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Sample records for human vaginal bacterial

  1. [Bacterial vaginal fluor in intrauterine contraception].

    PubMed

    Feichter, G E; Nohlen, M; Tauber, P F

    1979-11-01

    Vaginal swabs obtained from 100 IUD-users were examined bacteriologically. Fifty-one women had vaginal discharge and 49 women used as control group had no complaints originating either from the IUD or from the genital tract. In the group of IUD-users with vaginal discharge the number of bacterial isolates was higher and the cultures were more diversified. The nulliparous patients in this group exhibited more anaerobic cultures than the IUD-users without discharge. The significance of vaginal discharge in IUD-users is its function as a pool for pathogenic bacteria which may provoke and/or maintain inflammatory diseases of the female genital tract. IUD-users with vaginal discharge do therefore need not only bacteriologic diagnosis, but also consequent treatment of the discharge.

  2. Unraveling the Dynamics of the Human Vaginal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Kenetta L.; Forney, Larry J.

    2016-01-01

    Four Lactobacillus species, namely L. crispatus, L. iners, L. gasseri, and L. jensenii, commonly dominate the vaginal communities of most reproductive-age women. It is unclear why these particular species, and not others, are so prevalent. Historically, estrogen-induced glycogen production by the vaginal epithelium has been proffered as being key to supporting the proliferation of vaginal lactobacilli. However, the ‘fly in the ointment’ (that has been largely ignored) is that the species of Lactobacillus commonly found in the human vagina cannot directly metabolize glycogen. It would appear that this riddle has been solved as studies have demonstrated that vaginal lactobacilli can metabolize the products of glycogen depolymerization by α-amylase, and fortunately, amylase activity is found in vaginal secretions. These amylases are presumed to be host-derived, but we suggest that other bacterial populations in vaginal communities could also be sources of amylase in addition to (or instead of) the host. Here we briefly review what is known about human vaginal bacterial communities and discuss how glycogen-derived resources and resource competition might shape the composition and structure of these communities. PMID:27698617

  3. Unraveling the Dynamics of the Human Vaginal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Kenetta L.; Forney, Larry J.

    2016-01-01

    Four Lactobacillus species, namely L. crispatus, L. iners, L. gasseri, and L. jensenii, commonly dominate the vaginal communities of most reproductive-age women. It is unclear why these particular species, and not others, are so prevalent. Historically, estrogen-induced glycogen production by the vaginal epithelium has been proffered as being key to supporting the proliferation of vaginal lactobacilli. However, the ‘fly in the ointment’ (that has been largely ignored) is that the species of Lactobacillus commonly found in the human vagina cannot directly metabolize glycogen. It would appear that this riddle has been solved as studies have demonstrated that vaginal lactobacilli can metabolize the products of glycogen depolymerization by α-amylase, and fortunately, amylase activity is found in vaginal secretions. These amylases are presumed to be host-derived, but we suggest that other bacterial populations in vaginal communities could also be sources of amylase in addition to (or instead of) the host. Here we briefly review what is known about human vaginal bacterial communities and discuss how glycogen-derived resources and resource competition might shape the composition and structure of these communities.

  4. Vaginal biogenic amines: biomarkers of bacterial vaginosis or precursors to vaginal dysbiosis?

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Tiffanie M.; Borgogna, Joanna-Lynn C.; Brotman, Rebecca M.; Ravel, Jacques; Walk, Seth T.; Yeoman, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal disorder among reproductive age women. One clinical indicator of BV is a “fishy” odor. This odor has been associated with increases in several biogenic amines (BAs) that may serve as important biomarkers. Within the vagina, BA production has been linked to various vaginal taxa, yet their genetic capability to synthesize BAs is unknown. Using a bioinformatics approach, we show that relatively few vaginal taxa are predicted to be capable of producing BAs. Many of these taxa (Dialister, Prevotella, Parvimonas, Megasphaera, Peptostreptococcus, and Veillonella spp.) are more abundant in the vaginal microbial community state type (CST) IV, which is depleted in lactobacilli. Several of the major Lactobacillus species (L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. gasseri) were identified as possessing gene sequences for proteins predicted to be capable of putrescine production. Finally, we show in a small cross sectional study of 37 women that the BAs putrescine, cadaverine and tyramine are significantly higher in CST IV over CSTs I and III. These data support the hypothesis that BA production is conducted by few vaginal taxa and may be important to the outgrowth of BV-associated (vaginal dysbiosis) vaginal bacteria. PMID:26483694

  5. Bacterial vaginosis, aerobic vaginitis, vaginal inflammation and major Pap smear abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Baptista, P; Lima-Silva, J; Pinto, C; Saldanha, C; Beires, J; Martinez-de-Oliveira, J; Donders, G

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the impact of the vaginal milieu on the presence of abnormal Pap smears and a positive human papilloma virus (HPV) test. A cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and May 2015, evaluating the vaginal discharge by fresh wet mount microscopy and comparing these data with Pap smear findings. Wet mount slides were scored for bacterial vaginosis (BV), aerobic vaginitis (AV), presence of Candida and Trichomonas vaginalis. Cytologic evaluation was done on all Pap smears according to the Bethesda criteria. The cobas© HPV Test (Roche) was performed for HPV detection. A total of 622 cases were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 41.6 ± 10.65 years (range 21-75). Eighty-three women (13.3 %) had a cytology result worse than low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). When comparing this group with the one with normal or minor [atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) or LSIL] Pap smear abnormalities, there were no differences in the presence of Candida (32.5 % vs. 33.2 %, p = 1.0), absence of lactobacilli (38.6 % vs. 32.5 %, p = 0.32) or BV (20.5 % vs. 13.2 %, p = 0.09). On the other hand, moderate or severe inflammation (msI) (41.0 % vs. 28.8 %, p = 0,04), moderate or severe AV (msAV) (16.9 % vs. 7.2 %, p = 0.009) and msAV/BV (37.3 % vs. 20.0 %, p = 0.001) were more common in women with such major cervical abnormalities. No significant association was found between deviations of the vaginal milieu and high-risk HPV infection. The presence of msI or msAV, but not BV, is independently associated with an increased risk of major cervical cytological abnormalities, but not with HPV infection. PMID:26810061

  6. Clinical Features of Bacterial Vaginosis in a Murine Model of Vaginal Infection with Gardnerella vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Nicole M.; Lewis, Warren G.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a dysbiosis of the vaginal flora characterized by a shift from a Lactobacillus-dominant environment to a polymicrobial mixture including Actinobacteria and Gram-negative bacilli. BV is a common vaginal condition in women and is associated with increased risk of sexually transmitted infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm birth. Gardnerella vaginalis is one of the most frequently isolated bacterial species in BV. However, there has been much debate in the literature concerning the contribution of G. vaginalis to the etiology of BV, since it is also present in a significant proportion of healthy women. Here we present a new murine vaginal infection model with a clinical isolate of G. vaginalis. Our data demonstrate that this model displays key features used clinically to diagnose BV, including the presence of sialidase activity and exfoliated epithelial cells with adherent bacteria (reminiscent of clue cells). G. vaginalis was capable of ascending uterine infection, which correlated with the degree of vaginal infection and level of vaginal sialidase activity. The host response to G. vaginalis infection was characterized by robust vaginal epithelial cell exfoliation in the absence of histological inflammation. Our analyses of clinical specimens from women with BV revealed a measureable epithelial exfoliation response compared to women with normal flora, a phenotype that, to our knowledge, is measured here for the first time. The results of this study demonstrate that G. vaginalis is sufficient to cause BV phenotypes and suggest that this organism may contribute to BV etiology and associated complications. This is the first time vaginal infection by a BV associated bacterium in an animal has been shown to parallel the human disease with regard to clinical diagnostic features. Future studies with this model should facilitate investigation of important questions regarding BV etiology, pathogenesis and associated complications

  7. Genome Sequences of Nine Gram-Negative Vaginal Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Deitzler, Grace E.; Ruiz, Maria J.; Lu, Wendy; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd S.; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2016-01-01

    The vagina is home to a wide variety of bacteria that have great potential to impact human health. Here, we announce reference strains (now available through BEI Resources) and draft genome sequences for 9 Gram-negative vaginal isolates from the taxa Citrobacter, Klebsiella, Fusobacterium, Proteus, and Prevotella. PMID:27688330

  8. Genome Sequences of Nine Gram-Negative Vaginal Bacterial Isolates.

    PubMed

    Deitzler, Grace E; Ruiz, Maria J; Lu, Wendy; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd S; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka; Lewis, Warren G; Lewis, Amanda L

    2016-01-01

    The vagina is home to a wide variety of bacteria that have great potential to impact human health. Here, we announce reference strains (now available through BEI Resources) and draft genome sequences for 9 Gram-negative vaginal isolates from the taxa Citrobacter, Klebsiella, Fusobacterium, Proteus, and Prevotella. PMID:27688330

  9. GA-Based Selection of Vaginal Microbiome Features Associated with Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Joi; Beck, Daniel; Williams, Henry; Foster, James; Dozier, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we successfully apply GEFeS (Genetic & Evolutionary Feature Selection) to identify the key features in the human vaginal microbiome and in patient meta-data that are associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV). The vaginal microbiome is the community of bacteria found in a patient, and meta-data include behavioral practices and demographic information. Bacterial vaginosis is a disease that afflicts nearly one third of all women, but the current diagnostics are crude at best. We describe two types of classifies for BV diagnosis, and show that each is associated with one of two treatments. Our results show that the classifiers associated with the ‘Treat Any Symptom’ version have better performances that the classifier associated with the ‘Treat Based on N-Score Value’. Our long term objective is to develop a more accurate and objective diagnosis and treatment of BV. PMID:25541628

  10. Genome Sequences of 11 Human Vaginal Actinobacteria Strains

    PubMed Central

    Deitzler, Grace E.; Ruiz, Maria J.; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd S.; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the vaginal microbiota is an important health determinant. Several members of the phylum Actinobacteria have been implicated in bacterial vaginosis, a condition associated with many negative health outcomes. Here, we present 11 strains of vaginal Actinobacteria (now available through BEI Resources) along with draft genome sequences. PMID:27688328

  11. Genome Sequences of 11 Human Vaginal Actinobacteria Strains.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Amanda L; Deitzler, Grace E; Ruiz, Maria J; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd S; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka; Lewis, Warren G

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the vaginal microbiota is an important health determinant. Several members of the phylum Actinobacteria have been implicated in bacterial vaginosis, a condition associated with many negative health outcomes. Here, we present 11 strains of vaginal Actinobacteria (now available through BEI Resources) along with draft genome sequences.

  12. Genome Sequences of 11 Human Vaginal Actinobacteria Strains.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Amanda L; Deitzler, Grace E; Ruiz, Maria J; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd S; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka; Lewis, Warren G

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the vaginal microbiota is an important health determinant. Several members of the phylum Actinobacteria have been implicated in bacterial vaginosis, a condition associated with many negative health outcomes. Here, we present 11 strains of vaginal Actinobacteria (now available through BEI Resources) along with draft genome sequences. PMID:27688328

  13. Detection of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Tomoko; Motani, Hisako; Watanabe, Ken; Iwase, Hirotaro; Sakurada, Koichi

    2012-05-01

    To preliminarily evaluate the applicability of bacterial DNA as a marker for the forensic identification of vaginal fluid, we developed and performed PCR-based detection of 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus spp. dominating the vagina and of bacterial vaginosis-related bacteria from DNA extracted from body fluids and stains. As a result, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii and Atopobium vaginae were specifically detected in vaginal fluid and female urine samples. Bacterial genes detected in female urine might have originated from contaminated vaginal fluid. In addition, those of Lactobacillus iners, Lactobacillus gasseri and Gardnerella vaginalis were also detected in non-vaginal body fluids such as semen. Because bacterial genes were successfully amplified in DNA samples extracted by using the general procedure for animal tissues without any optional treatments, DNA samples prepared for the identification of vaginal fluid can also be used for personal identification. In conclusion, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of L. crispatus, L. jensenii and A. vaginae could be effective markers for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

  14. Bacterial vaginosis, vaginal flora patterns and vaginal hygiene practices in patients presenting with vaginal discharge syndrome in The Gambia, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Demba, Edward; Morison, Linda; van der Loeff, Maarten Schim; Awasana, Akum A; Gooding, Euphemia; Bailey, Robin; Mayaud, Philippe; West, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) – a syndrome characterised by a shift in vaginal flora – appears to be particularly common in sub-Saharan Africa, but little is known of the pattern of vaginal flora associated with BV in Africa. We conducted a study aimed at determining the prevalence of BV and patterns of BV-associated vaginal micro-flora among women with vaginal discharge syndrome (VDS) in The Gambia, West Africa. Methods We enrolled 227 women with VDS from a large genito-urinary medicine clinic in Fajara, The Gambia. BV was diagnosed by the Nugent's score and Amsel's clinical criteria. Vaginal swabs were collected for T vaginalis and vaginal flora microscopy, and for Lactobacillus spp, aerobic organisms, Candida spp and BV-associated bacteria (Gardnerella vaginalis, anaerobic bacteria, and Mycoplasma spp) cultures; and cervical swabs were collected for N gonorrhoeae culture and C trachomatis PCR. Sera were tested for HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies. Sexual health history including details on sexual hygiene were obtained by standardised questionnaire. Results BV prevalence was 47.6% by Nugent's score and 30.8% by Amsel's clinical criteria. Lactobacillus spp were isolated in 37.8% of women, and 70% of the isolates were hydrogen-peroxide (H202)-producing strains. Prevalence of BV-associated bacteria were: G vaginalis 44.4%; Bacteroides 16.7%; Prevotella 15.2%; Peptostretococcus 1.5%; Mobiluncus 0%; other anaerobes 3.1%; and Mycoplasma hominis 21.4%. BV was positively associated with isolation of G vaginalis (odds-ratio [OR] 19.42, 95%CI 7.91 – 47.6) and anaerobes (P = 0.001 [OR] could not be calculated), but not with M hominis. BV was negatively associated with presence of Lactobacillus (OR 0.07, 95%CI 0.03 – 0.15), and H2O2-producing lactobacilli (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.05 – 0.28). Presence of H2O2-producing lactobacilli was associated with significantly lower prevalence of G vaginalis, anaerobes and C trachomatis. HIV prevalence was 12.8%. Overall, there was

  15. Anaerobes and Bacterial Vaginosis in Pregnancy: Virulence Factors Contributing to Vaginal Colonisation

    PubMed Central

    Africa, Charlene W. J.; Nel, Janske; Stemmet, Megan

    2014-01-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis (BV) is unclear but it appears to be associated with factors that disrupt the normal acidity of the vagina thus altering the equilibrium between the normal vaginal microbiota. BV has serious implications for female morbidity, including reports of pelvic inflammatory disease, adverse pregnancy outcomes, increased susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections and infertility. This paper reviewed new available information regarding possible factors contributing to the establishment of the BV vaginal biofilm, examined the proposed role of anaerobic microbial species recently detected by new culture-independent methods and discusses developments related to the effects of BV on human pregnancy. The literature search included Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO), and Web of Science. Because of the complexity and diversity of population groups, diagnosis and methodology used, no meta-analysis was performed. Several anaerobic microbial species previously missed in the laboratory diagnosis of BV have been revealed while taking cognisance of newly proposed theories of infection, thereby improving our understanding and knowledge of the complex aetiology and pathogenesis of BV and its perceived role in adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25014248

  16. Molecular analysis of the relationship between specific vaginal bacteria and bacterial vaginosis metronidazole therapy failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Xiao, B B; Shang, C G; Wang, K; Na, R S; Nu, X X; Liao, Q

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial vaginosis frequently persists, even after treatment. The role of some strains of bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis treatment failure remains poorly defined. The aim of our study was to define the risk of bacterial vaginosis treatment failure, including pre-treatment detection of specific vaginal bacteria. Bacterial vaginosis is present when the Nugent score is ≥7 and the modified Amsel criteria is positive. Women with bacterial vaginosis were treated with intravaginal metronidazole gel nightly for 5 nights. The 454 pyrosequencing method was used to detect bacteria in vaginal fluid. By univariate analysis, a history of bacterial vaginosis, intrauterine device use and the presence of Facklamia, Corynebacterium and Veillonella were significantly associated with bacterial vaginosis treatment failure. Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus pentosus and Megasphaera were significantly associated with curing bacterial vaginosis. After logistic regression analysis and detection of these bacteria for test-of-cure, we found that women who had a history of bacterial vaginosis had a higher incidence of bacterial vaginosis treatment failure, whereas women with L. crispatus had a lower incidence of treatment failure. Post-treatment sexual activity was not associated with the treatment effect. Our data suggested that treatment failure may be not caused by drug resistance. Rather, it has a closer relationship with the failed restoration of lactobacilli.

  17. Vaginal bacterial flora activates rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Brzezińska - Błaszczyk, E.; Wasiela, M.

    2002-01-01

    Sixteen strains of physiological and pathological vaginal bacteria were tested for their ability to secrete histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro. We noticed that Mycoplasma hominis-induced histamine release was very high (up to 53.6%). The stimulation of rat mast cells with Staphylococccus cohnii, Staphylococcus coagulase(-) (two strains), Ureaplasma urealyticum, Peptostreptococcus spp., Bacteroides capillosus, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae resulted in lower but significant histamine secretion (11.2%-17.5%). Other bacteria strains (Staphylococcus epidermidids, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Actinomyces naeslundii (two strains) and Lactobacillus fermentum (two strains) caused very low (4.2% - 8.8%) histamine release.

  18. Evaluation of Lysis Methods for the Extraction of Bacterial DNA for Analysis of the Vaginal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Christina; Blow, Frances; Darby, Alistair C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies on the vaginal microbiota have employed molecular techniques such as 16S rRNA gene sequencing to describe the bacterial community as a whole. These techniques require the lysis of bacterial cells to release DNA before purification and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene. Currently, methods for the lysis of bacterial cells are not standardised and there is potential for introducing bias into the results if some bacterial species are lysed less efficiently than others. This study aimed to compare the results of vaginal microbiota profiling using four different pretreatment methods for the lysis of bacterial samples (30 min of lysis with lysozyme, 16 hours of lysis with lysozyme, 60 min of lysis with a mixture of lysozyme, mutanolysin and lysostaphin and 30 min of lysis with lysozyme followed by bead beating) prior to chemical and enzyme-based DNA extraction with a commercial kit. Results After extraction, DNA yield did not significantly differ between methods with the exception of lysis with lysozyme combined with bead beating which produced significantly lower yields when compared to lysis with the enzyme cocktail or 30 min lysis with lysozyme only. However, this did not result in a statistically significant difference in the observed alpha diversity of samples. The beta diversity (Bray-Curtis dissimilarity) between different lysis methods was statistically significantly different, but this difference was small compared to differences between samples, and did not affect the grouping of samples with similar vaginal bacterial community structure by hierarchical clustering. Conclusions An understanding of how laboratory methods affect the results of microbiota studies is vital in order to accurately interpret the results and make valid comparisons between studies. Our results indicate that the choice of lysis method does not prevent the detection of effects relating to the type of vaginal bacterial community one of the main outcome measures

  19. Promiscuity in mice is associated with increased vaginal bacterial diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmanes, Matthew David

    2011-11-01

    Differences in the number of sexual partners (i.e., mating system) have the potential to exert a strong influence on the bacterial communities present in reproductive structures like the vagina. Because this structure serves as a conduit for gametes, bacteria present there may have a pronounced, direct effect on host reproductive success. As a first step towards the identification of the relationship between sexual behavior and potentially pathogenic bacterial communities inhabiting vital reproductive structures, as well as their potential effects on fitness, I sought to quantify differences in bacterial diversity in a promiscuous and monogamous mammal species. To accomplish this, I used two sympatric species of Peromyscus rodents— Peromyscus californicus and Peromyscus maniculatus that differ with regard to the number of sexual partners per individual to test the hypothesis that bacterial diversity should be greater in the promiscuous P. maniculatus relative to the monogamous P. californicus. As predicted, phylogenetically controlled and operational taxonomic unit-based indices of bacterial diversity indicated that diversity is greater in the promiscuous species. These results provide important new insights into the effects of mating system on bacterial diversity in free-living vertebrates, and may suggest a potential cost of promiscuity.

  20. Promiscuity in Mice is Associated with Increased Vaginal Bacterial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    MacManes, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    Differences in the number of sexual partners (i.e., mating system) have the potential to exert a strong influence on the bacterial communities present in reproductive structures like the vagina. Because this structure serves as a conduit for gametes, bacteria present there may have a pronounced, direct effect on host reproductive success. As a first step towards the identification of the relationship between sexual behavior and potentially pathogenic bacterial communities inhabiting vital reproductive structures—as well as their potential effects on fitness, I sought to quantify differences in bacterial diversity in a promiscuous and monogamous mammal species. To accomplish this, I used 2 sympatric species of Peromyscus rodents—P. californicus and P. maniculatus that differ with regard to numbers of sexual partners per individual to test the hypothesis that bacterial diversity should be greater in the promiscuous P. maniculatus relative to the monogamous P. californicus. As predicted, phylogenetically controlled and operational taxonomic unit-based indices of bacterial diversity indicated that diversity is greater in the promiscuous species. These results provide important new insights into the effects of mating system on bacterial diversity in free-living vertebrates, and may suggest a potential cost of promiscuity. PMID:21964973

  1. The restoration of the vaginal microbiota after treatment for bacterial vaginosis with metronidazole or probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Chen, Weiguang; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Xia, Yaxian; Nelson, Karen E; Huang, Shaolei; Zhang, Shaoen; Wang, Yuezhu; Yuan, Jieli; Li, Lanjuan; Xiang, Charlie

    2013-04-01

    Whether or not treatment with antibiotics or probiotics for bacterial vaginosis (BV) is associated with a change in the diversity of vaginal microbiota in women was investigated. One hundred fifteen women, consisting of 30 healthy subjects, 30 BV-positive control subjects, 30 subjects with BV treated with a 7-day metronidazole regimen, and 25 subjects with BV treated with a 10-day probiotics regimen, were analyzed to determine the efficacy and disparity of diversity and richness of vaginal microbiota using 454 pyrosequencing. Follow-up visits at days 5 and 30 showed a greater BV cure rate in the probiotics-treated subjects (88.0 and 96 %, respectively) compared to the metronidazole-treated subjects (83.3 and 70 %, respectively [p = 0.625 at day 5 and p = 0.013 at day 30]). Treatment with metronidazole reduced the taxa diversity and eradicated most of the BV-associated phylotypes, while probiotics only suppressed the overgrowth and re-established vaginal homeostasis gradually and steadily. Despite significant interindividual variation, the microbiota of the actively treated groups or participants constituted a unique profile. Along with the decrease in pathogenic bacteria, such as Gardnerella, Atopobium, Prevotella, Megasphaera, Coriobacteriaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Mycoplasma, and Sneathia, a Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota was recovered. Acting as vaginal sentinels and biomarkers, the relative abundance of Lactobacillus and pathogenic bacteria determined the consistency of the BV clinical and microbiologic cure rates, as well as recurrent BV. Both 7-day intravaginal metronidazole and 10-day intravaginal probiotics have good efficacy against BV, while probiotics maintained normal vaginal microbiota longer due to effective and steady vaginal microbiota restoration, which provide new insights into BV treatment.

  2. Vaginal Microflora Associated With Bacterial Vaginosis in Nonpregnant Women: Reliability of Sialidase Detection

    PubMed Central

    Canigia, Liliana Fernández; Lanza, Alejandra; Bianchini, Hebe

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of Gardnerella vaginalis, anaerobic bacteria and Mycoplasma hominis in vaginal specimens of women with and without bacterial vaginosis (BV) as well as to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the direct sialidase assay of vaginal fluid as a rapid test for diagnosing this syndrome. Methods: Vaginal cultures were obtained from 109 nonpregnant women (mean age 33 ± 7.1 years), 47 of them with clinical signs of BV (BV+) and 62 of them without BV (BV- ). In addition, we determined the vaginal sialidase activity in both groups, which may serve as a feature of this syndrome. Results: Anaerobic bacteria were isolated in 91% and 18% of the BV+and BV- groups, respectively (p < 0.001). Peptostreptococcus spp., Prevotella bivia and Porphyromonas spp. were strongly associated with BV. P. bivia and Prevotella spp. represented 44% of all the anaerobes isolated in the BV+ group. All the isolated P. bivia strains presented sialidase activity. G. vaginalis and M. hominis were isolated in 76% and 42% of the BV+ and 1% and 0% of the BV- women, respectively (p < 0.001). Mobiluncus morphotypeswere observed in 34% of the BV+and 0% of BV- women. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of sialidase activity were 81%, 94%, 90% and 86%, respectively. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate a strong association between G. vaginalis, M. hominis, and P. bivia and BV. Sialidase activity and Gram stain of vaginal fluid represent accurate methods for diagnosing BV. PMID:11368254

  3. The Bacterial Microbiome in Paired Vaginal and Vestibular Samples from Women with Vulvar Vestibulitis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, Aswathi; Witkin, Steven S.; Zhou, IA; Brown, Celeste J.; Rey, Gustavo E.; Linhares, Iara M.; Ledger, William J.; Forney, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    Composition of the bacterial microbiome in the vagina and vestibule from 30 women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome (VVS) and 15 healthy controls were compared by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA amplicons. Vaginal concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β were determined by ELISA. Questionnaires elicited clinical and symptom data. Eighteen genera were detected in vaginal samples, and 23 genera were identified in vestibule samples, from women with VVS. The genera at both sites and the mean number of genera in subjects with VVS were largely similar to those in control subjects. However, differences were noted including higher proportions of Streptococcus and Enterococcus in women with VVS. Furthermore, Lactobacillus iners was more frequently identified in women with VVS while L. crispatus was more frequent in the control women. The dominant bacterial genera in the vagina closely paralleled the dominant genera present in the corresponding vestibular sample in both groups, leading us to postulate that vaginal secretions are an important source of bacteria present on the vestibule. Vaginal IL-1β levels were similar and varied depending on the dominant bacteria. We conclude in this pilot study that no major differences are apparent in the vagina and vestibule between women with or without VVS, except for an increased prevalence of Streptococcus and L. iners in some women with VVS. PMID:24961922

  4. Analysis of Vaginal Acetic Acid in Patients Undergoing Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudry, Amjad N.; Travers, Paul J.; Yuenger, Jeffrey; Colletta, Lorraine; Evans, Phillip; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; Tummon, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A “gold standard” method for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (BV) is lacking. The clinical criteria described by the Amsel technique are subjective and difficult to quantify. Alternatively, the reading of Gram-stained vaginal smears by scoring techniques such as those that use the Nugent or Hay-Ison scoring systems is again subjective, requires expert personnel to perform the reading, and is infrequently used clinically. Recently, a new diagnostic device, the Osmetech Microbial Analyzer—Bacterial Vaginosis (OMA-BV), which determines a patient's BV status on the basis of measurement of the amount of acetic acid present in a vaginal swab specimen, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The present study uses the conducting polymer gas-sensing technology of OMA-BV to measure the concentration of acetic acid in the headspace above vaginal swab specimens from patients undergoing treatment for BV with metronidazole. In 97.8% of the cases the level of acetic acid detected fell sharply during the treatment period, crossing from above to below the diagnostic threshold of 900 ppm. The diagnosis obtained on the basis of the level of vaginal acetic acid was compared with the diagnoses obtained by use of the Amsel criteria and the Nugent scoring system both at the time of initial entry into the study and at the repeat samplings on days 7 and 14. The results obtained with OMA-BV showed overall agreements compared with the results of the Amsel and Nugent tests of 98 and 94%, respectively, for the 34 patients monitored through the treatment process. This provides further evidence that the measurement of vaginal acetic acid by headspace analysis with conducting polymer sensors is a valid alternative to present tests for the diagnosis of BV. PMID:15528711

  5. Vaginal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Two common vaginal infections are bacterial vaginosis and yeast infections . Bacterial vaginosis (BV) happens when a certain ... increases the chances that you’ll get BV. Yeast infections happen when a fungus (a type of ...

  6. Gardnerella vaginalis isolated from patients with bacterial vaginosis and from patients with healthy vaginal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Aroutcheva, A A; Simoes, J A; Behbakht, K; Faro, S

    2001-10-01

    The differences in the phenotype and genotype of Gardnerella vaginalis isolates from patients with bacterial vaginosis (BV) and from patients without BV are unknown. In our study, 43 isolates of G. vaginalis were examined for biotype (hippurate hydrolysis, lipase, and beta-galactosidase activity), sensitivity to metronidazole, and genotype. Of the 117 women visiting the gynecology clinic at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center who were included in the study, 27.4% were found to have BV. G. vaginalis was found in samples from 87.5% of women with BV, from 34.0% of women with intermediate BV, and from 26.4% of women with healthy vaginal ecosystems. Among patients with G. vaginalis, biotypes 7 and 8 were isolated from 32% and 20% of patients, respectively. Biotype 5 was predominantly associated with a healthy vaginal ecosystem (P=.0004). Biotypes 5 and 7 were the most resistant to metronidazole. No specific phenotype or genotype of G. vaginalis causes BV.

  7. Characterisation of probiotic properties in human vaginal lactobacilli strains

    PubMed Central

    Hütt, Pirje; Lapp, Eleri; Štšepetova, Jelena; Smidt, Imbi; Taelma, Heleri; Borovkova, Natalja; Oopkaup, Helen; Ahelik, Ave; Rööp, Tiiu; Hoidmets, Dagmar; Samuel, Külli; Salumets, Andres; Mändar, Reet

    2016-01-01

    Background Vaginal lactobacilli offer protection against recurrent urinary infections, bacterial vaginosis, and vaginal candidiasis. Objective To characterise the isolated vaginal lactobacilli strains for their probiotic properties and to compare their probiotic potential. Methods The Lactobacillus strains were isolated from vaginal samples by conventional culturing and identified by sequencing of the 16S rDNA fragment. Several functional properties were detected (production of hydrogen peroxide and lactic acid; antagonistic activity against Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Gardnerella vaginalis; auto-aggregation and adhesiveness) as well as safety (haemolytic activity, antibiotic susceptibility, presence of transferrable resistance genes). Results A total of 135 vaginal lactobacilli strains of three species, Lactobacillus crispatus (56%), Lactobacillus jensenii (26%), and Lactobacillus gasseri (18%) were characterised using several functional and safety tests. Most of L. crispatus (89%) and L. jensenii (86%) strains produced H2O2. The best lactic acid producers were L. gasseri (18.2±2.2 mg/ml) compared to L. crispatus (15.6±2.8 mg/ml) and L. jensenii (11.6±2.6 mg/ml) (p<0.0001; p<0.0001, respectively). L. crispatus strains showed significantly higher anti-E. coli activity compared to L. jensenii. L. gasseri strains expressed significantly lower anticandidal activity compared to L. crispatus and L. jensenii (p<0.0001). There was no significant difference between the species in antagonistic activity against G. vaginalis. Nearly a third of the strains were able to auto-aggregate while all the tested strains showed a good ability to adhere to HeLa cells. None of the tested lactobacilli caused haemolysis. Although phenotypical resistance was not found to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, gentamycin, tetracycline, and vancomycin, the erm(B), tet(M), and tet(K) were detected in some strains. All strains were resistant to metronidazole

  8. Colonization of the upper genital tract by vaginal bacterial species in non-pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    MITCHELL, Caroline M.; HAICK, Anoria; NKWOPARA, Evangelyn; GARCIA, Rochelle; RENDI, Mara; AGNEW, Kathy; FREDRICKS, David N.; ESCHENBACH, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluate upper genital tract (UGT) presence of vaginal bacterial species using sensitive molecular methods capable of detecting fastidious bacterial vaginosis (BV)-associated bacteria. Study Design Vaginal swabs were collected prior to hysterectomy. The excised uterus was sterilely opened and swabs collected from endometrium and upper endocervix. DNA was tested in 11 quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays for 12 bacterial species: Lactobacillus iners, L. crispatus, L. jensenii, Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Megasphaera spp., Prevotella spp., Leptotrichia/Sneathia, BVAB1, BVAB2, BVAB3 and a broad-range16S rRNA gene assay. Endometrial fluid was tested with Luminex and ELISA for cytokines and defensins, and tissue for gene expression of defensins and cathelicidin. Results We enrolled 58 women: mean age 43 + 7 years, mostly white (n = 46; 79%) and BV-negative (n = 43; 74%). By species-specific qPCR, 55 (95%) had UGT colonization with at least one species (n = 52), or were positive by 16S PCR (n = 3). The most common species were L. iners (45% UGT, 61% vagina), Prevotella spp. (33% UGT, 76% vagina) and L. crispatus (33% UGT, 56% vagina). Median quantities of bacteria in the UGT were lower than vaginal levels by 2–4 log10 rRNA gene copies/swab. There were no differences in endometrial inflammatory markers between women with no bacteria, Lactobacillus only or any BV-associated species in the UGT. Conclusion Our data suggest that the endometrial cavity is not sterile in most women undergoing hysterectomy, and that the presence of low levels of bacteria in the uterus is not associated with significant inflammation. PMID:25524398

  9. Vaginal Mucosal Homeostatic Response May Determine Pregnancy Outcome in Women With Bacterial Vaginosis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Faure, Emmanuel; Faure, Karine; Figeac, Martin; Kipnis, Eric; Grandjean, Teddy; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Villenet, Céline; Grandbastien, Bruno; Brabant, Gilles; Subtil, Damien; Dessein, Rodrigue

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is considered as a trigger for an inflammatory response that could promote adverse pregnancy outcome (APO). We hypothesized that BV-related inflammation could be counterbalanced by anti-inflammatory and mucosal homeostatic responses that could participate in pregnancy outcomes.A total of 402 vaginal self-samples from pregnant women in their first trimester were screened by Nugent score. In this population, we enrolled 23 pregnant women with BV but without APO, 5 pregnant women with BV and developing APO, 21 pregnant women with intermediate flora, and 28 random control samples from pregnant women without BV or APO.BV without APO in pregnant women was associated with 28-fold interleukin-8, 5-fold interleukin-10, and 40-fold interleukin-22 increases in expression compared to controls. BV associated with APO in pregnant women shared 4-fold increase in tumor necrosis factor, 100-fold decrease in interleukin-10, and no variation in interleukin-22 expressions compared to controls. Next-generation sequencing of vaginal microbiota revealed a shift from obligate anaerobic bacteria dominance in BV without APO pregnant women to Lactobacillus dominance microbiota in BV with APO.Our results show that the anti-inflammatory and mucosal homeostatic responses to BV may determine outcome of pregnancy in the setting of BV possibly through effects on the vaginal microbiota. PMID:26844497

  10. Vaginal Mucosal Homeostatic Response May Determine Pregnancy Outcome in Women With Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Emmanuel; Faure, Karine; Figeac, Martin; Kipnis, Eric; Grandjean, Teddy; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Villenet, Céline; Grandbastien, Bruno; Brabant, Gilles; Subtil, Damien; Dessein, Rodrigue

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is considered as a trigger for an inflammatory response that could promote adverse pregnancy outcome (APO). We hypothesized that BV-related inflammation could be counterbalanced by anti-inflammatory and mucosal homeostatic responses that could participate in pregnancy outcomes. A total of 402 vaginal self-samples from pregnant women in their first trimester were screened by Nugent score. In this population, we enrolled 23 pregnant women with BV but without APO, 5 pregnant women with BV and developing APO, 21 pregnant women with intermediate flora, and 28 random control samples from pregnant women without BV or APO. BV without APO in pregnant women was associated with 28-fold interleukin-8, 5-fold interleukin-10, and 40-fold interleukin-22 increases in expression compared to controls. BV associated with APO in pregnant women shared 4-fold increase in tumor necrosis factor, 100-fold decrease in interleukin-10, and no variation in interleukin-22 expressions compared to controls. Next-generation sequencing of vaginal microbiota revealed a shift from obligate anaerobic bacteria dominance in BV without APO pregnant women to Lactobacillus dominance microbiota in BV with APO. Our results show that the anti-inflammatory and mucosal homeostatic responses to BV may determine outcome of pregnancy in the setting of BV possibly through effects on the vaginal microbiota. PMID:26844497

  11. Comparison of the Effect of Vaginal Zataria multiflora Cream and Oral Metronidazole Pill on Results of Treatments for Vaginal Infections including Trichomoniasis and Bacterial Vaginosis in Women of Reproductive Age.

    PubMed

    Abdali, Khadijeh; Jahed, Leila; Amooee, Sedigheh; Zarshenas, Mahnaz; Tabatabaee, Hamidreza; Bekhradi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Effect of Zataria multiflora on bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis is shown in vivo and in vitro. We compare the effectiveness of Zataria multiflora cream and oral metronidazole pill on results of treatment for vaginal infections including Trichomonas and bacterial vaginosis; these infections occur simultaneously. The study included 420 women with bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis, or both infections together, who were randomly divided into six groups. Criteria for diagnosis were wet smear and Gram stain. Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream and placebo pill were administered to the experiment groups; the control group received oral metronidazole pill and vaginal placebo cream. Comparison of the clinical symptoms showed no significant difference in all three vaginitis groups receiving metronidazole pill and vaginal Zataria multiflora cream. However, comparison of the wet smear test results was significant in patients with trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis associated with trichomoniasis in the two treatment groups (p = 0.001 and p = 0.01). Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream had the same effect of oral metronidazole tablets in improving clinical symptoms of all three vaginitis groups, as well as the treatment for bacterial vaginosis. It can be used as a drug for treatment of bacterial vaginosis and elimination of clinical symptoms of Trichomonas vaginitis.

  12. Comparison of the Effect of Vaginal Zataria multiflora Cream and Oral Metronidazole Pill on Results of Treatments for Vaginal Infections including Trichomoniasis and Bacterial Vaginosis in Women of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Abdali, Khadijeh; Jahed, Leila; Amooee, Sedigheh; Zarshenas, Mahnaz; Tabatabaee, Hamidreza; Bekhradi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Effect of Zataria multiflora on bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis is shown in vivo and in vitro. We compare the effectiveness of Zataria multiflora cream and oral metronidazole pill on results of treatment for vaginal infections including Trichomonas and bacterial vaginosis; these infections occur simultaneously. The study included 420 women with bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis, or both infections together, who were randomly divided into six groups. Criteria for diagnosis were wet smear and Gram stain. Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream and placebo pill were administered to the experiment groups; the control group received oral metronidazole pill and vaginal placebo cream. Comparison of the clinical symptoms showed no significant difference in all three vaginitis groups receiving metronidazole pill and vaginal Zataria multiflora cream. However, comparison of the wet smear test results was significant in patients with trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis associated with trichomoniasis in the two treatment groups (p = 0.001 and p = 0.01). Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream had the same effect of oral metronidazole tablets in improving clinical symptoms of all three vaginitis groups, as well as the treatment for bacterial vaginosis. It can be used as a drug for treatment of bacterial vaginosis and elimination of clinical symptoms of Trichomonas vaginitis. PMID:26266260

  13. Characterization of the Vaginal Microbiota among Sexual Risk Behavior Groups of Women with Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Muzny, Christina A.; Sunesara, Imran R.; Kumar, Ranjit; Mena, Leandro A.; Griswold, Michael E.; Martin, David H.; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Schwebke, Jane R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis (BV) remains elusive. BV may be more common among women who have sex with women (WSW). The objective of this study was to use 454 pyrosequencing to investigate the vaginal microbiome of WSW, women who have sex with women and men (WSWM), and women who have sex with men (WSM) with BV to determine if there are differences in organism composition between groups that may inform new hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis of BV. Methods Vaginal swab specimens from eligible women with BV at the Mississippi State Department of Health STD Clinic were used. After DNA extraction, 454 pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences was performed. Sequence data was classified using the Ribosomal Database Program classifer. Complete linkage clustering analysis was performed to compare bacterial community composition among samples. Differences in operational taxonomic units with an abundance of ≥2% between risk behavior groups were determined. Alpha and beta diversity were measured using Shannon’s Index implemented in QIIME and Unifrac analysis, respectively. Results 33 WSW, 35 WSWM, and 44 WSM were included. The vaginal bacterial communities of all women clustered into four taxonomic groups with the dominant taxonomic group in each being Lactobacillus, Lachnospiraceae, Prevotella, and Sneathia. Regarding differences in organism composition between risk behavior groups, the abundance of Atopobium (relative ratio (RR)=0.24; 95%CI 0.11-0.54) and Parvimonas (RR=0.33; 95%CI 0.11-0.93) were significantly lower in WSW than WSM, the abundance of Prevotella was significantly higher in WSW than WSWM (RR=1.77; 95%CI 1.10-2.86), and the abundance of Atopobium (RR=0.41; 95%CI 0.18-0.88) was significantly lower in WSWM than WSM. Overall, WSM had the highest diversity of bacterial taxa. Conclusion The microbiology of BV among women in different risk behavior groups is heterogeneous. WSM in this study had the highest diversity of

  14. Effectiveness of vaginal administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus following conventional metronidazole therapy: how to lower the rate of bacterial vaginosis recurrences.

    PubMed

    Marcone, Valentina; Calzolari, Ettore; Bertini, Marco

    2008-07-01

    Eighty-four patients with bacterial vaginosis diagnosed according to Amsel's criteria were randomized to receive either oral metronidazole 500 mg twice a day for seven days, or one vaginal tablet containing freeze-dried Lactobacillus rhamnosus once a week at bedtime for two months starting one week after the last antibiotic administration. Followup was performed at days 30, 90 and 180. Chi-squared analysis showed a significant difference between the two treatment groups at day 90 (P = 0.05). Safe and effective long-term vaginal administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus appears to be a useful complementary approach in the management of bacterial vaginosis.

  15. Silver sucrose octasulfate (IASOS™) as a valid active ingredient into a novel vaginal gel against human vaginal pathogens: in vitro antimicrobial activity assessment.

    PubMed

    Marianelli, Cinzia; Petrucci, Paola; Comelli, Maria Cristina; Calderini, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the antimicrobial properties of a novel octasilver salt of Sucrose Octasulfate (IASOS) as well as of an innovative vaginal gel containing IASOS (SilSOS Femme), against bacterial and yeast pathogens isolated from human clinical cases of symptomatic vaginal infections. In BHI and LAPT culture media, different ionic silver concentrations and different pHs were tested. IASOS exerted a strong antimicrobial activity towards all the pathogens tested in both culture media. The results demonstrated that salts and organic compounds present in the culture media influenced IASOS efficacy only to a moderate extent. Whereas comparable MBCs (Minimal Bactericidal Concentrations) were observed for G. vaginalis (10 mg/L Ag+), E. coli and E. aerogenes (25 mg/L Ag+) in both media, higher MBCs were found for S. aureus and S. agalactiae in LAPT cultures (50 mg/L Ag+ versus 25 mg/L Ag+). No minimal concentration totally inhibiting the growth of C. albicans was found. Nevertheless, in both media at the highest ionic silver concentrations (50-200 mg/L Ag+), a significant 34-52% drop in Candida growth was observed. pH differently affected the antimicrobial properties of IASOS against bacteria or yeasts; however, a stronger antimicrobial activity at pH higher than the physiological pH was generally observed. It can be therefore concluded that IASOS exerts a bactericidal action against all the tested bacteria and a clear fungistatic action against C. albicans. The antimicrobial activity of the whole vaginal gel SilSOS Femme further confirmed the antimicrobial activity of IASOS. Overall, our findings support IASOS as a valid active ingredient into a vaginal gel. PMID:24897299

  16. Silver sucrose octasulfate (IASOS™) as a valid active ingredient into a novel vaginal gel against human vaginal pathogens: in vitro antimicrobial activity assessment.

    PubMed

    Marianelli, Cinzia; Petrucci, Paola; Comelli, Maria Cristina; Calderini, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the antimicrobial properties of a novel octasilver salt of Sucrose Octasulfate (IASOS) as well as of an innovative vaginal gel containing IASOS (SilSOS Femme), against bacterial and yeast pathogens isolated from human clinical cases of symptomatic vaginal infections. In BHI and LAPT culture media, different ionic silver concentrations and different pHs were tested. IASOS exerted a strong antimicrobial activity towards all the pathogens tested in both culture media. The results demonstrated that salts and organic compounds present in the culture media influenced IASOS efficacy only to a moderate extent. Whereas comparable MBCs (Minimal Bactericidal Concentrations) were observed for G. vaginalis (10 mg/L Ag+), E. coli and E. aerogenes (25 mg/L Ag+) in both media, higher MBCs were found for S. aureus and S. agalactiae in LAPT cultures (50 mg/L Ag+ versus 25 mg/L Ag+). No minimal concentration totally inhibiting the growth of C. albicans was found. Nevertheless, in both media at the highest ionic silver concentrations (50-200 mg/L Ag+), a significant 34-52% drop in Candida growth was observed. pH differently affected the antimicrobial properties of IASOS against bacteria or yeasts; however, a stronger antimicrobial activity at pH higher than the physiological pH was generally observed. It can be therefore concluded that IASOS exerts a bactericidal action against all the tested bacteria and a clear fungistatic action against C. albicans. The antimicrobial activity of the whole vaginal gel SilSOS Femme further confirmed the antimicrobial activity of IASOS. Overall, our findings support IASOS as a valid active ingredient into a vaginal gel.

  17. Vaginal Discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... also be on the lookout for symptoms of yeast infections, bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis, 3 infections that ... cause changes in your vaginal discharge. Signs of yeast infections White, cottage cheese-like discharge Swelling and ...

  18. A double-blind treatment study of bacterial vaginosis with normal vaginal lactobacilli after an open treatment with vaginal clindamycin ovules.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Katarina; Carlsson, Bodil; Forsum, Urban; Larsson, P-G

    2005-01-01

    The expected 4-week cure rate after conventional treatment of bacterial vaginosis are only 65-70%. In an attempt to improve the cure rate by adding probiotic lactobacilli we performed a double-blind placebo-controlled study of adjuvant lactobacilli treatment after an open treatment with vaginal clindamycin ovules. Women with bacterial vaginosis as defined by Amsel's criteria were treated with clindamycin ovules. Vaginal smears were collected and analysed according to Nugent's criteria. During the following menstruation period the women used, as an adjuvant treatment, either lactobacilli-prepared tampons or placebo tampons. The lactobacilli tampons were loaded with a mixture of freeze-dried L. fermentum, L. casei var. rhamnosus and L. gasseri. The cure rate was recorded after the second menstruation period. There was no improvement in the cure rate after treatment with lactobacilli-containing tampons compared to placebo tampons; the cure rates as defined by Amsel's criteria were 56% and 62%, respectively, and 55% and 63%, as defined by Nugent's criteria. This is the first study to report cure rates for women with 'intermediate' wet smear ratings according to Nugent's classification and this group had an overall cure rate of 44%. The cure rate of treatment of bacterial vaginosis was not improved by using lactobacilli-prepared tampons for one menstruation.

  19. NORMAL VAGINAL BACTERIAL FLORA OF GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) AND THE ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF THE ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hongning; Li, Caiwu; He, Yongguo; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yuesong; Xu, Changwen; Fan, Chengyun; Xu, Lulai; Huang, Shan; Qu, Chunmao; Li, Guo

    2016-03-01

    In order to study the typical vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), we took vaginal swabs for the sake of bacterial isolation, from 24 healthy female giant pandas. A total of 203 isolates were identified, representing a total of 17 bacterial species. The most common bacteria isolated were Lactobacillus spp. (54.2%, 13 of 24), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (41.7%, 10 of 24) and Escherichia coli (33.3%, 8 of 24). Some opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis, were also isolated but showed no pathology. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacterial isolates was performed with disk diffusion method. Of the 152 isolates, resistance was most frequently observed with chloramphenicol (17.8%), followed by tetracycline (14.5%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%), streptomycin (11.8%), and florfenicol (11.8%), while 7.2% were multidrug resistant. This is the first report of the normal vaginal culturable bacterial flora of giant pandas, followed by the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates. PMID:27010307

  20. NORMAL VAGINAL BACTERIAL FLORA OF GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) AND THE ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF THE ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hongning; Li, Caiwu; He, Yongguo; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yuesong; Xu, Changwen; Fan, Chengyun; Xu, Lulai; Huang, Shan; Qu, Chunmao; Li, Guo

    2016-06-01

    To study the typical vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), we took vaginal swabs for the sake of bacterial isolation, from 24 healthy female giant pandas. A total of 203 isolates were identified, representing a total of 17 bacterial species. The most common bacteria isolated were Lactobacillus spp. (54.2%, 13/24), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (41.7%, 10/24) and Escherichia coli (33.3%, 8/24). Some opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae , and Proteus mirabilis , were also isolated but showed no pathology. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacterial isolates was performed with the disk diffusion method. Of the 152 isolates, resistance was most frequently observed with chloramphenicol (17.8%), followed by tetracycline (14.5%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%), streptomycin (11.8%), and florfenicol (11.8%), whereas 7.2% were multidrug resistant. This is the first report of the normal culturable vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas and the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates. PMID:27468049

  1. NORMAL VAGINAL BACTERIAL FLORA OF GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) AND THE ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF THE ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hongning; Li, Caiwu; He, Yongguo; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yuesong; Xu, Changwen; Fan, Chengyun; Xu, Lulai; Huang, Shan; Qu, Chunmao; Li, Guo

    2016-06-01

    To study the typical vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), we took vaginal swabs for the sake of bacterial isolation, from 24 healthy female giant pandas. A total of 203 isolates were identified, representing a total of 17 bacterial species. The most common bacteria isolated were Lactobacillus spp. (54.2%, 13/24), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (41.7%, 10/24) and Escherichia coli (33.3%, 8/24). Some opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae , and Proteus mirabilis , were also isolated but showed no pathology. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacterial isolates was performed with the disk diffusion method. Of the 152 isolates, resistance was most frequently observed with chloramphenicol (17.8%), followed by tetracycline (14.5%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%), streptomycin (11.8%), and florfenicol (11.8%), whereas 7.2% were multidrug resistant. This is the first report of the normal culturable vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas and the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates.

  2. NORMAL VAGINAL BACTERIAL FLORA OF GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) AND THE ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF THE ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hongning; Li, Caiwu; He, Yongguo; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yuesong; Xu, Changwen; Fan, Chengyun; Xu, Lulai; Huang, Shan; Qu, Chunmao; Li, Guo

    2016-03-01

    In order to study the typical vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), we took vaginal swabs for the sake of bacterial isolation, from 24 healthy female giant pandas. A total of 203 isolates were identified, representing a total of 17 bacterial species. The most common bacteria isolated were Lactobacillus spp. (54.2%, 13 of 24), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (41.7%, 10 of 24) and Escherichia coli (33.3%, 8 of 24). Some opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis, were also isolated but showed no pathology. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacterial isolates was performed with disk diffusion method. Of the 152 isolates, resistance was most frequently observed with chloramphenicol (17.8%), followed by tetracycline (14.5%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%), streptomycin (11.8%), and florfenicol (11.8%), while 7.2% were multidrug resistant. This is the first report of the normal vaginal culturable bacterial flora of giant pandas, followed by the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates.

  3. Vaginal gel adsorption and retention by human vaginal cells: visual analysis by means of inorganic and organic markers.

    PubMed

    Braga, Pier Carlo; Dal Sasso, Monica; Spallino, Alessandra; Sturla, Carla; Culici, Maria

    2009-05-21

    To improve efficiency and prolong protection, modern gynecological preparations frequently incorporate polymeric molecules that add a certain degree of viscosity in order to increase adhesion with vaginal cells and prolong local delivery of active molecules. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of visualising the ability of a commercial medicated gynecological gel to bind to and be retained by human vaginal cells. The gel formulation included the essential oils of Thymus vulgaris and Eugenia cariophylla, which contain active molecules such as thymol and eugenol that are known to have useful antibacterial and antimycotic activities. The adherence of different dilutions of the gel to human vaginal cells was visualised by means of Nomarski interference contrast microscopy and scanning electron microscopy using ferric oxide particles and Escherichia coli as inorganic and organic markers, both of which made it possible to visualise the binding of the thin transparent layer of gel and the retaining effect, which was proportional to the degree of dilution. PMID:19429283

  4. C5A Protects Macaques from Vaginal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Ronald S.; Chatterji, Udayan; Bobardt, Michael; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E.; Li, Jian; Wang, Xiaolei

    2015-01-01

    A safe and effective vaginal microbicide could decrease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in women. Here, we evaluated the safety and microbicidal efficacy of a short amphipathic peptide, C5A, in a rhesus macaque model. We found that a vaginal application of C5A protects 89% of the macaques from a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-162P3) challenge. We observed no signs of lesions or inflammation in animals vaginally treated with repeated C5A applications. With its noncellular cytotoxic activity and rare mechanism of action, C5A represents an attractive microbicidal candidate. PMID:26552985

  5. Longitudinal analysis reveals characteristically high proportions of bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria and temporal variability of vaginal microbiota in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Lei, Ai-Hua; Zheng, Hong-Yi; Lyu, Long-Bao; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-09-18

    The complex and dynamic vaginal microbial ecosystem is critical to both health and disease of the host. Studies focusing on how vaginal microbiota influences HIV-1 infection may face limitations in selecting proper animal models. Given that northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection, they may be an optimal animal model for elucidating the mechanisms by which vaginal microbiota contributes to resistance and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. However, little is known about the composition and temporal variability of vaginal microbiota of the northern pig-tailed macaque. Here, we present a comprehensive catalog of the composition and temporal dynamics of vaginal microbiota of two healthy northern pig-tailed macaques over 19 weeks using 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. We found remarkably high proportions of a diverse array of anaerobic bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis. Atopobium and Sneathia were dominant genera, and interestingly, we demonstrated the presence of Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota. Moreover, longitudinal analysis demonstrated that the temporal dynamics of the vaginal microbiota were considerably individualized. Finally, network analysis revealed that vaginal pH may influence the temporal dynamics of the vaginal microbiota, suggesting that inter-subject variability of vaginal bacterial communities could be mirrored in inter-subject variation in correlation profiles of species with each other and with vaginal pH over time. Our results suggest that the northern pig-tailed macaque could be an ideal animal model for prospective investigation of the mechanisms by which vaginal microbiota influence susceptibility and resistance to HIV-1 infection in the context of highly polymicrobial and Lactobacillus-dominated states.

  6. Longitudinal analysis reveals characteristically high proportions of bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria and temporal variability of vaginal microbiota in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina)

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, Lin; LEI, Ai-Hua; ZHENG, Hong-Yi; LYU, Long-Bao; ZHANG, Zhi-Gang; ZHENG, Yong-Tang

    2015-01-01

    The complex and dynamic vaginal microbial ecosystem is critical to both health and disease of the host. Studies focusing on how vaginal microbiota influences HIV-1 infection may face limitations in selecting proper animal models. Given that northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection, they may be an optimal animal model for elucidating the mechanisms by which vaginal microbiota contributes to resistance and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. However, little is known about the composition and temporal variability of vaginal microbiota of the northern pig-tailed macaque. Here, we present a comprehensive catalog of the composition and temporal dynamics of vaginal microbiota of two healthy northern pig-tailed macaques over 19 weeks using 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. We found remarkably high proportions of a diverse array of anaerobic bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis. Atopobium and Sneathia were dominant genera, and interestingly, we demonstrated the presence of Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota. Moreover, longitudinal analysis demonstrated that the temporal dynamics of the vaginal microbiota were considerably individualized. Finally, network analysis revealed that vaginal pH may influence the temporal dynamics of the vaginal microbiota, suggesting that inter-subject variability of vaginal bacterial communities could be mirrored in inter-subject variation in correlation profiles of species with each other and with vaginal pH over time. Our results suggest that the northern pig-tailed macaque could be an ideal animal model for prospective investigation of the mechanisms by which vaginal microbiota influence susceptibility and resistance to HIV-1 infection in the context of highly polymicrobial and Lactobacillus-dominated states. PMID:26452693

  7. Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human ... test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its ...

  8. Capsomer Vaccines Protect Mice from Vaginal Challenge with Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wai-Hong; Gersch, Elizabeth; Kwak, Kihyuck; Jagu, Subhashini; Karanam, Balasubramanyam; Huh, Warner K.; Garcea, Robert L.; Roden, Richard B. S.

    2011-01-01

    Capsomers were produced in bacteria as glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins with human papillomavirus type 16 L1 lacking the first nine and final 29 residues (GST-HPV16L1Δ) alone or linked with residues 13–47 of HPV18, HPV31 and HPV45 L2 in tandem (GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3). Subcutaneous immunization of mice with GST-HPV16L1Δ or GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 in alum and monophosphoryl lipid A induced similarly high titers of HPV16 neutralizing antibodies. GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 also elicited moderate L2-specific antibody titers. Intravaginal challenge studies showed that immunization of mice with GST-HPV16 L1Δ or GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 capsomers, like Cervarix®, provided complete protection against HPV16. Conversely, vaccination with GST-HPV16 L1Δ capsomers failed to protect against HPV18 challenge, whereas mice immunized with either GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 capsomers or Cervarix® were each completely protected. Thus, while the L2-specific response was moderate, it did not interfere with immunity to L1 in the context of GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 and is sufficient to mediate L2-dependent protection against an experimental vaginal challenge with HPV18. PMID:22069498

  9. Vaginal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Mendling, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge about the normal and abnormal vaginal microbiome has changed over the last years. Culturing techniques are not suitable any more for determination of a normal or abnormal vaginal microbiota. Non culture-based modern technologies revealed a complex and dynamic system mainly dominated by lactobacilli.The normal and the abnormal vaginal microbiota are complex ecosystems of more than 200 bacterial species influenced by genes, ethnic background and environmental and behavioral factors. Several species of lactobacilli per individuum dominate the healthy vagina. They support a defense system together with antibacterial substances, cytokines, defensins and others against dysbiosis, infections and care for an normal pregnancy without preterm birth.The numbers of Lactobacillus (L.) iners increase in the case of dysbiosis.Bacterial vaginosis (BV) - associated bacteria (BVAB), Atopobium vaginae and Clostridiales and one or two of four Gardnerella vaginalis - strains develop in different mixtures and numbers polymicrobial biofilms on the vaginal epithelium, which are not dissolved by antibiotic therapies according to guidelines and, thus, provoke recurrences.Aerobic vaginitis seems to be an immunological disorder of the vagina with influence on the microbiota, which is here dominated by aerobic bacteria (Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli). Their role in AV is unknown.Vaginal or oral application of lactobacilli is obviously able to improve therapeutic results of BV and dysbiosis. PMID:27161352

  10. Lactobacillus species isolated from vaginal secretions of healthy and bacterial vaginosis-intermediate Mexican women: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus jensenii, L. iners, L. crispatus and L. gasseri are the most frequently occurring lactobacilli in the vagina. However, the native species vary widely according to the studied population. The present study was performed to genetically determine the identity of Lactobacillus strains present in the vaginal discharge of healthy and bacterial vaginosis (BV) intermediate Mexican women. Methods In a prospective study, 31 strains preliminarily identified as Lactobacillus species were isolated from 21 samples collected from 105 non-pregnant Mexican women. The samples were classified into groups according to the Nugent score criteria proposed for detection of BV: normal (N), intermediate (I) and bacterial vaginosis (BV). We examined the isolates using culture-based methods as well as molecular analysis of the V1–V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequence analysis was performed to reject clones. Results Clinical isolates (25/31) were classified into four groups based on sequencing and analysis of the 16S rRNA gene: L. acidophilus (14/25), L. reuteri (6/25), L. casei (4/25) and L. buchneri (1/25). The remaining six isolates were presumptively identified as Enterococcus species. Within the L. acidophilus group, L. gasseri was the most frequently isolated species, followed by L. jensenii and L. crispatus. L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus and L. brevis were also isolated, and were placed in the L. reuteri, L. casei and L. buchneri groups, respectively. ERIC profile analysis showed intraspecific variability amongst the L. gasseri and L. fermentum species. Conclusions These findings agree with previous studies showing that L. crispatus, L. gasseri and L. jensenii are consistently present in the healthy vaginal ecosystem. Additional species or phylotypes were detected in the vaginal microbiota of the non-pregnant Mexican (Hispanic-mestizo) population, and thus, these results further our understanding of

  11. Engineered vaginal lactobacillus strain for mucosal delivery of the human immunodeficiency virus inhibitor cyanovirin-N.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowen; Lagenaur, Laurel A; Simpson, David A; Essenmacher, Kirsten P; Frazier-Parker, Courtney L; Liu, Yang; Tsai, Daniel; Rao, Srinivas S; Hamer, Dean H; Parks, Thomas P; Lee, Peter P; Xu, Qiang

    2006-10-01

    Women are at significant risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, with the cervicovaginal mucosa serving as a major portal for virus entry. Female-initiated preventatives, including topical microbicides, are urgently needed to help curtail the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Here we report on the development of a novel, live microbicide that employs a natural vaginal strain of Lactobacillus jensenii engineered to deliver the potent HIV inhibitor cyanovirin-N (CV-N). To facilitate efficient expression of CV-N by this bacterium, the L. jensenii 1153 genome was sequenced, allowing identification of native regulatory elements and sites for the chromosomal integration of heterologous genes. A CV-N expression cassette was optimized and shown to produce high levels of structurally intact CV-N when expressed in L. jensenii. Lactobacillus-derived CV-N was capable of inhibiting CCR5-tropic HIV(BaL) infectivity in vitro with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.3 nM. The CV-N expression cassette was stably integrated as a single copy into the bacterial chromosome and resolved from extraneous plasmid DNA without adversely affecting the bacterial phenotype. This bacterial strain was capable of colonizing the vagina and producing full-length CV-N when administered intravaginally to mice during estrus phase. The CV-N-producing Lactobacillus was genetically stable when propagated in vitro and in vivo. This work represents a major step towards the development of an inexpensive yet durable protein-based microbicide to block the heterosexual transmission of HIV in women. PMID:17005802

  12. Vaginal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer; Cancer - vagina; Tumor - vaginal ... Most vaginal cancers occur when another cancer, such as cervical or endometrial cancer , spreads. This is called secondary vaginal cancer. Cancer ...

  13. [Vaginal ecology, climate, landscapes and populations (xenoecies and facies)].

    PubMed

    Nicoli, J M; Nourrit, J; Michel-Nguyen, A; Sempe, M; Nicoli, R M

    1994-06-01

    Brief study of vaginal populations, the human vagina being considered as a biotopic cavity. Allusion to dynamic aspects ("vaginal climate", "landscapes") and to various bacterial populations. Introduction of the concept of xenoecies and of facies. This study is preceded by essential definitions of terms widely used in ecology.

  14. Vaginal dryness

    MedlinePlus

    ... atrophic; Vaginitis due to reduced estrogen; Atrophic vaginitis; Menopause vaginal dryness ... dryness and inflammation. Estrogen levels normally drop after menopause. The following may also cause estrogen levels to ...

  15. Ingestion of yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus compared with pasteurized yogurt as prophylaxis for recurrent candidal vaginitis and bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Shalev, E; Battino, S; Weiner, E; Colodner, R; Keness, Y

    1996-01-01

    To compare and assess ingestion of yogurt that contained live Lactobacillus acidophilus with pasteurized yogurt as prophylaxis for recurrent bacterial vaginosis (BV) and candidal vaginitis, we designed a crossover trial during which patients were examined monthly for candidal infection and BV while they were receiving either a pasteurized yogurt or a yogurt that contained live L acidophilus. Forty-six patients in 2 groups of 23 were randomly assigned to each of the study groups. At least 28 (61%) participated during the first 4 months of the study. Seven patients completed the entire study protocol. We concluded that daily ingestion of 150 mL of yogurt, enriched with live L acidophilus, was associated with an increased prevalence of colonization of the rectum and vagina by the bacteria, and this ingestion of yogurt may have reduced episodes of BV. PMID:8930233

  16. Predictive value of the composition of the vaginal microbiota in bacterial vaginosis, a dynamic study to identify recurrence-related flora.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bingbing; Niu, Xiaoxi; Han, Na; Wang, Ben; Du, Pengcheng; Na, Risu; Chen, Chen; Liao, Qinping

    2016-06-02

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a highly prevalent disease in women, and increases the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. It has been given wide attention because of the high recurrence rate. Traditional diagnostic methods based on microscope providing limited information on the vaginal microbiota increase the difficulty in tracing the development of the disease in bacteria resistance condition. In this study, we used deep-sequencing technology to observe dynamic variation of the vaginal microbiota at three major time points during treatment, at D0 (before treatment), D7 (stop using the antibiotics) and D30 (the 30-day follow-up visit). Sixty-five patients with BV were enrolled (48 were cured and 17 were not cured), and their bacterial composition of the vaginal microbiota was compared. Interestingly, we identified 9 patients might be recurrence. We also introduced a new measurement point of D7, although its microbiota were significantly inhabited by antibiotic and hard to be observed by traditional method. The vaginal microbiota in deep-sequencing-view present a strong correlation to the final outcome. Thus, coupled with detailed individual bioinformatics analysis and deep-sequencing technology, we may illustrate a more accurate map of vaginal microbial to BV patients, which provide a new opportunity to reduce the rate of recurrence of BV.

  17. Identification of vaginal bacteria diversity and it's association with clinically diagnosed bacterial vaginosis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and correspondence analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qing; Cheng, Lijuan; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Shangwen; Liu, Fang; Li, Hao; Yuan, Jing; Liu, Zhendong; Diao, Yutao

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common complex associated with numerous adverse health outcomes, affecting women of different ages throughout the world. The etiology of BV remains poorly understood due to the difficulty of establishing a molecular genetic criterion to recognize the vaginal microbiota of BV-positive women from that of the normal women. We used techniques of broad-range PCR-DGGE and gel imaging analysis system cooperated with 16S rRNA gene sequencing and statistical analysis to investigate the community structure of the healthy and BV-affected vaginal microbial ecosystems. The community of vaginal bacteria detected in subjects with BV was far more luxuriant and diverse than in subjects without BV. The mean number of microbial species in 128 BV-positive women was nearly two times greater than in 68 subjects without BV(4.05±1.96 versus 2.59±1.14). Our sequencing efforts yielded many novel phylotypes (198 of our sequences represented 59 species), including several novel BV-associated bacteria (BVAB) and many belonging to opportunistic infections, which remain inexplicable for their roles in determining the health condition of vaginal microflora. This study identifies Algoriphagus aquatilis, Atopobium vaginae, Burkholderia fungorum, Megasphaera genomosp species as indicators to BV and subjects with BV harbor particularly taxon-rich and diverse bacterial communities. Maybe Bifidobacterium, Staphylococcus or even more alien species are commensal creatures in normal vaginal microbiota. PMID:27503595

  18. Predictive value of the composition of the vaginal microbiota in bacterial vaginosis, a dynamic study to identify recurrence-related flora

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bingbing; Niu, Xiaoxi; Han, Na; Wang, Ben; Du, Pengcheng; Na, Risu; Chen, Chen; Liao, Qinping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a highly prevalent disease in women, and increases the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. It has been given wide attention because of the high recurrence rate. Traditional diagnostic methods based on microscope providing limited information on the vaginal microbiota increase the difficulty in tracing the development of the disease in bacteria resistance condition. In this study, we used deep-sequencing technology to observe dynamic variation of the vaginal microbiota at three major time points during treatment, at D0 (before treatment), D7 (stop using the antibiotics) and D30 (the 30-day follow-up visit). Sixty-five patients with BV were enrolled (48 were cured and 17 were not cured), and their bacterial composition of the vaginal microbiota was compared. Interestingly, we identified 9 patients might be recurrence. We also introduced a new measurement point of D7, although its microbiota were significantly inhabited by antibiotic and hard to be observed by traditional method. The vaginal microbiota in deep-sequencing-view present a strong correlation to the final outcome. Thus, coupled with detailed individual bioinformatics analysis and deep-sequencing technology, we may illustrate a more accurate map of vaginal microbial to BV patients, which provide a new opportunity to reduce the rate of recurrence of BV. PMID:27253522

  19. Predictive value of the composition of the vaginal microbiota in bacterial vaginosis, a dynamic study to identify recurrence-related flora.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bingbing; Niu, Xiaoxi; Han, Na; Wang, Ben; Du, Pengcheng; Na, Risu; Chen, Chen; Liao, Qinping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a highly prevalent disease in women, and increases the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. It has been given wide attention because of the high recurrence rate. Traditional diagnostic methods based on microscope providing limited information on the vaginal microbiota increase the difficulty in tracing the development of the disease in bacteria resistance condition. In this study, we used deep-sequencing technology to observe dynamic variation of the vaginal microbiota at three major time points during treatment, at D0 (before treatment), D7 (stop using the antibiotics) and D30 (the 30-day follow-up visit). Sixty-five patients with BV were enrolled (48 were cured and 17 were not cured), and their bacterial composition of the vaginal microbiota was compared. Interestingly, we identified 9 patients might be recurrence. We also introduced a new measurement point of D7, although its microbiota were significantly inhabited by antibiotic and hard to be observed by traditional method. The vaginal microbiota in deep-sequencing-view present a strong correlation to the final outcome. Thus, coupled with detailed individual bioinformatics analysis and deep-sequencing technology, we may illustrate a more accurate map of vaginal microbial to BV patients, which provide a new opportunity to reduce the rate of recurrence of BV. PMID:27253522

  20. Antimicrobial and immune modulatory effects of lactic acid and short chain fatty acids produced by vaginal microbiota associated with eubiosis and bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Aldunate, Muriel; Srbinovski, Daniela; Hearps, Anna C; Latham, Catherine F; Ramsland, Paul A; Gugasyan, Raffi; Cone, Richard A; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced by vaginal microbiota have reported antimicrobial and immune modulatory activities indicating their potential as biomarkers of disease and/or disease susceptibility. In asymptomatic women of reproductive-age the vaginal microbiota is comprised of lactic acid-producing bacteria that are primarily responsible for the production of lactic acid present at ~110 mM and acidifying the vaginal milieu to pH ~3.5. In contrast, bacterial vaginosis (BV), a dysbiosis of the vaginal microbiota, is characterized by decreased lactic acid-producing microbiota and increased diverse anaerobic bacteria accompanied by an elevated pH>4.5. BV is also characterized by a dramatic loss of lactic acid and greater concentrations of mixed SCFAs including acetate, propionate, butyrate, and succinate. Notably women with lactic acid-producing microbiota have more favorable reproductive and sexual health outcomes compared to women with BV. Regarding the latter, BV is associated with increased susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. In vitro studies demonstrate that lactic acid produced by vaginal microbiota has microbicidal and virucidal activities that may protect against STIs and endogenous opportunistic bacteria as well as immune modulatory properties that require further characterization with regard to their effects on the vaginal mucosa. In contrast, BV-associated SCFAs have far less antimicrobial activity with the potential to contribute to a pro-inflammatory vaginal environment. Here we review the composition of lactic acid and SCFAs in respective states of eubiosis (non-BV) or dysbiosis (BV), their effects on susceptibility to bacterial/viral STIs and whether they have inherent microbicidal/virucidal and immune modulatory properties. We also explore their potential as biomarkers for the presence and/or increased susceptibility to STIs.

