Science.gov

Sample records for human vaginal bacterial

  1. The Human Vaginal Bacterial Biota and Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fredricks, David N.

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial biota of the human vagina can have a profound impact on the health of women and their neonates. Changes in the vaginal microbiota have been associated with several adverse health outcomes including premature birth, pelvic inflammatory disease, and acquisition of HIV infection. Cultivation-independent molecular methods have provided new insights regarding bacterial diversity in this important niche, particularly in women with the common condition bacterial vaginosis (BV). PCR methods have shown that women with BV have complex communities of vaginal bacteria that include many fastidious species, particularly from the phyla Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. Healthy women are mostly colonized with lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii, and Lactobacillus iners, though a variety of other bacteria may be present. The microbiology of BV is heterogeneous. The presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae coating the vaginal epithelium in some subjects with BV suggests that biofilms may contribute to this condition. PMID:19282975

  2. Diversity of human vaginal bacterial communities and associations with clinically defined bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Brian B; Fiedler, Tina L; Marrazzo, Jeanne M; Fredricks, David N

    2008-08-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common syndrome associated with numerous adverse health outcomes in women. Despite its medical importance, the etiology and microbial ecology of BV remain poorly understood. We used broad-range PCR to census the community structure of the healthy and BV-affected vaginal microbial ecosystems and synthesized current publicly available bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequence data from this environment. The community of vaginal bacteria detected in subjects with BV was much more taxon rich and diverse than in subjects without BV. At a 97% sequence similarity cutoff, the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) per patient in 28 subjects with BV was nearly three times greater than in 13 subjects without BV: 14.8 +/- 0.7 versus 5.2 +/- 0.75 (mean +/- standard error). OTU-based analyses revealed previously hidden diversity for many vaginal bacteria that are currently poorly represented in GenBank. Our sequencing efforts yielded many novel phylotypes (123 of our sequences represented 38 OTUs not previously found in the vaginal ecosystem), including several novel BV-associated OTUs, such as those belonging to the Prevotella species complex, which remain severely underrepresented in the current NCBI database. Community composition was highly variable among subjects at a fine taxonomic scale, but at the phylum level, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were strongly associated with BV. Our data describe a previously unrecognized extent of bacterial diversity in the vaginal ecosystem. The human vagina hosts many bacteria that are only distantly related to known species, and subjects with BV harbor particularly taxon-rich and diverse bacterial communities.

  3. Diversity of Human Vaginal Bacterial Communities and Associations with Clinically Defined Bacterial Vaginosis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Brian B.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.; Fredricks, David N.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common syndrome associated with numerous adverse health outcomes in women. Despite its medical importance, the etiology and microbial ecology of BV remain poorly understood. We used broad-range PCR to census the community structure of the healthy and BV-affected vaginal microbial ecosystems and synthesized current publicly available bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequence data from this environment. The community of vaginal bacteria detected in subjects with BV was much more taxon rich and diverse than in subjects without BV. At a 97% sequence similarity cutoff, the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) per patient in 28 subjects with BV was nearly three times greater than in 13 subjects without BV: 14.8 ± 0.7 versus 5.2 ± 0.75 (mean ± standard error). OTU-based analyses revealed previously hidden diversity for many vaginal bacteria that are currently poorly represented in GenBank. Our sequencing efforts yielded many novel phylotypes (123 of our sequences represented 38 OTUs not previously found in the vaginal ecosystem), including several novel BV-associated OTUs, such as those belonging to the Prevotella species complex, which remain severely underrepresented in the current NCBI database. Community composition was highly variable among subjects at a fine taxonomic scale, but at the phylum level, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were strongly associated with BV. Our data describe a previously unrecognized extent of bacterial diversity in the vaginal ecosystem. The human vagina hosts many bacteria that are only distantly related to known species, and subjects with BV harbor particularly taxon-rich and diverse bacterial communities. PMID:18487399

  4. Human epididymis protein 4 and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor in vaginal fluid: relation to vaginal components and bacterial composition.

    PubMed

    Orfanelli, Theofano; Jayaram, Aswathi; Doulaveris, Georgios; Forney, Larry J; Ledger, William J; Witkin, Steven S

    2014-04-01

    Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a protease inhibitor and a recently identified serum biomarker for ovarian cancer. Properties of HE4 in the genital tract of healthy women have not been evaluated. We evaluated associations between HE4 and a second vaginal protease inhibitor, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), with vaginal concentrations of innate immune mediators or proteases and with the types of vaginal bacterial communities. Vaginal secretions were collected from 18 healthy reproductive age women and assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for concentrations of HE4, SLPI, kallikrein 5, cathepsin B, interleukin 1β (IL-1), IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1 ra), mannose-binding lectin (MBL), the inducible 70-kDa heat shock protein, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8. The species composition of vaginal bacterial communities in 16 women was characterized by sequencing amplicons derived from 16S bacterial ribosomal RNA genes. Correlations between any 2 assays were analyzed by the Spearman rank correlation tests. Differences in the concentrations of HE4 and SLPI, and between soluble components and vaginal community types, were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U tests. Vaginal HE4 concentrations, but not SLPI levels, were positively correlated with levels of IL-1β (P = .0152), IL-1ra (P = .0061), MBL (P = .0100), and MMP-8 (P = .0315). The median vaginal HE4 level, as well as concentrations of MBL, IL-1β, IL-1ra, and MMP-8, was highest when Gardnerella vaginalis dominated a vaginal community. The association between HE4, elevated levels of proteases, immune mediators and high proportions of G vaginalis strongly suggests that HE4 is a component of the proinflammatory immune response in the female genital tract.

  5. Temporal Variability of Human Vaginal Bacteria and Relationship with Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Liu, Congzhou; Mitchell, Caroline M.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Agnew, Kathy J.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.; Fredricks, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about short-term bacterial fluctuations in the human vagina. This study used PCR to assess the variability in concentrations of key vaginal bacteria in healthy women and the immediate response to antibiotic treatment in women with bacterial vaginosis (BV). Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty-two women assessed for BV using Amsel's criteria were evaluated daily for 7 or 14 days, then at 2, 3 and 4 weeks, using a panel of 11 bacterium-specific quantitative PCR assays. Participants with BV were treated with 5 days of intravaginal metronidazole. Participants without BV had vaginal biotas dominated by lactobacilli, whose levels fluctuated with menses. With onset of menstruation, quantities of Lactobacillus jensenii and Lactobacillus crispatus decreased and were found to be inversely related to Gardnerella vaginalis concentrations (p<0.001). Women with BV had a variety of fastidious bacteria whose concentrations dropped below detection thresholds 1–5 days after starting metronidazole. Recurrent BV was characterized by initial profound decreases of BV-associated bacteria after treatment followed by subsequent increases at relapse. Conclusions/Significance The microbiota of the human vagina can be highly dynamic. Healthy women are colonized with Lactobacillus species, but levels can change dramatically over a month. Marked increases in G. vaginalis were observed during menses. Participants with BV have diverse communities of fastidious bacteria that are depleted by vaginal metronidazole therapy. Women with recurrent BV initially respond to antibiotic treatment with steep declines in bacterial concentrations, but these bacteria later reemerge, suggesting that antibiotic resistance in these bacteria is not an important factor mediating BV recurrence. PMID:20419168

  6. Relationship between lactobacilli and opportunistic bacterial pathogens associated with vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Razzak, Mohammad Sabri A.; Al-Charrakh, Alaa H.; AL-Greitty, Bara Hamid

    2011-01-01

    Background: Vaginitis, is an infectious inflammation of the vaginal mucosa, which sometimes involves the vulva. The balance of the vaginal flora is maintained by the Lactobacilli and its protective and probiotic role in treating and preventing vaginal infection by producing antagonizing compounds which are regarded as safe for humans. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of Lactobacilli against common bacterial opportunistic pathogens in vaginitis and study the effects of some antibiotics on Lactobacilli isolates. Materials and Methods: In this study (110) vaginal swabs were obtained from women suffering from vaginitis who admitted to Babylon Hospital of Maternity and Paediatrics in Babylon province, Iraq. The study involved the role of intrauterine device among married women with vaginitis and also involved isolation of opportunistic bacterial isolates among pregnant and non pregnant women. This study also involved studying probiotic role of Lactobacilli by production of some defense factors like hydrogen peroxide, bacteriocin, and lactic acid. Results: Results revealed that a total of 130 bacterial isolates were obtained. Intrauterine device was a predisposing factor for vaginitis. The most common opportunistic bacterial isolates were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. All Lactobacilli were hydrogen peroxide producers while some isolates were bacteriocin producers that inhibited some of opportunistic pathogens (S. aureus, E. coli). Lactobacilli were sensitive to erythromycin while 93.3% of them were resistant to ciprofloxacin and (40%, 53.3%) of them were resistant to amoxicillin and gentamycin respectively. Results revealed that there was an inverse relationship between Lactobacilli presence and organisms causing vaginitis. This may be attributed to the production of defense factors by Lactobacilli. Conclusion: The types of antibiotics used to treat vaginitis must be very

  7. Relationship between lactobacilli and opportunistic bacterial pathogens associated with vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Razzak, Mohammad Sabri A; Al-Charrakh, Alaa H; Al-Greitty, Bara Hamid

    2011-04-01

    Vaginitis, is an infectious inflammation of the vaginal mucosa, which sometimes involves the vulva. The balance of the vaginal flora is maintained by the Lactobacilli and its protective and probiotic role in treating and preventing vaginal infection by producing antagonizing compounds which are regarded as safe for humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of Lactobacilli against common bacterial opportunistic pathogens in vaginitis and study the effects of some antibiotics on Lactobacilli isolates. In this study (110) vaginal swabs were obtained from women suffering from vaginitis who admitted to Babylon Hospital of Maternity and Paediatrics in Babylon province, Iraq. The study involved the role of intrauterine device among married women with vaginitis and also involved isolation of opportunistic bacterial isolates among pregnant and non pregnant women. This study also involved studying probiotic role of Lactobacilli by production of some defense factors like hydrogen peroxide, bacteriocin, and lactic acid. Results revealed that a total of 130 bacterial isolates were obtained. Intrauterine device was a predisposing factor for vaginitis. The most common opportunistic bacterial isolates were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. All Lactobacilli were hydrogen peroxide producers while some isolates were bacteriocin producers that inhibited some of opportunistic pathogens (S. aureus, E. coli). Lactobacilli were sensitive to erythromycin while 93.3% of them were resistant to ciprofloxacin and (40%, 53.3%) of them were resistant to amoxicillin and gentamycin respectively. Results revealed that there was an inverse relationship between Lactobacilli presence and organisms causing vaginitis. This may be attributed to the production of defense factors by Lactobacilli. The types of antibiotics used to treat vaginitis must be very selective in order not to kill the beneficial bacteria

  8. Bacterial vaginosis, human papilloma virus and herpes viridae do not predict vaginal HIV RNA shedding in women living with HIV in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Wessman, Maria; Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Jensen, Jørgen S; Storgaard, Merete; Rönsholt, Frederikke F; Johansen, Isik S; Pedersen, Gitte; Nørregård Nielsen, Lars; Bonde, Jesper; Katzenstein, Terese L; Weis, Nina; Lebech, Anne-Mette

    2017-05-31

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) has been found to be associated with HIV acquisition and transmission. This is suggested to be due to higher HIV RNA levels in cervicovaginal fluids in women living with HIV (WLWH) with BV, as bacteria associated with BV may induce viral replication and shedding in the genital tract despite undetectable HIV RNA plasma viral load. We examined the prevalence and diagnostic predictors of BV and HIV-1 RNA vaginal shedding in women living with HIV (WLWH) in Denmark, taking into account the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpes viridae. WLWH between 18-51 years were recruited from six Departments of Infectious Diseases in Denmark during enrolment in the SHADE cohort; a prospective cohort study of WLWH attending regular outpatient care. BV was diagnosed by microscopy of vaginal swabs and PCR was used for detection of BV-associated bacteria, HPV, herpes viridae, and vaginal HIV viral load. Median age of the 150 included women was 41 years; ethnicity was predominantly White (35%) or Black (47%). The majority (96%) was on ART and had undetectable (85%) plasma HIV RNA (<40 copies/mL). BV was diagnosed in 32%. Overall, 11% had detectable vaginal HIV RNA. Both before and after adjustment for BV, age, ethnicity, plasma HIV RNA, CD4 cell count, herpes viridae and HPV, we found no significant predictors of HIV RNA vaginal shedding. In well-treated WLWH, BV, herpes viridae or HPV do not predict vaginal HIV RNA shedding. This implies that HIV shedding does not seem to be increased by BV.

  9. Vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Hainer, Barry L; Gibson, Maria V

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis, and vulvovaginal candidiasis are the most common infectious causes of vaginitis. Bacterial vaginosis occurs when the normal lactobacilli of the vagina are replaced by mostly anaerobic bacteria. Diagnosis is commonly made using the Amsel criteria, which include vaginal pH greater than 4.5, positive whiff test, milky discharge, and the presence of clue cells on microscopic examination of vaginal fluid. Oral and topical clindamycin and metronidazole are equally effective at eradicating bacterial vaginosis. Symptoms and signs of trichomoniasis are not specific; diagnosis by microscopy is more reliable. Features of trichomoniasis are trichomonads seen microscopically in saline, more leukocytes than epithelial cells, positive whiff test, and vaginal pH greater than 5.4. Any nitroimidazole drug (e.g., metronidazole) given orally as a single dose or over a longer period resolves 90 percent of trichomoniasis cases. Sex partners should be treated simultaneously. Most patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis are diagnosed by the presence of vulvar inflammation plus vaginal discharge or with microscopic examination of vaginal secretions in 10 percent potassium hydroxide solution. Vaginal pH is usually normal (4.0 to 4.5). Vulvovaginal candidiasis should be treated with one of many topical or oral antifungals, which appear to be equally effective. Rapid point-of-care tests are available to aid in accurate diagnosis of infectious vaginitis. Atrophic vaginitis, a form of vaginitis caused by estrogen deficiency, produces symptoms of vaginal dryness, itching, irritation, discharge, and dyspareunia. Both systemic and topical estrogen treatments are effective. Allergic and irritant contact forms of vaginitis can also occur.

  10. Unraveling the Dynamics of the Human Vaginal Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Kenetta L; Forney, Larry J

    2016-09-01

    Four Lactobacillus species, namely L. crispatus , L. iners, L. gasseri, and L. jensenii, commonly dominate the vaginal communities of most reproductive-age women. It is unclear why these particular species, and not others, are so prevalent. Historically, estrogen-induced glycogen production by the vaginal epithelium has been proffered as being key to supporting the proliferation of vaginal lactobacilli. However, the 'fly in the ointment' (that has been largely ignored) is that the species of Lactobacillus commonly found in the human vagina cannot directly metabolize glycogen. It would appear that this riddle has been solved as studies have demonstrated that vaginal lactobacilli can metabolize the products of glycogen depolymerization by α-amylase, and fortunately, amylase activity is found in vaginal secretions. These amylases are presumed to be host-derived, but we suggest that other bacterial populations in vaginal communities could also be sources of amylase in addition to (or instead of) the host. Here we briefly review what is known about human vaginal bacterial communities and discuss how glycogen-derived resources and resource competition might shape the composition and structure of these communities.

  11. Unraveling the Dynamics of the Human Vaginal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Kenetta L.; Forney, Larry J.

    2016-01-01

    Four Lactobacillus species, namely L. crispatus, L. iners, L. gasseri, and L. jensenii, commonly dominate the vaginal communities of most reproductive-age women. It is unclear why these particular species, and not others, are so prevalent. Historically, estrogen-induced glycogen production by the vaginal epithelium has been proffered as being key to supporting the proliferation of vaginal lactobacilli. However, the ‘fly in the ointment’ (that has been largely ignored) is that the species of Lactobacillus commonly found in the human vagina cannot directly metabolize glycogen. It would appear that this riddle has been solved as studies have demonstrated that vaginal lactobacilli can metabolize the products of glycogen depolymerization by α-amylase, and fortunately, amylase activity is found in vaginal secretions. These amylases are presumed to be host-derived, but we suggest that other bacterial populations in vaginal communities could also be sources of amylase in addition to (or instead of) the host. Here we briefly review what is known about human vaginal bacterial communities and discuss how glycogen-derived resources and resource competition might shape the composition and structure of these communities. PMID:27698617

  12. Influence of contraceptive choice on vaginal bacterial and fungal microflora.

    PubMed

    Donders, G; Bellen, G; Janssens, D; Van Bulck, B; Hinoul, P; Verguts, J

    2017-01-01

    The influence of contraception on vaginal microflora can have a major impact on the risk of developing acute or recurrent vaginal infections, but also may influence the risk of acquiring sexually transmissible infections (STI) such as HIV. A cohort of 248 women presenting for levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) insertion or reinsertion were stratified according to their current contraceptive method. Information concerning their menstrual pattern and data about the medical history were collected. The composition of their vaginal microflora was studied by detailed phase contrast microscopy of fresh vaginal fluid, and aerobic cultures were taken to detect enteric bacterial growth and fungal colonisation. LNG-IUS and progesterone-only-pill (POP) users had significantly lower blood loss (p < 0.001) than other women. Regardless of the type of contraception used, all women reported similar rates of symptomatic lower genital tract infection during the preceding year. Women using combined oral contraception (COC) and long-term LNG-IUS had the same bacterial composition of vaginal microflora as non-contraceptive users, even when infections were combined. Both hormonal and non-hormonal intrauterine device users had an increased tendency to have more vaginal colonisation with Candida. Women on POPs or subcutaneous implants had a tendency towards increased vaginal atrophy, but had a lower Candida carriage rate compared to IUCD users (LNG-IUS and Copper-IUCD, p = 0.037). Women with an increased risk of acquiring STIs or recurrent BV could benefit from LNG-IUS or COC due to a well-preserved vaginal bacterial flora. Women with a susceptibility for RVVC should prefer POPs, and avoid intrauterine contraception.

  13. Vaginal biogenic amines: biomarkers of bacterial vaginosis or precursors to vaginal dysbiosis?

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Tiffanie M.; Borgogna, Joanna-Lynn C.; Brotman, Rebecca M.; Ravel, Jacques; Walk, Seth T.; Yeoman, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal disorder among reproductive age women. One clinical indicator of BV is a “fishy” odor. This odor has been associated with increases in several biogenic amines (BAs) that may serve as important biomarkers. Within the vagina, BA production has been linked to various vaginal taxa, yet their genetic capability to synthesize BAs is unknown. Using a bioinformatics approach, we show that relatively few vaginal taxa are predicted to be capable of producing BAs. Many of these taxa (Dialister, Prevotella, Parvimonas, Megasphaera, Peptostreptococcus, and Veillonella spp.) are more abundant in the vaginal microbial community state type (CST) IV, which is depleted in lactobacilli. Several of the major Lactobacillus species (L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. gasseri) were identified as possessing gene sequences for proteins predicted to be capable of putrescine production. Finally, we show in a small cross sectional study of 37 women that the BAs putrescine, cadaverine and tyramine are significantly higher in CST IV over CSTs I and III. These data support the hypothesis that BA production is conducted by few vaginal taxa and may be important to the outgrowth of BV-associated (vaginal dysbiosis) vaginal bacteria. PMID:26483694

  14. Identification of rhesus macaque genital microbiota by 16S pyrosequencing shows similarities to human bacterial vaginosis: implications for use as an animal model for HIV vaginal infection.

    PubMed

    Spear, Gregory T; Gilbert, Douglas; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Doyle, Lara; Green, Linda; Gillevet, Patrick M; Landay, Alan L; Veazey, Ronald S

    2010-02-01

    The composition of the lower genital tract microbiota in women is believed to affect the risk of sexually acquiring HIV. Since macaque genital microbiota could similarly impact vaginal infection with SIV we identified microbiota in 11 rhesus macaques using multitag pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The microbiota was polymicrobial with a median of nine distinct bacterial taxa per macaque (range 3-16 taxa, each constituting 1% or more of the sequences). Taxa frequently found included Peptoniphilus, Sneathia, Porphyromonas, Mobiluncus, Atopobacter, Dialister, Thioreductor, Prevotella, and Streptococcus, many of which are also frequently found in women with bacterial vaginosis. Lactobacillus sequences (mostly L. johnsonii) were found in only four macaques but were not predominant in any (median of 0% of sequences, range 0-39%). All macaques were resampled 6 months after the first time point to determine the stability of the microbiota. The microbiota remained polymicrobial with a median of 10 taxa (range 6-18). Microbial patterns remained similar for six of the macaques, changed substantially in two, and had a mixed pattern in three. Significant sialidase enzyme activity, a marker of bacteria vaginosis in women, was detected in genital fluid from 9/11 and 8/11 macaques from the first and second time points, respectively. These results show that the macaque lower genital microbiota resembled a bacteria vaginosis-type microbiota in women and suggest that the microbiota of macaques in captivity promote rather than protect against vaginal infection with SIV. These results also suggest macaques could be used as an animal model to study some aspects of bacterial vaginosis.

