Science.gov

Sample records for human tumoral myeloid

  1. Human Tumor-Infiltrating Myeloid Cells: Phenotypic and Functional Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Louise A.; Doherty, Glen A.; Sheahan, Kieran; Ryan, Elizabeth J.

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of human tumor-resident myeloid cells is, for the most part, based on a large body of work in murine models or studies enumerating myeloid cells in patient tumor samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC). This has led to the establishment of the theory that, by and large, tumor-resident myeloid cells are either “protumor” M2 macrophages or myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). This concept has accelerated our understanding of myeloid cells in tumor progression and enabled the elucidation of many key regulatory mechanisms involved in cell recruitment, polarization, and activation. On the other hand, this paradigm does not embrace the complexity of the tumor-resident myeloid cell phenotype (IHC can only measure 1 or 2 markers per sample) and their possible divergent function in the hostile tumor microenvironment. Here, we examine the criteria that define human tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell subsets and provide a comprehensive and critical review of human myeloid cell nomenclature in cancer. We also highlight new evidence characterizing their contribution to cancer pathogenesis based on evidence derived from clinical studies drawing comparisons with murine studies where necessary. We then review the mechanisms in which myeloid cells are regulated by tumors in humans and how these are being targeted therapeutically. PMID:28220123

  2. Vav promotes differentiation of human tumoral myeloid precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Bertagnolo, Valeria; Brugnoli, Federica; Mischiati, Carlo; Sereni, Alessia; Bavelloni, Alberto; Carini, Cinzia; Capitani, Silvano . E-mail: cps@unife.it

    2005-05-15

    Vav is one of the genetic markers that correlate with the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. In T and B cells, it appears crucial for both development and functions, while, in non-lymphoid hematopoietic cells, Vav seems not involved in cell maturation, but rather in the response of mature cells to agonist-dependent proliferation and phagocytosis. We have previously demonstrated that the amount and the tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav are up-regulated in both whole cells and nuclei of tumoral promyelocytes induced to granulocytic maturation by ATRA and that tyrosine-phosphorylated Vav does not display any ATRA-induced GEF activity but contributes to the regulation of PI 3-K activity. In this study, we report that Vav accumulates in nuclei of ATRA-treated APL-derived cells and that the down-modulation of Vav prevents differentiation of tumoral promyelocytes, indicating that it is a key molecule in ATRA-dependent myeloid maturation. On the other hand, the overexpression of Vav induces an increased expression of surface markers of granulocytic differentiation without affecting the maturation-related changes of the nuclear morphology. Consistent with an effect of Vav on the transcriptional machinery, array profiling shows that the inhibition of the Syk-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav reduces the number of ATRA-induced genes. Our data support the unprecedented notion that Vav plays crucial functions in the maturation process of myeloid cells, and suggest that Vav can be regarded as a potential target for the therapeutic treatment of myeloproliferative disorders.

  3. Aberrant PGE₂ metabolism in bladder tumor microenvironment promotes immunosuppressive phenotype of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-07-01

    Bladder cancer is associated with enhanced inflammation and characterized by deregulated prostanoid metabolism. Here we examined prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) metabolism and myeloid cell subsets that infiltrate tumor tissue using two xenograft models of human bladder cancer. Human bladder tumor xenografts implanted into athymic nude mice become highly infiltrated with host CD11b myeloid cells of bone marrow origin. Fast growing SW780 bladder tumor xenografts were infiltrated with heterogeneous CD11b myeloid cell subsets including tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In contrast, majority of myeloid cells in tumor tissue from slow growing bladder cancer Urothel 11 displayed more immature, homogenous phenotype and comprised mostly MHC II class-negative myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We demonstrate that human bladder tumors secrete substantial amounts of PGE₂. Normal bone marrow myeloid cell progenitors cultured in the presence of a bladder tumor-conditioned medium, which is enriched for PGE₂, failed to differentiate into mature APCs and acquired phenotype of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells or inflammatory macrophages with up-regulated chemokine receptor CXCR4. Collectively our data demonstrate that enhanced cancer-related inflammation and deregulated PGE₂ metabolism in tumor microenvironment promote immunosuppressive pro-tumoral phenotype of myeloid cells in bladder cancer. These data also suggest that not only local tumor microenvironment but other factors such as stage of cancer disease and pace of tumor growth could markedly influence the phenotype, differentiation and immune function of myeloid cells in tumor tissue.

  4. Aberrant PGE2 metabolism in bladder tumor microenvironment promotes immunosuppressive phenotype of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer is associated with enhanced inflammation and characterized by deregulated prostanoid metabolism. Here we examined prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) metabolism and myeloid cell subsets that infiltrate tumor tissue using two xenograft models of human bladder cancer. Human bladder tumor xenografts implanted into athymic nude mice become highly infiltrated with host CD11b myeloid cells of bone marrow origin. Fast growing SW780 bladder tumor xenografts were infiltrated with heterogeneous CD11b myeloid cell subsets including tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In contrast, majority of myeloid cells in tumor tissue from slow growing bladder cancer Urothel 11 displayed more immature, homogenous phenotype and comprised mostly MHC II class-negative myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We demonstrate that human bladder tumors secrete substantial amounts of PGE2. Normal bone marrow myeloid cell progenitors cultured in the presence of a bladder tumor-conditioned medium, which is enriched for PGE2, failed to differentiate into mature APCs and acquired phenotype of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells or inflammatory macrophages with up-regulated chemokine receptor CXCR4. Collectively our data demonstrate that enhanced cancer-related inflammation and deregulated PGE2 metabolism in tumor microenvironment promote immunosuppressive pro-tumoral phenotype of myeloid cells in bladder cancer. These data also suggest that not only local tumor microenvironment but other factors such as stage of cancer disease and pace of tumor growth could markedly influence the phenotype, differentiation and immune function of myeloid cells in tumor tissue. PMID:21315786

  5. Elusive Identities and Overlapping Phenotypes of Proangiogenic Myeloid Cells in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Lewis, Claire E.; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, J. Martin; Ferrara, Napoleone; De Palma, Michele

    2010-01-01

    It is now established that bone marrow–derived myeloid cells regulate tumor angiogenesis. This was originally inferred from studies of human tumor biopsies in which a positive correlation was seen between the number of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, and tumor microvessel density. However, unequivocal evidence was only provided once mouse models were used to examine the effects on tumor angiogenesis by genetically or pharmacologically targeting myeloid cells. Since then, identifying the exact myeloid cell types involved in this process has proved challenging because of myeloid cell heterogeneity and the expression of overlapping phenotypic markers in tumors. As a result, investigators often simply refer to them now as “bone marrow–derived myeloid cells.” Here we review the findings of various attempts to phenotype the myeloid cells involved and discuss the therapeutic implications of correctly identifying—and thus being able to target—this proangiogenic force in tumors. PMID:20167863

  6. Elusive identities and overlapping phenotypes of proangiogenic myeloid cells in tumors.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Lewis, Claire E; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, J Martin; Ferrara, Napoleone; De Palma, Michele

    2010-04-01

    It is now established that bone marrow-derived myeloid cells regulate tumor angiogenesis. This was originally inferred from studies of human tumor biopsies in which a positive correlation was seen between the number of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, and tumor microvessel density. However, unequivocal evidence was only provided once mouse models were used to examine the effects on tumor angiogenesis by genetically or pharmacologically targeting myeloid cells. Since then, identifying the exact myeloid cell types involved in this process has proved challenging because of myeloid cell heterogeneity and the expression of overlapping phenotypic markers in tumors. As a result, investigators often simply refer to them now as "bone marrow-derived myeloid cells." Here we review the findings of various attempts to phenotype the myeloid cells involved and discuss the therapeutic implications of correctly identifying-and thus being able to target-this proangiogenic force in tumors.

  7. Myeloid Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment: Modulation of Tumor Angiogenesis and Tumor Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Michael C.; Varner, Judith A.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid cells are a heterogeneous population of bone marrow-derived cells that play a critical role during growth and metastasis of malignant tumors. Tumors exhibit significant myeloid cell infiltrates, which are actively recruited to the tumor microenvironment. Myeloid cells promote tumor growth by stimulating tumor angiogenesis, suppressing tumor immunity, and promoting metastasis to distinct sites. In this review, we discuss the role of myeloid cells in promoting tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, we describe a subset of myeloid cells with immunosuppressive activity (known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells). Finally, we will comment on the mechanisms regulating myeloid cell recruitment to the tumor microenvironment and on the potential of myeloid cells as new targets for cancer therapy. PMID:20490273

  8. Myeloid-derived cells are key targets of tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Aranda, Fernando; Berraondo, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations recruited by cancer cells to promote growth and metastasis. Among cells comprising the tumor stroma, myeloid-derived cells play pleiotropic roles in supporting tumorigenesis at distinct stages of tumor development. The tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell contingent is composed of mast cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Such cells are capable of evading the hostile tumor environment typically prone to immune cell destruction and can even promote angiogenesis, chronic inflammation, and invasion. This paper briefly summarizes the different myeloid-derived subsets that promote tumor development and the strategies that have been used to counteract the protumorigenic activity of these cells. These strategies include myeloid cell depletion, reduction of recruitment, and inactivation or remodeling of cell phenotype. Combining drugs designed to target tumor myeloid cells with immunotherapies that effectively trigger antitumor adaptive immune responses holds great promise in the development of novel cancer treatments. PMID:25050208

  9. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts.

  10. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts. PMID:26325033

  11. Protein kinase C-{beta}, fibronectin, {alpha}{sub 5}{beta}{sub 1}-integrin and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} are required for phorbol diester-induced apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cells in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Laouar, A.; Glesne, D.; Huberman, E.

    2001-12-01

    The human myeloid HL-60 cell line and its cell variant HL-525 were used to study signaling events leading to apoptosis induction by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC) enzymes. Unlike parental cells, HL-525 cells are PKC-{beta} deficient and resistant to PMA-induced apoptosis. These cells regain susceptibility to apoptosis induction after transfection with a PKC-{beta} expression vector. By using this vector and specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), it was established that PMA-induced apoptosis also called for an interaction between cell-surface {alpha}{sub 5}{beta}{sub 1}-integrin and its deposited ligand fibronectin (FN), which is downstream of PKC-{beta} activation. Experiments with mAbs, the PKC-{beta} vector, and exogenous FN revealed that the next step entailed an interaction between secreted tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and its type I receptor. By using a sphingomyelinase inhibitor, it was concluded that the subsequent step involved ceramide production. Moreover, a permeable ceramide was effective in inducing apoptosis in both HL-60 and HL-525 cells, and this induction was caspase-1 and/or -4 dependent because an inhibitor of these caspases abrogated the induced apoptosis. Based on these and related differentiation studies, we conclude that the above signaling events, the early ones in particular, are shared with PMA-induced macrophage differentiation in the HL-60 cells. It is likely that once these cells acquire their macrophage phenotype and perform their tasks, they become superfluous and are eliminated from the body by a self-triggered apoptotic process that involves our proposed signaling scheme.

  12. Oncolytic measles virus induces tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated cytotoxicity by human myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Achard, Carole; Guillerme, Jean-Baptiste; Bruni, Daniela; Boisgerault, Nicolas; Combredet, Chantal; Tangy, Frédéric; Jouvenet, Nolwenn; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Attenuated measles virus (MV) is currently being evaluated in clinical trials as an oncolytic therapeutic agent. Originally used for its lytic activity against tumor cells, it is now admitted that the effectiveness of MV also lies in its ability to initiate antitumor immune responses through the activation of dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we investigated the capacity of oncolytic MV to convert human blood myeloid CD1c+ DCs and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) into cytotoxic effectors. We found that MV induces the expression of the cytotoxic protein TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) on the surface of DCs. We demonstrate that the secretion of interferon-α (IFN-α) by DCs in response to MV is responsible for this TRAIL expression. Several types of PRRs (pattern recognition receptors) have been implicated in MV genome recognition, including RLRs (RIG-I-like receptors) and TLRs (Toll-like receptors). We showed that CD1c+ DCs secrete modest amounts of IFN-α and express TRAIL in an RLR-dependent manner upon exposure to MV. In pDCs, MV is recognized by RLRs and also by TLR7, leading to the secretion of high amounts of IFN-α and TRAIL expression. Finally, we showed that MV-stimulated DCs induce TRAIL-mediated cell death of Jurkat cells, confirming their acquisition of cytotoxic functions. Our results demonstrate that MV can activate cytotoxic myeloid CD1c+ DCs and pDCs, which may participate to the antitumor immune response. PMID:28197384

  13. Myeloid heme oxygenase-1 promotes metastatic tumor colonization in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng-Huei; Chiang, Ming-Tsai; Chang, Po-Chiao; Chau, Lee-Young

    2015-03-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a heme degradation enzyme with antioxidant and immune-modulatory functions. HO-1 promotes tumorigenesis by enhancing tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Whether HO-1 has an effect on cancer progression through stromal compartments is less clear. Here we show that the growth of tumor engrafted subcutaneously in syngeneic mice was not affected by host HO-1 expression. However, lung metastasis arisen from subcutaneous tumor or circulating tumor cells was significantly reduced in HO-1(+/-) mice comparing to wild type (WT) mice. The reduced lung metastasis was also observed in B6 mice bearing HO-1(+/-) bone marrow as comparing to WT chimeras, indicating that HO-1 expression in hematopoietic cells impacts tumor colonization at the metastatic site. Further experiments demonstrated that the numbers of myeloid cells recruited to pulmonary premetastatic niches and metastatic loci were significantly lower in HO-1(+/-) mice than in WT mice. Likewise, the extents of tumor cell extravasation and colonization at the metastatic loci in the early phase of metastasis were significantly lower in HO-1(+/-) mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that HO-1 impacted chemoattractant-induced myeloid cell migration by modulating p38 kinase signaling. Moreover, myeloid HO-1-induced expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-10 promoted tumor cell transendothelial migration and STAT3 activation in vitro. These data support a pathological role of myeloid HO-1 in metastasis and suggest a possibility of targeting myeloid HO-1 for cancer treatment.

  14. Myeloid Cells as Targets for Therapy in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cotechini, Tiziana; Medler, Terry R.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that cancer development ensues based on reciprocal interactions between genomically altered neoplastic cells and diverse populations of recruited “host” cells co-opted to support malignant progression. Among the host cells recruited into tumor microenvironments, several subtypes of myeloid cells, including macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells, and granulocytes contribute to tumor development by providing tumor-promoting factors as well as a spectrum of molecules that suppress cytotoxic activities of T lymphocytes. Based on compelling preclinical data revealing that inhibition of critical myeloid-based programs leads to tumor suppression, novel immune-based therapies and approaches are now entering the clinic for evaluation. This review discusses mechanisms underlying protumorigenic programming of myeloid cells and discusses how targeting of these has potential to attenuate solid tumor progression via the induction and of mobilization CD8+ cytotoxic T cell immunity. PMID:26222088

  15. Tumor Expression of CD200 Inhibits IL-10 Production by Tumor-Associated Myeloid Cells and Prevents Tumor Immune Evasion of CTL Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lixin; Liu, Jin-Qing; Talebian, Fatemeh; El-Omrani, Hani Y.; Khattabi, Mazin; Yu, Li; Bai, Xue-Feng

    2010-01-01

    CD200 is a cell-surface glycoprotein that functions through interaction with the CD200 receptor (CD200R) on myeloid lineage cells to regulate myeloid cell functions. Expression of CD200 has been implicated in multiple types of human cancer, however the impact of tumor expression of CD200 on tumor immunity remains poorly understood. To evaluate this issue, we generated CD200-positive mouse plasmacytoma J558 and mastocytoma P815 cells. We found that established CD200-positive tumors were often completely rejected by adoptively transferred CTL without tumor recurrence; in contrast, CD200-negative tumors were initially rejected by adoptively transferred CTL but the majority of tumors recurred. Tumor expression of CD200 significantly inhibited suppressive activity and IL-10 production by tumor-associated myeloid cells (TAMC), and as a result, more CTL accumulated in the tumor and exhibited a greater capacity to produce IFN-γ in CD200-positive tumors than in CD200-negative tumors. Neutralization of IL-10 significantly inhibited the suppressor activity of TAMC, and IL-10-deficiency allowed TAMC to kill cancer cells and their antigenic variants, which prevented tumor recurrence during CTL therapy. Thus, tumor expression of CD200 prevents tumor recurrence via inhibiting IL-10 production by TAMC. PMID:20662098

  16. Tumor-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous, immune-suppressive leukocyte population that develops systemically and infiltrates tumors. MDSCs can restrain the immune response through different mechanisms including essential metabolite consumption, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production, as well as display of inhibitory surface molecules that alter T-cell trafficking and viability. Moreover, MDSCs play a role in tumor progression, acting directly on tumor cells and promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. Many biological and pharmaceutical drugs affect MDSC expansion and functions in preclinical tumor models and patients, often reversing host immune dysfunctions and allowing a more effective tumor immunotherapy.

  17. Pro-Tumoral Inflammatory Myeloid Cells as Emerging Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Szebeni, Gabor J.; Vizler, Csaba; Nagy, Lajos I.; Kitajka, Klara; Puskas, Laszlo G.

    2016-01-01

    Since the observation of Virchow, it has long been known that the tumor microenvironment constitutes the soil for the infiltration of inflammatory cells and for the release of inflammatory mediators. Under certain circumstances, inflammation remains unresolved and promotes cancer development. Here, we review some of these indisputable experimental and clinical evidences of cancer related smouldering inflammation. The most common myeloid infiltrate in solid tumors is composed of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). These cells promote tumor growth by several mechanisms, including their inherent immunosuppressive activity, promotion of neoangiogenesis, mediation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and alteration of cellular metabolism. The pro-tumoral functions of TAMs and MDSCs are further enhanced by their cross-talk offering a myriad of potential anti-cancer therapeutic targets. We highlight these main pro-tumoral mechanisms of myeloid cells and give a general overview of their phenotypical and functional diversity, offering examples of possible therapeutic targets. Pharmacological targeting of inflammatory cells and molecular mediators may result in therapies improving patient condition and prognosis. Here, we review experimental and clinical findings on cancer-related inflammation with a major focus on creating an inventory of current small molecule-based therapeutic interventions targeting cancer-related inflammatory cells: TAMs and MDSCs. PMID:27886105

  18. Primary cerebellar extramedullary myeloid cell tumor mimicking oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Ho, D M; Wong, T T; Guo, W Y; Chang, K P; Yen, S H

    1997-10-01

    Extramedullary myeloid cell tumors (EMCTs) are tumors consisting of immature cells of the myeloid series that occur outside the bone marrow. Most of them are associated with acute myelogenous leukemia or other myeloproliferative disorders, and a small number occur as primary lesions, i.e., are not associated with hematological disorders. Occurrence inside the cranium is rare, and there has been only one case of primary EMCT involving the cerebellum reported in the literature. The case we report here is a blastic EMCT occurring in the cerebellum of a 3-year-old boy who had no signs of leukemia or any hematological disorder throughout the entire course. The cerebellar tumor was at first misdiagnosed as an "oligodendroglioma" because of the uniformity and "fried egg" artifact of the tumor cells. The tumor disappeared during chemotherapy consisting of 12 treatments. However, it recurred and metastasized to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shortly after the therapy was completed. A diagnosis of EMCT was suspected because of the presence of immature myeloid cells in the CSF, and was confirmed by anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-lysozyme immunoreactivity of the cerebellar tumor. The patient succumbed 1 year and 3 months after the first presentation of the disease.

  19. Tumor STAT1 transcription factor activity enhances breast tumor growth and immune suppression mediated by myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Hix, Laura M; Karavitis, John; Khan, Mohammad W; Shi, Yihui H; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Zhang, Ming

    2013-04-26

    Previous studies had implicated the IFN-γ transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) as a tumor suppressor. However, accumulating evidence has correlated increased STAT1 activation with increased tumor progression in multiple types of cancer, including breast cancer. Indeed, we present evidence that tumor up-regulation of STAT1 activity in human and mouse mammary tumors correlates with increasing disease progression to invasive carcinoma. A microarray analysis comparing low aggressive TM40D and highly aggressive TM40D-MB mouse mammary carcinoma cells revealed significantly higher STAT1 activity in the TM40D-MB cells. Ectopic overexpression of constitutively active STAT1 in TM40D cells promoted mobilization of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and inhibition of antitumor T cells, resulting in aggressive tumor growth in tumor-transplanted, immunocompetent mice. Conversely, gene knockdown of STAT1 in the metastatic TM40D-MB cells reversed these events and attenuated tumor progression. Importantly, we demonstrate that in human breast cancer, the presence of tumor STAT1 activity and tumor-recruited CD33(+) myeloid cells correlates with increasing disease progression from ductal carcinoma in situ to invasive carcinoma. We conclude that STAT1 activity in breast cancer cells is responsible for shaping an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, and inhibiting STAT1 activity is a promising immune therapeutic approach.

  20. Sunitinib pretreatment improves tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte expansion by reduction in intratumoral content of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in human renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guislain, Aurelie; Gadiot, Jules; Kaiser, Andrew; Jordanova, Ekaterina S; Broeks, Annegien; Sanders, Joyce; van Boven, Hester; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Haanen, John B A G; Bex, Axel; Blank, Christian U

    2015-10-01

    Targeted therapy with sunitinib, pazopanib or everolimus has improved treatment outcome for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients (RCC). However, despite considerable efforts in sequential or combined modalities, durable remissions are rare. Immunotherapy like cytokine therapy with interleukin-2, T cell checkpoint blockade or adoptive T cell therapies can achieve long-term benefit and even cure. This raises the question of whether combining targeted therapy with immunotherapy could also be an effective treatment option for RCC patients. Sunitinib, one of the most frequently administered therapeutics in RCC patients has been implicated in impairing T cell activation and proliferation in vitro. In this work, we addressed whether this notion holds true for expansion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in sunitinib-treated patients. We compared resected primary RCC tumor material of patients pretreated with sunitinib with resection specimen from sunitinib-naïve patients. We found improved TIL expansion from sunitinib-pretreated tumor digests. These TIL products contained more PD-1 expressing TIL, while the regulatory T cell infiltration was not altered. The improved TIL expansion was associated with reduced intratumoral myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) content. Depletion of MDSCs from sunitinib-naïve RCC tissue-digest improved TIL expansion, proving the functional relevance of the MDSC alteration by sunitinib. Our in vivo results do not support previous in vitro observations of sunitinib inhibiting T cell function, but do provide a possible rationale for the combination of sunitinib with immunotherapy.

  1. Induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells by tumor exosomes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xiaoyu; Poliakov, Anton; Liu, Cunren; Liu, Yuelong; Deng, Zhong-bin; Wang, Jianhua; Cheng, Ziqiang; Shah, Spandan V; Wang, Gui-Jun; Zhang, Liming; Grizzle, William E; Mobley, Jim; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2009-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) promote tumor progression. The mechanisms of MDSC development during tumor growth remain unknown. Tumor exosomes (T-exosomes) have been implicated to play a role in immune regulation, however the role of exosomes in the induction of MDSCs is unclear. Our previous work demonstrated that exosomes isolated from tumor cells are taken up by bone marrow myeloid cells. Here, we extend those findings showing that exosomes isolated from T-exosomes switch the differentiation pathway of these myeloid cells to the MDSC pathway (CD11b(+)Gr-1(+)). The resulting cells exhibit MDSC phenotypic and functional characteristics including promotion of tumor growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that in vivo MDSC mediated promotion of tumor progression is dependent on T-exosome prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and TGF-beta molecules. T-exosomes can induce the accumulation of MDSCs expressing Cox2, IL-6, VEGF, and arginase-1. Antibodies against exosomal PGE2 and TGF-beta block the activity of these exosomes on MDSC induction and therefore attenuate MDSC-mediated tumor-promoting ability. Exosomal PGE2 and TGF-beta are enriched in T-exosomes when compared with exosomes isolated from the supernatants of cultured tumor cells (C-exosomes). The tumor microenvironment has an effect on the potency of T-exosome mediated induction of MDSCs by regulating the sorting and the amount of exosomal PGE2 and TGF-beta available. Together, these findings lend themselves to developing specific targetable therapeutic strategies to reduce or eliminate MDSC-induced immunosuppression and hence enhance host antitumor immunotherapy efficacy.

  2. The tumor microenvironment shapes lineage, transcriptional, and functional diversity of infiltrating myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Elpek, Kutlu G; Cremasco, Viviana; Shen, Hua; Harvey, Christopher J; Wucherpfennig, Kai W; Goldstein, Daniel R; Monach, Paul A; Turley, Shannon J

    2014-07-01

    Myeloid cells play important regulatory roles within the tumor environment by directly promoting tumor progression and modulating the function of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and as such, they represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. Although distinct subsets of tumor-associated myeloid cells have been identified, a broader analysis of the complete myeloid cell landscape within individual tumors and also across different tumor types has been lacking. By establishing the developmental and transcriptomic signatures of infiltrating myeloid cells from multiple primary tumors, we found that tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN), while present within all tumors analyzed, exhibited strikingly different frequencies, gene expression profiles, and functions across cancer types. We also evaluated the impact of anatomic location and circulating factors on the myeloid cell composition of tumors. The makeup of the myeloid compartment was determined by the tumor microenvironment rather than the anatomic location of tumor development or tumor-derived circulating factors. Protumorigenic and hypoxia-associated genes were enriched in TAMs and TANs compared with splenic myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Although all TANs had an altered expression pattern of secretory effector molecules, in each tumor type they exhibited a unique cytokine, chemokine, and associated receptor expression profile. One such molecule, haptoglobin, was uniquely expressed by 4T1 TANs and identified as a possible diagnostic biomarker for tumors characterized by the accumulation of myeloid cells. Thus, we have identified considerable cancer-specific diversity in the lineage, gene expression, and function of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells.

  3. Hyperforin Inhibits Akt1 Kinase Activity and Promotes Caspase-Mediated Apoptosis Involving Bad and Noxa Activation in Human Myeloid Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Merhi, Faten; Tang, Ruoping; Piedfer, Marion; Mathieu, Julie; Bombarda, Isabelle; Zaher, Murhaf; Kolb, Jean-Pierre; Billard, Christian; Bauvois, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Background The natural phloroglucinol hyperforin HF displays anti-inflammatory and anti-tumoral properties of potential pharmacological interest. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells abnormally proliferate and escape apoptosis. Herein, the effects and mechanisms of purified HF on AML cell dysfunction were investigated in AML cell lines defining distinct AML subfamilies and primary AML cells cultured ex vivo. Methodology and Results HF inhibited in a time- and concentration-dependent manner the growth of AML cell lines (U937, OCI-AML3, NB4, HL-60) by inducing apoptosis as evidenced by accumulation of sub-G1 population, phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation. HF also induced apoptosis in primary AML blasts, whereas normal blood cells were not affected. The apoptotic process in U937 cells was accompanied by downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, upregulation of pro-apoptotic Noxa, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, activation of procaspases and cleavage of the caspase substrate PARP-1. The general caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk and the caspase-9- and -3-specific inhibitors, but not caspase-8 inhibitor, significantly attenuated apoptosis. HF-mediated apoptosis was associated with dephosphorylation of active Akt1 (at Ser473) and Akt1 substrate Bad (at Ser136) which activates Bad pro-apoptotic function. HF supppressed the kinase activity of Akt1, and combined treatment with the allosteric Akt1 inhibitor Akt-I-VIII significantly enhanced apoptosis of U937 cells. Significance Our data provide new evidence that HF's pro-apoptotic effect in AML cells involved inhibition of Akt1 signaling, mitochondria and Bcl-2 members dysfunctions, and activation of procaspases -9/-3. Combined interruption of mitochondrial and Akt1 pathways by HF may have implications for AML treatment. PMID:21998731

  4. Tumor-induced immune dysfunctions caused by myeloid suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Bronte, V; Serafini, P; Apolloni, E; Zanovello, P

    2001-01-01

    In the late 1970s, several findings suggested that accessory cells distinct from lymphocytes might suppress immune reactivity in tumor-bearing hosts. Studies in animal models and patients later confirmed that cells driven to act as dominant immune suppressors by growing cancers could subvert the immune system. These cells have also been termed natural suppressors, a functional definition connoting their ability to hamper various T- and B-lymphocyte responses without prior activation and independently from antigen and MHC restriction. These properties were attributed to distinct cell populations. The phenotypic discrepancies, together with the lack of antigen specificity, have generated serious restraints to research on tumor-induced suppression. Recent evidence indicates that suppressor cells are closely related to immature myeloid precursors and can be found in several situations that can exert adverse effects on the immunotherapy of cancer. The present review is an attempt to address the nature and properties of immature myeloid suppressors and their relationship to dendritic cells and macrophages, with the aim of clarifying the complex network of tumor-induced, negative regulators of the immune system.

  5. Circulating and tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell subsets in patients with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Neuberger, Molly; Daurkin, Irina; Perrin, George Q; Algood, Chester; Dahm, Philipp; Rosser, Charles; Vieweg, Johannes; Gilbert, Scott M; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2012-03-01

    Both cancer-related inflammation and tumor-induced immune suppression are associated with expansion of myeloid cell subsets including myeloid-derived suppressor cells. However, little known regarding characteristics of myeloid cells in patients with bladder cancer. In this study, we analyzed myeloid cells from peripheral blood (PBMC) and tumor tissue that were collected from patients with superficial noninvasive and invasive urothelial carcinomas. Our results demonstrate that PBMC from bladder cancer patients contain two major CD11b myeloid cell subsets: granulocyte-type CD15(high) CD33(low) cells and monocyte-type CD15(low) CD33(high) cells. The number of circulating granulocytic but not monocytic myeloid cells in cancer patients was markedly increased when compared to healthy individuals. Both myeloid cell subsets from cancer patients were highly activated and produced substantial amounts of proinflammatory chemokines/cytokines including CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, G-CSF, IL-8 and IL-6. Granulocytic myeloid cells were able to inhibit in vitro T cell proliferation through induction of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells. Analysis of bladder cancer tissues revealed that tumors were infiltrated with monocyte-macrophage CD11b(+) HLA-DR(+) and granulocytic CD11b(+) CD15(+) HLA-DR(-) myeloid cells. Collectively, this study identifies myeloid cell subsets in patients with bladder cancer. We demonstrate that these highly activated inflammatory myeloid cells represent a source of multiple chemokines/cytokines and may contribute to inflammation and immune dysfunction in bladder cancer.

  6. Myeloid Leukemias and Virally Induced Lymphomas in Miniature Inbred Swine: Development of a Large Animal Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Matar, Abraham J; Huang, Christene A

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a large animal transplantable tumor model has limited the study of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of liquid cancers. Swine as a species provide a natural option based on their similarities with humans and their already extensive use in biomedical research. Specifically, the Massachusetts General Hospital miniature swine herd retains unique genetic characteristics that facilitate the study of hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation. Spontaneously arising liquid cancers in these swine, specifically myeloid leukemias and B cell lymphomas, closely resemble human malignancies. The ability to establish aggressive tumor cell lines in vitro from these naturally occurring malignancies makes a transplantable tumor model a close reality. Here, we discuss our experience with myeloid and lymphoid tumors in major histocompatibility characterized miniature swine and future approaches regarding the development of a large animal transplantable tumor model.

  7. Myeloid derived suppressor cells in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Greten, Tim F.; Manns, Michael P.; Korangy, Firouzeh

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been described as a heterogeneous cell population with potent immune suppressor function in mice. Limited data are available on MDSC in human diseases. Interpretation of these data is complicated by the fact that different markers have been used to analyze human MDSC subtypes in various clinical settings. Human MDSC are CD11b+, CD33+, HLA-DRneg/low and can be divided into granulocytic CD14− and monocytic CD14+ subtypes. Interleukin 4Rα, VEGFR, CD15 and CD66b have been suggested to be more specific markers for human MDSC, however these markers can only be found on some MDSC subsets. Until today the best marker for human MDSC remains their suppressor function, which can be either direct or indirect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Immune suppressor activity has been associated with high arginase 1 and iNOS activity as well as ROS production by MDSC. Not only in murine models, but even more importantly in patients with cancer, different drugs have been shown to either reverse the immune suppressor function of MDSC or directly target these cells. Systemic treatment with all-trans-retinoic acid has been shown to mature human MDSC and reverse their immune suppressor function. Alternatively, MDSC can be targeted by treatment with the multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib. In this review will provide a comprehensive summary of the recent literature on human MDSC. PMID:21237299

  8. The Emerging Understanding of Myeloid Cells as Partners and Targets in Tumor Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Broz, Miranda L.; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid cells are the most prominent amongst cells capable of presenting tumor-derived antigens to T cells and thereby maintaining the latter in an activated state. Myeloid populations of the tumor microenvironment prominently include monocytes and neutrophils (sometimes loosely grouped as myeloid-derived suppressor cells), macrophages and dendritic cells. While intratumoral myeloid populations, as a whole, have long been considered non-stimulatory or suppressive, it has only recently been appreciated that not all tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells are made equal. Because of advances in high-dimensional flow cytometry as well as more robust transcriptional profiling, we now also understand that the subsets of the tumor-myeloid compartment are far more diverse and notably even contain a rare population of stimulatory dendritic cells. As all of these myeloid populations represent major T-cell interacting partners for incoming tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes, understanding the distinctions in their lineage and function reveals and guides numerous therapeutic avenues targeting these antigen-presenting cells. In this Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads overview, we review the recent progress in this rapidly evolving field and advance the hypothesis that the antigen-presenting compartment within tumor microenvironments may contain significant numbers of potent allies to be leveraged for immune-based tumor clearance. PMID:25847968

  9. Loss of prolyl hydroxylase-2 in myeloid cells and T-lymphocytes impairs tumor development.

    PubMed

    Mamlouk, Soulafa; Kalucka, Joanna; Singh, Rashim Pal; Franke, Kristin; Muschter, Antje; Langer, Anika; Jakob, Christiane; Gassmann, Max; Baretton, Gustavo B; Wielockx, Ben

    2014-02-15

    The tumor microenvironment plays a pivotal role during cancer development and progression. The balance between suppressive and cytotoxic responses of the tumor immune microenvironment has been shown to have a direct effect on the final outcome in various human and experimental tumors. Recently, we demonstrated that the oxygen sensor HIF-prolyl hydroxylase-2 (PHD2) plays a detrimental role in tumor cells, stimulating systemic growth and metastasis in mice. In our current study, we show that the conditional ablation of PHD2 in the hematopoietic system also leads to reduced tumor volume, intriguingly generated by an imbalance between enhanced cell death and improved proliferation of tumor cells. This effect seems to rely on the overall downregulation of protumoral as well as antitumoral cytokines. Using different genetic approaches, we were able to confine this complex phenotype to the crosstalk of PHD2-deficient myeloid cells and T-lymphocytes. Taken together, our findings reveal a multifaceted role for PHD2 in several hematopoietic lineages during tumor development and might have important implications for the development of tumor therapies in the future.

  10. Oxidative stress regulates expression of VEGFR1 in myeloid cells: link to tumor-induced immune suppression in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Kübler, Hubert; Tseng, Timothy; Sakai, Yoshihisa; Su, Zhen; Kaliberov, Sergei; Heiser, Axel; Rosser, Charles; Dahm, Philip; Siemann, Dietmar; Vieweg, Johannes

    2008-07-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associates with overproduction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) due to the mutation/inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene. Herein we demonstrate that implantation of human RCC tumor cells into athymic nude mice promotes the appearance of VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1)/CD11b double-positive myeloid cells in peripheral blood. Avastin-mediated VEGF neutralization was capable of significantly reducing the numbers of circulating VEGFR1+ myeloid cells. Conversely, up-regulation of VEGFR1 by myeloid cells could also be achieved in vitro by coculturing bone marrow cells with RCC-conditioned medium or by short-term exposure of naive myeloid cells to oxidative stress. Treatment of myeloid cells with H2O2, lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal, or an inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase all resulted in increased expression of VEGFR1. Furthermore, after exposure to oxidative stress, myeloid cells acquire immunosuppressive features and become capable of inhibiting T cell proliferation. Data suggest that tumor-induced oxidative stress may promote both VEGFR1 up-regulation and immunosuppressive function in bone marrow-derived myeloid cells. Analysis of tumor tissue and peripheral blood from patients with metastatic RCC revealed that VEGFR1+ cells can be also found in cancer patients. Restoration of immunocompetence in metastatic RCC patients by pharmacological elimination of VEGFR1+ cells may have a significant impact on the therapeutic efficacy of cancer vaccines or other immune-based therapies.

  11. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell heterogeneity in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Solito, Samantha; Marigo, Ilaria; Pinton, Laura; Damuzzo, Vera; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    The dynamic interplay between cancer and host immune system often affects the process of myelopoiesis. As a consequence, tumor-derived factors sustain the accumulation and functional differentiation of myeloid cells, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which can interfere with T cell-mediated responses. Since both the phenotype and mechanisms of action of MDSCs appear to be tumor-dependent, it is important not only to determine the presence of all MDSC subsets in each cancer patient, but also which MDSC subsets have clinical relevance in each tumor environment. In this review, we describe the differences between MDSC populations expanded within different tumor contexts and evaluate the prognostic significance of MDSC expansion in peripheral blood and within tumor masses of neoplastic patients.

  12. Tumor Cell-Independent Estrogen Signaling Drives Disease Progression through Mobilization of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Svoronos, Nikolaos; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Allegrezza, Michael J; Rutkowski, Melanie R; Payne, Kyle K; Tesone, Amelia J; Nguyen, Jenny M; Curiel, Tyler J; Cadungog, Mark G; Singhal, Sunil; Eruslanov, Evgeniy B; Zhang, Paul; Tchou, Julia; Zhang, Rugang; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2017-01-01

    The role of estrogens in antitumor immunity remains poorly understood. Here, we show that estrogen signaling accelerates the progression of different estrogen-insensitive tumor models by contributing to deregulated myelopoiesis by both driving the mobilization of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and enhancing their intrinsic immunosuppressive activity in vivo Differences in tumor growth are dependent on blunted antitumor immunity and, correspondingly, disappear in immunodeficient hosts and upon MDSC depletion. Mechanistically, estrogen receptor alpha activates the STAT3 pathway in human and mouse bone marrow myeloid precursors by enhancing JAK2 and SRC activity. Therefore, estrogen signaling is a crucial mechanism underlying pathologic myelopoiesis in cancer. Our work suggests that new antiestrogen drugs that have no agonistic effects may have benefits in a wide range of cancers, independently of the expression of estrogen receptors in tumor cells, and may synergize with immunotherapies to significantly extend survival.

  13. MLL3 is a haploinsufficient 7q tumor suppressor in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Liu, Yu; Rappaport, Amy R; Kitzing, Thomas; Schultz, Nikolaus; Zhao, Zhen; Shroff, Aditya S; Dickins, Ross A; Vakoc, Christopher R; Bradner, James E; Stock, Wendy; LeBeau, Michelle M; Shannon, Kevin M; Kogan, Scott; Zuber, Johannes; Lowe, Scott W

    2014-05-12

    Recurring deletions of chromosome 7 and 7q [-7/del(7q)] occur in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and are associated with poor prognosis. However, the identity of functionally relevant tumor suppressors on 7q remains unclear. Using RNAi and CRISPR/Cas9 approaches, we show that an ∼50% reduction in gene dosage of the mixed lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3) gene, located on 7q36.1, cooperates with other events occurring in -7/del(7q) AMLs to promote leukemogenesis. Mll3 suppression impairs the differentiation of HSPC. Interestingly, Mll3-suppressed leukemias, like human -7/del(7q) AMLs, are refractory to conventional chemotherapy but sensitive to the BET inhibitor JQ1. Thus, our mouse model functionally validates MLL3 as a haploinsufficient 7q tumor suppressor and suggests a therapeutic option for this aggressive disease.

  14. Functional Alteration of Tumor-infiltrating Myeloid Cells in RNA Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Seya, Tsukasa; Shime, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Misako

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages, as well as dendritic cells (DCs), are derived from myeloid progenitor cells. Recent evidence suggests that tumor-infiltrating macrophages differ in many aspects from conventional tissue macrophages, including nature, function and markers. Tumors usually contain various myeloid lineage cells in their non-parenchymal environment. In immunotherapy for cancer, tumor cells and non-parenchymal cells are exposed to tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and tumor-cell-derived nucleic acids. In addition, a dsRNA mimic, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (polyI:C), exhibits strong adjuvant activity, which acts both on the immune system and tumor constituents. Herein we discuss the RNA recognition system and unique cellular output in tumor-associated myeloid cells in response to immunotherapy. We especially focus on the mechanism by which RNA adjuvant alters the tumor-supportive nature of tumor-infiltrated myeloid cells to those with tumoricidal activity. We discuss how RNA administration makes tumor cells collapse and its significance of evoking cell death signals in tumor cells and macrophages. This knowledge will be applicable to the development of an alternative immunotherapy for cancer.

  15. Cimetidine suppresses lung tumor growth in mice through proapoptosis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yisheng; Xu, Meng; Li, Xiao; Jia, Jinpeng; Fan, Kexing; Lai, Guoxiang

    2013-05-01

    Cimetidine, a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist, is known to inhibit the growth of several tumors in human and animals, however the mechanism of action underlying this effect remains largely unknown. Here, in the mice model of 3LL lung tumor, cimetidine showed significant inhibition of tumor growth. However, an in vitro study demonstrated that cimetidine showed no effect on proliferation, survival, migration and invasion of 3LL cells. We found that cimetidine reduced CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid derived-suppressive cell (MDSC) accumulation in spleen, blood and tumor tissue of tumor-bearing mice. In vitro coculture assay showed that cimetidine reversed MDSC-mediated T-cell suppression, and improved IFN-γ production. Further investigation demonstrated that the NO production and arginase I expression of MDSCs were reduced, and MDSCs prone to apoptosis by cimetidine treatment. However, MDSC differentiation was not affect by cimetidine. Importantly, although histamine H2 receptor was expressed in MDSC surface, histamine could not reverse the proapoptosis of cimetidine. Moreover, famotidine also did not have this capacity. We found that cimetidine could induce Fas and FasL expression in MDSC surface, and sequentially regulate caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway. Thus, these findings revealed a novel mechanism for cimetidine to inhibit tumor via modulation of MDSC apoptosis.

  16. Myeloid PTEN deficiency impairs tumor-immune surveillance via immune-checkpoint inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuttke, M.; Sahin, E.; Pisoni, J.; Percig, S.; Vogel, A.; Kraemmer, D.; Hanzl, L.; Brunner, J. S.; Paar, H.; Soukup, K.; Halfmann, A.; Dohnal, A. M.; Steiner, C. W.; Blüml, S.; Basilio, J.; Hochreiter, B.; Salzmann, M.; Hoesel, B.; Lametschwandtner, G.; Eferl, R.; Schmid, J. A.; Schabbauer, G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor–host interaction is determined by constant immune surveillance, characterized by tumor infiltration of myeloid and lymphoid cells. A malfunctioning or diverted immune response promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Recent advances had been made, by treating of certain tumor types, such as melanoma, with T-cell checkpoint inhibitors. This highlights the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between tumors and their environment, in particular myeloid and lymphoid cells. Our aim was to study the contribution of the myeloid PI3K/PTEN-signaling pathway in the regulation of tumor-immune surveillance in murine models of cancer. We made use of conditional PTEN-deficient mice, which exhibit sustained activation of the PI3K-signaling axis in a variety of myeloid cell subsets such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). In colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC), mice deficient in myeloid PTEN showed a markedly higher tumor burden and decreased survival. We attributed this observation to the increased presence of immune-modulatory conventional CD8α+ DCs in the spleen, whereas other relevant myeloid cell subsets were largely unaffected. Notably, we detected enhanced surface expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 on these DCs. As a consequence, tumoricidal T-cell responses were hampered or redirected. Taken together, our findings indicated an unanticipated role for the PI3K/PTEN-signaling axis in the functional regulation of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Our data pointed at potential, indirect, tumoricidal effects of subclass-specific PI3K inhibitors, which are currently under clinical investigation for treatment of tumors, via myeloid cell activation. PMID:27622019

  17. Haemophilus ducreyi partially activates human myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Banks, Keith E; Humphreys, Tricia L; Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Wilkes, David S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2007-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses to bacteria. How Haemophilus ducreyi, which causes genital ulcers and regional lymphadenitis, interacts with DC is unknown. H. ducreyi evades uptake by polymorphonuclear leukocyte and macrophage-like cell lines by secreting LspA1 and LspA2. Many H. ducreyi strains express cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), and recombinant CDT causes apoptosis of DC in vitro. Here, we examined interactions between DC and H. ducreyi 35000HP, which produces LspA1, LspA2, and CDT. In human volunteers infected with 35000HP, the ratio of myeloid DC to plasmacytoid DC was 2.8:1 in lesions, compared to a ratio of 1:1 in peripheral blood. Using myeloid DC derived from monocytes as surrogates for lesional DC, we found that DC infected with 35000HP remained as viable as uninfected DC for up to 48 h. Gentamicin protection and confocal microscopy assays demonstrated that DC ingested and killed 35000HP, but killing was incomplete at 48 h. The expression of LspA1 and LspA2 did not inhibit the uptake of H. ducreyi, despite inactivating Src kinases. Infection of DC with live 35000HP caused less cell surface marker activation than infection with heat-killed 35000HP and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and inhibited maturation by LPS. However, infection of DC with live bacteria caused the secretion of significantly higher levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha than infection with heat-killed bacteria and LPS. The survival of H. ducreyi in DC may provide a mechanism by which the organism traffics to lymph nodes. Partial activation of DC may abrogate the establishment of a full Th1 response and an environment that promotes phagocytosis.

  18. B7x and myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyungjun; Ohaegbulam, Kim C; Abadi, Yael M; Zang, Xingxing

    2013-01-01

    A new study demonstrates the tumorigenic functions of B7x and reveals a link between B7x and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) within the tumor microenvironment. We propose that the binding of B7x to a hitherto unidentified receptor on MDSCs may stimulate their proliferation and/or immunosuppressive functions, hence promoting tumor growth. PMID:24073367

  19. Pivotal Advance: Tumor-mediated induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and M2-polarized macrophages by altering intracellular PGE₂ catabolism in myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Ortiz, Javier; Vieweg, Johannes; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2010-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that tumor-infiltrated myeloid cells frequently up-regulate COX-2 expression and have enhanced PGE₂ metabolism. This may affect the maturation and immune function of tumor-infiltrated antigen-presenting cells. In vitro studies demonstrate that tumor-derived factors can skew GM-CSF-driven differentiation of T(h)1-oriented myeloid APCs into M2-oriented Ly6C(+)F4/80(+) MDSCs or Ly6C(-)F4/80(+) arginase-expressing macrophages. These changes enable myeloid cells to produce substantial amounts of IL-10, VEGF, and MIP-2. The tumor-mediated inhibition of APC differentiation was associated with the up-regulated expression of PGE₂-forming enzymes COX-2, mPGES1 in myeloid cells, and the simultaneous repression of PGE(2)-catabolizing enzyme 15-PGDH. The presence of tumor-derived factors also led to a reduced expression of PGT but promoted the up-regulation of MRP4, which works as a PGE₂ efflux receptor. Addition of COX-2 inhibitor to the BM cell cultures could prevent the tumor-induced skewing of myeloid cell differentiation, partially restoring cell phenotype and down-regulating the arginase expression in the myeloid APCs. Our study suggests that tumors impair the intracellular PGE(2) catabolism in myeloid cells through simultaneous stimulation of PGE(2)-forming enzymes and inhibition of PGE₂-degrading systems. This tumor-induced dichotomy drives the development of M2-oriented, arginase-expressing macrophages or the MDSC, which can be seen frequently among tumor-infiltrated myeloid cells.

  20. Targeting distinct tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells by inhibiting CSF-1 receptor: combating tumor evasion of antiangiogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Priceman, Saul J; Sung, James L; Shaposhnik, Zory; Burton, Jeremy B; Torres-Collado, Antoni X; Moughon, Diana L; Johnson, Mai; Lusis, Aldons J; Cohen, Donald A; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa; Wu, Lily

    2010-02-18

    Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells (TIMs) support tumor growth by promoting angiogenesis and suppressing antitumor immune responses. CSF-1 receptor (CSF1R) signaling is important for the recruitment of CD11b(+)F4/80(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and contributes to myeloid cell-mediated angiogenesis. However, the impact of the CSF1R signaling pathway on other TIM subsets, including CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), is unknown. Tumor-infiltrating MDSCs have also been shown to contribute to tumor angiogenesis and have recently been implicated in tumor resistance to antiangiogenic therapy, yet their precise involvement in these processes is not well understood. Here, we use the selective pharmacologic inhibitor of CSF1R signaling, GW2580, to demonstrate that CSF-1 regulates the tumor recruitment of CD11b(+)Gr-1(lo)Ly6C(hi) mononuclear MDSCs. Targeting these TIM subsets inhibits tumor angiogenesis associated with reduced expression of proangiogenic and immunosuppressive genes. Combination therapy using GW2580 with an anti-VEGFR-2 antibody synergistically suppresses tumor growth and severely impairs tumor angiogenesis along with reverting at least one TIM-mediated antiangiogenic compensatory mechanism involving MMP-9. These data highlight the importance of CSF1R signaling in the recruitment and function of distinct TIM subsets, including MDSCs, and validate the benefits of targeting CSF1R signaling in combination with antiangiogenic drugs for the treatment of solid cancers.

  1. Tumor-induced tolerance and immune suppression by myeloid derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Serafini, Paolo; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2008-04-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that the Achilles' heel of cancer immunotherapies is often the complex interplay of tumor-derived factors and deviant host properties, which involve a wide range of immune elements in the lymphoid and myeloid compartments. Regulatory lymphocytes, tumor-conditioned myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), tumor-associated macrophages, and dysfunctional and immature dendritic cells take part in a complex immunoregulatory network. Despite the fact that some mechanisms governing tumor-induced immune tolerance and suppression are starting to be better understood and their complexity dissected, little is known about the diachronic picture of immune tolerance. Based on observations of MDSCs, we present a time-structured and topologically consistent idea of tumor-dependent tolerance progression in tumor-bearing hosts.

  2. The nature of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are one of the major components of the tumor microenvironment. The main feature of these cells is their potent immune suppressive activity. MDSC are generated in the bone marrow, and in tumor-bearing hosts, migrate to peripheral lymphoid organs and the tumor to contribute to the formation of the tumor microenvironment. Recent findings have revealed differences in the function and fate of MDSC in the tumor and peripheral lymphoid organs. We review these findings here, and in this context we discuss the current understanding as to the nature of these differences, the underlying mechanisms, and their potential impact on the regulation of tumor progression. PMID:26858199

  3. Increased Levels of Circulating and Tumor-Infiltrating Granulocytic Myeloid Cells in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Toor, Salman M.; Syed Khaja, Azharuddin Sajid; El Salhat, Haytham; Bekdache, Omar; Kanbar, Jihad; Jaloudi, Mohammed; Elkord, Eyad

    2016-01-01

    Increased levels of myeloid cells, especially myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), have been reported to correlate with bad prognosis and reduced survival in cancer patients. However, limited data are available on their conclusive phenotypes and their correlation with clinical settings. The aim of this study was to investigate levels and phenotype of myeloid cells in peripheral blood and tumor microenvironment (TME) of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, compared to blood from healthy donors (HDs) and paired, adjacent non-tumor colon tissue. Flow cytometric analysis was performed to examine the expression of different myeloid markers in fresh peripheral blood samples from CRC patients and HDs, and tissue-infiltrating immune cells from CRC patients. We found significantly higher levels of cells expressing myeloid markers and lacking the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecule HLA-DR in blood and tumor of CRC patients. Further analysis revealed that these cells were granulocytic and expressed Arginase 1 indicative of their suppressive phenotype. These expanded cells could be neutrophils or granulocytic MDSCs, and we refer to them as granulocytic myeloid cells (GMCs) due to the phenotypical and functional overlap between these cell subsets. Interestingly, the expansion of peripheral GMCs correlated with higher stage and histological grade of cancer, thereby suggesting their role in cancer progression. Furthermore, an increase in CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR−CD14−CD15− immature myeloid cells was also observed in CRC tumor tissue. Our work shows that GMCs are expanded in circulation and TME of CRC patients, which provides further insights for developing immunotherapeutic approaches targeting these cell subsets to enhance antitumor immune and clinical responses. PMID:28008330

  4. ME-10TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT INFILTRATING MYELOID DERIVED SUPPRESSOR CELLS INHIBIT ANTI-TUMOR T CELL RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Neha; Ayala, Mariela; Li, Youping; Assi, Hikmat; Candolfi, Marianela; Dzaman, Marta; Lowenstein, Pedro; Castro, Maria

    2014-01-01

    MDSCs represent a population of immature myeloid cells at various stages of differentiation that inhibit anti-tumor T cell-mediated responses. We demonstrate the accumulation of MDSCs in GL26 induced glioma and B16 melanoma bearing mice. Absolute numbers of Ly-6G+ (Gr-1high) MDSCs showed a 200 fold increase within the tumor microenvironment (TME) 28 days post-tumor implantation. The numbers of Ly-6C+ (Gr-1low) MDSCs also showed a similar trend within the TME. While this massive influx of MDSCs was noted within intracranial tumors, MDSC levels did not increase in the dLNs, spleen or bone marrow (BM) of intracranial tumor bearing mice. MDSCs numbers were significantly elevated in the blood of GL26 intracranial tumor bearing mice at 28 days. Mice bearing B16 tumors in the flank showed a ∼5 fold increased influx of Ly-6G+ MDSCs while the Ly6C+ MDSCs increased marginally by 1.1 fold within the tumor mass. Levels of circulating MDSCs also increased by ∼10 fold, while the levels of splenic MDSCs did not change. While both Ly-6G+ and Ly6C+ MDSCs isolated from the brain TME of GL26 intracranial tumor bearing mice inhibited antigen-specific T cell proliferation, Ly6C+ MDSC were found to be more efficient. Ly6G+ or Ly6C+ MDSCs from the bone marrow of intracranial tumor bearing mice failed to suppress antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Splenic and bone marrow MDSCs from naïve mice also did not inhibit antigen-specific T cell proliferation suggesting that TME derived factors may activate MDSCs to exert their immune-suppressive properties. Microarray analysis of glioma cell lines showed elevated levels of CXCL1 mRNA and splenic MDSCs from GL26 tumor mice showed upregulation of the CXCR2 mRNA. Preliminary experiments indicate that CXCR2 signaling mediates MDSC chemotaxis. Overall, our data suggests that strategies that inhibit MDSC recruitment to the TME and/or block their activity could enhance the T cell mediated tumor clearance.

  5. Effect of tumor-derived cytokines and growth factors on differentiation and immune suppressive features of myeloid cells in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2006-01-01

    It is well established that cancers affect differentiation of dendritic cells and promote systemic expansion of immune suppressive immature myeloid cells. This phenomenon may represent a mechanism of tumor escape from immune attack and could have significant impact on tumor progression. In this review we discuss the role of different tumor-derived factors, which were implicated in abnormal myeloid cell differentiation. The role of reactive oxygen species as well as JAK/STAT signaling in mechanisms of the effects of tumor-derived factors on myeloid cells is also discussed. PMID:16983515

  6. Effect of tumor-derived cytokines and growth factors on differentiation and immune suppressive features of myeloid cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2006-09-01

    It is well established that cancers affect differentiation of dendritic cells and promote systemic expansion of immune suppressive immature myeloid cells. This phenomenon may represent a mechanism of tumor escape from immune attack and could have significant impact on tumor progression. In this review we discuss the role of different tumor-derived factors, which were implicated in abnormal myeloid cell differentiation. The role of reactive oxygen species as well as JAK/STAT signaling in mechanisms of the effects of tumor-derived factors on myeloid cells is also discussed.

  7. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Tumor-derived lactate and myeloid-derived suppressor cells: Linking metabolism to cancer immunology.

    PubMed

    Husain, Zaheed; Seth, Pankaj; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2013-11-01

    Many malignant cells produce increased amounts of lactate, which promotes the development of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs, lactate, and a low pH in the tumor microenvironment inhibit the function of natural killer (NK) cells and T lymphocytes, hence allowing for disease progression. Ketogenic diets can deplete tumor-bearing animals from MDSCs and regulatory T cells, thereby improving their immunological profile.

  9. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A.; Marignani, Paola A.; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D.; Marshall, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1−/−/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression. PMID:27622015

  10. mTOR masters monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice with allografts or tumors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Hao; Li, Yang; Shao, Lijuan; Wang, Ruoyu; Lu, Jun; Yang, Zhongzhou; Wang, Junjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-02-01

    CD11b(+) Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play critical roles in controlling the processes of tumors, infections, autoimmunity and graft rejection. Immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RPM), targeting on the key cellular metabolism molecule mTOR, is currently used in clinics to treat patients with allo-grafts, autoimmune diseases and tumors. However, the effect of RPM on MDSCs has not been studied. RPM significantly decreases the cell number and the immunosuppressive ability on T cells of CD11b(+) Ly6C(high) monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs) in both allo-grafts-transplanted and tumor-bearing mice respectively. Mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of mTOR have poor M-MDSCs after grafting with allo-skin tissue or a tumor. Grafting of allo-skin or tumors significantly activates glycolysis pathways in myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow, which is inhibited by RPM or mTOR deletion. 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of the glycolytic pathway, inhibits M-MDSC differentiation from precursors, while enhancing glycolysis by metformin significantly rescues the RPM-caused deficiency of M-MDSCs. Therefore, we offer evidence supporting that mTOR is an intrinsic factor essential for the differentiation and immunosuppressive function of M-MDSCs and that these metabolism-relevant medicines may impact MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression or immune tolerance induction, which is of considerable clinical importance in treating graft rejection, autoimmune diseases and cancers.

  11. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell role in tumor-related inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Marigo, Ilaria; Mantelli, Barbara; Peranzoni, Elisa; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2008-08-28

    Chronic inflammatory state can create a proper environment for neoplastic onset and sustain cancer growth. The inflammatory state that arises at the tumor edge could contribute to immune escape phenomena in many ways. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a cell population that contributes to tumor escape, immune tolerance, and suppression, respond to a variety of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory stimuli, which drive their recruitment and activation. Understanding how the inflammatory milieu favours tumor escape through the accumulation of MDSCs could be very useful to improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy.

  12. AZD1480 delays tumor growth in a melanoma model while enhancing the suppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Maenhout, Sarah K.; Four, Stephanie Du; Corthals, Jurgen; Neyns, Bart; Thielemans, Kris; Aerts, Joeri L.

    2014-01-01

    AZD1480 is a potent, competitive small-molecule inhibitor of JAK1/2 kinase which inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation and tumor growth. Here we investigated the effects of AZD1480 on the function of different immune cell populations in a melanoma model. When MO4 tumor-bearing mice were treated with AZD1480 we observed a strong inhibition of tumor growth as well as a prolonged survival. Moreover, a significant decrease in the percentage of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) was observed after treatment with AZD1480. However, AZD1480 enhanced the suppressive capacity of murine MDSCs while at the same time impairing the proliferative as well as the IFN-γ secretion capacity of murine T cells. The addition of AZD1480 to co-cultures of human MDSCs and T cells does not affect the suppressive activity of MDSCs but it does reduce the IFN-γ secretion and the proliferative capacity of T cells. We showed that although AZD1480 has the ability to delay the tumor growth of MO4 tumor-bearing mice, this drug has detrimental effects on several aspects of the immune system. These data indicate that systemic targeting of the JAK/STAT pathway by JAK1/2 inhibition can have divergent effects on tumor growth and anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:25149535

  13. Analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Susanne; Mead, Andrew; Malinovskis, Aleksandrs; Hardwick, Nicola R; Guinn, Barbara-Ann

    2015-11-01

    The use of peptide vaccines, enhanced by adjuvants, has shown some efficacy in clinical trials. However, responses are often short-lived and rarely induce notable memory responses. The reason is that self-antigens have already been presented to the immune system as the tumor develops, leading to tolerance or some degree of host tumor cell destruction. To try to break tolerance against self-antigens, one of the methods employed has been to modify peptides at the anchor residues to enhance their ability to bind major histocompatibility complex molecules, extending their exposure to the T-cell receptor. These modified or analogue peptides have been investigated as stimulators of the immune system in patients with different cancers with variable but sometimes notable success. In this review we describe the background and recent developments in the use of analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia describing knowledge useful for the application of analogue peptide treatments for other malignancies.

  14. Circulating and Tumor-Infiltrating Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Patients with Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liangliang; Zhang, Meng; Li, Wei; Ding, Jianhua; Zhu, Jun; Wei, Huafeng; Zhao, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous family of myeloid cells that suppress T cell immunity in tumor-bearing hosts. In patients with colon cancer, MDSCs have recently been described as Lin−/lowHLA-DR−CD11b+CD33+ cells correlating with cancer stage, metastasis and chemotherapy response. To learn in more detail the dynamic change and clinical relevance of circulating and tumor-infiltrating Lin−/lowHLA-DR−CD11b+CD33+ MDSC in colorectal cancer, we harvested the blood from 64 patients with varying stage of colorectal cancer and tumor and matched paraneoplastic tissues from 5 patients with advanced colorectal cancer, subjected them to multicolor flow cytometric analysis of percentage, absolute number and phenotype of MDSC and finally characterized their immunosuppressive functions. Our results demonstrate that peripheral blood from colorectal cancer patients contains markedly increased percentage and absolute number of Lin−/lowHLA-DR−CD11b+CD33+ MDSCs compared with healthy individuals, and this increase is closely correlated with clinical cancer stage and tumor metastasis but not primary tumor size and serum concentrations of cancer biomarker. A similar increase of MDSCs was also observed in the tumor tissues. Phenotyping MDSCs shows that they express high CD13 and CD39, low CD115, CD117, CD124 and PD-L1, and devoid of CD14, CD15 and CD66b, reminiscent of precursor myeloid cells. MDSCs from cancer patients but not healthy donors have the immunosuppressive activity and were able to inhibit in vitro autologous T-cell proliferation. Collectively, this study substantiates the presence of increased immunosuppressive circulating and tumor-resident Lin−/lowHLA-DR−CD11b+CD33+ MDSCs in patients with colorectal cancers correlating with cancer stage and metastasis, and suggests that pharmacologic blockade of MDSCs should be considered in future clinical trials. PMID:23437326

  15. MYBL2 is a sub-haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene in myeloid malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, Stefan; Conover, Lillian F; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Kilpivaara, Outi; Stevenson, Kristen; Neuberg, Donna; Loh, Mignon L; Wu, Wen-Shu; Rodig, Scott J; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Look, A Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A common deleted region (CDR) in both myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) affects the long arm of chromosome 20 and has been predicted to harbor a tumor suppressor gene. Here we show that MYBL2, a gene within the 20q CDR, is expressed at sharply reduced levels in CD34+ cells from most MDS cases (65%; n = 26), whether or not they harbor 20q abnormalities. In a murine competitive reconstitution model, Mybl2 knockdown by RNAi to 20–30% of normal levels in multipotent hematopoietic progenitors resulted in clonal dominance of these ‘sub-haploinsufficient’ cells, which was reflected in all blood cell lineages. By 6 months post-transplantation, the reconstituted mice had developed a clonal myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic disorder originating from the cells with aberrantly reduced Mybl2 expression. We conclude that downregulation of MYBL2 activity below levels predicted by classical haploinsufficiency underlies the clonal expansion of hematopoietic progenitors in a large fraction of human myeloid malignancies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00825.001 PMID:23878725

  16. TIMP-2 targets tumor-associated myeloid suppressor cells with effects in cancer immune dysfunction and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guedez, Liliana; Jensen-Taubman, Sandra; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Kwityn, Clifford J; Wei, Beiyang; Caterina, John; Stetler-Stevenson, William G

    2012-07-01

    Angiogenesis and inflammation are important therapeutic targets in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is well known that proteolysis mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) promotes angiogenesis and inflammation in the tumor microenvironment. Here, the effects of the MMP inhibitor TIMP-2 on NSCLC inflammation and angiogenesis were evaluated in TIMP-2-deficient (timp2-/-) mice injected subcutaneously (SC) with Lewis lung carcinoma cells and compared with the effects on tumors in wild-type mice. TIMP-2-deficient mice demonstrated increased tumor growth, enhanced expression of angiogenic marker αvβ3 in tumor and endothelial cells, and significantly higher serum vascular endothelial growth factor-A levels. Tumor-bearing timp2-/- mice showed a significant number of inflammatory cells in their tumors, upregulation of inflammation mediators, nuclear factor-kappaB, and Annexin A1, as well as higher levels of serum interleukin (IL)-6. Phenotypic analysis revealed an increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) cells (CD11b+ and Gr-1+) that coexpressed vascular-endothelial-growth factor receptor 1 (VEGF-R1) and elevated MMP activation present in tumors and spleens from timp2-/- mice. Furthermore, TIMP-2-deficient tumors upregulated expression of the immunosuppressing genes controlling MDSC growth, IL-10, IL-13, IL-11, and chemokine ligand (CCL-5/RANTES), and decreased interferon-γ and increased CD40L. Moreover, forced TIMP-2 expression in human lung adenocarcinoma A-549 resulted in a significant reduction of MDSCs recruited into tumors, as well as suppression of angiogenesis and tumor growth. The increase in MDSCs has been linked to cancer immunosuppression and angiogenesis. Therefore, this study supports TIMP-2 as a negative regulator of MDSCs with important implications for the immunotherapy and/or antiangiogenic treatment of NSCLC.

  17. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Hadi; Baradaran, Behzad; Esfahani, Ali; Sakhinia, Masoud; Sakhinia, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA) on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy. PMID:24754007

  18. COX2/mPGES1/PGE2 pathway regulates PD-L1 expression in tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Prima, Victor; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Kaliberov, Sergey; Curiel, David T; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2017-01-31

    In recent years, it has been established that programmed cell death protein ligand 1 (PD-L1)-mediated inhibition of activated PD-1(+) T lymphocytes plays a major role in tumor escape from immune system during cancer progression. Lately, the anti-PD-L1 and -PD-1 immune therapies have become an important tool for treatment of advanced human cancers, including bladder cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms of PD-L1 expression in cancer are not fully understood. We found that coculture of murine bone marrow cells with bladder tumor cells promoted strong expression of PD-L1 in bone marrow-derived myeloid cells. Tumor-induced expression of PD-L1 was limited to F4/80(+) macrophages and Ly-6C(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells. These PD-L1-expressing cells were immunosuppressive and were capable of eliminating CD8 T cells in vitro. Tumor-infiltrating PD-L1(+) cells isolated from tumor-bearing mice also exerted morphology of tumor-associated macrophages and expressed high levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-forming enzymes microsomal PGE2 synthase 1 (mPGES1) and COX2. Inhibition of PGE2 formation, using pharmacologic mPGES1 and COX2 inhibitors or genetic overexpression of PGE2-degrading enzyme 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), resulted in reduced PD-L1 expression. Together, our study demonstrates that the COX2/mPGES1/PGE2 pathway involved in the regulation of PD-L1 expression in tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and, therefore, reprogramming of PGE2 metabolism in tumor microenvironment provides an opportunity to reduce immune suppression in tumor host.