  1. Antimicrobial and immune modulatory effects of lactic acid and short chain fatty acids produced by vaginal microbiota associated with eubiosis and bacterial vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Aldunate, Muriel; Srbinovski, Daniela; Hearps, Anna C.; Latham, Catherine F.; Ramsland, Paul A.; Gugasyan, Raffi; Cone, Richard A.; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced by vaginal microbiota have reported antimicrobial and immune modulatory activities indicating their potential as biomarkers of disease and/or disease susceptibility. In asymptomatic women of reproductive-age the vaginal microbiota is comprised of lactic acid-producing bacteria that are primarily responsible for the production of lactic acid present at ~110 mM and acidifying the vaginal milieu to pH ~3.5. In contrast, bacterial vaginosis (BV), a dysbiosis of the vaginal microbiota, is characterized by decreased lactic acid-producing microbiota and increased diverse anaerobic bacteria accompanied by an elevated pH>4.5. BV is also characterized by a dramatic loss of lactic acid and greater concentrations of mixed SCFAs including acetate, propionate, butyrate, and succinate. Notably women with lactic acid-producing microbiota have more favorable reproductive and sexual health outcomes compared to women with BV. Regarding the latter, BV is associated with increased susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. In vitro studies demonstrate that lactic acid produced by vaginal microbiota has microbicidal and virucidal activities that may protect against STIs and endogenous opportunistic bacteria as well as immune modulatory properties that require further characterization with regard to their effects on the vaginal mucosa. In contrast, BV-associated SCFAs have far less antimicrobial activity with the potential to contribute to a pro-inflammatory vaginal environment. Here we review the composition of lactic acid and SCFAs in respective states of eubiosis (non-BV) or dysbiosis (BV), their effects on susceptibility to bacterial/viral STIs and whether they have inherent microbicidal/virucidal and immune modulatory properties. We also explore their potential as biomarkers for the presence and/or increased susceptibility to STIs. PMID:26082720

  2. Dermabacter vaginalis sp. nov., isolated from human vaginal fluid.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dong-Ho; Rhee, Moon-Soo; Kim, Byoung-Chan

    2016-04-01

    A novel actinobacterial strain, AD1-86T, was isolated from the vaginal fluid of a Korean female and was characterized by a polyphasic approach. The strain was a facultatively anaerobic, Gram-stain-positive, non-spore-forming, non-motile, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative short rod. Colonies were creamy white, of low convexity and 1-2 mm in diameter after growth on DSM 92 agar plates at 37 °C for 2 days. The most closely related strains were Dermabacter hominis DSM 7083T and Helcobacillus massiliensis 6401990T (98.3 and 96.3 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). The isolate grew optimally at 37 °C and pH 7 in the presence of 0.5% (w/v) NaCl. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid and the cell-wall hydrolysates contained ribose, galactose and glucose. The DNA G+C content was 62.6 mol% and the mean DNA-DNA relatedness value of the isolate to D. hominis DSM 7083T was 31.1±3.0% (reciprocal: 48.2±5.3%). The major cellular fatty acids (>10%) were anteiso-C17:0, anteiso-C15:0 and iso-C16:0, and the menaquinones were MK-9, MK-8 and MK-7. The polar lipid profile of strain AD1-86T consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, two aminolipids and a glycolipid. Data from this polyphasic study indicate that strain AD1-86T represents a novel species of the genus Dermabacter, for which the name Dermabacter vaginalis sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is AD1-86T (=KCTC 39585T=DSM 100050T). PMID:26867728

  3. [Effect of vaginal tampons on bacterial flora of the lower genitalia].

    PubMed

    Nowak-Sadzikowska, J; Bulanda, M; Heczko, P B

    A constant risk of genitary tract infections, especially during menstrual bleeding, poses several questions concerning and effect of various protective measures used during menstruation. Such measures, especially vaginal tampons, have direct contact with vaginal mucosa, and may affect normal flora. One of the most frequent causes of complaints are infections or changes in the normal flora. Several studies indicate that the intervaginal tampons did not markedly change normal flora composition due to the introduction of bacteria from the environment. However, inflammatory states of genitary tract related to the use of intravaginal tampons is merely due to irritative action of fibers used for manufacture of such tampons. Currently used raw materials are not producing any pathologies. Several authors have shown that the health hazards produced by such tampons related to toxic shock during menstruation have been due to highly absorbable fibers used for their manufacture. Actually such materials are not used anymore. Tampons used according to manufactures' recommendations are safe, and do not produce inflammatory states.

  4. Development of epithelial and mesenchymal regionalization of the human fetal utero-vaginal anlagen

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Helga; Hoermann, Romed; Bitsche, Mario; Pechriggl, Elisabeth; Reich, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Literature on the development of the human vagina is abundant; however, contributions concerning the prenatal development of the entire utero-vaginal anlagen (UVA) are rare or carried out in rodents. The primary epithelial characteristics in the adult vagina and uterus are determined during prenatal development and depend on epithelio-mesenchymal stroma interaction; thus an investigation summarizing the spatiotemporal distribution of relevant molecular markers in the entire human UVA will be of current interest. We phenotyped epithelial and mesenchymal characteristics in sagittal sections from 24 female fetuses of 14–34 weeks of gestation and two female newborns by immunostaining with cytokeratins 8, 13, 14 and 17, p63, bcl-2, bmp4, HOX A13, CD31, VEGF, SMA, Pax2 and vimentin. Epithelial differentiation followed a caudal-to-cranial direction in the UVA. Due to the cytokeratin profile of cytokeratins 8, 13 and 14, the characteristics of the different epithelial zones in the UVA could already be recognized in middle-age fetuses. Vaginal epithelium originated from the urogenital sinus in the lower portion and initiated the transformation of vimentin-positive Müllerian epithelium in the upper vaginal portion. During prenatal development the original squamo-columnar junction was clearly detectable from week 24 onwards and was always found in the cervical canal. Early blc-2 positivity within the surrounding mesenchyme of the entire vagina including the portio region pointed to an organ-specific mesenchymal influence. Prenatal findings in human specimens clearly show that fornix epithelium up to the squamo-columnar junction is of vaginal Müllerian origin, and the cervical epithelium cranial to the squamo-columnar junction is of uterine Müllerian origin and includes cells with enough plasticity to transform into squamous epithelium. PMID:23406280

  5. Menopause and the vaginal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Muhleisen, Alicia L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2016-09-01

    For over a century it has been well documented that bacteria in the vagina maintain vaginal homeostasis, and that an imbalance or dysbiosis may be associated with poor reproductive and gynecologic health outcomes. Vaginal microbiota are of particular significance to postmenopausal women and may have a profound effect on vulvovaginal atrophy, vaginal dryness, sexual health and overall quality of life. As molecular-based techniques have evolved, our understanding of the diversity and complexity of this bacterial community has expanded. The objective of this review is to compare the changes that have been identified in the vaginal microbiota of menopausal women, outline alterations in the microbiome associated with specific menopausal symptoms, and define how hormone replacement therapy impacts the vaginal microbiome and menopausal symptoms; it concludes by considering the potential of probiotics to reinstate vaginal homeostasis following menopause. This review details the studies that support the role of Lactobacillus species in maintaining vaginal homeostasis and how the vaginal microbiome structure in postmenopausal women changes with decreasing levels of circulating estrogen. In addition, the associated transformations in the microanatomical features of the vaginal epithelium that can lead to vaginal symptoms associated with menopause are described. Furthermore, hormone replacement therapy directly influences the dominance of Lactobacillus in the microbiota and can resolve vaginal symptoms. Oral and vaginal probiotics hold great promise and initial studies complement the findings of previous research efforts concerning menopause and the vaginal microbiome; however, additional trials are required to determine the efficacy of bacterial therapeutics to modulate or restore vaginal homeostasis. PMID:27451320

  6. Menopause and the vaginal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Muhleisen, Alicia L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2016-09-01

    For over a century it has been well documented that bacteria in the vagina maintain vaginal homeostasis, and that an imbalance or dysbiosis may be associated with poor reproductive and gynecologic health outcomes. Vaginal microbiota are of particular significance to postmenopausal women and may have a profound effect on vulvovaginal atrophy, vaginal dryness, sexual health and overall quality of life. As molecular-based techniques have evolved, our understanding of the diversity and complexity of this bacterial community has expanded. The objective of this review is to compare the changes that have been identified in the vaginal microbiota of menopausal women, outline alterations in the microbiome associated with specific menopausal symptoms, and define how hormone replacement therapy impacts the vaginal microbiome and menopausal symptoms; it concludes by considering the potential of probiotics to reinstate vaginal homeostasis following menopause. This review details the studies that support the role of Lactobacillus species in maintaining vaginal homeostasis and how the vaginal microbiome structure in postmenopausal women changes with decreasing levels of circulating estrogen. In addition, the associated transformations in the microanatomical features of the vaginal epithelium that can lead to vaginal symptoms associated with menopause are described. Furthermore, hormone replacement therapy directly influences the dominance of Lactobacillus in the microbiota and can resolve vaginal symptoms. Oral and vaginal probiotics hold great promise and initial studies complement the findings of previous research efforts concerning menopause and the vaginal microbiome; however, additional trials are required to determine the efficacy of bacterial therapeutics to modulate or restore vaginal homeostasis.

  7. Comparison of the Effects of Myrtus Communis L, Berberis Vulgaris and Metronidazole Vaginal Gel alone for the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Masoudi, Mansoureh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a growing tendency towards herbal medicines for treatment of vaginitis. Antibacterial and antifungal effects of Myrtus communis L and Berberis vulgaris have been demonstrated invitro and invivo. Aim This study aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of the vaginal gel of Berberis vulgaris 5% (in metronidazole base) and Myrtus communis L 2% (in metronidazole base) with only metronidazole vaginal gel 0.75% on bacterial vaginosis. Materials and Methods This study was a randomized clinical trial research on 120 married women aged 18-40 years affected by bacterial vaginosis attended for treatment to gynaecology clinic of Hajar Hospital (Shahrekord, Iran). They were randomly divided into three groups of 40 participants. Diagnostic criteria were Amsel’s criteria. Myrtus communis L, Berberis vulgaris vaginal gel or metronidazole vaginal gel for five-night usage were prescribed to each group, and after 7 days therapeutic effects were assessed. Data analysis was performed using ANOVA and Chi-square tests. Results A statistically significant difference was observed with regard to treatment response among the study groups (p<0.001), with Myrtus communis L and Berberis vulgaris groups having a better response than metronidazole gel alone. Moreover, there was no significant difference between Myrtus communis L and Berberis vulgaris groups (p= 0.18). The patients in groups of Myrtus communis L or Berberis vulgaris in metronidazole base did not experience any relapse, but in metronidazole group, 30% of patients experienced relapse during three weeks follow up. Conclusion Findings of the study showed that treatment with a combination of Myrtus communis L or Berberis vulgaris in metronidazole base improve the efficacy of bacterial vaginosis therapy. PMID:27134945

  8. A Multi-center, Double-blind, Randomized Study, Comparing Clindamycin Phosphate Vaginal Cream 2% (Watson Laboratories, Inc.) to Clindesse® (Ther-Rx™, Clindamyin Phosphate Vaginal Cream 2%) and Both Active Treatments to a Placebo Control in the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis in Non-pregnant Women

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-18

    BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS; Signs and Symptoms to be Evaluated and Recorded Include:; Vaginal Discharge: Color, Odor, and Consistency;; Vulvovaginal Itching and Irritation (Subjective): Absent, Mild, Moderate, or Severe; Vulvovaginal Inflammation (Objective): Absent, Mild, Moderate, or Severe.

  9. Plant innate immunity against human bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Melotto, Maeli; Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana

    2014-01-01

    Certain human bacterial pathogens such as the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are not proven to be plant pathogens yet. Nonetheless, under certain conditions they can survive on, penetrate into, and colonize internal plant tissues causing serious food borne disease outbreaks. In this review, we highlight current understanding on the molecular mechanisms of plant responses against human bacterial pathogens and discuss salient common and contrasting themes of plant interactions with phytopathogens or human pathogens. PMID:25157245

  10. A comprehensive review of vaginitis phytotherapy.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Hanieh; Fallah-Tafti, Mehrnaz; Karimi-Darmiyan, Maliheh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2011-11-01

    To overview phytotherapy of vaginitis in order to identify new approaches for new pharmacological treatments. All related literature databases were searched for herbal medicinal treatment in vaginitis. The search terms were plant, herb, herbal therapy, phytotherapy, vaginitis, vaginal, anti-candida, anti-bacterial and anti-trichomonas. All of the human, animal and in vitro studies were included. Anti-candida, anti-bacterial and anti-trichomonas effects were the key outcomes. The plants including carvacrol, 1,8-cineole, geranial, germacrene-D, limonene, linalool, menthol, terpinen-4-ol and thymol exhibited anti-candida effects. A very low concentration of geranium oil and geraniol blocked mycelial growth, but not yeast. Tea tree oil including terpinen-4-ol, alpha-terpinene, gamma-terpinene and alpha-terpineol showed anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-protozoal properties against trichomonas. Allium hirtifolium (persian shallot) comparable to metronidazole exhibited anti-trichomonas activity due to its components such as allicin, ajoene and other organosulfides. The plants having beneficial effects on vaginitis encompass essential oils that clear the pathway that future studies should be focused to standardize theses herbs. PMID:22514885

  11. High-dose vaginal maintenance metronidazole for recurrent bacterial vaginosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aguin, Tina; Akins, Robert A; Sobel, Jack D

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the benefit of high-dose intravaginal metronidazole as a maintenance therapy in reducing recurrence rates of bacterial vaginosis (BV). Eighteen women with a history of recurrent BV and symptomatic BV were treated with metronidazole 750 mg suppository intravaginally daily for 7 days. Those in remission by Amsel criteria received metronidazole 750 mg twice weekly for 3 months with further follow-up for 3 months. High-dose metronidazole intravaginally was associated with rare clinical recurrence during the period of use. After cessation of suppression therapy, recurrence was high.

  12. A new method to repair recto-vaginal fistula: Use of human amniotic membrane in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Roshanravan, Reza; Ghahramani, Leila; Hosseinzadeh, Massood; Mohammadipour, Mastoureh; Moslemi, Sam; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Safarpour, Ali Reza; Rahimikazerooni, Salar; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recto-vaginal fistula is primarily one of the co-morbidities of vaginal delivery. These patients suffer from persistent malodor vaginal discharge. Various surgical techniques have been employed by surgeons in the course of time. This is the first trial of applying Human Amniotic Membrane (HAM) as a bio-prosthesis in repairing recto-vaginal fistula. Materials and Methods: In a prospective animal study, 8 mixed-breed female dogs weighing 23-27 kg with the age of 12-18 months were selected. They were randomly divided into two groups for standard recto-vaginal fistula repair and fistula repair with human amniotic membrane. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney tests were performed to indicate statistical differences. Results: After 6 weeks, fistulas were evaluated both grossly and microscopically. In gross examination, there were no difference between the two groups and healing of fistula seemed to have been occurred in all dogs expect for one which had a persistent patent fistulous tract. Microscopic healing was scored according to epithelialization, collagenization inflammation, ulcer and necrosis of samples. Healing score was significantly higher in the HAM group than the standard group (P = 0.029). Conclusion: Our findings revealed that using HAM as a bio-prosthesis to repair recto-vaginal fistula would result in better surgical and histological outcomes comparing to simple repair. PMID:24804188

  13. Vaginal cysts

    MedlinePlus

    Inclusion cyst; Gartner duct cyst ... There are several types of vaginal cysts. Vaginal inclusion cysts are the most common. These may form as a result of injury to the vaginal walls during birth process ...

  14. Topical Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Nanoparticles Prevent HIV-1 Vaginal Transmission in a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Destache, Christopher J; Mandal, Subhra; Yuan, Zhe; Kang, Guobin; Date, Abhijit A; Lu, Wuxun; Shibata, Annemarie; Pham, Rachel; Bruck, Patrick; Rezich, Michael; Zhou, You; Vivekanandan, Renuga; Fletcher, Courtney V; Li, Qingsheng

    2016-06-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with 1% tenofovir (TFV) vaginal gel has failed in clinical trials. To improve TFV efficacy in vaginal gel, we formulated tenofovir disoproxil fumarate nanoparticles in a thermosensitive (TMS) gel (TDF-NP-TMS gel). TDF-NPs were fabricated using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer and an ion-pairing agent by oil-in-water emulsification. The efficacy of TDF-NP-TMS gel was tested in humanized bone marrow-liver-thymus (hu-BLT) mice. Hu-BLT mice in the treatment group (Rx; n = 15) were administered TDF-NP-TMS gel intravaginally, having TDF at 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1% (wt/vol) concentrations, whereas the control (Ctr; n = 8) group received a blank TMS gel. All Rx mice (0.1% [n = 4], 0.5% [n = 6], and 1% [n = 5]) were vaginally challenged with two transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 strains (2.5 × 10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious doses). Rx mice were challenged at 4 h (0.1%), 24 h (0.5%), and 7 days (1%) posttreatment (p.t.) and Ctr mice were challenged at 4 h p.t. Blood was drawn weekly for 4 weeks postinoculation (p.i.) for plasma viral load (pVL) using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Ctr mice had positive pVL within 2 weeks p.i. Rx mice challenged at 4 h and 24 h showed 100% protection and no detectable pVL throughout the 4 weeks of follow-up (P = 0.009; Mantel-Cox test). Mice challenged at 7 days were HIV-1 positive at 14 days p.i. Further, HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA) in vaginal and spleen tissues of Rx group mice with negative pVL were examined using an in situ hybridization (ISH) technique. The detection of vRNA was negative in all Rx mice studied. The present studies elucidate TDF-NP-TMS gel as a long-acting, coitus-independent HIV-1 vaginal protection modality. PMID:27044548

  15. Characterization of culturable vaginal Lactobacillus species among women with and without bacterial vaginosis from the United States and India: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Madhivanan, Purnima; Raphael, Eva; Rumphs, Alnecia; Krupp, Karl; Ravi, Kavitha; Srinivas, Vijaya; Arun, Anjali; Reingold, Arthur L; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Riley, Lee W

    2014-07-01

    Lactobacillus species play an integral part in the health of the vaginal microbiota. We compared vaginal Lactobacillus species in women from India and the USA with and without bacterial vaginosis (BV). Between July 2009 and November 2010, a cross-sectional study was conducted among 40 women attending a women's health clinic in Mysore, India, and a sexually transmitted diseases clinic in San Francisco, USA. Women were diagnosed with BV using Amsel's criteria and the Nugent score. Lactobacillus 16S rDNA was sequenced to speciate the cultured isolates. Ten Indian and 10 US women without BV were compared with an equal number of women with BV. Lactobacilli were isolated from all healthy women, but from only 10% of Indian and 50% of US women with BV. 16S rDNA from 164 Lactobacillus colonies was sequenced from healthy women (126 colonies) and women with BV (38 colonies). Seven cultivable Lactobacillus species were isolated from 11 Indian women and nine species from 15 US women. The majority of Lactobacillus species among Indian women were L. crispatus (25.0%), L. jensenii (25.0%) and L. reuteri (16.7%). Among US women, L. crispatus (32.0%), L. jensenii (20.0%) and L. coleohominis (12.0%) predominated. L. jensenii and L. crispatus dominated the vaginal flora of healthy Indian and US women. Indian women appeared to have a higher percentage of obligate heterofermentative species, suggesting the need for a larger degree of metabolic flexibility and a more challenging vaginal environment.

  16. The Human Microbiome during Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Onderdonk, Andrew B; Delaney, Mary L; Fichorova, Raina N

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most commonly reported microbiological syndrome among women of childbearing age. BV is characterized by a shift in the vaginal flora from the dominant Lactobacillus to a polymicrobial flora. BV has been associated with a wide array of health issues, including preterm births, pelvic inflammatory disease, increased susceptibility to HIV infection, and other chronic health problems. A number of potential microbial pathogens, singly and in combinations, have been implicated in the disease process. The list of possible agents continues to expand and includes members of a number of genera, including Gardnerella, Atopobium, Prevotella, Peptostreptococcus, Mobiluncus, Sneathia, Leptotrichia, Mycoplasma, and BV-associated bacterium 1 (BVAB1) to BVAB3. Efforts to characterize BV using epidemiological, microscopic, microbiological culture, and sequenced-based methods have all failed to reveal an etiology that can be consistently documented in all women with BV. A careful analysis of the available data suggests that what we term BV is, in fact, a set of common clinical signs and symptoms that can be provoked by a plethora of bacterial species with proinflammatory characteristics, coupled to an immune response driven by variability in host immune function. PMID:26864580

  17. Enterococcus faecalis inhibits superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1-induced interleukin-8 from human vaginal epithelial cells through tetramic acids.

    PubMed

    Brosnahan, Amanda J; Merriman, Joseph A; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Ford, Bradley; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2013-01-01

    The vaginal mucosa can be colonized by many bacteria including commensal organisms and potential pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Some strains of S. aureus produce the superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, which can penetrate the vaginal epithelium to cause toxic shock syndrome. We have observed that a female was mono-colonized with Enterococcus faecalis vaginally as tested in aerobic culture, even upon repeated culture for six months, suggesting this organism was negatively influencing colonization by other bacteria. In recent studies, we demonstrated an "outside-in" mechanism of cytokine signaling and consequent inflammation that facilitates the ability of potential pathogens to initiate infection from mucosal surfaces. Thus, we hypothesized that this strain of E. faecalis may make anti-inflammatory factors which block disease progression of more pathogenic organisms. E. faecalis MN1 inhibited interleukin-8 production from human vaginal epithelial cells in response to the vaginal pathogens Candida albicans, Gardnerella vaginalis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, as well as to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. We further demonstrated that this organism secretes two tetramic acid compounds which appear responsible for inhibition of interleukin-8 production, as well as inhibition of T cell proliferation due to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. Microbicides that include anti-inflammatory molecules, such as these tetramic acid compounds naturally produced by E. faecalis MN1, may be useful in prevention of diseases that develop from vaginal infections. PMID:23613823

  18. Expression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Neutralizing Antibody Fragments Using Human Vaginal Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Marcobal, Angela; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Wenlei; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Jia, Letong; Lee, Peter P.; Fouts, Timothy R.; Parks, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Eradication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by vaccination with epitopes that produce broadly neutralizing antibodies is the ultimate goal for HIV prevention. However, generating appropriate immune responses has proven difficult. Expression of broadly neutralizing antibodies by vaginal colonizing lactobacilli provides an approach to passively target these antibodies to the mucosa. We tested the feasibility of expressing single-chain and single-domain antibodies (dAbs) in Lactobacillus to be used as a topical microbicide/live biotherapeutic. Lactobacilli provide an excellent platform to express anti-HIV proteins. Broadly neutralizing antibodies have been identified against epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope and have been made into active antibody fragments. We tested single-chain variable fragment m9 and dAb-m36 and its derivative m36.4 as prototype antibodies. We cloned and expressed the antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 in Lactobacillus jensenii-1153 and tested the expression levels and functionality. We made a recombinant L. jensenii 1153-1128 that expresses dAb-m36.4. All antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 were expressed by lactobacilli. However, we noted the smaller m36/m36.4 were expressed to higher levels, ≥3 μg/ml. All L. jensenii-expressed antibody fragments bound to gp120/CD4 complex; Lactobacillus-produced m36.4 inhibited HIV-1BaL in a neutralization assay. Using a TZM-bl assay, we characterized the breadth of neutralization of the m36.4. Delivery of dAbs by Lactobacillus could provide passive transfer of these antibodies to the mucosa and longevity at the site of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26950606

  19. Basic vaginal pH, bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis: prevalence in early pregnancy and risk of spontaneous preterm delivery, a prospective study in a low socioeconomic and multiethnic South American population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) increases the risk of spontaneous preterm deliveries (PD) in developed countries. Its prevalence varies with ethnicity, socioeconomic conditions and gestational age. Aerobic vaginitis (AV) has also been implicated with spontaneous PD. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of asymptomatic BV, the accuracy of vaginal pH level to predict BV and to estimate the risk of spontaneous PD <34 and <37 weeks’ gestation of BV and AV. Methods Women attending prenatal public services in Rio de Janeiro were screened to select asymptomatic pregnant women, < 20 weeks’ gestation, with no indication for elective PD and without risk factors of spontaneous PD. Vaginal smears of women with vaginal pH > = 4.5 were collected to determine the Nugent score; a sample of those smears was also classified according to a modified Donders’ score. Primary outcomes were spontaneous PD < 34 and <37 weeks’ gestation and abortion. Results Prevalence of asymptomatic BV was estimated in 28.1% (n = 1699); 42.4% of the smears were collected before 14 weeks’ gestation. After an 8-week follow up, nearly 40% of the initially BV positive women became BV negative. The prevalence of BV among white and black women was 28.1% (95% CI: 24.6%-32.0%) and 32.5% (95% CI: 28.2%-37.2%), respectively. The sensitivity of vaginal pH= > 4.5 and = > 5.0 to predict BV status was 100% and 82%, correspondingly; the 5.0 cutoff value doubled the specificity, from 41% to 84%. The incidence of < 37 weeks’ spontaneous PDs among BV pregnant women with a pH= > 4.5 was 3.8%. The RR of spontaneous PD < 34 and <37 weeks among BV women with pH > =4.5, as compared with those with intermediate state, were 1.24 and 1.86, respectively (Fisher’s exact test, p value = 1; 0.52, respectively, both ns). No spontaneous case of PD or abortion was associated with severe or moderate AV. Conclusions A high prevalence of asymptomatic BV was

  20. A study of the osmotic characteristics, water permeability, and cryoprotectant permeability of human vaginal immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Hughes, Sean M.; Fang, Cifeng; Huang, Jinghua; Fu, Baiwen; Zhao, Gang; Fialkow, Michael; Lentz, Gretchen; Hladik, Florian; Gao, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Cryopreservation of specimens taken from the genital tract of women is important for studying mucosal immunity during HIV prevention trials. However, it is unclear whether the current, empirically developed cryopreservation procedures for peripheral blood cells are also ideal for genital specimens. The optimal cryopreservation protocol depends on the cryobiological features of the cells. Thus, we obtained tissue specimens from vaginal repair surgeries, isolated and flow cytometry-purified immune cells, and determined fundamental cryobiological characteristics of vaginal CD3+ T cells and CD14+ macrophages using a microfluidic device. The osmotically inactive volumes of the two cell types (Vb) were determined relative to the initial cell volume (V0) by exposing the cells to hypotonic and hypertonic saline solutions, evaluating the equilibrium volume, and applying the Boyle van't Hoff relationship. The cell membrane permeability to water (Lp) and to four different cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions (Ps) at room temperature were also measured. Results indicated Vb values of 0.516 V0 and 0.457 V0 for mucosal T cells and macrophages, respectively. Lp values at room temperature were 0.196 and 0.295 μm/min/atm for T cells and macrophages, respectively. Both cell types had high Ps values for the three CPAs, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), propylene glycol (PG) and ethylene glycol (EG) (minimum of 0.418 × 10−3 cm/min), but transport of the fourth CPA, glycerol, occurred 50–150 times more slowly. Thus, DMSO, PG, and EG are better options than glycerol in avoiding severe cell volume excursion and osmotic injury during CPA addition and removal for cryopreservation of human vaginal immune cells. PMID:26976225

  1. A study of the osmotic characteristics, water permeability, and cryoprotectant permeability of human vaginal immune cells.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zhiquan; Hughes, Sean M; Fang, Cifeng; Huang, Jinghua; Fu, Baiwen; Zhao, Gang; Fialkow, Michael; Lentz, Gretchen; Hladik, Florian; Gao, Dayong

    2016-04-01

    Cryopreservation of specimens taken from the genital tract of women is important for studying mucosal immunity during HIV prevention trials. However, it is unclear whether the current, empirically developed cryopreservation procedures for peripheral blood cells are also ideal for genital specimens. The optimal cryopreservation protocol depends on the cryobiological features of the cells. Thus, we obtained tissue specimens from vaginal repair surgeries, isolated and flow cytometry-purified immune cells, and determined fundamental cryobiological characteristics of vaginal CD3(+) T cells and CD14(+) macrophages using a microfluidic device. The osmotically inactive volumes of the two cell types (Vb) were determined relative to the initial cell volume (V0) by exposing the cells to hypotonic and hypertonic saline solutions, evaluating the equilibrium volume, and applying the Boyle van't Hoff relationship. The cell membrane permeability to water (Lp) and to four different cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions (Ps) at room temperature were also measured. Results indicated Vb values of 0.516 V0 and 0.457 V0 for mucosal T cells and macrophages, respectively. Lp values at room temperature were 0.196 and 0.295 μm/min/atm for T cells and macrophages, respectively. Both cell types had high Ps values for the three CPAs, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), propylene glycol (PG) and ethylene glycol (EG) (minimum of 0.418 × 10(-3) cm/min), but transport of the fourth CPA, glycerol, occurred 50-150 times more slowly. Thus, DMSO, PG, and EG are better options than glycerol in avoiding severe cell volume excursion and osmotic injury during CPA addition and removal for cryopreservation of human vaginal immune cells. PMID:26976225

  2. Comparison between the efficacy of metronidazole vaginal gel and Berberis vulgaris (Berberis vulgaris) combined with metronidazole gel alone in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Masoudi, Mansoure; Kopaei, Mahmoud Rafieian; Miraj, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis is one of the most prevalent complications among reproductive-aged women. Antibacterial and antifungal effects of Berberis vulgaris have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Objectives This study aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of the vaginal gel of Berberis vulgaris 5% (in metronidazole base) with metronidazole vaginal gel 0.75% on bacterial vaginosis on 80 patients referred to the Hajar Hospital from January 2012 to April 2013. Methods This study was a randomized clinical trial research on 80 women affected by bacterial vaginosis, who were randomly divided into two groups of 40 participants. Diagnostic criteria were Amsel’s criteria and Gram stain. Berberis vulgaris 5% (in metronidazole gel base) or metronidazole vaginal gel for five-night usage was prescribed to each group, and after two to seven days therapeutic effects and Amsel criteria were assessed. Data analysis was performed by SPSS 16 using Student t-test, chi-square, and ANOVA tests. Results Findings of the study showed a statistically significant difference with regard to treatment response between the study groups (p<0.001), and the Berberis vulgaris group had a better response than the metronidazole gel group. The patients in groups of Berberis vulgaris in a metronidazole gel base did not experience any relapse, but, in the metronidazole group, 30% of patients experienced relapse during three weeks’ follow-up. Conclusions Findings of the study showed that adding Berberis vulgaris fruit extract on metronidazole improve the efficacy of bacterial vaginosis therapy. Clinical trial registration The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCT ID: IRCT201411102085N13. Funding Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences supported this research. PMID:27757195

  3. Strategies for the evaluation and selection of potential vaginal probiotics from human sources: an exemplary study.

    PubMed

    Domig, K J; Kiss, H; Petricevic, L; Viernstein, H; Unger, F; Kneifel, W

    2014-09-01

    During the last years, the application of probiotics in gynaecological clinical practice has gained increasing relevance regarding therapy and prevention. This trend has also provoked the need for having tailored pharmaceutical preparations containing powerful microbial strains with defined properties. For the development of such preparations, several factors and criteria have to be considered, thereby not only focusing on identity and safety aspects as well as individual properties of the bacterial strains, but also on technological issues, such as stability and targeted release from the preparation. Against this background, this report exemplarily addresses the development procedure of a probiotic bacterial formulation for gynaecological application, covering the search for suitable strains, assessing their microbiological, molecular biological and physiological characterisation, and the selection for their use in clinical trials. In detail, starting with 127 presumptive lactobacilli isolates of vaginal origin, a step-by-step selection of candidate strains meeting special criteria was thoroughly examined, finally leading to a preparation consisting of four individual Lactobacillus strains that possess particular significance in women's urogenital health. Relevant issues and quality criteria of probiotic preparations used in gynecology are addressed and exemplarily introduced.

  4. Sequences of multiple bacterial genomes and a Chlamydia trachomatis genotype from direct sequencing of DNA derived from a vaginal swab diagnostic specimen.

    PubMed

    Andersson, P; Klein, M; Lilliebridge, R A; Giffard, P M

    2013-09-01

    Ultra-deep Illumina sequencing was performed on whole genome amplified DNA derived from a Chlamydia trachomatis-positive vaginal swab. Alignment of reads with reference genomes allowed robust SNP identification from the C. trachomatis chromosome and plasmid. This revealed that the C. trachomatis in the specimen was very closely related to the sequenced urogenital, serovar F, clade T1 isolate F-SW4. In addition, high genome-wide coverage was obtained for Prevotella melaninogenica, Gardnerella vaginalis, Clostridiales genomosp. BVAB3 and Mycoplasma hominis. This illustrates the potential of metagenome data to provide high resolution bacterial typing data from multiple taxa in a diagnostic specimen.

  5. The effect upon the human vaginal histology of the long-term use of the injectable contraceptive Depo-Provera.

    PubMed

    Bahamondes, L; Trevisan, M; Andrade, L; Marchi, N M; Castro, S; Díaz, J; Faúndes, A

    2000-07-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of long-term use of the injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) on human vaginal histology. Twenty premenopausal women currently using DMPA as a contraceptive method for two and three years were compared with 20 regularly menstruating women, who never used Depo-Provera and/or other kind of hormonal contraceptive in the last 6 months prior to the study. Subjects and controls were matched by age (+/-1 year), body mass index (kg/m2) (+/-1.0), number of pregnancies (+/-1), age at first intercourse (+/-1 year), years of sexual activity (+/-1 year), and number of partners during their life (+/-1). Vaginal biopsies were performed in users at 90+/-7 days after the last injection and in nonusers at day 20-25 of the menstrual cycle. In addition, at the day of the biopsy a blood sample was collected to measure estradiol (in all women) and DMPA in users. The level of serum estradiol was significant lower in Depo-Provera users than in controls (p < 0.001). The thickness of the vaginal epithelium was not smaller among DMPA users than among controls, the mean count of Langerhans cells per mm of epithelium were almost identical in both groups, and no significant differences were found on the vaginal maturation indices. In conclusion, the use of Depo-Provera between two and three years did not affect vaginal thinning of the epithelium, Langerhans cell count or maturation index.

  6. Vaginal transmission of chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency viruses in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y; Brosio, P; Lafaile, M; Li, J; Collman, R G; Sodroski, J; Miller, C J

    1996-01-01

    Chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that express the env genes derived from distinct HIV type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for the ability to infect rhesus macaques following intravaginal inoculation. SHIVs containing either the HIV-1 HXBc2 or the HIV-1 89.6 envelope glycoproteins were capable of replicating in intravenously inoculated rhesus macaques. However, intravaginal inoculation of animals with these two SHIVs resulted in infection only with the SHIV containing the HIV-1 89.6 glycoprotein. Thus, properties conferred by the envelope glycoproteins in the chimeric virus affect the ability of particular SHIVs to initiate a systemic infection following vaginal inoculation. These results provide indirect support for the hypothesis that the selection of specific viral variants occurs in the genital tracts of individuals exposed to HIV by sexual contact. PMID:8627782

  7. Sublingual Immunization of Trivalent Human Papillomavirus DNA Vaccine in Baculovirus Nanovector for Protection against Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Cho, Hansam; Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Heo, Yoon-Ki; Cho, Yeondong; Gwon, Yong-Dae; Park, Ki Hoon; Jin, Hyerim; Kim, Jinyoung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the immunogenicity of a sublingually delivered, trivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA vaccine encapsidated in a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope-coated, nonreplicable, baculovirus nanovector. The HERV envelope-coated, nonreplicable, baculovirus-based DNA vaccine, encoding HPV16L1, -18L1 and -58L1 (AcHERV-triHPV), was constructed and sublingually administered to mice without adjuvant. Following sublingual (SL) administration, AcHERV-triHPV was absorbed and distributed throughout the body. At 15 minutes and 1 day post-dose, the distribution of AcHERV-triHPV to the lung was higher than that to other tissues. At 30 days post-dose, the levels of AcHERV-triHPV had diminished throughout the body. Six weeks after the first of three doses, 1×108 copies of SL AcHERV-triHPV induced HPV type-specific serum IgG and neutralizing antibodies to a degree comparable to that of IM immunization with 1×109 copies. AcHERV-triHPV induced HPV type-specific vaginal IgA titers in a dose-dependent manner. SL immunization with 1×1010 copies of AcHERV-triHPV induced Th1 and Th2 cellular responses comparable to IM immunization with 1×109 copies. Molecular imaging revealed that SL AcHERV-triHPV in mice provided complete protection against vaginal challenge with HPV16, HPV18, and HPV58 pseudoviruses. These results support the potential of SL immunization using multivalent DNA vaccine in baculovirus nanovector for induction of mucosal, systemic, and cellular immune responses. PMID:25789464

  8. The vaginal microbiome, vaginal anti-microbial defence mechanisms and the clinical challenge of reducing infection-related preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Witkin, S S

    2015-01-01

    Ascending bacterial infection is implicated in about 40-50% of preterm births. The human vaginal microbiota in most women is dominated by lactobacilli. In women whose vaginal microbiota is not lactobacilli-dominated anti-bacterial defence mechanisms are reduced. The enhanced proliferation of pathogenic bacteria plus degradation of the cervical barrier increase bacterial passage into the endometrium and amniotic cavity and trigger preterm myometrial contractions. Evaluation of protocols to detect the absence of lactobaciili dominance in pregnant women by self-measuring vaginal pH, coupled with measures to promote growth of lactobacilli are novel prevention strategies that may reduce the occurrence of preterm birth in low-resource areas. PMID:25316066

  9. Chlamydia caviae infection alters abundance but not composition of the guinea pig vaginal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Neuendorf, Elizabeth; Gajer, Pawel; Bowlin, Anne K.; Marques, Patricia X.; Ma, Bing; Yang, Hongqiu; Fu, Li; Humphrys, Michael S.; Forney, Larry J.; Myers, Garry S.A.; Bavoil, Patrik M.; Rank, Roger G.; Ravel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    In humans, the vaginal microbiota is thought to be the first line of defense again pathogens including Chlamydia trachomatis. The guinea pig has been extensively used as a model to study chlamydial infection because it shares anatomical and physiological similarities with humans, such as a squamous vaginal epithelium as well as some of the long-term outcomes caused by chlamydial infection. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the guinea pig-C. caviae model of genital infection as a surrogate for studying the role of the vaginal microbiota in the early steps of C. trachomatis infection in humans. We used culture-independent molecular methods to characterize the relative and absolute abundance of bacterial phylotypes in the guinea pig vaginal microbiota in animals non-infected, mock-infected or infected by C. caviae. We showed that the guinea pig and human vaginal microbiotas are of different bacterial composition and abundance. Chlamydia caviae infection had a profound effect on the absolute abundance of bacterial phylotypes but not on the composition of the guinea pig vaginal microbiota. Our findings compromise the validity of the guinea pig-C. caviae model to study the role of the vaginal microbiota during the early steps of sexually transmitted infection. PMID:25761873

  10. Chlamydia caviae infection alters abundance but not composition of the guinea pig vaginal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Neuendorf, Elizabeth; Gajer, Pawel; Bowlin, Anne K; Marques, Patricia X; Ma, Bing; Yang, Hongqiu; Fu, Li; Humphrys, Michael S; Forney, Larry J; Myers, Garry S A; Bavoil, Patrik M; Rank, Roger G; Ravel, Jacques

    2015-06-01

    In humans, the vaginal microbiota is thought to be the first line of defense again pathogens including Chlamydia trachomatis. The guinea pig has been extensively used as a model to study chlamydial infection because it shares anatomical and physiological similarities with humans, such as a squamous vaginal epithelium as well as some of the long-term outcomes caused by chlamydial infection. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the guinea pig-C. caviae model of genital infection as a surrogate for studying the role of the vaginal microbiota in the early steps of C. trachomatis infection in humans. We used culture-independent molecular methods to characterize the relative and absolute abundance of bacterial phylotypes in the guinea pig vaginal microbiota in animals non-infected, mock-infected or infected by C. caviae. We showed that the guinea pig and human vaginal microbiotas are of different bacterial composition and abundance. Chlamydia caviae infection had a profound effect on the absolute abundance of bacterial phylotypes but not on the composition of the guinea pig vaginal microbiota. Our findings compromise the validity of the guinea pig-C. caviae model to study the role of the vaginal microbiota during the early steps of sexually transmitted infection.

  11. Clindamycin Vaginal

    MedlinePlus

    ... an infection caused by an overgrowth of harmful bacteria in the vagina). Clindamycin is in a class ... works by slowing or stopping the growth of bacteria. Vaginal clindamycin cannot be used to treat vaginal ...

  12. Vaginal micropapillary lesions are not related to human papillomavirus infection: in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction detection techniques.

    PubMed

    Garzetti, G G; Ciavattini, A; Goteri, G; Menzo, S; De Nictolis, M; Clementi, M; Brugia, M; Romanini, C

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the human papillomavirus DNA presence in vaginal papillary lesions, with particular regard to micropapillomatosis to better define their clinical significance. Prospective study: the study population was composed of 62 women who were recruited consecutively from the Colposcopy Centre of the Ancona University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, on the grounds of vaginal papillomatosis or/and typical acuminata warts. Biopsies for routine histology, and for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA detection by means of in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were taken from the papillary lesions and from 24 healthy women, who were selected as controls. Macroscopically, vaginal micropapillomatosis was ascertained in 51 cases (82.3%), while in 11 cases (17.7%) the colposcopic diagnosis was condyloma acuminatum. During in situ hybridization, HPV DNA positivity was observed in 8 (9.4%) out of 85 samples of squamous papillae and in 11 (64.7%) out of 17 samples of condylomata; in control specimens, HPV DNA was detected in 2 (8.3%) out of 24 bioptic samples. The correspondence between in situ hybridization and PCR was 96.1%, with 17.4% more diagnosis obtained by PCR. Vaginal micropapillomatosis may be regarded as a variation in the normal anatomy of the lower genital tract without any significant relationship with HPV infection, and as a lesion easily distinguishable from condylomata acuminata by clinical examination alone. PMID:7959342

  13. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  14. Engineering of a Human Vaginal Lactobacillus Strain for Surface Expression of Two-Domain CD4 Molecules▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaowen; Lagenaur, Laurel A.; Lee, Peter P.; Xu, Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Women are at significant risk of heterosexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, with the mucosal epithelium of the cervix and vagina serving as a major portal of entry. The cervicovaginal mucosa naturally harbors dynamic microflora composed predominantly of lactobacilli, which may be genetically modified to serve as a more efficient protective barrier against the heterosexual transmission of HIV. We selected a vaginal strain of Lactobacillus, L. jensenii 1153, for genetic modification to display surface-anchored anti-HIV proteins. Genomic sequencing analyses revealed that L. jensenii 1153 encodes several unique high-molecular-weight cell wall-anchored proteins with a C-terminal cell wall sorting LPQTG motif. In this report, we employed these proteins to express a surface-anchored two-domain CD4 (2D CD4) molecule in L. jensenii 1153. Our studies indicated that the C-terminal cell wall sorting signal LPQTG motif alone is insufficient to drive the surface expression of heterologous proteins, and the display of surface-anchored 2D CD4 molecules required native sequences of a defined length upstream of the unique C-terminal LPQTG cell wall sorting signal and the positively charged C terminus in a Lactobacillus-based expression system. The modified L. jensenii strain displayed 2D CD4 molecules that were uniformly distributed on bacterial surfaces. The surface-anchored 2D CD4 molecule was recognized by a conformation-dependent anti-CD4 antibody, suggesting that the expressed proteins adopted a native conformation. The establishment of this Lactobacillus-based surface expression system, with potential broad applicability, represents a major step toward developing an inexpensive yet durable approach to topical microbicides for the mitigation of heterosexual transmission of HIV and other mucosally transmitted viral pathogens. PMID:18539799

  15. Vaginitis: current microbiologic and clinical concepts.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, L V; Embil, J A

    1986-01-01

    Infectious vaginitis occurs when the normal vaginal flora is disrupted; it may arise when saprophytes overwhelm the host immune response, when pathogenic organisms are introduced into the vagina or when changes in substrate allow an imbalance of microorganisms to develop. Examples of these types of vaginitis include the presence of chronic fungal infection in women with an inadequate cellular immune response to the yeast, the introduction of trichomonads into vaginal epithelium that has a sufficient supply of glycogen, and the alteration in bacterial flora, normally dominated by Lactobacillus spp., and its metabolites that is characteristic of "nonspecific vaginitis". The authors review microbiologic and clinical aspects of the fungal, protozoal and bacterial infections, including the interactions of bacteria thought to produce nonspecific vaginitis, that are now recognized as causing vaginitis. Other causes of vaginitis are also discussed. PMID:3510698

  16. Bacterial protein toxins in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Rosadi, Francesca; Fiorentini, Carla; Fabbri, Alessia

    2016-02-01

    Many bacteria causing persistent infections produce toxins whose mechanisms of action indicate that they could have a role in carcinogenesis. Some toxins, like CDT and colibactin, directly attack the genome by damaging DNA whereas others, as for example CNF1, CagA and BFT, impinge on key eukaryotic processes, such as cellular signalling and cell death. These bacterial toxins, together with other less known toxins, mimic carcinogens and tumour promoters. The aim of this review is to fulfil an up-to-date analysis of toxins with carcinogenic potential that have been already correlated to human cancers. Bacterial toxins-induced carcinogenesis represents an emerging aspect in bacteriology, and its significance is increasingly recognized.

  17. Characterization of the vaginal microbiota of ewes and cows reveals a unique microbiota with low levels of lactobacilli and near-neutral pH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human vaginal microbiota affect reproductive performance and perinatal health. Although a number of common reproductive disorders in livestock involve bacterial infection, very little is known about their normal vaginal microbiota. Therefore, we sought to determine the species composition of sheep a...

  18. Neutralizing IgG at the Portal of Infection Mediates Protection against Vaginal Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Katja; Veazey, Ronald S.; Warrier, Ranjit; Hraber, Peter; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A.; Buffa, Viviana; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Shaw, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies may have critical importance in immunity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, the amount of protective antibody needed at mucosal surfaces has not been fully established. Here, we evaluated systemic and mucosal pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of 2F5 IgG and 2F5 Fab fragments with respect to protection against vaginal challenge with simian-human immunodeficiency virus-BaL in macaques. Antibody assessment demonstrated that 2F5 IgG was more potent than polymeric forms (IgM and IgA) across a range of cellular and tissue models. Vaginal challenge studies demonstrated a dose-dependent protection for 2F5 IgG and no protection with 2F5 Fab despite higher vaginal Fab levels at the time of challenge. Animals receiving 50 or 25 mg/kg of body weight 2F5 IgG were completely protected, while 3/5 animals receiving 5 mg/kg were protected. In the control animals, infection was established by a minimum of 1 to 4 transmitted/founder (T/F) variants, similar to natural human infection by this mucosal route; in the two infected animals that had received 5 mg 2F5 IgG, infection was established by a single T/F variant. Serum levels of 2F5 IgG were more predictive of sterilizing protection than measured vaginal levels. Fc-mediated antiviral activity did not appear to influence infection of primary target cells in cervical explants. However, PK studies highlighted the importance of the Fc portion in tissue biodistribution. Data presented in this study may be important in modeling serum levels of neutralizing antibodies that need to be achieved by either vaccination or passive infusion to prevent mucosal acquisition of HIV-1 infection in humans. PMID:23966410

  19. In vivo activity of Sapindus saponaria against azole-susceptible and -resistant human vaginal Candida species

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Study of in vivo antifungal activity of the hydroalcoholic extract (HE) and n-BuOH extract (BUTE) of Sapindus saponaria against azole-susceptible and -resistant human vaginal Candida spp. Methods The in vitro antifungal activity of HE, BUTE, fluconazole (FLU), and itraconazole (ITRA) was determined by the broth microdilution method. We obtained values of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicide concentration (MFC) for 46 strains of C. albicans and 10 of C. glabrata isolated from patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). VVC was induced in hyperestrogenic Wistar rats with azole-susceptible C. albicans (SCA), azole-resistant C. albicans (RCA), and azole-resistant C. glabrata (RCG). The rats were treated intravaginally with 0.1 mL of HE or BUTE at concentrations of 1%, 2.5% and 5%; 100 μg/mL of FLU (treatment positive control); or distilled water (negative control) at 1, 24, and 48 h after induction of the infection, and the progress of VVC was monitored by culturing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The toxicity was evaluated in cervical cells of the HeLa cell line. Results The extracts showed in vitro inhibitory and fungicidal activity against all the isolates, and the MIC and MFC values for the C. glabrata isolates were slightly higher. In vivo, the SCA, RCA, and RCG infections were eliminated by 21 days post-infection, with up to 5% HE and BUTE, comparable to the activity of FLU. No cytotoxic action was observed for either extract. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that HE and BUTE from S. saponaria show inhibitory and fungicidal activity in vitro, in addition to in vivo activity against azole-resistant vaginal isolates of C. glabrata and azole-susceptible and resistant isolates of C. albicans. Also considering the lack of cytotoxicity and the low concentrations of the extracts necessary to eliminate the infection in vivo, HE and BUTE show promise for continued studies with purified antifungal substances in VVC yeast

  20. Human domain antibodies against virulence traits of Candida albicans inhibit fungus adherence to vaginal epithelium and protect against experimental vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Liu, Haiqun; O'Mahony, Rachel; La Valle, Roberto; Bartollino, Silvia; Sandini, Silvia; Grant, Steven; Brewis, Neil; Tomlinson, Ian; Basset, Rachel C; Holton, John; Roitt, Ivan M; Cassone, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Antibody variable domains (domain antibodies [DAbs]) are genetically engineered antibody fragments that include individual heavy-chain (VH) or kappa-chain (Vkappa) variable domains and lack the Fc region. Human DAbs against the 65-kDa mannoprotein (MP65) or the secretory aspartyl proteinase (SAP)-2 of Candida albicans (monospecific DAbs) or against both fungal antigens (heterodimeric, bispecific DAbs) were generated from phage expression libraries. Both monospecific and bispecific DAbs inhibited fungus adherence to the epithelial cells of rat vagina and accelerated the clearance of vaginal infection with the fungus. When heterodimeric DAbs were used, the clearance of infection was at least equivalent to treatment with fluconazole. The in vivo protective effects of DAbs were demonstrated by both pre- and postchallenge schedules of DAb administration and with both fluconazole-susceptible and fluconazole-resistant strains of C. albicans. This is the first demonstration that human DAbs lacking the Fc constituent can efficiently control an infection and can act largely by inhibiting adherence.

  1. Vaginal gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia; Del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Isla, Arantxazu; Solinís, María Angeles

    2015-09-15

    In the last years, vaginal gene therapy has gained increasing attention mainly for the treatment and control of sexually transmitted infections. DNA delivery has been also suggested to improve reproductive outcomes for women with deficiencies in the female reproductive tract. Although no product has reached clinical phase, preclinical investigations reveal the potential of the vaginal tract as an effective administration route for gene delivery. This review focuses on the main advantages and challenges of vaginal gene therapy, and on the most used nucleic acid delivery systems, including viral and non-viral vectors. Additionally, the advances in the application of vaginal gene therapy for the treatment and/or prevention of infectious diseases such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the human papillomavirus (HPV) or the herpes simplex virus (HSV) are presented.

  2. Vaginal Discharge: What's Normal, What's Not

    MedlinePlus

    ... period Vaginal infections, such as bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis (yeast infection), and trichomoniasis are common causes of abnormal ... having sex, such as bacterial vaginosis or a yeast infection. If you notice any changes in your ...

  3. Human vaginal epithelium and the epithelial lining of a cyst model constructed from it: a comparative light microscopic and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Thompson, I O; van Wyk, C W; Darling, M R

    2001-11-01

    The light microscopic features and keratin filament distribution of human vaginal epithelium resemble those of buccal mucosa. We used vaginal epithelium to establish a human cyst model in immunodeficient mice. To strengthen the view that this experimental cyst is a suitable model to study mucosal diseases, we compared specific light microscopic and ultra-structural features of vaginal epithelium and the epithelial lining of the cyst. Nineteen cyst walls and 6 specimens of vaginal mucosa, which had been used to establish the cysts, were examined. We counted the number of cell layers of 17 cyst linings and the 6 vaginal specimens. Surface keratinisation was evaluated on sections stained with the Picro-Mallory method. To demonstrate intercellular lamellae and membrane coating granules 2 cyst linings were examined ultra-structurally. The epithelium lining of the cyst wall was thinner than that of vaginal mucosa but the surface keratinisation and ultra-structural features of the intercellular lamellae and membrane coating granules were similar. We concluded that vaginal mucosa is a useful substitute for oral mucosa in the cyst model.

  4. Identification of Trichomonas vaginalis cysteine proteases that induce apoptosis in human vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Ulf; Costello, Catherine E; Hayes, Gary R; Beach, David H; Gilbert, Robert O; Lucas, John J; Singh, Bibhuti N

    2005-06-24

    A secreted cysteine protease (CP) fraction from Trichomonas vaginalis is shown here to induce apoptosis in human vaginal epithelial cells (HVEC) and is analyzed by mass spectrometry. The trichomonad parasite T. vaginalis causes one of the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection in humans, trichomoniasis. The parasite as well as a secreted cysteine protease (CP) fraction, isolated by affinity chromatography followed by Bio-Gel P-60 column chromatography, are shown to induce HVEC apoptosis, as demonstrated by the Cell Death Detection ELISA(PLUS) assay and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate flow cytometry analyses. Initiation of apoptosis is correlated with protease activity because the specific CP inhibitor E-64 inhibits both activities. SDS-PAGE analysis of the CP fraction reveals triplet bands around 30 kDa, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight MS indicates two closely associated peaks of molecular mass 23.6 and 23.8 kDa. Mass spectral peptide sequencing of the proteolytically digested CPs results in matches to previously reported cDNA clones, CP2, CP3, and CP4 (Mallinson, D. J., Lockwood, B. C., Coombs, G. H., and North, M. J. (1994) Microbiology 140, 2725-2735), as well as another sequence with high homology to CP4 (www.tigr.org). These last two species are the most abundant components of the CP fraction. The present results, suggesting that CP-induced programmed cell death may be involved in the pathogenesis of T. vaginalis infection in vivo, may have important implications for therapeutic intervention. PMID:15843376

  5. The primate vaginal microbiome: comparative context and implications for human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Rebecca M; Wilson, Brenda A; Rivera, Angel; Yildirim, Suleyman; Yeoman, Carl J; Polk, John D; White, Bryan A; Leigh, Steven R

    2013-12-01

    The primate body hosts trillions of microbes. Interactions between primate hosts and these microbes profoundly affect primate physiology, reproduction, health, survival, and ultimately, evolution. It is increasingly clear that primate health cannot be understood fully without knowledge of host-microbial interactions. Our goals here are to review what is known about microbiomes of the female reproductive tract and to explore several factors that influence variation within individuals, as well as within and between primate species. Much of our knowledge of microbial variation derives from studies of humans, and from microbes located in nonreproductive regions (e.g., the gut). We review work suggesting that the vaginal microbiota affects female health, fecundity, and pregnancy outcomes, demonstrating the selective potential for these agents. We explore the factors that correlate with microbial variation within species. Initial colonization by microbes depends on the manner of birth; most microbial variation is structured by estrogen levels that change with age (i.e., at puberty and menopause) and through the menstrual cycle. Microbial communities vary by location within the vagina and can depend on the sampling methods used (e.g., swab, lavage, or pap smear). Interindividual differences also exist, and while this variation is not completely understood, evidence points more to differences in estrogen levels, rather than differences in external physical environment. When comparing across species, reproductive-age humans show distinct microbial communities, generally dominated by Lactobacillus, unlike other primates. We develop evolutionary hypotheses to explain the marked differences in microbial communities. While much remains to be done to test these hypotheses, we argue that the ample variation in primate mating and reproductive behavior offers excellent opportunities to evaluate host-microbe coevolution and adaptation.

  6. Anatomic Distribution of Nerves and Microvascular Density in the Human Anterior Vaginal Wall: Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting; Liao, Qinping; Zhang, Hong; Gao, Xuelian; Li, Xueying; Zhang, Miao

    2014-01-01

    Background The presence of the G-spot (an assumed erotic sensitive area in the anterior wall of the vagina) remains controversial. We explored the histomorphological basis of the G-spot. Methods Biopsies were drawn from a 12 o’clock direction in the distal- and proximal-third areas of the anterior vagina of 32 Chinese subjects. The total number of protein gene product 9.5–immunoreactive nerves and smooth muscle actin–immunoreactive blood vessels in each specimen was quantified using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase assay. Results Vaginal innervation was observed in the lamina propria and muscle layer of the anterior vaginal wall. The distal-third of the anterior vaginal wall had significantly richer small-nerve-fiber innervation in the lamina propria than the proximal-third (p = 0.000) and in the vaginal muscle layer (p = 0.006). There were abundant microvessels in the lamina propria and muscle layer, but no small vessels in the lamina propria and few in the muscle layer. Significant differences were noted in the number of microvessels when comparing the distal- with proximal-third parts in the lamina propria (p = 0.046) and muscle layer (p = 0.002). Conclusions Significantly increased density of nerves and microvessels in the distal-third of the anterior vaginal wall could be the histomorphological basis of the G-spot. Distal anterior vaginal repair could disrupt the normal anatomy, neurovascular supply and function of the G-spot, and cause sexual dysfunction. PMID:25379731

  7. Rhesus macaques previously infected with simian/human immunodeficiency virus are protected from vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac239.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C J; McChesney, M B; Lü, X; Dailey, P J; Chutkowski, C; Lu, D; Brosio, P; Roberts, B; Lu, Y

    1997-01-01

    Nontraumatic vaginal inoculation of rhesus macaques with a simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SIV/HIV) chimera containing the envelope gene from HIV-1 89.6 (SHIV 89.6) results in systemic infection (Y. Lu, B. Brosio, M. Lafaile, J. Li, R. G. Collman, J. Sodroski, and C. J. Miller, J. Virol. 70:3045-3050, 1996). A total of five rhesus macaques have each been infected by exposure to at least three intravaginal inoculations of SHIV 89.6. The SHIV 89.6 infection is characterized by a transient viremia that evokes humoral and cellular immune responses to HIV and SIV antigens, but disease does not develop in animals infected with SHIV 89.6. To determine if a previous infection with SHIV 89.6 by vaginal inoculation could protect animals from vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIV, all five animals were intravaginally inoculated twice with pathogenic SIV-mac239. After challenge, all of the SHIV-immunized animals had low or undetectable viral RNA levels in plasma compared to control animals. Three of the five of the SHIV-immunized animals remained virus isolation negative for more than 8 months, while two became virus isolation positive. The presence of SIV Gag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and SIV-specific antibodies in cervicovaginal secretions at the time of challenge was associated with resistance to pathogenic SIV infection after vaginal challenge. These results suggest that protection from sexual transmission of HIV may be possible by effectively stimulating both humoral and cellular antiviral immunity in the systemic and genital mucosal immune compartments. PMID:9032322

  8. Bacterial agents as a cause of infertility in humans.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Melania; Cannas, Sara; Cubeddu, Marina; Molicotti, Paola; Piras, Gennarina Laura; Dessole, Salvatore; Zanetti, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    Infertility is a problem affecting almost 15% of couples. There are many causes for this condition, among which urogenital bacterial infections seem to play an important role. Many studies have explained the mechanisms by which bacteria cause infertility both in men and women. Therefore we undertook this study to evaluate the presence of genito-urinary infections in infertile couples who sought counselling to investigate their condition. Microbiological analysis was performed on semen and vaginal/cervical samples of both partners of each couple. The percentage of individuals affected by a urogenital bacterial infection was between 14 and 20%. More significantly, most of the species isolated both in men and women have been described in the literature as potential causes of infertility. PMID:27602419

  9. Reference Gene Selection for qPCR Is Dependent on Cell Type Rather than Treatment in Colonic and Vaginal Human Epithelial Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Annette V.; Yemaneab, Bisrat T.; Jass, Jana; Scherbak, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    The ability of commensal bacteria to influence gene expression in host cells under the influence of pathogenic bacteria has previously been demonstrated, however the extent of this interaction is important for understanding how bacteria can be used as probiotics. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction is the most sensitive tool for evaluating relative changes to gene expression levels. However as a result of its sensitivity an appropriate method of normalisation should be used to account for any variation incurred in preparatory experimental procedures. These variations may result from differences in the amount of starting material, quality of extracted RNA, or in the efficiency of the reverse transcriptase or polymerase enzymes. Selection of an endogenous control gene is the preferred method of normalisation, and ideally a proper validation of the gene's appropriateness for the study in question should be performed. In this study we used quantitative polymerase chain reaction data and applied four different algorithms (geNorm, BestKeeper, NormFinder, and comparative ΔCq) to evaluate eleven different genes as to their suitability as endogenous controls for use in studies involving colonic (HT-29) and vaginal (VK2/E6E7) human mucosal epithelial cells treated with probiotic and pathogenic bacteria. We found phosphoglycerate kinase 1 to be most appropriate for HT-29 cells, and ribosomal protein large P0 to be the best choice for VK2/E6E7 cells. We also showed that use of less stable reference genes can lead to less accurate quantification of expression levels of gene of interest (GOI) and also can result in decreased statistical significance for GOI expression levels when compared to control. Additionally, we found the cell type being analysed had greater influence on reference gene selection than the treatment performed. This study provides recommendations for stable endogenous control genes for use in further studies involving colonic and vaginal cell

  10. Influence of the tryptophan-indole-IFNγ axis on human genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection: role of vaginal co-infections

    PubMed Central

    Aiyar, Ashok; Quayle, Alison J.; Buckner, Lyndsey R.; Sherchand, Shardulendra P.; Chang, Theresa L.; Zea, Arnold H.; Martin, David H.; Belland, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The natural history of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections can vary widely; infections can spontaneously resolve but can also last from months to years, potentially progressing to cause significant pathology. The host and bacterial factors underlying this wide variation are not completely understood, but emphasize the bacterium's capacity to evade/adapt to the genital immune response, and/or exploit local environmental conditions to survive this immune response. IFNγ is considered to be a primary host protective cytokine against endocervical C. trachomatis infections. IFNγ acts by inducing the host enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxgenase, which catabolizes tryptophan, thereby depriving the bacterium of this essential amino acid. In vitro studies have revealed that tryptophan deprivation causes Chlamydia to enter a viable but non-infectious growth pattern that is termed a persistent growth form, characterized by a unique morphology and gene expression pattern. Provision of tryptophan can reactivate the bacterium to the normal developmental cycle. There is a significant difference in the capacity of ocular and genital C. trachomatis serovars to counter tryptophan deprivation. The latter uniquely encode a functional tryptophan synthase to synthesize tryptophan via indole salvage, should indole be available in the infection microenvironment. In vitro studies have confirmed the capacity of indole to mitigate the effects of IFNγ; it has been suggested that a perturbed vaginal microbiome may provide a source of indole in vivo. Consistent with this hypothesis, the microbiome associated with bacterial vaginosis includes species that encode a tryptophanase to produce indole. In this review, we discuss the natural history of genital chlamydial infections, morphological and molecular changes imposed by IFNγ on Chlamydia, and finally, the microenvironmental conditions associated with vaginal co-infections that can ameliorate the effects of IFNγ on C. trachomatis. PMID

  11. Estrogen Vaginal

    MedlinePlus

    ... estradiol vaginal ring is also used to treat hot flushes ('hot flashes'; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... mild soap and warm water. Do not use hot water or boil the applicator. Ask your pharmacist ...

  12. Vaginal reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients.

  13. Trichomonas vaginalis adherence mediates differential gene expression in human vaginal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kucknoor, Ashwini; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Trichomonas vaginalis, an ancient protist, colonizes the vaginal mucosa causing trichomonosis, a vaginitis that sometimes leads to severe health complications. Preparatory to colonization of the vagina is the adhesion to vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) by trichomonads. We hypothesized that VECs alter the gene expression to form a complex signalling cascade in response to trichomonal adherence. In order to identify the genes that are upregulated, we constructed a subtraction cDNA library after contact with parasites that is enriched for differentially expressed genes from the immortalized MS-74 VECs. Sixty cDNA clones were sequenced and to our knowledge for the first time, differentially regulated genes were identified in response to early trichomonal infection. The identified genes were found to encode functional proteins with specific functions associated with cell structure maintenance and extracellular matrix components, proinflammatory molecules and apoptosis. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed expression of selected genes. Further, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) protein expression was analysed using Western blot and immunofluorescence assays. Data suggest that p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and tyrosine kinases play a role in COX-2 induction. Finally, T. vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus but not Pentatrichomonas hominis induce expression of COX-2. This is a first attempt at elucidating the basis of interaction of trichomonads with host cells and the corresponding host responses triggered by the parasites. PMID:15888089

  14. Exosomes in human semen restrict HIV-1 transmission by vaginal cells and block intravaginal replication of LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus complex.

    PubMed

    Madison, Marisa N; Jones, Philip H; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-08-01

    Exosomes are membranous extracellular nanovesicles secreted by diverse cell types. Exosomes from healthy human semen have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication and to impair progeny virus infectivity. In this study, we examined the ability of healthy human semen exosomes to restrict HIV-1 and LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus transmission in three different model systems. We show that vaginal cells internalize exosomes with concomitant transfer of functional mRNA. Semen exosomes blocked the spread of HIV-1 from vaginal epithelial cells to target cells in our cell-to-cell infection model and suppressed transmission of HIV-1 across the vaginal epithelial barrier in our trans-well model. Our in vivo model shows that human semen exosomes restrict intravaginal transmission and propagation of murine AIDS virus. Our study highlights an antiretroviral role for semen exosomes that may be harnessed for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat HIV-1 transmission.

  15. Human α-amylase present in lower-genital-tract mucosal fluid processes glycogen to support vaginal colonization by Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Spear, Gregory T; French, Audrey L; Gilbert, Douglas; Zariffard, M Reza; Mirmonsef, Paria; Sullivan, Thomas H; Spear, William W; Landay, Alan; Micci, Sandra; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2014-10-01

    Lactobacillus colonization of the lower female genital tract provides protection from the acquisition of sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus, and from adverse pregnancy outcomes. While glycogen in vaginal epithelium is thought to support Lactobacillus colonization in vivo, many Lactobacillus isolates cannot utilize glycogen in vitro. This study investigated how glycogen could be utilized by vaginal lactobacilli in the genital tract. Several Lactobacillus isolates were confirmed to not grow in glycogen, but did grow in glycogen-breakdown products, including maltose, maltotriose, maltopentaose, maltodextrins, and glycogen treated with salivary α-amylase. A temperature-dependent glycogen-degrading activity was detected in genital fluids that correlated with levels of α-amylase. Treatment of glycogen with genital fluids resulted in production of maltose, maltotriose, and maltotetraose, the major products of α-amylase digestion. These studies show that human α-amylase is present in the female lower genital tract and elucidates how epithelial glycogen can support Lactobacillus colonization in the genital tract.

  16. Molecular identification of vaginal fluid by microbial signature.

    PubMed

    Giampaoli, Saverio; Berti, Andrea; Valeriani, Federica; Gianfranceschi, Gianluca; Piccolella, Antonio; Buggiotti, Laura; Rapone, Cesare; Valentini, Alessio; Ripani, Luigi; Romano Spica, Vincenzo

    2012-09-01

    The discrimination of body fluids in forensic examinations can play an important role in crime scene reconstruction. Conventional methods rely on the detection of antigens or enzymatic activity, limiting detection sensitivity and specificity, particularly on old forensic samples. Methods based on human RNA analysis are not easily applicable to samples exposed to harsh and degrading environments. An alternative approach based on the identification of prokaryotic genomes was developed. Specific bacterial communities are characteristic typical of different human non-sterile body fluids: the molecular characterization of a microbial signature, and not the typing of single bacterial species, can effectively lead to univocal identification of these fluids. A multiplex real time PCR assay was developed using oligonucleotide mixtures targeting genomes specific for a selected group of bacteria. Microflora DNA (mfDNA) was extracted from vaginal, oral and fecal clinical swabs. In addition forensic samples were processed. Vaginal samples showed a strong specific signal for bacteria of the female genital tract. Oral samples clearly showed signal for bacteria present in saliva, and in fecal samples the main signal was from Enterococcaceae. Vaginal casework samples showed results comparable to freshly collected ones; moreover the DNA extracted was successfully used for STR typing. Also mixtures of body fluids were analyzed, providing a microbiological signature compatible with the presence of microbes of oral, fecal and vaginal origin. The presented method can be useful in identifying biological fluids, and it is based on DNA technologies already available in forensic laboratories and feasible for further high throughput automation. PMID:22364791

  17. Primate vaginal microbiomes exhibit species specificity without universal Lactobacillus dominance

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Suleyman; Yeoman, Carl J; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Thomas, Susan M; Ho, Mengfei; Leigh, Steven R; Consortium, Primate Microbiome; White, Bryan A; Wilson, Brenda A; Stumpf, Rebecca M

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial communities colonizing the reproductive tracts of primates (including humans) impact the health, survival and fitness of the host, and thereby the evolution of the host species. Despite their importance, we currently have a poor understanding of primate microbiomes. The composition and structure of microbial communities vary considerably depending on the host and environmental factors. We conducted comparative analyses of the primate vaginal microbiome using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of a phylogenetically broad range of primates to test for factors affecting the diversity of primate vaginal ecosystems. The nine primate species included: humans (Homo sapiens), yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus), olive baboons (Papio anubis), lemurs (Propithecus diadema), howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra), red colobus (Piliocolobus rufomitratus), vervets (Chlorocebus aethiops), mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Our results indicated that all primates exhibited host-specific vaginal microbiota and that humans were distinct from other primates in both microbiome composition and diversity. In contrast to the gut microbiome, the vaginal microbiome showed limited congruence with host phylogeny, and neither captivity nor diet elicited substantial effects on the vaginal microbiomes of primates. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance and Wilcoxon tests revealed correlations among vaginal microbiota and host species-specific socioecological factors, particularly related to sexuality, including: female promiscuity, baculum length, gestation time, mating group size and neonatal birth weight. The proportion of unclassified taxa observed in nonhuman primate samples increased with phylogenetic distance from humans, indicative of the existence of previously unrecognized microbial taxa. These findings contribute to our understanding of host–microbe variation and coevolution, microbial biogeography, and disease risk, and have important

  18. [Vaginal candidiasis].

    PubMed

    Vaginal candidiasis is an infection caused by a fungus. Normally found in the vagina, it usually has no symptoms but can cause problems when it grows uncontrollably. The infection can be caused by antibiotics or chronic illnesses, such as diabetes or HIV. Symptoms include a white discharge, irritation, and itching which can cause small lesions. A physician can perform a pelvic exam to diagnose candidiasis. Anti-fungal cremes, including nystatin, clotrimazole, micona zole, or suppositories used for one to two weeks can treat candidiasis. Chronic cases may require oral anti-fungal medications. Oral Diflucan is being studied for the prevention of oral and vaginal candidiasis.

  19. [Multipurpose treatment of vaginal infections].

    PubMed

    Nikolov, A; Masseva, A; Shopova, E; Georgiev, S

    2012-01-01

    Untreated bacterial vaginosis is related with many complications for non-pregnant women in reproductive age, most common from them are vaginal discharge and postoperative infections. The aim of our investigation was to compare the effectiveness of two therapeutic regimes which consist in Macmiror/Macmiror Complex alone and in combination with Feminella Vagi C for treatment of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and/or mycotic infection. 117 non-pregnant women with symptoms of vaginal infection were prospectively enrolled into two groups according their treatment. First group consist 66 women treated with Macmiror tablets and vaginal capsules followed with local application of Feminella Vagi C, the second group consist 54 women treated with Macmiror tablets and vaginal capsules only. The impact of treatment on clinical symptoms was observed at the end of medication and 20 days after it. Microbiological testing was repeated 20 days after treatment. Over than 80% (78.6 divided by 86.7%) of the cases with vaginal infection (BV and mycotic one) were successfully treated with Macmiror/Macmiror Complex. Supplement treatment with Feminella Vagi C lead to higher percentage of clinically recovery (86.7% vs 84.6%), better microbiological cleaning (86.7% vs 82.1%) and longer effect of treatment. Used medication showed higher efficacy against BV than to fungal infection. According obtained results we may conclude that bacterial vaginosis was better treated with multipurpose treatment (Nifuratel, Nistatin and vit. C) than with Macmiror alone. PMID:23234030

  20. 'Lascolabacter vaginalis' strain KHD1, a new bacterial species cultivated from human female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Diop, K; Mediannikov, O; Fournier, P-E; Raoult, D; Bretelle, F; Fenollar, F

    2016-09-01

    We present the major characteristics of 'Lascolabacter vaginalis' strain KHD1 (= CSUR P0109 = DSM 101752), a new member of the family Prevotellaceae that was cultivated from a vaginal sample of a 33-year-old woman with bacterial vaginosis. PMID:27358744

  1. Bats as reservoir hosts of human bacterial pathogen, Bartonella mayotimonensis.

    PubMed

    Veikkolainen, Ville; Vesterinen, Eero J; Lilley, Thomas M; Pulliainen, Arto T

    2014-06-01

    A plethora of pathogenic viruses colonize bats. However, bat bacterial flora and its zoonotic threat remain ill defined. In a study initially conducted as a quantitative metagenomic analysis of the fecal bacterial flora of the Daubenton's bat in Finland, we unexpectedly detected DNA of several hemotrophic and ectoparasite-transmitted bacterial genera, including Bartonella. Bartonella spp. also were either detected or isolated from the peripheral blood of Daubenton's, northern, and whiskered bats and were detected in the ectoparasites of Daubenton's, northern, and Brandt's bats. The blood isolates belong to the Candidatus-status species B. mayotimonensis, a recently identified etiologic agent of endocarditis in humans, and a new Bartonella species (B. naantaliensis sp. nov.). Phylogenetic analysis of bat-colonizing Bartonella spp. throughout the world demonstrates a distinct B. mayotimonensis cluster in the Northern Hemisphere. The findings of this field study highlight bats as potent reservoirs of human bacterial pathogens.