  15. Vaginal microbiome and metabolome highlight specific signatures of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Vitali, B; Cruciani, F; Picone, G; Parolin, C; Donders, G; Laghi, L

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we sought to find novel bacterial and metabolic hallmarks for bacterial vaginosis (BV). We studied the vaginal microbiome and metabolome of vaginal fluids from BV-affected patients (n = 43) and healthy controls (n = 37) by means of an integrated approach based on quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR). The correlations between the clinical condition and vaginal bacterial communities were investigated by principal component analysis (PCA). To define the metabolomics signatures of BV, 100 discriminant analysis by projection on latent structure (PLS-DA) models were calculated. Bacterial signatures distinguishing the health condition and BV were identified by qPCR. Lactobacillus crispatus strongly featured the healthy vagina, while increased concentrations of Prevotella, Atopobium and Mycoplasma hominis specifically marked the infection. (1)H-NMR analysis has led to the identification and quantification of 17 previously unreported molecules. BV was associated with changes in the concentration of metabolites belonging to the families of amines, organic acids, short chain fatty acids, amino acids, nitrogenous bases and monosaccharides. In particular, maltose, kynurenine and NAD(+) primarily characterised the healthy status, while nicotinate, malonate and acetate were the best metabolic hallmarks of BV. This study helps to better understand the role of the vaginal microbiota and metabolome in the development of BV infection. We propose a molecular approach for the diagnosis of BV based on quantitative detection in the vaginal fluids of Atopobium, Prevotella and M. hominis, and nicotinate, malonate and acetate by combining qPCR and (1)H-NMR.

  16. Cutting edge: the vaginal microflora and bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Verstraelen, H

    2008-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, the vaginal primarily harbours lactobacilli which ideally confer in mutualism with the vaginal epithelium colonisation resistance to other micro-organisms, thereby preventing ascending or systemic infection. Albeit only a few Lactobacillus species constitute the vaginal microflora, huge species- and strain-specific differences occur however, and these differences account for a wide variability in the intrinsic capability of the Lactobacillus microflora to maintain the vaginal ecosystem. Hence, among a substantial proportion of women, the picture of lactobacilli-driven mutualism is actually less ideal than one may assume. As the vagina is incessantly subjected to cyclic changes as well as behavioural exposures that may challenge the perpetuation of the Lactobacillus microflora, the intrinsic stability of the resident microflora is paramount to women's health. Considering the close concordance between the rectal and vaginal lactobacilli, future research may benefit from the study of food, oral, and intestinal microbiology in relation to the vaginal Lactobacillus microbiota. Loss of the hydrogen peroxide producing lactobacilli accompanied by massive anaerobic overgrowth is observed with bacterial vaginosis. Molecular studies of the bacterial vaginosis microflora have recently revealed a tremendous species variability further documenting the complex polymicrobial nature of this condition. Emerging issues include the predominance of G. vaginalis, a normal microflora constituent possibly eliciting a host of virulence mechanisms at increasing concentrations through quorum sensing, the associated abundance of A. vaginae as a rather specific marker of therapy failure and disease persistence or recurrence, and the discovery of an adherent, metronidazole-resistant biofilm consisting of the latter two species.

  17. Preferred Characteristics of Vaginal Microbicides in Women with Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Julie S.; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Switzer, Galen E.; Tanriover, Ozlem; Wiesenfeld, Harold; Murray, Pamela J.; Hillier, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Vaginal microbicides have the potential to reduce HIV/STD acquisition when used consistently. Our objectives were to determine product attributes associated with willingness to use a vaginal microbicide and whether product preferences varied according to participant characteristics. Methods Women (n = 408) with bacterial vaginosis (BV) were recruited as part of a randomized trial to prevent BV. Participants completed a survey interview that assessed demographic information, sexual history, and douching behavior. To assess microbicide preferences, women rated whether specific product attributes would make them more or less likely to use a vaginal microbicide. Principal components analyses revealed two major groupings for the product attribute items. We determined the relative importance of each group of product attributes and whether the importance of the different groupings varied among subgroups of women. Results The participants' mean age was 24 years (range 14–45), 64% were black, and 74% were unmarried. Overall, participants reported being most likely to use a vaginal product with protection properties (2.54), whereas they were nearly neutral regarding side effects (0.56). The individual product attributes, could prevent BV, could prevent vaginal odor (2.72), and could prevent vaginal itching and burning (2.61), were rated similarly or slightly higher than could reduce the risk of getting an STD (2.58) or could reduce the risk of getting HIV (2.44). In multivariate analyses, protection attributes were rated significantly higher among older women and marginally higher in women with a greater number of lifetime sexual partners. Younger women were most likely to report that side effects would affect their likelihood of using the product. Conclusions Women with BV rated potential protection features of a vaginal microbicide higher than side effects. A product's personal hygiene aspects were rated equally or more important than the product

  18. Diagnosis and management of bacterial vaginosis and other types of abnormal vaginal bacterial flora: a review.

    PubMed

    Donders, Gilbert

    2010-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common cause of abnormal vaginal discharge. It is characterised by an overgrowth of predominantly anaerobic organisms (Gardnerella vaginalis, Prevotella spp., Peptostreptocci, Mobiluncus spp.) in the vagina leading to a replacement of lactobacilli and an increase in vaginal pH. BV can arise and remit spontaneously, but often presents as a chronic or recurrent disease. BV is found most often in women of childbearing age, but may also be encountered in menopausal women, and is rather rare in children. The clinical and microscopic features and diagnosis of BV are herein reviewed, and antibiotic and non-antibiotic treatment approaches discussed. Obstetricians & Gynecologists, Family Physicians. After completion of this educational activity, the participant should be better able to analyze bacterial vaginosis clinically, formulate an oral antibiotic treatment regimen for bacterial vaginosis and use vaginal treatments for bacterial vaginosis.

  19. Clinical Features of Bacterial Vaginosis in a Murine Model of Vaginal Infection with Gardnerella vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Nicole M.; Lewis, Warren G.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a dysbiosis of the vaginal flora characterized by a shift from a Lactobacillus-dominant environment to a polymicrobial mixture including Actinobacteria and Gram-negative bacilli. BV is a common vaginal condition in women and is associated with increased risk of sexually transmitted infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm birth. Gardnerella vaginalis is one of the most frequently isolated bacterial species in BV. However, there has been much debate in the literature concerning the contribution of G. vaginalis to the etiology of BV, since it is also present in a significant proportion of healthy women. Here we present a new murine vaginal infection model with a clinical isolate of G. vaginalis. Our data demonstrate that this model displays key features used clinically to diagnose BV, including the presence of sialidase activity and exfoliated epithelial cells with adherent bacteria (reminiscent of clue cells). G. vaginalis was capable of ascending uterine infection, which correlated with the degree of vaginal infection and level of vaginal sialidase activity. The host response to G. vaginalis infection was characterized by robust vaginal epithelial cell exfoliation in the absence of histological inflammation. Our analyses of clinical specimens from women with BV revealed a measureable epithelial exfoliation response compared to women with normal flora, a phenotype that, to our knowledge, is measured here for the first time. The results of this study demonstrate that G. vaginalis is sufficient to cause BV phenotypes and suggest that this organism may contribute to BV etiology and associated complications. This is the first time vaginal infection by a BV associated bacterium in an animal has been shown to parallel the human disease with regard to clinical diagnostic features. Future studies with this model should facilitate investigation of important questions regarding BV etiology, pathogenesis and associated complications

  20. Clinical features of bacterial vaginosis in a murine model of vaginal infection with Gardnerella vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Nicole M; Lewis, Warren G; Lewis, Amanda L

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a dysbiosis of the vaginal flora characterized by a shift from a Lactobacillus-dominant environment to a polymicrobial mixture including Actinobacteria and gram-negative bacilli. BV is a common vaginal condition in women and is associated with increased risk of sexually transmitted infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm birth. Gardnerella vaginalis is one of the most frequently isolated bacterial species in BV. However, there has been much debate in the literature concerning the contribution of G. vaginalis to the etiology of BV, since it is also present in a significant proportion of healthy women. Here we present a new murine vaginal infection model with a clinical isolate of G. vaginalis. Our data demonstrate that this model displays key features used clinically to diagnose BV, including the presence of sialidase activity and exfoliated epithelial cells with adherent bacteria (reminiscent of clue cells). G. vaginalis was capable of ascending uterine infection, which correlated with the degree of vaginal infection and level of vaginal sialidase activity. The host response to G. vaginalis infection was characterized by robust vaginal epithelial cell exfoliation in the absence of histological inflammation. Our analyses of clinical specimens from women with BV revealed a measureable epithelial exfoliation response compared to women with normal flora, a phenotype that, to our knowledge, is measured here for the first time. The results of this study demonstrate that G. vaginalis is sufficient to cause BV phenotypes and suggest that this organism may contribute to BV etiology and associated complications. This is the first time vaginal infection by a BV associated bacterium in an animal has been shown to parallel the human disease with regard to clinical diagnostic features. Future studies with this model should facilitate investigation of important questions regarding BV etiology, pathogenesis and associated complications.

  1. Genome Sequences of Nine Gram-Negative Vaginal Bacterial Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Deitzler, Grace E.; Ruiz, Maria J.; Lu, Wendy; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd S.; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2016-01-01

    The vagina is home to a wide variety of bacteria that have great potential to impact human health. Here, we announce reference strains (now available through BEI Resources) and draft genome sequences for 9 Gram-negative vaginal isolates from the taxa Citrobacter, Klebsiella, Fusobacterium, Proteus, and Prevotella. PMID:27688330

  2. Bacterial vaginal flora in relation to changing oestrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J D; Lee, R A; Balen, A H; Rutherford, A J

    2007-05-01

    Hormonal changes may be important in the onset and clearance of bacterial vaginosis. We studied vaginal flora and serum oestradiol levels of 55 women at baseline and during hormonal treatment. None developed bacterial vaginosis (BV) from normal vaginal flora, 69% of women had normal flora at baseline increasing to 91% following hormonal treatment. The mean oestradiol level with BV was 39.07 ng/L compared with 176.41 ng/L with normal flora. Non-smokers had a mean oestradiol level of 173.95 ng/L compared with 118.67 ng/L in smokers. Recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone resulted in a mean oestradiol rise of 113.9 ng/L. The mean rise was 330.4 ng/L with improved vaginal flora but only 15.1 ng/L in persistently abnormal or worsening flora. A rise in oestradiol in this group of women was associated with a significant reduction of abnormal flora. Reversion from BV to normal flora was associated with a greater rise in oestradiol than where abnormal flora persisted or worsened. This study supports a possible hormonal influence in the natural history of BV. The lower oestradiol levels in smokers may help explain their increased risk of BV.

  3. Condom use and its association with bacterial vaginosis and bacterial vaginosis-associated vaginal microflora.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Katherine B; Kip, Kevin E; Ness, Roberta B

    2007-11-01

    Previous studies have been inconsistent with regard to whether condom use is associated with bacterial vaginosis. We evaluated this association using case-crossover analyses. A total of 871 women at high risk for sexually transmitted diseases were followed for a median of 3 years. At baseline and at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months thereafter, vaginal swabs were obtained for gram stain diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis, culture of microflora, and DNA amplification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. Case-crossover analyses using incident and recurrent incident case periods were used to assess the associations among condom use, bacterial vaginosis, and vaginal microflora. Consistent condom use (10 out of 10 sexual encounters) was associated with a decreased frequency of bacterial vaginosis (adjusted odds ratio = 0.55 [95% confidence interval 0.35-0.88]). When we excluded women with intermediate flora, consistent condom use was even more strongly protective against bacterial vaginosis (0.37 [0.20-0.70]). Consistent condom use was similarly protective against carriage of anaerobic gram-negative pigmented rods (0.58 [0.36-0.94]). Results were similar when analyses were repeated to capture only first occurrences of outcomes among women without bacterial vaginosis at baseline, suggesting a protective effect against the acquisition of bacterial vaginosis. Consistent condom use was associated with a decrease in the risk for bacterial vaginosis and associated vaginal microflora.

  4. Vaginitis

    MedlinePlus

    What is vaginitis? Vaginitis, also called vulvovaginitis, is an inflammation or infection of the vagina. It can also affect the vulva, which is the external part of a woman's genitals. Vaginitis can cause itching, pain, discharge, and odor. Vaginitis ...

  5. Temporal Dynamics of the Human Vaginal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Gajer, Pawel; Brotman, Rebecca M.; Bai, Guoyun; Sakamoto, Joyce; Schütte, Ursel M.E.; Zhong, Xue; Koenig, Sara S.K.; Fu, Li; Ma, Zhanshan; Zhou, Xia; Abdo, Zaid; Forney, Larry J.; Ravel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating the factors that impinge on the stability of bacterial communities in the vagina may help in predicting the risk of diseases that affect women’s health. Here, we describe the temporal dynamics of the composition of vaginal bacterial communities in 32 reproductive age women over a 16-week period. The analysis revealed the dynamics of five major classes of bacterial communities and showed that some communities change markedly over short time periods, whereas others are relatively stable. Modeling community stability using new quantitative measures indicates that deviation from stability correlates with time in the menstrual cycle, bacterial community composition and sexual activity. The women studied are healthy, thus it appears that neither variation in community composition per se, nor higher levels of observed diversity (co-dominance) are necessarily indicative of dysbiosis, in which there is microbial imbalance accompanied by symptoms. PMID:22553250

  6. Development of a Microarray-Based Tool To Characterize Vaginal Bacterial Fluctuations and Application to a Novel Antibiotic Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Cruciani, Federica; Biagi, Elena; Severgnini, Marco; Consolandi, Clarissa; Calanni, Fiorella; Donders, Gilbert; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The healthy vaginal microbiota is generally dominated by lactobacilli that confer antimicrobial protection and play a crucial role in health. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most prevalent lower genital tract infection in women in reproductive age and is characterized by a shift in the relative abundances of Lactobacillus spp. to a greater abundance of strictly anaerobic bacteria. In this study, we designed a new phylogenetic microarray-based tool (VaginArray) that includes 17 probe sets specific for the most representative bacterial groups of the human vaginal ecosystem. This tool was implemented using the ligase detection reaction-universal array (LDR-UA) approach. The entire probe set properly recognized the specific targets and showed an overall sensitivity of 6 to 12 ng per probe. The VaginArray was applied to assess the efficacy of rifaximin vaginal tablets for the treatment of BV, analyzing the vaginal bacterial communities of 22 BV-affected women treated with rifaximin vaginal tablets at a dosage of 25 mg/day for 5 days. Our results showed the ability of rifaximin to reduce the growth of various BV-related bacteria (Atopobium vaginae, Prevotella, Megasphaera, Mobiluncus, and Sneathia spp.), with the highest antibiotic susceptibility for A. vaginae and Sneathia spp. Moreover, we observed an increase of Lactobacillus crispatus levels in the subset of women who maintained remission after 1 month of therapy, opening new perspectives for the treatment of BV. PMID:25733514

  7. Development of a microarray-based tool to characterize vaginal bacterial fluctuations and application to a novel antibiotic treatment for bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, Federica; Biagi, Elena; Severgnini, Marco; Consolandi, Clarissa; Calanni, Fiorella; Donders, Gilbert; Brigidi, Patrizia; Vitali, Beatrice

    2015-05-01

    The healthy vaginal microbiota is generally dominated by lactobacilli that confer antimicrobial protection and play a crucial role in health. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most prevalent lower genital tract infection in women in reproductive age and is characterized by a shift in the relative abundances of Lactobacillus spp. to a greater abundance of strictly anaerobic bacteria. In this study, we designed a new phylogenetic microarray-based tool (VaginArray) that includes 17 probe sets specific for the most representative bacterial groups of the human vaginal ecosystem. This tool was implemented using the ligase detection reaction-universal array (LDR-UA) approach. The entire probe set properly recognized the specific targets and showed an overall sensitivity of 6 to 12 ng per probe. The VaginArray was applied to assess the efficacy of rifaximin vaginal tablets for the treatment of BV, analyzing the vaginal bacterial communities of 22 BV-affected women treated with rifaximin vaginal tablets at a dosage of 25 mg/day for 5 days. Our results showed the ability of rifaximin to reduce the growth of various BV-related bacteria (Atopobium vaginae, Prevotella, Megasphaera, Mobiluncus, and Sneathia spp.), with the highest antibiotic susceptibility for A. vaginae and Sneathia spp. Moreover, we observed an increase of Lactobacillus crispatus levels in the subset of women who maintained remission after 1 month of therapy, opening new perspectives for the treatment of BV. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Microbes on the human vaginal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Richard W.; Fukushima, Marilyn; Diamond, Lisa; Kumm, Jochen; Giudice, Linda C.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2005-01-01

    Using solely a gene-based procedure, PCR amplification of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene coupled with very deep sequencing of the amplified products, the microbes on 20 human vaginal epithelia of healthy women have been identified and quantitated. The Lactobacillus content on these 20 healthy vaginal epithelia was highly variable, ranging from 0% to 100%. For four subjects, Lactobacillus was (virtually) the only bacterium detected. However, that Lactobacillus was far from clonal and was a mixture of species and strains. Eight subjects presented complex mixtures of Lactobacillus and other microbes. The remaining eight subjects had no Lactobacillus. Instead, Bifidobacterium, Gardnerella, Prevotella, Pseudomonas, or Streptococcus predominated. PMID:15911771

  9. GA-Based Selection of Vaginal Microbiome Features Associated with Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Carter, Joi; Beck, Daniel; Williams, Henry; Foster, James; Dozier, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we successfully apply GEFeS (Genetic & Evolutionary Feature Selection) to identify the key features in the human vaginal microbiome and in patient meta-data that are associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV). The vaginal microbiome is the community of bacteria found in a patient, and meta-data include behavioral practices and demographic information. Bacterial vaginosis is a disease that afflicts nearly one third of all women, but the current diagnostics are crude at best. We describe two types of classifies for BV diagnosis, and show that each is associated with one of two treatments. Our results show that the classifiers associated with the 'Treat Any Symptom' version have better performances that the classifier associated with the 'Treat Based on N-Score Value'. Our long term objective is to develop a more accurate and objective diagnosis and treatment of BV.

  10. Metronidazole with Lactacyd vaginal gel in bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Decena, Ditas Cristina D; Co, Jennifer T; Manalastas, Ricardo M; Palaypayon, Evelyn P; Padolina, Christia S; Sison, Judith M; Dancel, Louella A; Lelis, Marievi A

    2006-04-01

    To assess the efficacy and tolerability of lactic acid (Lactacyd vaginal gel; LVG) when given as an adjunct to metronidazole in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis (BV) among Filipino patients. A multicenter, open-labeled, controlled, randomized, three-arm comparative study on 90 women aged 18 years or over with clinically and microbiologically proven BV. The lactobacilli colony count significantly increased over time in all three arms. At day 14, growth of lactobacilli was significantly higher among patients in the lactic acid gel and combination treatment arms. Significant reduction of malodorous vaginal discharge (whiff test) and lowest recurrence of BV were noted in the metronidazole plus lactic acid gel arm. Regarding disappearance of signs of BV, there was significant decrease in the pH level and frequency of clue cell positive patients across time but was not significantly different across treatment groups. Only one patient (3%, 1/60) among those who received lactic acid gel complained of increased curd-like discharge. Six patients (10%, 6/60) who received metronidazole complained of epigastric pain/discomfort, dizziness and dyspnea. Lactic acid gel (LVG) is safe and as efficacious as metronidazole in the treatment of BV. There is evidence that LVG when combined with metronidazole is superior to metronidazole alone in promoting lactobacilli colonization. LVG as an adjunct to metronidazole, having the least number of recurrent BV, appears to result in better long-term treatment effect on bacterial vaginosis.

  11. Efficacy of rifaximin vaginal tablets in treatment of bacterial vaginosis: a molecular characterization of the vaginal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, Federica; Brigidi, Patrizia; Calanni, Fiorella; Lauro, Vittoria; Tacchi, Raffaella; Donders, Gilbert; Peters, Klaus; Guaschino, Secondo; Vitali, Beatrice

    2012-08-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common vaginal disorder characterized by an alteration of the vaginal bacterial morphotypes, associated with sexually transmitted infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the impact of different doses of rifaximin vaginal tablets (100 mg/day for 5 days, 25 mg/day for 5 days, and 100 mg/day for 2 days) on the vaginal microbiota of 102 European patients with BV enrolled in a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. An integrated molecular approach based on quantitative PCR (qPCR) and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was used to investigate the effects of vaginal tablets containing the antibiotic. An increase in members of the genus Lactobacillus and a decrease in the BV-related bacterial groups after the antibiotic treatment were demonstrated by qPCR. PCR-DGGE profiles confirmed the capability of rifaximin to modulate the composition of the vaginal microbial communities and to reduce their complexity. This molecular analysis supported the clinical observation that rifaximin at 25 mg/day for 5 days represents an effective treatment to be used in future pivotal studies for the treatment of BV.