  19. Cytotoxic effects of high concentrations of sodium ascorbate on human myeloid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mastrangelo, Domenico; Massai, Lauretta; Lo Coco, Francesco; Noguera, Nélida Inés; Borgia, Loredana; Fioritoni, Giuseppe; Berardi, Anna; Iacone, Antonio; Muscettola, Michela; Pelosi, Elvira; Castelli, Germana; Testa, Ugo; Di Pisa, Francesco; Grasso, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    The effect of high doses of intravenous (sodium) ascorbate (ASC) in the treatment of cancer has been controversial although there is growing evidence that ASC in high (pharmacologic) concentrations induces dose-dependent pro-apoptotic death of tumor cells, in vitro. Very few data are available on the role of ASC in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Ascorbate behaves as an antioxidant at low (physiologic), and as pro-oxidant at pharmacologic, concentrations, and this may account for the differences reported in different experimental settings, when human myeloid cell lines, such as HL60, were treated with ASC. Considering the myeloid origin of HL60 cells, and previous literature reports showing that some cell lines belonging to the myeloid lineage could be sensitive to the pro-apoptotic effects of high concentrations of ASC, we investigated in more details the effects of high doses (0.5 to 7 mM) of ASC in vitro, on a variety of human myeloid cell lines including the following: HL60, U937, NB4, NB4-R4 (retinoic acid [RA]-resistant), NB4/AsR (ATO-resistant) acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL)-derived cell lines, and K562 as well as on normal CD34+ progenitors derived from human cord blood. Our results indicate that all analyzed cell lines including all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)- and arsenic trioxide (ATO)-resistant ones are highly sensitive to the cytotoxic, pro-oxidant effects of high doses of ASC, with an average 50 % lethal concentration (LC50) of 3 mM, depending on cell type, ASC concentration, and time of exposure. Conversely, high doses of ASC neither did exert significant cytotoxic effects nor impaired the differentiation potential in cord blood (CB) CD34+ normal cells. Since plasma ASC concentrations within the millimolar (mM) range can be easily and safely reached by intravenous administration, we conclude that phase I/II clinical trials using high doses of ASC should be designed for patients with advanced/refractory AML and APL.

  20. Inhibition of tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cell function by a nanoparticulated adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Audry; Mesa, Circe; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Clavell, Marilyn; Oliver, Liliana; Fernández, Luis E; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between cancer vaccine adjuvants and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) is currently poorly understood. Very small size proteoliposomes (VSSP) are a nanoparticulated adjuvant under investigation in clinical trials in patients with renal carcinoma, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III. We found that VSSP adjuvant induced a significant splenomegaly due to accumulation of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells. However, VSSP-derived MDSCs showed a reduced capacity to suppress both allogeneic and Ag-specific CTL response compared with that of tumor-induced MDSCs. Moreover, splenic MDSCs isolated from tumor-bearing mice treated with VSSP were phenotypically more similar to those isolated from VSSP-treated tumor-free mice and much less suppressive than tumor-induced MDSCs, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, different from dendritic cell vaccination, inoculation of VSSP-based vaccine in EG.7-OVA tumor-bearing mice was sufficient to avoid tumor-induced tolerance and stimulate an immune response against OVA Ag, similar to that observed in tumor-free mice. This effect correlated with an accelerated differentiation of MDSCs into mature APCs that was promoted by VSSP. VSSP used as a cancer vaccine adjuvant might thus improve antitumor efficacy not only by stimulating a potent immune response against tumor Ags but also by reducing tumor-induced immunosuppression.

  1. Mechanism regulating reactive oxygen species in tumor induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells1

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Cotter, Matthew J.; Cheng, Pingyan; Cheng, Fendong; Kusmartsev, Sergei; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V.; McCaffrey, Judith C.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major component of the immune suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that one of the major mechanisms of MDSC-induced immune suppression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. In this study we observed a substantial up-regulation of ROS by MDSC in all of seven different tumor models and in patients with head and neck cancer. The increased ROS production by MDSC is mediated by up-regulated activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX2). MDSC from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher expression of NOX2 subunits, primarily p47phox and gp91phox, compared to immature myeloid cells from tumor-free mice. Expression of NOX2 subunits in MDSC was controlled by the STAT3 transcription factor. In the absence of NOX2 activity, MDSC lost the ability to suppress T-cell responses and quickly differentiated into mature macrophages and dendritic cells. These findings expand our fundamental understanding of the biology of MDSC and may also open new opportunities for therapeutic regulation of these cells in cancer. PMID:19380816

  2. Mechanism regulating reactive oxygen species in tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Cesar A; Cotter, Matthew J; Cheng, Pingyan; Cheng, Fendong; Kusmartsev, Sergei; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V; McCaffrey, Judith C; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2009-05-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major component of the immune suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that one of the major mechanisms of MDSC-induced immune suppression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. In this study, we observed a substantial up-regulation of ROS by MDSC in all of seven different tumor models and in patients with head and neck cancer. The increased ROS production by MDSC is mediated by up-regulated activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX2). MDSC from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher expression of NOX2 subunits, primarily p47(phox) and gp91(phox), compared with immature myeloid cells from tumor-free mice. Expression of NOX2 subunits in MDSC was controlled by the STAT3 transcription factor. In the absence of NOX2 activity, MDSC lost the ability to suppress T cell responses and quickly differentiated into mature macrophages and dendritic cells. These findings expand our fundamental understanding of the biology of MDSC and may also open new opportunities for therapeutic regulation of these cells in cancer.

  3. Reduced inflammation in the tumor microenvironment delays the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and limits tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Bunt, Stephanie K; Yang, Linglin; Sinha, Pratima; Clements, Virginia K; Leips, Jeff; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2007-10-15

    Chronic inflammation is frequently associated with malignant growth and is thought to promote and enhance tumor progression, although the mechanisms which regulate this relationship remain elusive. We reported previously that interleukin (IL)-1beta promoted tumor progression by enhancing the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and hypothesized that inflammation leads to cancer through the production of MDSC which inhibit tumor immunity. If inflammation-induced MDSC promote tumor progression by blocking antitumor immunity, then a reduction in inflammation should reduce MDSC levels and delay tumor progression, whereas an increase in inflammation should increase MDSC levels and hasten tumor progression. We have tested this hypothesis using the 4T1 mammary carcinoma and IL-1 receptor (IL-1R)-deficient mice which have a reduced potential for inflammation, and IL-1R antagonist-deficient mice, which have an increased potential for inflammation. Consistent with our hypothesis, IL-1R-deficient mice have a delayed accumulation of MDSC and reduced primary and metastatic tumor progression. Accumulation of MDSC and tumor progression are partially restored by IL-6, indicating that IL-6 is a downstream mediator of the IL-1beta-induced expansion of MDSC. In contrast, excessive inflammation in IL-1R antagonist-deficient mice promotes the accumulation of MDSC and produces MDSC with enhanced suppressive activity. These results show that immune suppression by MDSC and tumor growth are regulated by the inflammatory milieu and support the hypothesis that the induction of suppressor cells which down-regulate tumor immunity is one of the mechanisms linking inflammation and cancer.

  4. CD45 Phosphatase Inhibits STAT3 Transcription Factor Activity in Myeloid Cells and Promotes Tumor-Associated Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinit; Cheng, Pingyan; Condamine, Thomas; Mony, Sridevi; Languino, Lucia R; McCaffrey, Judith C; Hockstein, Neil; Guarino, Michael; Masters, Gregory; Penman, Emily; Denstman, Fred; Xu, Xiaowei; Altieri, Dario C; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2016-02-16

    Recruitment of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and differentiation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the major factors contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. We demonstrated that differentiation of TAMs in tumor site from monocytic precursors was controlled by downregulation of the activity of the transcription factor STAT3. Decreased STAT3 activity was caused by hypoxia and affected all myeloid cells but was not observed in tumor cells. Upregulation of CD45 tyrosine phosphatase activity in MDSCs exposed to hypoxia in tumor site was responsible for downregulation of STAT3. This effect was mediated by the disruption of CD45 protein dimerization regulated by sialic acid. Thus, STAT3 has a unique function in the tumor environment in controlling the differentiation of MDSC into TAM, and its regulatory pathway could be a potential target for therapy.

  5. Recruitment of myeloid but not endothelial precursor cells facilitates tumor re-growth after local irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Kozin, Sergey V.; Kamoun, Walid S.; Huang, Yuhui; Dawson, Michelle R.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Duda, Dan G.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor neovascularization and growth may be promoted by recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs), which include endothelial precursor cells (EPCs) and “vascular modulatory” myelomonocytic (CD11b+) cells. BMDCs may also drive tumor re-growth after certain chemotherapeutic and vascular disruption treatments. In this study, we evaluated the role of BMDC recruitment in breast and lung carcinoma xenograft models after local irradiation (LI). We depleted the bone marrow by including whole body irradiation (WBI) of 6Gy as part of a total tumor dose of 21Gy, and compared the growth delay with the one achieved after LI of 21Gy. In both models, including WBI induced longer tumor growth delays. Moreover, including WBI increased lung tumor control probability by LI. Exogenous delivery of BMDCs from radiation-naïve donors partially abrogated the WBI effect. Myeloid BMDCs, primarily macrophages, rapidly accumulated in tumors after LI. Intratumoral expression of SDF-1α, a chemokine that promotes tissue retention of BMDCs, was noted 2 days after LI. Conversely, treatment with an inhibitor of SDF-1α receptor CXCR4 (AMD3100) with LI significantly delayed tumor re-growth. However, when administered starting from 5 days post-LI, AMD3100 treatment was ineffective. Lastly, with restorative bone marrow transplantation of Tie2-GFP-labeled BMDC population we observed an increased number of monocytes but not EPCs in tumors that recurred following LI. Our results suggest that an increase in intratumoral SDF-1α triggered by local irradiation recruits myelomonocyte/macrophage which promote tumor re-growth. PMID:20631066

  6. Generation of antigen-presenting cells from tumor-infiltrated CD11b myeloid cells with DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine.

    PubMed

    Daurkin, Irina; Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Vieweg, Johannes; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2010-05-01

    Tumor-recruited CD11b myeloid cells, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells, play a significant role in tumor progression, as these cells are involved in tumor-induced immune suppression and tumor neovasculogenesis. On the other hand, the tumor-infiltrated CD11b myeloid cells could potentially be a source of immunostimulatory antigen-presenting cells (APCs), since most of these cells represent common precursors of both dendritic cells and macrophages. Here, we investigated the possibility of generating mature APCs from tumor-infiltrated CD11b myeloid cells. We demonstrate that in vitro exposure of freshly excised mouse tumors to DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine, AZA) results in selective elimination of tumor cells, but, surprisingly it also enriches CD45(+) tumor-infiltrated cells. The majority of "post-AZA" surviving CD45(+) tumor-infiltrated cells were represented by CD11b myeloid cells. A culture of isolated tumor-infiltrated CD11b cells in the presence of AZA and GM-CSF promoted their differentiation into mature F4/80/CD11c/MHC class II-positive APCs. These tumor-derived myeloid APCs produced substantially reduced amounts of immunosuppressive (IL-13, IL-10, PGE(2)), pro-angiogenic (VEGF, MMP-9) and pro-inflammatory (IL-1beta, IL-6, MIP-2) mediators than their precursors, freshly isolated tumor-infiltrated CD11b cells. Vaccinating naïve mice with ex vivo generated tumor-derived APCs resulted in the protection of 70% mice from tumor outgrowth. Importantly, no loading of tumor-derived APC with exogenous antigen was needed to stimulate T cell response and induce the anti-tumor effect. Collectively, our results for the first time demonstrate that tumor-infiltrated CD11b myeloid cells can be enriched and differentiated in the presence of DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine into mature tumor-derived APCs, which could be used for cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Salmonella-mediated tumor regression involves targeting of tumor myeloid suppressor cells causing a shift to M1-like phenotype and reduction in suppressive capacity.

    PubMed

    Kaimala, Suneesh; Mohamed, Yassir A; Nader, Nancy; Issac, Jincy; Elkord, Eyad; Chouaib, Salem; Fernandez-Cabezudo, Maria J; Al-Ramadi, Basel K

    2014-06-01

    The effectiveness of attenuated Salmonella in inhibiting tumor growth has been demonstrated in many therapeutic models, but the precise mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In this study, we show that the anti-tumor capacity of Salmonella depends on a functional MyD88-TLR pathway and is independent of adaptive immune responses. Since myeloid suppressor cells play a critical role in tumor growth, we investigated the consequences of Salmonella treatment on myeloid cell recruitment, phenotypic characteristics, and functional activation in spleen and tumor tissue of B16.F1 melanoma-bearing mice. Salmonella treatment led to increased accumulation of splenic and intratumoral CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid cells, exhibiting significantly increased expression of various activation markers such as MHC class II, costimulatory molecules, and Sca-1/Ly6A proteins. Gene expression analysis showed that Salmonella treatment induced expression of iNOS, arginase-1 (ARG1), and IFN-γ in the spleen, but down-regulated IL-4 and TGF-β. Within the tumor, expression of iNOS, IFN-γ, and S100A9 was markedly increased, but ARG1, IL-4, TGF-β, and VEGF were inhibited. Functionally, splenic CD11b(+) cells maintained their suppressive capacity following Salmonella treatment, but intratumoral myeloid cells had significantly reduced suppressive capacity. Our findings demonstrate that administration of attenuated Salmonella leads to phenotypic and functional maturation of intratumoral myeloid cells making them less suppressive and hence enhancing the host's anti-tumor immune response. Modalities that inhibit myeloid suppressor cells may be useful adjuncts in cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Prostaglandin E2 promotes tumor progression by inducing myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Pratima; Clements, Virginia K; Fulton, Amy M; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2007-05-01

    A causative relationship between chronic inflammation and cancer has been postulated for many years, and clinical observations and laboratory experiments support the hypothesis that inflammation contributes to tumor onset and progression. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the relationship are not known. We recently reported that the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1beta, induces the accumulation and retention of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which are commonly found in many patients and experimental animals with cancer and are potent suppressors of adaptive and innate immunity. This finding led us to hypothesize that inflammation leads to cancer through the induction of MDSC, which inhibit immunosurveillance and thereby allow the unchecked persistence and proliferation of premalignant and malignant cells. We now report that host MDSC have receptors for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and that E-prostanoid receptor agonists, including PGE2, induce the differentiation of Gr1(+)CD11b(+) MDSC from bone marrow stem cells, whereas receptor antagonists block differentiation. BALB/c EP2 knockout mice inoculated with the spontaneously metastatic BALB/c-derived 4T1 mammary carcinoma have delayed tumor growth and reduced numbers of MDSC relative to wild-type mice, suggesting that PGE2 partially mediates MDSC induction through the EP2 receptor. Treatment of 4T1-tumor-bearing wild-type mice with the cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor, SC58236, delays primary tumor growth and reduces MDSC accumulation, further showing that PGE2 induces MDSC and providing a therapeutic approach for reducing this tumor-promoting cell population.

  9. Tumor-Derived Tissue Factor Aberrantly Activates Complement and Facilitates Lung Tumor Progression via Recruitment of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Zha, Haoran; Yang, Fei; Guo, Bo; Zhu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The initiator of extrinsic coagulation, tissue factor (TF), and its non-coagulant isoform alternatively spliced TF (asTF) are closely associated with tumor development. In the tumor microenvironment, the role of TF-induced coagulation in tumor progression remains to be fully elucidated. Using TF-knockdown lung tumor cells, we showed that TF is the dominant component of procoagulant activity but is dispensable in the cellular biology of tumor cells. In a xenograft model, using immunohistochemical analysis and flow cytometry analysis of the tumor microenvironment, we demonstrated that TF-induced fibrin deposition, which is correlated with complement activation and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) recruitment, is positively associated with tumor progression. C5aR antagonism blunted the effect of TF on tumor progression and decreased MDSC recruitment. In conclusion, our data suggested that in tumor microenvironment, TF-induced coagulation activated the complement system and subsequently recruited myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumor growth, which brings new insights into the coagulation-induced complement activation within the tumor microenvironment during tumor progression. PMID:28106852

  10. Tumor-Derived Tissue Factor Aberrantly Activates Complement and Facilitates Lung Tumor Progression via Recruitment of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao; Zha, Haoran; Yang, Fei; Guo, Bo; Zhu, Bo

    2017-01-19

    The initiator of extrinsic coagulation, tissue factor (TF), and its non-coagulant isoform alternatively spliced TF (asTF) are closely associated with tumor development. In the tumor microenvironment, the role of TF-induced coagulation in tumor progression remains to be fully elucidated. Using TF-knockdown lung tumor cells, we showed that TF is the dominant component of procoagulant activity but is dispensable in the cellular biology of tumor cells. In a xenograft model, using immunohistochemical analysis and flow cytometry analysis of the tumor microenvironment, we demonstrated that TF-induced fibrin deposition, which is correlated with complement activation and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) recruitment, is positively associated with tumor progression. C5aR antagonism blunted the effect of TF on tumor progression and decreased MDSC recruitment. In conclusion, our data suggested that in tumor microenvironment, TF-induced coagulation activated the complement system and subsequently recruited myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumor growth, which brings new insights into the coagulation-induced complement activation within the tumor microenvironment during tumor progression.

  11. Cross-talk between myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), macrophages, and dendritic cells enhances tumor-induced immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Sinha, Pratima; Beury, Daniel W; Clements, Virginia K

    2012-08-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex milieu of tumor and host cells. Host cells can include tumor-reactive T cells capable of killing tumor cells. However, more frequently the tumor and host components interact to generate a highly immune suppressive environment that frustrates T cell cytotoxicity and promotes tumor progression through a variety of immune and non-immune mechanisms. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major host component contributing to the immune suppressive environment. In addition to their inherent immune suppressive function, MDSC amplify the immune suppressive activity of macrophages and dendritic cells via cross-talk. This article will review the cell-cell interactions used by MDSC to inhibit anti-tumor immunity and promote progression, and the role of inflammation in promoting cross-talk between MDSC and other cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  12. Acute inflammation induces immunomodulatory effects on myeloid cells associated with anti-tumor responses in a tumor mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Mohamed L.; Attia, Zeinab I.; Galal, Sohaila M.

    2015-01-01

    Given the self nature of cancer, anti-tumor immune response is weak. As such, acute inflammation induced by microbial products can induce signals that result in initiation of an inflammatory cascade that helps activation of immune cells. We aimed to compare the nature and magnitude of acute inflammation induced by toll-like receptor ligands (TLRLs) on the tumor growth and the associated inflammatory immune responses. To induce acute inflammation in tumor-bearing host, CD1 mice were inoculated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) (5 × 105 cells/mouse), and then treated with i.p. injection on day 1, day 7 or days 1 + 7 with: (1) polyinosinic:polycytidylic (poly(I:C)) (TLR3L); (2) Poly-ICLC (clinical grade of TLR3L); (3) Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) (coding for TLR9L); (4) Complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) (coding for TLR9L); and (5) Incomplete Freund’s Adjuvant (IFA). Treatment with poly(I:C), Poly-ICLC, BCG, CFA, or IFA induced anti-tumor activities as measured by 79.1%, 75.94%, 73.94%, 71.88% and 47.75% decreases, respectively in the total number of tumor cells collected 7 days after tumor challenge. Among the tested TLRLs, both poly(I:C) (TLR3L) and BCG (contain TLR9L) showed the highest anti-tumor effects as reflected by the decrease in the number of EAc cells. These effects were associated with a 2-fold increase in the numbers of inflammatory cells expressing the myeloid markers CD11b+Ly6G+, CD11b+Ly6G−, and CD11b+Ly6G−. We concluded that Provision of the proper inflammatory signal with optimally defined magnitude and duration during tumor growth can induce inflammatory immune cells with potent anti-tumor responses without vaccination. PMID:26966565

  13. Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells as a potent suppressor of tumor immunity in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pogoda, Katarzyna; Pyszniak, Maria; Rybojad, Paweł; Tabarkiewicz, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising therapeutic option for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who do not qualify for surgery. In patients with advanced NSCLC, systemic immune suppression is frequently observed, therefore, researchers are investigating the tumor microenvironment for less invasive and more effective methods of treating lung cancer. Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (Mo-MDSCs) are potent suppressors of tumor immunity; therefore, this population may significantly impede the application of immunotherapy to treat cancer. The present study evaluated the distribution of Mo-MDSCs and monocytes/macrophages in the peripheral blood, lymph nodes and tumor tissue of patients with NSCLC. Furthermore, the profiles of cytokines produced by these cell populations, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-12/23p40, IL-10, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), were compared. The cell populations and the expression of cytokines were assessed by flow cytometry after 4 h in culture with mitogens and Brefeldin A. Mo-MDSCs were more numerous than monocytes/macrophages in all tissues and their prevalence was highest in the peripheral blood; they expressed higher levels of TGF-β than monocytes/macrophages in all tissues and expression of TGF-β produced by Mo-MDSCs was higher in the blood than in lymph nodes and tumor tissues. A higher percentage of monocytes/macrophages was observed in lymph nodes and tumor tissues than in blood. CD14+HLA-DR+ cells also produced more IL-10 in lymph nodes than Mo-MDSCs and more IL-1β and TNF in all tissues. A higher prevalence of cluster of differentiation 14+ human leukocyte antigen-D related+ cells secreting IL-1β, TNF and IL-12/23p40 was observed in peripheral blood. Thus, the results of the current study support the statement that Mo-MDSCs and monocytes/macrophages participate in NSCLC induced immunosuppression, and is consistent with previous research into associations between the TGF

  14. Dynamic Gene Regulatory Networks of Human Myeloid Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Ricardo N; El-Ali, Nicole C; Mager, Mikayla Anne; Wyman, Dana; Conesa, Ana; Mortazavi, Ali

    2017-03-27

    The reconstruction of gene regulatory networks underlying cell differentiation from high-throughput gene expression and chromatin data remains a challenge. Here, we derive dynamic gene regulatory networks for human myeloid differentiation using a 5-day time series of RNA-seq and ATAC-seq data. We profile HL-60 promyelocytes differentiating into macrophages, neutrophils, monocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. We find a rapid response in the expression of key transcription factors and lineage markers that only regulate a subset of their targets at a given time, which is followed by chromatin accessibility changes that occur later along with further gene expression changes. We observe differences between promyelocyte- and monocyte-derived macrophages at both the transcriptional and chromatin landscape level, despite using the same differentiation stimulus, which suggest that the path taken by cells in the differentiation landscape defines their end cell state. More generally, our approach of combining neighboring time points and replicates to achieve greater sequencing depth can efficiently infer footprint-based regulatory networks from long series data.

  15. Cancer stem-like cells derived from chemoresistant tumors have a unique capacity to prime tumorigenic myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashina, Tsunaki; Baghdadi, Muhammad; Yoneda, Akihiro; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Suzu, Shinya; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Jinushi, Masahisa

    2014-05-15

    Resistance to anticancer therapeutics greatly affects the phenotypic and functional properties of tumor cells, but how chemoresistance contributes to the tumorigenic activities of cancer stem-like cells remains unclear. In this study, we found that a characteristic of cancer stem-like cells from chemoresistant tumors (CSC-R) is the ability to produce a variety of proinflammatory cytokines and to generate M2-like immunoregulatory myeloid cells from CD14(+) monocytes. Furthermore, we identified the IFN-regulated transcription factor IRF5 as a CSC-R-specific factor critical for promoting M-CSF production and generating tumorigenic myeloid cells. Importantly, myeloid cells primed with IRF5(+) CSC-R facilitate the tumorigenic and stem cell activities of bulk tumors. Importantly, the activation of IRF5/M-CSF pathways in tumor cells were correlated with the number of tumor-associated CSF1 receptor(+) M2 macrophages in patients with non-small lung cancer. Collectively, our findings show how chemoresistance affects the properties of CSCs in their niche microenvironments.

  16. Tumor-associated CD8+ T cell tolerance induced by bone marrow-derived immature myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Nagaraj, Srinivas; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2005-10-01

    T cell tolerance is a critical element of tumor escape. However, the mechanism of tumor-associated T cell tolerance remains unresolved. Using an experimental system utilizing the adoptive transfer of transgenic T cells into naive recipients, we found that the population of Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells (ImC) from tumor-bearing mice was able to induce CD8+ T cell tolerance. These ImC accumulate in large numbers in spleens, lymph nodes, and tumor tissues of tumor-bearing mice and are comprised of precursors of myeloid cells. Neither ImC from control mice nor progeny of tumor-derived ImC, including tumor-derived CD11c+ dendritic cells, were able to render T cells nonresponsive. ImC are able to take up soluble protein in vivo, process it, and present antigenic epitopes on their surface and induce Ag-specific T cell anergy. Thus, this is a first demonstration that in tumor-bearing mice CD8+ T cell tolerance is induced primarily by ImC that may have direct implications for cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Tumor associated CD8+ T-cell tolerance induced by bone marrow derived immature myeloid cells1

    PubMed Central

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Nagaraj, Srinivas; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2005-01-01

    T-cell tolerance is a critical element of tumor escape. However, the mechanism of tumor-associated T-cell tolerance remains unresolved. Using an experimental system employing the adoptive transfer of transgenic T cells into naïve recipients, we found that the population of Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells (ImC) from tumor-bearing mice was able to induce CD8+ T-cell tolerance. These ImC accumulate in large numbers in spleens, lymph nodes, and tumor tissues of tumor-bearing mice and are comprised of precursors of myeloid cells. Neither ImC from control mice nor progeny of tumor-derived ImC including tumor-derived CD11c+ DCs were able to render T cells non-responsive. ImC are able to take-up soluble protein in vivo, process it, and present antigenic epitopes on their surface and induce antigen-specific T-cell anergy. Thus, this is a first demonstration that in tumor-bearing mice CD8+ T-cell tolerance is induced primarily by ImC that may have direct implications for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:16177103

  18. On the armament and appearances of human myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Poschke, Isabel; Kiessling, Rolf

    2012-09-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have frequently been observed in patients with cancer. This heterogeneous population of myeloid cells can exert potent suppression of lymphocyte function and thereby poses a significant hurdle to natural or therapeutically induced anti-tumor immunity. On the other hand, the natural function of MDSC is not yet well understood and their role in infection, inflammation and autoimmune disease is still puzzling. Understanding MDSC biology will provide the tools necessary for therapeutic targeting of this population, but also permit exploitation of their strong tolerogenic function in the treatment of inflammatory conditions and the prevention of graft rejection.

  19. Dissecting the Tumor Myeloid Compartment Reveals Rare Activating Antigen Presenting Cells, Critical for T cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Broz, Miranda; Binnewies, Mikhail; Boldajipour, Bijan; Nelson, Amanda; Pollock, Joshua; Erle, David; Barczak, Andrea; Rosenblum, Michael; Daud, Adil; Barber, Diane; Amigorena, Sebastian; van’t Veer, Laura J.; Sperling, Anne; Wolf, Denise; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY It is well understood that antigen-presenting cells (APC) within tumors typically do not maintain cytotoxic T cell (CTL) function, despite engaging them. Across multiple mouse tumor models and human tumor biopsies, we have delineated the intratumoral dendritic-cell (DC) populations as distinct from macrophage populations. Within these, CD103+ DCs are extremely sparse and yet remarkably capable CTL stimulators. These are uniquely dependent upon IRF8, Zbtb46 and Batf3 transcription factors and generated by GM-CSF and Flt3L cytokines. Regressing tumors have higher proportions of these cells, T-cell dependent immune clearance relies upon them, and abundance of their transcripts in human tumors correlates with clinical outcome. This cell type presents opportunities for prognostic and therapeutic approaches across multiple cancer types. PMID:25446897

  20. Tumor-conditioned Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells induce angiogenesis through the synergistic action of CCL2 and CXCL16 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Chun; Lee, Jungwhoi; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Choi, Chulhee

    2014-01-24

    Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells can suppress innate and adaptive immunity, and the functional immunosuppressive characteristics of these cells can be modulated by the tumor microenvironment. Since Gr-1(+)CD11(+) cells are also involved in tumor-associated angiogenesis, we hypothesized that the angiogenic nature of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells could be regulated by the tumor milieu. To address this hypothesis, we imitated a tumor microenvironment by exposing Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells isolated from spleen of 4T1 mammary carcinoma-bearing mice to tumor-conditioned medium. Supernatants from tumor-conditioned Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells significantly induced capillary-like tube formation and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) compared to naive Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells. Incubation of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells with tumor-conditioned medium induced production of pro-angiogenic chemokines CCL2 and CXCL16. Pretreatment with an anti-CCL2 antibody, but not an anti-CXCL16 antibody, suppressed the angiogenic effects of tumor-conditioned Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells on HUVECs. Simultaneous neutralization of CCL2 and CXCL16 significantly inhibited tube formation and migration of HUVECs compared to the sole neutralization against CCL2. Supernatants from tumor-conditioned Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in HUVECs, and inhibition of the ERK pathway blocked angiogenic effects. ERK pathway activity was partially abrogated by neutralization of CCL2 and more suppressed by simultaneous neutralization of CCL2 and CXCL16. These results collectively indicate that CCL2 and CXCL16 chemokines produced by tumor-conditioned Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells synergistically induce angiogenesis in vitro by stimulating the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Thus, regulation of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells in the tumor microenvironment may contribute to angiogenesis through the secretion of pro-angiogenic chemokines.

  1. A multi-functional role of interferon regulatory factor-8 in solid tumor and myeloid cell biology.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Scott I

    2010-03-01

    Understanding mechanisms of tumor escape are critically important not only to improving our knowledge of cancer biology, but also for the overall development of more effective anti-neoplastic therapies. Our laboratory focuses on mechanisms of apoptotic resistance, with emphasis on Fas loss of function as an important determinant of tumor progression. Our work in solid tumor systems has led to the identification of interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8) as a differentially expressed gene important for tumor cell response to cytotoxicity, including Fas-mediated apoptosis and host-anti-tumor immunosurveillance mechanisms. Although IRF-8 was originally identified in the regulation of normal and neoplastic myeloid cell development, these findings revealed a new functional role for IRF-8 in non-hematopoietic malignancies and establish a molecular basis for its potential manipulation during cancer therapy.

  2. Serum inhibits the immunosuppressive function of myeloid-derived suppressor cells isolated from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Melisa J; Banáth, Judit P; Lam, Vivian; Lepard, Nancy E; Krystal, Gerald; Bennewith, Kevin L

    2012-05-01

    As more groups investigate the role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in promoting the growth of primary tumors and distant tumor metastases, it is imperative to ensure the accurate detection and quantification of MDSC immunosuppression ex vivo. MDSCs are defined by their ability to suppress immune responses. Although different in vitro culture conditions have been used to study MDSCs, the effect of different culture conditions on MDSC immunosuppression is unknown. We therefore isolated MDSCs from the lungs and spleens of 4T1 murine mammary tumor-bearing mice and assayed MDSC-mediated suppression of T cell responses under different culture conditions. We found that 4T1-induced MDSCs effectively suppressed T cell proliferation under serum-free conditions, but not when fetal calf serum (FCS) was present. FCS neither altered the immunosuppressive activities of other myeloid cell types (i.e., peritoneal or tumor-associated macrophages) nor modified the susceptibility of T cells to myeloid cell-mediated suppression, but instead acted directly on 4T1-induced MDSCs to significantly reduce their immunosuppressive function. Importantly, we found that bovine serum albumin was a major contributor to the antagonistic effects of FCS on 4T1-induced MDSC immunosuppression by inhibiting reactive oxygen species production from MDSCs. This work reveals that in vitro culture conditions influence the immunosuppressive properties of MDSCs and highlights the importance of testing different culture conditions on MDSC phenotype to ensure that MDSC immunosuppression is not being masked. These data have important implications for the accurate detection and identification of MDSCs, as well as for determining the influence of MDSC-mediated immunosuppression on primary and metastatic tumor growth.

  3. Mechanism of all-trans retinoic acid effect on tumor-associated myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Nefedova, Yulia; Fishman, Mayer; Sherman, Simon; Wang, Xingyu; Beg, Amer A; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2007-11-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) play an important role in tumor escape by suppressing T-cell responses. MDSC represent a group of cells of myeloid lineage at different stages of differentiation. Increased arginase activity and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are among the main functional characteristics of these cells. Recent studies have shown that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) had a potent activity in eliminating MDSC in cancer patients and in tumor-bearing mice. ATRA differentiates these cells into mature myeloid cells. However, the mechanism of this effect is unclear. Here, we have shown that ATRA dramatically and specifically up-regulated gene expression and protein level of glutathione synthase (GSS) in MDSC. This resulted in accumulation of glutathione (GSH) in these cells, observed in both mice and cancer patients. Blockade of GSH synthesis cancelled the effect of ATRA on MDSC. Accumulation of GSH in these cells using N-acetyl-L-cysteine mimicked the effect of ATRA on MDSC differentiation. Analysis of potential mechanisms of ATRA effect on GSS revealed that ATRA regulates its expression not by directly binding to the promoter but primarily via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Thus, ATRA induced differentiation of MDSC primarily via neutralization of high ROS production in these cells. This novel mechanism involves specific up-regulation of GSS and accumulation of GSH and could be used in developing and monitoring therapeutic application of ATRA.

  4. Discovery of a novel Nrf2 inhibitor that induces apoptosis of human acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, JinFeng; Su, Le; Ye, Qing; Zhang, ShangLi; Kung, HsiangFu; Jiang, Fan; Jiang, GuoSheng; Miao, JunYing; Zhao, BaoXiang

    2017-01-31

    Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is persistently activated in many human tumors including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Therefore, inhibition of Nrf2 activity may be a promising target in leukemia therapy. Here, we used an antioxidant response element-luciferase reporter system to identify a novel pyrazolyl hydroxamic acid derivative, 1-(4-(tert-Butyl)benzyl)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-hydroxy-1H pyrazole-5-carboxamide (4f), that inhibited Nrf2 activity. 4f had a profound growth-inhibitory effect on three AML cell lines, THP-1, HL-60 and U937, and a similar anti-growth effect in a chick embryo model. Moreover, flow cytometry of AML cells revealed increased apoptosis with 4f (10 μM) treatment for 48 h. The protein levels of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase were enhanced in all three AML cell types. Furthermore, Nrf2 protein level was downregulated by 4f. Upregulation of Nrf2 by tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) or Nrf2 overexpression could ameliorate 4f-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. Treatment with 4f reduced both B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) expression and Bcl-2/Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) ratio, which indicated that 4f induced apoptosis, at least in part, via mitochondrial-dependent signaling. Therefore, as an Nrf2 inhibitor, the pyrazolyl hydroxamic acid derivative 4f may be a promising agent in AML therapy.

  5. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Un-Ho; Song, Kwon-Ho; Motomura, Muneo; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Gu, Yeun-Hwa; Kang, Yun-Jeong; Moon, Tae-Chul; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2008-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenyl ester (CAPE), a biologically active ingredient of propolis, has several interesting biological properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, immunostimulatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-invasive, anti-metastatic and carcinostatic activities. Recently, several groups have reported that CAPE is cytotoxic to tumor cells but not to normal cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of CAPE-induced apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia U937 cells. Treatment of U937 cells with CAPE decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. DNA fragmentation assay revealed the typical ladder profile of oligonucleosomal fragments in CAPE-treated U937 cells. In addition, as evidenced by the nuclear DAPI staining experiment, we observed that the nuclear condensation, a typical phenotype of apoptosis, was found in U937 cells treated with 5 microg/ml of CAPE. Therefore, it was suggested that CAPE is a potent agent inducing apoptosis in U937 cells. Apoptotic action of the CAPE was accompanied by release of cytochrome C, reduction of Bcl-2 expression, increase of Bax expression, activation/cleavage of caspase-3 and activation/cleavage of PARP in U937 cells, but not by Fas protein, an initial mediator in the death signaling, or by phospho-eIF2 alpha and CHOP, crucial mediators in ER-mediated apoptosis. From the results, it was concluded that CAPE induces the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis but not death receptors- or ER-mediated apoptosis in U937 cells.

  6. Interleukin 6 induces myeloid differentiation of a human biphenotypic leukemic cell line.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A; Petsche, D; Grunberger, T; Freedman, M H

    1992-08-01

    The human leukemic cell line B1, is characterized by a specific 4;11 chromosomal translocation, immature myeloid/pre-B biphenotypic features, expression of multiple cytokine receptors and IL-1-dependent autocrine growth regulation [Cohen et al. (1991) Blood 78, 94]. Exposure of B1 cells to low concentrations of IL-6 abolished the leukemic cells ability to form colonies in semi-solid medium and slowed down their proliferation rate in suspension. Associated with these changes in growth characteristics, the B1 cells differentiated along the myeloid lineage as judged by the induction of the myeloid-specific surface antigens CD33, CD13 and CD11b, as well as histochemical and morphological changes characteristic of myeloid cells. The induction of differentiation was specific to IL-6 since none of the other cytokines which inhibited B1 cell growth (IL-7, gamma IFN and TNF alpha) were able to induce myeloid or lymphoid differentiation in these cells. The IL-6-induced differentiation was completed over a two week period and was essentially irreversible. Together with the phenotypic changes, IL-6 induced the expression of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (CD45) which may be associated with altered growth observed in IL-6-treated cells. Induction of terminal differentiation of leukemic cells by recombinant bioregulators has therapeutic implications and merits further study.

  7. [Papillomaviruses and human tumors].

    PubMed

    Vonka, V; Hamsíková, E; Sobotková, E; Smahel, M; Kitasato, H; Sainerová, H; Ludvíková, V; Zák, R; Kanka, J; Kolár, Z; Kovarík, J

    2000-12-01

    The report summarizes the main results obtained in the course of our research project. The results of immunological and epidemiological studies provide further proofs that human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the etiological agents in cervical neoplasia. In addition, they raise hopes that immunological methods may be utilized in diagnostics of cervical cancer and for monitoring the clinical course of this disease in the near future. Since the etiological relationship between HPV and cervical carcinoma seems to be proven beyond reasonable doubt, the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines has become the dominant of the contemporary HPV reseach. For studying immune reactions against HPV-induced tumours we developed a model of HPV16-transformed rodent cells.

  8. All-trans-retinoic acid eliminates immature myeloid cells from tumor-bearing mice and improves the effect of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Cheng, Fengdong; Yu, Bin; Nefedova, Yulia; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Lush, Richard; Gabrilovich, Dmitry

    2003-08-01

    Tumor-induced immunosuppression is one of the crucial mechanisms of tumor evasion of immune surveillance. It contributes greatly to the failure of cancer vaccines. Immature myeloid cells (ImCs) play an important role in tumor-induced immunosuppression. These cells accumulate in large numbers in tumor-bearing hosts and directly inhibit T-cell functions via various mechanisms. In this study, we tried to eliminate ImCs in an attempt to improve antitumor response. In vivo administration of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) dramatically reduced the presence of ImCs in all tested tumor models. This effect was not because of a direct antitumor effect of ATRA or decreased production of growth factors by tumor cells. Experiments with adoptive transfer demonstrated that ATRA differentiated ImC in vivo into mature dendritic cells, macrophages, and granulocytes. Decreased presence of ImC in tumor-bearing mice noticeably improved CD4- and CD8-mediated tumor-specific immune response. Combination of ATRA with two different types of cancer vaccines in two different tumor models significantly prolonged the antitumor effect of the treatment. These data suggest that elimination of ImC with ATRA may open an opportunity to improve the effect of cancer vaccines.

  9. Interaction between arsenic trioxide and human primary cells: emphasis on human cells of myeloid origin.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Antoine, Francis; Girard, Denis

    2009-03-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3); ATO) is considered to be one of the most potent drugs in cancer chemotherapy and is highly effective in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). It is well established that treatment of APL patients with ATO is associated with the disappearance of the PML-RARalpha fusion transcript, the characteristic APL gene product of the chromosomal translocation t(15;17). Although its mode of action is still not fully understood, ATO is known to induce cell apoptosis via generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of caspases. Several reports have indicated that ATO acts principally by inducing cell apoptosis not only in APL, but in a variety of non-APL cells including myeloma cells, chronic myeloid leukemia cells and cells of immune origin, including B or T lymphocytes, macrophages and, more recently, neutrophils. There is an increasing amount of data, including some from our laboratory, concerning the interaction between ATO and human primary cells. The focus of this review will be to cover the role of ATO in human immune primary cells with special emphasis on cells of myeloid origin.

  10. Tumor-derived G-CSF facilitates neoplastic growth through a granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cell-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Waight, Jeremy D; Hu, Qiang; Miller, Austin; Liu, Song; Abrams, Scott I

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are induced under diverse pathologic conditions, including neoplasia, and suppress innate and adaptive immunity. While the mechanisms by which MDSC mediate immunosuppression are well-characterized, details on how they develop remain less understood. This is complicated further by the fact that MDSC comprise multiple myeloid cell types, namely monocytes and granulocytes, reflecting diverse stages of differentiation and the proportion of these subpopulations vary among different neoplastic models. Thus, it is thought that the type and quantities of inflammatory mediators generated during neoplasia dictate the composition of the resultant MDSC response. Although much interest has been devoted to monocytic MDSC biology, a fundamental gap remains in our understanding of the derivation of granulocytic MDSC. In settings of heightened granulocytic MDSC responses, we hypothesized that inappropriate production of G-CSF is a key initiator of granulocytic MDSC accumulation. We observed abundant amounts of G-CSF in vivo, which correlated with robust granulocytic MDSC responses in multiple tumor models. Using G-CSF loss- and gain-of-function approaches, we demonstrated for the first time that: 1) abrogating G-CSF production significantly diminished granulocytic MDSC accumulation and tumor growth; 2) ectopically over-expressing G-CSF in G-CSF-negative tumors significantly augmented granulocytic MDSC accumulation and tumor growth; and 3) treatment of naïve healthy mice with recombinant G-CSF protein elicited granulocytic-like MDSC remarkably similar to those induced under tumor-bearing conditions. Collectively, we demonstrated that tumor-derived G-CSF enhances tumor growth through granulocytic MDSC-dependent mechanisms. These findings provide us with novel insights into MDSC subset development and potentially new biomarkers or targets for cancer therapy.

  11. A novel subset of B7-H3(+)CD14(+)HLA-DR(-/low) myeloid-derived suppressor cells are associated with progression of human NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangbo; Huang, Haitao; Zhu, Yibei; Yu, Gehua; Gao, Xin; Xu, Yunyun; Liu, Cuiping; Hou, Jianquan; Zhang, Xueguang

    2015-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) potently inhibit antitumor immune responses, and thereby promoti tumor progression and metastasis. However, the nature of human tumor-infiltrating MDSC remains poorly characterized. Here, we find B7-H3 is exclusively expressed on a subset of intratumoral CD14(+)HLA-DR(-/low) MDSC but absent from adjacent normal lung tissues of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Cytokine analysis revealed that B7-H3(+)CD14(+)HLA-DR(-/low) MDSC (B7-H3(+)MDSC) produced higher levels of IL-10 and TNFα but lower levels of IL-1β and IL-6 when compared with B7-H3(-)CD14(+)HLA-DR(-/low) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (B7-H3(-)MDSC). In a murine lung cancer model, B7-H3(+)MDSCs were found only in the tumor microenvironment and their frequencies increased during tumor progression. Clinical data analysis indicated that a higher frequency of B7-H3(+)MDSCs was associated with reduced recurrence-free survival in patients with NSCLC. Taken together, we identify a novel subset of MDSCs within the tumor microenvironment that fosters tumor progression.

  12. 4PD Functionalized Dendrimers: A Flexible Tool for In Vivo Gene Silencing of Tumor-Educated Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Zilio, Serena; Vella, Jennifer L; De la Fuente, Adriana C; Daftarian, Pirouz M; Weed, Donald T; Kaifer, Angel; Marigo, Ilaria; Leone, Kevin; Bronte, Vincenzo; Serafini, Paolo

    2017-04-10

    Myeloid cells play a key role in tumor progression and metastasis by providing nourishment and immune protection, as well as facilitating cancer invasion and seeding to distal sites. Although advances have been made in understanding the biology of these tumor-educated myeloid cells (TEMCs), their intrinsic plasticity challenges our further understanding of their biology. Indeed, in vitro experiments only mimic the in vivo setting, and current gene-knockout technologies do not allow the simultaneous, temporally controlled, and cell-specific silencing of multiple genes or pathways. In this article, we describe the 4PD nanoplatform, which allows the in vivo preferential transfection and in vivo tracking of TEMCs with the desired RNAs. This platform is based on the conjugation of CD124/IL-4Rα-targeting peptide with G5 PAMAM dendrimers as the loading surface and can convey therapeutic or experimental RNAs of interest. When injected i.v. in mice bearing CT26 colon carcinoma or B16 melanoma, the 4PD nanoparticles predominantly accumulate at the tumor site, transfecting intratumoral myeloid cells. The use of 4PD to deliver a combination of STAT3- and C/EBPβ-specific short hairpin RNA or miR-142-3p confirmed the importance of these genes and microRNAs in TEMC biology and indicates that silencing of both genes is necessary to increase the efficacy of immune interventions. Thus, the 4PD nanoparticle can rapidly and cost effectively modulate and assess the in vivo function of microRNAs and mRNAs in TEMCs.

  13. Transcriptomic Analysis Comparing Tumor-Associated Neutrophils with Granulocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Normal Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Fridlender, Zvi G.; Sun, Jing; Mishalian, Inbal; Singhal, Sunil; Cheng, Guanjun; Kapoor, Veena; Horng, Wenhwai; Fridlender, Gil; Bayuh, Rachel; Worthen, G. Scott; Albelda, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The role of myeloid cells in supporting cancer growth is well established. Most work has focused on myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) that accumulate in tumor-bearing animals, but tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN) are also known to be capable of augmenting tumor growth. However, little is known about their evolution, phenotype, and relationship to naïve neutrophils (NN) and to the granulocytic fraction of MDSC (G-MDSC). In the current study, a transcriptomics approach was used in mice to compare these cell types. Our data show that the three populations of neutrophils are significantly different in their mRNA profiles with NN and G-MDSC being more closely related to each other than to TAN. Structural genes and genes related to cell-cytotoxicity (i.e. respiratory burst) were significantly down-regulated in TAN. In contrast, many immune-related genes and pathways, including genes related to the antigen presenting complex (e.g. all six MHC-II complex genes), and cytokines (e.g. TNF-α, IL-1-α/β), were up-regulated in G-MDSC, and further up-regulated in TAN. Thirteen of the 25 chemokines tested were markedly up-regulated in TAN compared to NN, including striking up-regulation of chemoattractants for T/B-cells, neutrophils and macrophages. This study characterizes different populations of neutrophils related to cancer, pointing out the major differences between TAN and the other neutrophil populations. PMID:22348096

  14. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C.; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity. PMID:25717144

  15. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A

    2015-05-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity.

  16. Activation of myeloid and endothelial cells by CD40L gene therapy supports T-cell expansion and migration into the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, E; Moreno, R; Milenova, I; Liljenfeldt, L; Dieterich, L C; Christiansson, L; Karlsson, H; Ullenhag, G; Mangsbo, S M; Dimberg, A; Alemany, R; Loskog, A

    2017-02-01

    CD40 is an interesting target in cancer immunotherapy due to its ability to stimulate T-helper 1 immunity via maturation of dendritic cells and to drive M2 to M1 macrophage differentiation. Pancreatic cancer has a high M2 content that has shown responsive to anti-CD40 agonist therapy and CD40 may thus be a suitable target for immune activation in these patients. In this study, a novel oncolytic adenovirus armed with a trimerized membrane-bound extracellular CD40L (TMZ-CD40L) was evaluated as a treatment of pancreatic cancer. Further, the CD40L mechanisms of action were elucidated in cancer models. The results demonstrated that the virus transferring TMZ-CD40L had oncolytic capacity in pancreatic cancer cells and could control tumor progression. TMZ-CD40L was a potent stimulator of human myeloid cells and T-cell responses. Further, CD40L-mediated stimulation increased tumor-infiltrating T cells in vivo, which may be due to a direct activation of endothelial cells to upregulate receptors for lymphocyte attachment and transmigration. In conclusion, CD40L-mediated gene therapy is an interesting concept for the treatment of tumors with high levels of M2 macrophages, such as pancreatic cancer, and an oncolytic virus as carrier of CD40L may further boost tumor killing and immune activation.

  17. Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma-Associated Semaphorin 4D Induces Expansion of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Younis, Rania H; Han, Kyu Lee; Webb, Tonya J

    2016-02-01

    One of the mechanisms by which malignancies can induce immune suppression is through the production of cytokines that affect the maturation and differentiation of inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment. Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) is a proangiogenic cytokine produced by several malignancies, which has been described in the regulation of the immune system. In the present study, we examined the role of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)-secreted Sema4D on myeloid cell differentiation. CD33(+) cells cultured in HNSCC cell line-derived conditioned medium differentiated into myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) (CD33(+)CD11b(+)HLA-DR(-/low)). The addition of anti-Sema4D Ab to HNSCC conditioned medium significantly reduced the expansion of the MDSC population. Similarly, knockdown of Sema4D in an HNSCC cell line resulted in a loss of MDSC function as shown by a decrease in the production of the immune-suppressive cytokines arginase-1, TGF-β, and IL-10 by MDSC, concomitant with recovery of T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production following stimulation of CD3/CD28. Importantly, CD33(+) myeloid and T cells cultured in conditioned medium of HNSCC cells in which Sema4D was knocked down promoted antitumor inflammatory profile, through recovery of the effector T cells (CD4(+)T-bet(+) and CD8(+)T-bet(+)), as well as a decrease in regulatory T cells (CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)). We also showed that Sema4D was comparable to GM-CSF in its induction of MDSC. Collectively, this study describes a novel immunosuppressive role for Sema4D in HNSCC through induction of MDSC, and it highlights Sema4D as a therapeutic target for future studies to enhance the antitumorigenic inflammatory response in HNSCC and other epithelial malignancies.

  18. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells expand during breast cancer progression and promote tumor-induced bone destruction

    PubMed Central

    Danilin, Sabrina; Merkel, Alyssa R.; Johnson, Joshua R.; Johnson, Rachelle W.; Edwards, James R.; Sterling, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), identified as Gr1+CD11b+ cells in mice, expand during cancer and promote tumor growth, recurrence and burden. However, little is known about their role in bone metastases. We hypothesized that MDSCs may contribute to tumor-induced bone disease, and inoculated breast cancer cells into the left cardiac ventricle of nude mice. Disease progression was monitored weekly by X-ray and fluorescence imaging and MDSCs expansion by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. To explore the contribution of MDSCs to bone metastasis, we co-injected mice with tumor cells or PBS into the left cardiac ventricle and Gr1+CD11b+ cells isolated from healthy or tumor-bearing mice into the left tibia. MDSCs didn’t induce bone resorption in normal mice, but increased resorption and tumor burden significantly in tumor-bearing mice. In vitro experiments showed that Gr1+CD11b+ cells isolated from normal and tumor-bearing mice differentiate into osteoclasts when cultured with RANK ligand and macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and that MDSCs from tumor-bearing mice upregulate parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) mRNA levels in cancer cells. PTHrP upregulation is likely due to the 2-fold increase in transforming growth factor β expression that we observed in MDSCs isolated from tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, using MDSCs isolated from GFP-expressing animals, we found that MDSCs differentiate into osteoclast-like cells in tumor-bearing mice as evidenced by the presence of GFP+TRAP+ cells. These results demonstrate that MDSCs expand in breast cancer bone metastases and induce bone destruction. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that MDSCs are able to differentiate into osteoclasts in vivo and that this is stimulated in the presence of tumors. PMID:23264895

  19. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells shape myeloid cell function within the tumor microenvironment through IFN-γ and GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Spear, Paul; Barber, Amorette; Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Sentman, Charles L

    2012-06-15

    The infiltration of suppressive myeloid cells into the tumor microenvironment restrains anti-tumor immunity. However, cytokines may alter the function of myeloid lineage cells to support tumor rejection, regulating the balance between pro- and anti-tumor immunity. In this study, it is shown that effector cytokines secreted by adoptively transferred T cells expressing a chimeric Ag receptor (CAR) shape the function of myeloid cells to promote endogenous immunity and tumor destruction. Mice bearing the ovarian ID8 tumor were treated with T cells transduced with a chimeric NKG2D receptor. GM-CSF secreted by the adoptively transferred T cells recruited peripheral F4/80(lo)Ly-6C(+) myeloid cells to the tumor microenvironment in a CCR2-dependent fashion. T cell IFN-γ and GM-CSF activated local, tumor-associated macrophages, decreased expression of regulatory factors, increased IL-12p40 production, and augmented Ag processing and presentation by host macrophages to Ag-specific T cells. In addition, T cell-derived IFN-γ, but not GM-CSF, induced the production of NO by F4/80(hi) macrophages and enhanced their lysis of tumor cells. The ability of CAR T cell therapy to eliminate tumor was moderately impaired when inducible NO synthase was inhibited and greatly impaired in the absence of peritoneal macrophages after depletion with clodronate encapsulated liposomes. This study demonstrates that the activation of host macrophages by CAR T cell-derived cytokines transformed the tumor microenvironment from immunosuppressive to immunostimulatory and contributed to inhibition of ovarian tumor growth.

  20. The hedgehog's trick for escaping immunosurveillance: The molecular mechanisms driving myeloid-derived suppressor cell recruitment in hedgehog signaling-dependent tumors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingwu

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are an important means by which tumor cells evade immunosurveillance. Here, we set out to determine how MDSCs are recruited to tumors in genetically engineered mouse cancer models. Expression of oncogenic and constitutively active SmoM2, a key hedgehog-signaling regulatory protein, revealed that MDSC recruitment to the tumor microenvironment is mediated by the CCL2/CCR2 axis in a TGFβ dependent fashion.

  1. Host miR155 promotes tumor growth through a myeloid-derived suppressor cell-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siqi; Wang, Long; Fan, Jie; Ye, Cong; Dominguez, Donye; Zhang, Yi; Curiel, Tyler J; Fang, Deyu; Kuzel, Timothy M; Zhang, Bin

    2015-02-01

    miR155 is a regulator of immune cell development and function that is generally thought to be immunostimulatory. However, we report here that genetic ablation of miR155 renders mice resistant to chemical carcinogenesis and the growth of several transplanted tumors, suggesting that miR155 functions in immunosuppression and tumor promotion. Host miR155 deficiency promoted overall antitumor immunity despite the finding of defective responses of miR155-deficient dendritic cells and antitumor T cells. Further analysis of immune cell compartments revealed that miR155 regulated the accumulation of functional myeloid-derived suppressive cells (MDSC) in the tumor microenvironment. Specifically, miR155 mediated MDSC suppressor activity through at least two mechanisms, including SOCS1 repression and a reduced ability to license the generation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. Importantly, we demonstrated that miR155 expression was required for MDSC to facilitate tumor growth. Thus, our results revealed a contextual function for miR155 in antitumor immunity, with a role in MDSC support that appears to dominate in tumor-bearing hosts. Overall, the balance of these cellular effects appears to be a root determinant of whether miR155 promotes or inhibits tumor growth.

  2. A Hyperactive Signalosome in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Drives Addiction to a Tumor-Specific Hsp90 Species.

    PubMed

    Zong, Hongliang; Gozman, Alexander; Caldas-Lopes, Eloisi; Taldone, Tony; Sturgill, Eric; Brennan, Sarah; Ochiana, Stefan O; Gomes-DaGama, Erica M; Sen, Siddhartha; Rodina, Anna; Koren, John; Becker, Michael W; Rudin, Charles M; Melnick, Ari; Levine, Ross L; Roboz, Gail J; Nimer, Stephen D; Chiosis, Gabriela; Guzman, Monica L

    2015-12-15

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous and fatal disease with an urgent need for improved therapeutic regimens given that most patients die from relapsed disease. Irrespective of mutation status, the development of aggressive leukemias is enabled by increasing dependence on signaling networks. We demonstrate that a hyperactive signalosome drives addiction of AML cells to a tumor-specific Hsp90 species (teHsp90). Through genetic, environmental, and pharmacologic perturbations, we demonstrate a direct and quantitative link between hyperactivated signaling pathways and apoptotic sensitivity of AML to teHsp90 inhibition. Specifically, we find that hyperactive JAK-STAT and PI3K-AKT signaling networks are maintained by teHsp90 and, in fact, gradual activation of these networks drives tumors increasingly dependent on teHsp90. Thus, although clinically aggressive AML survives via signalosome activation, this addiction creates a vulnerability that can be exploited with Hsp90-directed therapy.

  3. Correlation between myeloid-derived suppressor cells and S100A8/A9 in tumor and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ruoting; Chen, Shiyi; Chen, Shenren

    2015-12-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of cells that constitute an important component of immune regulatory system. Two calcium-binding proteins S100A8 and S100A9 act as important mediators in acute and chronic inflammation. In recent years, many researchers have found that MDSCs and S100A8/A9 operated with one another through a positive feedback loop to promote tumor development and metastasis. However, the correlation between MDSCs and S100A8/A9 in autoimmune diseases (AIDs) remains unknown. In this review, we discussed the co-operation of MDSCs and S100A8/A9 in tumor environment, and also, the role of these two components in AIDs.

  4. Sunitinib depletes myeloid-derived suppressor cells and synergizes with a cancer vaccine to enhance antigen-specific immune responses and tumor eradication.

    PubMed

    Draghiciu, Oana; Nijman, Hans W; Hoogeboom, Baukje Nynke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Daemen, Toos

    2015-03-01

    The high efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines in preclinical studies has yet to be fully achieved in clinical trials. Tumor immune suppression is a critical factor that hampers the desired antitumor effect. Here, we analyzed the combined effect of a cancer vaccine and the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib. Sunitinib was administered intraperitoneally, alone or in combination with intramuscular immunization using a viral vector based cancer vaccine composed of Semliki Forest virus replicon particles and encoding the oncoproteins E6 and E7 (SFVeE6,7) of human papilloma virus (HPV). We first demonstrated that treatment of tumor-bearing mice with sunitinib alone dose-dependently depleted myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the tumor, spleen and in circulation. Concomitantly, the number of CD8(+) T cells increased 2-fold and, on the basis of CD69 expression, their activation status was greatly enhanced. The intrinsic immunosuppressive activity of residual MDSCs after sunitinib treatment was not changed in a dose-dependent fashion. We next combined sunitinib treatment with SFVeE6,7 immunization. This combined treatment resulted in a 1.5- and 3-fold increase of E7-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) present within the circulation and tumor, respectively, as compared to immunization only. The ratio of E7-specific CTLs to MDSCs in blood thereby increased 10- to 20-fold and in tumors up to 12.5-fold. As a result, the combined treatment strongly enhanced the antitumor effect of the cancer vaccine. This study demonstrates that sunitinib creates a favorable microenvironment depleted of MDSCs and acts synergistically with a cancer vaccine resulting in enhanced levels of active tumor-antigen specific CTLs, thus changing the balance in favor of antitumor immunity.

  5. Altered expression of G/sub 1/-specific genes in human malignant myeloid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Calabretta, B.; Venturelli, D.; Kaczmarek, L.; Narni, F.; Talpaz, M.; Anderson, B.; Beran, M.; Baserga, R.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have studied the expression of cell-cycle genes specific to the G/sub 1/ (2A9, 2F1, 4F1, c-myc) and S (histone H3) phases of the cell cycle in normal and malignant human myeloid cycling cells. The levels of expression were determined by measuring the amounts of specific RNA in blot hybridization assays. Levels of expression of the G/sub 1/ genes were compared to the level of expression of the S-phase-specific H3 gene. In a normal asynchronous system provided by the bone marrow cells of three normal donors, the expressions of the four G/sub 1/-specific genes 2A9, 2F1, 4F1, and c-myc, and of the S-phase-specific gene H3 were in ratios that differed little from one individual to another. In the total RNA of eight patients in the chronic phase of chronic myelogenous leukemia, a high level of expression of G/sub 1/ cell-cycle genes was paralleled by a high level of expression of the S-phase H3 gene, simply reflecting and increase in the fraction of proliferating cells. In patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the RNA levels of 2F1 and 4F1 paralleled the expression of H3. However, in 9 of 10 patients with AML they found that the expression of c-myc was elevated with respect to H3 expression. Two important conclusions can be drawn from these findings: (i) increased levels of a G/sub 1/-specific RNA in a tumor may not indicate overexpression of that gene but may instead simply reflect the fraction of proliferating cells; and (ii) in some patients with AML, however, the expression of certain G/sub 1/ genes is truly deregulated and might contribute to the impairment of proliferative control that is associated with this phenotype.

  6. The novel compound OSI-461 induces apoptosis and growth arrest in human acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raminder; Fröbel, Julia; Cadeddu, Ron-Patrick; Bruns, Ingmar; Schroeder, Thomas; Brünnert, Daniela; Wilk, Christian Matthias; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Haas, Rainer; Czibere, Akos

    2012-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous hematological malignancy. Treatment of patients suffering from high-risk AML as defined by clinical parameters, cytogenetics, and/or molecular analyses is often unsuccessful. OSI-461 is a pro-apoptotic compound that has been proposed as a novel therapeutic option for patients suffering from solid tumors like prostate or colorectal carcinoma. But little is known about its anti-proliferative potential in AML. Hence, we treated bone marrow derived CD34(+) selected blast cells from 20 AML patients and the five AML cell lines KG-1a, THP-1, HL-60, U-937, and MV4-11 with the physiologically achievable concentration of 1 μM OSI-461 or equal amounts of DMSO as a control. Following incubation with OSI-461, we found a consistent induction of apoptosis and an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. In addition, we demonstrate that the OSI-461 mediated anti-proliferative effects observed in AML are associated with the induction of the pro-apoptotic cytokine mda-7/IL-24 and activation of the growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible genes (GADD) 45α and 45γ. Furthermore, OSI-461 treated leukemia cells did not regain their proliferative potential for up to 8 days after cessation of treatment following the initial 48 h treatment period with 1 μM OSI-461. This indicates sufficient targeting of the leukemia-initiating cells in our in vitro experiments through OSI-461. The AML samples tested in this study included samples from patients who were resistant to conventional chemotherapy and/or had FLT3-ITD mutations demonstrating the high potential of OSI-461 in human AML.

  7. Differential Effects of Polyphenols on Proliferation and Apoptosis in Human Myeloid and Lymphoid Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mahbub, Amani A; Le Maitre, Christine L.; Haywood-Small, Sarah L.; McDougall, Gordon J.; Cross, Neil A.; Jordan-Mahy, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mortality rates for leukemia are high despite considerable improvements in treatment. Since polyphenols exert pro-apoptotic effects in solid tumors, our study investigated the effects of polyphenols in haematological malignancies. The effect of eight polyphenols (quercetin, chrysin, apigenin, emodin, aloe-emodin, rhein, cis-stilbene and trans-stilbene) were studied on cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis in four lymphoid and four myeloid leukemic cells lines, together with normal haematopoietic control cells. Methods: Cellular proliferation was measured by CellTiter-Glo® luminescent assay; and cell cycle arrest was assessed using flow cytometry of propidium iodide stained cells. Apoptosis was investigated by caspase-3 activity assay using flow cytometry and apoptotic morphology was confirmed by Hoescht 33342 staining. Results: Emodin, quercetin, and cis-stilbene were the most effective polyphenols at decreasing cell viability (IC50 values of 5-22 µM, 8-33 µM, and 25-85 µM respectively) and inducing apoptosis (AP50 values (the concentration which 50% of cells undergo apoptosis) of 2-27 µM, 19-50 µM, and 8-50 µM respectively). Generally, lymphoid cell lines were more sensitive to polyphenol treatment compared to myeloid cell lines, however the most resistant myeloid (KG-1a and K562) cell lines were still found to respond to emodin and quercetin treatment at low micromolar levels. Non-tumor cells were less sensitive to all polyphenols compared to the leukemia cells. Conclusions: These findings suggest that polyphenols have anti-tumor activity against leukemia cells with differential effects. Importantly, the differential sensitivity of emodin, quercetin, and cis-stilbene between leukemia and normal cells suggests that polyphenols are potential therapeutic agents for leukemia. PMID:23796248

  8. Novel role of immature myeloid cells in formation of new lymphatic vessels associated with inflammation and tumors.

    PubMed

    Ran, Sophia; Wilber, Andrew

    2017-04-13

    Inflammation triggers an immune cell-driven program committed to restoring homeostasis to injured tissue. Central to this process is vasculature restoration, which includes both blood and lymphatic networks. Generation of new vessels or remodeling of existing vessels are also important steps in metastasis-the major cause of death for cancer patients. Although roles of the lymphatic system in regulation of inflammation and cancer metastasis are firmly established, the mechanisms underlying the formation of new lymphatic vessels remain a subject of debate. Until recently, generation of new lymphatics in adults was thought to occur exclusively through sprouting of existing vessels without help from recruited progenitors. However, emerging findings from clinical and experimental studies show that lymphoendothelial progenitors, particularly those derived from immature myeloid cells, play an important role in this process. This review summarizes current evidence for the existence and significant roles of myeloid-derived lymphatic endothelial cell progenitors (M-LECPs) in generation of new lymphatics. We describe specific markers of M-LECPs and discuss their biologic behavior in culture and in vivo, as well as currently known molecular mechanisms of myeloid-lymphatic transition (MLT). We also discuss the implications of M-LECPs for promoting adaptive immunity, as well as cancer metastasis. We conclude that improved mechanistic understanding of M-LECP differentiation and its role in adult lymphangiogenesis may lead to new therapeutic approaches for correcting lymphatic insufficiency or excessive formation of lymphatic vessels in human disorders.

