostic workup for the majority of solid tissue malignancies. Existing IHC methods use antibodies tagged with fluorophores or enzyme reporters that generate colored pigments. Because these reporters exhibit spectral and spatial overlap when used simultaneously, multiplexed IHC is not routinely used in clinical settings. We have developed a method that uses secondary ion mass spectrometry to image antibodies tagged with isotopically pure elemental metal reporters. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) is capable of analyzing up to 100 targets simultaneously over a five-log dynamic range. Here, we used MIBI to analyze formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human breast tumor tissue sections stained with ten labels simultaneously. The resulting data suggest that MIBI can provide new insights into disease pathogenesis that will be valuable for basic research, drug discovery and clinical diagnostics.

  11. ST3Gal-4 is the primary sialyltransferase regulating the synthesis of E-, P-, and L-selectin ligands on human myeloid leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Nandini; Buffone, Alexander; Stolfa, Gino; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Lau, Joseph T. Y.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Dell, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The precise glycosyltransferase enzymes that mediate selectin-ligand biosynthesis in human leukocytes are unknown. This knowledge is important because selectin-mediated cell tethering and rolling is a critical component of both normal immune response and various vascular disorders. We evaluated the role of 3 α(2,3)sialyltransferases, ST3Gal-3, -4, and -6, which act on the type II N-Acetyllactosamine structure (Galβ1,4GlcNAc) to create sialyl Lewis-X (sLeX) and related sialofucosylated glycans on human leukocytes of myeloid lineage. These genes were either silenced using lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or functionally ablated using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas9 technology. The results show that ST3Gal-4, but not ST3Gal-3 or -6, is the major sialyltransferase regulating the biosynthesis of E-, P-, and L-selectin ligands in humans. Reduction in ST3Gal-4 activity lowered cell-surface HECA-452 epitope expression by 75% to 95%. Glycomics profiling of knockouts demonstrate an almost complete loss of the sLeX epitope on both leukocyte N- and O-glycans. In cell-adhesion studies, ST3Gal-4 knockdown/knockout cells displayed 90% to 100% reduction in tethering and rolling density on all selectins. ST3Gal-4 silencing in neutrophils derived from human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells also resulted in 80% to 90% reduction in cell adhesion to all selectins. Overall, a single sialyltransferase regulates selectin-ligand biosynthesis in human leukocytes, unlike mice where multiple enzymes contribute to this function. PMID:25498912

  12. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  13. Direct tumor recognition by a human CD4+ T-cell subset potently mediates tumor growth inhibition and orchestrates anti-tumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Shiku, Hiroshi; Mineno, Junichi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells generally orchestrate and regulate immune cells to provide immune surveillance against malignancy. However, activation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is restricted at local tumor sites where antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are frequently dysfunctional, which can cause rapid exhaustion of anti-tumor immune responses. Herein, we characterize anti-tumor effects of a unique human CD4+ helper T-cell subset that directly recognizes the cytoplasmic tumor antigen, NY-ESO-1, presented by MHC class II on cancer cells. Upon direct recognition of cancer cells, tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells (TR-CD4) potently induced IFN-γ-dependent growth arrest in cancer cells. In addition, direct recognition of cancer cells triggers TR-CD4 to provide help to NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells by enhancing cytotoxic activity, and improving viability and proliferation in the absence of APCs. Notably, the TR-CD4 either alone or in collaboration with CD8+ T cells significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo in a xenograft model. Finally, retroviral gene-engineering with T cell receptor (TCR) derived from TR-CD4 produced large numbers of functional TR-CD4. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the role of TR-CD4 in tumor immunity, and suggest that approaches to utilize TR-CD4 will augment anti-tumor immune responses for durable therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients. PMID:26447332

  14. Human DMTF1β antagonizes DMTF1α regulation of the p14ARF Tumor Suppressor and Promotes Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tschan, Mario P.; Federzoni, Elena A.; Haimovici, Aladin; Britschgi, Christian; Moser, Bettina A.; Jin, Jing; Reddy, Venkateshwar A.; Sheeter, Dennis A.; Fischer, Kimberlee M.; Sun, Peiqing; Torbett, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    The human DMTF1 (DMP1) transcription factor, a DNA binding protein that interacts with cyclin D, is a positive regulator of the p14ARF (ARF) tumor suppressor. Our earlier studies have shown that three differentially spliced human DMP1 mRNAs, α, β and γ, arise from the human gene. We now show that DMP1α, β and γ isoforms differentially regulate ARF expression and promote distinct cellular functions. In contrast to DMP1α, DMP1β and γ did not activate the ARF promoter, whereas only β resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of DMP1α-induced transactivation of the ARF promoter. Ectopic expression of DMP1β reduced endogenous ARF mRNA levels in human fibroblasts. The DMP1β- and γ-isoforms share domains necessary for the inhibitory function of the β-isoform. That DMP1β may interact with DMP1α to antagonize its function was shown in DNA binding assays and in cells by the close proximity of DMP1α/β in the nucleus. Cells stably expressing DMP1β, as well as shRNA targeting all DMP1 isoforms, disrupted cellular growth arrest induced by serum deprivation or in PMA-derived macrophages in the presence or absence of cellular p53. DMP1 mRNA levels in acute myeloid leukemia samples, as compared to granulocytes, were reduced. Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia patient samples with all-trans retinoic acid promoted differentiation to granulocytes and restored DMP1 transcripts to normal granulocyte levels. Our findings imply that DMP1α- and β-ratios are tightly regulated in hematopoietic cells and DMP1β antagonizes DMP1α transcriptional regulation of ARF resulting in the alteration of cellular control with a gain in proliferation. PMID:26187004

  15. Toward harmonized phenotyping of human myeloid-derived suppressor cells by flow cytometry: results from an interim study.

    PubMed

    Mandruzzato, Susanna; Brandau, Sven; Britten, Cedrik M; Bronte, Vincenzo; Damuzzo, Vera; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Maurer, Dominik; Ottensmeier, Christian; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Welters, Marij J P; Walter, Steffen

    2016-02-01

    There is an increasing interest for monitoring circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in cancer patients, but there are also divergences in their phenotypic definition. To overcome this obstacle, the Cancer Immunoguiding Program under the umbrella of the Association of Cancer Immunotherapy is coordinating a proficiency panel program that aims at harmonizing MDSC phenotyping. After a consultation period, a two-stage approach was designed to harmonize MDSC phenotype. In the first step, an international consortium of 23 laboratories immunophenotyped 10 putative MDSC subsets on pretested, peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy donors to assess the level of concordance and define robust marker combinations for the identification of circulating MDSCs. At this stage, no mandatory requirements to standardize reagents or protocols were introduced. Data analysis revealed a small intra-laboratory, but very high inter-laboratory variance for all MDSC subsets, especially for the granulocytic subsets. In particular, the use of a dead-cell marker altered significantly the reported percentage of granulocytic MDSCs, confirming that these cells are especially sensitive to cryopreservation and/or thawing. Importantly, the gating strategy was heterogeneous and associated with high inter-center variance. Overall, our results document the high variability in MDSC phenotyping in the multicenter setting if no harmonization/standardization measures are applied. Although the observed variability depended on a number of identified parameters, the main parameter associated with variation was the gating strategy. Based on these findings, we propose further efforts to harmonize marker combinations and gating parameters to identify strategies for a robust enumeration of MDSC subsets.

  16. Fes tyrosine kinase expression in the tumor niche correlates with enhanced tumor growth, angiogenesis, circulating tumor cells, metastasis, and infiltrating macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengnan; Chitu, Violeta; Stanley, E Richard; Elliott, Bruce E; Greer, Peter A

    2011-02-15

    Fes is a protein tyrosine kinase with cell autonomous oncogenic activities that are well established in cell culture and animal models, but its involvement in human cancer has been unclear. Abundant expression of Fes in vascular endothelial cells and myeloid cell lineages prompted us to explore roles for Fes in the tumor microenvironment. In an orthotopic mouse model of breast cancer, we found that loss of Fes in the host correlated with reductions in engrafted tumor growth rates, metastasis, and circulating tumor cells. The tumor microenvironment in Fes-deficient mice also showed reduced vascularity and fewer macrophages. In co-culture with tumor cells, Fes-deficient macrophages also poorly promoted tumor cell invasive behavior. Taken together, our observations argue that Fes inhibition might provide therapeutic benefits in breast cancer, in part by attenuating tumor-associated angiogenesis and the metastasis-promoting functions of tumor-associated macrophages.

  17. The oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate activates NF-κB-dependent tumor-promoting stromal niche for acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Lai, You-Syuan; Tsai, Hui-Jen; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Yen, B Linju; Yeh, Su-Peng; Sun, H Sunny; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells produce the oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2HG) to induce epigenetic alteration and block hematopoietic differentiation. However, the effect of R-2HG released by IDH-mutated AML cells on the bone marrow microenvironment is unclear. Here, we report that R-2HG induces IκB kinase-independent activation of NF-κB in bone marrow stromal cells. R-2HG acts via a reactive oxygen species/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent pathway to phosphorylate NF-κB on the Thr254 residue. This phosphorylation enhances the interaction of NF-κB and the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase PIN1 and increases the protein stability and transcriptional activity of NF-κB. As a consequence, R-2HG enhances NF-κB-dependent expression of cytokines including IL-6, IL-8 and complement 5a to stimulate proliferation of AML cells. In addition, R-2HG also upregulates vascular endothelial adhesion molecule 1 and CXCR4 in stromal cells to enhance the contact between AML and stromal cells and attenuates chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. More importantly, we validated the R-2HG-activated gene signature in the primary bone marrow stromal cells isolated from IDH-mutated AML patients. Collectively, our results suggest that AML cell-derived R-2HG may be helpful for the establishment of a supportive bone marrow stromal niche to promote AML progression via paracrine stimulation. PMID:27577048

  18. The oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate activates NF-κB-dependent tumor-promoting stromal niche for acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Lai, You-Syuan; Tsai, Hui-Jen; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Yen, B. Linju; Yeh, Su-Peng; Sun, H. Sunny; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells produce the oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2HG) to induce epigenetic alteration and block hematopoietic differentiation. However, the effect of R-2HG released by IDH-mutated AML cells on the bone marrow microenvironment is unclear. Here, we report that R-2HG induces IκB kinase-independent activation of NF-κB in bone marrow stromal cells. R-2HG acts via a reactive oxygen species/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent pathway to phosphorylate NF-κB on the Thr254 residue. This phosphorylation enhances the interaction of NF-κB and the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase PIN1 and increases the protein stability and transcriptional activity of NF-κB. As a consequence, R-2HG enhances NF-κB-dependent expression of cytokines including IL-6, IL-8 and complement 5a to stimulate proliferation of AML cells. In addition, R-2HG also upregulates vascular endothelial adhesion molecule 1 and CXCR4 in stromal cells to enhance the contact between AML and stromal cells and attenuates chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. More importantly, we validated the R-2HG-activated gene signature in the primary bone marrow stromal cells isolated from IDH-mutated AML patients. Collectively, our results suggest that AML cell-derived R-2HG may be helpful for the establishment of a supportive bone marrow stromal niche to promote AML progression via paracrine stimulation. PMID:27577048

  19. Chemotherapeutic response of tumor derived from human adenovirus 12--induced retinal tumor cell line in syngeneic CDF (F 344) rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Mukai, N; Solish, S P; Sawada, T; Pomeroy, M E

    1983-01-01

    The effect of two anticancer agents, vincristine (VCR) and cyclophosphamide (CTX), on an established cell line (EXP-5) derived from human adenovirus serotype 12 (Ad 12)--induced retinal tumor was studied in vitro and in vivo. VCR at a concentration of 5 and 10 micrograms/ml of culture medium and CTX at 50 and 100 micrograms/ml suppressed growth in vitro. EXP-5 cells were transplanted into the vitreous of 56 inbred CDF (F 344 strain) rats. The implants grew almost exclusively as intravitreous tumors within one month. When the tumor was full grown in the vitreous, VCR and CTX were administered intravenously, singly or in combination, on a schedule based on the protocol CCG-961 for localized unilateral retinoblastoma, Reese-Ellsworth group 5. At a dosage of 0.05 mg/kg, VCR was effective in reducing tumor size; at a dosage of 5 mg/kg, CTX did not reduce tumor size. Combined VCR/CTX therapy induced reduction of about two thirds in tumor size in 2 of 10 treated animals; in all 10 animals, the tumor became morphologically less distinct during the course of treatment although some characteristic features remained. Cytotoxic tumor changes (necrosis, fibrous proliferation, cell transformation, and bizarre giant cells) were observed in all treated animals. This model used the EXP-5 cell line grown in the vitreous, thereby providing a potential tool for evaluating growth and chemotherapeutic responsiveness of retinoblastoma.

  20. Expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in human tumors: relationship to breast, colorectal, and prostate tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Han, Zeqiu; Slack, Rebecca S; Li, Wenping; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2003-01-01

    High levels of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), the alternative-binding site for diazepam, are part of the aggressive human breast cancer cell phenotype in vitro. We examined PBR levels and distribution in normal tissue and tumors from multiple cancer types by immunohistochemistry. Among normal breast tissues, fibroadenomas, primary and metastatic adenocarcinomas, there is a progressive increase in PBR levels parallel to the invasive and metastatic ability of the tumor (p < 0.0001). In colorectal and prostate carcinomas, PBR levels were also higher in tumor than in the corresponding non-tumoral tissues and benign lesions (p < 0.0001). In contrast, PBR was highly concentrated in normal adrenal cortical cells and hepatocytes, whereas in adrenocortical tumors and hepatomas PBR levels were decreased. Moreover, malignant skin tumors showed decreased PBR expression compared with normal skin. These results indicate that elevated PBR expression is not a common feature of aggressive tumors, but rather may be limited to certain cancers, such as those of breast, colon-rectum and prostate tissues, where elevated PBR expression is associated with tumor progression. Thus, we propose that PBR overexpression could serve as a novel prognostic indicator of an aggressive phenotype in breast, colorectal and prostate cancers.

  1. Depletion of Mouse Cells from Human Tumor Xenografts Significantly Improves Downstream Analysis of Target Cells.

    PubMed

    Agorku, David J; Tomiuk, Stefan; Klingner, Kerstin; Wild, Stefan; Rüberg, Silvia; Zatrieb, Lisa; Bosio, Andreas; Schueler, Julia; Hardt, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    The use of in vitro cell line models for cancer research has been a useful tool. However, it has been shown that these models fail to reliably mimic patient tumors in different assays(1). Human tumor xenografts represent the gold standard with respect to tumor biology, drug discovery, and metastasis research (2-4). Tumor xenografts can be derived from different types of material like tumor cell lines, tumor tissue from primary patient tumors(4) or serially transplanted tumors. When propagated in vivo, xenografted tissue is infiltrated and vascularized by cells of mouse origin. Multiple factors such as the tumor entity, the origin of xenografted material, growth rate and region of transplantation influence the composition and the amount of mouse cells present in tumor xenografts. However, even when these factors are kept constant, the degree of mouse cell contamination is highly variable. Contaminating mouse cells significantly impair downstream analyses of human tumor xenografts. As mouse fibroblasts show high plating efficacies and proliferation rates, they tend to overgrow cultures of human tumor cells, especially slowly proliferating subpopulations. Mouse cell derived DNA, mRNA, and protein components can bias downstream gene expression analysis, next-generation sequencing, as well as proteome analysis (5). To overcome these limitations, we have developed a fast and easy method to isolate untouched human tumor cells from xenografted tumor tissue. This procedure is based on the comprehensive depletion of cells of mouse origin by combining automated tissue dissociation with the benchtop tissue dissociator and magnetic cell sorting. Here, we demonstrate that human target cells can be can be obtained with purities higher than 96% within less than 20 min independent of the tumor type. PMID:27501218

  2. Potentiation of platinum antitumor effects in human lung tumor xenografts by the angiogenesis inhibitor squalamine: effects on tumor neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Schiller, J H; Bittner, G

    1999-12-01

    Squalamine is a novel anti-angiogenic aminosterol that is postulated to inhibit neovascularization by selectively inhibiting the sodium-hydrogen antiporter exchanger. To determine how to most effectively use this agent in patients with cancer, we examined the antitumor effects of squalamine with or without cytotoxic agents in human lung cancer xenografts and correlated these observations with the degree of tumor neovascularization. No direct cytotoxic effects of squalamine against tumor cells were observed in vitro with or without cisplatin. Squalamine was effective in inhibiting the establishment of H460 human tumors in BALBc nude mice but was ineffective in inhibiting the growth of H460, CALU-6, or NL20T-A human tumor xenografts when administered i.p. to mice bearing established tumors. However, when combined with cisplatin or carboplatin, squalamine increased tumor growth delay by > or =1.5-fold in the three human lung carcinoma cell lines compared with cisplatin or carboplatin alone. No enhancement of antitumor activity was observed when squalamine was combined with paclitaxel, vinorelbine, gemcitabine, or docetaxel. Repeated cycles of squalamine plus cisplatin administration delayed H460 tumor growth >8.6-fold. Squalamine plus cisplatin reduced CD31 vessel formation by 25% compared with controls, squalamine alone, or cisplatin alone; however, no inhibition in CD31 vessel formation was observed when squalamine was combined with vinorelbine. These data demonstrate that the combination of squalamine and a platinum analog has significant preclinical antitumor activity against human lung cancer that is related to the anti-angiogenic effects of squalamine. PMID:10632372

  3. Enhanced In Vivo Tumor Detection by Active Tumor Cell Targeting Using Multiple Tumor Receptor-Binding Peptides Presented on Genetically Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Koo Chul; Ko, Ho Kyung; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-08-01

    Human ferritin heavy-chain nanoparticle (hFTH) is genetically engineered to present tumor receptor-binding peptides (affibody and/or RGD-derived cyclic peptides, named 4CRGD here) on its surface. The affibody and 4CRGD specifically and strongly binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor I (EGFR) and human integrin αvβ3, respectively, which are overexpressed on various tumor cells. Through in vitro culture of EGFR-overexpressing adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-468) and integrin-overexpressing glioblastoma cells (U87MG), it is clarified that specific interactions between receptors on tumor cells and receptor-binding peptides on engineered hFTH is critical in active tumor cell targeting. After labeling with the near-infrared fluorescence dye (Cy5.5) and intravenouse injection into MDA-MB-468 or U87MG tumor-bearing mice, the recombinant hFTHs presenting either peptide or both of affibody and 4CRGD are successfully delivered to and retained in the tumor for a prolonged period of time. In particular, the recombinant hFTH presenting both affibody and 4CRGD notably enhances in vivo detection of U87MG tumors that express heterogeneous receptors, integrin and EGFR, compared to the other recombinant hFTHs presenting either affibody or 4CRGD only. Like affibody and 4CRGD used in this study, other multiple tumor receptor-binding peptides can be also genetically introduced to the hFTH surface for actively targeting of in vivo tumors with heterogenous receptors. PMID:27356892

  4. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in human peripheral blood: Optimized quantification in healthy donors and patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Flörcken, Anne; Takvorian, Anna; Singh, Anju; Gerhardt, Anne; Ostendorf, Benjamin Nils; Dörken, Bernd; Pezzutto, Antonio; Westermann, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells is an important mechanism leading to tolerance against tumors. Phenotypic characterization of MDSC has been established and heterogeneous populations with monocytic or granulocytic features have been characterized. Increased levels of MDSC have been described in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and seem to correlate with an adverse outcome. As MDSC constitute only small populations in peripheral blood of cancer patients, it is highly important to achieve technically optimized conditions for quantification. Different cell preparation techniques--besides freezing and thawing--are potential sources of substantial variation. Our study was focused on an optimized quantification of MDSC in pB of healthy donors and patients with mRCC, in whom major technical sources of variation were analyzed. Whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used for the flow cytometric quantification of MDSC in the pB of mRCC patients and healthy donors. We compared (1) analysis in whole blood vs. PBMC after Ficoll gradient centrifugation and (2) immediate analysis after blood drawing vs. analysis one day later. Finally, in order to evaluate our optimized technical approach, pB of 15 patients with histologically confirmed mRCC under treatment with either sunitinib or sorafenib was analyzed. No difference in the number of MDSC was observed after analysis in whole blood vs. PBMC. In contrast, the time point of analysis was a source of substantial variation (one day later vs. immediate analysis after blood drawing). In conclusion, for optimal analysis of MDSC, immediate analysis of whole blood after blood drawing rather than one day later seems to be most appropriate under the aspect of practical feasibility and reliability. Using this method, we were able to confirm both (a) increased numbers of MDSC in patients with mRCC and (b) a decrease of MDSC under sunitinib therapy. PMID:26462434

  5. Human kallikrein 3 (prostate specific antigen) and human kallikrein 5 expression in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Darling, M R; Tsai, S; Jackson-Boeters, L; Daley, T D; Diamandis, E P

    2006-01-01

    The human kallikrein 5 protein (hK5) is expressed in many normal tissues, most notably in skin, breast, salivary gland and esophagus. It has also been shown to be a potential biomarker for breast, ovarian and testicular cancer. Human kallikrein 3 (hK3; prostate-specific antigen) is the most useful marker for adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. The aim of this study was to determine whether hK3 and hK5 are expressed in salivary gland tissues and salivary gland tumors (both benign and malignant), in order to compare normal with tumor tissues. Pleomorphic adenomas, adenoid cystic carcinomas, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas, acinic cell carcinomas, mucoepidermoid carcinomas and adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified of both minor and major salivary glands were examined. The results of this study indicate that most salivary gland tumors do not show high levels of expression of hK5. Staining was most prominent in keratinizing epithelia in pleomorphic adenomas. hK3 is not expressed in salivary gland tumors.