  12. Efficacy of Rifaximin Vaginal Tablets in Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis: a Molecular Characterization of the Vaginal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cruciani, Federica; Brigidi, Patrizia; Calanni, Fiorella; Lauro, Vittoria; Tacchi, Raffaella; Donders, Gilbert; Peters, Klaus; Guaschino, Secondo

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common vaginal disorder characterized by an alteration of the vaginal bacterial morphotypes, associated with sexually transmitted infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the impact of different doses of rifaximin vaginal tablets (100 mg/day for 5 days, 25 mg/day for 5 days, and 100 mg/day for 2 days) on the vaginal microbiota of 102 European patients with BV enrolled in a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. An integrated molecular approach based on quantitative PCR (qPCR) and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was used to investigate the effects of vaginal tablets containing the antibiotic. An increase in members of the genus Lactobacillus and a decrease in the BV-related bacterial groups after the antibiotic treatment were demonstrated by qPCR. PCR-DGGE profiles confirmed the capability of rifaximin to modulate the composition of the vaginal microbial communities and to reduce their complexity. This molecular analysis supported the clinical observation that rifaximin at 25 mg/day for 5 days represents an effective treatment to be used in future pivotal studies for the treatment of BV. PMID:22585228

  13. Vaginal and Uterine Bacterial Communities in Postpartum Lactating Cows

    PubMed Central

    Clemmons, Brooke A.; Reese, Sydney T.; Dantas, Felipe G.; Franco, Gessica A.; Smith, Timothy P. L.; Adeyosoye, Olusoji I.; Pohler, Ky G.; Myer, Phillip R.

    2017-01-01

    Reproductive inefficiency in cattle has major impacts on overall productivity of cattle operations, increasing cost of production, and impacting the sustainability of the cattle enterprise. Decreased reproductive success and associated disease states have been correlated with the presence of specific microbes and microbial community profiles, yet details of the relationship between microbial communities and host physiology are not well known. The present study profiles and compares the microbial communities in the bovine uterus and vagina using 16S rRNA sequencing of the V1–V3 hypervariable region at the time of artificial insemination. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between the vaginal and uterine communities were observed at the level of α-diversity metrics, including Chao1, Shannon’s Diversity Index, and observed OTU. Greater clustering of vaginal OTU was apparent in principal coordinate analysis compared to uterine OTU, despite greater diversity in the vaginal community in both weighted and unweighted UniFrac distance matrices (p < 0.05). There was a significantly greater relative abundance of unassigned taxa in the uterus (p = 0.008), otherwise there were few differences between the overall community profiles. Both vaginal and uterine communities were dominated by Firmicutes, although the relative abundance of rRNA sequences corresponding to species in this phylum was significantly (p = 0.007) lower in the uterine community. Additional differences were observed at the genus level, specifically in abundances within Clostridium (p = 0.009), Anaerofustis (p = 0.018), Atopobium (p = 0.035), Oscillospira (p = 0.035), 5-7N15 (p = 0.035), Mycoplasma (p = 0.035), Odoribacter (p = 0.042), and within the families Clostridiaceae (p = 0.006), Alcaligenaceae (p = 0.021), and Ruminococcaceae (p = 0.021). Overall, the comparison revealed differences and commonalities among bovine reproductive organs, which may be influenced by host physiology. The increased

  14. Genome Sequences of 11 Human Vaginal Actinobacteria Strains

    PubMed Central

    Deitzler, Grace E.; Ruiz, Maria J.; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd S.; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the vaginal microbiota is an important health determinant. Several members of the phylum Actinobacteria have been implicated in bacterial vaginosis, a condition associated with many negative health outcomes. Here, we present 11 strains of vaginal Actinobacteria (now available through BEI Resources) along with draft genome sequences. PMID:27688328

  15. Genome Sequences of 11 Human Vaginal Actinobacteria Strains.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Amanda L; Deitzler, Grace E; Ruiz, Maria J; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd S; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka; Lewis, Warren G

    2016-09-29

    The composition of the vaginal microbiota is an important health determinant. Several members of the phylum Actinobacteria have been implicated in bacterial vaginosis, a condition associated with many negative health outcomes. Here, we present 11 strains of vaginal Actinobacteria (now available through BEI Resources) along with draft genome sequences.

  16. Rapid and Profound Shifts in the Vaginal Microbiota Following Antibiotic Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Bryan T.; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fiedler, Tina L.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.; Fredricks, David N.; Schiffer, Joshua T.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common polymicrobial disease associated with numerous negative reproductive health outcomes, including an increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus acquisition. BV is treatable with antibiotics, but relapse is common. A more detailed understanding of bacterial dynamics during antibiotic therapy for BV could identify conditions that favor establishment, maintenance, and eradication of BV-associated bacterial species, thereby improving treatment outcomes. Methods. We used mathematical models to analyze daily quantitative measurements of 11 key bacterial species during metronidazole treatment for 15 cases of BV. Results. We identified complete reorganization of vaginal bacterial composition within a day of initiating therapy. Although baseline bacterial levels predicted a longer time to clearance, all anaerobic species were eliminated rapidly within a median of 3 days. However, reemergence of BV-associated species was common following treatment cessation. Gardnerella vaginalis, a facultative anaerobe, was cleared more slowly than anaerobic BV-associated species, and levels of G. vaginalis often rebounded during treatment. We observed gradual Lactobacillus species growth, indicating that untargeted microbes fill the transient vacuum formed during treatment. Conclusions. Under antibiotic pressure, the human microbiome can undergo rapid shifts on a scale of hours. When treatment is stopped, BV-associated bacteria quickly reemerge, suggesting a possible role for intermittent prophylactic treatment. PMID:25676470

  17. Rapid and Profound Shifts in the Vaginal Microbiota Following Antibiotic Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Bryan T; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fiedler, Tina L; Marrazzo, Jeanne M; Fredricks, David N; Schiffer, Joshua T

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common polymicrobial disease associated with numerous negative reproductive health outcomes, including an increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus acquisition. BV is treatable with antibiotics, but relapse is common. A more detailed understanding of bacterial dynamics during antibiotic therapy for BV could identify conditions that favor establishment, maintenance, and eradication of BV-associated bacterial species, thereby improving treatment outcomes. We used mathematical models to analyze daily quantitative measurements of 11 key bacterial species during metronidazole treatment for 15 cases of BV. We identified complete reorganization of vaginal bacterial composition within a day of initiating therapy. Although baseline bacterial levels predicted a longer time to clearance, all anaerobic species were eliminated rapidly within a median of 3 days. However, reemergence of BV-associated species was common following treatment cessation. Gardnerella vaginalis, a facultative anaerobe, was cleared more slowly than anaerobic BV-associated species, and levels of G. vaginalis often rebounded during treatment. We observed gradual Lactobacillus species growth, indicating that untargeted microbes fill the transient vacuum formed during treatment. Under antibiotic pressure, the human microbiome can undergo rapid shifts on a scale of hours. When treatment is stopped, BV-associated bacteria quickly reemerge, suggesting a possible role for intermittent prophylactic treatment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Lactobacilli Dominance and Vaginal pH: Why Is the Human Vaginal Microbiome Unique?

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth A; Beasley, DeAnna E; Dunn, Robert R; Archie, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiome is dominated by bacteria from the genus Lactobacillus, which create an acidic environment thought to protect women against sexually transmitted pathogens and opportunistic infections. Strikingly, lactobacilli dominance appears to be unique to humans; while the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the human vagina is typically >70%, in other mammals lactobacilli rarely comprise more than 1% of vaginal microbiota. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain humans' unique vaginal microbiota, including humans' distinct reproductive physiology, high risk of STDs, and high risk of microbial complications linked to pregnancy and birth. Here, we test these hypotheses using comparative data on vaginal pH and the relative abundance of lactobacilli in 26 mammalian species and 50 studies (N = 21 mammals for pH and 14 mammals for lactobacilli relative abundance). We found that non-human mammals, like humans, exhibit the lowest vaginal pH during the period of highest estrogen. However, the vaginal pH of non-human mammals is never as low as is typical for humans (median vaginal pH in humans = 4.5; range of pH across all 21 non-human mammals = 5.4-7.8). Contrary to disease and obstetric risk hypotheses, we found no significant relationship between vaginal pH or lactobacilli relative abundance and multiple metrics of STD or birth injury risk (P-values ranged from 0.13 to 0.99). Given the lack of evidence for these hypotheses, we discuss two alternative explanations: the common function hypothesis and a novel hypothesis related to the diet of agricultural humans. Specifically, with regard to diet we propose that high levels of starch in human diets have led to increased levels of glycogen in the vaginal tract, which, in turn, promotes the proliferation of lactobacilli. If true, human diet may have paved the way for a novel, protective microbiome in human vaginal tracts. Overall, our results highlight the need for continuing research on non-human

  19. Lactobacilli Dominance and Vaginal pH: Why Is the Human Vaginal Microbiome Unique?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth A.; Beasley, DeAnna E.; Dunn, Robert R.; Archie, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiome is dominated by bacteria from the genus Lactobacillus, which create an acidic environment thought to protect women against sexually transmitted pathogens and opportunistic infections. Strikingly, lactobacilli dominance appears to be unique to humans; while the relative abundance of lactobacilli in the human vagina is typically >70%, in other mammals lactobacilli rarely comprise more than 1% of vaginal microbiota. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain humans' unique vaginal microbiota, including humans' distinct reproductive physiology, high risk of STDs, and high risk of microbial complications linked to pregnancy and birth. Here, we test these hypotheses using comparative data on vaginal pH and the relative abundance of lactobacilli in 26 mammalian species and 50 studies (N = 21 mammals for pH and 14 mammals for lactobacilli relative abundance). We found that non-human mammals, like humans, exhibit the lowest vaginal pH during the period of highest estrogen. However, the vaginal pH of non-human mammals is never as low as is typical for humans (median vaginal pH in humans = 4.5; range of pH across all 21 non-human mammals = 5.4–7.8). Contrary to disease and obstetric risk hypotheses, we found no significant relationship between vaginal pH or lactobacilli relative abundance and multiple metrics of STD or birth injury risk (P-values ranged from 0.13 to 0.99). Given the lack of evidence for these hypotheses, we discuss two alternative explanations: the common function hypothesis and a novel hypothesis related to the diet of agricultural humans. Specifically, with regard to diet we propose that high levels of starch in human diets have led to increased levels of glycogen in the vaginal tract, which, in turn, promotes the proliferation of lactobacilli. If true, human diet may have paved the way for a novel, protective microbiome in human vaginal tracts. Overall, our results highlight the need for continuing research on non-human

  20. A comparative study of the therapeutic effects of the Zataria multiflora vaginal cream and metronidazole vaginal gel on bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Simbar, M; Azarbad, Z; Mojab, F; Majd, H Alavi

    2008-12-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of most prevalent complications among reproductive-aged women. Metromidazole prescription, which is considered as the first-line treatment of BV, is usually followed by a few side effects. Besides, there is a growing tendency toward herbal medicines for the treatment of vaginitis. Antibacterial and antifungal effects of Zataria multiflora (Z. multiflora) have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. This study aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of the Z. multiflora vaginal cream and metronidazole vaginal gel on bacterial vaginosis. This was a randomized clinical trial on 90 married women aged 18-40 affected by BV who attended for treatment to the gynecology clinic of Shabih-Khani Hospital. They randomly divided to two groups of 45 participants. Diagnostic criteria were Amsel's criteria and Gram stain. Z. multiflora vaginal cream or metronidazole vaginal gel for five-night usage were prescribed to each group, and after 2-7 days therapeutic effects on participants' complications and their Amsel criteria were assessed. Data analysis was performed by McNemar and Fisher exact tests. Patients' complication and their Amsel's criteria were significantly decreased after treatment with Z. multiflora or metronidazole (p<0.05). Relative risk for unresponsiveness to treatment with Z. multiflora, to unresponsiveness to metronidazole was 1.5, which was not significant. Therapeutic effects of Z. multiflora vaginal cream are similar to metronidazole vaginal gel on BV. Therefore it could be an appropriate choice to BV treatment for those interested in herbal medicines or those affected by side effects of metronidazole.

  1. Cervicovaginal cytokines, sialidase activity and bacterial load in reproductive-aged women with intermediate vaginal flora.

    PubMed

    Santos-Greatti, Mariana Morena de Vieira; da Silva, Márcia Guimarães; Ferreira, Carolina Sanitá Tafner; Marconi, Camila

    2016-11-01

    Studies have shown that not only bacterial vaginosis, but also intermediate vaginal flora has deleterious effects for women's reproductive health. However, literature still lacks information about microbiological and immunological aspects of intermediate flora.

  2. Associations between vaginal pathogenic community and bacterial vaginosis in Chinese reproductive-age women.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Luo, Yueqiu; Wu, Xiaoxing; Yuan, Li; Tong, Xiaojuan; Li, Lanjuan; Xiang, Charlie

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of the most common urogenital infections among women of reproductive age that represents shifts in microbiota from Lactobacillus spp. to diverse anaerobes. The aim of our study was to evalute the diagnostic values of Gardnerella, Atopobium, Eggerthella, Megasphaera typeI, Leptotrichia/Sneathia and Prevotella, defined as a vaginal pathogenic community for BV and their associations with vaginal pH and Nugent scores. We investigated the vaginal pathogenic bacteria and Lactobacillus spp. with species-specific real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) in 50 BV-positive and 50 BV-negative Chinese women of reproductive age. Relative to BV-negative subjects, a siginificant decline in Lactobacillus and an obvious increase in bacteria in the vaginal pathogenic community were observed in BV-postive subjects (P<0.05). With the exception of Megasphaera typeI, other vaginal pathogenic bacteria were highly predictable for BV with a better sensitivity and specificity. The vaginal pathogenic community was positively associated with vaginal pH and Nugent scores, while Lactobacillus spp., such as L. iners and L. crispatus was negatively associated with them (P<0.05). Our data implied that the prevalance of vaginal pathogenic bacteria as well as the depletion of Lactobacillus was highly accurate for BV diagnosis. Vaginal microbiota shifts, especially the overgrowth of the vaginal pathogenic community, showed well diagnostic values in predicting BV. Postive correlations between those vaginal pathogenic bacteria and vaginal pH, Nugent score indicated the vaginal pathogenic community rather than a single vaginal microorganism, was participated in the onset of BV directly.

  3. Associations between Vaginal Pathogenic Community and Bacterial Vaginosis in Chinese Reproductive-Age Women

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yueqiu; Wu, Xiaoxing; Yuan, Li; Tong, Xiaojuan; Li, Lanjuan; Xiang, Charlie

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of the most common urogenital infections among women of reproductive age that represents shifts in microbiota from Lactobacillus spp. to diverse anaerobes. The aim of our study was to evalute the diagnostic values of Gardnerella, Atopobium, Eggerthella, Megasphaera typeI, Leptotrichia/Sneathia and Prevotella, defined as a vaginal pathogenic community for BV and their associations with vaginal pH and Nugent scores. Methods and Findings We investigated the vaginal pathogenic bacteria and Lactobacillus spp. with species-specific real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) in 50 BV-positive and 50 BV-negative Chinese women of reproductive age. Relative to BV-negative subjects, a siginificant decline in Lactobacillus and an obvious increase in bacteria in the vaginal pathogenic community were observed in BV-postive subjects (P<0.05). With the exception of Megasphaera typeI, other vaginal pathogenic bacteria were highly predictable for BV with a better sensitivity and specificity. The vaginal pathogenic community was positively associated with vaginal pH and Nugent scores, while Lactobacillus spp., such as L. iners and L. crispatus was negatively associated with them (P<0.05). Conclusions Our data implied that the prevalance of vaginal pathogenic bacteria as well as the depletion of Lactobacillus was highly accurate for BV diagnosis. Vaginal microbiota shifts, especially the overgrowth of the vaginal pathogenic community, showed well diagnostic values in predicting BV. Postive correlations between those vaginal pathogenic bacteria and vaginal pH, Nugent score indicated the vaginal pathogenic community rather than a single vaginal microorganism, was participated in the onset of BV directly. PMID:24124575

  4. Bacterial vaginosis, vaginal flora patterns and vaginal hygiene practices in patients presenting with vaginal discharge syndrome in The Gambia, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Demba, Edward; Morison, Linda; van der Loeff, Maarten Schim; Awasana, Akum A; Gooding, Euphemia; Bailey, Robin; Mayaud, Philippe; West, Beryl

    2005-03-09

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) - a syndrome characterised by a shift in vaginal flora - appears to be particularly common in sub-Saharan Africa, but little is known of the pattern of vaginal flora associated with BV in Africa. We conducted a study aimed at determining the prevalence of BV and patterns of BV-associated vaginal micro-flora among women with vaginal discharge syndrome (VDS) in The Gambia, West Africa. We enrolled 227 women with VDS from a large genito-urinary medicine clinic in Fajara, The Gambia. BV was diagnosed by the Nugent's score and Amsel's clinical criteria. Vaginal swabs were collected for T vaginalis and vaginal flora microscopy, and for Lactobacillus spp, aerobic organisms, Candida spp and BV-associated bacteria (Gardnerella vaginalis, anaerobic bacteria, and Mycoplasma spp) cultures; and cervical swabs were collected for N gonorrhoeae culture and C trachomatis PCR. Sera were tested for HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies. Sexual health history including details on sexual hygiene were obtained by standardised questionnaire. BV prevalence was 47.6% by Nugent's score and 30.8% by Amsel's clinical criteria. Lactobacillus spp were isolated in 37.8% of women, and 70% of the isolates were hydrogen-peroxide (H202)-producing strains. Prevalence of BV-associated bacteria were: G vaginalis 44.4%; Bacteroides 16.7%; Prevotella 15.2%; Peptostretococcus 1.5%; Mobiluncus 0%; other anaerobes 3.1%; and Mycoplasma hominis 21.4%. BV was positively associated with isolation of G vaginalis (odds-ratio [OR] 19.42, 95%CI 7.91 - 47.6) and anaerobes (P = 0.001 [OR] could not be calculated), but not with M hominis. BV was negatively associated with presence of Lactobacillus (OR 0.07, 95%CI 0.03 - 0.15), and H2O2-producing lactobacilli (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.05 - 0.28). Presence of H2O2-producing lactobacilli was associated with significantly lower prevalence of G vaginalis, anaerobes and C trachomatis. HIV prevalence was 12.8%. Overall, there was no association between BV and HIV, and

  5. Controlled study on thymol + eugenol vaginal douche versus econazole in vaginal candidiasis and metronidazole in bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Sosto, Francesco; Benvenuti, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vaginal candidiasis (VC) are usually managed with topical antibiotics. This study compared the efficacy of a thymol + eugenol vaginal douche (SD) (CAS nr. thymol: 89-83-8 and eugenol: 97-53-0), with econazole (CAS 27220-47-9) in VC and metronidazole (CAS 443-48-1) in BV, as suppository reference therapies. Thymol and eugenol are natural antibacterial and antimycotic active ingredients extracted from plants. A multicentre, parallel group, randomized study was performed, after stratification for diagnosis. Twenty-three Italian gynaecological units enrolled 459 patients (232 BV, 227 VC). The treatments applied were as follows: SD 1 douche/day (Saugella lavanda Attiva) for 1 week, 1 metronidazole vaginal suppository/night for 1 week and 1 econazole vaginal suppository/night for 3 days. Clinical evaluations were performed before and 1 week after treatment. A similar significant symptom reduction was observed with metronidazole and SD in BV and with econazole and SD in VC. SD was found to be an effective prescription drug in minor recurrent vaginal infectious episodes and its use can reduce the repeated exposure to antibiotics.

  6. Bacteria in the vaginal microbiome alter the innate immune response and barrier properties of the human vaginal epithelia in a species-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Doerflinger, Sylvie Y; Throop, Andrea L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2014-06-15

    Bacterial vaginosis increases the susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections and negatively affects women's reproductive health. To investigate host-vaginal microbiota interactions and the impact on immune barrier function, we colonized 3-dimensional (3-D) human vaginal epithelial cells with 2 predominant species of vaginal microbiota (Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus crispatus) or 2 prevalent bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (Atopobium vaginae and Prevotella bivia). Colonization of 3-D vaginal epithelial cell aggregates with vaginal microbiota was observed with direct attachment to host cell surface with no cytotoxicity. A. vaginae infection yielded increased expression membrane-associated mucins and evoked a robust proinflammatory, immune response in 3-D vaginal epithelial cells (ie, expression of CCL20, hBD-2, interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, and tumor necrosis factor α) that can negatively affect barrier function. However, P. bivia and L. crispatus did not significantly upregulate pattern-recognition receptor-signaling, mucin expression, antimicrobial peptides/defensins, or proinflammatory cytokines in 3-D vaginal epithelial cell aggregates. Notably, L. iners induced pattern-recognition receptor-signaling activity, but no change was observed in mucin expression or secretion of interleukin 6 and interleukin 8. We identified unique species-specific immune signatures from vaginal epithelial cells elicited by colonization with commensal and bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria. A. vaginae elicited a signature that is consistent with significant disruption of immune barrier properties, potentially resulting in enhanced susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections during bacterial vaginosis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus acidophilus on bacterial vaginal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bertuccini, Lucia; Russo, Rosario; Iosi, Francesca; Superti, Fabiana

    2017-06-01

    The human vagina is colonized by a variety of microbes. Lactobacilli are the most common, mainly in healthy women; however, the microbiota composition can change rapidly, leading to infection or to a state in which potential pathogenic microorganisms co-exist with other commensals. In premenopausal women, urogenital infections, such as bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis, remain an important health problem. Treatment of these infections involves different kind of antibiotics; however, the recurrence rate remains high, and it must be also underlined that antibiotics are unable to spontaneously restore normal flora characterized by an abundant community of Lactobacilli. The main limitation is the inability to offer a long-term defensive barrier, thus facilitating relapses and recurrences. We report here the antimicrobial activities of two commercially existing Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Lactobacillus acidophilus GLA-14 strains and their combination (Respecta® probiotic blend) against four different pathogens responsible for both bacterial vaginosis ( Gardenerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae) and aerobic vaginitis ( Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli) by co-culturing assay. The probiotic combination, even if resulting in a different microbicidal activity against the different strains tested, demonstrated the efficacy of combined Lactobacillus strain treatment.