  2. Influence of age, reproductive cycling status, and menstruation on the vaginal microbiome in baboons (Papio anubis).

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, M; Bergin, I L; Bassis, C M; Hashway, S A; Chai, D; Bell, J D

    2015-05-01

    The vaginal microbiome is believed to influence host health by providing protection from pathogens and influencing reproductive outcomes such as fertility and gestational length. In humans, age-associated declines in diversity of the vaginal microbiome occur in puberty and persist into adulthood. Additionally, menstruation has been associated with decreased microbial community stability. Adult female baboons, like other non-human primates (NHPs), have a different and highly diverse vaginal microbiome compared to that of humans, which is most commonly dominated by Lactobacillus spp. We evaluated the influence of age, reproductive cycling status (cycling vs. non-cycling) and menstruation on the vaginal microbiome of 38 wild-caught, captive female olive baboons (Papio anubis) by culture-independent sequencing of the V3-V5 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. All baboons had highly diverse vaginal microbial communities. Adult baboons had significantly lower microbial diversity in comparison to subadult baboons, which was attributable to decreased relative abundance of minor taxa. No significant differences were detected based on cycling state or menstruation. Predictive metagenomic analysis showed uniformity in relative abundance of metabolic pathways regardless of age, cycle stage, or menstruation, indicating conservation of microbial community functions. This study suggests that selection of an optimal vaginal microbial community occurs at puberty. Since decreased diversity occurs in both baboons and humans at puberty, this may reflect a general strategy for selection of adult vaginal microbial communities. Comparative evaluation of vaginal microbial community development and composition may elucidate mechanisms of community formation and function that are conserved across host species or across microbial community types. These findings have implications for host health, evolutionary biology, and microbe-host ecosystems.

  3. Vaginal sponge and spermicides

    MedlinePlus

    ... counter; Contraceptives - over the counter; Family planning - vaginal sponge; Contraception - vaginal sponge ... Spermicides and vaginal sponges do not work as well at preventing pregnancy as some other forms of birth control. However, using a spermicide ...

  4. Evolution of Bacterial Pathogens Within the Human Host.

    PubMed

    Bliven, Kimberly A; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2016-02-01

    Selective pressures within the human host, including interactions with innate and adaptive immune responses, exposure to medical interventions such as antibiotics, and competition with commensal microbiota all facilitate the evolution of bacterial pathogens. In this chapter, we present examples of pathogen strategies that emerged as a result of selective pressures within the human host niche and discuss the resulting coevolutionary "arms race" between these organisms. In bacterial pathogens, many of the genes responsible for these strategies are encoded on mobile pathogenicity islands or plasmids, underscoring the importance of horizontal gene transfer in the emergence of virulent microbial species.

  5. Evolution of Bacterial Pathogens within the Human Host

    PubMed Central

    Bliven, Kimberly A.; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    Selective pressures within the human host, including interactions with innate and adaptive immune responses, exposure to medical interventions such as antibiotics, and competition with commensal microbiota all facilitate the evolution of bacterial pathogens. In this chapter, we present examples of pathogen strategies which emerged as a result of selective pressures within the human host niche, and discuss the resulting co-evolutionary ‘arms race’ between these organisms. In bacterial pathogens, many of the genes responsible for these strategies are encoded on mobile pathogenicity islands (PAIs) or plasmids, underscoring the importance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the emergence of virulent microbial species. PMID:26999399

  6. Effects of feminine hygiene products on the vaginal mucosal biome

    PubMed Central

    Fashemi, Bisiayo; Delaney, Mary L.; Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Fichorova, Raina N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Over-the-counter (OTC) feminine hygiene products come with little warning about possible side effects. This study evaluates in-vitro their effects on Lactobacillus crispatus, which is dominant in the normal vaginal microbiota and helps maintain a healthy mucosal barrier essential for normal reproductive function and prevention of sexually transmitted infections and gynecologic cancer. Methods A feminine moisturizer (Vagisil), personal lubricant, and douche were purchased OTC. A topical spermicide (nonoxynol-9) known to alter the vaginal immune barrier was used as a control. L. crispatus was incubated with each product for 2 and 24h and then seeded on agar for colony forming units (CFU). Human vaginal epithelial cells were exposed to products in the presence or absence of L. crispatus for 24h, followed by epithelium-associated CFU enumeration. Interleukin-8 was immunoassayed and ANOVA was used for statistical evaluation. Results Nonoxynol-9 and Vagisil suppressed Lactobacillus growth at 2h and killed all bacteria at 24h. The lubricant decreased bacterial growth insignificantly at 2h but killed all at 24h. The douche did not have a significant effect. At full strength, all products suppressed epithelial viability and all, except the douche, suppressed epithelial-associated CFU. When applied at non-toxic dose in the absence of bacteria, the douche and moisturizer induced an increase of IL-8, suggesting a potential to initiate inflammatory reaction. In the presence of L. crispatus, the proinflammatory effects of the douche and moisturizer were countered, and IL-8 production was inhibited in the presence of the other products. Conclusion Some OTC vaginal products may be harmful to L. crispatus and alter the vaginal immune environment. Illustrated through these results, L. crispatus is essential in the preservation of the function of vaginal epithelial cells in the presence of some feminine hygiene products. More research should be invested toward these

  7. Vaginal colonization and activity of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus fermentum L23 in a murine model of vaginal tract infection.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Liliana; Ruiz, Francisco; Giordano, Walter; Barberis, Isabel Lucila

    2010-03-01

    A strain of Lactobacillus, identified as Lactobacillus fermentum L23, was selected from among 100 strains isolated from vaginal swabs of healthy, non-pregnant, pre-menopausal women. L. fermentum L23 was chosen on the basis of its bacteriocinogenic ability and its properties relevant to colonization, i.e. self-aggregation, adherence to vaginal epithelial cells and co-aggregation with bacterial pathogens. The antimicrobial preventative and curative effects produced by the probiotic L. fermentum L23 administered locally against Escherichia coli in a murine vaginal tract infection model were studied. One dose of the human strain L23 containing 10(8) c.f.u. ml(-1) colonized and persisted in the vaginal tract of the female BALB/c mice for 5 days. Infection with the pathogen at 10(6) c.f.u. ml(-1) in the vaginal tract was maintained for more than 7 days. A single dose of L23 administered 24 h pre-infection inhibited E. coli growth on day 3 post-infection, showing the preventative effect displayed by this Lactobacillus strain. Treatment with L. fermentum L23 during the post-infection period showed complete inhibition of pathogen growth from day 5. Thus, this in vivo study indicated that the probiotic bacterium L. fermentum L23 produced both preventative and curative effects on E. coli growth. The beneficial properties and the production of antimicrobial metabolites may act in situ to inhibit a pathogenic micro-organism within the vaginal environment. Strain L23 could be a good natural alternative to other therapies used for genital infections. PMID:19926731

  8. Stubborn vaginal yeast infections.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    Fungi, which along with plants and animals comprise a distinct group in the classification of living things, break down and recycle organic matter. One sub-group with over 600 varieties consists of microscopic, single-celled yeasts. Of the genus Candida, the species Candida albicans accounts for 94% of all cases of fungal vaginitis. Yeasts thrive in human bodies as either beneficial or pathogenic agents. Even when they are an innocuous presence in a healthy human body, they are always poised to create opportunistic infections in susceptible individuals. Candida has been known to infect every organ of the body, but its ability to cause infection depends upon the presence of a sufficient amount of fungal organisms or generally reduced resistance or both. Often use of modern medical drugs such as oral contraceptives, antibiotics, or immunosuppressant drugs can trigger an infection. The symptoms of vaginal infection are vaginal itching, inflammation, and swelling; a burning sensation; and a white, cheesy discharge. Yeast infections can occur in females of all ages (although they are most common in women of child-bearing age) and prompt a large percentage of trips to the gynecologist. Recurrence is common, and each occurrence is harder to eradicate. Often frustrated women turn to alternative therapies. Successful treatment depends upon reducing the yeast population in the body, building up the beneficial bacteria population, limiting and controlling yeast triggers, and strengthening overall health. PMID:12318962

  9. Gene Expression Profiling of Human Vaginal Cells In Vitro Discriminates Compounds with Pro-Inflammatory and Mucosa-Altering Properties: Novel Biomarkers for Preclinical Testing of HIV Microbicide Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Zalenskaya, Irina A.; Joseph, Theresa; Bavarva, Jasmin; Yousefieh, Nazita; Jackson, Suzanne S.; Fashemi, Titilayo; Yamamoto, Hidemi S.; Settlage, Robert; Fichorova, Raina N.; Doncel, Gustavo F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and immune activation of the cervicovaginal mucosa are considered factors that increase susceptibility to HIV infection. Therefore, it is essential to screen candidate anti-HIV microbicides for potential mucosal immunomodulatory/inflammatory effects prior to further clinical development. The goal of this study was to develop an in vitro method for preclinical evaluation of the inflammatory potential of new candidate microbicides using a microarray gene expression profiling strategy. Methods To this end, we compared transcriptomes of human vaginal cells (Vk2/E6E7) treated with well-characterized pro-inflammatory (PIC) and non-inflammatory (NIC) compounds. PICs included compounds with different mechanisms of action. Gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2 arrays. Data processing was performed using GeneSpring 11.5 (Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, CA). Results Microarraray comparative analysis allowed us to generate a panel of 20 genes that were consistently deregulated by PICs compared to NICs, thus distinguishing between these two groups. Functional analysis mapped 14 of these genes to immune and inflammatory responses. This was confirmed by the fact that PICs induced NFkB pathway activation in Vk2 cells. By testing microbicide candidates previously characterized in clinical trials we demonstrated that the selected PIC-associated genes properly identified compounds with mucosa-altering effects. The discriminatory power of these genes was further demonstrated after culturing vaginal cells with vaginal bacteria. Prevotella bivia, prevalent bacteria in the disturbed microbiota of bacterial vaginosis, induced strong upregulation of seven selected PIC-associated genes, while a commensal Lactobacillus gasseri associated to vaginal health did not cause any changes. Conclusions In vitro evaluation of the immunoinflammatory potential of microbicides using the PIC-associated genes defined in this study could help in the initial

  10. The effect of one injection of Depo-Provera on the human vaginal epithelium and cervical ectopy.

    PubMed

    Mauck, C K; Callahan, M M; Baker, J; Arbogast, K; Veazey, R; Stock, R; Pan, Z; Morrison, C S; Chen-Mok, M; Archer, D F; Gabelnick, H L

    1999-07-01

    Two studies in rhesus monkeys have shown that progesterone implants, Depo-Provera and Norplant, were associated with vaginal thinning. Progesterone implants have also been associated with an increased risk of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) acquisition. This study in 16 women was done to assess vaginal epithelial thickness and number of cell layers from biopsies taken in the untreated follicular and luteal phases, and at 1 month and 3 months after administration of Depo-Provera. There was no significant change over time in either parameter from biopsies obtained in the luteal phase compared with those at either time after Depo-Provera administration. There was also no change in the mean number of Langerhans cells in vaginal wall specimens and no change in cervical ectopy. It appears that women do not respond to exogenous progestins with the dramatic vaginal thinning seen in rhesus monkeys.

  11. Targeting Human Papillomavirus to Reduce the Burden of Cervical, Vulvar and Vaginal Cancer and Pre-Invasive Neoplasia: Establishing the Baseline for Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Nygård, Mari; Hansen, Bo Terning; Dillner, Joakim; Munk, Christian; Oddsson, Kristján; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Hortlund, Maria; Liaw, Kai-Li; Dasbach, Erik J.; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Background Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally related to cervical, vulvar and vaginal pre-invasive neoplasias and cancers. Highly effective vaccines against HPV types 16/18 have been available since 2006, and are currently used in many countries in combination with cervical cancer screening to control the burden of cervical cancer. We estimated the overall and age-specific incidence rate (IR) of cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancer and pre-invasive neoplasia in Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden in 2004–2006, prior to the availability of HPV vaccines, in order to establish a baseline for surveillance. We also estimated the population attributable fraction to determine roughly the expected effect of HPV16/18 vaccination on the incidence of these diseases. Methods Information on incident cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancers and high-grade pre-invasive neoplasias was obtained from high-quality national population-based registries. A literature review was conducted to define the fraction of these lesions attributable to HPV16/18, i.e., those that could be prevented by HPV vaccination. Results Among the four countries, the age-standardised IR/105 of cervical, vaginal and vulvar cancer ranged from 8.4–13.8, 1.3–3.1 and 0.2–0.6, respectively. The risk for cervical cancer was highest in women aged 30–39, while vulvar and vaginal cancers were most common in women aged 70+. Age-standardised IR/105 of cervical, vulvar and vaginal pre-invasive neoplasia ranged between 138.8−183.2, 2.5−8.8 and 0.5−1.3, respectively. Women aged 20−29 had the highest risk for cervical pre-invasive neoplasia, while vulvar and vaginal pre-invasive neoplasia peaked in women aged 40−49 and 60−69, respectively. Over 50% of the observed 47,820 incident invasive and pre-invasive cancer cases in 2004−2006 can be attributed to HPV16/18. Conclusion In the four countries, vaccination against HPV 16/18 could prevent approximately 8500 cases of

  12. Differences in vaginal microbiome in African American women versus women of European ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Brooks, J. Paul; Serrano, Myrna G.; Sheth, Nihar U.; Girerd, Philippe H.; Edwards, David J.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Jefferson, Kimberly K.

    2014-01-01

    Women of European ancestry are more likely to harbour a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiome, whereas African American women are more likely to exhibit a diverse microbial profile. African American women are also twice as likely to be diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis and are twice as likely to experience preterm birth. The objective of this study was to further characterize and contrast the vaginal microbial profiles in African American versus European ancestry women. Through the Vaginal Human Microbiome Project at Virginia Commonwealth University, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was used to compare the microbiomes of vaginal samples from 1268 African American women and 416 women of European ancestry. The results confirmed significant differences in the vaginal microbiomes of the two groups and identified several taxa relevant to these differences. Major community types were dominated by Gardnerella vaginalis and the uncultivated bacterial vaginosis-associated bacterium-1 (BVAB1) that were common among African Americans. Moreover, the prevalence of multiple bacterial taxa that are associated with microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity and preterm birth, including Mycoplasma, Gardnerella, Prevotella and Sneathia, differed between the two ethnic groups. We investigated the contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including pregnancy, body mass index, diet, smoking and alcohol use, number of sexual partners, and household income, to vaginal community composition. Ethnicity, pregnancy and alcohol use correlated significantly with the relative abundance of bacterial vaginosis-associated species. Trends between microbial profiles and smoking and number of sexual partners were observed; however, these associations were not statistically significant. These results support and extend previous findings that there are significant differences in the vaginal microbiome related to ethnicity and demonstrate that these differences are pronounced even in healthy women

  13. Differences in vaginal microbiome in African American women versus women of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Fettweis, Jennifer M; Brooks, J Paul; Serrano, Myrna G; Sheth, Nihar U; Girerd, Philippe H; Edwards, David J; Strauss, Jerome F; Jefferson, Kimberly K; Buck, Gregory A

    2014-10-01

    Women of European ancestry are more likely to harbour a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiome, whereas African American women are more likely to exhibit a diverse microbial profile. African American women are also twice as likely to be diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis and are twice as likely to experience preterm birth. The objective of this study was to further characterize and contrast the vaginal microbial profiles in African American versus European ancestry women. Through the Vaginal Human Microbiome Project at Virginia Commonwealth University, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was used to compare the microbiomes of vaginal samples from 1268 African American women and 416 women of European ancestry. The results confirmed significant differences in the vaginal microbiomes of the two groups and identified several taxa relevant to these differences. Major community types were dominated by Gardnerella vaginalis and the uncultivated bacterial vaginosis-associated bacterium-1 (BVAB1) that were common among African Americans. Moreover, the prevalence of multiple bacterial taxa that are associated with microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity and preterm birth, including Mycoplasma, Gardnerella, Prevotella and Sneathia, differed between the two ethnic groups. We investigated the contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including pregnancy, body mass index, diet, smoking and alcohol use, number of sexual partners, and household income, to vaginal community composition. Ethnicity, pregnancy and alcohol use correlated significantly with the relative abundance of bacterial vaginosis-associated species. Trends between microbial profiles and smoking and number of sexual partners were observed; however, these associations were not statistically significant. These results support and extend previous findings that there are significant differences in the vaginal microbiome related to ethnicity and demonstrate that these differences are pronounced even in healthy women

  14. Differences in vaginal microbiome in African American women versus women of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Fettweis, Jennifer M; Brooks, J Paul; Serrano, Myrna G; Sheth, Nihar U; Girerd, Philippe H; Edwards, David J; Strauss, Jerome F; Jefferson, Kimberly K; Buck, Gregory A

    2014-10-01

    Women of European ancestry are more likely to harbour a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiome, whereas African American women are more likely to exhibit a diverse microbial profile. African American women are also twice as likely to be diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis and are twice as likely to experience preterm birth. The objective of this study was to further characterize and contrast the vaginal microbial profiles in African American versus European ancestry women. Through the Vaginal Human Microbiome Project at Virginia Commonwealth University, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was used to compare the microbiomes of vaginal samples from 1268 African American women and 416 women of European ancestry. The results confirmed significant differences in the vaginal microbiomes of the two groups and identified several taxa relevant to these differences. Major community types were dominated by Gardnerella vaginalis and the uncultivated bacterial vaginosis-associated bacterium-1 (BVAB1) that were common among African Americans. Moreover, the prevalence of multiple bacterial taxa that are associated with microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity and preterm birth, including Mycoplasma, Gardnerella, Prevotella and Sneathia, differed between the two ethnic groups. We investigated the contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including pregnancy, body mass index, diet, smoking and alcohol use, number of sexual partners, and household income, to vaginal community composition. Ethnicity, pregnancy and alcohol use correlated significantly with the relative abundance of bacterial vaginosis-associated species. Trends between microbial profiles and smoking and number of sexual partners were observed; however, these associations were not statistically significant. These results support and extend previous findings that there are significant differences in the vaginal microbiome related to ethnicity and demonstrate that these differences are pronounced even in healthy women.

  15. Vaginal Lactobacillus: biofilm formation in vivo - clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Ventolini, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal lactobacilli provide protection against intrusive pathogenic bacteria. Some Lactobacillus spp. produce in vitro a thick, protective biofilm. We report in vivo formation of biofilm by vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii. The biofilm formation was captured in fresh wet-mount microscopic samples from asymptomatic patients after treatment for recurrent bacterial vaginitis. In vivo documentation of biofilm formation is in our opinion noteworthy, and has significant clinical implications, among which are the possibility to isolate, grow, and therapeutically utilize lactobacilli to prevent recurrent vaginal infections and preterm labor associated with vaginal microbial pathogens. PMID:25733930

  16. Looking in ticks for human bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Mediannikov, O; Fenollar, F

    2014-12-01

    Ticks are considered to be second worldwide to mosquitoes as vectors of human diseases and the most important vectors of disease-causing pathogens in domestic and wild animals. A number of emerging tick-borne pathogens are already discovered; however, the proportion of undiagnosed infectious diseases, especially in tropical regions, may suggest that there are still more pathogens associated with ticks. Moreover, the identification of bacteria associated with ticks may provide new tool for the control of ticks and tick-borne diseases. Described here molecular methods of screening of ticks, extensive use of modern culturomics approach, newly developed artificial media and different cell line cultures may significantly improve our knowledge about the ticks as the agents of human and animal pathology. PMID:25229617

  17. Vaginal microbiome and epithelial gene array in post-menopausal women with moderate to severe dryness.

    PubMed

    Hummelen, Ruben; Macklaim, Jean M; Bisanz, Jordan E; Hammond, Jo-Anne; McMillan, Amy; Vongsa, Rebecca; Koenig, David; Gloor, Gregory B; Reid, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    After menopause, many women experience vaginal dryness and atrophy of tissue, often attributed to the loss of estrogen. An understudied aspect of vaginal health in women who experience dryness due to atrophy is the role of the resident microbes. It is known that the microbiota has an important role in healthy vaginal homeostasis, including maintaining the pH balance and excluding pathogens. The objectives of this study were twofold: first to identify the microbiome of post-menopausal women with and without vaginal dryness and symptoms of atrophy; and secondly to examine any differences in epithelial gene expression associated with atrophy. The vaginal microbiome of 32 post-menopausal women was profiled using Illumina sequencing of the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Sixteen subjects were selected for follow-up sampling every two weeks for 10 weeks. In addition, 10 epithelial RNA samples (6 healthy and 4 experiencing vaginal dryness) were acquired for gene expression analysis by Affymetrix Human Gene array. The microbiota abundance profiles were relatively stable over 10 weeks compared to previously published data on premenopausal women. There was an inverse correlation between Lactobacillus ratio and dryness and an increased bacterial diversity in women experiencing moderate to severe vaginal dryness. In healthy participants, Lactobacillus iners and L. crispatus were generally the most abundant, countering the long-held view that lactobacilli are absent or depleted in menopause. Vaginal dryness and atrophy were associated with down-regulation of human genes involved in maintenance of epithelial structure and barrier function, while those associated with inflammation were up-regulated consistent with the adverse clinical presentation.

  18. Multiple vaginal exposures to low doses of R5 simian-human immunodeficiency virus: strategy to study HIV preclinical interventions in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Otten, Ron A; Adams, Debra R; Kim, Caryn N; Jackson, Eddie; Pullium, Jennifer K; Lee, Kemba; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Monsour, Michael; Butera, Sal; Folks, Thomas M

    2005-01-15

    A nonhuman-primate model of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection that more closely emulates human heterosexual transmission by use of multiple exposures to low doses of virus is critical to better evaluate intervention strategies that include microbicides or vaccines. In this report, we describe such a system that uses female pig-tailed macaques exposed vaginally to a CCR5-using simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV(SF162P3)) at weekly intervals. Results of dose-titration experiments indicated that 3 once-weekly exposures to 10 tissue culture infectious doses of SHIV(SF162P3) resulted in consistent transmission of virus and establishment of systemic infection. The efficacy of cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) as a vaginal microbicide was evaluated by applying it to the vaginal vault of macaques (n = 4) 15 min before each weekly exposure to SHIV(SF162P3). One conclusion that can be drawn from the data derived from multiple exposures to virus is that CAP prevented infection in 12 of 13 possible chances for infection, over the course of 39 total exposures. Our findings provide a basis to refine monkey models for transmission of HIV-1, which may be relevant to preclinical evaluation for therapeutic interventions.

  19. Lactobacillus species as biomarkers and agents that can promote various aspects of vaginal health.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Mariya I; Lievens, Elke; Malik, Shweta; Imholz, Nicole; Lebeer, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The human body is colonized by a vast number of microorganisms collectively referred to as the human microbiota. One of the main microbiota body sites is the female genital tract, commonly dominated by Lactobacillus spp., in approximately 70% of women. Each individual species can constitute approximately 99% of the ribotypes observed in any individual woman. The most frequently isolated species are Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus jensenii and Lactobacillus iners. Residing at the port of entry of bacterial and viral pathogens, the vaginal Lactobacillus species can create a barrier against pathogen invasion since mainly products of their metabolism secreted in the cervicovaginal fluid can play an important role in the inhibition of bacterial and viral infections. Therefore, a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota appears to be a good biomarker for a healthy vaginal ecosystem. This balance can be rapidly altered during processes such as menstruation, sexual activity, pregnancy and various infections. An abnormal vaginal microbiota is characterized by an increased diversity of microbial species, leading to a condition known as bacterial vaginosis. Information on the vaginal microbiota can be gathered from the analysis of cervicovaginal fluid, by using the Nugent scoring or the Amsel's criteria, or at the molecular level by investigating the number and type of Lactobacillus species. However, when translating this to the clinical setting, it should be noted that the absence of a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota does not appear to directly imply a diseased condition or dysbiosis. Nevertheless, the widely documented beneficial role of vaginal Lactobacillus species demonstrates the potential of data on the composition and activity of lactobacilli as biomarkers for vaginal health. The substantiation and further validation of such biomarkers will allow the design of better targeted probiotic strategies. PMID:25859220

  20. Lactobacillus species as biomarkers and agents that can promote various aspects of vaginal health

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Mariya I.; Lievens, Elke; Malik, Shweta; Imholz, Nicole; Lebeer, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The human body is colonized by a vast number of microorganisms collectively referred to as the human microbiota. One of the main microbiota body sites is the female genital tract, commonly dominated by Lactobacillus spp., in approximately 70% of women. Each individual species can constitute approximately 99% of the ribotypes observed in any individual woman. The most frequently isolated species are Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus jensenii and Lactobacillus iners. Residing at the port of entry of bacterial and viral pathogens, the vaginal Lactobacillus species can create a barrier against pathogen invasion since mainly products of their metabolism secreted in the cervicovaginal fluid can play an important role in the inhibition of bacterial and viral infections. Therefore, a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota appears to be a good biomarker for a healthy vaginal ecosystem. This balance can be rapidly altered during processes such as menstruation, sexual activity, pregnancy and various infections. An abnormal vaginal microbiota is characterized by an increased diversity of microbial species, leading to a condition known as bacterial vaginosis. Information on the vaginal microbiota can be gathered from the analysis of cervicovaginal fluid, by using the Nugent scoring or the Amsel's criteria, or at the molecular level by investigating the number and type of Lactobacillus species. However, when translating this to the clinical setting, it should be noted that the absence of a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota does not appear to directly imply a diseased condition or dysbiosis. Nevertheless, the widely documented beneficial role of vaginal Lactobacillus species demonstrates the potential of data on the composition and activity of lactobacilli as biomarkers for vaginal health. The substantiation and further validation of such biomarkers will allow the design of better targeted probiotic strategies. PMID:25859220

  1. Antigonococcal effects of vaginal tampons.

    PubMed

    Arko, R J; Wong, K H; Smith, S J; Finley-Price, K G

    1983-04-01

    Different brands of vaginal tampons varied significantly (p less than 0.0001) in their anti-bacterial effects when tested with 46 strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Gonococcal strains recovered from patients with disseminated infections were substantially more sensitive to the anti-bacterial effects of tampons than were strains from patients with uncomplicated genital infections. Strains from patients with pelvic inflammatory disease were moderately sensitive. Tampons showing strong in-vitro antigonococcal effects were also generally effective in vivo in eliminating gonococcal infections from subcutaneous chambers in mice. Extracts of the Rely tampon showed no in-vitro antigonococcal effect, however, but did induce antibacterial activity when injected into subcutaneous chambers in mice. These results emphasise the importance of both in-vitro as well as in-vivo testing of tampon materials to elucidate more fully the nature of their antibacterial effects and their potential for affecting vaginal pathogens and disease processes.

  2. Topographic diversity of fungal and bacterial communities in human skin.

    PubMed

    Findley, Keisha; Oh, Julia; Yang, Joy; Conlan, Sean; Deming, Clayton; Meyer, Jennifer A; Schoenfeld, Deborah; Nomicos, Effie; Park, Morgan; Kong, Heidi H; Segre, Julia A

    2013-06-20

    Traditional culture-based methods have incompletely defined the microbial landscape of common recalcitrant human fungal skin diseases, including athlete's foot and toenail infections. Skin protects humans from invasion by pathogenic microorganisms and provides a home for diverse commensal microbiota. Bacterial genomic sequence data have generated novel hypotheses about species and community structures underlying human disorders. However, microbial diversity is not limited to bacteria; microorganisms such as fungi also have major roles in microbial community stability, human health and disease. Genomic methodologies to identify fungal species and communities have been limited compared with those that are available for bacteria. Fungal evolution can be reconstructed with phylogenetic markers, including ribosomal RNA gene regions and other highly conserved genes. Here we sequenced and analysed fungal communities of 14 skin sites in 10 healthy adults. Eleven core-body and arm sites were dominated by fungi of the genus Malassezia, with only species-level classifications revealing fungal-community composition differences between sites. By contrast, three foot sites--plantar heel, toenail and toe web--showed high fungal diversity. Concurrent analysis of bacterial and fungal communities demonstrated that physiologic attributes and topography of skin differentially shape these two microbial communities. These results provide a framework for future investigation of the contribution of interactions between pathogenic and commensal fungal and bacterial communities to the maintainenace of human health and to disease pathogenesis.

  3. Identification and characterisation of vaginal lactobacilli from South African women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV), which is highly prevalent in the African population, is one of the most common vaginal syndromes affecting women in their reproductive age placing them at increased risk for sexually transmitted diseases including infection by human immunodeficiency virus-1. The vaginal microbiota of a healthy woman is often dominated by the species belonging to the genus Lactobacillus namely L. crispatus, L. gasseri, L. jensenii and L. iners, which have been extensively studied in European populations, albeit less so in South African women. In this study, we have therefore identified the vaginal Lactobacillus species in a group of 40 African women from Soweto, a township on the outskirts of Johannesburg, South Africa. Methods Identification was done by cultivating the lactobacilli on Rogosa agar, de Man-Rogosa-Sharpe (MRS) and Blood agar plates with 5% horse blood followed by sequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA. BV was diagnosed on the basis of Nugent scores. Since some of the previous studies have shown that the lack of vaginal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) producing lactobacilli is associated with bacterial vaginosis, the Lactobacillus isolates were also characterised for their production of H2O2. Results Cultivable Lactobacillus species were identified in 19 out of 21 women without BV, in three out of five women with intermediate microbiota and in eight out of 14 women with BV. We observed that L. crispatus, L. iners, L. jensenii, L. gasseri and L. vaginalis were the predominant species. The presence of L. crispatus was associated with normal vaginal microbiota (P = 0.024). High level of H2O2 producing lactobacilli were more often isolated from women with normal microbiota than from the women with BV, although not to a statistically significant degree (P = 0.064). Conclusion The vaginal Lactobacillus species isolated from the cohort of South African women are similar to those identified in European populations. In accordance with the other

  4. Seminal plasma induces prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase (PTGS) 2 expression in immortalized human vaginal cells: involvement of semen prostaglandin E2 in PTGS2 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Theresa; Zalenskaya, Irina A; Sawyer, Lyn C; Chandra, Neelima; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of the cervicovaginal mucosa is considered a risk factor for HIV infection in heterosexual transmission. In this context, seminal plasma (SP) may play an important role that is not limited to being the main carrier for the virions. It is known that SP induces an inflammatory reaction in the cervix called postcoital leukocytic reaction, which has been associated with promotion of fertility. The mechanisms by which SP triggers this reaction, however, have not been clearly established. Previously we reported the expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), also known as cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), in human vaginal cells in response to toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands and other proinflammatory stimuli. In this study, we demonstrate that SP induces transcriptional and translational increase of COX-2 expression in human vaginal cells and cervicovaginal tissue explants. Furthermore, SP potentiates vaginal PTGS2 expression induced by other proinflammatory stimulants, such as TLR ligands and a vaginal mucosal irritant (nonoxynol-9) in a synergistic manner. SP-induced PTGS2 expression is mediated by intracellular signaling pathways involving MAPKs and NF-κB. Using fractionation and functional analysis, seminal prostaglandin (PG)-E(2) was identified as a one of the major factors in PTGS2 induction. Given the critical role of this PG-producing enzyme in mucosal inflammatory processes, the finding that SP induces and potentiates the expression of PTGS2 in cervicovaginal cells and tissues has mechanistic implications for the role of SP in fertility-associated mucosal leukocytic reaction and its potential HIV infection-enhancing effect. PMID:23153564

  5. RNA/DNA co-analysis from human menstrual blood and vaginal secretion stains: results of a fourth and fifth collaborative EDNAP exercise.

    PubMed

    Haas, C; Hanson, E; Anjos, M J; Ballantyne, K N; Banemann, R; Bhoelai, B; Borges, E; Carvalho, M; Courts, C; De Cock, G; Drobnic, K; Dötsch, M; Fleming, R; Franchi, C; Gomes, I; Hadzic, G; Harbison, S A; Harteveld, J; Hjort, B; Hollard, C; Hoff-Olsen, P; Hüls, C; Keyser, C; Maroñas, O; McCallum, N; Moore, D; Morling, N; Niederstätter, H; Noël, F; Parson, W; Phillips, C; Popielarz, C; Roeder, A D; Salvaderi, L; Sauer, E; Schneider, P M; Shanthan, G; Court, D Syndercombe; Turanská, M; van Oorschot, R A H; Vennemann, M; Vidaki, A; Zatkalíková, L; Ballantyne, J

    2014-01-01

    The European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) organized a fourth and fifth collaborative exercise on RNA/DNA co-analysis for body fluid identification and STR profiling. The task was to identify dried menstrual blood and vaginal secretion stains using specific RNA biomarkers, and additionally test 3 housekeeping genes for their suitability as reference genes. Six menstrual blood and six vaginal secretion stains, two dilution series (1/4-1/64 pieces of a menstrual blood/vaginal swab) and, optionally, bona fide or mock casework samples of human or non-human origin were analyzed by 24 participating laboratories, using RNA extraction or RNA/DNA co-extraction methods. Two novel menstrual blood mRNA multiplexes were used: MMP triplex (MMP7, MMP10, MMP11) and MB triplex (MSX1, LEFTY2, SFRP4) in conjunction with a housekeeping gene triplex (B2M, UBC, UCE). Two novel mRNA multiplexes and a HBD1 singleplex were used for the identification of vaginal secretion: Vag triplex (MYOZ1, CYP2B7P1 and MUC4) and a Lactobacillus-specific Lacto triplex (Ljen, Lcris, Lgas). The laboratories used different chemistries and instrumentation and all were able to successfully isolate and detect mRNA in dried stains. The simultaneous extraction of RNA and DNA allowed for positive identification of the tissue/fluid source of origin by mRNA profiling as well as a simultaneous identification of the body fluid donor by STR profiling, also from old and compromised casework samples. The results of this and the previous collaborative RNA exercises support RNA profiling as a reliable body fluid identification method that can easily be combined with current STR typing technology.

  6. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  7. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  8. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  9. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  10. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or...

  11. Cultured bacterial diversity and human impact on alpine glacier cryoconite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung Mi; Kim, So-Yeon; Jung, Jia; Kim, Eun Hye; Cho, Kyeung Hee; Schinner, Franz; Margesin, Rosa; Hong, Soon Gyu; Lee, Hong Kum

    2011-06-01

    The anthropogenic effect on the microbial communities in alpine glacier cryoconites was investigated by cultivation and physiological characterization of bacteria from six cryoconite samples taken at sites with different amounts of human impact. Two hundred and forty seven bacterial isolates were included in Actinobacteria (9%, particularly Arthrobacter), Bacteroidetes (14%, particularly Olleya), Firmicutes (0.8%), Alphaproteobacteria (2%), Betaproteobacteria (16%, particularly Janthinobacterium), and Gammaproteobacteria (59%, particularly Pseudomonas). Among them, isolates of Arthrobacter were detected only in samples from sites with no human impact, while isolates affiliated with Enterobacteriaceae were detected only in samples from sites with strong human impact. Bacterial isolates included in Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were frequently isolated from pristine sites and showed low maximum growth temperature and enzyme secretion. Bacterial isolates included in Gammaproteobacteria were more frequently isolated from sites with stronger human impact and showed high maximum growth temperature and enzyme secretion. Ecotypic differences were not evident among isolates of Janthinobacterium lividum, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas veronii, which were frequently isolated from sites with different degrees of anthropogenic effect.

  12. Postpartum Vaginal Stenosis Due to Chemical Vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurcharan; Sinha, Maruti; Gupta, Ridhima

    2016-05-01

    Acquired vaginal stenosis is a rare obstructing anomaly, which can be caused by use of chemicals in the vagina. A 21-year-old gravida 1 para 1, presented with secondary amenorrhea and inability to have sexual intercourse, after normal spontaneous vaginal delivery complicated by post partum bleeding. The delivery was conducted by untrained traditional birth attendant at home. The wash cloth soaked with caustic soda was packed in the patient's vagina and was left in situ for 10 days, which ultimately led to the severe scarring and stenosis of the vagina. Patient underwent surgical management and the extensive vaginal adhesions were excised and a patent vagina was reconstructed. Patient then reported successful vaginal intercourse without dyspareunia. Post partum vaginal stenosis due to chemical vaginitis is rare. These cases can be prevented by adequate training of untrained health care workers. PMID:27437311

  13. Postpartum Vaginal Stenosis Due to Chemical Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurcharan; Gupta, Ridhima

    2016-01-01

    Acquired vaginal stenosis is a rare obstructing anomaly, which can be caused by use of chemicals in the vagina. A 21-year-old gravida 1 para 1, presented with secondary amenorrhea and inability to have sexual intercourse, after normal spontaneous vaginal delivery complicated by post partum bleeding. The delivery was conducted by untrained traditional birth attendant at home. The wash cloth soaked with caustic soda was packed in the patient’s vagina and was left in situ for 10 days, which ultimately led to the severe scarring and stenosis of the vagina. Patient underwent surgical management and the extensive vaginal adhesions were excised and a patent vagina was reconstructed. Patient then reported successful vaginal intercourse without dyspareunia. Post partum vaginal stenosis due to chemical vaginitis is rare. These cases can be prevented by adequate training of untrained health care workers. PMID:27437311

  14. Induction of Human Regulatory T Cells with Bacterial Superantigens.

    PubMed

    Caserta, Stefano; Taylor, Amanda L; Terrazzini, Nadia; Llewelyn, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress the activation of immune effector cells limit immunopathology and are fast emerging as therapeutic targets for autoimmune and cancer disease. Tools enabling Treg in vitro-induction, expansion, and characterization and manipulation will help future clinical developments. In this chapter, we describe in detail how to use bacterial superantigens to induce human Tregs efficiently from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. How to assess human Treg phenotype and suppressive capacity are also described. Technical details, variations, and alternative experimental conditions are provided.

  15. Evolution of antibiotic resistance by human and bacterial niche construction.

    PubMed

    Boni, Maciej F; Feldman, Marcus W

    2005-03-01

    Antibiotic treatment by humans generates strong viability selection for antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. The frequency of host antibiotic use often determines the strength of this selection, and changing patterns of antibiotic use can generate many types of behaviors in the population dynamics of resistant and sensitive bacterial populations. In this paper, we present a simple model of hosts dimorphic for their tendency to use/avoid antibiotics and bacterial pathogens dimorphic in their resistance/sensitivity to antibiotic treatment. When a constant fraction of hosts uses antibiotics, the two bacterial strain populations can coexist unless host use-frequency is above a critical value; this critical value is derived as the ratio of the fitness cost of resistance to the fitness cost of undergoing treatment. When strain frequencies can affect host behavior, the dynamics may be analyzed in the light of niche construction. We consider three models underlying changing host behavior: conformism, the avoidance of long infections, and adherence to the advice of public health officials. In the latter two, we find that the pathogen can have quite a strong effect on host behavior. In particular, if antibiotic use is discouraged when resistance levels are high, we observe a classic niche-construction phenomenon of maintaining strain polymorphism even in parameter regions where it would not be expected.

  16. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Medicines to treat vaginal yeast infections are available as creams, ointments, vaginal tablets or suppositories and oral tablets. Most can be bought without needing to see your provider. Treating yourself at home is probably OK if: Your ...

  17. Assisted Vaginal Delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... having a repeat assisted vaginal delivery in a future pregnancy? If you have had one assisted vaginal ... a vacuum device. Vacuum Device: A metal or plastic cup that is applied to the fetus’ head ...

  18. Vaginal Yeast Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... t diagnose this condition by a person’s medical history and physical examination. They usually diagnose yeast infection by examining vaginal secretions under a microscope for evidence of yeast. Treatment Various antifungal vaginal ...

  19. The vaginal microbiome: rethinking health and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bing; Forney, Larry J.; Ravel, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Vaginal microbiota form a mutually beneficial relationship with their host and have major impact on health and disease. In recent years our understanding of vaginal bacterial community composition and structure has significantly broadened as a result of investigators using cultivation-independent methods based on the analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences. In asymptomatic, otherwise healthy women, several kinds of vaginal microbiota exist, the majority often dominated by species of Lactobacillus, while others comprise a diverse array of anaerobic microorganisms. Bacterial vaginosis is the most common vaginal conditions and is vaguely characterized as the disruption of the equilibrium of the ‘normal’ vaginal microbiots. A better understanding of ‘normal’ and ‘healthy’ vaginal ecosystems that is based on its ‘true’ function and not simply on its composition would help better define health and further improve disease diagnostics as well as the development of more personalized regimens to promote health and treat diseases. PMID:22746335

  20. Bacterial Type IV Secretion Systems in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Llosa, Matxalen; Roy, Craig; Dehio, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Summary Type IV secretion (T4S) systems are versatile machines involved in many processes relevant to bacterial virulence, such as horizontal DNA transfer and effector translocation into human cells. A recent Workshop organized by the International University of Andalousia (UNIA) in Baeza, Spain, covered most aspects of bacterial T4S relevant to human disease, ranging from the structural and mechanistic analysis of the T4S systems to the physiological roles of the translocated effector proteins in subverting cellular functions in infected humans. This review reports the highlights from this workshop, which include the first visualization of a T4S system core complex spanning both membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, the identification of the first host receptors for T4S systems, the identification and characterization of novel T4S effector proteins, the analysis of the molecular function of effector proteins in subverting human cellular functions, and an analysis of the role of T4S systems in the evolution of pathogenic bacteria. Our increasing knowledge of the biology of T4S improves our ability to exploit them as biotechnological tools or to use them as novel targets for a new generation of antimicrobials. PMID:19508287

  1. Expression and gene transcript of Fc receptors for IgG, HLA class II antigens and Langerhans cells in human cervico-vaginal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, L A; Kelly, C G; Fellowes, R; Hecht, E M; Wilson, J; Chapman, M; Lehner, T

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism of transmission of HIV from the male to the female genital tract or in the reverse order is not clear. CD4 glycoprotein is the receptor for HIV and Langerhans cells and the related dendritic cells could play a role in the initial transmission of HIV. Fc receptors (FcR) for IgG might be involved in antibody-mediated binding of HIV. We carried out an immunohistological study of normal human cervical and vaginal epithelia for the presence of CD4 glycoprotein, Langerhans cells and FcR to IgG. CD4+ glycoprotein was not found in the vaginal or cervical epithelium, with the exception of a few endocervical epithelial cells. A small number of CD4+ mononuclear cells were found in the endocervical epithelium of a third of the specimens but a large number of CD4+ cells was found in the submucosa of most of the cervical and vaginal specimens. Langerhans cells expressing CD4, HLA class II, Fc gamma R2 and Fc gamma R3 were detected in most vaginal, ectocervical and transformation zone epithelia and in 9/14 endocervical tissues. Fc gamma R3 was detected in about two-thirds of the columnar endocervical epithelium and the transformation zone. A smaller number of specimens expressed Fc gamma R2 in these epithelia, but Fc gamma R1 was not detected. We then demonstrated mRNA for Fc gamma R3 in the columnar endocervical epithelial cells and transformation zone by in situ hybridization, using a CD16-RNA probe. Fc gamma R3 and Fc gamma R2 gene transcripts were also found in fetal cervical tissue by applying the polymerase chain reaction to amplify portions of the Fc gamma R3 and Fc gamma R2 coding sequences in cDNA prepared from fetal RNA. HLA-DR was found in the endocervical cells, transformation zone and in Langerhans cells of all specimens. The presence of Langerhans cells, Fc gamma receptors and HLA class II antigen offers three potential mechanisms for cervico-vaginal HIV transmission: (i) direct HIV infection of Langerhans cells, (ii) binding of HIV antibody complexes

  2. Effects of low dose estrogen therapy on the vaginal microbiomes of women with atrophic vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jian; Song, Ning; Williams, Christopher J.; Brown, Celeste J.; Yan, Zheng; Xu, Chen; Forney, Larry J.

    2016-01-01

    Atrophic vaginitis (AV) is common in postmenopausal women, but its causes are not well understood. The symptoms, which include vaginal itching, burning, dryness, irritation, and dyspareunia, can usually be alleviated by low doses of estrogen given orally or locally. Regrettably, the composition of vaginal bacterial communities in women with AV have not been fully characterized and little is known as to how these communities change over time in response to hormonal therapy. In the present intervention study we determined the response of vaginal bacterial communities in postmenopausal women with AV to low-dose estrogen therapy. The changes in community composition in response to hormonal therapy were rapid and typified by significant increases in the relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. that were mirrored by a decreased relative abundance of Gardnerella. These changes were paralleled by a significant four-fold increase in serum estradiol levels and decreased vaginal pH, as well as nearly a two-fold increase in the Vaginal Maturation Index (VMI). The results suggest that after menopause a vaginal microbiota dominated by species of Lactobacillus may have a beneficial role in the maintenance of health and these findings that could lead to new strategies to protect postmenopausal women from AV. PMID:27103314

  3. Effects of low dose estrogen therapy on the vaginal microbiomes of women with atrophic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jian; Song, Ning; Williams, Christopher J; Brown, Celeste J; Yan, Zheng; Xu, Chen; Forney, Larry J

    2016-01-01

    Atrophic vaginitis (AV) is common in postmenopausal women, but its causes are not well understood. The symptoms, which include vaginal itching, burning, dryness, irritation, and dyspareunia, can usually be alleviated by low doses of estrogen given orally or locally. Regrettably, the composition of vaginal bacterial communities in women with AV have not been fully characterized and little is known as to how these communities change over time in response to hormonal therapy. In the present intervention study we determined the response of vaginal bacterial communities in postmenopausal women with AV to low-dose estrogen therapy. The changes in community composition in response to hormonal therapy were rapid and typified by significant increases in the relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. that were mirrored by a decreased relative abundance of Gardnerella. These changes were paralleled by a significant four-fold increase in serum estradiol levels and decreased vaginal pH, as well as nearly a two-fold increase in the Vaginal Maturation Index (VMI). The results suggest that after menopause a vaginal microbiota dominated by species of Lactobacillus may have a beneficial role in the maintenance of health and these findings that could lead to new strategies to protect postmenopausal women from AV.

  4. Effects of low dose estrogen therapy on the vaginal microbiomes of women with atrophic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jian; Song, Ning; Williams, Christopher J; Brown, Celeste J; Yan, Zheng; Xu, Chen; Forney, Larry J

    2016-01-01

    Atrophic vaginitis (AV) is common in postmenopausal women, but its causes are not well understood. The symptoms, which include vaginal itching, burning, dryness, irritation, and dyspareunia, can usually be alleviated by low doses of estrogen given orally or locally. Regrettably, the composition of vaginal bacterial communities in women with AV have not been fully characterized and little is known as to how these communities change over time in response to hormonal therapy. In the present intervention study we determined the response of vaginal bacterial communities in postmenopausal women with AV to low-dose estrogen therapy. The changes in community composition in response to hormonal therapy were rapid and typified by significant increases in the relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. that were mirrored by a decreased relative abundance of Gardnerella. These changes were paralleled by a significant four-fold increase in serum estradiol levels and decreased vaginal pH, as well as nearly a two-fold increase in the Vaginal Maturation Index (VMI). The results suggest that after menopause a vaginal microbiota dominated by species of Lactobacillus may have a beneficial role in the maintenance of health and these findings that could lead to new strategies to protect postmenopausal women from AV. PMID:27103314

  5. Randomized Comparison of Two Vaginal Self-Sampling Methods for Human Papillomavirus Detection: Dry Swab versus FTA Cartridge

    PubMed Central

    Catarino, Rosa; Vassilakos, Pierre; Bilancioni, Aline; Vanden Eynde, Mathieu; Meyer-Hamme, Ulrike; Menoud, Pierre-Alain; Guerry, Frédéric; Petignat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling (self-HPV) is valuable in cervical cancer screening. HPV testing is usually performed on physician-collected cervical smears stored in liquid-based medium. Dry filters and swabs are an alternative. We evaluated the adequacy of self-HPV using two dry storage and transport devices, the FTA cartridge and swab. Methods A total of 130 women performed two consecutive self-HPV samples. Randomization determined which of the two tests was performed first: self-HPV using dry swabs (s-DRY) or vaginal specimen collection using a cytobrush applied to an FTA cartridge (s-FTA). After self-HPV, a physician collected a cervical sample using liquid-based medium (Dr-WET). HPV types were identified by real-time PCR. Agreement between collection methods was measured using the kappa statistic. Results HPV prevalence for high-risk types was 62.3% (95%CI: 53.7–70.2) detected by s-DRY, 56.2% (95%CI: 47.6–64.4) by Dr-WET, and 54.6% (95%CI: 46.1–62.9) by s-FTA. There was overall agreement of 70.8% between s-FTA and s-DRY samples (kappa = 0.34), and of 82.3% between self-HPV and Dr-WET samples (kappa = 0.56). Detection sensitivities for low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse (LSIL+) were: 64.0% (95%CI: 44.5–79.8) for s-FTA, 84.6% (95%CI: 66.5–93.9) for s-DRY, and 76.9% (95%CI: 58.0–89.0) for Dr-WET. The preferred self-collection method among patients was s-DRY (40.8% vs. 15.4%). Regarding costs, FTA card was five times more expensive than the swab (~5 US dollars (USD)/per card vs. ~1 USD/per swab). Conclusion Self-HPV using dry swabs is sensitive for detecting LSIL+ and less expensive than s-FTA. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 43310942 PMID:26630353

  6. Herpes simplex virus type 2 virion host shutoff protein suppresses innate dsRNA antiviral pathways in human vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiao-Dan; Rosenthal, Kenneth Lee

    2011-09-01

    Viruses that establish persistent infections have evolved numerous strategies to evade host innate antiviral responses. We functionally assessed the role of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) virion host shutoff (vhs) protein on innate immune sensing pathways in human vaginal epithelial cells (VK2 ECs). Infection of cells with wild-type (WT) HSV-2 significantly decreased expression of innate immune sensors of viral infection, Toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR3, retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (Mda-5), relative to cells infected with a mutant that lacks vhs (vhsB) or mock-infected cells. Transfection with HSV-2 vhs similarly decreased expression of TLR2, TLR3, RIG-I and Mda-5, which was also confirmed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. vhsB infection of VK2 cells caused robust increases in the active form of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)3 and its translocation to the nucleus compared with the WT. Additionally, IRF3 activation by Sendai virus and polyinosinic : polycytidylic acid-induced stimulation of beta interferon (IFN-β) was significantly inhibited in vhs-transfected cells. Overall, our findings provide the first evidence that HSV-2 vhs plays roles in selectively inhibiting TLR3 and RIG-I/Mda-5, as well as TLR2-mediated antiviral pathways for sensing dsRNA and effectively suppresses IFN-β antiviral responses in human vaginal ECs.

  7. From bacterial to human dihydrouridine synthase: automated structure determination

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Fiona Jenkins, Huw T.; Griffiths, Samuel C.; Byrne, Robert T.; Dodson, Eleanor J.; Antson, Alfred A.

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of a human dihydrouridine synthase, an enzyme associated with lung cancer, with 18% sequence identity to a T. maritima enzyme, has been determined at 1.9 Å resolution by molecular replacement after extensive molecular remodelling of the template. The reduction of uridine to dihydrouridine at specific positions in tRNA is catalysed by dihydrouridine synthase (Dus) enzymes. Increased expression of human dihydrouridine synthase 2 (hDus2) has been linked to pulmonary carcinogenesis, while its knockdown decreased cancer cell line viability, suggesting that it may serve as a valuable target for therapeutic intervention. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a construct of hDus2 encompassing the catalytic and tRNA-recognition domains (residues 1–340) determined at 1.9 Å resolution is presented. It is shown that the structure can be determined automatically by phenix.mr-rosetta starting from a bacterial Dus enzyme with only 18% sequence identity and a significantly divergent structure. The overall fold of the human Dus2 is similar to that of bacterial enzymes, but has a larger recognition domain and a unique three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet insertion into the catalytic domain that packs next to the recognition domain, contributing to domain–domain interactions. The structure may inform the development of novel therapeutic approaches in the fight against lung cancer.

  8. Cultivated Vaginal Microbiomes Alter HIV-1 Infection and Antiretroviral Efficacy in Colonized Epithelial Multilayer Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pyles, Richard B.; Vincent, Kathleen L.; Baum, Marc M.; Elsom, Barry; Miller, Aaron L.; Maxwell, Carrie; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia D.; Li, Guangyu; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Ferguson, Monique R.

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for modeling of the symbiotic and at times dysbiotic relationship established between bacterial microbiomes and human mucosal surfaces. In particular clinical studies have indicated that the complex vaginal microbiome (VMB) contributes to the protection against sexually-transmitted pathogens including the life-threatening human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The human microbiome project has substantially increased our understanding of the complex bacterial communities in the vagina however, as is the case for most microbiomes, very few of the community member species have been successfully cultivated in the laboratory limiting the types of studies that can be completed. A genetically controlled ex vivo model system is critically needed to study the complex interactions and associated molecular dialog. We present the first vaginal mucosal culture model that supports colonization by both healthy and dysbiotic VMB from vaginal swabs collected from routine gynecological patients. The immortalized vaginal epithelial cells used in the model and VMB cryopreservation methods provide the opportunity to reproducibly create replicates for lab-based evaluations of this important mucosal/bacterial community interface. The culture system also contains HIV-1 susceptible cells allowing us to study the impact of representative microbiomes on replication. Our results show that our culture system supports stable and reproducible colonization by VMB representing distinct community state types and that the selected representatives have significantly different effects on the replication of HIV-1. Further, we show the utility of the system to predict unwanted alterations in efficacy or bacterial community profiles following topical application of a front line antiretroviral. PMID:24676219

  9. Complete protection from repeated vaginal simian-human immunodeficiency virus exposures in macaques by a topical gel containing tenofovir alone or with emtricitabine.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Urvi M; Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Cong, Mian-er; Jia, Hongwei; Martin, Amy; Pau, Chou-Pong; Hanson, Debra L; Guenthner, Patricia; Smith, James; Kersh, Ellen; Garcia-Lerma, J Gerardo; Novembre, Francis J; Otten, Ron; Folks, Thomas; Heneine, Walid

    2009-10-01

    New-generation gels that deliver potent antiretroviral drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 have renewed hopes for topical prophylaxis as a prevention strategy. Previous preclinical research with monkey models suggested that high concentrations and drug combinations are needed for high efficacy. We evaluated two long-acting reverse transcriptase inhibitors, tenofovir (TFV) and emtricitabine (FTC), by using a twice-weekly repeat challenge macaque model and showed that a preexposure vaginal application of gel with 1% TFV alone or in combination with 5% FTC fully protected macaques from a total of 20 exposures to simian-human immunodeficiency virus SF162p3. FTC and TFV were detected in plasma 30 min after vaginal application, suggesting rapid absorption. FTC was detected more frequently than TFV and showed higher levels, reflecting the fivefold-higher concentration of this drug than of TFV. Two of 12 repeatedly exposed but protected macaques showed limited T-cell priming, which did not induce resistance to infection when macaques were rechallenged. Thus, single drugs with durable antiviral activity can provide highly effective topical prophylaxis and overcome the need for noncoital use or for drug combinations which are more complex and costly to formulate and approve.

  10. Vaginal Dysbiosis from an Evolutionary Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia; Gygax, Scott E; Dick, Edward; Smith, William L.; Snider, Cathy; Hubbard, Gene; Ventolini, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary approaches are powerful tools for understanding human disorders. The composition of vaginal microbiome is important for reproductive success and has not yet been characterized in the contexts of social structure and vaginal pathology in non-human primates (NHPs). We investigated vaginal size, vulvovaginal pathology and the presence of the main human subtypes of Lactobacillus spp./ BV-related species in the vaginal microflora of baboons (Papio spp.). We performed morphometric measurements of external and internal genitalia (group I, n = 47), analyzed pathology records of animals from 1999–2015 (group II, n = 64 from a total of 12,776), and evaluated vaginal swabs using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (group III, n = 14). A total of 68 lesions were identified in 64 baboons. Lactobacillus iners, Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Megasphaera I, and Megasphaera II were not detected. L. jensenii, L. crispatus, and L. gasseri were detected in 2/14 (14.2%), 1/14 (7.1%), and 1/14 (7.1%) samples, respectively. BVAB2 was detected in 5/14 (35.7%) samples. The differences in the vaginal milieu between NHP and humans might be the factor associated with human-specific pattern of placental development and should be taken in consideration in NHP models of human pharmacology and microbiology. PMID:27226349

  11. Vaginal Dysbiosis from an Evolutionary Perspective.

    PubMed

    Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia; Gygax, Scott E; Dick, Edward; Smith, William L; Snider, Cathy; Hubbard, Gene; Ventolini, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary approaches are powerful tools for understanding human disorders. The composition of vaginal microbiome is important for reproductive success and has not yet been characterized in the contexts of social structure and vaginal pathology in non-human primates (NHPs). We investigated vaginal size, vulvovaginal pathology and the presence of the main human subtypes of Lactobacillus spp./ BV-related species in the vaginal microflora of baboons (Papio spp.). We performed morphometric measurements of external and internal genitalia (group I, n = 47), analyzed pathology records of animals from 1999-2015 (group II, n = 64 from a total of 12,776), and evaluated vaginal swabs using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (group III, n = 14). A total of 68 lesions were identified in 64 baboons. Lactobacillus iners, Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Megasphaera I, and Megasphaera II were not detected. L. jensenii, L. crispatus, and L. gasseri were detected in 2/14 (14.2%), 1/14 (7.1%), and 1/14 (7.1%) samples, respectively. BVAB2 was detected in 5/14 (35.7%) samples. The differences in the vaginal milieu between NHP and humans might be the factor associated with human-specific pattern of placental development and should be taken in consideration in NHP models of human pharmacology and microbiology. PMID:27226349

  12. Vaginal microbiota and its role in HIV transmission and infection.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Mariya I; van den Broek, Marianne; Balzarini, Jan; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2013-09-01

    The urogenital tract appears to be the only niche of the human body that shows clear differences in microbiota between men and women. The female reproductive tract has special features in terms of immunological organization, an epithelial barrier, microbiota, and influence by sex hormones such as estrogen. While the upper genital tract is regarded as free of microorganisms, the vagina is colonized by bacteria dominated by Lactobacillus species, although their numbers vary considerably during life. Bacterial vaginosis is a common pathology characterized by dysbiosis, which increases the susceptibility for HIV infection and transmission. On the other hand, HIV infections are often characterized by a disturbed vaginal microbiota. The endogenous vaginal microbiota may protect against HIV by direct production of antiviral compounds, through blocking of adhesion and transmission by ligands such as lectins, and/or by stimulation of immune responses. The potential role of probiotics in the prevention of HIV infections and associated symptoms, by introducing them to the vaginal and gastrointestinal tract (GIT), is also discussed. Of note, the GIT is a site of considerable HIV replication and CD4(+) T-cell destruction, resulting in both local and systemic inflammation. Finally, genetically engineered lactobacilli show promise as new microbicidal agents against HIV.

  13. A Phase 3, Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind, Vehicle-Controlled Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Metronidazole Vaginal Gel 1.3% in the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Schwebke, Jane R.; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Beelen, Andrew P.; Sobel, Jack D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a prevalent infection in women of reproductive age, is associated with increased risk of upper genital tract and sexually transmitted infections, and complications in pregnancy. Currently approved treatments include metronidazole, which requires once or twice daily intravaginal administration for 5 days or twice daily oral administration for 7 days. This phase 3 study determined the safety and efficacy of single-dose metronidazole vaginal gel (MVG) 1.3%. Methods In this double-blind, vehicle-controlled study, 651 women with clinical diagnosis of BV were randomized 1:1 to receive MVG 1.3% or vehicle vaginal gel. Primary efficacy measure was clinical cure (normal discharge, negative “whiff test,” and <20% clue cells) at day 21. Secondary measures included therapeutic cure (both clinical and bacteriological; day 21) and bacteriologic cure (Nugent score <4), clinical cure, and time to resolution of symptoms (day 7). Results A total of 487 participants were included in the primary analysis. Clinical and therapeutic cure rates (day 21) were higher in participants treated with MVG 1.3% compared with vehicle gel (37.2% vs. 26.6% [P = 0.010] and 16.8% vs. 7.2% [P = 0.001], respectively). Clinical and bacteriologic cure rates (day 7) were also higher in the MVG 1.3% group (46.0% vs. 20.0% [P < 0.001] and 32.7% vs. 6.3% [P < 0.001], respectively). The median time to resolution of symptoms was shorter in the MVG 1.3% (day 6) than vehicle group (not reached). No serious adverse events were reported, and incidence was similar across treatment groups. Conclusions Single-dose MVG 1.3% was safe and superior to vehicle gel in producing cure among women with BV. PMID:26222750

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., Strain CCRI-22567T, Isolated from a Vaginal Sample from a Woman with Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Maheux, Andrée F; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K; Raymond, Frédéric; Corbeil, Jacques; Roy, Paul H; Boissinot, Maurice; Omar, Rabeea F

    2016-01-01

    Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., CCRI-22567 is the type strain of the new genus Criibacterium The strain was isolated from a woman with bacterial vaginosis. The genome assembly comprised 2,384,460 bp, with 34.4% G+C content. This is the first genome announcement of a strain belonging to the genus Criibacterium. PMID:27587833

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., Strain CCRI-22567T, Isolated from a Vaginal Sample from a Woman with Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, Andrée F.; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K.; Raymond, Frédéric; Corbeil, Jacques; Roy, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., CCRI-22567 is the type strain of the new genus Criibacterium. The strain was isolated from a woman with bacterial vaginosis. The genome assembly comprised 2,384,460 bp, with 34.4% G+C content. This is the first genome announcement of a strain belonging to the genus Criibacterium. PMID:27587833

  16. Bacterial Delivery of TALEN Proteins for Human Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Ting; Wu, Donghai; Yang, Lijun; Terada, Naohiro; Wu, Weihui; Jin, Shouguang

    2014-01-01

    Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) are a novel class of sequence-specific nucleases that have recently gained prominence for its ease of production and high efficiency in genome editing. A TALEN pair recognizes specific DNA sequences and introduce double-strand break in the target site, triggering non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination. Current methods of TALEN delivery involves introduction of foreign genetic materials, such as plasmid DNA or mRNA, through transfection. Here, we show an alternative way of TALEN delivery, bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) mediated direct injection of the TALEN proteins into human cells. Bacterially injected TALEN was shown to efficiently target host cell nucleus where it persists for almost 12 hours. Using a pair of TALENs targeting venus gene, such injected nuclear TALENs were shown functional in introducing DNA mutation in the target site. Interestingly, S-phase cells seem to show greater sensitivity to the TALEN mediated target gene modification. Accordingly, efficiency of such genome editing can easily be manipulated by the infection dose, number of repeated infections as well as enrichment of S phase cells. This work further extends the utility of T3SS in the delivery of functional proteins into mammalian cells to alter their characters for biomedical applications. PMID:24618838

  17. Bacterial delivery of TALEN proteins for human genome editing.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jingyue; Jin, Yongxin; Bian, Ting; Wu, Donghai; Yang, Lijun; Terada, Naohiro; Wu, Weihui; Jin, Shouguang

    2014-01-01

    Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) are a novel class of sequence-specific nucleases that have recently gained prominence for its ease of production and high efficiency in genome editing. A TALEN pair recognizes specific DNA sequences and introduce double-strand break in the target site, triggering non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination. Current methods of TALEN delivery involves introduction of foreign genetic materials, such as plasmid DNA or mRNA, through transfection. Here, we show an alternative way of TALEN delivery, bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) mediated direct injection of the TALEN proteins into human cells. Bacterially injected TALEN was shown to efficiently target host cell nucleus where it persists for almost 12 hours. Using a pair of TALENs targeting venus gene, such injected nuclear TALENs were shown functional in introducing DNA mutation in the target site. Interestingly, S-phase cells seem to show greater sensitivity to the TALEN mediated target gene modification. Accordingly, efficiency of such genome editing can easily be manipulated by the infection dose, number of repeated infections as well as enrichment of S phase cells. This work further extends the utility of T3SS in the delivery of functional proteins into mammalian cells to alter their characters for biomedical applications. PMID:24618838

  18. In vivo optical imaging of human vaginal gel thickness distributions with a probe-based, dual-modality instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Tyler K.; DeSoto, Michael G.; Peters, Jennifer J.; Henderson, Marcus H.; Thiele, Bonnie; Bishop, Tammy Sinclair; Murtha, Amy P.; Katz, David F.; Wax, Adam

    2012-11-01

    We used a probe-based dual-modality optical imaging instrument to measure in vivo coating thickness distributions of a gel distributed along the vaginal lumen, in a clinical study. The gel was a surrogate for one delivering an anti-HIV topical microbicide. Imaging data from Fourier-domain multiplexed low-coherence interferometry (mLCI) and fluorimetric measurements were compared to assess the feasibility and accuracy of mLCI in measuring in vivo gel coating thickness distributions. In each study session, 3.5 mL of Replens gel was inserted to the vaginal fornix while the participant was supine. The participant either: 1. remained supine (10 or 60 min) or 2. sat up (1 min), stood up (1 min), sat down (1 min) and returned to the supine position; net elapsed time was 10 or 60 min after which the gel distribution was imaged. Local coating thickness distributions were qualitatively and quantitatively similar. Here mLCI did not accurately measure thicker gel coatings (>0.8 mm), a limitation not seen with fluorimetry. However, mLCI is capable of measuring in vivo microbicide gel distributions with resolution on the order of 10 μm, without the need for exogenous contrast agents, and can accurately capture relevant summary coating measures in good agreement with fluorimetry.

  19. Induction, structural characterization, and genome sequence of Lv1, a prophage from a human vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii strain.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rebeca; Escobedo, Susana; Suárez, Juan E

    2010-09-01

    The prophage Lv1, harbored by a vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii isolate, was induced by several different anticancer, antimicrobial, and antiseptic agents, suggesting that they contribute to the adverse vaginal effects associated with their therapeutic use. Of special interest with respect to its novelty was the inducing effect of nonoxynol-9, a non-ionic detergent commonly used as a spermicide. The Lv1 genome consists of a 38,934-bp dsDNA molecule with cohesive ends, in which 48 ORFs were recognized, and is organized into functional modules. Lv1 belongs to the family Siphoviridae and, more precisely, to the proposed Sfi21-like genus. The capsid-tail junction of the Lv1 virions is fragile such that most particles become disrupted, suggesting that the virus is defective and thus unable to generate fertile progeny. However, genome analysis did not provide evidence of the defective nature of the prophage, other than the finding that its genome is shorter than those of other, related, phages. Further analysis indicated that prophage Lv1 suffered deletions in its right half to the extent that it no longer fulfill the minimum packaging limits, thereby generating the observed unstable particles. PMID:20890845

  20. Human cytomegalovirus: bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) cloning and genetic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Anne M; Yu, Dong

    2012-02-01

    The understanding of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) biology was long hindered by the inability to perform efficient viral genetic analysis. This hurdle was recently overcome when the genomes of multiple HCMV strains were cloned as infectious bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The BAC system takes advantage of the single-copy F plasmid of E. coli that can stably carry large pieces of foreign DNA. In this system, a recombinant HCMV virus carrying a modified F plasmid is first generated in eukaryotic cells. Recombinant viral genomes are then isolated and recovered in E. coli as BAC clones. BAC-captured viral genomes can be manipulated using prokaryotic genetics, and recombinant virus can be reconstituted from BAC transfection in eukaryotic cells. The BAC reverse genetic system provides a reliable and efficient method to introduce genetic alterations into the viral genome in E.coli and subsequently analyze their effects on virus biology in eukaryotic cells. PMID:22307551

  1. Human Cytomegalovirus: Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Cloning and Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, Anne M.; Yu, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) biology was long hindered by the inability to perform efficient viral genetic analysis. This hurdle was recently overcome when the genomes of multiple HCMV strains were cloned as infectious bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The BAC system takes advantage of the single-copy F plasmid of E. coli that can stably carry large pieces of foreign DNA. In this system, a recombinant HCMV virus carrying a modified F plasmid is first generated in eukaryotic cells. Recombinant viral genomes are then isolated and recovered in E. coli as BAC clones. BAC-captured viral genomes can be manipulated using prokaryotic genetics, and recombinant virus can be reconstituted from BAC transfection in eukaryotic cells. The BAC reverse genetic system provides a reliable and efficient method to introduce genetic alterations into the viral genome in E.coli and subsequently analyze their effects on virus biology in eukaryotic cells. PMID:22307551

  2. The human salivary microbiome exhibits temporal stability in bacterial diversity.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Simon J S; Huws, Sharon A; Hegarty, Matthew J; Smith, Daniel P M; Mur, Luis A J

    2015-09-01

    The temporal variability of the human microbiome may be an important factor in determining its relationship with health and disease. In this study, the saliva of 40 participants was collected every 2 months over a one-year period to determine the temporal variability of the human salivary microbiome. Salivary pH and 16S rRNA gene copy number were measured for all participants, with the microbiome of 10 participants assessed through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. In February 2013, 16S rRNA gene copy number was significantly (P < 0.001) higher, with individual changes between time points significant (P = 0.003). Salivary pH levels were significantly (P < 0.001) higher in December 2012 than in October 2012 and February 2013, with significant (P < 0.001) individual variations seen throughout. Bacterial α-diversity showed significant differences between participants (P < 0.001), but not sampling periods (P = 0.801), and a significant positive correlation with salivary pH (R(2) = 7.8%; P = 0.019). At the phylum level, significant differences were evident between participants in the Actinobacteria (P < 0.001), Bacteroidetes (P < 0.001), Firmicutes (P = 0.008), Fusobacteria (P < 0.001), Proteobacteria (P < 0.001), Synergistetes (P < 0.001) and Spirochaetes (P = 0.003) phyla. This study charted the temporal variability of the salivary microbiome, suggesting that bacterial diversity is stable, but that 16S rRNA gene copy number may be subject to seasonal flux.