  9. Establishment of a Humanized APL Model via the Transplantation of PML-RARA-Transduced Human Common Myeloid Progenitors into Immunodeficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Hiromichi; Yahata, Takashi; Sheng, Yin; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Muguruma, Yukari; Matsuzawa, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Masayuki; Hayashi, Hideki; Sato, Tadayuki; Damdinsuren, Anar; Onizuka, Makoto; Ito, Mamoru; Miyachi, Hayato; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Ando, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer biology have revealed that many malignancies possess a hierarchal system, and leukemic stem cells (LSC) or leukemia-initiating cells (LIC) appear to be obligatory for disease progression. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the formation of a PML-RARα fusion protein, leads to the accumulation of abnormal promyelocytes. In order to understand the precise mechanisms involved in human APL leukemogenesis, we established a humanized in vivo APL model involving retroviral transduction of PML-RARA into CD34+ hematopoietic cells from human cord blood and transplantation of these cells into immunodeficient mice. The leukemia well recapitulated human APL, consisting of leukemic cells with abundant azurophilic abnormal granules in the cytoplasm, which expressed CD13, CD33 and CD117, but not HLA-DR and CD34, were clustered in the same category as human APL samples in the gene expression analysis, and demonstrated sensitivity to ATRA. As seen in human APL, the induced APL cells showed a low transplantation efficiency in the secondary recipients, which was also exhibited in the transplantations that were carried out using the sorted CD34− fraction. In order to analyze the mechanisms underlying APL initiation and development, fractionated human cord blood was transduced with PML-RARA. Common myeloid progenitors (CMP) from CD34+/CD38+ cells developed APL. These findings demonstrate that CMP are a target fraction for PML-RARA in APL, whereas the resultant CD34− APL cells may share the ability to maintain the tumor. PMID:25369030

  10. Establishment of a humanized APL model via the transplantation of PML-RARA-transduced human common myeloid progenitors into immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiromichi; Yahata, Takashi; Sheng, Yin; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Muguruma, Yukari; Matsuzawa, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Masayuki; Hayashi, Hideki; Sato, Tadayuki; Damdinsuren, Anar; Onizuka, Makoto; Ito, Mamoru; Miyachi, Hayato; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Ando, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer biology have revealed that many malignancies possess a hierarchal system, and leukemic stem cells (LSC) or leukemia-initiating cells (LIC) appear to be obligatory for disease progression. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the formation of a PML-RARα fusion protein, leads to the accumulation of abnormal promyelocytes. In order to understand the precise mechanisms involved in human APL leukemogenesis, we established a humanized in vivo APL model involving retroviral transduction of PML-RARA into CD34(+) hematopoietic cells from human cord blood and transplantation of these cells into immunodeficient mice. The leukemia well recapitulated human APL, consisting of leukemic cells with abundant azurophilic abnormal granules in the cytoplasm, which expressed CD13, CD33 and CD117, but not HLA-DR and CD34, were clustered in the same category as human APL samples in the gene expression analysis, and demonstrated sensitivity to ATRA. As seen in human APL, the induced APL cells showed a low transplantation efficiency in the secondary recipients, which was also exhibited in the transplantations that were carried out using the sorted CD34- fraction. In order to analyze the mechanisms underlying APL initiation and development, fractionated human cord blood was transduced with PML-RARA. Common myeloid progenitors (CMP) from CD34(+)/CD38(+) cells developed APL. These findings demonstrate that CMP are a target fraction for PML-RARA in APL, whereas the resultant CD34(-) APL cells may share the ability to maintain the tumor.

  11. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    ; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. The Role of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Patients with Solid Tumors: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Wang, Guoping; Yuan, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Targeting immune cells or factors are effective for patients with solid tumors. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are known to have immunosuppressive functions, and the levels of MDSCs in patients with solid tumor are assumed to have prognostic values. This meta-analysis aimed at evaluating the relationship between MDSCs and the prognosis of patients with solid tumors. We searched articles in PUBMED and EMBASE comprehensively, updated to March 2016. Eight studies with 442 patients were included in the meta-analysis. We analyzed pooled hazard ratios (HRs) for overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and progression-free survival (PFS). The results showed that MDSCs were associated with poor OS (HR, 1.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.42–2.66; P < 0.0001) in patients with solid tumors. PFS/RFS (HR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.16–2.97; P = 0.01) also indicated the association between MDSCs and prognosis. The HRs and 95% CIs for OS in Asian and non-Asian patients were 2.53 (95% CI 1.61–3.42, p < 0.00001) and 1.67 (95% CI 1.14–2.46, p < 0.0001), respectively. We further analyzed the data according to tumor types. The combined HRs and 95% CIs for OS were 1.26 (95% CI 1.10–1.44, p = 0.0003) for gastrointestinal (GI) cancer, 2.59 (95% CI 1.69–3.98, p < 0.0001) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 1.86 (95% CI 1.26–2.75, p = 0.002) for other tumor types. In conclusion, MDSCs had a fine prognostic value for OS and PFS/RFS in patients with solid tumors. MDSCs could be used as biomarkers to evaluate prognosis in clinical practice. PMID:27780254

  13. Ex vivo generation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells that model the tumor immunosuppressive environment in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dufait, Inès; Schwarze, Julia Katharina; Liechtenstein, Therese; Leonard, Wim; Jiang, Heng; Escors, David

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of cells that accumulate in tumor-bearing subjects and which strongly inhibit anti-cancer immune responses. To study the biology of MDSC in colorectal cancer (CRC), we cultured bone marrow cells in conditioned medium from CT26 cells, which are genetically modified to secrete high levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. This resulted in the generation of high numbers of CD11b+ Ly6G+ granulocytic and CD11b+ Ly6C+ monocytic MDSC, which closely resemble those found within the tumor but not the spleen of CT26 tumor-bearing mice. Such MDSC potently inhibited T-cell responses in vitro, a process that could be reversed upon blocking of arginase-1 or inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). We confirmed that inhibition of arginase-1 or iNOS in vivo resulted in the stimulation of cytotoxic T-cell responses. A delay in tumor growth was observed upon functional repression of both enzymes. These data confirm the role of MDSC as inhibitors of T-cell-mediated immune responses in CRC. Moreover, MDSC differentiated in vitro from bone marrow cells using conditioned medium of GM-CSF-secreting CT26 cells, represent a valuable platform to study/identify drugs that counteract MDSC activities. PMID:25869209

  14. Cross-talk among myeloid-derived suppressor cells, macrophages, and tumor cells impacts the inflammatory milieu of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Beury, Daniel W.; Parker, Katherine H.; Nyandjo, Maeva; Sinha, Pratima; Carter, Kayla A.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    MDSC and macrophages are present in most solid tumors and are important drivers of immune suppression and inflammation. It is established that cross-talk between MDSC and macrophages impacts anti-tumor immunity; however, interactions between tumor cells and MDSC or macrophages are less well studied. To examine potential interactions between these cells, we studied the impact of MDSC, macrophages, and four murine tumor cell lines on each other, both in vitro and in vivo. We focused on IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α, and NO, as these molecules are produced by macrophages, MDSC, and many tumor cells; are present in most solid tumors; and regulate inflammation. In vitro studies demonstrated that MDSC-produced IL-10 decreased macrophage IL-6 and TNF-α and increased NO. IL-6 indirectly regulated MDSC IL-10. Tumor cells increased MDSC IL-6 and vice versa. Tumor cells also increased macrophage IL-6 and NO and decreased macrophage TNF-α. Tumor cell-driven macrophage IL-6 was reduced by MDSC, and tumor cells and MDSC enhanced macrophage NO. In vivo analysis of solid tumors identified IL-6 and IL-10 as the dominant cytokines and demonstrated that these molecules were produced predominantly by stromal cells. These results suggest that inflammation within solid tumors is regulated by the ratio of tumor cells to MDSC and macrophages and that interactions of these cells have the potential to alter significantly the inflammatory milieu within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25170116

  15. The retinoblastoma gene in human pituitary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, V.L.; Arnold, A.; Alexander, J.M.; Klibanski, A. )

    1993-09-01

    Functional inactivation of the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor gene is important in the pathogenesis of many human tumors. Recently, the frequent occurrence of pituitary tumors was reported in mice genetically engineered to have one defective RB allele, a genetic background analogous to that of patients with familial retinoblastoma. The molecular pathogenesis of human pituitary tumors is largely unknown, and the potential role of RB gene inactivation in these neoplasms has not been examined. Consequently, the authors studied 20 human pituitary tumors (12 clinically nonfunctioning tumors, 4 somatotroph adenomas, 2 prolactinomas, and 2 corticotrophy adenomas) for tumor-specific allelic loss of the RB gene using a highly informative polymorphic locus within the gene. Control leukocyte DNA samples from 18 of these 20 patients were heterozygous at this locus, permitting genetic evaluation of their paired tumor specimens. In contrast to the pituitary tumors in the mouse model, none of these 18 human tumors exhibited RB allelic loss. These findings indicate that RB gene inactivation probably does not play an important role in the pathogenesis of common types of human pituitary tumors. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Tasquinimod modulates tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and improves the antitumor immune response to PD-L1 blockade in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakhlé, Jessica; Pierron, Valérie; Bauchet, Anne-Laure; Plas, Pascale; Thiongane, Amath; Meyer-Losic, Florence; Schmidlin, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    The infiltration of myeloid cells helps tumors to overcome immune surveillance and imparts resistance to cancer immunotherapy. Thus, strategies to modulate the effects of these immune cells may offer a potential therapeutic benefit. We report here that tasquinimod, a novel immunotherapy which targets S100A9 signaling, reduces the immunosuppressive properties of myeloid cells in preclinical models of bladder cancer (BCa). As single anticancer agent, tasquinimod treatment was effective in preventing early stage tumor growth, but did not achieve a clear antitumor effect in advanced tumors. Investigations of this response revealed that tasquinimod induces an increase in the expression of a negative regulator of T cell activation, Programmed-death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). This markedly weakens its antitumor immunity, yet provokes an "inflamed" milieu rendering tumors more prone to T cell-mediated immune attack by PD-L1 blockade. Interestingly, the combination of tasquinimod with an Anti-PD-L1 antibody enhanced the antitumor immune response in bladder tumors. This combination synergistically modulated tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, thereby strongly affecting proliferation and activation of effector T cells. Together, our data provide insight into the rational combination of therapies that activate both innate and adaptive immune system, such as the association of S100A9-targeting agents with immune checkpoints inhibitors, to improve the response to cancer immunotherapeutic agents in BCa.

  17. Tasquinimod modulates tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and improves the antitumor immune response to PD-L1 blockade in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakhlé, Jessica; Pierron, Valérie; Bauchet, Anne-Laure; Plas, Pascale; Thiongane, Amath; Meyer-Losic, Florence; Schmidlin, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The infiltration of myeloid cells helps tumors to overcome immune surveillance and imparts resistance to cancer immunotherapy. Thus, strategies to modulate the effects of these immune cells may offer a potential therapeutic benefit. We report here that tasquinimod, a novel immunotherapy which targets S100A9 signaling, reduces the immunosuppressive properties of myeloid cells in preclinical models of bladder cancer (BCa). As single anticancer agent, tasquinimod treatment was effective in preventing early stage tumor growth, but did not achieve a clear antitumor effect in advanced tumors. Investigations of this response revealed that tasquinimod induces an increase in the expression of a negative regulator of T cell activation, Programmed-death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). This markedly weakens its antitumor immunity, yet provokes an “inflamed” milieu rendering tumors more prone to T cell-mediated immune attack by PD-L1 blockade. Interestingly, the combination of tasquinimod with an Anti-PD-L1 antibody enhanced the antitumor immune response in bladder tumors. This combination synergistically modulated tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, thereby strongly affecting proliferation and activation of effector T cells. Together, our data provide insight into the rational combination of therapies that activate both innate and adaptive immune system, such as the association of S100A9-targeting agents with immune checkpoints inhibitors, to improve the response to cancer immunotherapeutic agents in BCa. PMID:27471612

  18. Paving the Road to Tumor Development and Spreading: Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells are Ruling the Fate

    PubMed Central

    Meirow, Yaron; Kanterman, Julia; Baniyash, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Cancer development is dependent on intrinsic cellular changes as well as inflammatory factors in the tumor macro and microenvironment. The inflammatory milieu nourishes the tumor and contributes to cancer progression. Numerous studies, including ours, have demonstrated that the tumor microenvironment is immunosuppressive, impairing the anticancer immune responses. Chronic inflammation was identified as the key process responsible for this immunosuppression via induction of immature myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Upon a prolonged immune response, MDSCs are polarized toward immunosuppressive cells meant to control the exacerbated immune response. In cancer, the chronic inflammatory response renders the MDSCs harmful. Polarized MDSCs suppress T-cells and natural killer cells, as well as antigen-presenting cells, abrogating the beneficial immune response. These changes in the immunological milieu could also lead to high frequency of mutations, enhanced cancer cell stemness, and angiogenesis, directly supporting tumor initiation, growth, and spreading. The presence of MDSCs in cancer poses a serious obstacle in a variety of immune-based therapies, which rely on the stimulation of antitumor immune responses. Cumulative data, including our own, suggest that the selection of an appropriate and effective anticancer therapy must take into consideration the host’s immune status as well as tumor-related parameters. Merging biomarkers for immune monitoring into the traditional patient’s categorization and follow-up can provide new predictive and diagnostic tools to the clinical practice. Chronic inflammation and MDSCs could serve as novel targets for therapeutic interventions, which can be combined with conventional cancer treatments such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and cancer cell-targeted and immune-based therapies. Intervention in environmental and tumor-specific inflammatory mechanisms will allow better clinical management of cancer toward more efficient

  19. Targeting ornithine decarboxylase by α-difluoromethylornithine inhibits tumor growth by impairing myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Cong; Geng, Zhe; Dominguez, Donye; Chen, Siqi; Fan, Jie; Qin, Lei; Long, Alan; Zhang, Yi; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) is currently used in chemopreventive regimens primarily for its conventional direct anti-carcinogenesis activity. However, little is known about the effect of decarboxylase (ODC) inhibition by DFMO on antitumor immune responses. We showed here that pharmacologic blockade of ODC by DFMO inhibited tumor growth in intact immunocompetent mice, but abrogated in the immunodeficient Rag1−/− mice, suggesting that antitumor effect of DFMO is dependent on the induction of adaptive anti-tumor T cell immune responses. Depletion of CD8+ T cells impeded the tumor-inhibiting advantage of DFMO. Moreover, DFMO treatment enhanced antitumor CD8+ T cell infiltration and IFN-γ production, and augmented the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. Importantly, DFMO impaired Gr1+CD11b+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) suppressive activity through at least two mechanisms, including reducing arginase expression and activity, and inhibiting CD39/CD73-mediated pathway. MDSCs were one primary cellular target of DFMO as indicated by both adoptive transfer and MDSC depletion analyses. Our findings establish a new role of ODC inhibition by DFMO as a viable and effective immunological adjunct in effective cancer treatment, thereby adding to the growing list of chemoimmunotherapeutic applications of these agents. PMID:26663722

  20. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Targeting by Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells: Bridging the Gap from Preclinical Modeling to Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Rotiroti, Maria Caterina; Arcangeli, Silvia; Casucci, Monica; Perriello, Vincenzo; Bondanza, Attilio; Biondi, Andrea; Tettamanti, Sarah; Biagi, Ettore

    2017-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) still represents an unmet clinical need for adult and pediatric high-risk patients, thus demanding advanced and personalized therapies. In this regard, different targeted immunotherapeutic approaches are available, ranging from naked monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to conjugated and multifunctional mAbs (i.e., BiTEs and DARTs). Recently, researchers have focused their attention on novel techniques of genetic manipulation specifically to redirect cytotoxic T cells endowed with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) toward selected tumor associated antigens. So far, CAR T cells targeting the CD19 antigen expressed by B-cell origin hematological cancers have gained impressive clinical results, leading to the possibility of translating the CAR platform to treat other hematological malignancies such as AML. However, one of the main concerns in the field of AML CAR immunotherapy is the identification of an ideal target cell surface antigen, being highly expressed on tumor cells but minimally present on healthy tissues, together with the design of an anti-AML CAR appropriately balancing efficacy and safety profiles. The current review focuses mainly on AML target antigens and the related immunotherapeutic approaches developed so far, deeply dissecting methods of CAR T cell safety improvements, when designing novel CARs approaching human studies.

  1. Gr-1+ myeloid cells derived from tumor-bearing mice inhibit primary T cell activation induced through CD3/CD28 costimulation.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, S A; Li, Y; Chen, S H

    2000-07-15

    Activation of T cells is a necessary step in the development of a specific antitumor immune response. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of Gr-1+ myeloid cells, derived from the bone marrow or spleen of tumor-bearing mice, to inhibit CD3/CD28-mediated T cell activation. Using flow cytometry, we found that growth of a murine colon carcinoma (MCA-26) induces a significant increase in the number of Gr-1+ and Gr-1+/Mac-1+ myeloid cells in both bone marrow and spleen of the tumor host. The proliferative response of T cells was dramatically decreased when naive T cells were activated by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 Abs in the presence of a myeloid-enriched cell fraction derived from spleen or bone marrow of tumor-bearing mice vs the bone marrow of naive mice. Reversal of the inhibitory effect could be achieved by adding a combination of MnTBAP (manganese [III] tetrakis [4-benzoic acid]) porphyrin and l -NMMA (NG-monomethyl-l -arginine), a superoxide dismutase mimetic and inducible NO synthase inhibitor, respectively, or by depletion of the Gr-1-positive cells. IFN-gamma, which is endogenously produced by CD3/CD28-stimulated naive T cells, is involved in induction of the inhibitory activity of myeloid cells. Importantly, when T cells pre-activated with anti-CD3 Abs were used as responder cells, the bone marrow- or spleen-derived Gr-1+ myeloid cells were unable to suppress CD3/CD28-induced T cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that one mechanism by which an increased number of immune suppressive Gr-1+ cells can induce T cell unresponsiveness or immune tolerance in tumor hosts could be through peroxynitrite production upon primary T cell activation.

  2. Evaluation of myeloid cells (tumor-associated tissue eosinophils and mast cells) infiltration in different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Debta, Priyanka; Debta, Fakir Mohan; Chaudhary, Minal; Bussari, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Background: The multifunctional involvement and infiltration of myeloid cells (tumor-associated tissue eosinophils [TATE] and mast cells) can provide a unique opportunity to define relevant effectors functions that may represent novel, therapeutic options for modulation of tumor onset/growth. Aim: Our study aimed to evaluate infiltration of myeloid cells (TATE and Mast cells) infiltration in different grades (WHO grading) of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Materials and Methods: Total 30 cases of OSCC were selected for this study. Hematoxylin and eosin stain and toluidine blue special stain, to evaluate TATE and the mast cells infiltration, were used. Three-year follow-up of OSCC cases was done. Result: Among 30 cases, 63.33% cases of OSCC showed TATE-positive and 36.66% cases showed TATE-negative. Regarding mast cells infiltration, 66.66% OSCC cases showed mast cells positive and 33.33% cases did not show significant mast cells infiltration. We found significant association of TATE and mast cells infiltration in OSCC cases. These myeloid cells infiltration significantly associated with age of patients but did not show any significant association with gender, site, and habit of cases. When we compared these cells infiltration with clinical stages and different histological grades of tumor, we found their infiltration is decreasing, from Stages 1 to Stage 3 of tumor and from well to poorly differentiated carcinoma. We have also found the less infiltration of these myeloid in recurrence cases of OSCC. Conclusion: As the infiltration of TATE and mast cells are correlated, along with evaluation of TATE, we should also evaluate the presence of mast cells infiltration in OSCC. The assessment of myeloid cells could become, in the future, useful for therapeutic approaches in this subset of the patient. PMID:27688609

  3. Targeting myeloid-derived suppressor cells with colony stimulating factor-1 receptor blockade can reverse immune resistance to immunotherapy in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-expressing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Zamarin, Dmitriy; Lesokhin, Alexander; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) promotes immunosuppression by direct action on effector T cells and Tregs and through recruitment, expansion and activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Targeting of MDSCs is clinically being explored as a therapeutic strategy, though optimal targeting strategies and biomarkers predictive of response are presently unknown. Maturation and tumor recruitment of MDSCs are dependent on signaling through the receptor tyrosine kinase CSF-1R on myeloid cells. Here, we show that MDSCs are the critical cell population in IDO-expressing B16 tumors in mediating accelerated tumor outgrowth and resistance to immunotherapy. Using a clinically relevant drug, we show that inhibition of CSF-1R signaling can functionally block tumor-infiltrating MDSCs and enhance anti-tumor T cell responses. Furthermore, inhibition of CSF-1R sensitizes IDO-expressing tumors to immunotherapy with T cell checkpoint blockade, and combination of CSF-1R blockade with IDO inhibitors potently elicits tumor regression. These findings provide evidence for a critical and functional role for MDSCs on the in vivo outcome of IDO-expressing tumors. PMID:27211548

  4. Gene expression profiling of human fibrocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (f-MDSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Emilia Maria Cristina; Zoso, Alessia; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo; Serafini, Paolo; Inverardi, Luca; Bicciato, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been shown to control self-reactive and anti-graft effector T-cells in autoimmunity and transplantation, but their therapeutic use is limited by their scarce availability in the peripheral blood of tumor-free donors. We isolated and characterized a novel population of myeloid suppressor cells, named fibrocytic MDSC (f-MDSC), which are differentiated from umbilical cord blood (UCB) precursors (Zoso et al., 2014). This MDSC subset promotes regulatory T-cell expansion and induces normoglycemia in a xenogeneic model of type 1 diabetes. Here we describe in details the experimental design and the bioinformatics analyses of the gene expression dataset used to investigate the molecular mechanisms at the base of MDSC tolerogenic and suppressive properties. We also provide an R code to easily access the data and perform the quality controls and basic analyses relevant to this dataset. Raw and pre-processed data are available at Gene Expression Omnibus under accession GSE52376. PMID:26484135

  5. Glutathione Levels in Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gamcsik, Michael P.; Kasibhatla, Mohit S.; Teeter, Stephanie D.; Colvin, O. Michael

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes clinical studies in which glutathione was measured in tumor tissue from patients with brain, breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, head and neck and lung cancer. Glutathione tends to be elevated in breast, ovarian, head and neck and lung cancer and lower in brain and liver tumors compared to disease-free tissue. Cervical, colorectal, gastric and esophageal cancers show both higher and lower levels of tumor glutathione. Some studies show an inverse relationship between patient survival and tumor glutathione. Based on this survey, we recommend approaches that may improve the clinical value of glutathione as a biomarker. PMID:22900535

  6. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) facilitate distant metastasis of malignancies by shielding circulating tumor cells (CTC) from immune surveillance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiaofei; Liao, Quan; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms of distant metastasis of malignancies largely remain unknown. Circulating tumor cells (CTC) derived from the primary cancer initiate distant metastasis by entering and traversing the bloodstream. Current methods to detect CTC are based on the notion that CTC do not express the common leukocyte antigen CD45. However, these methods neglect the fact that CTC can directly adhere to platelets and immune cells and therefore appear to be CD45-positive. The potential effects of interactions between CTC and adhesive immune cells have been largely overlooked, despite the fact that most CTC are killed by immune effector cells and only those that evade immune surveillance result in clonal expansion and metastatic lesions. It is crucial to define the characteristics that allow a select CTC population to escape immune surveillance; particularly, it must be determined whether interactions between CTC and adhesive immune cells provide a protective effect on CTC survival. If interactions between CTC and adhesive immune cells offer a selective advantage to those CTC cells, the next consideration is which characteristics of a CTC-immune cell population allow sufficient protection to facilitate immune evasion. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a large heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that accumulate during cancer progression to induce extensively systemic and local immunosuppression, a phenomenon that has been demonstrated to facilitate cancer distant metastasis. We hypothesize, therefore, that CTC populations interacting with adhesive immune cells will have different biological behavior than CTC populations alone. Further, we hypothesize that CTC can create a defensive shield consisting of adhesive MDSC, which allows evasion of immune surveillance and therefore facilitates distant metastatic lesions. This possibility highlights the importance of direct interactions between CTC and adhesive immune cells and suggests the potential target that

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF CYTOKINE-INDUCED MYELOID-DERIVED SUPPRESSOR CELLS FROM NORMAL HUMAN PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Melissa G.; Liebertz, Daniel J.; Epstein, Alan L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Tumor immune tolerance can derive from the recruitment of suppressor cell populations, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). In cancer patients, increased MDSC correlate with more aggressive disease and a poor prognosis. Experimental Design Expression of 15 immune factors (TGFβ, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, GM-CSF, M-CSF, IDO, FLT3L, c-kit L, iNOS, ARG-1, TNFα, COX2, VEGF) by MDSC-inducing human solid tumor cell lines was evaluated by RT-PCR. Based upon these data, cytokine mixtures were then tested for their ability to generate suppressive CD33+ cells from healthy donor PBMC in vitro by measuring their ability to inhibit the proliferation of, and IFNγ production by, fresh autologous human T cells after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Induced MDSC were characterized with respect to their morphology, surface phenotype, and gene expression profile. Results MDSC-inducing cancer cell lines demonstrated multiple pathways for MDSC generation, including over-expression of IL-6, IL-1β, COX2, M-CSF, and IDO. CD33+ cells with potent suppressive capacity were best generated in vitro by GM-CSF and IL-6, and secondarily by GM-CSF + IL-1β, PGE2, TNFα, or VEGF. Characterization studies of cytokine-induced suppressive cells revealed CD33+CD11b+CD66b+HLA-DRlowIL-13Rα2int large mononuclear cells with abundant basophilic cytoplasm. Expression of iNOS, TGFβ, NOX2, VEGF, and/or ARG-1 was also up-regulated and transwell studies showed suppression of autologous T cells to be contact dependent. Conclusion Suppressive CD33+ cells generated from PBMC by GM-CSF and IL-6 were consistent with human MDSC. This study suggests that these cytokines are potential therapeutic targets for the inhibition of MDSC induction in cancer patients. PMID:20644162

  8. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Myeloid Cells in Human Blood, Bronchoalveolar Lavage, and Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yen-Rei A.; Hotten, Danielle F.; Malakhau, Yuryi; Volker, Ellen; Ghio, Andrew J.; Noble, Paul W.; Kraft, Monica; Hollingsworth, John W.; Gunn, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Clear identification of specific cell populations by flow cytometry is important to understand functional roles. A well-defined flow cytometry panel for myeloid cells in human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue is currently lacking. The objective of this study was to develop a flow cytometry–based panel for human BAL and lung tissue. We obtained and performed flow cytometry/sorting on human BAL cells and lung tissue. Confocal images were obtained from lung tissue using antibodies for cluster of differentiation (CD)206, CD169, and E cadherin. We defined a multicolor flow panel for human BAL and lung tissue that identifies major leukocyte populations. These include macrophage (CD206+) subsets and other CD206− leukocytes. The CD206− cells include: (1) three monocyte (CD14+) subsets, (2) CD11c+ dendritic cells (CD14−, CD11c+, HLA-DR+), (3) plasmacytoid dendritic cells (CD14−, CD11c−, HLA-DR+, CD123+), and (4) other granulocytes (neutrophils, mast cells, eosinophils, and basophils). Using this panel on human lung tissue, we defined two populations of pulmonary macrophages: CD169+ and CD169− macrophages. In lung tissue, CD169− macrophages were a prominent cell type. Using confocal microscopy, CD169+ macrophages were located in the alveolar space/airway, defining them as alveolar macrophages. In contrast, CD169− macrophages were associated with airway/alveolar epithelium, consistent with interstitial-associated macrophages. We defined a flow cytometry panel in human BAL and lung tissue that allows identification of multiple immune cell types and delineates alveolar from interstitial-associated macrophages. This study has important implications for defining myeloid cells in human lung samples. PMID:26267148

  9. A proteomic chronology of gene expression through the cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ly, Tony; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shlien, Adam; Soroka, Dominique; Mills, Allie; Emanuele, Michael J; Stratton, Michael R; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have enabled the analysis of cellular protein and RNA levels with unprecedented depth and sensitivity, allowing for an unbiased re-evaluation of gene regulation during fundamental biological processes. Here, we have chronicled the dynamics of protein and mRNA expression levels across a minimally perturbed cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells using centrifugal elutriation combined with mass spectrometry-based proteomics and RNA-Seq, avoiding artificial synchronization procedures. We identify myeloid-specific gene expression and variations in protein abundance, isoform expression and phosphorylation at different cell cycle stages. We dissect the relationship between protein and mRNA levels for both bulk gene expression and for over ∼6000 genes individually across the cell cycle, revealing complex, gene-specific patterns. This data set, one of the deepest surveys to date of gene expression in human cells, is presented in an online, searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01630.001.

  10. Cytogenetics of human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Finkernagel, S.W.; Kletz, T.; Day-Salvatore, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome studies of 55 brain tumors, including meningiomas, gliomas, astrocyomas and pituatary adenomas, were performed. Primary and first passage cultures were successfully obtained in 75% of these samples with an average of 18 G-banded metaphases analyzed per tumor. 44% of all the brain tumors showed numerical and or structural abnormalities. 46% of the primary and 38% of the first passage cultures showed similar numerical gains/losses and complex karyotypic changes. The most frequent numerical abnormalities (n {ge} 5) included loss of chromosomes 10, 22, and Y. The structural abnormalities most often seen involved 1p, 2, 5, 7, 17q and 19. This is an ongoing study which will attempt to correlate tumor type with specific karyotypic changes and to see if any of the observed chromosomal abnormalities provide prognostic indicators.

  11. Regulatory T Cells and Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment Undergo Fas-Dependent Cell Death during IL-2/αCD40 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jonathan M.; Subleski, Jeff J.; Back, Tim; Chen, Xin; Watkins, Stephanie K.; Yagita, Hideo; Sayers, Thomas J.; Murphy, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Fas ligand expression in certain tumors has been proposed to contribute to immunosuppression and poor prognosis. However, immunotherapeutic approaches may elicit the Fas-mediated elimination of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) within tumors that represent major obstacles for cancer immunotherapy. Previously, we showed that IL-2 and agonistic CD40 Ab (αCD40) elicited synergistic antitumor responses coincident with the efficient removal of Tregs and MDSCs. We demonstrate in this study in two murine tumor models that Treg and MDSC loss within the tumor microenvironment after IL-2/αCD40 occurs through a Fas-dependent cell death pathway. Among tumor-infiltrating leukocytes, CD8+ T cells, neutrophils, and immature myeloid cells expressed Fas ligand after treatment. Fas was expressed by tumor-associated Tregs and immature myeloid cells, including MDSCs. Tregs and MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment expressed active caspases after IL-2/αCD40 therapy and, in contrast with effector T cells, Tregs significantly downregulated Bcl-2 expression. In contrast, Tregs and MDSCs proliferated and expanded in the spleen after treatment. Adoptive transfer of Fas-deficient Tregs or MDSCs into wild-type, Treg-, or MDSC-depleted hosts resulted in the persistence of Tregs or MDSCs and the loss of antitumor efficacy in response to IL-2/αCD40. These results demonstrate the importance of Fas-mediated Treg/MDSC removal for successful antitumor immunotherapy. Our results suggest that immunotherapeutic strategies that include exploiting Treg and MDSC susceptibility to Fas-mediated apoptosis hold promise for treatment of cancer. PMID:24808361

  12. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Vellenga, Edo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone marrow retroviral transduction models followed by transplantation. With the advancement of immunodeficient xenograft models, it has become possible to use human stem/progenitor cells for in vivo studies as well as cells directly derived from CML patients. These models not only mimic CML but also have been instrumental in uncovering various fundamental mechanisms of CML disease progression and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance. With the availability of iPSC technology, it has become feasible to derive, maintain, and expand CML subclones that are at least genetically identical to those in patients. The following review provides an overview of all murine as well as human xenograft models for CML established till date. PMID:27642303

  13. Cytogenetic diversity in primary human tumors.

    PubMed

    Wolman, S R; Camuto, P M; Perle, M A

    1988-02-01

    Cytogenetic patterns from primary short-term culture of breast cancer, renal carcinoma, and tumors of the central nervous system are presented to illustrate the range of karyotypic diversity of human solid tumors as well as their biologic differences in culture systems that support their growth. These studies have illustrated several major issues. 1) Results vary with the tissue of origin: primary cultures from breast are almost uniformly diploid, while renal tumors are near-diploid, mosaic, and show clonal aberrations; and CNS tumors are heterogeneous: some diploid, some near-diploid and some highly aneuploid. 2) Results after short-term culture are selective, representing subpopulations from the heterogeneous cells that are detected on direct analysis of fresh tumors by cytogenetics or flow cytometry (FCM). It is not yet clear whether prognosis depends on the dominant population of the primary tumor or alternatively should be influenced by detection of small aneuploid subpopulations. 3) Evidence from all three tumor types supports the interpretation that cytogenetically normal diploid cells constitute part of some tumor populations, and may be better adapted to routine growth in culture than aneuploid subpopulations from the same primary tumors. These cells may also compose a major portion of the viable population of tumors in vivo and, therefore, could represent a useful model for studies of tumorigenesis and therapeutic regimens.

  14. Phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils and their subsets in early-stage human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2017-03-10

    Neutrophils accumulate in many types of human and murine tumors and represent a significant portion of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells. Our current understanding of the role of neutrophils in tumor development has depended primarily on murine models of cancer. However, there are crucial species differences in the evolution of tumors, genetic diversity, immune and inflammatory responses, and intrinsic biology of neutrophils that might have a profound impact on the tumor development and function of neutrophils in mouse versus human tumors. To date, the majority of experimental approaches to study neutrophils in cancer patients have been limited to the examination of circulating blood neutrophils. The phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans, particularly in the early stages of tumor development, have not been extensively investigated. Thus, the long-term goal of our work has been to characterize human TANs and determine their specific role in tumor development. Here, we summarize our findings on human TANs obtained from human early stage lung cancer patients. We will describe the phenotypes of different TAN subsets identified in early stage lung tumors, as well as their functional dialog with T cells.

  15. Tumor-induced CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells exacerbate immune-mediated hepatitis in mice in a CD40-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kapanadze, Tamar; Medina-Echeverz, José; Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Weiss, Jonathan M; Wiltrout, Robert H; Kapoor, Veena; Hawk, Nga; Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A; Manns, Michael P; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2015-04-01

    Immunosuppressive CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate in the livers of tumor-bearing (TB) mice. We studied hepatic MDSCs in two murine models of immune-mediated hepatitis. Unexpectedly, treatment of TB mice with Concanavalin A (Con A) or α-galactosylceramide resulted in increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) serum levels in comparison to tumor-free mice. Adoptive transfer of hepatic MDSCs into naïve mice exacerbated Con A induced liver damage. Hepatic CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) cells revealed a polarized proinflammatory gene signature after Con A treatment. An IFN-γ-dependent upregulation of CD40 on hepatic CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) cells along with an upregulation of CD80, CD86, and CD1d after Con A treatment was observed. Con A treatment resulted in a loss of suppressor function by tumor-induced CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) MDSCs as well as enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated hepatotoxicity. CD40 knockdown in hepatic MDSCs led to increased arginase activity upon Con A treatment and lower ALT/AST serum levels. Finally, blockade of arginase activity in Cd40(-/-) tumor-induced myeloid cells resulted in exacerbation of hepatitis and increased ROS production in vivo. Our findings indicate that in a setting of acute hepatitis, tumor-induced hepatic MDSCs act as proinflammatory immune effector cells capable of killing hepatocytes in a CD40-dependent manner.

  16. Monoclonal antibody therapy directed against human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Majeti, R

    2011-03-03

    Accumulating evidence indicates that many human cancers are organized as a cellular hierarchy initiated and maintained by self-renewing cancer stem cells. This cancer stem cell model has been most conclusively established for human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), although controversies still exist regarding the identity of human AML stem cells (leukemia stem cell (LSC)). A major implication of this model is that, in order to eradicate the cancer and cure the patient, the cancer stem cells must be eliminated. Monoclonal antibodies have emerged as effective targeted therapies for the treatment of a number of human malignancies and, given their target antigen specificity and generally minimal toxicity, are well positioned as cancer stem cell-targeting therapies. One strategy for the development of monoclonal antibodies targeting human AML stem cells involves first identifying cell surface antigens preferentially expressed on AML LSC compared with normal hematopoietic stem cells. In recent years, a number of such antigens have been identified, including CD123, CD44, CLL-1, CD96, CD47, CD32, and CD25. Moreover, monoclonal antibodies targeting CD44, CD123, and CD47 have demonstrated efficacy against AML LSC in xenotransplantation models. Hopefully, these antibodies will ultimately prove to be effective in the treatment of human AML.

  17. Engagement of the Mannose Receptor by Tumoral Mucins Activates an Immune Suppressive Phenotype in Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Allavena, P.; Chieppa, M.; Bianchi, G.; Solinas, G.; Fabbri, M.; Laskarin, G.; Mantovani, A.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs) are abundantly present in the stroma of solid tumors and modulate several important biological processes, such as neoangiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion, and suppression of adaptive immune responses. Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) constitute a large family of transmembrane carbohydrate-binding receptors that recognize pathogens as well as endogenous glycoproteins. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that some CLRs can inhibit the immune response. In this study we investigated TAM-associated molecules potentially involved in their immune suppressive activity. We found that TAMs isolated from human ovarian carcinoma samples predominantly express the CLRs Dectin-1, MDL-1, MGL, DCIR, and most abundantly the Mannose Receptor (MR). Components of carcinomatous ascites and purified tumoral mucins (CA125 and TAG-72) bound the MR and induced its internalization. MR engagement by tumoral mucins and by an agonist anti-MR antibody modulated cytokine production by TAM toward an immune-suppressive profile: increase of IL-10, absence of IL-12, and decrease of the Th1-attracting chemokine CCL3. This study highlights that tumoral mucin-mediated ligation of the MR on infiltrating TAM may contribute to their immune suppressive phenotype. PMID:21331365

  18. Metabolic heterogeneity in human lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Christopher T.; Faubert, Brandon; Yuan, Qing; Lev-Cohain, Naama; Jin, Eunsook; Kim, Jiyeon; Jiang, Lei; Ko, Bookyung; Skelton, Rachael; Loudat, Laurin; Wodzak, Michelle; Klimko, Claire; McMillan, Elizabeth; Butt, Yasmeen; Ni, Min; Oliver, Dwight; Torrealba, Jose; Malloy, Craig R.; Kernstine, Kemp; Lenkinski, Robert E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in the genetic and environmental parameters that influence cell metabolism in culture. Here, we assessed the impact of these factors on human NSCLC metabolism in vivo using intra-operative 13C-glucose infusions in nine NSCLC patients to compare metabolism between tumors and benign lung. While enhanced glycolysis and glucose oxidation were common among these tumors, we observed evidence for oxidation of multiple nutrients in each of them, including lactate as a potential carbon source. Moreover, metabolically heterogeneous regions were identified within and between tumors, and surprisingly, our data suggested potential contributions of non-glucose nutrients in well-perfused tumor areas. Our findings not only demonstrate the heterogeneity in tumor metabolism in vivo but also highlight the strong influence of the microenvironment on this feature. PMID:26853473

  19. MicroRNA-494 is required for the accumulation and functions of tumor-expanded myeloid-derived suppressor cells via targeting of PTEN.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lai, Lihua; Chen, Qingyun; Song, Yinjing; Xu, Sheng; Ma, Feng; Wang, Xiaojian; Wang, Jianli; Yu, Hai; Cao, Xuetao; Wang, Qingqing

    2012-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) potently suppress the anti-tumor immune responses and also orchestrate the tumor microenvironment that favors tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. The molecular networks regulating the accumulation and functions of tumor-expanded MDSCs are largely unknown. In this study, we identified microRNA-494 (miR-494), whose expression was dramatically induced by tumor-derived factors, as an essential player in regulating the accumulation and activity of MDSCs by targeting of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and activation of the Akt pathway. TGF-β1 was found to be the main tumor-derived factor responsible for the upregulation of miR-494 in MDSCs. Expression of miR-494 not only enhanced CXCR4-mediated MDSC chemotaxis but also altered the intrinsic apoptotic/survival signal by targeting of PTEN, thus contributing to the accumulation of MDSCs in tumor tissues. Consequently, downregulation of PTEN resulted in increased activity of the Akt pathway and the subsequent upregulation of MMPs for facilitation of tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Knockdown of miR-494 significantly reversed the activity of MDSCs and inhibited the tumor growth and metastasis of 4T1 murine breast cancer in vivo. Collectively, our findings reveal that TGF-β1-induced miR-494 expression in MDSCs plays a critical role in the molecular events governing the accumulation and functions of tumor-expanded MDSCs and might be identified as a potential target in cancer therapy.

  20. Immune Suppression Mediated by Myeloid and Lymphoid Derived Immune Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment Facilitates Progression of Thyroid Cancers Driven by HrasG12V and Pten Loss

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Lee Ann; Massoll, Nicole; Franco, Aime T

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and is predicted to be the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer by 2030. Approximately one-half of follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTC) contain genetic alterations in RAS family members. Furthermore, Cowden's disease, which is characterized by loss of PTEN, predisposes for the development of FTC in humans. We have shown that thyroid specific expression of HrasG12V at endogenous levels and Pten inactivation (HrasG12V/Pten−/−/TPO-cre mice) leads to the development of FTCs that closely recapitulate human disease, with complete penetrance at one year. In patients, FTCs metastasize via the bloodstream to distant sites, frequently the lungs, bones and brain. The first objective of the study was to determine if these mice developed de novo metastasis to relevant sites. Indeed, spontaneous metastasis to the lungs was observed in 56% of HrasG12V/Pten−/−/TPO-cre mice. We next sought to identify the cellular components within the tumor microenvironment (TME) of FTC that contribute to tumor progression and metastasis via FACS analysis. Surprisingly, a large amount of immune infiltrate was observed. HrasG12V/Pten−/−/TPO-Cre thyroid tumors were comprised of 68.5 ± 11.79% CD45+ cells, in stark contrast to wild-type (WT) thyroids which were comprised of 17.6% CD45+ cells. Further, 53.1 ± 10.9% of the CD45+ cells from HrasG12V/Pten−/−/TPO-Cre thyroid tumors were of myeloid-lineage (CD11b+), consisting of macrophages (F4/80+Gr-1−) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (F4/80−Gr-1+). Further, HrasG12V/Pten−/−/TPO-cre tumors contained Arginase-1 positive cells as determined by immunohistochemical analysis, supporting an immunosuppressive TME in HrasG12V/Pten−/−/TPO-Cre thyroid tumors. We next evaluated whether or not cytotoxic (CD8+) or helper T cells (CD4+) were recruited to HrasG12V/Pten−/−/TPO-Cre tumors. The majority of T cells in these tumors were double positive for CD4 and CD25, markers of

  1. Molecular cloning, expression, and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding a human myeloid membrane antigen (gp150).

    PubMed Central

    Look, A T; Peiper, S C; Rebentisch, M B; Ashmun, R A; Roussel, M F; Lemons, R S; Le Beau, M M; Rubin, C M; Sherr, C J

    1986-01-01

    DNA from a tertiary mouse cell transformant containing amplified human sequences encoding a human myeloid membrane glycoprotein, gp150, was used to construct a bacteriophage lambda library. A single recombinant phage containing 12 kilobases (kb) of human DNA was isolated, and molecular subclones were then used to isolate the complete gp150 gene from a human placental genomic DNA library. The intact gp150 gene, assembled from three recombinant phages, proved to be biologically active when transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. Molecular probes from the gp150 locus annealed with a 4.0-kb polyadenylated RNA transcript derived from human myeloid cell lines and from tertiary mouse cell transformants. The gp150 gene was assigned to human chromosome 15, and was subchromosomally localized to bands q25-26 by in situ hybridization. The chromosomal location of the gp150 gene coincides cytogenetically with the region assigned to the c-fes proto-oncogene, another human gene specifically expressed by myeloid cells. Images PMID:2428842

  2. Tumor-infiltrating CD14-positive myeloid cells and CD8-positive T-cells prolong survival in patients with cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Vos van Steenwijk, P J; Ramwadhdoebe, T H; Goedemans, R; Doorduijn, E M; van Ham, J J; Gorter, A; van Hall, T; Kuijjer, M L; van Poelgeest, M I E; van der Burg, S H; Jordanova, E S

    2013-12-15

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is the influx of myeloid cells. In our study, we investigated the constitution of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and their relationship to other tumor-infiltrating immune cells, tumor characteristics and the disease-specific survival of patients with cervical cancer (CxCa). Triple-color immunofluorescence confocal microscopy was used to locate, identify and quantify macrophages (CD14), their maturation status (CD33) and their polarization (CD163) in a cohort of 86 patients with cervical carcinoma. Quantification of the numbers of myeloid cells revealed that a strong intraepithelial infiltration of CD14+ cells, and more specifically the population of CD14+CD33-CD163- matured M1 macrophages, is associated with a large influx of intraepithelial T lymphocytes (p = 0.008), improved disease-specific survival (p = 0.007) and forms an independent prognostic factor for survival (p = 0.033). The intraepithelial CD8+ T-cell and regulatory T-cell (Treg) ratio also forms an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.010) and combination of these two factors reveals a further increased benefit in survival for patients whose tumor displays a dense infiltration with intraepithelial matured M1 macrophages and a high CD8 T-cell/Treg ratio, indicating that both populations of immune cells simultaneously improve survival. Subsequently, we made a heatmap including all known immune parameters for these patients, whereby we were able to identify different immune signatures in CxCa. These results indicate that reinforcement and activation of the intratumoral M1 macrophages may form an attractive immunotherapeutic option in CxCa.

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitors deplete myeloid-derived suppressor cells induced by 4T1 mammary tumors in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Fang; Ning, Fen; Liu, Zong-Cai; Wu, Long; Li, Zi-Qian; Qi, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Ge; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Cai, Shao-Hui; Du, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been identified as a population of immature myeloid cells that suppress anti-tumor immunity. MDSC are increased in tumor-bearing hosts; thus, depletion of MDSC may enhance anti-tumor immunity. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are chemical agents that are primarily used against hematologic malignancies. The ability of these agents to modulate anticancer immunity has recently been extensively studied. However, the effect of HDACi on MDSC has remained largely unexplored. In the present study, we provide the first demonstration that HDACi treatment decreases MDSC accumulation in the spleen, blood and tumor bed but increases the proportion of T cells (particularly the frequency of IFN-γ- or perforin-producing CD8(+) T cells) in BALB/C mice with 4T1 mammary tumors. In addition, HDACi exposure of bone marrow (BM) cells significantly eliminated the MDSC population induced by GM-CSF or the tumor burden in vitro, which was further demonstrated as functionally important to relieve the inhibitory effect of MDSC-enriched BM cells on T cell proliferation. Mechanistically, HDACi increased the apoptosis of Gr-1(+) cells (almost MDSC) compared with that of Gr-1(-) cells, which was abrogated by the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine, suggesting that the HDACi-induced increase in MDSC apoptosis due to increased intracellular ROS might partially account for the observed depletion of MDSC. These findings suggest that the elimination of MDSC using an HDACi may contribute to the overall anti-tumor properties of these agents, highlighting a novel property of HDACi as potent MDSC-targeting agents, which may be used to enhance the efficacy of immunotherapeutic regimens.

  4. 6-Thioguanine-loaded polymeric micelles deplete myeloid-derived suppressor cells and enhance the efficacy of T cell immunotherapy in tumor-bearing mice

    DOE PAGES

    Jeanbart, Laura; Kourtis, Iraklis C.; van der Vlies, André J.; ...

    2015-05-16

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that suppress effector T cell responses and can reduce the efficacy of cancer immunotherapies. We previously showed that ultra-small polymer nanoparticles efficiently drain to the lymphatics after intradermal injection and target antigen-presenting cells, including Ly6chi Ly6g₋monocytic MDSCs (Mo-MDSCs), in skin-draining lymph nodes (LNs) and spleen. Here, we developed ultra-small polymer micelles loaded with 6-thioguanine (MC-TG), a cytotoxic drug used in the treatment of myelogenous leukemia, with the aim of killing Mo-MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and thus enhancing T cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. We found that 2 days post-injection inmore » tumor-bearing mice (B16-F10 melanoma or E.G7-OVA thymoma), MC-TG depleted Mo-MDSCs in the spleen, Ly6clo Ly6g+ granulocytic MDSCs (G-MDSCs) in the draining LNs, and Gr1int Mo-MDSCs in the tumor. In both tumor models, MC-TG decreased the numbers of circulating Mo- and G-MDSCs, as well as of Ly6chi macrophages, for up to 7 days following a single administration. MDSC depletion was dose dependent and more effective with MC-TG than with equal doses of free TG. Finally, we tested whether this MDSC-depleting strategy might enhance cancer immunotherapies in the B16-F10 melanoma model. We found that MC-TG significantly improved the efficacy of adoptively transferred, OVA-specific CD8+ T cells in melanoma cells expressing OVA. Ultimately, these findings highlight the capacity of MC-TG in depleting MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment and show promise in promoting anti-tumor immunity when used in combination with T cell immunotherapies.« less

  5. Cancer-Associated Myeloid Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Vlaeminck, Yannick; González-Rascón, Anna; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells are critically involved in the pathophysiology of cancers. In the tumor microenvironment (TME), they comprise tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), neutrophils (TANs), dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which are further subdivided into a monocytic subset and a granulocytic subset. Some of these myeloid cells, in particular TAMs and TANs, are divided into type 1 or type 2 cells, according to the paradigm of T helper type 1 or type 2 cells. Type 1-activated cells are generally characterized as cells that aid tumor rejection, while all other myeloid cells are shown to favor tumor progression. Moreover, these cells are often at the basis of resistance to various therapies. Much research has been devoted to study the biology of myeloid cells. This endeavor has proven to be challenging, as the markers used to categorize myeloid cells in the TME are not restricted to particular subsets. Also from a functional and metabolic point of view, myeloid cells share many features. Finally, myeloid cells are endowed with a certain level of plasticity, which further complicates studying them outside their environment. In this article, we challenge the exclusive use of cell markers to unambiguously identify myeloid cell subsets in the TME. We further propose to divide myeloid cells into myeloid regulatory or stimulatory cells according to their pro- or antitumor function, because we contend that for therapeutic purposes it is not targeting the cell subsets but rather targeting their protumor traits; hence, myeloid regulatory cells will push antitumor immunotherapy to the next level. PMID:27065074

  6. Identification of a human intestinal myeloid cell subset that regulates gut homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Barman, Soumik; Kayama, Hisako; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Ogino, Takayuki; Osawa, Hideki; Matsuno, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Mori, Masaki; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Inappropriate activation of T helper (Th) cells, such as Th1 and Th17 cells, is implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disorders including ulcerative colitis (UC). CX3CR1(high) macrophages contribute to intestinal homeostasis through various mechanisms in mice. However, whether mononuclear phagocytes with regulatory functions are present in the human colon is not clearly defined. We investigated whether innate myeloid cells that suppress activation of effector T cells exist in the human intestinal mucosa. Among intestinal lamina propria cells, Lin(-) HLA-DR(high) CD14(+) CD163(high) cells were subdivided into CD160(low) and CD160(high) cells. Both subsets produced high levels of IL-10. CD163(high) CD160(high) cells suppressed effector T cell proliferation, whereas CD163(high) CD160(low) cells induced Th17 differentiation. Patients with UC exhibited increased numbers of CD163(high) CD160(low) cells, while showing profoundly decreased numbers of CD163(high) CD160(high) cells. In this context, CD163(high) CD160(high) cells had higher CD80/CD86 expression and lower IL10RB expression, and these cells did not suppress effector T cell proliferation. The CD163(high) CD160(high) subset in normal intestinal mucosa inhibits inappropriate Th1/Th17 responses through suppression of their proliferation, and its number and suppressive activity are impaired in patients with UC. These findings indicate how human innate immune cells might prevent UC development.

  7. Functional Impairment of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells during Schistosoma haematobium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Everts, Bart; Adegnika, Ayola A.; Kruize, Yvonne C. M.; Smits, Hermelijn H.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Chronic Schistosoma infection is often characterized by a state of T cell hyporesponsiveness of the host. Suppression of dendritic cell (DC) function could be one of the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, since Schistosoma antigens are potent modulators of dendritic cell function in vitro. Yet, it remains to be established whether DC function is modulated during chronic human Schistosoma infection in vivo. To address this question, the effect of Schistosoma haematobium infection on the function of human blood DC was evaluated. We found that plasmacytoid (pDC) and myeloid DC (mDC) from infected subjects were present at lower frequencies in peripheral blood and that mDC displayed lower expression levels of HLA-DR compared to those from uninfected individuals. Furthermore, mDC from infected subjects, but not pDC, were found to have a reduced capacity to respond to TLR ligands, as determined by MAPK signaling, cytokine production and expression of maturation markers. Moreover, the T cell activating capacity of TLR-matured mDC from infected subjects was lower, likely as a result of reduced HLA-DR expression. Collectively these data show that S. haematobium infection is associated with functional impairment of human DC function in vivo and provide new insights into the underlying mechanisms of T cell hyporesponsiveness during chronic schistosomiasis. PMID:20422029

  8. Effects of HDM2 antagonism on sunitinib resistance, p53 activation, SDF-1 induction, and tumor infiltration by CD11b+/Gr-1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The studies reported herein were undertaken to determine if the angiostatic function of p53 could be exploited as an adjunct to VEGF-targeted therapy in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods Nude/beige mice bearing human RCC xenografts were treated with various combinations of sunitinib and the HDM2 antagonist MI-319. Tumors were excised at various time points before and during treatment and analyzed by western blot and IHC for evidence of p53 activation and function. Results Sunitinib treatment increased p53 levels in RCC xenografts and transiently induced the expression of p21waf1, Noxa, and HDM2, the levels of which subsequently declined to baseline (or undetectable) with the emergence of sunitinib resistance. The development of resistance and the suppression of p53-dependent gene expression temporally correlated with the induction of the p53 antagonist HDMX. The concurrent administration of MI-319 markedly increased the antitumor and anti-angiogenic activities of sunitinib and led to sustained p53-dependent gene expression. It also suppressed the expression of the chemokine SDF-1 (CXCL12) and the influx of CD11b+/Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) otherwise induced by sunitinib. Although p53 knockdown markedly reduced the production of the angiostatic peptide endostatin, the production of endostatin was not augmented by MI-319 treatment. Conclusions The evasion of p53 function (possibly through the expression of HDMX) is an essential element in the development of resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy in RCC. The maintenance of p53 function through the concurrent administration of an HDM2 antagonist is an effective means of delaying or preventing the development of resistance. PMID:23497256

  9. Cellular analysis of the histamine H4 receptor in human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Capelo, Ricardo; Lehmann, Christoph; Ahmad, Khalil; Snodgrass, Ryan; Diehl, Olaf; Ringleb, Julia; Flamand, Nicolas; Weigert, Andreas; Stark, Holger; Steinhilber, Dieter; Kahnt, Astrid S

    2016-03-01

    The human histamine H4 receptor (H4R) is a Gαi/o-coupled receptor which is mainly expressed on hematopoietic cells. Accordingly, the receptor is implicated in the pathology of various diseases such as autoimmune disorders, bronchial asthma and pruritus. Due to complicated receptor pharmacology, the lack of a reliable antibody and limited availability of primary cells expressing the receptor the physiology of this receptor is still poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to assess absolute receptor mRNA expression and functionality (intracellular Ca(2+) release) in various human myeloid cell types such as granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). This was put into context with the expression of the H1R and H2R. In addition, the influence of various inflammatory stimuli on H4R expression was investigated in macrophages and monocyte-derived DCs. We found that classically activated macrophages treated with pro-inflammatory stimuli down-regulated histamine receptor mRNA expression as did LPS and zymosan A matured monocyte-derived DCs. In contrast, alternatively activated macrophages (IL-4 or IL-13) upregulated H2R and H4R expression compared to controls. Consistent with existing literature, we found eosinophils to be the major source of the H4R. Since availability of primary eosinophils is limited, we developed a cell model based on the differentiated eosinophilic cell line EOL-1, in which H4R pharmacology and physiology may be studied.

  10. Myelogenous Leukemia in Adult Inbred MHC Defined Miniature Swine: a model for human myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Patricia S.; Teague, Alexander G.S.; Fishman, Brian; Fishman, Aaron S.; Hanekamp, John S.; Moran, Shannon G.; Wikiel, Krzysztof J.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Lo, Diana P.; Duggan, Michael; Arn, J. Scott; Billiter, Bob; Horner, Ben; Houser, Stuart; Yeap, Beow Yong; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; McMorrow, Isabel M.; Sachs, David H.; Bronson, Roderick T; Huang, Christene A.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript reports on five cases of spontaneous myelogenous leukemia, similar to human disease, occurring within highly inbred, histocompatible sublines of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) MHC-defined miniature swine. In cases where a neoplasm was suspected based on clinical observations, samples were obtained for complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, and flow cytometric analysis. Animals confirmed to have neoplasms were euthanized and underwent necropsy. Histological samples were obtained from abnormal tissues and suspect lesions. The phenotype of the malignancies was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of processed peripheral blood mononuclear cells and affected tissues. Five cases of spontaneous myeloid leukemia were identified in adult animals older than 30 months of age. All animals presented with symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, and marked leukocytosis. At autopsy, all animals had systemic disease involvement and presented with severe hepatosplenomegaly. Three of the five myelogenous leukemias have successfully been expanded in vitro. The clustered incidence of disease in this closed herd suggests that genetic factors may be contributing to disease development. Myelogenous leukemia cell lines established from inbred sublines of MGH MHC-defined miniature swine have the potential to be utilized as a model to evaluate therapies of human leukemia. PMID:20079939

  11. Co-transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells and human breast cancer cells in NSG mice: a novel approach to generate tumor cell specific human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wege, Anja K; Schmidt, Marcus; Ueberham, Elke; Ponnath, Marvin; Ortmann, Olaf; Brockhoff, Gero; Lehmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Humanized tumor mice (HTM) were generated by the co-transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells and human breast cancer cells overexpressing HER2 into neonatal NOD-scid IL2Rγ(null) (NSG) mice. These mice are characterized by the development of a human immune system in combination with human breast cancer growth. Due to concurrent transplantation into newborn mice, transfer of MHC-mismatched tumor cells resulted in solid coexistence and immune cell activation (CD4(+) T cells, natural killer cells, and myeloid cells), but without evidence for rejection. Histological staining of the spleen of HTM revealed co-localization of human antigen-presenting cells together with human T and B cells allowing MHC-dependent interaction, and thereby the generation of T cell-dependent antibody production. Here, we investigated the capability of these mice to generate human tumor-specific antibodies and correlated immunoglobulin titers with tumor outgrowth. We found detectable IgM and also IgG amounts in the serum of HTM, which apparently controlled tumor development when IgG serum concentrations were above 10 µg/ml. Western blot analyses revealed that the tumor-specific antibodies generated in HTM did not recognize HER2/neu antigens, but different, possibly relevant antigens for breast cancer therapy. In conclusion, HTM offer a novel approach to generate complete human monoclonal antibodies that do not require further genetic manipulation (e. g., humanization) for a potential application in humans. In addition, efficacy and safety of the generated antibodies can be tested in the same mouse model under human-like conditions. This might be of particular interest for cancer subtypes with no currently available antibody therapy.

  12. Ceramide as a Target of Marine Triterpene Glycosides for Treatment of Human Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Shin, Sung-Won; Stonik, Valentin A.; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous myeloid clonal disorder exhibiting the accumulation of immature myeloid progenitors in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Standard AML therapy requires intensive combination chemotherapy, which leads to significant treatment-related toxicity. The search for new, low toxic marine agents, inducing the generation of ceramide in leukemic cells is a new approach to improve the therapy of leukemia. This review focuses on the metabolism of sphingolipids, the role of ceramide in treating leukemia, and the antitumor activity, related to ceramide metabolism, of some marine metabolites, particularly stichoposides, triterpene glycosides extracted from sea cucumbers of the family Stichopodiidae. PMID:27827870

  13. Potential role of curcumin and taurine combination therapy on human myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro.

    PubMed

    El-Houseini, Motawa E; Refaei, Mohammed Osman; Amin, Ahmed Ibrahim; Abol-Ftouh, Mahmoud A

    2013-10-01

    Curcumin and taurine are natural products that have been used in this study evaluating their therapeutic effect on myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro. Sixty patients with myeloid leukemia and 30 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. All patient groups were admitted to the Medical Oncology Department of the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. There were statistically significant differences between treated leukemic cells compared to normal mononuclear leukocytes in cell density, interferon-γ and immunophenotypic profile, mainly CD4+, CD8 + and CD25+. This work highlights the possibility of using curcumin and taurine as a potential useful therapy in the management of patients suffering from chronic and acute myeloid leukemias.

  14. Testicular myeloid sarcoma: case report

    PubMed Central

    Zago, Luzia Beatriz Ribeiro; Ladeia, Antônio Alexandre Lisbôa; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; de Oliveira, Leonardo Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid sarcomas are extramedullary solid tumors composed of immature granulocytic precursor cells. In association with acute myeloid leukemia and other myeloproliferative disorders, they may arise concurrently with compromised bone marrow related to acute myeloid leukemia, as a relapsed presentation, or occur as the first manifestation. The testicles are considered to be an uncommon site for myeloid sarcomas. No therapeutic strategy has been defined as best but may include chemotherapy, radiotherapy and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This study reports the evolution of a patient with testicular myeloid sarcoma as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. The patient initially refused medical treatment and died five months after the clinical condition started. PMID:23580888

  15. [Preliminary establishment of transplanted human chronic myeloid leukemia model in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Min; Ding, Xin; Zhang, Long-Zhen; Cen, Jian-Nong; Chen, Zi-Xing

    2011-12-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a malignant clonal disease derived from hematopoietic stem cells. CML stem cells were thought to be the root which could lead disease development and ultimately rapid change. However, a stable animal model for studying the characteristics of CML stem cells is currently lacking. This study was aimed to establish a transplanted human CML nude-mice model to further explore the biological behavior of CML stem cells in vivo, and to enrich CML stem cells in nude mice by series transplantation. The 4 - 6 weeks old BALB/c nude mice pretreated by splenectomy (S), cytoxan intraperitoneal injection (C) and sublethal irradiation (I) were transplanted intravenously with (5 - 7) × 10(7) of bone marrow mononuclear cells from CML patients in chronic phase. Alternatively, 4 - 6 weeks old BALB/c nude mice pretreated by lethal irradiation were transplanted intravenously with 5 × 10(6) homologous bone marrow cells of BALB/c nude mice together with (5 - 7) × 10(7) of bone marrow mononuclear cells from CML patients in chronic phase simultaneously. The leukemic cells engrafted and infiltrated in organs and bone marrow of the mice were tracked by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), plastic-embedded biopsy and flow cytometry. The results of these two methods were compared. The results showed that human CML cells engrafted and infiltrating into the bone marrow of two nude mice pretreated with SCI could be detected. In spite of the low successful rate, results suggested the feasibility of this method by using BALB/c nude mice as a human CML animal model. In contrast, in nude mice pretreated by the lethal dose irradiation, CML cells in the bone marrow could not be found. It is concluded that human bone marrow CML cells can results in leukemia in nude mice pretreated by SCI. Thus this study provides a new strategy for establishment of CML animal models which deserves further elaboration.

  16. Tadalafil Reduces Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Regulatory T Cells and Promotes Tumor Immunity in Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Jennifer L.; Reis, Isildinha M.; De la fuente, Adriana C.; Gomez, Carmen; Sargi, Zoukaa; Nazarian, Ronen; Califano, Joseph; Borrello, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and regulatory T cells (Treg) play a key role in the progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). On the basis of our preclinical data demonstrating that phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibition can modulate these cell populations, we evaluated whether the PDE5 inhibitor tadalafil can revert tumor-induced immunosuppression and promote tumor immunity in patients with HNSCC. Experimental Design First, we functionally and phenotypically characterized MDSCs in HNSCCs and determined, retrospectively, whether their presence at the tumor site correlates with recurrence. Then, we performed a prospective single-center, double-blinded, randomized, three-arm study in which patients with HNSCC undergoing definitive surgical resection of oral and oropharyngeal tumors were treated with tadalafil 10 μg/day, 20 μg/day, or placebo for at least 20 days preoperatively. Blood and tumor MDSC and Treg presence and CD8+ T-cell reactivity to tumor antigens were evaluated before and after treatment. Results MDSCs were characterized in HNSCC and their intratumoral presence significantly correlates with recurrence. Tadalafil treatment was well tolerated and significantly reduced both MDSCs and Treg concentrations in the blood and in the tumor (P < 0.05). In addition, the concentration of blood CD8+ T cells reactive to autologous tumor antigens significantly increased after treatment (P < 0.05). Tadalafil immunomodulatory activity was maximized at an intermediate dose but not at higher doses. Mechanistic analysis suggests a possible off-target effect on PDE11 at high dosages that, by increasing intracellular cAMP, may negatively affect antitumor immunity. Conclusions Tadalafil seems to beneficially modulate the tumor micro- and macro-environment in patients with HNSCC by lowering MDSCs and Tregs and increasing tumor-specific CD8+ T cells in a dose-dependent fashion. PMID:25320361

  17. Distinct populations of metastases-enabling myeloid cells expand in the liver of mice harboring invasive and preinvasive intra-abdominal tumor.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Michael K; Mallen-St Clair, Jon; Bedrosian, Andrea S; Malhotra, Ashim; Vera, Valery; Ibrahim, Junaid; Henning, Justin; Pachter, H Leon; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Frey, Alan B; Miller, George

    2010-04-01

    The liver is the most common site of adenocarcinoma metastases, even in patients who initially present with early disease. We postulated that immune-suppressive cells in the liver of tumor-bearing hosts inhibit anti-tumor T cells, thereby accelerating the growth of liver metastases. Using models of early preinvasive pancreatic neoplasia and advanced colorectal cancer, aims of this study were to determine immune phenotype, stimulus for recruitment, inhibitory effects, and tumor-enabling function of immune-suppressive cells in the liver of tumor-bearing hosts. We found that in mice with intra-abdominal malignancies, two distinct CD11b(+)Gr1(+) populations with divergent phenotypic and functional properties accumulate in the liver, becoming the dominant hepatic leukocytes. Their expansion is contingent on tumor expression of KC. These cells are distinct from CD11b(+)Gr1(+) populations in other tissues of tumor-bearing hosts in terms of cellular phenotype and cytokine and chemokine profile. Liver CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells are highly suppressive of T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxicity and induce the development of Tregs. Moreover, liver myeloid-derived suppressor cells accelerate the development of hepatic metastases by inactivation of cytotoxic T cells. These findings may explain the propensity of patients with intra-abdominal cancers to develop liver metastases and suggest a promising target for experimental therapeutics.