  8. Detection of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Tomoko; Motani, Hisako; Watanabe, Ken; Iwase, Hirotaro; Sakurada, Koichi

    2012-05-01

    To preliminarily evaluate the applicability of bacterial DNA as a marker for the forensic identification of vaginal fluid, we developed and performed PCR-based detection of 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus spp. dominating the vagina and of bacterial vaginosis-related bacteria from DNA extracted from body fluids and stains. As a result, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii and Atopobium vaginae were specifically detected in vaginal fluid and female urine samples. Bacterial genes detected in female urine might have originated from contaminated vaginal fluid. In addition, those of Lactobacillus iners, Lactobacillus gasseri and Gardnerella vaginalis were also detected in non-vaginal body fluids such as semen. Because bacterial genes were successfully amplified in DNA samples extracted by using the general procedure for animal tissues without any optional treatments, DNA samples prepared for the identification of vaginal fluid can also be used for personal identification. In conclusion, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of L. crispatus, L. jensenii and A. vaginae could be effective markers for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

  9. In vaginal fluid, bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis can be suppressed with lactic acid but not hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by vaginal lactobacilli is generally believed to protect against bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV), and strains of lactobacilli that can produce H2O2 are being developed as vaginal probiotics. However, evidence that led to this belief was based in part on non-physiological conditions, antioxidant-free aerobic conditions selected to maximize both production and microbicidal activity of H2O2. Here we used conditions more like those in vivo to compare the effects of physiologically plausible concentrations of H2O2 and lactic acid on a broad range of BV-associated bacteria and vaginal lactobacilli. Methods Anaerobic cultures of seventeen species of BV-associated bacteria and four species of vaginal lactobacilli were exposed to H2O2, lactic acid, or acetic acid at pH 7.0 and pH 4.5. After two hours, the remaining viable bacteria were enumerated by growth on agar media plates. The effect of vaginal fluid (VF) on the microbicidal activities of H2O2 and lactic acid was also measured. Results Physiological concentrations of H2O2 (< 100 μM) failed to inactivate any of the BV-associated bacteria tested, even in the presence of human myeloperoxidase (MPO) that increases the microbicidal activity of H2O2. At 10 mM, H2O2 inactivated all four species of vaginal lactobacilli but only one of seventeen species of BV-associated bacteria. Moreover, the addition of just 1% vaginal fluid (VF) blocked the microbicidal activity of 1 M H2O2. In contrast, lactic acid at physiological concentrations (55-111 mM) and pH (4.5) inactivated all the BV-associated bacteria tested, and had no detectable effect on the vaginal lactobacilli. Also, the addition of 10% VF did not block the microbicidal activity of lactic acid. Conclusions Under optimal, anaerobic growth conditions, physiological concentrations of lactic acid inactivated BV-associated bacteria without affecting vaginal lactobacilli, whereas physiological concentrations of H2O2

  10. Distinct Histone Modifications Modulate DEFB1 Expression in Human Vaginal Keratinocytes in Response to Lactobacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehyouk; Jang, Ara; Kim, Jin Wook; Han, Jun Hyun; Chun, Byung Hee; Jung, Hye Su; Jeon, Che Ok; Myung, Soon Chul

    2017-05-15

    Vaginal commensal lactobacilli are considered to contribute significantly to the control of vaginal microbiota by competing with other microflora for adherence to the vaginal epithelium and by producing antimicrobial compounds. However, the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic prokaryotic-eukaryotic communication in the vaginal ecosystem remain poorly understood. Here, we showed that both DNA methylation and histone modifications were associated with expression of the DEFB1 gene, which encodes the antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin-1, in vaginal keratinocyte VK2/E6E7 cells. We investigated whether exposure to Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus reuteri would trigger the epigenetic modulation of DEFB1 expression in VK2/E6E7 cells in a bacterial species-dependent manner. While enhanced expression of DEFB1 was observed when VK2/E6E7 cells were exposed to L. gasseri, treatment with L. reuteri resulted in reduced DEFB1 expression. Moreover, L. gasseri stimulated the recruitment of active histone marks and, in contrast, L. reuteri led to the decrease of active histone marks at the DEFB1 promoter. It was remarkable that distinct histone modifications within the same promoter region of DEFB1 were mediated by L. gasseri and L. reuteri. Therefore, our study suggested that one of the underlying mechanisms of DEFB1 expression in the vaginal ecosystem might be associated with the epigenetic crosstalk between individual Lactobacillus spp. and vaginal keratinocytes.

  11. Association of the vaginal microbiota with human papillomavirus infection in a Korean twin cohort.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Sunghee; Lee, Heetae; Song, Yun-Mi; Lee, Kayoung; Han, Min Ji; Sung, Joohon; Ko, GwangPyo

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important causative agent of cervical cancers worldwide. However, our understanding of how the vaginal microbiota might be associated with HPV infection is limited. In addition, the influence of human genetic and physiological factors on the vaginal microbiota is unclear. Studies on twins and their families provide the ideal settings to investigate the complicated nature of human microbiota. This study investigated the vaginal microbiota of 68 HPV-infected or uninfected female twins and their families using 454-pyrosequencing analysis targeting the variable region (V2-V3) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Analysis of the vaginal microbiota from both premenopausal women and HPV-discordant twins indicated that HPV-positive women had significantly higher microbial diversity with a lower proportion of Lactobacillus spp. than HPV-negative women. Fusobacteria, including Sneathia spp., were identified as a possible microbiological marker associated with HPV infection. The vaginal microbiotas of twin pairs were significantly more similar to each other than to those from unrelated individuals. In addition, there were marked significant differences from those of their mother, possibly due to differences in menopausal status. Postmenopausal women had a lower proportion of Lactobacillus spp. and a significantly higher microbiota diversity. This study indicated that HPV infection was associated with the composition of the vaginal microbiota, which is influenced by multiple host factors such as genetics and menopause. The potential biological markers identified in this study could provide insight into HPV pathogenesis and may represent biological targets for diagnostics.

  12. Anaerobes and Bacterial Vaginosis in Pregnancy: Virulence Factors Contributing to Vaginal Colonisation

    PubMed Central

    Africa, Charlene W. J.; Nel, Janske; Stemmet, Megan

    2014-01-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis (BV) is unclear but it appears to be associated with factors that disrupt the normal acidity of the vagina thus altering the equilibrium between the normal vaginal microbiota. BV has serious implications for female morbidity, including reports of pelvic inflammatory disease, adverse pregnancy outcomes, increased susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections and infertility. This paper reviewed new available information regarding possible factors contributing to the establishment of the BV vaginal biofilm, examined the proposed role of anaerobic microbial species recently detected by new culture-independent methods and discusses developments related to the effects of BV on human pregnancy. The literature search included Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO), and Web of Science. Because of the complexity and diversity of population groups, diagnosis and methodology used, no meta-analysis was performed. Several anaerobic microbial species previously missed in the laboratory diagnosis of BV have been revealed while taking cognisance of newly proposed theories of infection, thereby improving our understanding and knowledge of the complex aetiology and pathogenesis of BV and its perceived role in adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25014248

  13. Vaginitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... see your health care professional. What is bacterial vaginosis? Bacterial vaginosis is caused by overgrowth of the ... the vagina. What are the symptoms of bacterial vaginosis? The main symptom is increased discharge with a ...

  14. Vaginal and uterine bacterial communities in postpartum lactating cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The vaginal and uterine microbiome of cattle could provide important indicators of fertility pregnancy success; however, only recently has next-generation sequencing made it possible to deeply interrogate these microbial communities. The objective of this study was to determine the bacteriome of the...

  15. Predictive value for preterm birth of abnormal vaginal flora, bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis during the first trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Donders, G G; Van Calsteren, K; Bellen, G; Reybrouck, R; Van den Bosch, T; Riphagen, I; Van Lierde, S

    2009-09-01

    Abnormal vaginal flora (AVF) before 14 gestational weeks is a risk factor for preterm birth (PTB). The presence of aerobic microorganisms and an inflammatory response in the vagina may also be important risk factors. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the differential influences of AVF, full and partial bacterial vaginosis, and aerobic vaginitis in the first trimester on PTB rate. The secondary aim was to elucidate why treatment with metronidazole has not been found to be beneficial in previous studies. Unselected women with low-risk pregnancies attending the prenatal unit of the Heilig Hart General Hospital in Tienen, Belgium, were included in the study. At the first prenatal visit, 1026 women were invited to undergo sampling of the vaginal fluid for wet mount microscopy and culture, of whom 759 were fully evaluable. Abnormal vaginal flora (AVF; disappearance of lactobacilli), bacterial vaginosis (BV), aerobic vaginitis (AV), increased inflammation (more than ten leucocytes per epithelial cell) and vaginal colonisation with Candida (CV) were scored according to standardised definitions. Partial BV was defined as patchy streaks of BV flora or sporadic clue cells mixed with other flora, and full BV as a granular anaerobic-type flora or more than 20% clue cells. Vaginal fluid was cultured for aerobic bacteria, Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum. Outcome was recorded as miscarriage vaginal flora in the first trimester had a 75% lower risk of delivery before 35 weeks compared with women with AVF [odds ratio (OR) 0

  16. Comparison of the vaginal microbiota diversity of women with and without human papillomavirus infection: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weijiao; Weng, Jinlong; Gao, Yunong; Chen, Xiaochi

    2013-06-10

    The female genital tract is an important bacterial habitat of the human body, and vaginal microbiota plays a crucial role in vaginal health. The alteration of vaginal microbiota affects millions of women annually, and is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes, including human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, previous studies have primarily focused on the association between bacterial vaginosis and HPV infection. Little is known about the composition of vaginal microbial communities involved in HPV acquisition. The present study was performed to investigate whether HPV infection was associated with the diversity and composition of vaginal microbiota. A total of 70 healthy women (32 HPV-negative and 38 HPV-positive) with normal cervical cytology were enrolled in this study. Culture-independent polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to measure the diversity and composition of vaginal microbiota of all subjects. We found significantly greater biological diversity in the vaginal microbiota of HPV-positive women (p < 0.001). Lactobacillus, including L. gallinarum, L. iners and L. gasseri, was the predominant genus and was detected in all women. No significant difference between HPV-positive and HPV-negative women was found for the frequency of detection of L. gallinarum (p = 0.775) or L. iners (p = 0.717), but L. gasseri was found at a significantly higher frequency in HPV-positive women (p = 0.005). Gardnerella vaginalis was also found at a significantly higher frequency in HPV-positive women (p = 0.031). Dendrograms revealed that vaginal microbiota from the two groups had different profiles. Our study is the first systematic evaluation of an association between vaginal microbiota and HPV infection, and we have demonstrated that compared with HPV-negative women, the bacterial diversity of HPV-positive women is more complex and the composition of vaginal microbiota is different.

  17. Bacterial vaginosis, vaginal flora patterns and vaginal hygiene practices in patients presenting with vaginal discharge syndrome in The Gambia, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Demba, Edward; Morison, Linda; van der Loeff, Maarten Schim; Awasana, Akum A; Gooding, Euphemia; Bailey, Robin; Mayaud, Philippe; West, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) – a syndrome characterised by a shift in vaginal flora – appears to be particularly common in sub-Saharan Africa, but little is known of the pattern of vaginal flora associated with BV in Africa. We conducted a study aimed at determining the prevalence of BV and patterns of BV-associated vaginal micro-flora among women with vaginal discharge syndrome (VDS) in The Gambia, West Africa. Methods We enrolled 227 women with VDS from a large genito-urinary medicine clinic in Fajara, The Gambia. BV was diagnosed by the Nugent's score and Amsel's clinical criteria. Vaginal swabs were collected for T vaginalis and vaginal flora microscopy, and for Lactobacillus spp, aerobic organisms, Candida spp and BV-associated bacteria (Gardnerella vaginalis, anaerobic bacteria, and Mycoplasma spp) cultures; and cervical swabs were collected for N gonorrhoeae culture and C trachomatis PCR. Sera were tested for HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies. Sexual health history including details on sexual hygiene were obtained by standardised questionnaire. Results BV prevalence was 47.6% by Nugent's score and 30.8% by Amsel's clinical criteria. Lactobacillus spp were isolated in 37.8% of women, and 70% of the isolates were hydrogen-peroxide (H202)-producing strains. Prevalence of BV-associated bacteria were: G vaginalis 44.4%; Bacteroides 16.7%; Prevotella 15.2%; Peptostretococcus 1.5%; Mobiluncus 0%; other anaerobes 3.1%; and Mycoplasma hominis 21.4%. BV was positively associated with isolation of G vaginalis (odds-ratio [OR] 19.42, 95%CI 7.91 – 47.6) and anaerobes (P = 0.001 [OR] could not be calculated), but not with M hominis. BV was negatively associated with presence of Lactobacillus (OR 0.07, 95%CI 0.03 – 0.15), and H2O2-producing lactobacilli (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.05 – 0.28). Presence of H2O2-producing lactobacilli was associated with significantly lower prevalence of G vaginalis, anaerobes and C trachomatis. HIV prevalence was 12.8%. Overall, there was

  18. Changes in vaginal bacterial concentrations with intravaginal metronidazole therapy for bacterial vaginosis as assessed by quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Fredricks, David N; Fiedler, Tina L; Thomas, Katherine K; Mitchell, Caroline M; Marrazzo, Jeanne M

    2009-03-01

    Several fastidious bacteria have been associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV) using broad-range bacterial PCR methods such as consensus sequence 16S rRNA gene PCR, but their role in BV remains poorly defined. We describe changes in vaginal bacterial concentrations following metronidazole therapy for BV. Vaginal swabs were collected from women with BV diagnosed using Amsel clinical criteria, and vaginal fluid was assessed by Gram stain to generate Nugent scores. Follow-up swabs were collected 1 month after a 5-day course of vaginal 0.75% metronidazole gel and analyzed for 24 subjects with cured BV and 24 subjects with persistent BV. Changes in bacterial concentrations were measured using eight bacterium-specific 16S rRNA gene quantitative PCR assays. DNA from several fastidious BV-associated bacteria (BVAB) were present at high concentrations in the vagina prior to treatment. Successful antibiotic therapy resulted in 3- to 4-log reductions in median bacterial loads of BVAB1 (P=0.02), BVAB2 (P=0.0004), BVAB3 (P=0.03), a Megasphaera-like bacterium (P<0.0001), Atopobium species (P<0.0001), Leptotrichia/Sneathia species (P=0.0002), and Gardnerella vaginalis (P<0.0001). Median posttreatment bacterial levels did not change significantly in subjects with persistent BV except for a decline in levels of BVAB3. The presence or absence of BV is reflected by vaginal concentrations of BV-associated bacteria such as BVAB1, BVAB2, Leptotrichia/Sneathia species, Atopobium species, Gardnerella vaginalis, and a Megasphaera-like bacterium, suggesting that these bacteria play an important role in BV pathogenesis and may be suitable markers of disease and treatment response.

  19. Changes in Vaginal Bacterial Concentrations with Intravaginal Metronidazole Therapy for Bacterial Vaginosis as Assessed by Quantitative PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Fredricks, David N.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Mitchell, Caroline M.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2009-01-01

    Several fastidious bacteria have been associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV) using broad-range bacterial PCR methods such as consensus sequence 16S rRNA gene PCR, but their role in BV remains poorly defined. We describe changes in vaginal bacterial concentrations following metronidazole therapy for BV. Vaginal swabs were collected from women with BV diagnosed using Amsel clinical criteria, and vaginal fluid was assessed by Gram stain to generate Nugent scores. Follow-up swabs were collected 1 month after a 5-day course of vaginal 0.75% metronidazole gel and analyzed for 24 subjects with cured BV and 24 subjects with persistent BV. Changes in bacterial concentrations were measured using eight bacterium-specific 16S rRNA gene quantitative PCR assays. DNA from several fastidious BV-associated bacteria (BVAB) were present at high concentrations in the vagina prior to treatment. Successful antibiotic therapy resulted in 3- to 4-log reductions in median bacterial loads of BVAB1 (P = 0.02), BVAB2 (P = 0.0004), BVAB3 (P = 0.03), a Megasphaera-like bacterium (P < 0.0001), Atopobium species (P < 0.0001), Leptotrichia/Sneathia species (P = 0.0002), and Gardnerella vaginalis (P < 0.0001). Median posttreatment bacterial levels did not change significantly in subjects with persistent BV except for a decline in levels of BVAB3. The presence or absence of BV is reflected by vaginal concentrations of BV-associated bacteria such as BVAB1, BVAB2, Leptotrichia/Sneathia species, Atopobium species, Gardnerella vaginalis, and a Megasphaera-like bacterium, suggesting that these bacteria play an important role in BV pathogenesis and may be suitable markers of disease and treatment response. PMID:19144794

  20. First isolation of Desulfovibrio from the human vaginal flora.

    PubMed

    Ichiishi, Suguru; Tanaka, Kaori; Nakao, Kenichi; Izumi, Koji; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Watanabe, Kunitomo

    2010-06-01

    Four Desulfovibrio species, including 2 subtypes of 1 species, namely, Desulfovibrio piger, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans MB subtype and Essex 6 subtype, Desulfovibrio fairfieldensis, and Desulfovibrio vulgaris, have been isolated from the human oral and intestinal flora, but not previously from the vaginal flora. They are opportunistic pathogens and have been considered as possible environmental and etiologic agents involved in ulcerative colitis and chronic periodontitis. We isolated Desulfovibrio intestinalis from vaginal specimens of four Japanese women; a species which has not been previously isolated from humans. The vaginal isolates were highly resistant to cefoxitin, piperacillin, and piperacillin-tazobactam but were susceptible to the other antimicrobial agents tested. Our findings suggested that vaginal Desulfovibrio species may be involved in gynecological or obstetric pathology, and provides additional information of the medical relevance on human Desulfovibrio species.