  3. The human salivary microbiome exhibits temporal stability in bacterial diversity.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Simon J S; Huws, Sharon A; Hegarty, Matthew J; Smith, Daniel P M; Mur, Luis A J

    2015-09-01

    The temporal variability of the human microbiome may be an important factor in determining its relationship with health and disease. In this study, the saliva of 40 participants was collected every 2 months over a one-year period to determine the temporal variability of the human salivary microbiome. Salivary pH and 16S rRNA gene copy number were measured for all participants, with the microbiome of 10 participants assessed through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. In February 2013, 16S rRNA gene copy number was significantly (P < 0.001) higher, with individual changes between time points significant (P = 0.003). Salivary pH levels were significantly (P < 0.001) higher in December 2012 than in October 2012 and February 2013, with significant (P < 0.001) individual variations seen throughout. Bacterial α-diversity showed significant differences between participants (P < 0.001), but not sampling periods (P = 0.801), and a significant positive correlation with salivary pH (R(2) = 7.8%; P = 0.019). At the phylum level, significant differences were evident between participants in the Actinobacteria (P < 0.001), Bacteroidetes (P < 0.001), Firmicutes (P = 0.008), Fusobacteria (P < 0.001), Proteobacteria (P < 0.001), Synergistetes (P < 0.001) and Spirochaetes (P = 0.003) phyla. This study charted the temporal variability of the salivary microbiome, suggesting that bacterial diversity is stable, but that 16S rRNA gene copy number may be subject to seasonal flux. PMID:26207044

  4. Optimized bacterial expression of human apolipoprotein A-I.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Robert O; Forte, Trudy M; Oda, Michael N

    2003-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) serves critical functions in plasma lipoprotein metabolism as a structural component of high density lipoprotein, activator of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase, and acceptor of cellular cholesterol as part of the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. In an effort to facilitate structure:function studies of human apoA-I, we have optimized a plasmid vector for production of recombinant wild type (WT) and mutant apoA-I in bacteria. To facilitate mutagenesis studies, subcloning, and DNA manipulation, numerous silent mutations have been introduced into the apoA-I cDNA, generating 13 unique restriction endonuclease sites. The coding sequence for human apoA-I has been modified by the introduction of additional silent mutations that eliminate 18 separate codons that employ tRNAs that are of low or moderate abundance in Escherichia coli. Yields of recombinant apoA-I achieved using the optimized cDNA were 100+/-20 mg/L bacterial culture, more than fivefold greater than yields routinely obtained with the original cDNA. Site-directed mutagenesis of the apoA-I cDNA was performed to generate a Glu2Asp mutation in the N-terminal sequence of apoA-I. This modification, which creates an acid labile Asp-Pro peptide bond between amino acids 2 and 3, permits specific chemical cleavage of an N-terminal His-Tag fusion peptide used for rapid protein purification. The product protein's primary structure is identical to WT apoA-I in all other respects. Together, these changes in apoA-I cDNA and bacterial expression protocol significantly improve the yield of apoA-I protein without compromising the relative ease of purification.

  5. In Vivo Replication Capacity Rather Than In Vitro Macrophage Tropism Predicts Efficiency of Vaginal Transmission of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus or Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christopher J.; Marthas, Marta; Greenier, Jennifer; Lu, Ding; Dailey, Peter J.; Lu, Yichen

    1998-01-01

    We used the rhesus macaque model of heterosexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission to test the hypothesis that in vitro measures of macrophage tropism predict the ability of a primate lentivirus to initiate a systemic infection after intravaginal inoculation. A single atraumatic intravaginal inoculation with a T-cell-tropic molecular clone of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), SIVmac239, or a dualtropic recombinant molecular clone of SIV, SIVmac239/1A11/239, or uncloned dualtropic SIVmac251 or uncloned dualtropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) 89.6-PD produced systemic infection in all rhesus macaques tested. However, vaginal inoculation with a dualtropic molecular clone of SIV, SIVmac1A11, resulted in transient viremia in one of two rhesus macaques. It has previously been shown that 12 intravaginal inoculations with SIVmac1A11 resulted in infection of one of five rhesus macaques (M. L. Marthas, C. J. Miller, S. Sutjipto, J. Higgins, J. Torten, B. L. Lohman, R. E. Unger, H. Kiyono, J. R. McGhee, P. A. Marx, and N. C. Pedersen, J. Med. Primatol. 21:99–107, 1992). In addition, SHIV HXBc2, which replicates in monkey macrophages, does not infect rhesus macaques following multiple vaginal inoculations, while T-cell-tropic SHIV 89.6 does (Y. Lu, P. B. Brosio, M. Lafaile, J. Li, R. G. Collman, J. Sodroski, and C. J. Miller, J. Virol. 70:3045–3050, 1996). These results demonstrate that in vitro measures of macrophage tropism do not predict if a SIV or SHIV will produce systemic infection after intravaginal inoculation of rhesus macaques. However, we did find that the level to which these viruses replicate in vivo after intravenous inoculation predicts the outcome of intravaginal inoculation with each virus. PMID:9525652

  6. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide activates CD57-negative human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Kanevskiy, L M; Erokhina, S A; Streltsova, M A; Telford, W G; Sapozhnikov, A M; Kovalenko, E I

    2014-12-01

    NK cells play an important regulatory role in sepsis by induction and augmentation of proinflammatory reactions in early stages of the septic process and by suppression of immune response in later stages of inflammation. The present work was aimed at the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the main pathogenic factor of sepsis development, on human NK cells ex vivo. We show that LPS activates immature CD57-negative NK cells, which typically constitute less than half of the normal NK cell population in human peripheral blood. Under conditions of NK cell stimulation with IL-2, addition of LPS provokes an increase in IFN-γ production. However, LPS both increased and inhibited NK cell cytotoxic activity. It is important to note that the activation of NK cells on LPS addition was observed in the absence of TLR4 on the NK cell surface. These results confirm our previous data arguing for a direct interaction of LPS with NK cells and evidence an atypical mechanism of LPS-induced NK cell activation without the involvement of surface TLR4.

  7. Application of vaginal temperature measurement in bitches.

    PubMed

    Maeder, B; Arlt, S; Burfeind, O; Heuwieser, W

    2012-12-01

    Finding innovative, non-invasive methods for continuously measuring body temperature minimizing human interference is important for accurate data collection. The objective of this study was to assess feasibility and accuracy of continuous body temperature measurements with loggers placed in the vaginal cavity of bitches. First, an in vitro experiment was performed to compare values obtained by temperature loggers (n = 26) to a calibrated liquid-in-glass thermometer. The mean differences between the two methods were low. Next, an in vivo experiment was performed using five healthy bitches, and values obtained by the vaginal loggers were compared to measurements collected rectally with digital thermometers. The results show that rectal and vaginal temperatures were correlated. The mean differences between rectal and vaginal temperatures were negligible. We conclude that the utilized temperature loggers provide accurate and reliable data.

  8. Vaginal cancer: an iatrogenic disease?

    PubMed

    Weiss, K

    1975-01-01

    Presently we are witnessing two unique occurrences in the field of public health: the first demonstration of transplacental carcinogenesis in humans and the first drug-induced cancer epidemic in women under age 30. This article examines the current status of the vaginal cancer epidemic and possible reasons for the failure of governmental health agencies to recall and test the generation of females who were exposed to diethylstilbestrol (DES) in utero. Epidemiologic evidence indicates that the large majority of "DES daughters" may develop adenosis. The carcinogenicity of other estrogens in wide use is examined. It is pointed out that, although vaginal cancer in daughters exposed to DES in utero provided the clinical evidence to secure a Food and Drug Administration ban on DES as an additive to cattle feed, the FDA approved a new use of DES as a "morning-after pill" contraceptive even though the contraceptive contains 833,000 times the amount of DES banned for human consumption in beef. The lack of standards of informed consent in the testing of the morning-after pill on university women and the additional risk this presents to DES daughters are discussed. The sociopolitical and economic contributing factors to the vaginal cancer epidemic and the extent to which the scientific direction of medical care is influenced by economic factors are examined. Public health measures which might prevent the occurrence of such man-made epidemics in the future are recommended.

  9. Rationale and Safety Assessment of a Novel Intravaginal Drug-Delivery System with Sustained DL-Lactic Acid Release, Intended for Long-Term Protection of the Vaginal Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Verstraelen, Hans; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a prevalent state of dysbiosis of the vaginal microbiota with wide-ranging impact on human reproductive health. Based on recent insights in community ecology of the vaginal microbiome, we hypothesize that sustained vaginal DL-lactic acid enrichment will enhance the recruitment of lactobacilli, while counteracting bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria. We therefore aimed to develop an intravaginal device that would be easy to insert and remove, while providing sustained DL-lactic acid release into the vaginal lumen. The final prototype selected is a vaginal ring matrix system consisting of a mixture of ethylene vinyl acetate and methacrylic acid-methyl methacrylate copolymer loaded with 150 mg DL-lactic acid with an L/D-lactic acid ratio of 1:1. Preclinical safety assessment was performed by use of the Slug Mucosal Irritation test, a non-vertebrate assay to evaluate vaginal mucosal irritation, which revealed no irritation. Clinical safety was evaluated in a phase I trial with six healthy nulliparous premenopausal volunteering women, with the investigational drug left in place for 7 days. Colposcopic monitoring according to the WHO/CONRAD guidelines for the evaluation of vaginal products, revealed no visible cervicovaginal mucosal changes. No adverse events related to the investigational product occurred. Total release from the intravaginal ring over 7 days was estimated through high performance liquid chromatography at 37.1 (standard deviation 0.9) mg DL-lactic acid. Semisolid lactic acid formulations have been studied to a limited extent in the past and typically consist of a large volume of excipients and very high doses of lactic acid, which is of major concern to mucosal safety. We have documented the feasability of enriching the vaginal environment with pure DL-lactic acid with a prototype intravaginal ring. Though the efficacy of this platform remains to be established possibly requiring further development, this approach may offer a

  10. Vaginal Self-Swab Specimen Collection in a Home-Based Survey of Older Women: Methods and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Joscelyn N.; Lundeen, Katie; Jaszczak, Angela; McClintock, Martha K.; Jordan, Jeanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To describe the methods used for, cooperation with, assays conducted on, and applications of vaginal specimens collected by older women in their homes. Methods Community-residing women (N = 1,550), ages 57–85 years, participated in a nationally representative probability survey. Vaginal self-swab specimen collection and in-home interviews were conducted between 2005 and 2006. Specimens were analyzed for bacterial vaginosis (BV), vaginal candidiasis (VC), high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV), and cytological characteristics. Field methods, consent procedures, the swab protocol, laboratory procedures, and results reporting are described. Results One thousand twenty-eight respondents (67.5% weighted) agreed to provide a vaginal specimen; 99.1% were successful. The specimen adequacy rates were BV and VC, 94.1%; HR-HPV, 99.7%; and cytology, 85.5%. The most common recorded reason for nonparticipation was a physical or health problem (38% of nonresponders). Responders were significantly more likely than nonresponders to be younger and more educated, and were more likely to report a recent pelvic examination, menopausal hormone use, and recent sexual activity. Discussion Collection of vaginal self-swab specimens from older women in a population-based study is feasible and provides novel data on microenvironmental characteristics of the female genital tract relevant to analyses of gynecologic health, sexual activity and problems, and immune and inflammatory function. PMID:19204072

  11. Protective effect of vaginal Lactobacillus paracasei CRL 1289 against urogenital infection produced by Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse animal model.

    PubMed

    Zárate, Gabriela; Santos, Viviana; Nader-Macias, María Elena

    2009-01-01

    Urogenital infections of bacterial origin have a high incidence among the world female population at reproductive age. Lactobacilli, the predominant microorganisms of the healthy vaginal microbiota, have shown a protective effect against the colonization and overgrowth of urogenital pathogens that increased the interest for including them into probiotics products assigned to restore the urogenital balance. In the present work, we determined in a mouse animal model the capability of Lactobacillus paracasei CRL 1289, a human vaginal strain with probiotic properties, to prevent the vaginal colonization of a uropathogenic strain of Staphylococcus aureus. Six-week-old female BALB/c mice, synchronized in their estral cycle, were intravaginally inoculated with two doses of 10(9) lactobacilli before challenging them with a single dose of 10(5) or 10(7) CFU of S. aureus. The vaginal colonization of both microorganisms and the effect on the vaginal structure were determined at 2, 5, and 7 days after pathogen inoculation. Control mice and those challenged only with the pathogen showed an insignificant lactobacilli population, whereas 10(5) lactobacilli/mL of vaginal homogenate were recovered at 2 days after challenge from the L. paracasei CRL 1289 and the probiotic + pathogen groups, decreasing this number on the following days. The treatment with L. paracasei CRL 1289 decreased significantly the number of staphylococci recovered at 2 and 5 days when mice were challenged only with 10(5) CFU of pathogen. The inoculation of S. aureus produced a remarkable inflammatory response and structural alterations in the vaginal mucosa that decreases in a significant manner when the mice were protected with L. paracasei CRL 1289. The results obtained suggest that this particular Lactobacillus strain could prevent the onset of urogenital infections by interfering with the epithelial colonization by uropathogenic S. aureus.

  12. Protective Effect of Vaginal Lactobacillus paracasei CRL 1289 against Urogenital Infection Produced by Staphylococcus aureus in a Mouse Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Zárate, Gabriela; Santos, Viviana; Nader-Macias, María Elena

    2007-01-01

    Urogenital infections of bacterial origin have a high incidence among the world female population at reproductive age. Lactobacilli, the predominant microorganisms of the healthy vaginal microbiota, have shown a protective effect against the colonization and overgrowth of urogenital pathogens that increased the interest for including them into probiotics products assigned to restore the urogenital balance. In the present work, we determined in a mouse animal model the capability of Lactobacillus paracasei CRL 1289, a human vaginal strain with probiotic properties, to prevent the vaginal colonization of a uropathogenic strain of Staphylococcus aureus. Six-week-old female BALB/c mice, synchronized in their estral cycle, were intravaginally inoculated with two doses of 109 lactobacilli before challenging them with a single dose of 105 or 107 CFU of S. aureus. The vaginal colonization of both microorganisms and the effect on the vaginal structure were determined at 2, 5, and 7 days after pathogen inoculation. Control mice and those challenged only with the pathogen showed an insignificant lactobacilli population, whereas 105 lactobacilli/mL of vaginal homogenate were recovered at 2 days after challenge from the L. paracasei CRL 1289 and the probiotic + pathogen groups, decreasing this number on the following days. The treatment with L. paracasei CRL 1289 decreased significantly the number of staphylococci recovered at 2 and 5 days when mice were challenged only with 105 CFU of pathogen. The inoculation of S. aureus produced a remarkable inflammatory response and structural alterations in the vaginal mucosa that decreases in a significant manner when the mice were protected with L. paracasei CRL 1289. The results obtained suggest that this particular Lactobacillus strain could prevent the onset of urogenital infections by interfering with the epithelial colonization by uropathogenic S. aureus. PMID:17485818

  13. [Morcellement in vaginal hysterectomy].

    PubMed

    Draca, P; Miljković, S

    1976-01-01

    From 1968 to 1975 the authors performed 632 vaginal histerectomies; morcellement was applied in 81 patients (12.81%). The largest uterus subjected to morcellement weighed 700 g; most of them weighed about 250 g. In all cases morcellement was applied due to the enlarged uterus. In the authors opinion, the uterus can be extirpated vaginally until it reaches the size corresponding to pregnancy up to 12 weeks. The postoperative morbidity rate in patients with vaginal histerectomy and morcellement proved to be 30.56%. Morcellement doest not increase the occurrence of intraoperative injuries of the neighbouring organs or early postoperative morbidity.

  14. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by intercourse, trauma, infection, polyp, genital warts , ulcer, or varicose veins) IUD use (may cause occasional spotting) Ectopic pregnancy Miscarriage Other pregnancy complications Vaginal dryness due to lack of estrogen after ...

  15. Review of Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Adisruption of the dynamic equilibrium of the healthy vagina may have significant sequelae, leading to chronic or serious conditions. Therefore, all cases of vaginitis should be accurately diagnosed and appropriately treated. PMID:18475337

  16. Vaginitis - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Vulvovaginitis - self-care; Yeast infections - vaginitis ... Creams or suppositories are used to treat yeast infections in the vagina. You can buy most of them without a prescription at drug stores, some grocery stores, and other stores. Treating yourself ...

  17. The aetiology of vaginal symptoms in rural Haiti.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Claire C; Desgrottes, Tania; Cutler, Lauren; Cutler, David; Devarajan, Karthika; Ocheretina, Oksana; Pape, Jean William; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2014-08-01

    Vaginal symptoms are a common chief complaint amongst women visiting outpatient clinics in rural Haiti. A systematic sample of 206 consecutive women over age 18 with gynaecological symptoms underwent gynaecologic examination and laboratory testing for chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis, HIV infection, trichomoniasis, candidiasis, and bacterial vaginosis. Among 206 women, 174 (84%) presented with vaginal discharge, 165 (80%) with vaginal itching, 123 (60%) with vaginal pain or dysuria, and 18 (9%) with non-traumatic vaginal sores or boils. Laboratory results were positive forChlamydia trachomatisin 5.4% (11/203), syphilis in 3.5% (7/202), HIV in 1.0% (2/200), andNeisseria gonorrhoeaein 1.0% (2/203). Among those that had microscopy, hyphae suggestive of candidiasis were visualized in 2.2% (1/45) and no cases of trichomoniasis were diagnosed 0% (0/45). Bacterial vaginosis was diagnosed in 28.3% (13/46). The prevalence of chlamydia was 4.9 (95% CI: 1.3-17.7) times greater among those 25 years of age and under (10.8%) than those older (2.3%). Chlamydia and bacterial vaginosis were the most common sexually transmitted infection and vaginal condition, respectively, in this study of rural Haitian adult women. The higher risk of chlamydia in younger women suggests education and screening programmes in young women should be considered.

  18. Invasion of human cells by a bacterial pathogen.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Andrew M; Massey, Ruth C

    2011-03-21

    Here we will describe how we study the invasion of human endothelial cells by bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus . The general protocol can be applied to the study of cell invasion by virtually any culturable bacterium. The stages at which specific aspects of invasion can be studied, such as the role of actin rearrangement or caveolae, will be highlighted. Host cells are grown in flasks and when ready for use are seeded into 24-well plates containing Thermanox coverslips. Using coverslips allows subsequent removal of the cells from the wells to reduce interference from serum proteins deposited onto the sides of the wells (to which S. aureus would attach). Bacteria are grown to the required density and washed to remove any secreted proteins (e.g. toxins). Coverslips with confluent layers of endothelial cells are transferred to new 24-well plates containing fresh culture medium before the addition of bacteria. Bacteria and cells are then incubated together for the required amount of time in 5% CO(2) at 37°C. For S. aureus this is typically between 15-90 minutes. Thermanox coverslips are removed from each well and dip-washed in PBS to remove unattached bacteria. If total associated bacteria (adherent and internalised) are to be quantified, coverslips are then placed in a fresh well containing 0.5% Triton X-100 in PBS. Gentle pipetting leads to complete cell lysis and bacteria are enumerated by serial dilution and plating onto agar. If the number of bacteria that have invaded the cells is needed, coverslips are added to wells containing 500 μl tissue culture medium supplemented with gentamicin and incubation continued for 1 h, which will kill all external bacteria. Coverslips can then be washed, cells lysed and bacteria enumerated by plating onto agar as described above. If the experiment requires direct visualisation, coverslips can be fixed and stained for light, fluorescence or confocal microscopy or prepared for electron microscopy.

  19. [HPV contamination of endocavity vaginal ultrasound probes].

    PubMed

    Heard, I; Favre, M

    2015-02-01

    While the use of endovaginal ultrasound probes is increasing, the risk of contamination of women with endocavity vaginal probes was not assessed. In particular, the clinical significance of detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, the most common sexually transmitted viral infection, on endovaginal ultrasound probes is uncertain. The recommendations of good practice for decontamination of these probes developed by the High Council for Public Health and the Academy of Medicine have not been evaluated. The objective of this article was to review recent publications concluding to the detection of HPV and human cellular DNA after gynecological examination and disinfection of vaginal ultrasound probes.

  20. Secretory Aspartyl Proteinases Cause Vaginitis and Can Mediate Vaginitis Caused by Candida albicans in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pericolini, Eva; Gabrielli, Elena; Amacker, Mario; Kasper, Lydia; Roselletti, Elena; Luciano, Eugenio; Sabbatini, Samuele; Kaeser, Matthias; Moser, Christian; Hube, Bernhard; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaginal inflammation (vaginitis) is the most common disease caused by the human-pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. Secretory aspartyl proteinases (Sap) are major virulence traits of C. albicans that have been suggested to play a role in vaginitis. To dissect the mechanisms by which Sap play this role, Sap2, a dominantly expressed member of the Sap family and a putative constituent of an anti-Candida vaccine, was used. Injection of full-length Sap2 into the mouse vagina caused local neutrophil influx and accumulation of the inflammasome-dependent interleukin-1β (IL-1β) but not of inflammasome-independent tumor necrosis factor alpha. Sap2 could be replaced by other Sap, while no inflammation was induced by the vaccine antigen, the N-terminal-truncated, enzymatically inactive tSap2. Anti-Sap2 antibodies, in particular Fab from a human combinatorial antibody library, inhibited or abolished the inflammatory response, provided the antibodies were able, like the Sap inhibitor Pepstatin A, to inhibit Sap enzyme activity. The same antibodies and Pepstatin A also inhibited neutrophil influx and cytokine production stimulated by C. albicans intravaginal injection, and a mutant strain lacking SAP1, SAP2, and SAP3 was unable to cause vaginal inflammation. Sap2 induced expression of activated caspase-1 in murine and human vaginal epithelial cells. Caspase-1 inhibition downregulated IL-1β and IL-18 production by vaginal epithelial cells, and blockade of the IL-1β receptor strongly reduced neutrophil influx. Overall, the data suggest that some Sap, particularly Sap2, are proinflammatory proteins in vivo and can mediate the inflammasome-dependent, acute inflammatory response of vaginal epithelial cells to C. albicans. These findings support the notion that vaccine-induced or passively administered anti-Sap antibodies could contribute to control vaginitis. PMID:26037125

  1. Forensic interlaboratory evaluation of the ForFLUID kit for vaginal fluids identification.

    PubMed

    Giampaoli, Saverio; Alessandrini, Federica; Berti, Andrea; Ripani, Luigi; Choi, Ajin; Crab, Roselien; De Vittori, Elisabetta; Egyed, Balazs; Haas, Cordula; Lee, Hwan Young; Korabecná, Marie; Noel, Fabrice; Podini, Daniele; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Valentini, Alessio; Romano Spica, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Identification of vaginal fluids is an important step in the process of sexual assaults confirmation. Advances in both microbiology and molecular biology defined technical approaches allowing the discrimination of body fluids. These protocols are based on the identification of specific bacterial communities by microfloraDNA (mfDNA) amplification. A multiplex real time-PCR assay (ForFLUID kit) has been developed for identifying biological fluids and for discrimination among vaginal, oral and fecal samples. In order to test its efficacy and reliability of the assay in the identification of vaginal fluids, an interlaboratory evaluation has been performed on homogeneous vaginal swabs. All the involved laboratories were able to correctly recognize all the vaginal swabs, and no false positives were identified when the assay was applied on non-vaginal samples. The assay represents an useful molecular tool that can be easily adopted by forensic geneticists involved in vaginal fluid identification.

  2. Uterine Natural Killer Cell and Human Leukocyte Antigen-G1 and Human Leukocyte Antigen-G5 Expression in Vaginal Discharge of Threatened-Abortion Women: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Shobeiri, Saeideh Sadat; Rahmani, Zahra; Hossein Nataj, Hadi; Ranjbaran, Hossein; Mohammadi, Masoud; Abediankenari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    The immunotolerant human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) molecules have a major role in fetal-maternal tolerance during pregnancy. Interaction between these molecules and uterine natural killer (uNK) cells inhibitory receptors prevents NK cell invasion against fetus trophoblast cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the percentages of uNK cells and HLA-G1 and HLA-G5 isoforms expression in vaginal discharge of threatened-abortion women in comparison with control. In a case-control study, we investigated 30 threatened-abortion women with bleeding or spotting less than 20 weeks of pregnancy as compared to 30 normal pregnant women. uNK cells percentage was assessed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, we evaluated HLA-G1 and HLA-G5 isoforms expression by Real-Time PCR in these groups. The results of this study showed that threatened-abortion women had increased uNK cells and decreased T cells percentage in vaginal discharge in comparison with normal pregnant women (p = 0.01, p = 0.003, resp.). In addition, HLA-G1 isoform had lower expression in threatened-abortion women in comparison with control group (p = 0.0001). The increase of uNK cells level with the decrease of HLA-G expression in vaginal discharge of threatened-abortion pregnant women is an indicator of mother's immune dysregulation. It is concluded that HLA-G expression level with uNK cells percentage can be determined as a diagnostic marker for threatened-abortion women. PMID:26509178

  3. Uterine Natural Killer Cell and Human Leukocyte Antigen-G1 and Human Leukocyte Antigen-G5 Expression in Vaginal Discharge of Threatened-Abortion Women: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Shobeiri, Saeideh Sadat; Rahmani, Zahra; Hossein Nataj, Hadi; Ranjbaran, Hossein; Mohammadi, Masoud; Abediankenari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    The immunotolerant human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) molecules have a major role in fetal-maternal tolerance during pregnancy. Interaction between these molecules and uterine natural killer (uNK) cells inhibitory receptors prevents NK cell invasion against fetus trophoblast cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the percentages of uNK cells and HLA-G1 and HLA-G5 isoforms expression in vaginal discharge of threatened-abortion women in comparison with control. In a case-control study, we investigated 30 threatened-abortion women with bleeding or spotting less than 20 weeks of pregnancy as compared to 30 normal pregnant women. uNK cells percentage was assessed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, we evaluated HLA-G1 and HLA-G5 isoforms expression by Real-Time PCR in these groups. The results of this study showed that threatened-abortion women had increased uNK cells and decreased T cells percentage in vaginal discharge in comparison with normal pregnant women (p = 0.01, p = 0.003, resp.). In addition, HLA-G1 isoform had lower expression in threatened-abortion women in comparison with control group (p = 0.0001). The increase of uNK cells level with the decrease of HLA-G expression in vaginal discharge of threatened-abortion pregnant women is an indicator of mother's immune dysregulation. It is concluded that HLA-G expression level with uNK cells percentage can be determined as a diagnostic marker for threatened-abortion women. PMID:26509178

  4. An emerging mycoplasma associated with trichomoniasis, vaginal infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Fettweis, Jennifer M; Serrano, Myrna G; Huang, Bernice; Brooks, J Paul; Glascock, Abigail L; Sheth, Nihar U; Strauss, Jerome F; Jefferson, Kimberly K; Buck, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Humans are colonized by thousands of bacterial species, but it is difficult to assess the metabolic and pathogenic potential of the majority of these because they have yet to be cultured. Here, we characterize an uncultivated vaginal mycoplasma tightly associated with trichomoniasis that was previously known by its 16S rRNA sequence as "Mnola." In this study, the mycoplasma was found almost exclusively in women infected with the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, but rarely observed in women with no diagnosed disease. The genomes of four strains of this species were reconstructed using metagenome sequencing and assembly of DNA from four discrete mid-vaginal samples, one of which was obtained from a pregnant woman with trichomoniasis who delivered prematurely. These bacteria harbor several putative virulence factors and display unique metabolic strategies. Genes encoding proteins with high similarity to potential virulence factors include two collagenases, a hemolysin, an O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase and a feoB-type ferrous iron transport system. We propose the name "Candidatus Mycoplasma girerdii" for this potential new pathogen. PMID:25337710

  5. Increased vaginal pH in Ugandan women: what does it indicate?

    PubMed

    Donders, G G G; Gonzaga, A; Marconi, C; Donders, F; Michiels, T; Eggermont, N; Bellen, G; Lule, J; Byamughisa, J

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal vaginal flora (AVF), indicative of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and/or aerobic vaginitis (AV), amongst other abnormalities, is a risk factor for multiple complications in pregnant as well as non-pregnant women. Screening for such conditions could help prevent these complications. Can self-testing for increased vaginal pH reliably detect BV and other high-risk microflora types, and is this more accurate than performing Gram stain-based Nugent score when screening for high-risk microflora? A total of 344 women presenting at different outpatient clinics in Mulago Hospital and Mbuikwe Outpatient clinics in Kampala, Uganda, were asked to test themselves by introducing a gloved finger into the vagina and smearing it on a microscopy slide, on which a pH strip was attached. Self-assessed categories of normal (pH 3.6-4.4), intermediate (4.5-4.7) or high pH (>4.7) were compared with demographic and with centralised microscopic data, both in air-dried rehydrated wet mounts (Femicare), as well as in Gram-stained specimens (Nugent). AVF was present in 38 %, BV in 25 % and AV in 11 % of patients. High pH and AVF is correlated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), infertility, frequent sex, but not vaginal douching. Screening for raised pH detects 90 % of AVF cases, but would require testing over half of the population. As AV and non-infectious conditions are frequent in women with AVF and high pH, Nugent score alone is an insufficient technique to screen women for a high-risk vaginal microflora, especially in infertile and HIV-infected women. PMID:27180245

  6. May We Strengthen the Human Natural Defenses with Bacterial Lysates?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    During the last twenty years bacterial lysates have gained a new interest and their use has obtained a progressively larger consensus in the medical practice. They are commonly used as immunomodulators, in order to up-regulate immune responses against infectious damages. As a matter of fact, the role of these lysate seems relevant in upper and lower respiratory tract infections prevention, frequently observed both in paediatric and elder ages, and which represent a relevant problem also in terms of socio-economical implications. The effects of bacterial lysates as immunostimulatory agents have become the central point of many studies. The aim of those in vivo and in vitro studies was to understand and evaluate the capacity of this kind of treatments to create a better answer of the immune system against microbial infections, eventually leading to a reduction in their number. All the in vivo and in vitro findings analyzed support the evidence that bacterial lysates are powerful inducers of a specific immune response against bacterial infections. Both in paediatric and adult clinical trials, a positive trend has been found in terms of overall reduction of infection rates and duration, beneficial effect on symptoms, reduction in antibiotics use and possibility to improve the patient's quality of life in several diseases. Further well-designed trials in terms of blinding and randomization procedures and including a higher number of patients, selected according to the disease and its severity, are needed. PMID:23282746

  7. General Information about Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Vaginal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Vaginal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  8. Vaginal Yeast Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Vaginal Yeast Infections Print ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  9. Vaginal itching and discharge - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... vulvae; Itching - vaginal area; Vulvar itching; Yeast infection - child ... To prevent and treat vaginal irritation, your child should: Avoid colored or perfumed toilet tissue and bubble bath. Use plain, unscented soap. Limit bath time to 15 minutes or less. Ask ...

  10. Primary Vaginal Adenocarcinoma Arising in Vaginal Adenosis After CO2 Laser Vaporization and 5-Fluorouracil Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Paczos, Tamera A.; Ackers, Stacey; Odunsi, Kunle; Lele, Shashikant; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette

    2016-01-01

    Summary We present a case of a 45-year-old woman with a long-standing history of persistent cervical dysplasia that resulted in a hysterectomy. Subsequent vaginal smears revealed high-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN III) on Pap smear with positive human papilloma virus (HPV) testing. Over the course of 2 years, the patient underwent 2 CO2 laser vaporization procedures of the upper vagina and intermittent 5-fluorouracil therapy. A biopsy performed at the time of the second laser procedure revealed endocervical-type well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, associated with VAIN III. HPV in situ hybridization for HPV types 16 and 18 was positive in both the glandular and squamous mucosa. The patient has no known history of intrauterine diethylstilbestrol exposure or mullerian developmental abnormalities. Subsequently, the patient underwent a radical upper vaginetcomy with bilateral pelvic lymph nodes dissection and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The vaginectomy specimen showed residual adenocarcinoma associated with VAIN-III and extensive vaginal adenosis with free resection margins. This is the second reported case in the literature of adenocarcinoma arising in vaginal adenosis after 5-fluorouracil. Herein, we highlight these important findings and shed some light on the pathogenesis of vaginal adenosis and the subsequent development of vaginal adenocarcinoma. PMID:20173507

  11. Analysis of Lactobacillus Products for Phages and Bacteriocins That Inhibit Vaginal Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Sylvia I.; Mou, Susan M.; Ma, Wen-ge; Kiliç, Ali O.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Bacterial vaginosis is associated with an unexplained loss of vaginal lactobacilli. Previously, we have identified certain vaginal lactobacilli-released phages that can inhibit in vitro other vaginal lactobacilli. However, there is no apparent route for phages to be transmitted among women. The purpose of this study was to identify whether certain Lactobacillus products commonly used by women release phages or bacteriocins that can inhibit vaginal lactobacilli. Methods: From 26 Lactobacillus products (2 acidophilus milks, 20 yogurts, 3 Lactobacillus pills, and 1 vaginal douche mix), lactobacilli were isolated with Rogosa SL agar (Difco, Detroit, MI). From these lactobacilli, phages and bacteriocins were induced with mitomycin C and tested against a collection of vaginal Lactobacillus strains. Results: From the 26 products, 43 Lactobacillus strains were isolated. Strains from 11 yogurts released phages, among which 7 inhibited vaginal lactobacilli. Eleven strains released bacteriocins that inhibited vaginal lactobacilli. While about one-half of the vaginal strains were lysed by bacteriocins, less than 20% were lysed by phages. Conclusions: Some vaginal lactobacilli were inhibited in vitro by phages or bacteriocins released from Lactobacillus products used by women, implying that vaginal lactobacilli may be reduced naturally due to phages or bacteriocins from the environment. PMID:18476145

  12. Bacterial Urease and its Role in Long-Lasting Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Konieczna, Iwona; Żarnowiec, Paulina; Kwinkowski, Marek; Kolesińska, Beata; Frączyk, Justyna; Kamiński, Zbigniew; Kaca, Wiesław

    2012-01-01

    Urease is a virulence factor found in various pathogenic bacteria. It is essential in colonization of a host organism and in maintenance of bacterial cells in tissues. Due to its enzymatic activity, urease has a toxic effect on human cells. The presence of ureolytic activity is an important marker of a number of bacterial infections. Urease is also an immunogenic protein and is recognized by antibodies present in human sera. The presence of such antibodies is connected with progress of several long-lasting diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis or urinary tract infections. In bacterial ureases, motives with a sequence and/or structure similar to human proteins may occur. This phenomenon, known as molecular mimicry, leads to the appearance of autoantibodies, which take part in host molecules destruction. Detection of antibodies-binding motives (epitopes) in bacterial proteins is a complex process. However, organic chemistry tools, such as synthetic peptide libraries, are helpful in both, epitope mapping as well as in serologic investigations. In this review, we present a synthetic report on a molecular organization of bacterial ureases - genetic as well as structural. We characterize methods used in detecting urease and ureolytic activity, including techniques applied in disease diagnostic processes and in chemical synthesis of urease epitopes. The review also provides a summary of knowledge about a toxic effect of bacterial ureases on human body and about occurrence of anti-urease antibodies in long-lasting diseases. PMID:23305365

  13. Vaginal infections, cervical ripening and preterm delivery.

    PubMed

    Chambers, S; Pons, J C; Richard, A; Chiesa, M; Bouyer, J; Papiernik, E

    1991-01-30

    A prospective study is presented which addresses the relative effect of cervicovaginal infection and precocious maturation of the uterine cervix on preterm delivery. From April 1981 through December 1983, a total of 5758 pregnant women were checked by means of a vaginal examination at every prenatal visit and a research for bacterial cervicovaginal infection whenever abnormal signs were observed. The study reveals that vaginal infection has no measurable effect when observed during the second trimester of pregnancy, and a small effect during the third trimester. This means that infection of the vagina or/and the cervix may be demonstrated as a risk factor only when the cervix is short before 28 weeks or open before 37 weeks. PMID:1995377

  14. Is vaginal hyaluronic acid as effective as vaginal estriol for vaginal dryness relief?

    PubMed

    Stute, Petra

    2013-12-01

    In a multicenter, randomized, controlled, open-label, parallel- group trial hyaluronic acid vaginal gel (Hyalofemme) was compared to estriol vaginal cream (Ovestin) in women with vaginal dryness due to various causes. A total of 144 supposedly postmenopausal women below age 70 years were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either receive hyaluronic acid vaginal gel (5 g per application) or estriol vaginal cream (0.5 g cream per application = 0.5 mg estriol) every 3 days for a total of ten applications, respectively. Exclusion criteria included vaginal infections, conventional contraindications to estrogens, use of vaginal products other than the investigational compounds, being unmarried, pregnant, or breastfeeding. The aim of the study was to test for non-inferiority of hyaluronic acid vaginal gel compared to estriol vaginal cream. The primary efficacy end point was the percentage (%) improvement in vaginal dryness, with the secondary end points being the percentage (%) improvements in vaginal itching, burning, and dyspareunia. Efficacy was assessed by using a visual analog scale (VAS) (0-10; 0 = absent, 10 = intolerable) at baseline (V0), during telephone contact after the third administration (V1), and at the final visit after the tenth administration (V2). Safety parameters included vaginal pH, endometrial thickness, and a vaginal smear for vaginal microecosystem assessment. Adverse events were recorded according to international guidelines. 133 women completed the study. At baseline, participants' characteristics did not differ significantly. Mean age was 54 years, time since menopause was 5 years on average, and cause of menopause was mostly natural. However, mean menstrual cycle days were also reported, although according to inclusion criteria only postmenopausal women were eligible for the study. At V1, an improvement in vaginal dryness was reported by about 49 % of women using hyaluronic acid vaginal gel, and by 53 % of women using estriol vaginal cream (p = 0

  15. Potential Use of Bacterial Community Succession in Decaying Human Bone for Estimating Postmortem Interval.

    PubMed

    Damann, Franklin E; Williams, Daniel E; Layton, Alice C

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria are taphonomic agents of human decomposition, potentially useful for estimating postmortem interval (PMI) in late-stage decomposition. Bone samples from 12 individuals and three soil samples were analyzed to assess the effects of decomposition and advancing time on bacterial communities. Results indicated that partially skeletonized remains maintained a presence of bacteria associated with the human gut, whereas bacterial composition of dry skeletal remains maintained a community profile similar to soil communities. Variation in the UniFrac distances was significantly greater between groups than within groups (p < 0.001) for the unweighted metric and not the weighted metric. The members of the bacterial communities were more similar within than between decomposition stages. The oligotrophic environment of bone relative to soft tissue and the physical protection of organic substrates may preclude bacterial blooms during the first years of skeletonization. Therefore, community membership (unweighted) may be better for estimating PMI from skeletonized remains than community structure (weighted).

  16. Humanized Mouse Model to Study Bacterial Infections Targeting the Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Melican, Keira; Aubey, Flore; Duménil, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes a severe, frequently fatal sepsis when it enters the human blood stream. Infection leads to extensive damage of the blood vessels resulting in vascular leak, the development of purpuric rashes and eventual tissue necrosis. Studying the pathogenesis of this infection was previously limited by the human specificity of the bacteria, which makes in vivo models difficult. In this protocol, we describe a humanized model for this infection in which human skin, containing dermal microvessels, is grafted onto immunocompromised mice. These vessels anastomose with the mouse circulation while maintaining their human characteristics. Once introduced into this model, N. meningitidis adhere exclusively to the human vessels, resulting in extensive vascular damage, inflammation and in some cases the development of purpuric rash. This protocol describes the grafting, infection and evaluation steps of this model in the context of N. meningitidis infection. The technique may be applied to numerous human specific pathogens that infect the blood stream. PMID:24747976

  17. THE ETIOLOGY OF BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Turovskiy, Yevgeniy; Noll, Katia Sutyak; Chikindas, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection among women of childbearing age. This condition is notorious for causing severe complications related to the reproductive health of women. Five decades of intense research established many risk factors for acquisition of BV, however due to the complexity of BV and due to lack of a reliable animal model for this condition, its exact etiology remains elusive. In this manuscript we use a historical perspective to critically review the development of major theories on the etiology of BV, ultimately implicating BV-related pathogens, healthy vaginal microbiota, bacteriophages and the immune response of the host. None of these theories on their own can reliably explain the epidemiological data. Instead, BV is caused by a complex interaction of multiple factors, which include the numerous components of the vaginal microbial ecosystem and their human host. Many of these factors are yet to be characterized because a clear understanding of their relative contribution to the etiology of BV is pivotal to formulation of an effective treatment for and prophylaxis of this condition. PMID:21332897

  18. The composition and stability of the vaginal microbiota of normal pregnant women is different from that of non-pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was undertaken to characterize the vaginal microbiota throughout normal human pregnancy using sequence-based techniques. We compared the vaginal microbial composition of non-pregnant patients with a group of pregnant women who delivered at term. Results A retrospective case–control longitudinal study was designed and included non-pregnant women (n = 32) and pregnant women who delivered at term (38 to 42 weeks) without complications (n = 22). Serial samples of vaginal fluid were collected from both non-pregnant and pregnant patients. A 16S rRNA gene sequence-based survey was conducted using pyrosequencing to characterize the structure and stability of the vaginal microbiota. Linear mixed effects models and generalized estimating equations were used to identify the phylotypes whose relative abundance was different between the two study groups. The vaginal microbiota of normal pregnant women was different from that of non-pregnant women (higher abundance of Lactobacillus vaginalis, L. crispatus, L. gasseri and L. jensenii and lower abundance of 22 other phylotypes in pregnant women). Bacterial community state type (CST) IV-B or CST IV-A characterized by high relative abundance of species of genus Atopobium as well as the presence of Prevotella, Sneathia, Gardnerella, Ruminococcaceae, Parvimonas, Mobiluncus and other taxa previously shown to be associated with bacterial vaginosis were less frequent in normal pregnancy. The stability of the vaginal microbiota of pregnant women was higher than that of non-pregnant women; however, during normal pregnancy, bacterial communities shift almost exclusively from one CST dominated by Lactobacillus spp. to another CST dominated by Lactobacillus spp. Conclusion We report the first longitudinal study of the vaginal microbiota in normal pregnancy. Differences in the composition and stability of the microbial community between pregnant and non-pregnant women were observed. Lactobacillus spp. were the

  19. Human intestinal alkaline phosphatase-binding IgG in patients with severe bacterial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Mäder, M; Kolbus, N; Meihorst, D; Köhn, A; Beuche, W; Felgenhauer, K

    1994-01-01

    Patterns of alkaline phosphatase (AP)-binding proteins were observed in the alkaline pH range of 6.5-9.5 upon isoelectric focusing and blotting of serum from patients with inflammatory diseases. After isolation using affinity chromatography on protein A or immunoaffinity chromatography on AP coupled to cyanogen bromide (CNBr)-activated Sepharose, the AP-binding protein was identified as IgG on Western blots and in ELISA using human IgG-specific antibodies. It was shown that this IgG binds to AP from both calf (bovine) and human intestine. However, it binds neither to the human liver-bone-kidney (LBK) isoform nor to bacterial AP. Moderate reaction was observed with human placental AP. Comparing patients with various diagnoses (n = 284), AP-binding antibodies were mainly found in severe bacterial infections. They were not detected in serum from healthy blood donors (n = 300). The presence of AP-binding IgG was independent of the infected organ and the bacterial species causing infection. This antibody may be useful for discriminating bacterial from viral infection and for indicating severe bacterial inflammation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8287614

  20. Vaginal leiomyoma in pregnancy presenting as a prolapsed vaginal mass.

    PubMed

    Dane, Cem; Rustemoglu, Yaprak; Kiray, Murat; Ozkuvanci, Unsal; Tatar, Zeynep; Dane, Banu

    2012-12-01

    Vaginal leiomyomas are rare benign solid tumours of the vagina. They can cause mechanical dystocia, which is a common problem in obstetrics leading to serious maternal and perinatal complications. Here we describe a patient with a vaginal leiomyoma diagnosed during the mid-trimester that could have caused dystocia. This 22-year-old woman presented with a vaginal mass and leaking vaginal fluid during pregnancy. On examination, a prolapsed, pedunculated mass, measuring 5 × 3 × 4 cm was detected in the anterior vaginal wall. Via a midline incision, the mass was easily enucleated and removed. Transvaginal surgical enucleation of the vaginal leiomyoma is usually curative and recommended as the initial treatment of choice to prevent for dystocia. Such treatment is indicated when the tumour is a potential obstacle to normal labour.

  1. Exploiting Bacterial Operons To Illuminate Human Iron-Sulfur Proteins.

    PubMed

    Andreini, Claudia; Banci, Lucia; Rosato, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Organisms from all kingdoms of life use iron-sulfur proteins (FeS-Ps) in a multitude of functional processes. We applied a bioinformatics approach to investigate the human portfolio of FeS-Ps. Sixty-one percent of human FeS-Ps bind Fe4S4 clusters, whereas 39% bind Fe2S2 clusters. However, this relative ratio varies significantly depending on the specific cellular compartment. We compared the portfolio of human FeS-Ps to 12 other eukaryotes and to about 700 prokaryotes. The comparative analysis of the organization of the prokaryotic homologues of human FeS-Ps within operons allowed us to reconstruct the human functional networks involving the conserved FeS-Ps common to prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These functional networks have been maintained during evolution and thus presumably represent fundamental cellular processes. The respiratory chain and the ISC machinery for FeS-P biogenesis are the two conserved processes that involve the majority of human FeS-Ps. Purine metabolism is another process including several FeS-Ps, in which BOLA proteins possibly have a regulatory role. The analysis of the co-occurrence of human FeS-Ps with other proteins highlighted numerous links between the iron-sulfur cluster machinery and the response mechanisms to cell damage, from repair to apoptosis. This relationship probably relates to the production of reactive oxygen species within the biogenesis and degradation of FeS-Ps.

  2. Diffusion of Immunoglobulin G in Shed Vaginal Epithelial Cells and in Cell-Free Regions of Human Cervicovaginal Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Schroeder, Holly A.; Nunn, Kenetta L.; Woods, Karen; Anderson, Deborah J.; Cone, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) is a viscoelastic gel containing a complex mixture of mucins, shed epithelial cells, microbes and macromolecules, such as antibodies, that together serve as the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Here, to investigate the affinity between IgG and different mucus constituents, we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to measure the diffusion of IgG in fresh, minimally modified CVM. We found that CVM exhibits substantial spatial variations that necessitate careful selection of the regions in which to perform FRAP. In portions of CVM devoid of cells, FRAP measurements using different IgG antibodies and labeling methods consistently demonstrate that both exogenous and endogenous IgG undergo rapid diffusion, almost as fast as in saline, in good agreement with the rapid diffusion of IgG in mid-cycle endocervical mucus that is largely devoid of cells. This rapid diffusion indicates the interactions between secreted mucins and IgG must be very weak and transient. IgG also accumulated in cellular debris and shed epithelial cells that had become permeable to IgG, which may allow shed epithelial cells to serve as reservoirs of secreted IgG. Interestingly, in contrast to cell-free regions of CVM, the diffusion of cell-associated IgG was markedly slowed, suggesting greater affinity between IgG and cellular constituents. Our findings contribute to an improved understanding of the role of IgG in mucosal protection against infectious diseases, and may also provide a framework for using FRAP to study molecular interactions in mucus and other complex biological environments. PMID:27362256

  3. Vaginal microbiome of reproductive-age women.

    PubMed

    Ravel, Jacques; Gajer, Pawel; Abdo, Zaid; Schneider, G Maria; Koenig, Sara S K; McCulle, Stacey L; Karlebach, Shara; Gorle, Reshma; Russell, Jennifer; Tacket, Carol O; Brotman, Rebecca M; Davis, Catherine C; Ault, Kevin; Peralta, Ligia; Forney, Larry J

    2011-03-15

    The means by which vaginal microbiomes help prevent urogenital diseases in women and maintain health are poorly understood. To gain insight into this, the vaginal bacterial communities of 396 asymptomatic North American women who represented four ethnic groups (white, black, Hispanic, and Asian) were sampled and the species composition characterized by pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA genes. The communities clustered into five groups: four were dominated by Lactobacillus iners, L. crispatus, L. gasseri, or L. jensenii, whereas the fifth had lower proportions of lactic acid bacteria and higher proportions of strictly anaerobic organisms, indicating that a potential key ecological function, the production of lactic acid, seems to be conserved in all communities. The proportions of each community group varied among the four ethnic groups, and these differences were statistically significant [χ(2)(10) = 36.8, P < 0.0001]. Moreover, the vaginal pH of women in different ethnic groups also differed and was higher in Hispanic (pH 5.0 ± 0.59) and black (pH 4.7 ± 1.04) women as compared with Asian (pH 4.4 ± 0.59) and white (pH 4.2 ± 0.3) women. Phylotypes with correlated relative abundances were found in all communities, and these patterns were associated with either high or low Nugent scores, which are used as a factor for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. The inherent differences within and between women in different ethnic groups strongly argues for a more refined definition of the kinds of bacterial communities normally found in healthy women and the need to appreciate differences between individuals so they can be taken into account in risk assessment and disease diagnosis.

  4. The vaginal microbiome: New information about genital tract flora using molecular based techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Ronald F.; Sobel, Jack D.; Akins, Robert A.; Hassan, Sonia S.; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Romero, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Vaginal microbiome studies provide information which may change the way we define vaginal flora. Normal flora appears dominated by one or two species of Lactobacillus. Significant numbers of healthy women lack appreciable numbers of vaginal lactobacilli. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is not a single entity, but different bacterial communities or profiles of greater microbial diversity than is evident from cultivation-dependent studies. BV should be considered a syndrome of variable composition which results in different symptoms, phenotypical outcomes, and responses to different antibiotic regimens. This information may help to elucidate the link between BV and infection-related adverse outcomes of pregnancy. PMID:21251190

  5. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression. PMID:26962942

  6. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression.

  7. In vitro testing of Today vaginal contraceptive sponge with bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hammill, H A; Ford, L C; Suzuki, F; Mickus, K; Yip, D; Finegold, S

    1986-01-01

    In vitro methods were used to test Today vaginal contraceptive sponges for sterility, contamination by handling, and inhibition of bacterial growth. Also tested was an in vitro vaginal model surrounded by growth medium that continually seeded the dialysis tubing with nutrient in an attempt to replicate vaginal secretions. A goal of this research was to investigate manufacturer claims of hostility of the sponge in the presence of Staph aureus. Sponges added in a sterile manner to brain-heart infusion broth produced no growth under aerobic or anaerobic conditions when no organisms were added. However, the experiments that involved contamination of the sponges by hadling in a nonsterile fashion resulted in 10.8 colony forming units of Staph epidermidis and Staph aureus, coagulese negative. In the in vitro vaginal model, 16 hours after an inoculum of Staph aureus colony forming units was placed on a sponge, 3.5 x 10.10 colony forming units were cultured and there was a similar profusion of E coli sludge. These results fail to confirm claims of hostility of the vaginal sponge to the bacteria tested. There is concern that the technique recommended by the manufacturer involves adding water and then inserting the sponge with 1 hand and leaving it in place for 24 hours. This procedure may facilitate the enhancement of vaginitis and perhaps pelvic inflammatory disease.

  8. Oral iron acutely elevates bacterial growth in human serum.

    PubMed

    Cross, James H; Bradbury, Richard S; Fulford, Anthony J; Jallow, Amadou T; Wegmüller, Rita; Prentice, Andrew M; Cerami, Carla

    2015-11-23

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency worldwide and routine supplementation is standard policy for pregnant mothers and children in most low-income countries. However, iron lies at the center of host-pathogen competition for nutritional resources and recent trials of iron administration in African and Asian children have resulted in significant excesses of serious adverse events including hospitalizations and deaths. Increased rates of malaria, respiratory infections, severe diarrhea and febrile illnesses of unknown origin have all been reported, but the mechanisms are unclear. We here investigated the ex vivo growth characteristics of exemplar sentinel bacteria in adult sera collected before and 4 h after oral supplementation with 2 mg/kg iron as ferrous sulfate. Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (all gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (gram-positive) showed markedly elevated growth in serum collected after iron supplementation. Growth rates were very strongly correlated with transferrin saturation (p < 0.0001 in all cases). Growth of Staphylococcus aureus, which preferentially scavenges heme iron, was unaffected. These data suggest that even modest oral supplements with highly soluble (non-physiological) iron, as typically used in low-income settings, could promote bacteremia by accelerating early phase bacterial growth prior to the induction of immune defenses.

  9. Oral iron acutely elevates bacterial growth in human serum

    PubMed Central

    Cross, James H.; Bradbury, Richard S.; Fulford, Anthony J.; Jallow, Amadou T.; Wegmüller, Rita; Prentice, Andrew M.; Cerami, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency worldwide and routine supplementation is standard policy for pregnant mothers and children in most low-income countries. However, iron lies at the center of host-pathogen competition for nutritional resources and recent trials of iron administration in African and Asian children have resulted in significant excesses of serious adverse events including hospitalizations and deaths. Increased rates of malaria, respiratory infections, severe diarrhea and febrile illnesses of unknown origin have all been reported, but the mechanisms are unclear. We here investigated the ex vivo growth characteristics of exemplar sentinel bacteria in adult sera collected before and 4 h after oral supplementation with 2 mg/kg iron as ferrous sulfate. Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (all gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (gram-positive) showed markedly elevated growth in serum collected after iron supplementation. Growth rates were very strongly correlated with transferrin saturation (p < 0.0001 in all cases). Growth of Staphylococcus aureus, which preferentially scavenges heme iron, was unaffected. These data suggest that even modest oral supplements with highly soluble (non-physiological) iron, as typically used in low-income settings, could promote bacteremia by accelerating early phase bacterial growth prior to the induction of immune defenses. PMID:26593732

  10. Oral iron acutely elevates bacterial growth in human serum.

    PubMed

    Cross, James H; Bradbury, Richard S; Fulford, Anthony J; Jallow, Amadou T; Wegmüller, Rita; Prentice, Andrew M; Cerami, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency worldwide and routine supplementation is standard policy for pregnant mothers and children in most low-income countries. However, iron lies at the center of host-pathogen competition for nutritional resources and recent trials of iron administration in African and Asian children have resulted in significant excesses of serious adverse events including hospitalizations and deaths. Increased rates of malaria, respiratory infections, severe diarrhea and febrile illnesses of unknown origin have all been reported, but the mechanisms are unclear. We here investigated the ex vivo growth characteristics of exemplar sentinel bacteria in adult sera collected before and 4 h after oral supplementation with 2 mg/kg iron as ferrous sulfate. Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (all gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (gram-positive) showed markedly elevated growth in serum collected after iron supplementation. Growth rates were very strongly correlated with transferrin saturation (p < 0.0001 in all cases). Growth of Staphylococcus aureus, which preferentially scavenges heme iron, was unaffected. These data suggest that even modest oral supplements with highly soluble (non-physiological) iron, as typically used in low-income settings, could promote bacteremia by accelerating early phase bacterial growth prior to the induction of immune defenses. PMID:26593732

  11. Detecting human bacterial pathogens in wastewater treatment plants by a high-throughput shotgun sequencing technique.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lin; Zhang, Tong

    2013-05-21

    Human pathogens are one of the major threats to global public health. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) serve as city guts to receive and digest various human pathogens. Several techniques have been developed to detect human pathogens in WWTPs and to assess potential environmental risks. In this study, we employed 24 metagenomic DNA data sets derived from a high-throughput shotgun sequencing technique to more accurately and efficiently detect human bacterial pathogens in influent, activated sludge, and effluent of two Hong Kong WWTPs. Each data set was quality-filtered and normalized to 12,500,000 DNA sequences with a length of 150-190 bp. Then, a BLASTN search against Greengenes general 16S rRNA gene database and human pathogenic bacteria 16S rRNA gene database, a BLASTX search against human pathogenic bacteria virulence factor database, as well as MetaPhlAn analysis were conducted to survey the distribution, diversity, and abundance of human bacterial pathogens. The results revealed that (i) nine bacterial pathogens were detected; (ii) the overall pathogenic bacteria abundance was estimated as 0.06-3.20% in the total bacteria population using 16S rRNA gene fingerprinting; (iii) pathogenic bacteria detected in activated sludge and effluent shared similar profiles but were different from influent based on both 16S rRNA gene and virulence factor fingerprintings; (iv) Mycobacterium tuberculosis -like species may present potential pathogenic risks because it was detected with high abundance in both activated sludge and effluent. These findings provided a comprehensive profile of commonly concerned human pathogens in two Hong Kong WWTPs and demonstrated that the high-throughput shotgun sequencing technique is a feasible and effectual approach for environmental detection of human bacterial pathogens.

  12. The vaginal microbiota: what have we learned after a decade of molecular characterization?

    PubMed

    van de Wijgert, Janneke H H M; Borgdorff, Hanneke; Verhelst, Rita; Crucitti, Tania; Francis, Suzanna; Verstraelen, Hans; Jespers, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review of the Medline database (U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, U.S.A) to determine if consistent molecular vaginal microbiota (VMB) composition patterns can be discerned after a decade of molecular testing, and to evaluate demographic, behavioral and clinical determinants of VMB compositions. Studies were eligible when published between 1 January 2008 and 15 November 2013, and if at least one molecular technique (sequencing, PCR, DNA fingerprinting, or DNA hybridization) was used to characterize the VMB. Sixty three eligible studies were identified. These studies have now conclusively shown that lactobacilli-dominated VMB are associated with a healthy vaginal micro-environment and that bacterial vaginosis (BV) is best described as a polybacterial dysbiosis. The extent of dysbiosis correlates well with Nugent score and vaginal pH but not with the other Amsel criteria. Lactobacillus crispatus is more beneficial than L. iners. Longitudinal studies have shown that a L. crispatus-dominated VMB is more likely to shift to a L. iners-dominated or mixed lactobacilli VMB than to full dysbiosis. Data on VMB determinants are scarce and inconsistent, but dysbiosis is consistently associated with HIV, human papillomavirus (HPV), and Trichomonas vaginalis infection. In contrast, vaginal colonization with Candida spp. is more common in women with a lactobacilli-dominated VMB than in women with dysbiosis. Cervicovaginal mucosal immune responses to molecular VMB compositions have not yet been properly characterized. Molecular techniques have now become more affordable, and we make a case for incorporating them into larger epidemiological studies to address knowledge gaps in etiology and pathogenesis of dysbiosis, associations of different dysbiotic states with clinical outcomes, and to evaluate interventions aimed at restoring and maintaining a lactobacilli-dominated VMB. PMID:25148517

  13. Conformational dynamics of bacterial and human cytoplasmic models of the ribosomal A-site.

    PubMed

    Panecka, Joanna; Šponer, Jiří; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-05-01

    The aminoacyl-tRNA binding site (A-site) is located in helix 44 of small ribosomal subunit. The mobile adenines 1492 and 1493 (Escherichia coli numbering), forming the A-site bulge, act as a functional switch that ensures mRNA decoding accuracy. Structural data on the oligonucleotide models mimicking the ribosomal A-site with sequences corresponding to bacterial and human cytoplasmic sites confirm that this RNA motif forms also without the ribosome context. We performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of these crystallographic A-site models to compare their conformational properties. We found that the human A-site bulge is more internally flexible than the bacterial one and has different base pairing preferences, which result in the overall different shapes of these bulges and cation density distributions. Also, in the human A-site model we observed repetitive destacking of A1492, while A1493 was more stably paired than in the bacterial variant. Based on the dynamics of the A-sites we suggest why aminoglycoside antibiotics, which target the bacterial A-site, have lower binding affinities and anti-translational activities toward the human variant. PMID:25748164

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a Human Cytomegalovirus Strain AD169 Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clone

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Spohn, Michael; Indenbirken, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence of the human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 (variant ATCC) cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (AD169-BAC, also known as HB15 or pHB15) was determined. The viral genome has a length of 230,290 bp and shows 52 nucleotide differences compared to a previously sequenced AD169varATCC clone. PMID:27034483

  15. [Bacterial infection as a cause of infertility in humans].

    PubMed

    Sleha, Radek; Boštíková, Vanda; Salavec, Miloslav; Mosio, Petra; Kusáková, Eva; Kukla, Rudolf; Mazurová, Jaroslava; Spliňo, Miroslav

    2013-04-01

    Microorganisms which are present in the human urogenital tract may be involved in the development of inflammatory changes negatively affecting the genitals in both men and women. Pathological conditions due to inflammatory alterations may result in complete loss of fertility. Infections of the urogenital tract are responsible for 15% of all cases of infertility in couples. Negative impact on the human reproduction is mainly caused by direct damage to the genital tract mucosa by metabolic products of microorganisms or by induction of pro-inflammatory responses of the body. Another mechanism is indirect impact of microorganisms on the genital function. Moreover, the effect of bacteria on spermatogenesis and semen quality is important in men. Infections mainly caused by Chlamydia trachomatis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae represent the greatest risk in terms of permanent consequences for human reproduction. As for other sexually transmitted disorders, such as infections caused by Gardnerella vaginalis, urogenital mycoplasmas or ureaplasmas, the link between infection and infertility has been intensively researched. PMID:23768092

  16. Binding of type 1-piliated Escherichia coli to vaginal mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Venegas, M F; Navas, E L; Gaffney, R A; Duncan, J L; Anderson, B E; Schaeffer, A J

    1995-01-01

    To better understand the interactions involved in bacterial adherence and the role of mucus in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections, we developed a system to study the binding of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain, HB101/pWRS1-17, expressing type 1 pili, to vaginal mucus collected from 28 women. Bacteria bound to differing extents to all specimens examined, and preincubation of bacteria with mannose inhibited binding by 50 to 89%. Additionally, all mucus samples showed reactivity with anti-mannose antibody, and the levels of reactivity correlated with the levels of bacterial binding, suggesting that the mannose-terminal saccharides present on these glycoproteins are the receptors for the binding of type 1-piliated bacteria. Mucus specimens collected over periods of 5 days and 12 weeks exhibited significant variation in bacterial binding, indicating temporal differences in the ability of vaginal mucus to act as a receptor for type 1-piliated E. coli. The results show that vaginal mucus can bind bacteria and may thus influence the initial attachment and subsequent colonization of the vaginal and urinary tract epithelium by E. coli. PMID:7822005

  17. Relationship between Milk Microbiota, Bacterial Load, Macronutrients, and Human Cells during Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Boix-Amorós, Alba; Collado, Maria C.; Mira, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Human breast milk is considered the optimal nutrition for infants, providing essential nutrients and a broad range of bioactive compounds, as well as its own microbiota. However, the interaction among those components and the biological role of milk microorganisms is still uncovered. Thus, our aim was to identify the relationships between milk microbiota composition, bacterial load, macronutrients, and human cells during lactation. Bacterial load was estimated in milk samples from a total of 21 healthy mothers through lactation time by bacteria-specific qPCR targeted to the single-copy gene fusA. Milk microbiome composition and diversity was estimated by 16S-pyrosequencing and the structure of these bacteria in the fluid was studied by flow cytometry, qPCR, and microscopy. Fat, protein, lactose, and dry extract of milk as well as the number of somatic cells were also analyzed. We observed that milk bacterial communities were generally complex, and showed individual-specific profiles. Milk microbiota was dominated by Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, and Acinetobacter. Staphylococcus aureus was not detected in any of these samples from healthy mothers. There was high variability in composition and number of bacteria per milliliter among mothers and in some cases even within mothers at different time points. The median bacterial load was 106 bacterial cells/ml through time, higher than those numbers reported by 16S gene PCR and culture methods. Furthermore, milk bacteria were present in a free-living, “planktonic” state, but also in equal proportion associated to human immune cells. There was no correlation between bacterial load and the amount of immune cells in milk, strengthening the idea that milk bacteria are not sensed as an infection by the immune system. PMID:27148183

  18. Relationship between Milk Microbiota, Bacterial Load, Macronutrients, and Human Cells during Lactation.

    PubMed

    Boix-Amorós, Alba; Collado, Maria C; Mira, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Human breast milk is considered the optimal nutrition for infants, providing essential nutrients and a broad range of bioactive compounds, as well as its own microbiota. However, the interaction among those components and the biological role of milk microorganisms is still uncovered. Thus, our aim was to identify the relationships between milk microbiota composition, bacterial load, macronutrients, and human cells during lactation. Bacterial load was estimated in milk samples from a total of 21 healthy mothers through lactation time by bacteria-specific qPCR targeted to the single-copy gene fusA. Milk microbiome composition and diversity was estimated by 16S-pyrosequencing and the structure of these bacteria in the fluid was studied by flow cytometry, qPCR, and microscopy. Fat, protein, lactose, and dry extract of milk as well as the number of somatic cells were also analyzed. We observed that milk bacterial communities were generally complex, and showed individual-specific profiles. Milk microbiota was dominated by Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, and Acinetobacter. Staphylococcus aureus was not detected in any of these samples from healthy mothers. There was high variability in composition and number of bacteria per milliliter among mothers and in some cases even within mothers at different time points. The median bacterial load was 10(6) bacterial cells/ml through time, higher than those numbers reported by 16S gene PCR and culture methods. Furthermore, milk bacteria were present in a free-living, "planktonic" state, but also in equal proportion associated to human immune cells. There was no correlation between bacterial load and the amount of immune cells in milk, strengthening the idea that milk bacteria are not sensed as an infection by the immune system.

  19. Relationship between Milk Microbiota, Bacterial Load, Macronutrients, and Human Cells during Lactation.

    PubMed

    Boix-Amorós, Alba; Collado, Maria C; Mira, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Human breast milk is considered the optimal nutrition for infants, providing essential nutrients and a broad range of bioactive compounds, as well as its own microbiota. However, the interaction among those components and the biological role of milk microorganisms is still uncovered. Thus, our aim was to identify the relationships between milk microbiota composition, bacterial load, macronutrients, and human cells during lactation. Bacterial load was estimated in milk samples from a total of 21 healthy mothers through lactation time by bacteria-specific qPCR targeted to the single-copy gene fusA. Milk microbiome composition and diversity was estimated by 16S-pyrosequencing and the structure of these bacteria in the fluid was studied by flow cytometry, qPCR, and microscopy. Fat, protein, lactose, and dry extract of milk as well as the number of somatic cells were also analyzed. We observed that milk bacterial communities were generally complex, and showed individual-specific profiles. Milk microbiota was dominated by Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, and Acinetobacter. Staphylococcus aureus was not detected in any of these samples from healthy mothers. There was high variability in composition and number of bacteria per milliliter among mothers and in some cases even within mothers at different time points. The median bacterial load was 10(6) bacterial cells/ml through time, higher than those numbers reported by 16S gene PCR and culture methods. Furthermore, milk bacteria were present in a free-living, "planktonic" state, but also in equal proportion associated to human immune cells. There was no correlation between bacterial load and the amount of immune cells in milk, strengthening the idea that milk bacteria are not sensed as an infection by the immune system. PMID:27148183

  20. Vaginal Microbiota of Healthy Pregnant Mexican Women is Constituted by Four Lactobacillus Species and Several Vaginosis-Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Romero-González, Roberto; Albani-Campanario, Mario; Figueroa-Damián, Ricardo; Meraz-Cruz, Noemí; Hernández-Guerrero, César

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To identify the microbiota communities in the vaginal tracts of healthy Mexican women across the pregnancy. Methods. Vaginal swabs were obtained during the prenatal visit of women from all trimesters (n = 64) of healthy pregnant women of Mexico City. DNA was isolated from each sample, and PCR-DGGE and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments were used to identify the bacterial communities. Results. 21 different microorganisms were identified in the vaginal samples. Lactobacillus genus was present in 98% of women studied. Four lactobacilli species were identified in vaginal samples. L. acidophilus was the predominant (78%) followed by L. iners (54%), L. gasseri (20%), and L. delbrueckii (6%). 17 different microorganisms related to bacterial vaginosis conditions were identified. Ureaplasma urealyticum was the predominant (21%) followed by BVAB1 (17%) and Gemella bergeriae (7.8%). Conclusions. Lactobacillus genus predominates in the vaginal samples of Mexican pregnant women associated with different microorganisms related to bacterial vaginosis conditions. PMID:21960733

  1. The in vitro activity of vaginal Lactobacillus with probiotic properties against Candida.

    PubMed

    Strus, Magdalena; Kucharska, Agnieszka; Kukla, Grazyna; Brzychczy-Włoch, Monika; Maresz, Katarzyna; Heczko, Piotr B

    2005-06-01

    Lactobacilli, the predominant vaginal microorganisms in healthy premenopausal women, control other members of the vaginal microflora and thus protect against bacterial vaginosis and urinary tract infections. It has been claimed that some lactobacilli are also protective against Candida vaginitis. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms by which these lactobacilli can control vaginal populations of Candida and prevent vaginitis. To address this question, vaginal Lactobacillus strains with known antagonistic properties against bacteria were tested for their cell surface properties, adhesion to vaginal cell lines in vitro and antagonistic activities against Candida. A small proportion of the lactobacilli tested adhered strongly to cultured vaginal epithelial cells and inhibited growth of Candida albicans but not of C. pseudotropicalis. This anticandidal activity was in some Lactobacillus strains related to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, but catalase treatment did not suppress this activity in other Lactobacillus strains, suggesting alternative mechanism(s). Moreover, tested vaginal Candida strains were resistant to relatively high concentrations of H2O2 that markedly exceeded those produced by even the most active Lactobacillus strains.

  2. Encapsulation and subsequent freeze-drying of Lactobacillus reuteri CRL 1324 for its potential inclusion in vaginal probiotic formulations.

    PubMed

    Juárez Tomás, María Silvina; De Gregorio, Priscilla Romina; Leccese Terraf, María Cecilia; Nader-Macías, María Elena Fátima

    2015-11-15

    Probiotic formulations must include a high number of viable and active microorganisms. In this work, the survival of human vaginal Lactobacillus reuteri CRL 1324 during encapsulation, lyophilization and storage, and the activity of encapsulated and/or freeze-dried bacterial cells were evaluated. Extrusion-ionic gelation technique was applied to encapsulate L. reuteri CRL 1324, using xanthan and gellan. Encapsulated and free bacterial cells were freeze-dried with or without lactose and skim milk as lyoprotectors. The different systems obtained were stored at room temperature and at 4°C for 150days. The following determinations were performed: L. reuteri CRL 1324 viability, microorganism released from capsules, survival in a medium simulating the vaginal fluid and maintenance of beneficial properties (growth inhibition of opportunistic pathogenic Streptococcus agalactiae NH 17 and biofilm formation). L. reuteri CRL 1324 encapsulation was efficient, allowing the recovery of a high number of entrapped lactobacilli. The survival of encapsulated L. reuteri during lyophilization and storage was significantly higher in the presence of lyoprotectors. At the end of storage, the highest numbers of viable cells were obtained in free or encapsulated cells freeze-dried with lyoprotectors, stored at 4°C. Encapsulated and/or lyophilized L. reuteri cells maintained their viability in simulated vaginal fluid as well as the ability to inhibit S. agalactiae NH 17 growth and to form biofilm. Encapsulated and freeze-dried L. reuteri CRL 1324 can be included in a suitable pharmaceutical form for vaginal application to prevent or treat urogenital infections in women.

  3. Mucus-penetrating nanoparticles for vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensign-Hodges, Laura

    A method that could provide more uniform and longer-lasting drug delivery to mucosal surfaces holds the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches for numerous diseases and conditions, including sexually transmitted infections and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the body's natural defenses, including adhesive, rapidly cleared mucus linings coating nearly all entry points to the body not covered by skin, has limited the effectiveness of drug and gene delivery by nanoscale delivery systems. Here, we investigate the use of muco-inert mucus-penetrating nanoparticles (MPP) for improving vaginal and gastrointestinal drug delivery. Conventional hydrophobic nanoparticles strongly adhere to mucus, facilitating rapid clearance from the body. Here, we demonstrate that mucoadhesive polystyrene nanoparticles (conventional nanoparticles, CP) become mucus-penetrating in human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) after pretreatment with sufficient concentrations of Pluronic F127. Importantly, the diffusion rate of large MPP did not change in F127 pretreated CVM, implying there is no affect on the native pore structure of CVM. Additionally, there was no increase in inflammatory cytokine release in the vaginal tract of mice after daily application of 1% F127 for one week. Importantly, HSV virus remains adherent in F127-pretreated CVM. Mucosal epithelia use osmotic gradients for fluid absorption and secretion. We hypothesized that hypotonically-induced fluid uptake could be advantageous for rapidly delivering drugs through mucus to the vaginal epithelium. We evaluated hypotonic formulations for delivering water-soluble drugs and for drug delivery with MPP. Hypotonic formulations markedly increased the rate at which drugs and MPP reached the epithelial surface. Additionally, hypotonic formulations greatly enhanced drug and MPP delivery to the entire epithelial surface, including deep into the vaginal folds (rugae) that isotonic formulations

  4. Streptococcus massiliensis in the human mouth: a phylogenetic approach for the inference of bacterial habitats.

    PubMed

    Póntigo, F; Silva, C; Moraga, M; Flores, S V

    2015-12-29

    Streptococcus is a diverse bacterial lineage. Species of this genus occupy a myriad of environments inside humans and other animals. Despite the elucidation of several of these habitats, many remain to be identified. Here, we explore a methodological approach to reveal unknown bacterial environments. Specifically, we inferred the phylogeny of the Mitis group by analyzing the sequences of eight genes. In addition, information regarding habitat use of species belonging to this group was obtained from the scientific literature. The oral cavity emerged as a potential, previously unknown, environment of Streptococcus massiliensis. This phylogeny-based prediction was confirmed by species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. We propose employing a similar approach, i.e., use of bibliographic data and molecular phylogenetics as predictive methods, and species-specific PCR as confirmation, in order to reveal other unknown habitats in further bacterial taxa.