  6. WISP-2 expression in human salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Kouzu, Yukinao; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Kato, Masaki; Higo, Morihiro; Nimura, Yoshinori; Harada, Koji; Numata, Tsutomu; Seki, Naohiko; Sato, Mitsunobu; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2006-04-01

    This study was designed to disclose detailed genetic mechanisms in salivary gland tumors (SGTs) for development of novel independent marker. We constructed an in-house cDNA microarray carrying 2,201 cDNA clones derived from SGT and oral squamous cell carcinoma cDNA libraries. Four cell lines that originated from the SGT-derived cell lines were analyzed using this microarray system. The genes identified by our microarray system were further analyzed at the mRNA or protein expression level in other types of human cancer cell lines and clinical samples (ten normal salivary glands [NSGs], eleven pleomorphic adenomas, ten adenoid cystic carcinomas and three adenocarcinomas). Two up-regulated genes and six down-regulated genes were identified in common when compared with the control RNA. Of the up-regulated genes, WISP-2, which plays an important role in breast carcinogenesis, was selected for further analyses. We found a higher expression of the WISP-2 gene in the SGT-derived cell lines compared with other types of human cancer cell lines. Furthermore, WISP-2 mRNA and protein expression levels in NSGs were significantly higher than those in SGTs. These results suggest that WISP-2 could be a reliable independent marker and that down-regulation or loss of the WISP-2 gene may be associated with the development of SGTs.

  7. Resistance of human tumor cells in vitro to oxidative cytolysis.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell-Tormey, J; DeBoer, C J; Nathan, C F

    1985-07-01

    Nine human cell types, six of them malignant, displayed a marked resistance to lysis by hydrogen peroxide (LD50, 2-20 mM). Of the reactive oxygen intermediates generated extracellularly, only H2O2 lysed all the cell types. OH was lytic to one of four, OI- to one of one, and O-2 to none of four cell types tested. Resistance to oxidative lysis did not correlate with specific activity of catalase, glutathione (GSH) peroxidase, other peroxidases, or glutathione disulfide reductase, or with specific content of GSH. Resistance to H2O2 seemed to occur via mechanisms distinct from those responsible for cellular consumption of H2O2. Consumption was inhibitable by azide and was probably due to catalase in each cell type. In contrast, resistance to oxidative lysis occurred via distinct routes in different cells. One cell type used the GSH redox cycle as the primary defense against H2O2, like murine tumors previously studied. Other cells seemed to utilize catalase as the major defense against H2O2. Nonetheless, with both catalase and the GSH redox cycle inhibited, all the human cells tested exhibited an inherent resistance to oxidative lysis, that is, resistance independent of detectable degradation of H2O2. PMID:2991343

  8. Malignant Potential of Murine Stromal Cells after Transplantation of Human Tumors into Nude Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenberg, David M.; Pavia, Rose A.

    1981-04-01

    Human malignant cancer tumors grafted into nude mice produce tumors containing both human cancer cells and the host's stromal cells. After short-term propagation of these tumors in vitro, the murine mesenchymal cells appear transformed and are tumorigenic in nude mice. However, established human cancer cell lines fail to similarly alter adjacent murine stromal cells when used to produce tumors in nude mice. These experiments suggest that cancer cells may recruit normal cells to become malignant, qualifying the view of the clonal (unicellular) origin of cancer.

  9. Contact-dependent depletion of hydrogen peroxide by catalase is a novel mechanism of myeloid-derived suppressor cell induction operating in human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Resheq, Yazid J; Li, Ka-Kit; Ward, Stephen T; Wilhelm, Annika; Garg, Abhilok; Curbishley, Stuart M; Blahova, Miroslava; Zimmermann, Henning W; Jitschin, Regina; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Mackensen, Andreas; Weston, Chris J; Adams, David H

    2015-03-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) represent a unique cell population with distinct immunosuppressive properties that have been demonstrated to shape the outcome of malignant diseases. Recently, human hepatic stellate cells (HSC) have been reported to induce monocytic-MDSC from mature CD14(+) monocytes in a contact-dependent manner. We now report a novel and unexpected mechanism by which CD14(+)HLADR(low/-) suppressive cells are induced by catalase-mediated depletion of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Incubation of CD14(+) monocytes with catalase led to a significant induction of functional MDSC compared with media alone, and H2O2 levels inversely correlated with MDSC frequency (r = -0.6555, p < 0.05). Catalase was detected in primary HSC and a stromal cell line, and addition of the competitive catalase inhibitor hydroxylamine resulted in a dose-dependent impairment of MDSC induction and concomitant increase of H2O2 levels. The NADPH-oxidase subunit gp91 was significantly increased in catalase-induced MDSC as determined by quantitative PCR outlining the importance of oxidative burst for the induction of MDSC. These findings represent a so far unrecognized link between immunosuppression by MDSC and metabolism. Moreover, this mechanism potentially explains how stromal cells can induce a favorable immunological microenvironment in the context of tissue oxidative stress such as occurs during cancer therapy.

  10. BDCA1-positive dendritic cells (DCs) represent a unique human myeloid DC subset that induces innate and adaptive immune responses to Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jun-O; Zhang, Wei; Du, Jiang-Yuan; Yu, Qing

    2014-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (bacteremia) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and places substantial cost burdens on health care systems. The role of peripheral blood dendritic cells (PBDCs) in the immune responses against S. aureus infection has not been well characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that BDCA1(+) myeloid DCs (mDCs) represent a unique PBDC subset that can induce immune responses against S. aureus infection. BDCA1(+) mDCs could engulf S. aureus and strongly upregulated the expression of costimulatory molecules and production of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, BDCA1(+) mDCs expressed high levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules in response to S. aureus and greatly promoted proliferation and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production in CD4 and CD8 T cells. Moreover, BDCA1(+) mDCs expressed higher levels of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) and scavenger receptor A (SR-A) than those on CD16(+) and BDCA3(+) mDCs, and these two receptors were both required for the recognition of S. aureus and the subsequent activation of BDCA1(+) mDCs. Finally, BDCA1(+) mDC-mediated immune responses against S. aureus were dependent on MyD88 signaling pathways. These results demonstrate that human BDCA1(+) mDCs represent a unique subset of mDCs that can respond to S. aureus to undergo maturation and activation and to induce Th1 and Tc1 immune responses. PMID:25114114

  11. Betanin a betacyanin pigment purified from fruits of Opuntia ficus-indica induces apoptosis in human chronic myeloid leukemia Cell line-K562.

    PubMed

    Sreekanth, Devalraju; Arunasree, M K; Roy, Karnati R; Chandramohan Reddy, T; Reddy, Gorla V; Reddanna, Pallu

    2007-11-01

    Betalains are water-soluble nitrogenous vacuolar pigments present in flowers and fruits of many caryophyllales with potent antioxidant properties. In the present study the antiproliferative effects of betanin, a principle betacyanin pigment, isolated from the fruits of Opuntia ficus-indica, was evaluated on human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line (K562). The results show dose and time dependent decrease in the proliferation of K562 cells treated with betanin with an IC(50) of 40 microM. Further studies involving scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed the apoptotic characteristics such as chromatin condensation, cell shrinkage and membrane blebbing. Agarose electrophoresis of genomic DNA of cells treated with betanin showed fragmentation pattern typical for apoptotic cells. Flow cytometric analysis of cells treated with 40 microM betanin showed 28.4% of cells in sub G0/G1 phase. Betanin treatment to the cells also induced the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage, down regulation Bcl-2, and reduction in the membrane potentials. Confocal microscopic studies on the cells treated with betanin suggest the entry of betanin into the cells. These studies thus demonstrate that betanin induces apoptosis in K562 cells through the intrinsic pathway and is mediated by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol, and PARP cleavage. The antiproliferative effects of betanin add further value to the nutritional characteristics of the fruits of O. ficus-indica.

  12. Micro FT-IR Characterization Of Human Lung Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Enzo; Teodori, L.; Vergamini, Piergiorgio; Trinca, M. L.; Mauro, F.; Salvati, F.; Spremolla, Giuliano

    1989-12-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy has opened up a new approach to the analytical study of cell transformation. Investigations carried out in normal and leukemic lymphocytes have evidenced an increase in DNA with respect to proteic components in neoplastic cells.(1) The evaluation of the ratio of the integrated areas(A) of the bands at 1080 cm-1 (mainly DNA) and at 1540 cm-1 (proteic components) has allowed us to establish a parameter which indicates, for values above 1.5, the neoplastic nature of cells. Recently, this approach has been applied to the study of human lung tumor cells. Several monocellular suspension procedures of the tissue fragment (mechanical and/or chemical) were tested to obtain reproducible and reliable spectra able to differentiate clearly between normal and patological cells. Chemical treatment (EDTA, Pepsin, Collagenase, etc.) produced additional bands in the spectra of the cells causing distortion of the profiles of some absorptions, and as a result, mechanical treatment was preferred. The normal and neoplastic cells homogeneously distributed by cytospin preparation on BaF2 windows were examined by means of FT-IR microscopy. An examination of several microareas of each sample yielded reproducible spectra, with values of the A 1080 cm-1 / A 1540 cm-1 parameter within a very narrow range for each sample, even if certain differences still remained among the different cases, in good agreement with the results obtained for leukemic cells.(1) The value of this parameter was found to be lower for cells isolated from the normal area of lung, than in the case of those corresponding to the tumoral area, meaning that an increase occurs in DNA with respect to the proteic components. These insights, which provide a basis to obtain indications at the molecular level, can open up new possibilities in clinical practice, in order to obtain diagnosis confirmation, to detect early stages of disease and to offer additional indications in cases of dubious interpretation.

  13. NKp46 and DNAM-1 NK-cell receptors drive the response to human cytomegalovirus-infected myeloid dendritic cells overcoming viral immune evasion strategies.

    PubMed

    Magri, Giuliana; Muntasell, Aura; Romo, Neus; Sáez-Borderías, Andrea; Pende, Daniela; Geraghty, Daniel E; Hengel, Hartmut; Angulo, Ana; Moretta, Alessandro; López-Botet, Miguel

    2011-01-20

    Information on natural killer (NK)-cell receptor-ligand interactions involved in the response to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is limited and essentially based on the study of infected fibroblasts. Experimental conditions were set up to characterize the NK response to HCMV-infected myeloid dendritic cells (DCs). Monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) infected by the TB40/E HCMV strain down-regulated the expression of human leukocyte antigen class I molecules and specifically activated autologous NK-cell populations. NKG2D ligands appeared virtually undetectable in infected moDCs, reflecting the efficiency of immune evasion mechanisms, and explained the lack of antagonistic effects of NKG2D-specific monoclonal antibody. By contrast, DNAM-1 and DNAM-1 ligands (DNAM-1L)-specific monoclonal antibodies inhibited the NK response at 48 hours after infection, although the impact of HCMV-dependent down-regulation of DNAM-1L in infected moDCs was perceived at later stages. moDCs constitutively expressed ligands for NKp46 and NKp30 natural cytotoxicity receptors, which were partially reduced on HCMV infection; yet, only NKp46 appeared involved in the NK response. In contrast to previous reports in fibroblasts, human leukocyte antigen-E expression was not preserved in HCMV-infected moDCs, which triggered CD94/NKG2A(+) NK-cell activation. The results provide an insight on key receptor-ligand interactions involved in the NK-cell response against HCMV-infected moDCs, stressing the importance of the dynamics of viral immune evasion mechanisms.

  14. Frequent loss of heterozygosity and altered expression of the candidate tumor suppressor gene 'FAT' in human astrocytic tumors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We had earlier used the comparison of RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) DNA fingerprinting profiles of tumor and corresponding normal DNA to identify genetic alterations in primary human glial tumors. This has the advantage that DNA fingerprinting identifies the genetic alterations in a manner not biased for locus. Methods In this study we used RAPD-PCR to identify novel genomic alterations in the astrocytic tumors of WHO grade II (Low Grade Diffuse Astrocytoma) and WHO Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the altered region was studied by microsatellite and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Expression study of the gene identified at the altered locus was done by semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Results Bands consistently altered in the RAPD profile of tumor DNA in a significant proportion of tumors were identified. One such 500 bp band, that was absent in the RAPD profile of 33% (4/12) of the grade II astrocytic tumors, was selected for further study. Its sequence corresponded with a region of FAT, a putative tumor suppressor gene initially identified in Drosophila. Fifty percent of a set of 40 tumors, both grade II and IV, were shown to have Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) at this locus by microsatellite (intragenic) and by SNP markers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed low FAT mRNA levels in a major subset of tumors. Conclusion These results point to a role of the FAT in astrocytic tumorigenesis and demonstrate the use of RAPD analysis in identifying specific alterations in astrocytic tumors. PMID:19126244

  15. The re-expression of the epigenetically silenced e-cadherin gene by a polyamine analogue lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) inhibitor in human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Woster, Patrick M.; Casero, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes is a common feature observed during the transformation process of many cancers, including those of hematologic origin. Histone modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, and methylation, collaborate with DNA CpG island methylation to regulate gene expression. The dynamic process of histone methylation is the latest of these epigenetic modifications to be described, and the identification and characterization of LSD1 as a demethylase of lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4) has confirmed that both the enzyme and the modified histone play important roles as regulators of gene expression. LSD1 activity contributes to the suppression of gene expression by demethylating promoter-region mono- and dimethyl- H3K4 histone marks that are associated with active gene expression. As most posttranslational modifications are reversible, the enzymes involved in the modification of histones have become targets for chemotherapeutic intervention. In this study, we examined the effects of the polyamine analogue LSD1 inhibitor 2d (1,15-bis{N5-[3,3-(diphenyl)propyl]-N1-biguanido}-4,12-diazapentadecane) in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines. In each line studied, 2d evoked cytotoxicity and inhibited LSD1 activity, as evidenced by increases in the global levels of mono- and di-methylated H3K4 proteins. Global increases in other chromatin modifications were also observed following exposure to 2d, suggesting a broad response to this compound with respect to chromatin regulation. On a gene-specific level, treatment with 2d resulted in the reexpression of e-cadherin, a tumor suppressor gene frequently silenced by epigenetic modification in AML. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the ecadherin promoter further confirmed that this re-expression was concurrent with changes in both active and repressive histone marks that were consistent with LSD1 inhibition. As hematologic malignancies have demonstrated

  16. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fecher, David; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Buck, Andreas; Bundschuh, Ralph; Nietzer, Sarah; Dandekar, Gudrun; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Lückerath, Katharina; Steinke, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and -testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future. PMID:27501455

  17. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fecher, David; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Buck, Andreas; Bundschuh, Ralph; Nietzer, Sarah; Dandekar, Gudrun; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Lückerath, Katharina; Steinke, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and –testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future. PMID:27501455

  18. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  19. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  20. The interleukin 3 gene is located on human chromosome 5 and is deleted in myeloid leukemias with a deletion of 5q.

    PubMed Central

    Le Beau, M M; Epstein, N D; O'Brien, S J; Nienhuis, A W; Yang, Y C; Clark, S C; Rowley, J D

    1987-01-01

    The gene IL-3 encodes interleukin 3, a hematopoietic colony-stimulating factor (CSF) that is capable of supporting the proliferation of a broad range of hematopoietic cell types. By using somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, we localized this gene to human chromosome 5 at bands q23-31, a chromosomal region that is frequently deleted [del(5q)] in patients with myeloid disorders. By in situ hybridization, IL-3 was found to be deleted in the 5q-chromosome of one patient with refractory anemia who had a del(5)(q15q33.3), of three patients with refractory anemia (two patients) or acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) de novo who had a similar distal breakpoint [del(5)(q13q33.3)], and of a fifth patient, with therapy-related ANLL, who had a similar distal breakpoint in band q33 [del(5)(q14q33.3)]. Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrids retaining the normal or the deleted chromosome 5 from two patients with the refractory anemia 5q- syndrome indicated that IL-3 sequences were absent form the hybrids retaining the deleted chromosome 5 but not from hybrids that had a cytologically normal chromosome 5. Thus, a small segment of chromosome 5 contains IL-3, GM-CSF (the gene encoding granulocyte-macrophage-CSF), CSF-1 (the gene encoding macrophage-CSF), and FMS (the human c-fms protooncogene, which encodes the CSF-1 receptor). Our findings and earlier results indicating that GM-CSF, CSF-1, and FMS were deleted in the 5q-chromosome, suggest that loss of IL-3 or of other CSF genes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of hematologic disorders associated with a del(5q). Images PMID:3497400

  1. The apoptotic mechanism of action of the sphingosine kinase 1 selective inhibitor SKI-178 in human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dick, Taryn E; Hengst, Jeremy A; Fox, Todd E; Colledge, Ashley L; Kale, Vijay P; Sung, Shen-Shu; Sharma, Arun; Amin, Shantu; Loughran, Thomas P; Kester, Mark; Wang, Hong-Gang; Yun, Jong K

    2015-03-01

    We previously developed SKI-178 (N'-[(1E)-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethylidene]-3-(4-methoxxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carbohydrazide) as a novel sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) selective inhibitor and, herein, sought to determine the mechanism-of-action of SKI-178-induced cell death. Using human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines as a model, we present evidence that SKI-178 induces prolonged mitosis followed by apoptotic cell death through the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Further examination of the mechanism of action of SKI-178 implicated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and cyclin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDK1) as critical factors required for SKI-178-induced apoptosis. In cell cycle synchronized human AML cell lines, we demonstrate that entry into mitosis is required for apoptotic induction by SKI-178 and that CDK1, not JNK, is required for SKI-178-induced apoptosis. We further demonstrate that the sustained activation of CDK1 during prolonged mitosis, mediated by SKI-178, leads to the simultaneous phosphorylation of the prosurvival Bcl-2 family members, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, as well as the phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of Mcl-1. Moreover, multidrug resistance mediated by multidrug-resistant protein1 and/or prosurvival Bcl-2 family member overexpression did not affect the sensitivity of AML cells to SKI-178. Taken together, these findings highlight the therapeutic potential of SKI-178 targeting SphK1 as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of AML, including multidrug-resistant/recurrent AML subtypes.

  2. Functional involvement of human discs large tumor suppressor in cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Unno, Kenji; Hanada, Toshihiko; Chishti, Athar H.