  1. Pilot randomized trial for treatment of bacterial vaginosis using in situ forming metronidazole vaginal gel.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Omar M; Fetih, Gihan N; Abdellah, Noura H; Ismail, Saeyd; Ibrahim, Maggie A; Ibrahim, El-sayed A

    2011-07-01

    To compare the efficacy of a novel vaginal delivery system for metronidazole (0.8% MTZ in situ gel) versus a conventional MTZ vaginal gel product in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis (BV). All consecutive patients who presented to a tertiary care hospital with symptoms suggestive of BV were approached to participate in the study. Forty-two eligible participants were randomly assigned to either MTZ in situ gel or a conventional vaginal gel product twice daily for 5 days. All participants were re-examined after one and 4 weeks of the beginning of treatment to ensure cure of infection and any side-effects. Demographic criteria of the participants were comparable in the two treatment groups. The cure rate after one week from the treatment was 85% in the in situ gel group and 71.4% in the conventional vaginal gel group (P = 0.294), while after 4 weeks, the cure rate showed significant difference in the in situ gel group as compared to the conventional vaginal gel group (16/20 [80%]) and (9/19 [47.4%]), respectively (P = 0.034). Pilot testing showed that in situ MTZ vaginal gel is more effective than the conventional vaginal gel for long-term cure of BV. These findings suggest a novel and efficient long-term treatment of BV. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2011 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  2. The Structure of the Human Vaginal Stratum Corneum and its Role in Immune Defense

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deborah J.; Marathe, Jai; Pudney, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The superficial layers of the human vaginal epithelium, which form an interface between host and environment, are comprised of dead flattened cells that have undergone a terminal cell differentiation program called cornification. This entails extrusion of nuclei and intercellular organelles, and the depletion of functional DNA and RNA precluding the synthesis of new proteins. As a consequence, the terminally differentiated cells do not maintain robust intercellular junctions and have a diminished capacity to actively respond to microbial exposure, yet the vaginal stratum corneum (SC) mounts an effective defense against invasive microbial infections. The vaginal SC in reproductive aged women is comprised of loosely connected glycogen-filled cells which are permeable to bacterial and viral microbes as well as molecular and cellular mediators of immune defense. We propose here that the vaginal SC provides a unique microenvironment that maintains vaginal health by fostering endogenous lactobacillii and retaining critical mediators of acquired and innate immunity. A better understanding of the molecular and physicochemical properties of the vaginal SC could promote the design of more effective topical drugs and microbicides. PMID:24661416

  3. Rifaximin modulates the vaginal microbiome and metabolome in women affected by bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Laghi, Luca; Picone, Gianfranco; Cruciani, Federica; Brigidi, Patrizia; Calanni, Fiorella; Donders, Gilbert; Capozzi, Francesco; Vitali, Beatrice

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common vaginal disorder characterized by the decrease of lactobacilli and overgrowth of Gardnerella vaginalis and resident anaerobic vaginal bacteria. In the present work, the effects of rifaximin vaginal tablets on vaginal microbiota and metabolome of women affected by BV were investigated by combining quantitative PCR and a metabolomic approach based on (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance. To highlight the general trends of the bacterial communities and metabolomic profiles in response to the antibiotic/placebo therapy, a multivariate statistical strategy was set up based on the trajectories traced by vaginal samples in a principal component analysis space. Our data demonstrated the efficacy of rifaximin in restoring a health-like condition in terms of both bacterial communities and metabolomic features. In particular, rifaximin treatment was significantly associated with an increase in the lactobacillus/BV-related bacteria ratio, as well as with an increase in lactic acid concentration and a decrease of a pool of metabolites typically produced by BV-related bacteria (acetic acid, succinate, short-chain fatty acids, and biogenic amines). Among the tested dosages of rifaximin (100 and 25 mg for 5 days and 100 mg for 2 days), 25 mg for 5 days was found to be the most effective. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Rifaximin Modulates the Vaginal Microbiome and Metabolome in Women Affected by Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Picone, Gianfranco; Cruciani, Federica; Brigidi, Patrizia; Calanni, Fiorella; Donders, Gilbert; Capozzi, Francesco; Vitali, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common vaginal disorder characterized by the decrease of lactobacilli and overgrowth of Gardnerella vaginalis and resident anaerobic vaginal bacteria. In the present work, the effects of rifaximin vaginal tablets on vaginal microbiota and metabolome of women affected by BV were investigated by combining quantitative PCR and a metabolomic approach based on 1H nuclear magnetic resonance. To highlight the general trends of the bacterial communities and metabolomic profiles in response to the antibiotic/placebo therapy, a multivariate statistical strategy was set up based on the trajectories traced by vaginal samples in a principal component analysis space. Our data demonstrated the efficacy of rifaximin in restoring a health-like condition in terms of both bacterial communities and metabolomic features. In particular, rifaximin treatment was significantly associated with an increase in the lactobacillus/BV-related bacteria ratio, as well as with an increase in lactic acid concentration and a decrease of a pool of metabolites typically produced by BV-related bacteria (acetic acid, succinate, short-chain fatty acids, and biogenic amines). Among the tested dosages of rifaximin (100 and 25 mg for 5 days and 100 mg for 2 days), 25 mg for 5 days was found to be the most effective. PMID:24709255

  5. Norepinephrine potentiates proinflammatory responses of human vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brosnahan, Amanda J; Vulchanova, Lucy; Witta, Samantha R; Dai, Yuying; Jones, Bryan J; Brown, David R

    2013-06-15

    The vaginal epithelium provides a barrier to pathogens and recruits immune defenses through the secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Several studies have shown that mucosal sites are innervated by norepinephrine-containing nerve fibers. Here we report that norepinephrine potentiates the proinflammatory response of human vaginal epithelial cells to products produced by Staphylococcus aureus, a pathogen that causes menstrual toxic shock syndrome. The cells exhibit immunoreactivity for catecholamine synthesis enzymes and the norepinephrine transporter. Moreover, the cells secrete norepinephrine and dopamine at low concentrations. These results indicate that norepinephrine may serve as an autocrine modulator of proinflammatory responses in the vaginal epithelium.

  6. Association between aerobic vaginitis, bacterial vaginosis and squamous intraepithelial lesion of low grade.

    PubMed

    Jahic, Mahira; Mulavdic, Mirsada; Hadzimehmedovic, Azra; Jahic, Elmir

    2013-01-01

    To determine frequency of HPV infection, aerobic vaginitis and bacterial vaginosis in respondents with squamous intraepithelial lesion of lower grade comparing to respondents with normal PAP test results. Prospective research of 100 respondents has been conducted at University-Clinic Center Tuzla and Gynecology and Obstetrics Department at Primary Health Care Center Tuzla in period from May 2011 untill January 2012. Examination program included: anamnesis, clinical gynecological examination, HPV typization, microbiological examination of vaginal and cervical smear and PAP test. High risk HPV group has been found more frequently among the respondents with LG SIL 46% (23) than in those with normal PAP result 14% (7) p < 0.05. Aerobic vaginitis has been found in the respondents with LG SIL in 28% (14) and there is statistically significant difference of this vaginitis comparing to the respondents with normal PAP result (p < 0.05). Bacterial vaginosis has been found in 12% (6) of the respondents with LG SIL and in 4% (2) of those with normal PAP result which is not statistically significant. In women with LG SIL and aerobic vaginitis in 9 cases E. coli has been isolated, in 4 E. faecalis and in 1 Staphylococcus aureus, while in women with normal PAP test results 3 cases of E.coli have been isolated. Examining changes in pH value of vaginal environment, higher measured values have been found in the respondents with LG SIL- 5.26 while in the respondents with normal PAP test result was 4.94 (p < 0.05). There is also statistically significant increase in the number of leukocytes in the respondents with LG SIL in relation to those with normal result. In women with LG SIL aerobic vaginitis is very common but is not an indicator of HPV infection. An adequate treatment of aerobic vaginitis would decrease the frequency of LG SIL and number of precancerous lesions which may

  7. Bacterial vaginosis: what is physiological in vaginal bacteriology? An update and opinion.

    PubMed

    Leppäluoto, Pentti A

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) was originally described as a sexually transmitted infection caused by a single microbe. The prevailing concept describes BV as a polymicrobial coitus-associated disease of uncertain origin. In this overview the natural history of BV as a monobacterial and polymicrobial entity is examined with respect to the physiological concept of BV in relation to sexual behavior before and after introduction of the hormonal contraceptive pill. Bacterial vaginosis, characterized by low vaginal acidity (elevated pH) and replacement of vaginal Lactobacillus by Gardnerella vaginalis flora, could be caused by unprotected intercourse when a low pH changes through the neutralizing power of male ejaculate, vaginal coital transudate and vaginal neurogenic transudate. A monobacterial form, G. vaginalis vaginitis, could be a physiological post-coital condition for protection of ejaculated spermatozoa, characterized by 'pure'Gardnerella flora and elevated pH as an immediate result of an incidental unprotected coital act through neutralization of vaginal acid and replacement of Lactobacillus by Gardnerella flora. A polymicrobial form of BV could be autoinfection of the post-coital physiological G. vaginalis flora, characterized by a mixture of G. vaginalis, Mycoplasma hominis and anaerobic bacteria at lower vaginal acidity, possibly resulting from suppression of normal vaginal acidity through repeated sexual acts, with a resultant higher pH and transfer of enteric bacteria from the perianal region. Monobacterial and polymicrobial auto-infectious forms of BV may be clinically distinct and share a common origin. The understanding of BV as a basic physiological entity could influence the prophylaxis and treatment of the largely therapy-resistant polymicrobial BV. © 2011 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2011 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. A longitudinal study of vaginal douching and bacterial vaginosis--a marginal structural modeling analysis.

    PubMed

    Brotman, Rebecca M; Klebanoff, Mark A; Nansel, Tonja R; Andrews, William W; Schwebke, Jane R; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Kai F; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Scharfstein, Daniel O

    2008-07-15

    The etiology of bacterial vaginosis is unknown, and there are no long-term therapies for preventing this frequently recurring condition. Vaginal douching has been reported to be associated with bacterial vaginosis in observational studies. However, this association may be due to confounding by indication--that is, confounding by women douching in response to vaginal symptoms associated with bacterial vaginosis. The authors used marginal structural modeling to estimate the causal effect of douching on bacterial vaginosis risk while controlling for this confounding effect. In 1999-2002, nonpregnant women (n = 3,620) were recruited into a prospective study when they visited one of 12 public health clinics in Birmingham, Alabama, for routine care. Participants were assessed quarterly for 1 year. Bacterial vaginosis was based on a Nugent's Gram stain score of 7 or higher. Thirty-two percent of participants douched in every study interval, and 43.0% never douched. Of the 12,349 study visits, 40.2% were classified as involving bacterial vaginosis. The relative risk for regular douching as compared with no douching was 1.21 (95% confidence interval: 1.08, 1.38). These findings indicate that douching confers increased risk of disruption of vaginal flora. In the absence of a large randomized trial, these findings provide the best evidence to date for a risk of bacterial vaginosis associated with douching.

  9. A Longitudinal Study of Vaginal Douching and Bacterial Vaginosis—A Marginal Structural Modeling Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Klebanoff, Mark A.; Nansel, Tonja R.; Andrews, William W.; Schwebke, Jane R.; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Kai F.; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; Scharfstein, Daniel O.

    2008-01-01

    The etiology of bacterial vaginosis is unknown, and there are no long-term therapies for preventing this frequently recurring condition. Vaginal douching has been reported to be associated with bacterial vaginosis in observational studies. However, this association may be due to confounding by indication—that is, confounding by women douching in response to vaginal symptoms associated with bacterial vaginosis. The authors used marginal structural modeling to estimate the causal effect of douching on bacterial vaginosis risk while controlling for this confounding effect. In 1999–2002, nonpregnant women (n = 3,620) were recruited into a prospective study when they visited one of 12 public health clinics in Birmingham, Alabama, for routine care. Participants were assessed quarterly for 1 year. Bacterial vaginosis was based on a Nugent's Gram stain score of 7 or higher. Thirty-two percent of participants douched in every study interval, and 43.0% never douched. Of the 12,349 study visits, 40.2% were classified as involving bacterial vaginosis. The relative risk for regular douching as compared with no douching was 1.21 (95% confidence interval: 1.08, 1.38). These findings indicate that douching confers increased risk of disruption of vaginal flora. In the absence of a large randomized trial, these findings provide the best evidence to date for a risk of bacterial vaginosis associated with douching. PMID:18503038

  10. Molecular analysis of the relationship between specific vaginal bacteria and bacterial vaginosis metronidazole therapy failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Xiao, B B; Shang, C G; Wang, K; Na, R S; Nu, X X; Liao, Q

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial vaginosis frequently persists, even after treatment. The role of some strains of bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis treatment failure remains poorly defined. The aim of our study was to define the risk of bacterial vaginosis treatment failure, including pre-treatment detection of specific vaginal bacteria. Bacterial vaginosis is present when the Nugent score is ≥7 and the modified Amsel criteria is positive. Women with bacterial vaginosis were treated with intravaginal metronidazole gel nightly for 5 nights. The 454 pyrosequencing method was used to detect bacteria in vaginal fluid. By univariate analysis, a history of bacterial vaginosis, intrauterine device use and the presence of Facklamia, Corynebacterium and Veillonella were significantly associated with bacterial vaginosis treatment failure. Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus pentosus and Megasphaera were significantly associated with curing bacterial vaginosis. After logistic regression analysis and detection of these bacteria for test-of-cure, we found that women who had a history of bacterial vaginosis had a higher incidence of bacterial vaginosis treatment failure, whereas women with L. crispatus had a lower incidence of treatment failure. Post-treatment sexual activity was not associated with the treatment effect. Our data suggested that treatment failure may be not caused by drug resistance. Rather, it has a closer relationship with the failed restoration of lactobacilli.

  11. Suppressive antibacterial therapy with 0.75% metronidazole vaginal gel to prevent recurrent bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Jack D; Ferris, Daron; Schwebke, Jane; Nyirjesy, Paul; Wiesenfeld, Harold C; Peipert, Jeffrey; Soper, David; Ohmit, Suzanne E; Hillier, Sharon L

    2006-05-01

    Efficacy study of suppressive vaginal metronidazole in reducing recurrent symptomatic episodes of bacterial vaginosis. Multicenter prospective study with initial 10-day open-label metronidazole gel in which asymptomatic responders randomly assigned to receive twice weekly metronidazole vaginal gel or placebo for 16 weeks and off therapy for 12 weeks. Of 157 eligible women with recurrent bacterial vaginosis, 112 of 127 returning evaluable women (88.2%) responded clinically and were randomly assigned. During suppressive therapy, recurrent bacterial vaginosis occurred in 13 women (25.5%) receiving metronidazole and 26 (59.1%) receiving placebo (MITT analysis, relative risk [RR] 0.43, CI = 0.25-0.73, P = .001). During the entire 28-week follow-up, recurrence occurred in 26 (51.0%) on treatment compared with 33 (75%) on placebo (RR 0.68, CI = 0.49-0.93, P = .02). Probability for remaining cured was 70% for metronidazole compared with 39% on placebo, which declined to 34% and 18%, respectively, by 28 weeks follow-up. Adverse effects were uncommon; however, secondary vaginal candidiasis occurred significantly more often in metronidazole-treated women (P = .02). Suppressive therapy with twice-weekly metronidazole gel achieves a significant reduction in the recurrence rate of bacterial vaginosis; however, secondary vaginal candidiasis is common.

  12. Associations of the vaginal microbiota with HIV infection, bacterial vaginosis, and demographic factors.

    PubMed

    Chehoud, Christel; Stieh, Daniel J; Bailey, Aubrey G; Laughlin, Alice L; Allen, Shannon A; McCotter, Kerrie L; Sherrill-Mix, Scott A; Hope, Thomas J; Bushman, Frederic D

    2017-04-24

    We sought to investigate the effects of HIV infection on the vaginal microbiota and associations with treatment and demographic factors. We thus compared vaginal microbiome samples from HIV-infected (HIV+) and HIV-uninfected (HIV-) women collected at two Chicago area hospitals. We studied vaginal microbiome samples from 178 women analyzed longitudinally (n = 324 samples) and collected extensive data on clinical status and demographic factors. We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to characterize the bacterial lineages present, then UniFrac, Shannon diversity, and other measures to compare community structure with sample metadata. Differences in microbiota measures were modest in the comparison of HIV+ and HIV- samples, in contrast to several previous studies, consistent with effective antiretroviral therapy. Proportions of healthy Lactobacillus species were not higher in HIV- patients overall, but were significantly higher when analyzed within each hospital in isolation. Rates of bacterial vaginosis were higher among African-American women and HIV+ women. Bacterial vaginosis was associated with higher frequency of HIV+. Unexpectedly, African-American women were more likely to switch bacterial vaginosis status between sampling times; switching was not associated with HIV+ status. The influence of HIV infection on the vaginal microbiome was modest for this cohort of well suppressed urban American women, consistent with effective antiretroviral therapy. HIV+ was found to be associated with bacterial vaginosis. Although bacterial vaginosis has previously been associated with HIV transmission, most of the women studied here became HIV+ many years before our test for bacterial vaginosis, thus implicating additional mechanisms linking HIV infection and bacterial vaginosis.

  13. Proteome profiles of vaginal fluids from women affected by bacterial vaginosis and healthy controls: outcomes of rifaximin treatment.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, Federica; Wasinger, Valerie; Turroni, Silvia; Calanni, Fiorella; Donders, Gilbert; Brigidi, Patrizia; Vitali, Beatrice

    2013-11-01

    This study was designed to characterize the proteome of vaginal fluid (VF) from women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) in comparison with that from healthy women, and to evaluate the effect exerted by rifaximin vaginal tablets. Women with BV (n = 39) and matched healthy controls (n = 41) were included in the study. BV patients were distributed among four groups receiving different doses of rifaximin. Vaginal rinsings were collected at the screening visit from all the participants and at a follow-up visit from BV-affected women. The VF proteome was analysed by tandem mass spectrometry using an Orbitrap mass analyser. A large number of human proteins were differentially expressed in women with BV in comparison with healthy women (n = 118) and in BV-affected women treated with rifaximin (n = 284). In both comparisons, a high proportion of the dysregulated proteins (∼20%) were involved in the innate immune response. Twenty-one of 24 proteins increased in abundance in women with BV versus healthy women and 31/59 proteins decreased after rifaximin treatment, suggesting a general reduction of the immune response resulting from the therapy. Major changes in protein abundance were found following treatment with 25 mg of rifaximin once daily for 5 days. BV is associated with a massive change in the VF proteome, mainly regarding the abundance of proteins involved in the innate immune response. Rifaximin at a dosage of 25 mg for 5 days modulated the vaginal proteome, counteracting the alterations associated with the BV condition.

  14. Evaluation of Lysis Methods for the Extraction of Bacterial DNA for Analysis of the Vaginal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gill, Christina; van de Wijgert, Janneke H H M; Blow, Frances; Darby, Alistair C

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies on the vaginal microbiota have employed molecular techniques such as 16S rRNA gene sequencing to describe the bacterial community as a whole. These techniques require the lysis of bacterial cells to release DNA before purification and PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene. Currently, methods for the lysis of bacterial cells are not standardised and there is potential for introducing bias into the results if some bacterial species are lysed less efficiently than others. This study aimed to compare the results of vaginal microbiota profiling using four different pretreatment methods for the lysis of bacterial samples (30 min of lysis with lysozyme, 16 hours of lysis with lysozyme, 60 min of lysis with a mixture of lysozyme, mutanolysin and lysostaphin and 30 min of lysis with lysozyme followed by bead beating) prior to chemical and enzyme-based DNA extraction with a commercial kit. After extraction, DNA yield did not significantly differ between methods with the exception of lysis with lysozyme combined with bead beating which produced significantly lower yields when compared to lysis with the enzyme cocktail or 30 min lysis with lysozyme only. However, this did not result in a statistically significant difference in the observed alpha diversity of samples. The beta diversity (Bray-Curtis dissimilarity) between different lysis methods was statistically significantly different, but this difference was small compared to differences between samples, and did not affect the grouping of samples with similar vaginal bacterial community structure by hierarchical clustering. An understanding of how laboratory methods affect the results of microbiota studies is vital in order to accurately interpret the results and make valid comparisons between studies. Our results indicate that the choice of lysis method does not prevent the detection of effects relating to the type of vaginal bacterial community one of the main outcome measures of epidemiological studies

  15. Co-occurrence of Trichomonas vaginalis and bacterial vaginosis and vaginal shedding of HIV-1 RNA.

    PubMed

    Fastring, Danielle R; Amedee, Angela; Gatski, Megan; Clark, Rebecca A; Mena, Leandro A; Levison, Judy; Schmidt, Norine; Rice, Janet; Gustat, Jeanette; Kissinger, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) and bacterial vaginosis (BV) are independently associated with increased risk of vaginal shedding in HIV-positive women. Because these 2 conditions commonly co-occur, this study was undertaken to examine the association between TV/BV co-occurrence and vaginal shedding of HIV-1 RNA. HIV-positive women attending outpatient HIV clinics in 3 urban US cities underwent a clinical examination; were screened for TV, BV, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and vulvovaginal candidiasis; and completed a behavioral survey. Women shedding HIV-1 RNA vaginally (≥50 copies/mL) were compared with women who had an undetectable (<50 copies/mL) vaginal viral load to determine if women who were TV positive and BV positive or had co-occurrence of TV/BV had higher odds of shedding vaginally when compared with women who did not have these conditions. In this sample of 373 HIV-positive women, 43.1% (n = 161) had co-occurrence of TV/BV and 33.2% (n = 124) were shedding HIV-1 RNA vaginally. The odds of shedding HIV vaginally in the presence of TV alone or BV alone and when TV/BV co-occurred were 4.07 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.78-9.37), 5.65 (95% CI, 2.64-12.01), and 18.63 (95% CI, 6.71-51.72), respectively, when compared with women with no diagnosis of TV or BV, and after adjusting for age, antiretroviral therapy status, and plasma viral load. T. vaginalis and BV were independently and synergistically related to vaginal shedding of HIV-1 RNA. Screening and prompt treatment of these 2 conditions among HIV-positive women are important not only clinically but for HIV prevention, as well.