  18. α-Tomatine inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in HL-60 human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huarong; Chen, Shaohua; Van Doren, Jeremiah; Li, Dongli; Farichon, Chelsea; He, Yan; Zhang, Qiuyan; Zhang, Kun; Conney, Allan H; Goodin, Susan; Du, Zhiyun; Zheng, Xi

    2015-06-01

    α‑Tomatine is a glycoalkaloid that occurs naturally in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). In the present study, the effects of α‑tomatine on human myeloid leukemia HL‑60 cells were investigated. Treatment of HL‑60 cells with α‑tomatine resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration‑dependent manner. Tomatidine, the aglycone of tomatine had little effect on the growth and apoptosis of HL‑60 cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by α‑tomatine in HL‑60 cells was partially abrogated by addition of cholesterol indicating that interactions between α‑tomatine and cell membrane‑associated cholesterol may be important in mediating the effect of α‑tomatine. Activation of nuclear factor‑κB by the phorbol ester, 12‑O‑tetradecanoylphorbol‑13‑acetate failed to prevent apoptosis in HL‑60 cells treated with α‑tomatine. In animal experiments, it was found that treatment of mice with α‑tomatine inhibited the growth of HL‑60 xenografts in vivo. Results from the present study indicated that α‑tomatine may have useful anti‑leukemia activities.

  19. α-tomatine inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in HL-60 human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, HUARONG; CHEN, SHAOHUA; VAN DOREN, JEREMIAH; LI, DONGLI; FARICHON, CHELSEA; HE, YAN; ZHANG, QIUYAN; ZHANG, KUN; CONNEY, ALLAN H; GOODIN, SUSAN; DU, ZHIYUN; ZHENG, XI

    2015-01-01

    α-tomatine is a glycoalkaloid that occurs naturally in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). In the present study, the effects of α-tomatine on human myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells were investigated. Treatment of HL-60 cells with α-tomatine resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Tomatidine, the aglycone of tomatine had little effect on the growth and apoptosis of HL-60 cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by α-tomatine in HL-60 cells was partially abrogated by addition of cholesterol indicating that interactions between α-tomatine and cell membrane-associated cholesterol may be important in mediating the effect of α-tomatine. Activation of nuclear factor-κB by the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate failed to prevent apoptosis in HL-60 cells treated with α-tomatine. In animal experiments, it was found that treatment of mice with α-tomatine inhibited the growth of HL-60 xenografts in vivo. Results from the present study indicated that α-tomatine may have useful anti-leukemia activities. PMID:25625536

  20. Altered expression of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase in tumor-infiltrated CD11b myeloid cells: a mechanism for immune evasion in cancer.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Kaliberov, Sergei; Daurkin, Irina; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Buchsbaum, Donald; Vieweg, Johannes; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2009-06-15

    Many cancers are known to produce high amounts of PGE(2), which is involved in both tumor progression and tumor-induced immune dysfunction. The key enzyme responsible for the biological inactivation of PGE(2) in tissue is NAD(+)-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). It is well established that cancer cells frequently show down-regulated expression of 15-PGDH, which plays a major role in catabolism of the PGE(2). Here we demonstrate that tumor-infiltrated CD11b cells are also deficient for the 15-PGDH gene. Targeted adenovirus-mediated delivery of 15-PGDH gene resulted in substantial inhibition of tumor growth in mice with implanted CT-26 colon carcinomas. PGDH-mediated antitumor effect was associated with attenuated tumor-induced immune suppression and substantially reduced secretion of immunosuppressive mediators and cytokines such as PGE(2), IL-10, IL-13, and IL-6 by intratumoral CD11b cells. We show also that introduction of 15-PGDH gene in tumor tissue is sufficient to redirect the differentiation of intratumoral CD11b cells from immunosuppressive M2-oriented F4/80(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) into M1-oriented CD11c(+) MHC class II-positive myeloid APCs. Notably, the administration of the 15-PGDH gene alone demonstrated a significant therapeutic effect promoting tumor eradication and long-term survival in 70% of mice with preestablished tumors. Surviving mice acquired antitumor T cell-mediated immune response. This study for the first time demonstrates an important role of the 15-PGDH in regulation of local antitumor immune response and highlights the potential to be implemented to enhance the efficacy of cancer therapy and immunotherapy.

  1. Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells: Fuel the Fire.

    PubMed

    Achyut, B R; Arbab, Ali S

    2014-08-01

    Low oxygen tension, hypoxia, is a characteristic of many tumors and associated with the poor prognosis. Hypoxia invites bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) from bone marrow to the site of tumor. These recruited CXCR4+ BMDCs provide favorable environment for the tumor growth by acquiring pro-angiogenic phenotype such as CD45+VEGFR2+ Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPC), or CD45+Tie2+ myeloid cells. CD11b+CD13+ myeloid population of the BMDCs modulate tumor progression. These myeloid populations retain immunosuppressive characteristics, for example, myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and regulates immune- suppression by inhibiting cytotoxic T cell function. In addition, MDSCs were observed at the premetastatic niche of the distant organs in other tumors. Protumorigenic and prometastatic role of the myeloid cells provides a basis for therapeutic targeting of immunosuppression and thus inhibiting tumor development and metastasis.

  2. Secondary Lymphoid Organ Homing Phenotype of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells Disrupted by an Intracellular Oral Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Brodie; Zakhary, Ibrahim; El-Awady, Ahmed; Scisci, Elizabeth; Carrion, Julio; O'Neill, John C.; Rawlings, Aaron; Stern, J. Kobi; Susin, Cristiano

    2014-01-01

    Several intracellular pathogens, including a key etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, infect blood myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs). This infection results in pathogen dissemination to distant inflammatory sites (i.e., pathogen trafficking). The alteration in chemokine-chemokine receptor expression that contributes to this pathogen trafficking function, particularly toward sites of neovascularization in humans, is unclear. To investigate this, we utilized human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and primary endothelial cells in vitro, combined with ex vivo-isolated blood mDCs and serum from chronic periodontitis subjects and healthy controls. Our results, using conditional fimbria mutants of P. gingivalis, show that P. gingivalis infection of MoDCs induces an angiogenic migratory profile. This profile is enhanced by expression of DC-SIGN on MoDCs and minor mfa-1 fimbriae on P. gingivalis and is evidenced by robust upregulation of CXCR4, but not secondary lymphoid organ (SLO)-homing CCR7. This disruption of SLO-homing capacity in response to respective chemokines closely matches surface expression of CXCR4 and CCR7 and is consistent with directed MoDC migration through an endothelial monolayer. Ex vivo-isolated mDCs from the blood of chronic periodontitis subjects, but not healthy controls, expressed a similar migratory profile; moreover, sera from chronic periodontitis subjects expressed elevated levels of CXCL12. Overall, we conclude that P. gingivalis actively “commandeers” DCs by reprogramming the chemokine receptor profile, thus disrupting SLO homing, while driving migration toward inflammatory vascular sites. PMID:24126519

  3. Induction of cytosine arabinoside-resistant human myeloid leukemia cell death through autophagy regulation by hydroxychloroquine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yundeok; Eom, Ju-In; Jeung, Hoi-Kyung; Jang, Ji Eun; Kim, Jin Seok; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Young Sam; Min, Yoo Hong

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) on cell death of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)-resistant human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Ara-C-sensitive (U937, AML-2) and Ara-C-resistant (U937/AR, AML-2/AR) human AML cell lines were used to evaluate HCQ-regulated cytotoxicity, autophagy, and apoptosis as well as effects on cell death-related signaling pathways. We found that HCQ-induced dose- and time-dependent cell death in Ara-C-resistant cells compared to Ara-C-sensitive cell lines. The extent of cell death and features of HCQ-induced autophagic markers including increase in microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) I conversion to LC3-II, beclin-1, ATG5, as well as green fluorescent protein-LC3 positive puncta and autophagosome were remarkably greater in U937/AR cells. Also, p62/SQSTM1 was increased in response to HCQ. p62/SQSTM1 protein interacts with both LC3-II and ubiquitin protein and is degraded in autophagosomes. Therefore, a reduction of p62/SQSTM1 indicates increased autophagic degradation, whereas an increase of p62/SQSTM1 by HCQ indicates inhibited autophagic degradation. Knock down of p62/SQSTM1 using siRNA were prevented the HCQ-induced LC3-II protein level as well as significantly reduced the HCQ-induced cell death in U937/AR cells. Also, apoptotic cell death and caspase activation in U937/AR cells were increased by HCQ, provided evidence that HCQ-induced autophagy blockade. Taken together, our data show that HCQ-induced apoptotic cell death in Ara-C-resistant AML cells through autophagy regulation.

  4. DNA methylation profiles in the human genes for tumor necrosis factors. alpha. and. beta. in subpopulations of leukocytes and in leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanek, S.; Radbruch, A.; Tesch, H.; Renz, D.; Doerfler, W. )

    1991-07-01

    The genomic sequencing technique has been applied to assess the state of methylation in the DNA from human leukocyte subpopulations from healthy individuals and in the DNA from several individuals with myeloid or lymphatic leukemias or non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Leukocyte populations were purified by the high-gradient magnetic cell sorting technique. In the human tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) gene segment between nucleotides 300 and 1150, the specific methylation profile in the DNA from human granulocytes and monocytes is maintained in three cases of myeloid leukemia. In the TNF-{beta} gene, DNA methylation is decreased in several examples of acute or chronic myeloid leukemias in comparison to normal human granulocytes or monocytes, whose DNA is almost completely methylated between nucleotides 700 and 900. In human T and B lymphocytes, the main producers of TNF-{beta}, in three instances of chronic lymphatic leukemias and two cases of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, all 5{prime}-CG-3{prime} sequences are unmethylated in this region. The DNA from the human HeLa cell line is highly methylated at all 5{prime}-CG-3{prime} sequences in the TNF-{alpha} and -{beta} genes. The TNF-{alpha} gene is transcribed in the cells of one case of acute myeloid leukemia in which the analyzed region of the TNF-{alpha} gene is completely unmethylated. The TNF-{beta} gene is not transcribed in any of the malignant cells tested.

  5. Metabolism of steroids by human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Weidenfeld, J; Schiller, H

    1984-01-01

    Hormonal steroids or their precursors can be metabolized in the CNS to products with altered hormonal activity. The importance of the intracerebral transformation of steroids has been demonstrated, particularly with regard to neuroendocrine regulation and sexual behavior. These studies were carried out on normal brain tissues, but the ability of neoplastic tissues of CNS origin to metabolize steroids is unknown. We investigated the in vitro metabolism of tritiated pregnenolone, testosterone, and estradiol-17 beta by homogenates of four brain tumors defined as astrocytomas. In three tumors of cortical origin, removed from adult patients, the only enzymic activity found was the conversion of estradiol to estrone. In one tumor of cerebellar origin removed from an 11-year-old boy, the following conversions were found: pregnenolone to progesterone, testosterone to either androstenedione or estradiol, and estradiol to estrone. These results demonstrate that human astrocytomas can transform steroids to compounds with modified hormonal activity. These compounds formed by the tumorous tissue can affect brain function, which may be of clinical significance. Furthermore, these results may add important parameters for biochemical characterization of neoplastic brain tissues.

  6. Critical Role of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Tumor-Induced Liver Immune Suppression through Inhibition of NKT Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongru; Li, Zheng; Wang, Li; Tian, Gaofei; Tian, Jun; Yang, Zishan; Cao, Guangchao; Zhou, Hong; Zhao, Liqing; Wu, Zhenzhou; Yin, Zhinan

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis followed by the tumor development is the primary cause of death for cancer patients. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how the growth of tumor resulted in the immune suppression, especially at the blood-enriched organ such as liver, were largely unknown. In this report, we studied the liver immune response of tumor-bearing (TB) mice using concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis model. We demonstrated that TB mice displayed an immune suppression phenotype, with attenuated alanine aminotransferase levels and liver damage upon Con A treatment. We also elucidated that large amounts of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) being influx into the liver in TB mice and these MDSCs were essential for liver immune suppression through both depletion and reconstitution approaches. We further determined that these MDSCs selectively suppressed the IFN-γ production deriving from NKT cells through membrane-bound transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). Finally, we defined a tumor-derived TGF-β-triggered CXCL1/2/5- and CXCR2-dependent recruitment of MDSC into the liver. In summary, our results defined a novel mechanism of liver immune suppression triggered by growing living tumor and provided possible therapeutic targets against these MDSCs. PMID:28243237

  7. Molecular Pathways: Myeloid Complicity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stromnes, Ingunn M.; Greenberg, Philip D.; Hingorani, Sunil R.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-induced inflammation results in accumulation of myeloid cells. It has become increasingly evident that tumor-dependent factors condition myeloid cells toward an immunosuppressive and pro-tumorigenic phenotype. These myeloid cells include progenitors and progeny of monocytes, granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Myeloid cells are not simply bystanders in malignancy or barometers of disease burden. Reflecting their dynamic and plastic nature, myeloid cells manifesta continuum of cellular differentiation and are intimately involved at all stages of neoplastic progression. They can promote tumorigenesis through both immune-dependent and independent mechanisms and can dictate response to therapies. A greater understanding of the inherent plasticity and relationships among myeloid subsets is needed to inform therapeutic targeting. New clinical trials are being designed to modulate the activities of myeloid cells in cancer, which may be essential to maximize the efficacy of both conventional cytotoxic and immune-based therapies for solid tumors. PMID:25047706

  8. [Oncolytic virotherapy for human solid tumors].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2009-05-01

    Replication-selective tumor-specific viruses present a novel approach for treatment of neoplastic disease. Telomerase activation is considered to be a critical step in carcinogenesis, and its activity correlates closely with human telomerase reverse transcriptase(hTERT)expression. We constructed an attenuated adenovirus 5 vector(Telomelysin, OBP-301), in which the hTERT promoter element drives expression of E1 genes. Telomelysin replicated efficiently and induced marked cell killing in a panel of human cancer cell lines, whereas replication as well as cytotoxicity was highly attenuated in normal human cells lacking telomerase activity. We further modified the E3 region of OBP-301 to contain green fluorescent protein(GFP)gene for monitoring viral replication(TelomeScan, OBP-401). When TelomeScan was intratumorally injected into human tumors orthotopically implanted into the rectum in mice, para-aortic lymph node metastasis could be visualized at laparotomy with a three-chip color cooled charged-coupled device camera. This article reviews recent highlights in this rapidly evolving field of cancer therapeutic and diagnostic approaches using telomerase-specific oncolytic adenoviruses.

  9. 6-Thioguanine-loaded polymeric micelles deplete myeloid-derived suppressor cells and enhance the efficacy of T cell immunotherapy in tumor-bearing mice

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanbart, Laura; Kourtis, Iraklis C.; van der Vlies, André J.; Swartz, Melody A.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-16

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that suppress effector T cell responses and can reduce the efficacy of cancer immunotherapies. We previously showed that ultra-small polymer nanoparticles efficiently drain to the lymphatics after intradermal injection and target antigen-presenting cells, including Ly6chi Ly6gmonocytic MDSCs (Mo-MDSCs), in skin-draining lymph nodes (LNs) and spleen. Here, we developed ultra-small polymer micelles loaded with 6-thioguanine (MC-TG), a cytotoxic drug used in the treatment of myelogenous leukemia, with the aim of killing Mo-MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and thus enhancing T cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. We found that 2 days post-injection in tumor-bearing mice (B16-F10 melanoma or E.G7-OVA thymoma), MC-TG depleted Mo-MDSCs in the spleen, Ly6clo Ly6g+ granulocytic MDSCs (G-MDSCs) in the draining LNs, and Gr1int Mo-MDSCs in the tumor. In both tumor models, MC-TG decreased the numbers of circulating Mo- and G-MDSCs, as well as of Ly6chi macrophages, for up to 7 days following a single administration. MDSC depletion was dose dependent and more effective with MC-TG than with equal doses of free TG. Finally, we tested whether this MDSC-depleting strategy might enhance cancer immunotherapies in the B16-F10 melanoma model. We found that MC-TG significantly improved the efficacy of adoptively transferred, OVA-specific CD8+ T cells in melanoma cells expressing OVA. Ultimately, these findings highlight the capacity of MC-TG in depleting MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment and show promise in promoting anti-tumor immunity when used in combination with T cell immunotherapies.

  10. Expression and functional characterization of CD33 transcript variants in human acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Laszlo, George S.; Harrington, Kimberly H.; Gudgeon, Chelsea J.; Beddoe, Mary E.; Fitzgibbon, Matthew P.; Ries, Rhonda E.; Lamba, Jatinder K.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Meshinchi, Soheil; Walter, Roland B.

    2016-01-01

    With the demonstration of improved survival of some acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with the CD33 antibody-drug conjugate, gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO), CD33 has been validated as a target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. Since previous studies identified a CD33 splice variant missing exon 2 (CD33∆E2) and, consequently, the immune-dominant membrane-distal V-set domain, we investigated the expression and functional characteristics of CD33 transcript variants in AML. In primary AML specimens, we not only found full-length CD33 (CD33FL) and CD33∆E2 but also corresponding variants containing an alternate exon 7 predicted to encode a CD33 protein lacking most of the intracellular domain (CD33E7a and, not previously described, CD33∆E2,E7a) in almost all cases. In acute leukemia cell sublines engineered to express individual CD33 splice variants, all splice variants had endocytic properties. CD33FL and CD33E7a mediated similar degrees of GO cytotoxicity, whereas CD33∆E2 and CD33∆E2,E7a could not serve as target for GO. Co-expression of CD33∆E2 did not interfere with CD33FL endocytosis and did not impact CD33FL-mediated GO cytotoxicity. Together, our findings document a greater-than-previously thought complexity of CD33 expression in human AML. They identify CD33 variants that lack exon 2 and are not recognized by current CD33-directed therapeutics as potential target for future unconjugated or conjugated antibodies. PMID:27248327

  11. Gr-1 Ab administered after bone marrow transplantation plus thymus transplantation suppresses tumor growth by depleting granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Li, Ming; Cui, Yunze; Adachi, Yasushi; Ikehara, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that allogeneic intra-bone marrow-bone marrow transplantation (IBM-BMT) plus thymus transplantation (TT) is effective in treating recipients with malignant tumors. Although TT increases the percentage of T cells in the early term after BMT, the myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are still the dominant population. We used the Gr-1 Ab to deplete the granulocytic MDSCs (G-MDSCs) in tumor-bearing mice that had received BMT+TT. Two weeks after the BMT, the mice injected with Gr-1 Ab showed smaller tumors than those in the control group. In addition, Gr-1 Ab significantly increased the percentages and numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and decreased the percentages and numbers of MDSCs and G-MDSCs. No side effects of the Gr-1 Ab on recipient or donor thymus were observed. These findings indicate that Gr-1 Ab administered after BMT+TT may enhance the effectiveness of tumor suppression.

  12. Listeria monocytogenes (Lm)-LLO immunotherapies reduce the immunosuppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wallecha, Anu; Singh, Reshma; Malinina, Inga

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and regulatory T cells (Treg) are major components of the immune suppressive cells that potentially limit the effectiveness of an immunotherapy-based treatment. Both of these suppressive cell types have been shown to expand in tumor models and promote T-cell dysfunction that in turn favors tumor progression. This study demonstrates that Listeria monocytogenes (Lm)-LLO immunotherapies effect on the suppressive ability of MDSC and Treg in the tumor microenvironment (TME), resulting in a loss in the ability of these cells to suppress T cells. This alteration of immunosuppression in the TME was an inherent property of all Lm-LLO immunotherapies tested and was independent of the tumor model. The virtually total loss in the suppressive ability of these cells in the TME was linked to the reduction in the expression of arginase I in MDSC and IL-10 in Treg. The results presented here provide insight into a novel mechanism of Lm-LLO immunotherapies that potentially contributes to therapeutic antitumor responses.

  13. Myeloid sarcoma causing airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Krause, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is an extramedullary collection of blasts of the myeloid series that partially or totally effaces the architecture of the tissue in which it is found. These tumors have been described in many sites of the body, but the skin, lymph nodes, gastrointestinal tract, bone, soft tissue, and testes are most common. They can arise in a patient following the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia, but they may also be precursors of leukemia and should be considered diagnostic for acute myeloid leukemia. The differential diagnosis of this neoplasm includes malignant lymphoma, with which it is often mistaken, leading to diagnostic and therapeutic delays. We present the case of an 84-year-old African American man with a history of renal disease secondary to hypertension and coronary artery disease without any prior history of malignancies who presented with airway obstruction. He was diagnosed with a myeloid sarcoma of the mediastinum compressing his trachea.

  14. PU.1 downregulation in murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML): from molecular mechanism to human AML

    PubMed Central

    Verbiest, Tom; Bouffler, Simon; Nutt, Stephen L.; Badie, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor PU.1, encoded by the murine Sfpi1 gene (SPI1 in humans), is a member of the Ets transcription factor family and plays a vital role in commitment and maturation of the myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Murine studies directly link primary acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and decreased PU.1 expression in specifically modified strains. Similarly, a radiation-induced chromosome 2 deletion and subsequent Sfpi1 point mutation in the remaining allele lead to murine radiation-induced AML. Consistent with murine data, heterozygous deletion of the SPI1 locus and mutation of the −14kb SPI1 upstream regulatory element were described previously in human primary AML, although they are rare events. Other mechanisms linked to PU.1 downregulation in human AML include TP53 deletion, FLT3-ITD mutation and the recurrent AML1-ETO [t(8;21)] and PML-RARA [t(15;17)] translocations. This review provides an up-to-date overview on our current understanding of the involvement of PU.1 in the initiation and development of radiation-induced AML, together with recommendations for future murine and human studies. PMID:25750172

  15. Dickkopf-related protein 1 (Dkk1) regulates the accumulation and function of myeloid derived suppressor cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Lucia; Mahajan, Sahil; Capietto, Aude-Hélène; Yang, Zhengfeng; Zamani, Ali; Ricci, Biancamaria; Bumpass, David B; Meyer, Melissa; Su, Xinming; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Weilbaecher, Katherine; Stewart, Sheila A; DeNardo, David G; Faccio, Roberta

    2016-05-02

    Tumor-stroma interactions contribute to tumorigenesis. Tumor cells can educate the stroma at primary and distant sites to facilitate the recruitment of heterogeneous populations of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs suppress T cell responses and promote tumor proliferation. One outstanding question is how the local and distant stroma modulate MDSCs during tumor progression. Down-regulation of β-catenin is critical for MDSC accumulation and immune suppressive functions in mice and humans. Here, we demonstrate that stroma-derived Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) targets β-catenin in MDSCs, thus exerting immune suppressive effects during tumor progression. Mice bearing extraskeletal tumors show significantly elevated levels of Dkk1 in bone microenvironment relative to tumor site. Strikingly, Dkk1 neutralization decreases tumor growth and MDSC numbers by rescuing β-catenin in these cells and restores T cell recruitment at the tumor site. Recombinant Dkk1 suppresses β-catenin target genes in MDSCs from mice and humans and anti-Dkk1 loses its antitumor effects in mice lacking β-catenin in myeloid cells or after depletion of MDSCs, demonstrating that Dkk1 directly targets MDSCs. Furthermore, we find a correlation between CD15(+) myeloid cells and Dkk1 in pancreatic cancer patients. We establish a novel immunomodulatory role for Dkk1 in regulating tumor-induced immune suppression via targeting β-catenin in MDSCs.

  16. Integrated and Quantitative Proteomics of Human Tumors.

    PubMed

    Yakkioui, Y; Temel, Y; Chevet, E; Negroni, L

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative proteomics represents a powerful approach for the comprehensive analysis of proteins expressed under defined conditions. These properties have been used to investigate the proteome of disease states, including cancer. It has become a major subject of studies to apply proteomics for biomarker and therapeutic target identification. In the last decades, technical advances in mass spectrometry have increased the capacity of protein identification and quantification. Moreover, the analysis of posttranslational modification (PTM), especially phosphorylation, has allowed large-scale identification of biological mechanisms. Even so, increasing evidence indicates that global protein quantification is often insufficient for the explanation of biology and has shown to pose challenges in identifying new and robust biomarkers. As a consequence, to improve the accuracy of the discoveries made using proteomics in human tumors, it is necessary to combine (i) robust and reproducible methods for sample preparation allowing statistical comparison, (ii) PTM analyses in addition to global proteomics for additional levels of knowledge, and (iii) use of bioinformatics for decrypting protein list. Herein, we present technical specificities for samples preparation involving isobaric tag labeling, TiO2-based phosphopeptides enrichment and hydrazyde-based glycopeptides purification as well as the key points for the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the protein lists. The method is based on our experience with tumors analysis derived from hepatocellular carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, human embryonic intervertebral disk, and chordoma experiments.

  17. PU.1 affects proliferation of the human acute myeloid leukemia U937 cell line by directly regulating MEIS1

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, JING; ZHANG, XIAOFENG; WANG, YUHUA; GUAN, YINGHUI

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is a member of the ETS family, which is expressed in a wide variety of hematopoietic lineages. Accumulating evidence has indicated that PU.1 plays a key role in hematopoiesis, and reduced expression of PU.1 leads to the pathogenesis of human myeloid leukemia. As a multi-functional factor, PU.1 is also required for mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) stem cell potential and the development of MLL. However, the function of PU.1 in human non-MLL leukemia and its molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. In the present study, PU.1 siRNA was demonstrated to efficiently inhibit the transcription level of oncogene MEIS1 in the human acute myeloid non-MLL leukemia U937 cell line. In addition, PU.1, as a positive regulator of MEIS1, performed a crucial role in maintaining cell proliferation. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis and luciferase reporter assay, previously unexplored evidence that PU.1 activated the MEIS1 promoter through a conserved binding motif in vitro and in vivo was further defined. Overall, the present study provides insight into the molecular mechanism of the contribution of PU.1 to the pathogenesis of non-MLL U937 cells, which is mediated by direct regulation of MEIS1 transcription. The present data reveal the possibility of developing an alternative therapy for non-MLL leukemia by targeting PU.1-mediated MEIS1 gene activation. PMID:26622774

  18. Dendritic Cells in the Context of Human Tumors: Biology and Experimental Tools.

    PubMed

    Volovitz, Ilan; Melzer, Susanne; Amar, Sarah; Bocsi, József; Bloch, Merav; Efroni, Sol; Ram, Zvi; Tárnok, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent and versatile antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the immune system. DC have an exceptional ability to comprehend the immune context of a captured antigen based on molecular signals identified from its vicinity. The analyzed information is then conveyed to other immune effector cells. Such capability enables DC to play a pivotal role in mediating either an immunogenic response or immune tolerance towards an acquired antigen. This review summarizes current knowledge on DC in the context of human tumors. It covers the basics of human DC biology, elaborating on the different markers, morphology and function of the different subsets of human DC. Human blood-borne DC are comprised of at least three subsets consisting of one plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and two to three myeloid DC (mDC) subsets. Some tissues have unique DC. Each subset has a different phenotype and function and may induce pro-tumoral or anti-tumoral effects. The review also discusses two methods fundamental to the research of DC on the single-cell level: multicolor flow cytometry (FCM) and image-based cytometry (IC). These methods, along with new genomics and proteomics tools, can provide high-resolution information on specific DC subsets and on immune and tumor cells with which they interact. The different layers of collected biological data may then be integrated using Immune-Cytomics modeling approaches. Such novel integrated approaches may help unravel the complex network of cellular interactions that DC carry out within tumors, and may help harness this complex immunological information into the development of more effective treatments for cancer.

  19. Myeloid Engraftment in Humanized Mice: Impact of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor Treatment and Transgenic Mouse Strain.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Alice M; Harmon, Cathal; Whelan, Sarah; O'Brien, Eóin C; O'Reilly, Vincent P; Crotty, Paul; Kelly, Pamela; Ryan, Michelle; Hickey, Fionnuala B; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Little, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Poor myeloid engraftment remains a barrier to experimental use of humanized mice. Focusing primarily on peripheral blood cells, we compared the engraftment profile of NOD-scid-IL2Rγc(-/-) (NSG) mice with that of NSG mice transgenic for human membrane stem cell factor (hu-mSCF mice), NSG mice transgenic for human interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and stem cell factor (SGM3 mice). hu-mSCF and SGM3 mice showed enhanced engraftment of human leukocytes compared to NSG mice, and this was reflected in the number of human neutrophils and monocytes present in these strains. Importantly, discrete classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocyte populations were identifiable in the blood of NSG and hu-mSCF mice, while the nonclassical population was absent in the blood of SGM3 mice. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) treatment increased the number of blood monocytes in NSG and hu-mSCF mice, and neutrophils in NSG and SGM3 mice; however, this effect appeared to be at least partially dependent on the stem cell donor used to engraft the mice. Furthermore, GCSF treatment resulted in a preferential expansion of nonclassical monocytes in both NSG and hu-mSCF mice. Human tubulointerstitial CD11c(+) cells were present in the kidneys of hu-mSCF mice, while monocytes and neutrophils were identified in the liver of all strains. Bone marrow-derived macrophages prepared from NSG mice were most effective at phagocytosing polystyrene beads. In conclusion, hu-mSCF mice provide the best environment for the generation of human myeloid cells, with GCSF treatment further enhancing peripheral blood human monocyte cell numbers in this strain.

  20. Myeloid Sarcoma in the Orbit.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoxiao; Gigantelli, James W; Abromowitch, Minnie; Morgan, Linda A; Suh, Donny W

    2016-12-08

    The authors describe a case of myeloid sarcoma of the orbit in a pediatric patient. An 8-month-old male infant presented to the ophthalmology clinic with a left orbital mass, which had been increasing in size over the previous 2 months. The mass was initially diagnosed at another clinic as an infantile hemangioma, and had been treated with a topical formulation of timolol. In the ophthalmology clinic, orbital magnetic resonance imaging showed a solid enhancing mass. A biopsy was performed, and histopathology revealed myeloid sarcoma. The disease responded well to a standard chemotherapy regimen. Myeloid sarcoma is a rare, extra-medullary presentation that can occur as an isolated tumor, concurrently with or at relapse of acute myeloid leukemia. Because few cases of myeloid sarcoma in the orbit have been reported, this case report aids in the management of myeloid sarcoma in pediatric patients. The report describes an 8-month-old male infant, the youngest patient to develop myeloid sarcoma without preexisting acute myeloid leukemia. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53:e64-e68.].

  1. CD93 marks a non-quiescent human leukemia stem cell population and is required for development of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Masayuki; Liedtke, Michaela; Gentles, Andrew J.; Cleary, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are thought to share several properties with hematopoietic stem cells, including cell cycle quiescence and a capacity for self-renewal. These features are hypothesized to underlie leukemic initiation, progression, and relapse, and also complicate efforts to eradicate leukemia through therapeutic targeting of LSCs without adverse effects on HSCs. Here, we show that acute myeloid leukemias with genomic rearrangements of the MLL gene contain a non-quiescent LSC population. Although human CD34+CD38− LSCs are generally highly quiescent, the C-type lectin CD93 is expressed on a subset of actively cycling, non-quiescent AML cells enriched for LSC activity. CD93 expression is functionally required for engraftment of primary human AML LSCs and leukemogenesis, and regulates LSC self-renewal predominantly by silencing CDKN2B, a major tumor suppressor in AML. Thus, CD93 expression identifies a predominantly cycling, non-quiescent leukemia-initiating cell population in MLL-rearranged AML, providing opportunities for selective targeting and eradication of LSCs. PMID:26387756

  2. Regulation of myeloid cells by activated T cells determines the efficacy of PD-1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Eissler, Nina; Mao, Yumeng; Brodin, David; Reuterswärd, Philippa; Andersson Svahn, Helene; Johnsen, John Inge; Kiessling, Rolf; Kogner, Per

    2016-01-01

    Removal of immuno-suppression has been reported to enhance antitumor immunity primed by checkpoint inhibitors. Although PD-1 blockade failed to control tumor growth in a transgenic murine neuroblastoma model, concurrent inhibition of colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) by BLZ945 reprogrammed suppressive myeloid cells and significantly enhanced therapeutic effects. Microarray analysis of tumor tissues identified a significant increase of T-cell infiltration guided by myeloid cell-derived chemokines CXCL9, 10, and 11. Blocking the responsible chemokine receptor CXCR3 hampered T-cell infiltration and reduced antitumor efficacy of the combination therapy. Multivariate analysis of 59 immune-cell parameters in tumors and spleens detected the correlation between PD-L1-expressing myeloid cells and tumor burden. In vitro, anti-PD-1 antibody Nivolumab in combination with BLZ945 increased the activation of primary human T and NK cells. Importantly, we revealed a previously uncharacterized pathway, in which T cells secreted M-CSF upon PD-1 blockade, leading to enhanced suppressive capacity of monocytes by upregulation of PD-L1 and purinergic enzymes. In multiple datasets of neuroblastoma patients, gene expression of CD73 correlated strongly with myeloid cell markers CD163 and CSF-1R in neuroblastoma tumors, and associated with worse survival in high-risk patients. Altogether, our data reveal the dual role of activated T cells on myeloid cell functions and provide a rationale for the combination therapy of anti-PD-1 antibody with CSF-1R inhibitor.

  3. Myeloid cell leukemia-1 is a key molecular target for mithramycin A-induced apoptosis in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells and a tumor xenograft animal model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Jung, Ji-Youn; Lee, Jin-Seok; Park, Jong-Hwan; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Cho, Sung-Dae

    2013-01-01

    Mithramycin A (Mith) is a natural polyketide that has been used in multiple areas of research including apoptosis of various cancer cells. Here, we examined the critical role of Mith in apoptosis and its molecular mechanism in DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells and tumor xenografts. Mith decreased cell growth and induced apoptosis in DU145 and PC-3 cells. Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) was over-expressed in both cell lines compared to RWPE1 cells. Mith inhibited Mcl-1 protein expression in both cells, but only altered Mcl-1 mRNA levels in PC-3 cells. We also found that Mith reduced Mcl-1 protein levels through both proteasome-dependent protein degradation and the inhibition of protein synthesis in DU145 cells. Studies using siRNA confirmed that the knockdown of Mcl-1 induced apoptosis. Mith significantly suppressed TPA-induced neoplastic cell transformation through the down-regulation of the Mcl-1 protein in JB6 cells, and suppressed the transforming activity of both cell types. Mith also inhibited tumor growth and Mcl-1 levels, in addition to inducing apoptosis, in athymic nude mice bearing DU145 cell xenografts without affecting five normal organs. Therefore, Mith inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis by suppressing Mcl-1 in both prostate cancer cells and xenograft tumors, and thus is a potent anticancer drug candidate for prostate cancer.

  4. Myeloid suppressor cells in cancer: recruitment, phenotype, properties, and mechanisms of immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Paolo; Borrello, Ivan; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2006-02-01

    Growing tumors acquire the ability to resist immune recognition and immune-mediated injury. Among several mechanisms, mouse and human tumors share the ability to alter the normal hematopoiesis, leading to accumulation of cells of the myelo-monoctytic lineage at the tumor site and in different primary and secondary lymphoid organs. These cells aid tumor development by providing molecules and factors essential for tumor growth and neovascularization but also exert a profound inhibitory activity on both tumor-specific and nonspecific T lymphocytes. The present article summarizes recent findings on the interaction between developing cancers and these recently described "myeloid suppressor cells".

  5. A zebrafish model of Poikiloderma with Neutropenia recapitulates the human syndrome hallmarks and traces back neutropenia to the myeloid progenitor

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Elisa A.; Carra, Silvia; Fontana, Laura; Bresciani, Erica; Cotelli, Franco; Larizza, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Poikiloderma with Neutropenia (PN) is an autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by early-onset poikiloderma, pachyonychia, hyperkeratosis, bone anomalies and neutropenia, predisposing to myelodysplasia. The causative C16orf57/USB1 gene encodes a conserved phosphodiesterase that regulates the stability of spliceosomal U6-RNA. The involvement of USB1 in splicing has not yet allowed to unveil the pathogenesis of PN and how the gene defects impact on skin and bone tissues besides than on the haematological compartment. We established a zebrafish model of PN using a morpholino-knockdown approach with two different splicing morpholinos. Both usb1-depleted embryos displayed developmental abnormalities recapitulating the signs of the human syndrome. Besides the pigmentation and osteochondral defects, usb1-knockdown caused defects in circulation, manifested by a reduced number of circulating cells. The overall morphant phenotype was also obtained by co-injecting sub-phenotypic dosages of the two morpholinos and could be rescued by human USB1 RNA. Integrated in situ and real-time expression analyses of stage-specific markers highlighted defects of primitive haematopoiesis and traced back the dramatic reduction in neutrophil myeloperoxidase to the myeloid progenitors showing down-regulated pu.1 expression. Our vertebrate model of PN demonstrates the intrinsic requirement of usb1 in haematopoiesis and highlights PN as a disorder of myeloid progenitors associated with bone marrow dysfunction. PMID:26522474

  6. Experimental chemotherapy of human tumors heterotransplanted in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Giovanella, B C

    1980-01-01

    Human tumors heterotransplanted in nude mice offer the most realistic model for experimental chemotherapy of human neoplasms. Almost all the known human malignancies have been successfully transplanted in the nudes, although the rate of takes varies considerably between different tumor types. So far, a good correlation has been observed between the results obtained treating with the same drug the same tumor in the patient and in the nude mouse. Our experience in this field is, however, still too limited for the direct extrapolation of chemotherapeutic results obtained in the nudes to human tumors.

  7. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells: therapeutic modulation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Ryan A

    2012-01-01

    Improved understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of adaptive immunity has been realized over the past few decades, leading to the development of novel immunotherapeutic strategies capable of promoting host anti-tumor immunity. In order to achieve clinically meaningful results, further understanding of the mechanisms by which tumors suppress host immunity, and the development of therapeutic strategies which overcome tumor-associated immune suppression, will be necessary. Myeloid-derived cells with potent immunosuppressive properties are ubiquitous in human cancers. Improved mechanistic understanding of factors promoting their development, activation and mechanisms of immune suppression are being translated into novel therapeutic approaches, and will be summarized herein.

  8. Finasteride Enhances the Generation of Human Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells by Up-Regulating the COX2/PGE2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yufeng; Lin, Yingtong; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Hui; Pan, Ting; Fu, Yongshui

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been known to be a key factor in the regulation of the immune system under numerous conditions such as tumors, infections, autoimmune diseases, and transplantations. In contrast to the proposed deleterious role of MDSCs in tumors and infections, MDSCs with their suppressive function are now proved to have the beneficial potential of suppressing the autoimmune response and promoting tolerance to transplantation. Therefore, the expansion of MDSCs could be a promising therapeutic strategy for many diseases. In this study, we aimed to identify FDA-approved drugs that could aid in the expansion of functional MDSCs. We performed a high-throughput screening (HTS) of FDA-approved drugs based on the in vitro human MDSC-differentiation system and identified finasteride (FIN) to have the best potency to aid the generation of human MDSCs. The FIN-induced MDSCs were quite similar to monocytic MDSCs with regard to their surface phenotype, morphology, immunosuppressive function, and related gene expression. Next, we aimed to determine the mechanism of action of FIN and found that FIN induced the expansion of MDSCs through up-regulation of the COX2/PGE2 pathway by enhancing the activity of COX2 promoter. In addition, the administration of indomethacin (IND), a COX2 inhibitor, abrogated the effect of FIN. Based on these results, we suggested that FIN could find applications in the future in the expansion of MDSCs. Further development of FIN-like compounds could be a novel strategy for generating functional MDSCs for immunosuppressive therapies in various immune disorder conditions. PMID:27253400

  9. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by or linked with viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Most anal cancers (human papillomavirus) Some throat ...

  10. Genetically distinct leukemic stem cells in human CD34- acute myeloid leukemia are arrested at a hemopoietic precursor-like stage.

    PubMed

    Quek, Lynn; Otto, Georg W; Garnett, Catherine; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Karamitros, Dimitris; Stoilova, Bilyana; Lau, I-Jun; Doondeea, Jessica; Usukhbayar, Batchimeg; Kennedy, Alison; Metzner, Marlen; Goardon, Nicolas; Ivey, Adam; Allen, Christopher; Gale, Rosemary; Davies, Benjamin; Sternberg, Alexander; Killick, Sally; Hunter, Hannah; Cahalin, Paul; Price, Andrew; Carr, Andrew; Griffiths, Mike; Virgo, Paul; Mackinnon, Stephen; Grimwade, David; Freeman, Sylvie; Russell, Nigel; Craddock, Charles; Mead, Adam; Peniket, Andrew; Porcher, Catherine; Vyas, Paresh

    2016-07-25

    Our understanding of the perturbation of normal cellular differentiation hierarchies to create tumor-propagating stem cell populations is incomplete. In human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), current models suggest transformation creates leukemic stem cell (LSC) populations arrested at a progenitor-like stage expressing cell surface CD34. We show that in ∼25% of AML, with a distinct genetic mutation pattern where >98% of cells are CD34(-), there are multiple, nonhierarchically arranged CD34(+) and CD34(-) LSC populations. Within CD34(-) and CD34(+) LSC-containing populations, LSC frequencies are similar; there are shared clonal structures and near-identical transcriptional signatures. CD34(-) LSCs have disordered global transcription profiles, but these profiles are enriched for transcriptional signatures of normal CD34(-) mature granulocyte-macrophage precursors, downstream of progenitors. But unlike mature precursors, LSCs express multiple normal stem cell transcriptional regulators previously implicated in LSC function. This suggests a new refined model of the relationship between LSCs and normal hemopoiesis in which the nature of genetic/epigenetic changes determines the disordered transcriptional program, resulting in LSC differentiation arrest at stages that are most like either progenitor or precursor stages of hemopoiesis.

  11. Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentially Inhibit Cytokine Production by Peripheral Blood Monocytes Subpopulations and Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Laranjeira, Paula; Gomes, Joana; Pedrosa, Monia; Martinho, Antonio; Antunes, Brigida; Ribeiro, Tania; Santos, Francisco; Domingues, Rosario; Abecasis, Manuel; Trindade, Helder; Paiva, Artur

    2015-01-01

    The immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) rendered them an attractive therapeutic approach for immune disorders and an increasing body of evidence demonstrated their clinical value. However, the influence of MSC on the function of specific immune cell populations, namely, monocyte subpopulations, is not well elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of human bone marrow MSC on the cytokine and chemokine expression by peripheral blood classical, intermediate and nonclassical monocytes, and myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), stimulated with lipopolysaccharide plus interferon (IFN)γ. We found that MSC effectively inhibit tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α and macrophage inflammatory protein- (MIP-) 1β protein expression in monocytes and mDC, without suppressing CCR7 and CD83 protein expression. Interestingly, mDC exhibited the highest degree of inhibition, for both TNF-α and MIP-1β, whereas the reduction of TNF-α expression was less marked for nonclassical monocytes. Similarly, MSC decreased mRNA levels of interleukin- (IL-) 1β and IL-6 in classical monocytes, CCL3, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10 in classical and nonclassical monocytes, and IL-1β and CXCL10 in mDC. MSC do not impair the expression of maturation markers in monocytes and mDC under our experimental conditions; nevertheless, they hamper the proinflammatory function of monocytes and mDC, which may impede the development of inflammatory immune responses. PMID:26060498

  12. Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentially Inhibit Cytokine Production by Peripheral Blood Monocytes Subpopulations and Myeloid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Paula; Gomes, Joana; Pedreiro, Susana; Pedrosa, Monia; Martinho, Antonio; Antunes, Brigida; Ribeiro, Tania; Santos, Francisco; Domingues, Rosario; Abecasis, Manuel; Trindade, Helder; Paiva, Artur

    2015-01-01

    The immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) rendered them an attractive therapeutic approach for immune disorders and an increasing body of evidence demonstrated their clinical value. However, the influence of MSC on the function of specific immune cell populations, namely, monocyte subpopulations, is not well elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of human bone marrow MSC on the cytokine and chemokine expression by peripheral blood classical, intermediate and nonclassical monocytes, and myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), stimulated with lipopolysaccharide plus interferon (IFN)γ. We found that MSC effectively inhibit tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α and macrophage inflammatory protein- (MIP-) 1β protein expression in monocytes and mDC, without suppressing CCR7 and CD83 protein expression. Interestingly, mDC exhibited the highest degree of inhibition, for both TNF-α and MIP-1β, whereas the reduction of TNF-α expression was less marked for nonclassical monocytes. Similarly, MSC decreased mRNA levels of interleukin- (IL-) 1β and IL-6 in classical monocytes, CCL3, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10 in classical and nonclassical monocytes, and IL-1β and CXCL10 in mDC. MSC do not impair the expression of maturation markers in monocytes and mDC under our experimental conditions; nevertheless, they hamper the proinflammatory function of monocytes and mDC, which may impede the development of inflammatory immune responses.

  13. Genetically distinct leukemic stem cells in human CD34− acute myeloid leukemia are arrested at a hemopoietic precursor-like stage

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Lynn; Garnett, Catherine; Karamitros, Dimitris; Stoilova, Bilyana; Doondeea, Jessica; Kennedy, Alison; Metzner, Marlen; Ivey, Adam; Sternberg, Alexander; Hunter, Hannah; Price, Andrew; Virgo, Paul; Grimwade, David; Freeman, Sylvie; Russell, Nigel; Mead, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the perturbation of normal cellular differentiation hierarchies to create tumor-propagating stem cell populations is incomplete. In human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), current models suggest transformation creates leukemic stem cell (LSC) populations arrested at a progenitor-like stage expressing cell surface CD34. We show that in ∼25% of AML, with a distinct genetic mutation pattern where >98% of cells are CD34−, there are multiple, nonhierarchically arranged CD34+ and CD34− LSC populations. Within CD34− and CD34+ LSC–containing populations, LSC frequencies are similar; there are shared clonal structures and near-identical transcriptional signatures. CD34− LSCs have disordered global transcription profiles, but these profiles are enriched for transcriptional signatures of normal CD34− mature granulocyte–macrophage precursors, downstream of progenitors. But unlike mature precursors, LSCs express multiple normal stem cell transcriptional regulators previously implicated in LSC function. This suggests a new refined model of the relationship between LSCs and normal hemopoiesis in which the nature of genetic/epigenetic changes determines the disordered transcriptional program, resulting in LSC differentiation arrest at stages that are most like either progenitor or precursor stages of hemopoiesis. PMID:27377587

  14. Liver myeloid-derived suppressor cells expand in response to liver metastases in mice and inhibit the anti-tumor efficacy of anti-CEA CAR-T.

    PubMed

    Burga, Rachel A; Thorn, Mitchell; Point, Gary R; Guha, Prajna; Nguyen, Cang T; Licata, Lauren A; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Ayala, Alfred; Joseph Espat, N; Junghans, Richard P; Katz, Steven C

    2015-07-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cell (CAR-T) technology, a promising immunotherapeutic tool, has not been applied specifically to treat liver metastases (LM). While CAR-T delivery to LM can be optimized by regional intrahepatic infusion, we propose that liver CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (L-MDSC) will inhibit the efficacy of CAR-T in the intrahepatic space. We studied anti-CEA CAR-T in a murine model of CEA+ LM and identified mechanisms through which L-MDSC expand and inhibit CAR-T function. We established CEA+ LM in mice and studied purified L-MDSC and responses to treatment with intrahepatic anti-CEA CAR-T infusions. L-MDSC expanded threefold in response to LM, and their expansion was dependent on GM-CSF, which was produced by tumor cells. L-MDSC utilized PD-L1 to suppress anti-tumor responses through engagement of PD-1 on CAR-T. GM-CSF, in cooperation with STAT3, promoted L-MDSC PD-L1 expression. CAR-T efficacy was rescued when mice received CAR-T in combination with MDSC depletion, GM-CSF neutralization to prevent MDSC expansion, or PD-L1 blockade. As L-MDSC suppressed anti-CEA CAR-T, infusion of anti-CEA CAR-T in tandem with agents targeting L-MDSC is a rational strategy for future clinical trials.

  15. Characterization of Gene Expression in Human Breast Tumor Endothelium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    to UV-induced apoptosis in primary culture of canine mammary gland tumors (7), and SFRP2 decreased apoptosis in cardiomyocytes exposed to hypoxia(8...microdissection (LCM) of vascular cells from frozen human breast tumors and normal breast tissue for genomic analysis. We found SFRP2 to have 6 fold increased...vascular cells from frozen human breast tumors , where the RNA was of high quality and sufficient for genomic analysis(6). We found 55 genes with > 4

  16. Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours.

    PubMed

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-03-22

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated haematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells - macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes - are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour microenvironment alters myeloid cells and can convert them into potent immunosuppressive cells. Here, we consider myeloid cells as an intricately connected, complex, single system and we focus on how tumours manipulate the myeloid system to evade the host immune response.

  17. E4F1 dysfunction results in autophagic cell death in myeloid leukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hatchi, Elodie; Rodier, Geneviève; Sardet, Claude

    2011-01-01

    The multifunctional E4F1 protein was originally identified as a cellular target of the E1A adenoviral oncoprotein. Although E4F1 is implicated in several key oncogenic pathways, its roles in tumorigenesis remain unclear. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of myeloid leukemia (histiocytic sarcomas, HS) based on the genetic inactivation of the tumor suppressor Ink4a/Arf locus, we have recently unraveled an unsuspected function of E4F1 in the survival of leukemic cells. In vivo, genetic ablation of E4F1 in established myeloid tumors results in tumor regression. E4F1 inactivation results in a cascade of alterations originating from dysfunctional mitochondria that induce increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and ends in massive autophagic cell death in HS transformed, but not normal myeloid cells. E4F1 depletion also induces cell death in various human myeloid leukemic cell lines, including acute myeloid leukemic (AML) cell lines. Interestingly, the E4F1 protein is overexpressed in a large proportion of human AML samples. These data provide new insights into E4F1-associated survival functions implicated in tumorigenesis and could open the path for new therapeutic strategies. PMID:22024746

  18. Pancreastatin producing cell line from human pancreatic islet cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, A; Tateishi, K; Tsuru, M; Jimi, A; Wakasugi, H; Ikeda, Y; Kono, A

    1990-04-30

    It has been characterized that cell line QGP-1 derived from human non-functioning pancreatic islet cell tumor produces human pancreastatin. Exponentially growing cultures produced 5.7 fmol of pancreastatin/10(6) cells/hr. Human pancreastatin immunoreactivities in plasma and tumor after xenografting with QGP-1 into nude mouse were 92.7 fmol/ml and 160.2 pmol/g wet weight, respectively. Immunocytochemical study revealed both chromogranin A and pancreastatin immunoreactive cells in the tumor. Gel filtrations of culture medium and tumor extract identified heterogenous molecular forms of PST-LI which eluted as large and smaller molecular species. These results suggest that plasma pancreastatin levels may be useful as a tumor marker of endocrine tumor of the pancreas, and the pancreastatin producing cell line may be useful for studies of the mechanism of secretions and processing of chromogranin A and pancreastatin.

  19. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M.; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A.; Berger, Steffen M.; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells. PMID:26384306

  20. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Bernhard F; Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Prokhorov, Alexandr; Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-10-06

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells.

  1. RORC1 Regulates Tumor-Promoting "Emergency" Granulo-Monocytopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Laura; Sangaletti, Sabina; Consonni, Francesca Maria; Szebeni, Gabor; Morlacchi, Sara; Totaro, Maria Grazia; Porta, Chiara; Anselmo, Achille; Tartari, Silvia; Doni, Andrea; Zitelli, Francesco; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P; Sica, Antonio

    2015-08-10

    Cancer-driven granulo-monocytopoiesis stimulates expansion of tumor promoting myeloid populations, mostly myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). We identified subsets of MDSCs and TAMs based on the expression of retinoic-acid-related orphan receptor (RORC1/RORγ) in human and mouse tumor bearers. RORC1 orchestrates myelopoiesis by suppressing negative (Socs3 and Bcl3) and promoting positive (C/EBPβ) regulators of granulopoiesis, as well as the key transcriptional mediators of myeloid progenitor commitment and differentiation to the monocytic/macrophage lineage (IRF8 and PU.1). RORC1 supported tumor-promoting innate immunity by protecting MDSCs from apoptosis, mediating TAM differentiation and M2 polarization, and limiting tumor infiltration by mature neutrophils. Accordingly, ablation of RORC1 in the hematopoietic compartment prevented cancer-driven myelopoiesis, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis.

  2. Human peripheral blood granulocytes and myeloid leukemic cell lines express both transcripts encoding for stem cell factor.

    PubMed

    Ramenghi, U; Ruggieri, L; Dianzani, I; Rosso, C; Brizzi, M F; Camaschella, C; Pietsch, T; Saglio, G

    1994-09-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF), the ligand for the c-kit proto-oncogene, has been shown to play a critical role in the migration of melanocytes and germ cells during embryogenesis as well as in the proliferative control of the hematopoietic compartment. In this study we investigated the expression of both the soluble and transmembrane SCF forms in purified peripheral blood populations and in several hematopoietic cell lines. Expression of both transcripts, though in different ratios, was identified in whole bone marrow, in bone marrow stromal cells and in human peripheral blood. In peripheral blood, SCF expression could be ascribable to polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), whereas no SCF expression was detected in isolated lymphocytes, monocytes and in some T lymphoid cell lines. Conversely, some hematopoietic myeloid cell lines, such as HL-60, KG1 and K562, express SCF with similar patterns.

  3. Complexity and Challenges in Defining Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Damuzzo, Vera; Pinton, Laura; Desantis, Giacomo; Solito, Samantha; Marigo, Ilaria; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Study of myeloid cells endowed with suppressive activity is an active field of research which has particular importance in cancer, in view of the negative regulatory capacity of these cells to the host's immune response. The expansion of these cells, called myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), has been documented in many models of tumor-bearing mice and in patients with tumors of various origin, and their presence is associated with disease progression and reduced survival. For this reason, monitoring this type of cell expansion is of clinical importance, and flow cytometry is the technique of choice for their identification. Over the years, it has been demonstrated that MDSCs comprise a group of immature myeloid cells belonging both to monocytic and granulocytic lineages, with several stages of differentiation; their occurrence depends on tumor-derived soluble factors, which guide their expansion and determine their block of differentiation. Because of their heterogeneous composition, accurate phenotyping of these cells requires a multicolor approach, so that the expansion of all MDSC subsets can be appreciated. This review article focuses on identifying MDSCs and discusses problems associated with phenotyping circulating and tumor-associated MDSCs in humans and in mouse models. © 2014 The Authors Cytometry Part B: Clinical Cytometry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25504825

  4. The immune receptor Tim-3 acts as a trafficker in a Tim-3/galectin-9 autocrine loop in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Rüegg, Laura; Gibbs, Bernhard F.; Bardelli, Marco; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Varani, Luca; Berger, Steffen M.; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The immune receptor Tim-3 is often highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells where it acts as a growth factor and inflammatory receptor. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Tim-3 forms an autocrine loop with its natural ligand galectin-9 in human AML cells. However, the pathophysiological functions of Tim-3 in human AML cells remain unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Tim-3 is required for galectin-9 secretion in human AML cells. However, this effect is cell-type specific and was found so far to be applicable only to myeloid (and not, for example, lymphoid) leukemia cells. We concluded that AML cells might use Tim-3 as a trafficker for the secretion of galectin-9 which can then be possibly used to impair the anticancer activities of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. PMID:27622049

  5. The immune receptor Tim-3 acts as a trafficker in a Tim-3/galectin-9 autocrine loop in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Rüegg, Laura; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Fruehwirth, Alexander; Varani, Luca; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2016-07-01

    The immune receptor Tim-3 is often highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells where it acts as a growth factor and inflammatory receptor. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Tim-3 forms an autocrine loop with its natural ligand galectin-9 in human AML cells. However, the pathophysiological functions of Tim-3 in human AML cells remain unclear. Here, we report for the first time that Tim-3 is required for galectin-9 secretion in human AML cells. However, this effect is cell-type specific and was found so far to be applicable only to myeloid (and not, for example, lymphoid) leukemia cells. We concluded that AML cells might use Tim-3 as a trafficker for the secretion of galectin-9 which can then be possibly used to impair the anticancer activities of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells.

  6. Quaternized chitosan-coated nanofibrous implants loaded with gossypol prepared by electrospinning and their efficacy against Graffi myeloid tumor.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Milena; Kalinov, Kalin; Manolova, Nevena; Toshkova, Reneta; Rashkov, Iliya; Alexandrov, Marin

    2014-01-01

    Nanofibrous poly(L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide) (coPLA) or coPLA/poly(ethylene glycol) implants loaded with plant polyphenolic compound gossypol (GOS) with anti-tumor activity were fabricated by electrospinning. Implants containing quaternized chitosan (QCh) were prepared by coating of the obtained fibrous materials with a thin film of cross-linked QCh. The morphology of the implants and chemical composition of the implant surface were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that GOS-loaded nanofibrous implants, both non-coated and QCh-coated displayed about two-fold higher inhibitory activity against Graffi tumor cells than that of free GOS at the 72nd h of incubation. As evidenced by the performed fluorescence microscopy analyses and SEM observations, the anti-tumor activity of the fibrous implants was mainly due to induction of apoptosis. The experiments in which the implants containing both QCh and GOS were placed locally into the tumor site after the tumor extirpation showed an increase in the survival rate and a lower rate of recurrence in the operative field and of metastases in regional lymph nodes. In this case, 40% of hamsters were alive on the 45th day of implantation and they did not show any clinical sign of recurrence in the operative field and metastases in the regional lymph nodes.

  7. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  8. Immune checkpoint inhibitors enhance cytotoxicity of cytokine-induced killer cells against human myeloid leukaemic blasts.

    PubMed

    Poh, Su Li; Linn, Yeh Ching

    2016-05-01

    We studied whether blockade of inhibitory receptors on cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells by immune checkpoint inhibitors could increase its anti-tumour potency against haematological malignancies. CIK cultures were generated from seven normal donors and nine patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or multiple myeloma (MM). The inhibitory receptors B and T lymphocyte attenuator, CD200 receptor, lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3) and T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain-containing-3 (TIM-3) were present at variable percentages in most CIK cultures, while cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4), programmed death-1 (PD-1) and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR2DL1/2/3) were expressed at low level in most cultures. Without blockade, myeloid leukaemia cells were susceptible to autologous and allogeneic CIK-mediated cytotoxicity. Blockade of KIR, LAG-3, PD-1 and TIM-3 but not CTLA-4 resulted in remarkable increase in killing against these targets, even in those with poor baseline cytotoxicity. ALL and MM targets were resistant to CIK-mediated cytotoxicity, and blockade of receptors did not increase cytotoxicity to a meaningful extent. Combination of inhibitors against two receptors did not further increase cytotoxicity. Interestingly, potentiation of CIK killing by blocking antibodies was not predicted by expression of receptors on CIK and their respective ligands on the targets. Compared to un-activated T and NK cells, blockade potentiated the cytotoxicity of CIK cells to a greater degree and at a lower E:T ratio, but without significant increase in cytotoxicity against normal white cell. Our findings provide the basis for clinical trial combining autologous CIK cells with checkpoint inhibitors for patients with AML.

  9. Detection of cytosine and CpG density in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in promoter sequences of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Senol; Cilic, Anis; Marjanovic, Damir; Kurtovic-Kozaric, Amina

    2017-03-21

    Aberrant methylation is one of the driving forces of cancer genome development. Although the rate of methylation appears massively variable across the genome, it is mainly observed in histone modification, chromatin organization, DNA accessibility, or promoter sequence. Methylation of promoter sequence occurs mostly to cytosine nucleotides, which can affect transcription factors' binding affinities. In this study, we demonstrated that cytosine repeats (C types density), consisting of CC, CCC, CCCC, CCCCC, CCCCCC, CCCCCCC motifs and CpG islands density in 25 proto-oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and control genes may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. The promoter sequences were divided into a 100 nucleotide window from -500 to +100 nucleotides and 20 nucleotide window from -100 to +100. Each window is analyzed to find the higher C type and CpG islands density, which may cause the increased methylation in the promoter sequence. Our novel findings show that promoter sequence cytosine repeats and CpG density increase closer to transcription sites, especially just before and after the transcription start site (TSS). The results demonstrate that cytosine density increases while proto-oncogenes and TSG promoter sequences are closer to TSS 50.8% and 41.0% respectively, if (-500 to -200) and (-100 to +100) windows of the nucleotide sequences are compared. This proves that around TSS location has special nucleotide motifs and could be an important implication for our understanding of potential methylating locations in promoters.

  10. Tumor Endothelial Inflammation Predicts Clinical Outcome in Diverse Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Filippo, Matthew; Labay, Edwardine; Beckett, Michael A.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Liang, Hua; Darga, Thomas E.; Perakis, Samantha; Khan, Sajid A.; Sutton, Harold G.; Zhang, Wei; Khodarev, Nikolai N.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial cells contribute to the pathogenesis of numerous human diseases by actively regulating the stromal inflammatory response; however, little is known regarding the role of endothelial inflammation in the growth of human tumors and its influence on the prognosis of human cancers. Methods Using an experimental model of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-mediated inflammation, we characterized inflammatory gene expression in immunopurified tumor-associated endothelial cells. These genes formed the basis of a multivariate molecular predictor of overall survival that was trained and validated in four types of human cancer. Results We report that expression of experimentally derived tumor endothelial genes distinguished pathologic tissue specimens from normal controls in several human diseases associated with chronic inflammation. We trained these genes in human cancer datasets and defined a six-gene inflammatory signature that predicted significantly reduced overall survival in breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, and glioma. This endothelial-derived signature predicted outcome independently of, but cooperatively with, standard clinical and pathological prognostic factors. Consistent with these findings, conditioned culture media from human endothelial cells stimulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines accelerated the growth of human colon and breast tumors in immunodeficient mice as compared with conditioned media from untreated endothelial cells. Conclusions This study provides the first prognostic cancer gene signature derived from an experimental model of tumor-associated endothelial inflammation. These findings support the notion that activation of inflammatory pathways in non-malignant tumor-infiltrating endothelial cells contributes to tumor growth and progression in multiple human cancers. Importantly, these results identify endothelial-derived factors that could serve as potential targets for therapy in diverse human cancers

  11. Anti-Gr-1 antibody depletion fails to eliminate hepatic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi; Kapanadze, Tamar; Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies show that the liver is a preferred organ for the accumulation of MDSC. In this study, we examined the effect of systemic RB6-8C5 treatment on hepatic MDSC in tumor-bearing mice. EL4 tumor-bearing mice were injected i.p. with RB6-8C5, and hepatic, splenic, and blood MDSCs were analyzed by flow cytometry. Unexpectedly, hepatic MDSC remained in the liver, although RB6-8C5 completely eliminated them from the spleen and peripheral blood 24 h after treatment. Secondary antibody staining confirmed the presence of RB6-8C5-bound MDSC in the liver of mice with s.c. tumors. Similar observations were made in two other (colon and melanoma) tumor models. Whereas RB6-8C5 injection induced cell death of hepatic MDSC, as shown by Annexin V/7-AAD staining, these cells were replaced immediately, leading to a constant, increased frequency of hepatic MDSC. Adoptively transferred MDSC migrated preferentially to the liver after RB6-8C5 treatment, suggesting that hepatic MDSCs are reconstituted rapidly after depletion. Finally, hepatic MDSC remained immunosuppressive despite RB6-8C5 injection. Our study demonstrates that RB6-8C5 is not suitable for depletion of hepatic MDSCs and analysis of their function.

  12. Hematopoietic stem cell-derived myeloid and plasmacytoid DC-based vaccines are highly potent inducers of tumor-reactive T cell and NK cell responses ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Thordardottir, Soley; Schaap, Nicolaas; Louer, Elja; Kester, Michel G D; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Jansen, Joop; Radstake, Timothy R D; Hobo, Willemijn; Dolstra, Harry

    2017-01-01

    Because of the potent graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect, allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) can be a curative therapy for hematological malignancies. However, relapse remains the most frequent cause of treatment failure, illustrating the necessity for development of adjuvant post-transplant therapies to boost GVT immunity. Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination is a promising strategy in this respect, in particular, where distinct biologic functions of naturally occurring DC subsets, i.e. myeloid DCs (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), are harnessed. However, it is challenging to obtain high enough numbers of primary DC subsets from blood for immunotherapy due to their low frequencies. Therefore, we present here an ex vivo GMP-compliant cell culture protocol for generating different DC subsets from CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) of alloSCT donor origin. High numbers of BDCA1(+) mDCs and pDCs could be generated, sufficient for multiple vaccination cycles. These HSPC-derived DC subsets were highly potent in inducing antitumor immune responses in vitro. Notably, HSPC-derived BDCA1(+) mDCs were superior in eliciting T cell responses. They efficiently primed naïve T cells and robustly expanded patient-derived minor histocompatibility antigen (MiHA)-specific T cells. Though the HSPC-pDCs also efficiently induced T cell responses, they exhibited superior capacity in activating NK cells. pDC-primed NK cells highly upregulated TRAIL and possessed strong cytolytic capacity against tumor cells. Collectively, these findings indicate that HSPC-derived DC vaccines, comprising both mDCs and pDCs, may possess superior potential to boost antitumor immunity post alloSCT, due to their exceptional T cell and NK cell stimulatory capacity.