    2008-10-15

    Cytokinesis is the final step of cell division that completes the separation of two daughter cells. We found that the human discs large (hDlg) tumor suppressor homologue is functionally involved in cytokinesis. The guanylate kinase (GUK) domain of hDlg mediates the localization of hDlg to the midbody during cytokinesis, and over-expression of the GUK domain in U2OS and HeLa cells impaired cytokinesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from dlg mutant mice contained an increased number of multinucleated cells and showed reduced proliferation in culture. A kinesin-like motor protein, GAKIN, which binds directly to the GUK domain of hDlg, exhibited a similar intracellular distribution pattern with hDlg throughout mitosis and localized to the midbody during cytokinesis. However, the targeting of hDlg and GAKIN to the midbody appeared to be independent of each other. The midbody localization of GAKIN required its functional kinesin-motor domain. Treatment of cells with the siRNA specific for hDlg and GAKIN caused formation of multinucleated cells and delayed cytokinesis. Together, these results suggest that hDlg and GAKIN play functional roles in the maintenance of midbody architecture during cytokinesis.

  3. Functional involvement of human discs large tumor suppressor in cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Unno, Kenji; Hanada, Toshihiko; Chishti, Athar H.

    2008-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the final step of cell division that completes the separation of two daughter cells. We found that the human discs large (hDlg) tumor suppressor homologue is functionally involved in cytokinesis. The guanylate kinase (GUK) domain of hDlg mediates the localization of hDlg to the midbody during cytokinesis, and over-expression of the GUK domain in U2OS and HeLa cells impaired cytokinesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from dlg mutant mice contained an increased number of multinucleated cells and showed reduced proliferation in culture. A kinesin-like motor protein, GAKIN, which binds directly to the GUK domain of hDlg, exhibited a similar intracellular distribution pattern with hDlg throughout mitosis and localized to the midbody during cytokinesis. However, the targeting of hDlg and GAKIN to the midbody appeared to be independent of each other. The midbody localization of GAKIN required its functional kinesin-motor domain. Treatment of cells with the siRNA specific for hDlg and GAKIN caused formation of multinucleated cells and delayed cytokinesis. Together, these results suggest that hDlg and GAKIN play functional roles in the maintenance of midbody architecture during cytokinesis. PMID:18760273

  4. Gonadal development and germ cell tumors in mouse and humans.

    PubMed

    Dolci, Susanna; Campolo, Federica; De Felici, Massimo

    2015-09-01

    In multicellular organisms, proper development of gonads and germ cells is essential for the transmission of genetic information to the next generations and eventually for the survival of the species. For this reason, germline development is finely regulated to control germ cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Disruption of such controls can lead to infertility or germ cell tumors (GCTs). GCTs are particularly hideous pathologies since they occur mainly in neonates, infants, and children, rarely in the adults. They arise primarily in the testes and ovaries, though they can also develop in extragonadal sites along the midline of the body and the brain. Many similarities exist between most types of GCTs of the ovary and testis, including a morphological resemblance (often constituting a caricature of normal embryogenesis) and a similar pattern of chromosomal alterations. Furthermore, families with both ovarian and testicular GCTs have been reported, suggesting a possible common genetic etiology. This review focuses on the cellular processes, differentiation events and molecular mechanisms occurring during gonad development in mice and humans whose disturbance can be implicated in GCT formation.

  5. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C; Heth, Jason A; Maher, Cormac O; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D; Freudiger, Christian W; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A

    2015-10-14

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a nondestructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. We show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ = 0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery.

  6. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C.; Heth, Jason A.; Maher, Cormac O.; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D.; Freudiger, Christian W.; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a non-destructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. Here we show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ=0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density and protein:lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density and protein:lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Importantly, quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26468325

  7. Genes affected by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral insertions in mouse mammary tumors are deregulated or mutated in primary human mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert; Mudunuri, Uma; Bargo, Sharon; Raafat, Ahmed; McCurdy, David; Boulanger, Corinne; Lowther, William; Stephens, Robert; Luke, Brian T.; Stewart, Claudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of mutations is a contributing factor in the initiation of premalignant mammary lesions and their progression to malignancy and metastasis. We have used a mouse model in which the carcinogen is the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) which induces clonal premalignant mammary lesions and malignant mammary tumors by insertional mutagenesis. Identification of the genes and signaling pathways affected in MMTV-induced mouse mammary lesions provides a rationale for determining whether genetic alteration of the human orthologues of these genes/pathways may contribute to human breast carcinogenesis. A high-throughput platform for inverse PCR to identify MMTV-host junction fragments and their nucleotide sequences in a large panel of MMTV-induced lesions was developed. Validation of the genes affected by MMTV-insertion was carried out by microarray analysis. Common integration site (CIS) means that the gene was altered by an MMTV proviral insertion in at least two independent lesions arising in different hosts. Three of the new genes identified as CIS for MMTV were assayed for their capability to confer on HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells the ability for invasion, anchorage independent growth and tumor development in nude mice. Analysis of MMTV induced mammary premalignant hyperplastic outgrowth (HOG) lines and mammary tumors led to the identification of CIS restricted to 35 loci. Within these loci members of the Wnt, Fgf and Rspo gene families plus two linked genes (Npm3 and Ddn) were frequently activated in tumors induced by MMTV. A second group of 15 CIS occur at a low frequency (2-5 observations) in mammary HOGs or tumors. In this latter group the expression of either Phf19 or Sdc2 was shown to increase HC11 cells invasion capability. Foxl1 expression conferred on HC11 cells the capability for anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar and tumor development in nude mice. The published transcriptome and nucleotide sequence analysis of gene

  8. Myeloid Dendritic Cells (DCs) of Mice Susceptible to Paracoccidioidomycosis Suppress T Cell Responses whereas Myeloid and Plasmacytoid DCs from Resistant Mice Induce Effector and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Adriana; Frank de Araujo, Eliseu; Felonato, Maíra; Loures, Flávio V.; Feriotti, Claudia; Bernardino, Simone; Barbuto, José Alexandre M.

    2013-01-01

    The protective adaptive immune response in paracoccidioidomycosis, a mycosis endemic among humans, is mediated by T cell immunity, whereas impaired T cell responses are associated with severe, progressive disease. The early host response to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection is not known since the disease is diagnosed at later phases of infection. Our laboratory established a murine model of infection where susceptible mice reproduce the severe disease, while resistant mice develop a mild infection. This work aimed to characterize the influence of dendritic cells in the innate and adaptive immunity of susceptible and resistant mice. We verified that P. brasiliensis infection induced in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) of susceptible mice a prevalent proinflammatory myeloid phenotype that secreted high levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-β, whereas in resistant mice, a mixed population of myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs secreting proinflammatory cytokines and expressing elevated levels of secreted and membrane-bound transforming growth factor β was observed. In proliferation assays, the proinflammatory DCs from B10.A mice induced anergy of naïve T cells, whereas the mixed DC subsets from resistant mice induced the concomitant proliferation of effector and regulatory T cells (Tregs). Equivalent results were observed during pulmonary infection. The susceptible mice displayed preferential expansion of proinflammatory myeloid DCs, resulting in impaired proliferation of effector T cells. Conversely, the resistant mice developed myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs that efficiently expanded gamma interferon-, IL-4-, and IL-17-positive effector T cells associated with increased development of Tregs. Our work highlights the deleterious effect of excessive innate proinflammatory reactions and provides new evidence for the importance of immunomodulation during pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:23340311

  9. Steroid Tumor Environment in Male and Female Mice Model of Canine and Human Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; Silvan, Gema; Illera, Maria J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Reuben, James M.; Illera, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares clinical and histopathological characteristics with human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and has been proposed as a good model for studying the human disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of female and male mice to reproduce IMC and IBC tumors and identify the hormonal tumor environment. To perform the study sixty 6–8-week-old male and female mice were inoculated subcutaneously with a suspension of 106IPC-366 and SUM149 cells. Tumors and serum were collected and used for hormonal analysis. Results revealed that IPC-366 reproduced tumors in 90% of males inoculated after 2 weeks compared with 100% of females that reproduced tumor at the same time. SUM149 reproduced tumors in 40% of males instead of 80% of females that reproduced tumors after 4 weeks. Both cell lines produce distant metastasis in lungs being higher than the metastatic rates in females. EIA analysis revealed that male tumors had higher T and SO4E1 concentrations compared to female tumors. Serum steroid levels were lower than those found in tumors. In conclusion, IBC and IMC male mouse model is useful as a tool for IBC research and those circulating estrogens and intratumoral hormonal levels are crucial in the development and progression of tumors. PMID:27195300

  10. Cell-mediated immunity in F 344 rats bearing intraocular tumors derived from human adenovirus 12-induced retinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Mukai, N; Solish, S P; Sawada, T; Pomeroy, M E

    1983-10-01

    The eyes of 10 F344 rats were inoculated with retinal tumor cells (EXP-5 cell line) induced by human adenovirus 12. The animals were killed at 4 weeks thereafter, and the cytotoxicity of their lymphocytes was investigated by using 51Cr-releasing assay. The percentage of EXP-5 cells killed in vitro by lymphocytes was higher in 10 rats with ocular tumors (24.6% +/- 6.1%, mean +/- SD) than in 10 control rats (6.2% +/- 1.8%). Morphologic investigation using syngeneic spleen cells confirmed the presence of lymphoid cells, resembling T-lymphocytes, adhering to EXP-5 cells. The influence of subcutaneous injection of EXP-5 cells on the growth of intravitreously injected tumor cells was investigated. Cells injected subcutaneously prior to intravitreous injection elicited an immune response that was capable of controlling vitreous tumor growth. These findings suggest that the rats with transplanted retinal tumors develop a cell-mediated immune response in the early stage of tumor bearing, and that a state of pre-existing specific immunity can overcome so-called "immunologic privilege" of the vitreous body.

  11. Interleukin 3 gene is located on human chromosome 5 and is deleted in myeloid leukemias with a deletion of 5q

    SciTech Connect

    Le Beau, M.M.; Epstein, N.D.; O'Brien, S.J.; Nienhuis, A.W.; Yang, Y.C.; Clark, S.C.; Rowley, J.D.

    1987-08-01

    The gene IL-3 encodes interleukin 3, a hematopoietic colony-stimulating factor (CSF) that is capable of supporting the proliferation of a broad range of hematopoietic cell types. By using somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, the authors localized this gene to human chromosome 5 at bands q23-31, a chromosomal region that is frequently deleted (del(5q)) in patients with myeloid disorders. By in situ hybridization, IL-3 was found to be deleted in the 5q-chromosome of one patient with refractory anemia who had a del(5)(q15q33.3), of three patients with refractory anemia (two patients) or acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) de novo who had a similar distal breakpoint (del(5)(q13q33.3)), and of a fifth patient, with therapy-related ANLL, who had a similar distal breakpoint in band q33(del(5)(q14q33.3)). Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrids retaining the normal or the deleted chromosome 5 from two patients with the refractory anemia 5q- syndrome indicated that IL-3 sequences were absent from the hybrids retaining the deleted chromosome 5 but not from hybrids that had a cytologically normal chromosome 5. Thus, a small segment of chromosome 5 contains IL-3, GM-CSF, CSF-1, and FMS. The findings and earlier results indicating that GM-CSF, CSF-1, and FMS were deleted in the 5q- chromosome, suggest that loss of IL-3 or of other CSF genes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of hematologic disorders associated with a del(5q).

  12. Lymphocyte response to autochthonous human solid tumor cells: relationship to histological types and tumor load.

    PubMed

    Kurosu, Y; Honjo, H; Hironaka, T; Morita, K

    1979-12-01

    Mixed lymphocyte--tumor cell cultures were made with materials from patients with various histological types of cancer. In 25 out of 89 patients, positive lymphocyte response to tumor cells was observed. There appeared to be an inverse relationship between the frequency of positive responses and extent of the disease. Patients with neuroblastoma, however, showed more frequent positive responses in cases of widespread disease. The data obtained may have valuable clinical implications, supporting the possibility of immunotherapy of cancer patients.

  13. The role of L-type amino acid transporter 1 in human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Lin; Pan, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Summary L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is an L-type amino acid transporter and transports large neutral amino acids such as leucine, isoleucine, valine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, methionine, and histidine. LAT1 was found to be highly expressed especially in human cancer tissues, and up-regulated LAT1 can lead to dysfunction in human tumor cells. These findings suggest that LAT1 plays an important role in human tumors. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of LAT1 expression and its clinical significance and function in tumors. PMID:26668776

  14. Maximum recovery potential of human tumor cells may predict clinical outcome in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Beckett, M.

    1987-05-01

    We studied inherent radiosensitivity/resistance (D0), ability to accumulate sublethal damage (n) and repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) in established human tumor cell lines as well as early passage human tumor cell lines derived from patients with known outcome following radiotherapy. Survival 24 hrs after treatment of human tumor cells with X rays in plateau phase cultures is a function of initial damage (D0, n), as well as recovery over 24 hrs (PLDR). A surviving fraction greater than .1 24 hrs following treatment with 7 Gy in plateau phase cultures is associated with tumor cell types (melanoma, osteosarcoma) with a high probability of radiotherapy failure or tumor cells derived from patients who actually failed radiotherapy. Therefore, total cellular recovery following radiation may be an important determinant of radiocurability. Accurate assays of radiotherapy outcome may need to account for all these radiobiological parameters.

  15. Expression-analysis of the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-K in human astrocytic tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) has been acquired by the genome of human ancestors million years ago. It is the most complete of the HERVs with transcriptionally active gag, pol and env genes. Splice variants of env, which are rec, 1.5 kb transcript and Np9 have been suggested to be tumorigenic. Transcripts of HERV-K have been detected in a multitude of human cancers. However, no such reports are available concerning glioblastomas (GBM), the most common malignant brain tumor in adults. Patients have a limited prognosis of 14.6 months in median, despite standard treatment. Therefore, we elucidated whether HERV-K transcripts could be detected in these tumors and serve as new molecular target for treatment. Findings We analyzed human GBM cell lines, tissue samples from patients and primary cell cultures of different passages for HERV-K full length mRNA and env, rec and 1.5 kb transcripts. While the GBM cell lines U138, U251, U343 and GaMG displayed weak and U87 strong expression of the full length HERV-K, the splice products could not be detected, despite a weak expression of env mRNA in U87 cells. Very few tissue samples from patients showed weak expression of env mRNA, but none of the rec or 1.5 kb transcripts. Primary cells expressed the 1.5 kb transcript weakly in early passages, but lost HERV-K expression with extended culture time. Conclusions These data suggest that HERV-K splice products do not play a role in human malignant gliomas and therefore, are not suitable as targets for new therapy regimen. PMID:24642114

  16. Apoptotic Efficacy of Etomoxir in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells. Cooperation with Arsenic Trioxide and Glycolytic Inhibitors, and Regulation by Oxidative Stress and Protein Kinase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Estañ, María Cristina; Calviño, Eva; Calvo, Susana; Guillén-Guío, Beatriz; Boyano-Adánez, María del Carmen; de Blas, Elena; Rial, Eduardo; Aller, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are frequently exacerbated in leukemia cells, and may therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention. In this work we analyzed the apoptotic and chemo-sensitizing action of the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Etomoxir caused negligible lethality at concentrations up to 100 µM, but efficaciously cooperated to cause apoptosis with the anti-leukemic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO, Trisenox), and with lower efficacy with other anti-tumour drugs (etoposide, cisplatin), in HL60 cells. Etomoxir-ATO cooperation was also observed in NB4 human acute promyelocytic cells, but not in normal (non-tumour) mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Biochemical determinations in HL60 cells indicated that etomoxir (25–200 µM) dose-dependently inhibited mitochondrial respiration while slightly stimulating glycolysis, and only caused marginal alterations in total ATP content and adenine nucleotide pool distribution. In addition, etomoxir caused oxidative stress (increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, decrease in reduced glutathione content), as well as pro-apoptotic LKB-1/AMPK pathway activation, all of which may in part explain the chemo-sensitizing capacity of the drug. Etomoxir also cooperated with glycolytic inhibitors (2-deoxy-D-glucose, lonidamine) to induce apoptosis in HL60 cells, but not in NB4 cells. The combined etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment did not increase oxidative stress, caused moderate decrease in net ATP content, increased the AMP/ATP ratio with concomitant drop in energy charge, and caused defensive Akt and ERK kinase activation. Apoptosis generation by etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose was further increased by co-incubation with ATO, which is apparently explained by the capacity of ATO to attenuate Akt and ERK activation. In summary, co-treatment with etomoxir may represent an interesting strategy to increase the apoptotic

  17. Chemically-induced mouse lung tumors: applications to human health assessments [Poster 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to discuss issues related to the use of mouse lung tumor data in human health assessments. Naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbenzene were chosen for the anal...

  18. Chemically-induced Mouse Lung Tumors: Applications to Human Health Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to better understand the mouse lung tumor data’s role in human health assessments. Three environmental chemicals - naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbe...

  19. Expression of HER2/neu is uncommon in human neuroblastic tumors and is unrelated to tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Gambini, Claudio; Sementa, Angela Rita; Boni, Luca; Marino, Carla Enrica; Croce, Michela; Negri, Francesca; Pistoia, Vito; Ferrini, Silvano; Corrias, Maria Valeria

    2003-02-01

    Neuroblastic tumors (NT) are the most frequently occurring extracranial solid tumors during childhood. The overall 5-year survival is approximately 20% for patients with metastatic disease. Novel treatments are therefore intensively sought and tumor-targeted immuno- and chemotherapy appear promising. The HER2/neu oncogene, which is highly homologous to the EGF receptor, was initially isolated from rat neuroblastoma cells. HER2/neu over-expression is frequently detected in breast tumors and constitutes an important unfavorable prognostic factor. HER2/neu is a suitable target for antibody-based immunotherapy, as demonstrated by the clinical efficacy of the Herceptin monoclonal antibody (mAb), which reacts with its extracellular domain. Expression of HER2/neu has also been reported to be a negative prognostic factor in a small survey of NT tumors. Here, we have investigated HER2/neu expression in 14 human and 2 murine neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines by flow cytometric analysis and in 93 NT by means of a certified immunohistochemical system. HER2/neu over-expression was found in 2 human cell lines and 11 tumors (14% for both types of samples). No significant association was found between HER2/neu expression and stage, age, sex, ploidy, histological type or subtype. Moreover, log rank test indicated that overall and event-free survival was not significantly different in HER2/neu positive and negative patients. These data suggest that HER2/neu should not be considered as a relevant prognostic factor in NT, and that HER2/neu-based immunotherapy may be feasible only in a minority of NT patients.

  20. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

    PubMed

    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  1. EVOLUTION OF MYELOID CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, Daniel R.; Neely, Harold R.; Flajnik, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    In 1882, Elie Metchnikoff identified myeloid-like cells from starfish larvae responding to the invasion by a foreign body (rose thorn). This marked the origins of the study of innate immunity, and an appreciation that cellular immunity is already well established in these “primitive” organisms. This chapter focuses on these myeloid cells as well as the newest members of this family, the dendritic cells (DC), and explores their evolutionary origins. Our goal is to provide evolutionary context for the development of the multilayered immune system of mammals, where myeloid cells now serve as central effectors of innate immunity and regulators of adaptive immunity. Overall, we find that core contributions of myeloid cells to the regulation of inflammation are based on mechanisms that have been honed over hundreds of millions of years of evolution. Using phagocytosis as a platform, we show how fairly simple beginnings have offered a robust foundation onto which additional control features have been integrated, resulting in central regulatory nodes that now manage multi-factorial aspects of homeostasis and immunity. PMID:27337471

  2. Cholesterol masks membrane glycosphingolipid tumor-associated antigens to reduce their immunodetection in human cancer biopsies.