  16. Molecular analysis of the diversity of vaginal microbiota associated with bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zongxin; Kong, Jianming; Liu, Fang; Zhu, Haibin; Chen, Xiaoyi; Wang, Yuezhu; Li, Lanjuan; Nelson, Karen E; Xia, Yaxian; Xiang, Charlie

    2010-09-07

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is an ecological disorder of the vaginal microbiota that affects millions of women annually, and is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes including pre-term birth and the acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. However, little is known about the overall structure and composition of vaginal microbial communities; most of the earlier studies focused on predominant vaginal bacteria in the process of BV. In the present study, the diversity and richness of vaginal microbiota in 50 BV positive and 50 healthy women from China were investigated using culture-independent PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and barcoded 454 pyrosequencing methods, and validated by quantitative PCR. Our data demonstrated that there was a profound shift in the absolute and relative abundances of bacterial species present in the vagina when comparing populations associated with healthy and diseased conditions. In spite of significant interpersonal variations, the diversity of vaginal microbiota in the two groups could be clearly divided into two clusters. A total of 246,359 high quality pyrosequencing reads was obtained for evaluating bacterial diversity and 24,298 unique sequences represented all phylotypes. The most predominant phyla of bacteria identified in the vagina belonged to Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria. The higher number of phylotypes in BV positive women over healthy is consistent with the results of previous studies and a large number of low-abundance taxa which were missed in previous studies were revealed. Although no single bacterium could be identified as a specific marker for healthy over diseased conditions, three phyla - Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria, and eight genera including Gardnerella, Atopobium, Megasphaera, Eggerthella, Aerococcus, Leptotrichia/Sneathia, Prevotella and Papillibacter were strongly associated with BV (p < 0.05). These genera are potentially excellent

  17. Molecular analysis of the diversity of vaginal microbiota associated with bacterial vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is an ecological disorder of the vaginal microbiota that affects millions of women annually, and is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes including pre-term birth and the acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. However, little is known about the overall structure and composition of vaginal microbial communities; most of the earlier studies focused on predominant vaginal bacteria in the process of BV. In the present study, the diversity and richness of vaginal microbiota in 50 BV positive and 50 healthy women from China were investigated using culture-independent PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and barcoded 454 pyrosequencing methods, and validated by quantitative PCR. Results Our data demonstrated that there was a profound shift in the absolute and relative abundances of bacterial species present in the vagina when comparing populations associated with healthy and diseased conditions. In spite of significant interpersonal variations, the diversity of vaginal microbiota in the two groups could be clearly divided into two clusters. A total of 246,359 high quality pyrosequencing reads was obtained for evaluating bacterial diversity and 24,298 unique sequences represented all phylotypes. The most predominant phyla of bacteria identified in the vagina belonged to Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria. The higher number of phylotypes in BV positive women over healthy is consistent with the results of previous studies and a large number of low-abundance taxa which were missed in previous studies were revealed. Although no single bacterium could be identified as a specific marker for healthy over diseased conditions, three phyla - Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria, and eight genera including Gardnerella, Atopobium, Megasphaera, Eggerthella, Aerococcus, Leptotrichia/Sneathia, Prevotella and Papillibacter were strongly associated with BV (p < 0.05). These genera are

  18. Promiscuity in mice is associated with increased vaginal bacterial diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmanes, Matthew David

    2011-11-01

    Differences in the number of sexual partners (i.e., mating system) have the potential to exert a strong influence on the bacterial communities present in reproductive structures like the vagina. Because this structure serves as a conduit for gametes, bacteria present there may have a pronounced, direct effect on host reproductive success. As a first step towards the identification of the relationship between sexual behavior and potentially pathogenic bacterial communities inhabiting vital reproductive structures, as well as their potential effects on fitness, I sought to quantify differences in bacterial diversity in a promiscuous and monogamous mammal species. To accomplish this, I used two sympatric species of Peromyscus rodents— Peromyscus californicus and Peromyscus maniculatus that differ with regard to the number of sexual partners per individual to test the hypothesis that bacterial diversity should be greater in the promiscuous P. maniculatus relative to the monogamous P. californicus. As predicted, phylogenetically controlled and operational taxonomic unit-based indices of bacterial diversity indicated that diversity is greater in the promiscuous species. These results provide important new insights into the effects of mating system on bacterial diversity in free-living vertebrates, and may suggest a potential cost of promiscuity.

  19. Promiscuity in Mice is Associated with Increased Vaginal Bacterial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    MacManes, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    Differences in the number of sexual partners (i.e., mating system) have the potential to exert a strong influence on the bacterial communities present in reproductive structures like the vagina. Because this structure serves as a conduit for gametes, bacteria present there may have a pronounced, direct effect on host reproductive success. As a first step towards the identification of the relationship between sexual behavior and potentially pathogenic bacterial communities inhabiting vital reproductive structures—as well as their potential effects on fitness, I sought to quantify differences in bacterial diversity in a promiscuous and monogamous mammal species. To accomplish this, I used 2 sympatric species of Peromyscus rodents—P. californicus and P. maniculatus that differ with regard to numbers of sexual partners per individual to test the hypothesis that bacterial diversity should be greater in the promiscuous P. maniculatus relative to the monogamous P. californicus. As predicted, phylogenetically controlled and operational taxonomic unit-based indices of bacterial diversity indicated that diversity is greater in the promiscuous species. These results provide important new insights into the effects of mating system on bacterial diversity in free-living vertebrates, and may suggest a potential cost of promiscuity. PMID:21964973

  20. The effects of intravaginal clindamycin and metronidazole therapy on vaginal lactobacilli in patients with bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Nyirjesy, Paul; McIntosh, Matthew J; Gattermeir, David J; Schumacher, Robert J; Steinmetz, Jana I; Joffrion, James L

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 3 intravaginal antibacterial treatments on vaginal lactobacilli in patients with bacterial vaginosis (BV). Retrospective analyses were performed on Lactobacillus scores from 3 similar studies evaluating 2 2% clindamycin vaginal creams and 0.75% metronidazole gel at baseline and at 21 to 30 days in 408 patients with BV. Scores were compared using a 1-way global F test and McNemar's test. All groups had similar mean Lactobacillus scores at baseline (P = 0.37) and at 21 to 30 days (P = .71). The 3 groups were also comparable at both visits with respect to the distributions of scores within each group. In all groups, there was significant improvement in the percentages of patients with no lactobacilli present at 21 to 30 days compared with baseline (P < .0001 for all comparisons). Clindamycin and metronidazole promoted similar levels of restoration of vaginal lactobacilli at 21 to 30 days.

  1. Periodic Presumptive Treatment for Vaginal Infections May Reduce the Incidence of Sexually Transmitted Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Balkus, Jennifer E; Manhart, Lisa E; Lee, Jeannette; Anzala, Omu; Kimani, Joshua; Schwebke, Jane; Shafi, Juma; Rivers, Charles; Kabare, Emanuel; Scott McClelland, R

    2016-06-15

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) may increase women's susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections (STIs). In a randomized trial of periodic presumptive treatment (PPT) to reduce vaginal infections, we observed a significant reduction in BV. We further assessed the intervention effect on incident Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Mycoplasma genitalium infection. Nonpregnant, human immunodeficiency virus-uninfected women from the United States and Kenya received intravaginal metronidazole (750 mg) plus miconazole (200 mg) or placebo for 5 consecutive nights each month for 12 months. Genital fluid specimens were collected every other month. Poisson regression models were used to assess the intervention effect on STI acquisition. Of 234 women enrolled, 221 had specimens available for analysis. Incidence of any bacterial STI (C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhoeae, or M. genitalium infection) was lower in the intervention arm, compared with the placebo arm (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], .32-.91). When assessed individually, reductions in STI incidences were similar but not statistically significant (IRRs, 0.50 [95% confidence interval {CI}, .20-1.23] for C. trachomatis infection, 0.56 [95% CI, .19-1.67] for N. gonorrhoeae infection, and 0.66 [95% CI, .38-1.15] for M. genitalium infection). In addition to reducing BV, this PPT intervention may also reduce the risk of bacterial STI among women. Because BV is highly prevalent, often persists, and frequently recurs after treatment, interventions that reduce BV over extended periods could play a role in decreasing STI incidence globally. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Association of the Vaginal Microbiota with Human Papillomavirus Infection in a Korean Twin Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Sunghee; Lee, Heetae; Song, Yun-Mi; Lee, Kayoung; Han, Min Ji; Sung, Joohon; Ko, GwangPyo

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important causative agent of cervical cancers worldwide. However, our understanding of how the vaginal microbiota might be associated with HPV infection is limited. In addition, the influence of human genetic and physiological factors on the vaginal microbiota is unclear. Studies on twins and their families provide the ideal settings to investigate the complicated nature of human microbiota. This study investigated the vaginal microbiota of 68 HPV-infected or uninfected female twins and their families using 454-pyrosequencing analysis targeting the variable region (V2–V3) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Analysis of the vaginal microbiota from both premenopausal women and HPV-discordant twins indicated that HPV-positive women had significantly higher microbial diversity with a lower proportion of Lactobacillus spp. than HPV-negative women. Fusobacteria, including Sneathia spp., were identified as a possible microbiological marker associated with HPV infection. The vaginal microbiotas of twin pairs were significantly more similar to each other than to those from unrelated individuals. In addition, there were marked significant differences from those of their mother, possibly due to differences in menopausal status. Postmenopausal women had a lower proportion of Lactobacillus spp. and a significantly higher microbiota diversity. This study indicated that HPV infection was associated with the composition of the vaginal microbiota, which is influenced by multiple host factors such as genetics and menopause. The potential biological markers identified in this study could provide insight into HPV pathogenesis and may represent biological targets for diagnostics. PMID:23717441

  3. Targeted PCR for detection of vaginal bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Fredricks, David N; Fiedler, Tina L; Thomas, Katherine K; Oakley, Brian B; Marrazzo, Jeanne M

    2007-10-01

    Several novel bacterial species have been detected in subjects with bacterial vaginosis (BV) by using broad-range PCR assays, but this approach is insensitive for detecting minority species. We developed a series of taxon-directed 16S rRNA gene PCR assays for more sensitive detection of key vaginal bacteria. We sought to determine the prevalence of each species in the vagina, its association with BV, and the utility of PCR for the microbiological diagnosis of BV. Targeted PCR assays were developed for 17 vaginal bacterial species and applied to 264 vaginal-fluid samples from 81 subjects with and 183 subjects without BV. The results were compared to those of two widely accepted methods for diagnosing BV, the use of clinical findings (Amsel criteria) and the interpretation of vaginal-fluid Gram stains (Nugent criteria). Leptotrichia/Sneathia, Atopobium vaginae, an Eggerthella-like bacterium, Megasphaera species, and three novel bacteria in the order Clostridiales are among the bacterial species significantly associated with BV. PCR detection of either a Megasphaera species or one of the Clostridiales bacteria yielded a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 89% for diagnosis of BV compared to the Amsel clinical criteria and a sensitivity of 95.9% and a specificity of 93.7% compared to the Nugent criteria (Gram stain). PCR detection of one or more fastidious bacterial species is a more reliable indicator of BV than detection of bacteria, such as Gardnerella vaginalis, previously linked to BV, highlighting the potential of PCR for the diagnosis of BV.

  4. Targeted PCR for Detection of Vaginal Bacteria Associated with Bacterial Vaginosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Fredricks, David N.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Oakley, Brian B.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2007-01-01

    Several novel bacterial species have been detected in subjects with bacterial vaginosis (BV) by using broad-range PCR assays, but this approach is insensitive for detecting minority species. We developed a series of taxon-directed 16S rRNA gene PCR assays for more sensitive detection of key vaginal bacteria. We sought to determine the prevalence of each species in the vagina, its association with BV, and the utility of PCR for the microbiological diagnosis of BV. Targeted PCR assays were developed for 17 vaginal bacterial species and applied to 264 vaginal-fluid samples from 81 subjects with and 183 subjects without BV. The results were compared to those of two widely accepted methods for diagnosing BV, the use of clinical findings (Amsel criteria) and the interpretation of vaginal-fluid Gram stains (Nugent criteria). Leptotrichia/Sneathia, Atopobium vaginae, an Eggerthella-like bacterium, Megasphaera species, and three novel bacteria in the order Clostridiales are among the bacterial species significantly associated with BV. PCR detection of either a Megasphaera species or one of the Clostridiales bacteria yielded a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 89% for diagnosis of BV compared to the Amsel clinical criteria and a sensitivity of 95.9% and a specificity of 93.7% compared to the Nugent criteria (Gram stain). PCR detection of one or more fastidious bacterial species is a more reliable indicator of BV than detection of bacteria, such as Gardnerella vaginalis, previously linked to BV, highlighting the potential of PCR for the diagnosis of BV. PMID:17687006

  5. The restoration of the vaginal microbiota after treatment for bacterial vaginosis with metronidazole or probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Chen, Weiguang; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Xia, Yaxian; Nelson, Karen E; Huang, Shaolei; Zhang, Shaoen; Wang, Yuezhu; Yuan, Jieli; Li, Lanjuan; Xiang, Charlie

    2013-04-01

    Whether or not treatment with antibiotics or probiotics for bacterial vaginosis (BV) is associated with a change in the diversity of vaginal microbiota in women was investigated. One hundred fifteen women, consisting of 30 healthy subjects, 30 BV-positive control subjects, 30 subjects with BV treated with a 7-day metronidazole regimen, and 25 subjects with BV treated with a 10-day probiotics regimen, were analyzed to determine the efficacy and disparity of diversity and richness of vaginal microbiota using 454 pyrosequencing. Follow-up visits at days 5 and 30 showed a greater BV cure rate in the probiotics-treated subjects (88.0 and 96 %, respectively) compared to the metronidazole-treated subjects (83.3 and 70 %, respectively [p = 0.625 at day 5 and p = 0.013 at day 30]). Treatment with metronidazole reduced the taxa diversity and eradicated most of the BV-associated phylotypes, while probiotics only suppressed the overgrowth and re-established vaginal homeostasis gradually and steadily. Despite significant interindividual variation, the microbiota of the actively treated groups or participants constituted a unique profile. Along with the decrease in pathogenic bacteria, such as Gardnerella, Atopobium, Prevotella, Megasphaera, Coriobacteriaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Mycoplasma, and Sneathia, a Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota was recovered. Acting as vaginal sentinels and biomarkers, the relative abundance of Lactobacillus and pathogenic bacteria determined the consistency of the BV clinical and microbiologic cure rates, as well as recurrent BV. Both 7-day intravaginal metronidazole and 10-day intravaginal probiotics have good efficacy against BV, while probiotics maintained normal vaginal microbiota longer due to effective and steady vaginal microbiota restoration, which provide new insights into BV treatment.

  6. Vaginal Microflora Associated With Bacterial Vaginosis in Nonpregnant Women: Reliability of Sialidase Detection

    PubMed Central

    Canigia, Liliana Fernández; Lanza, Alejandra; Bianchini, Hebe

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of Gardnerella vaginalis, anaerobic bacteria and Mycoplasma hominis in vaginal specimens of women with and without bacterial vaginosis (BV) as well as to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the direct sialidase assay of vaginal fluid as a rapid test for diagnosing this syndrome. Methods: Vaginal cultures were obtained from 109 nonpregnant women (mean age 33 ± 7.1 years), 47 of them with clinical signs of BV (BV+) and 62 of them without BV (BV- ). In addition, we determined the vaginal sialidase activity in both groups, which may serve as a feature of this syndrome. Results: Anaerobic bacteria were isolated in 91% and 18% of the BV+and BV- groups, respectively (p < 0.001). Peptostreptococcus spp., Prevotella bivia and Porphyromonas spp. were strongly associated with BV. P. bivia and Prevotella spp. represented 44% of all the anaerobes isolated in the BV+ group. All the isolated P. bivia strains presented sialidase activity. G. vaginalis and M. hominis were isolated in 76% and 42% of the BV+ and 1% and 0% of the BV- women, respectively (p < 0.001). Mobiluncus morphotypeswere observed in 34% of the BV+and 0% of BV- women. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of sialidase activity were 81%, 94%, 90% and 86%, respectively. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate a strong association between G. vaginalis, M. hominis, and P. bivia and BV. Sialidase activity and Gram stain of vaginal fluid represent accurate methods for diagnosing BV. PMID:11368254

  7. Changes in the vaginal microenvironment with metronidazole treatment for bacterial vaginosis in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Caroline; Balkus, Jennifer; Agnew, Kathy; Lawler, Richard; Hitti, Jane

    2009-11-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is associated with preterm delivery, but there is little evidence that treatment improves pregnancy outcomes. We examined whether oral or vaginal metronidazole treatment for BV in early pregnancy was more effective in restoring the normal vaginal environment. This was a randomized controlled trial comparing oral and intravaginal metronidazole for treatment of BV in early pregnancy (<20 weeks). Vaginal samples collected at baseline and 4 weeks after treatment were evaluated using gram stain, culture, colorimetric detection of sialidase, and immunoassay for measurement of proinflammatory cytokines interleukins-1beta, -6, -8 (IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8) and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). We compared the effect of treatment between groups (using chi-square and t test) and within individuals (McNemar's test). Of 126 subjects, 108 (86%) completed follow-up (55 oral, 53 intravaginal). Of the study population, 34% achieved therapeutic cure, and this was not different between treatment groups. BV-associated bacteria were significantly reduced in both groups, but few subjects regained colonization with protective lactobacilli. Among women who achieved therapeutic cure, the level of IL-1beta dropped significantly (p < 0.001) and SLPI increased (p = 0.003). More women in the vaginal treatment group had undetectable sialidase after treatment (p = 0.013). Treatment with oral or intravaginal metronidazole in early pregnancy reduced colonization with BV-associated bacteria but was not effective in achieving therapeutic cure or in restoring healthy vaginal lactobacilli.

  8. The bacterial microbiome in paired vaginal and vestibular samples from women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Aswathi; Witkin, Steven S; Zhou, Xia; Brown, Celeste J; Rey, Gustavo E; Linhares, Iara M; Ledger, William J; Forney, Larry J

    2014-12-01

    Composition of the bacterial microbiome in the vagina and vestibule from 30 women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome (VVS) and 15 healthy controls were compared by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Vaginal concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β were determined by ELISA. Questionnaires elicited clinical and symptom data. Eighteen genera were detected in vaginal samples, and 23 genera were identified in vestibule samples, from women with VVS. The genera at both sites and the mean number of genera in subjects with VVS were largely similar to those in control subjects. However, differences were noted including higher proportions of Streptococcus and Enterococcus in women with VVS. Furthermore, Lactobacillus iners was more frequently identified in women with VVS while L. crispatus was more frequent in the control women. The dominant bacterial genera in the vagina closely paralleled the dominant genera present in the corresponding vestibular sample in both groups, leading us to postulate that vaginal secretions are an important source of bacteria present on the vestibule. Vaginal IL-1β levels were similar and varied depending on the dominant bacteria. We conclude in this pilot study that no major differences are apparent in the vagina and vestibule between women with or without VVS, except for an increased prevalence of Streptococcus and L. iners in some women with VVS. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Does pre- and postoperative metronidazole treatment lower vaginal cuff infection rate after abdominal hysterectomy among women with bacterial vaginosis?

    PubMed

    Larsson, Per-Göran; Carlsson, Bodil

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a known risk factor for postoperative infection following abdominal hysterectomy. Vaginal bacterial flora scored as intermediate has been shown to have the same risk of postoperative infection as BV. Women undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy for benign diseases were open-randomized according to Zelen to either treatment with metronidazole rectally for at least 4 days or no treatment. At the preoperative gynecological examination a vaginal smear was collected and Gram stained. Women with BV or intermediate flora were merged to one group called abnormal vaginal flora. In total 213 women were randomized to treatment or no treatment. After exclusion of 71 women, 142 women were eligible for analysis. Among the 59 women diagnosed with abnormal vaginal flora there were no vaginal cuff infections in the treated arm, compared with 27% in the 'no treatment' arm (p < 0.01). Treatment also reduced the vaginal cuff infection rate from 9.5 to 2% among the 83 women with lactobacilli flora. However, this difference was not statistically significant. Treatment had no effect on the rate of wound infections. Intention-to-treat analysis showed a significant reduction in vaginal cuff infections among women randomized to treatment. Pre- and postoperative treatment for at least 4 days with metronidazole rectally reduces significantly vaginal cuff infection among women with abnormal vaginal flora.

  10. Higher-risk behavioral practices associated with bacterial vaginosis compared with vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Catriona Susan; Morton, Anna N; Garland, Suzanne M; Morris, Margaret B; Moss, Lorna M; Fairley, Christopher K

    2005-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis has been associated with hormonal factors and sexual practices; however, the cause is unclear, and the notion that bacterial vaginosis is a sexually transmitted infection is still debated. To investigate whether bacterial vaginosis is associated with specific sexual practices or instead has features in common with a sexually transmitted infection, we compared behavioral associations in women with bacterial vaginosis to women with vaginal candidiasis. Women with symptoms of abnormal vaginal discharge or odor who attended Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between July 2003 and August 2004 were eligible for enrollment in the study. Information on demographics and behavioral and contraceptive practices were collected by self-completed questionnaire. Participants were tested for bacterial vaginosis, Candida spp (microscopy and culture), and sexually transmitted infections. Statistical comparisons were made between women with and without bacterial vaginosis and women with and without candidiasis, using univariate and multivariate analysis. A total of 342 women were enrolled in the study; 157 were diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis, 51 had candidiasis by microscopy, and 95 had candidiasis by culture. Bacterial vaginosis was associated with indicators of high-risk sexual behavior such as a new sexual partner and greater number of male partners in the last year, increased number of lifetime sexual partners, less than 13 years of education, a past history of pregnancy, and smoking (P < .05). Candidiasis was not associated with these risk behaviors and was instead related to practices such as receptive anal and oral sex and douching. The association between bacterial vaginosis and practices that are associated with sexually transmitted infections, in contrast to those observed with candidiasis, suggests a possible sexually transmitted cause. II-2.