  13. Liver myeloid-derived suppressor cells expand in response to liver metastases in mice and inhibit the anti-tumor efficacy of anti-CEA CAR-T

    PubMed Central

    Burga, Rachel A.; Thorn, Mitchell; Point, Gary R.; Guha, Prajna; Nguyen, Cang T.; Licata, Lauren A.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Ayala, Alfred; Espat, N. Joseph; Junghans, Richard P.; Katz, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor modified T cell (CAR-T) technology, a promising immunotherapeutic tool, has not been applied specifically to treat liver metastases (LM). While CAR-T delivery to LM can be optimized by regional intrahepatic infusion, we propose that liver CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (L-MDSC) will inhibit the efficacy of CAR-T in the intrahepatic space. We studied anti-CEA CAR-T in a murine model of CEA+ LM and identified mechanisms through which L-MDSC expand and inhibit CAR-T function. We established CEA+ LM in mice and studied purified L-MDSC and responses to treatment with intrahepatic anti-CEA CAR-T infusions. L-MDSC expanded three-fold in response to LM and their expansion was dependent on GM-CSF, which was produced by tumor cells. L-MDSC utilized PD-L1 to suppress anti-tumor responses through engagement of PD-1 on CAR-T. GM-CSF, in cooperation with STAT3, promoted L-MDSC PD-L1 expression. CAR-T efficacy was rescued when mice received CAR-T in combination with MDSC depletion, GM-CSF neutralization to prevent MDSC expansion, or PD-L1 blockade. As L-MDSC suppressed anti-CEA CAR-T, infusion of anti-CEA CAR-T in tandem with agents targeting L-MDSC is a rational strategy for future clinical trials. PMID:25850344

  14. Myeloid zinc finger 1 mediates sulindac sulfide-induced upregulation of death receptor 5 of human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Horinaka, Mano; Yoshida, Tatsushi; Tomosugi, Mitsuhiro; Yasuda, Shusuke; Sowa, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    A combined therapy of sulindac sulfide and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer. Sulindac sulfide had been shown to induce the expression of death receptor 5 (DR5), a receptor for TRAIL, and sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis; however, the molecular mechanism underlying the upregulation of DR5 has not yet been elucidated. We demonstrate here that myeloid zinc finger 1 (MZF1) mediates the induction of DR5 by sulindac sulfide. Sulindac sulfide induced the expression of DR5 at the protein and mRNA levels in colon cancer SW480 cells. Furthermore, sulindac sulfide increased DR5 promoter activity. We showed that sulindac sulfide stimulated DR5 promoter activity via the −301 to −253 region. This region contained a putative MZF1-binding site. Site-directed mutations in the site abrogated the enhancement in DR5 promoter activity by sulindac sulfide. MZF1 directly bound to the putative MZF1-binding site of the DR5 promoter and the binding was increased by sulindac sulfide. The expression of MZF1 was also increased by sulindac sulfide, and MZF1 siRNA attenuated the upregulation of DR5 by sulindac sulfide. These results indicate that sulindac sulfide induces the expression of DR5 by up-regulating MZF1. PMID:25102912

  15. A human programmed death-ligand 1-expressing mouse tumor model for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy of anti-human PD-L1 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Anfei; Peng, Di; Guo, Huanhuan; Ben, Yinyin; Zuo, Xiangyang; Wu, Fei; Yang, Xiaoli; Teng, Fei; Li, Zhen; Qian, Xueming; Qin, F. Xiao-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Huge efforts have been devoted to develop therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting human Programmed death-ligand 1 (hPD-L1) for treating various types of human cancers. However, thus far there is no suitable animal model for evaluating the anti-tumor efficacy of such antibodies against hPD-L1. Here we report the generation of a robust and effective system utilizing hPD-L1-expressing mouse tumor cells to study the therapeutic activity and mode of action of anti-human PD-L1 in mice. The model has been validated by using a clinically proven hPD-L1 blocking antibody. The anti-hPD-L1 antibody treatment resulted in potent dose-dependent rejection of the human PD-L1-expressing tumors in mice. Consistent with what have observed in autochthonous mouse tumor models and cancer patients, the hPD-L1 tumor bearing mice treated by anti-hPD-L1 antibody showed rapid activation, proliferation and reinvigoration of the cytolytic effector function of CD8+T cells inside tumor tissues. Moreover, anti-hPD-L1 treatment also led to profound inhibition of Treg expansion and shifting of myeloid cell profiles, showing bona fide induction of multilateral anti-tumor responses by anti-hPD-L1 blockade. Thus, this hPD-L1 mouse model system would facilitate the pre-clinical investigation of therapeutic efficacy and immune modulatory function of various forms of anti-hPD-L1 antibodies. PMID:28202921

  16. [A TIM-3/galectin-9 autocrine stimulatory loop drives self-renewal of human myeloid leukemia stem cells and leukemia progression].

    PubMed

    Kikushige, Yoshikane

    2016-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) originates from self-renewing leukemic stem cells (LSCs), an ultimate therapeutic target for AML. We previously reported that the T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3) is expressed on the LCS surface in most types of AML. Since only the TIM-3(+), i.e. not the TIM-3(-), fraction of human AML cells can reconstitute human AML in immunodeficient mice, we hypothesized that the TIM-3 has an essential function in maintaining AML LSCs. Herein, we show that TIM-3 and its ligand, galectin-9 (Gal-9), constitute an autocrine loop critical for human AML LSC development. Serum Gal-9 was significantly elevated in primary AML patients and in mice xenografted with human AML. Neutralization of Gal-9 inhibited xenogeneic reconstitution of human AML, as well as Gal-9 ligation of TIM-3 co-activated NF-κB and β-catenin signaling, suggesting that TIM-3 signaling is necessary for LSC self-renewal. Interestingly, identical changes were found to be involved in the progressive transformation of a variety of pre-leukemic disorders into myeloid leukemia. Thus, molecules constituting the TIM-3/Gal-9 autocrine loop are potential therapeutic targets applicable to most types of myeloid leukemia.

  17. Myeloid cells as target of fingolimod action in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Di Dario, Marco; Colombo, Emanuela; Govi, Chiara; De Feo, Donatella; Messina, Maria José; Romeo, Marzia; Sangalli, Francesca; Moiola, Lucia; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Martino, Gianvito; Martinelli, Vittorio; Comi, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To track the effects of fingolimod, an approved drug for multiple sclerosis (MS), on the activation of myeloid cells from the periphery to the CNS. Methods: In vitro and ex vivo immunologic studies coupled with flow cytometry were performed to evaluate the action of fingolimod on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)–induced expression of activation markers in human monocytes from healthy participants, participants with untreated MS, and participants with fingolimod-treated MS. In vivo administration of fingolimod during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was established to verify the activation state of splenic, CNS infiltrating, and CNS resident myeloid cells ex vivo at flow cytometer. Results: We found that in vitro exposure of human monocytes to fingolimod inhibited LPS-induced CD25 and CD150 expression and tumor necrosis factor–α (TNF-α) secretion without altering immune cell survival. Further, EAE treatment with fingolimod led to reduced amounts of TNF-α produced by myeloid cells in vivo in the spleen and CNS. Finally, while displaying normal induction of CD25 and CD150 levels at high LPS concentration, monocytes from patients with fingolimod-treated MS showed significantly higher activation threshold at suboptimal LPS stimulation than controls. Conclusions: The inhibition of myeloid cell activation may be part of the immunosuppressive action of fingolimod and take place in the periphery and in the CNS. PMID:26587553

  18. Differential expression and biochemical activity of the immune receptor Tim-3 in healthy and malignant human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Varani, Luca; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-10-20

    The T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim-3) is a plasma membrane-associated receptor which is involved in a variety of biological responses in human immune cells. It is highly expressed in most acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells and therefore may serve as a possible target for AML therapy. However, its biochemical activities in primary human AML cells remain unclear. We therefore analysed the total expression and surface presence of the Tim-3 receptor in primary human AML blasts and healthy primary human leukocytes isolated from human blood. We found that Tim-3 expression was significantly higher in primary AML cells compared to primary healthy leukocytes. Tim-3 receptor molecules were distributed largely on the surface of primary AML cells, whereas in healthy leukocytes Tim-3 protein was mainly expressed intracellularly. In primary human AML blasts, both Tim-3 agonistic antibody and galectin-9 (a Tim-3 natural ligand) significantly upregulated mTOR pathway activity. This was in line with increased accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and secretion of VEGF and TNF-α. Similar results were obtained in primary human healthy leukocytes. Importantly, in both types of primary cells, Tim-3-mediated effects were compared with those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and stem cell factor (SCF). Tim-3 induced comparatively moderate responses in both AML cells and healthy leukocytes. However, Tim-3, like LPS, mediated the release of both TNF-α and VEGF, while SCF induced mostly VEGF secretion and did not upregulate TNF-α release.

  19. Small Molecule Inhibition of cAMP Response Element Binding Protein in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitton, Bryan; Chae, Hee-Don; Hsu, Katie; Dutta, Ritika; Aldana-Masangkay, Grace; Ferrari, Roberto; Davis, Kara; Tiu, Bruce C.; Kaul, Arya; Lacayo, Norman; Dahl, Gary; Xie, Fuchun; Li, Bingbing X.; Breese, Marcus R.; Landaw, Elliot M.; Nolan, Garry; Pellegrini, Matteo; Romanov, Sergei; Xiao, Xiangshu; Sakamoto, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor CREB (cAMP Response Element Binding Protein) is overexpressed in the majority of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, and this is associated with a worse prognosis. Previous work revealed that CREB overexpression augmented AML cell growth, while CREB knockdown disrupted key AML cell functions in vitro. In contrast, CREB knockdown had no effect on long-term hematopoietic stem cell activity in mouse transduction/transplantation assays. Together, these studies position CREB as a promising drug target for AML. To test this concept, a small molecule inhibitor of CREB, XX-650-23, was developed. This molecule blocks a critical interaction between CREB and its required co-activator CBP (CREB Binding Protein), leading to disruption of CREB-driven gene expression. Inhibition of CBP-CREB interaction induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in AML cells, and prolonged survival in vivo in mice injected with human AML cells. XX-650-23 had little toxicity on normal human hematopoietic cells and tissues in mice. To understand the mechanism of XX-650-23, we performed RNA-seq, ChIP-seq and Cytometry Time of Flight with human AML cells. Our results demonstrate that small molecule inhibition of CBP-CREB interaction mostly affects apoptotic, cell cycle, and survival pathways, which may represent a novel approach for AML therapy. PMID:27211267

  20. Expansion of CCR8+ inflammatory myeloid cells in cancer patients with urothelial and renal carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Stoffs, Taryn; Kim, Wan-Ju; Daurkin, Irina; Gilbert, Scott M.; Su, Li-Ming; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Chemokines are involved in cancer-related inflammation and malignant progression. In this study we evaluated expression of CCR8 and its natural cognate ligand CCL1 in patients with urothelial carcinomas of bladder and renal cell carcinomas. Experimental Design We examined CCR8 expression in peripheral blood and tumor tissues from patients with bladder and renal carcinomas. CCR8-positive myeloid cells were isolated from cancer tissues with magnetic beads and tested in vitro for cytokine production and ability to modulate T cell function. Results We demonstrate that monocytic and granulocytic myeloid cell subsets in peripheral blood of cancer patients with urothelial and renal carcinomas display increased expression of chemokine receptor CCR8. Up-regulated expression of CCR8 is also detected within human cancer tissues and primarily limited to tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). When isolated, CD11b+CCR8+ cell subset produces the highest levels of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factors among intratumoral CD11b myeloid cells. Tumor-infiltrating CD11b+CCR8+ cells selectively display activated Stat3 and are capable of inducing FoxP3 expression in autologous T lymphocytes. Primary human tumors produce substantial amounts of the natural CCR8 ligand CCL1. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that CCR8+ myeloid cell subset is expanded in cancer patients. Elevated secretion of CCL1 by tumors, increased presence of CCR8+ myeloid cells in peripheral blood and cancer tissues indicate that CCL1/CCR8 axis is a component of cancer-related inflammation and may contribute to immune evasion. Obtained results also implicate that blockade of CCR8 signals may provide an attractive strategy for therapeutic intervention in human urothelial and renal cancers. PMID:23363815

  1. Infrared Spectra of Human Breast Tumor Tissue and Experimental Animal Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Belkov, M. V.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Pekhnyo, V. I.; Kozachkova, A. N.; Tsarik, H. V.; Kutsenko, I. P.; Sharykina, N. I.; Butra, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used Fourier transform IR spectroscopy methods to conduct comparative studies of human breast tumors and sarcoma 180 tumor grafted into mice. The IR spectral parameters used to identify tumor tissue in mice with the sarcoma 180 strain proved to be identical to the parameters for human breast tissue in cancer. In the presence of a malignant tumor in humans, the most intense C=O vibrational bands in the protein molecules are observed in the interval 1710-1680 cm-1. For a benign tumor, in the IR spectra of breast tissue the intense bands are located in the interval 1670-1650 cm-1. We spectroscopically monitored the diagnosis and the chemotherapy process using the model of sarcoma 180 in mice. As the therapeutic drugs, we used synthesized coordination compounds based on palladium complexes with diphosphonic acid derivatives. We demonstrate the promising potential of palladium complexes with zoledronic acid as an effective cytostatic. In therapy using a palladium complex with zoledronic acid, the effect of tumor growth inhibition is accompanied by a change in its spectral characteristics. The parameters of the IR spectra for tumor tissue after treatment are close to those of the IR spectra for healthy tissue.

  2. CBFB and MYH11 in inv(16)(p13q22) of acute myeloid leukemia displaying close spatial proximity in interphase nuclei of human hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Weckerle, Allison B; Santra, Madhumita; Ng, Maggie C Y; Koty, Patrick P; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2011-09-01

    To gain a better understanding of the mechanism of chromosomal translocations in cancer, we investigated the spatial proximity between CBFB and MYH11 genes involved in inv(16)(p13q22) found in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for spatial genome organization in the formation of tumorigenic abnormalities. The nonrandom localization of chromosomes and, more specifically, of genes appears to play a role in the mechanism of chromosomal translocations. Here, two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal microscopy were used to measure the interphase distance between CBFB and MYH11 in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), where inv(16)(p13q22) is believed to occur, leading to leukemia development. The measured distances in HSCs were compared with mesenchymal stem cells, peripheral blood lymphocytes, and fibroblasts, as spatial genome organization is determined to be cell-type specific. Results indicate that CBFB and MYH11 are significantly closer in HSCs compared with all other cell types examined. Furthermore, the CBFB-MYH11 distance is significantly reduced compared with CBFB and a control locus in HSCs, although separation between CBFB and the control is ∼70% of that between CBFB and MYH11 on metaphase chromosomes. HSCs were also treated with fragile site-inducing chemicals because both the genes contain translocation breakpoints within these regions. However, treatment with fragile site-inducing chemicals did not significantly affect the interphase distance. Consistent with previous studies, our results suggest that gene proximity may play a role in the formation of cancer-causing rearrangements, providing insight into the mechanism of chromosomal abnormalities in human tumors.

  3. CBFB and MYH11 in inv(16)(p13q22) of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Display Close Spatial Proximity in Interphase Nuclei of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weckerle, Allison B.; Santra, Madhumita; Ng, Maggie C.Y.; Koty, Patrick P.; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the mechanism of chromosomal translocations in cancer, we investigated the spatial proximity between CBFB and MYH11 genes involved in inv(16)(p13q22) found in acute myeloid leukemia patients. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for spatial genome organization in the formation of tumorigenic abnormalities. The non-random localization of chromosomes and, more specifically, of genes appears to play a role in the mechanism of chromosomal translocations. Here, two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal microscopy were used to measure the interphase distance between CBFB and MYH11 in hematopoietic stem cells, where inv(16)(p13q22) is believed to occur, leading to leukemia development. The measured distances in hematopoietic stem cells were compared to mesenchymal stem cells, peripheral blood lymphocytes and fibroblasts, as spatial genome organization is determined to be cell-type specific. Results indicate that CBFB and MYH11 are significantly closer in hematopoietic stem cells compared to all other cell types examined. Furthermore, the CBFB-MYH11 distance is significantly reduced compared to CBFB and a control locus in hematopoietic stem cells, although separation between CBFB and the control is ~70% of that between CBFB and MYH11 on metaphase chromosomes. Hematopoietic stem cells were also treated with fragile site-inducing chemicals since both genes contain translocation breakpoints within these regions. However, treatment with fragile site-inducing chemicals did not significantly affect the interphase distance. Consistent with previous studies, our results suggest that gene proximity may play a role in the formation of cancer-causing rearrangements, providing insight into the mechanism of chromosomal abnormalities in human tumors. PMID:21638519

  4. Canine tumors: a spontaneous animal model of human carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Salomé S; Carvalho, Sandra; Cabral, Joana; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2012-03-01

    The enormous biologic complexity of human cancer has stimulated the development of more appropriate experimental models that could resemble in a natural and spontaneous manner the physiopathologic aspects of cancer biology. Companion animals have many desired characteristics that fill the gap between in vitro and in vivo studies, and these characteristics have proven to be important in understanding many complex molecular aspects of human cancer. Spontaneous tumors in dogs share a wide variety of epidemiologic, biologic, and clinical features with human cancer, which makes this animal model both attractive and underused in oncology research. In this review, we summarize the importance of naturally occurring canine tumors as valuable tools for studying numerous aspects of human cancer as well as the potential use of this animal model for the development of new cancer treatments. We address specifically the use of canine mammary tumors as an increasingly powerful model to study human breast cancer.

  5. Growth Factor-Activated Stem Cell Circuits and Stromal Signals Cooperatively Accelerate Non-Integrated iPSC Reprogramming of Human Myeloid Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tea Soon; Huo, Jeffrey S.; Peters, Ann; Talbot, C. Conover; Verma, Karan; Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Kaplan, Ian M.; Zambidis, Elias T.

    2012-01-01

    Nonviral conversion of skin or blood cells into clinically useful human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) occurs in only rare fractions (∼0.001%–0.5%) of donor cells transfected with non-integrating reprogramming factors. Pluripotency induction of developmentally immature stem-progenitors is generally more efficient than differentiated somatic cell targets. However, the nature of augmented progenitor reprogramming remains obscure, and its potential has not been fully explored for improving the extremely slow pace of non-integrated reprogramming. Here, we report highly optimized four-factor reprogramming of lineage-committed cord blood (CB) myeloid progenitors with bulk efficiencies of ∼50% in purified episome-expressing cells. Lineage-committed CD33+CD45+CD34− myeloid cells and not primitive hematopoietic stem-progenitors were the main targets of a rapid and nearly complete non-integrated reprogramming. The efficient conversion of mature myeloid populations into NANOG+TRA-1-81+ hiPSC was mediated by synergies between hematopoietic growth factor (GF), stromal activation signals, and episomal Yamanaka factor expression. Using a modular bioinformatics approach, we demonstrated that efficient myeloid reprogramming correlated not to increased proliferation or endogenous Core factor expressions, but to poised expression of GF-activated transcriptional circuits that commonly regulate plasticity in both hematopoietic progenitors and embryonic stem cells (ESC). Factor-driven conversion of myeloid progenitors to a high-fidelity pluripotent state was further accelerated by soluble and contact-dependent stromal signals that included an implied and unexpected role for Toll receptor-NFκB signaling. These data provide a paradigm for understanding the augmented reprogramming capacity of somatic progenitors, and reveal that efficient induced pluripotency in other cell types may also require extrinsic activation of a molecular framework that commonly regulates self

  6. Regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and cytokine gene expression in myeloid cells by NF-kappa B/Rel transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Roulston, A; Lin, R; Beauparlant, P; Wainberg, M A; Hiscott, J

    1995-01-01

    CD4+ macrophages in tissues such as lung, skin, and lymph nodes, promyelocytic cells in bone marrow, and peripheral blood monocytes serve as important targets and reservoirs for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. HIV-1-infected myeloid cells are often diminished in their ability to participate in chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and intracellular killing. HIV-1 infection of myeloid cells can lead to the expression of surface receptors associated with cellular activation and/or differentiation that increase the responsiveness of these cells to cytokines secreted by neighboring cells as well as to bacteria or other pathogens. Enhancement of HIV-1 replication is related in part to increased DNA-binding activity of cellular transcription factors such as NF-kappa B. NF-kappa B binds to the HIV-1 enhancer region of the long terminal repeat and contributes to the inducibility of HIV-1 gene expression in response to multiple activating agents. Phosphorylation and degradation of the cytoplasmic inhibitor I kappa B alpha are crucial regulatory events in the activation of NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity. Both N- and C-terminal residues of I kappa B alpha are required for inducer-mediated degradation. Chronic HIV-1 infection of myeloid cells leads to constitutive NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity and provides an intranuclear environment capable of perpetuating HIV-1 replication. Increased intracellular stores of latent NF-kappa B may also result in rapid inducibility of NF-kappa B-dependent cytokine gene expression. In response to secondary pathogenic infections or antigenic challenge, cytokine gene expression is rapidly induced, enhanced, and sustained over prolonged periods in HIV-1-infected myeloid cells compared with uninfected cells. Elevated levels of several inflammatory cytokines have been detected in the sera of HIV-1-infected individuals. Secretion of myeloid cell-derived cytokines may both increase virus production and contribute to AIDS

  7. CD45 phosphatase is crucial for human and murine acute myeloid leukemia maintenance through its localization in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Saint-Paul, Laetitia; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Buffière, Anne; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Hammann, Arlette; Landras-Guetta, Corinne; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; Johnson, Pauline; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent; Quéré, Ronan

    2016-10-04

    CD45 is a pan-leukocyte protein with tyrosine phosphatase activity involved in the regulation of signal transduction in hematopoiesis. Exploiting CD45 KO mice and lentiviral shRNA, we prove the crucial role that CD45 plays in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development and maintenance. We discovered that CD45 does not colocalize with lipid rafts on murine and human non-transformed hematopoietic cells. Using a mouse model, we proved that CD45 positioning within lipid rafts is modified during their oncogenic transformation to AML. CD45 colocalized with lipid rafts on AML cells, which contributes to elevated GM-CSF signal intensity involved in proliferation of leukemic cells. We furthermore proved that the GM-CSF/Lyn/Stat3 pathway that contributes to growth of leukemic cells could be profoundly affected, by using a new plasma membrane disrupting agent, which rapidly delocalized CD45 away from lipid rafts. We provide evidence that this mechanism is also effective on human primary AML samples and xenograft transplantation. In conclusion, this study highlights the emerging evidence of the involvement of lipid rafts in oncogenic development of AML and the targeting of CD45 positioning among lipid rafts as a new strategy in the treatment of AML.

  8. A rapid culture technique produces functional dendritic-like cells from human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ning, Jian; Morgan, David; Pamphilon, Derwood

    2011-01-01

    Most anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies involving dendritic cells (DC) as vaccines rely upon the adoptive transfer of DC loaded with exogenous tumour-peptides. This study utilized human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells as progenitors from which functional dendritic-like antigen presenting cells (DLC) were generated, that constitutively express tumour antigens for recognition by CD8(+) T cells. DLC were generated from AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3 using rapid culture techniques and appropriate cytokines. DLC were evaluated for their cell-surface phenotype, antigen uptake and ability to stimulate allogeneic responder cell proliferation, and production of IFN-γ; compared with DC derived from normal human PBMC donors. KG-1 and MUTZ-3 DLC increased expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR, and MUTZ-3 DLC downregulated CD14 and expressed CD1a. Importantly, both KG-1 and MUTZ-3-derived DLC promoted proliferation of allogeneic responder cells more efficiently than unmodified cells; neither cells incorporated FITC-labeled dextran, but both stimulated IFN-γ production from responding allogeneic CD8(+) T cells. Control DC produced from PBMC using the FastDC culture also expressed high levels of critical cell surface ligands and demonstrated good APC function. This paper indicates that functional DLC can be cultured from the AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3, and FastDC culture generates functional KG-1 DLC.

  9. Dihydroartemisinin induces autophagy and inhibits the growth of iron-loaded human myeloid leukemia K562 cells via ROS toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zeng; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Jia-Li; Wu, Xiu-Hua; Zhou, Hui-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), an active metabolite of artemisinin derivatives, is the most remarkable anti-malarial drug and has little toxicity to humans. Recent studies have shown that DHA effectively inhibits the growth of cancer cells. In the present study, we intended to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the inhibition of growth of iron-loaded human myeloid leukemia K562 cells by DHA. Mitochondria are important regulators of both autophagy and apoptosis, and one of the triggers for mitochondrial dysfunction is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that the DHA-induced autophagy of leukemia K562 cells, whose intracellular organelles are primarily mitochondria, was ROS dependent. The autophagy of these cells was followed by LC3-II protein expression and caspase-3 activation. In addition, we demonstrated that inhibition of the proliferation of leukemia K562 cells by DHA is also dependent upon iron. This inhibition includes the down-regulation of TfR expression and the induction of K562 cell growth arrest in the G2/M phase. PMID:23650588

  10. CD45 phosphatase is crucial for human and murine acute myeloid leukemia maintenance through its localization in lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Paul, Laetitia; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Buffière, Anne; de Barros, Jean-Paul Pais; Hammann, Arlette; Landras-Guetta, Corinne; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; Johnson, Pauline; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent; Quéré, Ronan

    2016-01-01

    CD45 is a pan-leukocyte protein with tyrosine phosphatase activity involved in the regulation of signal transduction in hematopoiesis. Exploiting CD45 KO mice and lentiviral shRNA, we prove the crucial role that CD45 plays in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development and maintenance. We discovered that CD45 does not colocalize with lipid rafts on murine and human non-transformed hematopoietic cells. Using a mouse model, we proved that CD45 positioning within lipid rafts is modified during their oncogenic transformation to AML. CD45 colocalized with lipid rafts on AML cells, which contributes to elevated GM-CSF signal intensity involved in proliferation of leukemic cells. We furthermore proved that the GM-CSF/Lyn/Stat3 pathway that contributes to growth of leukemic cells could be profoundly affected, by using a new plasma membrane disrupting agent, which rapidly delocalized CD45 away from lipid rafts. We provide evidence that this mechanism is also effective on human primary AML samples and xenograft transplantation. In conclusion, this study highlights the emerging evidence of the involvement of lipid rafts in oncogenic development of AML and the targeting of CD45 positioning among lipid rafts as a new strategy in the treatment of AML. PMID:27579617

  11. Combined radiation and hyperthermia in superficial human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Marmor, J.B.; Hahn, G.M.

    1980-11-01

    Hyperthermia (42-43 C) appears to potentiate the effects of radiation therapy in experimental tumor models. In addition, some studies indicate that tumors may be sensitized to a greater extent than normal tissue. This study was designed to test whether the effectiveness of irradiating human tumors was enhanced significantly by concomitant heating. We also examined skin to see if heating enhanced the response to radiation of normal tissues. Nineteen patients with multiple metastatic superficial tumor masses of various histologies were studied. Two or more masses in the same patient were matched for size and location, so that one of the patient's own tumors was a control to monitor the effect of irradiation alone. One of the matched nodules was given hyperthermia (43 C) for 15 minutes before and 30 minutes after each radiation fraction. In seven of 15 evaluable patients the tumor that received heat in addition to radiation had a greater objective response than the tumor receiving radiation alone. Two patients had increased cutaneous reaction to radiation in the heated area; one of these was a severe desquamative reaction, which conformed to the size and shape of the ultrasound field. These results suggest that hyperthermia improves the objective response to radiation in some human tumors; in two cases it appeared to sensitize skin as well.

  12. TGF{beta}-mediated formation of pRb-E2F complexes in human myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Xiaotang

    2008-05-02

    TGF{beta} is well known for its inhibitory effect on cell cycle G1 checkpoint kinases. However, its role in the control of pRb-E2F complexes is not well established. TGF{beta} inhibits phosphorylation of pRb at several serine and threonine residues and regulates the association of E2F transcription factors with pRb family proteins. Recent studies found that predominantly E2F-4, p130, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) are found to bind to corresponding E2F-responsive promoters in G0/G1 phase. As cells progress through mid-G1, p130-E2F4 complex are replaced by p107-E2F4 followed by activators E2F1, 2, and 3. pRb was not detectable in the promoters containing the E2F-responsive site in cycling cells but was associated with E2F4-p130 complexes or E2F4-p107 complexes during G0/G1 phase. In human myeloid leukemia cell line, MV4-11, TGF{beta} upregulated pRb-E2F-4 and p130-E2F-4, and downregulated p107-E2F-4 complexes. However, pRB-E2F1 and pRb-E2F3 complexes were found in proliferating cells but not in TGF{beta} arrested G1 cells. In addition, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assay (EMSA) could not detect pRb-E2F DNA-binding activities either in S or G1 phase but exhibited the existence of p107-E2F4 in proliferating cells and p130-E2F4 complexes in TGF{beta}-arrested G1 cells, respectively. Our data suggest that p107 and p130, but not pRb, and the repressor E2F, but not activator E2Fs, play a critical role in regulating E2F-responsive gene expression in TGF{beta}-mediated cell cycle control in human myeloid leukemia cells.

  13. Human papillomavirus capsids preferentially bind and infect tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kines, Rhonda C.; Cerio, Rebecca J.; Roberts, Jeffrey N.; Thompson, Cynthia D.; de Los Pinos, Elisabet; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.

    2015-01-01

    We previously determined that human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particles (VLPs) and pseudovirions (PsV) did not, respectively, bind to or infect intact epithelium of the cervicovaginal tract. However, they strongly bound heparin sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) on the basement membrane of disrupted epithelium and infected the keratinocytes that subsequently entered the disrupted site. We here report that HPV capsids (VLP and PsV) have the same restricted tropism for a wide variety of disrupted epithelial and mesothelial tissues, whereas intact tissues remain resistant to binding. However, the HPV capsids directly bind and infect most tumor-derived cell lines in vitro and have analogous tumor-specific properties in vivo, after local or intravenous injection, using orthotopic models for human ovarian and lung cancer, respectively. The pseudovirions also specifically infected implanted primary human ovarian tumors. Heparin and ι-carrageenan blocked binding and infection of all tumor lines tested, implying that tumor cell binding is HSPG-dependent. A survey using a panel of modified heparins indicate that N-sulfation and, to a lesser degree O-6 sulfation of the surface HSPG on the tumors are important for HPV binding. Therefore, it appears that tumor cells consistently evolve HSPG modification patterns that mimic the pattern normally found on the basement membrane but not on the apical surfaces of normal epithelial or mesothelial cells. Consequently, appropriately modified HPV VLPs and/or PsV could be useful reagents to detect and potentially treat a remarkably broad spectrum of cancers. PMID:26317490

  14. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gudkov, Sergey V.; Shilyagina, Natalya Yu.; Vodeneev, Vladimir A.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed. PMID:26729091

  15. A rare case of myeloid sarcoma presenting as anal fissure

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; INTAGLIATA, E.; FIUMARA, P.F.; VILLARI, L.; MARCHESE, S.; CACCIOLA, E.

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a tumor composed of myeloblasts occurring at an extramedullary site. It may develop in patients with acute myeloid leukemia, myeloproliferative or myelodysplastic syndrome, sometimes preceding onset of the systemic disease. Frequent sites of myeloid sarcoma are bones or various soft tissues. Gastrointestinal involvement is very rare. We report a unique case of myeloid sarcoma presenting as a painful anal fissure, in a patient with a history of acute myeloid leukemia. The diagnosis was achieved by a surgical excisional biopsy and immunoistochemical staining. PMID:26712260

  16. The Hypothesis of the Human iNKT/Innate CD8(+) T-Cell Axis Applied to Cancer: Evidence for a Deficiency in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jacomet, Florence; Cayssials, Emilie; Barbarin, Alice; Desmier, Deborah; Basbous, Sara; Lefèvre, Lucie; Levescot, Anaïs; Robin, Aurélie; Piccirilli, Nathalie; Giraud, Christine; Guilhot, François; Roy, Lydia; Herbelin, André; Gombert, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    We recently identified a new human subset of NK-like [KIR/NKG2A(+)] CD8(+) T cells with a marked/memory phenotype, high Eomesodermin expression, potent antigen-independent cytotoxic activity, and the capacity to generate IFN-γ rapidly after exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines. These features support the hypothesis that this new member of the innate T cell family in humans, hereafter referred to as innate CD8(+) T cells, has a role in cancer immune surveillance analogous to invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. Here, we report the first quantitative and functional analysis of innate CD8(+) T cells in a physiopathological context in humans, namely chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a well-characterized myeloproliferative disorder. We have chosen CML based on our previous report that IL-4 production by iNKT cells was deficient in CML patients at diagnosis and considering the recent evidence in mice that IL-4 promotes the generation/differentiation of innate CD8(+) T cells. We found that the pool of innate CD8(+) T cells was severely reduced in the blood of CML patients at diagnosis. Moreover, like iNKT and NK cells, innate CD8(+) T cells were functionally impaired, as attested by their loss of antigen-independent cytotoxic activity and IFN-γ production in response to innate-like stimulation with IL-12 + IL-18. Remarkably, as previously reported for IL-4 production by iNKT cells, both quantitative and functional deficiencies of innate CD8(+) T cells were at least partially corrected in patients having achieved complete cytogenetic remission following tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Finally, direct correlation between the functional potential of innate CD8(+) T and iNKT cells was found when considering all healthy donors and CML patients in diagnosis and remission, in accordance with the iNKT cell-dependent generation of innate CD8(+) T cells reported in mice. All in all, our data demonstrate that CML is associated with deficiencies of innate CD8(+) T cells

  17. Gemcitabine directly inhibits myeloid derived suppressor cells in BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 mammary carcinoma and augments expansion of T cells from tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Le, Hanh K; Graham, Laura; Cha, Esther; Morales, Johanna K; Manjili, Masoud H; Bear, Harry D

    2009-07-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate in 4T1 mammary carcinoma bearing mice and present a barrier to the success of adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) by suppressing T cell immunity. In this study, we investigated the inhibition of MDSCs by gemcitabine (GEM), a chemotherapy agent that may have favorable immunologic effects. BALB/c mice were inoculated with 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells and treated with GEM either once a week starting 5 days after tumor inoculation (EARLY GEM) or as a single dose at days 20-25 (LATE GEM). Splenic mononuclear cells were isolated, activated in vitro, expanded, and stimulated with tumor antigen. T cells were then used for AIT to treat tumor-bearing mice. EARLY GEM treatment of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice significantly inhibited tumor growth, reduced splenomegaly, and significantly decreased MDSC proportion in the spleen. Support for a direct effect was demonstrated through suppression of MDSCs in spleens, bone marrow, and blood harvested 24 and 48 h after LATE GEM treatment, despite no significant decrease in tumor burden. Interestingly, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with GEM augmented in vitro expansion of splenic T cells and boosted IFN-gamma secretion in response to stimulation by tumor antigen. However, despite GEM-mediated inhibition of MDSC suppression, splenic T cells from mice with advanced tumors were ineffective in vivo against established tumors. This study provides support for direct inhibition of MDSCs and direct reduction of tumor burden by GEM in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. GEM treatment of mice with advanced tumors improves T cell function and growth in vitro.

  18. Tumor suppression by MEG3 lncRNA in a human pituitary tumor derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Chunharojrith, Paweena; Nakayama, Yuki; Jiang, Xiaobing; Kery, Rachel E; Ma, Jun; De La Hoz Ulloa, Cristine S; Zhang, Xun; Zhou, Yunli; Klibanski, Anne

    2015-11-15

    Human clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFAs) account for approximately 40% of diagnosed pituitary tumors. Epigenetic mutations in tumor suppressive genes play an important role in NFA development. Maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3) is a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and we hypothesized that it is a candidate tumor suppressor whose epigenetic silencing is specifically linked to NFA development. In this study, we introduced MEG3 expression into PDFS cells, derived from a human NFA, using both inducible and constitutively active expression systems. MEG3 expression significantly suppressed xenograft tumor growth in vivo in nude mice. When induced in culture, MEG3 caused cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. In addition, inactivation of p53 completely abolished tumor suppression by MEG3, indicating that MEG3 tumor suppression is mediated by p53. In conclusion, our data support the hypothesis that MEG3 is a lncRNA tumor suppressor in the pituitary and its inactivation contributes to NFA development.

  19. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  20. SKI knockdown inhibits human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dahu; Lin, Qiushi; Box, Neil; Roop, Dennis; Ishii, Shunsuke; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Fan, Tao; Hornyak, Thomas J; Reed, Jon A; Stavnezer, Ed; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Medrano, Estela E

    2009-12-01

    The SKI protein represses the TGF-beta tumor suppressor pathway by associating with the Smad transcription factors. SKI is upregulated in human malignant melanoma tumors in a disease-progression manner and its overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which SKI antagonizes TGF-beta signaling in vivo have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that human melanoma cells in which endogenous SKI expression was knocked down by RNAi produced minimal orthotopic tumor xenograft nodules that displayed low mitotic rate and prominent apoptosis. These minute tumors exhibited critical signatures of active TGF-beta signaling including high levels of nuclear Smad3 and p21(Waf-1), which are not found in the parental melanomas. To understand how SKI promotes tumor growth we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches and found that simultaneously to blocking the TGF-beta-growth inhibitory pathway, SKI promotes the switch of Smad3 from tumor suppression to oncogenesis by favoring phosphorylations of the Smad3 linker region in melanoma cells but not in normal human melanocytes. In this context, SKI is required for preventing TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of the oncogenic protein c-MYC, and for inducing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, a mediator of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Together, the results indicate that SKI exploits multiple regulatory levels of the TGF-beta pathway and its deficiency restores TGF-beta tumor suppressor and apoptotic activities in spite of the likely presence of oncogenic mutations in melanoma tumors.

  1. Critical involvement of the α(1,2)-fucosyltransferase in multidrug resistance of human chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Che, Yuxuan; Ren, Xing; Xu, Liye; Ding, Xiaolei; Zhang, Xuan; Sun, Xiuhua

    2016-05-01

    The fucosyltransferases are key enzymes in cell surface antigen synthesis during multidrug resistance (MDR) development. The aim of the present study was to analyze the alteration of α(1,2)-fucosyltransferase involved in MDR development in human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). FUT1 was overexpressed in three CML/MDR cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of CML patients. However, no significant changes of FUT2 were observed. The altered levels of FUT1 had a significant impact on the phenotypic variation of MDR of K562 and K562/ADR cells, the activity of EGFR/MAPK pathway and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. Blocking the EGFR/MAPK pathway by its specific inhibitor PD153035 or EGFR small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in the reduced MDR of K562/ADR cells. This study indicated that α(1,2)-fucosyltransferase involved in the development of MDR of CML cells probably through FUT1 regulated the activity of EGFR/MAPK signaling pathway and the expression of P-gp.

  2. Human herpesvirus 7 infection of lymphoid and myeloid cell lines transduced with an adenovirus vector containing the CD4 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yasukawa, M; Inoue, Y; Ohminami, H; Sada, E; Miyake, K; Tohyama, T; Shimada, T; Fujita, S

    1997-01-01

    It has been reported recently that CD4 is a major component of the receptor for human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7), which has been newly identified as a T-lymphotropic virus. To investigate further the role of CD4 in HHV-7 infection, we examined the susceptibility to HHV-7 infection of various CD4-negative or weakly positive cell lines into which the cDNA for CD4 was transferred using an adenovirus vector (Adex1CACD4). Of 13 cell lines transduced with Adex1CACD4, including T-lymphoid, B-lymphoid, monocytoid, and myeloid cell lines, one T-lymphoid cell line, one monocytoid cell line, and two cell lines established from the blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia showed high susceptibility to HHV-7 infection. Taken together with the results of previous studies, these data suggest strongly that CD4 is a major component of the binding receptor for HHV-7. This study also shows that HHV-7 may be able to infect CD4-positive hematopoietic precursor cells as well as T lymphocytes. PMID:8995705

  3. The Effects of T4 and A3/R Bacteriophages on Differentiation of Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Zarzycki, Michał; Pacek, Magdalena; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Machcińska, Maja; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are viruses of bacteria. Here we evaluated the effects of T4 and A3/R bacteriophages, as well as phage-generated bacterial lysates, on differentiation of human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) from monocytes. Neither of the phages significantly reduced the expression of markers associated with differentiation of DCs and their role in the activation of T cells (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, CD1c, CD11c, MHC II, PD-L1, PD-L2, TLR2, TLR4, and CCR7) and phagocytosis receptors (CD64 and DEC-205). By contrast, bacterial lysate of T4 phage significantly decreased the percentages of DEC-205- and CD1c-positive cells. The percentage of DEC-205-positive cells was also significantly reduced in DCs differentiated in the presence of lysate of A3/R phage. Thus while bacteriophages do not substantially affect differentiation of DCs, some products of phage-induced lysis of bacterial cells may influence the differentiation and potentially also some functions of DCs. Our results have important implications for phage therapy of bacterial infections because during infections monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation are an important source of inflammatory DCs. PMID:27582733

  4. Phase I clinical study of RG7356, an anti-CD44 humanized antibody, in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vey, Norbert; Delaunay, Jacques; Martinelli, Giovanni; Fiedler, Walter; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Prebet, Thomas; Gomez-Roca, Carlos; Papayannidis, Cristina; Kebenko, Maxim; Paschka, Peter; Christen, Randolph; Guarin, Ernesto; Bröske, Ann-Marie; Baehner, Monika; Brewster, Michael; Walz, Antje-Christine; Michielin, Francesca; Runza, Valeria; Meresse, Valerie; Recher, Christian

    2016-01-01

    RG7356, a recombinant anti-CD44 immunoglobulin G1 humanized monoclonal antibody, inhibits cell adhesion and has been associated with macrophage activation in preclinical models. We report results of a phase I dose-escalation study of RG7356 in relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Eligible patients with refractory AML, relapsed AML after induction chemotherapy, or previously untreated AML not eligible for intensive chemotherapy were enrolled and received intravenous RG7356 at dosages ≤ 2400 mg every other week or ≤ 1200 mg weekly or twice weekly; dose escalation started at 300 mg. Forty-four patients (median age, 69 years) were enrolled. One dose-limiting toxicity occurred (grade 3 hemolysis exacerbation) after one 1200 mg dose (twice-weekly cohort). The majority of adverse events were mild/moderate. Infusion-related reactions occurred in 64% of patients mainly during cycle 1. Two patients experienced grade 3 drug-induced aseptic meningitis. Pharmacokinetics increased supraproportionally, suggesting a target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) at ≥ 1200 mg. Two patients achieved complete response with incomplete platelet recovery or partial response, respectively. One patient had stable disease with hematologic improvement. RG7356 was generally safe and well tolerated. Maximum tolerated dose was not reached, but saturation of TMDD was achieved. The recommended dose for future AML evaluations is 2400 mg every other week. PMID:27081038

  5. Inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in human myeloid dendritic cells induces potent tolerogenic functions during LPS stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jun-O; Zhang, Wei; Wong, Ka-Wing; Kwak, Minseok; van Driel, Ian R; Yu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2), a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporters has been identified as a major determinant of multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells, but ABC transporter inhibition has limited therapeutic value in vivo. In this research, we demonstrated that inhibition of efflux transporters ABCG2 induced the generation of tolerogenic DCs from human peripheral blood myeloid DCs (mDCs). ABCG2 expression was present in mDCs and was further increased by LPS stimulation. Treatment of CD1c+ mDCs with an ABCG2 inhibitor, Ko143, during LPS stimulation caused increased production of IL-10 and decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased expression of CD83 and CD86. Moreover, inhibition of ABCG2 in monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) abrogated the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells in response to LPS. Furthermore, CD1c+ mDCs stimulated with LPS plus Ko143 inhibited the proliferation of allogeneic and superantigen-specific syngenic CD4+ T cells and promoted expansion of CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells in an IL-10-dependent fashion. These tolerogenic effects of ABCG2 inhibition could be abolished by ERK inhibition. Thus, we demonstrated that inhibition of ABCG2 in LPS-stimulated mDCs can potently induce tolerogenic potentials in these cells, providing crucial new information that could lead to development of better strategies to combat MDR cancer.

  6. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Support Survival and Proliferation of Primary Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells through Heterogeneous Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Annette K.; Nepstad, Ina; Bruserud, Øystein

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a bone marrow malignancy, and various bone marrow stromal cells seem to support leukemogenesis, including osteoblasts and endothelial cells. We have investigated how normal bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) support the in vitro proliferation of primary human AML cells. Both MSCs and primary AML cells show constitutive release of several soluble mediators, and the mediator repertoires of the two cell types are partly overlapping. The two cell populations were cocultured on transwell plates, and MSC effects on AML cells mediated through the local cytokine/soluble mediator network could thus be evaluated. The presence of normal MSCs had an antiapoptotic and growth-enhancing effect on primary human AML cells when investigating a group of 51 unselected AML patients; this was associated with increased phosphorylation of mTOR and its downstream targets, and the effect was independent of cytogenetic or molecular-genetic abnormalities. The MSCs also supported the long-term proliferation of the AML cells. A subset of the patients also showed an altered cytokine network with supra-additive levels for several cytokines. The presence of cytokine-neutralizing antibodies or receptor inhibitors demonstrated that AML cells derived from different patients were heterogeneous with regard to effects of various cytokines on AML cell proliferation or regulation of apoptosis. We conclude that even though the effects of single cytokines derived from bone marrow MSCs on human AML cells differ among patients, the final cytokine-mediated effects of the MSCs during coculture is growth enhancement and inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:28232835

  8. Ethacrynic acid and 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 cooperatively inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Makishima, M; Honma, Y

    1996-09-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3), inhibits proliferation and induces differentiation of leukemia cells, but its clinical use is limited by the adverse effect of hypercalcemia. In this study we found that the loop diuretic ethacrynic acid, which is used to treat hypercalcemia, enhanced the differentiation of human leukemia cells induced by VD3. Ethacrynic acid alone inhibited the proliferation of human promyelocytic HL-60 cells while only slightly increasing differentiation markers such as nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-reducing and lysozyme activities. Ethacrynic acid effectively enhanced the growth-inhibiting action of VD3. In the presence of ethacrynic acid, VD3 increased the NBT-reducing and lysozyme activities and the CD11b expression of HL-60 cells more effectively than VD3 alone. Other loop diuretics, furosemide and bumetanide, also enhanced the differentiation of HL-60 cells induced by VD3, but to a lesser extent than ethacrynic acid. The differentiation of HL-60 cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide or phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate was also enhanced by ethacrynic acid with increasing NBT-reducing and lysozyme activities and the expression of CD11b or CD14 surface antigen. Morphologically, ethacrynic acid enhanced the monocytic differentiation of HL-60 cells induced by VD3 and phorbol ester and the granulocytic differentiation by retinoic acid and dimethyl sulfoxide. Other human myelomonocytic leukemia ML-1, U937, P39/TSU and P31/FUJ cells were induced to differentiate by VD3 and this was also enhanced by ethacrynic acid. The long-term culture of HL-60 cells showed that ethacrynic acid plus VD3 induced the complete growth arrest of HL-60 cells. Therefore ethacrynic acid, which is used to treat hypercalcemia, enhanced the proliferation-inhibiting and differentiation-inducing activities of VD3 and the combination of ethacrynic acid and VD3 may be useful in therapy for myeloid leukemia.

  9. Emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of human acute myeloid leukemia (part 1) - gene transcription, cell cycle regulation, metabolism and intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Reikvam, Håkon; Hauge, Michelle; Brenner, Annette K; Hatfield, Kimberley Joanne; Bruserud, Øystein

    2015-06-01

    Human acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous disease and the effect of therapeutic targeting of specific molecular mechanisms will probably vary between patient subsets. Cell cycle regulators are among the emerging targets (e.g., aurora and polo-like kinases, cyclin-dependent kinases). Inhibition of communication between acute myeloid leukemia and stromal cells is also considered; among the most promising of these strategies are inhibition of hedgehog-initiated, CXCR4-CXCL12 and Axl-Gas6 signaling. Finally, targeting of energy and protein metabolism is considered, the most promising strategy being inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase in patients with IDH mutations. Thus, several strategies are now considered, and a major common challenge for all of them is to clarify how they should be combined with each other or with conventional chemotherapy, and whether their use should be limited to certain subsets of patients.

  10. Telomerase activity in human brain tumors: astrocytoma and meningioma.

    PubMed

    Kheirollahi, Majid; Mehrazin, Masoud; Kamalian, Naser; Mohammadi-asl, Javad; Mehdipour, Parvin

    2013-05-01

    Somatic cells do not have telomerase activity but immortalized cell lines and more than 85 % of the cancer cells show telomerase activation to prevent the telomere from progressive shortening. The activation of this enzyme has been found in a variety of human tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, but only few studies on telomerase activity in human brain tumors have been reported. Here, we evaluated telomerase activity in different grades of human astrocytoma and meningioma brain tumors. In this study, assay for telomerase activity performed on 50 eligible cases consisted of 26 meningioma, 24 astrocytoma according to the standard protocols. In the brain tissues, telomerase activity was positive in 39 (65 %) of 50 patients. One sample t test showed that the telomerase activity in meningioma and astrocytoma tumors was significantly positive entirely (P < 0.001). Also, grade I of meningioma and low grades of astrocytoma (grades I and II) significantly showed telomerase activity. According to our results, we suggest that activation of telomerase is an event that starts mostly at low grades of brain including meningioma and astrocytoma tumors.

  11. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary We analyzed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, mRNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously-defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at > 10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the Luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein expression-defined subgroups, possibly contributed by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signaling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/p-HER2/HER1/p-HER1 signature within the HER2-Enriched expression subtype. Comparison of Basal-like breast tumors with high-grade Serous Ovarian tumors showed many molecular commonalities, suggesting a related etiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biologic finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biologic subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:23000897

  12. Human natural killer cells promote cross-presentation of tumor cell-derived antigens by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Deauvieau, Florence; Ollion, Vincent; Doffin, Anne-Claire; Achard, Carole; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Verronese, Estelle; Durand, Isabelle; Ghittoni, Raffaella; Marvel, Jacqueline; Dezutter-Dambuyant, Colette; Walzer, Thierry; Vie, Henri; Perrot, Ivan; Goutagny, Nadège; Caux, Christophe; Valladeau-Guilemond, Jenny

    2015-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) cross-present antigen (Ag) to initiate T-cell immunity against most infections and tumors. Natural killer (NK) cells are innate cytolytic lymphocytes that have emerged as key modulators of multiple DC functions. Here, we show that human NK cells promote cross-presentation of tumor cell-derived Ag by DC leading to Ag-specific CD8(+) T-cell activation. Surprisingly, cytotoxic function of NK cells was not required. Instead, we highlight a critical and nonredundant role for IFN-γ and TNF-α production by NK cells to enhance cross-presentation by DC using two different Ag models. Importantly, we observed that NK cells promote cell-associated Ag cross-presentation selectively by monocytes-derived DC (Mo-DC) and CD34-derived CD11b(neg) CD141(high) DC subsets but not by myeloid CD11b(+) DC. Moreover, we demonstrate that triggering NK cell activation by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs)-coated tumor cells leads to efficient DC cross-presentation, supporting the concept that NK cells can contribute to therapeutic mAbs efficiency by inducing downstream adaptive immunity. Taken together, our findings point toward a novel role of human NK cells bridging innate and adaptive immunity through selective induction of cell-associated Ag cross-presentation by CD141(high) DC, a process that could be exploited to better harness Ag-specific cellular immunity in immunotherapy.

  13. Sensitive Detection of Viral Transcripts in Human Tumor Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Schelhorn, Sven-Eric; Fischer, Matthias; Tolosi, Laura; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Pfister, Herbert; Lengauer, Thomas; Berthold, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In excess of % of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates analyzed. Therefore, our

  14. Molecular pathways: myeloid complicity in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; Greenberg, Philip D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-10-15

    Cancer-induced inflammation results in accumulation of myeloid cells. These myeloid cells include progenitors and progeny of monocytes, granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. It has become increasingly evident that tumor-dependent factors can condition myeloid cells toward an immunosuppressive and protumorigenic phenotype. Thus, myeloid cells are not simply bystanders in malignancy or barometers of disease burden. Reflecting their dynamic and plastic nature, myeloid cells manifest a continuum of cellular differentiation and are intimately involved at all stages of neoplastic progression. They can promote tumorigenesis through both immune-dependent and -independent mechanisms and can dictate response to therapies. A greater understanding of the inherent plasticity and relationships among myeloid subsets is needed to inform therapeutic targeting. New clinical trials are being designed to modulate the activities of myeloid cells in cancer, which may be essential to maximize the efficacy of both conventional cytotoxic and immune-based therapies for solid tumors. Clin Cancer Res; 20(20); 5157-70. ©2014 AACR.

  15. Doublecortin is preferentially expressed in invasive human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Daou, Marie-Claire; Smith, Thomas W; Litofsky, N Scott; Hsieh, Chung C; Ross, Alonzo H

    2005-11-01

    Doublecortin (DCX) is required for neuroblastic migration during the development of the cerebral cortex. DCX is a microtubule-associated protein that plays a role in cellular motility. These facts led us to hypothesize that DCX is increased in invasive brain tumors. DCX expression was assessed in 69 paraffin-embedded brain tumors of neuroepithelial origin. In addition, mouse brain sections of the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus were used as positive controls for immunostaining, and specificity of antibody staining was demonstrated by peptide neutralization. DCX was highly expressed in both high-grade invasive tumors (glioblastoma, n=11; anaplastic astrocytoma/oligoastrocytoma, n=7; and medulloblastoma/PNET, n=6) and low-grade invasive tumors (oligodendroglioma, n=3; and astrocytoma/oligoastrocytoma, n=5). However, DCX was less intensely expressed in the circumscribed group of tumors (pilocytic astrocytoma, n=6; ependymoma/subependymoma, n=7; dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor, n=4; ganglioglioma, n=2; meningioma, n=9; and schwannoma, n=9). By the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel statistical test, the circumscribed group was significantly different from both the high-grade invasive group (P<0.0001) and the low-grade invasive group (P<0.0001). We conclude that DCX is preferentially expressed in invasive brain tumors. In addition, DCX immunostaining was stronger at the margin of the tumor than at the center. For a subset of these tumors, we also detected DCX mRNA and protein by Northern and Western blotting. DCX mRNA and protein was detected in glioma cell lines by Northern blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting. Collectively, the immunohistochemistry, Western blots and Northern blots conclusively demonstrate expression of DCX by human brain tumors.

  16. CCR5 susceptibility to ligand-mediated down-modulation differs between human T lymphocytes and myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Fox, James M; Kasprowicz, Richard; Hartley, Oliver; Signoret, Nathalie

    2015-07-01

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on leukocytes and a coreceptor used by HIV-1 to enter CD4(+) T lymphocytes and macrophages. Stimulation of CCR5 by chemokines triggers internalization of chemokine-bound CCR5 molecules in a process called down-modulation, which contributes to the anti-HIV activity of chemokines. Recent studies have shown that CCR5 conformational heterogeneity influences chemokine-CCR5 interactions and HIV-1 entry in transfected cells or activated CD4(+) T lymphocytes. However, the effect of CCR5 conformations on other cell types and on the process of down-modulation remains unclear. We used mAbs, some already shown to detect distinct CCR5 conformations, to compare the behavior of CCR5 on in vitro generated human T cell blasts, monocytes and MDMs and CHO-CCR5 transfectants. All human cells express distinct antigenic forms of CCR5 not detected on CHO-CCR5 cells. The recognizable populations of CCR5 receptors exhibit different patterns of down-modulation on T lymphocytes compared with myeloid cells. On T cell blasts, CCR5 is recognized by all antibodies and undergoes rapid chemokine-mediated internalization, whereas on monocytes and MDMs, a pool of CCR5 molecules is recognized by a subset of antibodies and is not removed from the cell surface. We demonstrate that this cell surface-retained form of CCR5 responds to prolonged treatment with more-potent chemokine analogs and acts as an HIV-1 coreceptor. Our findings indicate that the regulation of CCR5 is highly specific to cell type and provide a potential explanation for the observation that native chemokines are less-effective HIV-entry inhibitors on macrophages compared with T lymphocytes.

  17. Porphyromonas gingivalis Evasion of Autophagy and Intracellular Killing by Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells Involves DC-SIGN-TLR2 Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    El-Awady, Ahmed R.; Miles, Brodie; Scisci, Elizabeth; Kurago, Zoya B.; Palani, Chithra D.; Arce, Roger M.; Waller, Jennifer L.; Genco, Caroline A.; Slocum, Connie; Manning, Matthew; Schoenlein, Patricia V.; Cutler, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed on professional antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), is crucial to the fate of engulfed microbes. Among the many PRRs expressed by DCs are Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectins such as DC-SIGN. DC-SIGN is targeted by several major human pathogens for immune-evasion, although its role in intracellular routing of pathogens to autophagosomes is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of DC-SIGN and TLRs in evasion of autophagy and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). We employed a panel of P. gingivalis isogenic fimbriae deficient strains with defined defects in Mfa-1 fimbriae, a DC-SIGN ligand, and FimA fimbriae, a TLR2 agonist. Our results show that DC-SIGN dependent uptake of Mfa1+P. gingivalis strains by MoDCs resulted in lower intracellular killing and higher intracellular content of P. gingivalis. Moreover, Mfa1+P. gingivalis was mostly contained within single membrane vesicles, where it survived intracellularly. Survival was decreased by activation of TLR2 and/or autophagy. Mfa1+P. gingivalis strain did not induce significant levels of Rab5, LC3-II, and LAMP1. In contrast, P. gingivalis uptake through a DC-SIGN independent manner was associated with early endosomal routing through Rab5, increased LC3-II and LAMP-1, as well as the formation of double membrane intracellular phagophores, a characteristic feature of autophagy. These results suggest that selective engagement of DC-SIGN by Mfa-1+P. gingivalis promotes evasion of antibacterial autophagy and lysosome fusion, resulting in intracellular persistence in myeloid DCs; however TLR2 activation can overcome autophagy evasion and pathogen persistence in DCs. PMID:25679217

  18. Induction of apoptosis by Cordyceps militaris fraction in human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells involved with mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Song, Liyan; Zheng, Qin; Hu, Xianjing; Yu, Rongmin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cordyceps militaris is widely used for various ethno medical conditions including cancer and inflammation complications in traditional Chinese medicine. Objective: To investigate the in vitro antitumor activity of Cordyceps militaris fraction (CMF) and the molecular mechanism underlying the apoptosis it induces in human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells. Materials and Methods: CMF was prepared according to our previous report. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. The rate of apoptosis, distribution of cell cycle and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were measured by flow cytometry. Caspase activities were analyzed by Western blot and oxygen consumption rate was recorded using the Oxytherm system. Results: The results demonstrated that CMF triggered growth inhibition in K562 cells with only minor toxicity on a normal human cell line and inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with IC50 value of 34.1 ± 2.0 μg/ml after 48 h incubation. This most likely resulted from cell cycle arrest at the S phase and the induction of apoptosis. In addition, CMF induced activation of caspase-3 and subsequent cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). The caspase signals may originate from mitochondrial dysfunction, which was supported by the finding of decreased mitochondria transmembrance potential and the lower oxygen consumption rate. Conclusion: CMF possessed the in vitro antitumor effect on K562 cells and CMF-induced apoptosis might be involved by the mitochondrial dysfunction and valuable to research and develop as a potential antitumor agency. PMID:25210321

  19. Porphyromonas gingivalis evasion of autophagy and intracellular killing by human myeloid dendritic cells involves DC-SIGN-TLR2 crosstalk.

    PubMed

    El-Awady, Ahmed R; Miles, Brodie; Scisci, Elizabeth; Kurago, Zoya B; Palani, Chithra D; Arce, Roger M; Waller, Jennifer L; Genco, Caroline A; Slocum, Connie; Manning, Matthew; Schoenlein, Patricia V; Cutler, Christopher W

    2015-02-01

    Signaling via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed on professional antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), is crucial to the fate of engulfed microbes. Among the many PRRs expressed by DCs are Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectins such as DC-SIGN. DC-SIGN is targeted by several major human pathogens for immune-evasion, although its role in intracellular routing of pathogens to autophagosomes is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of DC-SIGN and TLRs in evasion of autophagy and survival of Porphyromonas gingivalis in human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). We employed a panel of P. gingivalis isogenic fimbriae deficient strains with defined defects in Mfa-1 fimbriae, a DC-SIGN ligand, and FimA fimbriae, a TLR2 agonist. Our results show that DC-SIGN dependent uptake of Mfa1+P. gingivalis strains by MoDCs resulted in lower intracellular killing and higher intracellular content of P. gingivalis. Moreover, Mfa1+P. gingivalis was mostly contained within single membrane vesicles, where it survived intracellularly. Survival was decreased by activation of TLR2 and/or autophagy. Mfa1+P. gingivalis strain did not induce significant levels of Rab5, LC3-II, and LAMP1. In contrast, P. gingivalis uptake through a DC-SIGN independent manner was associated with early endosomal routing through Rab5, increased LC3-II and LAMP-1, as well as the formation of double membrane intracellular phagophores, a characteristic feature of autophagy. These results suggest that selective engagement of DC-SIGN by Mfa-1+P. gingivalis promotes evasion of antibacterial autophagy and lysosome fusion, resulting in intracellular persistence in myeloid DCs; however TLR2 activation can overcome autophagy evasion and pathogen persistence in DCs.

  20. HMGA1-pseudogene expression is induced in human pituitary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Francesco; De Martino, Marco; D'Angelo, Daniela; Mussnich, Paula; Raverot, Gerald; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Fraggetta, Filippo; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Fusco, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have established that High Mobility Group A (HMGA) proteins play a pivotal role on the onset of human pituitary tumors. They are overexpressed in pituitary tumors, and, consistently, transgenic mice overexpressing either the Hmga1 or the Hmga2 gene develop pituitary tumors. In contrast with HMGA2, HMGA1 overexpression is not related to any rearrangement or amplification of the HMGA1 locus in these tumors. We have recently identified 2 HMGA1 pseudogenes, HMGA1P6 and HMGA1P7, acting as competitive endogenous RNA decoys for HMGA1 and other cancer related genes. Here, we show that HMGA1 pseudogene expression significantly correlates with HMGA1 mRNA levels in growth hormone and nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas likely inhibiting the repression of HMGA1 through microRNAs action. According to our functional studies, these HMGA1 pseudogenes enhance the proliferation and migration of the mouse pituitary tumor cell line, at least in part, through their upregulation. Our results point out that the overexpression of HMGA1P6 and HMGA1P7 could contribute to increase HMGA1 levels in human pituitary tumors, and then to pituitary tumorigenesis. PMID:25894544

  1. Regulation of myeloid cells by activated T cells determines the efficacy of PD-1 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Eissler, Nina; Mao, Yumeng; Brodin, David; Andersson Svahn, Helene; Johnsen, John Inge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Removal of immuno-suppression has been reported to enhance antitumor immunity primed by checkpoint inhibitors. Although PD-1 blockade failed to control tumor growth in a transgenic murine neuroblastoma model, concurrent inhibition of colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) by BLZ945 reprogrammed suppressive myeloid cells and significantly enhanced therapeutic effects. Microarray analysis of tumor tissues identified a significant increase of T-cell infiltration guided by myeloid cell-derived chemokines CXCL9, 10, and 11. Blocking the responsible chemokine receptor CXCR3 hampered T-cell infiltration and reduced antitumor efficacy of the combination therapy. Multivariate analysis of 59 immune-cell parameters in tumors and spleens detected the correlation between PD-L1-expressing myeloid cells and tumor burden. In vitro, anti-PD-1 antibody Nivolumab in combination with BLZ945 increased the activation of primary human T and NK cells. Importantly, we revealed a previously uncharacterized pathway, in which T cells secreted M-CSF upon PD-1 blockade, leading to enhanced suppressive capacity of monocytes by upregulation of PD-L1 and purinergic enzymes. In multiple datasets of neuroblastoma patients, gene expression of CD73 correlated strongly with myeloid cell markers CD163 and CSF-1R in neuroblastoma tumors, and associated with worse survival in high-risk patients. Altogether, our data reveal the dual role of activated T cells on myeloid cell functions and provide a rationale for the combination therapy of anti-PD-1 antibody with CSF-1R inhibitor. PMID:28123870

  2. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Uva, Paolo; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Watters, James; Loboda, Andrey; Kulkarni, Amit; Castle, John; Palombo, Fabio; Viti, Valentina; Mesiti, Giuseppe; Zappulli, Valentina; Marconato, Laura; Abramo, Francesca; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Lahm, Armin; La Monica, Nicola; de Rinaldis, Emanuele

    2009-01-01

    Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies. PMID:19327144

  3. Bee venom inhibits growth of human cervical tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Myoung; Jung, Yu Yeon; Park, Mi Hee; Oh, Sang Hyun; Yun, Hye Seok; Jun, Hyung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ung Soo; Yoon, Joo Hee; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    We studied whether bee venom (BV) inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of death receptor (DR) expressions and inactivation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in mice. In vivo study showed that BV (1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth. Similar inhibitory effects of BV on cancer growth in primary human cervical cancer cells were also found. BV (1–5 μg/ml) also inhibited the growth of cancer cells, Ca Ski and C33Aby the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Agreed with cancer cell growth inhibition, expression of death receptors; FAS, DR3 and DR6, and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with BV in tumor mice, human cancer cell and human tumor samples as well as cultured cancer cells. In addition, deletion of FAS, DR3 and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV-induced cell growth inhibitory effects as well as NF-κB inactivation. These results suggest that BV inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of FAS, DR3 and DR6 expression via inhibition of NF-κB pathway. PMID:25730901

  4. Thymidine analogues to assess microperfusion in human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Hilde L.; Ljungkvist, Anna S.; Rijken, Paul F.; Sprong, Debbie; Bussink, Jan; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Haustermans, Karin M.; Begg, Adrian C. . E-mail: a.begg@nki.nl

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To validate the use of the thymidine analogues as local perfusion markers in human tumors (no labeling indicates no perfusion) by comparison with the well-characterized perfusion marker Hoechst 33342. Methods and Materials: Human tumor xenografts from gliomas and head-and-neck cancers were injected with iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) and the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342. In frozen sections, each blood vessel was scored for the presence of IdUrd/BrdUrd labeling and Hoechst in surrounding cells. The percentage of analogue-negative vessels was compared with the fraction of Hoechst-negative vessels. Collocalization of the two markers was also scored. Results: We found considerable intertumor variation in the fraction of perfused vessels, measured by analogue labeling, both in the human tumor xenografts and in a series of tumor biopsies from head-and-neck cancer patients. There was a significant correlation between the Hoechst-negative and IdUrd/BrdUrd-negative vessels in the xenografts (r 85, p = 0.0004), despite some mismatches on a per-vessel basis. Conclusions: Thymidine analogues can be successfully used to rank tumors according to their fraction of perfused vessels. Whether this fraction correlates with the extent of acute hypoxia needs further confirmation.