    PubMed

    Novak, Anton; Binnington, Beth; Ngan, Bo; Chadwick, Karen; Fleshner, Neil; Lingwood, Clifford A

    2013-11-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are neoplastic and normal/cancer stem cell markers and GSL/cholesterol-containing membrane rafts are increased in cancer cell plasma membranes. We define a novel means by which cancer cells can restrict tumor-associated GSL immunoreactivity. The GSL-cholesterol complex reorients GSL carbohydrate to a membrane parallel, rather than perpendicular conformation, largely unavailable for antibody recognition. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin cholesterol extraction of all primary human tumor frozen sections tested (ovarian, testicular, neuroblastoma, prostate, breast, colon, pheochromocytoma and ganglioneuroma), unmasked previously "invisible" membrane GSLs for immunodetection. In ovarian carcinoma, globotriaosyl ceramide (Gb3), the GSL receptor for the antineoplastic Escherichia coli-derived verotoxin, was increased throughout the tumor. In colon carcinoma, Gb3 detection was vastly increased within the neovasculature and perivascular stroma. In tumors considered Gb3 negative (neuroblastoma, Leydig testicular tumor and pheochromocytoma), neovascular Gb3 was unmasked. Tumor-associated GSL stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4 and globoH were unmasked according to tumor: SSEA-1 in prostate/colon; SSEA-3 in prostate; SSEA-4 in pheochromocytoma/some colon tumors; globoH in prostate/some colon tumors. In colon, anti-SSEA-1 was tumor cell specific. Within the GSL-cholesterol complex, filipin-cholesterol binding was also reduced. These results may relate to the ill-defined benefit of statins on cancer prognosis, for example, prostate carcinoma. We found novel anti-tumor GSL antibodies circulating in 3/5 statin-treated, but not untreated, prostate cancer patients. Lowering tumor membrane cholesterol may permit immune recognition of otherwise unavailable tumor-associated GSL carbohydrate, for more effective immunosurveillance and active/passive immunotherapy. Our results show standard immunodetection of tumor GSLs significantly under assesses

  3. A new human tumor-associated antigen (TLP) is naturally expressed in rat DHD-K12 colorectal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Rasi, G; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, P; Serafino, A; Bernard, P; Pierimarchi, P; Guarino, E; Faticanti-Scucchi, L; Graziano, P; Guadagni, F; Garci, E

    2000-02-15

    Renewed interest in cancer immunotherapy has been raised by the availability of a variety of tumor-associated antigens and animal models. We have recently described the presence of a new antigen, TLP, in sera and cancer tissue from lung and colorectal cancer patients. In order to develop an experimental model suitable for preclinical studies on cancer vaccines, we investigated the presence of TLP antigen in vitro, in the DHD-K12 cell line and in vivo, in metastases induced in syngeneic BDIX rats by DHD-K12 cell injection. TLP was not detected in any tissue of healthy rats nor in normal tissues of tumor-bearing rats. This is in agreement with our previous studies, in which we had demonstrated that TLP is expressed in human colorectal cancer and adenomas but not in normal colonic mucosa. Our results indicate TLP as a possible human tumor-specific antigen naturally expressed in DHD-K12 tumor syngeneic to immunocompetent BDIX rats.

  4. Flow cytometric monitoring of hormone receptor expression in human solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Awtar

    2002-05-01

    Hormone receptor expression in human breast and prostate tumors is of diagnostic and therapeutic importance. With the availability of anti-estrogen, androgen and progesterone antibodies, immunohistochemistry has become a standard tool for determination of receptor expression in human tumor biopsies. However, this method is dependent on examination of a small number of cells under a microscope and the data obtained in most cases is not quantitative. As most of the commercially used anti-hormone antibodies have nuclear specificity, we have developed methods for isolation and antigen unmasking of nuclei from formalin fixed/paraffin embedded archival human tumors. After immunostaining with the antibodies and propidium iodide (for DNA content and cell cycle analysis), nuclei are analyzed by multiparametric laser flow cytometry for hormone receptor expression, DNA content, aneuploidy and cell cycle determination. These multiparametric methods are especially important for retrospective studies seeking to correlate hormone receptor expression with clinical response to anti-hormonal therapy of human breast and prostate tumors.

  5. Gastrin-releasing peptide, a mammalian analog of bombesin, is present in human neuroendocrine lung tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, D. G.; Roth, K. A.; Evans, C. J.; Barchas, J. D.; Bensch, K. G.

    1984-01-01

    Several reports have indicated that the amphibian peptide bombesin is present in oat-cell carcinoma of the human lung. The recent observation that gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), a 27-amino acid peptide isolated from porcine intestine, may be the mammalian analog of bombesin led the authors to look for this peptide in human pulmonary tumors. Examination of 36 human lung tumors (8 carcinoids, 8 oat-cell carcinomas, and 20 non-oat-cell carcinomas) by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay demonstrated the presence of high, although variable, levels of GRP in neuroendocrine tumors, and not in other histologic types. These findings indicate that bombesin immunoreactivity in human lung tumors should be attributed to GRP or GRP-like molecules and that GRP may be a useful marker of neuroendocrine differentiation. Images Figure 1 PMID:6093543

  6. The 57Fe hyperfine interactions in iron storage proteins in liver and spleen tissues from normal human and two patients with mantle cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia: a Mössbauer effect study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Alenkina, I. V.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Semionkin, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    Study of human spleen and liver tissues from healthy persons and two patients with mantle cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia was carried out using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. Small variations in the 57Fe hyperfine parameters for normal and patient's tissues were detected and related to small variations in the 57Fe local microenvironment in ferrihydrite cores. The differences in the relative parts of more crystalline and more amorphous core regions were also supposed for iron storage proteins in normal and patients' spleen and liver tissues.

  7. Third harmonic generation imaging for fast, label-free pathology of human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, N V; Wesseling, P; Hamer, P C de Witt; Noske, D P; Galgano, G D; Mansvelder, H D; Baayen, J C; Groot, M L

    2016-05-01

    In brain tumor surgery, recognition of tumor boundaries is key. However, intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries by the neurosurgeon is difficult. Therefore, there is an urgent need for tools that provide the neurosurgeon with pathological information during the operation. We show that third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy provides label-free, real-time images of histopathological quality; increased cellularity, nuclear pleomorphism, and rarefaction of neuropil in fresh, unstained human brain tissue could be clearly recognized. We further demonstrate THG images taken with a GRIN objective, as a step toward in situ THG microendoscopy of tumor boundaries. THG imaging is thus a promising tool for optical biopsies.

  8. Third harmonic generation imaging for fast, label-free pathology of human brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, N. V.; Wesseling, P.; Hamer, P. C. de Witt; Noske, D. P.; Galgano, G. D.; Mansvelder, H. D.; Baayen, J. C.; Groot, M. L.

    2016-01-01

    In brain tumor surgery, recognition of tumor boundaries is key. However, intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries by the neurosurgeon is difficult. Therefore, there is an urgent need for tools that provide the neurosurgeon with pathological information during the operation. We show that third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy provides label-free, real-time images of histopathological quality; increased cellularity, nuclear pleomorphism, and rarefaction of neuropil in fresh, unstained human brain tissue could be clearly recognized. We further demonstrate THG images taken with a GRIN objective, as a step toward in situ THG microendoscopy of tumor boundaries. THG imaging is thus a promising tool for optical biopsies. PMID:27231629

  9. Roles of F-box proteins in human digestive system tumors (Review).

    PubMed

    Gong, Jian; Lv, Liang; Huo, Jirong

    2014-12-01

    F-box proteins (FBPs), the substrate-recognition subunit of E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase, are the important components of Ub proteasome system (UPS). FBPs are involved in multiple cellular processes through ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation of their target proteins. Many studies have described the roles of FBPs in human cancers. Digestive system tumors account for a large proportion of all the tumors, and their mortality is very high. This review summarizes for the first time the roles of FBPs in digestive system tumorige-nesis and tumor progression, aiming at finding new routes for the rational design of targeted anticancer therapies in digestive system tumors.

  10. Loss of SOCS3 in myeloid cells prolongs survival in a syngeneic model of glioma

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Braden C.; Marks, Margaret P.; Rowse, Amber L.; Fehling, Samuel C.; Gerigk, Magda; Qin, Hongwei; Benveniste, Etty N.

    2016-01-01

    In glioma, microglia and macrophages are the largest population of tumor-infiltrating cells, referred to as glioma associated macrophages (GAMs). Herein, we sought to determine the role of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 (SOCS3), a negative regulator of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3), in GAM functionality in glioma. We utilized a conditional model in which SOCS3 deletion is restricted to the myeloid cell population. We found that SOCS3-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages display enhanced and prolonged expression of pro-inflammatory M1 cytokines when exposed to glioma tumor cell conditioned medium in vitro. Moreover, we found that deletion of SOCS3 in the myeloid cell population delays intracranial tumor growth and increases survival of mice bearing orthotopic glioma tumors in vivo. Although intracranial tumors from mice with SOCS3-deficient myeloid cells appear histologically similar to control mice, we observed that loss of SOCS3 in myeloid cells results in decreased M2 polarized macrophage infiltration in the tumors. Furthermore, loss of SOCS3 in myeloid cells results in increased CD8+ T-cell and decreased regulatory T-cell infiltration in the tumors. These findings demonstrate a beneficial effect of M1 polarized macrophages on suppressing glioma tumor growth, and highlight the importance of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26967393

  11. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  12. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  13. Effects of Charged Particles on Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kathryn D.; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Kaminuma, Takuya; Paz, Athena Evalour S.; Yoshida, Yukari; Liu, Qi; Willers, Henning; Takahashi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects, including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors, and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors, such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions, and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles. PMID:26904502

  14. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    PubMed

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely "functional," i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing's syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn's syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  15. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    PubMed Central

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely “functional,” i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing’s syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn’s syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  16. Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Protease ClpP as a Therapeutic Strategy for Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cole, Alicia; Wang, Zezhou; Coyaud, Etienne; Voisin, Veronique; Gronda, Marcela; Jitkova, Yulia; Mattson, Rachel; Hurren, Rose; Babovic, Sonja; Maclean, Neil; Restall, Ian; Wang, Xiaoming; Jeyaraju, Danny V; Sukhai, Mahadeo A; Prabha, Swayam; Bashir, Shaheena; Ramakrishnan, Ashwin; Leung, Elisa; Qia, Yi Hua; Zhang, Nianxian; Combes, Kevin R; Ketela, Troy; Lin, Fengshu; Houry, Walid A; Aman, Ahmed; Al-Awar, Rima; Zheng, Wei; Wienholds, Erno; Xu, Chang Jiang; Dick, John; Wang, Jean C Y; Moffat, Jason; Minden, Mark D; Eaves, Connie J; Bader, Gary D; Hao, Zhenyue; Kornblau, Steven M; Raught, Brian; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-06-01

    From an shRNA screen, we identified ClpP as a member of the mitochondrial proteome whose knockdown reduced the viability of K562 leukemic cells. Expression of this mitochondrial protease that has structural similarity to the cytoplasmic proteosome is increased in leukemic cells from approximately half of all patients with AML. Genetic or chemical inhibition of ClpP killed cells from both human AML cell lines and primary samples in which the cells showed elevated ClpP expression but did not affect their normal counterparts. Importantly, Clpp knockout mice were viable with normal hematopoiesis. Mechanistically, we found that ClpP interacts with mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins and metabolic enzymes, and knockdown of ClpP in leukemic cells inhibited oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26058080

  17. Inhibition of the mitochondrial protease, ClpP, as a therapeutic strategy for human acute myeloid leuekmia

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Alicia; Wang, Zezhou; Coyaud, Etienne; Voisin, Veronique; Gronda, Marcela; Jitkova, Yulia; Mattson, Rachel; Hurren, Rose; Babovic, Sonja; Maclean, Neil; Restall, Ian; Wang, Xiaoming; Jeyaraju, Danny V.; Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Bashir, Shaheena; Ramakrishnan, Ashwin; Leung, Elisa; Qia, Yi Hua; Zhang, Nianxian; Combes, Kevin R.; Ketela, Troy; Lin, Fengshu; Houry, Walid A.; Aman, Ahmed; Al-awar, Rima; Zheng, Wei; Wienholds, Erno; Xu, Chang Jiang; Dick, John; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Moffat, Jason; Minden, Mark D.; Eaves, Connie J.; Bader, Gary D.; Hao, Zhenyue; Kornblau, Steven M.; Raught, Brian; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary From an shRNA screen, we identified ClpP as a member of the mitochondrial proteome whose knockdown reduced the viability of K562 leukemic cells. Expression of this mitochondrial protease that has structural similarity to the cytoplasmic proteosome is increased in the leukemic cells from approximately half of patients with AML. Genetic or chemical inhibition of ClpP killed cells from both human AML cell lines and primary samples in which the cells showed elevated ClpP expression, but did not affect their normal counterparts. Importantly, Clpp knockout mice were viable with normal hematopoiesis. Mechanistically, we found ClpP interacts with mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins and metabolic enzymes, and knockdown of ClpP in leukemic cells inhibited oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26058080

  18. VCAM-1 and VAP-1 recruit myeloid cells that promote pulmonary metastasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferjančič, Špela; Gil-Bernabé, Ana M; Hill, Sally A; Allen, Philip D; Richardson, Peter; Sparey, Tim; Savory, Edward; McGuffog, Jane; Muschel, Ruth J

    2013-04-18

    Pulmonary metastasis is a frequent cause of poor outcome in cancer patients. The formation of pulmonary metastasis is greatly facilitated by recruitment of myeloid cells, which are crucial for tumor cell survival and extravasation. During inflammation, homing of myeloid cells is mediated by endothelial activation, raising the question of a potential role for endothelial activation in myeloid cell recruitment during pulmonary metastasis. Here, we show that metastatic tumor cell attachment causes the induction of the endothelial activation markers vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1). Induction of VCAM-1 is dependent on tumor cell-clot formation, decreasing upon induction of tissue factor pathway inhibitor or treatment with hirudin. Furthermore, inhibition of endothelial activation with a VCAM-1 blocking antibody or a VAP-1 small molecule inhibitor leads to reduced myeloid cell recruitment and diminished tumor cell survival and metastasis without affecting tumor cell adhesion. Simultaneous inhibition of VCAM-1 and VAP-1 does not result in further reduction in myeloid cell recruitment and tumor cell survival, suggesting that both act through closely related mechanisms. These results establish VCAM-1 and VAP-1 as mediators of myeloid cell recruitment in metastasis and identify VAP-1 as a potential target for therapeutic intervention to combat early metastasis.

  19. A role for T-lymphocytes in human breast cancer and in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Maria Isabel; Pires, Isabel; Prada, Justina; Queiroga, Felisbina L

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment has a prominent role in carcinogenesis and benefits the proliferation and survival of malignant cells, promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Mammary tumors are frequently infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of immune cells where T-lymphocytes have a great importance. Interestingly, similar inflammatory cell infiltrates, cytokine and chemokine expression in humans and canine mammary tumors were recently described. However, in both species, despite all the scientific evidences that appoint for a significant role of T-lymphocytes, a definitive conclusion concerning the effectiveness of T-cell dependent immune mechanisms has not been achieved yet. In the present review, we describe similarities between human breast cancer and canine mammary tumors regarding tumor T-lymphocyte infiltration, such as relationship of TILs and mammary tumors malignancy, association of ratio CD4+/ CD8+ T-cells with low survival rates, promotion of tumor progression by Th2 cells actions, and association of great amounts of Treg cells with poor prognostic factors. This apparent parallelism together with the fact that dogs develop spontaneous tumors in the context of a natural immune system highlight the dog as a possible useful biological model for studies in human breast cancer immunology. PMID:24672781

  20. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Lessi, Francesca; Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-07-30

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma.

  1. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus

    PubMed Central

    Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-01-01

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma. PMID:26214095

  2. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Intracerebral Granulocytic Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, E; Thirumavalavan; Sowrirajan

    2015-10-01

    The CNS involvement of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is more commonly manifest as meningeal involvement. Rarely it may present as intravascular tumor aggregates called granulocytic sarcoma which presents as intracranial hemorrhage. We are presenting a case of intracranial, intra-parenchymal granulocytic sarcoma (other names: chloroma, extramedullary myeloblastoma), presenting as acute hemiplegia without cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27608697

  3. Rearrangement of a common cellular DNA domain on chromosome 4 in human primary liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, C.; Garreau, F.; Bougueleret, L.; Cariani, E.; Thiers, V.; Croissant, O.; Hadchouel, M.; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C. ); Grzeschik, K.H. )

    1988-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA integration has been shown to occur frequently in human hepatocellular carcinomas. The authors have investigated whether common cellular DNA domains might be rearranged, possibly by HBV integration, in human primary liver tumors. Unique cellular DNA sequences adjacent to an HBV integration site were isolated from a patient with hepatitis B surface antigen-positive hepatocellular carcinoma. These probes detected rearrangement of this cellular region of chromosomal DNA in 3 of 50 additional primary liver tumors studied. Of these three tumor samples, two contained HBV DNA, without an apparent link between the viral DNA and the rearranged allele; HBV DNA sequences were not detected in the third tumor sample. By use of a panel of somatic cell hybrids, these unique cellular DNA sequences were shown to be located on chromosome 4. Therefore, this region of chromosomal DNA might be implicated in the formation of different tumors at one step of liver cell transformation, possible related to HBV integration.

  4. Imaging of bone tumors using a monoclonal antibody raised against human osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, N.C.; Perkins, A.C.; Pimm, M.V.; Wastie, M.; Hopkins, J.S.; Dowling, F.; Baldwin, R.W.; Hardcastle, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    The radiolabeled monoclonal antibody 791T/36 raised against a human osteosarcoma was injected into 20 patients with known or suspected bone tumors. Gamma camera images were acquired at 48 or 72 hours after injection, and assessed for antibody localization. Positive images were obtained in all five osteosarcomas and four other primary malignant sarcomas. Two of the four other primary bone tumors gave positive images. Three patients with trauma had negative images as did one patient with Paget's disease. Two patients with suppurative disease gave positive images. The antibody localized in the majority of malignant sarcomas tested. In one tumor where tissue was available, a tumor:non-tumor ratio of 2.8:1 was measured. Repeat imaging was performed in five patients. Immunoscintigraphy using the monoclonal antibody 791T/36 has shown tumor localization in patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  5. Gene Regulatory Scenarios of Primary 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Target Genes in a Human Myeloid Leukemia Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ryynänen, Jussi; Seuter, Sabine; Campbell, Moray J.; Carlberg, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Genome- and transcriptome-wide data has significantly increased the amount of available information about primary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) target genes in cancer cell models, such as human THP-1 myelomonocytic leukemia cells. In this study, we investigated the genes G0S2, CDKN1A and MYC as master examples of primary vitamin D receptor (VDR) targets being involved in the control of cellular proliferation. The chromosomal domains of G0S2 and CDKN1A are 140–170 kb in size and contain one and three VDR binding sites, respectively. This is rather compact compared to the MYC locus that is 15 times larger and accommodates four VDR binding sites. All eight VDR binding sites were studied by chromatin immunoprecipitation in THP-1 cells. Interestingly, the site closest to the transcription start site of the down-regulated MYC gene showed 1,25(OH)2D3-dependent reduction of VDR binding and is not associated with open chromatin. Four of the other seven VDR binding regions contain a typical DR3-type VDR binding sequence, three of which are also occupied with VDR in macrophage-like cells. In conclusion, the three examples suggest that each VDR target gene has an individual regulatory scenario. However, some general components of these scenarios may be useful for the development of new therapy regimens. PMID:24202443

  6. CRLX101 nanoparticles localize in human tumors and not in adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue after intravenous dosing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew J.; Wiley, Devin T.; Zuckerman, Jonathan E.; Webster, Paul; Chao, Joseph; Lin, James; Yen, Yun; Davis, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics are being used to treat patients with solid tumors. Whereas nanoparticles have been shown to preferentially accumulate in solid tumors of animal models, there is little evidence to prove that intact nanoparticles localize to solid tumors of humans when systemically administered. Here, tumor and adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue biopsies are obtained through endoscopic capture from patients with gastric, gastroesophageal, or esophageal cancer who are administered the nanoparticle CRLX101. Both the pre- and postdosing tissue samples adjacent to tumors show no definitive evidence of either the nanoparticle or its drug payload (camptothecin, CPT) contained within the nanoparticle. Similar results are obtained from the predosing tumor samples. However, in nine of nine patients that were evaluated, CPT is detected in the tumor tissue collected 24–48 h after CRLX101 administration. For five of these patients, evidence of the intact deposition of CRLX101 nanoparticles in the tumor tissue is obtained. Indications of CPT pharmacodynamics from tumor biomarkers such as carbonic anhydrase IX and topoisomerase I by immunohistochemistry show clear evidence of biological activity from the delivered CPT in the posttreatment tumors. PMID:27001839

  7. Development of human serum albumin conjugated with near-infrared dye for photoacoustic tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazaki, Kengo; Sano, Kohei; Makino, Akira; Takahashi, Atsushi; Deguchi, Jun; Ohashi, Manami; Temma, Takashi; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2014-09-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has emerged as a noninvasive diagnostic method which detects ultrasonic waves thermoelastically induced by optical absorbers irradiated with laser. For tumor diagnosis, PA contrast agent has been proposed to enhance the PA effect for detecting tumors sensitively. Here, we prepared a human serum albumin (HSA) conjugated with indocyanine green (ICG) as a PA contrast agent allowing enhanced permeability and retention effect for sensitive tumor imaging. The feasibility of PA imaging with HSA-ICG to detect allografted tumors was evaluated in tumor-bearing mice. In vivo fluorescence imaging and radiolabeled biodistribution study showed that the biodistribution dramatically changed as the number of ICG bound to HSA increased, and the maximum accumulation of ICG was achieved when around three ICG molecules were loaded on an HSA. In vivo PA imaging demonstrated a tumor-selective and dose-dependent increase of PA signal intensity in mice injected with HSA-ICG (R2=0.88, 387% increase for HSA-ICG, 104 nmol ICG). In conclusion, HSA-ICG clearly visualized the allografted tumors with high tumor-to-background ratios having high quantitative and spatial resolution for the sensitive PA imaging of tumors. HSA-ICG could be useful as a favorable contrast agent for PA tumor imaging for the management of cancer.