  5. The Anti-HIV Microbicide Candidate RC-101 Inhibits Pathogenic Vaginal Bacteria Without Harming Endogenous Flora or Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Eade, Colleen R.; Cole, Amy L.; Diaz, Camila; Rohan, Lisa C.; Parniak, Michael A.; Marx, Preston; Tarwater, Patrick M.; Gupta, Phalguni; Cole, Alexander M.

    2012-01-01

    Problem Vaginal microbicides represent a promising approach for preventing heterosexual HIV transmission. However, preclinical evaluation should be conducted to ensure that microbicides will be safe for human cells and healthy microflora of the female reproductive tract. One microbicide candidate, RC-101, has been effective and well-tolerated in preliminary cell culture and macaque models. However, the effect of RC-101 on primary vaginal tissues and resident vaginal microflora requires further evaluation. Method of Study We treated primary vaginal tissues and vaginal bacteria, both pathogenic and commensal, with RC-101 to investigate effects of this microbicide. Results RC-101 was well-tolerated by host tissues, and also by commensal vaginal bacteria. Simultaneously, pathogenic vaginal bacteria, which are known to increase susceptibility to HIV acquisition, were inhibited by RC-101. Conclusions By establishing vaginal microflora, the specific antibacterial activity of RC-101 may provide a dual mechanism of HIV protection. These findings support advancement of RC-101 to clinical trials. PMID:23167830

  6. WHO to concentrate HIV strategy on vaginal microbicide.

    PubMed

    Cookson, C

    1993-11-27

    The World Health Organization (WHO), at a meeting in Geneva in November 1993, launched a campaign that will coordinate efforts of the pharmaceutical industry, academic research institutes, and drug regulatory bodies to find a vaginal antiviral agent that will either inactivate the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or prevent its attachment to vaginal cells, without harming the genital tract or killing sperm. Spermicides, such as nonoxynol 9, which kill HIV in test tubes may increase HIV transmission by harming the vaginal lining. However, this may be due to the carrier substance. Clinical research, using a protocol designed by the WHO and international regulatory authorities, will begin examining existing vaginal microbicides. Other candidates include sulphated polysaccharides and reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Included are comments by Dr. Michael Merson and Prof. Don Jefferies. The meeting was organized by the United Kingdom's Medical Research Council and Department of Health.

  7. The Highly Autoaggregative and Adhesive Phenotype of the Vaginal Lactobacillus plantarum Strain CMPG5300 Is Sortase Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Shweta; Petrova, Mariya I.; Claes, Ingmar J. J.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Busschaert, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Lievens, Bart; Lambrichts, Ivo; Siezen, Roland J.; Balzarini, Jan; Vanderleyden, Jos

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacilli are important for the maintenance of a healthy ecosystem in the human vagina. Various mechanisms are postulated but so far are poorly substantiated by molecular studies, such as mutant analysis. Bacterial autoaggregation is an interesting phenomenon that can promote adhesion to host cells and displacement of pathogens. In this study, we report on the identification of a human vaginal isolate, Lactobacillus plantarum strain CMPG5300, which shows high autoaggregative and adhesive capacity. To investigate the importance of sortase-dependent proteins (SDPs) in these phenotypes, a gene deletion mutant was constructed for srtA, the gene encoding the housekeeping sortase that covalently anchors these SDPs to the cell surface. This mutant lost the capacity to autoaggregate, showed a decrease in adhesion to vaginal epithelial cells, and lost biofilm-forming capacity under the conditions tested. These results indicate that the housekeeping sortase SrtA of CMPG5300 is a key determinant of the peculiar surface properties of this vaginal Lactobacillus strain. PMID:23709503

  8. Plasma progesterone profile and conception rate following exogenous supplementation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, human chorionic gonadotropin, and progesterone releasing intra-vaginal device in repeat-breeder crossbred cows

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, N. K. J.; Gupta, H. P.; Prasad, Shiv; Sheetal, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to evaluate the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and progesterone impregnated intra-vaginal device on progesterone profile and conception rate in repeat-breeding crossbred cows. Materials and Methods: Repeat-breeding crossbred cows aged 3-8 years (n=32), lactating and negative to white side test were randomly divided into four groups: Group 1 (Control, n=8), Group 2 (GnRH at 10 µg i.m, n=8), Group 3 (hCG at 1500 IU i.m., n=8), and Group 4 (progesterone impregnated intra-vaginal device at 958 mg, n=8). All the treatme nts were given on 5th daypostbreeding and in Group 4 intra-vaginally implanted device was withdrawn on 9th day (i.e., implant inserted for total 4 days) of the estrous cycle. Blood samples were collected on day 0, 5, 10, 15, and day 20 of estrous cycle, and plasma was separated for progesterone estimation. Results: Accessory corpus luteum was not formed in crossbred cows of Group4 and control group. However, total 6 and 8 accessory corpora lutea were found in Group 2 and Group 3, respectively. In pregnant cows, the plasma progesterone concentration increased continuously from day 0 to day 20. In non-pregnant cows, it increased from day 0 to day 15 and then declined. The conception rate on day 60 in Group 1, Group 2, Group 3, and Group 4 was 37.5%, 50%, 75%, and 37.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Treating repeat-breeder cows with hCG is effective in increasing conception rate by developing accessory corpora lutea and higher progesterone level. PMID:27397976

  9. Heterogeneity of Vaginal Microbial Communities within Individuals▿ #

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Kyung; Thomas, Susan M.; Ho, Mengfei; Sharma, Shobha; Reich, Claudia I.; Frank, Jeremy A.; Yeater, Kathleen M.; Biggs, Diana R.; Nakamura, Noriko; Stumpf, Rebecca; Leigh, Steven R.; Tapping, Richard I.; Blanke, Steven R.; Slauch, James M.; Gaskins, H. Rex; Weisbaum, Jon S.; Olsen, Gary J.; Hoyer, Lois L.; Wilson, Brenda A.

    2009-01-01

    Recent culture-independent studies have revealed that a healthy vaginal ecosystem harbors a surprisingly complex assemblage of microorganisms. However, the spatial distribution and composition of vaginal microbial populations have not been investigated using molecular methods. Here, we evaluated site-specific microbial composition within the vaginal ecosystem and examined the influence of sampling technique in detection of the vaginal microbiota. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were prepared from samples obtained from different locations (cervix, fornix, outer vaginal canal) and by different methods (swabbing, scraping, lavaging) from the vaginal tracts of eight clinically healthy, asymptomatic women. The data reveal that the vaginal microbiota is not homogenous throughout the vaginal tract but differs significantly within an individual with regard to anatomical site and sampling method used. Thus, this study illuminates the complex structure of the vaginal ecosystem and calls for the consideration of microenvironments when sampling vaginal microbiota as a clinical predictor of vaginal health. PMID:19158255

  10. [Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Djukić, Slobodanka; Ćirković, Ivana; Arsić, Biljana; Garalejić, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2-producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent's scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up-to-date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short-term and long-term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context. PMID:24073569

  11. Probiotics - a helpful additional therapy for bacterial vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Bodean, O; Munteanu, O; Cirstoiu, C; Secara, D; Cirstoiu, M

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Bacterial vaginosis is a condition of unknown etiology, associated with an imbalance of the normal vaginal microbiota, characterized by a high recurrence rate despite of classical therapy solutions. Probiotics are microorganisms, which taken in adequate amounts, are proven to bring health benefits in human and animal bodies, by re-establishing the normal flora at different levels. Objective: The present article studies the possibility of using probiotic treatment as an adjuvant therapy for nonspecific vaginosis and reducing its recurrence rate. Methods: We have evaluated the evolution of patients with bacterial vaginosis who received the classical antibiotic therapy and a probiotic product. The study group consisted of 173 non-pregnant, sexually active patients, 20-45 years old, with no additional health problems and no contraceptive undergoing treatment, which have been admitted to the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Bucharest Emergency University Hospital between 1.01.2012-31.12.2012.The bacteriological evaluation was made on cervical and vaginal cultures. Results: From a total of 173 patients, those who used probiotics oral capsules while taking an antibiotic had lower recurrence rates. More than a half of women who did not use any probiotic product had 3 or more relapse episodes per year. Vaginal capsules with probiotics have also proven to be useful in lowering the recurrence rate, but research is still needed. Conclusion: Probiotic products are proven to be a helpful adjuvant therapy for bacterial vaginosis, with no adverse outcomes. PMID:24868256

  12. Antibodies to bacterial vaccines demonstrating specificity for human choriogonadotropin (hCG) and immunochemical detection of hCG-like factor in subcellular bacterial fractions.

    PubMed Central

    Domingue, G J; Acevedo, H F; Powell, J E; Stevens, V C

    1986-01-01

    Investigations were done to determine whether vaccines prepared with chemically killed Staphylococcus haemolyticus RU1 and Streptococcus bovis AV46 (bacteria that have been demonstrated to express human choriogonadotropin [hCG]-like material on their surface) elicited antibodies in rabbits with specificity for hCG determinants. In addition, the anatomical locus of the hCG-like factor was determined by separation of bacterial subcellular fractions. The results demonstrated that these bacterial vaccines elicited antibodies immunologically similar to those antibodies produced in response to the whole human trophoblastic hormone, a similarity extending even to cross-reactivity with human luteinizing hormone. The bacterial hCG-like material appeared to be localized in the membranes of the cell wall, and most was present in the soluble membranous and cytoplasmic constituents. Its expression in bacteria was a strain characteristic and not a species characteristic. Images PMID:3721581

  13. Hemocytes from Pediculus humanus humanus are hosts for human bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Coulaud, Pierre-Julien; Lepolard, Catherine; Bechah, Yassina; Berenger, Jean-Michel; Raoult, Didier; Ghigo, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Pediculus humanus humanus is an human ectoparasite which represents a serious public health threat because it is vector for pathogenic bacteria. It is important to understand and identify where bacteria reside in human body lice to define new strategies to counterstroke the capacity of vectorization of the bacterial pathogens by body lice. It is known that phagocytes from vertebrates can be hosts or reservoirs for several microbes. Therefore, we wondered if Pediculus humanus humanus phagocytes could hide pathogens. In this study, we characterized the phagocytes from Pediculus humanus humanus and evaluated their contribution as hosts for human pathogens such as Rickettsia prowazekii, Bartonella Quintana, and Acinetobacter baumannii. PMID:25688336

  14. Vaginal Microbiome Characterization of Nellore Cattle Using Metagenomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Laguardia-Nascimento, Mateus; Branco, Kelly Moreira Grillo Ribeiro; Gasparini, Marcela Ribeiro; Giannattasio-Ferraz, Silvia; Leite, Laura Rabelo; Araujo, Flávio Marcos Gomes; Salim, Anna Christina de Matos; Nicoli, Jacques Robert; de Oliveira, Guilherme Corrêa; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel Figueiredo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of microbial communities inhabiting cattle vaginal tract may lead to a better comprehension of bovine physiology and reproductive health being of great economic interest. Up to date, studies involving cattle microbiota are focused on the gastrointestinal tract, and little is known about the vaginal microbiota. This study aimed to investigate the vaginal microbiome in Nellore cattle, heifers and cows, pregnant and non-pregnant, using a culture independent approach. The main bacterial phyla found were Firmicutes (~40-50%), Bacteroidetes (~15-25%) and Proteobacteria (~5-25%), in addition to ~10-20% of non-classified bacteria. 45-55% of the samples were represented by only ten OTUs: Aeribacillus, Bacteroides, Clostridium, Ruminococcus, Rikenella, Alistipes, Bacillus, Eubacterium, Prevotella and non-classified bacteria. Interestingly, microbiota from all 20 animals could be grouped according to the respiratory metabolism of the main OTUs found, creating three groups of vaginal microbiota in cattle. Archaeal samples were dominated by the Methanobrevibacter genus (Euryarchaeota, ~55-70%). Ascomycota was the main fungal phylum (~80-95%) and Mycosphaerella the most abundant genus (~70-85%). Hormonal influence was not clear, but a tendency for the reduction of bacterial and increase of archaeal populations in pregnant animals was observed. Eukaryotes did not vary significantly between pregnant and non-pregnant animals, but tended to be more abundant on cows than on heifers. The present work describes a great microbial variability in the vaginal community among the evaluated animals and groups (heifers and cows, pregnant and non-pregnant), which is significantly different from the findings previously reported using culture dependent methods, pointing out the need for further studies on this issue. The microbiome found also indicates that the vaginal colonization appears to be influenced by the gastrointestinal community. PMID:26599789

  15. Vaginal Microbiome Characterization of Nellore Cattle Using Metagenomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Laguardia-Nascimento, Mateus; Branco, Kelly Moreira Grillo Ribeiro; Gasparini, Marcela Ribeiro; Giannattasio-Ferraz, Silvia; Leite, Laura Rabelo; Araujo, Flávio Marcos Gomes; Salim, Anna Christina de Matos; Nicoli, Jacques Robert; de Oliveira, Guilherme Corrêa; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel Figueiredo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of microbial communities inhabiting cattle vaginal tract may lead to a better comprehension of bovine physiology and reproductive health being of great economic interest. Up to date, studies involving cattle microbiota are focused on the gastrointestinal tract, and little is known about the vaginal microbiota. This study aimed to investigate the vaginal microbiome in Nellore cattle, heifers and cows, pregnant and non-pregnant, using a culture independent approach. The main bacterial phyla found were Firmicutes (~40–50%), Bacteroidetes (~15–25%) and Proteobacteria (~5–25%), in addition to ~10–20% of non-classified bacteria. 45–55% of the samples were represented by only ten OTUs: Aeribacillus, Bacteroides, Clostridium, Ruminococcus, Rikenella, Alistipes, Bacillus, Eubacterium, Prevotella and non-classified bacteria. Interestingly, microbiota from all 20 animals could be grouped according to the respiratory metabolism of the main OTUs found, creating three groups of vaginal microbiota in cattle. Archaeal samples were dominated by the Methanobrevibacter genus (Euryarchaeota, ~55–70%). Ascomycota was the main fungal phylum (~80–95%) and Mycosphaerella the most abundant genus (~70–85%). Hormonal influence was not clear, but a tendency for the reduction of bacterial and increase of archaeal populations in pregnant animals was observed. Eukaryotes did not vary significantly between pregnant and non-pregnant animals, but tended to be more abundant on cows than on heifers. The present work describes a great microbial variability in the vaginal community among the evaluated animals and groups (heifers and cows, pregnant and non-pregnant), which is significantly different from the findings previously reported using culture dependent methods, pointing out the need for further studies on this issue. The microbiome found also indicates that the vaginal colonization appears to be influenced by the gastrointestinal community. PMID:26599789

  16. Gnotobiotic mouse model of phage–bacterial host dynamics in the human gut

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Alejandro; Wu, Meng; McNulty, Nathan P.; Rohwer, Forest L.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial viruses (phages) are the most abundant biological group on Earth and are more genetically diverse than their bacterial prey/hosts. To characterize their role as agents shaping gut microbial community structure, adult germ-free mice were colonized with a consortium of 15 sequenced human bacterial symbionts, 13 of which harbored one or more predicted prophages. One member, Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, was represented by a library of isogenic transposon mutants that covered 90% of its genes. Once assembled, the community was subjected to a staged phage attack with a pool of live or heat-killed virus-like particles (VLPs) purified from the fecal microbiota of five healthy humans. Shotgun sequencing of DNA from the input pooled VLP preparation plus shotgun sequencing of gut microbiota samples and purified fecal VLPs from the gnotobiotic mice revealed a reproducible nonsimultaneous pattern of attack extending over a 25-d period that involved five phages, none described previously. This system allowed us to (i) correlate increases in specific phages present in the pooled VLPs with reductions in the representation of particular bacterial taxa, (ii) provide evidence that phage resistance occurred because of ecological or epigenetic factors, (iii) track the origin of each of the five phages among the five human donors plus the extent of their genome variation between and within recipient mice, and (iv) establish the dramatic in vivo fitness advantage that a locus within a B. cellulosilyticus prophage confers upon its host. Together, these results provide a defined community-wide view of phage–bacterial host dynamics in the gut. PMID:24259713

  17. Comparing the anterior nare bacterial community of two discrete human populations using Illumina amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Camarinha-Silva, Amélia; Jáuregui, Ruy; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Oxley, Andrew P A; Schaumburg, Frieder; Becker, Karsten; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2014-09-01

    The anterior nares are an important reservoir for opportunistic pathogens and commensal microorganisms. A barcoded Illumina paired-end sequencing method targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA V1-2 hypervariable region was developed to compare the bacterial diversity of the anterior nares across distinct human populations (volunteers from Germany vs a Babongo Pygmy tribe, Africa). Of the 251 phylotypes detected, 231 could be classified to the genus level and 109 to the species level, including the unambiguous identification of the ubiquitous Staphylococcus aureus and Moraxella catarrhalis. The global bacterial community of both adult populations revealed that they shared 85% of the phylotypes, suggesting that our global bacterial communities have likely been with us for thousands of years. Of the 34 phylotypes unique to the non-westernized population, most were related to members within the suborder Micrococcineae. There was an even more overwelming distinction between children and adults of the same population, suggesting a progression of a childhood community of high-diversity comprising species of Moraxellaceae and Streptococcaceae to an adult community of lower diversity comprising species of Propionibacteriaceae, Clostridiales Incertae Sedis XI, Corynebacteriaceae and Staphylococcaceae. Thus, age was a stronger factor for accounting for differing bacterial assemblages than the origin of the human population sampled.

  18. New In Vitro Model To Study the Effect of Human Simulated Antibiotic Concentrations on Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Haagensen, Janus A. J.; Verotta, Davide; Huang, Liusheng; Spormann, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    A new in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic simulator for bacterial biofilms utilizing flow cell technology and confocal laser scanning microscopy is described. The device has the ability to simulate the changing antibiotic concentrations in humans associated with intravenous dosing on bacterial biofilms grown under continuous culture conditions. The free drug concentrations of a single 2-g meropenem intravenous bolus dose and first-order elimination utilizing a half-life of 0.895 h (elimination rate constant, 0.776 h−1) were simulated. The antibacterial activity of meropenem against biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and three clinical strains isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis was investigated. Additionally, the effect of meropenem on PAO1 biofilms cultured for 24 h versus that on biofilms cultured for 72 h was examined. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, rapid biofilm killing was observed in the first hour of the dosing interval for all biofilms. However, for PAO1 biofilms cultured for 72 h, only bacterial subpopulations at the periphery of the biofilm were affected, with subpopulations at the substratum remaining viable, even at the conclusion of the dosing interval. The described model is a novel method to investigate antimicrobial killing of bacterial biofilms using human simulated concentrations. PMID:25918138

  19. New in vitro model to study the effect of human simulated antibiotic concentrations on bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Haagensen, Janus A J; Verotta, Davide; Huang, Liusheng; Spormann, Alfred; Yang, Katherine

    2015-07-01

    A new in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic simulator for bacterial biofilms utilizing flow cell technology and confocal laser scanning microscopy is described. The device has the ability to simulate the changing antibiotic concentrations in humans associated with intravenous dosing on bacterial biofilms grown under continuous culture conditions. The free drug concentrations of a single 2-g meropenem intravenous bolus dose and first-order elimination utilizing a half-life of 0.895 h (elimination rate constant, 0.776 h(-1)) were simulated. The antibacterial activity of meropenem against biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and three clinical strains isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis was investigated. Additionally, the effect of meropenem on PAO1 biofilms cultured for 24 h versus that on biofilms cultured for 72 h was examined. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, rapid biofilm killing was observed in the first hour of the dosing interval for all biofilms. However, for PAO1 biofilms cultured for 72 h, only bacterial subpopulations at the periphery of the biofilm were affected, with subpopulations at the substratum remaining viable, even at the conclusion of the dosing interval. The described model is a novel method to investigate antimicrobial killing of bacterial biofilms using human simulated concentrations.

  20. Shared and distinct mechanisms of iron acquisition by bacterial and fungal pathogens of humans

    PubMed Central

    Caza, Mélissa; Kronstad, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is the most abundant transition metal in the human body and its bioavailability is stringently controlled. In particular, iron is tightly bound to host proteins such as transferrin to maintain homeostasis, to limit potential damage caused by iron toxicity under physiological conditions and to restrict access by pathogens. Therefore, iron acquisition during infection of a human host is a challenge that must be surmounted by every successful pathogenic microorganism. Iron is essential for bacterial and fungal physiological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, metabolism, and energy generation via respiration. Hence, pathogenic bacteria and fungi have developed sophisticated strategies to gain access to iron from host sources. Indeed, siderophore production and transport, iron acquisition from heme and host iron-containing proteins such as hemoglobin and transferrin, and reduction of ferric to ferrous iron with subsequent transport are all strategies found in bacterial and fungal pathogens of humans. This review focuses on a comparison of these strategies between bacterial and fungal pathogens in the context of virulence and the iron limitation that occurs in the human body as a mechanism of innate nutritional defense. PMID:24312900

  1. Murine models of vaginal trichomonad infections.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Eduardo R; Eckmann, Lars; Corbeil, Lynette B

    2011-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus cause common sexually transmitted infections in humans and cattle, respectively. Mouse models of trichomoniasis are important for pathogenic and therapeutic studies. Here, we compared murine genital infections with T. vaginalis and T. foetus. Persistent vaginal infection with T. foetus was established with 100 parasites but T. vaginalis infection required doses of 10(6), perhaps because of greater susceptibility to killing by mouse vaginal polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Infection with T. vaginalis persisted longest after combined treatment of mice with estrogen and dexamethasone, whereas infection was only short-lived when mice were given estrogen or dexamethasone alone, co-infected with Lactobacillus acidophilus, and/or pretreated with antibiotics. Infection rates were similar with metronidazole-resistant (MR) and metronidazole-sensitive (MS) T. vaginalis. High dose but not low dose metronidazole treatment controlled infection with MS better than MR T. vaginalis. These murine models will be valuable for investigating the pathogenesis and treatment of trichomoniasis. PMID:21976570

  2. Identification of Bacterial DNA Markers for the Detection of Human Fecal Pollution in Water▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Orin C.; Domingo, Jorge W. Santo; Lu, Jingrang; Kelty, Catherine A.; Graham, James E.

    2007-01-01

    We used genome fragment enrichment and bioinformatics to identify several microbial DNA sequences with high potential for use as markers in PCR assays for detection of human fecal contamination in water. Following competitive solution-phase hybridization of total DNA from human and pig fecal samples, 351 plasmid clones were sequenced and were determined to define 289 different genomic DNA regions. These putative human-specific fecal bacterial DNA sequences were then analyzed by dot blot hybridization, which confirmed that 98% were present in the source human fecal microbial community and absent from the original pig fecal DNA extract. Comparative sequence analyses of these sequences suggested that a large number (43.5%) were predicted to encode bacterial secreted or surface-associated proteins. Deoxyoligonucleotide primers capable of annealing to a subset of 26 of the candidate sequences predicted to encode factors involved in interactions with host cells were then used in the PCR and did not amplify markers in DNA from any additional pig fecal specimens. These 26 PCR assays exhibited a range of specificity in tests with 11 other animal sources, with more than half amplifying markers only in specimens from dogs or cats. Four assays were more specific, detecting markers only in specimens from humans, including those from 18 different human populations examined. We then demonstrated the potential utility of these assays by using them to detect human fecal contamination in several impacted watersheds. PMID:17209067

  3. [Importance of studying the balance of vaginal content (BAVACO) in the preventive control of sex workers].

    PubMed

    Bologno, Romina; Díaz, Yanina M; Giraudo, María C; Fernández, Rosa; Menéndez, Viviana; Brizuela, Juan C; Gallardo, Adriana A; Alvarez, Laura A; Estevao Belchior, Silvia G

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the vaginal microenvironment in sex workers from Comodoro Rivadavia, Chubut. For that purpose, BAVACO procedures were applied. A total of 229 female sex workers attended public health centers. Vaginal secretions were analyzed by Gram and Giemsa stains. The following results were obtained: normal microbiota 35.37 %, intermediate microbiota 15.72 %, bacterial vaginosis 23.14 %, microbial non-specific vaginitis, Donders'"aerobic vaginitis" 10.48 %, yeast vulvovaginitis 8.30 %, and trichomoniasis 6.99 %. The intermediate microbiota was characterized by a decrease in the number of lactobacilli and the presence of diphtheroid bacilli cell types. The population studied shared increased values of vaginal dysfunctions. These results are considered risk factors for obstetric and gynecologic diseases.

  4. Leukocyte Esterase Activity in Vaginal Fluid of Pregnant and Non-Pregnant Women With Vaginitis/Vaginosis and in Controls

    PubMed Central

    Novikova, Natalia; Niklasson, Ola; Bekassy, Zoltan; Skude, Lennart

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the leukocyte esterase (LE) activity in vaginal lavage fluid of women with acute and recurrent vulvovaginal candidosis (VVC and RVVC respectively), bacterial vaginosis (BV), and in pregnant and non-pregnant women without evidence of the three conditions. Also to compare the result of LE tests in women consulting at different weeks in the cycle and trimesters of pregnancy.The LE activity was correlated to vaginal pH, number of inflammatory cells in stained vaginal smears, type of predominating vaginal bacteria and presence of yeast morphotypes. Methods: One hundred and thirteen women with a history of RVVC, i.e. with at least four attacks of the condition during the previous year and who had consulted with an assumed new attack of the condition, were studied. Furthermore, we studied 16 women with VVC, 15 women with BV, and 27 women attending for control of cytological abnormalities, who all presented without evidence of either vaginitis or vaginosis. Finally, 73 pregnant women were investigated. The LE activity in vaginal fluid during different weeks in the cycle of 53 of the women was measured. Results: In the non-pregnant women, an increased LE activity was found in 96, 88, 73 and 56% of those with RVVC, VVC and BV and in the non-VVC/BV cases, respectively. In 73% of pregnant women in the second trimester, and 76% of those in the third, the LE test was positive. In all groups of non-pregnant women tested, the LE activity correlated with the number of leukocytes in vaginal smears, but it did not in those who were pregnant. There was no correlation between LE activity and week in cycle. The vaginal pH showed no correlation to LE activity in any of the groups studied. Conclusions: The use of commercial LE dipsticks has a limited value in the differential diagnosis of RVVC, VVCand BV. There is no correlation between the LE activity in vaginal secretion on one hand and vaginal pH, week in the menstrual cycle and trimester in pregnancy on the

  5. Vaginal Absorption of Penicillin.

    PubMed

    Rock, J; Barker, R H; Bacon, W B

    1947-01-01

    Except during the last two months of pregnancy, penicillin is easily absorbed from cocoa butter suppositories in the vagina, ordinarily to give therapeutic blood levels for from 4 to 6 hours. Penicillin in the dosage used seems to have a good effect on vaginal infections. In nonpregnant women, during the ovulation phase, considered as including days 14 +/- 2 in the ordinary menstrual cycle of about 28 days, absorption seemed to be somewhat diminished. Higher levels were found in patients who were near the end of their menstrual cycles and in two patients who were menopausal. Patients who were very near term absorbed little or no penicillin, whereas patients 10 days post partum showed excellent absorption.

  6. Randomized Trial of Periodic Presumptive Treatment With High-Dose Intravaginal Metronidazole and Miconazole to Prevent Vaginal Infections in HIV-negative Women

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, R. Scott; Balkus, Jennifer E.; Lee, Jeannette; Anzala, Omu; Kimani, Joshua; Schwebke, Jane; Bragg, Vivian; Lensing, Shelly; Kavak, Lale

    2015-01-01

    Background. Vaginal infections are common, frequently recur, and may increase women's risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We tested the efficacy of a novel regimen to prevent recurrent vaginal infections. Methods. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–negative women 18–45 years old with 1 or more vaginal infections, including bacterial vaginosis (BV), vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), or Trichomonas vaginalis (TV), were randomly assigned to receive vaginal suppositories containing metronidazole 750 mg plus miconazole 200 mg or matching placebo for 5 consecutive nights each month for 12 months. Primary endpoints, evaluated every 2 months, were BV (Gram stain) and VVC (positive wet mount and culture). Results. Participants (N = 234) were randomly assigned to the intervention (N = 118) or placebo (N = 116) arm. Two hundred seventeen (93%) women completed an end-of-study evaluation. The intervention reduced the proportion of visits with BV compared to placebo (21.2% vs 32.5%; relative risk [RR] 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] .48–.87). In contrast, the proportion of visits with VVC was similar in the intervention (10.4%) versus placebo (11.3%) arms (RR 0.92, 95% CI .62–1.37). Conclusions. Monthly treatment with intravaginal metronidazole plus miconazole reduced the proportion of visits with BV during 12 months of follow-up. Further study will be important to determine whether this intervention can reduce women's risk of STIs. PMID:25526757

  7. Reduced Set of Virulence Genes Allows High Accuracy Prediction of Bacterial Pathogenicity in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Iraola, Gregorio; Vazquez, Gustavo; Spangenberg, Lucía; Naya, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Although there have been great advances in understanding bacterial pathogenesis, there is still a lack of integrative information about what makes a bacterium a human pathogen. The advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies has dramatically increased the amount of completed bacterial genomes, for both known human pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains; this information is now available to investigate genetic features that determine pathogenic phenotypes in bacteria. In this work we determined presence/absence patterns of different virulence-related genes among more than finished bacterial genomes from both human pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains, belonging to different taxonomic groups (i.e: Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, etc.). An accuracy of 95% using a cross-fold validation scheme with in-fold feature selection is obtained when classifying human pathogens and non-pathogens. A reduced subset of highly informative genes () is presented and applied to an external validation set. The statistical model was implemented in the BacFier v1.0 software (freely available at ), that displays not only the prediction (pathogen/non-pathogen) and an associated probability for pathogenicity, but also the presence/absence vector for the analyzed genes, so it is possible to decipher the subset of virulence genes responsible for the classification on the analyzed genome. Furthermore, we discuss the biological relevance for bacterial pathogenesis of the core set of genes, corresponding to eight functional categories, all with evident and documented association with the phenotypes of interest. Also, we analyze which functional categories of virulence genes were more distinctive for pathogenicity in each taxonomic group, which seems to be a completely new kind of information and could lead to important evolutionary conclusions. PMID:22916122

  8. [Condition of periodontal tissue in women with bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Petrushanko, T A; Shul'zhenko, A D; Krutikova, E I

    2014-12-01

    Cross colonization of open cavities of human body has little been studied in contemporary medicine. There in no practical recommendations as for management of dental patients with urogenital tract microflora disorder. The paper presents the findings of clinical features of periodontium tissues in women with bacterial vaginosis correlated with bacteriological estimation of oral cavity and vagina, number of sexual partners. Interpretation of amine test of oral and vaginal fluids has been provided for the first time. Chronic generalized inflammatory and inflammatory-dystrophic periodontal diseases of different severity have been detected in all female patients with gynecological diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. Gardnerella vaginalis, which is atypical representative of oral cavity microflora, has been detected by the PCR method in bacterial vaginosis both in vagina and oral cavity. The major markers of bacterial vaginosis have been also detected in oral cavity in women with this pathology.

  9. Rationale and Safety Assessment of a Novel Intravaginal Drug-Delivery System with Sustained DL-Lactic Acid Release, Intended for Long-Term Protection of the Vaginal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Verstraelen, Hans; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a prevalent state of dysbiosis of the vaginal microbiota with wide-ranging impact on human reproductive health. Based on recent insights in community ecology of the vaginal microbiome, we hypothesize that sustained vaginal DL-lactic acid enrichment will enhance the recruitment of lactobacilli, while counteracting bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria. We therefore aimed to develop an intravaginal device that would be easy to insert and remove, while providing sustained DL-lactic acid release into the vaginal lumen. The final prototype selected is a vaginal ring matrix system consisting of a mixture of ethylene vinyl acetate and methacrylic acid-methyl methacrylate copolymer loaded with 150 mg DL-lactic acid with an L/D-lactic acid ratio of 1:1. Preclinical safety assessment was performed by use of the Slug Mucosal Irritation test, a non-vertebrate assay to evaluate vaginal mucosal irritation, which revealed no irritation. Clinical safety was evaluated in a phase I trial with six healthy nulliparous premenopausal volunteering women, with the investigational drug left in place for 7 days. Colposcopic monitoring according to the WHO/CONRAD guidelines for the evaluation of vaginal products, revealed no visible cervicovaginal mucosal changes. No adverse events related to the investigational product occurred. Total release from the intravaginal ring over 7 days was estimated through high performance liquid chromatography at 37.1 (standard deviation 0.9) mg DL-lactic acid. Semisolid lactic acid formulations have been studied to a limited extent in the past and typically consist of a large volume of excipients and very high doses of lactic acid, which is of major concern to mucosal safety. We have documented the feasability of enriching the vaginal environment with pure DL-lactic acid with a prototype intravaginal ring. Though the efficacy of this platform remains to be established possibly requiring further development, this approach may offer a

  10. From Environment to Man: Genome Evolution and Adaptation of Human Opportunistic Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Aujoulat, Fabien; Roger, Frédéric; Bourdier, Alice; Lotthé, Anne; Lamy, Brigitte; Marchandin, Hélène; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle

    2012-01-01

    Environment is recognized as a huge reservoir for bacterial species and a source of human pathogens. Some environmental bacteria have an extraordinary range of activities that include promotion of plant growth or disease, breakdown of pollutants, production of original biomolecules, but also multidrug resistance and human pathogenicity. The versatility of bacterial life-style involves adaptation to various niches. Adaptation to both open environment and human specific niches is a major challenge that involves intermediate organisms allowing pre-adaptation to humans. The aim of this review is to analyze genomic features of environmental bacteria in order to explain their adaptation to human beings. The genera Pseudomonas, Aeromonas and Ochrobactrum provide valuable examples of opportunistic behavior associated to particular genomic structure and evolution. Particularly, we performed original genomic comparisons among aeromonads and between the strictly intracellular pathogens Brucella spp. and the mild opportunistic pathogens Ochrobactrum spp. We conclude that the adaptation to human could coincide with a speciation in action revealed by modifications in both genomic and population structures. This adaptation-driven speciation could be a major mechanism for the emergence of true pathogens besides the acquisition of specialized virulence factors. PMID:24704914

  11. Graphene-Iodine Nanocomposites: Highly Potent Bacterial Inhibitors that are Bio-compatible with Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Some, Surajit; Sohn, Ji Soo; Kim, Junmoo; Lee, Su-Hyun; Lee, Su Chan; Lee, Jungpyo; Shackery, Iman; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kim, So Hyun; Choi, Nakwon; Cho, Il-Joo; Jung, Hyo-Il; Kang, Shinill; Jun, Seong Chan

    2016-01-01

    Graphene-composites, capable of inhibiting bacterial growth which is also bio-compatible with human cells have been highly sought after. Here we report for the first time the preparation of new graphene-iodine nano-composites via electrostatic interactions between positively charged graphene derivatives and triiodide anions. The resulting composites were characterized by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, UV-spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and Scanning electron microscopy. The antibacterial potential of these graphene-iodine composites against Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirobilis, Staphylococcus aureus, and E. coli was investigated. In addition, the cytotoxicity of the nanocomposite with human cells [human white blood cells (WBC), HeLa, MDA-MB-231, Fibroblast (primary human keratinocyte) and Keratinocyte (immortalized fibroblast)], was assessed. DGO (Double-oxidizes graphene oxide) was prepared by the additional oxidation of GO (graphene oxide). This generates more oxygen containing functional groups that can readily trap more H+, thus generating a positively charged surface area under highly acidic conditions. This step allowed bonding with a greater number of anionic triiodides and generated the most potent antibacterial agent among graphene-iodine and as-made povidone-iodine (PVP-I) composites also exhibited nontoxic to human cells culture. Thus, these nano-composites can be used to inhibit the growth of various bacterial species. Importantly, they are also very low-cytotoxic to human cells culture. PMID:26843066

  12. Human NAIP and mouse NAIP1 recognize bacterial type III secretion needle protein for inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jieling; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shao, Feng

    2013-08-27

    Inflammasome mediated by central nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) protein is critical for defense against bacterial infection. Here we show that type III secretion system (T3SS) needle proteins from several bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Burkholderia spp., can induce robust inflammasome activation in both human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow macrophages. Needle protein activation of human NRL family CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome requires the sole human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (hNAIP). Among the seven mouse NAIPs, NAIP1 functions as the mouse counterpart of hNAIP. We found that NAIP1 recognition of T3SS needle proteins was more robust in mouse dendritic cells than in bone marrow macrophages. Needle proteins, as well as flagellin and rod proteins from five different bacteria, exhibited differential and cell type-dependent inflammasome-stimulating activity. Comprehensive profiling of the three types of NAIP ligands revealed that NAIP1 sensing of the needle protein dominated S. flexneri-induced inflammasome activation, particularly in dendritic cells. hNAIP/NAIP1 and NAIP2/5 formed a large oligomeric complex with NLRC4 in the presence of corresponding bacterial ligands, and could support reconstitution of the NLRC4 inflammasome in a ligand-specific manner. PMID:23940371

  13. Human NAIP and mouse NAIP1 recognize bacterial type III secretion needle protein for inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jieling; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Inflammasome mediated by central nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) protein is critical for defense against bacterial infection. Here we show that type III secretion system (T3SS) needle proteins from several bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Burkholderia spp., can induce robust inflammasome activation in both human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow macrophages. Needle protein activation of human NRL family CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome requires the sole human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (hNAIP). Among the seven mouse NAIPs, NAIP1 functions as the mouse counterpart of hNAIP. We found that NAIP1 recognition of T3SS needle proteins was more robust in mouse dendritic cells than in bone marrow macrophages. Needle proteins, as well as flagellin and rod proteins from five different bacteria, exhibited differential and cell type-dependent inflammasome-stimulating activity. Comprehensive profiling of the three types of NAIP ligands revealed that NAIP1 sensing of the needle protein dominated S. flexneri-induced inflammasome activation, particularly in dendritic cells. hNAIP/NAIP1 and NAIP2/5 formed a large oligomeric complex with NLRC4 in the presence of corresponding bacterial ligands, and could support reconstitution of the NLRC4 inflammasome in a ligand-specific manner. PMID:23940371

  14. Bacterial-protozoa interactions; an update on the role these phenomena play towards human illness.

    PubMed

    Snelling, William J; Moore, John E; McKenna, James P; Lecky, Donna M; Dooley, James S G

    2006-02-01

    The usage of water with poor microbiological quality increases the risk of human illness. This review discusses and updates current thinking on the nature of the interaction between a range of human bacterial pathogens and waterborne protozoa. The importance of protozoa acting as protective environments for pathogenic bacteria from disinfection and of promoting extended survival in otherwise hostile environments is highlighted. The significance of biofilms in water systems, and new relationships between Salmonella and Campylobacter and water-borne protozoa are also discussed. The protection of pathogenic bacteria from disinfection within protozoa and/or biofilms has important implications for water safety.

  15. Effects of microwaving human milk: Changes in IgA content and bacterial count

    SciTech Connect

    Sigman, M.; Burke, K.I.; Swarner, O.W.; Shavlik, G.W.

    1989-05-01

    On the basis of this study, IgA was best preserved in frozen human milk by thawing either overnight in the refrigerator or under warm running water. If either of those procedures are to be used, it is suggested that bacterial monitoring should be performed. Because current technology does not allow for accurate low internal temperature monitoring of liquids, it is concluded that use of the microwave oven for the treatment of human milk is inappropriate. However, because microwaving is as effective as holder pasteurization in killing bacteria, and because it would be less expensive and is faster, this process should be further investigated.

  16. A bacterial regulatory RNA attenuates virulence, spread and human host cell phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Le Pabic, Hélène; Germain-Amiot, Noëlla; Bordeau, Valérie; Felden, Brice

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is directed by regulatory proteins and RNAs. We report the case of an RNA attenuating virulence and host uptake, possibly to sustain commensalism. A S. aureus sRNA, SprC (srn_3610), reduced virulence and bacterial loads in a mouse infection model. S. aureus deleted for sprC became more virulent and increased bacterial dissemination in colonized animals. Conversely, inducing SprC expression lowered virulence and the bacterial load. Without sprC, S. aureus phagocytosis by monocytes and macrophages was higher, whereas bacteria were internalized at lower yields when SprC expression was stimulated. Without sprC, higher internalization led to a greater number of extracellular bacteria, facilitating colonization. SprC expression decreased after phagocytosis, concurring with the facilitated growth of bacteria lacking the sRNA in the presence of an oxidant. The major staphylococcal autolysin facilitates S. aureus uptake by human phagocytes. ATL proved to be negatively regulated by SprC. The SprC domains involved in pairing with atl mRNA were analyzed. The addition of ATL reduced phagocytosis of bacteria lacking sprC with no effects on wild-type bacterial uptake, implying that SprC influences phagocytosis, at least in part, by controlling ATL. Since the control of SprC on ATL was modest, other factors must contribute to atl regulation. PMID:26240382

  17. A bacterial regulatory RNA attenuates virulence, spread and human host cell phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Le Pabic, Hélène; Germain-Amiot, Noëlla; Bordeau, Valérie; Felden, Brice

    2015-10-30

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is directed by regulatory proteins and RNAs. We report the case of an RNA attenuating virulence and host uptake, possibly to sustain commensalism. A S. aureus sRNA, SprC (srn_3610), reduced virulence and bacterial loads in a mouse infection model. S. aureus deleted for sprC became more virulent and increased bacterial dissemination in colonized animals. Conversely, inducing SprC expression lowered virulence and the bacterial load. Without sprC, S. aureus phagocytosis by monocytes and macrophages was higher, whereas bacteria were internalized at lower yields when SprC expression was stimulated. Without sprC, higher internalization led to a greater number of extracellular bacteria, facilitating colonization. SprC expression decreased after phagocytosis, concurring with the facilitated growth of bacteria lacking the sRNA in the presence of an oxidant. The major staphylococcal autolysin facilitates S. aureus uptake by human phagocytes. ATL proved to be negatively regulated by SprC. The SprC domains involved in pairing with atl mRNA were analyzed. The addition of ATL reduced phagocytosis of bacteria lacking sprC with no effects on wild-type bacterial uptake, implying that SprC influences phagocytosis, at least in part, by controlling ATL. Since the control of SprC on ATL was modest, other factors must contribute to atl regulation.

  18. A Metagenomic Approach to Characterization of the Vaginal Microbiome Signature in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Aagaard, Kjersti; Riehle, Kevin; Ma, Jun; Segata, Nicola; Mistretta, Toni-Ann; Coarfa, Cristian; Raza, Sabeen; Rosenbaum, Sean; Van den Veyver, Ignatia; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Gevers, Dirk; Huttenhower, Curtis; Petrosino, Joseph; Versalovic, James

    2012-01-01

    While current major national research efforts (i.e., the NIH Human Microbiome Project) will enable comprehensive metagenomic characterization of the adult human microbiota, how and when these diverse microbial communities take up residence in the host and during reproductive life are unexplored at a population level. Because microbial abundance and diversity might differ in pregnancy, we sought to generate comparative metagenomic signatures across gestational age strata. DNA was isolated from the vagina (introitus, posterior fornix, midvagina) and the V5V3 region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes were sequenced (454FLX Titanium platform). Sixty-eight samples from 24 healthy gravidae (18 to 40 confirmed weeks) were compared with 301 non-pregnant controls (60 subjects). Generated sequence data were quality filtered, taxonomically binned, normalized, and organized by phylogeny and into operational taxonomic units (OTU); principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) of the resultant beta diversity measures were used for visualization and analysis in association with sample clinical metadata. Altogether, 1.4 gigabytes of data containing >2.5 million reads (averaging 6,837 sequences/sample of 493 nt in length) were generated for computational analyses. Although gravidae were not excluded by virtue of a posterior fornix pH >4.5 at the time of screening, unique vaginal microbiome signature encompassing several specific OTUs and higher-level clades was nevertheless observed and confirmed using a combination of phylogenetic, non-phylogenetic, supervised, and unsupervised approaches. Both overall diversity and richness were reduced in pregnancy, with dominance of Lactobacillus species (L. iners crispatus, jensenii and johnsonii, and the orders Lactobacillales (and Lactobacillaceae family), Clostridiales, Bacteroidales, and Actinomycetales. This intergroup comparison using rigorous standardized sampling protocols and analytical methodologies provides robust initial evidence that the vaginal

  19. Sugar expressions on the vaginal epithelium in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Youhei; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Nabeta, Motowo; Matsuu, Aya; Asano, Atsushi; Ohta, Yasuhiko

    2012-06-01

    Sugar expressions were examined on the epithelium of both the middle portion of the vagina and the vaginal portion of the cervical canal (CC) in pregnant mice to understand the pathogenesis of bacterial infection in the female reproductive organ by using a panel of lectins. As a result, N-acetylglucosamine was positive before pregnant day (P) 7 but negative after P10 and at diestrus on both the vagina and the CC. In addition, some differences in sugar expressions were seen between them. These results suggest that sugar expressions on the mucosal surface would change not only site-specifically but also time-dependently, and these sugar differences indicate the possibility of the alteration of the settled bacterial species on the vaginal mucosa in pregnancy.

  20. Bacterial diversity and antibiotic resistance in water habitats: searching the links with the human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M

    2014-07-01

    Water is one of the most important bacterial habitats on Earth. As such, water represents also a major way of dissemination of bacteria between different environmental compartments. Human activities led to the creation of the so-called urban water cycle, comprising different sectors (waste, surface, drinking water), among which bacteria can hypothetically be exchanged. Therefore, bacteria can be mobilized between unclean water habitats (e.g. wastewater) and clean or pristine water environments (e.g. disinfected and spring drinking water) and eventually reach humans. In addition, bacteria can also transfer mobile genetic elements between different water types, other environments (e.g. soil) and humans. These processes may involve antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes. In this review, the hypothesis that some bacteria may share different water compartments and be also hosted by humans is discussed based on the comparison of the bacterial diversity in different types of water and with the human-associated microbiome. The role of such bacteria as potential disseminators of antibiotic resistance and the inference that currently only a small fraction of the clinically relevant antibiotic resistome may be known is discussed.

  1. Vaginal Douching in Cambodian Women: Its Prevalence and Association With Vaginal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Lon Say; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Morita, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Junichi

    2010-01-01

    Background We determined the prevalence of vaginal douching (cleansing of the vagina with liquid) in a sample of Cambodian women, and examined the associations of douching with genitourinary symptoms and infections, after controlling for potential confounding factors, including genitourinary symptoms and sociodemographic factors. Methods A total of 451 adolescent and adult females aged 15 to 49 years who attended 17 maternal and child health (MCH) clinics in 7 provinces of Cambodia in 2001 were consecutively enrolled as a part of the Sexually Transmitted Infection Sentinel Survey. Sociodemographic factors, genitourinary symptoms, and frequency of douching were assessed by face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire. Vaginal infections were examined by using standard diagnostic procedures specific to each pathogen. Results The proportion of participants who douched at least once a week was 76.7% (n = 346). Douching was significantly more prevalent in urban than in rural women (85.7%, n = 198 vs 67.3%, n = 148; P < 0.001). Frequency of douching was significantly associated with genitourinary symptoms, which were most prevalent in participants who douched from several times a week to once a day; genitourinary symptoms were less prevalent in those who douched more than once a day. Douching was significantly associated with vaginal candidiasis, but not with trichomoniasis or bacterial vaginosis, and this association persisted even after controlling for sociodemographic factors and genitourinary symptoms. Conclusions Vaginal douching was very common among Cambodian women visiting MCH clinics. Further investigations are warranted to elucidate the reasons for douching. In addition, women should be informed that douching may endanger their reproductive health. PMID:20009371

  2. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal bleeding normally occurs during a woman's menstrual cycle, when she gets her period. Every woman's period is different. Most women have cycles between 24 and 34 days apart. It usually lasts ...

  3. HIV and the vaginal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Denenberg, R

    1997-01-01

    Vaginal health is related to the risk of acquiring or transmitting HIV and other STDs. Significant factors in that risk analysis include pH level, local immune factors, hormone levels, menstrual cycle, sexual maturity, the use of contraceptives, douching, and sexual practices. The vagina, if healthy, has a number of natural protections against HIV and STDs. Inflammation can contribute to increased disease susceptibility, and can be caused either by organisms or mechanical trauma. High levels of HIV in vaginal secretions are directly associated with high plasma levels, and there is some correlation to cervicovaginal secretions levels as well. Vaginal health can be enhanced by self-inspection, gynecological care, and prompt treatment of infections. A table details comfort measures for vaginal conditions.

  4. Can Vaginal Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be spread during sex – including vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, and oral sex – but sex doesn’t ... not letting others come in contact with your anal or genital area, but even then there could ...

  5. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Breast metastasis from vaginal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Neeraja; Scharifker, Daniel; Varsegi, George; Almeida, Zoyla

    2016-07-21

    Vaginal cancer is a rare malignancy accounting for 1-2% of all pelvic neoplasms. Dissemination usually occurs through local invasion and rarely metastasises to distal locations. Metastasis of vaginal cancer to the breast is extremely infrequent and unique. A 66-year-old Asian woman presented with vaginal bleeding and was found to have a vaginal mass and a left breast mass. Pathological assessment of the biopsies revealed identical squamous cell characteristics of both masses. We describe a very rare and novel case of a distally located vaginal carcinoma with metastasis to the breast Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IV (FIGO IVB). Robot-assisted extrafascial total hysterectomy with local vaginal mass excision and partial mastectomy of the left breast were performed. After surgery, the patient underwent adjuvant chemotherapy followed by breast and pelvic radiotherapy, with maintained complete remission after 3 years of follow-up. This combination of findings and treatment is very distinct with a unique and favourable response.

  7. Breast metastasis from vaginal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Neeraja; Scharifker, Daniel; Varsegi, George; Almeida, Zoyla

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal cancer is a rare malignancy accounting for 1-2% of all pelvic neoplasms. Dissemination usually occurs through local invasion and rarely metastasises to distal locations. Metastasis of vaginal cancer to the breast is extremely infrequent and unique. A 66-year-old Asian woman presented with vaginal bleeding and was found to have a vaginal mass and a left breast mass. Pathological assessment of the biopsies revealed identical squamous cell characteristics of both masses. We describe a very rare and novel case of a distally located vaginal carcinoma with metastasis to the breast Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IV (FIGO IVB). Robot-assisted extrafascial total hysterectomy with local vaginal mass excision and partial mastectomy of the left breast were performed. After surgery, the patient underwent adjuvant chemotherapy followed by breast and pelvic radiotherapy, with maintained complete remission after 3 years of follow-up. This combination of findings and treatment is very distinct with a unique and favourable response. PMID:27444140

  8. Antibacterial screening of traditional herbal plants and standard antibiotics against some human bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Awan, Uzma Azeem; Andleeb, Saiqa; Kiyani, Ayesha; Zafar, Atiya; Shafique, Irsa; Riaz, Nazia; Azhar, Muhammad Tehseen; Uddin, Hafeez

    2013-11-01

    Chloroformic and isoamyl alcohol extracts of Cinnnamomum zylanicum, Cuminum cyminum, Curcuma long Linn, Trachyspermum ammi and selected standard antibiotics were investigated for their in vitro antibacterial activity against six human bacterial pathogens. The antibacterial activity was evaluated and based on the zone of inhibition using agar disc diffusion method. The tested bacterial strains were Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aurues, Serratia marcesnces, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Ciprofloxacin showed highly significant action against K. pneumonia and S. epidermidis while Ampicillin and Amoxicillin indicated lowest antibacterial activity against tested pathogens. Among the plants chloroform and isoamyl alcohol extracts of C. cyminum, S. aromaticum and C. long Linn had significant effect against P. aeruginosa, S. marcesnces and S. pyogenes. Comparison of antibacterial activity of medicinal herbs and standard antibiotics was also recorded via activity index. Used medicinal plants have various phytochemicals which reasonably justify their use as antibacterial agent.

  9. Effects of Gamma Irradiation on Bacterial Microflora Associated with Human Amniotic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Binte Atique, Fahmida; Ahmed, Kazi Tahsin; Asaduzzaman, S. M.; Hasan, Kazi Nadim

    2013-01-01

    Human amniotic membrane is considered a promising allograft material for the treatment of ocular surface reconstruction, burns, and other skin defects. In order to avoid the transmission of any diseases, grafts should be perfectly sterile. Twenty-five amniotic sacs were collected to determine the microbiological quality of human amniotic membrane, to analyze the radiation sensitivity pattern of the microorganism, and to detect the radiation decimal reduction dose (D10) values. All the samples were found to be contaminated, and the bioburden was ranged from 3.4 × 102 to 1.2 × 105 cfu/g. Initially, a total fifty bacterial isolates were characterized according to their cultural, morphological, and biochemical characteristics and then tested for the radiation sensitivity in an incremental series of radiation doses from 1 to 10 KGy. The results depict gradual decline in bioburden with incline of radiation doses. Staphylococcus spp. were the most frequently isolated bacterial contaminant in tissue samples (44%). The D10 values of the bacterial isolates were ranged from 0.6 to 1.27 KGy. Streptococcus spp. were found to be the highest radioresistant strain with the radiation sterilization dose (RSD) of 11.4 KGy for a bioburden level of 1000. To compare the differences, D10 values were also calculated by graphical evaluations of the data with two of the representative isolates of each bacterial species which showed no significant variations. Findings of this study indicate that lower radiation dose is quite satisfactory for the sterilization of amniotic membrane grafts. Therefore, these findings would be helpful to predict the efficacy of radiation doses for the processing of amniotic membrane for various purposes. PMID:24063009

  10. Combining flagellin and human β-defensin-3 to combat bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Sabag, Ofra; Lorberboum-Galski, Haya

    2014-01-01

    The discovery and therapeutic use of antibiotics made a major contribution to the reduction of human morbidity and mortality. However, the growing resistance to antibiotics has become a matter of huge concern. In this study we aimed to develop an innovative approach to treat bacterial infections utilizing two components: the human antibacterial peptide β-defensin-3 (BD3) and the bacterial protein flagellin (F). This combination was designed to provide an efficient weapon against bacterial infections with the peptide killing the bacteria directly, while the flagellin protein triggers the immune system and acts against bacteria escaping from the peptide’s action. We designed, expressed and purified the fusion protein flagellin BD3 (FBD3) and its two components, the F protein and the native BD3 peptide. FBD3 fusion protein and native BD3 peptide had antibacterial activity in vitro against various bacterial strains. FBD3 and F proteins could also recognize their receptor expressed on target cells and stimulated secretion of IL-8. In addition, F and FBD3 proteins had a partial protective effect in mice infected by pathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria that cause a lethal disease. Moreover, we were able to show partial protection of mice infected with E. coli using a flagellin sequence from Salmonella. We also explored flagellin’s basic mechanisms of action, focusing on its effects on CD4+ T cells from healthy donors. We found that F stimulation caused an increase in the mRNA levels of the Th1 response cytokines IL12A and IFNγ. In addition, F stimulation affected its own receptor. PMID:25538693

  11. Potential Use of Antimicrobial Peptides as Vaginal Spermicides/Microbicides.

    PubMed

    Tanphaichitr, Nongnuj; Srakaew, Nopparat; Alonzi, Rhea; Kiattiburut, Wongsakorn; Kongmanas, Kessiri; Zhi, Ruina; Li, Weihua; Baker, Mark; Wang, Guanshun; Hickling, Duane

    2016-01-01

    The concurrent increases in global population and sexually transmitted infection (STI) demand a search for agents with dual spermicidal and microbicidal properties for topical vaginal application. Previous attempts to develop the surfactant spermicide, nonoxynol-9 (N-9), into a vaginal microbicide were unsuccessful largely due to its inefficiency to kill microbes. Furthermore, N-9 causes damage to the vaginal epithelium, thus accelerating microbes to enter the women's body. For this reason, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), naturally secreted by all forms of life as part of innate immunity, deserve evaluation for their potential spermicidal effects. To date, twelve spermicidal AMPs have been described including LL-37, magainin 2 and nisin A. Human cathelicidin LL-37 is the most promising spermicidal AMP to be further developed for vaginal use for the following reasons. First, it is a human AMP naturally produced in the vagina after intercourse. Second, LL-37 exerts microbicidal effects to numerous microbes including those that cause STI. Third, its cytotoxicity is selective to sperm and not to the female reproductive tract. Furthermore, the spermicidal effects of LL-37 have been demonstrated in vivo in mice. Therefore, the availability of LL-37 as a vaginal spermicide/microbicide will empower women for self-protection against unwanted pregnancies and STI. PMID:26978373

  12. Potential Use of Antimicrobial Peptides as Vaginal Spermicides/Microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Tanphaichitr, Nongnuj; Srakaew, Nopparat; Alonzi, Rhea; Kiattiburut, Wongsakorn; Kongmanas, Kessiri; Zhi, Ruina; Li, Weihua; Baker, Mark; Wang, Guanshun; Hickling, Duane

    2016-01-01

    The concurrent increases in global population and sexually transmitted infection (STI) demand a search for agents with dual spermicidal and microbicidal properties for topical vaginal application. Previous attempts to develop the surfactant spermicide, nonoxynol-9 (N-9), into a vaginal microbicide were unsuccessful largely due to its inefficiency to kill microbes. Furthermore, N-9 causes damage to the vaginal epithelium, thus accelerating microbes to enter the women’s body. For this reason, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), naturally secreted by all forms of life as part of innate immunity, deserve evaluation for their potential spermicidal effects. To date, twelve spermicidal AMPs have been described including LL-37, magainin 2 and nisin A. Human cathelicidin LL-37 is the most promising spermicidal AMP to be further developed for vaginal use for the following reasons. First, it is a human AMP naturally produced in the vagina after intercourse. Second, LL-37 exerts microbicidal effects to numerous microbes including those that cause STI. Third, its cytotoxicity is selective to sperm and not to the female reproductive tract. Furthermore, the spermicidal effects of LL-37 have been demonstrated in vivo in mice. Therefore, the availability of LL-37 as a vaginal spermicide/microbicide will empower women for self-protection against unwanted pregnancies and STI. PMID:26978373

  13. A simple identification method for vaginal secretions using relative quantification of Lactobacillus DNA.

    PubMed

    Doi, Masanori; Gamo, Shinsuke; Okiura, Tatsuyuki; Nishimukai, Hiroaki; Asano, Migiwa

    2014-09-01

    In criminal investigations there are some cases in which identifying the presence of vaginal secretions provides crucial evidence in proving sexual assault. However, there are no methods for definitively identifying vaginal secretions. In the present study, we focused on Lactobacillus levels in vaginal secretions and developed a novel identification method for vaginal secretions by relative quantification based on real time PCR. We designed a Lactobacillus conserved region primer pair (LCP) by aligning 16S rRNA gene sequences from major vaginal Lactobacillus species (Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus jensenii), and selected the human specific primer pair (HSP) as an endogenous control for relative quantification. As a result, the ΔCt (ΔCt=Ct[LCP]-Ct[HSP]) values of vaginal secretions (11 out of 12 samples) were significantly lower than those of saliva, semen and skin surface samples, and it was possible to discriminate between vaginal secretions and other body fluids. For the one remaining sample, it was confirmed that the predominant species in the microflora was not of the Lactobacillus genus. The ΔCt values in this study were calculated when the total DNA input used from the vaginal secretions was 10pg or more. Additionally, the ΔCt values of samples up to 6-months-old, which were kept at room temperature, remained unchanged. Thus, we concluded in this study that the simple ΔCt method by real time PCR is a useful tool for detecting the presence of vaginal secretions.

  14. In vitro and in vivo effects of beneficial vaginal lactobacilli on pathogens responsible for urogenital tract infections.

    PubMed

    De Gregorio, Priscilla Romina; Juárez Tomás, María Silvina; Leccese Terraf, María Cecilia; Nader-Macías, María Elena Fátima

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of beneficial human vaginal lactobacilli (Lb) on urogenital pathogens through in vitro and in vivo experiments. Co-aggregative and antimicrobial properties between five vaginal Lb strains and urogenital pathogens or potential pathogens (Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans strains) were assayed. Also, associative cultures of Lb strains and S. agalactiae were performed and bacterial growth, pH, lactic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were determined at different times. Based on the results obtained, the in vivo studies were assayed in mice with Lactobacillus gasseri CRL 1509 or Lactobacillus salivarius CRL 1328 inoculated intravaginally (i.v.) and then challenged i.v. with S. agalactiae. Results were analysed by ANOVA (repeated measures and general linear models). Most of the Lb strains increased the percentage of aggregation of S. agalactiae strains. Only one strain (Lactobacillus reuteri CRL 1324) positively affected the aggregation of S. aureus and none increased the aggregation of C. albicans. The inhibition of the growth of S. agalactiae strains by production of organic acids by lactobacilli was evidenced. The Lb-S. agalactiae co-cultures showed a significant inhibition of the pathogen after 4 h and 8 h of incubation. Parallel increases in lactic acid and H2O2 levels were observed. However, in the experimental murine model, no significant differences were obtained in the number of streptococci recovered from the vaginal tract of control mice and those inoculated with Lb. In conclusion, vaginal Lb exhibited in vitro co-aggregative and antimicrobial effects on S. agalactiae strains, suggesting that they could be promising candidates for protection against S. agalactiae challenge. However, as these effects were not evidenced in the murine model used, further animal studies under different experimental conditions should be conducted to evaluate the preventive effect of Lb against

  15. New immunotherapeutic strategies to control vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Cassone, Antonio; De Bernardis, Flavia; Polonelli, Luciano

    2002-03-01

    The widespread occurrence of mucosal infections caused by Candida, in particular recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis among fertile-age women, together with the paucity of safe candidacidal antimycotics, have prompted a great number of investigations into the immunotherapy of candidal vaginitis. This article will discuss three different experimental approaches demonstrated to be potentially transferable to human disease: (1) the use of antibodies against well-defined cell-surface adhesins or enzymes; (2) the generation of yeast killer-toxin-like candidacidal anti-idiotypic antibodies and their engineered molecular derivatives (e.g. single chains, peptides); and (3) the generation of therapeutic vaccines and immunomodulators.

  16. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups

    PubMed Central

    HRV, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  17. Malaria Vaccine Development: Are Bacterial Flagellin Fusion Proteins the Bridge between Mouse and Humans?

    PubMed Central

    Bargieri, Daniel Y.; Soares, Irene S.; Costa, Fabio T. M.; Braga, Catarina J.; Ferreira, Luis C. S.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2011-01-01

    In the past 25 years, the development of an effective malaria vaccine has become one of the biggest riddles in the biomedical sciences. Experimental data using animal infection models demonstrated that it is possible to induce protective immunity against different stages of malaria parasites. Nonetheless, the vast body of knowledge has generated disappointments when submitted to clinical conditions and presently a single antigen formulation has progressed to the point where it may be translated into a human vaccine. In parallel, new means to increase the protective effects of antigens in general have been pursued and depicted, such as the use of bacterial flagellins as carriers/adjuvants. Flagellins activate pathways in the innate immune system of both mice and humans. The recent report of the first Phase I clinical trial of a vaccine containing a Salmonella flagellin as carrier/adjuvant may fuel the use of these proteins in vaccine formulations. Herein, we review the studies on the use of recombinant flagellins as vaccine adjuvants with malarial antigens in the light of the current state of the art of malaria vaccine development. The available information indicates that bacterial flagellins should be seriously considered for malaria vaccine formulations to the development of effective human vaccines. PMID:21603205

  18. Characterization of a large human transgene following invasin-mediated delivery in a bacterial artificial chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Austin E.; Lucas, Catherine A.; Haussecker, Pei Ling; Kosak, Steven T.; Harris, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are widely used in transgenesis, particularly for the humanization of animal models. Moreover, due to their extensive capacity, BACs provide attractive tools to study distal regulatory elements associated with large gene loci. However, despite their widespread use, little is known about the integration dynamics of these large transgenes in mammalian cells. Here, we investigate the post-integration structure of a ~260 kb BAC carrying the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) locus following delivery by bacterial invasion and compare this to the outcome of a more routine lipid-based delivery method. We find substantial variability in integrated copy number and expression levels of the BAC CFTR transgene after bacterial invasion-mediated delivery. Furthermore, we frequently observed variation in the representation of different regions of the CFTR transgene within individual cell clones, indicative of BAC fragmentation. Finally, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we observed that the integrated BAC forms extended, megabase-scale structures in some clones that are apparently stably maintained at cell division. These data demonstrate that the utility of large BACs to investigate cis-regulatory elements in the genomic context may be limited by recombination events that complicate their use. PMID:23749207

  19. Vaginal Practices of HIV-Negative Zimbabwean Women

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Abigail Norris; Morrison, Charles S.; Munjoma, Marshall W.; Moyo, Precious; Chipato, Tsungai; van de Wijgert, Janneke H.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Vaginal practices (VPs) may increase HIV risk by injuring vaginal epithelium or by increasing risk of bacterial vaginosis, an established risk factor for HIV. Methods. HIV-negative Zimbabwean women (n = 2,185) participating in a prospective study on hormonal contraception and HIV risk completed an ancillary questionnaire capturing detailed VP data at quarterly followup visits for two years. Results. Most participants (84%) reported ever cleansing inside the vagina, and at 40% of visits women reported drying the vagina using cloth or paper. Vaginal tightening using cloth/cotton wool, lemon juice, traditional herbs/powders, or other products was reported at 4% of visits. Women with ≥15 unprotected sex acts monthly had higher odds of cleansing (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.17, 95% CI: 1.04–1.32). Women with sexually transmitted infections had higher odds of tightening (aOR: 1.42, 95% CI: 1.08–1.86). Conclusion. Because certain vaginal practices were associated with other HIV risk factors, synergism between VPs and other risk factors should be explored. PMID:20871844

  20. [Vaginal candida infection in the third trimester of pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Nikolov, A; Shopova, E; Mŭseva, A; Dimitrov, A

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is the determination of the frequency of vaginal Candida colonization in pregnant women in the third trimester, the status of the vaginal ecosystem, the grade and the subspecies of the candidal colonization, clinical manifestations and the therapeutic effect of the local antimycotic treatment. In this study it has been followed 172 pregnant women with a normal pregnancy at the end of the third trimester. It has been estimated that about 28.4% of all women get a vaginal yeast colonization - Candida spp. In 89.7% (44 women) of the cases, the colonization was caused by an overgrowth of the yeast Candida albicans. The remaining cases are caused by other subspecies of Candida - 5 cases (10.3%) - C. tropicalis /2/, C. parapsilosis /2/, C. glabrata/1/. The women in the first group were with symptoms of active candidosis (25.6%) and 88.3% of the cases were confirmed by microscopy, and 90.6% after a bacterial growth in a culture. In 7.7% of the cases was specified a mild to moderate colonization without a clinical signs of infection (II group). The local treatment with antimycotic vaginal globules and crème for 5 to 7 days alleviates the clinical symptoms. It was not observed a case of maternal - fetal transmission of this infection not a clinical manifestation in the early postpartal period. PMID:17168476

  1. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges and bacterial revertants by organic extracts of airborne particles. [Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lockard, J.M.; Viau, C.J.; Lee-Stephens, C.; Caldwell, J.C.; Wojciechowski, J.P.; Enoch, H.G.; Sabharwal, P.S.

    1981-01-01

    The genotoxicities of organic extracts of airborne particles have been studied extensively in the Salmonella/mammalian microsome (Ames) test, but in few other bioassays. In these studies, we tested benzene-acetone extracts of particulate pollutants collected in Lexington, Kentucky, for capacity to induce increases in sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in human lumphocytes and V79 cells, as well as in the Ames assay. Extracts induced linear dose-related increases in SCE in human lumphocytes and in bacterial revertants.However, variable responses were observed in SCE assays in V79 cells with and without activation by rat liver S9 or feeder layers of irradiated Syrian hamster fetal cells. We conclude that the SCE assay in human lumphocytes may be a useful indicator of the potential risks to humans of airborne particulate pollutants, as it utilizes human cells recently taken from the host, is rapid and economical, and requires small quantities of test materials. However, thorough studies of the quantitative relationships between SCE induction and mutagenicity in human cells are needed.

  2. The vaginal isolate Lactobacillus paracasei LPC-S01 (DSM 26760) is suitable for oral administration

    PubMed Central

    Balzaretti, Silvia; Taverniti, Valentina; Rondini, Greta; Marcolegio, Giorgio; Minuzzo, Mario; Remagni, Maria C.; Fiore, Walter; Arioli, Stefania; Guglielmetti, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is one of the most common urogenital diseases affecting women in reproductive age. The administration of probiotics as vaginal suppository has been proposed as a strategy to cure this condition and reduce its recurrence. Nonetheless, also oral consumption of probiotics, which is a more practical route of administration, proved to be an efficient strategy. In this perspective, we studied Lactobacillus paracasei LPC-S01 (DSM 26760), a human vaginal isolate included in commercial probiotic preparations for topical use, in order to assess if this bacterium can also perform as gastrointestinal probiotic. Comparative genomics revealed the presence of several accessory genes suggesting that LPC-S01 is a niche-generalist member of its species. According to a procedure conventionally used to predict the probiotic potential, we demonstrated that the probiotic properties of strain LPC-S01, with respect to those of the well-known probiotic references L. paracasei Shirota and DG, are equal for the bile tolerance and the reduction of NF-κB activation in Caco-2 cells, or superior for the tolerance to gastric juice and the adhesion to Caco-2 epithelial cells. We then demonstrated that LPC-S01 is susceptible to antibiotics indicated by EFSA and does not produce biogenic amines. Finally, a double-blind cross-over pilot intervention trial on healthy human volunteers showed that, after a 7-days oral consumption of capsules containing about 24 billion live cells, the fecal cell concentrations of strains LPC-S01 and DG (evaluated by qPCR) were not dissimilar. Specifically, both probiotics' cell concentrations were above the detection limit for an average of 5 days from the end of the treatment, corresponding to a mean number of evacuations of 7 ± 2. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the vaginal isolate L. paracasei LPC-S01 possesses safety and functional properties that may support its use as probiotic to be administered per os for potential intestinal as

  3. Impact of Different Fecal Processing Methods on Assessments of Bacterial Diversity in the Human Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Peterson, Courtney M.; Raggio, Anne; Keenan, Michael J.; Martin, Roy J.; Ravussin, Eric; Marco, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota are integral to understanding the relationships between nutrition and health. Therefore, fecal sampling and processing protocols for metagenomic surveys should be sufficiently robust, accurate, and reliable to identify the microorganisms present. We investigated the use of different fecal preparation methods on the bacterial community structures identified in human stools. Complete stools were collected from six healthy individuals and processed according to the following methods: (i) randomly sampled fresh stool, (ii) fresh stool homogenized in a blender for 2 min, (iii) randomly sampled frozen stool, and (iv) frozen stool homogenized in a blender for 2 min, or (v) homogenized in a pneumatic mixer for either 10, 20, or 30 min. High-throughput DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA V4 regions of bacterial community DNA extracted from the stools showed that the fecal microbiota remained distinct between individuals, independent of processing method. Moreover, the different stool preparation approaches did not alter intra-individual bacterial diversity. Distinctions were found at the level of individual taxa, however. Stools that were frozen and then homogenized tended to have higher proportions of Faecalibacterium, Streptococcus, and Bifidobacterium and decreased quantities of Oscillospira, Bacteroides, and Parabacteroides compared to stools that were collected in small quantities and not mixed prior to DNA extraction. These findings indicate that certain taxa are at particular risk for under or over sampling due to protocol differences. Importantly, homogenization by any method significantly reduced the intra-individual variation in bacteria detected per stool. Our results confirm the robustness of fecal homogenization for microbial analyses and underscore the value of collecting and mixing large stool sample quantities in human nutrition intervention studies. PMID:27812352

  4. Vaginal itching and discharge - adult and adolescent

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaginal dryness and other symptoms ( atrophic vaginitis ). Forgotten tampon or foreign body, which may cause a foul ... in the genital area. Use pads and not tampons while you have an infection. If you have ...