  11. Clindamycin vaginal cream vs oral metronidazole in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, J L; Higuera, F; Hidalgo, H; Narcio, L; Casanova, G; Beltran, M; Sanchez, C J

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the safety/efficacy of the treatment of 2% clindamycin vaginal cream and oral metronidazole in 184 women with bacterial vaginosis. This was a randomized, prospective, multicenter, double-blind, controlled study. Patients were randomized to either Clindamycin phosphate vaginal cream 2%, 5 gm intravaginally at bedtime, and placebo oral metronidazole capsules taken twice daily, or oral metronidazole capsules, 500 mg, taken twice daily, and placebo clindamycin vaginal cream, 5 gm to be administered intravaginally at bedtime. All treatments were for 7 days. Patients were seen for followup at 4-13 days and 20-43 days after completion of protocol therapy. 2 investigators in Mexico City enrolled a total of 184 patients (91 clindamycin and 93 metronidazole). 1 patient never received drugs after enrollment, leaving 183 valuable for safety. A total of 114 were valuable for efficacy. Protocol regimens were comparable in efficacy (p=0.22) and the percentage of cure/improvement was 87% in the clindamycin group compared to 79% in the metronidazole group. No relapse was observed in the clindamycin group, as opposed to 7% in the metronidazole group. The clindamycin group had a failure of 13% while this was 15% in the metronidazole group. Both treatments were well-tolerated. Most of the events were either vulvovaginal irritation upon application of the study drug, or the development of vaginitis/cervicitis. The 1 event classified as serious in this study (metronidazole group) was generalized rash which, in the opinion of the investigator, was related to the study drug. There were 4 nongenital tract side effects (1 gastrointestinal, 2 dermatologic, and 1 allergy) all in the metronidazole group. The authors can conclude that clindamycin 2% vaginal cream is at least as effective as orally administered metronidazole for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis in nonpregnant women.

  12. Analysis of Vaginal Acetic Acid in Patients Undergoing Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudry, Amjad N.; Travers, Paul J.; Yuenger, Jeffrey; Colletta, Lorraine; Evans, Phillip; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; Tummon, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A “gold standard” method for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (BV) is lacking. The clinical criteria described by the Amsel technique are subjective and difficult to quantify. Alternatively, the reading of Gram-stained vaginal smears by scoring techniques such as those that use the Nugent or Hay-Ison scoring systems is again subjective, requires expert personnel to perform the reading, and is infrequently used clinically. Recently, a new diagnostic device, the Osmetech Microbial Analyzer—Bacterial Vaginosis (OMA-BV), which determines a patient's BV status on the basis of measurement of the amount of acetic acid present in a vaginal swab specimen, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The present study uses the conducting polymer gas-sensing technology of OMA-BV to measure the concentration of acetic acid in the headspace above vaginal swab specimens from patients undergoing treatment for BV with metronidazole. In 97.8% of the cases the level of acetic acid detected fell sharply during the treatment period, crossing from above to below the diagnostic threshold of 900 ppm. The diagnosis obtained on the basis of the level of vaginal acetic acid was compared with the diagnoses obtained by use of the Amsel criteria and the Nugent scoring system both at the time of initial entry into the study and at the repeat samplings on days 7 and 14. The results obtained with OMA-BV showed overall agreements compared with the results of the Amsel and Nugent tests of 98 and 94%, respectively, for the 34 patients monitored through the treatment process. This provides further evidence that the measurement of vaginal acetic acid by headspace analysis with conducting polymer sensors is a valid alternative to present tests for the diagnosis of BV. PMID:15528711

  13. Analysis of vaginal acetic acid in patients undergoing treatment for bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudry, Amjad N; Travers, Paul J; Yuenger, Jeffrey; Colletta, Lorraine; Evans, Phillip; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Tummon, Andrew

    2004-11-01

    A "gold standard" method for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (BV) is lacking. The clinical criteria described by the Amsel technique are subjective and difficult to quantify. Alternatively, the reading of Gram-stained vaginal smears by scoring techniques such as those that use the Nugent or Hay-Ison scoring systems is again subjective, requires expert personnel to perform the reading, and is infrequently used clinically. Recently, a new diagnostic device, the Osmetech Microbial Analyzer--Bacterial Vaginosis (OMA-BV), which determines a patient's BV status on the basis of measurement of the amount of acetic acid present in a vaginal swab specimen, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The present study uses the conducting polymer gas-sensing technology of OMA-BV to measure the concentration of acetic acid in the headspace above vaginal swab specimens from patients undergoing treatment for BV with metronidazole. In 97.8% of the cases the level of acetic acid detected fell sharply during the treatment period, crossing from above to below the diagnostic threshold of 900 ppm. The diagnosis obtained on the basis of the level of vaginal acetic acid was compared with the diagnoses obtained by use of the Amsel criteria and the Nugent scoring system both at the time of initial entry into the study and at the repeat samplings on days 7 and 14. The results obtained with OMA-BV showed overall agreements compared with the results of the Amsel and Nugent tests of 98 and 94%, respectively, for the 34 patients monitored through the treatment process. This provides further evidence that the measurement of vaginal acetic acid by headspace analysis with conducting polymer sensors is a valid alternative to present tests for the diagnosis of BV.

  14. Nasal and vaginal vaccinations have differential effects on antibody responses in vaginal and cervical secretions in humans.

    PubMed

    Johansson, E L; Wassén, L; Holmgren, J; Jertborn, M; Rudin, A

    2001-12-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are a major health problem worldwide, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how to induce an optimal immune response in the genital tract of humans. In this study we vaccinated 21 volunteers nasally or vaginally with the model mucosal antigen cholera toxin B subunit and determined the level of specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG antibodies in vaginal and cervical secretions as well as in serum. To assess the hormonal influence on the induction of antibody responses after vaginal vaccination, we administered the vaccine either independently of the stage in the menstrual cycle or on days 10 and 24 in the cycle in different groups of subjects. Vaginal and nasal vaccinations both resulted in significant IgA and IgG anti-cholera toxin B subunit responses in serum in the majority of the volunteers in the various vaccination groups. Only vaginal vaccination given on days 10 and 24 in the cycle induced strong specific antibody responses in the cervix with 58-fold IgA and 16-fold IgG increases. In contrast, modest responses were seen after nasal vaccination and in the other vaginally vaccinated group. Nasal vaccination was superior in inducing a specific IgA response in vaginal secretions, giving a 35-fold increase, while vaginal vaccination induced only a 5-fold IgA increase. We conclude that a combination of nasal and vaginal vaccination might be the best vaccination strategy for inducing protective antibody responses in both cervical and vaginal secretions, provided that the vaginal vaccination is given on optimal time points in the cycle.

  15. The Complex Vaginal Flora of West African Women with Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Pépin, Jacques; Deslandes, Sylvie; Giroux, Geneviève; Sobéla, François; Khonde, Nzambi; Diakité, Soumaila; Demeule, Sophie; Labbé, Annie-Claude; Carrier, Nathalie; Frost, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Background The spectrum of bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV) has recently expanded through taxonomic changes and the use of molecular methods. These methods have yet to be used in large-scale epidemiological studies in Africa where BV is highly prevalent. Methods An analysis of samples obtained during a clinical trial of the management of vaginal discharge in four West African countries. Samples were available from 1555 participants; 843 (54%) had BV. Nucleic acids of 13 bacterial genera or species potentially associated with BV were detected through the polymerase chain reaction. Results The associations between various components of the vaginal flora were complex. Excluding Lactobacillus, the other 12 micro-organisms were all associated with each other at the p≤0.001 level. The prevalence of various bacterial genera or species varied according to age, sexual activity and HIV status. In multivariate analysis, the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis, Bifidobacterium, Megasphaera elsdenii, Dialister, Mycoplasma hominis, Leptotrichia, and Prevotella were independently associated with BV as was the absence of Lactobacillus and Peptoniphilus. However, Mobiluncus, Atopobium vaginae, Anaerococcus, and Eggerthella were not independently associated with BV. Unexpectedly, after treatment with a regimen that included either metronidazole or tinidazole, the proportion of patients with a complete resolution of symptoms by day 14 increased with the number of bacterial genera or species present at enrolment. Conclusions Numerous bacterial genera or species were strongly associated with each other in a pattern that suggested a symbiotic relationship. BV cases with a simpler flora were less likely to respond to treatment. Overall, the vaginal flora of West African women with BV was reminiscent of that of their counterparts in industrialized countries. PMID:21949860

  16. The complex vaginal flora of West African women with bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Pépin, Jacques; Deslandes, Sylvie; Giroux, Geneviève; Sobéla, François; Khonde, Nzambi; Diakité, Soumaila; Demeule, Sophie; Labbé, Annie-Claude; Carrier, Nathalie; Frost, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The spectrum of bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV) has recently expanded through taxonomic changes and the use of molecular methods. These methods have yet to be used in large-scale epidemiological studies in Africa where BV is highly prevalent. An analysis of samples obtained during a clinical trial of the management of vaginal discharge in four West African countries. Samples were available from 1555 participants; 843 (54%) had BV. Nucleic acids of 13 bacterial genera or species potentially associated with BV were detected through the polymerase chain reaction. The associations between various components of the vaginal flora were complex. Excluding Lactobacillus, the other 12 micro-organisms were all associated with each other at the p≤0.001 level. The prevalence of various bacterial genera or species varied according to age, sexual activity and HIV status. In multivariate analysis, the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis, Bifidobacterium, Megasphaera elsdenii, Dialister, Mycoplasma hominis, Leptotrichia, and Prevotella were independently associated with BV as was the absence of Lactobacillus and Peptoniphilus. However, Mobiluncus, Atopobium vaginae, Anaerococcus, and Eggerthella were not independently associated with BV. Unexpectedly, after treatment with a regimen that included either metronidazole or tinidazole, the proportion of patients with a complete resolution of symptoms by day 14 increased with the number of bacterial genera or species present at enrolment. Numerous bacterial genera or species were strongly associated with each other in a pattern that suggested a symbiotic relationship. BV cases with a simpler flora were less likely to respond to treatment. Overall, the vaginal flora of West African women with BV was reminiscent of that of their counterparts in industrialized countries.

  17. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin Concentration in Vaginal Fluid: Relation to Bacterial Vaginosis and Vulvovaginal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Beghini, Joziani; Giraldo, Paulo C; Linhares, Iara M; Ledger, William J; Witkin, Steven S

    2015-08-01

    Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a component of innate immunity that prevents iron uptake by microorganisms. We evaluated whether NGAL was present in vaginal fluid and whether concentrations were altered in women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) or vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). Vaginal secretions from 52 women with VVC, 43 with BV, and 77 healthy controls were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for NGAL and for concentrations of L-lactic acid. The median concentration of NGAL in vaginal fluid was significantly higher in control women (561 pg/mL) than in women with BV (402 pg/mL; P = .0116) and lower in women with VVC (741 pg/mL; P = .0017). Median lactic acid levels were similar in controls (0.11 mmol/L) and women with VVC (0.13 mmol/L) and were lower in women with BV (0.02 mmol/L; P < .0001). The NGAL and lactic acid concentrations were highly correlated (P < .0001). A decrease in Lactobacilli and/or lactic acid plus the absence of leukocytes results in lower vaginal NGAL levels that might facilitate the growth of bacteria associated with BV. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Changes in the Vaginal Microenvironment with Metronidazole Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis in Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Balkus, Jennifer; Agnew, Kathy; Lawler, Richard; Hitti, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is associated with preterm delivery, but there is little evidence that treatment improves pregnancy outcomes. We examined whether oral or vaginal metronidazole treatment for BV in early pregnancy was more effective in restoring the normal vaginal environment. Methods This was a randomized controlled trial comparing oral and intravaginal metronidazole for treatment of BV in early pregnancy (<20 weeks). Vaginal samples collected at baseline and 4 weeks after treatment were evaluated using gram stain, culture, colorimetric detection of sialidase, and immunoassay for measurement of proinflammatory cytokines interleukins-1β, -6, -8 (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8) and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). We compared the effect of treatment between groups (using chi-square and t test) and within individuals (McNemar's test). Results Of 126 subjects, 108 (86%) completed follow-up (55 oral, 53 intravaginal). Of the study population, 34% achieved therapeutic cure, and this was not different between treatment groups. BV-associated bacteria were significantly reduced in both groups, but few subjects regained colonization with protective lactobacilli. Among women who achieved therapeutic cure, the level of IL-1β dropped significantly (p < 0.001) and SLPI increased (p = 0.003). More women in the vaginal treatment group had undetectable sialidase after treatment (p = 0.013). Conclusions Treatment with oral or intravaginal metronidazole in early pregnancy reduced colonization with BV-associated bacteria but was not effective in achieving therapeutic cure or in restoring healthy vaginal lactobacilli. PMID:19951217

  19. Prevalence of the genital tract bacterial infections after vaginal reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Maghsoudi, Reza; Danesh, Azar; Kabiri, Najmeh; Setorki, Mahbubeh; Doudi, Monir

    2014-09-01

    Due to frequent childbirth, heavy lifting and the structure of the lives of rural women in Shahrekord region, Iran, cystocele and rectocele are of the main medical problems of the women in this area and for its correction, vaginal reconstructive surgery is needed which causes infection. The purpose of this study was to identify the bacteria causing infection after vaginal reconstructive surgery and performing antibiogram to help these patients for faster recovery. Patients enrolled this study were 92 who had undergone previous vaginal reconstructive surgery and now had infection. After examination, the group of patients taking antibiotics (n = 26) were excluded and the remaining 66 completed the study questionnaire. A gynecologist performed sampling; related tests (aerobic and anaerobic culture using an anaerobic culture gas pack jar and type A which provides absolute anaerobic conditions) were performed; antimicrobial susceptibility testing using Disk Diffusion Method was carried out; and the results were recorded. All the positive samples were polymicrobial. Gardnerella vaginalis in 20 cases (31%), peptostreptococci and anaerobic cocci in 9 cases (13.6%), staphylococcus aureus in 8 cases (9.1%), bacteroides and fusobacterium in 7 cases (10.6%), streptococcus group B in 4 cases (6%), yeast cells in 11 cases (16.6%) and Trichomonas vaginalis in wet mount of 4 (6%) existed. Anaerobic bacteria showed 85% sensitivity to clindamycin, 82% to chloramphenicol, 85% sensitivity to ceftizoxime and 45% to penicillin. Facultative anaerobic bacteria showed a sensitivity rate of 90% to ceftizoxime, chloramphenicol and cephalothin. According to our findings, the rate of vaginal bacterial infection in women with vaginal reconstructive surgery has increased; from which, infections with anaerobic bacteria origins have increased dramatically. We recommend antibiotic prophylaxis prior to genital reconstructive surgeries.

  20. Vaginal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nicolle, Lindsay E.

    1989-01-01

    Vaginal infections are among the most common complaints for which women see their physicians. The patient complains primarily of vaginal discharge or pruritus. Optimal management of these infections requires a careful history, physical examination, and laboratory assessment to determine the pathogen. Specific therapy is available for the three important causes of vaginal infection: yeast vulvovaginitis, trichomoniasis, and bacterial vaginosis. Concomitant sexually transmitted diseases should be excluded in women with complaints suggestive of vaginal infection. PMID:21248968

  1. A large, population-based study of age-related associations between vaginal pH and human papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vaginal pH is related to genital tract inflammation and changes in the bacterial flora, both suggested cofactors for persistence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. To evaluate the relationship between vaginal pH and HPV, we analyzed data from our large population-based study in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. We examined vaginal pH and the risk of HPV infection, cytological abnormalities, and C. trachomatis infection. Methods Our study included 9,165 women aged 18-97 at enrollment with a total of 28,915 visits (mean length of follow-up = 3.4 years). Generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate the relationship between vaginal pH and HPV infection (both overall and single versus multiple types) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), the cytomorphic manifestation of HPV infection. The relationship between enrollment vaginal pH and C. trachomatis infection was assessed by logistic regression. Results were stratified by age at visit. Results Detection of HPV was positively associated with vaginal pH, mainly in women < 35 years (p-trend = 0.009 and 0.007 for women aged < 25 and 25-34 years, respectively). Elevated vaginal pH was associated with 30% greater risk of infection with multiple HPV types and with LSIL, predominantly in women younger than 35 and 65+ years of age. Detection of C. trachomatis DNA was associated with increased vaginal pH in women < 25 years (OR 2.2 95% CI 1.0-5.0). Conclusions Our findings suggest a possible association of the cervical microenvironment as a modifier of HPV natural history in the development of cervical precancer and cancer. Future research should include studies of vaginal pH in a more complex assessment of hormonal changes and the cervicovaginal microbiome as they relate to the natural history of cervical neoplasia. PMID:22316377

  2. Characterization of human vaginal mucosa cells for autologous in vitro cultured vaginal tissue transplantation in patients with MRKH syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nodale, Cristina; Vescarelli, Enrica; D'Amici, Sirio; Maffucci, Diana; Ceccarelli, Simona; Monti, Marco; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi; Romano, Ferdinando; Angeloni, Antonio; Marchese, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) is a rare syndrome characterized by congenital aplasia of the uterus and vagina. The most common procedure used for surgical reconstruction of the neovagina is the McIndoe vaginoplasty, which consists in creation of a vaginal canal covered with a full-thickness skin graft. Here we characterized the autologous in vitro cultured vaginal tissue proposed as alternative material in our developed modified McIndoe vaginoplasty in order to underlie its importance in autologous total vaginal replacement. To this aim human vaginal mucosa cells (HVMs) were isolated from vaginal mucosa of patients affected by MRKH syndrome and characterized with respect to growth kinetics, morphology, PAS staining, and expression of specific epithelial markers by immunofluorescence, Western blot, and qRT-PCR analyses. The presence of specific epithelial markers along with the morphology and the presence of mucified cells demonstrated the epithelial nature of HMVs, important for an efficient epithelialization of the neovagina walls and for creating a functional vaginal cavity. Moreover, these cells presented characteristics of effective proliferation as demonstrated by growth kinetics assay. Therefore, the autologous in vitro cultured vaginal tissue might represent a highly promising and valid material for McIndoe vaginoplasty.

  3. Characterization of Human Vaginal Mucosa Cells for Autologous In Vitro Cultured Vaginal Tissue Transplantation in Patients with MRKH Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nodale, Cristina; D'Amici, Sirio; Maffucci, Diana; Ceccarelli, Simona; Monti, Marco; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi; Romano, Ferdinando; Angeloni, Antonio; Marchese, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) is a rare syndrome characterized by congenital aplasia of the uterus and vagina. The most common procedure used for surgical reconstruction of the neovagina is the McIndoe vaginoplasty, which consists in creation of a vaginal canal covered with a full-thickness skin graft. Here we characterized the autologous in vitro cultured vaginal tissue proposed as alternative material in our developed modified McIndoe vaginoplasty in order to underlie its importance in autologous total vaginal replacement. To this aim human vaginal mucosa cells (HVMs) were isolated from vaginal mucosa of patients affected by MRKH syndrome and characterized with respect to growth kinetics, morphology, PAS staining, and expression of specific epithelial markers by immunofluorescence, Western blot, and qRT-PCR analyses. The presence of specific epithelial markers along with the morphology and the presence of mucified cells demonstrated the epithelial nature of HMVs, important for an efficient epithelialization of the neovagina walls and for creating a functional vaginal cavity. Moreover, these cells presented characteristics of effective proliferation as demonstrated by growth kinetics assay. Therefore, the autologous in vitro cultured vaginal tissue might represent a highly promising and valid material for McIndoe vaginoplasty. PMID:25162002

  4. Colonization of the upper genital tract by vaginal bacterial species in non-pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    MITCHELL, Caroline M.; HAICK, Anoria; NKWOPARA, Evangelyn; GARCIA, Rochelle; RENDI, Mara; AGNEW, Kathy; FREDRICKS, David N.; ESCHENBACH, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluate upper genital tract (UGT) presence of vaginal bacterial species using sensitive molecular methods capable of detecting fastidious bacterial vaginosis (BV)-associated bacteria. Study Design Vaginal swabs were collected prior to hysterectomy. The excised uterus was sterilely opened and swabs collected from endometrium and upper endocervix. DNA was tested in 11 quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays for 12 bacterial species: Lactobacillus iners, L. crispatus, L. jensenii, Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Megasphaera spp., Prevotella spp., Leptotrichia/Sneathia, BVAB1, BVAB2, BVAB3 and a broad-range16S rRNA gene assay. Endometrial fluid was tested with Luminex and ELISA for cytokines and defensins, and tissue for gene expression of defensins and cathelicidin. Results We enrolled 58 women: mean age 43 + 7 years, mostly white (n = 46; 79%) and BV-negative (n = 43; 74%). By species-specific qPCR, 55 (95%) had UGT colonization with at least one species (n = 52), or were positive by 16S PCR (n = 3). The most common species were L. iners (45% UGT, 61% vagina), Prevotella spp. (33% UGT, 76% vagina) and L. crispatus (33% UGT, 56% vagina). Median quantities of bacteria in the UGT were lower than vaginal levels by 2–4 log10 rRNA gene copies/swab. There were no differences in endometrial inflammatory markers between women with no bacteria, Lactobacillus only or any BV-associated species in the UGT. Conclusion Our data suggest that the endometrial cavity is not sterile in most women undergoing hysterectomy, and that the presence of low levels of bacteria in the uterus is not associated with significant inflammation. PMID:25524398

  5. Metronidazole for bacterial vaginosis. A comparison of vaginal gel vs. oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanson, J M; McGregor, J A; Hillier, S L; Eschenbach, D A; Kreutner, A K; Galask, R P; Martens, M

    2000-11-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of 0.75% metronidazole vaginal gel with oral metronidazole for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis (BV). Nonpregnant women with BV were enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, investigator-blind treatment trial. Patients were randomly assigned to either 0.75% metronidazole vaginal gel (5 g twice daily for five days) or oral metronidazole (500 mg twice daily for seven days). Follow-up visits occurred approximately two and five weeks after initiation of therapy. BV was clinically eliminated at the first follow-up visit in 83.7% (36/43, 95% CI 72.3-95.1%) of the intravaginal group and 85.1% (40/47, 95% CI 74.6-95.6%) of the oral group. At the final visit, BV was eliminated in 70.7% (29/41, 95% CI 56.3-85.1%) of the intravaginal group and 71.1% (32/45, 95% CI 57.4-84.8%) of the oral group. Significantly more patients in the oral treatment group (51.8%) reported gastrointestinal complaints as compared to the intravaginal treatment group (32.7%, P = .04). The efficacy of 0.75% metronidazole vaginal gel twice daily for five days in treating BV was similar to that of standard oral metronidazole treatment and was associated with fewer gastrointestinal complaints.