  8. Magnetic Fluorescent Nanoformulation for Intracellular Drug Delivery to Human Breast Cancer, Primary Tumors, and Tumor Biopsies: Beyond Targeting Expectations.

    PubMed

    El-Boubbou, Kheireddine; Ali, Rizwan; Bahhari, Hassan M; AlSaad, Khaled O; Nehdi, Atef; Boudjelal, Mohamed; AlKushi, Abdulmohsen

    2016-06-15

    We report the development of a chemotherapeutic nanoformulation made of polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized magnetofluorescent nanoparticles (Fl-PMNPs) loaded with anticancer drugs as a promising drug carrier homing to human breast cancer cells, primary tumors, and solid tumors. First, nanoparticle uptake and cell death were evaluated in three types of human breast cells: two metastatic cancerous MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells and nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. While Fl-PMNPs were not toxic to cells even at the highest concentrations used, Dox-loaded Fl-PMNPs showed significant potency, effectively killing the different breast cancer cells, albeit at different affinities. Interestingly and superior to free Dox, Dox-loaded Fl-PMNPs were found to be more effective in killing the metastatic cells (2- to 3-fold enhanced cytotoxicities for MDA-MB-231 compared to MCF-7), compared to the normal noncancerous MCF-10A cells (up to 8-fold), suggesting huge potentials as selective anticancer agents. Electron and live confocal microscopy imaging mechanistically confirmed that the nanoparticles were successfully endocytosed and packaged into vesicles inside the cytoplasm, where Dox is released and then translocated to the nucleus exerting its cytotoxic action and causing apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, commendable and enhanced penetration in 3D multilayered primary tumor cells derived from primary lesions as well as in patient breast tumor biopsies was observed, killing the tumor cells inside. The designed nanocarriers described here can potentially open new opportunities for breast cancer patients, especially in theranostic imaging and hyperthermia. While many prior studies have focused on targeting ligands to specific receptors to improve efficacies, we discovered that even with passive-targeted tailored delivery system enhanced toxic responses can be attained. PMID:27269304

  9. Magnetic Fluorescent Nanoformulation for Intracellular Drug Delivery to Human Breast Cancer, Primary Tumors, and Tumor Biopsies: Beyond Targeting Expectations.

    PubMed

    El-Boubbou, Kheireddine; Ali, Rizwan; Bahhari, Hassan M; AlSaad, Khaled O; Nehdi, Atef; Boudjelal, Mohamed; AlKushi, Abdulmohsen

    2016-06-15

    We report the development of a chemotherapeutic nanoformulation made of polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized magnetofluorescent nanoparticles (Fl-PMNPs) loaded with anticancer drugs as a promising drug carrier homing to human breast cancer cells, primary tumors, and solid tumors. First, nanoparticle uptake and cell death were evaluated in three types of human breast cells: two metastatic cancerous MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells and nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. While Fl-PMNPs were not toxic to cells even at the highest concentrations used, Dox-loaded Fl-PMNPs showed significant potency, effectively killing the different breast cancer cells, albeit at different affinities. Interestingly and superior to free Dox, Dox-loaded Fl-PMNPs were found to be more effective in killing the metastatic cells (2- to 3-fold enhanced cytotoxicities for MDA-MB-231 compared to MCF-7), compared to the normal noncancerous MCF-10A cells (up to 8-fold), suggesting huge potentials as selective anticancer agents. Electron and live confocal microscopy imaging mechanistically confirmed that the nanoparticles were successfully endocytosed and packaged into vesicles inside the cytoplasm, where Dox is released and then translocated to the nucleus exerting its cytotoxic action and causing apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, commendable and enhanced penetration in 3D multilayered primary tumor cells derived from primary lesions as well as in patient breast tumor biopsies was observed, killing the tumor cells inside. The designed nanocarriers described here can potentially open new opportunities for breast cancer patients, especially in theranostic imaging and hyperthermia. While many prior studies have focused on targeting ligands to specific receptors to improve efficacies, we discovered that even with passive-targeted tailored delivery system enhanced toxic responses can be attained.

  10. Characterization of golimumab, a human monoclonal antibody specific for human tumor necrosis factor α.

    PubMed

    Shealy, David J; Cai, Ann; Staquet, Kim; Baker, Audrey; Lacy, Eilyn R; Johns, Laura; Vafa, Omid; Gunn, George; Tam, Susan; Sague, Sarah; Wang, Dana; Brigham-Burke, Mike; Dalmonte, Paul; Emmell, Eva; Pikounis, Bill; Bugelski, Peter J; Zhou, Honghui; Scallon, Bernard J; Giles-Komar, Jill

    2010-01-01

    We prepared and characterized golimumab (CNTO148), a human IgG1 tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antagonist monoclonal antibody chosen for clinical development based on its molecular properties. Golimumab was compared with infliximab, adalimumab and etanercept for affinity and in vitro TNFα neutralization. The affinity of golimumab for soluble human TNFα, as determined by surface plasmon resonance, was similar to that of etanercept (18 pM versus 11 pM), greater than that of infliximab (44 pM) and significantly greater than that of adalimumab (127 pM, p=0.018).  The concentration of golimumab necessary to neutralize TNFα-induced E-selectin expression on human endothelial cells by 50% was significantly less than those for infliximab (3.2 fold; p=0.017) and adalimumab (3.3-fold; p=0.008) and comparable to that for etanercept. The conformational stability of golimumab was greater than that of infliximab (primary melting temperature [Tm] 74.8 °C vs. 69.5 °C) as assessed by differential scanning calorimetry.  In addition, golimumab showed minimal aggregation over the intended shelf life when formulated as a high concentration liquid product (100 mg/mL) for subcutaneous administration.  In vivo, golimumab at doses of 1 and 10 mg/kg significantly delayed disease progression in a mouse model of human TNFα-induced arthritis when compared with untreated mice, while infliximab was effective only at 10 mg/kg. Golimumab also significantly reduced histological scores for arthritis severity and cartilage damage, as well as serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines associated with arthritis. Thus, we have demonstrated that golimumab is a highly stable human monoclonal antibody with high affinity and capacity to neutralize human TNFα in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Targeting Homologous Recombination in Notch-Driven C. elegans Stem Cell and Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xinzhu; Michaelson, David; Tchieu, Jason; Cheng, Jin; Rothenstein, Diana; Feldman, Regina; Lee, Sang-gyu; Fuller, John; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Studer, Lorenz; Powell, Simon; Fuks, Zvi; Hubbard, E. Jane Albert; Kolesnick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian NOTCH1-4 receptors are all associated with human malignancy, although exact roles remain enigmatic. Here we employ glp-1(ar202), a temperature-sensitive gain-of-function C. elegans NOTCH mutant, to delineate NOTCH-driven tumor responses to radiotherapy. At ≤20°C, glp-1(ar202) is wild-type, whereas at 25°C it forms a germline stem cell⁄progenitor cell tumor reminiscent of human cancer. We identify a NOTCH tumor phenotype in which all tumor cells traffic rapidly to G2⁄M post-irradiation, attempt to repair DNA strand breaks exclusively via homology-driven repair, and when this fails die by mitotic death. Homology-driven repair inactivation is dramatically radiosensitizing. We show that these concepts translate directly to human cancer models. PMID:26120834

  12. A Spectrum of Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Human Mammary Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colcher, D.; Horan Hand, P.; Nuti, M.; Schlom, J.

    1981-05-01

    Splenic lymphocytes of mice, immunized with membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic human mammary carcinoma tissues, were fused with the NS-1 non-immunoglobulin-secreting murine myeloma cell line. This resulted in the generation of hybridoma cultures secreting immunoglobulins reactive in solid-phase radioimmunoassays with extracts of metastatic mammary carcinoma cells from involved livers, but not with extracts of apparently normal human liver. As a result of further screening of immunoglobulin reactivities and double cloning of cultures, 11 monoclonal antibodies were chosen that demonstrated reactivities with human mammary tumor cells and not with apparently normal human tissues. These monoclonal antibodies could be placed into at least five major groups on the basis of their differential binding to the surface of various live human mammary tumor cells in culture, to extracts of mammary tumor tissues, or to tissue sections of mammary tumor cells studied by the immunoperoxidase technique. Whereas a spectrum of reactivities to mammary tumors was observed with the 11 monoclonal antibodies, no reactivity was observed to apparently normal cells of the following human tissues: breast, lymph node, lung, skin, testis, kidney, thymus, bone marrow, spleen, uterus, thyroid, intestine, liver, bladder, tonsils, stomach, prostate, and salivary gland. Several of the antibodies also demonstrated a ``pancarcinoma'' reactivity, showing binding to selected non-breast carcinomas. None of the monoclonal antibodies showed binding to purified ferritin or carcinoembryonic antigen. Monoclonal antibodies of all five major groups, however, demonstrated binding to human metastatic mammary carcinoma cells both in axillary lymph nodes and at distal sites.

  13. Functional evidence for a second tumor suppressor gene on human chromosome 17.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, P; Ellmore, N; Weissman, B E

    1994-01-01

    The development and progression of human tumors often involves inactivation of tumor suppressor gene function. Observations that specific chromosome deletions correlate with distinct groups of cancer suggest that some types of tumors may share common defective tumor suppressor genes. In support of this notion, our initial studies showed that four human carcinoma cell lines belong to the same complementation group for tumorigenic potential. In this investigation, we have extended these studies to six human soft tissue sarcoma cell lines. Our data showed that hybrid cells between a peripheral neuroepithelioma (PNET) cell line and normal human fibroblasts or HeLa cells were nontumorigenic. However, hybrid cells between the PNET cell line and five other soft tissue sarcoma cell lines remained highly tumorigenic, suggesting at least one common genetic defect in the control of tumorigenic potential in these cells. To determine the location of this common tumor suppressor gene, we examined biochemical and molecular polymorphic markers in matched pairs of tumorigenic and nontumorigenic hybrid cells between the PNET cell line and a normal human fibroblast. The data showed that loss of the fibroblast-derived chromosome 17 correlated with the conversion from nontumorigenic to tumorigenic cells. Transfer of two different chromosome 17s containing a mutant form of the p53 gene into the PNET cell line caused suppression of tumorigenic potential, implying the presence of a second tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 17. Images PMID:8264622

  14. Gene modification of primary tumor cells for active immunotherapy of human breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Philip, R; Clary, B; Brunette, E; Kilinski, L; Murugesh, D; Sorich, M; Yau, J; Lebkowski, J; Lyerly, H K; Philip, M

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that cationic liposomes facilitate adeno-associated virus (AAV) plasmid transfections of primary and cultured cell types. To test the clinical feasibility of using genetically modified tumor vaccines for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers, we have constructed an expression plasmid pMP6IL2 and investigated the use of liposome-mediated gene delivery into primary, uncultured human breast and ovarian tumor cells to produce interleukin 2 (IL-2)-secreting tumor cells. We have demonstrated significant levels of IL-2 expression in tumor cell lines and primary breast and ovarian tumor cells using this AAV-based expression plasmid complexed to cationic liposomes. Transfections with the non-AAV plasmid containing the identical expression cassette as the AAV plasmid induced IL-2 expression in the tumor cell line but failed to produce IL-2 in primary tumor cells. Significant levels of IL-2 were induced with the AAV plasmid regardless of liposome compositions used for transfection. The transfected breast cell line and primary tumor cells were able to express the transgene product for up to 28 days after lethal radiation. The transfection efficiency was comparable for both the tumor cell line and primary tumor cells and ranged from 20 to 50% for both cell types as assessed by intracellular IL-2 staining. Although the primary tumor cell preparations consist of mixed population of cells, at least 40% of the tumor cells expressed the transgene as assessed by immunostaining for IL-2. The ability to efficiently express transgenes in freshly isolated, nondividing tumor cells may potentiate active immunotherapy strategies for gene-based cancer treatment.

  15. Human brain tumor xenografts in nude mice as a chemotherapy model.

    PubMed

    Houchens, D P; Ovejera, A A; Riblet, S M; Slagel, D E

    1983-06-01

    Two human brain tumors which were previously established in nude mice were used to determine antitumor efficacy of various therapeutic agents. These tumors were a medulloblastoma (TE-671) and a glioma (U-251) with mass doubling times of 3.5 and 5.5 days respectively as subcutaneous implants in nude mice. Intracranial (i.c.) tumor challenge was accomplished by inoculating tissue culture-grown cells of either tumor into the right cerebral hemisphere to a depth of 3 mm. Median survival time (MST) in untreated mice with 10(5) i.c. injected TE-671 cells was approximately 30 days and 53 days in the U-251 tumor. With 2 X 10(5) U-251 tumor cells the MST was 27-31 days. Groups of mice which had been inoculated with tumor were treated with various doses and schedules of antineoplastic compounds by the i.p. route. The TE-671 tumor responded to AZQ treatment with an increase in life span (ILS) of 37% compared to untreated controls and an ILS of 30% with CCNU treatment. BCNU and PCNU were ineffective. With the U-251 tumor BCNU produced an ILS of greater than 60%, with 75% cures, greater than 112% ILS with PCNU and 49% ILS with CCNU. Neither tumor responded to procarbazine, PALA, dianhydrogalactitol, D-O-norleucine or dibromodulcitol. The U-251 tumor was treated on various schedules and doses with BCNU and found to respond well on late as well as early treatment. A new drug (rapamycin) being investigated by the NCI was found to be very effective against the U-251 tumor. This model system should prove valuable in assessing the effects of various chemotherapeutic modalities against brain tumors.

  16. Effectivity of pazopanib treatment in orthotopic models of human testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cisplatin (CDDP) resistance in testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) is still a clinical challenge, and one associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this work was to test pazopanib, an anti-tumoral and anti-angiogenic multikinase inhibitor, and its combination with lapatinib (an anti-ErbB inhibitor) in mouse orthotopic models of human testicular GCTs. Methods We used two different models of human testicular GCTs orthotopically grown in nude mice; a CDDP-sensitive choriocarcinoma (TGT38) and a new orthotopic model generated from a metastatic GCT refractory to first-line CDDP chemotherapy (TGT44). Nude mice implanted with these orthotopic tumors were treated with the inhibitors and the effect on tumoral growth and angiogenesis was evaluated. Results TGT44 refractory tumor had an immunohistochemical profile similar to the original metastasis, with characteristics of yolk sac tumor. TGT44 did not respond when treated with cisplatin. In contrast, pazopanib had an anti-angiogenic effect and anti-tumor efficacy in this model. Pazopanib in combination with lapatinib in TGT38, an orthotopic model of choriocarcinoma had an additive effect blocking tumor growth. Conclusions We present pazopanib as a possible agent for the alternative treatment of CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-refractory GCT patients, alone or in combination with anti-ErbB therapies. PMID:23937707

  17. Suppressive effects of tumor cell-derived 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine on human T cells.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Frederik C; Singer, Katrin; Poller, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Luise; Strobl, Carolin D; Limm, Katharina; Ritter, Axel P; Gottfried, Eva; Völkl, Simon; Jacobs, Benedikt; Peter, Katrin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Dettmer, Katja; Oefner, Peter J; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Kreutz, Marina P; Aigner, Michael; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment represents one of the main obstacles for immunotherapy of cancer. The tumor milieu is among others shaped by tumor metabolites such as 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Increased intratumoral MTA levels result from a lack of the MTA-catabolizing enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in tumor cells and are found in various tumor entities. Here, we demonstrate that MTA suppresses proliferation, activation, differentiation, and effector function of antigen-specific T cells without eliciting cell death. Conversely, if MTA is added to highly activated T cells, MTA exerts cytotoxic effects on T cells. We identified the Akt pathway, a critical signal pathway for T cell activation, as a target of MTA, while, for example, p38 remained unaffected. Next, we provide evidence that MTA exerts its immunosuppressive effects by interfering with protein methylation in T cells. To confirm the relevance of the suppressive effects of exogenously added MTA on human T cells, we used an MTAP-deficient tumor cell-line that was stably transfected with the MTAP-coding sequence. We observed that T cells stimulated with MTAP-transfected tumor cells revealed a higher proliferative capacity compared to T cells stimulated with Mock-transfected cells. In conclusion, our findings reveal a novel immune evasion strategy of human tumor cells that could be of interest for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27622058

  18. Identification of internalizing human single chain antibodies targeting brain tumor sphere cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Hashizume, Rintaro; James, C. David; Berger, Mitchel S.; Liu, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor and there is no curative treatment to date. Resistance to conventional therapies and tumor recurrence pose major challenges to treatment and management of this disease, and therefore new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. Previous studies by other investigators have shown that a subpopulation of GBM cells can grow as neurosphere-like cells when cultured in restrictive media, and exhibit enhanced tumor initiating ability and resistance to therapy. We report here the identification of internalizing human single chain antibodies (scFvs) targeting GBM tumor sphere cells. We selected a large naive phage antibody display library on the glycosylation-dependent CD133 epitope-positive subpopulation of GBM cells grown as tumor spheres and identified internalizing scFvs that target tumor sphere cells broadly, as well as scFvs that target the CD133 positive subpopulation. These scFvs were found to be efficiently internalized by GBM tumor sphere cells. One scFv GC4 inhibited self-renewal of GBM tumor sphere cells in vitro. We have further developed a full-length human IgG1 based on this scFv and found that it potently inhibits proliferation of GBM tumor sphere cells and GBM cells grown in regular non-selective media. Taken together, these results show that internalizing human scFvs targeting brain tumor sphere cells can be readily identified from a phage antibody display library, which could be useful for further development of novel therapies that target subpopulations of GBM cells to combat recurrence and resistance to treatment. PMID:20587664

  19. The significance of the nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of metallothionein in human liver and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Cherian, M G

    1994-09-01

    Metallothioneins are a group of low-molecular-weight intracellular proteins present in high levels in fetal mammalian livers, bound to zinc and copper. They are also present in two major isoforms in low basal levels in various organs of adults in several species. Although a number of functions have been proposed for metallothioneins, their major biological roles may be in the storage of zinc and copper during rapid growth and development, and also in the detoxification of certain toxic metals. In adult liver, metallothionein is mainly localized in the cytoplasm, it is localized also in the hepatocyte nuclei in human fetal liver and fetal and neonatal rat liver, as determined by immunohistochemical staining with a specific metallothionein antibody. Because of its high expression in fetal development, the potential role of metallothioneins in human tumors was investigated. The cellular localization of metallothionein was demonstrated in various human tumors such as thyroid tumors, testicular germ cell carcinoma, bladder transitional cell carcinomas, and salivary gland tumors. In most of these tumor tissues, metallothioneins were found in high levels in nucleus and cytoplasm in both benign and malignant tumors, although the proliferating edge of the malignant tumors showed most intense metallothionein staining. The expression of metallothionein is not universal to all tumor growth; its presence may depend on various factors, such as the type of tumor, cellular origin, morphological heterogeneity, or stage of growth. Human testicular seminomas, which are well differentiated, showed little expression of metallothionein irrespective of the staging, as compared to less well-differentiated embryonal carcinomas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Myeloid Cells' Evasion of Melanoma Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Chen, Lieping

    2015-01-01

    An immune-suppressive role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in melanoma has long been speculated, whereas molecular mechanisms underlying this role are not well understood. Here, Chung and colleagues show that dendritic cell-associated, heparan sulfate proteoglycans-dependent integrin ligand (DC-HIL), a cell surface immune-modulatory molecule, is highly expressed on tumor-associated MDSCs. Genetic ablation or antibody blockade of DC-HIL delays the growth of transplantable B16 melanoma in syngeneic mice, which is accompanied by enhanced antitumor T-cell activities. These findings support a role for DC-HIL in immune evasion within the melanoma microenvironment. PMID:25318429

  1. Transport processes in biological systems: Tumoral cells and human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    The entropy generation approach has been developed for the analysis of complex systems, with particular regards to biological systems, in order to evaluate their stationary states. The entropy generation is related to the transport processes related to exergy flows. Moreover, cancer can be described as an open complex dynamic and self-organizing system. Consequently, it is used as an example useful to evaluate the different thermo-chemical quantities of the transport processes in normal and in tumoral cells systems.