  5. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, C A

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common of the vaginitides affecting women of reproductive age. It appears to be due to an alteration in the vaginal ecology by which Lactobacillus spp., the predominant organisms in the healthy vagina, are replaced by a mixed flora including Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Porphyromonas spp., Mobiluncus spp., and Peptostreptococcus spp. All of these organisms except Mobiluncus spp. are also members of the endogenous vaginal flora. While evidence from treatment trials does not support the notion that BV is sexually transmitted, recent studies have shown an increased risk associated with multiple sexual partners. It has also been suggested that the pathogenesis of BV may be similar to that of urinary tract infections, with the rectum serving as a reservoir for some BV-associated flora. The organisms associated with BV have also been recognized as agents of female upper genital tract infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease, and the syndrome BV has been associated with adverse outcome of pregnancy, including premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, and fetal loss; postpartum endometritis; cuff cellulitis; and urinary tract infections. The mechanisms by which the BV-associated flora causes the signs of BV are not well understood, but a role for H2O2-producing Lactobacillus spp. in protecting against colonization by catalase-negative anaerobic bacteria has been recognized. These and other aspects of BV are reviewed. PMID:1747864

  6. Inactivation of bacterial pathogens in human milk by high-pressure processing.

    PubMed

    Viazis, S; Farkas, B E; Jaykus, L A

    2008-01-01

    Low-temperature, long-time (LTLT) pasteurization assures the safety of banked human milk; however, heat can destroy important nutritional biomolecules. High-pressure processing (HPP) shows promise as an alternative for pasteurization of breast milk. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of HPP for inactivation of selected bacterial pathogens in human milk. Human milk was inoculated with one of five pathogens (10(8) to 10(9) CFU/ml), while 0.1% peptone solution solutions with the same levels of each organism were used as controls. The samples were subjected to 400 MPa at 21 to 31 degrees C for 0 to 50 min or to 62.5 degrees C for 0 to 30 min (capillary tube method) to simulate LTLT pasteurization. Tryptic soy agar and selective media were used for enumeration. Traditional thermal pasteurization resulted in inactivation (> 7 log) of all pathogens within 10 min. In human milk and in peptone solution, a 6-log reduction was achieved after 30 min of HPP for Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538. After 30 min, S. aureus ATCC 25923 was reduced by 8 log and 6 log in human milk and peptone solution, respectively. Treatments of 4 and 7 min resulted in an 8-log inactivation of Streptococcus agalactiae ATCC 12927 in human milk and peptone solution, respectively, while Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115 required 2 min for an 8-log inactivation in human milk. Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 was inactivated by 8 log after 10 min in peptone solution and by 6 log after 30 min in human milk. These data suggest that HPP may be a promising alternative for pasteurization of human milk. Further research should evaluate the efficacy of HPP in the inactivation of relevant viral pathogens.

  7. Colonization with the enteric protozoa Blastocystis is associated with increased diversity of human gut bacterial microbiota.

    PubMed

    Audebert, Christophe; Even, Gaël; Cian, Amandine; Loywick, Alexandre; Merlin, Sophie; Viscogliosi, Eric; Chabé, Magali

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of commensal bacterial populations, a phenomenon known as dysbiosis, are linked to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, or to infections by diverse enteric pathogens. Blastocystis is one of the most common single-celled eukaryotes detected in human faecal samples. However, the clinical significance of this widespread colonization remains unclear, and its pathogenic potential is controversial. To address the issue of Blastocystis pathogenicity, we investigated the impact of colonization by this protist on the composition of the human gut microbiota. For that purpose, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 48 Blastocystis-colonized patients and 48 Blastocystis-free subjects and performed an Ion Torrent 16S rDNA gene sequencing to decipher the Blastocystis-associated gut microbiota. Here, we report a higher bacterial diversity in faecal microbiota of Blastocystis colonized patients, a higher abundance of Clostridia as well as a lower abundance of Enterobacteriaceae. Our results contribute to suggesting that Blastocystis colonization is usually associated with a healthy gut microbiota, rather than with gut dysbiosis generally observed in metabolic or infectious inflammatory diseases of the lower gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27147260

  8. The importance of the viable but non-culturable state in human bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Laam; Mendis, Nilmini; Trigui, Hana; Oliver, James D.; Faucher, Sebastien P.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial species have been found to exist in a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state since its discovery in 1982. VBNC cells are characterized by a loss of culturability on routine agar, which impairs their detection by conventional plate count techniques. This leads to an underestimation of total viable cells in environmental or clinical samples, and thus poses a risk to public health. In this review, we present recent findings on the VBNC state of human bacterial pathogens. The characteristics of VBNC cells, including the similarities and differences to viable, culturable cells and dead cells, and different detection methods are discussed. Exposure to various stresses can induce the VBNC state, and VBNC cells may be resuscitated back to culturable cells under suitable stimuli. The conditions that trigger the induction of the VBNC state and resuscitation from it are summarized and the mechanisms underlying these two processes are discussed. Last but not least, the significance of VBNC cells and their potential influence on human health are also reviewed. PMID:24917854

  9. Colonization with the enteric protozoa Blastocystis is associated with increased diversity of human gut bacterial microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Audebert, Christophe; Even, Gaël; Cian, Amandine; Safadi, Dima El; Certad, Gabriela; Delhaes, Laurence; Pereira, Bruno; Nourrisson, Céline; Poirier, Philippe; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Delbac, Frédéric; Morelle, Christelle; Bastien, Patrick; Lachaud, Laurence; Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Botterel, Françoise; Candolfi, Ermanno; Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Morio, Florent; Pomares, Christelle; Rabodonirina, Meja; Loywick, Alexandre; Merlin, Sophie; Viscogliosi, Eric; Chabé, Magali

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of commensal bacterial populations, a phenomenon known as dysbiosis, are linked to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, or to infections by diverse enteric pathogens. Blastocystis is one of the most common single-celled eukaryotes detected in human faecal samples. However, the clinical significance of this widespread colonization remains unclear, and its pathogenic potential is controversial. To address the issue of Blastocystis pathogenicity, we investigated the impact of colonization by this protist on the composition of the human gut microbiota. For that purpose, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 48 Blastocystis-colonized patients and 48 Blastocystis-free subjects and performed an Ion Torrent 16S rDNA gene sequencing to decipher the Blastocystis-associated gut microbiota. Here, we report a higher bacterial diversity in faecal microbiota of Blastocystis colonized patients, a higher abundance of Clostridia as well as a lower abundance of Enterobacteriaceae. Our results contribute to suggesting that Blastocystis colonization is usually associated with a healthy gut microbiota, rather than with gut dysbiosis generally observed in metabolic or infectious inflammatory diseases of the lower gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27147260

  10. Cloning of human epidermal growth factor as a bacterial secretory protein, its properties and mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, D.A.; Matsunami, R.K.; Campion, S.R.; Foote, R.S.; Mural, R.J.; Larimer, F.W.; Stevens, A.; Niyogi, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    A chimeric gene, containing the DNA coding for the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) and that for the signal peptide of E. coli alkaline phosphatase, was constructed by the annealing and subsequent ligation of appropriate DNA oligonucleotides synthesized in an automated DNA synthesizer. The gene was then cloned into a bacterial plasmid under the transcriptional control of the E. coli trp-lac (tac) promoter, and then transformed into E. coli. Following induction with isopropylthiogalactoside, the secretion of EGF into the E. coli periplasmic space and some into the growth medium was confirmed by its specific binding to the EGF receptor and stimulation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The size and physicochemical properties of the purified protein mimicked those of authentic human EGF. Studies of structure/function relationships by specific alterations of targeted amino acid residues in the EGF molecule have been initiated by utilizing site-directed mutagenesis.

  11. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinoso-Colacio, Mercedes; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel; García-Cañadas, Marta; Amador-Cubero, Suyapa; Pérez, José Luis García; Toro, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Group II introns are mobile retroelements that self-splice from precursor RNAs to form ribonucleoparticles (RNP), which can invade new specific genomic DNA sites. This specificity can be reprogrammed, for insertion into any desired DNA site, making these introns useful tools for bacterial genetic engineering. However, previous studies have suggested that these elements may function inefficiently in eukaryotes. We investigated the subcellular distribution, in cultured human cells, of the protein encoded by the group II intron RmInt1 (IEP) and several mutants. We created fusions with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and with a FLAG epitope. We found that the IEP was localized in the nucleus and nucleolus of the cells. Remarkably, it also accumulated at the periphery of the nuclear matrix. We were also able to identify spliced lariat intron RNA, which co-immunoprecipitated with the IEP, suggesting that functional RmInt1 RNPs can be assembled in cultured human cells. PMID:26244523

  12. Douglas-fir root-associated microorganisms with inhibitory activity towards fungal plant pathogens and human bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Axelrood, P E; Clarke, A M; Radley, R; Zemcov, S J

    1996-07-01

    A microbial culture collection composed of 1820 bacterial strains, including 298 actinomycete strains, was established from the roots of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings harvested from conifer nurseries and forest sites. Two hundred and thirty-four strains inhibited the growth of Fusarium, Cylindrocarpon, and (or) Pythium spp. in in vitro assays. A significantly greater proportion of bacterial strains from actinomycete genera exhibited antifungal properties compared with bacterial strains from nonactinomycete genera. Eighty-nine percent of identified inhibitory strains were Streptomyces, Streptoverticillium, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, or Burkholderia species. The actinomycete species were isolated almost exclusively from forest seedlings. Recovery of inhibitory strains representing 29 microbial species was enhanced using a variety of methods to isolate microorganisms from the roots of seedlings from nursery and forest sites. Bacterial strains (including actinomycete strains) with antifungal activity were tested for in vitro growth inhibition of six clinical human bacterial pathogens (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Forty-eight percent of the tested strains inhibited one or more human pathogens, Inhibitory activity towards fungal and bacterial pathogens was strain specific, not species specific, and many inhibitory strains exhibited broad-spectrum activity. Strains with antifungal activity against several conifer root pathogens were also more likely to inhibit multiple species of clinical bacterial pathogens.

  13. Vaginal radical trachelectomy: an update.

    PubMed

    Plante, Marie

    2008-11-01

    The vaginal radical trachelectomy has emerged as a valuable fertility-preserving treatment option for young women with early-stage disease. Cancer-related infertility is associated with feelings of depression, grief, stress, and sexual dysfunction. Data have shown that the overall oncological outcome is safe and that the obstetrical outcome is promising. In this article, we analyze the data on the vaginal radical trachelectomy published over the last 10 years in the context of what we have learned, what issues remain unclear, and what the future holds.

  14. [Yin Care--a natural product for prophylactics and treatment of vaginal infections].

    PubMed

    Mikhova, M; Batashki, I; Ivanov, St

    2007-01-01

    A prospective study, including 60 patients with vaginal discharge has been made at Maternity hospital "Majchin dom"--Sofia for the period November 2006- February 2007. In 32 patients no causative agent has been revealed. They have been counseled to use Yin Care--vaginal lotion for 3 months in prophylactic concentration. 88.4% reported for diminished discharge. No adverse effects have been observed. In 11 patients suffering from bacterial vaginitis, caused by S. Epidermidis, S. Aureus, Enterococcus and E. Coli cure was achieved in 72.7% of cases. 17 women with Candida vaginitis have been included in the study. After standard antifungal treatment, 8 of them continued therapy with Yin Care. Recurrence of disease has been observed in only one case, while in the group treated with antifungal medication only recurrence has been observed in 2 cases.

  15. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy.

  16. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Patras, Kathryn A.; Wescombe, Philip A.; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D.; Tagg, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. PMID:26077762

  17. Streptococcus salivarius K12 Limits Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kathryn A; Wescombe, Philip A; Rösler, Berenice; Hale, John D; Tagg, John R; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) colonizes the rectovaginal tract in 20% to 30% of women and during pregnancy can be transmitted to the newborn, causing severe invasive disease. Current routine screening and antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen short of complete prevention of GBS transmission, and GBS remains a leading cause of neonatal infection. We have investigated the ability of Streptococcus salivarius, a predominant member of the native human oral microbiota, to control GBS colonization. Comparison of the antibacterial activities of multiple S. salivarius strains by use of a deferred-antagonism test showed that S. salivarius strain K12 exhibited the broadest spectrum of activity against GBS. K12 effectively inhibited all GBS strains tested, including disease-implicated isolates from newborns and colonizing isolates from the vaginal tract of pregnant women. Inhibition was dependent on the presence of megaplasmid pSsal-K12, which encodes the bacteriocins salivaricin A and salivaricin B; however, in coculture experiments, GBS growth was impeded by K12 independently of the megaplasmid. We also demonstrated that K12 adheres to and invades human vaginal epithelial cells at levels comparable to GBS. Inhibitory activity of K12 was examined in vivo using a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization. Mice colonized with GBS were treated vaginally with K12. K12 administration significantly reduced GBS vaginal colonization in comparison to nontreated controls, and this effect was partially dependent on the K12 megaplasmid. Our results suggest that K12 may have potential as a preventative therapy to control GBS vaginal colonization and thereby prevent its transmission to the neonate during pregnancy. PMID:26077762

  18. Characterization of the vaginal micro- and mycobiome in asymptomatic reproductive-age Estonian women.

    PubMed

    Drell, Tiina; Lillsaar, Triin; Tummeleht, Lea; Simm, Jaak; Aaspõllu, Anu; Väin, Edda; Saarma, Ivo; Salumets, Andres; Donders, Gilbert G G; Metsis, Madis

    2013-01-01

    The application of high-throughput sequencing methods has raised doubt in the concept of the uniform healthy vaginal microbiota consisting predominantly of lactobacilli by revealing the existence of more variable bacterial community composition. As this needs to be analyzed more extensively and there is little straightforward data regarding the vaginal mycobiome of asymptomatic women we aimed to define bacterial and fungal communities in vaginal samples from 494 asymptomatic, reproductive-age Estonian women. The composition of the vaginal microbiota was determined by amplifying bacterial 16S rRNA and fungal internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS-1) regions and subsequently sequencing them using 454 Life Sciences pyrosequencing. We delineated five major bacterial community groups with distinctive diversity and species composition. Lactobacilli were among the most abundant bacteria in all groups, but also members of genus Gardnerella had high relative abundance in some of the groups. Microbial diversity increased with higher vaginal pH values, and was also higher when a malodorous discharge was present, indicating that some of the women who consider themselves healthy may potentially have asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis (BV). Our study is the first of its kind to analyze the mycobiome that colonizes the healthy vaginal environment using barcoded pyrosequencing technology. We observed 196 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs), including 16 OTUs of Candida spp., which is more diverse than previously recognized. However, assessing true fungal diversity was complicated because of the problems regarding the possible air-borne contamination and bioinformatics used for identification of fungal taxons as significant proportion of fungal sequences were assigned to unspecified OTUs.

  19. Characterization of the Vaginal Micro- and Mycobiome in Asymptomatic Reproductive-Age Estonian Women

    PubMed Central

    Drell, Tiina; Lillsaar, Triin; Tummeleht, Lea; Simm, Jaak; Aaspõllu, Anu; Väin, Edda; Saarma, Ivo; Salumets, Andres; Donders, Gilbert G. G.; Metsis, Madis

    2013-01-01

    The application of high-throughput sequencing methods has raised doubt in the concept of the uniform healthy vaginal microbiota consisting predominantly of lactobacilli by revealing the existence of more variable bacterial community composition. As this needs to be analyzed more extensively and there is little straightforward data regarding the vaginal mycobiome of asymptomatic women we aimed to define bacterial and fungal communities in vaginal samples from 494 asymptomatic, reproductive-age Estonian women. The composition of the vaginal microbiota was determined by amplifying bacterial 16S rRNA and fungal internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS-1) regions and subsequently sequencing them using 454 Life Sciences pyrosequencing. We delineated five major bacterial community groups with distinctive diversity and species composition. Lactobacilli were among the most abundant bacteria in all groups, but also members of genus Gardnerella had high relative abundance in some of the groups. Microbial diversity increased with higher vaginal pH values, and was also higher when a malodorous discharge was present, indicating that some of the women who consider themselves healthy may potentially have asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis (BV). Our study is the first of its kind to analyze the mycobiome that colonizes the healthy vaginal environment using barcoded pyrosequencing technology. We observed 196 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs), including 16 OTUs of Candida spp., which is more diverse than previously recognized. However, assessing true fungal diversity was complicated because of the problems regarding the possible air-borne contamination and bioinformatics used for identification of fungal taxons as significant proportion of fungal sequences were assigned to unspecified OTUs. PMID:23372716

  20. Metabolic Signatures of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Martin T.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Djukovic, Danijel; Hoffman, Noah G.; Raftery, Daniel; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by shifts in the vaginal microbiota from Lactobacillus dominant to a microbiota with diverse anaerobic bacteria. Few studies have linked specific metabolites with bacteria found in the human vagina. Here, we report dramatic differences in metabolite compositions and concentrations associated with BV using a global metabolomics approach. We further validated important metabolites using samples from a second cohort of women and a different platform to measure metabolites. In the primary study, we compared metabolite profiles in cervicovaginal lavage fluid from 40 women with BV and 20 women without BV. Vaginal bacterial representation was determined using broad-range PCR with pyrosequencing and concentrations of bacteria by quantitative PCR. We detected 279 named biochemicals; levels of 62% of metabolites were significantly different in women with BV. Unsupervised clustering of metabolites separated women with and without BV. Women with BV have metabolite profiles marked by lower concentrations of amino acids and dipeptides, concomitant with higher levels of amino acid catabolites and polyamines. Higher levels of the signaling eicosanoid 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), a biomarker for inflammation, were noted in BV. Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii exhibited similar metabolite correlation patterns, which were distinct from correlation patterns exhibited by BV-associated bacteria. Several metabolites were significantly associated with clinical signs and symptoms (Amsel criteria) used to diagnose BV, and no metabolite was associated with all four clinical criteria. BV has strong metabolic signatures across multiple metabolic pathways, and these signatures are associated with the presence and concentrations of particular bacteria. PMID:25873373

  1. Pharmacokinetic and Safety Analyses of Tenofovir and Tenofovir-Emtricitabine Vaginal Tablets in Pigtailed Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Lara E.; Friend, David R.; Garber, David A.; McNicholl, Janet M.; Hendry, R. Michael; Doncel, Gustavo F.

    2014-01-01

    Vaginal rapidly disintegrating tablets (RDTs) containing tenofovir (TFV) or TFV and emtricitabine (FTC) were evaluated for safety and pharmacokinetics in pigtailed macaques. Two separate animal groups (n = 4) received TFV (10 mg) or TFV-FTC (10 mg each) RDTs, administered near the cervix. A third group (n = 4) received 1 ml TFV gel. Blood plasma, vaginal tissue biopsy specimens, and vaginal fluids were collected before and after product application at 0, 0.5, 1, 4, and 24 h. A disintegration time of <30 min following vaginal application of the RDTs was noted, with negligible effects on local inflammatory cytokines, vaginal pH, and microflora. TFV pharmacokinetics were generally similar for both RDTs and gel, with peak median concentrations in vaginal tissues and vaginal secretions being on the order of 104 to 105 ng/g (147 to 571 μM) and 106 ng/g (12 to 34 mM), respectively, at 1 to 4 h postdose. At 24 h, however, TFV vaginal tissue levels were more sustained after RDT dosing, with median TFV concentrations being approximately 1 log higher than those with gel dosing. FTC pharmacokinetics after combination RDT dosing were similar to those of TFV, with peak median vaginal tissue and fluid levels being on the order of 104 ng/g (374 μM) and 106 ng/g (32 mM), respectively, at 1 h postdose with levels in fluid remaining high at 24 h. RDTs are a promising alternative vaginal dosage form, delivering TFV and/or FTC at levels that would be considered inhibitory to simian-human immunodeficiency virus in the macaque vaginal microenvironment over a 24-h period. PMID:24566178

  2. Activity of quinolone CP-115,955 against bacterial and human type II topoisomerases is mediated by different interactions.

    PubMed

    Aldred, Katie J; Schwanz, Heidi A; Li, Gangqin; Williamson, Benjamin H; McPherson, Sylvia A; Turnbough, Charles L; Kerns, Robert J; Osheroff, Neil

    2015-02-10

    CP-115,955 is a quinolone with a 4-hydroxyphenyl at C7 that displays high activity against both bacterial and human type II topoisomerases. To determine the basis for quinolone cross-reactivity between bacterial and human enzymes, the activity of CP-115,955 and a series of related quinolones and quinazolinediones against Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV and human topoisomerase IIα was analyzed. Results indicate that the activity of CP-115,955 against the bacterial and human enzymes is mediated by different interactions. On the basis of the decreased activity of quinazolinediones against wild-type and resistant mutant topoisomerase IV and the low activity of quinolones against resistant mutant enzymes, it appears that the primary interaction of CP-115,955 with the bacterial system is mediated through the C3/C4 keto acid and the water-metal ion bridge. In contrast, the drug interacts with the human enzyme primarily through the C7 4-hydroxyphenyl ring and has no requirement for a substituent at C8 in order to attain high activity. Despite the fact that the human type II enzyme is unable to utilize the water-metal ion bridge, quinolones in the CP-115,955 series display higher activity against topoisomerase IIα in vitro and in cultured human cells than the corresponding quinazolinediones. Thus, quinolones may be a viable platform for the development of novel drugs with anticancer potential.

  3. Influence of Vaginal Bacteria and d- and l-Lactic Acid Isomers on Vaginal Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer: Implications for Protection against Upper Genital Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Witkin, Steven S.; Mendes-Soares, Helena; Linhares, Iara M.; Jayaram, Aswathi; Ledger, William J.; Forney, Larry J.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We evaluated levels of vaginal extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-8) in vaginal secretions in relation to the composition of vaginal bacterial communities and d- and l-lactic acid levels. The composition of vaginal bacterial communities in 46 women was determined by pyrosequencing the V1 to V3 region of 16S rRNA genes. Lactobacilli were dominant in 71.3% of the women, followed by Gardnerella (17.4%), Streptococcus (8.7%), and Enterococcus (2.2%). Of the lactobacillus-dominated communities, 51.5% were dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus, 36.4% by Lactobacillus iners, and 6.1% each by Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus jensenii. Concentrations of l-lactic acid were slightly higher in lactobacillus-dominated vaginal samples, but most differences were not statistically significant. d-Lactic acid levels were higher in samples containing L. crispatus than in those with L. iners (P < 0.0001) or Gardnerella (P = 0.0002). The relative proportion of d-lactic acid in vaginal communities dominated by species of lactobacilli was in concordance with the proportions found in axenic cultures of the various species grown in vitro. Levels of l-lactic acid (P < 0.0001) and the ratio of l-lactic acid to d-lactic acid (P = 0.0060), but not concentrations of d-lactic acid, were also correlated with EMMPRIN concentrations. Moreover, vaginal concentrations of EMMPRIN and MMP-8 levels were highly correlated (P < 0.0001). Taken together, the data suggest the relative proportion of l- to d-lactic acid isomers in the vagina may influence the extent of local EMMPRIN production and subsequent induction of MMP-8. The expression of these proteins may help determine the ability of bacteria to transverse the cervix and initiate upper genital tract infections. PMID:23919998

  4. Quantitative assessment of vaginal microflora during use of tampons of various compositions.

    PubMed

    Onderdonk, A B; Zamarchi, G R; Rodriguez, M L; Hirsch, M L; Muñoz, A; Kass, E H

    1987-12-01

    Although the effect of vaginal tampons on the microbial flora during menstruation has recently been studied by several investigators, quantitative effects attributable to particular tampon fibers have received less attention. The purposes of the present study were (i) to determine and then to compare the effects of polyacrylate rayon tampons and viscose rayon tampons on the normal vaginal flora, (ii) to compare quantitative bacterial counts obtained from these tampons with those obtained from concomitant vaginal swabs, and (iii) to determine whether either of these tampon types alters the vaginal microflora when compared with the microflora in the same women using all-cotton tampons or external catamenial pads. Tampon and swab samples were obtained at predetermined times from 18 women for an average of seven menstrual cycles. Samples consisting of swabs from women wearing menstrual pads were compared with swab and tampon samples taken at predetermined times during the menstrual cycle from women using cotton, polyacrylate rayon, or viscose rayon tampons. Samples were analyzed for total aerobic, facultative, and anaerobic bacterial counts. Statistical evaluation of the results indicated that, on the whole, total bacterial counts decreased during menstruation and that the numbers of bacteria in tampons tended to be lower than those in swab samples taken at the same time. The tampon type had little effect on the vaginal microflora.

  5. Remote detection of human toxicants in real time using a human-optimized, bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette bioreporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Dan; Webb, James; Ripp, Steven; Patterson, Stacey; Sayler, Gary

    2012-06-01

    Traditionally, human toxicant bioavailability screening has been forced to proceed in either a high throughput fashion using prokaryotic or lower eukaryotic targets with minimal applicability to humans, or in a more expensive, lower throughput manner that uses fluorescent or bioluminescent human cells to directly provide human bioavailability data. While these efforts are often sufficient for basic scientific research, they prevent the rapid and remote identification of potentially toxic chemicals required for modern biosecurity applications. To merge the advantages of high throughput, low cost screening regimens with the direct bioavailability assessment of human cell line use, we re-engineered the bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette to function autonomously (without exogenous stimulation) within human cells. Optimized cassette expression provides for fully endogenous bioluminescent production, allowing continuous, real time monitoring of the bioavailability and toxicology of various compounds in an automated fashion. To access the functionality of this system, two sets of bioluminescent human cells were developed. The first was programed to suspend bioluminescent production upon toxicological challenge to mimic the non-specific detection of a toxicant. The second induced bioluminescence upon detection of a specific compound to demonstrate autonomous remote target identification. These cells were capable of responding to μM concentrations of the toxicant n-decanal, and allowed for continuous monitoring of cellular health throughout the treatment process. Induced bioluminescence was generated through treatment with doxycycline and was detectable upon dosage at a 100 ng/ml concentration. These results demonstrate that leveraging autonomous bioluminescence allows for low-cost, high throughput direct assessment of toxicant bioavailability.

  6. Characterizing a model human gut microbiota composed of members of its two dominant bacterial phyla

    SciTech Connect

    Mahowald, Michael; Rey, Frederico E.; Seedorf, Henning; Turnbaugh, Peter J.; Fulton, Robert S.; Wollam, Aye; Shah, Neha; Wang, Chunyan; Magrini, Vincent; Wilson, Richard K.; Cantarel, Brandi L.; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; Crock, Lara W.; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Erickson, Alison L; Gordon, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The adult human distal gut microbial community is typically dominated by 2 bacterial phyla (divisions), the Firmicutes and the Bacteroidetes. Little is known about the factors that govern the interactions between their members. Here, we examine the niches of representatives of both phyla in vivo. Finished genome sequences were generated from Eubacterium rectale and E. eligens, which belong to Clostridium Cluster XIVa, one of the most common gut Firmicute clades. Comparison of these and 25 other gut Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes indicated that the Firmicutes possess smaller genomes and a disproportionately smaller number of glycan-degrading enzymes. Germ-free mice were then colonized with E. rectale and/or a prominent human gut Bacteroidetes, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, followed by whole-genome transcriptional profiling, high-resolution proteomic analysis, and biochemical assays of microbial microbial and microbial host interactions. B. thetaiotaomicron adapts to E. rectale by up-regulating expression of a variety of polysaccharide utilization loci encoding numerous glycoside hydrolases, and by signaling the host to produce mucosal glycans that it, but not E. rectale, can access. E. rectale adapts to B. thetaiotaomicron by decreasing production of its glycan-degrading enzymes, increasing expression of selected amino acid and sugar transporters, and facilitating glycolysis by reducing levels of NADH, in part via generation of butyrate from acetate, which in turn is used by the gut epithelium. This simplified model of the human gut microbiota illustrates niche specialization and functional redundancy within members of its major bacterial phyla, and the importance of host glycans as a nutrient foundation that ensures ecosystem stability.

  7. HIGH YIELD SOLUBLE BACTERIAL EXPRESSION AND STREAMLINED PURIFICATION OF RECOMBINANT HUMAN INTERFERON α-2A

    PubMed Central

    Bis, Regina L.; Stauffer, Tara M.; Singh, Surinder M.; Lavoie, Thomas B.; Mallela, Krishna M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Interferon α-2a (IFNA2) is a member of the Type I interferon cytokine family, known for its antiviral and anti-proliferative functions. The role of this family in the innate immune response makes it an attractive candidate for the treatment of many viral and chronic immune-compromised diseases. Recombinant IFNA2 is clinically used to modulate hairy cell leukemia as well as hepatitis c. Historically, IFNA2 has been purified from human leukocytes as well as bacterial expression systems. In most cases, bacterial expression of IFNA2 resulted in inclusion body formation, or required numerous purification steps that decreased the protein yield. Here, we describe an expression and purification scheme for IFNA2 using a pET-SUMO bacterial expression system and a single purification step. Using SUMO protein as the fusion tag achieved high soluble protein expression. The SUMO tag was cleaved with the Ulp1 protease leaving no additional amino acids on the fusion terminus following the cleavage. Mass spectrometry, circular dichroism, 2D heteronuclear NMR, and analytical ultracentrifugation confirmed the amino acid sequence identity, secondary and tertiary protein structures, and the solution behavior of the purified IFNA2. The purified protein also has antiviral and anti-proliferative activities comparable to the WHO International Standard, NIBSC 95/650, and the IFNA2 standard available from PBL Assay Science. Combining the expression and purification protocols developed here to produce IFNA2 on a laboratory scale with the commercial fermenter technology commonly used in pharmaceutical industry may further enhance IFNA2 yields, which will promote the development of interferon-based protein drugs to treat various disorders. PMID:24794500

  8. [Natural remedies for vaginal infections].

    PubMed

    Genet, J

    1995-01-01

    Vaginal infections, affecting half of all women, are more severe in women with AIDS. The infection vulva vaginitis, caused by candida, may require medical attention. The doctor performs a pelvic exam and examines vaginal fluids under a microscope. Antibiotics, diet, or a suppressed immune system can increase candida yeast presence. Sweets should be avoided, as well as foods high in leavening, such as bread, cheese, fruit, or alcoholic beverages. Vegetables, grains, rice and wheat can be added to the diet. Eating a half-cup of yogurt daily will help maintain a proper level of yeast. Acidophilus capsules can be taken two or three times daily to relieve digestive problems. Raw or cooked garlic can be used as a vaginal suppository at night. Pau D'arco, the bark of a South American tree, is also anti-yeast. Boil for ten to twenty minutes, and take a teaspoon two or three times a day. Tea, or vinegar and water, can be used as a douche. Some women get relief by adding a half-cup of white vinegar to their bath. Do not wash genitals with soap and do not use sanitary napkins or tampons. Visit a doctor if the condition persists.

  9. Common vaginal and vulvar disorders.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Andrea; Gardella, Carolyn

    2015-05-01

    Vaginal and vulvar disorders are among the leading causes for women to visit a health care professional. Therefore, it is important to have a basic understanding of these diseases. Although rarely life threatening, these disorders can impact significantly a woman's sexual function and sense of well-being.

  10. Current Concepts of Treating Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Theresa

    1977-01-01

    Vaginitis can be a frustrating entity to treat, since the incidence of recurrence is high. This paper examines evidence from the literature concerning diagnosis and treatment of Candida albicans, Trichomonas vaginalis, Corynebacterium vaginale, herpes simplex type 2 and gonorrhea. A protocol based on these readings is outlined. PMID:21304797

  11. [Natural remedies for vaginal infections].

    PubMed

    Genet, J

    1995-01-01

    Vaginal infections, affecting half of all women, are more severe in women with AIDS. The infection vulva vaginitis, caused by candida, may require medical attention. The doctor performs a pelvic exam and examines vaginal fluids under a microscope. Antibiotics, diet, or a suppressed immune system can increase candida yeast presence. Sweets should be avoided, as well as foods high in leavening, such as bread, cheese, fruit, or alcoholic beverages. Vegetables, grains, rice and wheat can be added to the diet. Eating a half-cup of yogurt daily will help maintain a proper level of yeast. Acidophilus capsules can be taken two or three times daily to relieve digestive problems. Raw or cooked garlic can be used as a vaginal suppository at night. Pau D'arco, the bark of a South American tree, is also anti-yeast. Boil for ten to twenty minutes, and take a teaspoon two or three times a day. Tea, or vinegar and water, can be used as a douche. Some women get relief by adding a half-cup of white vinegar to their bath. Do not wash genitals with soap and do not use sanitary napkins or tampons. Visit a doctor if the condition persists. PMID:11362438

  12. [Resorption of drugs through the vaginal wall].

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Guenzet, J; Pradal, G

    1983-01-01

    Drug absorption during vaginal administration. A method is described (systems approach to vaginal delivery of drugs and development of in situ vaginal drug absorption procedure) and is able to show vaginal absorption of drugs. Some drugs are rapidly and largely absorbed through vaginal epithelium: Metronidazole (Flagyl), Prostaglandins, Estrogens, Polyvidone-iodine (Betadine), Chloroquinadol (Gynotherax), d-Methadone, Hexachlorophene (Phisohex et Ultralan), Insulin and Triclosan. Other drugs are poorly absorbed: Amphotericin B (Fungizone, Amphocycline), Econazole (Pevaryl) and Trimethoprim. At least, some drugs are not absorbed: Nystatine (Mycostatine) and Furazolidone (Tricofuron).

  13. Beneficial lactobacilli: effects on the vaginal tract in a murine experimental model.

    PubMed

    De Gregorio, Priscilla Romina; Juárez Tomás, María Silvina; Santos, Viviana; Nader-Macías, María Elena Fatima

    2012-11-01

    Vaginal probiotics containing lactic acid bacteria with activity towards pathogenic microorganisms that cause urogenital tract infections have been proposed as a valid strategy for their prophylaxis and therapy. A murine experimental model was set up to evaluate the colonization capability of beneficial human lactobacilli and their effects on the mouse vaginal mucosa and innate immune cells. Five Lactobacillus strains were intravaginally inoculated into previously estrogenized BALB/c mice. The significance of the effects observed in the vaginal tract was determined by analysis of variance using the general linear model. The numbers of viable vaginal lactobacilli were significantly higher at proestrous-estrous than those at the metaestrous-diestrous phase and decreased markedly on the days after inoculation. Lactobacilli inoculation did not cause cytological or histological modifications of the murine vaginal tract. Moreover, the intravaginal administration of Lactobacillus salivarius CRL (Centro de Referencia para Lactobacilos culture collection) 1328 and Lactobacillus gasseri CRL 1263 did not affect the amounts of granulocytes and macrophages present in vaginal washings. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that vaginal lactobacilli did not produce adverse effects on the murine vaginal tract. Therefore, they could be proposed as safe probiotic candidates to promote a balanced microbiota in the urogenital tract.

  14. Neisseria gonorrhoeae phagosomes delay fusion with primary granules to enhance bacterial survival inside human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M Brittany; Criss, Alison K

    2013-08-01

    Symptomatic infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) promotes inflammation driven by polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs, neutrophils), yet some Gc survive PMN exposure during infection. Here we report a novel mechanism of gonococcal resistance to PMNs: Gc phagosomes avoid maturation into phagolysosomes by delayed fusion with primary (azurophilic) granules, which contain antimicrobial components including serine proteases. Reduced phagosome-primary granule fusion was observed in gonorrheal exudates and human PMNs infected ex vivo. Delayed phagosome-granule fusion could be overcome by opsonizing Gc with immunoglobulin. Using bacterial viability dyes along with antibodies to primary granules revealed that Gc survival in PMNs correlated with early residence in primary granule-negative phagosomes. However, when Gc was killed prior to PMN exposure, dead bacteria were also found in primary granule-negative phagosomes. These results suggest that Gc surface characteristics, rather than active bacterial processes, influence phagosome maturation and that Gc death inside PMNs occurs after phagosome-granule fusion. Ectopically increasing primary granule-phagosome fusion, by immunoglobulin opsonization or PMN treatment with lysophosphatidylcholine, reduced intracellular Gc viability, which was attributed in part to serine protease activity. We conclude that one method for Gc to avoid PMN clearance in acute gonorrhoea is by delaying primary granule-phagosome fusion, thus preventing formation of a degradative phagolysosome. PMID:23374609

  15. Identification of a human neonatal immune-metabolic network associated with bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire L; Dickinson, Paul; Forster, Thorsten; Craigon, Marie; Ross, Alan; Khondoker, Mizanur R; France, Rebecca; Ivens, Alasdair; Lynn, David J; Orme, Judith; Jackson, Allan; Lacaze, Paul; Flanagan, Katie L; Stenson, Benjamin J; Ghazal, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how human neonates respond to infection remains incomplete. Here, a system-level investigation of neonatal systemic responses to infection shows a surprisingly strong but unbalanced homeostatic immune response; developing an elevated set-point of myeloid regulatory signalling and sugar-lipid metabolism with concomitant inhibition of lymphoid responses. Innate immune-negative feedback opposes innate immune activation while suppression of T-cell co-stimulation is coincident with selective upregulation of CD85 co-inhibitory pathways. By deriving modules of co-expressed RNAs, we identify a limited set of networks associated with bacterial infection that exhibit high levels of inter-patient variability. Whereas, by integrating immune and metabolic pathways, we infer a patient-invariant 52-gene-classifier that predicts bacterial infection with high accuracy using a new independent patient population. This is further shown to have predictive value in identifying infection in suspected cases with blood culture-negative tests. Our results lay the foundation for future translation of host pathways in advancing diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies for neonatal sepsis. PMID:25120092

  16. Composition and Metabolic Activities of Bacterial Biofilms Colonizing Food Residues in the Human Gut

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Sandra; Macfarlane, George T.

    2006-01-01

    Bacteria growing in the human large intestine live in intimate association with the host and play an important role in host digestive processes, gut physiology, and metabolism. Fecal bacteria have been investigated extensively, but few studies have been done on biofilms that form on digestive wastes in the large bowel. The aims of this investigation were to investigate the composition and metabolic activities of bacterial communities that colonize the surfaces of food residues in fecal material, with respect to their role in the fermentation of complex carbohydrates. Fresh stools were obtained from 15 healthy donors, and food residues were separated by filtration. Adherent bacteria were removed by surfactant treatment for microbiological analysis and fermentation studies. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were used to visualize intact biofilms. Results showed that bacterial populations strongly adhering to particulate matter were phenotypically similar in composition to unattached communities, with bacteroides and bifidobacteria predominating. Biofilms comprised a mixture of living and dead bacteria, and CLSM showed that bifidobacteria in the biofilms occurred as isolated dispersed cells and in microcolonies near the interface with the substratum. Fermentation experiments with a variety of complex carbohydrates demonstrated that biofilm populations were more efficient in digesting polysaccharides, while nonadhering communities fermented oligosaccharides most rapidly. Acetate was the principal fermentation product formed by biofilm bacteria, whereas higher levels of butyrate were produced by nonadherent populations, showing that the two communities were metabolically distinct. PMID:16957247

  17. Identification of a human neonatal immune-metabolic network associated with bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire L; Dickinson, Paul; Forster, Thorsten; Craigon, Marie; Ross, Alan; Khondoker, Mizanur R; France, Rebecca; Ivens, Alasdair; Lynn, David J; Orme, Judith; Jackson, Allan; Lacaze, Paul; Flanagan, Katie L; Stenson, Benjamin J; Ghazal, Peter

    2014-08-14

    Understanding how human neonates respond to infection remains incomplete. Here, a system-level investigation of neonatal systemic responses to infection shows a surprisingly strong but unbalanced homeostatic immune response; developing an elevated set-point of myeloid regulatory signalling and sugar-lipid metabolism with concomitant inhibition of lymphoid responses. Innate immune-negative feedback opposes innate immune activation while suppression of T-cell co-stimulation is coincident with selective upregulation of CD85 co-inhibitory pathways. By deriving modules of co-expressed RNAs, we identify a limited set of networks associated with bacterial infection that exhibit high levels of inter-patient variability. Whereas, by integrating immune and metabolic pathways, we infer a patient-invariant 52-gene-classifier that predicts bacterial infection with high accuracy using a new independent patient population. This is further shown to have predictive value in identifying infection in suspected cases with blood culture-negative tests. Our results lay the foundation for future translation of host pathways in advancing diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies for neonatal sepsis.

  18. Identification of a human neonatal immune-metabolic network associated with bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Claire L.; Dickinson, Paul; Forster, Thorsten; Craigon, Marie; Ross, Alan; Khondoker, Mizanur R.; France, Rebecca; Ivens, Alasdair; Lynn, David J.; Orme, Judith; Jackson, Allan; Lacaze, Paul; Flanagan, Katie L.; Stenson, Benjamin J.; Ghazal, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how human neonates respond to infection remains incomplete. Here, a system-level investigation of neonatal systemic responses to infection shows a surprisingly strong but unbalanced homeostatic immune response; developing an elevated set-point of myeloid regulatory signalling and sugar-lipid metabolism with concomitant inhibition of lymphoid responses. Innate immune-negative feedback opposes innate immune activation while suppression of T-cell co-stimulation is coincident with selective upregulation of CD85 co-inhibitory pathways. By deriving modules of co-expressed RNAs, we identify a limited set of networks associated with bacterial infection that exhibit high levels of inter-patient variability. Whereas, by integrating immune and metabolic pathways, we infer a patient-invariant 52-gene-classifier that predicts bacterial infection with high accuracy using a new independent patient population. This is further shown to have predictive value in identifying infection in suspected cases with blood culture-negative tests. Our results lay the foundation for future translation of host pathways in advancing diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies for neonatal sepsis. PMID:25120092

  19. Effect of diet and Lactobacillus acidophilus supplements on human fecal bacterial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Goldin, B R; Swenson, L; Dwyer, J; Sexton, M; Gorbach, S L

    1980-02-01

    The effect of diet and Lactobacillus acidophilus supplements on fecal microflora enzyme activity was studied in humans. The bacterial enzymes that were investigated are known to catalyze reactions that may result in formation of proximal carcinogens. Compared to vegetarians, omnivores eating a "Western-type" diet had higher levels of beta-glucuronidase, nitroreductase, azoreductase, and steroid 7-alpha-dehydroxylase in their fecal microflora. Removal of red meat or addition of fiber in the form of bran or wheat germ to the diet of omnivores for 30 days had no effect on beta-glucuronidase, nitroreductase, or azoreductase activity. However, removal of red meat or addition of fiber reduced fecal steroid 7-alpha-dehydroxylase activity. The addition of viable Lactobacillus acidophilus supplements to the diet of omnivores significantly decreased fecal bacterial beta-glucuronidase and nitroreductase activities. Thirty days after Lactobacillus supplements were curtailed, fecal enzyme levels returned to normal base-line activities. These findings suggested that the metabolic activity of the fecal microflora was influenced by diet and could be altered by Lactobacillus supplements and to a lesser extent by dietary fiber.

  20. Selecting anti-microbial treatment of aerobic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Donders, Gilbert G G; Ruban, Katerina; Bellen, Gert

    2015-05-01

    Aerobic vaginitis (AV) is a vaginal infectious condition which is often confused with bacterial vaginosis (BV) or with the intermediate microflora as diagnosed by Nugent's method to detect BV on Gram-stained specimens. However, although both conditions reflect a state of lactobacillary disruption in the vagina, leading to an increase in pH, BV and AV differ profoundly. While BV is a noninflammatory condition composed of a multiplex array of different anaerobic bacteria in high quantities, AV is rather sparely populated by one or two enteric commensal flora bacteria, like Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylocuccus aureus, or Escherichia coli. AV is typically marked by either an increased inflammatory response or by prominent signs of epithelial atrophy or both. The latter condition, if severe, is also called desquamative inflammatory vaginitis. As AV is per exclusionem diagnosed by wet mount microscopy, it is a mistake to treat just vaginal culture results. Vaginal cultures only serve as follow-up data in clinical research projects and are at most used in clinical practice to confirm the diagnosis or exclude Candida infection. AV requires treatment based on microscopy findings and a combined local treatment with any of the following which may yield the best results: antibiotic (infectious component), steroids (inflammatory component), and/or estrogen (atrophy component). In cases with Candida present on microscopy or culture, antifungals must be tried first in order to see if other treatment is still needed. Vaginal rinsing with povidone iodine can provide rapid relief of symptoms but does not provide long-term reduction of bacterial loads. Local antibiotics most suitable are preferably non-absorbed and broad spectrum, especially those covering enteric gram-positive and gram-negative aerobes, like kanamycin. To achieve rapid and short-term improvement of severe symptoms, oral therapy with amoxyclav or moxifloxacin can be used, especially in deep dermal vulvitis and

  1. Deep Sequencing of the Vaginal Microbiota of Women with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hummelen, Ruben; Fernandes, Andrew D.; Macklaim, Jean M.; Dickson, Russell J.; Changalucha, John

    2010-01-01

    Background Women living with HIV and co-infected with bacterial vaginosis (BV) are at higher risk for transmitting HIV to a partner or newborn. It is poorly understood which bacterial communities constitute BV or the normal vaginal microbiota among this population and how the microbiota associated with BV responds to antibiotic treatment. Methods and Findings The vaginal microbiota of 132 HIV positive Tanzanian women, including 39 who received metronidazole treatment for BV, were profiled using Illumina to sequence the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Of note, Gardnerella vaginalis and Lactobacillus iners were detected in each sample constituting core members of the vaginal microbiota. Eight major clusters were detected with relatively uniform microbiota compositions. Two clusters dominated by L. iners or L. crispatus were strongly associated with a normal microbiota. The L. crispatus dominated microbiota were associated with low pH, but when L. crispatus was not present, a large fraction of L. iners was required to predict a low pH. Four clusters were strongly associated with BV, and were dominated by Prevotella bivia, Lachnospiraceae, or a mixture of different species. Metronidazole treatment reduced the microbial diversity and perturbed the BV-associated microbiota, but rarely resulted in the establishment of a lactobacilli-dominated microbiota. Conclusions Illumina based microbial profiling enabled high though-put analyses of microbial samples at a high phylogenetic resolution. The vaginal microbiota among women living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa constitutes several profiles associated with a normal microbiota or BV. Recurrence of BV frequently constitutes a different BV-associated profile than before antibiotic treatment. PMID:20711427

  2. Sample preparation module for bacterial lysis and isolation of DNA from human urine

    PubMed Central

    Gillers, Sara; Zhang, Jane Y.; Singh, Satish; Klapperich, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Silica impregnated polymer monolithic columns may provide a simple method for lysing and extracting DNA from bacteria inside of microfluidic chips. Here we use Escherichia coli as a test organism for a point of care thermoplastic microfluidic module designed to take in a urine sample, mix it with lysis buffer, and perform a hybrid chemical/mechanical lysis and solid phase extraction of nucleic acids from the sample. To demonstrate proof-of-concept, we doped human hematuric urine samples with E. coli at concentrations ranging from 101–105 colony-forming units/mL (CFU/mL) to simulate patient samples. We then performed on-chip lysis and DNA extraction. The bacterial DNA was amplified using real-time PCR demonstrating lysis and isolation down to 101 CFU/mL. Results were comparable to a commercial kit at higher concen trations and performed better at recovering DNA at lower concentrations. PMID:19130239

  3. Specificity and affinity of natural product cyclopentapeptide inhibitors against A. fumigatus, human, and bacterial chitinases.

    PubMed

    Rao, Francesco V; Houston, Douglas R; Boot, Rolf G; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Hodkinson, Michael; Adams, David J; Shiomi, Kazuro; Omura, Satoshi; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2005-01-01

    Family 18 chitinases play key roles in organisms ranging from bacteria to man. There is a need for specific, potent inhibitors to probe the function of these chitinases in different organisms. Such molecules could also provide leads for the development of chemotherapeuticals with fungicidal, insecticidal, or anti-inflammatory potential. Recently, two natural product peptides, argifin and argadin, have been characterized, which structurally mimic chitinase-chitooligosaccharide interactions and inhibit a bacterial chitinase in the nM-mM range. Here, we show that these inhibitors also act on human and Aspergillus fumigatus chitinases. The structures of these enzymes in complex with argifin and argadin, together with mutagenesis, fluorescence, and enzymology, reveal that subtle changes in the binding site dramatically affect affinity and selectivity. The data show that it may be possible to develop specific chitinase inhibitors based on the argifin/argadin scaffolds.

  4. The influence of bacterial exotoxins and endotoxins on the phagocytic activity of human macrophages in culture.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, C; Paradisi, F

    1983-01-01

    The effect of bacterial exotoxins and endotoxins on phagocytosis was tested on human macrophages in monolayer cultures by determining the rate of zymosan particle ingestion at different toxin concentrations and incubation times. The exotoxins tested were staphylococcal alpha-toxin and diphtheria-toxin. The endotoxins used were lipopolysaccharides from Salmonella typhi, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri and Serratia marcescens. Phagocytosis was significantly impaired after prolonged incubation with diphtheria toxin whereas alpha-toxin was ineffective. Endotoxin-treated macrophages showed a wide range of phagocytic activity. Enhancement of phagocytosis was observed with a low concentration of endotoxin (1 microgram/ml) from S. typhi, S. typhimurium and S. flexneri. Higher concentrations (2.5 and 5 micrograms/ml) depressed phagocytosis to varying extents, except for S. typhi lipopolysaccharide, which did not induce a significant decrease in phagocytosis in comparison to the controls.

  5. Phage-based platforms for the clinical detection of human bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, David A.; Sharp, Natasha J.; Westwater, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) have been utilized for decades as a means for uniquely identifying their target bacteria. Due to their inherent natural specificity, ease of use, and straightforward production, phage possess a number of desirable attributes which makes them particularly suited as bacterial detectors. As a result, extensive research has been conducted into the development of phage, or phage-derived products to expedite the detection of human pathogens. However, very few phage-based diagnostics have transitioned from the research lab into a clinical diagnostic tool. Herein we review the phage-based platforms that are currently used for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Yersinia pestis, Bacillus anthracis and Staphylococcus aureus in the clinical field. We briefly describe the disease, the current diagnostic options, and the role phage diagnostics play in identifying the cause of infection, and determining antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:23050221

  6. High-resolution structures of bacterially expressed soluble human CD59

    PubMed Central

    Leath, Kirstin J.; Johnson, Steven; Roversi, Pietro; Hughes, Timothy R.; Smith, Richard A. G.; Mackenzie, Lloyd; Morgan, B. Paul; Lea, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    CD59 is a membrane-bound glycoprotein that protects host cells from lysis by inhibiting the terminal pathway of complement, preventing the formation and insertion of the membrane attack complex (MAC). Crystals of bacterially expressed and nonglycosylated recombinant soluble human CD59 have been obtained from three crystallization conditions, each of which gave rise to a distinct crystal form. Each crystal form led to a crystal structure at high resolution (1.15, 1.35 and 1.8 Å). In one of these structures the electron-density map shows an as yet unidentified small molecule in the predicted C8/C9-binding site. The presence/absence of this ligand is linked to alternate conformations of the amino acids implicated in C8/C9 binding. PMID:17671359

  7. Selective Inhibition of Bacterial and Human Topoisomerases by N-Arylacyl O-Sulfonated Aminoglycoside Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic applications have been proposed for molecules that bind heparin-binding proteins. Development of such compounds has primarily focused on optimizing the degree and orientation of anionic groups on a scaffold, but utility of these polyanions has been diminished by their typically large size and nonspecific interactions with many proteins. In this study, N-arylacyl O-sulfonated aminoglycosides were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to selectively inhibit structurally similar bacterial and human topoisomerases. It is demonstrated that the structure of the aminoglycoside and of the N-arylacyl moiety imparts selective inhibition of different topoisomerases and alters the mechanism. The results here outline a strategy that will be applicable to identifying small, structurally defined oligosaccharides that bind heparin-binding proteins with a high degree of selectivity. PMID:23814643

  8. Bacterial Inactivation of Wound Infection in a Human Skin Model by Liquid-Phase Discharge Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Paul Y.; Kim, Yoon-Sun; Koo, Il Gyo; Jung, Jae Chul; Kim, Gon Jun; Choi, Myeong Yeol; Yu, Zengqi; Collins, George J.

    2011-01-01

    Background We investigate disinfection of a reconstructed human skin model contaminated with biofilm-formative Staphylococcus aureus employing plasma discharge in liquid. Principal Findings We observed statistically significant 3.83-log10 (p<0.001) and 1.59-log10 (p<0.05) decreases in colony forming units of adherent S. aureus bacteria and 24 h S. aureus biofilm culture with plasma treatment. Plasma treatment was associated with minimal changes in histological morphology and tissue viability determined by means of MTT assay. Spectral analysis of the plasma discharge indicated the presence of highly reactive atomic oxygen radicals (777 nm and 844 nm) and OH bands in the UV region. The contribution of these and other plasma-generated agents and physical conditions to the reduction in bacterial load are discussed. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the potential of liquid plasma treatment as a potential adjunct therapy for chronic wounds. PMID:21897870

  9. Pyogenic Bacterial Infections in Humans with MyD88 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    von Bernuth, Horst; Picard, Capucine; Jin, Zhongbo; Pankla, Rungnapa; Xiao, Hui; Ku, Cheng-Lung; Chrabieh, Maya; Mustapha, Imen Ben; Ghandil, Pegah; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Vasconcelos, Júlia; Sirvent, Nicolas; Guedes, Margarida; Vitor, Artur Bonito; Herrero-Mata, María José; Aróstegui, Juan Ignacio; Rodrigo, Carlos; Alsina, Laia; Ruiz-Ortiz, Estibaliz; Juan, Manel; Fortuny, Claudia; Yagüe, Jordi; Antón, Jordi; Pascal, Mariona; Chang, Huey-Hsuan; Janniere, Lucile; Rose, Yoann; Garty, Ben-Zion; Chapel, Helen; Issekutz, Andrew; Maródi, László; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Banchereau, Jacques; Abel, Laurent; Li, Xiaoxia; Chaussabel, Damien; Puel, Anne; Casanova1, Jean-Laurent

    2009-01-01

    MyD88 is a key downstream adapter for most Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin-1 receptors (IL-1Rs). MyD88 deficiency in mice leads to susceptibility to a broad range of pathogens in experimental settings of infection. We describe a distinct situation in a natural setting of human infection. Nine children with autosomal recessive MyD88 deficiency suffered from life-threatening, often recurrent pyogenic bacterial infections, including invasive pneumococcal disease. However, these patients were otherwise healthy, with normal resistance to other microbes. Their clinical status improved with age, but not due to any cellular leakiness in MyD88 deficiency. The MyD88-dependent TLRs and IL-1Rs are therefore essential for protective immunity to a small number of pyogenic bacteria, but redundant for host defense to most natural infections. PMID:18669862

  10. The Performance of the Vaginal Discharge Syndromic Management in Treating Vaginal and Cervical Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kiarie, James; Seuc, Armando; Mogasale, Vittal; Latif, Ahmed; Broutet, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Background This review aimed to synthesize and analyze the diagnostic accuracy and the likelihood of providing correct treatment of the syndromic approach Vaginal Discharge Flowchart in managing cervical infections caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), and vaginal infections caused by Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) and Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and Candida albicans. This review will inform updating the WHO 2003 guidelines on Vaginal Discharge syndromic case management. Methods A systematic review was conducted on published studies from 01-01-2000 to 30-03-2015 in multiple databases. Studies evaluating the diagnostic accuracy and validation of the WHO Vaginal Discharge Flowchart were included. Validation parameters including sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) and the 95% confidence intervals for the different types of the flowchart were taken as outcomes, re-calculated, and analysed using a fixed model meta-analysis for data pooling. The level of agreement between the index and reference test were determined by the Cohen’s Kappa co-efficiency test. Each individual study was assessed on quality using the QUADAS-2 tool. Findings The search yielded 2,845 studies of which 16 met the eligibility criteria for final analysis. The diagnostic performance to identify cervical infections was low and resulted in a high proportion of over and missed treatment. The four flowcharts had a sensitivity between 27.37% in history and risk assessment and 90.13% with microscopy, with the inverse in specificity rates. The treatment performances between the flowcharts were inconsistent. The same applies to the use of vaginal discharge flowchart for treating vaginal infections. For vaginal infections the vaginal discharge flowchart had a good performance in flowchart 3 with 91.68% of sensitivity; 99.97% specificity; 99.93% PPV and 0.02% who missed their treatment and 8.32% of women who were over treated

  11. The Human Skin Microbiome Associates with the Outcome of and Is Influenced by Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    van Rensburg, Julia J.; Lin, Huaiying; Gao, Xiang; Toh, Evelyn; Fortney, Kate R.; Ellinger, Sheila; Zwickl, Beth; Janowicz, Diane M.; Katz, Barry P.; Nelson, David E.; Dong, Qunfeng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The influence of the skin microbiota on host susceptibility to infectious agents is largely unexplored. The skin harbors diverse bacterial species that may promote or antagonize the growth of an invading pathogen. We developed a human infection model for Haemophilus ducreyi in which human volunteers are inoculated on the upper arm. After inoculation, papules form and either spontaneously resolve or progress to pustules. To examine the role of the skin microbiota in the outcome of H. ducreyi infection, we analyzed the microbiomes of four dose-matched pairs of “resolvers” and “pustule formers” whose inoculation sites were swabbed at multiple time points. Bacteria present on the skin were identified by amplification and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) using Bray-Curtis dissimilarity between the preinfection microbiomes of infected sites showed that sites from the same volunteer clustered together and that pustule formers segregated from resolvers (P = 0.001, permutational multivariate analysis of variance [PERMANOVA]), suggesting that the preinfection microbiomes were associated with outcome. NMDS using Bray-Curtis dissimilarity of the endpoint samples showed that the pustule sites clustered together and were significantly different than the resolved sites (P = 0.001, PERMANOVA), suggesting that the microbiomes at the endpoint differed between the two groups. In addition to H. ducreyi, pustule-forming sites had a greater abundance of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Micrococcus, Corynebacterium, Paracoccus, and Staphylococcus species, whereas resolved sites had higher levels of Actinobacteria and Propionibacterium species. These results suggest that at baseline, resolvers and pustule formers have distinct skin bacterial communities which change in response to infection and the resultant immune response. PMID:26374122

  12. Role of Lactobacillus Species in the Intermediate Vaginal Flora in Early Pregnancy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Machal, Susanne; Holzer, Iris; Kueronya, Verena; Husslein, Peter Wolf; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor obstetrical outcomes are associated with imbalances in the vaginal flora. The present study evaluated the role of vaginal Lactobacillus species in women with intermediate vaginal flora with regard to obstetrical outcomes. Methods We retrospectively analysed data from all women with singleton pregnancies who had undergone routine screening for asymptomatic vaginal infections at our tertiary referral centre between 2005 and 2014. Vaginal smears were Gram-stained and classified according to the Nugent scoring system as normal flora (score 0–3), intermediate vaginal flora (4–6), or bacterial vaginosis (7–10). Only women with intermediate vaginal flora were investigated. Women with a Nugent score of 4 were categorised into those with and without Lactobacilli. Follow-up smears were obtained 4–6 weeks after the initial smears. Descriptive data analysis, the Welch’s t-test, the Fisher’s exact test, and multiple regression analysis with adjustment for confounders were performed. Gestational age at delivery and birth weight were the outcome measures. Results At antenatal screening, 529/8421 women presented with intermediate vaginal flora. Amongst these, 349/529 (66%) had a Nugent score of 4, 94/529 (17.8%) a Nugent score of 5, and 86/529 (16.2%) a Nugent score of 6. Amongst those with a Nugent score of 4, 232/349 (66.5%) women were in the Lactobacilli group and 117/349 (33.5%) in the Non-Lactobacilli group. The preterm delivery rate was significantly lower in the Lactobacilli than in the Non-Lactobacilli group (OR 0.34, CI 0.21–0.55; p<0.001). Mean birth weight was 2979 ± 842 g and 2388 ± 1155 g in the study groups, respectively (MD 564.12, CI 346.23–781.92; p<0.001). On follow-up smears, bacterial vaginosis rates were 9% in the Lactobacilli and 7.8% in the Non-Lactobacilli group. Conclusions The absence of vaginal Lactobacillus species and any bacterial colonisation increases the risks of preterm delivery and low birth weight in women with

  13. A human pathogenic bacterial infection model using the two-spotted cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Kochi, Yuto; Miyashita, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Kohsuke; Mitsuyama, Masao; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2016-08-01

    Invertebrate animal species that can withstand temperatures as high as 37°C, the human body temperature, are limited. In the present study, we utilized the two-spotted cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, which lives in tropical and subtropical regions, as an animal model of human pathogenic bacterial infection. Injection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus into the hemolymph killed crickets. Injected P. aeruginosa or S. aureus proliferated in the hemolymph until the cricket died. The ability of these pathogenic bacteria to kill the crickets was blocked by the administration of antibiotics. S. aureus gene-knockout mutants of virulence factors, including cvfA, agr and srtA, exhibited decreased killing ability compared with the parent strain. The dose at which 50% of crickets were killed by P. aeruginosa or S. aureus was not decreased at 37°C compared with that at 27°C. Injection of Listeria monocytogenes, which upregulates toxin expression at 37°C, killed crickets, and the dose at which 50% of crickets were killed was decreased at 37°C compared with that at 27°C. These findings suggest that the two-spotted cricket is a useful model animal for evaluating the virulence properties of various human pathogenic bacteria at variable temperature including 37°C. PMID:27377894

  14. The vaginal microbiome is stable in prepubertal and sexually mature Ellegaard Göttingen Minipigs throughout an estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Emma; Kudirkiene, Egle; Gutman, Nicole; Grossi, Anette Blak; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Erneholm, Karin; Skytte, Christina; Dalgaard, Marlene Danner; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2015-10-28

    Although the pig has been introduced as an advanced animal model of genital tract infections in women, almost no knowledge exists on the porcine vaginal microbiota, especially in barrier-raised Göttingen Minipigs. In women, the vaginal microbiota plays a crucial role for a healthy vaginal environment and the fate of sexually transmitted infections such as Chlamydia trachomatis infections. Therefore, knowledge on the vaginal microbiota is urgently needed for the minipig model. The aim of this study was to characterize the microbiota of the anterior vagina by 16 s rRNA gene sequencing in prepubertal and sexually mature Göttingen Minipigs during an estrous cycle. The dominating phyla in the vaginal microbiota consisted of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteriodetes and Tenericutes. The most abundant bacterial families were Enterobacteriaceae, unclassified families from Gammaproteobacteria, Clostridiales Family XI Incertae Sedis, Paenibacillaceae, Lactobacillaceae, Ruminococcaceae and Syntrophaceae. We found a higher abundance of Lactobacillaceae in the prepubertal Göttingen Minipigs compared to sexually mature non-pregnant Göttingen Minipigs. However, correlation tests and diversity parameters revealed a very stable vaginal microbiota in the Göttingen Minipigs, both before and after sexual maturity and on different days throughout an estrous cycle. The vaginal microbiota in Göttingen Minipigs was not dominated by lactobacilli, as it is in women and according to our results the minipig vaginal microbiota is very stable, in opposite to women. These differences should be considered when using the minipig as a model of the genital tract in women.

  15. Identification and evaluation of potential forensic marker proteins in vaginal fluid by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Igoh, Akihisa; Doi, Yusuke; Sakurada, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Vaginal fluid is one of the most common body fluids found at crime scenes. Discriminating vaginal fluid from other body fluids is important in forensic science; however, few potential protein markers have been reported to date. Proteomic methods for identifying protein markers have gained attention, although few reports have applied this technology to forensic protein markers. Therefore, to identify characteristic vaginal proteins, we examined various body fluids (nasal secretions, saliva, urine, semen, vaginal fluids, and sweat) using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and peptide mass fingerprinting. We identified three components (average molecular mass values 17,237 ± 2, 18,063 ± 2, and 15,075 ± 1) detectable only in vaginal samples: two human small proline-rich protein 3 (SPRR3) isoforms and a human fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) with an acetylated (+42) N-terminal region lacking the initiator methionine residue (-131). Using ELISA, these yielded markedly high average values in vaginal fluids. The mass spectra of these proteins were not detected in infant saliva but were detected in the vaginal fluid throughout the menstrual cycle. The results of forensic analysis (detection limit, mixed body fluid samples, casework samples, and blind samples) suggest that these proteins are potential forensic markers. In conclusion, high SPRR3 and FABP5 expression levels, which may be used as potential markers for vaginal fluid identification in forensic science, were detected in vaginal fluids from healthy adults.

  16. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose bacterial vaginosis (BV)? Skip sharing on ... BV requires a vaginal exam by a qualified health care provider and the laboratory testing of fluid collected ...

  17. Vaginal birth after cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Martins, M E

    1996-03-01

    The rate of vaginal birth after a previous cesarean delivery continues to rise due to both national organization recommendations and trials spanning 10 years of experience demonstrating its effectiveness and general safety. Broadening eligibility criteria and investigation of the clinical and nonclinical factors influencing this rate should place us on the glide path to reduction of the overall cesarean rate by the year 2000. Remaining controversies and management strategy will be discussed.

  18. Comparison of vaginal microbial community structure in healthy and endometritis dairy cows by PCR-DGGE and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Sun, Chengtao; Liu, Chang; Yang, Yujiang; Lu, Wenfa

    2016-04-01

    The normal vaginal microflora provides protection against infections of the reproductive tract. Previous studies have focused on the isolation and screening of probiotic strains from the vagina of cows; however, the vaginal microflora of postpartum cows is poorly characterized. The present study was conducted to evaluate and characterize the vaginal microflora of healthy postpartum cows in relation to postpartum cows with endometritis by using PCR followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and Real-time PCR. The study population comprised 5 healthy cows and 5 cows with endometritis. The results indicated that the vaginal bacterial microflora of healthy postpartum cows was dominated by Lactobacillus sakei subsp. and Weissella koreensis, while there were no dominant bacterial species in the vaginal microflora of postpartum cows with endometritis. Common microorganisms such as Bacteroides spp., Fusobacterium spp., Enterococcus spp., Prevotella spp., Clostridium perfringens strains, and Escherichia coli were detected in both groups of cows by Real-time PCR. The bacterial diversity in the vagina of cows with endometritis was significantly higher than that in healthy cows. The results indicated that the vaginal microflora of cows with endometritis was more diverse and lacked dominant bacterial species as compared to that of the healthy cows, suggesting that disruption of the normal vaginal microflora may contribute to the onset of endometritis. This microbial community analysis provided information that might be used to develop probiotics to treat endometritis in cows; however, further investigation is needed. PMID:26551525

  19. A hemolytic pigment of Group B Streptococcus allows bacterial penetration of human placenta.

    PubMed

    Whidbey, Christopher; Harrell, Maria Isabel; Burnside, Kellie; Ngo, Lisa; Becraft, Alexis K; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L; Hitti, Jane; Waldorf, Kristina M Adams; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2013-06-01

    Microbial infection of the amniotic fluid is a significant cause of fetal injury, preterm birth, and newborn infections. Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is an important human bacterial pathogen associated with preterm birth, fetal injury, and neonatal mortality. Although GBS has been isolated from amniotic fluid of women in preterm labor, mechanisms of in utero infection remain unknown. Previous studies indicated that GBS are unable to invade human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs), which represent the last barrier to the amniotic cavity and fetus. We show that GBS invades hAECs and strains lacking the hemolysin repressor CovR/S accelerate amniotic barrier failure and penetrate chorioamniotic membranes in a hemolysin-dependent manner. Clinical GBS isolates obtained from women in preterm labor are hyperhemolytic and some are associated with covR/S mutations. We demonstrate for the first time that hemolytic and cytolytic activity of GBS is due to the ornithine rhamnolipid pigment and not due to a pore-forming protein toxin. Our studies emphasize the importance of the hemolytic GBS pigment in ascending infection and fetal injury.