  5. Cell-to-Cell Contact and Nectin-4 Govern Spread of Measles Virus from Primary Human Myeloid Cells to Primary Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brajesh K.; Li, Ni; Mark, Anna C.; Mateo, Mathieu; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles is a highly contagious, acute viral illness. Immune cells within the airways are likely first targets of infection, and these cells traffic measles virus (MeV) to lymph nodes for amplification and subsequent systemic dissemination. Infected immune cells are thought to return MeV to the airways; however, the mechanisms responsible for virus transfer to pulmonary epithelial cells are poorly understood. To investigate this process, we collected blood from human donors and generated primary myeloid cells, specifically, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and dendritic cells (DCs). MDMs and DCs were infected with MeV and then applied to primary cultures of well-differentiated airway epithelial cells from human donors (HAE). Consistent with previous results obtained with free virus, infected MDMs or DCs were incapable of transferring MeV to HAE when applied to the apical surface. Likewise, infected MDMs or DCs applied to the basolateral surface of HAE grown on small-pore (0.4-μm) support membranes did not transfer virus. In contrast, infected MDMs and DCs applied to the basolateral surface of HAE grown on large-pore (3.0-μm) membranes successfully transferred MeV. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that MDMs and DCs are capable of penetrating large-pore membranes but not small-pore membranes. Further, by using a nectin-4 blocking antibody or recombinant MeV unable to enter cells through nectin-4, we demonstrated formally that transfer from immune cells to HAE occurs in a nectin-4-dependent manner. Thus, both infected MDMs and DCs rely on cell-to-cell contacts and nectin-4 to efficiently deliver MeV to the basolateral surface of HAE. IMPORTANCE Measles virus spreads rapidly and efficiently in human airway epithelial cells. This rapid spread is based on cell-to-cell contact rather than on particle release and reentry. Here we posit that MeV transfer from infected immune cells to epithelial cells also occurs by cell-to-cell contact rather than through cell

  6. Artesunate suppresses tumor growth and induces apoptosis through the modulation of multiple oncogenic cascades in a chronic myeloid leukemia xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chulwon; Lee, Jong Hyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Sethi, Gautam; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, is one of the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Also, ART possesses anticancer potential albeit through incompletely understood molecular mechanism(s). Here, the effect of ART on various protein kinases, associated gene products, cellular response, and apoptosis was investigated. The in vivo effect of ART on the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in athymic nu/nu mice was also examined. In our preliminary experiments, we first observed that phosphorylation of p38, ERK, CREB, Chk-2, STAT5, and RSK proteins were suppressed upon ART exposure. Interestingly, ART induced the expression of SOCS-1 protein and depletion of SOCS-1 using siRNA abrogated the STAT5 inhibitory effect of the drug. Also various dephosphorylations caused by ART led to the suppression of various survival gene products and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation. Moreover, ART also substantially potentiated the apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents. Finally, when administered intraperitoneally, ART inhibited p38, ERK, STAT5, and CREB activation in tumor tissues and the growth of human CML xenograft tumors in mice without exhibiting any significant adverse effects. Overall, our results suggest that ART exerts its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects through suppression of multiple signaling cascades in CML both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25738364

  7. Characteristics of Myeloid Differentiation and Maturation Pathway Derived from Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells Exposed to Different Linear Energy Transfer Radiation Types

    PubMed Central

    Monzen, Satoru; Yoshino, Hironori; Kasai-Eguchi, Kiyomi; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to ionizing radiation causes a marked suppression of mature functional blood cell production in a linear energy transfer (LET)- and/or dose-dependent manner. However, little information about LET effects on the proliferation and differentiation of HSPCs has been reported. With the aim of characterizing the effects of different types of LET radiations on human myeloid hematopoiesis, in vitro hematopoiesis in Human CD34+ cells exposed to carbon-ion beams or X-rays was compared. Highly purified CD34+ cells exposed to each form of radiation were plated onto semi-solid culture for a myeloid progenitor assay. The surviving fractions of total myeloid progenitors, colony-forming cells (CFC), exposed to carbon-ion beams were significantly lower than of those exposed to X-rays, indicating that CFCs are more sensitive to carbon-ion beams (D0 = 0.65) than to X-rays (D0 = 1.07). Similar sensitivities were observed in granulocyte-macrophage and erythroid progenitors, respectively. However, the sensitivities of mixed-type progenitors to both radiation types were similar. In liquid culture for 14 days, no significant difference in total numbers of mononuclear cells was observed between non-irradiated control culture and cells exposed to 0.5 Gy X-rays, whereas 0.5 Gy carbon-ion beams suppressed cell proliferation to 4.9% of the control, a level similar to that for cells exposed to 1.5 Gy X-rays. Cell surface antigens associated with terminal maturation, such as CD13, CD14, and CD15, on harvest from the culture of X-ray-exposed cells were almost the same as those from the non-irradiated control culture. X-rays increased the CD235a+ erythroid-related fraction, whereas carbon-ion beams increased the CD34+CD38− primitive cell fraction and the CD13+CD14+/−CD15− fraction. These results suggest that carbon-ion beams inflict severe damage on the clonal growth of myeloid HSPCs, although the intensity of cell surface

  8. Characteristics of myeloid differentiation and maturation pathway derived from human hematopoietic stem cells exposed to different linear energy transfer radiation types.

    PubMed

    Monzen, Satoru; Yoshino, Hironori; Kasai-Eguchi, Kiyomi; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to ionizing radiation causes a marked suppression of mature functional blood cell production in a linear energy transfer (LET)- and/or dose-dependent manner. However, little information about LET effects on the proliferation and differentiation of HSPCs has been reported. With the aim of characterizing the effects of different types of LET radiations on human myeloid hematopoiesis, in vitro hematopoiesis in Human CD34(+) cells exposed to carbon-ion beams or X-rays was compared. Highly purified CD34(+) cells exposed to each form of radiation were plated onto semi-solid culture for a myeloid progenitor assay. The surviving fractions of total myeloid progenitors, colony-forming cells (CFC), exposed to carbon-ion beams were significantly lower than of those exposed to X-rays, indicating that CFCs are more sensitive to carbon-ion beams (D(0) = 0.65) than to X-rays (D(0) = 1.07). Similar sensitivities were observed in granulocyte-macrophage and erythroid progenitors, respectively. However, the sensitivities of mixed-type progenitors to both radiation types were similar. In liquid culture for 14 days, no significant difference in total numbers of mononuclear cells was observed between non-irradiated control culture and cells exposed to 0.5 Gy X-rays, whereas 0.5 Gy carbon-ion beams suppressed cell proliferation to 4.9% of the control, a level similar to that for cells exposed to 1.5 Gy X-rays. Cell surface antigens associated with terminal maturation, such as CD13, CD14, and CD15, on harvest from the culture of X-ray-exposed cells were almost the same as those from the non-irradiated control culture. X-rays increased the CD235a(+) erythroid-related fraction, whereas carbon-ion beams increased the CD34(+)CD38(-) primitive cell fraction and the CD13(+)CD14(+/-)CD15(-) fraction. These results suggest that carbon-ion beams inflict severe damage on the clonal growth of myeloid HSPCs, although the intensity of cell surface

  9. Responsiveness of human prostate carcinoma bone tumors to interleukin-2 therapy in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Kocheril, S V; Grignon, D J; Wang, C Y; Maughan, R L; Montecillo, E J; Talati, B; Tekyi-Mensah, S; Pontes, J e; Hillman, G G

    1999-01-01

    We have tested an immunotherapy approach for the treatment of metastatic prostate carcinoma using a bone tumor model. Human PC-3 prostate carcinoma tumor cells were heterotransplanted into the femur cavity of athymic Balb/c nude mice. Tumor cells replaced marrow cells in the bone cavity, invaded adjacent bone and muscle tissues, and formed a palpable tumor at the hip joint. PC-3/IF cell lines, generated from bone tumors by serial in vivo passages, grew with faster kinetics in the femur and metastasized to inguinal lymph nodes. Established tumors were treated with systemic interleukin-2 (IL-2) injections. IL-2 significantly inhibited the formation of palpable tumors and prolonged mouse survival at nontoxic low doses. Histologically IL-2 caused vascular damage and infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes in the tumor as well as necrotic areas with apoptotic cells. These findings suggest destruction of tumor cells by systemic IL-2 therapy and IL-2 responsiveness of prostate carcinoma bone tumors.

  10. Immature myeloid cells and cancer-associated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2002-08-01

    Impaired balance between mature and immature myeloid cells is one of the hallmarks of cancer. In cancer patients as well as in mouse models there is increasing evidence that progressive tumor growth is associated with an accumulation of immature myeloid cells, monocytes/macrophages, and with a decreased number and function of dendritic cells (DC). This review examines recent findings on the contribution of immature myeloid cells (ImC) to cancer-induced immune suppression.

  11. Dicoumarol impairs mitochondrial electron transport and pyrimidine biosynthesis in human myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    González-Aragón, David; Ariza, Julia; Villalba, José M

    2007-02-01

    Dicoumarol, a competitive inhibitor of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), increases intracellular superoxide and affects cell growth of tumor cells. This work was set to establish a mechanistic link between dicoumarol, superoxide and cell cycle alterations in HL-60 cells. Using ES936, a mechanism-based irreversible inhibitor of NQO1, we demonstrate that NQO1 inhibition is not a major factor involved in superoxide boost. Mitochondrial Complexes II, III and IV were directly inhibited by dicoumarol. Succinate, which inhibits superoxide generation by reversed electron flow in Complex II, significantly decreased superoxide boost in dicoumarol-treated cells and in isolated mitochondria incubated with dicoumarol and decylubiquinol. Superoxide generation in cells was strongly potentiated by blocking the quinone site of Complex II with thenoyltrifluoroacetone, supporting the involvement of cytochrome b560 to drive electrons for increasing superoxide. Simultaneous inhibition of the mitochondrial chain upstream ubiquinone and displacement of succinate from the Complex II active site is proposed as a major mechanism to explain how dicoumarol increases superoxide in HL-60 cells. Dicoumarol-treated cells accumulated in S phase due to the impairment of pyrimidine biosynthesis at dihydroorotate dehydrogenase step because blockade was overcome by addition of exogenous uridine or orotate, but not by dihydroorotate. We demonstrate for the first time that dicoumarol inhibits mitochondrial electron transport, induces superoxide release by reversed electron flow in Complex II, and inhibits pyrimidines biosynthesis. These actions must be taken into account when considering dicoumarol effects on cells.

  12. Noncontact diffuse correlation tomography of human breast tumor

    PubMed Central

    He, Lian; Lin, Yu; Huang, Chong; Irwin, Daniel; Szabunio, Margaret M.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Our first step to adapt our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation tomography (ncDCT) system for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of blood flow distribution in human breast tumors is reported. A commercial 3-D camera was used to obtain breast surface geometry, which was then converted to a solid volume mesh. An ncDCT probe scanned over a region of interest on the mesh surface and the measured boundary data were combined with a finite element framework for 3-D image reconstruction of blood flow distribution. This technique was tested in computer simulations and in vivo human breasts with low-grade carcinoma. Results from computer simulations suggest that relatively high accuracy can be achieved when the entire tumor is within the sensitive region of diffuse light. Image reconstruction with a priori knowledge of the tumor volume and location can significantly improve the accuracy in recovery of tumor blood flow contrasts. In vivo imaging results from two breast carcinomas show higher average blood flow contrasts (5.9- and 10.9-fold) in the tumor regions compared to the surrounding tissues, which are comparable with previous findings using diffuse correlation spectroscopy. The ncDCT system has the potential to image blood flow distributions in soft and vulnerable tissues without distorting tissue hemodynamics. PMID:26259706

  13. Human STEAP3 maintains tumor growth under hypoferric condition

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, Taichi; Baba, Eishi; Arita, Shuji; Komoda, Masato; Tamura, Shingo; Shirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Ariyama, Hiroshi; Takaishi, Shigeo; Kusaba, Hitoshi; and others

    2011-11-01

    Iron is essential in cellular proliferation and survival based on its crucial roles in DNA and ATP synthesis. Tumor cells proliferate rapidly even in patients with low serum iron, although their actual mechanisms are not well known. To elucidate molecular mechanisms of efficient tumor progression under the hypoferric condition, we studied the roles of six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate family member 3 (STEAP3), which was reported to facilitate iron uptake. Using Raji cells with low STEAP3 mRNA expression, human STEAP3-overexpressing cells were established. The impact of STEAP3 expression was analyzed about the amount of iron storage, the survival under hypoferric conditions in vitro and the growth of tumor in vivo. STEAP3 overexpression increased ferritin, an indicator of iron storage, in STEAP3-overexpressing Raji cells. STEAP3 gave Raji cells the resistance to iron deprivation-induced apoptosis. These STEAP3-overexpressing Raji cells preserved efficient growth even in hypoferric mice, while parental Raji cells grew less rapidly. In addition, iron deficiency enhanced STEAP3 mRNA expression in tumor cells. Furthermore, human colorectal cancer tissues exhibited more STEAP3 mRNA expression and iron storage compared with normal colon mucosa. These findings indicate that STEAP3 maintains iron storage in human malignant cells and tumor proliferation under the hypoferric condition. -- Highlights: {yields} STEAP3 expression results in increment of stored intracellular iron. {yields} Iron deprivation induces expression of STEAP3. {yields} Colorectal cancer expresses STEAP3 highly and stores iron much. {yields} STEAP3 expressing tumors preserves growth even in mice being hypoferremia.

  14. Stanniocalcin-1 Reduces Tumor Size in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Bonnie H. Y.; Shek, Felix H.; Lee, Nikki P.; Wong, Chris K. C.

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence has revealed high expression levels of stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) in different types of human cancers. Numerous experimental studies using cancer cell lines demonstrated the involvement of STC1 in inflammatory and apoptotic processes; however the role of STC1 in carcinogenesis remains elusive. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) an exemplified model of inflammation-related cancer, represents a paradigm of studying the association between STC1 and tumor development. Therefore, we conducted a statistical analysis on the expression levels of STC1 using clinicopathological data from 216 HCC patients. We found that STC1 was upregulated in the tumor tissues and its expression levels was positively correlated with the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Intriguingly tumors with greater expression levels of STC1 (tumor/normal ≥ 2) were significantly smaller than the lower level (tumor/normal<2) samples (p = 0.008). A pharmacological approach was implemented to reveal the functional correlation between STC1 and the ILs in the HCC cell-lines. IL-6 and IL-8 treatment of Hep3B cells induced STC1 expression. Lentiviral-based STC1 overexpression in Hep3B and MHCC-97L cells however showed inhibitory action on the pro-migratory effects of IL-6 and IL-8 and reduced size of tumor spheroids. The inhibitory effect of STC1 on tumor growth was confirmed in vivo using the stable STC1-overexpressing 97L cells on a mouse xenograft model. Genetic analysis of the xenografts derived from the STC1-overexpressing 97L cells, showed upregulation of the pro-apoptotic genes interleukin-12 and NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3. Collectively, the anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic functions of STC1 were suggested to relate its inhibitory effect on the growth of HCC cells. This study supports the notion that STC1 may be a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory tumors in HCC patients. PMID:26469082

  15. Proteolytic Activity of Human Lymphoid Tumor Cells. Correlation with Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ribatti, Domenico; Ria, Roberto; Pellegrino, Antonio; Bruno, Michele; Merchionne, Francesca; Dammacco, Franco

    2000-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and production are associated with advanced-stage tumor and contribute to tumor progression, invasion and metastases. The current study was designed to determine the expression and production of MMP-2 (gelatinase A) and MMP-9 (gelatinase B) by human lymphoid tumor cells. Changes in expression and production were also investigated during tumor progression of multiple myeloma and mycosis fungoides. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that lymphoblastic leukemia B cells (SB cell line), multiple myeloma (MM) cells (U266 cell line) and lymphoblastic leukemia T cells (CEM and Jurkat cell lines) express constitutively the mRNA for MMP-2 and/or MMP-9. We demonstrated by gelatin-zymography of cell culture medium that both enzymes were secreted in their cleaved (activated) form. In situ hybridization of bone marrow plasma cells and gelatin- zymography of the medium showed that patients with active MM (diagnosis, relapse, leukemic progression) express higher levels of MMP-2 mRNA and protein than patients with non-active MM (complete/objective response, plateau) and with monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS). MMP-9 expression and secretion was similar in all patient groups. In patients with mycosis fungoides (MF), the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNAs was significantly upregulated with advancing stage, in terms of lesions both positive for one of two mRNAs and with the greatest intensity of expression. Besides MF cells, the MMP-2 and/or MMP-9 mRNAs were expressed by some stromal cell populations (microvascular endothelial cells, fibroblasts, macrophages), suggesting that these cells cooperate in the process of tumor invasion. Our studies identify MMPs as an important class of proteinases involved in the extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation by human lymphoid tumors, and suggest that MMPs inhibitors may lead to important new treatment for their control. PMID:11097203

  16. Antagonizing Retinoic Acid Receptors Increases Myeloid Cell Production by Cultured Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Geoffrey; Marchwicka, Aleksandra; Cunningham, Alan; Toellner, Kai-Michael; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2017-02-01

    Activities of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR)α and RARγ are important to hematopoiesis. Here, we have investigated the effects of receptor selective agonists and antagonists on the primitive human hematopoietic cell lines KG1 and NB-4 and purified normal human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Agonizing RARα (by AGN195183) was effective in driving neutrophil differentiation of NB-4 cells and this agonist synergized with a low amount (10 nM) of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to drive monocyte differentiation of NB-4 and KG1 cells. Treatment of cultures of human HSCs (supplemented with stem cell factor ± interleukin 3) with an antagonist of all RARs (AGN194310) or of RARα (AGN196996) prolonged the lifespan of cultures, up to 55 days, and increased the production of neutrophils and monocytes. Slowing down of cell differentiation was not observed, and instead, hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells had expanded in number. Antagonism of RARγ (by AGN205728) did not affect cultures of HSCs. Studies of CV-1 and LNCaP cells transfected with RAR expression vectors and a reporter vector revealed that RARγ and RARβ are activated by sub-nM all-trans retinoic acid (EC50-0.3 nM): ~50-fold more is required for activation of RARα (EC50-16 nM). These findings further support the notion that the balance of expression and activity of RARα and RARγ are important to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell expansion and differentiation.

  17. The human nucleophosmin 1 mutation A inhibits myeloid differentiation of leukemia cells by modulating miR-10b

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Qin; Tan, Shi; Yang, Zailin; Wang, Juan; Xian, Jingrong; Zhang, Shuaishuai; Jin, Hongjun; Yang, Liyuan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, we showed that enforced expression of NPM1 mutation type A (NPM1-mA) inhibits myeloid differentiation of leukemia cells, whereas knockdown of NPM1-mA has the opposite effect. Our analyses of normal karyotype AML samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset revealed that miR-10b is commonly overexpressed in NPM1-mutated AMLs. We also found high expression of miR-10b in primary NPM1-mutated AML blasts and NPM1-mA positive OCI-AML3 cells. In addition, NPM1-mA knockdown enhanced myeloid differentiation, while induced expression of miR-10b reversed this effect. Finally, we showed that KLF4 is downregulated in NPM1-mutated AMLs. These results demonstrated that miR-10b exerts its effects by repressing the translation of KLF4 and that NPM1-mA inhibits myeloid differentiation through the miR-10b/KLF4 axis. This sheds new light on the effect of NPM1 mutations' on leukemogenesis. PMID:27669739

  18. Latent infection of myeloid progenitors by human cytomegalovirus protects cells from FAS-mediated apoptosis through the cellular IL-10/PEA-15 pathway.

    PubMed

    Poole, Emma; Lau, Jonathan C H; Sinclair, John

    2015-08-01

    Latent infection of primary CD34(+) progenitor cells by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) results in their increased survival in the face of pro-apoptotic signals. For instance, we have shown previously that primary myeloid cells are refractory to FAS-mediated killing and that cellular IL-10 (cIL-10) is an important survival factor for this effect. However, how cIL-10 mediates this protection is unclear. Here, we have shown that cIL-10 signalling leading to upregulation of the cellular factor PEA-15 mediates latency-associated protection of CD34(+) progenitor cells from the extrinsic death pathway.

  19. Effects of mesenchymal stromal cells on human myeloid dendritic cell differentiation and maturation in a humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Huang, Yanfei; Womer, Karl L

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have shown promise as cellular therapy in allogeneic transplantation, although the precise mechanisms underlying their benefit in clinical trials are difficult to study. We previously demonstrated that MSCs exert immunoregulatory effects in mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cell (DC) culture. Since mouse studies do not reliably reproduce human events, we used a humanized mouse model to study the immunomodulatory effects of human MSCs on human DC immunobiology. Humanized mice were established by injection of cord blood CD34(+) cells into NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl/SzJ) (NOD scid gamma, NSG) mice. Human cells were detected in the mouse bone marrow, blood, and spleen 12weeks after transplantation. Human DCs were differentiated from humanized mouse bone marrow cells during human MSC co-culture. MSCs inhibited DC differentiation and kept DCs in an immature state as demonstrated by phenotype and function. In conclusion, humanized mouse models represent a useful method to study the function of human MSCs on human DC immunobiology.

  20. Quercus Suber L. Cork Extracts Induce Apoptosis in Human Myeloid Leukaemia HL-60 Cells.

    PubMed

    Bejarano, Ignacio; Godoy-Cancho, Belén; Franco, Lourdes; Martínez-Cañas, Manuel A; Tormo, María A

    2015-08-01

    Quercus suber L. cork contains a diversity of phenolic compounds, mostly low molecular weight phenols. A rising number of reports support with convergent findings that polyphenols evoke pro-apoptotic events in cancerous cells. However, the literature related to the anti-cancer bioactivity of Q. suber L. cork extractives (QSE) is still limited. Herein, we aim to describe the antitumor potential displayed by cork extractives obtained by different extraction methods in the human promyelocytic leukaemia cells. In order to quantify the effects of QSE on cancer cells viability, phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase-3 activity, mitochondrial membrane potential and cell cycle were evaluated. The results indicated that the QSE present a time-dependent and dose-dependent cytotoxicity in the human promyelocytic leukaemia cells. Such a noxious effect leads these leukaemia cells to their death through apoptotic processes by altering the mitochondrial outer membrane potential, activating caspase-3 and externalizing phosphatidylserine. However, cells cycle progression was not affected by the treatments. This study contributes to open a new way to use this natural resource by exploiting its anti-cancer properties. Moreover, it opens new possibilities of application of cork by-products, being more efficient in the sector of cork-based agriculture. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Significance of rat mammary tumors for human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jose

    2015-02-01

    We have previously indicated that the ideal animal tumor model should mimic the human disease. This means that the investigator should be able to ascertain the influence of host factors on the initiation of tumorigenesis, mimic the susceptibility of tumor response based on age and reproductive history, and determine the response of the tumors induced to chemotherapy. The utilization of experimental models of mammary carcinogenesis in risk assessment requires that the influence of ovarian, pituitary, and placental hormones, among others, as well as overall reproductive events are taken into consideration, since they are important modifiers of the susceptibility of the organ to neoplastic development. Several species, such as rodents, dogs, cats, and monkeys, have been evaluated for these purposes; however, none of them fulfills all the criteria specified previously. Rodents, however, are the most widely used models; therefore, this work will concentrate on discussing the rat rodent model of mammary carcinogenesis.

  2. Alterations of telomere length in human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kheirollahi, Majid; Mehrazin, Masoud; Kamalian, Naser; Mehdipour, Parvin

    2011-09-01

    Telomeres at the ends of human chromosomes consist of tandem hexametric (TTAGGG)n repeats, which protect them from degradation. At each cycle of cell division, most normal somatic cells lose approximately 50-100 bp of the terminal telomeric repeat DNA. Precise prediction of growth and estimation of the malignant potential of brain tumors require additional markers. DNA extraction was performed from the 51 frozen tissues, and a non-radioactive chemiluminescent assay was used for Southern blotting. One sample t-test shows highly significant difference in telomere length in meningioma and astrocytoma with normal range. According to our results, higher grades of meningioma and astrocytoma tumors show more heterogeneity in telomere length, and also it seems shortening process of telomeres is an early event in brain tumors.

  3. The transcriptional network that controls growth arrest and differentiation in a human myeloid leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Harukazu; Forrest, Alistair R R; van Nimwegen, Erik; Daub, Carsten O; Balwierz, Piotr J; Irvine, Katharine M; Lassmann, Timo; Ravasi, Timothy; Hasegawa, Yuki; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Katayama, Shintaro; Schroder, Kate; Carninci, Piero; Tomaru, Yasuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Akalin, Altuna; Ando, Yoshinari; Arner, Erik; Asada, Maki; Asahara, Hiroshi; Bailey, Timothy; Bajic, Vladimir B; Bauer, Denis; Beckhouse, Anthony G; Bertin, Nicolas; Björkegren, Johan; Brombacher, Frank; Bulger, Erika; Chalk, Alistair M; Chiba, Joe; Cloonan, Nicole; Dawe, Adam; Dostie, Josee; Engström, Pär G; Essack, Magbubah; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Fink, J Lynn; Fredman, David; Fujimori, Ko; Furuno, Masaaki; Gojobori, Takashi; Gough, Julian; Grimmond, Sean M; Gustafsson, Mika; Hashimoto, Megumi; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Hatakeyama, Mariko; Heinzel, Susanne; Hide, Winston; Hofmann, Oliver; Hörnquist, Michael; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Ikeo, Kazuho; Imamoto, Naoko; Inoue, Satoshi; Inoue, Yusuke; Ishihara, Ryoko; Iwayanagi, Takao; Jacobsen, Anders; Kaur, Mandeep; Kawaji, Hideya; Kerr, Markus C; Kimura, Ryuichiro; Kimura, Syuhei; Kimura, Yasumasa; Kitano, Hiroaki; Koga, Hisashi; Kojima, Toshio; Kondo, Shinji; Konno, Takeshi; Krogh, Anders; Kruger, Adele; Kumar, Ajit; Lenhard, Boris; Lennartsson, Andreas; Lindow, Morten; Lizio, Marina; Macpherson, Cameron; Maeda, Norihiro; Maher, Christopher A; Maqungo, Monique; Mar, Jessica; Matigian, Nicholas A; Matsuda, Hideo; Mattick, John S; Meier, Stuart; Miyamoto, Sei; Miyamoto-Sato, Etsuko; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakano, Mika; Nygaard, Sanne; Okayama, Toshitsugu; Okazaki, Yasushi; Okuda-Yabukami, Haruka; Orlando, Valerio; Otomo, Jun; Pachkov, Mikhail; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Plessy, Charles; Quackenbush, John; Radovanovic, Aleksandar; Rehli, Michael; Saito, Rintaro; Sandelin, Albin; Schmeier, Sebastian; Schönbach, Christian; Schwartz, Ariel S; Semple, Colin A; Sera, Miho; Severin, Jessica; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Simons, Cas; St Laurent, George; Suzuki, Masanori; Suzuki, Takahiro; Sweet, Matthew J; Taft, Ryan J; Takeda, Shizu; Takenaka, Yoichi; Tan, Kai; Taylor, Martin S; Teasdale, Rohan D; Tegnér, Jesper; Teichmann, Sarah; Valen, Eivind; Wahlestedt, Claes; Waki, Kazunori; Waterhouse, Andrew; Wells, Christine A; Winther, Ole; Wu, Linda; Yamaguchi, Kazumi; Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Jun; Zavolan, Mihaela; Hume, David A; Arakawa, Takahiro; Fukuda, Shiro; Imamura, Kengo; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kaiho, Ai; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kawazu, Chika; Kitazume, Yayoi; Kojima, Miki; Miura, Hisashi; Murakami, Kayoko; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Ogawa, Chihiro; Sano, Takuma; Simon, Christophe; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Yukari; Kawai, Jun; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2009-05-01

    Using deep sequencing (deepCAGE), the FANTOM4 study measured the genome-wide dynamics of transcription-start-site usage in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 throughout a time course of growth arrest and differentiation. Modeling the expression dynamics in terms of predicted cis-regulatory sites, we identified the key transcription regulators, their time-dependent activities and target genes. Systematic siRNA knockdown of 52 transcription factors confirmed the roles of individual factors in the regulatory network. Our results indicate that cellular states are constrained by complex networks involving both positive and negative regulatory interactions among substantial numbers of transcription factors and that no single transcription factor is both necessary and sufficient to drive the differentiation process.

  4. The p53 gene and protein in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, D.N. )

    1994-01-01

    Because p53 gene alterations are commonplace in human tumors and because p53 protein is involved in a number of important cellular pathways, p53 has become a topic of intensive investigation, both by basic scientists and clinicians. p53 was initially identified by two independent laboratories in 1979 as a 53 kilodalton (kD) protein that complexes with the large T antigen of SV40 virus. Shortly thereafter, it was shown that the E1B oncoprotein of adenovirus also binds p53. The binding of two different oncogenic viral tumor proteins to the same cellular protein suggested that p53 might be integral to tumorigenesis. The human p53 cDNA and gene were subsequently cloned in the mid-1980s, and analysis of p53 gene alterations in human tumors followed a few year later. During these 10 years, researchers grappling with the vagaries of p53 first characterized the gene as an oncogene, then as a tumor suppressor gene, and most recently as both a tumor suppressor gene and a so-called [open quotes]dominant negative[close quotes] oncogene. The last few years have seen an explosion in work on this single gene and its protein product. A review of a computerized medical database revealed approximately 650 articles on p53 in 1992 alone. p53 has assumed importance in neuro-oncology because p53 mutations and protein alterations are frequent in the common diffuse, fibrillary astrocytic tumors of adults. p53 mutations in astrocytomas were first described in 1989 and were followed by more extensive analyses of gene mutations and protein alterations in adult astrocytomas. The gene has also been studied in less common brain tumors. Elucidating the role of p53 in brain tumorigenesis will not only enhance understanding of brain tumor biology but may also contribute to improved diagnosis and therapy. This discussion reviews key aspects of the p53 gene and protein, and describe their emerging roles in central nervous system neoplasia. 102 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Sigma and opioid receptors in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.E.; Szuecs, M.; Mamone, J.Y.; Bem, W.T.; Rush, M.D.; Johnson, F.E.; Coscia, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Human brain tumors and nude mouse-borne human neuroblastomas and gliomas were analyzed for sigma and opioid receptor content. Sigma binding was assessed using ({sup 3}H) 1, 3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), whereas opioid receptor subtypes were measured with tritiated forms of the following: {mu}, (D-ala{sup 2}, mePhe{sup 4}, gly-ol{sup 5}) enkephalin (DAMGE); {kappa}, ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) or U69,593; {delta}, (D-pen{sup 2}, D-pen{sup 5}) enkephalin (DPDPE) or (D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5}) enkephalin (DADLE) with {mu} suppressor present. Binding parameters were estimated by homologous displacement assays followed by analysis using the LIGAND program. Sigma binding was detected in 15 of 16 tumors examined with very high levels found in a brain metastasis from an adenocarcinoma of lung and a human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) passaged in nude mice. {kappa} opioid receptor binding was detected in 4 of 4 glioblastoma multiforme specimens and 2 of 2 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but not in the other brain tumors analyzed.

  6. Myeloid cell origins, differentiation, and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Schnorr, Peter J.; Pang, Wendy W.; Chao, Mark P.; Chhabra, Akanksha; Seita, Jun; Feng, Mingye; Weissman, Irving L.

    2016-01-01

    The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is a multipotent stem cell that resides in the bone marrow and has the ability to form all of the cells of the blood and immune system. Since its first purification in 1988, additional studies have refined the phenotype and functionality of HSCs and characterized all of their downstream progeny. The hematopoietic lineage is divided into two main branches: the myeloid and lymphoid arms. The myeloid arm is characterized by the Common Myeloid Progenitor and all of its resulting cell types. The stages of hematopoiesis have been defined in both mice and humans. During embryological development, the earliest hematopoiesis takes place in yolk sac blood islands then migrates to the fetal liver and hematopoietic organs. Some adult myeloid populations develop directly from yolk sac progenitors without apparent bone marrow intermediates, such as tissue resident macrophages. Hematopoiesis also changes over time, with a bias of the dominating HSCs towards myeloid development as animals age. Defects in myelopoiesis contribute to many hematologic disorders, and some of these can be overcome with therapies that target the aberrant stage of development. Furthermore, insights into myeloid development have informed us of mechanisms of programmed cell removal. The CD47/SIRPα axis, a myeloid-specific immune checkpoint, limits macrophage removal of HSCs but can be exploited by hematologic and solid malignancies. Therapeutics targeting CD47 represent a new strategy for treating cancer. Overall, an understanding of hematopoiesis and myeloid cell development has implications for regenerative medicine, hematopoietic cell transplantation, malignancy, and many other diseases. PMID:27763252

  7. Proteomic analysis of the response to cell cycle arrests in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Tony; Endo, Aki; Lamond, Angus I

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previously, we analyzed protein abundance changes across a ‘minimally perturbed’ cell cycle by using centrifugal elutriation to differentially enrich distinct cell cycle phases in human NB4 cells (Ly et al., 2014). In this study, we compare data from elutriated cells with NB4 cells arrested at comparable phases using serum starvation, hydroxyurea, or RO-3306. While elutriated and arrested cells have similar patterns of DNA content and cyclin expression, a large fraction of the proteome changes detected in arrested cells are found to reflect arrest-specific responses (i.e., starvation, DNA damage, CDK1 inhibition), rather than physiological cell cycle regulation. For example, we show most cells arrested in G2 by CDK1 inhibition express abnormally high levels of replication and origin licensing factors and are likely poised for genome re-replication. The protein data are available in the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/), an online, searchable resource. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04534.001 PMID:25555159

  8. Icariin and its derivative, ICT, exert anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor effects, and modulate myeloid derived suppressive cells (MDSCs) functions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junmin; Wu, Jinfeng; Chen, Xianghong; Fortenbery, Nicole; Eksioglu, Erika; Kodumudi, Krithika N; Pk, Epling-Burnette; Dong, Jingcheng; Djeu, Julie Y; Wei, Sheng

    2011-07-01

    3, 5,7-trihydroxy-4'-methoxy-8-(3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyl)-flavone (ICT) is a novel derivative of Icariin (ICA), the major active ingredient of Herba Epimedii, a herb used in traditional Chinese and alternative medicine. We previously demonstrated its anti-inflammatory effect in murine innate immune cells and activated human PBMCs. We report herein that ICA or ICT treatment reduces the expression of MRP8/MRP14 and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on human PBMCs. Administration of ICA or ICT inhibited tumor growth in 4T1-Neu tumor-bearing mice and considerably decreased MDSC numbers in the spleen of these mice. Further, we saw a restoration of IFN-γ production by CD8+ T cells in tumor bearing mice when treated with ICA or ICT. ICA and ICT significantly decreased the amounts of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in MDSC in vivo. When MDSC were treated in vitro with ICT, we saw a significant reduction in the percent of these cells with concomitant differentiation into dendritic cells and macrophages. Concomitant with this cell type conversion was a down-regulation of IL-10, IL-6 and TNF-α production. Decreased expression of S100A8/9 and inhibition of activation of STAT3 and AKT may in part be responsible for the observed results. In conclusion, our results showed that ICA, and more robustly, ICT, directly modulate MDSC signaling and therefore altered the phenotype and function of these cells, in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Alternating electric fields arrest cell proliferation in animal tumor models and human brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kirson, Eilon D.; Dbalý, Vladimír; Tovaryš, František; Vymazal, Josef; Soustiel, Jean F.; Itzhaki, Aviran; Mordechovich, Daniel; Steinberg-Shapira, Shirley; Gurvich, Zoya; Schneiderman, Rosa; Wasserman, Yoram; Salzberg, Marc; Ryffel, Bernhard; Goldsher, Dorit; Dekel, Erez; Palti, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    We have recently shown that low intensity, intermediate frequency, electric fields inhibit by an anti-microtubule mechanism of action, cancerous cell growth in vitro. Using implanted electrodes, these fields were also shown to inhibit the growth of dermal tumors in mice. The present study extends these findings to additional cell lines [human breast carcinoma; MDA-MB-231, and human non-small-cell lung carcinoma (H1299)] and to animal tumor models (intradermal B16F1 melanoma and intracranial F-98 glioma) using external insulated electrodes. These findings led to the initiation of a pilot clinical trial of the effects of TTFields in 10 patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). Median time to disease progression in these patients was 26.1 weeks and median overall survival was 62.2 weeks. These time to disease progression and OS values are more than double the reported medians of historical control patients. No device-related serious adverse events were seen after >70 months of cumulative treatment in all of the patients. The only device-related side effect seen was a mild to moderate contact dermatitis beneath the field delivering electrodes. We conclude that TTFields are a safe and effective new treatment modality which effectively slows down tumor growth in vitro, in vivo and, as demonstrated here, in human cancer patients. PMID:17551011

  10. Absence of human cytomegalovirus infection in childhood brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Iacopo; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Becciani, Sabrina; Facchini, Ludovica; Guidi, Milena; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Moriondo, Maria; Baroni, Gianna; Stival, Alessia; Farina, Silvia; Genitori, Lorenzo; de Martino, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common human pathogen which induces different clinical manifestations related to the age and the immune conditions of the host. HCMV infection seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of adult glioblastomas. The aim of our study was to detect the presence of HCMV in high grade gliomas and other pediatric brain tumors. This hypothesis might have important therapeutic implications, offering a new target for adjuvant therapies. Among 106 pediatric patients affected by CNS tumors we selected 27 patients with a positive HCMV serology. The serological analysis revealed 7 patients with positive HCMV IGG (≥14 U/mL), whom had also a high HCMV IgG avidity, suggesting a more than 6 months-dated infection. Furthermore, HCMV IGM were positive (≥22 U/mL) in 20 patients. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in all the 27 samples. Despite a positive HCMV serology, confirmed by ELISA, no viral DNA was shown at the PCR analysis in the patients’ neoplastic cells. At immunohistochemistry, no expression of HCMV antigens was observed in tumoral cells. Our results are in agreement with recent results in adults which did not evidence the presence of HCMV genome in glioblastoma lesions. We did not find any correlation between HCMV infection and pediatric CNS tumors. PMID:26396923

  11. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Dinesh; Gravekamp, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    While conventional anticancer therapies, including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and/or chemotherapy, are relatively efficient at eliminating primary tumors, these treatment modalities are largely ineffective against metastases. At least in part, this reflects the rather inefficient delivery of conventional anticancer agents to metastatic lesions. We have recently demonstrated that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) can be used as cellular missiles to selectively deliver a radioisotope-coupled attenuated variant of Listeria monocytogenes to both primary and metastatic neoplastic lesions in mice with pancreatic cancer. This novel immunotherapeutic intervention robustly inhibited tumor growth while promoting a dramatic decrease in the number of metastases. PMID:24427545

  12. Myeloid Sarcoma in an Eyelid That Developed during Chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyera; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Emiko; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2016-01-01

    An 80-year-old female presented with a mass in the left upper eyelid margin that had developed during chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. The mass was elastic, hard, and pinkish, with a relatively smooth surface but without madarosis. The histopathological findings corresponded to a myeloid sarcoma. No blast cells were shown in the peripheral blood at the time of biopsy, and she subsequently underwent an azacitidine injection regimen. The size of the eyelid tumor decreased 3 months after the biopsy, when the course of azacitidine injections was completed. However, acute myeloid leukemia recurred, and the patient died PMID:26889156

  13. Conserved Expression Signatures between Medaka and Human Pigment Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred; Kneitz, Susanne; Wilde, Brigitta; Wagner, Toni; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Spaink, Herman P.; Meierjohann, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in gene expression are a hallmark of cancer cells. Differential tumor-specific transcript levels of single genes or whole sets of genes may be critical for the neoplastic phenotype and important for therapeutic considerations or useful as biomarkers. As an approach to filter out such relevant expression differences from the plethora of changes noted in global expression profiling studies, we searched for changes of gene expression levels that are conserved. Transcriptomes from massive parallel sequencing of different types of melanoma from medaka were generated and compared to microarray datasets from zebrafish and human melanoma. This revealed molecular conservation at various levels between fish models and human tumors providing a useful strategy for identifying expression signatures strongly associated with disease phenotypes and uncovering new melanoma molecules. PMID:22693581

  14. Dectin-2 Recognizes Mannosylated O-antigens of Human Opportunistic Pathogens and Augments Lipopolysaccharide Activation of Myeloid Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Alexandra; Lamprinaki, Dimitra; Bowles, Kristian M.; Katzenellenbogen, Ewa; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Whitfield, Chris; Nishimura, Takashi; Matsumoto, Naoki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Saijo, Shinobu; Kawasaki, Norihito

    2016-01-01

    LPS consists of a relatively conserved region of lipid A and core oligosaccharide and a highly variable region of O-antigen polysaccharide. Whereas lipid A is known to bind to the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD2) complex, the role of the O-antigen remains unclear. Here we report a novel molecular interaction between dendritic cell-associated C-type lectin-2 (Dectin-2) and mannosylated O-antigen found in a human opportunistic pathogen, Hafnia alvei PCM 1223, which has a repeating unit of [-Man-α1,3-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,3-]. H. alvei LPS induced higher levels of TNFα and IL-10 from mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs), when compared with Salmonella enterica O66 LPS, which has a repeat of [-Gal-α1,6-Gal-α1,4-[Glc-β1,3]GalNAc-α1,3-GalNAc-β1,3-]. In a cell-based reporter assay, Dectin-2 was shown to recognize H. alvei LPS. This binding was inhibited by mannosidase treatment of H. alvei LPS and by mutations in the carbohydrate-binding domain of Dectin-2, demonstrating that H. alvei LPS is a novel glycan ligand of Dectin-2. The enhanced cytokine production by H. alvei LPS was Dectin-2-dependent, because Dectin-2 knock-out BM-DCs failed to do so. This receptor cross-talk between Dectin-2 and TLR4 involved events including spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) activation and receptor juxtaposition. Furthermore, another mannosylated LPS from Escherichia coli O9a also bound to Dectin-2 and augmented TLR4 activation of BM-DCs. Taken together, these data indicate that mannosylated O-antigens from several Gram-negative bacteria augment TLR4 responses through interaction with Dectin-2. PMID:27358401

  15. HLA-G promotes myeloid-derived suppressor cell accumulation and suppressive activity during human pregnancy through engagement of the receptor ILT4.

    PubMed

    Köstlin, Natascha; Ostermeir, Anna-Lena; Spring, Bärbel; Schwarz, Julian; Marmé, Alexander; Walter, Christina B; Poets, Christian F; Gille, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Establishing and maintaining maternal-fetal tolerance is essential for a successful pregnancy; failure of immunological adaptation to pregnancy leads to severe complications such as abortion or preterm delivery. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells that suppress T-cell responses, expand during pregnancy and thus may play a role in tolerance induction. Human leucocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I molecule with immune-modulatory properties, which is expressed during pregnancy. Here, we investigated the impact of HLA-G on MDSCs accumulation and activation in pregnant women. We demonstrate that granulocytic MDSCs (GR-MDSCs) express receptors for HLA-G, namely immunoglobulin-like transcript (ILT) 2 and 4, and that ILT4-expression by GR-MDSCs is regulated during pregnancy. Stimulation with soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) increased suppressive activity of GR-MDSCs, induced MDSCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and led to phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and induction of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in myeloid cells. Effects of sHLA-G on MDSC accumulation were mediated through ILT4. These results suggest an interaction between MDSCs and HLA-G in humans as a potential mechanism for maintaining maternal-fetal tolerance. Modulating MDSC function during pregnancy via HLA-G might provide new opportunities for a therapeutic manipulation of immunological pregnancy complications.

  16. Inflammation- and tumor-induced anorexia and weight loss require MyD88 in hematopoietic/myeloid cells but not in brain endothelial or neural cells.

    PubMed

    Ruud, Johan; Wilhelms, Daniel Björk; Nilsson, Anna; Eskilsson, Anna; Tang, Yan-Juan; Ströhle, Peter; Caesar, Robert; Schwaninger, Markus; Wunderlich, Thomas; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Engblom, David; Blomqvist, Anders

    2013-05-01

    Loss of appetite is a hallmark of inflammatory diseases. The underlying mechanisms remain undefined, but it is known that myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), an adaptor protein critical for Toll-like and IL-1 receptor family signaling, is involved. Here we addressed the question of determining in which cells the MyD88 signaling that results in anorexia development occurs by using chimeric mice and animals with cell-specific deletions. We found that MyD88-knockout mice, which are resistant to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced anorexia, displayed anorexia when transplanted with wild-type bone marrow cells. Furthermore, mice with a targeted deletion of MyD88 in hematopoietic or myeloid cells were largely protected against LPS-induced anorexia and displayed attenuated weight loss, whereas mice with MyD88 deletion in hepatocytes or in neural cells or the cerebrovascular endothelium developed anorexia and weight loss of similar magnitude as wild-type mice. Furthermore, in a model for cancer-induced anorexia-cachexia, deletion of MyD88 in hematopoietic cells attenuated the anorexia and protected against body weight loss. These findings demonstrate that MyD88-dependent signaling within the brain is not required for eliciting inflammation-induced anorexia. Instead, we identify MyD88 signaling in hematopoietic/myeloid cells as a critical component for acute inflammatory-driven anorexia, as well as for chronic anorexia and weight loss associated with malignant disease.

  17. Interferon-α and interleukin-12 are induced, respectively, by double-stranded DNA and single-stranded RNA in human myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Katashiba, Yuichi; Miyamoto, Rie; Hyo, Akira; Shimamoto, Keiko; Murakami, Naoko; Ogata, Makoto; Amakawa, Ryuichi; Inaba, Muneo; Nomura, Shosaku; Fukuhara, Shirou; Ito, Tomoki

    2011-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are initiators of innate immunity and acquired immunity as cells linking these two bio-defence systems through the production of cytokines such as interferon-α (IFN-α) and interleukin-12 (IL-12). Nucleic acids such as DNA from damaged cells or pathogens are important activators not only for anti-microbial innate immune responses but also in the pathogenesis of IFN-related autoimmune diseases. Plasmacytoid DCs are regarded as the main effectors for the DNA-mediated innate immunity by possessing DNA-sensing toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). We here found that double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) complexed with lipotransfectants triggered activation of human monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs), leading to the preferential production of IFN-α but not IL-12. This indicates that myeloid DCs also function as supportive effectors against the invasion of pathogenic microbes through the DNA-mediated activation in innate immunity. The dsDNA with lipotransfectants can be taken up by moDCs without co-localization of endosomal LAMP1 staining, and the dsDNA-mediated IFN-α production was not impaired by chloroquine. These findings indicate that moDC activation by dsDNA does not involve the endosomal TLR pathway. In contrast, single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) stimulated moDCs to secrete IL-12 but not IFN-α. This process was inhibited by chloroquine, suggesting an involvement of the TLR pathway in ssRNA-mediated moDC activation. As might be inferred from our findings, myeloid DCs may function as a traffic control between innate immunity via IFN-α production and acquired immunity via IL-12 production, depending on the type of nucleic acids. Our results provide a new insight into the biological action of myeloid DCs underlying the DNA-mediated activation of protective or pathogenic immunity.

  18. Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy Using Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibodies to Deliver Radiation to Murine Hematolymphoid Tissues and Human Myeloid Leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M.; Matthews, Dana C.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Lin, Yukang; Saganic, Laura; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for treatment of patients with hematological malignancies frequently fails because of disease recurrence. We therefore conducted pretargeted RIT studies to augment the efficacy in mice of therapy using a pretargeted anti-human (h)CD45 antibody (Ab)-streptavidin (SA) conjugate followed by delivery of a biotinylated clearing agent and radiolabeled-DOTA-biotin. Tumor-to-blood ratios at 24 hours were 20:1 using pretargeted anti-hCD45 RIT and <1:1 with conventional RIT. In vivo imaging studies confirmed that the pretargeted RIT approach provided high-contrast tumor images with minimal blood-pool activity, whereas directly-labeled anti-hCD45 Ab produced distinct tumor images but the blood pool retained a large amount of labeled antibody for a prolonged time. Therapy experiments demonstrated that 90Y-DOTA-biotin significantly prolonged survival of mice treated pretargeted with anti-hCD45 Ab-SA compared to mice treated with conventional RIT using 90Y-labeled anti-hCD45 Ab at the maximally tolerated dose (400 µCi). Since human CD45 antigens are confined to xenograft tumor cells in this model, and all murine tissues are devoid of hCD45 and will not bind anti-hCD45 Ab, we also compared one-step and pretargeted RIT using an anti-murine (m)CD45 Ab (A20 ) in a model where the target antigen is present on normal hematopoietic tissues. After 24 hours, 27.3 ± 2.8% of the injected dose of radionuclide was delivered per gram (% ID/g) of lymph node using 131I-A20-Ab compared with 40.0 ± 5.4% ID/g for pretargeted 111In-DOTA-biotin (p value). These data suggest that multi-step pretargeted methods for delivering RIT are superior to conventional RIT when targeting CD45 for the treatment of leukemia and may allow for the intensification of therapy, while minimizing toxicities.

  19. Stage-Specific Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Map the Progression of Myeloid Transformation to Transplantable Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kotini, Andriana G; Chang, Chan-Jung; Chow, Arthur; Yuan, Han; Ho, Tzu-Chieh; Wang, Tiansu; Vora, Shailee; Solovyov, Alexander; Husser, Chrystel; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Perumal, Deepak; Klimek, Virginia M; Spyridonidis, Alexandros; Rampal, Raajit K; Silverman, Lewis; Reddy, E Premkumar; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Parekh, Samir; Greenbaum, Benjamin D; Leslie, Christina S; Kharas, Michael G; Papapetrou, Eirini P

    2017-03-02

    Myeloid malignancy is increasingly viewed as a disease spectrum, comprising hematopoietic disorders that extend across a phenotypic continuum ranging from clonal hematopoiesis to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study, we derived a collection of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines capturing a range of disease stages encompassing preleukemia, low-risk MDS, high-risk MDS, and secondary AML. Upon their differentiation, we found hematopoietic phenotypes of graded severity and/or stage specificity that together delineate a phenotypic roadmap of disease progression culminating in serially transplantable leukemia. We also show that disease stage transitions, both reversal and progression, can be modeled in this system using genetic correction or introduction of mutations via CRISPR/Cas9 and that this iPSC-based approach can be used to uncover disease-stage-specific responses to drugs. Our study therefore provides insight into the cellular events demarcating the initiation and progression of myeloid transformation and a new platform for testing genetic and pharmacological interventions.

  20. Myeloid derived suppressor cells and their role in tolerance induction in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Taku; Mahnke, Karsten; Enk, Alexander H

    2010-07-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprise a phenotypically heterogeneous population of cells, which can be found in tumor-bearing mice and in patients with cancer. MDSCs play a central role in the induction of peripheral tolerance. Together with regulatory T cells (Tregs) they promote an immunosuppressive environment in tumor-bearing hosts. The phenotype of MDSCs differs in humans and mice, and the exact mechanisms of their suppressive function are still controversially discussed. In summary, MDSCs are a group of phenotypically heterogeneous cells of myeloid origin that have common biological activities. In this review, we discuss the definition of MDSCs, the proposed mechanisms of expansion and the recruitment and activation of MDSCs, as well as their biological activities in tumorbearing hosts to assess the potential therapeutic applications.

  1. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  2. Activated protooncogenes in human lung tumors from smokers.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, S H; Anna, C K; Brown, K C; Wiest, J S; Beattie, E J; Pero, R W; Iglehart, J D; Anderson, M W

    1991-02-15

    Fourteen primary human lung tumor DNAs from smokers were analyzed for transforming activity by two DNA transfection assays. Activated protooncogenes were detected in 3 of 11 tumor DNAs by the NIH 3T3 focus assay, whereas activated protooncogenes were detected in 11 of 13 tumor DNAs by the NIH 3T3 cotransfection-nude mouse tumorigenicity assay. K- or NRAS genes activated by point mutation at codons 12 or 61 were detected in a large cell carcinoma, a squamous cell carcinoma, and 5 adenocarcinomas. An HRAS oncogene activated by a different mechanism was detected in an epidermoid carcinoma. One adenocarcinoma was found to contain an activated RAF gene. Two unidentified transforming genes were detected in a squamous cell carcinoma DNA and two adenocarcinoma DNAs. Eight of 10 lung adenocarcinomas that had formed metastases at the time of surgery were found to contain RAS oncogenes. No significant increase in metastasis was observed in the lung adenocarcinomas that contained one or more 6-kilobase EcoRI alleles of the LMYC gene. Overall, 12 of 14 (86%) of the lung tumor DNAs from smokers were found to contain activated protooncogenes. RAS oncogenes appear to play a role in the development of metastases in lung adenocarcinomas.

  3. Radiopotentiation of human brain tumor cells by sodium phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, T; Lu, R M; Hu, L J; Lamborn, K R; Prados, M D; Deen, D F

    1999-08-03

    Phenylacetate (PA) inhibits the growth of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo and shows promise as a relatively nontoxic agent for cancer treatment. A recent report shows that prolonged exposure of cells to low concentrations of PA can enhance the radiation response of brain tumor cells in vitro, opening up the possibility of using this drug to improve the radiation therapy of brain tumor patients. We investigated the cytotoxicity produced by sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) alone and in combination with X-rays in SF-767 human glioblastoma cells and in two medulloblastoma cell lines, Masden and Daoy. Exposure of all three cell lines to relatively low concentrations of NaPA for up to 5 days did not enhance the subsequent cell killing produced by X-irradiation. However, enhanced cell killing was achieved by exposing either oxic or hypoxic cells to relatively high drug concentrations ( > 50-70 mM) for 1 h immediately before X-irradiation. Because central nervous system toxicity can occur in humans at serum concentrations of approximately 6 mM PA, translation of these results into clinical trials will likely require local drug-delivery strategies to achieve drug concentrations that can enhance the radiation response. The safety of such an approach with this drug has not been demonstrated.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Condamine, Thomas; Mastio, Jérôme; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are a heterogeneous group of pathologically activated immature cells that play a major role in the negative regulation of the immune response in cancer, autoimmunity, many chronic infections, and inflammatory conditions, as well as in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, tumor cell invasion, and metastases. Accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells is governed by a network of transcriptional regulators that could be combined into 2 partially overlapping groups: factors promoting myelopoiesis and preventing differentiation of mature myeloid cells and factors promoting pathologic activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In this review, we discuss the specific nature of these factors and their impact on myeloid-derived suppressor cell development. PMID:26337512

  5. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Xinyu; Han, Xingpeng; Zhang, Fang; He, Miao; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhao, Hong

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  6. Toxoplasma gondii-Infected Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells Induce T-Lymphocyte Dysfunction and Contact-Dependent Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuang; Marches, Florentina; Borvak, Jozef; Zou, Weiping; Channon, Jacqueline; White, Michael; Radke, Jay; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Curiel, Tyler J.

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells ignite adaptive immunity by priming naïve T lymphocytes. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) infected with Toxoplasma gondii induce T-lymphocyte gamma interferon production and may thus activate T. gondii-specific immunity. However, we now demonstrate that T. gondii-infected MDDCs are poor at activating T lymphocytes and are unable to induce specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. On the other hand, MDDCs acquiring nonviable T. gondii antigens directly, or indirectly through captured apoptotic or necrotic cell bodies, induce potent T-lymphocyte activation. T lymphocytes exposed to infected MDDCs are significantly impaired in upregulation of CD69 and CD28, are refractory to activation, and die through contact-dependent apoptosis mediated by an as-yet-unidentified mechanism not requiring Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, leukocyte function antigen 1, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 10, alpha interferon, gamma interferon, prostaglandins, or reactive nitrogen intermediates. Bystander T lymphocytes that were neither infected nor apoptotic were refractory to activation, suggesting global dysfunction. Immunosuppression and T-lymphocyte unresponsiveness and apoptosis are typical of acute T. gondii infection. Our data suggest that infected dendritic cells contribute to these processes. On the other hand, host cells infected with T. gondii are resistant to multiple inducers of apoptosis. Thus, regulation of host cell and bystander cell apoptosis by viable T. gondii may be significant components of a strategy to evade immunity and enhance intracellular parasite survival. PMID:11895936

  7. Invariant NKT cells reduce the immunosuppressive activity of influenza A virus–induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    De Santo, Carmela; Salio, Mariolina; Masri, S. Hajar; Lee, Laurel Yong-Hwa; Dong, Tao; Speak, Anneliese O.; Porubsky, Stefan; Booth, Sarah; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Platt, Frances M.; Zambon, Maria; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Infection with influenza A virus (IAV) presents a substantial threat to public health worldwide, with young, elderly, and immunodeficient individuals being particularly susceptible. Inflammatory responses play an important role in the fatal outcome of IAV infection, but the mechanism remains unclear. We demonstrate here that the absence of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells in mice during IAV infection resulted in the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which suppressed IAV-specific immune responses through the expression of both arginase and NOS, resulting in high IAV titer and increased mortality. Adoptive transfer of iNKT cells abolished the suppressive activity of MDSCs, restored IAV-specific immune responses, reduced IAV titer, and increased survival rate. The crosstalk between iNKT and MDSCs was CD1d- and CD40-dependent. Furthermore, IAV infection and exposure to TLR agonists relieved the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Finally, we extended these results to humans by demonstrating the presence of myeloid cells with suppressive activity in the PBLs of individuals infected with IAV and showed that their suppressive activity is substantially reduced by iNKT cell activation. These findings identify what we believe to be a novel immunomodulatory role of iNKT cells, which we suggest could be harnessed to abolish the immunosuppressive activity of MDSCs during IAV infection. PMID:19033672

  8. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells: general characteristics and relevance to clinical management of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Goedegebuure, P; Mitchem, J B; Porembka, M R; Tan, M C B; Belt, B A; Wang-Gillam, A; Gillanders, W E; Hawkins, W G; Linehan, D C

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies describe a heterogeneous population of cells of the myeloid lineage, termed myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which are observed with increased prevalence in the peripheral blood and tumor microenvironment of cancer patients, including pancreatic cancer. Accumulation of MDSC in the peripheral circulation has been related to extent of disease, and correlates with stage. MDSC have primarily been implicated in promoting tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immunity. There is also compelling evidence MDSC are also involved in angiogenesis and metastatic spread. Two main subsets of MDSC have been identified in cancer patients: a monocytic subset, characterized by expression of CD14, and a granulocytic subset characterized by expression of CD15. Both subsets of MDSC actively suppress host immunity through a variety of mechanisms including production of reactive oxygen species and arginase. Just as in humans, accumulation of monocytic and granulocytic MDSC has been noted in the bone marrow, spleen, peripheral circulation, and tumors of tumor bearing mice. Successful targeting of MDSC in mice is associated with improved immune responses, delayed tumor growth, improved survival, and increased efficacy of vaccine therapy. By further elucidating mechanisms of MDSC recruitment and maintenance in the tumor environment, strategies could be developed to reverse immune tolerance to tumor. We discuss here what is currently known about MDSC as well as some potential strategies targeting MDSC in the context of our work on pancreatic cancer and recent literature. Due to the number of new reports on MDSC, the most pertinent ones have been selected.

  9. Small Molecule Inhibitors in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From the Bench to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Muneera; DiPersio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will eventually develop refractory or relapsed disease. In the absence of standard therapy for this population, there is currently an urgent unmet need for novel therapeutic agents. Targeted therapy with small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) represents a new therapeutic intervention that has been successful for the treatment of multiple tumors (e.g., gastrointestinal stromal tumors, chronic myelogenous leukemia). Hence, there has been great interest in generating selective small molecule inhibitors targeting critical pathways of proliferation and survival in AML. This review highlights a selective group of intriguing therapeutic agents and their presumed targets in both preclinical models and in early human clinical trials. PMID:25025370

  10. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Proinflammatory Cytokines as Targets for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Atretkhany, K-S N; Drutskaya, M S

    2016-11-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells represent a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells. Under normal conditions, these cells differentiate into macrophages, dendritic cells, and granulocytes. However, in pathological states such as inflammation, infection, or tumor growth, there is an arrest of their differentiation that results in the accumulation of immature myeloid cells in the organism. In addition, these cells acquire a suppressor phenotype, expressing anti-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and suppress T-cell immune response. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) contribute to cancerogenesis by forming a favorable microenvironment for tumor growth. Proinflammatory cytokines, secreted by tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment, induce angiogenesis and metastasis and promote tumor growth. They also provide signals necessary for survival, accumulation, and function of MDSC. Understanding the mechanisms of myeloid suppressor cell development and the use of proinflammatory cytokine inhibitors may prove beneficial for tumor therapy.

  11. A novel model for evaluating therapies targeting human tumor vasculature and human cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Ojeda, Daniela; McLean, Karen; Bai, Shoumei; Pulaski, Heather; Gong, Yusong; Silva, Ines; Skorecki, Karl; Tzukerman, Maty; Buckanovich, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Human tumor vessels express tumor vascular markers (TVMs), proteins that are not expressed in normal blood vessels. Antibodies targeting TVMs could act as potent therapeutics. Unfortunately, preclinical in vivo studies testing anti-human TVM therapies have been difficult to perform due to a lack of in vivo models with confirmed expression of human TVMs. We therefore evaluated TVM expression in a human embryonic stem cell derived teratoma (hESCT) tumor model previously shown to have human vessels. We now report that, in the presence of tumor cells, hESCT tumor vessels express human TVMs. The addition of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human tumor endothelial cells significantly increases the number of human tumor vessels. TVM induction is mostly tumor type specific with ovarian cancer cells inducing primarily ovarian TVMs while breast cancer cells induce breast cancer specific TVMs. We demonstrate the utility of this model to test an anti-human specific TVM immunotherapeutics; anti-human Thy-1 TVM immunotherapy results in central tumor necrosis and a three-fold reduction in human tumor vascular density. Finally, we tested the ability of the hESCT model, with human tumor vascular niche, to enhance the engraftment rate of primary human ovarian cancer stem-like cells (CSC). ALDH+ CSC from patients (n=6) engrafted in hESCT within 4–12 weeks whereas none engrafted in the flank. ALDH- ovarian cancer cells showed no engraftment in the hESCT or flank (n=3). Thus this model represents a useful tool to test anti-human TVM therapy and evaluate in vivo human CSC tumor biology. PMID:23576551

  12. Phagocytosis of dying tumor cells by human peritoneal mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Britta Janina; Lindau, Dennis; Ripper, Dagmar; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Glatzle, Jörg; Witte, Maria; Beck, Henning; Keppeler, Hildegard; Lauber, Kirsten; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Königsrainer, Alfred

    2011-05-15

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis is an advanced form of metastatic disease characterized by cancer cell dissemination onto the peritoneum. It is commonly observed in ovarian and colorectal cancers and is associated with poor patient survival. Novel therapies consist of cytoreductive surgery in combination with intraperitoneal chemotherapy, aiming at tumor cell death induction. The resulting dying tumor cells are considered to be eliminated by professional as well as semi-professional phagocytes. In the present study, we have identified a hitherto unknown type of 'amateur' phagocyte in this environment: human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HMCs). We demonstrate that HMCs engulf corpses of dying ovarian and colorectal cancer cells, as well as other types of apoptotic cells. Flow cytometric, confocal and electron microscopical analyses revealed that HMCs ingest dying cell fragments in a dose- and time-dependent manner and the internalized material subsequently traffics into late phagolysosomes. Regarding the mechanisms of prey cell recognition, our results show that HMCs engulf apoptotic corpses in a serum-dependent and -independent fashion and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that diverse opsonin receptor systems orchestrating dying cell clearance are expressed in HMCs at high levels. Our data strongly suggest that HMCs contribute to dying cell removal in the peritoneum, and future studies will elucidate in what manner this influences tumor cell dissemination and the antitumor immune response.

  13. Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase

    MedlinePlus

    ... CML) Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase Treatment options for people with chronic ... Myeloid Leukemia by Phase More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  14. Sequence dependence of administration of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-2 in murine tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R J; Gauny, S; Chan, A; Landre, P; Winkelhake, J L

    1989-02-01

    Simultaneous administration of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rhTNF) and interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) has been shown to block tumor take in murine models. We investigated the effects of sequence and schedule of administration as a function of tumor burden with two tumor models (B16 and Meth A). rhTNF followed by rhIL-2 had extraordinary antitumor efficacy, but rhIL-2 followed by rhTNF was much less effective. Sequential rhTNF/rhIL-2 therapy resulted in complete tumor regression, whereas simultaneous therapy resulted in complete tumor regression, whereas simultaneous therapy resulted in only reduced growth rate. Experiments with genetically immunodeficient mice suggested that T cell factors may be required for synergistic antitumor activity.

  15. The role of natural killer cells in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Danier, Anna Carolyna Araújo; de Melo, Ricardo Pereira; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; Laguna-Abreu, Maria Theresa Cerávolo

    2011-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a neoplasia resulting from a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 producing the BCR-ABL hybrid known as the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph). In chronic myeloid leukemia a proliferation of malignant myeloid cells occurs in the bone marrow due to excessive tyrosine kinase activity. In order to maintain homeostasis, natural killer cells, by means of receptors, identify the major histocompatibility complex on the surface of tumor cells and subsequently induce apoptosis. The NKG2D receptor in the natural killer cells recognizes the transmembrane proteins related to major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes A and B (MICA and MICB), and it is by the interaction between NKG2D and MICA that natural killer cells exert cytotoxic activity against chronic myeloid leukemia tumor cells. However, in the case of chronic exposure of the NKG2D receptor, the MICA ligand releases soluble proteins called sMICA from the tumor cell surface, which negatively modulate NKG2D and enable the tumor cells to avoid lysis mediated by the natural killer cells. Blocking the formation of sMICA may be an important antitumor strategy. Treatment using tyrosine kinase inhibitors induces modulation of NKG2DL expression, which could favor the activity of the natural killer cells. However this mechanism has not been fully described in chronic myeloid leukemia. In the present study, we analyze the role of natural killer cells to reduce proliferation and in the cellular death of tumor cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:23049299

  16. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells adhere to physiologic STAT3- vs STAT5-dependent hematopoietic programming, establishing diverse tumor-mediated mechanisms of immunologic escape.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Peter A; Ko, Jennifer S; Storkus, Walter J; Spencer, Christopher D; Bradley, Judy M; Gorman, Jessica E; McCurry, Dustin B; Zorro-Manrique, Soroya; Dominguez, Anna Lucia; Pathangey, Latha B; Rayman, Patricia A; Rini, Brian I; Gendler, Sandra J; Finke, James H

    2012-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, is astonishingly effective in its capacity to reduce MDSCs in peripheral tissues such as blood (human) and spleen (mouse), restoring responsiveness of bystander T lymphocytes to TcR stimulation. Sunitinib blocks proliferation of undifferentiated MDSCs and decreases survival of more differentiated neutrophilic MDSC (n-MDSC) progeny. Ironically, sunitinib's profound effects are observed even in a total absence of detectable anti-tumor therapeutic response. This is best explained by the presence of disparate MDSC-conditioning stimuli within individual body compartments, allowing sensitivity and resistance to sunitinib to coexist within the same mouse or patient. The presence or absence of GM-CSF is likely the major determinant in each compartment, given that GM-CSF's capacity to preempt STAT3-dependent with dominant STAT5-dependent hematopoietic programming confers sunitinib resistance and redirects differentiation from the n-MDSC lineage to the more versatile monocytoid (m-MDSC) lineage. The clinical sunitinib experience underscores that strategies for MDSC and Treg depletions must be mindful of disparities among body compartments to avoid sanctuary effects. Ironically, m-MDSCs manifesting resistance to sunitinib also have the greatest potential to differentiate into tumoricidal accessory cells, by virtue of their capacity to respond to T cell-secreted IFN-γ or to TLR agonists with nitric oxide and peroxynitrate production.