  2. STAT signaling in the pathogenesis and treatment of myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Natan, Michal; Nelson, Erik A.; Xiang, Michael; Frank, David A.

    2012-01-01

    STAT transcription factors play a critical role in mediating the effects of cytokines on myeloid cells. As STAT target genes control key processes such as survival, proliferation and self-renewal, it is not surprising that constitutive activation of STATs, particularly STAT3 and STAT5, are common events in many myeloid tumors. STATs are activated both by mutant tyrosine kinases as well as other pathogenic events, and continued activation of STATs is common in the setting of resistance to kinase inhibitors. Thus, the targeting of STATs, alone or in combination with other drugs, will likely have increasing importance for cancer therapy. PMID:24058751

  3. Human T Cell Crosstalk Is Induced by Tumor Membrane Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Uzana, Ronny; Eisenberg, Galit; Merims, Sharon; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Pato, Aviad; Yefenof, Eitan; Engelstein, Roni; Peretz, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC). Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+T-APCs). We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1) Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2) Fratricide (killing) of CD8+T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response. PMID:25671577

  4. Expansion of human tumor infiltrating lymphocytes for use in immunotherapy trials.

    PubMed

    Topalian, S L; Muul, L M; Solomon, D; Rosenberg, S A

    1987-08-24

    The potential utility of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in the adoptive immunotherapy of human tumors has been suggested by murine experiments showing these cells to be 50-100 times more powerful than LAK cells in treating advanced metastatic disease. A method for the large-scale expansion of human TIL for the use of these cells in clinical trials is described in this report. TIL were successfully expanded on an experimental scale from 24 of 25 consecutive human tumors, including six melanomas, ten sarcomas, and eight adenocarcinomas. Tumors were digested enzymatically to yield single cell suspensions which were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium with 10% human serum and 1000 U/ml recombinant interleukin-2. Lymphocytes constituted from 3% to 74% of single cell tumor suspensions, and expanded from 2.9-fold to 9.1 X 10(8)-fold over a culture period ranging from 14 to 100 days. Nine of 24 TIL cultures lysed fresh autologous tumor targets in 4 h chromium release assays. Cell surface phenotyping identified cultured TIL as activated cytotoxic/suppressor T cells. Subsequently, large-scale expansion of TIL was successful in generating more than 10(10) lymphocytes in five of eight consecutive cases. Clinical trials employing the adoptive transfer of expanded TIL to patients with metastatic disease have begun. PMID:3305708

  5. The Significance of the Discordant Occurrence of Lens Tumors in Humans versus Other Species

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Daniel M.; Phelps, Paul O.; Surapaneni, Krishna R.; Thuro, Bradley A.; Potter, Heather D.; Ikeda, Akihiro; Teixeira, Leandro B. C.; Dubielzig, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine in which species and under what conditions lens tumors occur. Design A review of data bases of available human and veterinary ocular pathological material and the previously reported literature. Participants Approximately 18,000 patients who had ocular surgical specimens submitted and studied at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (UWSMPH) between 1920 and 2014 and 45,000 ocular veterinary cases from the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin (COPLOW) between 1983 and 2014. Methods Material in two major archived collections at the University of Wisconsin medical and veterinary schools were studied for occurrence of lens tumors. Tumor was defined as “a new growth of tissue characterized by progressive, uncontrolled proliferation of cells.” In addition, cases presented at 3 major eye pathology societies (Verhoeff-Zimmerman Ophthalmic Pathology Society, Eastern Ophthalmic Pathology Society, and The Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Ophthalmic Alumni Society) from 1975 through 2014 were reviewed. Finally, a careful search of the literature was carried out. Approval from the IRB to carry out this study was obtained. Main Outcome Measures The presence of tumors of the lens. Results The database search and literature review failed to find an example of a lens tumor in humans. In contrast, examples of naturally occurring lens tumors were found in cats, dogs, rabbits, and birds. 4.5% of feline intraocular and adnexal neoplasms (234/5153) in the veterinary school database were designated as feline ocular post-traumatic sarcoma (FOPTS), a tumor previously demonstrated to be of lens epithelial origin. Similar tumors were seen in rabbit eyes, a bird, and in a dog. All four species with lens tumors had a history of either ocular trauma or protracted uveitis. The literature search also revealed cases where lens tumors were induced in zebrafish, rainbow trout, hamsters, and mice, by

  6. Positive and negative aggregation responses to cultured human tumor cell lines among different normal individuals.

    PubMed

    Bastida, E; Ordinas, A; Jamieson, G A

    1982-01-01

    Platelets from approximately 50% (7/16) of normal individuals have been shown to have greater sensitivity to aggregation induced by critical threshold concentrations of three human tumor cell lines. These results may have implications for the genetics and epidemiology of human neoplastic disease.

  7. Human class II major histocompatibility complex gene transfer into murine neuroblastoma leads to loss of tumorigenicity, immunity against subsequent tumor challenge, and elimination of microscopic preestablished tumors.

    PubMed

    Hock, R A; Reynolds, B D; Tucker-McClung, C L; Kwok, W W

    1995-01-01

    Immunological recognition of transformed cells is critically important to limit tumor development and proliferation. Because established tumors have escaped immune recognition and elimination, novel strategies to enhance antitumor immunity have been developed. A unique approach has used the introduction of genes encoding major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens into tumor cells. Experiments in mice have shown that the expression of syngeneic class II MHC antigens in tumor cells completely abrogates tumorigenicity and induces tumor-specific immunity. In this study we sought to determine whether a more effective antitumor immune response would be generated by introducing xenogeneic class II MHC genes into tumor cells. To address this question we used recombinant retroviruses to express human class II MHC genes in a highly malignant murine neuroblastoma cell line, Neuro-2a. We found that normal mice inoculated with Neuro-2a expressing the human class II MHC antigen did not develop tumors and were immune to subsequent challenge with unmodified Neuro-2a cells. In addition, mice bearing small established Neuro-2a tumors were cured by vaccination with Neuro-2a expressing human class II MHC. We hypothesize that a similar approach using retroviral-mediated transduction of class II MHC genes into human tumor cells may be an effective alternative to current cancer treatment.

  8. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Patient-derived xenograft mouse models of pseudomyxoma peritonei recapitulate the human inflammatory tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kuracha, Murali R; Thomas, Peter; Loggie, Brian W; Govindarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a neoplastic syndrome characterized by peritoneal tumor implants with copious mucinous ascites. The standard of care for PMP patients is aggressive cytoreductive surgery performed in conjunction with heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Not all patients are candidates for these procedures and a majority of the patients will have recurrent disease. In addition to secreted mucin, inflammation and fibrosis are central to PMP pathogenesis but the molecular processes that regulate tumor-stromal interactions within the peritoneal tumor microenvironment remain largely unknown. This knowledge is critical not only to elucidate PMP pathobiology but also to identify novel targets for therapy. Here, we report the generation of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models for PMP and assess the ability of these models to replicate the inflammatory peritoneal microenvironment of human PMP patients. PDX mouse models of low- and high-grade PMP were generated and were of a similar histopathology as human PMP. Cytokines previously shown to be elevated in human PMP were also elevated in PDX ascites. Significant differences in IL-6 and IL-8/KC/MIP2 were seen between human and PDX ascites. Interestingly, these cytokines were mostly secreted by mouse-derived, tumor-associated stromal cells rather than by human-derived PMP tumor cells. Our data suggest that the PMP PDX mouse models are especially suited to the study of tumor-stromal interactions that regulate the peritoneal inflammatory environment in PMP as the tumor and stromal cells in these mouse models are of human and murine origins, respectively. These mouse models are therefore, likely to be useful in vivo surrogates for testing and developing novel therapeutic treatment interventions for PMP.

  10. Gene expression patterns associated with the metastatic phenotype in rodent and human tumors.

    PubMed

    Nestl, A; Von Stein, O D; Zatloukal, K; Thies, W G; Herrlich, P; Hofmann, M; Sleeman, J P

    2001-02-15

    Using subtractive technology, we have generated metastasis-associated gene expression profiles for rat mammary and pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Several genes whose expression is thought to be related to tumor progression such as c-Met, urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor, ezrin, HMG-1, oncomodulin, cathepsin, and caveolin were thereby isolated. Half of the metastasis-associated clones showed no significant homology to genes with known function. Notably, several of the metastasis-associated clones were also expressed in metastatic lines but not in nonmetastatic lines of other tumor models. Furthermore, in situ hybridization using selected clones documents the relevance of these results for human cancer because strong expression in tumor cells including metastases was detected in human colorectal cancer samples and, to a lesser extent, in mammary cancer samples. These data support the concept that tumors express a "metastatic program" of genes. PMID:11245467

  11. Pathophysiological effects of human TNF-alpha-producing tumor xenografts in immunosuppressed mice.

    PubMed

    Nagy, T; Jánossy, T; Vizler, C; Bohus, K; Joó, F; Végh, P; Duda, E

    1999-10-01

    Groups of CBA mice immunosuppressed with anti-thymocyte serum (ATS) treatment were xeno-transplanted with either HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells or genetically modified cells expressing the human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) gene (All cells). Both cell lines were highly resistant to the cytotoxic effects of TNF. If 3 x 10(6) tumor cells were inoculated s.c. into female mice, HeLa cells grew progressively into large tumors and killed 74% of the recipients, while TNF-expressing All cells caused fatal tumor growth only in 22% of the mice. 3 x 10(6) or 1.5 x 10(7). All cells produced progressive tumor growth and lethality in all male recipients. In sera of all the A11-cell-transplanted mice, biologically active TNF was detected shortly (4.5 h) after tumor inoculation (6 39 U/ml), decreasing to below detection level in the circulation by day 3. In recipients of 15 million A11 cells, circulating TNF reappeared and reached high levels (12-1000 U/ml) 3 to 7 weeks later, when the animals bore large tumors (14-23 mm). Generally, such mice became cachectic, severely anemic, hypothermic, and soon died. On account of calcium mobilization from bones, their serum Ca levels were high. Electron microscopy revealed severe liver damage, but there were no signs of chronic arthritis. These results suggest that ATS-treated mice xenotransplanted with TNF-gene-transfected A11 human tumor cells provide a new model for studying the pathophysiological and anti-tumor effects of TNF. PMID:10549587

  12. Eribulin mesylate reduces tumor microenvironment abnormality by vascular remodeling in preclinical human breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yusuke; Semba, Taro; Uesugi, Mai; Ozawa, Yoichi; Tohyama, Osamu; Uehara, Taisuke; Kimura, Takayuki; Watanabe, Hideki; Asano, Makoto; Kawano, Satoshi; Tizon, Xavier; McCracken, Paul J; Matsui, Junji; Aoshima, Ken; Nomoto, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    Eribulin mesylate is a synthetic macrocyclic ketone analog of the marine sponge natural product halichondrin B and an inhibitor of microtubule dynamics. Some tubulin-binding drugs are known to have antivascular (antiangiogenesis or vascular-disrupting) activities that can target abnormal tumor vessels. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analyses, here we show that eribulin induces remodeling of tumor vasculature through a novel antivascular activity in MX-1 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenograft models. Vascular remodeling associated with improved perfusion was shown by Hoechst 33342 staining and by increased microvessel density together with decreased mean vascular areas and fewer branched vessels in tumor tissues, as determined by immunohistochemical staining for endothelial marker CD31. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of normal host cells in the stroma of xenograft tumors showed that eribulin altered the expression of mouse (host) genes in angiogenesis signaling pathways controlling endothelial cell–pericyte interactions, and in the epithelial–mesenchymal transition pathway in the context of the tumor microenvironment. Eribulin also decreased hypoxia-associated protein expression of mouse (host) vascular endothelial growth factor by ELISA and human CA9 by immunohistochemical analysis. Prior treatment with eribulin enhanced the anti-tumor activity of capecitabine in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. These findings suggest that eribulin-induced remodeling of abnormal tumor vasculature leads to a more functional microenvironment that may reduce the aggressiveness of tumors due to elimination of inner tumor hypoxia. Because abnormal tumor microenvironments enhance both drug resistance and metastasis, the apparent ability of eribulin to reverse these aggressive characteristics may contribute to its clinical benefits. PMID:25060424

  13. Transcription factors link mouse WAP-T mammary tumors with human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Otto, Benjamin; Streichert, Thomas; Wegwitz, Florian; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Klätschke, Kristin; Wagener, Christoph; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V

    2013-03-15

    Mouse models are important tools to decipher the molecular mechanisms of mammary carcinogenesis and to mimic the respective human disease. Despite sharing common phenotypic and genetic features, the proper translation of murine models to human breast cancer remains a challenging task. In a previous study we showed that in the SV40 transgenic WAP-T mice an active Met-pathway and epithelial-mesenchymal characteristics distinguish low- and high-grade mammary carcinoma. To assign these murine tumors to corresponding human tumors we here incorporated the analysis of expression of transcription factor (TF) coding genes and show that thereby a more accurate interspecies translation can be achieved. We describe a novel cross-species translation procedure and demonstrate that expression of unsupervised selected TFs, such as ELF5, HOXA5 and TFCP2L1, can clearly distinguish between the human molecular breast cancer subtypes--or as, for example, expression of TFAP2B between yet unclassified subgroups. By integrating different levels of information like histology, gene set enrichment, expression of differentiation markers and TFs we conclude that tumors in WAP-T mice exhibit similarities to both, human basal-like and non-basal-like subtypes. We furthermore suggest that the low- and high-grade WAP-T tumor phenotypes might arise from distinct cells of tumor origin. Our results underscore the importance of TFs as common cross-species denominators in the regulatory networks underlying mammary carcinogenesis.

  14. X-ray responses of human colon tumor cells grown in artificial capillary culture

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazawa, M.; Leith, J.T.; Glicksman, A.S.

    1984-06-01

    Clone A human colon adenocarcinoma cells were grown in three-dimensional artificial capillary culture (ACC) to determine responses of capillaries treated 3 weeks after tumor cell inoculation with a specific, easily quantifiable cytotoxic agent, ionizing radiation. Changes in extracapillary space (ECS) fluid concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (GOT) and the utilization of glucose in circulating medium were monitored after a supralethal radiation dose (90 Gy) of X-rays. Immediately after irradiation, increased levels of LDH and GOT were found that reached maximum levels about four to five times those found in nonirradiated control capillaries at 10-13 days post irradiation and then declined. Patterns of enzyme production appeared to correlate with the numbers of nonviable tumor cells collected from the ECS of the artificial capillaries. In contrast, glucose utilization showed little correlation with either enzyme concentration or dead cell production. In other studies, tumor cells were removed from unirradiated capillaries by trypsinization and used to obtain complete survival curves after graded doses of X-radiation. The dose-response curves obtained indicate that clone A colon tumor cells grown in ACC show a marked decrease in their ability to accumulate sublethal radiation injury as compared to responses of these cells growing exponentially in asynchronous monolayer cultures, to synchronized mid-G1 tumor cells, or to tumor cells in stationary growth phase. These data suggest that ACC is a potentially useful model to study the effects of cytotoxic agents on human tumor cells.

  15. Metabolic shifts induced by human H460 cells in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linsheng; Wang, Yaqiong; Zheng, Tian; Cao, Bei; Li, Mengjie; Shi, Jian; Aa, Nan; Wang, Xinwen; Zhao, Chunyan; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2016-03-01

    Tumor markers are most popularly used in diagnosis of various cancers clinically. However, the confounding factors of individual background diversities, such as genetics, food preferences, living styles, physical exercises, etc., greatly challenge the identification of tumor markers. Study of the metabolic impact of inoculated tumors on model animals can facilitate the identification of metabolomic markers relevant to tumor insult. In this study, serum metabolites from nude mice (n = 14) inoculated with human H460 cells (human nonsmall cell lung carcinoma) were profiled using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mice with inoculated tumors showed an obviously different metabolic pattern from the control; identification of the discriminatory metabolites suggested the metabolic perturbation of free fatty acids, amino acids, glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle turnover. The significantly decreased TCA intermediates, free fatty acids, 3-hydroxybutyric acid and fluctuating amino acids (t-test, p < 0.05) in serum of tumor-bearing mice characterized the metabolic impact of local inoculated H460 tumor cells on the whole system. This indicates that they are candidate metabolomic markers for translational study of lung cancer, clinically. PMID:26147780

  16. Yes-associated protein 1 is widely expressed in human brain tumors and promotes glioblastoma growth.

    PubMed

    Orr, Brent A; Bai, Haibo; Odia, Yazmin; Jain, Deepali; Anders, Robert A; Eberhart, Charles G

    2011-07-01

    The hippo pathway and its downstream mediator yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) regulate mammalian organ size in part through modulating progenitor cell numbers. YAP1 has also been implicated as an oncogene in multiple human cancers. Currently, little is known about the expression of YAP1 either in normal human brain tissue or in central nervous system neoplasms. We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate nuclear YAP1 expression in the fetal and normal adult human brains and in 264 brain tumors. YAP1 was expressed in fetal and adult brain regions known to harbor neural progenitor cells, but there was little YAP1 immunoreactivity in the adult cerebral cortex. YAP1 protein was also readily detected in the nuclei of human brain tumors. In medulloblastoma, the expression varied between histologic subtypes and was most prominent in nodular/desmoplastic tumors. In gliomas, it was frequently expressed in infiltrating astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas but rarely in pilocytic astrocytomas. Using a loss-of-function approach, we show that YAP1 promoted growth of glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. High levels of YAP1 messenger RNA expression were associated with aggressive molecular subsets of glioblastoma and with a nonsignificant trend toward reduced mean survival in human astrocytoma patients. These findings suggest that YAP1 may play an important role in normal human brain development and that it could represent a new target in human brain tumors.