  20. Hidden Selection of Bacterial Resistance to Fluoroquinolones In Vivo: The Case of Legionella pneumophila and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shadoud, Lubana; Almahmoud, Iyad; Jarraud, Sophie; Etienne, Jérôme; Larrat, Sylvie; Schwebel, Carole; Timsit, Jean-François; Schneider, Dominique; Maurin, Max

    2015-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are the leading cause of human morbidity and mortality worldwide. One dramatic issue is the emergence of microbial resistance to antibiotics which is a major public health concern. Surprisingly however, such in vivo adaptive ability has not been reported yet for many intracellular human bacterial pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila. Methods We examined 82 unrelated patients with Legionnaire's disease from which 139 respiratory specimens were sampled during hospitalization and antibiotic therapy. We both developed a real time PCR assay and used deep-sequencing approaches to detect antibiotic resistance mutations in L. pneumophila and follow their selection and fate in these samples. Findings We identified the in vivo selection of fluoroquinolone resistance mutations in L. pneumophila in two infected patients treated with these antibiotics. By investigating the mutational dynamics in patients, we showed that antibiotic resistance occurred during hospitalization most likely after fluoroquinolone treatment. Interpretation In vivo selection of antibiotic resistances in L. pneumophila may be associated with treatment failures and poor prognosis. This hidden resistance must be carefully considered in the therapeutic management of legionellosis patients and in the control of the gradual loss of effectiveness of antibiotics. PMID:26501115

  1. A hemolytic pigment of Group B Streptococcus allows bacterial penetration of human placenta

    PubMed Central

    Whidbey, Christopher; Harrell, Maria Isabel; Burnside, Kellie; Ngo, Lisa; Becraft, Alexis K.; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Aravind, L.; Hitti, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Microbial infection of the amniotic fluid is a significant cause of fetal injury, preterm birth, and newborn infections. Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is an important human bacterial pathogen associated with preterm birth, fetal injury, and neonatal mortality. Although GBS has been isolated from amniotic fluid of women in preterm labor, mechanisms of in utero infection remain unknown. Previous studies indicated that GBS are unable to invade human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs), which represent the last barrier to the amniotic cavity and fetus. We show that GBS invades hAECs and strains lacking the hemolysin repressor CovR/S accelerate amniotic barrier failure and penetrate chorioamniotic membranes in a hemolysin-dependent manner. Clinical GBS isolates obtained from women in preterm labor are hyperhemolytic and some are associated with covR/S mutations. We demonstrate for the first time that hemolytic and cytolytic activity of GBS is due to the ornithine rhamnolipid pigment and not due to a pore-forming protein toxin. Our studies emphasize the importance of the hemolytic GBS pigment in ascending infection and fetal injury. PMID:23712433

  2. Antifungal resistance in yeast vaginitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dun, E.

    1999-01-01

    The increased number of vaginal yeast infections in the past few years has been a disturbing trend, and the scientific community has been searching for its etiology. Several theories have been put forth to explain the apparent increase. First, the recent widespread availability of low-dosage, azole-based over-the-counter antifungal medications for vaginal yeast infections encourages women to self-diagnose and treat, and women may be misdiagnosing themselves. Their vaginitis may be caused by bacteria, parasites or may be a symptom of another underlying health condition. As a result, they may be unnecessarily and chronically expose themselves to antifungal medications and encourage fungal resistance. Second, medical technology has increased the life span of seriously immune compromised individuals, yet these individuals are frequently plagued by opportunistic fungal infections. Long-term and intense azole-based antifungal treatment has been linked to an increase in resistant Candida and non-Candida species. Thus, the future of limiting antifungal resistance lies in identifying the factors promoting resistance and implementing policies to prevent it. PMID:10907778

  3. Viral Inhibition of Bacterial Phagocytosis by Human Macrophages: Redundant Role of CD36

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Grace E.; Pounce, Zoe C.; Wallington, Joshua C.; Bastidas-Legarda, Leidy Y.; Nicholas, Ben; Chidomere, Chiamaka; Robinson, Emily C.; Martin, Kirstin; Tocheva, Anna S.; Christodoulides, Myron; Djukanovic, Ratko; Wilkinson, Tom M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are essential to maintaining lung homoeostasis and recent work has demonstrated that influenza-infected lung macrophages downregulate their expression of the scavenger receptor CD36. This receptor has also been shown to be involved in phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a primary agent associated with pneumonia secondary to viral infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of CD36 in the effects of viral infection on macrophage phagocytic function. Human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were exposed to H3N2 X31 influenza virus, M37 respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) or UV-irradiated virus. No infection of MDM was seen upon exposure to UV-irradiated virus but incubation with live X31 or M37 resulted in significant levels of viral detection by flow cytometry or RT-PCR respectively. Infection resulted in significantly diminished uptake of S. pneumoniae by MDM and significantly decreased expression of CD36 at both the cell surface and mRNA level. Concurrently, there was a significant increase in IFNβ gene expression in response to infection and we observed a significant decrease in bacterial phagocytosis (p = 0.031) and CD36 gene expression (p = 0.031) by MDM cultured for 24 h in 50IU/ml IFNβ. Knockdown of CD36 by siRNA resulted in decreased phagocytosis, but this was mimicked by transfection reagent alone. When MDM were incubated with CD36 blocking antibodies no effect on phagocytic ability was observed. These data indicate that autologous IFNβ production by virally-infected cells can inhibit bacterial phagocytosis, but that decreased CD36 expression by these cells does not play a major role in this functional deficiency. PMID:27701435

  4. Selection of Lactobacillus strains as potential probiotics for vaginitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carolina M A; Pires, Maria C V; Leão, Thiago L; Hernández, Zulema P; Rodriguez, Marisleydys L; Martins, Ariane K S; Miranda, Lilian S; Martins, Flaviano S; Nicoli, Jacques R

    2016-07-01

    Lactobacilli are the dominant bacteria of the vaginal tract of healthy women, and imbalance of the local microbiota can predispose women to acquire infections, such as bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). Although antimicrobial therapy is generally effective, there is still a high incidence of recurrence and increase of microbial resistance due to the repetitive use of antimicrobials. Thus, it has been suggested that administration of probiotics incorporating selected Lactobacillus strains may be an effective strategy for preventing vaginal infections. Accordingly, the in vitro probiotic potential of 23 lactobacilli isolated from the vaginal ecosystem of healthy women from Cuba was evaluated for use in BV and VVC treatments. Eight strains were selected based on their antagonist potential against Gardnerella vaginalis, Candida albicansor both. In vitro assays revealed that all these strains reduced the pathogen counts in co-incubation, showed excellent adhesive properties (biofilm formation and auto-aggregation), were able to co-aggregate with G. vaginalis and C. albicans, yielded high amounts of hydrogen peroxide and lactic acid and demonstrated high adhesion rates to epithelial HeLa cells. Interference tests within HeLa cells showed that all strains were able to reduce the adherence of pathogens by exclusion or displacement. Lactobacilli were able to inhibit HeLa cell apoptosis caused by pathogens when the cells were incubated with the probiotics prior to challenge. These results suggest that these strains have a promising probiotic potential and can be used for prevention or treatment of BV and VVC. PMID:27154285

  5. Selection of Lactobacillus strains as potential probiotics for vaginitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carolina M A; Pires, Maria C V; Leão, Thiago L; Hernández, Zulema P; Rodriguez, Marisleydys L; Martins, Ariane K S; Miranda, Lilian S; Martins, Flaviano S; Nicoli, Jacques R

    2016-07-01

    Lactobacilli are the dominant bacteria of the vaginal tract of healthy women, and imbalance of the local microbiota can predispose women to acquire infections, such as bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). Although antimicrobial therapy is generally effective, there is still a high incidence of recurrence and increase of microbial resistance due to the repetitive use of antimicrobials. Thus, it has been suggested that administration of probiotics incorporating selected Lactobacillus strains may be an effective strategy for preventing vaginal infections. Accordingly, the in vitro probiotic potential of 23 lactobacilli isolated from the vaginal ecosystem of healthy women from Cuba was evaluated for use in BV and VVC treatments. Eight strains were selected based on their antagonist potential against Gardnerella vaginalis, Candida albicansor both. In vitro assays revealed that all these strains reduced the pathogen counts in co-incubation, showed excellent adhesive properties (biofilm formation and auto-aggregation), were able to co-aggregate with G. vaginalis and C. albicans, yielded high amounts of hydrogen peroxide and lactic acid and demonstrated high adhesion rates to epithelial HeLa cells. Interference tests within HeLa cells showed that all strains were able to reduce the adherence of pathogens by exclusion or displacement. Lactobacilli were able to inhibit HeLa cell apoptosis caused by pathogens when the cells were incubated with the probiotics prior to challenge. These results suggest that these strains have a promising probiotic potential and can be used for prevention or treatment of BV and VVC.

  6. Bacterial Profiling Reveals Novel "Ca. Neoehrlichia", Ehrlichia, and Anaplasma Species in Australian Human-Biting Ticks.

    PubMed

    Gofton, Alexander W; Doggett, Stephen; Ratchford, Andrew; Oskam, Charlotte L; Paparini, Andrea; Ryan, Una; Irwin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In Australia, a conclusive aetiology of Lyme disease-like illness in human patients remains elusive, despite growing numbers of people presenting with symptoms attributed to tick bites. In the present study, we surveyed the microbial communities harboured by human-biting ticks from across Australia to identify bacteria that may contribute to this syndrome. Universal PCR primers were used to amplify the V1-2 hyper-variable region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in DNA samples from individual Ixodes holocyclus (n = 279), Amblyomma triguttatum (n = 167), Haemaphysalis bancrofti (n = 7), and H. longicornis (n = 7) ticks. The 16S amplicons were sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform and analysed in USEARCH, QIIME, and BLAST to assign genus and species-level taxonomies. Nested PCR and Sanger sequencing were used to confirm the NGS data and further analyse novel findings. All 460 ticks were negative for Borrelia spp. by both NGS and nested PCR analysis. Two novel "Candidatus Neoehrlichia" spp. were identified in 12.9% of I. holocyclus ticks. A novel Anaplasma sp. was identified in 1.8% of A. triguttatum ticks, and a novel Ehrlichia sp. was identified in both A. triguttatum (1.2%) ticks and a single I. holocyclus (0.6%) tick. Further phylogenetic analysis of novel "Ca. Neoehrlichia", Anaplasma and Ehrlichia based on 1,265 bp 16S rRNA gene sequences suggests that these are new species. Determining whether these newly discovered organisms cause disease in humans and animals, like closely related bacteria do abroad, is of public health importance and requires further investigation. PMID:26709826

  7. Differential repair of etheno-DNA adducts by bacterial and human AlkB proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zdżalik, Daria; Domańska, Anna; Prorok, Paulina; Kosicki, Konrad; van den Born, Erwin; Falnes, Pål Ø.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; Guengerich, F. Peter; Tudek, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    AlkB proteins are evolutionary conserved Fe(II)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, which remove alkyl and highly promutagenic etheno (ε)-DNA adducts, but their substrate specificity has not been fully determined. We developed a novel assay for the repair of ε-adducts by AlkB enzymes using oligodeoxynucleotides with a single lesion and specific DNA glycosylases and AP-endonuclease for identification of the repair products. We compared the repair of three ε-adducts, 1,N6-ethenoadenine (εA), 3,N4-ethenocytosine (εC) and 1,N2-ethenoguanine (1,N2-εG) by nine bacterial and two human AlkBs, representing four different structural groups defined on the basis of conserved amino acids in the nucleotide recognition lid, engaged in the enzyme binding to the substrate. Two bacterial AlkB proteins, MT-2B (from Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and SC-2B (Streptomyces coelicolor) did not repair these lesions in either double-stranded (ds) or single-stranded (ss) DNA. Three proteins, RE-2A (Rhizobium etli), SA-2B (Streptomyces avermitilis), and XC-2B (Xanthomonas campestris) efficiently removed all three lesions from the DNA substrates. Interestingly, XC-2B and RE-2A are the first AlkB proteins shown to be specialized for ε-adducts, since they do not repair methylated bases. Three other proteins, EcAlkB (Escherichia coli), SA-1A, and XC-1B removed εA and εC from ds and ssDNA but were inactive toward 1,N2-εG. SC-1A repaired only εA with the preference for dsDNA. The human enzyme ALKBH2 repaired all three ε-adducts in dsDNA, while only εA and εC in ssDNA and repair was less efficient in ssDNA. ALKBH3 repaired only εC in ssDNA Altogether, we have shown for the first time that some AlkB proteins, namely ALKBH2, RE-2A, SA-2B and XC-2B can repair 1,N2-εG and that ALKBH3 removes only εC from ssDNA. Our results also suggest that the nucleotide recognition lid is not the sole determinant of the substrate specificity of AlkB proteins. PMID:25797601

  8. Progesterone vaginal ring for luteal support.

    PubMed

    Stadtmauer, Laurel; Waud, Kay

    2015-02-01

    Progesterone supplementation is universally used and has been shown to be beneficial in supplementation of the luteal phase in IVF. There are multiple options and the most commonly used include intramuscular and vaginal progesterone. A progesterone vaginal ring is a novel system for luteal support with advantages of controlled release with less frequent dosing. This review examines options for progesterone luteal support focusing on the rationale for a progesterone vaginal ring. Pub-med search of the literature. A weekly vaginal ring, although not yet FDA approved, is an effective and safe alternative for luteal supplementation in IVF. Large prospective clinical trials are needed to determine the best protocols for replacement cycles.

  9. Vaginal hysterectomy: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Moen, Michael D; Richter, Holly E

    2014-09-01

    Vaginal hysterectomy is the oldest and least invasive of the hysterectomy techniques and fulfills the evidence-based requirements as the preferred route of hysterectomy for benign gynecologic disease. Currently, vaginal hysterectomy is commonly utilized for treating uterine prolapse, but despite proven safety and effectiveness, the use of vaginal hysterectomy for treating non-prolapse conditions has been and remains underutilized in surgical practice. Improving the use of vaginal hysterectomy in the future will likely depend on addressing the key issues of training and maintaining skills in the technique and increasing awareness of the scientific evidence supporting its use.

  10. The changing landscape of the vaginal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bernice; Fettweis, Jennifer M; Brooks, J Paul; Jefferson, Kimberly K; Buck, Gregory A

    2014-12-01

    Deep sequence analysis of the vaginal microbiome is revealing an unexpected complexity that was not anticipated as recently as several years ago. The lack of clarity in the definition of a healthy vaginal microbiome, much less an unhealthy vaginal microbiome, underscores the need for more investigation of these phenomena. Some clarity may be gained by the careful analysis of the genomes of the specific bacteria in these women. Ongoing studies will clarify this process and offer relief for women with recurring vaginal maladies and hope for pregnant women to avoid the experience of preterm birth. PMID:25439274

  11. Effects of vaginal lactobacilli in Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

    PubMed

    Mastromarino, Paola; Di Pietro, Marisa; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Nardis, Chiara; Gentile, Massimo; Sessa, Rosa

    2014-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that abnormal vaginal flora lacking lactobacilli facilitates the acquisition of several sexually transmitted diseases including Chlamydia trachomatis. C. trachomatis, the most common bacterial agent of genital infections worldwide, can progress from the lower to upper reproductive tract and induce severe sequelae. The ability of C. trachomatis to develop into a persistent form has been suggested as key pathogenetic mechanism underlying chronic infections and sequelae. The aim of our study was to investigate the C. trachomatis interaction with vaginal microbiota analyzing the effects of Lactobacillus strains (L. brevis and L. salivarius) on the different phases of C. trachomatis developmental cycle. In addition, the effect of lactobacilli on persistent chlamydial forms induced by HSV-2 coinfection has also been evaluated. Our results demonstrated significant inhibition of C. trachomatis multiplication by vaginal lactobacilli. L. brevis was significantly more effective than L. salivarius (p<0.05) on all the steps of chlamydial infection cycle suggesting that the ability of lactobacilli to protect from infection is strain-dependent. Lactobacilli had an adverse effect on elementary chlamydial bodies (p<0.05), on chlamydial adsorption to epithelial cells (p<0.001) and on intracellular phases of chlamydial replication (p<0.0001). Our study also demonstrated a protective effect of lactobacilli toward persistent C. trachomatis forms induced by HSV-2 coinfection. A significant increase in the production of C. trachomatis infectious progeny was observed in C. trachomatis/HSV-2 coinfection in the presence of L. brevis (p=0.01) despite a significant inhibition of C. trachomatis multiplication (p=0.028). Our data suggest that a healthy vaginal microbiota can reduce the risk of acquiring C. trachomatis infection and counteract the development of persistent chlamydial forms.

  12. Detection of Bacterial Indicators and Human and Bovine Enteric Viruses in Surface Water and Groundwater Sources Potentially Impacted by Animal and Human Wastes in Lower Yakima Valley, Washington▿

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Kristen E.; Schwab, Kellogg J.

    2011-01-01

    Tangential flow ultrafiltration (UF) was used to concentrate and recover bacterial indicators and enteric viruses from 100 liters of groundwater (GW; n = 10) and surface water (SW; n = 11) samples collected in Lower Yakima Valley, WA. Human and bovine enteric viruses were analyzed in SW and GW concentrates by real-time PCR by using integrated inhibition detection. PMID:21075875

  13. Is a Vaginal Birth Possible After a Cesarean Delivery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Is a vaginal birth possible after a cesarean delivery? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) describes vaginal delivery by a ...

  14. Gram stains: a resource for retrospective analysis of bacterial pathogens in clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Usha; Ponnaluri, Sreelatha; Villareal, Lisa; Gillespie, Brenda; Wen, Ai; Miles, Arianna; Bucholz, Brigette; Marrs, Carl F; Iyer, Ram K; Misra, Dawn; Foxman, Betsy

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using qPCR on DNA extracted from vaginal Gram stain slides to estimate the presence and relative abundance of specific bacterial pathogens. We first tested Gram stained slides spiked with a mix of 10(8) cfu/ml of Escherichia coli and 10(5) cfu/ml of Lactobacillus acidophilus. Primers were designed for amplification of total and species-specific bacterial DNA based on 16S ribosomal gene regions. Sample DNA was pre-amplified with nearly full length 16S rDNA ribosomal gene fragment, followed by quantitative PCR with genera and species-specific 16S rDNA primers. Pre-amplification PCR increased the bacterial amounts; relative proportions of Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus recovered from spiked slides remained unchanged. We applied this method to forty two archived Gram stained slides available from a clinical trial of cerclage in pregnant women at high risk of preterm birth. We found a high correlation between Nugent scores based on bacterial morphology of Lactobacillus, Gardenerella and Mobiluncus and amounts of quantitative PCR estimated genus specific DNA (rrn copies) from Gram stained slides. Testing of a convenience sample of eight paired vaginal swabs and Gram stains freshly collected from healthy women found similar qPCR generated estimates of Lactobacillus proportions from Gram stained slides and vaginal swabs. Archived Gram stained slides collected from large scale epidemiologic and clinical studies represent a valuable, untapped resource for research on the composition of bacterial communities that colonize human mucosal surfaces.

  15. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases. PMID:27246808

  16. In vivo effect of an immunostimulating bacterial lysate on human B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lanzilli, G; Falchetti, R; Cottarelli, A; Macchi, A; Ungheri, D; Fuggetta, M P

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate in humans the mechanism by which the oral vaccine Polyvalent Mechanical Bacterial Lysate (PMBL) can rapidly mobilize specific immune response and evaluate the efficacy of its immunostimulating activity in preventing recurrent infections of the upper respiratory tract (URTIs) in a group of patients with a medical history of URTI recurrence. Patients received, by sublingual route, PBML, an immunostimulating lysate obtained by mechanical lysis of the most common bacteria responsible for upper respiratory tract infections. The treatment was administered for 10 consecutive days/month for 3 consecutive months. After the end of the treatment period the patients were followed up for an additional 3 months. The frequency of IgM memory B cells and the expression of the activation marker CD25 in peripheral blood lymphocytes were measured using the flow cytometric method before the start and at days 30 and 90 of the treatment cycle. To correlate clinical results to immunological parameters, the patients were monitored at different time-points during the treatment and at the end of follow-up period. The results showed that PMBL exerts a therapeutic and preventing effect in acute and recurrent infections of the upper respiratory tract and that this effect correlated with the activation and enhancement of both IgM memory B lymphocytes (CD24+/CD27+ cells) and IL2 receptor-expressing lymphocytes (CD25+ cells) involved either in humoral or cellular immunity. PMID:17026840

  17. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-06-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases.

  18. Modified bacterial cellulose scaffolds for localized doxorubicin release in human colorectal HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Cacicedo, Maximiliano L; León, Ignacio E; Gonzalez, Jimena S; Porto, Luismar M; Alvarez, Vera A; Castro, Guillermo R

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) films modified by the in situ method with the addition of alginate (Alg) during the microbial cultivation of Gluconacetobacter hansenii under static conditions increased the loading of doxorubicin by at least three times. Biophysical analysis of BC-Alg films by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction and FTIR showed a highly homogeneous interpenetrated network scaffold without changes in the BC crystalline structure but with an increased amorphous phase. The main molecular interactions determined by FTIR between both biopolymers clearly suggest high compatibility. These results indicate that alginate plays a key role in the biophysical properties of the hybrid BC matrix. BC-Alg scaffold analysis by nitrogen adsorption isotherms revealed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method an increase in surface area of about 84% and in pore volume of more than 200%. The Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) model also showed an increase of about 25% in the pore size compared to the BC film. Loading BC-Alg scaffolds with different amounts of doxorubicin decreased the cell viability of HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line compared to the free Dox from around 95-53% after 24h and from 63% to 37% after 48 h. Dox kinetic release from the BC-Alg nanocomposite displayed hyperbolic curves related to the different amounts of drug payload and was stable for at least 14 days. The results of the BC-Alg nanocomposites show a promissory potential for anticancer therapies of solid tumors. PMID:26784658

  19. Modification of Bacterial Cellulose with Organosilanes to Improve Attachment and Spreading of Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Taokaew, Siriporn; Phisalaphong, Muenduen; Newby, Bi-min Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial Cellulose (BC) synthesized by Acetobacter xylinum has been a promising candidate for medical applications. Modifying BC to possess the properties needed for specific applications has been reported. In this study, BCs functionalized by organosilanes were hypothesized to improve the attachment and spreading of Normal Human Dermal Fibroblast (NHDF). The BC gels obtained from biosynthesis were dried by either ambient-air drying or freeze drying. The surfaces of those dried BCs were chemically modified by grafting methyl terminated octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) or amine terminated 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to expectedly increase hydrophobic or electrostatic interactions with NHDF cells, respectively. NHDF cells improved their attachment and spreading on the majority of APTES-modified BCs (∼70-80% of area coverage by cells) with more rapid growth (∼2.6-2.8× after incubations from 24 to 48h) than on tissue culture polystyrene (∼2×); while the inverse results (< 5% of area coverage and stationary growth) were observed on the OTS-modified BCs. For organosilane modified BCs, the drying method had no effect on in vitro cell attachment/spreading behaviors. PMID:26478661

  20. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases. PMID:27246808

  1. Modified bacterial cellulose scaffolds for localized doxorubicin release in human colorectal HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Cacicedo, Maximiliano L; León, Ignacio E; Gonzalez, Jimena S; Porto, Luismar M; Alvarez, Vera A; Castro, Guillermo R

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) films modified by the in situ method with the addition of alginate (Alg) during the microbial cultivation of Gluconacetobacter hansenii under static conditions increased the loading of doxorubicin by at least three times. Biophysical analysis of BC-Alg films by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction and FTIR showed a highly homogeneous interpenetrated network scaffold without changes in the BC crystalline structure but with an increased amorphous phase. The main molecular interactions determined by FTIR between both biopolymers clearly suggest high compatibility. These results indicate that alginate plays a key role in the biophysical properties of the hybrid BC matrix. BC-Alg scaffold analysis by nitrogen adsorption isotherms revealed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method an increase in surface area of about 84% and in pore volume of more than 200%. The Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) model also showed an increase of about 25% in the pore size compared to the BC film. Loading BC-Alg scaffolds with different amounts of doxorubicin decreased the cell viability of HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line compared to the free Dox from around 95-53% after 24h and from 63% to 37% after 48 h. Dox kinetic release from the BC-Alg nanocomposite displayed hyperbolic curves related to the different amounts of drug payload and was stable for at least 14 days. The results of the BC-Alg nanocomposites show a promissory potential for anticancer therapies of solid tumors.

  2. Bacterial RTX toxins allow acute ATP release from human erythrocytes directly through the toxin pore.

    PubMed

    Skals, Marianne; Bjaelde, Randi G; Reinholdt, Jesper; Poulsen, Knud; Vad, Brian S; Otzen, Daniel E; Leipziger, Jens; Praetorius, Helle A

    2014-07-01

    ATP is as an extracellular signaling molecule able to amplify the cell lysis inflicted by certain bacterial toxins including the two RTX toxins α-hemolysin (HlyA) from Escherichia coli and leukotoxin A (LtxA) from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Inhibition of P2X receptors completely blocks the RTX toxin-induced hemolysis over a larger concentration range. It is, however, at present not known how the ATP that provides the amplification is released from the attacked cells. Here we show that both HlyA and LtxA trigger acute release of ATP from human erythrocytes that preceded and were not caused by cell lysis. This early ATP release did not occur via previously described ATP-release pathways in the erythrocyte. Both HlyA and LtxA were capable of triggering ATP release in the presence of the pannexin 1 blockers carbenoxolone and probenecid, and the HlyA-induced ATP release was found to be similar in erythrocytes from pannexin 1 wild type and knock-out mice. Moreover, the voltage-dependent anion channel antagonist TRO19622 had no effect on ATP release by either of the toxins. Finally, we showed that both HlyA and LtxA were able to release ATP from ATP-loaded lipid (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine) vesicles devoid of any erythrocyte channels or transporters. Again we were able to show that this happened in a non-lytic fashion, using calcein-containing vesicles as controls. These data show that both toxins incorporate into lipid vesicles and allow ATP to be released. We suggest that both toxins cause acute ATP release by letting ATP pass the toxin pores in both human erythrocytes and artificial membranes.

  3. Lactobacillus crispatus as biomarker of the healthy vaginal tract.

    PubMed

    Lepargneur, Jean-Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Decades of research have shown that the lactobacilli inhabiting the human vagina are the first line of defense in the female urogenital and reproductive tracts. In healthy cervicovaginal microbiota, Lactobacillus crispatus is prevalent and beneficial with production of copious amounts of lactic acid potent broad spectrum bactericide virucide and immunomodulator. Future and preventic approaches may need to include probiotics, prebiotics also have the potential to optimize and restore the vaginal ecosystem. PMID:27492695

  4. Helicobacter pylori: Bacterial Strategy for Incipient Stage and Persistent Colonization in Human Gastric Niches

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Kwang-Ho; Park, Jin-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) undergoes decades long colonization of the gastric mucosa of half the population in the world to produce acute and chronic gastritis at the beginning of infection, progressing to more severe disorders, including peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Prolonged carriage of H. pylori is the most crucial factor for the pathogenesis of gastric maladies. Bacterial persistence in the gastric mucosa depends on bacterial factors as well as host factors. Herein, the host and bacterial components responsible for the incipient stages of H. pylori infection are reviewed and discussed. Bacterial adhesion and adaptation is presented to explain the persistence of H. pylori colonization in the gastric mucosa, in which bacterial evasion of host defense systems and genomic diversity are included. PMID:25323880

  5. Retargeting pre-existing human antibodies to a bacterial pathogen with an alpha-Gal conjugated aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Kristian, Sascha A.; Hwang, John H.; Hall, Bradley; Leire, Emma; Iacomini, John; Old, Robert; Galili, Uri; Roberts, Charles; Mullis, Kary B.; Westby, Mike; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The ever-increasing threat of multi-drug resistant bacterial infections has spurred renewed interest in alternative approaches to classical antibiotic therapy. In contrast to other mammals, humans do not express the galactose-α-1,3-galactosyl-β-1,4-N-acetyl-glucosamine (α-Gal) epitope. As a result of exposure of humans to α-Gal in the environment, a large proportion of circulating antibodies are specific for the trisaccharide. In this study, we examine whether these anti-Gal antibodies can be recruited and redirected to exert anti-bacterial activity. We show that a specific DNA aptamer conjugated to an α-Gal epitope at its 5′ end, herein termed an alphamer, can bind to group A Streptococcus (GAS) bacteria by recognition of a conserved region of the surface-anchored M protein. The anti-GAS alphamer was shown to recruit anti-Gal antibodies to the streptococcal surface in an α-Gal-specific manner, elicit uptake and killing of the bacteria by human phagocytes, and slow growth of invasive GAS in human whole blood. These studies provide a first in vitro proof of concept that alphamers have the potential to redirect pre-existing antibodies to bacteria in a specific manner and trigger an immediate antibacterial immune response. Further validation of this novel therapeutic approach of applying α-Gal technology in in vivo models of bacterial infection is warranted. PMID:25940316

  6. Specific parasitism of purified vaginal epithelial cells by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed Central

    Alderete, J F; Demeś, P; Gombosova, A; Valent, M; Fabusová, M; Jánoska, A; Stefanovic, J; Arroyo, R

    1988-01-01

    Human vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) from vaginal swabs obtained from normal women or from patients with trichomoniasis were purified, and VEC parasitism by Trichomonas vaginalis was examined. Trichomonads bound equally well to live or dead VECs, and up to 20% of VECs were parasitized. Trichomonal cytadherence of human VECs was time, temperature, and pH dependent. Saturation binding levels of live trichomonads to VECs gave approximately 2 organisms adherent to parasitized VEC. No differences in cytadherence levels were detected by different isolates to VECs from the same patient compared with adherence to VECs from normal individuals. Trypsinized, live T. vaginalis organisms failed to recognize VECs. A ligand assay identified four adhesin candidates, and only organisms without a prominent immunogen on the surface (negative phenotype) cytadhered to VECs and synthesized the adhesins, confirming the results of a recently published report by us on adherence to HeLa cell monolayers (J. F. Alderete and G. E. Garza, Infect. Immun. 56:28-33, 1988). These data show the ability of T. vaginalis to parasitize human vaginal epithelial cells in a specific receptor-ligand manner. PMID:3262088

  7. Treatment of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy with 10-μg estradiol vaginal tablets.

    PubMed

    Panay, Nick; Maamari, Ricardo

    2012-03-01

    Postmenopausal estrogen deficiency can lead to symptoms of urogenital atrophy. Individuals with urogenital atrophy have symptoms that include vaginal dryness, vaginal and vulval irritation, vaginal soreness, pain and burning during urination (dysuria), increased vaginal discharge, vaginal odour, vaginal infections, recurrent urinary tract infections, pain associated with sexual activity (dyspareunia) and vaginal bleeding associated with sexual activity. Despite the frequency and effects of vaginal atrophy symptoms, they are often under-reported and, consequently, under-treated. Therefore, care of a menopausal woman should include a physical assessment of vaginal atrophy and a dialogue between the physician and the patient that explores existing symptoms and their effect on vulvovaginal health, sexuality and quality-of-life issues. The development of the ultra-low-dose 10-µg estradiol vaginal tablets is in line with the requirements of regulatory agencies and women's health societies regarding the use of the lowest effective hormonal dose. Because of its effectiveness and safety profiles, in addition to its minimal systemic absorption, the 10-µg estradiol vaginal tablet can offer greater reassurance to health-care providers and postmenopausal women with an annual estradiol administration of only 1.14 mg.

  8. Nonimmunoglobulin fraction of human milk inhibits bacterial adhesion (hemagglutination) and enterotoxin binding of Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Holmgren, J; Svennerholm, A M; Ahrén, C

    1981-01-01

    Human milk and colostrum samples were divided into an immunoglobulin and a nonimmunoglobulin fraction by immunosorbent chromatography. The ability of these fractions to inhibit bacterial cell adhesion and enterotoxin receptor binding of Vibrio cholerae and various Escherichia coli isolates was then tested by in vitro assays. The strongest effect was generally seen with the nonimmunoglobulin fractions, which were shown to significantly inhibit E. coli cell adhesion (hemagglutination) mediated by CFA/I, CFA/II, or K88 fimbriae (but not type 1 pili) and V. cholerae hemagglutination, as well as the binding of cholera toxin and E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin to GM1 ganglioside. Also, the immunoglobulin fractions had significant inhibitory activity in some of these systems. The results are interpreted to suggest that human milk and colostrum may contain secreted structure analogs of the cell receptors for some bacterial adhesions and enterotoxins; this might contribute to the protective effect of milk against enteric infections. PMID:7021421

  9. Mode of growth of bacterial pathogens in chronic polymicrobial human osteomyelitis.

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, T J; Costerton, J W

    1985-01-01

    Direct examination of material from two cases of persistent (2 and 60 years) osteomyelitis by morphological and culture techniques showed that the pathogens comprised several bacterial species whose cells grew predominantly in discrete exopolysaccharide-enclosed microcolonies made up of a single bacterial morphotype. Bacterial microcolonies were seen between tissue elements in infected connective tissue, and the microcolonies adherent to bone surfaces coalesced to form extensive biofilms that occluded the surfaces of dead bone in sequestrae. Decalcification techniques were required to examine the interior of infected bone, but recognizable remnants were associated with very large amounts of fibrous, ruthenium red-stained material. All bacterial growth in these persistent infections occurred within an intercellular matrix, and some elements of this matrix, which was fibrous in transmission electron microscopy and amorphous in scanning electron microscopy, were associated with the surfaces of bacterial cells in a manner that suggested their production by these organisms. All of the implications of this microcolony mode of bacterial growth in osteomyelitis, and in other chronic bacterial diseases, have yet to be determined. Images PMID:4066923

  10. Vaginal Exposure to Zika Virus during Pregnancy Leads to Fetal Brain Infection.

    PubMed

    Yockey, Laura J; Varela, Luis; Rakib, Tasfia; Khoury-Hanold, William; Fink, Susan L; Stutz, Bernardo; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Van den Pol, Anthony; Lindenbach, Brett D; Horvath, Tamas L; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-08-25

    Zika virus (ZIKV) can be transmitted sexually between humans. However, it is unknown whether ZIKV replicates in the vagina and impacts the unborn fetus. Here, we establish a mouse model of vaginal ZIKV infection and demonstrate that, unlike other routes, ZIKV replicates within the genital mucosa even in wild-type (WT) mice. Mice lacking RNA sensors or transcription factors IRF3 and IRF7 resulted in higher levels of local viral replication. Furthermore, mice lacking the type I interferon (IFN) receptor (IFNAR) became viremic and died of infection after a high-dose vaginal ZIKV challenge. Notably, vaginal infection of pregnant dams during early pregnancy led to fetal growth restriction and infection of the fetal brain in WT mice. This was exacerbated in mice deficient in IFN pathways, leading to abortion. Our study highlights the vaginal tract as a highly susceptible site of ZIKV replication and illustrates the dire disease consequences during pregnancy.

  11. Vaginal Exposure to Zika Virus during Pregnancy Leads to Fetal Brain Infection.

    PubMed

    Yockey, Laura J; Varela, Luis; Rakib, Tasfia; Khoury-Hanold, William; Fink, Susan L; Stutz, Bernardo; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Van den Pol, Anthony; Lindenbach, Brett D; Horvath, Tamas L; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-08-25

    Zika virus (ZIKV) can be transmitted sexually between humans. However, it is unknown whether ZIKV replicates in the vagina and impacts the unborn fetus. Here, we establish a mouse model of vaginal ZIKV infection and demonstrate that, unlike other routes, ZIKV replicates within the genital mucosa even in wild-type (WT) mice. Mice lacking RNA sensors or transcription factors IRF3 and IRF7 resulted in higher levels of local viral replication. Furthermore, mice lacking the type I interferon (IFN) receptor (IFNAR) became viremic and died of infection after a high-dose vaginal ZIKV challenge. Notably, vaginal infection of pregnant dams during early pregnancy led to fetal growth restriction and infection of the fetal brain in WT mice. This was exacerbated in mice deficient in IFN pathways, leading to abortion. Our study highlights the vaginal tract as a highly susceptible site of ZIKV replication and illustrates the dire disease consequences during pregnancy. PMID:27565347

  12. Vaginitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS Influenza Malaria Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Tuberculosis Zika Virus Find a Funding Opportunity Opportunities & Announcements Types of ... however, can have severe reactions to EBV infections. Zika Virus Discovered in the Zika forest, Uganda, in 1947, ...

  13. Endotoxin, capsule, and bacterial attachment contribute to Neisseria meningitidis resistance to the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

    PubMed

    Jones, Allison; Geörg, Miriam; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2009-06-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have evolved numerous mechanisms to evade the human immune system and have developed widespread resistance to traditional antibiotics. We studied the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis and present evidence of novel mechanisms of resistance to the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. We found that bacteria attached to host epithelial cells are resistant to 10 microM LL-37 whereas bacteria in solution or attached to plastic are killed, indicating that the cell microenvironment protects bacteria. The bacterial endotoxin lipooligosaccharide and the polysaccharide capsule contribute to LL-37 resistance, probably by preventing LL-37 from reaching the bacterial membrane, as more LL-37 reaches the bacterial membrane on both lipooligosaccharide-deficient and capsule-deficient mutants whereas both mutants are also more susceptible to LL-37 killing than the wild-type strain. N. meningitidis bacteria respond to sublethal doses of LL-37 and upregulate two of their capsule genes, siaC and siaD, which further results in upregulation of capsule biosynthesis.

  14. In vitro effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide on the cytotoxicity of human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, D; Puente, J; Blanco, L; Wolf, M E; Mosnaim, A D

    1998-04-01

    Preincubation with a number of mediators of infection, such as Gram negative bacteria (S. typhi), bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrotic factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-2 (IL-2), significantly increases natural killer (NK) cell activity in samples of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), without changing the levels of either the phenotypic CD16/56 or stimulatory CD25 marker. We now report similar results after preincubation of highly purified NK cell preparations (CD16 + 56 > 95%; the rest corresponding to CD3+ T-cells) with either S. typhi, TNF-alpha or IL-2. However, in similar experiments, LPS inhibits, in a dose-dependent manner (final conc. 2.5, 5.0 or 10.0 micrograms/mL), NK cell cytotoxicity against K-562 tumor cells. Preincubation of purified NK cells with LPS (25 micrograms/mL; 10 and 30 min) produced significant alterations in the tyrosine phosphorylation/dephosphorylation pattern of several intracellular proteins, including a significant increase (10 min) in the phosphorylation of the 120; 100; 72 and 59 kDa proteins, followed (30 min) by the essentially complete desphosphorylation of the p59 protein. Qualitatively similar results were obtained at lower LPS concentrations e.g., range 2.5 to 20 micrograms/mL. The absence of phosphoproteins in the 40-44 kDa range, known to be present after incubation of monocytes with LPS, raises the possibility that these "class" of proteins may be critical in explaining the LPS inhibitory effect on NK lytic function. Our finding may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the complex in vivo interaction between LPS, monocytes and NK cells.

  15. Effects of High Hydrostatic Pressure on Bacterial Growth on Human Ossicles Explanted from Cholesteatoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ostwald, Jürgen; Lindner, Tobias; Zautner, Andreas Erich; Arndt, Kathleen; Pau, Hans Wilhelm; Podbielski, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment can eliminate cholesteatoma cells from explanted human ossicles prior to re-insertion. We analyzed the effects of HHP treatment on the microbial flora on ossicles and on the planktonic and biofilm states of selected isolates. Methodology Twenty-six ossicles were explanted from cholesteatoma patients. Five ossicles were directly analyzed for microbial growth without further treatment. Fifteen ossicles were cut into two pieces. One piece was exposed to HHP of 350 MPa for 10 minutes. Both the treated and untreated (control) pieces were then assessed semi-quantitatively. Three ossicles were cut into two pieces and exposed to identical pressure conditions with or without the addition of one of two different combinations of antibiotics to the medium. Differential effects of 10-minute in vitro exposure of planktonic and biofilm bacteria to pressures of 100 MPa, 250 MPa, 400 MPa and 540 MPa in isotonic and hypotonic media were analyzed using two patient isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Neisseria subflava. Bacterial cell inactivation and biofilm destruction were assessed by colony counting and electron microscopy. Principal Findings A variety of microorganisms were isolated from the ossicles. Irrespective of the medium, HHP treatment at 350 MPa for 10 minutes led to satisfying but incomplete inactivation especially of Gram-negative bacteria. The addition of antibiotics increased the efficacy of elimination. A comparison of HHP treatment of planktonic and biofilm cells showed that the effects of HPP were reduced by about one decadic logarithmic unit when HPP was applied to biofilms. High hydrostatic pressure conditions that are suitable to inactivate cholesteatoma cells fail to completely sterilize ossicles even if antibiotics are added. As a result of the reduced microbial load and the viability loss of surviving bacteria, however, there is a lower risk of re-infection after re-insertion. PMID:22291908

  16. Bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy treated with yoghurt.

    PubMed

    Neri, A; Sabah, G; Samra, Z

    1993-01-01

    As various drugs might have an effect on the fetus during pregnancy, the use of drugs should be minimized in the pregnant woman. Since bacterial vaginosis (BV) can be associated with prematurity and postpartum complications, we searched for alternative therapy for its cure during pregnancy. Commercial yoghurt incorporates both factors necessary for maintaining the protective mechanism of the vagina, vaginal pH and lactobacillus. A total of 32 women with BV in the first trimester of pregnancy were treated with intravaginal application of yoghurt. The result was favorable indicating that the continuous correction of vaginal pH and lactobacillus flora is crucial for normal vaginal ecology. During pregnancy, a local treatment restoring the normal acidity and vaginal flora, without systemic effect, may be preferable to any other treatment. PMID:8382424

  17. "Lachnoclostridium bouchesdurhonense," a new bacterial species isolated from human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Amadou, T; Hosny, M; La Scola, B; Cassir, N

    2016-09-01

    We report the main characteristics of "Lachnoclostridium bouchesdurhonense" strain AT5(T) (=CSUR P2181), a new bacterial species isolated from the gut microbiota of an obese patient from Marseille. PMID:27493758

  18. Human Mitochondrial DNA and Endogenous Bacterial Surrogates for Risk Assessment of Graywater Reuse

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous graywater risk assessment studies have focused on fecal contamination, yet the low density of fecal indicators may not provide the most useful approach to assess pathogen removal during graywater treatment. In this study, we employed high throughput bacterial sequencing ...

  19. 'Lachnoclostridium massiliosenegalense', a new bacterial species isolated from the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Tidjani Alou, M; Lagier, J-C; La Scola, B; Cassir, N

    2016-11-01

    We report the main characteristics of 'Lachnoclostridium massiliosenegalense' strain mt23(T) (=CSUR P299 =DSM 102084), a new bacterial species isolated from the gut microbiota of a healthy young girl from Senegal. PMID:27595004

  20. 'Lachnoclostridium massiliosenegalense', a new bacterial species isolated from the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Tidjani Alou, M; Lagier, J-C; La Scola, B; Cassir, N

    2016-11-01

    We report the main characteristics of 'Lachnoclostridium massiliosenegalense' strain mt23(T) (=CSUR P299 =DSM 102084), a new bacterial species isolated from the gut microbiota of a healthy young girl from Senegal.

  1. The Effects of Hormones and Vaginal Microflora on the Glycome of the Female Genital Tract: Cervical-Vaginal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Moncla, Bernard J; Chappell, Catherine A; Debo, Brian M; Meyn, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we characterized the glycome of cervical-vaginal fluid, collected with a Catamenial cup. We quantified: glycosidase levels; sialic acid and high mannose specific lectin binding; mucins, MUC1, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC7; and albumin in the samples collected. These data were analyzed in the context of hormonal status (day of menstrual cycle, hormonal contraception use) and role, if any, of the type of the vaginal microflora present. When the Nugent score was used to stratify the subjects by microflora as normal, intermediate, or bacterial vaginosis, several important differences were observed. The activities of four of six glycosidases in the samples from women with bacterial vaginosis were significantly increased when compared to normal or intermediate women: sialidase, P = <0.001; α-galactosidase, P = 0.006; β-galactosidase, P = 0.005; α-glucosidase, P = 0.056. Sialic acid binding sites as measured by two lectins, Maackia amurensis and Sambucus nigra binding, were significantly lower in women with BV compared to women with normal and intermediate scores (P = <0.0001 and 0.008 respectively). High mannose binding sites, a measure of innate immunity were also significantly lower in women with BV (P = <0.001). Additionally, we observed significant increases in MUC1, MUC4, MUC5AC, and MUC7 concentrations in women with BV (P = <0.001, 0.001, <0.001, 0.02 respectively). Among normal women we found that the membrane bound mucin MUC4 and the secreted MUC5AC were decreased in postmenopausal women (P = 0.02 and 0.07 respectively), while MUC7 (secreted) was decreased in women using levonorgestrel-containing IUDs (P = 0.02). The number of sialic acid binding sites was lower in the postmenopausal group (P = 0.04), but the number of high mannose binding sites, measured with Griffithsin, was not significantly different among the 6 hormonal groups. The glycosidase levels in the cervical-vaginal mucus were rather low in the groups, with exception of α-glucosidase activity

  2. The Effects of Hormones and Vaginal Microflora on the Glycome of the Female Genital Tract: Cervical-Vaginal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Moncla, Bernard J.; Chappell, Catherine A.; Debo, Brian M.; Meyn, Leslie A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we characterized the glycome of cervical-vaginal fluid, collected with a Catamenial cup. We quantified: glycosidase levels; sialic acid and high mannose specific lectin binding; mucins, MUC1, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC7; and albumin in the samples collected. These data were analyzed in the context of hormonal status (day of menstrual cycle, hormonal contraception use) and role, if any, of the type of the vaginal microflora present. When the Nugent score was used to stratify the subjects by microflora as normal, intermediate, or bacterial vaginosis, several important differences were observed. The activities of four of six glycosidases in the samples from women with bacterial vaginosis were significantly increased when compared to normal or intermediate women: sialidase, P = <0.001; α-galactosidase, P = 0.006; β-galactosidase, P = 0.005; α-glucosidase, P = 0.056. Sialic acid binding sites as measured by two lectins, Maackia amurensis and Sambucus nigra binding, were significantly lower in women with BV compared to women with normal and intermediate scores (P = <0.0001 and 0.008 respectively). High mannose binding sites, a measure of innate immunity were also significantly lower in women with BV (P = <0.001). Additionally, we observed significant increases in MUC1, MUC4, MUC5AC, and MUC7 concentrations in women with BV (P = <0.001, 0.001, <0.001, 0.02 respectively). Among normal women we found that the membrane bound mucin MUC4 and the secreted MUC5AC were decreased in postmenopausal women (P = 0.02 and 0.07 respectively), while MUC7 (secreted) was decreased in women using levonorgestrel-containing IUDs (P = 0.02). The number of sialic acid binding sites was lower in the postmenopausal group (P = 0.04), but the number of high mannose binding sites, measured with Griffithsin, was not significantly different among the 6 hormonal groups. The glycosidase levels in the cervical-vaginal mucus were rather low in the groups, with exception of α-glucosidase activity

  3. CAP-D3 Promotes Bacterial Clearance in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Repressing Expression of Amino Acid Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Jacqueline R.; Nickerson, Kourtney P.; Deutschman, Emily; Kim, Yeojung; West, Gail; Sadler, Tammy; Stylianou, Eleni; Krokowski, Dawid; Hatzoglou, Maria; de la Motte, Carol; Rubin, Brian P.; Fiocchi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Defects in colonic epithelial barrier defenses are associated with ulcerative colitis (UC). The proteins that regulate bacterial clearance in the colonic epithelium have not been completely identified. The chromosome-associated protein D3 (dCAP-D3), regulates responses to bacterial infection. We examined whether CAP-D3 promotes bacterial clearance in human colonic epithelium. METHODS Clearance of Salmonella or adherent-invasive Escherichia coli LF82 was assessed by gentamycin protection assays in HT-29 and Caco-2 cells expressing small hairpin RNAs against CAP-D3. We used immunoblot assays to measure levels of CAP-D3 in colonic epithelial cells from patients with UC and healthy individuals (controls). RNA sequencing identified genes activated by CAP-D3. We analyzed the roles of CAP-D3 target genes in bacterial clearance using gentamycin protection and immunofluorescence assays and studies with pharmacologic inhibitors. RESULTS CAP-D3 expression was reduced in colonic epithelial cells from patients with active UC. Reduced CAP-D3 expression decreased autophagy and impaired intracellular bacterial clearance by HT-29 and Caco-2 colonic epithelial cells. Lower levels of CAP-D3 increased transcription of genes encoding SLC7A5 and SLC3A2, whose products heterodimerize to form an amino acid transporter in HT-29 cells following bacterial infection; levels of SLC7A5–SLC3A2 were increased in tissues from patients with UC, compared with controls. Reduced CAP-D3 in HT-29 cells resulted in earlier recruitment of SLC7A5 to Salmonella-containing vacuoles, increased activity of mTORC1, and increased survival of bacteria. Inhibition of SLC7A5–SLC3A2 or mTORC1 activity rescued the bacterial clearance defects of CAP-D3– deficient cells. CONCLUSIONS CAP-D3 downregulates transcription of genes that encode amino acid transporters (SLC7A5 and SLC3A2) to promote bacterial autophagy by colon epithelial cells. Levels of CAP-D3 protein are reduced in patients with

  4. Protection against rat vaginal candidiasis by adoptive transfer of vaginal B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Santoni, Giorgio; Boccanera, Maria; Lucciarini, Roberta; Arancia, Silvia; Sandini, Silvia; Amantini, Consuelo; Cassone, Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is a mucosal infection affecting many women, but the immune mechanisms operating against Candida albicans at the mucosal level remain unknown. A rat model was employed to further characterize the contribution of B and T cells to anti-Candida vaginal protection. Particularly, the protective role of vaginal B cells was studied by means of adoptive transfer of vaginal CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) cells from Candida-immunized rats to naïve animals. This passive transfer of B cells resulted into a number of vaginal C. albicans CFU approximately 50% lower than their controls. Sorted CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) vaginal B lymphocytes from Candida-infected rats proliferated in response to stimulation with an immunodominant mannoprotein (MP) antigen of the fungus. Importantly, anti-MP antibodies and antibody-secreting B cells were detected in the supernatant and cell cultures, respectively, of vaginal B lymphocytes from infected rats incubated in vitro with vaginal T cells and stimulated with MP. No such specific antibodies were found when using vaginal B cells from uninfected rats. Furthermore, inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6 and IL-10, were found in the supernatant of vaginal B cells from infected rats. These data are evidence of a partial anti-Candida protective role of CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) vaginal B lymphocytes in our experimental model.

  5. Bacterial zoonoses of fishes: a review and appraisal of evidence for linkages between fish and human infections.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, David T

    2015-01-01

    Human contact with and consumption of fishes presents hazards from a range of bacterial zoonotic infections. Whereas many bacterial pathogens have been presented as fish-borne zoonoses on the basis of epidemiological and phenotypic evidence, genetic identity between fish and human isolates is not frequently examined or does not provide support for transmission between these hosts. In order to accurately assess the zoonotic risk from exposure to fishes in the context of aquaculture, wild fisheries and ornamental aquaria, it is important to critically examine evidence of linkages between bacteria infecting fishes and humans. This article reviews bacteria typically presented as fish-borne zoonoses, and examines the current strength of evidence for this classification. Of bacteria generally described as fish-borne zoonoses, only Mycobacterium spp., Streptococcus iniae, Clostridium botulinum, and Vibrio vulnificus appear to be well-supported as zoonoses in the strict sense. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, while transmissible from fishes to humans, does not cause disease in fishes and is therefore excluded from the list. Some epidemiological and/or molecular linkages have been made between other bacteria infecting both fishes and humans, but more work is needed to elucidate routes of transmission and the identity of these pathogens in their respective hosts at the genomic level.

  6. Bacterial zoonoses of fishes: a review and appraisal of evidence for linkages between fish and human infections.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, David T

    2015-01-01

    Human contact with and consumption of fishes presents hazards from a range of bacterial zoonotic infections. Whereas many bacterial pathogens have been presented as fish-borne zoonoses on the basis of epidemiological and phenotypic evidence, genetic identity between fish and human isolates is not frequently examined or does not provide support for transmission between these hosts. In order to accurately assess the zoonotic risk from exposure to fishes in the context of aquaculture, wild fisheries and ornamental aquaria, it is important to critically examine evidence of linkages between bacteria infecting fishes and humans. This article reviews bacteria typically presented as fish-borne zoonoses, and examines the current strength of evidence for this classification. Of bacteria generally described as fish-borne zoonoses, only Mycobacterium spp., Streptococcus iniae, Clostridium botulinum, and Vibrio vulnificus appear to be well-supported as zoonoses in the strict sense. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, while transmissible from fishes to humans, does not cause disease in fishes and is therefore excluded from the list. Some epidemiological and/or molecular linkages have been made between other bacteria infecting both fishes and humans, but more work is needed to elucidate routes of transmission and the identity of these pathogens in their respective hosts at the genomic level. PMID:25466575

  7. Comparative Functional Genomics of Lactobacillus spp. Reveals Possible Mechanisms for Specialization of Vaginal Lactobacilli to Their Environment

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Haruo; Hickey, Roxana J.; Forney, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacilli are found in a wide variety of habitats. Four species, Lactobacillus crispatus, L. gasseri, L. iners, and L. jensenii, are common and abundant in the human vagina and absent from other habitats. These may be adapted to the vagina and possess characteristics enabling them to thrive in that environment. Furthermore, stable codominance of multiple Lactobacillus species in a single community is infrequently observed. Thus, it is possible that individual vaginal Lactobacillus species possess unique characteristics that confer to them host-specific competitive advantages. We performed comparative functional genomic analyses of representatives of 25 species of Lactobacillus, searching for habitat-specific traits in the genomes of the vaginal lactobacilli. We found that the genomes of the vaginal species were significantly smaller and had significantly lower GC content than those of the nonvaginal species. No protein families were found to be specific to the vaginal species analyzed, but some were either over- or underrepresented relative to nonvaginal species. We also found that within the vaginal species, each genome coded for species-specific protein families. Our results suggest that even though the vaginal species show no general signatures of adaptation to the vaginal environment, each species has specific and perhaps unique ways of interacting with its environment, be it the host or other microbes in the community. These findings will serve as a foundation for further exploring the role of lactobacilli in the ecological dynamics of vaginal microbial communities and their ultimate impact on host health. PMID:24488312

  8. Genetic Stability of Bacterial Artificial Chromosome-Derived Human Cytomegalovirus during Culture In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Isa; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Davison, Andrew J.; Statkute, Evelina; Fielding, Ceri A.; Tomasec, Peter; Wilkinson, Gavin W. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clinical human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strains invariably mutate when propagated in vitro. Mutations in gene RL13 are selected in all cell types, whereas in fibroblasts mutants in the UL128 locus (UL128L; genes UL128, UL130, and UL131A) are also selected. In addition, sporadic mutations are selected elsewhere in the genome in all cell types. We sought to investigate conditions under which HCMV can be propagated without incurring genetic defects. Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) provide a stable, genetically defined source of viral genome. Viruses were generated from BACs containing the genomes of strains TR, TB40, FIX, and Merlin, as well as from Merlin-BAC recombinants containing variant nucleotides in UL128L from TB40-BAC4 or FIX-BAC. Propagation of viruses derived from TR-BAC, TB40-BAC4, and FIX-BAC in either fibroblast or epithelial cells was associated with the generation of defects around the prokaryotic vector, which is retained in the unique short (US) region of viruses. This was not observed for Merlin-BAC, from which the vector is excised in derived viruses; however, propagation in epithelial cells was consistently associated with mutations in the unique long b′ (UL/b′) region, all impacting on gene UL141. Viruses derived from Merlin-BAC in fibroblasts had mutations in UL128L, but mutations occurred less frequently with recombinants containing UL128L nucleotides from TB40-BAC4 or FIX-BAC. Viruses derived from a Merlin-BAC derivative in which RL13 and UL128L were either mutated or repressed were remarkably stable in fibroblasts. Thus, HCMV containing a wild-type gene complement can be generated in vitro by deriving virus from a self-excising BAC in fibroblasts and repressing RL13 and UL128L. IMPORTANCE Researchers should aim to study viruses that accurately represent the causative agents of disease. This is problematic for HCMV because clinical strains mutate rapidly when propagated in vitro, becoming less cell associated, altered in

  9. Crystal structure of a bacterial phosphoglucomutase, an enzyme involved in the virulence of multiple human pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Mehra-Chaudhary, Ritcha; Mick, Jacob; Tanner, John J.; Henzl, Michael T.; Beamer, Lesa J.

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structure of the enzyme phosphoglucomutase from Salmonella typhimurium (StPGM) is reported at 1.7 Å resolution. This is the first high-resolution structural characterization of a bacterial protein from this large enzyme family, which has a central role in metabolism and is also important to bacterial virulence and infectivity. A comparison of the active site of StPGM with that of other phosphoglucomutases reveals conserved residues that are likely involved in catalysis and ligand binding for the entire enzyme family. An alternate crystal form of StPGM and normal mode analysis give insights into conformational changes of the C-terminal domain that occur upon ligand binding. A novel observation from the StPGM structure is an apparent dimer in the asymmetric unit of the crystal, mediated largely through contacts in an N-terminal helix. Analytical ultracentrifugation and small-angle X-ray scattering confirm that StPGM forms a dimer in solution. Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic studies show that a distinct subset of bacterial PGMs share the signature dimerization helix, while other bacterial and eukaryotic PGMs are likely monomers. These structural, biochemical, and bioinformatic studies of StPGM provide insights into the large α-d-phosphohexomutase enzyme superfamily to which it belongs, and are also relevant to the design of inhibitors specific to the bacterial PGMs. PMID:21246636

  10. Investigation of bacterial biofilm in the human middle ear using optical coherence tomography and acoustic measurements.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cac T; Robinson, Sarah R; Jung, Woonggyu; Novak, Michael A; Boppart, Stephen A; Allen, Jont B

    2013-07-01

    Children with chronic otitis media (OM) often have conductive hearing loss which results in communication difficulties and requires surgical treatment. Recent studies have provided clinical evidence that there is a one-to-one correspondence between chronic OM and the presence of a bacterial biofilm behind the tympanic membrane (TM). Here we investigate the acoustic effects of bacterial biofilms, confirmed using optical coherence tomography (OCT), in adult ears. Non-invasive OCT images are collected to visualize the cross-sectional structure of the middle ear, verifying the presence of a biofilm behind the TM. Wideband measurements of acoustic reflectance and impedance (0.2-6 [kHz]) are used to study the acoustic properties of ears with confirmed bacterial biofilms. Compared to known acoustic properties of normal middle ears, each of the ears with a bacterial biofilm has an elevated power reflectance in the 1 to 3 [kHz] range, corresponding to an abnormally small resistance (real part of the impedance). These results provide assistance for the clinical diagnosis of a bacterial biofilm, which could lead to improved treatment of chronic middle ear infection and further understanding of the impact of chronic OM on conductive hearing loss. This article is part of a special issue entitled "MEMRO 2012".

  11. Chronic Liver Disease Impairs Bacterial Clearance in a Human Model of Induced Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Ashare, Alix; Stanford, Clark; Hancock, Patricia; Stark, Donna; Lilli, Kathleen; Birrer, Emily; Nymon, Amanda; Doerschug, Kevin C.; Hunninghake, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis often causes impaired hepatic function. Patients with liver disease have an increased risk of bacteremia. This is thought to be secondary to impaired reticuloendothelial system function. However, this has not been demonstrated clinically. Since transient bacteremia occurs following toothbrushing, we hypothesized that subjects with cirrhosis would have impaired bacterial clearance following toothbrushing compared with subjects with pulmonary disease and healthy controls. After baseline blood was drawn, the subjects underwent a dental examination to determine plaque index and gingival index. Following toothbrushing, blood was drawn at 30 seconds, 5 minutes, and 15 minutes. Bacteremia was measured using quantitative real-time PCR with primers that amplify all known bacteria. We found greater than 75% incidence of bacteremia following toothbrushing. While control and pulmonary subjects were able to clear this bacteremia, subjects with cirrhosis had prolonged bacteremia. Baseline and peak bacterial load correlated with plaque index, suggesting that dental hygiene predicts the degree of bacteremia. However, only the severity of cirrhosis was predictive of bacterial clearance at 15 minutes, suggesting that liver function is important in clearing bacteremia. In this study, we demonstrate clinically that cirrhosis results in impaired bacterial clearance. This suggests that cirrhotic patients may be more susceptible to sepsis because of ineffective bacterial clearance. PMID:20443893

  12. Surgical treatments for vaginal apical prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Mi Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse is a common condition, occurring in up to 11% of women in the United States. Often, pelvic organ prolapse recurs after surgery; when it recurs after hysterectomy, it frequently presents as vaginal apical prolapse. There are many different surgical treatments for vaginal apical prolapse; among them, abdominal sacral colpopexy is considered the gold standard. However, recent data reveal that other surgical procedures also result in good outcome. This review discusses the various surgical treatments for vaginal apical prolapse including their risks and benefits. PMID:27462591

  13. Gel-microemulsions as vaginal spermicides and intravaginal drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, O J; Uckun, F M

    2001-08-01

    There is a need for novel formulations to improve the bioavailability through the vaginal/rectal mucosa of microbicidal drug substances against sexually transmitted diseases. In addition, there is a need for more effective and less toxic vaginal spermicides. Here we review our recent discovery of novel gel-microemulsions (GM) as nontoxic, dual-function intravaginal spermicides, which can be used as delivery vehicles for lipophilic drug substances targeting sexually transmitted pathogens. We describe the formulation and biologic properties of 2 novel, submicron-particle-size GMs, GM-4 and GM-144, which were prepared from commonly available pharmaceutical excipients. These GMs comprising oil-in-water microemulsion and polymeric hydrogels were designed to solubilize lipophilic antiviral/antimicrobial agents and exhibited rapid spermicidal activity in human semen. Preclinical studies comparing the in vivo contraceptive efficacy of GM-4 and GM-144 versus nonoxynol-9-based detergent spermicide (Gynol II) in the rigorous rabbit model confirmed the potent contraceptive activity of these GMs. Unlike nonoxynol-9, repeated intravaginal applications of GM-4 and GM-144 in the rabbit vaginal irritation test were not associated with local inflammation or damage of the vaginal mucosa or epithelium. Furthermore, in short-term toxicity studies performed in mice, repetitive intravaginal application of spermicidal GM-4 and GM-144 for up to 13 weeks was not associated with any local, systemic, or reproductive toxicity. Spermicidal GMs have unprecedented potential as dual function microbicidal contraceptives to improve vaginal bioavailability of poorly soluble antimicrobial agents without causing significant vaginal damage.

  14. Relationship between vaginal microbial dysbiosis, inflammation, and pregnancy outcomes in cervical cerclage.

    PubMed

    Kindinger, Lindsay M; MacIntyre, David A; Lee, Yun S; Marchesi, Julian R; Smith, Ann; McDonald, Julie A K; Terzidou, Vasso; Cook, Joanna R; Lees, Christoph; Israfil-Bayli, Fidan; Faiza, Yazmin; Toozs-Hobson, Philip; Slack, Mark; Cacciatore, Stefano; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Teoh, T G; Bennett, Phillip R

    2016-08-01

    Preterm birth, the leading cause of death in children under 5 years, may be caused by inflammation triggered by ascending vaginal infection. About 2 million cervical cerclages are performed annually to prevent preterm birth. The procedure is thought to provide structural support and maintain the endocervical mucus plug as a barrier to ascending infection. Two types of suture material are used for cerclage: monofilament or multifilament braided. Braided sutures are most frequently used, although no evidence exists to favor them over monofilament sutures. We assessed birth outcomes in a retrospective cohort of 678 women receiving cervical cerclage in five UK university hospitals and showed that braided cerclage was associated with increased intrauterine death (15% versus 5%; P = 0.0001) and preterm birth (28% versus 17%; P = 0.0006) compared to monofilament suture. To understand the potential underlying mechanism, we performed a prospective, longitudinal study of the vaginal microbiome in women at risk of preterm birth because of short cervical length (≤25 mm) who received braided (n = 25) or monofilament (n = 24) cerclage under comparable circumstances. Braided suture induced a persistent shift toward vaginal microbiome dysbiosis characterized by reduced Lactobacillus spp. and enrichment of pathobionts. Vaginal dysbiosis was associated with inflammatory cytokine and interstitial collagenase excretion into cervicovaginal fluid and premature cervical remodeling. Monofilament suture had comparatively minimal impact upon the vaginal microbiome and its interactions with the host. These data provide in vivo evidence that a dynamic shift of the human vaginal microbiome toward dysbiosis correlates with preterm birth. PMID:27488896

  15. Feasibility of a breath test for monitoring adherence to vaginal administration of antiretroviral microbicide gels.

    PubMed

    Morey, Timothy E; Wasdo, Scott; Wishin, Judith; Quinn, Brian; van der Straten, Ariane; Booth, Matthew; Gonzalez, Daniel; Derendorf, Hartmut; Melker, Richard J; Dennis, Donn M

    2013-01-01

    Adherence to microbicide gel use is critical to optimizing effectiveness in preventing human immunodeficiency virus transmission. The authors hypothesized that ester taggants added to vaginal gels would generate exhaled alcohol and ketone metabolites and provide a "breath test" for vaginal gel use. This 2-arm (vaginal and dermal), randomized, participant-blinded, pilot study tested this hypothesis. On 8 visits, healthy women (n = 8) received intravaginal taggant (2-butyl acetate, 2-pentyl acetate, isopropyl butyrate, or 2-pentyl butyrate; 30 mg) formulated in hydroxyethylcellulose or tenofovir placebo gel. A second group (n = 4) of women received the same formulations administered dermally on the forearm to determine if skin administration might confound the system. Breath samples were collected using bags before and after taggant administration for 1 hour. Samples were measured using a miniature gas chromatograph and/or gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy for ester taggant, alcohol, and ketone concentrations. After vaginal administration, 2-butyl acetate, 2-pentyl acetate, and metabolites were observed in breath, whereas isopropyl butyrate, 2-pentyl butyrate, and metabolites were not. Some women reported self-resolving, mild burning (24/64 visits) with vaginal administration or a "bubblegum" taste (7/64 visits). No taggants or metabolites were detected following dermal application. A "breath test" for adherence to antiretroviral vaginal gel application appears physiologically and technically feasible. PMID:23400750

  16. MIV-150-Containing Intravaginal Rings Protect Macaque Vaginal Explants against SHIV-RT Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Louise A.; Barnable, Patrick; Mawson, Paul; Seidor, Samantha; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; Kizima, Larisa; Rodriguez, Aixa; Fernández-Romero, José A.; Cooney, Michael L.; Roberts, Kevin D.; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Robbiani, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that intravaginal rings (IVRs) containing 100 mg of the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 significantly protect macaques against a chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus that expresses the HIV-1 HxB2 reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) when present before and after vaginal challenge. The objectives of this study were to (i) evaluate the pharmacodynamics (PD) of MIV-150 in vaginal fluids (VF) and in ectocervical and vaginal tissues following 100-mg MIV-150 IVR exposure and to (ii) gain more insight whether pharmacokinetics (PK) of MIV-150 can predict PD. MIV-150 in VF collected at 1 day and 14 days post-MIV-150 IVR insertion inhibited ex vivo SHIV-RT infection in vaginal biopsy specimens from untreated animals (not carrying IVRs) in a dose-dependent manner. Previous PK studies demonstrated a significant increase of ectocervical and vaginal tissue MIV-150 concentrations 14 days versus 1 day post-IVR insertion, with the highest increase in vaginal tissue. Therefore, we tested PD of MIV-150 in tissues 14 days post-MIV-150 IVR insertion. Ex vivo SHIV-RT infection of vaginal, but not ectocervical, tissues collected 14 days post-MIV-150 IVR insertion was significantly inhibited compared to infection at the baseline (prior to MIV-150 IVR exposure). No changes in vaginal and ectocervical tissue infection were observed after placebo IVR exposure. Overall, these data underscore the use of the ex vivo macaque explant challenge models to evaluate tissue and VF PK/PD of candidate microbicides before in vivo animal efficacy studies. The data support further development of MIV-150-containing IVRs. PMID:24614384

  17. Cladophora (Chlorophyta) spp. harbor human bacterial pathogens in nearshore water of Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ishii, S.; Yan, T.; Shively, D.A.; Byappanahalli, M.N.; Whitman, R.L.; Sadowsky, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cladophora glomerata, a macrophytic green alga, is commonly found in the Great Lakes, and significant accumulations occur along shorelines during the summer months. Recently, Cladophora has been shown to harbor high densities of the fecal indicator bacteria Escherichia coli and enterococci. Cladophora may also harbor human pathogens; however, until now, no studies to address this question have been performed. In the present study, we determined whether attachedCladophora, obtained from the Lake Michigan and Burns Ditch (Little Calumet River, Indiana) sides of a breakwater during the summers of 2004 and 2005, harbored the bacterial pathogens Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC),Salmonella, Shigella, and Campylobacter. The presence of potential pathogens and numbers of organisms were determined by using cultural methods and by using conventional PCR, most-probable-number PCR (MPN-PCR), and quantitative PCR (QPCR) performed with genus- and toxin-specific primers and probes. WhileShigella and STEC were detected in 100% and 25%, respectively, of the algal samples obtained near Burns Ditch in 2004, the same pathogens were not detected in samples collected in 2005. MPN-PCR and QPCR allowed enumeration of Salmonella in 40 to 80% of the ditch- and lakeside samples, respectively, and the densities were up to 1.6 × 103 cells per g Cladophora. Similarly, these PCR methods allowed enumeration of up to 5.4 × 102 Campylobacter cells/gCladophora in 60 to 100% of lake- and ditchside samples. The Campylobacterdensities were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the lakeside Cladophora samples than in the ditchside Cladophora samples. DNA fingerprint analyses indicated that genotypically identical Salmonella isolates were associated with geographically and temporally distinct Cladophora samples. However, Campylobacter isolates were genetically diverse. Since animal hosts are thought to be the primary habitat for

  18. Contributions of microbiome and mechanical deformation to intestinal bacterial overgrowth and inflammation in a human gut-on-a-chip

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Li, Hu; Collins, James J.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    A human gut-on-a-chip microdevice was used to coculture multiple commensal microbes in contact with living human intestinal epithelial cells for more than a week in vitro and to analyze how gut microbiome, inflammatory cells, and peristalsis-associated mechanical deformations independently contribute to intestinal bacterial overgrowth and inflammation. This in vitro model replicated results from past animal and human studies, including demonstration that probiotic and antibiotic therapies can suppress villus injury induced by pathogenic bacteria. By ceasing peristalsis-like motions while maintaining luminal flow, lack of epithelial deformation was shown to trigger bacterial overgrowth similar to that observed in patients with ileus and inflammatory bowel disease. Analysis of intestinal inflammation on-chip revealed that immune cells and lipopolysaccharide endotoxin together stimulate epithelial cells to produce four proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) that are necessary and sufficient to induce villus injury and compromise intestinal barrier function. Thus, this human gut-on-a-chip can be used to analyze contributions of microbiome to intestinal pathophysiology and dissect disease mechanisms in a controlled manner that is not possible using existing in vitro systems or animal models. PMID:26668389

  19. Association between BVAB1 and high Nugent scores among women with bacterial vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Muzny, Christina A.; Sunesara, Imran R.; Griswold, Michael E.; Kumar, Ranjit; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Mena, Leandro A.; Schwebke, Jane R.; Martin, David H.; Swiatlo, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    As part of a larger study using 454 pyrosequencing to investigate the vaginal microbiota of women with bacterial vaginosis (BV), we found an association between a novel BV-associated bacterium (BVAB1) and high Nugent scores and propose that BVAB1 is the curved Gram-negative rod traditionally identified as Mobiluncus spp. in vaginal Gram stains. PMID:25262105

  20. A beta-glucan-conjugate vaccine and anti-beta-glucan antibodies are effective against murine vaginal candidiasis as assessed by a novel in vivo imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Pietrella, Donatella; Rachini, Anna; Torosantucci, Antonella; Chiani, Paola; Brown, Alistair J P; Bistoni, Francesco; Costantino, Paolo; Mosci, Paolo; d'Enfert, Christophe; Rappuoli, Rino; Cassone, Antonio; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2010-02-17

    The protective capacity of a parenterally administered beta-glucan-conjugate vaccine formulated with the human-compatible MF59 adjuvant was assessed in a murine model of vaginal candidiasis. To monitor infection, an in vivo imaging technique exploiting genetically engineered, luminescent Candida albicans was adopted, and compared with measurements of colony forming units. The vaccine conferred significant protection, and this was associated with production of serum and vaginal anti-beta-glucan IgG antibodies. Vaginal IgG molecules were the likely mediators of protection as inferred by the efficacy of passive transfer of immune vaginal fluid and passive protection by an anti-beta-1,3-glucan mAb. Overall, the in vivo imaging technique was more reliable than vaginal CFU counts in assessing the extent and duration of the vaginal infection, and the consequent protection level.

  1. Biofilms: An Underappreciated Mechanism of Treatment Failure and Recurrence in Vaginal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Muzny, Christina A.; Schwebke, Jane R.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities of surface-attached cells embedded in a self-produced extracellular matrix. They are of major medical significance because they decrease susceptibility to antimicrobial agents and enhance the spread of antimicrobial resistance. Biofilm-associated bacterial and fungal microorganisms have increasingly been recognized to play a role in multiple infectious diseases, particularly in their persistence and recurrence. More recently, biofilms have also been implicated in vaginal infections, notably bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), particularly in the setting of treatment failure and recurrence. The purpose of this review is to discuss the impact of biofilms on the management and treatment of BV and recurrent VVC and highlight the need for additional research and development of novel therapeutics targeting pathogenic vaginal biofilms. PMID:25935553

  2. Biofilms: An Underappreciated Mechanism of Treatment Failure and Recurrence in Vaginal Infections.

    PubMed

    Muzny, Christina A; Schwebke, Jane R

    2015-08-15

    Biofilms are microbial communities of surface-attached cells embedded in a self-produced extracellular matrix. They are of major medical significance because they decrease susceptibility to antimicrobial agents and enhance the spread of antimicrobial resistance. Biofilm-associated bacterial and fungal microorganisms have increasingly been recognized to play a role in multiple infectious diseases, particularly in their persistence and recurrence. More recently, biofilms have also been implicated in vaginal infections, notably bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), particularly in the setting of treatment failure and recurrence. The purpose of this review is to discuss the impact of biofilms on the management and treatment of BV and recurrent VVC and highlight the need for additional research and development of novel therapeutics targeting pathogenic vaginal biofilms.

  3. Place of Schauta's radical vaginal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Michel; Plante, Marie

    2011-04-01

    Women affected by early stage invasive cancer of the cervix are usually treated by surgery. Radical abdominal hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy is the most widely used technique. Because the morbidity of the abdominal approach can be important, the radical vaginal hysterectomy has gained acceptance in gynaecologic oncology. New instrumentation in laparoscopy also opens the possibility of treating cervical cancer by laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical hysterectomy and also total laparoscopic radical hysterectomy. Before these techniques become widely accepted, it has to be shown that safety and efficacy are comparable with the 'standard' abdominal approach. In this chapter, we review the technique of radical vaginal hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy and evaluate results of published studies, comparing the abdominal, vaginal and laparoscopic approaches.

  4. Vaginal birth after C-section

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000589.htm Vaginal birth after C-section To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. If you had a cesarean birth (C-section) before, it does not mean that you ...