  17. High-mobility group box protein 1 promotes the survival of myeloid-derived suppressor cells by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Parker, Katherine H; Horn, Lucas A; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are immune-suppressive cells that are elevated in most individuals with cancer, where their accumulation and suppressive activity are driven by inflammation. As myeloid-derived suppressor cells inhibit anti-tumor immunity and promote tumor progression, we are determining how their viability is regulated. Previous studies have established that the damage-associated molecular pattern molecule high-mobility group box protein 1 drives myeloid-derived suppressor cell accumulation and suppressive potency and is ubiquitously present in the tumor microenvironment. As high-mobility group box protein 1 also facilitates tumor cell survival by inducing autophagy, we sought to determine if high-mobility group box protein 1 regulates myeloid-derived suppressor cell survival through induction of autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy increased the quantity of apoptotic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, demonstrating that autophagy extends the survival and increases the viability of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Inhibition of high-mobility group box protein 1 similarly increased the level of apoptotic myeloid-derived suppressor cells and reduced myeloid-derived suppressor cell autophagy, demonstrating that in addition to inducing the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, high-mobility group box protein 1 sustains myeloid-derived suppressor cell viability. Circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells have a default autophagic phenotype, and tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells are more autophagic, consistent with the concept that inflammatory and hypoxic conditions within the microenvironment of solid tumors contribute to tumor progression by enhancing immune-suppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that in addition to previously recognized protumor effects, high-mobility group box protein 1 contributes to tumor progression by increasing myeloid-derived suppressor cell viability by

  18. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of tumor-bearing mice treated with human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Aicher, K P; Dupon, J W; White, D L; Aukerman, S L; Moseley, M E; Juster, R; Rosenau, W; Winkelhake, J L; Brasch, R C

    1990-11-15

    Pharmacological effects of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) were studied in a mouse fibrosarcoma model using magnetic resonance imaging enhanced with a macromolecular contrast agent, albumin(gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid)35. TNF was administered i.v. in a dose of 150 micrograms/kg, 60 to 80 min prior to imaging. Contrast-enhanced and nonenhanced magnetic resonance images of TNF-treated (n = 10) and untreated (n = 8) Meth A fibrosarcomas were obtained at 2.0 Tesla using T1-weighted spin-echo pulse sequences. Serial images spanning an interval of 60 to 120 min after TNF administration showed that the TNF-treated tumors enhanced significantly more overall than did untreated tumors (43% versus 31%). The most marked differential tumor enhancement was observed in the tumor rim (59% versus 40%). Nontumorous tissue, including muscle and brain, revealed no significant enhancement differences between TNF-treated animals and controls. The observed tumor enhancement corresponded strongly with Evans blue staining; the TNF-treated tumors stained deep blue, while untreated tumors and normal tissues observed did not stain. The different enhancement and Evans blue staining patterns between TNF-treated tumors and untreated tumors are attributed to TNF-induced changes in tumor capillary integrity. The data indicate that TNF effects on tumors include an increased capillary permeability for macromolecules at early times after administration. The ability to detect changes in capillary permeability in vivo using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging may prove to be clinically useful to monitor tumor response to TNF.

  19. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis.

  20. Moxifloxacin increases anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activity of irinotecan in human xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Debby; Halperin, Drora; Fabian, Ina; Tsarfaty, Galia; Askenasy, Nadir; Shalit, Itamar

    2010-04-15

    Camptothecins (CPTs) are topoisomerase I inhibitors chemotherapeutic agents used in combination chemotherapy. We showed previously that combination of moxifloxacin (MXF) and CPT induced inhibitory effects on topoisomerase I activity, on proliferation of HT-29 cells in vitro and enhanced apoptosis, compared to CPT alone. Analysis of secretion of the pro-angiogenic factors IL-8 and VEGF showed significant reduction by MXF. Using a murine model of human colon carcinoma xenograft, we compared the effects of MXF/CPT in vitro to MXF/irinotecan combination in vivo. We show that the MXF/CPT inhibitory effects observed in vitro are reflected in the inhibition of the progressive growth of HT-29 cells implanted in SCID mice. Using caliper measurements, Doppler ultrasonography, image analyses and immunohistochemistry of nuclear proteins (Ki-67) and vascular endothelial cells (CD-31) we show that addition of MXF (45mg/kg) to a relatively ineffective dose of irinotecan (20mg/kg), results in a 50% and 30% decrease, respectively, in tumor size and a decrease in Ki-67 staining. Power Doppler Ultrasound showed a significant, pronounced decrease in the number of blood vessels, as did CD-31 staining, indicating decreased blood flow in tumors in mice treated with MXF alone or MXF/irinotecan compared to irinotecan. These results suggest that the combination of MXF/irinotecan may result in enhanced anti-neoplastic/anti-angiogenic activity.

  1. CLEC12A-Mediated Antigen Uptake and Cross-Presentation by Human Dendritic Cell Subsets Efficiently Boost Tumor-Reactive T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Hutten, Tim J A; Thordardottir, Soley; Fredrix, Hanny; Janssen, Lisanne; Woestenenk, Rob; Tel, Jurjen; Joosten, Ben; Cambi, Alessandra; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Franssen, Gerben M; Boerman, Otto C; Bakker, Lex B H; Jansen, Joop H; Schaap, Nicolaas; Dolstra, Harry; Hobo, Willemijn

    2016-10-01

    Potent immunotherapies are urgently needed to boost antitumor immunity and control disease in cancer patients. As dendritic cells (DCs) are the most powerful APCs, they are an attractive means to reinvigorate T cell responses. An appealing strategy to use the effective Ag processing and presentation machinery, T cell stimulation and cross-talk capacity of natural DC subsets is in vivo tumor Ag delivery. In this context, endocytic C-type lectin receptors are attractive targeting molecules. In this study, we investigated whether CLEC12A efficiently delivers tumor Ags into human DC subsets, facilitating effective induction of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses. We confirmed that CLEC12A is selectively expressed by myeloid cells, including the myeloid DC subset (mDCs) and the plasmacytoid DC subset (pDCs). Moreover, we demonstrated that these DC subsets efficiently internalize CLEC12A, whereupon it quickly translocates to the early endosomes and subsequently routes to the lysosomes. Notably, CLEC12A Ab targeting did not negatively affect DC maturation or function. Furthermore, CLEC12A-mediated delivery of keyhole limpet hemocyanin resulted in enhanced proliferation and cytokine secretion by keyhole limpet hemocyanin-experienced CD4(+) T cells. Most importantly, CLEC12A-targeted delivery of HA-1 long peptide resulted in efficient Ag cross-presentation by mDCs and pDCs, leading to strong ex vivo activation of HA-1-specific CD8(+) T cells of patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Collectively, these data indicate that CLEC12A is an effective new candidate with great potential for in vivo Ag delivery into mDCs and pDCs, thereby using the specialized functions and cross-talk capacity of these DC subsets to boost tumor-reactive T cell immunity in cancer patients.

  2. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  3. Deregulation of Apoptotic Factors Bcl-xL and Bax Confers Apoptotic Resistance to Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cells and Contributes to Their Persistence in Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaolin; Bardhan, Kankana; Paschall, Amy V.; Yang, Dafeng; Waller, Jennifer L.; Park, Mary Anne; Nayak-Kapoor, Asha; Samuel, Thomas A.; Abrams, Scott I.; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are heterogeneous immature myeloid cells that accumulate in response to tumor progression. Compelling data from mouse models and human cancer patients showed that tumor-induced inflammatory mediators induce MDSC differentiation. However, the mechanisms underlying MDSC persistence is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrated that tumor-induced MDSCs exhibit significantly decreased spontaneous apoptosis as compared with myeloid cells with the same phenotypes from tumor-free mice. Consistent with the decreased apoptosis, cell surface Fas receptor decreased significantly in tumor-induced MDSCs. Screening for changes of key apoptosis mediators downstream the Fas receptor revealed that expression levels of IRF8 and Bax are diminished, whereas expression of Bcl-xL is increased in tumor-induced MDSCs. We further determined that IRF8 binds directly to Bax and Bcl-x promoter in primary myeloid cells in vivo, and IRF8-deficient MDSC-like cells also exhibit increased Bcl-xL and decreased Bax expression. Analysis of CD69 and CD25 levels revealed that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are partially activated in tumor-bearing hosts. Strikingly, FasL but not perforin and granzymes were selectively activated in CTLs in the tumor-bearing host. ABT-737 significantly increased the sensitivity of MDSCs to Fas-mediated apoptosis in vitro. More importantly, ABT-737 therapy increased MDSC spontaneous apoptosis and decreased MDSC accumulation in tumor-bearing mice. Our data thus determined that MDSCs use down-regulation of IRF8 to alter Bax and Bcl-xL expression to deregulate the Fas-mediated apoptosis pathway to evade elimination by host CTLs. Therefore, targeting Bcl-xL is potentially effective in suppression of MDSC persistence in cancer therapy. PMID:23677993

  4. Deregulation of apoptotic factors Bcl-xL and Bax confers apoptotic resistance to myeloid-derived suppressor cells and contributes to their persistence in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaolin; Bardhan, Kankana; Paschall, Amy V; Yang, Dafeng; Waller, Jennifer L; Park, Mary Anne; Nayak-Kapoor, Asha; Samuel, Thomas A; Abrams, Scott I; Liu, Kebin

    2013-06-28

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are heterogeneous immature myeloid cells that accumulate in response to tumor progression. Compelling data from mouse models and human cancer patients showed that tumor-induced inflammatory mediators induce MDSC differentiation. However, the mechanisms underlying MDSC persistence is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrated that tumor-induced MDSCs exhibit significantly decreased spontaneous apoptosis as compared with myeloid cells with the same phenotypes from tumor-free mice. Consistent with the decreased apoptosis, cell surface Fas receptor decreased significantly in tumor-induced MDSCs. Screening for changes of key apoptosis mediators downstream the Fas receptor revealed that expression levels of IRF8 and Bax are diminished, whereas expression of Bcl-xL is increased in tumor-induced MDSCs. We further determined that IRF8 binds directly to Bax and Bcl-x promoter in primary myeloid cells in vivo, and IRF8-deficient MDSC-like cells also exhibit increased Bcl-xL and decreased Bax expression. Analysis of CD69 and CD25 levels revealed that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are partially activated in tumor-bearing hosts. Strikingly, FasL but not perforin and granzymes were selectively activated in CTLs in the tumor-bearing host. ABT-737 significantly increased the sensitivity of MDSCs to Fas-mediated apoptosis in vitro. More importantly, ABT-737 therapy increased MDSC spontaneous apoptosis and decreased MDSC accumulation in tumor-bearing mice. Our data thus determined that MDSCs use down-regulation of IRF8 to alter Bax and Bcl-xL expression to deregulate the Fas-mediated apoptosis pathway to evade elimination by host CTLs. Therefore, targeting Bcl-xL is potentially effective in suppression of MDSC persistence in cancer therapy.

  5. Establishment of human tumoral ependymal cell lines and coculture with tubular-like human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brisson, C; Lelong-Rebel, I; Mottolèse, C; Jouvet, A; Fèvre-Montange, M; Saint Pierre, G; Rebel, G; Belin, M F

    2002-10-01

    Ependymomas, rare neoplasms of the central nervous system, occur predominantly in children. They are highly vascularized, and histological findings show many perivascular rosettes of tumoral cells radially organized around capillaries. Treatment of ependymomas relies on surgery combined with radio- or chemotherapy, but the efficiency of chemotherapy is limited, probably because of their multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. Progress in the therapy of these neoplasms is dramatically limited by the absence of cell line models. We established conditions for the long-term culture of human tumoral ependymocytes and their 3D coculture in Matrigel with endothelial cells. Histological, immunological, and ultrastructural studies showed that the morphological features (microvilli, cilia, and caveolae) of these cultured cells were similar to those of the tumor in vivo. The cells expressed potential oncological markers related to the immature state of tumoral cells (nestin and Notch-1), their tumorigenicity [caveolae and epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R)], or the MDR phenotype [P-glycoprotein (P-gp)]. The expression of P-gp, EGF-R, and caveolin-1 by these tumoral ependymocytes could be useful in studies on new drugs. This coculture model might represent a new powerful tool to study new therapeutic delivery strategies in tumoral cells.

  6. Retargeting T cells to GD2 pentasaccharide on human tumors using bispecific humanized antibody

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Cheng, Ming; Guo, Hongfen; Chen, Yuedan; Huse, Morgan; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-disialoganglioside GD2 IgG antibodies have shown clinical efficacy in solid tumors that lack human leukocyte antigens (e.g. neuroblastoma) by relying on Fc-dependent cytotoxicity. However, there are pain side effects secondary to complement activation. T-cell retargeting bispecific antibodies (BsAb) also have clinical potential, but it is thus far only effective against liquid tumors. In this study, a fully humanized hu3F8-BsAb was developed, in which the anti-CD3 huOKT3 single chain Fv fragment (ScFv) was linked to the carboxyl end of the anti-GD2 hu3F8 IgG1 light chain, and was aglycosylated at N297 of Fc to prevent complement activation and cytokine storm. In vitro, hu3F8-BsAb activated T cells through classic immunological synapses, inducing GD2-specific tumor cytotoxicity at femtomolar EC50 with >105-fold selectivity over normal tissues, releasing Th1 cytokines (TNFα, IFNγ and IL2) when GD2(+) tumors were present. In separate murine neuroblastoma and melanoma xenograft models, intravenous hu3F8-BsAb activated T cells in situ and recruited intravenous T cells for tumor ablation, significantly prolonging survival from local recurrence or from metastatic disease. Hu3F8-BsAb, but not control BsAb, drove T cells and monocytes to infiltrate tumor stroma. These monocytes were necessary for sustained T-cell proliferation and/or survival and contributed significantly to the antitumor effect. The in vitro and in vivo antitumor properties of hu3F8-BsAb and its safety profile support its further clinical development as a cancer therapeutic, and provide the rationale for exploring aglycosylated IgG-scFv as a structural platform for retargeting human T cells. PMID:25542634

  7. Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Cell Lines as a Three-Dimensional Model for the Study of Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chung; Vosburgh, Evan; Levine, Arnold J.; Cong, Lei; Xu, Eugenia Y.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare tumors, with an incidence of two per 100, 000 individuals per year, and they account for 0.5% of all human malignancies.1 Other than surgery for the minority of patients who present with localized disease, there is little or no survival benefit of systemic therapy. Therefore, there is a great need to better understand the biology of NETs, and in particular define new therapeutic targets for patients with nonresectable or metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. 3D cell culture is becoming a popular method for drug screening due to its relevance in modeling the in vivo tumor tissue organization and microenvironment.2,3 The 3D multicellular spheroids could provide valuable information in a more timely and less expensive manner than directly proceeding from 2D cell culture experiments to animal (murine) models. To facilitate the discovery of new therapeutics for NET patients, we have developed an in vitro 3D multicellular spheroids model using the human NET cell lines. The NET cells are plated in a non-adhesive agarose-coated 24-well plate and incubated under physiological conditions (5% CO2, 37 °C) with a very slow agitation for 16-24 hr after plating. The cells form multicellular spheroids starting on the 3rd or 4th day. The spheroids become more spherical by the 6th day, at which point the drug treatments are initiated. The efficacy of the drug treatments on the NET spheroids is monitored based on the morphology, shape and size of the spheroids with a phase-contrast light microscope. The size of the spheroids is estimated automatically using a custom-developed MATLAB program based on an active contour algorithm. Further, we demonstrate a simple method to process the HistoGel embedding on these 3D spheroids, allowing the use of standard histological and immunohistochemical techniques. This is the first report on generating 3D spheroids using NET cell lines to examine the effect of therapeutic drugs. We have also performed histology

  8. Human BDCA2+CD123+CD56+ dendritic cells (DCs) related to blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm represent a unique myeloid DC subset.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haisheng; Zhang, Peng; Yin, Xiangyun; Yin, Zhao; Shi, Quanxing; Cui, Ya; Liu, Guanyuan; Wang, Shouli; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Jiang, Taijiao; Zhang, Liguo

    2015-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) comprise two functionally distinct subsets: plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and myeloid DCs (mDCs). pDCs are specialized in rapid and massive secretion of type I interferon (IFN-I) in response to nucleic acids through Toll like receptor (TLR)-7 or TLR-9. In this report, we characterized a CD56(+) DC population that express typical pDC markers including CD123 and BDCA2 but produce much less IFN-I comparing with pDCs. In addition, CD56(+) DCs cluster together with mDCs but not pDCs by genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Accordingly, CD56(+) DCs functionally resemble mDCs by producing IL-12 upon TLR4 stimulation and priming naïve T cells without prior activation. These data suggest that the CD56(+) DCs represent a novel mDC subset mixed with some pDC features. A CD4(+)CD56(+) hematological malignancy was classified as blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) due to its expression of characteristic molecules of pDCs. However, we demonstrated that BPDCN is closer to CD56(+) DCs than pDCs by global gene-expression profiling. Thus, we propose that the CD4(+)CD56(+) neoplasm may be a tumor counterpart of CD56(+) mDCs but not pDCs.

  9. Multiplexed ion beam imaging of human breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Michael; Bendall, Sean C; Finck, Rachel; Hale, Matthew B; Hitzman, Chuck; Borowsky, Alexander D; Levenson, Richard M; Lowe, John B; Liu, Scot D; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Nolan, Garry P

    2014-04-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a tool for visualizing protein expression that is employed as part of the diagnostic workup for the majority of solid tissue malignancies. Existing IHC methods use antibodies tagged with fluorophores or enzyme reporters that generate colored pigments. Because these reporters exhibit spectral and spatial overlap when used simultaneously, multiplexed IHC is not routinely used in clinical settings. We have developed a method that uses secondary ion mass spectrometry to image antibodies tagged with isotopically pure elemental metal reporters. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) is capable of analyzing up to 100 targets simultaneously over a five-log dynamic range. Here, we used MIBI to analyze formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human breast tumor tissue sections stained with ten labels simultaneously. The resulting data suggest that MIBI can provide new insights into disease pathogenesis that will be valuable for basic research, drug discovery and clinical diagnostics.

  10. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  11. Human pancreatic cancer tumors are nutrient poor and tumor cells actively scavenge extracellular protein.

    PubMed

    Kamphorst, Jurre J; Nofal, Michel; Commisso, Cosimo; Hackett, Sean R; Lu, Wenyun; Grabocka, Elda; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Miller, George; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Thompson, Craig B; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2015-02-01

    Glucose and amino acids are key nutrients supporting cell growth. Amino acids are imported as monomers, but an alternative route induced by oncogenic KRAS involves uptake of extracellular proteins via macropinocytosis and subsequent lysosomal degradation of these proteins as a source of amino acids. In this study, we examined the metabolism of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a poorly vascularized lethal KRAS-driven malignancy. Metabolomic comparisons of human PDAC and benign adjacent tissue revealed that tumor tissue was low in glucose, upper glycolytic intermediates, creatine phosphate, and the amino acids glutamine and serine, two major metabolic substrates. Surprisingly, PDAC accumulated essential amino acids. Such accumulation could arise from extracellular proteins being degraded through macropinocytosis in quantities necessary to meet glutamine requirements, which in turn produces excess of most other amino acids. Consistent with this hypothesis, active macropinocytosis is observed in primary human PDAC specimens. Moreover, in the presence of physiologic albumin, we found that cultured murine PDAC cells grow indefinitely in media lacking single essential amino acids and replicate once in the absence of free amino acids. Growth under these conditions was characterized by simultaneous glutamine depletion and essential amino acid accumulation. Overall, our findings argue that the scavenging of extracellular proteins is an important mode of nutrient uptake in PDAC.

  12. Human pancreatic cancer tumors are nutrient poor and tumor cells actively scavenge extracellular protein

    PubMed Central

    Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Nofal, Michel; Commisso, Cosimo; Hackett, Sean R.; Lu, Wenyun; Grabocka, Elda; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Miller, George; Drebin, Jeffrey A.; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Thompson, Craig B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Glucose and amino acids are key nutrients supporting cell growth. Amino acids are imported as monomers, but an alternative route induced by oncogenic KRAS involves uptake of extracellular proteins via macropinocytosis and subsequent lysosomal degradation of these proteins as a source of amino acids. In this study, we examined the metabolism of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a poorly vascularized lethal KRAS-driven malignancy. Metabolomic comparisons of human PDAC and benign adjacent tissue revealed that tumor tissue was low in glucose, upper glycolytic intermediates, creatine phosphate and the amino acids glutamine and serine, two major metabolic substrates. Surprisingly, PDAC accumulated essential amino acids. Such accumulation could arise from extracellular proteins being degraded through macropinocytosis in quantities necessary to meet glutamine requirements, which in turn produces excess of most other amino acids. Consistent with this hypothesis, active macropinocytosis is observed in primary human PDAC specimens. Moreover, in the presence of physiological albumin, we found that cultured murine PDAC cells grow indefinitely in media lacking single essential amino acids, and replicate once in the absence of free amino acids. Growth under these conditions was characterized by simultaneous glutamine depletion and essential amino acid accumulation. Overall, our findings argue that the scavenging of extracellular proteins is an important mode of nutrient uptake in PDAC. PMID:25644265

  13. Synergistic COX2 Induction by IFNγ and TNFα Self-Limits Type-1 Immunity in the Human Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jeffrey L; Obermajer, Nataša; Odunsi, Kunle; Edwards, Robert P; Kalinski, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    Maintenance of CTL-, Th1-, and NK cell-mediated type-1 immunity is essential for effective antitumor responses. Unexpectedly, we observed that the critical soluble mediators of type-1 immune effector cells, IFNγ and TNFα, synergize in the induction of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), the key enzyme in prostaglandin (PG)E2 synthesis, and the subsequent hyperactivation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) within the tumor microenvironment (TME) of ovarian cancer patients. MDSC hyperactivation by type-1 immunity and the resultant overexpression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2), IL10, and additional COX2 result in strong feedback suppression of type-1 immune responses. This paradoxical immune suppression driven by type-1 immune cell activation was found to depend on the synergistic action of IFNγ and TNFα, and could not be reproduced by either of these factors alone. Importantly, from a therapeutic standpoint, these negative feedback limiting type-1 responses could be eliminated by COX2 blockade, allowing amplification of type-1 immunity in the ovarian cancer TME. Our data demonstrate a new mechanism underlying the self-limiting nature of type-1 immunity in the human TME, driven by the synergistic induction of COX2 by IFNγ and TNFα, and provide a rationale for targeting the COX2-PGE2 axis to enhance the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies.

  14. Involvement of the transcription factor PU.1/Spi-1 in myeloid cell-restricted expression of an interferon-inducible gene encoding the human high-affinity Fc gamma receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Perez, C; Coeffier, E; Moreau-Gachelin, F; Wietzerbin, J; Benech, P D

    1994-01-01

    Induction by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) of the gene encoding the human high-affinity Fc gamma receptor (Fc gamma R1) in myeloid cells requires an IFN-gamma response region (GRR) and a myeloid cell-activating transcription element (MATE). GRR and MATE interact with factors to form, respectively, an IFN-gamma-activating complex (GIRE-BP), depending on the phosphorylation of the 91-kDa protein (subunit of ISGF3), and a cell-type-specific complex (MATE-BP). Although GIRE-BP is detected in cells of different origins after IFN-gamma treatment, the presence of MATE-BP was found to be restricted to B- and myeloid cell lines. Sequence analysis of a cDNA encoding a polypeptide recognizing specifically the MATE motif led to the identification of this product as the proto-oncogene PU.1/Spi-1, a transcriptional activator expressed in myeloid and B cells. Expression of this factor in nonhematopoietic cells allowed IFN-gamma-induced expression of a reporter gene under control of the GRR and MATE sequences. The presence of these motifs in other gene promoters indicates that the binding of PU.1/Spi-1 and IFN regulatory proteins to their respective motifs could be part of a general mechanism leading to cell-type-restricted and IFN-induced gene expression. Images PMID:8035786

  15. Activation of Human Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4)·Myeloid Differentiation Factor 2 (MD-2) by Hypoacylated Lipopolysaccharide from a Clinical Isolate of Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Flaviana; Kubik, Łukasz; Oblak, Alja; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Cigana, Cristina; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Hamad, Mohamad A; De Soyza, Anthony; Silipo, Alba; Jerala, Roman; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Valvano, Miguel A; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-08-28

    Lung infection by Burkholderia species, in particular Burkholderia cenocepacia, accelerates tissue damage and increases post-lung transplant mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. Host-microbe interplay largely depends on interactions between pathogen-specific molecules and innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which recognizes the lipid A moiety of the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The human TLR4·myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) LPS receptor complex is strongly activated by hexa-acylated lipid A and poorly activated by underacylated lipid A. Here, we report that B. cenocepacia LPS strongly activates human TLR4·MD-2 despite its lipid A having only five acyl chains. Furthermore, we show that aminoarabinose residues in lipid A contribute to TLR4-lipid A interactions, and experiments in a mouse model of LPS-induced endotoxic shock confirmed the proinflammatory potential of B. cenocepacia penta-acylated lipid A. Molecular modeling combined with mutagenesis of TLR4-MD-2 interactive surfaces suggests that longer acyl chains and the aminoarabinose residues in the B. cenocepacia lipid A allow exposure of the fifth acyl chain on the surface of MD-2 enabling interactions with TLR4 and its dimerization. Our results provide a molecular model for activation of the human TLR4·MD-2 complex by penta-acylated lipid A explaining the ability of hypoacylated B. cenocepacia LPS to promote proinflammatory responses associated with the severe pathogenicity of this opportunistic bacterium.

  16. HIF-2α protects human hematopoietic stem/progenitors and acute myeloid leukemic cells from apoptosis induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Rouault-Pierre, Kevin; Lopez-Onieva, Lourdes; Foster, Katie; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Lamrissi-Garcia, Isabelle; Serrano-Sanchez, Martin; Mitter, Richard; Ivanovic, Zoran; de Verneuil, Hubert; Gribben, John; Taussig, David; Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Mazurier, Frédéric; Bonnet, Dominique

    2013-11-07

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are exposed to low levels of oxygen in the bone marrow niche, and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are the main regulators of cellular responses to oxygen variation. Recent studies using conditional knockout mouse models have unveiled a major role for HIF-1α in the maintenance of murine HSCs; however, the role of HIF-2α is still unclear. Here, we show that knockdown of HIF-2α, and to a much lesser extent HIF-1α, impedes the long-term repopulating ability of human CD34(+) umbilical cord blood cells. HIF-2α-deficient HSPCs display increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which subsequently stimulates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and triggers apoptosis by activation of the unfolded-protein-response (UPR) pathway. HIF-2α deregulation also significantly decreased engraftment ability of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Overall, our data demonstrate a key role for HIF-2α in the maintenance of human HSPCs and in the survival of primary AML cells.

  17. Preservation of glial cytoarchitecture from ex vivo human tumor and non-tumor cerebral cortical explants: A human model to study neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Chaichana, Kaisorn L; Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Pradilla, Gustavo; Han, James; Olivi, Alessandro; Brem, Henry; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2007-08-30

    For the human brain, in vitro models that accurately represent what occurs in vivo are lacking. Organotypic models may be the closest parallel to human brain tissue outside of a live patient. However, this model has been limited primarily to rodent-derived tissue. We present an organotypic model to maintain intraoperatively collected human tumor and non-tumor explants ex vivo for a prolonged period of time ( approximately 11 days) without any significant changes to the tissue cytoarchitecture as evidenced through immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy analyses. The ability to establish and reliably predict the cytoarchitectural changes that occur with time in an organotypic model of tumor and non-tumor human brain tissue has several potential applications including the study of cell migration on actual tissue matrix, drug toxicity on neural tissue and pharmacological treatment for brain cancers, among others.

  18. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of two new Pd(II) methylsarcosinedithiocarbamate derivatives on human acute myeloid leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Aldinucci, Donatella; Cattaruzza, Lara; Lorenzon, Debora; Giovagnini, Lorena; Fregona, Dolores; Colombatti, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    [Pd(MSDT)Cl]n palladium, chloro[methyl N-(dithiocarboxy-kS,kS')-N-methylglycinate], and [Pd(MSDT) Br]n palladium, bromo[methyl N-(dithiocarboxy-kS,kS')-N-methylglycinate], palladium (Pd)(II) derivatives are two newly synthesized Pd(II) derivatives of methylsarcosinedithiocarbamate (MSDT), containing a sulfur chelating ligand that is able to strongly bind the metal center, so preventing interactions with sulfur-containing enzymes. In fact, these reactions are believed to be responsible for the nephrotoxicity induced by platinum (II)-based drugs. Their activity has been evaluated in a panel of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines representing different French-American-British (FAB) subtypes and in the Philadelphia (Ph)-positive cell line K-562 and compared to cisplatin. Both compounds suppressed, in a dose-dependent manner, colony formation in methylcellulose with ID50 values comparable to those of the reference drug cisplatin, excluding the ML-3 cell line (ID50 10-fold lower than cisplatin). Exposure of HL-60, ML-3, NB-4, and THP-1 cell lines to a cytotoxic concentration of [Pd(MSDT)Br]n (5 microM) determined: downregulation of the antiapoptotic molecule Bcl-2, upregulation of the proapoptotic molecule Bax; apoptosis induction, as evaluated by APO2.7 and annexin V staining; mitochondrial membrane permeabilization; and DNA fragmentation. In ML-3 cells the Pd(II) complexes were more active than cisplatin in apoptosis induction. Finally, [Pd(MSDT)Br]n showed an inhibitory effect on clonogenic growth of hematopoietic progenitors (CFU-GM, CFU-GEMM, and BFU-E) with both ID50 and ID90 comparable to those of cisplatin. Remarkably, the Pd(II) complex was more potent in inhibiting the clonogenic growth of the less differentiated AML cell lines KG-1a, HL-60, NB-4, ML-3, and THP-1 (ID50 ranging from 0.02 +/- 0.001 to 0.52 +/- 0.04 microM), compared to normal hematopoietic progenitors (ID50 of 2.1 +/- 0.1, 3.8 +/- 0.4, and 2.5 +/- 0.2 microM) for CFU-GEMM, BFU-E, and CFU

  19. Follow-up of the tumor load in patients with de novo chronic myeloid leukemia and in complete cytogenetic remission treated with imatinib in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    González, Jaime A; Lopera, Diego E; González, Manuel; Saavedra, José D; Lobaton, José Fernando; Duque, Jorge Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hematological, cytogenetic, and molecular responses in Colombian patients with CML chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treated with imatinib. Methods: Two groups of patients, one with the novo diagnostic and another in state of complete cytogenetic remission were followed for 12 months with quantitative PCR evaluations every three months and with chromosomal analysis every 6 months. Results: The group with the novo diagnosis showed 50% of complete cytogenetic remission at 12 months while the other 50% were considered to have primary resistance. Respect the molecular analysis, 10.5% of the patients reached undetectable BCR-ABL transcripts at 12 months. In the complete cytogenetic remission group, 10.6% lost the state of complete cytogenetic remission at 12 months, 50% reached undetectable BCR-ABL transcripts but 10% showed levels higher than 10%, which in our standardization was equal to no molecular response. Conclusions: Despite having received the conventional dosages of 400 mg/day of imatinib, the cytogenetic and molecular responses obtained in our group of Colombian patients with CML, were lower than those in other international studies. PMID:24893299

  20. Predictive role of minimal residual disease and log clearance in acute myeloid leukemia: a comparison between multiparameter flow cytometry and Wilm's tumor 1 levels.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giovanni; Minervini, Maria Marta; Melillo, Lorella; di Nardo, Francesco; de Waure, Chiara; Scalzulli, Potito Rosario; Perla, Gianni; Valente, Daniela; Sinisi, Nicola; Cascavilla, Nicola

    2014-07-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) as well as the degree of log clearance similarly identifies patients with poor prognosis. No comparison was provided between the two approaches in order to identify the best one to monitor follow-up patients. In this study, MRD and clearance were assessed by both multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) and WT1 expression at different time points on 45 AML patients achieving complete remission. Our results by WT1 expression showed that log clearance lower than 1.96 after induction predicted the recurrence better than MRD higher than 77.0 copies WT1/10(4) ABL. Conversely, on MFC, MRD higher than 0.2 % after consolidation was more predictive than log clearance below 2.64. At univariate and multivariate analysis, positive MRD values and log clearance below the optimal cutoffs were associated with a shorter disease-free survival (DFS). At the univariate analysis, positive MRD values were also associated with overall survival (OS). Therefore, post-induction log clearance by WT1 and post-consolidation MRD by MFC represented the most informative approaches to identify the relapse. At the optimal timing of assessment, positive MRD and log-clearance values lower than calculated thresholds similarly predicted an adverse prognosis in AML.

  1. Oncogenic pathways of AML1-ETO in acute myeloid leukemia: multifaceted manipulation of marrow maturation

    PubMed Central

    Elagib, Kamaleldin E.; Goldfarb, Adam N.

    2007-01-01

    The leukemic fusion protein AML1-ETO occurs frequently in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and has received much attention over the past decade. An initial model for its pathogenetic effects emphasized the conversion of a hematopoietic transcriptional activator, RUNX1 (or AML1), into a leukemogenic repressor which blocked myeloid differentiation at the level of target gene regulation. This view has been absorbed into a larger picture of AML1-ETO pathogenesis, encompassing dysregulation of hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis at several mechanistic levels. Recent reports have highlighted a multifaceted capacity of AML1-ETO directly to inhibit key hematopoietic transcription factors that function as tumor suppressors at several nodal points during hematopoietic differentiation. A new model is presented in which AML1-ETO coordinates expansion of the stem cell compartment with diminished lineage commitment and with genome instability. PMID:17125917

  2. Cooperative loss of RAS feedback regulation drives myeloid leukemognesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Chen, Chi-Chao; Rillahan, Cory D.; Shen, Ronglai; Kitzing, Thomas; McNerney, Megan E.; Diaz-Flores, Ernesto; Zuber, Johannes; Shannon, Kevin; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Spector, Mona S.; Kogan, Scott C.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    RAS network activation is common in human cancers and, in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), achieved mainly through gain-of-function mutations in KRAS, NRAS, or the FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinase1. In mice, we show that premalignant myeloid cells harboring a KrasG12D allele retain low Ras signaling owing to a negative feedback involving Spry4 that prevents transformation. In humans, SPRY4 is located on chromosome 5q, a region affected by large heterozygous deletion that are associated with an aggressive disease in which gain-of-function RAS pathway mutations are rare. These 5q deletions often co-occur with chromosome 17 alterations involving deletion of NF1 - another RAS negative regulator - and TP53. Accordingly, combined suppression of Spry4, Nf1 and Trp53 produces high Ras signaling and drives AML in mice. Therefore, SPRY4 is a 5q tumor suppressor whose disruption contributes to a lethal AML subtype that appears to acquire RAS pathway activation through loss of negative regulators. PMID:25822087

  3. Tumor-mediated inhibition of human dendritic cell differentiation and function is consistently counteracted by combined p38 MAPK and STAT3 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Oosterhoff, Dinja; Lougheed, Sinéad; van de Ven, Rieneke; Lindenberg, Jelle; van Cruijsen, Hester; Hiddingh, Lotte; Kroon, Jan; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J.M.; Hangalapura, Basav; Scheper, Rik J.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.

    2012-01-01

    Targeting dendritic cells (DC) through the release of suppressive factors is an effective means for tumors to escape immune control. We assessed the involvement of downstream signaling through the JAK2/STAT3 and p38 MAPK pathways in tumor-induced suppression of human DC development. Whereas the JAK2/STAT3 pathway has been pinpointed in mouse studies as a key regulator of myeloid suppression, in human DC this is less well established. We studied the effects of STAT3 inhibition on the suppression of monocyte-derived DC differentiation mediated by a short-list of four predominant suppressive factors and found that pharmacological STAT3 inhibition could only counteract the effects of IL-6. Accordingly, in testing a panel of supernatants derived from 11 cell lines representing various types of solid tumors, STAT3 inhibition only modestly affected the suppressive effects of a minority of supernatants. Importantly, combined interference in the STAT3 and p38 pathways completely prevented inhibition of DC differentiation by all tested supernatants and effected superior DC function, evidenced by increased allogeneic T cell reactivity with elevated IL-12p70/IL-10 ratios and Th1 skewing. Combined STAT3 and p38 inhibition also afforded superior protection against the suppressive effects of primary glioma and melanoma supernatants and induced a shift from CD14+ cells to CD1a+ cells in metastatic melanoma single-cell suspensions, indicating a potential for improved DC differentiation in the tumor microenvironment. We conclude that combined interference in the STAT3 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways is a promising approach to overcome tumor-induced inhibitory signaling in DC precursors and will likely support clinical immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:22934257

  4. Micro FT-IR Characterization Of Human Lung Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Enzo; Teodori, L.; Vergamini, Piergiorgio; Trinca, M. L.; Mauro, F.; Salvati, F.; Spremolla, Giuliano

    1989-12-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy has opened up a new approach to the analytical study of cell transformation. Investigations carried out in normal and leukemic lymphocytes have evidenced an increase in DNA with respect to proteic components in neoplastic cells.(1) The evaluation of the ratio of the integrated areas(A) of the bands at 1080 cm-1 (mainly DNA) and at 1540 cm-1 (proteic components) has allowed us to establish a parameter which indicates, for values above 1.5, the neoplastic nature of cells. Recently, this approach has been applied to the study of human lung tumor cells. Several monocellular suspension procedures of the tissue fragment (mechanical and/or chemical) were tested to obtain reproducible and reliable spectra able to differentiate clearly between normal and patological cells. Chemical treatment (EDTA, Pepsin, Collagenase, etc.) produced additional bands in the spectra of the cells causing distortion of the profiles of some absorptions, and as a result, mechanical treatment was preferred. The normal and neoplastic cells homogeneously distributed by cytospin preparation on BaF2 windows were examined by means of FT-IR microscopy. An examination of several microareas of each sample yielded reproducible spectra, with values of the A 1080 cm-1 / A 1540 cm-1 parameter within a very narrow range for each sample, even if certain differences still remained among the different cases, in good agreement with the results obtained for leukemic cells.(1) The value of this parameter was found to be lower for cells isolated from the normal area of lung, than in the case of those corresponding to the tumoral area, meaning that an increase occurs in DNA with respect to the proteic components. These insights, which provide a basis to obtain indications at the molecular level, can open up new possibilities in clinical practice, in order to obtain diagnosis confirmation, to detect early stages of disease and to offer additional indications in cases of dubious interpretation.

  5. Human NK cells in acute myeloid leukaemia patients: analysis of NK cell-activating receptors and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Correa, Beatriz; Morgado, Sara; Gayoso, Inmaculada; Bergua, Juan M; Casado, Javier G; Arcos, Maria Jose; Bengochea, Maria Luisa; Duran, Esther; Solana, Rafael; Tarazona, Raquel

    2011-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activation is strictly regulated to ensure that healthy cells are preserved, but tumour-transformed or virus-infected cells are recognized and eliminated. To carry out this selective killing, NK cells have an ample repertoire of receptors on their surface. Signalling by inhibitory and activating receptors by interaction with their ligands will determine whether the NK cell becomes activated and kills the target cell. Here, we show reduced expression of NKp46, NKp30, DNAM-1, CD244 and CD94/NKG2C activating receptors on NK cells from acute myeloid leukaemia patients. This reduction may be induced by chronic exposure to their ligands on leukaemic blasts. The analysis of ligands for NK cell-activating receptors showed that leukaemic blasts from the majority of patients express ligands for NK cell-activating receptors. DNAM-1 ligands are frequently expressed on blasts, whereas the expression of the NKG2D ligand MICA/B is found in half of the patients and CD48, a ligand for CD244, in only one-fourth of the patients. The decreased expression of NK cell-activating receptors and/or the heterogeneous expression of ligands for major receptors on leukaemic blasts can lead to an inadequate tumour immunosurveillance by NK cells. A better knowledge of the activating receptor repertoire on NK cells and their putative ligands on blasts together with the possibility to modulate their expression will open new possibilities for the use of NK cells in immunotherapy against leukaemia.

  6. Proteome Changes Induced by Imatinib and Novel Imatinib Derivatives in K562 Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arvaniti, Katerina; Papadioti, Anastasia; Kinigopoulou, Maria; Theodorou, Vassiliki; Skobridis, Konstantinos; Tsiotis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate is the leading compound to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and other cancers, through its inhibition of Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinases. However, resistance to imatinib develops frequently, particularly in late-stage disease and has necessitated the development of new Bcr-Abl inhibitors. The synthesis of a new series of phenylaminopyrimidines, structurally related to imatinib, showed large interest since the introduction of nilotinib. Here, we compare the protein levels in K562 cells treated with either imatinib or with novel imatinib derivates. Our results revealed that among the 986 quantified proteins, 35 had significantly altered levels of expression by imatinib or its derivates. In a second series of experiments, we directly compared the proteomes of imatinib treated K562 cells with those K562 cells treated with any of the four imatinib derivates. More than 1029 protein were quantified, 80 of which had altered levels of expression. Both experiments pointed to changes in the expression of the ATP-dependent RNA helicase DDX3X and of two mitochondrial coiled-coil-helix-coiled-coil-helix domain-containing proteins. PMID:28250386

  7. The development of a three-dimensional scaffold for ex vivo biomimicry of human acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Teresa Mortera; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Bismarck, Alexander; Panoskaltsis, Nicki

    2010-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a cancer of haematopoietic cells that develops in three-dimensional (3-D) bone marrow niches in vivo. The study of AML has been hampered by lack of appropriate ex vivo models that mimic this microenvironment. We hypothesised that fabrication and optimisation of suitable biomimetic scaffolds for culturing leukaemic cells ex vivo might facilitate the study of AML in its native 3-D niche. We evaluated the growth of three leukaemia subtype-specific cell lines, K-562, HL60 and Kasumi-6, on highly porous scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymeric materials, such as poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), polyurethane (PU), poly (methyl-methacrylate), poly (D, L-lactade), poly (caprolactone), and polystyrene. Our results show that PLGA and PU supported the best seeding efficiency and leukaemic growth. Furthermore, the PLGA and PU scaffolds were coated with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, collagen type I (62.5 or 125 microg/ml) and fibronectin (25 or 50 microg/ml) to provide biorecognition signals. The 3 leukaemia subtype-specific lines grew best on PU scaffolds coated with 62.5 microg/ml collagen type I over 6 weeks in the absence of exogenous growth factors. In conclusion, PU-collagen scaffolds may provide a practical model to study the biology and treatment of primary AML in an ex vivo mimicry.

  8. Functional EpoR Pathway Utilization Is Not Detected in Primary Tumor Cells Isolated from Human Breast, Non-Small Cell Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Tumor Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Scott D.; Rossi, John M.; Paweletz, Katherine L.; Fitzpatrick, V. Dan; Begley, C. Glenn; Busse, Leigh; Elliott, Steve; McCaffery, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Several clinical trials in oncology have reported increased mortality or disease progression associated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. One hypothesis proposes that erythropoiesis-stimulating agents directly stimulate tumor proliferation and/or survival through cell-surface receptors. To test this hypothesis and examine if human tumors utilize the erythropoietin receptor pathway, the response of tumor cells to human recombinant erythropoietin was investigated in disaggregated tumor cells obtained from 186 patients with colorectal, breast, lung, ovarian, head and neck, and other tumors. A cocktail of well characterized tumor growth factors (EGF, HGF, and IGF-1) were analyzed in parallel as a positive control to determine whether freshly-isolated tumor cells were able to respond to growth factor activation ex vivo. Exposing tumor cells to the growth factor cocktail resulted in stimulation of survival and proliferation pathways as measured by an increase in phosphorylation of the downstream signaling proteins AKT and ERK. In contrast, no activation by human recombinant erythropoietin was observed in isolated tumor cells. Though tumor samples exhibited a broad range of cell-surface expression of EGFR, c-Met, and IGF-1R, no cell-surface erythropoietin receptor was detected in tumor cells from the 186 tumors examined (by flow cytometry or Western blot). Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents did not act directly upon isolated tumor cells to stimulate pathways known to promote proliferation or survival of human tumor cells isolated from primary and metastatic tumor tissues. PMID:25807104

  9. Energy metabolism drives myeloid-derived suppressor cell differentiation and functions in pathology.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Strauss, Laura

    2017-02-21

    Over the last decade, a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells with major regulatory functions has been described in cancer and other pathologic conditions and ultimately defined as MDSCs. Most of the early work on the origins and functions of MDSCs has been in murine and human tumor bearers in which MDSCs are known to be immunosuppressive and to result in both reduced immune surveillance and antitumor cytotoxicity. More recent studies, however, suggest that expansion of these immature myeloid cells may be linked to most, if not all, chronic and acute inflammatory processes. The universal expansion to inflammatory stimuli of MDSCs suggests that these cells may be more of a normal component of the inflammatory response (emergency myelopoiesis) than simply a pathologic response to a growing tumor. Instead of an adverse immunosuppressive response, expansion of these immature myeloid cell populations may result from a complex balance between increased immune surveillance and dampened adaptive immune responses that are common to many inflammatory responses. Within this scenario, new pathways of metabolic reprogramming are emerging as drivers of MDSC differentiation and functions in cancer and inflammatory disorders, crucially linking metabolic syndrome to inflammatory processes.

  10. Hypoxia inducible factors are dispensable for myeloid cell migration into the inflamed mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Peter J.; Liyanage, Sidath E.; Cristante, Enrico; Sampson, Robert D.; Dick, Andrew D.; Ali, Robin R.; Bainbridge, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) are ubiquitously expressed transcription factors important for cell homeostasis during dynamic oxygen levels. Myeloid specific HIFs are crucial for aspects of myeloid cell function, including their ability to migrate into inflamed tissues during autoimmune disease. This contrasts with the concept that accumulation of myeloid cells at ischemic and hypoxic sites results from a lack of chemotactic responsiveness. Here we seek to address the role of HIFs in myeloid trafficking during inflammation in a mouse model of human uveitis. We show using mice with myeloid-specific Cre-deletion of HIFs that myeloid HIFs are dispensable for leukocyte migration into the inflamed eye. Myeloid-specific deletion of Hif1a, Epas1, or both together, had no impact on the number of myeloid cells migrating into the eye. Additionally, stabilization of HIF pathways via deletion of Vhl in myeloid cells had no impact on myeloid trafficking into the inflamed eye. Finally, we chemically induce hypoxemia via hemolytic anemia resulting in HIF stabilization within circulating leukocytes to demonstrate the dispensable role of HIFs in myeloid cell migration into the inflamed eye. These data suggest, contrary to previous reports, that HIF pathways in myeloid cells during inflammation and hypoxia are dispensable for myeloid cell tissue trafficking. PMID:28112274

  11. Mll partial tandem duplication and Flt3 internal tandem duplication in a double knock-in mouse recapitulates features of counterpart human acute myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Zorko, Nicholas A.; Bernot, Kelsie M.; Whitman, Susan P.; Siebenaler, Ronald F.; Ahmed, Elshafa H.; Marcucci, Gabriele G.; Yanes, Daniel A.; McConnell, Kathleen K.; Mao, Charlene; Kalu, Chidimma; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jarjoura, David; Dorrance, Adrienne M.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Lee, Benjamin H.; Huang, Gang; Marcucci, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The MLL-partial tandem duplication (PTD) associates with high-risk cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Concurrent presence of FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) is observed in 25% of patients with MLL-PTD AML. However, mice expressing either Mll-PTD or Flt3-ITD do not develop AML, suggesting that 2 mutations are necessary for the AML phenotype. Thus, we generated a mouse expressing both Mll-PTD and Flt3-ITD. MllPTD/WT:Flt3ITD/WT mice developed acute leukemia with 100% penetrance, at a median of 49 weeks. As in human MLL-PTD and/or the FLT3-ITD AML, mouse blasts exhibited normal cytogenetics, decreased Mll-WT-to-Mll-PTD ratio, loss of the Flt3-WT allele, and increased total Flt3. Highlighting the adverse impact of FLT3-ITD dosage on patient survival, mice with homozygous Flt3-ITD alleles, MllPTD/WT:Flt3ITD/ITD, demonstrated a nearly 30-week reduction in latency to overt AML. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that Mll-PTD contributes to leukemogenesis as a gain-of-function mutation and describe a novel murine model closely recapitulating human AML. PMID:22674806

  12. CXXC5 (Retinoid-Inducible Nuclear Factor, RINF) is a Potential Therapeutic Target in High-Risk Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Astori, Audrey; Fredly, Hanne; Aloysius, Thomas Aquinas; Bullinger, Lars; Mas, Véronique Mansat-De; de la Grange, Pierre; Delhommeau, François; Hagen, Karen Marie; Récher, Christian; Dusanter-Fourt, Isabelle; Knappskog, Stian; Lillehaug, Johan Richard

    2013-01-01

    The retinoid-responsive gene CXXC5 localizes to the 5q31.2 chromosomal region and encodes a retinoid-inducible nuclear factor (RINF) that seems important during normal myelopoiesis. We investigated CXXC5/RINF expression in primary human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells derived from 594 patients, and a wide variation in CXXC5/RINF mRNA levels was observed both in the immature leukemic myeloblasts and in immature acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, patients with low-risk cytogenetic abnormalities showed significantly lower levels compared to patients with high-risk abnormalities, and high RINF/CXXC5/ mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival for patients receiving intensive chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. This association with prognosis was seen both when investigating (i) an unselected patient population as well as for patients with (ii) normal cytogenetic and (iii) core-binding factor AML. CXXC5/RINF knockdown in AML cell lines caused increased susceptibility to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, and regulation of apoptosis also seemed to differ between primary human AML cells with high and low RINF expression. The association with adverse prognosis together with the antiapoptotic effect of CXXC5/RINF suggests that targeting of CXXC5/RINF should be considered as a possible therapeutic strategy, especially in high-risk patients who show increased expression in AML cells compared with normal hematopoietic cells. PMID:23988457

  13. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson’s two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of “two-hit inactivation” in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:22515449

  14. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2012-04-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson's two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of 'two-hit inactivation' in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches in cancer therapy.

  15. Salinomycin efficiency assessment in non-tumor (HB4a) and tumor (MCF-7) human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Andressa Megumi; D Epiro, Gláucia Fernanda Rocha; Marques, Lilian Areal; Semprebon, Simone Cristine; Sartori, Daniele; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    The search for anticancer drugs has led researchers to study salinomycin, an ionophore antibiotic that selectively destroys cancer stem cells. In this study, salinomycin was assessed in two human cell lines, a breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and a non-tumor breast cell line (HB4a), to verify its selective action against tumor cells. Real-time assessment of cell proliferation showed that HB4a cells are more resistant to salinomycin than MCF-7 tumor cell line, and these data were confirmed in a cytotoxicity assay. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values show the increased sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to salinomycin. In the comet assay, only MCF-7 cells showed the induction of DNA damage. Flow cytometric analysis showed that cell death by apoptosis/necrosis was only induced in the MCF-7 cells. The increased expression of GADD45A and CDKN1A genes was observed in all cell lines. Decreased expression of CCNA2 and CCNB1 genes occurred only in tumor cells, suggesting G2/M cell cycle arrest. Consequently, cell death was activated in tumor cells through strong inhibition of the antiapoptotic genes BCL-2, BCL-XL, and BIRC5 genes in MCF-7 cells. These data demonstrate the selectivity of salinomycin in killing human mammary tumor cells. The cell death observed only in MCF-7 tumor cells was confirmed by gene expression analysis, where there was downregulation of antiapoptotic genes. These data contribute to clarifying the mechanism of action of salinomycin as a promising antitumor drug and, for the first time, we observed the higher resistance of HB4a non-tumor breast cells to salinomycin.

  16. Ultrastructural characterization of macrophage-like mononuclear leukocytes in human astrocytic tumors.

    PubMed

    Arismendi-Morillo, Gabriel; Castellano-Ramírez, Alan; Medina, Zulamita

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the ultrastructural features of macrophage-like mononuclear leukocytes associated with human astrocytic tumors. Tumoral biopsies of 10 patients with a pathological diagnosis of astrocytic tumor by means of transmission electron microscopy were examined. The macrophage-like mononuclear leukocyte shows ultrastructural characteristics related with the physiologic phenotype of the alternatively activated macrophage (M2), localized principally around of tumoral vasculature and tumor milieu; classically activated macrophages (M1) in surrounding necrosis areas were observed. The presence of these two ultrastructural kinds of macrophage-like mononuclear leukocytes into different areas of the tumor denotes that cellular response of TAMs is dependent of microenvironment stimuli in different parts of a tumor. The process of transvascular emigration of monocyte/macrophage-like mononuclear leukocytes into tumor is presented. The preponderance of alternatively activated macrophage-like mononuclear leukocytes suggests disequilibrium between pro-tumoral leukocytes and anti-tumoral leukocytes. Therefore, macrophage polarization toward anti-tumoral macrophage-like mononuclear leukocytes would be a potential target for therapeutic manipulation in human astrocytic tumors.

  17. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fecher, David; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Buck, Andreas; Bundschuh, Ralph; Nietzer, Sarah; Dandekar, Gudrun; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Lückerath, Katharina; Steinke, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and –testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future. PMID:27501455

  18. Prevalent expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors and FGF2 in human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chandler, L A; Sosnowski, B A; Greenlees, L; Aukerman, S L; Baird, A; Pierce, G F

    1999-05-05

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) has potent mitogenic and angiogenic activities that have been implicated in tumor development and malignant progression. The biological effects of FGF2 and other members of the FGF ligand family are mediated by 4 transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors (FGFRs). To better understand the roles of FGFRs in cancer, the expression of FGF2 and each of the 4 FGFRs was assessed by RNase protection analysis of 60 human tumor cell lines, representing 9 tumor types. Expression of at least one FGFR isoform was detected in 90% and FGF2 mRNA in 35% of the cell lines. Our comprehensive analysis of FGF2 and FGFR expression in human tumor cell lines provides evidence that FGF signaling pathways are active in a majority of human tumor cell lines, and lends support to the development of anti-tumor strategies that target FGFRs.

  19. Distinct Dasatinib-Induced Mechanisms of Apoptotic Response and Exosome Release in Imatinib-Resistant Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Zhang, Yujing; Liu, Aichun; Wang, Jinghua; Li, Lianqiao; Chen, Xi; Gao, Xinyu; Xue, Yanming; Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Although dasatinib is effective in most imatinib mesylate (IMT)-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, the underlying mechanism of its effectiveness in eliminating imatinib-resistant cells is only partially understood. This study investigated the effects of dasatinib on signaling mechanisms driving-resistance in imatinib-resistant CML cell line K562 (K562RIMT). Compared with K562 control cells, exsomal release, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/ mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and autophagic activity were increased significantly in K562RIMT cells and mTOR-independent beclin-1/Vps34 signaling was shown to be involved in exosomal release in these cells. We found that Notch1 activation-mediated reduction of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) was responsible for the increased Akt/mTOR activities in K562RIMT cells and treatment with Notch1 γ-secretase inhibitor prevented activation of Akt/mTOR. In addition, suppression of mTOR activity by rapamycin decreased the level of activity of p70S6K, induced upregulation of p53 and caspase 3, and led to increase of apoptosis in K562RIMT cells. Inhibition of autophagy by spautin-1 or beclin-1 knockdown decreased exosomal release, but did not affect apoptosis in K562RIMT cells. In summary, in K562RIMT cells dasatinib promoted apoptosis through downregulation of Akt/mTOR activities, while preventing exosomal release and inhibiting autophagy by downregulating expression of beclin-1 and Vps34. Our findings reveal distinct dasatinib-induced mechanisms of apoptotic response and exosomal release in imatinib-resistant CML cells. PMID:27070592

  20. The subcellular distribution of myeloid-related protein 8 (MRP8) and MRP14 in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Stroncek, David F; Shankar, Raji A; Skubitz, Keith M

    2005-01-01

    Background Myeloid-related protein 8 (MRP8) and MRP14 are S100 family calcium binding proteins that form a heterodimer known as calprotectin or MRP8/14 that is present in the cytosol of neutrophils and monocytes. MRP8/14 becomes associated with endothelium at sites of monocyte and neutrophil adhesion and transmigration and induces a thrombogenic and inflammatory response by increasing the endothelial transcription of proinflamatory chemokines and adhesion molecules. The distribution of MRP8/MRP14 among neutrophil granules and plasma membranes is unclear and was investigated to better understand the role of this molecule in acute inflammation. Study design Three monoclonal antibodies specific for MRP8 and MRP14 were characterized and used in immunoblotting assays of neutrophil whole cell extracts, and isolated plasma membranes, primary granules, secondary granules and cytosol. Results MRP8 and MRP14 were detected in neutrophil cytosol, plasma membrane, primary granule and secondary granule fractions. MRP8/14 demonstrated a calcium-dependent adherence to plasma membranes and primary granules and could be removed by washing with EGTA in a high ionic strength buffer. In contrast, MRP8/14 was found within the contents of the secondary granules. Activated neutrophils released secondary granules and MRP8/14. Conclusion MRP8/14 is located in neutrophil cytosol and secondary granule fractions and is loosely associated with plasma membranes. MRP8/14 released with secondary granules by activated neutrophils likely binds to endothelium and plays an important role in acute inflammation. PMID:16191197

  1. Toward harmonized phenotyping of human myeloid-derived suppressor cells by flow cytometry: results from an interim study.

    PubMed

    Mandruzzato, Susanna; Brandau, Sven; Britten, Cedrik M; Bronte, Vincenzo; Damuzzo, Vera; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Maurer, Dominik; Ottensmeier, Christian; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Welters, Marij J P; Walter, Steffen

    2016-02-01

    There is an increasing interest for monitoring circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in cancer patients, but there are also divergences in their phenotypic definition. To overcome this obstacle, the Cancer Immunoguiding Program under the umbrella of the Association of Cancer Immunotherapy is coordinating a proficiency panel program that aims at harmonizing MDSC phenotyping. After a consultation period, a two-stage approach was designed to harmonize MDSC phenotype. In the first step, an international consortium of 23 laboratories immunophenotyped 10 putative MDSC subsets on pretested, peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy donors to assess the level of concordance and define robust marker combinations for the identification of circulating MDSCs. At this stage, no mandatory requirements to standardize reagents or protocols were introduced. Data analysis revealed a small intra-laboratory, but very high inter-laboratory variance for all MDSC subsets, especially for the granulocytic subsets. In particular, the use of a dead-cell marker altered significantly the reported percentage of granulocytic MDSCs, confirming that these cells are especially sensitive to cryopreservation and/or thawing. Importantly, the gating strategy was heterogeneous and associated with high inter-center variance. Overall, our results document the high variability in MDSC phenotyping in the multicenter setting if no harmonization/standardization measures are applied. Although the observed variability depended on a number of identified parameters, the main parameter associated with variation was the gating strategy. Based on these findings, we propose further efforts to harmonize marker combinations and gating parameters to identify strategies for a robust enumeration of MDSC subsets.

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells Inhibit Cytomegalovirus Inflammation through Interleukin-27 and B7-H4

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Ankita; Trout, Rodney; Spector, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    HIV/CMV co-infected persons despite prolonged viral suppression often experience persistent immune activation, have an increased frequency of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. We examined how HIV MDSC control CD4+ T cell IFNγ response to a CMVpp65 peptide pool (CMVpp65). We show that HIV/CMV co-infected persons with virologic suppression and recovered CD4+ T cells compared to HIV(−)/CMV(+) controls exhibit an increase in CD4+CX3CR1+IFNγ+ cells in response to CMVpp65; MDSC depletion further augmented CD4+CX3CR1+IFNγ+ cells and IFNγ production. IL-2 and IFNγ in response to CMVpp65 were enhanced with depletion of MDSC expanded in presence of HIV (HIV MDSC), but decreased with culture of HIV MDSC with autologous PBMCs. CMVpp65 specific CD4+CX3CR1+IFNγ+ cells were also decreased in presence of HIV MDSC. HIV MDSC overexpressed B7-H4 and silencing B7-H4 increased the production of IL-2 and IFNγ from autologous cells; a process mediated through increased phosphorylated (p)-Akt upon stimulation with CMVpp65. Additionally, IL-27 regulated the expression of B7-H4 on HIV MDSC, and controlled CMV-specific T cell activity by limiting CMVpp65-IFNγ production and expanding CD4+IL-10+ regulatory T cells. These findings provide new therapeutic targets to control the chronic immune activation and endothelial cell inflammation observed in HIV-infected persons. PMID:28338007

  3. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  4. Shedding of tumor necrosis factor receptors by activated human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The capacity of human neutrophils (PMN) to bind tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was rapidly lost when the cells were incubated in suspension with agents that can stimulate their migratory and secretory responses. Both physiological (poly)peptides (FMLP, C5a, CSF-GM) and pharmacologic agonists (PMN, calcium ionophore A23187) induced the loss of TNF receptors (TNF-R) from the cell surface. Half-maximal loss in TNF-R ensued after only approximately 2 min with 10(-7) M FMLP at 37 degrees C, and required only 10(-9) M FMLP during a 30-min exposure. However, there were no such changes even with prolonged exposure of PMN to FMLP at 4 degrees or 16 degrees C. Scatchard analysis revealed loss of TNF- binding sites without change in their affinity (Kd approximately 0.4 nM) as measured at incompletely modulating concentrations of FMLP, C5a, PMA, or A23187. The binding of anti-TNF-R mAbs to PMN decreased in parallel, providing independent evidence for the loss of TNF-R from the cell surface. At the same time, soluble TNF-R appeared in the medium of stimulated PMN. This inference was based on the PMN- and FMLP-dependent generation of a nonsedimentable activity that could inhibit the binding of TNF to fresh human PMN or to mouse macrophages, and the ability of mAbs specific for human TNF-R to abolish inhibition by PMN-conditioned medium of binding of TNF to mouse macrophages. Soluble TNF-R activity was associated with a protein of Mr approximately 28,000 by ligand blot analysis of cell-free supernatants of FMLP-treated PMN. Thus, some portion of the FMLP-induced loss of TNF-R from human PMN is due to shedding of TNF-R. Shedding was unaffected by inhibitors of serine and thiol proteases and could not be induced with phosphatidylinositol- specific phospholipase C. Loss of TNF-R from PMN first stimulated by other agents may decrease their responsiveness to TNF. TNF-R shed by PMN may be one source of the TNF-binding proteins found in body fluids, and may blunt the actions of the

  5. Terahertz spectroscopic investigation of human gastric normal and tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Dibo; Li, Xian; Cai, Jinhui; Ma, Yehao; Kang, Xusheng; Huang, Pingjie; Zhang, Guangxin

    2014-09-01

    Human dehydrated normal and cancerous gastric tissues were measured using transmission time-domain terahertz spectroscopy. Based on the obtained terahertz absorption spectra, the contrasts between the two kinds of tissue were investigated and techniques for automatic identification of cancerous tissue were studied. Distinctive differences were demonstrated in both the shape and amplitude of the absorption spectra between normal and tumor tissue. Additionally, some spectral features in the range of 0.2~0.5 THz and 1~1.5 THz were revealed for all cancerous gastric tissues. To systematically achieve the identification of gastric cancer, principal component analysis combined with t-test was used to extract valuable information indicating the best distinction between the two types. Two clustering approaches, K-means and support vector machine (SVM), were then performed to classify the processed terahertz data into normal and cancerous groups. SVM presented a satisfactory result with less false classification cases. The results of this study implicate the potential of the terahertz technique to detect gastric cancer. The applied data analysis methodology provides a suggestion for automatic discrimination of terahertz spectra in other applications.

  6. Functional involvement of human discs large tumor suppressor in cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Unno, Kenji; Hanada, Toshihiko; Chishti, Athar H.

    2008-10-15

    Cytokinesis is the final step of cell division that completes the separation of two daughter cells. We found that the human discs large (hDlg) tumor suppressor homologue is functionally involved in cytokinesis. The guanylate kinase (GUK) domain of hDlg mediates the localization of hDlg to the midbody during cytokinesis, and over-expression of the GUK domain in U2OS and HeLa cells impaired cytokinesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from dlg mutant mice contained an increased number of multinucleated cells and showed reduced proliferation in culture. A kinesin-like motor protein, GAKIN, which binds directly to the GUK domain of hDlg, exhibited a similar intracellular distribution pattern with hDlg throughout mitosis and localized to the midbody during cytokinesis. However, the targeting of hDlg and GAKIN to the midbody appeared to be independent of each other. The midbody localization of GAKIN required its functional kinesin-motor domain. Treatment of cells with the siRNA specific for hDlg and GAKIN caused formation of multinucleated cells and delayed cytokinesis. Together, these results suggest that hDlg and GAKIN play functional roles in the maintenance of midbody architecture during cytokinesis.

  7. Genes affected by mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviral insertions in mouse mammary tumors are deregulated or mutated in primary human mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Robert; Mudunuri, Uma; Bargo, Sharon; Raafat, Ahmed; McCurdy, David; Boulanger, Corinne; Lowther, William; Stephens, Robert; Luke, Brian T.; Stewart, Claudia; Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of mutations is a contributing factor in the initiation of premalignant mammary lesions and their progression to malignancy and metastasis. We have used a mouse model in which the carcinogen is the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) which induces clonal premalignant mammary lesions and malignant mammary tumors by insertional mutagenesis. Identification of the genes and signaling pathways affected in MMTV-induced mouse mammary lesions provides a rationale for determining whether genetic alteration of the human orthologues of these genes/pathways may contribute to human breast carcinogenesis. A high-throughput platform for inverse PCR to identify MMTV-host junction fragments and their nucleotide sequences in a large panel of MMTV-induced lesions was developed. Validation of the genes affected by MMTV-insertion was carried out by microarray analysis. Common integration site (CIS) means that the gene was altered by an MMTV proviral insertion in at least two independent lesions arising in different hosts. Three of the new genes identified as CIS for MMTV were assayed for their capability to confer on HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells the ability for invasion, anchorage independent growth and tumor development in nude mice. Analysis of MMTV induced mammary premalignant hyperplastic outgrowth (HOG) lines and mammary tumors led to the identification of CIS restricted to 35 loci. Within these loci members of the Wnt, Fgf and Rspo gene families plus two linked genes (Npm3 and Ddn) were frequently activated in tumors induced by MMTV. A second group of 15 CIS occur at a low frequency (2-5 observations) in mammary HOGs or tumors. In this latter group the expression of either Phf19 or Sdc2 was shown to increase HC11 cells invasion capability. Foxl1 expression conferred on HC11 cells the capability for anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar and tumor development in nude mice. The published transcriptome and nucleotide sequence analysis of gene

  8. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C; Heth, Jason A; Maher, Cormac O; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D; Freudiger, Christian W; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A

    2015-10-14

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a nondestructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. We show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ = 0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery.