  17. S100A8, S100A9 and the S100A8/A9 heterodimer complex specifically bind to human endothelial cells: identification and characterization of ligands for the myeloid-related proteins S100A9 and S100A8/A9 on human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Eue, Ines; König, Simone; Pior, Jolanthe; Sorg, Clemens

    2002-03-01

    The natural ligands of the S100 EF hand proteins S100A8 and A9 [myeloid-related proteins 8 and 14] have long been searched for in order to further the understanding of the role of the S100A8/A9-expressing monocyte subpopulation in progressing inflammatory processes. We demonstrate that S100A8, S100A9 and the S100A8/A9 heterodimeric complex bind to human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC)-1 with an increasing binding capacity progressing from S100A8 < or = S100A9 < or = S100A8/A9. Similar results were obtained in the apolipoprotein E knockout mouse model, where preferably recombinant S100A9 but no S100A8 bound to the endothelium of the aorta ascendens. The binding of the S100A8/A9 heterodimer complex to activated HMEC-1 is specific as demonstrated by a dose-responding and satiable binding curve and the competition of FITC-labeled versus unlabeled protein. The protein character of the binding site was proven by treatment with trypsin. S100A8/A9 binding to HMEC-1 is inducible by lipopolysaccharide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and in the presence of calcium. A 163-kDa protein was isolated from a cell lysate of activated HMEC-1 cells using an affinity-chromatography protocol. The endothelial cell-associated ligand proteins isolated by the use of the S100A9 monomer and the S100A8/A9 dimer were subjected to mass spectrometry for protein identification. Clearly, alpha(2)-macroglobulin was identified as a binding partner for the S100A9 monomer, whereas no protein could be identified from the database for the ligand of the S100A8/A9 dimer. PMID:11867565

  18. Targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G; Rosenblat, Todd L

    2014-01-01

    Because alpha-particles have a shorter range and a higher linear energy transfer (LET) compared with beta-particles, targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy offers the potential for more efficient tumor cell killing while sparing surrounding normal cells. To date, clinical studies of alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have focused on the myeloid cell surface antigen CD33 as a target using the humanized monoclonal antibody lintuzumab. An initial phase I study demonstrated the safety, feasibility, and antileukemic effects of bismuth-213 ((213)Bi)-labeled lintuzumab. In a subsequent study, (213)Bi-lintuzumab produced remissions in some patients with AML after partial cytoreduction with cytarabine, suggesting the utility of targeted alpha-particle therapy for small-volume disease. The widespread use of (213)Bi, however, is limited by its short half-life. Therefore, a second-generation construct containing actinium-225 ((225)Ac), a radiometal that generates four alpha-particle emissions, was developed. A phase I trial demonstrated that (225)Ac-lintuzumab is safe at doses of 3 μCi/kg or less and has antileukemic activity across all dose levels studied. Fractionated-dose (225)Ac-lintuzumab in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) is now under investigation for the management of older patients with untreated AML in a multicenter trial. Preclinical studies using (213)Bi- and astatine-211 ((211)At)-labeled anti-CD45 antibodies have shown that alpha-particle immunotherapy may be useful as part conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation. The use of novel pretargeting strategies may further improve target-to-normal organ dose ratios. PMID:24857092

  19. Strategies for Human Tumor Virus Discoveries: From Microscopic Observation to Digital Transcriptome Subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Mirvish, Ezra D.; Shuda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Over 20% of human cancers worldwide are associated with infectious agents, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Various methods have been used to identify human tumor viruses, including electron microscopic observations of viral particles, immunologic screening, cDNA library screening, nucleic acid hybridization, consensus PCR, viral DNA array chip, and representational difference analysis. With the Human Genome Project, a large amount of genetic information from humans and other organisms has accumulated over the last decade. Utilizing the available genetic databases, Feng et al. (2007) developed digital transcriptome subtraction (DTS), an in silico method to sequentially subtract human sequences from tissue or cellular transcriptome, and discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) from Merkel cell carcinoma. Here, we review the background and methods underlying the human tumor virus discoveries and explain how DTS was developed and used for the discovery of MCV. PMID:27242703

  20. Strategies for Human Tumor Virus Discoveries: From Microscopic Observation to Digital Transcriptome Subtraction.

    PubMed

    Mirvish, Ezra D; Shuda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Over 20% of human cancers worldwide are associated with infectious agents, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Various methods have been used to identify human tumor viruses, including electron microscopic observations of viral particles, immunologic screening, cDNA library screening, nucleic acid hybridization, consensus PCR, viral DNA array chip, and representational difference analysis. With the Human Genome Project, a large amount of genetic information from humans and other organisms has accumulated over the last decade. Utilizing the available genetic databases, Feng et al. (2007) developed digital transcriptome subtraction (DTS), an in silico method to sequentially subtract human sequences from tissue or cellular transcriptome, and discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) from Merkel cell carcinoma. Here, we review the background and methods underlying the human tumor virus discoveries and explain how DTS was developed and used for the discovery of MCV. PMID:27242703

  1. Impact of myeloid cells on the efficacy of anticancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Aranda, Fernando; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Tumors are not immunologically silent but evolve and respond to therapy in the context of a continuous, bi-directional interaction with the host immune system. In line with this notion, several clinically successful chemotherapeutics have been shown to mediate antineoplastic effects as they (re)activate an anticancer immune response that is generally executed by lymphoid cells. Myeloid cells play a central role in this process, not only because they critically regulate the activity of T and B lymphocytes, but also because they exert direct tumoricidal effects, at least in some settings. Here, we discuss the impact of various myeloid cell populations, including macrophages, dendritic cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, on the efficacy of anticancer chemotherapy.

  2. Tumor control by human cytomegalovirus in a murine model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Coquard, Laurie; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Russo, Laetitia; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Borg, Christophe; Pothier, Pierre; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Although viruses can cause cancer, other studies reported the regression of human tumors upon viral infections. We investigated the cytoreductive potential of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in a murine model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in severe-immunodeficient mice. Infection of HepG2 cells with HCMV resulted in the absence of tumor or in a limited tumor growth following injection of cells subcutaneously. By contrast all mice injected with uninfected HepG2 cells and with HepG2 cells infected with UV-treated HCMV did develop tumors without any significant restriction. Analysis of tumors indicated that in mice injected with HCMV-infected-HepG2 cells, but not in controls, a restricted cellular proliferation was observed parallel to a limited activation of the STAT3-cyclin D1 axis, decreased formation of colonies in soft agar, and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. We conclude that HCMV can provide antitumoral effects in a murine model of HCC which requires replicative virus at some stages that results in limitation of tumor cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis mediated through the intrinsic caspase pathway. PMID:27626063

  3. Morphological evidence of neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism) in human gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Caruso, R A; Muda, A O; Bersiga, A; Rigoli, L; Inferrera, C

    2002-01-01

    The phenomenon of neutrophil-tumor cell emperipolesis or phagocytosis has been documented by light microscopy in various human carcinomas, but little is known about the cellular pathological processes and the morphological changes involved. In an attempt to clarify the nature of this phenomenon, the authors' ultrastructural studies on the relationships among neutrophils and tumor cells in human gastric carcinomas are reviewed and analyzed. At the electron microscopy level, apoptotic neutrophils were found within vacuoles of adenocarcinoma cells in 2 cases. They showed either early apoptotic morphology with perinuclear chromatin aggregation but cytoplasm integrity or late apoptotic morphology with uniform, collapsed nucleus and tightly packed cytoplasmic granules. A light microscopy review of 200 cases of resected gastric carcinomas identified 22 cases (11%) that were characterized by neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism). TUNEL staining confirmed the presence of apoptotic neutrophils within the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. This study provides light and electron microscopic evidence of apoptotic neutrophils phagocytosed by gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The morphological features of neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism) would suggest a particular mechanism of tumor-immune escape in human gastric carcinoma. PMID:12396242

  4. Tumor control by human cytomegalovirus in a murine model of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Coquard, Laurie; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Russo, Laetitia; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Borg, Christophe; Pothier, Pierre; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Although viruses can cause cancer, other studies reported the regression of human tumors upon viral infections. We investigated the cytoreductive potential of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in a murine model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in severe-immunodeficient mice. Infection of HepG2 cells with HCMV resulted in the absence of tumor or in a limited tumor growth following injection of cells subcutaneously. By contrast all mice injected with uninfected HepG2 cells and with HepG2 cells infected with UV-treated HCMV did develop tumors without any significant restriction. Analysis of tumors indicated that in mice injected with HCMV-infected-HepG2 cells, but not in controls, a restricted cellular proliferation was observed parallel to a limited activation of the STAT3-cyclin D1 axis, decreased formation of colonies in soft agar, and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. We conclude that HCMV can provide antitumoral effects in a murine model of HCC which requires replicative virus at some stages that results in limitation of tumor cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis mediated through the intrinsic caspase pathway. PMID:27626063

  5. Expression of endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine kinases and growth factors in human brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Kaipainen, A.; Mentula, P.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Paetau, A.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1995-01-01

    Key growth factor-receptor interactions involved in angiogenesis are possible targets for therapy of CNS tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific endothelial cell mitogen that has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis, a requirement for solid tumor growth. The expression of VEGF, the closely related placental growth factor (PIGF), the newly cloned endothelial high affinity VEGF receptors KDR and FLT1, and the endothelial orphan receptors FLT4 and Tie were analyzed by in situ hybridization in normal human brain tissue and in the following CNS tumors: gliomas, grades II, III, IV; meningiomas, grades I and II; and melanoma metastases to the cerebrum. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in the majority of low grade tumors studied and was highly expressed in cells of malignant gliomas. Significantly elevated levels of Tie, KDR, and FLT1 mRNAs, but not FLT4 mRNA, were observed in malignant tumor endothelia, as well as in endothelia of tissues directly adjacent to the tumor margin. In comparison, there was little or no receptor expression in normal brain vasculature. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that these endothelial receptors are induced during tumor progression and may play a role in tumor angiogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7856749

  6. Warburg metabolism in tumor-conditioned macrophages promotes metastasis in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Penny, Hweixian Leong; Sieow, Je Lin; Adriani, Giulia; Yeap, Wei Hseun; See Chi Ee, Peter; San Luis, Boris; Lee, Bernett; Lee, Terence; Mak, Shi Ya; Ho, Ying Swan; Lam, Kong Peng; Ong, Choon Kiat; Huang, Ruby Y J; Ginhoux, Florent; Rotzschke, Olaf; Kamm, Roger D; Wong, Siew Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) face a clinically intractable disease with poor survival rates, attributed to exceptionally high levels of metastasis. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is pronounced at inflammatory foci within the tumor; however, the immunological mechanisms promoting tumor dissemination remain unclear. It is well established that tumors exhibit the Warburg effect, a preferential use of glycolysis for energy production, even in the presence of oxygen, to support rapid growth. We hypothesized that the metabolic pathways utilized by tumor-infiltrating macrophages are altered in PDAC, conferring a pro-metastatic phenotype. We generated tumor-conditioned macrophages in vitro, in which human peripheral blood monocytes were cultured with conditioned media generated from normal pancreatic or PDAC cell lines to obtain steady-state and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), respectively. Compared with steady-state macrophages, TAMs promoted vascular network formation, augmented extravasation of tumor cells out of blood vessels, and induced higher levels of EMT. TAMs exhibited a pronounced glycolytic signature in a metabolic flux assay, corresponding with elevated glycolytic gene transcript levels. Inhibiting glycolysis in TAMs with a competitive inhibitor to Hexokinase II (HK2), 2-deoxyglucose (2DG), was sufficient to disrupt this pro-metastatic phenotype, reversing the observed increases in TAM-supported angiogenesis, extravasation, and EMT. Our results indicate a key role for metabolic reprogramming of tumor-infiltrating macrophages in PDAC metastasis, and highlight the therapeutic potential of using pharmacologics to modulate these metabolic pathways. PMID:27622062

  7. Diagnostic significance of coexpression of intermediate filaments in fine needle aspirates of human tumors.

    PubMed

    Domagala, W; Weber, K; Osborn, M

    1988-01-01

    A study was undertaken of the diagnostic significance of the coexpression of intermediate filaments in fine needle aspirates of human tumors. Three types of coexpression were found: (1) true coexpression, in which tumor cells simultaneously express more than one intermediate filament protein; (2) pseudocoexpression, in which various tumor cell types from histogenetically different parts of a complex tumor show different results; and (3) false coexpression, in which tumor cells with one or two types of intermediate filaments are present together with benign cells expressing a different filament type. True coexpression of vimentin and keratin was documented in renal cell carcinomas, endometrial carcinomas, certain thyroid carcinomas and Hürthle cell adenomas. Coexpression of keratin and neurofilaments was seen in Merkel cell carcinomas, and coexpression of desmin and vimentin was found in leiomyosarcomas. Keratin, vimentin and neurofilament expression was seen in medullary thyroid carcinomas, and keratin, vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression was observed in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary gland. Pseudocoexpression was noted in synovial sarcoma, epithelioid sarcoma, benign cystosarcoma phyllodes of the breast, teratocarcinoma, malignant granular cell tumor, progonoma, Wilms' tumor and triton tumor. Sources of false coexpression are also discussed.

  8. [Myeloid sarcoma of the small bowel with inversion of chromosome 16: a description of 3 clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Gavrilina, O A; Bariakh, E A; Parovichnikova, E N; Troitskaia, V V; Zvonkov, E E; Kravchenko, S K; Sinitsyna, M N; Obukhova, T N; Gitis, M K; Savchenko, V G

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma (MS) is a rare malignant solid tumor presented with myeloid blast cells showing varying degrees of maturation. MS may have an extramedullary site, precede, or develop simultaneously with the clinical manifestations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML); it may also occur as an AML relapse. Besides AML, MS may be a manifestation of chronic myeloid leukemia or other chronic myeloproliferative diseases. Due to the fact that this disease is rare, the bulk of the literature on MS is presented with single descriptions of retrospective studies and clinical cases. The paper describes 3 cases of MS with inversion of chromosome 16 and small bowel lesion.

  9. A novel metastatic animal model reflecting the clinical appearance of human neuroblastoma: growth arrest of orthotopic tumors by natural, cytotoxic human immunoglobulin M antibodies.

    PubMed

    Engler, S; Thiel, C; Förster, K; David, K; Bredehorst, R; Juhl, H

    2001-04-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood is associated with poor prognosis in patients with advanced tumor stages. Natural human cytotoxic anti-NB IgM antibodies present in the serum of healthy humans are discussed as a potential novel immunotherapeutic regimen against human NB because these antibodies have been shown to affect growth arrest of solid s.c. xenografts of human NB in nude rats. Subcutaneously induced tumors, however, exhibit a different growth pattern compared with the typical growth pattern of NB tumors in humans. Therefore, we developed in this study a novel metastatic tumor model in nude rats that reflects the clinical appearance of human NB and used this model to study the therapeutic efficacy of human anti-NB IgM. Intra-aortal injection of human NB cells in nude rats resulted in the development of large invasive adrenal gland tumors and micrometastases in the liver and bones. Apparently, adrenal glands provide most favorable growth conditions for human NB cells, as documented by the preferential and rapid growth of NB cells in this location. We studied three different treatment protocols of natural human anti-NB IgM. Anti-NB IgM completely inhibited tumor formation and metastases when injected simultaneously with human LAN-1 NB cells (P < 0.05). When antibody treatment was started 6 days after tumor cell injection (i.e., micrometastatic stage), tumor growth was inhibited by 90% (P < 0.05). An anti-NB IgM therapy directed against established tumors (14 days after tumor cell injection) shrank adrenal gland tumors by 90% (P < 0.05). Analysis of the tumors revealed both complement activation and an induction of apoptosis as two independent mechanisms of antitumor function. This study strongly suggests human anti-NB IgM antibodies as new agents for the therapy of neuroblastoma.

  10. The Expression of Human Cytomegalovirus MicroRNA MiR-UL148D during Latent Infection in Primary Myeloid Cells Inhibits Activin A-triggered Secretion of IL-6.

    PubMed

    Lau, Betty; Poole, Emma; Krishna, Benjamin; Sellart, Immaculada; Wills, Mark R; Murphy, Eain; Sinclair, John

    2016-08-05

    The successful establishment and maintenance of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency is dependent on the expression of a subset of viral genes. Whilst the exact spectrum and functions of these genes are far from clear, inroads have been made for protein-coding genes. In contrast, little is known about the expression of non-coding RNAs. Here we show that HCMV encoded miRNAs are expressed de novo during latent infection of primary myeloid cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-UL148D, one of the most highly expressed viral miRNAs during latent infection, directly targets the cellular receptor ACVR1B of the activin signalling axis. Consistent with this, we observed upregulation of ACVR1B expression during latent infection with a miR-UL148D deletion virus (ΔmiR-UL148D). Importantly, we observed that monocytes latently infected with ΔmiR-UL148D are more responsive to activin A stimulation, as demonstrated by their increased secretion of IL-6. Collectively, our data indicates miR-UL148D inhibits ACVR1B expression in latently infected cells to limit proinflammatory cytokine secretion, perhaps as an immune evasion strategy or to postpone cytokine-induced reactivation until conditions are more favourable. This is the first demonstration of an HCMV miRNA function during latency in primary myeloid cells, implicating that small RNA species may contribute significantly to latent infection.

  11. The Expression of Human Cytomegalovirus MicroRNA MiR-UL148D during Latent Infection in Primary Myeloid Cells Inhibits Activin A-triggered Secretion of IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Betty; Poole, Emma; Krishna, Benjamin; Sellart, Immaculada; Wills, Mark R.; Murphy, Eain; Sinclair, John

    2016-01-01

    The successful establishment and maintenance of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency is dependent on the expression of a subset of viral genes. Whilst the exact spectrum and functions of these genes are far from clear, inroads have been made for protein-coding genes. In contrast, little is known about the expression of non-coding RNAs. Here we show that HCMV encoded miRNAs are expressed de novo during latent infection of primary myeloid cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-UL148D, one of the most highly expressed viral miRNAs during latent infection, directly targets the cellular receptor ACVR1B of the activin signalling axis. Consistent with this, we observed upregulation of ACVR1B expression during latent infection with a miR-UL148D deletion virus (ΔmiR-UL148D). Importantly, we observed that monocytes latently infected with ΔmiR-UL148D are more responsive to activin A stimulation, as demonstrated by their increased secretion of IL-6. Collectively, our data indicates miR-UL148D inhibits ACVR1B expression in latently infected cells to limit proinflammatory cytokine secretion, perhaps as an immune evasion strategy or to postpone cytokine-induced reactivation until conditions are more favourable. This is the first demonstration of an HCMV miRNA function during latency in primary myeloid cells, implicating that small RNA species may contribute significantly to latent infection. PMID:27491954

  12. The Expression of Human Cytomegalovirus MicroRNA MiR-UL148D during Latent Infection in Primary Myeloid Cells Inhibits Activin A-triggered Secretion of IL-6.

    PubMed

    Lau, Betty; Poole, Emma; Krishna, Benjamin; Sellart, Immaculada; Wills, Mark R; Murphy, Eain; Sinclair, John

    2016-01-01

    The successful establishment and maintenance of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency is dependent on the expression of a subset of viral genes. Whilst the exact spectrum and functions of these genes are far from clear, inroads have been made for protein-coding genes. In contrast, little is known about the expression of non-coding RNAs. Here we show that HCMV encoded miRNAs are expressed de novo during latent infection of primary myeloid cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-UL148D, one of the most highly expressed viral miRNAs during latent infection, directly targets the cellular receptor ACVR1B of the activin signalling axis. Consistent with this, we observed upregulation of ACVR1B expression during latent infection with a miR-UL148D deletion virus (ΔmiR-UL148D). Importantly, we observed that monocytes latently infected with ΔmiR-UL148D are more responsive to activin A stimulation, as demonstrated by their increased secretion of IL-6. Collectively, our data indicates miR-UL148D inhibits ACVR1B expression in latently infected cells to limit proinflammatory cytokine secretion, perhaps as an immune evasion strategy or to postpone cytokine-induced reactivation until conditions are more favourable. This is the first demonstration of an HCMV miRNA function during latency in primary myeloid cells, implicating that small RNA species may contribute significantly to latent infection. PMID:27491954

  13. At a crossroads: human DNA tumor viruses and the host DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Pavel A; Luftig, Micah A

    2011-07-01

    Human DNA tumor viruses induce host cell proliferation in order to establish the necessary cellular milieu to replicate viral DNA. The consequence of such viral-programmed induction of proliferation coupled with the introduction of foreign replicating DNA structures makes these viruses particularly sensitive to the host DNA damage response machinery. In fact, sensors of DNA damage are often activated and modulated by DNA tumor viruses in both latent and lytic infection. This article focuses on the role of the DNA damage response during the life cycle of human DNA tumor viruses, with a particular emphasis on recent advances in our understanding of the role of the DNA damage response in EBV, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and human papillomavirus infection. PMID:21927617

  14. Finding mouse models of human lymphomas and leukemia's using the Jackson laboratory mouse tumor biology database.

    PubMed

    Begley, Dale A; Sundberg, John P; Krupke, Debra M; Neuhauser, Steven B; Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Morse, Herbert C; Ward, Jerrold M

    2015-12-01

    Many mouse models have been created to study hematopoietic cancer types. There are over thirty hematopoietic tumor types and subtypes, both human and mouse, with various origins, characteristics and clinical prognoses. Determining the specific type of hematopoietic lesion produced in a mouse model and identifying mouse models that correspond to the human subtypes of these lesions has been a continuing challenge for the scientific community. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) is designed to facilitate use of mouse models of human cancer by providing detailed histopathologic and molecular information on lymphoma subtypes, including expertly annotated, on line, whole slide scans, and providing a repository for storing information on and querying these data for specific lymphoma models. PMID:26302176

  15. Human mammary carcinomas in nude rats--a new approach for investigating oxygen transport and substrate utilization in tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Vaupel, P; Kallinowski, F; Dave, S; Gabbert, H; Bastert, G

    1985-01-01

    A new model is presented for the study of oxygen supply and substrate utilization in human tumor tissue. In this approach human tumor material thrives in immune-deficient nude rats. The host chosen allows the continuous evaluation of all relevant parameters. From the data obtained so far it is concluded that this model is a valid tool in investigation of the metabolic status of human tumors.