  5. The Interplay of Host Immunity, Environment and the Risk of Bacterial Vaginosis and Associated Reproductive Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kerry; Mitchell, Caroline M

    2016-08-15

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of the most common causes of vaginal symptoms in US women, but its causal mechanism has not yet been defined. BV is more prevalent in women who are immunosuppressed, and several risk factors for the development of BV are associated with lower quantities of immune mediators in vaginal fluid. In contrast, the poor reproductive health outcomes associated with BV, such as preterm birth and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 acquisition, are associated with increased levels of proinflammatory immune mediators in the genital tract. In this article, we discuss how variations in the host immune profile and environmental effects on host immunity may influence the risk of BV, as well as the risk of complications associated with BV.

  6. Is bacterial vaginosis associated with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia?

    PubMed

    Boyle, D C M; Barton, S E; Uthayakumar, S; Hay, P E; Pollock, J W; Steer, P J; Smith, J R

    2003-01-01

    Previous research has produced conflicting results regarding the association of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). These studies have been weakened in their conclusions mainly by failure to adequately control for the presence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). One proposed mechanism suggesting that carcinogenic nitrosamines acting either independently or via human papilloma virus (HPV) has not been fully tested previously. We undertook a prospective, case-controlled, cross-sectional study where the presence of STIs, in particular human papillomavirus (HPV) which is known to be associated with the development of CIN, was controlled for. Women with BV were not found to have CIN more frequently than women with normal vaginal flora and the quantities of nitrosamines produced by women with BV did not differ significantly from women without BV. We thus found that BV is not associated with CIN. PMID:12657117

  7. Thalidomide inhibits granulocyte responses in healthy humans after ex vivo stimulation with bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Juffermans, N P; Verbon, A; Schultz, M J; Hack, C E; van Deventer, S J; Speelman, P; van der Poll, T

    2001-05-01

    Ingestion of thalidomide was associated with a reduction in the upregulation of the granulocyte activation marker CD11b and a reduced capacity to release elastase and lactoferrin after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or lipoteichoic acid. A single oral dose of thalidomide attenuates neutrophil activation upon ex vivo stimulation with bacterial antigens.

  8. The microbiological signature of human cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions exhibits restricted bacterial diversity compared to healthy skin

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Vanessa R; de Queiroz, Artur TL; Sanabani, Sabri S; de Oliveira, Camila I; Carvalho, Edgar M; Costa, Jackson ML; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina

    2016-01-01

    Localised cutaneous leishmaniasis (LCL) is the most common form of cutaneous leishmaniasis characterised by single or multiple painless chronic ulcers, which commonly presents with secondary bacterial infection. Previous culture-based studies have found staphylococci, streptococci, and opportunistic pathogenic bacteria in LCL lesions, but there have been no comparisons to normal skin. In addition, this approach has strong bias for determining bacterial composition. The present study tested the hypothesis that bacterial communities in LCL lesions differ from those found on healthy skin (HS). Using a high throughput amplicon sequencing approach, which allows for better populational evaluation due to greater depth coverage and the Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology pipeline, we compared the microbiological signature of LCL lesions with that of contralateral HS from the same individuals.Streptococcus, Staphylococcus,Fusobacterium and other strict or facultative anaerobic bacteria composed the LCL microbiome. Aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria found in HS, including environmental bacteria, were significantly decreased in LCL lesions (p < 0.01). This paper presents the first comprehensive microbiome identification from LCL lesions with next generation sequence methodology and shows a marked reduction of bacterial diversity in the lesions. PMID:27074253

  9. Early life dynamics of the human gut virome and bacterial microbiome in infants

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Efrem S.; Zhou, Yanjiao; Zhao, Guoyan; Bauer, Irma K.; Droit, Lindsay; Ndao, I. Malick; Warner, Barbara B.; Tarr, Phillip I.; Wang, David; Holtz, Lori R.

    2016-01-01

    The early years of life are important for immune development and influences health in adulthood. While it has been established that the gut bacterial microbiome is rapidly acquired after birth, less is known about the viral microbiome (or, virome), consisting of bacteriophages and eukaryotic RNA and DNA viruses, during the first years of life. Here, we characterized the gut virome and bacterial microbiome in a longitudinal cohort of healthy infant twins. The virome and bacterial microbiome are more similar between co-twins than between non-related infants. From birth to two years of age, the eukaryotic virome and the bacterial microbiome expanded, but this was accompanied by a contraction of and shift in the bacteriophage virome composition. The bacteriophage-bacteria relationship begins from birth with a high predator-low prey dynamic, consistent with the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model. Thus, in contrast to the stable microbiome observed in adults, the infant microbiome is highly dynamic and associated with early life changes in the composition of bacteria, viruses and bacteriophage with age. PMID:26366711

  10. Early life dynamics of the human gut virome and bacterial microbiome in infants.

    PubMed

    Lim, Efrem S; Zhou, Yanjiao; Zhao, Guoyan; Bauer, Irma K; Droit, Lindsay; Ndao, I Malick; Warner, Barbara B; Tarr, Phillip I; Wang, David; Holtz, Lori R

    2015-10-01

    The early years of life are important for immune development and influence health in adulthood. Although it has been established that the gut bacterial microbiome is rapidly acquired after birth, less is known about the viral microbiome (or 'virome'), consisting of bacteriophages and eukaryotic RNA and DNA viruses, during the first years of life. Here, we characterized the gut virome and bacterial microbiome in a longitudinal cohort of healthy infant twins. The virome and bacterial microbiome were more similar between co-twins than between unrelated infants. From birth to 2 years of age, the eukaryotic virome and the bacterial microbiome expanded, but this was accompanied by a contraction of and shift in the bacteriophage virome composition. The bacteriophage-bacteria relationship begins from birth with a high predator-low prey dynamic, consistent with the Lotka-Volterra prey model. Thus, in contrast to the stable microbiome observed in adults, the infant microbiome is highly dynamic and associated with early life changes in the composition of bacteria, viruses and bacteriophages with age. PMID:26366711

  11. Early life dynamics of the human gut virome and bacterial microbiome in infants.

    PubMed

    Lim, Efrem S; Zhou, Yanjiao; Zhao, Guoyan; Bauer, Irma K; Droit, Lindsay; Ndao, I Malick; Warner, Barbara B; Tarr, Phillip I; Wang, David; Holtz, Lori R

    2015-10-01

    The early years of life are important for immune development and influence health in adulthood. Although it has been established that the gut bacterial microbiome is rapidly acquired after birth, less is known about the viral microbiome (or 'virome'), consisting of bacteriophages and eukaryotic RNA and DNA viruses, during the first years of life. Here, we characterized the gut virome and bacterial microbiome in a longitudinal cohort of healthy infant twins. The virome and bacterial microbiome were more similar between co-twins than between unrelated infants. From birth to 2 years of age, the eukaryotic virome and the bacterial microbiome expanded, but this was accompanied by a contraction of and shift in the bacteriophage virome composition. The bacteriophage-bacteria relationship begins from birth with a high predator-low prey dynamic, consistent with the Lotka-Volterra prey model. Thus, in contrast to the stable microbiome observed in adults, the infant microbiome is highly dynamic and associated with early life changes in the composition of bacteria, viruses and bacteriophages with age.

  12. Effect of vaginal estrogen on pessary use

    PubMed Central

    Dessie, Sybil G.; Armstrong, Katherine; Modest, Anna M.; Hacker, Michele R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Many providers recommend concurrent estrogen therapy with pessary use to limit complications; however, limited data exist to support this practice. We hypothesized that vaginal estrogen supplementation decreases incidence of pessary-related complications and discontinuation. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent a pessary fitting from 1 January 2007 through 1 September 2013 at one institution; participants were identified by billing code and were eligible if they were post-menopausal and had at least 3 months of pessary use and 6 months of follow-up. All tests were two sided, and P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Data from 199 women were included; 134 used vaginal estrogen and 65 did not. Women who used vaginal estrogen had a longer median follow-up time (29.5 months) compared with women who did not (15.4 months) and were more likely to have at least one pessary check (98.5 % vs 86.2 %, P < 0.001). Those in the estrogen group were less likely to discontinue using their pessary (30.6 % vs 58.5 %, P < 0.001) and less likely to develop increased vaginal discharge than women who did not [hazard ratio (HR) 0.31, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.17–0.58]. Vaginal estrogen was not protective against erosions (HR 0.93, 95 % CI 0.54–1.6) or vaginal bleeding (HR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.36–1.7). Conclusions Women who used vaginal estrogen exhibited a higher incidence of continued pessary use and lower incidence of increased vaginal discharge than women who did not. PMID:26992727

  13. Vaginal Health During Breast Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Falk, Sandy J; Bober, Sharon

    2016-05-01

    There are increasing numbers of breast cancer survivors. Chemotherapy or endocrine therapy result in effects on vaginal health that may affect quality of life. These effects may impact sexual function, daily comfort, or the ability to perform a pelvic examination. Vulvovaginal atrophy, or genitourinary syndrome of menopause, may be treated with nonhormonal or hormonal measures. Breast cancer survivors who are menopausal and/or on endocrine therapy should be screened for issues with vaginal health and counseled about treatment options.

  14. Consistently inconsistent, the posterior vaginal wall.

    PubMed

    Hale, Douglass S; Fenner, Dee

    2016-03-01

    Posterior vaginal wall prolapse is one of the most common prolapses encountered by gynecological surgeons. What appears to be a straightforward condition to diagnose and treat surgically for physicians has proven to be frustratingly unpredictable with regard to symptom relief for patients. Functional disorders such as dyssynergic defecation and constipation are often attributed to posterior vaginal wall prolapse. Little scientific evidence supports this assumption, emphasizing that structure and function are not synonymous when treating posterior vaginal wall prolapse. Rectoceles, enteroceles, sigmoidoceles, peritoneoceles, rectal and intraanal intussusception, rectal prolapse, and descending perineal syndrome are all conditions that have an impact on the posterior vaginal wall. All too often these different anatomic conditions are treated with the same surgical approach, addressing a posterior vaginal wall bulge with a traditional posterior colporrhaphy. Studies that examine the correlation between stage of posterior wall prolapse and patient symptoms have failed to reliably do so. Surgical outcomes measured by prolapse staging appear successful, yet patient expectations are often not met. As increasing attention is being placed on patient satisfaction outcomes concerning surgical treatments, this fact will need to be addressed. Surgeons will have to clearly communicate what can and what cannot be expected with surgical repair of posterior vaginal wall prolapse.

  15. Quantification of Borrelia burgdorferi Membrane Proteins in Human Serum: A New Concept for Detection of Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Crystal S F; Anderson, Kyle W; Benitez, Kenia Y Villatoro; Soloski, Mark J; Aucott, John N; Phinney, Karen W; Turko, Illarion V

    2015-11-17

    The Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne disease in the United States. The low abundance of bacterial proteins in human serum during infection imposes a challenge for early proteomic detection of Lyme disease. To address this challenge, we propose to detect membrane proteins released from bacteria due to disruption of their plasma membrane triggered by the innate immune system. These membrane proteins can be separated from the bulk of serum proteins by high-speed centrifugation causing substantial sample enrichment prior to targeted protein quantification using multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. This new approach was first applied to detection of B. burgdorferi membrane proteins supplemented in human serum. Our results indicated that detection of B. burgdorferi membrane proteins, which are ≈10(7) lower in abundance than major serum proteins, is feasible. Therefore, quantitative analysis was also carried out for serum samples from three patients with acute Lyme disease. We were able to demonstrate the detection of ospA, the major B. burgdorferi lipoprotein at the level of 4.0 fmol of ospA/mg of serum protein. The results confirm the concept and suggest that the proposed approach can be expanded to detect other bacterial infections in humans, particularly where existing diagnostics are unreliable. PMID:26491962

  16. Vaginal carriage of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in pregnant women.

    PubMed Central

    Leszczynski, P; van Belkum, A; Pituch, H; Verbrugh, H; Meisel-Mikolajczyk, F

    1997-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is an anaerobic bacterial species that is involved in gynecological infections and pathology. The incidence of vaginal carriage is largely unknown, and in order to study this, 120 pregnant women attending a general hospital for delivery were examined. Cultures were positive for eight of these women (6.6%). Interestingly, potential clonal relatedness could be demonstrated among several of the nonenterotoxigenic B. fragilis strains. Among the strains, only one produced metalloprotease enterotoxin. The presence of the gene for the metalloprotease, giving rise to the pathogenic effect on cultured eukaryotic HT29/C1 cells, was confirmed by a newly designed specific PCR assay. The enterotoxigenic B. fragilis (ETBF) strain was analyzed with the help of arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) and PCR-mediated ribotyping. The ETBF strain was shown to be genetically different compared to several other strains obtained from diverse sources. Our data indicate a relatively high vaginal B. fragilis carriage rate among pregnant women in Warsaw, Poland. Although neither ETBF nor B. fragilis colonization presented a clinical problem, the possible genetic relatedness among the colonizing B. fragilis strains indicates the need for additional research in the field of ETBF transmission and molecular epidemiology. PMID:9350755

  17. Phenotypic characterization and genomic DNA polymorphisms of Escherichia coli strains isolated as the sole micro-organism from vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Lobos, Olga; Padilla, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    Vaginal infections such as vulvovaginal candiadiasis, trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis are common worldwide. Accurate diagnosis and prescription of appropriate treatments are important since these infections are linked to adverse outcomes for women during pregnancy and for newborns. Several aetiological agents are responsible for these infectious diseases; however, the presence of Escherichia coli in these infections is controversial. Thus, it is important to identify some phenotypic and genotypic properties of E. coli strains isolated from vaginal infections. Forty-six E. coli strains isolated from vaginal fluid as the sole micro-organism, and 20 other E. coli strains isolated from other samples (urinary tract infections, otitis and septicaemia) were analysed by several phenotypic tests. In addition, genotypic features were studied by RAPD-PCR techniques. Biochemical tests showed that the E. coli strains isolated from vaginal fluid could be grouped into a single cluster which is subdivided into two phenogroups. Analysis of the dendrogram based on fragment length polymorphisms of genomic DNA indicated that E. coli isolates from vaginal infections form a single cluster with two subdivisions. Further studies are needed to analyse the molecular structure and virulence characteristics of these E. coli strains in order to determine their potential role in vaginal infections.

  18. Safety assessment of genetically modified rice expressing human serum albumin from urine metabonomics and fecal bacterial profile.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaozhe; Chen, Siyuan; Sheng, Yao; Guo, Mingzhang; Liu, Yifei; He, Xiaoyun; Huang, Kunlun; Xu, Wentao

    2015-02-01

    The genetically modified (GM) rice expressing human serum albumin (HSA) is used for non-food purposes; however, its food safety assessment should be conducted due to the probability of accidental mixture with conventional food. In this research, Sprague Dawley rats were fed diets containing 50% (wt/wt) GM rice expressing HSA or non-GM rice for 90 days. Urine metabolites were detected by (1)H NMR to examine the changes of the metabolites in the dynamic process of metabolism. Fecal bacterial profiles were detected by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to reflect intestinal health. Additionally, short chain fatty acids and fecal enzymes were investigated. The results showed that compared with rats fed the non-GM rice, some significant differences were observed in rats fed with the GM rice; however, these changes were not significantly different from the control diet group. Additionally, the gut microbiota was associated with blood indexes and urine metabolites. In conclusion, the GM rice diet is as safe as the traditional daily diet. Furthermore, urine metabonomics and fecal bacterial profiles provide a non-invasive food safety assessment rat model for genetically modified crops that are used for non-food/feed purposes. Fecal bacterial profiles have the potential for predicting the change of blood indexes in future.

  19. Safety assessment of genetically modified rice expressing human serum albumin from urine metabonomics and fecal bacterial profile.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaozhe; Chen, Siyuan; Sheng, Yao; Guo, Mingzhang; Liu, Yifei; He, Xiaoyun; Huang, Kunlun; Xu, Wentao

    2015-02-01

    The genetically modified (GM) rice expressing human serum albumin (HSA) is used for non-food purposes; however, its food safety assessment should be conducted due to the probability of accidental mixture with conventional food. In this research, Sprague Dawley rats were fed diets containing 50% (wt/wt) GM rice expressing HSA or non-GM rice for 90 days. Urine metabolites were detected by (1)H NMR to examine the changes of the metabolites in the dynamic process of metabolism. Fecal bacterial profiles were detected by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to reflect intestinal health. Additionally, short chain fatty acids and fecal enzymes were investigated. The results showed that compared with rats fed the non-GM rice, some significant differences were observed in rats fed with the GM rice; however, these changes were not significantly different from the control diet group. Additionally, the gut microbiota was associated with blood indexes and urine metabolites. In conclusion, the GM rice diet is as safe as the traditional daily diet. Furthermore, urine metabonomics and fecal bacterial profiles provide a non-invasive food safety assessment rat model for genetically modified crops that are used for non-food/feed purposes. Fecal bacterial profiles have the potential for predicting the change of blood indexes in future. PMID:25478734

  20. The origin of human milk bacteria: is there a bacterial entero-mammary pathway during late pregnancy and lactation?

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Juan M

    2014-11-01

    Human milk is a source of bacteria to the infant gut; however, the origin of milk bacteria, as well as their impact on neonatal gut microbiota establishment, remains largely unknown. In the past years, results provided by different research groups suggest that certain bacteria from the maternal gastrointestinal tract could translocate through a mechanism involving mononuclear immune cells, migrate to the mammary glands via an endogenous cellular route (the bacterial entero-mammary pathway), and subsequently colonize the gastrointestinal tract of the breast-fed neonate. If such findings are confirmed in the future, we could exert a positive influence on infant health by modulating the maternal gut microbiota.

  1. Salivary bacterial fingerprints of established oral disease revealed by the Human Oral Microbe Identification using Next Generation Sequencing (HOMINGS) technique

    PubMed Central

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Paster, Bruce J.; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Bardow, Allan; Holmstrup, Palle

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective The composition of the salivary microbiota, as determined using various molecular methods, has been reported to differentiate oral health from diseases. Thus, the purpose of this study was to utilize the newly developed molecular technique HOMINGS (Human Oral Microbe Identification using Next Generation Sequencing) for comparison of the salivary microbiota in patients with periodontitis, patients with dental caries, and orally healthy individuals. The hypothesis was that this method could add on to the existing knowledge on salivary bacterial profiles in oral health and disease. Design Stimulated saliva samples (n=30) were collected from 10 patients with untreated periodontitis, 10 patients with untreated dental caries, and 10 orally healthy individuals. Salivary microbiota was analyzed using HOMINGS and statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal–Wallis test with Benjamini–Hochberg's correction. Results From a total of 30 saliva samples, a mean number of probe targets of 205 (range 120–353) were identified, and a statistically significant higher mean number of targets was registered in samples from patients with periodontitis (mean 220, range 143–306) and dental caries (mean 221, range 165–353) as compared to orally healthy individuals (mean 174, range 120–260) (p=0.04 and p=0.04). Nine probe targets were identified with a different relative abundance between groups (p<0.05). Conclusions Cross-sectional comparison of salivary bacterial profiles by means of HOMINGS analysis showed that different salivary bacterial profiles were associated with oral health and disease. Future large-scale prospective studies are needed to evaluate if saliva-based screening for disease-associated oral bacterial profiles may be used for identification of patients at risk of acquiring periodontitis and dental caries. PMID:26782357

  2. Investigations by Cell-Mediated Immunologic Tests and Therapeutic Trials With Thymopentin in Vaginal Mycoses

    PubMed Central

    Koldovsky, Ursula

    1996-01-01

    Objective: According to unsatisfactory therapeutic results in patients with chronically recurrent vaginal candidosis, we investigated if immunologic patient factors could be found and treated. Methods: In 42 women with chronically recurrent and 20 women with acute Candida albicans vulvovaginitis, as well as 14 women with C. glabrata vaginitis, the following investigations were carried out: identification of yeast species; quantification of T lymphocytes and their subpopulations in sera; proliferation tests of T lymphocytes in vitro; treatment of 18 patients with chronically recurrent vaginal candidosis with the synthetic T-lymphocyte- stimulator thymopentin; and, finally, control of the above-mentioned parameters in the clinical course. Results: Women with C. albicans vulvovaginitis showed fewer T lymphocytes and subpopulations in the peripheral blood than healthy women. Only the number of non-specific killer (NK) cells, however, was significantly lower in cases of acute C. albicans vulvovaginitis. In women with C. glabrata vaginitis, the number of T lymphocytes in the blood was within the normal range. In vitro proliferation tests using mitogens, bacterial antigens, and commercially available candida antigens with and without addition of thymopentin were carried out on the T lymphocytes of women with chronically recurrent C. albicans vulvovaginitis. These tests revealed no significant differences compared with the other patients with C. albicans infections. The patients were treated with thymopentin. Those women who revealed an increase of initially low numbers of T-helper cells recovered from vaginal candidosis after thymopentin treatment. Conclusions: The peripheral T lymphocytes may be diminished in patients with chronically recurrent C. albicans vaginitis, and immunologic treatment can reduce the relapse rate. PMID:18476097

  3. Utility of Microbiological Profile of Symptomatic Vaginal Discharge in Rural Women of Reproductive Age Group

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jaya; Gupta, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Symptomatic vaginal discharge is the most frequent symptom in women of reproductive age group. Owing to social stigma majority of affected women hesitate to seek medical consultation. Therefore the actual incidence of vaginal discharge is much more than what is reported. The aim of the study is to determine the microbiological profile of symptomatic vaginal discharge in rural area and its utility in the management of genital tract infection. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive type of observational study, conducted in sexually active women of reproductive age group (18-45 years) attending the OPD/IPD of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department of National Institute of Medical Sciences, Shobhanagar, Jaipur (Rajasthan), over a period of 18 months from June 2012 to December 2013. Hundred sexually active non pregnant women of reproductive age group (18-45 years) were included in the study. After taking consent general physical examination along with pelvic examination was performed. Two high vaginal swabs and blood sample were collected for various tests. Hanging drop preparation was immediately made. This was followed by gram staining and culture. Chlamydia trachomatis IgM antibody was detected by ELISA method. Results: Out of 100 women with symptomatic vaginal discharge, specific diagnosis was obtained in 89% of cases whereas no specific aetiology was found in 11% cases. Mean age was 32.60 years. Fifty-three percent patient had Bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis was found in 14% cases, 16% had Chlamydia trachomatis infection while Trichomonas vaginalis infection was detected in 6% cases. Homogenous discharge was most prevalent (52%), followed by mucopurulant discharge in 23% of women. Conclusion: Patient with symptomatic vaginal discharge need to be actively managed with appropriate antimicrobial agents. Judicious management may be helpful in prevention of HIV, HPV, CIN and post infection sequelae. PMID:25954668

  4. Human-restricted bacterial pathogens block shedding of epithelial cells by stimulating integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Muenzner, Petra; Bachmann, Verena; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Hentschel, Jochen; Hauck, Christof R

    2010-09-01

    Colonization of mucosal surfaces is the key initial step in most bacterial infections. One mechanism protecting the mucosa is the rapid shedding of epithelial cells, also termed exfoliation, but it is unclear how pathogens counteract this process. We found that carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-binding bacteria colonized the urogenital tract of CEA transgenic mice, but not of wild-type mice, by suppressing exfoliation of mucosal cells. CEA binding triggered de novo expression of the transforming growth factor receptor CD105, changing focal adhesion composition and activating beta1 integrins. This manipulation of integrin inside-out signaling promotes efficient mucosal colonization and represents a potential target to prevent or cure bacterial infections. PMID:20813953

  5. Bacterial rheotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Marcos; Fu, Henry C.; Powers, Thomas R.; Stocker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    The motility of organisms is often directed in response to environmental stimuli. Rheotaxis is the directed movement resulting from fluid velocity gradients, long studied in fish, aquatic invertebrates, and spermatozoa. Using carefully controlled microfluidic flows, we show that rheotaxis also occurs in bacteria. Excellent quantitative agreement between experiments with Bacillus subtilis and a mathematical model reveals that bacterial rheotaxis is a purely physical phenomenon, in contrast to fish rheotaxis but in the same way as sperm rheotaxis. This previously unrecognized bacterial taxis results from a subtle interplay between velocity gradients and the helical shape of flagella, which together generate a torque that alters a bacterium's swimming direction. Because this torque is independent of the presence of a nearby surface, bacterial rheotaxis is not limited to the immediate neighborhood of liquid–solid interfaces, but also takes place in the bulk fluid. We predict that rheotaxis occurs in a wide range of bacterial habitats, from the natural environment to the human body, and can interfere with chemotaxis, suggesting that the fitness benefit conferred by bacterial motility may be sharply reduced in some hydrodynamic conditions. PMID:22411815

  6. Design and synthesis of substituted morpholin/piperidin-1-yl-carbamodithioates as promising vaginal microbicides with spermicidal potential.

    PubMed

    Bala, Veenu; Jangir, Santosh; Kumar, Vikas; Mandalapu, Dhanaraju; Gupta, Sonal; Kumar, Lalit; Kushwaha, Bhavana; Chhonker, Yashpal S; Krishna, Atul; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Shukla, Praveen K; Bhatta, Rabi S; Gupta, Gopal; Sharma, Vishnu L

    2014-12-15

    A series of seventeen morpholin/piperidin-1-yl-carbamodithioate (3-19) were synthesized as topical vaginal microbicidal spermicides. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-Trichomonas activity against MTZ susceptible and resistant strains along with their spermicidal and antifungal potential. All the synthesized compounds were assessed for their safety through cytotoxic assay against human cervical cell line (HeLa) and compatibility with vaginal flora, Lactobacillus. The study identified eleven dually active compounds with apparent safety. The plausible mode of action of these compounds was through sulfhydryl binding, confirmed via reduction in available free thiols on human sperm. The most promising compound 9 significantly inhibited (P<0.001) thiol-sensitive sperm hexokinase. The stability of compound 9 in simulated vaginal fluid (SVF) was performed via HPLC-PDA method, which supported its utility for vaginal administration. PMID:25453819

  7. Bacterial histo-blood group antigens contributing to genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with a microfiltration membrane.

    PubMed

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Miura, Takayuki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrated the genotype-dependent removal of human norovirus particles with a microfiltration (MF) membrane in the presence of bacteria bearing histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Three genotypes (GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6) of norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) were mixed with three bacterial strains (Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, Escherichia coli O86:K61:B7, and Staphylococcus epidermidis), respectively, and the mixture was filtered with an MF membrane having a nominal pore size of 0.45 μm. All NoVLP genotypes were rejected by the MF membrane in the presence of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, which excreted HBGAs as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This MF membrane removal of NoVLPs was not significant when EPS was removed from cells of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6. GII.6 NoVLP was not rejected with the MF membrane in the presence of E. coli O86:K61:B7, but the removal of EPS of E. coli O86:K61:B7 increased the removal efficiency due to the interaction of NoVLPs with the exposed B-antigen in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O86:K61:B7. No MF membrane removal of all three genotypes was observed when S. epidermidis, an HBGA-negative strain, was mixed with NoVLPs. These results demonstrate that the location of HBGAs on bacterial cells is an important factor in determining the genotype-dependent removal efficiency of norovirus particles with the MF membrane. The presence of HBGAs in mixed liquor suspended solids from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was confirmed by immune-transmission electron microscopy, which implies that bacterial HBGAs can contribute to the genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with MBR using MF membrane. PMID:27095709

  8. Genome Sequences of 14 Firmicutes Strains Isolated from the Human Vagina.

    PubMed

    Deitzler, Grace E; Ruiz, Maria J; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka; Lewis, Amanda L; Lewis, Warren G

    2016-01-01

    Research on vaginal infections is currently limited by a lack of available fully sequenced bacterial reference strains. Here, we present strains (now available through BEI Resources) and genome sequences for a set of 14 vaginal isolates from the phylum Firmicutes These genome sequences provide a valuable resource for future research in understanding the role of Gram-positive bacteria in vaginal health and disease.

  9. Bacterial superantigens promote acute nasopharyngeal infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a human MHC Class II-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Katherine J; Zeppa, Joseph J; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T; Xu, Stacey X; Mazzuca, Delfina M; Welch, Ian; Baroja, Miren L; Kotb, Malak; Cairns, Ewa; Cleary, P Patrick; Haeryfar, S M Mansour; McCormick, John K

    2014-05-01

    Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs) as 'trademark' virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC -II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms.

  10. Loofah sponges as reservoirs and vehicles in the transmission of potentially pathogenic bacterial species to human skin.

    PubMed

    Bottone, E J; Perez, A A; Oeser, J L

    1994-02-01

    Loofah sponges are natural products used as exfoliative beauty aids. As a consequence of tracing a case of Pseudomonas aeruginosa folliculitis to a contaminated loofah sponge, we assessed the role of loofah sponges in supporting the growth of a wide variety of bacterial species. Our data show growth enhancement of sterile loofah fragments for numerous gram-negative (Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas, and Klebsiella) and gram-positive (Enterococcus and group B Streptococcus) species of human and environmental origin. Furthermore, hydrated new, unused loofah sponges undergo a shift in bacterial flora from sparse colonies of Bacillus spp. and Staphylococcus epidermidis to a predominantly gram-negative flora. The growth-promoting potential of loofah sponges (and other exfoliatives) can be further augmented by desquamated epithelial cells entrapped in the loofah fibrous matrix. Therefore, as loofah sponges (and other exfoliatives) can serve as a reservoir and a vehicle for the transmission of potentially pathogenic species to the human skin, we recommend their decontamination with hypochlorite (10%) bleach at regular intervals. PMID:8150959

  11. Modulation of Human Airway Barrier Functions during Burkholderia thailandensis and Francisella tularensis Infection Running Title: Airway Barrier Functions during Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Blume, Cornelia; David, Jonathan; Bell, Rachel E; Laver, Jay R; Read, Robert C; Clark, Graeme C; Davies, Donna E; Swindle, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    The bronchial epithelium provides protection against pathogens from the inhaled environment through the formation of a highly-regulated barrier. In order to understand the pulmonary diseases melioidosis and tularemia caused by Burkholderia thailandensis and Fransicella tularensis, respectively, the barrier function of the human bronchial epithelium were analysed. Polarised 16HBE14o- or differentiated primary human bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) were exposed to increasing multiplicities of infection (MOI) of B. thailandensis or F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain and barrier responses monitored over 24-72 h. Challenge of polarized BECs with either bacterial species caused an MOI- and time-dependent increase in ionic permeability, disruption of tight junctions, and bacterial passage from the apical to the basolateral compartment. B. thailandensis was found to be more invasive than F. tularensis. Both bacterial species induced an MOI-dependent increase in TNF-α release. An increase in ionic permeability and TNF-α release was induced by B. thailandensis in differentiated BECs. Pretreatment of polarised BECs with the corticosteroid fluticasone propionate reduced bacterial-dependent increases in ionic permeability, bacterial passage, and TNF-α release. TNF blocking antibody Enbrel(®) reduced bacterial passage only. BEC barrier properties are disrupted during respiratory bacterial infections and targeting with corticosteroids or anti-TNF compounds may represent a therapeutic option. PMID:27527221

  12. Modulation of Human Airway Barrier Functions during Burkholderia thailandensis and Francisella tularensis Infection Running Title: Airway Barrier Functions during Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Cornelia; David, Jonathan; Bell, Rachel E.; Laver, Jay R.; Read, Robert C.; Clark, Graeme C.; Davies, Donna E.; Swindle, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    The bronchial epithelium provides protection against pathogens from the inhaled environment through the formation of a highly-regulated barrier. In order to understand the pulmonary diseases melioidosis and tularemia caused by Burkholderia thailandensis and Fransicella tularensis, respectively, the barrier function of the human bronchial epithelium were analysed. Polarised 16HBE14o- or differentiated primary human bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) were exposed to increasing multiplicities of infection (MOI) of B. thailandensis or F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain and barrier responses monitored over 24–72 h. Challenge of polarized BECs with either bacterial species caused an MOI- and time-dependent increase in ionic permeability, disruption of tight junctions, and bacterial passage from the apical to the basolateral compartment. B. thailandensis was found to be more invasive than F. tularensis. Both bacterial species induced an MOI-dependent increase in TNF-α release. An increase in ionic permeability and TNF-α release was induced by B. thailandensis in differentiated BECs. Pretreatment of polarised BECs with the corticosteroid fluticasone propionate reduced bacterial-dependent increases in ionic permeability, bacterial passage, and TNF-α release. TNF blocking antibody Enbrel® reduced bacterial passage only. BEC barrier properties are disrupted during respiratory bacterial infections and targeting with corticosteroids or anti-TNF compounds may represent a therapeutic option. PMID:27527221

  13. Use of porcine vaginal tissue ex-vivo to model environmental effects on vaginal mucosa to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Catherine C.; Baccam, Mekhine; Mantz, Mary J.; Osborn, Thomas W.; Hill, Donna R.; Squier, Christopher A.

    2014-01-15

    Surfactants increased penetration of tracers across vaginal mucosa. • Alpha-hemolysin increased the penetration of bacterial toxin across vaginal mucosa.

  14. Efficacy of syndromic management measured as symptomatic improvement in females with vaginal discharge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vidyalaxmi; Shah, Maitri C.; Patel, Sangita V.; Marfatia, Yogesh S.; Zalavadiya, Dhara

    2016-01-01

    Background: In spite of a few shortcomings such as over diagnosis and over treatment, syndromic management is a recommended practice in India for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). This study tries to find out the efficacy of syndromic management measured as symptomatic improvement in females with vaginal discharge syndrome. Objective: The objective of the study is to find out the effectiveness of syndromic management in terms of symptomatic improvement among females with vaginal discharge syndrome. Materials and Methods: A longitudinal study was conducted in Gynecology Department of Tertiary Care Hospital including 180 symptomatic females having vaginal discharge syndrome. Demographic profile, presenting complaints, menstrual history, obstetric history, partner history, and contraceptive history were noted. This was followed by clinical examination and specimen collection for laboratory tests and blood tests to find out type of STI including viral STI such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Treatment was given according to syndromic management on the same day. All the participants were asked to come for follow-up after 15 days and their improvement in symptoms was noted as complete improvement, some improvement or no improvement on a five point scale. Results: 63.9% cases showed complete improvement, while 36.1% showed some improvement. None of the patients was without any improvement. Vaginal discharge syndrome was most common between 20 and 30 years (43.4%), and 67.8% of symptomatic females with vaginal discharge syndrome belonged to the lower socioeconomic group. HSV infection was the most common (15%) associated viral infection with vaginal discharge syndrome, while hepatitis B infection was the least common (0.5%). HIV was reactive in 2.8% cases only. Conclusion: Syndromic management was found to be effective in relieving symptoms in most of the cases of vaginal discharge syndrome

  15. Comparisons of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and viromes in human saliva reveal bacterial adaptations to salivary viruses.

    PubMed

    Pride, David T; Salzman, Julia; Relman, David A

    2012-09-01

    Explorations of human microbiota have provided substantial insight into microbial community composition; however, little is known about interactions between various microbial components in human ecosystems. In response to the powerful impact of viral predation, bacteria have acquired potent defences, including an adaptive immune response based on the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)/Cas system. To improve our understanding of the interactions between bacteria and their viruses in humans, we analysed 13 977 streptococcal CRISPR sequences and compared them with 2 588 172 virome reads in the saliva of four human subjects over 17 months. We found a diverse array of viruses and CRISPR spacers, many of which were specific to each subject and time point. There were numerous viral sequences matching CRISPR spacers; these matches were highly specific for salivary viruses. We determined that spacers and viruses coexist at the same time, which suggests that streptococcal CRISPR/Cas systems are under constant pressure from salivary viruses. CRISPRs in some subjects were just as likely to match viral sequences from other subjects as they were to match viruses from the same subject. Because interactions between bacteria and viruses help to determine the structure of bacterial communities, CRISPR-virus analyses are likely to provide insight into the forces shaping the human microbiome.

  16. Sexually transmitted infections in women: A correlation of clinical and laboratory diagnosis in cases of vaginal discharge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vidyalaxmi; Shah, Maitri; Thakkar, Sejal; Patel, Sangita V.; Marfatia, Yogesh

    2014-01-01

    Aims: This study compares the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of vaginal discharge syndrome. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study was carried out at the gynaecology outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital in Gujarat, India. Material and Methods: Total of 180 females diagnosed as vaginal discharge or cervicitis based on syndromic approach and were recruited for the study. Their clinical profile was noted and they were investigated for bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis, candidiasis, gonorrhoea and chlamydia infection. Results: Lower abdominal pain (35%) followed by burning micturition (23.9%) were the common associated complaints. Bacterial vaginosis was the most common clinical diagnosis, while trichomoniasis was least common. Upon laboratory investigation, 35.6% of cases of vaginal discharge and 12% of cases of cervicitis tested positive. Percentage of cases confirmed by laboratory investigation was 50, 27.8 and 41.7 for bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis and candidiasis respectively. Conclusion: Among all the females diagnosed as vaginal discharge syndrome, a very small percentage actually turned out to be positive upon laboratory testing. PMID:25506555

  17. Vaginal mucus from ewes treated with progestogen sponges affects quality of ram spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Manes, Jorgelina; Ríos, Glenda; Fiorentino, María Andrea; Ungerfeld, Rodolfo

    2016-03-15

    The use of intravaginal sponges (IS) to synchronize estrous onset in ewes provokes vaginitis, an increase in the vaginal bacterial load, and growth of bacterial species that are not present during spontaneous estrous behavior. The objective of the study was to compare the functional sperm parameters after incubating it with mucus collected from the vagina of ewes during spontaneous estrus or estrous synchronized with IS. Pooled spermatozoa were co-incubated with: (1) vaginal mucus collected from ewes in spontaneous estrus; (2) vaginal mucus collected from ewes in estrus pretreated with progestogen-impregnated IS; (3) synthetic mucus; and (4) medium without mucus as a control group. Sperm samples were evaluated after incubating it for 30 and 90 minutes. The number of colony-forming units (CFUs/mL), pH, and osmolality were greater in the mucus collected from ewes treated with IS than from those untreated (P = 0.046; P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0001, respectively). The percentage of sperm with progressive motility was lower after incubation with vaginal mucus collected from estrous ewes treated with IS than in the other three treatments both, 30 and 90 minutes after incubation (P = 0.0009 and P < 0.0001, respectively). The sample incubated for 30 minutes with mucus from ewes treated with IS had a lower percentage of sperm with intact plasma membrane than all the other treatments (P < 0.0001). The percentage of sperm with functional membrane was significantly lower in the sample incubated for 30 minutes with vaginal mucus from ewes treated with IS than in the other three treatments (P < 0.0001). After 90 minutes, the percentage was still lower than that in the sample collected from ewes during their spontaneous estrus (P = 0.0005). The lowest percentages of sperm with acrosome damage were observed in sperm incubated with mucus collected from sheep in spontaneous estrus for 30 and 90 minutes (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.008, respectively). The percentage of apoptotic spermatozoa was

  18. Comparison of vaginal flora after treatment with a clotrimazole 500 mg vaginal pessary or a fluconazole 150 mg capsule for vaginal candidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Boag, F C; Houang, E T; Westrom, R; McCormack, S M; Lawrence, A G

    1991-01-01

    The effect of antifungal therapy on the vaginal microbial flora was studied in 23 patients suffering from culture-positive, symptomatic vaginal candidosis. They were randomly allocated to receive either a 500 mg clotrimazole vaginal pessary or a 150 mg fluconazole capsule. Quantitative microbiological examination was carried out on samples of vaginal secretions obtained prior, and at intervals up to 10 days after, treatment. No significant difference was found in the vaginal flora before or after therapy in individual patients or between the treatment groups. In patients with C glabrata or C krusei, the yeasts persisted longer in the vagina with poorer response to either of the medications. PMID:2071126

  19. Non-coding-regulatory regions of human brain genes delineated by bacterial artificial chromosome knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The next big challenge in human genetics is understanding the 98% of the genome that comprises non-coding DNA. Hidden in this DNA are sequences critical for gene regulation, and new experimental strategies are needed to understand the functional role of gene-regulation sequences in health and disease. In this study, we build upon our HuGX ('high-throughput human genes on the X chromosome’) strategy to expand our understanding of human gene regulation in vivo. Results In all, ten human genes known to express in therapeutically important brain regions were chosen for study. For eight of these genes, human bacterial artificial chromosome clones were identified, retrofitted with a reporter, knocked single-copy into the Hprt locus in mouse embryonic stem cells, and mouse strains derived. Five of these human genes expressed in mouse, and all expressed in the adult brain region for which they were chosen. This defined the boundaries of the genomic DNA sufficient for brain expression, and refined our knowledge regarding the complexity of gene regulation. We also characterized for the first time the expression of human MAOA and NR2F2, two genes for which the mouse homologs have been extensively studied in the central nervous system (CNS), and AMOTL1 and NOV, for which roles in CNS have been unclear. Conclusions We have demonstrated the use of the HuGX strategy to functionally delineate non-coding-regulatory regions of therapeutically important human brain genes. Our results also show that a careful investigation, using publicly available resources and bioinformatics, can lead to accurate predictions of gene expression. PMID:24124870

  20. Electrosurgical Settings and Vaginal Cuff Complications

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Megan L.; Rao, Rama; Manahan, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: After being encouraged to change the technique for opening the vaginal cuff during robotic surgery, this study was performed to determine the correlation between vaginal cuff complications and electrosurgical techniques. Methods: The study group consisted of patients who had their vaginal cuffs opened with a cutting current compared to the group of patients having their vaginal cuff opened with a coagulation current. Data were collected on 150 women who underwent robotic surgery for endometrial cancer. All patients received preoperative antibiotics. Data, including operative time, type of electrosurgery used, estimated blood loss, transfusion rate, and complications, were collected from the patients' records. Results: Surgeries in 150 women and the associated complications were studied. The mean age of the patients was not significantly different between the groups (P = .63). The mean body mass index was 38 kg/m2 in the coagulation arm and 36 kg/m2 in the cutting arm (P = .03). Transfusion was not required. Estimated blood loss and operative time were not significantly different in the coagulation versus the cutting arms (P = .29 and .5; respectively). No patients in the cutting arm and 4 patients (with 5 complications) in the coagulation arm had cuff complications (P = .02). Conclusions: Complications involving the vaginal cuff appear to occur more frequently when the vagina is entered by using electrosurgery with coagulation versus cutting in this cohort of patients undergoing robot-assisted surgery for endometrial cancer.. PMID:26681912

  1. The Gestational Vaginal Microbiome and Spontaneous Preterm Birth among Nulliparous African American Women.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Deborah B; Shin, Hakdong; Wu, Jingwei; Dominguez-Bello, Maria G

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Early markers to identify pregnant women at high risk for spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB) have not been established and preventive options are limited. Recent attention has focused on examining the importance of characterizing the vaginal microbiome to predict SPTB. Results We examined the diversity and structure of the vaginal microbiome in nulliparous African American women during early pregnancy and compared 13 women who delivered preterm and 27 women who delivered at term. Samples were taken at one of two points in gestation, before 16 weeks or between 20 and 24 weeks. Among women who delivered preterm, we found lower bacterial diversity with lower abundance of Coriobacteriaceae, Sneathia, Prevotella, and Aerococcus compared with women delivering at term (linear discriminant analysis score > 3.0). The Shannon diversity index was not significantly different between the groups (p-value = 0.239). Phylogenetic diversity and Chao1 suggested a lower diversity in the vaginal microbiota of women who delivered preterm compared with term, but these findings were not significantly different (p = 0.077 and p = 0.066, respectively). Conclusion These data suggest that the vaginal microbiome of women delivering preterm had lower diversity than women delivering after 37 weeks, although these findings need to be explored in a larger sample of nulliparous African American women.

  2. Evaluation of two self-care treatments for prevention of vaginal candidiasis in women with HIV.

    PubMed

    Williams, A B; Yu, C; Tashima, K; Burgess, J; Danvers, K

    2001-01-01

    Vaginal candidiasis (VC) is a common concern for women living with HIV infection. The authors evaluated the effectiveness of two self-care approaches to prophylaxis of VC among HIV-infected women, weekly intravaginal application of Lactobacillus acidophilus or weekly intravaginal application of clotrimazole tablets, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. VC was defined as a vaginal swab positive for Candida species in the presence of signs/symptoms of vaginitis and the absence of a diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis or bacterial vaginosis. Thirty-four episodes of VC occurred among 164 women followed for a median of 21 months. The relative risk of experiencing an episode of VC was 0.4 (95% CI = 0.2, 0.9) in the clotrimazole arm and 0.5 (95% CI = 0.2, 1.1) in the Lactobacillus acidophilus arm. The estimated median time to first episode VC was longer for clotrimazole (p = .03, log rank test) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (p = .09, log rank test) compared with placebo. Vaginal yeast infections can be prevented with local therapy. Education about self-care for prophylaxis of VC should be offered to HIV-infected women.

  3. Bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: an approach for the 1990s.

    PubMed

    McCoy, M C; Katz, V L; Kuller, J A; Killam, A P; Livengood, C H

    1995-06-01

    It is proposed that clinicians screen all pregnant women at high risk for preterm labor and premature rupture of membranes for bacterial vaginosis, and treat all women when it is diagnosed. This infection is associated with a two to three times increase in preterm labor and delivery, premature rupture of the membranes, and endometritis. Although cause and effect have not been conclusively documented, these associations must be considered in the practice of obstetrics at the present. The paucity of vaginal Lactobacillus spp is pivotal in allowing overgrowth of many other organisms of the vagina. Screening is suggested because 50 percent of bacterial vaginosis is asymptomatic. The diagnosis, which is rapidly made and inexpensive, remains defined by clue cells seen on wet prep, high vaginal pH, and amine odor of the vaginal discharge. Optimal treatment of pregnant women with bacterial vaginosis is via oral or intravaginal metronidazole or clindamycin. PMID:7659396

  4. [Vaginal sonography versus vaginal palpation: initial experiences in 120 pregnant patients with suspected cervix insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Böhmer, S; Degenhardt, F; Gerlach, C; Jagla, K; Schneider, J

    1989-01-01

    In a clinical study a group of pregnant women with suspected cervical incompetence was examined by vaginal sonography. Aim of the investigation was to compare results of performed vaginal palpation with results of sonography. 120 pregnant women with cervical insufficiency between 16th and 33rd week of gestation were examined by a 5-MHz vaginal sectorscanner probe. After focussing sagittal projection of uterine cervix and lower uterine segment the cervical length and opening of the internal os were assessed prior to cerclage. Postoperative vaginal sonography was performed to ascertain lengthening and stabilization of the incompetent cervix. Another group of 50 pregnant women with unsuspicious obstetrical findings were also examined to gain information about normal sonographical morphology and length of the competent uterine cervix. Comparing results of vaginal palpation and vaginal sonography showed, that the cervical length obtained by sonography was constantly higher in all patients than the results obtained by palpation. This difference became more distinct in the group of patients with extreme cervical incompetence. We are of the opinion that vaginal sonography is an objective method revealing the extent of cervical incompetence. Exact measurement of the cervical length and assessment of the internal os are efficient diagnostic criteria. They complete results of cervical palpation and offer precise information concerning an intended cerclage. In case of suspected cervical incompetence continuous sonographical examination can supervise the development of the uterine cervix during pregnancy. In future the number of prophylactic cerclage-operations perhaps decreases by using the technique of transvaginal sonography. PMID:2669397

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Vesicles Triggered by Human Mucosal Fluid and Lysozyme Can Prime Host Tissue Surfaces for Bacterial Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Metruccio, Matteo M. E.; Evans, David J.; Gabriel, Manal M.; Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality that often targets epithelial surfaces. Host immunocompromise, or the presence of indwelling medical devices, including contact lenses, can predispose to infection. While medical devices are known to accumulate bacterial biofilms, it is not well understood why resistant epithelial surfaces become susceptible to P. aeruginosa. Many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in response to stress that can fuse with host cells to alter their function. Here, we tested the hypothesis that mucosal fluid can trigger OMV release to compromise an epithelial barrier. This was tested using tear fluid and corneal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. After 1 h both human tear fluid, and the tear component lysozyme, greatly enhanced OMV release from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS) controls (∼100-fold). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and SDS-PAGE showed tear fluid and lysozyme-induced OMVs were similar in size and protein composition, but differed from biofilm-harvested OMVs, the latter smaller with fewer proteins. Lysozyme-induced OMVs were cytotoxic to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro and murine corneal epithelium in vivo. OMV exposure in vivo enhanced Ly6G/C expression at the corneal surface, suggesting myeloid cell recruitment, and primed the cornea for bacterial adhesion (∼4-fold, P < 0.01). Sonication disrupted OMVs retained cytotoxic activity, but did not promote adhesion, suggesting the latter required OMV-mediated events beyond cell killing. These data suggest that mucosal fluid induced P. aeruginosa OMVs could contribute to loss of epithelial barrier function during medical device-related infections. PMID:27375592

  6. Two novel human members of an emerging mammalian gene family related to mono-ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Koch-Nolte, F.; Haag, F.; Braren, R.

    1997-02-01

    Mono-ADP-ribosylation is one of the posttranslational protein modifications regulating cellular metabolism, e.g., nitrogen fixation, in prokaryotes. Several bacterial toxins mono-ADP-ribosylate and inactivate specific proteins in their animal hosts. Recently, two mammalian GPI-anchored cell surface enzymes with similar activities were cloned (designated ART1 and ART2). We have now identified six related expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the public database and cloned the two novel human genes from which these are derived (designated ART3 and ART4). The deduced amino acid sequences of the predicted gene products show 28% sequence identity to one another and 32-41% identity vs the muscle and T cell enzymes. They contain signal peptide sequences characteristic of GPI anchorage. Southern Zoo blot analyses suggest the presence of related genes in other mammalian species. By PCR screening of somatic cell hybrids and by in situ hybridization, we have mapped the two genes to human chromosomes 4p14-p15.l and 12q13.2- q13.3. Northern blot analyses show that these genes are specifically expressed in testis and spleen, respectively. Comparison of genomic and cDNA sequences reveals a conserved exon/intron structure, with an unusually large exon encoding the predicted mature membrane proteins. Secondary structure prediction analyses indicate conserved motifs and amino acid residues consistent with a common ancestry of this emerging mammalian enzyme family and bacterial mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferases. It is possible that the four human gene family members identified so far represent the {open_quotes}tip of an iceberg,{close_quote} i.e., a larger family of enzymes that influences the function of target proteins via mono-ADP-ribosylation. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Ammonium salts of carbamodithioic acid as potent vaginal trichomonacides and fungicides.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Bhavana; Mandalapu, Dhanaraju; Bala, Veenu; Kumar, Lokesh; Pandey, Aastha; Pandey, Deepti; Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Pratiksha; Shukla, P K; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Sankhwar, Satya N; Sharma, Vishnu L; Gupta, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Chemical attenuation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive anaerobes Trichomonas vaginalis, which is the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted infection, and two often coexisting vaginal infections, namely Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus, which are opportunistic reproductive tract infections, was attempted with novel ammonium salts of carbamodithioic acid through inhibition of free thiols. In vitro and in vivo efficacies of the designed compounds were evaluated as topical vaginal microbicides. Five compounds showed exceptional activity against drug-resistant and -susceptible strains with negligible toxicity to host (HeLa) cells in vitro in comparison with the standard vaginal microbicide nonoxynol-9 (N-9), without disturbing the normal vaginal flora (i.e. Lactobacillus). The compounds significantly inhibited the cytopathic effects of Trichomonas on HeLa cells in vitro with efficacies comparable with metronidazole (MTZ); however, their efficacy to rescue host cells from co-infection (protozoal and fungal) was greater than that of MTZ. The compounds inhibited β-haemolysis of red blood cells caused by Trichomonas and were found to be active in vivo in the mouse subcutaneous abscess assay. Some compounds rapidly immobilized human sperm. A mechanism involving inhibition of free thiols and consequently the cysteine proteases of T. vaginalis by the new compounds has been proposed. Thus, a unique scaffold of antimicrobial agents has been discovered that warrants further investigation for development as contraceptive vaginal microbicides.

  8. Ammonium salts of carbamodithioic acid as potent vaginal trichomonacides and fungicides.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Bhavana; Mandalapu, Dhanaraju; Bala, Veenu; Kumar, Lokesh; Pandey, Aastha; Pandey, Deepti; Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Pratiksha; Shukla, P K; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Sankhwar, Satya N; Sharma, Vishnu L; Gupta, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Chemical attenuation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive anaerobes Trichomonas vaginalis, which is the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted infection, and two often coexisting vaginal infections, namely Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus, which are opportunistic reproductive tract infections, was attempted with novel ammonium salts of carbamodithioic acid through inhibition of free thiols. In vitro and in vivo efficacies of the designed compounds were evaluated as topical vaginal microbicides. Five compounds showed exceptional activity against drug-resistant and -susceptible strains with negligible toxicity to host (HeLa) cells in vitro in comparison with the standard vaginal microbicide nonoxynol-9 (N-9), without disturbing the normal vaginal flora (i.e. Lactobacillus). The compounds significantly inhibited the cytopathic effects of Trichomonas on HeLa cells in vitro with efficacies comparable with metronidazole (MTZ); however, their efficacy to rescue host cells from co-infection (protozoal and fungal) was greater than that of MTZ. The compounds inhibited β-haemolysis of red blood cells caused by Trichomonas and were found to be active in vivo in the mouse subcutaneous abscess assay. Some compounds rapidly immobilized human sperm. A mechanism involving inhibition of free thiols and consequently the cysteine proteases of T. vaginalis by the new compounds has been proposed. Thus, a unique scaffold of antimicrobial agents has been discovered that warrants further investigation for development as contraceptive vaginal microbicides. PMID:26706422

  9. Intravaginal practices, vaginal flora disturbances, and acquisition of sexually transmitted diseases in Zimbabwean women.

    PubMed

    van De Wijgert, J H; Mason, P R; Gwanzura, L; Mbizvo, M T; Chirenje, Z M; Iliff, V; Shiboski, S; Padian, N S

    2000-02-01

    One hundred sixty-nine Zimbabwean women were studied to determine whether the use of intravaginal practices (cleaning with the fingers, wiping the vagina, and inserting traditional substances) are associated with disturbances of vaginal flora and acquisition of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Subjects were interviewed and received counseling and a pelvic examination at enrollment, 1 month, and 6 months, and vaginal specimens were collected at enrollment and at 6 months. Users were more likely than nonusers to have vaginal flora disturbances but were not more likely to acquire an STD (relative risk [RR], 2.15; P=.188). Certain vaginal flora disturbances were associated with increased STD incidence and HIV prevalence. The absence of lactobacilli from the vaginal flora was associated with being positive for human immunodeficiency virus in baseline (odds ratio [OR], 0.24; P=.001) and 6-month transition multivariate models (OR, 0.39; P=.025). The presence of clue cells at baseline was associated with a higher incidence of STDs (RR, 1. 94; P=.025). PMID:10669342

  10. Robust vaginal colonization of macaques with a novel vaginally disintegrating tablet containing a live biotherapeutic product to prevent HIV infection in women.

    PubMed

    Lagenaur, Laurel A; Swedek, Iwona; Lee, Peter P; Parks, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    MucoCept is a biotherapeutic for prevention of HIV-1 infection in women and contains a human, vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii that has been genetically enhanced to express the HIV-1 entry inhibitor, modified cyanovirin-N (mCV-N). The objective of this study was to develop a solid vaginal dosage form that supports sustained vaginal colonization of the MucoCept Lactobacillus at levels previously shown, with freshly prepared cultures, to protect macaques from SHIV infection and to test this formulation in a macaque vaginal colonization model. Vaginally disintegrating tablets were prepared by lyophilizing the formulated bacteria in tablet-shaped molds, then packaging in foil pouches with desiccant. Disintegration time, potency and stability of the tablets were assessed. For colonization, non-synchronized macaques were dosed vaginally with either one tablet or five tablets delivered over five days. Vaginal samples were obtained at three, 14, and 21 days post-dosing and cultured to determine Lactobacillus colonization levels. To confirm identity of the MucoCept Lactobacillus strain, genomic DNA was extracted from samples on days 14 and 21 and a strain-specific PCR was performed. Supernatants from bacteria were tested for the presence of the mCV-N protein by Western blot. The tablets were easy to handle, disintegrated within two minutes, potent (5.7x1011 CFU/g), and stable at 4°C and 25°C. Vaginal administration of the tablets to macaques resulted in colonization of the MucoCept Lactobacillus in 66% of macaques at 14 days post-dosing and 83% after 21 days. There was no significant difference in colonization levels for the one or five tablet dosing regimens (p=0.88 Day 14, p=0.99 Day 21). Strain-specific PCR confirmed the presence of the bacteria even in culture-negative macaques. Finally, the presence of mCV-N protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis using a specific anti-mCV-N antibody.

  11. Robust vaginal colonization of macaques with a novel vaginally disintegrating tablet containing a live biotherapeutic product to prevent HIV infection in women.

    PubMed

    Lagenaur, Laurel A; Swedek, Iwona; Lee, Peter P; Parks, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    MucoCept is a biotherapeutic for prevention of HIV-1 infection in women and contains a human, vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii that has been genetically enhanced to express the HIV-1 entry inhibitor, modified cyanovirin-N (mCV-N). The objective of this study was to develop a solid vaginal dosage form that supports sustained vaginal colonization of the MucoCept Lactobacillus at levels previously shown, with freshly prepared cultures, to protect macaques from SHIV infection and to test this formulation in a macaque vaginal colonization model. Vaginally disintegrating tablets were prepared by lyophilizing the formulated bacteria in tablet-shaped molds, then packaging in foil pouches with desiccant. Disintegration time, potency and stability of the tablets were assessed. For colonization, non-synchronized macaques were dosed vaginally with either one tablet or five tablets delivered over five days. Vaginal samples were obtained at three, 14, and 21 days post-dosing and cultured to determine Lactobacillus colonization levels. To confirm identity of the MucoCept Lactobacillus strain, genomic DNA was extracted from samples on days 14 and 21 and a strain-specific PCR was performed. Supernatants from bacteria were tested for the presence of the mCV-N protein by Western blot. The tablets were easy to handle, disintegrated within two minutes, potent (5.7x1011 CFU/g), and stable at 4°C and 25°C. Vaginal administration of the tablets to macaques resulted in colonization of the MucoCept Lactobacillus in 66% of macaques at 14 days post-dosing and 83% after 21 days. There was no significant difference in colonization levels for the one or five tablet dosing regimens (p=0.88 Day 14, p=0.99 Day 21). Strain-specific PCR confirmed the presence of the bacteria even in culture-negative macaques. Finally, the presence of mCV-N protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis using a specific anti-mCV-N antibody. PMID:25875100

  12. Robust Vaginal Colonization of Macaques with a Novel Vaginally Disintegrating Tablet Containing a Live Biotherapeutic Product to Prevent HIV Infection in Women

    PubMed Central

    Lagenaur, Laurel A.; Swedek, Iwona; Lee, Peter P.; Parks, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    MucoCept is a biotherapeutic for prevention of HIV-1 infection in women and contains a human, vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii that has been genetically enhanced to express the HIV-1 entry inhibitor, modified cyanovirin-N (mCV-N). The objective of this study was to develop a solid vaginal dosage form that supports sustained vaginal colonization of the MucoCept Lactobacillus at levels previously shown, with freshly prepared cultures, to protect macaques from SHIV infection and to test this formulation in a macaque vaginal colonization model. Vaginally disintegrating tablets were prepared by lyophilizing the formulated bacteria in tablet-shaped molds, then packaging in foil pouches with desiccant. Disintegration time, potency and stability of the tablets were assessed. For colonization, non-synchronized macaques were dosed vaginally with either one tablet or five tablets delivered over five days. Vaginal samples were obtained at three, 14, and 21 days post-dosing and cultured to determine Lactobacillus colonization levels. To confirm identity of the MucoCept Lactobacillus strain, genomic DNA was extracted from samples on days 14 and 21 and a strain-specific PCR was performed. Supernatants from bacteria were tested for the presence of the mCV-N protein by Western blot. The tablets were easy to handle, disintegrated within two minutes, potent (5.7x1011 CFU/g), and stable at 4°C and 25°C. Vaginal administration of the tablets to macaques resulted in colonization of the MucoCept Lactobacillus in 66% of macaques at 14 days post-dosing and 83% after 21 days. There was no significant difference in colonization levels for the one or five tablet dosing regimens (p=0.88 Day 14, p=0.99 Day 21). Strain-specific PCR confirmed the presence of the bacteria even in culture-negative macaques. Finally, the presence of mCV-N protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis using a specific anti-mCV-N antibody. PMID:25875100

  13. Role of Semen on Vaginal HIV-1 Transmission and Maraviroc Protection

    PubMed Central

    Council, Olivia D.; Swanson, Michael D.; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann

    2015-01-01

    We used bone marrow/liver/thymus (BLT) humanized mice to establish the effect of semen on vaginal HIV infection and on the efficacy of topically applied maraviroc. Our results demonstrate that vaginal transmission of cell-free HIV occurs efficiently in the presence of semen and that topically applied maraviroc efficiently prevents HIV transmission in the presence of semen. We also show that semen has no significant effect on the transmission of transmitted/founder viruses or cell-associated viruses. PMID:26392489

  14. NIH Human Microbiome Project defines normal bacterial makeup of the body

    Cancer.gov

    Microbes inhabit just about every part of the human body, living on the skin, in the gut, and up the nose. Sometimes they cause sickness, but most of the time, microorganisms live in harmony with their human hosts, providing vital functions essential for

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIAL DNA MARKERS FOR THE DETECTION OF HUMAN FECAL POLLUTION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used genome fragment enrichment and bioinformatics to identify several microbial DNA sequences with high potential for use as markers in PCR assays for detection of human fecal contamination in water. Following competitive solution-phase hybridization of total DNA from human a...

  16. Development of self-contained, indwelling vaginal temperature probe for use in cattle research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A device was developed to monitor the vaginal temperature of cattle in a research setting. This device decreases labor involved with monitoring temperature compared with manual temperature readings. It also allows for temperature measurements without the presence of a human handler or without restra...

  17. Raman spectroscopic signature of vaginal fluid and its potential application in forensic body fluid identification.

    PubMed

    Sikirzhytskaya, Aliaksandra; Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Lednev, Igor K

    2012-03-10

    Traces of human body fluids, such as blood, saliva, sweat, semen and vaginal fluid, play an increasingly important role in forensic investigations. However, a nondestructive, easy and rapid identification of body fluid traces at the scene of a crime has not yet been developed. The obstacles have recently been addressed in our studies, which demonstrated the considerable potential of Raman spectroscopy. In this study, we continued to build a full library of body fluid spectroscopic signatures. The problems concerning vaginal fluid stain identification were addressed using Raman spectroscopy coupled with advanced statistical analysis. Calculated characteristic Raman and fluorescent spectral components were used to build a multidimensional spectroscopic signature of vaginal fluid, which demonstrated good specificity and was able to handle heterogeneous samples from different donors.

  18. Outpatient vaginal hysterectomy in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M A; Lalich, R A; Meyer, M M; Widener, J

    1994-08-01

    From Sept 1, 1992 to Dec 31, 1993, 38 outpatient vaginal hysterectomy patients were evaluated for identification of complications after discharge, adequacy of pain relief at home, return to baseline lifestyle, and costs. No complications that would have necessitated an overnight or longer stay were identified. All patients reported adequate pain relief and a more rapid return to activity than they had expected. The hospital cost of outpatient vaginal hysterectomy was about half that of inpatient, and additional significant savings were realized in the cost of postoperative medication. Patients were positive about returning home the day of surgery and would recommend the protocol to others who qualified.

  19. The Gut Microbiota and Human Health with an Emphasis on the Use of Microencapsulated Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Satya; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Cantor, Arielle

    2011-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in maintaining health. Alterations of the gut bacterial population have been associated with a number of diseases. Past and recent studies suggest that one can positively modify the contents of the gut microbiota by introducing prebiotics, probiotics, synbiotics, and other therapeutics. This paper focuses on probiotic modulation of the gut microbiota by their delivery to the lower gastrointestinal tract (GIT). There are numerous obstacles to overcome before microorganisms can be utilized as therapeutics. One important limitation is the delivery of viable cells to the lower GIT without a significant loss of cell viability and metabolic features through the harsh conditions of the upper GIT. Microencapsulation has been shown to overcome this, with various types of microcapsules available for resolving this limitation. This paper discusses the gut microbiota and its role in disease, with a focus on microencapsulated probiotics and their potentials and limitations. PMID:21772792

  20. Adherence of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains to human lung fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Martin, D; Mathieu, L G; Lecomte, J; deRepentigny, J

    1986-01-01

    The adherence to eukaryotic cells of Escherichia coli, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and the yeast Candida albicans was studied by light microscopy with an in vitro micromethod involving different cell lines. The method is inexpensive, consumes little time and material, and is reproducible. It was used to show that the gram-positive Cowan I strain of S. aureus, which naturally forms protein A on its surface, adheres in much larger numbers to human lung fibroblasts than the protein A-free Wood 46 strain, the strain of S. epidermidis, and the encapsulated Smith strain. The presence of a capsule on the latter strain apparently prevented its attachment to the fibroblasts. Among the gram-negative species studied, a piliated clinical isolate of N. gonorrhoeae, displaying the opaque colonial phenotype, adhered in larger numbers than another isolate lacking pili and displaying the transparent phenotype. E. coli K12 attached slightly to the cell line, whereas P. aeruginosa adhered to it moderately. One strain of C. albicans tested did not attach in any detectable numbers. No clear correlation between bacterial cell surface hydrophobicity, as evaluated by the hexadecane assay, and adherence to eukaryotic cells could be demonstrated for these microorganisms. With our method, bacterial attachment proceeded best at 37 degrees C and did not require more than 1 h of contact with the cell monolayer. The method described revealed differences in the adherence to eukaryotic cells, not only among species, but also between strains of the same species.

  1. MONOCYTE HUMAN LEUKOCYTE ANTIGEN–DR EXPRESSION—A TOOL TO DISTINGUISH INTESTINAL BACTERIAL INFECTIONS FROM INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE?

    PubMed Central

    Tillinger, Wolfgang; Jilch, Ruth; Waldhoer, Thomas; Reinisch, Walter; Junger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background We sought to determine the quantitative expression of human leukocyte antigen–DR (HLA-DR) on monocytes in patients with acute intestinal bacterial infections and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods The quantitative expression of HLA-DR on monocytes was determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis in patients with IBD, patients with acute intestinal bacterial infections (bact.), and healthy subjects (contr.). Results The quantitative expression of HLA-DR in patients with bact. (n = 20; 90,000 molecules per monocyte; confidence interval [CI], 79,000–102,000) was significantly higher than that in patients with ulcerative colitis (n = 40, 30,000; CI, 30,000–38,000; P < 0.0001), Crohn disease (n = 80, 31,000; CI, 32,000–39,000; P < 0.0001), or in contr. (n = 28, 39,000; CI, 36,000–46,000; P < 0.0001). In patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease, HLA-DR expression was significantly decreased, as compared with contr. (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). With a cutoff point of 50,000, HLA-DR showed a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 92% in discriminating between bact. and active IBD. Conclusion The quantitative measurement of HLA-DR expression could serve as a valuable tool to discriminate between bact. and active IBD. PMID:23860582

  2. Mechanisms of the harmful effects of bacterial semen infection on ejaculated human spermatozoa: potential inflammatory markers in semen.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Monika; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The invasion of the male reproductive tract by microorganisms, and its subsequent consequences for sperm fertilizing potential, has been intensely discussed. The role of the bacteria that are responsible for the colonization and contamination of the male urogenital tract, rather than its infection, in diminished sperm parameters raises the most controversy. There are numerous premises suggesting that bacterial semen infection is associated with male infertility. However, the molecular mechanism by which the fertility is affected is complex and multifactorial, and still presents a puzzle. Some authors have suggested that direct interactions between bacteria and human spermatozoa facilitate sperm immobilization, affect sperm morphology, and thus weaken the ability of sperm to fertilize. On the other hand, the massive infiltration of activated leukocytes into the inflammatory site may be associated with impairment of sperm fertilizing potential, due to oxidative, apoptotic, and immune processes. This review presents current research trends and aims to summarize the present knowledge of semen inflammation and causative bacterial agents in the male urogenital tract, with its consequence on seminological parameters, and male fertility status. PMID:26306512

  3. Procalcitonin neutralizes bacterial LPS and reduces LPS-induced cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Procalcitonin (PCT) is a polypeptide with several cationic aminoacids in its chemical structure and it is a well known marker of sepsis. It is now emerging that PCT might exhibit some anti-inflammatory effects. The present study, based on the evaluation of the in vitro interaction between PCT and bacterial lipopolisaccharide (LPS), reports new data supporting the interesting and potentially useful anti-inflammatory activity of PCT. Results PCT significantly decreased (p < 0.05) the limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) assay reactivity of LPS from both Salmonella typhimurium (rough chemotype) and Escherichia coli (smooth chemotype). Subsequently, the in vitro effects of PCT on LPS-induced cytokine release were studied in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). When LPS was pre-incubated for 30 minutes with different concentrations of PCT, the release of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) by PBMC decreased in a concentration-dependent manner after 24 hours for IL-10 and 4 hours for TNFα. The release of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) exhibited a drastic reduction at 4 hours for all the PCT concentrations assessed, whereas such decrease was concentration-dependent after 24 hours. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence of the capability of PCT to directly neutralize bacterial LPS, thus leading to a reduction of its major inflammatory mediators. PMID:22568957

  4. Qualitative assessment of vaginal microflora during use of tampons of various compositions.

    PubMed

    Onderdonk, A B; Zamarchi, G R; Rodriguez, M L; Hirsch, M L; Muñoz, A; Kass, E H

    1987-12-01

    The effect of vaginal tampons on the microbial flora during menstruation has recently been studied by several investigators. However, little information regarding the qualitative effects attributable to particular tampon fibers is available. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of polyacrylate rayon tampons and cotton-viscose rayon blend tampons on the qualitative bacterial counts obtained from tampons and concomitant vaginal swabs and to determine whether either of these tampon types alters the qualitative makeup of the vaginal microflora when compared with the microflora in the same women using all-cotton tampons or external catamenial pads. Tampon and swab samples were obtained as described previously (A. B. Onderdonk, G. R. Zamarchi, M. L. Rodriguez, M. L. Hirsch, A. Muñoz, and E. H. Kass, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 53:2774-2778). The genus and species of the six dominant bacterial species in each sample were identified, if possible. A statistical evaluation of the qualitative makeup of the microflora revealed that the same numerically dominant phenotypes were present regardless of sample type, sample time, or catamenial product. Predictable changes in total numbers among the dominant species were also noted when the data were evaluated by day of menstrual cycle. The correlation between the total numbers of each dominant species present was evaluated by day of cycle, and the findings are discussed.

  5. Human Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Transgenesis Fully Rescues Noradrenergic Function in Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cubells, Joseph F.; Schroeder, Jason P.; Barrie, Elizabeth S.; Manvich, Daniel F.; Sadee, Wolfgang; Berg, Tiina; Mercer, Kristina; Stowe, Taylor A.; Liles, L. Cameron; Squires, Katherine E.; Mezher, Andrew; Curtin, Patrick; Perdomo, Dannie L.; Szot, Patricia; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) converts dopamine (DA) to norepinephrine (NE) in noradrenergic/adrenergic cells. DBH deficiency prevents NE production and causes sympathetic failure, hypotension and ptosis in humans and mice; DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice reveal other NE deficiency phenotypes including embryonic lethality, delayed growth, and behavioral defects. Furthermore, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human DBH gene promoter (-970C>T; rs1611115) is associated with variation in serum DBH activity and with several neurological- and neuropsychiatric-related disorders, although its impact on DBH expression is controversial. Phenotypes associated with DBH deficiency are typically treated with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS), which can be converted to NE by aromatic acid decarboxylase (AADC) in the absence of DBH. In this study, we generated transgenic mice carrying a human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) encompassing the DBH coding locus as well as ~45 kb of upstream and ~107 kb of downstream sequence to address two issues. First, we characterized the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral transgenic rescue of DBH deficiency by crossing the BAC onto a Dbh -/