  9. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C.; Heth, Jason A.; Maher, Cormac O.; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D.; Freudiger, Christian W.; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a non-destructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. Here we show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ=0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density and protein:lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density and protein:lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Importantly, quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26468325

  10. How Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed? Many people with CML do not have ... About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  11. Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? It’s not clear what causes most ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  12. Contact-dependent depletion of hydrogen peroxide by catalase is a novel mechanism of myeloid-derived suppressor cell induction operating in human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Resheq, Yazid J; Li, Ka-Kit; Ward, Stephen T; Wilhelm, Annika; Garg, Abhilok; Curbishley, Stuart M; Blahova, Miroslava; Zimmermann, Henning W; Jitschin, Regina; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Mackensen, Andreas; Weston, Chris J; Adams, David H

    2015-03-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) represent a unique cell population with distinct immunosuppressive properties that have been demonstrated to shape the outcome of malignant diseases. Recently, human hepatic stellate cells (HSC) have been reported to induce monocytic-MDSC from mature CD14(+) monocytes in a contact-dependent manner. We now report a novel and unexpected mechanism by which CD14(+)HLADR(low/-) suppressive cells are induced by catalase-mediated depletion of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Incubation of CD14(+) monocytes with catalase led to a significant induction of functional MDSC compared with media alone, and H2O2 levels inversely correlated with MDSC frequency (r = -0.6555, p < 0.05). Catalase was detected in primary HSC and a stromal cell line, and addition of the competitive catalase inhibitor hydroxylamine resulted in a dose-dependent impairment of MDSC induction and concomitant increase of H2O2 levels. The NADPH-oxidase subunit gp91 was significantly increased in catalase-induced MDSC as determined by quantitative PCR outlining the importance of oxidative burst for the induction of MDSC. These findings represent a so far unrecognized link between immunosuppression by MDSC and metabolism. Moreover, this mechanism potentially explains how stromal cells can induce a favorable immunological microenvironment in the context of tissue oxidative stress such as occurs during cancer therapy.

  13. BDCA1-Positive Dendritic Cells (DCs) Represent a Unique Human Myeloid DC Subset That Induces Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses to Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Du, Jiang-yuan; Yu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (bacteremia) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and places substantial cost burdens on health care systems. The role of peripheral blood dendritic cells (PBDCs) in the immune responses against S. aureus infection has not been well characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that BDCA1+ myeloid DCs (mDCs) represent a unique PBDC subset that can induce immune responses against S. aureus infection. BDCA1+ mDCs could engulf S. aureus and strongly upregulated the expression of costimulatory molecules and production of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, BDCA1+ mDCs expressed high levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules in response to S. aureus and greatly promoted proliferation and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production in CD4 and CD8 T cells. Moreover, BDCA1+ mDCs expressed higher levels of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) and scavenger receptor A (SR-A) than those on CD16+ and BDCA3+ mDCs, and these two receptors were both required for the recognition of S. aureus and the subsequent activation of BDCA1+ mDCs. Finally, BDCA1+ mDC-mediated immune responses against S. aureus were dependent on MyD88 signaling pathways. These results demonstrate that human BDCA1+ mDCs represent a unique subset of mDCs that can respond to S. aureus to undergo maturation and activation and to induce Th1 and Tc1 immune responses. PMID:25114114

  14. Impact on outcomes of human leukocyte antigen matching by allele-level typing in adults with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Jaime; Jaramillo, Francisco J; Planelles, Dolores; Montesinos, Pau; Lorenzo, Ignacio; Moscardó, Federico; Martin, Guillermo; López, Francisca; Martínez, Jesús; Jarque, Isidro; de la Rubia, Javier; Larrea, Luis; Sanz, Miguel A; Sanz, Guillermo F

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective study analyzed the impact of directional donor-recipient human leukocyte antigen (HLA) disparity using allele-level typing at HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 in 79 adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who received single-unit umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplant at a single institution. With extended high-resolution HLA typing, the donor-recipient compatibility ranged from 2/8 to 8/8. HLA disparity showed no negative impact on nonrelapse mortality (NRM), graft-versus-host (GVH) disease or engraftment. Considering disparities in the GVH direction, the 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 44% and 22% for patients receiving an UCB unit matched ≥ 6/8 and < 6/8, respectively (P = .04). In multivariable analysis, a higher HLA disparity in the GVH direction using extended high-resolution typing (Risk ratio [RR] 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5 to 5.1; P = .0009) and first complete remission at time of transplantation (RR 2.1; 95% CI, 1.2 to 3.8; P = .01) were the only variables significantly associated with an improved disease-free survival. In conclusion, we found that in adults with AML undergoing single-unit UCBT, an increased number of HLA disparities at allele-level typing improved disease-free survival by decreasing the relapse rate without a negative effect on NRM.

  15. Polymorphisms in the human organic cation transporter and the multidrug resistance gene: correlation with imatinib levels and clinical course in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vine, Jacob; Cohen, Sara Bar; Ruchlemer, Rosa; Goldschmidt, Neta; Levin, Moshe; Libster, Diana; Gural, Alexander; Gatt, Moshe E; Lavie, David; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Rund, Deborah

    2014-11-01

    The optimal tyrosine kinase inhibitor for any individual patient with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is not predictable. Pharmacogenetic parameters and trough levels of imatinib (IM) have each been independently correlated with response. We therefore studied the human organic cation transporter (hOCT1) and multidrug resistance (MDR1) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and correlated these with IM levels and major molecular response (MMR) (3-log reduction) in 84 patients with CML, the first such study performed in Caucasians. We studied MDR1 G2677T and C3435T, and for hOCT1, C480G and A1222G. IM levels varied significantly with dose (< or > 400 mg/day) (p = 0.038) and were significantly lower in 20 patients who lost MMR (p = 0.042). Adjusting for dose, trough IM levels were not significantly correlated with SNPs. Patients with MDR1 3435 TT had significantly longer times to MMR compared to CC/CT genotypes (p = 0.047). Genotypes did not predict treatment failure when controlling for IM levels. We conclude that IM levels, but not the SNPs studied here, determine IM failure.

  16. Human Xenografts Are Not Rejected in a Naturally Occurring Immunodeficient Porcine Line: A Human Tumor Model in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Basel, Matthew T.; Balivada, Sivasai; Beck, Amanda P.; Kerrigan, Maureen A.; Pyle, Marla M.; Dekkers, Jack C.M.; Wyatt, Carol R.; Rowland, Robert R.R.; Anderson, David E.; Bossmann, Stefan H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Animal models for cancer therapy are invaluable for preclinical testing of potential cancer treatments; however, therapies tested in such models often fail to translate into clinical settings. Therefore, a better preclinical model for cancer treatment testing is needed. Here we demonstrate that an immunodeficient line of pigs can host and support the growth of xenografted human tumors and has the potential to be an effective animal model for cancer therapy. Wild-type and immunodeficient pigs were injected subcutaneously in the left ear with human melanoma cells (A375SM cells) and in the right ear with human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1). All immunodeficient pigs developed tumors that were verified by histology and immunohistochemistry. Nonaffected littermates did not develop tumors. Immunodeficient pigs, which do not reject xenografted human tumors, have the potential to become an extremely useful animal model for cancer therapy because of their similarity in size, anatomy, and physiology to humans. PMID:23514746

  17. The re-expression of the epigenetically silenced e-cadherin gene by a polyamine analogue lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) inhibitor in human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Woster, Patrick M.; Casero, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes is a common feature observed during the transformation process of many cancers, including those of hematologic origin. Histone modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, and methylation, collaborate with DNA CpG island methylation to regulate gene expression. The dynamic process of histone methylation is the latest of these epigenetic modifications to be described, and the identification and characterization of LSD1 as a demethylase of lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4) has confirmed that both the enzyme and the modified histone play important roles as regulators of gene expression. LSD1 activity contributes to the suppression of gene expression by demethylating promoter-region mono- and dimethyl- H3K4 histone marks that are associated with active gene expression. As most posttranslational modifications are reversible, the enzymes involved in the modification of histones have become targets for chemotherapeutic intervention. In this study, we examined the effects of the polyamine analogue LSD1 inhibitor 2d (1,15-bis{N5-[3,3-(diphenyl)propyl]-N1-biguanido}-4,12-diazapentadecane) in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines. In each line studied, 2d evoked cytotoxicity and inhibited LSD1 activity, as evidenced by increases in the global levels of mono- and di-methylated H3K4 proteins. Global increases in other chromatin modifications were also observed following exposure to 2d, suggesting a broad response to this compound with respect to chromatin regulation. On a gene-specific level, treatment with 2d resulted in the reexpression of e-cadherin, a tumor suppressor gene frequently silenced by epigenetic modification in AML. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the ecadherin promoter further confirmed that this re-expression was concurrent with changes in both active and repressive histone marks that were consistent with LSD1 inhibition. As hematologic malignancies have demonstrated

  18. The re-expression of the epigenetically silenced e-cadherin gene by a polyamine analogue lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) inhibitor in human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2014-03-01

    Aberrant epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes is a common feature observed during the transformation process of many cancers, including those of hematologic origin. Histone modifications, including acetylation, phosphorylation, and methylation, collaborate with DNA CpG island methylation to regulate gene expression. The dynamic process of histone methylation is the latest of these epigenetic modifications to be described, and the identification and characterization of LSD1 as a demethylase of lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4) has confirmed that both the enzyme and the modified histone play important roles as regulators of gene expression. LSD1 activity contributes to the suppression of gene expression by demethylating promoter-region mono- and dimethyl-H3K4 histone marks that are associated with active gene expression. As most post-translational modifications are reversible, the enzymes involved in the modification of histones have become targets for chemotherapeutic intervention. In this study, we examined the effects of the polyamine analogue LSD1 inhibitor 2d (1,15-bis{N (5)-[3,3-(diphenyl)propyl]-N(1)-biguanido}-4,12-diazapentadecane) in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines. In each line studied, 2d evoked cytotoxicity and inhibited LSD1 activity, as evidenced by increases in the global levels of mono- and di-methylated H3K4 proteins. Global increases in other chromatin modifications were also observed following exposure to 2d, suggesting a broad response to this compound with respect to chromatin regulation. On a gene-specific level, treatment with 2d resulted in the re-expression of e-cadherin, a tumor suppressor gene frequently silenced by epigenetic modification in AML. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the e-cadherin promoter further confirmed that this re-expression was concurrent with changes in both active and repressive histone marks that were consistent with LSD1 inhibition. As hematologic malignancies have

  19. Evi-2, a common integration site involved in murine myeloid leukemogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Buchberg, A M; Bedigian, H G; Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G

    1990-01-01

    BXH-2 mice have the highest incidence of spontaneous retrovirally induced myeloid leukemia of any known inbred strain and, as such, represent a valuable model system for identifying cellular proto-oncogenes involved in myeloid disease. Chronic murine leukemia viruses often induce disease by insertional activation or mutation of cellular proto-oncogenes. These loci are identified as common viral integration sites in tumor DNAs. Here we report on the characterization of a novel common viral integration site in BXH-2 myeloid leukemias, designated Evi-2. Within the cluster of viral integration sites that define Evi-2, we identified a gene that has the potential for encoding a novel protein of 223 amino acids. This putative proto-oncogene possesses all of the structural features of a transmembrane protein. Within the transmembrane domain is a "leucine zipper," suggesting that Evi-2 is involved in either homopolymer or heteropolymer formation, which may play an important role in the normal functioning of Evi-2. Interestingly, the human homolog of Evi-2 has recently been shown to be tightly linked to the von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis locus, suggesting a role for Evi-2 in human disease as well. Images PMID:2167436

  20. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells and myeloid regulatory cells in cancer and autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Barnie, Prince Amoah; Zhang, Pan; Lv, Hongxiang; Wang, Dan; Su, Xiaolian; Su, Zhaoliang; Xu, Huaxi

    2017-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were originally described as a heterogeneous population of immature cells derived from myeloid progenitors with immune-suppressive functions in tumor-bearing hosts. In recent years, increasing number of studies have described various populations of myeloid cells with MDSC-like properties in murine models of cancer and autoimmune diseases. These studies have observed that the populations of MDSCs are increased during inflammation and autoimmune conditions. In addition, MDSCs can effectively suppress T cell responses and modulate the activity of natural killer cells and other myeloid cells. MDSCs have also been implicated in the induction of regulatory T cell production. Furthermore, these cells have the potential to suppress the autoimmune response, thereby limiting tissue injury. Myeloid regulatory cells (Mregs) are recently attracting increasing attention, since they function in proinflammatory and immune suppression in autoimmune diseases, as well as in various types of cancer. Currently, research focus is directed from MDSCs to Mregs in cancer and autoimmune diseases. The present study reviewed the suppressive roles of MDSCs in various autoimmune murine models, the immune modulation of MDSCs to T helper 17 lymphocytes, as well as the proinflammatory and immunosuppressive roles of Mregs in various types of cancer and autoimmune diseases. PMID:28352304

  1. Preparation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) from naive and pancreatic tumor-bearing mice using flow cytometry and automated magnetic activated cell sorting (AutoMACS).

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nadine; Szekeres, Karoly; Cooper, Denise; Ghansah, Tomar

    2012-06-18

    MDSC are a heterogeneous population of immature macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes that accumulate in lymphoid organs in pathological conditions including parasitic infection, inflammation, traumatic stress, graft-versus-host disease, diabetes and cancer. In mice, MDSC express Mac-1 (CD11b) and Gr-1 (Ly6G and Ly6C) surface antigens. It is important to note that MDSC are well studied in various tumor-bearing hosts where they are significantly expanded and suppress anti-tumor immune responses compared to naïve counterparts. However, depending on the pathological condition, there are different subpopulations of MDSC with distinct mechanisms and targets of suppression. Therefore, effective methods to isolate viable MDSC populations are important in elucidating their different molecular mechanisms of suppression in vitro and in vivo. Recently, the Ghansah group has reported the expansion of MDSC in a murine pancreatic cancer model. Our tumor-bearing MDSC display a loss of homeostasis and increased suppressive function compared to naïve MDSC. MDSC percentages are significantly less in lymphoid compartments of naïve vs. tumor-bearing mice. This is a major caveat, which often hinders accurate comparative analyses of these MDSC. Therefore, enriching Gr-1(+) leukocytes from naïve mice prior to Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) enhances purity, viability and significantly reduces sort time. However, enrichment of Gr-1(+) leukocytes from tumor-bearing mice is optional as these are in abundance for quick FACS sorting. Therefore, in this protocol, we describe a highly efficient method of immunophenotyping MDSC and enriching Gr-1(+) leukocytes from spleens of naïve mice for sorting MDSC in a timely manner. Immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice are inoculated with murine Panc02 cells subcutaneously whereas naïve mice receive 1XPBS. Approximately 30 days post inoculation; spleens are harvested and processed into single-cell suspensions using a cell dissociation

  2. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells: linking inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Sinha, Pratima

    2009-04-15

    Many cancer immunotherapies developed in experimental animals have been tested in clinical trials. Although some have shown modest clinical effects, most have not been effective. Recent studies have identified myeloid-origin cells that are potent suppressors of tumor immunity and therefore a significant impediment to cancer immunotherapy. "Myeloid-derived suppressor cells" (MDSC) accumulate in the blood, lymph nodes, and bone marrow and at tumor sites in most patients and experimental animals with cancer and inhibit both adaptive and innate immunity. MDSC are induced by tumor-secreted and host-secreted factors, many of which are proinflammatory molecules. The induction of MDSC by proinflammatory mediators led to the hypothesis that inflammation promotes the accumulation of MDSC that down-regulate immune surveillance and antitumor immunity, thereby facilitating tumor growth. This article reviews the characterization and suppressive mechanisms used by MDSC to block tumor immunity and describes the mechanisms by which inflammation promotes tumor progression through the induction of MDSC.

  3. Activation of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 on Human Neutrophils by Marburg and Ebola Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-21

    vitro interaction of human neutrophils with MARV and EBOV. We report that although productive filovirus replication was not observed in human neutrophils...supernatants. Where alphaviruses such as Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) were used as nonfilovirus controls, the viruses to be inactivated...viral replication in human neutrophils exposed to live MARV or EBOV (MOI 1), as measured by plaque assay of supernatants 1, 6, 24, or 48 h

  4. The role of L-type amino acid transporter 1 in human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Lin; Pan, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Summary L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is an L-type amino acid transporter and transports large neutral amino acids such as leucine, isoleucine, valine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, methionine, and histidine. LAT1 was found to be highly expressed especially in human cancer tissues, and up-regulated LAT1 can lead to dysfunction in human tumor cells. These findings suggest that LAT1 plays an important role in human tumors. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of LAT1 expression and its clinical significance and function in tumors. PMID:26668776

  5. Myeloid malignancies: mutations, models and management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid malignant diseases comprise chronic (including myelodysplastic syndromes, myeloproliferative neoplasms and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia) and acute (acute myeloid leukemia) stages. They are clonal diseases arising in hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Mutations responsible for these diseases occur in several genes whose encoded proteins belong principally to five classes: signaling pathways proteins (e.g. CBL, FLT3, JAK2, RAS), transcription factors (e.g. CEBPA, ETV6, RUNX1), epigenetic regulators (e.g. ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2, IDH1, IDH2, SUZ12, TET2, UTX), tumor suppressors (e.g. TP53), and components of the spliceosome (e.g. SF3B1, SRSF2). Large-scale sequencing efforts will soon lead to the establishment of a comprehensive repertoire of these mutations, allowing for a better definition and classification of myeloid malignancies, the identification of new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets, and the development of novel therapies. Given the importance of epigenetic deregulation in myeloid diseases, the use of drugs targeting epigenetic regulators appears as a most promising therapeutic approach. PMID:22823977

  6. The HER2 inhibitor TAK165 Sensitizes Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to Retinoic Acid-Induced Myeloid Differentiation by activating MEK/ERK mediated RARα/STAT1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xuejing; Liu, Yujia; Li, Yangling; Xian, Miao; Zhou, Qian; Yang, Bo; Ying, Meidan; He, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The success of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in differentiation therapy for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) highly encourages researches to apply this therapy to other types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, AML, with the exception of APL, fails to respond to differentiation therapy. Therefore, research strategies to further sensitize cells to retinoids and to extend the range of AMLs that respond to retinoids beyond APLs are urgently needed. In this study, we showed that TAK165, a HER2 inhibitor, exhibited a strong synergy with ATRA to promote AML cell differentiation. We observed that TAK165 sensitized the AML cells to ATRA-induced cell growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, CD11b expression, mature morphologic changes, NBT reduction and myeloid regulator expression. Unexpectedly, HER2 pathway might not be essential for TAK165-enhanced differentiation when combined with ATRA, while the enhanced differentiation was dependent on the activation of the RARα/STAT1 axis. Furthermore, the MEK/ERK cascade regulated the activation of STAT1. Taken together, our study is the first to evaluate the synergy of TAK165 and ATRA in AML cell differentiation and to assess new opportunities for the combination of TAK165 and ATRA as a promising approach for future differentiation therapy. PMID:27074819

  7. Type, Density, and Location of Immune Cells Within Human Colorectal Tumors Predict Clinical Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galon, Jérôme; Costes, Anne; Sanchez-Cabo, Fatima; Kirilovsky, Amos; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Lagorce-Pagès, Christine; Tosolini, Marie; Camus, Matthieu; Berger, Anne; Wind, Philippe; Zinzindohoué, Franck; Bruneval, Patrick; Cugnenc, Paul-Henri; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Fridman, Wolf-Herman; Pagès, Franck

    2006-09-01

    The role of the adaptive immune response in controlling the growth and recurrence of human tumors has been controversial. We characterized the tumor-infiltrating immune cells in large cohorts of human colorectal cancers by gene expression profiling and in situ immunohistochemical staining. Collectively, the immunological data (the type, density, and location of immune cells within the tumor samples) were found to be a better predictor of patient survival than the histopathological methods currently used to stage colorectal cancer. The results were validated in two additional patient populations. These data support the hypothesis that the adaptive immune response influences the behavior of human tumors. In situ analysis of tumor-infiltrating immune cells may therefore be a valuable prognostic tool in the treatment of colorectal cancer and possibly other malignancies.

  8. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-11-17

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species' regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF -p53 axis activation.

  9. Activation of proto-oncogenes in human and mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Anderson, M.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in several nations. Epidemiological studies have indicated that 85% of all lung cancer deaths and 30% of all cancer deaths in the US are associated with tobacco smoking. Various chemicals in tobacco smoke are thought to react with DNA and to ultimately yield heritable mutations. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung tumorigenesis, the authors have analyzed proto-oncogene activation in a series of human lung tumors from smokers and spontaneously occurring and chemically induced lung tumors in mice. Approximately 86% of the human lung tumors and > 90% of the mouse lung tumors were found to contain activated oncogenes. ras Oncogenes activated by point mutations were detected in many of the human lung adenocarcinomas and virtually all of the mouse lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The mutation profiles of the activated K-ras genes detected in the chemically induced mouse lung tumors suggest that the observed mutations result from genotoxic effects of the chemicals. Comparison of the K-ras mutations observed in the human lung adenocarcinomas with mutation profiles observed in the mouse lung tumors suggest that bulky hydrophobic DNA adducts may be responsible for the majority of the mutations observed in the activated human K-ras genes. Other data indicate that approximately 20% of human lung tumors contain potentially novel transforming genes that may also be targets for mutagens in cigarette smoke.

  10. DEMONSTRATION OF TUMOR-SPECIFIC ANTIGENS IN HUMAN COLONIC CARCINOMATA BY IMMUNOLOGICAL TOLERANCE AND ABSORPTION TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Phil; Freedman, Samuel O.

    1965-01-01

    Two methods were used to demonstrate the presence of tumor-specific antigens in adenocarcinomata of the human colon: (a) rabbits were immunized with extracts of pooled colonic carcinomata, and the antitumor antisera thus produced were absorbed with a pooled extract of normal human colon and with human blood components; (b) newborn rabbits were made immunologically tolerant to normal colonic tissue at birth, and were then immunized with pooled tumor material in adult life. Normal and tumor tissues were obtained from the same human donors in order to avoid misinterpretation of results due to individual-specific antigenic differences. The antisera prepared by both methods were tested against normal and tumor antigens by the techniques of agar gel diffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, hemagglutination, PCA, and immunofluorescence. Distinct antibody activity directed against at least two qualitatively tumor-specific antigens, or antigenic determinants, was detected in the antisera prepared by both methods and at least two additional tumor antigens were detected exclusively in antisera prepared by the tolerance technique. Whether these additional antigens were qualitatively different from normal tissue antigens, or merely present in tumor tissue in higher concentrations than in normal tissue has not as yet been determined. Furthermore, it was shown that the tumor-specific antibodies were not directed against bacterial contaminants or against the unusually high concentrations of fibrin found in many neoplastic tissues. It was concluded from these results that the pooled tumor extracts contained tumor-specific antigens not present in normal colonic tissue. Identical tumor-specific antigens were also demonstrated in a number of individual colonic carcinomata obtained from different human donors. PMID:14270243

  11. The apoptotic mechanism of action of the sphingosine kinase 1 selective inhibitor SKI-178 in human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dick, Taryn E; Hengst, Jeremy A; Fox, Todd E; Colledge, Ashley L; Kale, Vijay P; Sung, Shen-Shu; Sharma, Arun; Amin, Shantu; Loughran, Thomas P; Kester, Mark; Wang, Hong-Gang; Yun, Jong K

    2015-03-01

    We previously developed SKI-178 (N'-[(1E)-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethylidene]-3-(4-methoxxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carbohydrazide) as a novel sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) selective inhibitor and, herein, sought to determine the mechanism-of-action of SKI-178-induced cell death. Using human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines as a model, we present evidence that SKI-178 induces prolonged mitosis followed by apoptotic cell death through the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Further examination of the mechanism of action of SKI-178 implicated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and cyclin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDK1) as critical factors required for SKI-178-induced apoptosis. In cell cycle synchronized human AML cell lines, we demonstrate that entry into mitosis is required for apoptotic induction by SKI-178 and that CDK1, not JNK, is required for SKI-178-induced apoptosis. We further demonstrate that the sustained activation of CDK1 during prolonged mitosis, mediated by SKI-178, leads to the simultaneous phosphorylation of the prosurvival Bcl-2 family members, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, as well as the phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of Mcl-1. Moreover, multidrug resistance mediated by multidrug-resistant protein1 and/or prosurvival Bcl-2 family member overexpression did not affect the sensitivity of AML cells to SKI-178. Taken together, these findings highlight the therapeutic potential of SKI-178 targeting SphK1 as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of AML, including multidrug-resistant/recurrent AML subtypes.

  12. Increased tubulointerstitial recruitment of human CD141(hi) CLEC9A(+) and CD1c(+) myeloid dendritic cell subsets in renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kassianos, Andrew J; Wang, Xiangju; Sampangi, Sandeep; Muczynski, Kimberly; Healy, Helen; Wilkinson, Ray

    2013-11-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play critical roles in immune-mediated kidney diseases. Little is known, however, about DC subsets in human chronic kidney disease, with previous studies restricted to a limited set of pathologies and to using immunohistochemical methods. In this study, we developed novel protocols for extracting renal DC subsets from diseased human kidneys and identified, enumerated, and phenotyped them by multicolor flow cytometry. We detected significantly greater numbers of total DCs as well as CD141(hi) and CD1c(+) myeloid DC (mDCs) subsets in diseased biopsies with interstitial fibrosis than diseased biopsies without fibrosis or healthy kidney tissue. In contrast, plasmacytoid DC numbers were significantly higher in the fibrotic group compared with healthy tissue only. Numbers of all DC subsets correlated with loss of kidney function, recorded as estimated glomerular filtration rate. CD141(hi) DCs expressed C-type lectin domain family 9 member A (CLEC9A), whereas the majority of CD1c(+) DCs lacked the expression of CD1a and DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), suggesting these mDC subsets may be circulating CD141(hi) and CD1c(+) blood DCs infiltrating kidney tissue. Our analysis revealed CLEC9A(+) and CD1c(+) cells were restricted to the tubulointerstitium. Notably, DC expression of the costimulatory and maturation molecule CD86 was significantly increased in both diseased cohorts compared with healthy tissue. Transforming growth factor-β levels in dissociated tissue supernatants were significantly elevated in diseased biopsies with fibrosis compared with nonfibrotic biopsies, with mDCs identified as a major source of this profibrotic cytokine. Collectively, our data indicate that activated mDC subsets, likely recruited into the tubulointerstitium, are positioned to play a role in the development of fibrosis and, thus, progression to chronic kidney disease.

  13. Distinct functions of epidermal and myeloid-derived VEGF-A in skin tumorigenesis mediated by HPV8.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaolei; Lucas, Tina; Marcuzzi, Gian P; Pfister, Herbert; Eming, Sabine A

    2015-01-15

    Beta human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been suspected to be carcinogenic in nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC), but the basis for potential viral contributions to these cancers is poorly understood. In particular, it is unresolved how HPV-infected keratinocytes escape cell-cycle control and whether their cross-talk with immune cells is critical for tumorigenesis. In nonviral preclinical models, the angiogenic cytokine VEGF-A has been identified as a critical regulator of NMSC. In this study, we dissected the contribution of epidermal versus myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A in HPV-mediated skin cancer by interbreeding an HPV8 transgenic mouse model with a conditional disruption of VEGF-A restricted to either epidermal or myeloid cells. Although only epidermal-derived VEGF-A was essential for initiation of skin tumor development, both spontaneously and UV-light triggered, both epidermal and myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A contributed to regeneration-induced tumorigenesis upon HPV8 overexpression, partly not only through a paracrine effect on endothelial cells, but also most probably through an additional autocrine effect on epidermal cells. Our findings offer new mechanistic insights into distinct functions of epidermal versus myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A during HPV-mediated tumorigenesis, with possible implications for preventing this disease.

  14. [Molecular monitoring of myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kiss, Richárd; Király, Attila Péter; Gaál-Weisinger, Júlia; Marosvári, Dóra; Gángó, Péter Ambrus; Demeter, Judit; Bödör, Csaba

    2017-03-08

    The last fifteen years brought a revolution both in treatment and diagnostics of chronic myeloid leukemia. Nowadays, the main method for monitoring of the disease is molecular monitoring with real-time PCR technology which can indicate treatment modification. With the development of the international scale and inter-laboratory standardization the residual tumor mass can be measured accurately and the results are comparable between the different laboratories. By the growing experience in the field of molecular responses we can now accurately predict treatment outcome early on with the so called early molecular response and BCR-ABL1 kinetics, allowing the selection of the best TKI with the treatment-free remission representing real option of the near future. Nevertheless, further advancements can be expected, including the workflow automatization and detection of even deeper molecular responses.

  15. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  16. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in the ...

  17. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (ABCC1) confers resistance to arsenic compounds in human myeloid leukemic HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shi; Zhang, Yan Fang; Carew, Micheal W; Hao, Wen Hui; Loo, Jacky Fong Chuen; Naranmandura, Hua; Le, X Chris

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) is established as one of the most effective drugs for treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia, as well as other types of malignant tumors. However, HL-60 cells are resistant to As(2)O(3), and little is known about the underlying resistance mechanism for As(2)O(3) and its biomethylation products, namely, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) on the treatment of tumors. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying iAs(III) and its intermediate metabolite MMA(III)-induced anticancer effects in the HL-60 cells. Here, we show that the HL-60 cells exhibit resistance to inorganic iAs(III) (IC(50) = 10 μM), but are relatively sensitive to its intermediate MMA(III) (IC(50) = 3.5 μM). Moreover, we found that the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), but not MRP2, is expressed in HL-60 cells, which reduced the intracellular arsenic accumulation, and conferred resistance to inorganic iAs(III) and MMA(III). Pretreatment of HL-60 with MK571, an inhibitor of MRP1, significantly increased iAs(III) and MMA(III)-induced cytotoxicity and arsenic accumulations, suggesting that the expression of MRP1/4 may lead to HL-60 cells resistance to trivalent arsenic compounds.

  18. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

    PubMed

    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  19. Transplantation of human renal cell carcinoma into NMRI nu/nu mice. III. Effect of irradiation on tumor acceptance and tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, U.; Huland, H.; Baisch, H.; Kloeppel, G.

    1985-07-01

    Irradiation of human renal cell carcinoma before radical tumor nephrectomy resulted in a significantly lower acceptance rate (1 of 7) in nude mice than for nonirradiated tumors (all of 13). The tumor tissue was transplanted into NMRI nu/nu mice immediately after nephrectomy. In this experimental system the authors demonstrated the reduced vitality of human tumor cells after irradiation. In a second series of experiments, 3 morphologically different human renal cell carcinomas were irradiated at various doses after establishment in nude mice. The irradiated tumor tissue was transplanted to the next passage. The morphology, proliferation rate and growth of these tumors were compared with those of nonirradiated controls. Radiation effect was dose dependent in the responding tumor types. The characteristics correlated with radiosensitivity were high proliferation rate (measured by flow cytometry), low cytologic grading and fast growth rate in the nude mice.

  20. IL-10 immunomodulation of myeloid cells regulates a murine model of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hart, Kevin M; Byrne, Katelyn T; Molloy, Michael J; Usherwood, Edward M; Berwin, Brent

    2011-01-01

    Elevated levels of IL-10 in the microenvironment of human ovarian cancer and murine models of ovarian cancer are well established and correlate with poor clinical prognosis. However, amongst a myriad of immunosuppressive factors, the actual contribution of IL-10 to the ovarian tumor microenvironment, the mechanisms by which it acts, and its possible functional redundancy are unknown. We previously demonstrated that elimination of the myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) compartment within the ovarian tumor ascites inhibited tumor progression and, intriguingly, significantly decreased local IL-10 levels. Here we identify a novel pathway in which the tumor-infiltrating MDSC are the predominant producers of IL-10 and, importantly, require it to develop their immunosuppressive function in vivo. Importantly, we demonstrate that the role of IL-10 is critical, and not redundant with other immunosuppressive molecules, to in vivo tumor progression: blockade of the IL-10 signaling network results in alleviation of MDSC-mediated immunosuppression, altered T cell phenotype and activity, and improved survival. These studies define IL-10 as a fundamental modulator of both MDSC and T cells within the ovarian tumor microenvironment. Importantly, IL-10 signaling is shown to be necessary to the development and maintenance of a permissive tumor microenvironment and represents a viable target for anti-tumor strategies.

  1. Fibroblast cell interactions with human melanoma cells affect tumor cell growth as a function of tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    Cornil, I; Theodorescu, D; Man, S; Herlyn, M; Jambrosic, J; Kerbel, R S

    1991-01-01

    It is known from a variety of experimental systems that the ability of tumor cells to grow locally and metastasize can be affected by the presence of adjacent normal tissues and cells, particularly mesenchymally derived stromal cells such as fibroblasts. However, the comparative influence of such normal cell-tumor cell interactions on tumor behavior has not been thoroughly investigated from the perspective of different stages of tumor progression. To address this question we assessed the influence of normal dermal fibroblasts on the growth of human melanoma cells obtained from different stages of tumor progression. We found that the in vitro growth of most (4 out of 5) melanoma cell lines derived from early-stage radial growth phase or vertical growth phase metastatically incompetent primary lesions is repressed by coculture with normal dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that negative homeostatic growth controls are still operative on melanoma cells from early stages of disease. On the other hand, 9 out of 11 melanoma cell lines derived from advanced metastatically competent vertical growth phase primary lesions, or from distant metastases, were found to be consistently stimulated to grow in the presence of dermal fibroblasts. Evidence was obtained to show that this discriminatory fibroblastic influence is mediated by soluble inhibitory and stimulatory growth factor(s). Taken together, these results indicate that fibroblast-derived signals can have antithetical growth effects on metastatic versus metastatically incompetent tumor subpopulations. This resultant conversion in responsiveness to host tissue environmental factors may confer upon small numbers of metastatically competent cells a growth advantage, allowing them to escape local growth constraints both in the primary tumor site and at distant ectopic tissue sites. PMID:2068080

  2. "Wilms Tumor Protein 1" (WT1) peptide vaccination-induced complete remission in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia is accompanied by the emergence of a predominant T-cell clone both in blood and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Ochsenreither, Sebastian; Fusi, Alberto; Busse, Antonia; Bauer, Sandra; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Stather, David; Thiel, Eckhard; Keilholz, Ulrich; Letsch, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Within the last few years, the first peptide vaccination trials for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have been initiated. Athough the presence of epitope-specific T cells could be seen both in bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB), nothing is known about their clonal composition. In this study, we analyzed material from a patient with recurrent AML vaccinated with "Wilms Tumor Protein 1" (WT1) peptide, who achieved a complete remission (CR) lasting for 12 months. For identification of expanded WT1-specific T-cell clones, enrichment by tetramer and IFNγ secretion were followed by comparative quantitative reverse transcribed PCR (qRT PCR) quantification of all TCR Vβ-families. Vβ-families with increase in the enriched fraction were cloned and sequenced. A predominant clone was quantified by clonotypic qRT PCR from PB and BM. Quantity and functionality of WT1-specific cells were assessed by tetramer analyses and intracellular IFNγ staining. A specific predominant clone was identified during clinical remission. Clone-specific qRT PCR showed an increase both in PB and BM after 8 vaccinations. Six months after achieving CR, the transcript levels in BM decreased. Relapse was accompanied by secondary rise of the WT1-specific clone in PB but not in BM. In parallel, a lack of vaccine-induced WT1 specific IFNγ production was observed at that timepoint. In conclusion, we provide first data regarding evolution and compartmentalization of a peptide vaccine-induced T-cell clone in PB and BM of an AML patient. At the time of relapse, the same clone reappeared spontaneously in PB but not in BM showing impaired functionality.

  3. Myxoma virus lacking the pyrin-like protein M013 is sensed in human myeloid cells by both NLRP3 and multiple Toll-like receptors, which independently activate the inflammasome and NF-κB innate response pathways.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant

    2011-12-01

    The myxoma virus (MYXV)-encoded pyrin domain-containing protein M013 coregulates inflammatory responses mediated by both the inflammasome and the NF-κB pathways. Infection of human THP-1 monocytic cells with a MYXV construct deleted for the M013 gene (vMyxM013-KO), but not the parental MYXV, activates both the inflammasome and NF-κB pathways and induces a spectrum of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, like interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1. Here, we report that vMyxM013-KO virus-mediated activation of inflammasomes and secretion of IL-1β are dependent on the adaptor protein ASC, caspase-1, and NLRP3 receptor. However, vMyxM013-KO virus-mediated activation of NF-κB signaling, which induces TNF secretion, was independent of ASC, caspase-1, and either the NLRP3 or AIM2 inflammasome receptors. We also report that early synthesis of pro-IL-1β in response to vMyxM013-KO infection is dependent upon the components of the inflammasome complex. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and secretion of IL-1β was also dependent on the release of cathepsin B and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). By using small interfering RNA screening, we further demonstrated that, among the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) and Toll-like receptors (TLRs), only TLR2, TLR6, TLR7, and TLR9 contribute to the NF-κB-dependent secretion of TNF and the inflammasome-dependent secretion of IL-1β in response to vMyxM013-KO virus infection. Additionally, we demonstrate that early triggering of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway by vMyxM013-KO virus infection of THP-1 cells plays a critical common upstream role in the coordinate induction of both NF-κB and inflammasome pathways. We conclude that an additional cellular sensor(s)/receptor(s) in addition to the known RLRs/TLRs plays a role in the M013 knockout virus-induced activation of NF-κB pathway signaling, but the activation of inflammasomes entirely depends

  4. Lactate Activates HIF-1 in Oxidative but Not in Warburg-Phenotype Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Saedeleer, Christophe J.; Copetti, Tamara; Porporato, Paolo E.; Verrax, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Cancer can be envisioned as a metabolic disease driven by pressure selection and intercellular cooperativeness. Together with anaerobic glycolysis, the Warburg effect, formally corresponding to uncoupling glycolysis from oxidative phosphorylation, directly participates in cancer aggressiveness, supporting both tumor progression and dissemination. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key contributor to glycolysis. It stimulates the expression of glycolytic transporters and enzymes supporting high rate of glycolysis. In this study, we addressed the reverse possibility of a metabolic control of HIF-1 in tumor cells. We report that lactate, the end-product of glycolysis, inhibits prolylhydroxylase 2 activity and activates HIF-1 in normoxic oxidative tumor cells but not in Warburg-phenotype tumor cells which also expressed lower basal levels of HIF-1α. These data were confirmed using genotypically matched oxidative and mitochondria-depleted glycolytic tumor cells as well as several different wild-type human tumor cell lines of either metabolic phenotype. Lactate activates HIF-1 and triggers tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo, an activity that we found to be under the specific upstream control of the lactate transporter monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) expressed in tumor cells. Because MCT1 also gates lactate-fueled tumor cell respiration and mediates pro-angiogenic lactate signaling in endothelial cells, MCT1 inhibition is confirmed as an attractive anticancer strategy in which a single drug may target multiple tumor-promoting pathways. PMID:23082126

  5. Radiocurability Is Associated with Interstitial Fluid Pressure in Human Tumor Xenografts1

    PubMed Central

    Rofstad, Einar K; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Brurberg, Kjetil G; Mathiesen, Berit; Galappathi, Kanthi; Simonsen, Trude G

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) has been shown to be an independent prognostic parameter for disease-free survival in cervical carcinoma patients treated with radiation therapy. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The main aims of this study were to investigate whether tumor radiocurability may be associated with IFP and, if so, to identify possible mechanisms. Human melanoma xenografts transplanted intradermally or in window chamber preparations in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as preclinical tumor models. Radiation dose resulting in 50% local tumor control was higher by a factor of 1.19 ± 0.06 in tumors with IFP ≥ 9 mm Hg than in tumors with IFP ≤ 7 mm Hg. Tumor IFP was positively correlated to vessel segment length and vessel tortuosity and was inversely correlated to vessel density. Compared with tumors with low IFP, tumors with high IFP showed high resistance to blood flow, high frequency of Po2 fluctuations, and high fractions of acutely hypoxic cells, whereas the fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells and the fraction of chronically hypoxic cells did not differ between tumors with high and tumors with low IFP. IFP showed a significant correlation to the fraction of acutely hypoxic cells, probably because both parameters were determined primarily by the microvascular resistance to blood flow. Therefore, the observed association between tumor radiocurability and IFP was most likely an indirect consequence of a strong relationship between IFP and the fraction of acutely hypoxic cells. PMID:19881960

  6. Magnetic resonance microscopy at 14 Tesla and correlative histopathology of human brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy at 14 Tesla and Correlative Histopathology of Human Brain Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples. PMID:22110653

  8. RNA tumor viruses, oncogenes, human cancer and AIDS: On the frontiers of understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, P.; Hager, J.C.; Rich, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 31 papers divided into six sections. The section headings are: Molecular Genetics of the RNA Tumor Viruses, Endogenous Retrovirus Sequences in Human Cells, Molecular Biology of Human Cancers, HTLV/LAV, T-Cell Leukemia and AIDS, Experimental Model Systems for the Study of Human Neoplasia and Related Diseases, and Perspectives.

  9. Flow cytometric monitoring of hormone receptor expression in human solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Awtar

    2002-05-01

    Hormone receptor expression in human breast and prostate tumors is of diagnostic and therapeutic importance. With the availability of anti-estrogen, androgen and progesterone antibodies, immunohistochemistry has become a standard tool for determination of receptor expression in human tumor biopsies. However, this method is dependent on examination of a small number of cells under a microscope and the data obtained in most cases is not quantitative. As most of the commercially used anti-hormone antibodies have nuclear specificity, we have developed methods for isolation and antigen unmasking of nuclei from formalin fixed/paraffin embedded archival human tumors. After immunostaining with the antibodies and propidium iodide (for DNA content and cell cycle analysis), nuclei are analyzed by multiparametric laser flow cytometry for hormone receptor expression, DNA content, aneuploidy and cell cycle determination. These multiparametric methods are especially important for retrospective studies seeking to correlate hormone receptor expression with clinical response to anti-hormonal therapy of human breast and prostate tumors.

  10. Inhibition of subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumor cells in nude mice by LRIG1.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; He, X J; Xu, H Q; Chen, Z W; Fan, H H

    2016-05-06

    The aim of this study was to explore the inhibition of subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumor cells in nude mice by LRIG1 and its mechanism. For this study, athymic nude mice were injected with either normal pituitary tumor RC-4B/C cells or LRIG1-transfected RC-4B/C cells. We then calculated the volume inhibition rate of the tumors, as well as the apoptosis index of tumor cells and the expression of Ras, Raf, AKt, and ERK mRNA in tumor cells. Tumor cell morphological and structural changes were also observed under electron microscope. Our data showed that subcutaneous tumor growth was slowed or even halted in LRIG1-transfected tumors. The tumor volumes were significantly different between the two groups of mice (χ2 = 2.14, P < 0.05). The tumor apoptosis index was found to be 8.72% in the control group and 39.7% in LRIG1-transfected mice (χ2 = 7.59, P < 0.05). The levels of Ras, Raf, and AKt mRNA in LRIG1-transfected RC-4B/C cells were significantly reduced after transfection (P < 0.01). Transfected subcutaneous tumor cells appeared to be in early or late apoptosis under an electron microscope, while only a few subcutaneous tumor cells appeared to be undergoing apoptosis in the control group. In conclusion, the LRIG1 gene is able to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis in subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumors in nude mice. The mechanism of LRIG1 may involve the inhibition of the PI3K/ Akt and Ras/Raf/ERK signal transduction pathways.

  11. Chromosomal localization of putative tumor-suppressor genes in several human cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Jun; Sugimura, Takashi; Terada, Masaaki )

    1991-06-01

    Restriction-fragment-length polymorphism analysis was performed on several different types of human cancers, including carcinoma of the uterine cervix, neuroblastoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, stomach cancer, and small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), to determine the chromosomal loci of putative tumor-suppressor genes in each type of tumor because loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is supposed to unmask the recessive mutation of tumor-suppressor gene in the remaining allele. Chromosomal loci showing frequent LOH differed among these tumors, suggesting that there are several tumor-suppressor genes in the human genome and that critical genes for the development of each type of tumor are different. In some cases LOH was observed in the early stage of tumor such as chromosome 3p loss in carcinoma of the uterine cervix, and in other cases it was observed only in the advanced stage of tumor such as chromosomes 4 and 16q loss in hepatocellular carcinoma. These results suggest that there are two different types of tumor-suppressor genes: one is the gene whose inactivation is responsible for malignant transformation of a normal cell and the other is the gene whose inactivation is responsible for the progression of a tumor cell. In SCLC, LOH at three different chromosomal loci, 3p, 13q, and 17p, was simultaneously observed in nearly 100% of tumors. It was observed even in stage I tumors and an untreated tumor, and it occurred prior to N-myc amplification. These results may imply that at least six genetic alterations are necessary to convert a normal cell into a fully malignant cancer cell in SCLC.

  12. Third harmonic generation imaging for fast, label-free pathology of human brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, N. V.; Wesseling, P.; Hamer, P. C. de Witt; Noske, D. P.; Galgano, G. D.; Mansvelder, H. D.; Baayen, J. C.; Groot, M. L.

    2016-01-01

    In brain tumor surgery, recognition of tumor boundaries is key. However, intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries by the neurosurgeon is difficult. Therefore, there is an urgent need for tools that provide the neurosurgeon with pathological information during the operation. We show that third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy provides label-free, real-time images of histopathological quality; increased cellularity, nuclear pleomorphism, and rarefaction of neuropil in fresh, unstained human brain tissue could be clearly recognized. We further demonstrate THG images taken with a GRIN objective, as a step toward in situ THG microendoscopy of tumor boundaries. THG imaging is thus a promising tool for optical biopsies. PMID:27231629

  13. Defining the Recruitment of Reactive Stroma Progenitor Cells to the Tumor Microenvironment of Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-08-1-0059 TITLE: Defining the Recruitment of Reactive Stroma Progenitor Cells to the Tumor Microenvironment of Human...2008 - 6 Jan 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defining the Recruitment of Reactive Stroma Progenitor Cells to the Tumor Microenvironment of Human...Symposium on Stem Cells , Cancer, and Aging in Singapore RESEARCH EXPERIENCE 2001 Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Pulmonary and Critical

  14. Sex steroids in human brain tumors and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    von Schoultz, E; Bixo, M; Bäckström, T; Silfvenius, H; Wilking, N; Henriksson, R

    1990-02-15

    The concentrations of three sex steroids, estradiol, progesterone and testosterone, were analyzed by radioimmunoassay after celite chromatography in brain tumor and breast cancer tissues. The concentrations in malignant gliomas and breast cancers showed interindividual variations, especially evident with regard to estradiol. High estradiol concentrations were recorded in two patients with malignant astrocytoma. The concentrations of 1.00 pg/mg and 3.32 pg/mg were 10 to 30 times as high as in normal female brain. In five of ten astrocytomas the estradiol concentration was higher than the lowest breast cancer value. The distribution of progesterone seemed more even, and the level was significantly lower in brain tumors and breast cancers as compared with female brain, perhaps indicating an increased metabolism. Testosterone levels were somewhat higher in brain tumors, as compared with breast cancers, but not different from values in brain tissue. There were no significant age or sex correlation or differences in the concentrations of steroids in the brain tumors. The results suggest that manipulation of sex steroid metabolism in malignant brain tumors can be of beneficial therapeutic value as has been shown for breast cancer and prostatic carcinoma.

  15. Effects of Charged Particles on Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kathryn D.; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Kaminuma, Takuya; Paz, Athena Evalour S.; Yoshida, Yukari; Liu, Qi; Willers, Henning; Takahashi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects, including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors, and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors, such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions, and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles. PMID:26904502

  16. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    PubMed Central

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely “functional,” i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing’s syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn’s syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  17. Reversion of immune tolerance in advanced malignancy: modulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cell development by blockade of stem-cell factor function.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ping-Ying; Wang, George X; Yin, Bingjiao; Ozao, Junko; Ku, Teresa; Divino, Celia M; Chen, Shu-Hsia

    2008-01-01

    Tumor growth induced a significant increase of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the tumor-bearing host. In our previous study, we showed that MDSCs induced tumor-specific T-cell tolerance and the development of T regulatory cells (Tregs). Tumor-derived factors have been implicated in the accumulation of MDSCs. We hypothesize that reduction of MDSC accumulation in tumor-bearing hosts, through the blockade of tumor factors, can prevent T-cell anergy and Treg development and thereby improve immune therapy for the treatment of advanced tumors. Several tumor-derived factors were identified by gene array analysis. Among the candidate factors, stem- cell factor (SCF) is expressed by various human and murine carcinomas and was selected for further study. Mice bearing tumor cells with SCF siRNA knockdown exhibited significantly reduced MDSC expansion and restored proliferative responses of tumor-infiltrating T cells. More importantly, blockade of SCF receptor (ckit)-SCF interaction by anti-ckit prevented tumor-specific T-cell anergy, Treg development, and tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, the prevention of MDSC accumulation in conjunction with immune activation therapy showed synergistic therapeutic effect when treating mice bearing large tumors. This information supports the notion that modulation of MDSC development may be required to achieve effective immune-enhancing therapy for the treatment of advanced tumors.

  18. IL-27 in human secondary lymphoid organs attracts myeloid dendritic cells and impairs HLA class I-restricted antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Fabio; Di Carlo, Emma; Ferrone, Soldano; Petretto, Andrea; Pistoia, Vito; Airoldi, Irma

    2014-03-15

    Different cytokines play crucial roles in inflammation and in polarizing immune responses, including IL-27 that exerts pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. Although the activity of IL-27 is well characterized in murine immune cells, only limited information is available regarding the natural cellular sources of IL-27 in humans and its effects on human immune cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional APCs that in the immature state are positioned throughout peripheral tissues by acting as sentinels, sensing the presence of Ags. Activated DCs migrate into the lymph nodes and direct Ag-specific T cell responses, thus acting as key players in both adaptive and innate immunity. In this study we asked whether IL-27 is produced by human secondary lymphoid organs and what is its functional role on human DCs. To our knowledge, we provide the first evidence that 1) in lymph nodes, macrophages are the major source for IL-27; 2) immature and mature human DCs express functional IL-27R; 3) IL-27 exerts immunosuppressive activity by crippling the Ag processing machinery in immature DCs under steady-state conditions and after pulsing with a viral Ag; and 4) IL-27 is chemotactic for human DCs. Our findings highlight novel mechanisms underlying the immunosuppressive activity of IL-27, suggesting that this cytokine may function as a homeostatic cytokine in secondary lymphoid organs by limiting duration and/or intensity of ongoing adaptive immune responses. The results presented in this study pave the way to future studies aimed at investigating whether dysregulation of IL-27 expression and function may be involved in pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and cancer.

  19. Selective ablation of immature blood vessels in established human tumors follows vascular endothelial growth factor withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, L E; Golijanin, D; Itin, A; Pode, D; Keshet, E

    1999-01-01

    Features that distinguish tumor vasculatures from normal blood vessels are sought to enable the destruction of preformed tumor vessels. We show that blood vessels in both a xenografted tumor and primary human tumors contain a sizable fraction of immature blood vessels that have not yet recruited periendothelial cells. These immature vessels are selectively obliterated as a consequence of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) withdrawal. In a xenografted glioma, the selective vulnerability of immature vessels to VEGF loss was demonstrated by downregulating VEGF transgene expression using a tetracycline-regulated expression system. In human prostate cancer, the constitutive production of VEGF by the glandular epithelium was suppressed as a consequence of androgen-ablation therapy. VEGF loss led, in turn, to selective apoptosis of endothelial cells in vessels devoid of periendothelial cells. These results suggest that the unique dependence on VEGF of blood vessels lacking periendothelial cells can be exploited to reduce an existing tumor vasculature.

  20. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Lessi, Francesca; Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-07-30

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma.

  1. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus

    PubMed Central

    Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-01-01

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma. PMID:26214095

  2. Phorbol ester-treated human acute myeloid leukemia cells secrete G-CSF, GM-CSF and erythroid differentiation factor into serum-free media in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Scher, W; Eto, Y; Ejima, D; Den, T; Svet-Moldavsky, I A

    1990-12-10

    Upon treatment with the phorbol ester, tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (PMA), peripheral mononuclear blood cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia secrete into serum-free cell-conditioned media (PMA-CCM) at least three distinct nondialysable 'hematopoietic' factors: granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and erythroid differentiation factor (EDF, activin A). G-CSF was identified by its stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into a G-CSF-responsive cell line, NSF-60, and the inhibition of its stimulation by a G-CSF-specific monoclonal antibody (MAB). GM-CSF was identified by its stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into a GM-CSF-responsive line, TALL-101, and the inhibition of its stimulation by a GM-CSF-specific MAB. EDF was identified by its ability to stimulate erythroid differentiation in mouse erythroleukemia cell lines, its identical retention times to those of authentic EDF on three successive reverse-phase HPLC columns and characterization of its penultimate N-terminal residue as leucine which is the same as that of authentic EDF. Both authentic EDF and the erythroid-stimulating activity in PMA-CCM were found to act synergistically with a suboptimal inducing concentration of a well-studied inducing agent, dimethyl sulfoxide, in inducing erythroid differentiation. In addition, a fourth activity was observed in PMA-CCM: normal human fetal bone marrow cell-proliferation stimulating activity (FBMC-PSA). FBMC-PSA was identified by its ability to stimulate the growth of granulocytes and macrophages in FBMC suspension cultures, which neither recombinant G-CSF or GM-CSF were found to do.

  3. Mutation in the DC-SIGN cytoplasmic triacidic cluster motif markedly attenuates receptor activity for phagocytosis and endocytosis of mannose-containing ligands by human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul K; Torrelles, Jordi B; Schlesinger, Larry S

    2008-12-01

    The transmembrane C-type lectin, dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), has three conserved cytoplasmic tail motifs: the tyrosine (Y)-based, dileucine (LL), and triacidic cluster (EEE), which are believed to regulate ligand binding, uptake, and trafficking. We mutated each of these motifs by alanine substitution and tested their roles in phagocytosis and receptor-mediated endocytosis of the highly mannosylated ligands, Mycobacterium tuberculosis mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and HIV-1 surface glycoprotein gp120, respectively, in transfected human myeloid K-562 cells. Compared with wild-type and other mutants, the EEE mutant of DC-SIGN showed a reduced cell-surface expression, near abolishment in the phagocytosis of ManLAM-coated beads (90.5+/-0.4%), and a marked reduction in the endocytosis of soluble gp120 (79.3+/-0.7%). Although, the Y mutant of DC-SIGN did not exhibit any effect on phagocytosis and intracellular trafficking to the phagolysosome, the LL mutant caused the majority of the receptor and/or ligands to remain bound to the cell surface, indicating a role for the LL motif as an internalization signal. The majority of the EEE mutant protein was found to be retained by the intracellular trans-Golgi network and not by the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment of transfected K-562 cells. Collectively, our data indicate a dual role for the EEE motif as a sorting signal in the secretory pathway and a lysosomal targeting signal in the endocytic pathway.

  4. Interleukin 3 gene is located on human chromosome 5 and is deleted in myeloid leukemias with a deletion of 5q

    SciTech Connect

    Le Beau, M.M.; Epstein, N.D.; O'Brien, S.J.; Nienhuis, A.W.; Yang, Y.C.; Clark, S.C.; Rowley, J.D.

    1987-08-01

    The gene IL-3 encodes interleukin 3, a hematopoietic colony-stimulating factor (CSF) that is capable of supporting the proliferation of a broad range of hematopoietic cell types. By using somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, the authors localized this gene to human chromosome 5 at bands q23-31, a chromosomal region that is frequently deleted (del(5q)) in patients with myeloid disorders. By in situ hybridization, IL-3 was found to be deleted in the 5q-chromosome of one patient with refractory anemia who had a del(5)(q15q33.3), of three patients with refractory anemia (two patients) or acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) de novo who had a similar distal breakpoint (del(5)(q13q33.3)), and of a fifth patient, with therapy-related ANLL, who had a similar distal breakpoint in band q33(del(5)(q14q33.3)). Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrids retaining the normal or the deleted chromosome 5 from two patients with the refractory anemia 5q- syndrome indicated that IL-3 sequences were absent from the hybrids retaining the deleted chromosome 5 but not from hybrids that had a cytologically normal chromosome 5. Thus, a small segment of chromosome 5 contains IL-3, GM-CSF, CSF-1, and FMS. The findings and earlier results indicating that GM-CSF, CSF-1, and FMS were deleted in the 5q- chromosome, suggest that loss of IL-3 or of other CSF genes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of hematologic disorders associated with a del(5q).

  5. Impaired antigen presentation and potent phagocytic activity identifying tumor-tolerant human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Soares-Schanoski, Alessandra; Jurado, Teresa; Córdoba, Raúl; Siliceo, María; Fresno, Carlos Del; Gómez-Piña, Vanesa; Toledano, Victor; Vallejo-Cremades, Maria T; Alfonso-Iñiguez, Sergio; Carballo-Palos, Arkaitz; Fernández-Ruiz, Irene; Cubillas-Zapata, Carolina; Biswas, Subhra K; Arnalich, Francisco; García-Río, Francisco; López-Collazo, Eduardo

    2012-06-29

    Monocyte exposure to tumor cells induces a transient state in which these cells are refractory to further exposure to cancer. This phenomenon, termed "tumor tolerance", is characterized by a decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines in response to tumors. In the past, we found that this effect comprises IRAK-M up regulation and TLR4 and CD44 activation. Herein we have established a human model of tumor tolerance and have observed a marked down-regulation of MHCII molecules as well as the MHCII master regulator, CIITA, in monocytes/macrophages. These cells combine an impaired capability for antigen presentation with potent phagocytic activity and exhibit an M2-like phenotype. In addition circulating monocytes isolated from Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia patients exhibited the same profile as tumor tolerant cells after tumor ex vivo exposition.

  6. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of early myeloid progenitors and precursors at different stages of differentiation into granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Blockade of their differentiation into mature myeloid cells in cancer results in an expansion of this population. High-grade gliomas are the most common malignant tumours of the central nervous system (CNS), with a poor prognosis despite intensive radiation and chemotherapy. Histopathological and flow cytometry analyses of human and rodent experimental gliomas revealed the extensive heterogeneity of immune cells infiltrating gliomas and their microenvironment. Immune cell infiltrates consist of: resident (microglia) and peripheral macrophages, granulocytes, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and T lymphocytes. Intratumoural density of glioma-associated MDSCs correlates positively with the histological grade of gliomas and patient’s survival. MDSCs have the ability to attract T regulatory lymphocytes to the tumour, but block the activation of tumour-reactive CD4+ T helper cells and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. Immunomodulatory mechanisms employed by malignant gliomas pose an appalling challenge to brain tumour immunotherapy. In this mini-review we describe phenotypic and functional characteristics of MDSCs in humans and rodents, and their occurrence and potential roles in glioma progression. While understanding the complexity of immune cell interactions in the glioma microenvironment is far from being accomplished, there is significant progress that may lead to the development of immunotherapy for gliomas. PMID:28373814

  7. CRLX101 nanoparticles localize in human tumors and not in adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue after intravenous dosing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew J.; Wiley, Devin T.; Zuckerman, Jonathan E.; Webster, Paul; Chao, Joseph; Lin, James; Yen, Yun; Davis, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics are being used to treat patients with solid tumors. Whereas nanoparticles have been shown to preferentially accumulate in solid tumors of animal models, there is little evidence to prove that intact nanoparticles localize to solid tumors of humans when systemically administered. Here, tumor and adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue biopsies are obtained through endoscopic capture from patients with gastric, gastroesophageal, or esophageal cancer who are administered the nanoparticle CRLX101. Both the pre- and postdosing tissue samples adjacent to tumors show no definitive evidence of either the nanoparticle or its drug payload (camptothecin, CPT) contained within the nanoparticle. Similar results are obtained from the predosing tumor samples. However, in nine of nine patients that were evaluated, CPT is detected in the tumor tissue collected 24–48 h after CRLX101 administration. For five of these patients, evidence of the intact deposition of CRLX101 nanoparticles in the tumor tissue is obtained. Indications of CPT pharmacodynamics from tumor biomarkers such as carbonic anhydrase IX and topoisomerase I by immunohistochemistry show clear evidence of biological activity from the delivered CPT in the posttreatment tumors. PMID:27001839

  8. Apoptotic Efficacy of Etomoxir in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells. Cooperation with Arsenic Trioxide and Glycolytic Inhibitors, and Regulation by Oxidative Stress and Protein Kinase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Estañ, María Cristina; Calviño, Eva; Calvo, Susana; Guillén-Guío, Beatriz; Boyano-Adánez, María del Carmen; de Blas, Elena; Rial, Eduardo; Aller, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are frequently exacerbated in leukemia cells, and may therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention. In this work we analyzed the apoptotic and chemo-sensitizing action of the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Etomoxir caused negligible lethality at concentrations up to 100 µM, but efficaciously cooperated to cause apoptosis with the anti-leukemic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO, Trisenox), and with lower efficacy with other anti-tumour drugs (etoposide, cisplatin), in HL60 cells. Etomoxir-ATO cooperation was also observed in NB4 human acute promyelocytic cells, but not in normal (non-tumour) mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Biochemical determinations in HL60 cells indicated that etomoxir (25–200 µM) dose-dependently inhibited mitochondrial respiration while slightly stimulating glycolysis, and only caused marginal alterations in total ATP content and adenine nucleotide pool distribution. In addition, etomoxir caused oxidative stress (increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, decrease in reduced glutathione content), as well as pro-apoptotic LKB-1/AMPK pathway activation, all of which may in part explain the chemo-sensitizing capacity of the drug. Etomoxir also cooperated with glycolytic inhibitors (2-deoxy-D-glucose, lonidamine) to induce apoptosis in HL60 cells, but not in NB4 cells. The combined etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment did not increase oxidative stress, caused moderate decrease in net ATP content, increased the AMP/ATP ratio with concomitant drop in energy charge, and caused defensive Akt and ERK kinase activation. Apoptosis generation by etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose was further increased by co-incubation with ATO, which is apparently explained by the capacity of ATO to attenuate Akt and ERK activation. In summary, co-treatment with etomoxir may represent an interesting strategy to increase the apoptotic

  9. [NVP-BEZ235 inhibits proliferation and colony-forming capability of CD34(+)CD38(-) human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells].

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying-Ying; Hu, Liang-Shan; Han, Hui-Juan; Song, Chao-Yang; Huang, Yu-Xian; Guo, Kun-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    This study was aimed to explore the effect of NVP-BEZ235, a dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, on proliferation, cell cycle and colony forming capability of CD34(+)CD38(-) human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) KG1a cells. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CD34 and CD38 on the surface of human AML KG1a cells; Trypan blue assay was used to analyze the effect of NVP-BEZ235 at various concentrations on proliferation of KG1a cells; flow cytometry was performed to examine the cell cycle of KG1a cells after NVP-BEZ235 treatment; Soft agar colony-forming experiment was used to detect the colony forming ability of KG1a cells treated with NVP-BEZ235 at various concentrations. The results indicated that the percentage of CD34(+)CD38(-) AML KG1a cells was (98.02 ± 0.72)%. NVP-BEZ235 (0.125 - 1 µmol/L) inhibited the proliferation of KG1a cells in a time-and dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05) and the 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) at 24 h and 48 h were 0.597 µmol/L and 0.102 µmol/L, respectively. KG1a cells were arrested at G0/G1 phase after treating with 0.5 µmol/L NVP-BEZ235 for 24 h, it was significantly higher than that of control group (83.2 ± 3.80)% vs (43.47 ± 9.60)% (P < 0.05). KG1a cells treated with NVP-BEZ235 (0 - 1 µmol/L) for 14 d and 21 d, the number of colony decreased respectively from (375.67 ± 21.46) per 2500 KG1a cells and (706.33 ± 87.31) per 2500 KG1a cells to 0, with statistical significance (P < 0.05). It is concluded that NVP-BEZ235 can inhibit proliferation and colony-forming capability of CD34(+)CD38(-) human AML KG1a cells.

  10. Targeting Homologous Recombination in Notch-Driven C. elegans Stem Cell and Human Tumors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xinzhu; Michaelson, David; Tchieu, Jason; Cheng, Jin; Rothenstein, Diana; Feldman, Regina; Lee, Sang-gyu; Fuller, John; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Studer, Lorenz; Powell, Simon; Fuks, Zvi; Hubbard, E Jane Albert; Kolesnick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian NOTCH1-4 receptors are all associated with human malignancy, although exact roles remain enigmatic. Here we employ glp-1(ar202), a temperature-sensitive gain-of-function C. elegans NOTCH mutant, to delineate NOTCH-driven tumor responses to radiotherapy. At ≤20°C, glp-1(ar202) is wild-type, whereas at 25°C it forms a germline stem cell⁄progenitor cell tumor reminiscent of human cancer. We identify a NOTCH tumor phenotype in which all tumor cells traffic rapidly to G2⁄M post-irradiation, attempt to repair DNA strand breaks exclusively via homology-driven repair, and when this fails die by mitotic death. Homology-driven repair inactivation is dramatically radiosensitizing. We show that these concepts translate directly to human cancer models.

  11. Human endometrial mesenchymal stem cells exhibit intrinsic anti-tumor properties on human epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Shixia; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Qiuwan; Sun, Junyan; He, Biwei; Xiang, Charlie; Liu, Zhiwei; Lai, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal tumor of all gynecologic tumors. There is no curative therapy for EOC thus far. The tumor-homing ability of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide the promising potential to use them as vehicles to transport therapeutic agents to the site of tumor