  16. Multi-Platform, Multi-Site, Microarray-Based Human Tumor Classification

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Greg; Yang, Ivana V.; Boulware, David; Kwong, Ka Yin; Coppola, Domenico; Eschrich, Steven; Quackenbush, John; Yeatman, Timothy J.

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of gene expression profiling has resulted in the production of rich human data sets with potential for deciphering tumor diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. Here we demonstrate how artificial neural networks (ANNs) can be applied to two completely different microarray platforms (cDNA and oligonucleotide), or a combination of both, to build tumor classifiers capable of deciphering the identity of most human cancers. First, 78 tumors representing eight different types of histologically similar adenocarcinoma, were evaluated with a 32k cDNA microarray and correctly classified by a cDNA-based ANN, using independent training and test sets, with a mean accuracy of 83%. To expand our approach, oligonucleotide data derived from six independent performance sites, representing 463 tumors and 21 tumor types, were assembled, normalized, and scaled. An oligonucleotide-based ANN, trained on a random fraction of the tumors (n = 343), was 88% accurate in predicting known pathological origin of the remaining fraction of tumors (n = 120) not exposed to the training algorithm. Finally, a mixed-platform classifier using a combination of both cDNA and oligonucleotide microarray data from seven performance sites, normalized and scaled from a large and diverse tumor set (n = 539), produced similar results (85% accuracy) on independent test sets. Further validation of our classifiers was achieved by accurately (84%) predicting the known primary site of origin for an independent set of metastatic lesions (n = 50), resected from brain, lung, and liver, potentially addressing the vexing classification problems imposed by unknown primary cancers. These cDNA- and oligonucleotide-based classifiers provide a first proof of principle that data derived from multiple platforms and performance sites can be exploited to build multi-tissue tumor classifiers. PMID:14695313

  17. Expression and precursor processing of neuropeptide Y in human pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma tumors.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, M M; Schwartz, T W

    1989-12-15

    The expression of the potent vasoactive peptide neuropeptide Y (NPY) was studied in 16 clinically and/or histologically diagnosed human pheochromocytomas and 3 human neuroblastoma tumors. All tumors contained NPY in concentrations ranging from 21 pmol/g of tissue, similar to that found in normal adrenal tissue, to 91,000 pmol/g (median, 1,700 pmol/g). Three control tumors of Cushing's type did not contain NPY. An almost total proteolytic processing of pro-NPY to normal NPY was observed in the tumors (median, 93%; range, 72-100%). A positive correlation between the processing efficiency and the NPY content was also observed. The small amount of pro-NPY found in the tumors was characterized by "in vitro conversion" with endoproteinase Lys-C. In the tumor extracts, the majority of the NPY immunoreactivity, corresponding in size to the NPY standard, also behaved like synthetic NPY by high performance liquid chromatography and isoelectric focusing. As assessed by both its elution position in isoelectric focusing and its reaction with an antiserum specific for the COOH-terminal amidated sequence, the peptide produced by the tumors was found to be efficiently amidated, a modification which is essential for the biological activity of NPY. It is concluded that although only a subset of chromaffin cells express NPY, a very high number of pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas produce correctly amidated and thus biologically active NPY in large amounts, and that this is of potential importance for tumor-related cardiovascular symptoms and for autocrine stimulation of tumor cells.

  18. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp.) are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Methods Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 oC for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231) and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A). Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. Results More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 oC hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil treatment. Boswellia sacra

  19. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts express pro-inflammatory factors in human breast and ovarian tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Erez, Neta; Glanz, Sarah; Raz, Yael; Avivi, Camilla; Barshack, Iris

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express pro-inflammatory factors. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors correlates with tumor invasiveness. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors is associated with NF-κb activation in CAFs. -- Abstract: Inflammation has been established in recent years as a hallmark of cancer. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) support tumorigenesis by stimulating angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We previously demonstrated that CAFs also mediate tumor-enhancing inflammation in a mouse model of skin carcinoma. Breast and ovarian carcinomas are amongst the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in women and cancer-related inflammation is linked with both these tumor types. However, the role of CAFs in mediating inflammation in these malignancies remains obscure. Here we show that CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express high levels of the pro-inflammatory factors IL-6, COX-2 and CXCL1, previously identified to be part of a CAF pro-inflammatory gene signature. Moreover, we show that both pro-inflammatory signaling by CAFs and leukocyte infiltration of tumors are enhanced in invasive ductal carcinoma as compared with ductal carcinoma in situ. The pro-inflammatory genes expressed by CAFs are known NF-κB targets and we show that NF-κB is up-regulated in breast and ovarian CAFs. Our data imply that CAFs mediate tumor-promoting inflammation in human breast and ovarian tumors and thus may be an attractive target for stromal-directed therapeutics.

  20. Survivin, a novel target of the Hedgehog/GLI signaling pathway in human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Vlčková, K; Ondrušová, L; Vachtenheim, J; Réda, J; Dundr, P; Zadinová, M; Žáková, P; Poučková, P

    2016-01-01

    Survivin, an important antiapoptotic protein, is expressed in tumors, whereas in normal tissues the expression of this protein is extremely low, defining a role for survivin as a cancer gene. Survivin exhibits multifunctional activity in tumor cells. However, why survivin expression is sharply and invariably restricted to tumor tissue remains unclear. Here, we identified 11 putative consensus binding sites for GLI transcription factors in the survivin promoter and characterized the promoter activity. Inhibitors of the Hedgehog/GLI pathway, cyclopamine and GANT61, decreased the promoter activity in reporter assays. ΔNGLI2 (which lacks the repressor domain) was the most potent vector in activating the survivin promoter-reporter. Moreover, GANT61, a GLI1/2 inhibitor, repressed endogenous survivin protein and mRNA expression in most cells across a large panel of tumor cell lines. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed GLI2 binding to the survivin promoter. The ectopic GLI2-evoked expression of endogenous survivin was observed in normal human fibroblasts. GANT61 decreased survivin level in nude mice tumors, mimicking the activity of GANT61 in cultured cells. The immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence of human tumors revealed a correlation between the tissue regions showing high GLI2 and survivin positivity. Thus, these results demonstrated that survivin is a classical transcriptional target of GLI2, a Hedgehog pathway signaling effector. This potentially reflects the high expression of survivin in human tumor cells. As the Hedgehog pathway is upregulated in virtually all types of cancer cells, these findings substantially contribute to the explanation of uniform survivin expression in tumors as a potential target for the development of a more effective treatment of cancers through the inhibition of GLI2 to restrain survivin activity. PMID:26775700

  1. Is IGSF1 involved in human pituitary tumor formation?

    PubMed

    Faucz, Fabio R; Horvath, Anelia D; Azevedo, Monalisa F; Levy, Isaac; Bak, Beata; Wang, Ying; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Gourgari, Evgenia; Manning, Allison D; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Lodish, Maya; Hofman, Paul; Anderson, Yvonne C; Holdaway, Ian; Oldfield, Edward; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nesterova, Maria; Biermasz, Nienke R; Wit, Jan M; Bernard, Daniel J; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-02-01

    IGSF1 is a membrane glycoprotein highly expressed in the anterior pituitary. Pathogenic mutations in the IGSF1 gene (on Xq26.2) are associated with X-linked central hypothyroidism and testicular enlargement in males. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IGSF1 is involved in the development of pituitary tumors, especially those that produce growth hormone (GH). IGSF1 was sequenced in 21 patients with gigantism or acromegaly and 92 healthy individuals. Expression studies with a candidate pathogenic IGSF1 variant were carried out in transfected cells and immunohistochemistry for IGSF1 was performed in the sections of GH-producing adenomas, familial somatomammotroph hyperplasia, and in normal pituitary. We identified the sequence variant p.N604T, which in silico analysis suggested could affect IGSF1 function, in two male patients and one female with somatomammotroph hyperplasia from the same family. Of 60 female controls, two carried the same variant and seven were heterozygous for other variants. Immunohistochemistry showed increased IGSF1 staining in the GH-producing tumor from the patient with the IGSF1 p.N604T variant compared with a GH-producing adenoma from a patient negative for any IGSF1 variants and with normal control pituitary tissue. The IGSF1 gene appears polymorphic in the general population. A potentially pathogenic variant identified in the germline of three patients with gigantism from the same family (segregating with the disease) was also detected in two healthy female controls. Variations in IGSF1 expression in pituitary tissue in patients with or without IGSF1 germline mutations point to the need for further studies of IGSF1 action in pituitary adenoma formation.

  2. Is IGSF1 involved in human pituitary tumor formation?

    PubMed Central

    Faucz, Fabio R.; Horvath, Anelia D.; Azevedo, Monalisa F.; Levy, Isaac; Bak, Beata; Wang, Ying; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Gourgari, Evgenia; Manning, Allison D.; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Lodish, Maya; Hofman, Paul; Anderson, Yvonne C; Holdaway, Ian; Oldfield, Edward; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nesterova, Maria; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Wit, Jan M.; Bernard, Daniel J.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2014-01-01

    IGSF1 is a membrane glycoprotein highly expressed in the anterior pituitary. Pathogenic mutations in the IGSF1 gene (on Xq26.2) are associated with X-linked central hypothyroidism and testicular enlargement in males. In this study we tested the hypothesis that IGSF1 is involved in the development of pituitary tumors, especially those that produce growth hormone (GH). IGSF1 was sequenced in 21 patients with gigantism or acromegaly and 92 healthy individuals. Expression studies with a candidate pathogenic IGSF1 variant were carried out in transfected cells and immunohistochemistry for IGSF1 was performed in sections from GH-producing adenomas, familial somatomammotroph hyperplasia and in normal pituitary. In two male patients, and in one female, with somatomammotroph hyperplasia from the same family, we identified the sequence variant p.N604T, which in silico analysis suggested could affect IGSF1 function. Of 60 female controls, two carried the same variant, and seven were heterozygous for other variants. Immunohistochemistry showed increase IGSF1 staining in the GH-producing tumor from the patient with the IGSF1 p.N604T variant compared to a GH-producing adenoma from a patient negative for any IGSF1 variants and to normal control pituitary tissue. The IGSF1 gene appears polymorphic in the general population. A potentially pathogenic variant identified in the germline of three patients with gigantism from the same family (segregating with the disease) was also detected in two healthy female controls. Variations in IGSF1 expression in pituitary tissue in patients with or without IGSF1 germline mutations point to the need for further studies of IGSF1 action in pituitary adenoma formation. PMID:25527509

  3. Is IGSF1 involved in human pituitary tumor formation?

    PubMed

    Faucz, Fabio R; Horvath, Anelia D; Azevedo, Monalisa F; Levy, Isaac; Bak, Beata; Wang, Ying; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Gourgari, Evgenia; Manning, Allison D; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Lodish, Maya; Hofman, Paul; Anderson, Yvonne C; Holdaway, Ian; Oldfield, Edward; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nesterova, Maria; Biermasz, Nienke R; Wit, Jan M; Bernard, Daniel J; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-02-01

    IGSF1 is a membrane glycoprotein highly expressed in the anterior pituitary. Pathogenic mutations in the IGSF1 gene (on Xq26.2) are associated with X-linked central hypothyroidism and testicular enlargement in males. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IGSF1 is involved in the development of pituitary tumors, especially those that produce growth hormone (GH). IGSF1 was sequenced in 21 patients with gigantism or acromegaly and 92 healthy individuals. Expression studies with a candidate pathogenic IGSF1 variant were carried out in transfected cells and immunohistochemistry for IGSF1 was performed in the sections of GH-producing adenomas, familial somatomammotroph hyperplasia, and in normal pituitary. We identified the sequence variant p.N604T, which in silico analysis suggested could affect IGSF1 function, in two male patients and one female with somatomammotroph hyperplasia from the same family. Of 60 female controls, two carried the same variant and seven were heterozygous for other variants. Immunohistochemistry showed increased IGSF1 staining in the GH-producing tumor from the patient with the IGSF1 p.N604T variant compared with a GH-producing adenoma from a patient negative for any IGSF1 variants and with normal control pituitary tissue. The IGSF1 gene appears polymorphic in the general population. A potentially pathogenic variant identified in the germline of three patients with gigantism from the same family (segregating with the disease) was also detected in two healthy female controls. Variations in IGSF1 expression in pituitary tissue in patients with or without IGSF1 germline mutations point to the need for further studies of IGSF1 action in pituitary adenoma formation. PMID:25527509

  4. Immortalized Human Schwann Cell Lines Derived From Tumors of Schwannomatosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ostrow, Kimberly Laskie; Donaldson, Katelyn; Blakeley, Jaishri; Belzberg, Allan; Hoke, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomatosis, a rare form of neurofibromatosis, is characterized predominantly by multiple, often painful, schwannomas throughout the peripheral nervous system. The current standard of care for schwannomatosis is surgical resection. A major obstacle to schwannomatosis research is the lack of robust tumor cell lines. There is a great need for mechanistic and drug discovery studies of schwannomatosis, yet appropriate tools are not currently available. Schwannomatosis tumors are difficult to grow in culture as they survive only a few passages before senescence. Our lab has extensive experience in establishing primary and immortalized human Schwann cell cultures from normal tissue that retain their phenotypes after immortalization. Therefore we took on the challenge of creating immortalized human Schwann cell lines derived from tumors from schwannomatosis patients. We have established and fully characterized 2 schwannomatosis cell lines from 2 separate patients using SV40 virus large T antigen. One patient reported pain and the other did not. The schwannomatosis cell lines were stained with S100B antibodies to confirm Schwann cell identity. The schwannomatosis cells also expressed the Schwann cell markers, p75NTR, S100B, and NGF after multiple passages. Cell morphology was retained following multiple passaging and freeze/ thaw cycles. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to compare the cell lines with their respective parent tumors. No differences in key genes were detected, with the exception that several cell cycle regulators were upregulated in the schwannomatosis cell lines when compared to their parent tumors. This upregulation was apparently a product of cell culturing, as the schwannomatosis cells exhibited the same expression pattern of cell cycle regulatory genes as normal primary human Schwann cells. Cell growth was also similar between normal primary and immortalized tumor cells in culture. Accurate cell lines derived directly from human tumors

  5. Immunobiology of human mucin 1 in a preclinical ovarian tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Budiu, RA; Elishaev, E; Brozick, J; Lee, M; Edwards, RP; Kalinski, P; Vlad, AM

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is an aggressive malignancy, with a low 5-year median survival. Continued improvement on the development of more effective therapies depends in part on the availability of adequate preclinical models for in vivo testing of treatment efficacy. Mucin 1 (MUC1) glycoprotein is a tumor-associated antigen overexpressed in ovarian cancer cells, making it a potential target for immune therapy. To create a preclinical mouse model for MUC1-positive ovarian tumors, we generated triple transgenic (Tg) mice that heterozygously express human MUC1+/− as a transgene, and carry the conditional K-rasG12D oncoallele (loxP-Stop-loxP-K-rasG12D/+) and the floxed Pten gene (Pten/loxP/loxP). Injection of Cre recombinase-encoding adenovirus (AdCre) in the ovarian bursa of triple (MUC1KrasPten) Tg mice triggers ovarian tumors that, in analogy to human ovarian cancer, express strongly elevated MUC1 levels. The tumors metastasize loco-regionally and are accompanied by high serum MUC1, closely mimicking the human disease. Compared with the KrasPten mice with tumors, the MUC1KrasPten mice show increased loco-regional metastasis and augmented accumulation of CD4+Foxp3+ immune-suppressive regulatory T cells. Vaccination of MUC1KrasPten mice with type 1 polarized dendritic cells (DC1) loaded with a MUC1 peptide (DC1–MUC1) can circumvent tumor-mediated immune suppression in the host, activate multiple immune effector genes and effectively prolong survival. Our studies report the first human MUC1-expressing, orthotopic ovarian tumor model, reveal novel MUC1 functions in ovarian cancer biology and demonstrate its suitability as a target for immune-based therapies. PMID:22964632

  6. Squalamine treatment of human tumors in nu/nu mice enhances platinum-based chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Williams, J I; Weitman, S; Gonzalez, C M; Jundt, C H; Marty, J; Stringer, S D; Holroyd, K J; Mclane, M P; Chen, Q; Zasloff, M; Von Hoff, D D

    2001-03-01

    Squalamine, an antiangiogenic aminosterol, is presently undergoing Phase II clinical trials in cancer patients. To broaden our understanding of the clinical potential for squalamine, this agent was evaluated in nu/nu mouse xenograft models using the chemoresistant MV-522 human non-small cell lung carcinoma and the SD human neuroblastoma lines. Squalamine was studied alone and in combination with either cisplatin or paclitaxel plus carboplatin. Squalamine alone produced a modest MV-522 tumor growth inhibition (TGI) and yielded a TGI with cisplatin that was better than cisplatin alone. Squalamine also significantly enhanced the activity of paclitaxel/carboplatin combination therapy in the MV-522 tumor model. Squalamine similarly improved the effectiveness of cisplatin in producing TGI when screened against the SD human neuroblastoma xenograft. Xenograft tumor shrinkage was seen for the MV-522 tumor in combination treatments including squalamine, whereas no tumor shrinkage was seen when squalamine was omitted from the treatment regimen. To gain a greater understanding of the mechanism by which squalamine inhibited tumor growth in the xenograft studies, in vitro experiments were carried out with vascular endothelial growth factor-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture exposed to squalamine. Squalamine treatment was found to retard two cellular events necessary for angiogenesis, inducing disorganization of F-actin stress fibers and causing a concomitant reduction of detectable cell the surface molecular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin). We propose that the augmentation by squalamine of cytotoxicity from platinum-based therapies is attributable to interference by squalamine with the ability of stimuli to promote endothelial cell movement and cell-cell communication necessary for growth of new blood vessels in xenografts after chemotherapeutic injury to the tumor. PMID:11297269

  7. Cancer stem cells from human breast tumors are involved in spontaneous metastases in orthotopic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiping; Patel, Manishkumar R.; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Patsialou, Antonia; Qian, Dalong; Lin, Jiahui; Wen, Susanna; Chang, Ya-Fang; Bachmann, Michael H.; Shimono, Yohei; Dalerba, Piero; Adorno, Maddalena; Lobo, Neethan; Bueno, Janet; Dirbas, Frederick M.; Goswami, Sumanta; Somlo, George; Condeelis, John; Contag, Christopher H.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Clarke, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the role of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in metastasis, we generated human-in-mouse breast cancer orthotopic models using patient tumor specimens, labeled with optical reporter fusion genes. These models recapitulate human cancer features not captured with previous models, including spontaneous metastasis in particular, and provide a useful platform for studies of breast tumor initiation and progression. With noninvasive imaging approaches, as few as 10 cells of stably labeled BCSCs could be tracked in vivo, enabling studies of early tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis. These advances in BCSC imaging revealed that CD44+ cells from both primary tumors and lung metastases are highly enriched for tumor-initiating cells. Our metastatic cancer models, combined with noninvasive imaging techniques, constitute an integrated approach that could be applied to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the dissemination of metastatic CSCs (MCSCs) and to explore therapeutic strategies targeting MCSCs in general or to evaluate individual patient tumor cells and predict response to therapy. PMID:20921380