  6. Diversity of Vaginal Lactic Acid Bacterial Microbiota in 15 Algerian Pregnant Women with and without Bacterial Vaginosis by using Culture Independent Method.

    PubMed

    Alioua, Souad; Abdi, Akila; Fhoula, Imène; Bringel, Françoise; Boudabous, Abdelatif; Ouzari, Imene Hadda

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) is the most common lower genital tract disorder among women of reproductive age (pregnant and non-pregnant) and a better knowledge of Lactobacillus species richness in healthy and infected vaginal microbiota is needed to efficiently design better probiotic products to promote the maintenance of normal flora which will help prevent bacterial vaginosis. To evaluate and compare the diversity of lactic acid bacterial species in pregnant women with and without BV. A pilot study was carried out during November-2014 to March-2015 in University Badji Mokhtar, Annaba, Algeria. Vaginal swabs were collected from 15 pregnant women aged between 19 and 35 years (mean 27.6 years; n=15) living in the East of Algeria visiting Gynecology service, hospital Abdallah Nouaouria- El bouni, Annaba. Vaginal samples were gram-stained, and scored by the Nugent method. The cohort included cases of women with healthy "normal" vaginal flora, infected flora with bacterial vaginosis and women with "intermediate" flora. The vaginal LAB community from pregnant women was identified by culture independent method based on Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), with the 16S rRNA gene sequencing. A majority of LAB affiliated to the genus Lactobacillus was found in "normal" and "intermediate" flora (87.5% and 43.75% respectively), while a majority of LAB affiliated to the genus Enterococcus was identified in women with bacterial vaginosis and intermediate flora (60% and 46.75% respectively). Our results showed that the presence of Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus delbruekii promotes stability of the vaginal microbiota. This result confirms the findings of previous studies suggesting that the occurrence of predominant Lactobacillus negatively correlates with bacterial vaginosis incidence and their current use as probiotics. Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus delbruekii can be defined as critical for defense of the vagina. In addition, Enterococcus feacalis can be

  7. Diversity of Vaginal Lactic Acid Bacterial Microbiota in 15 Algerian Pregnant Women with and without Bacterial Vaginosis by using Culture Independent Method

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Akila; Fhoula, Imène; Bringel, Françoise; Boudabous, Abdelatif; Ouzari, Imene Hadda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) is the most common lower genital tract disorder among women of reproductive age (pregnant and non-pregnant) and a better knowledge of Lactobacillus species richness in healthy and infected vaginal microbiota is needed to efficiently design better probiotic products to promote the maintenance of normal flora which will help prevent bacterial vaginosis. Aim To evaluate and compare the diversity of lactic acid bacterial species in pregnant women with and without BV. Materials and Methods A pilot study was carried out during November-2014 to March-2015 in University Badji Mokhtar, Annaba, Algeria. Vaginal swabs were collected from 15 pregnant women aged between 19 and 35 years (mean 27.6 years; n=15) living in the East of Algeria visiting Gynecology service, hospital Abdallah Nouaouria- El bouni, Annaba. Vaginal samples were gram-stained, and scored by the Nugent method. The cohort included cases of women with healthy “normal” vaginal flora, infected flora with bacterial vaginosis and women with “intermediate” flora. The vaginal LAB community from pregnant women was identified by culture independent method based on Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), with the 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results A majority of LAB affiliated to the genus Lactobacillus was found in “normal” and “intermediate” flora (87.5% and 43.75% respectively), while a majority of LAB affiliated to the genus Enterococcus was identified in women with bacterial vaginosis and intermediate flora (60% and 46.75% respectively). Our results showed that the presence of Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus delbruekii promotes stability of the vaginal microbiota. Conclusion This result confirms the findings of previous studies suggesting that the occurrence of predominant Lactobacillus negatively correlates with bacterial vaginosis incidence and their current use as probiotics. Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus delbruekii can be defined as

  8. Characterisation of probiotic properties in human vaginal lactobacilli strains

    PubMed Central

    Hütt, Pirje; Lapp, Eleri; Štšepetova, Jelena; Smidt, Imbi; Taelma, Heleri; Borovkova, Natalja; Oopkaup, Helen; Ahelik, Ave; Rööp, Tiiu; Hoidmets, Dagmar; Samuel, Külli; Salumets, Andres; Mändar, Reet

    2016-01-01

    Background Vaginal lactobacilli offer protection against recurrent urinary infections, bacterial vaginosis, and vaginal candidiasis. Objective To characterise the isolated vaginal lactobacilli strains for their probiotic properties and to compare their probiotic potential. Methods The Lactobacillus strains were isolated from vaginal samples by conventional culturing and identified by sequencing of the 16S rDNA fragment. Several functional properties were detected (production of hydrogen peroxide and lactic acid; antagonistic activity against Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Gardnerella vaginalis; auto-aggregation and adhesiveness) as well as safety (haemolytic activity, antibiotic susceptibility, presence of transferrable resistance genes). Results A total of 135 vaginal lactobacilli strains of three species, Lactobacillus crispatus (56%), Lactobacillus jensenii (26%), and Lactobacillus gasseri (18%) were characterised using several functional and safety tests. Most of L. crispatus (89%) and L. jensenii (86%) strains produced H2O2. The best lactic acid producers were L. gasseri (18.2±2.2 mg/ml) compared to L. crispatus (15.6±2.8 mg/ml) and L. jensenii (11.6±2.6 mg/ml) (p<0.0001; p<0.0001, respectively). L. crispatus strains showed significantly higher anti-E. coli activity compared to L. jensenii. L. gasseri strains expressed significantly lower anticandidal activity compared to L. crispatus and L. jensenii (p<0.0001). There was no significant difference between the species in antagonistic activity against G. vaginalis. Nearly a third of the strains were able to auto-aggregate while all the tested strains showed a good ability to adhere to HeLa cells. None of the tested lactobacilli caused haemolysis. Although phenotypical resistance was not found to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, gentamycin, tetracycline, and vancomycin, the erm(B), tet(M), and tet(K) were detected in some strains. All strains were resistant to metronidazole

  9. The vaginal microbiota, human papillomavirus infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: what do we know and where are we going next?

    PubMed

    Mitra, Anita; MacIntyre, David A; Marchesi, Julian R; Lee, Yun S; Bennett, Phillip R; Kyrgiou, Maria

    2016-11-01

    The vaginal microbiota plays a significant role in health and disease of the female reproductive tract. Next-generation sequencing techniques based upon the analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes permit in-depth study of vaginal microbial community structure to a level of detail not possible with standard culture-based microbiological techniques. The human papillomavirus (HPV) causes both cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer. Although the virus is highly prevalent, only a small number of women have a persistent HPV infection and subsequently develop clinically significant disease. There is emerging evidence which leads us to conclude that increased diversity of vaginal microbiota combined with reduced relative abundance of Lactobacillus spp. is involved in HPV acquisition and persistence and the development of cervical precancer and cancer. In this review, we summarise the current literature and discuss potential mechanisms for the involvement of vaginal microbiota in the evolution of CIN and cervical cancer. The concept of manipulation of vaginal bacterial communities using pre- and probiotics is also discussed as an exciting prospect for the field of cervical pathology.

  10. Multiplex detection of bacteria associated with normal microbiota and with bacterial vaginosis in vaginal swabs by use of oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent microspheres.

    PubMed

    Dumonceaux, Tim J; Schellenberg, John; Goleski, Vanessa; Hill, Janet E; Jaoko, Walter; Kimani, Joshua; Money, Deborah; Ball, T Blake; Plummer, Francis A; Severini, Alberto

    2009-12-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a recurrent condition that is associated with a range of negative outcomes, including the acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus and other sexually transmitted diseases, preterm births, and pelvic inflammatory disease. In contrast to the Lactobacillus-dominated normal vaginal microbiota, BV is characterized by a lack of lactobacilli and an abundance of anaerobic and gram-negative organisms, including Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae. To date, the laboratory diagnosis of BV has relied upon the fulfillment of criteria determined by microscopic observation of Gram-stained vaginal swabs. We describe a molecular-based method for the easy determination of the species profile within the vaginal microbiota based on the amplification of the chaperonin-60 genes of all bacteria present in the swab and hybridization of the amplicon to species-specific oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent beads that are identified by flow cytometry with a Luminex instrument. We designed a nineplex Luminex array for characterization of the vaginal microbiota and applied it to the analysis of vaginal swabs from individuals from Africa and North America. Using the presence of A. vaginae or G. vaginalis, or both, as the defining criterion for BV, we found that the method was highly specific and sensitive for the diagnosis of BV using microscopy as a gold standard.

  11. Multiplex Detection of Bacteria Associated with Normal Microbiota and with Bacterial Vaginosis in Vaginal Swabs by Use of Oligonucleotide-Coupled Fluorescent Microspheres▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dumonceaux, Tim J.; Schellenberg, John; Goleski, Vanessa; Hill, Janet E.; Jaoko, Walter; Kimani, Joshua; Money, Deborah; Ball, T. Blake; Plummer, Francis A.; Severini, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a recurrent condition that is associated with a range of negative outcomes, including the acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus and other sexually transmitted diseases, preterm births, and pelvic inflammatory disease. In contrast to the Lactobacillus-dominated normal vaginal microbiota, BV is characterized by a lack of lactobacilli and an abundance of anaerobic and gram-negative organisms, including Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae. To date, the laboratory diagnosis of BV has relied upon the fulfillment of criteria determined by microscopic observation of Gram-stained vaginal swabs. We describe a molecular-based method for the easy determination of the species profile within the vaginal microbiota based on the amplification of the chaperonin-60 genes of all bacteria present in the swab and hybridization of the amplicon to species-specific oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent beads that are identified by flow cytometry with a Luminex instrument. We designed a nineplex Luminex array for characterization of the vaginal microbiota and applied it to the analysis of vaginal swabs from individuals from Africa and North America. Using the presence of A. vaginae or G. vaginalis, or both, as the defining criterion for BV, we found that the method was highly specific and sensitive for the diagnosis of BV using microscopy as a gold standard. PMID:19794034

  12. Impact of Periodic Presumptive Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis on the Vaginal Microbiome among Women Participating in the Preventing Vaginal Infections Trial.

    PubMed

    Balkus, Jennifer E; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Anzala, Omu; Kimani, Joshua; Andac, Chloe; Schwebke, Jane; Fredricks, David N; McClelland, R Scott

    2017-03-01

    Evidence suggests that specific vaginal bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV) may increase the risk of adverse health outcomes in women. Among women participating in a randomized, double-blinded trial, we assessed the effect of periodic presumptive treatment (PPT) on detection of select vaginal bacteria. High-risk women from the United States and Kenya with a recent vaginal infection received intravaginal metronidazole 750 mg plus miconazole 200 mg or placebo for 5 consecutive nights each month for 12 months. Vaginal fluid specimens were collected via polyester/polyethylene terephthalate swabs every other month and tested for bacteria, using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. The effect of PPT on bacterium detection was assessed among all participants and stratified by country. Of 234 women enrolled, 221 had specimens available for analysis. The proportion of follow-up visits with detectable quantities was lower in the PPT arm versus the placebo arm for the following bacteria: BVAB1, BVAB2, Atopobium vaginae, Leptotrichia/Sneathia, and Megasphaera. The magnitude of reductions was greater among Kenyan participants as compared to US participants. Use of monthly PPT for 1 year reduced colonization with several bacteria strongly associated with BV. The role of PPT to improve vaginal health should be considered, and efforts to improve the impact of PPT regimens are warranted.

  13. Impact of targeted counseling on reported vaginal hygiene practices and bacterial vaginosis: the HIV Prevention Trials Network 035 study.

    PubMed

    Kasaro, Margaret P; Husnik, Marla J; Chi, Benjamin H; Reid, Cheri; Magure, Tsitsi; Makanani, Bonus; Tembo, Tchangani; Ramjee, Gita; Maslankowski, Lisa; Rabe, Lorna; Brad Guffey, M

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the impact of intense counseling to reduce vaginal hygiene practices and its effect on bacterial vaginosis. A secondary data analysis of the HIV Prevention Trials Network 035 study was undertaken, focusing on HIV-negative, nonpregnant women who were at least 18 years old, in seven African sites and one US site. At enrollment and during follow-up quarterly visits, vaginal hygiene practices were determined by face-to-face administration of a behavioral assessment questionnaire. Vaginal hygiene practices were categorized as insertion into the vagina of (1) nothing, (2) water only, and (3) other substances with or without water. Each practice was quantified by frequency and type/combination of inserted substances. At quarterly visits, diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis was made using the Nugent score. Trends for vaginal hygiene practices and bacterial vaginosis were evaluated using generalized estimating equation models. A total of 3087 participants from the HIV Prevention Trials Network 035 study were eligible for this analysis. At enrollment, 1859 (60%) reported recent vaginal hygiene practices. By one year, this figure had decreased to 1019 (33%) with counseling. However, bacterial vaginosis prevalence remained consistent across the study observation period, with 36%-38% of women testing positive for the condition ( p for trend = 0.27). Overall, those who reported douching with water only (AOR = 1.03, 95%CI: 0.94-1.13) and those who reported inserting other substances (AOR= 0.98, 95%CI: 0.88-1.09) in the past quarter were not more likely to have bacterial vaginosis compared to those who reported no insertions. However, in South Africa, an increase in bacterial vaginosis was seen among those who reported inserting other substances (AOR: 1.48, 95%CI: 1.17, 1.88). In conclusion, targeted counseling against vaginal hygiene practices resulted in change in self-reported behavior but did not have an impact on bacterial vaginosis

  14. Clinical and cervical cytokine response to treatment with oral or vaginal metronidazole for bacterial vaginosis during pregnancy: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Yudin, Mark H; Landers, Daniel V; Meyn, Leslie; Hillier, Sharon L

    2003-09-01

    To compare the efficacy of oral versus vaginal metronidazole treatment in pregnant women with bacterial vaginosis, and to compare cytokine profiles (interleukin-1beta, -6, and -8) in the cervical secretions of these women before and after treatment. Pregnant women with bacterial vaginosis diagnosed both by Gram stain and clinical criteria were randomized to receive oral (n=52) or vaginal (n=50) metronidazole therapy. Cervical specimens for cytokine analysis and vaginal fluid for evaluation of bacterial vaginosis were obtained at baseline and 4 weeks after treatment. There was no significant difference in therapeutic cure rates (defined as a Gram stain score of 0-3 and the absence of all four clinical signs of bacterial vaginosis) between the two groups (71% and 70% for the oral and vaginal groups, respectively, P=1.0). Cervical levels of interleukin-1beta, -6, and -8 were significantly lower after treatment among the 72 women cured of bacterial vaginosis (P<.001, P=.001, and P=.02, respectively) but not among women who failed to respond to therapy. For interleukin-1beta and -6, a significant decrease in cytokine level was observed in both the oral and vaginal treatment groups. One week of oral metronidazole and 5 days of intravaginal metronidazole are equally efficacious for treatment of bacterial vaginosis during pregnancy. The decrease in cervical interleukin-1beta, -6, and -8 levels among women who established a normal flora after treatment but not among those with persistent bacterial vaginosis suggests a direct linkage between vaginal flora abnormalities and elevated cervical levels of interleukin-1beta, -6, and -8.

  15. A comparison of the efficacy of metronidazole vaginal gel and Myrtus (Myrtus communis) extract combination and metronidazole vaginal gel alone in the treatment of recurrent bacterial vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Masoudi, Mansoureh; Rafieian Kopaei, Mahmoud; Miraj, Sepideh

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Due to the high incidence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and its resistance to chemical medications and considering the anti-bacterial and anti-fungal effects of Myrtus communis, the present study aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of the vaginal gel of M. communis 2% (in metronidazole base) with metronidazole vaginal gel 0.75% alone on BV. Materials and Methods: This research was a randomized controlled clinical trial conducted on 80 women of 18-40 years old with BV. Patients were divided into two groups of 40 women. Diagnostic criteria were Amsel's criteria and Gram staining. The first group received vaginal gel of metronidazole plus M. communis 2% and the second group received metronidazole vaginal gel alone for five consecutive nights. Therapeutic effects and Amsel’s criteria were assessed after one week. Finally, the data were analyzed by SPSS 16 using t-test and Chi square tests. Results: There was a significant difference in the therapeutic response between the two groups. The results demonstrated that the combination of metronidazole and M. communis had a higher efficiency (p<0.05). The patients receiving M. communis in metronidazole gel base did not experience any recurrent BV, but 30% of patients taking metronidazole alone faced recurrent BV after three weeks of follow up. Conclusion: Findings of the study suggested that adding M. communis extract to metronidazole increases the efficiency of BV treatment. PMID:28348968

  16. A comparison of the efficacy of metronidazole vaginal gel and Myrtus (Myrtus communis) extract combination and metronidazole vaginal gel alone in the treatment of recurrent bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Masoudi, Mansoureh; Rafieian Kopaei, Mahmoud; Miraj, Sepideh

    2017-01-01

    Due to the high incidence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and its resistance to chemical medications and considering the anti-bacterial and anti-fungal effects of Myrtus communis, the present study aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of the vaginal gel of M. communis 2% (in metronidazole base) with metronidazole vaginal gel 0.75% alone on BV. This research was a randomized controlled clinical trial conducted on 80 women of 18-40 years old with BV. Patients were divided into two groups of 40 women. Diagnostic criteria were Amsel's criteria and Gram staining. The first group received vaginal gel of metronidazole plus M. communis 2% and the second group received metronidazole vaginal gel alone for five consecutive nights. Therapeutic effects and Amsel's criteria were assessed after one week. Finally, the data were analyzed by SPSS 16 using t-test and Chi square tests. There was a significant difference in the therapeutic response between the two groups. The results demonstrated that the combination of metronidazole and M. communis had a higher efficiency (p<0.05). The patients receiving M. communis in metronidazole gel base did not experience any recurrent BV, but 30% of patients taking metronidazole alone faced recurrent BV after three weeks of follow up. Findings of the study suggested that adding M. communis extract to metronidazole increases the efficiency of BV treatment.

  17. Bacterial vaginosis and vaginal microorganisms in idiopathic premature labor and association with pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Holst, E; Goffeng, A R; Andersch, B

    1994-01-01

    The vaginal microflora of 49 women in idiopathic preterm labor was compared with that of 38 term controls to determine whether the presence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and/or specific microorganisms would influence the rate of preterm delivery. Demographic factors, pregnancy outcome, and reproductive history were also studied. BV, as defined by the presence of clue cells in a vaginal wet mount and characteristic microbial findings in a stained vaginal smear and vaginal culture, was more common in women with preterm labor and delivery than in controls (P < 0.01). The condition, diagnosed in 41% of women who had both preterm labor and delivery (n = 22) and in 11% each of women who had preterm labor but term delivery (n = 27) and controls, was associated with a 2.1-fold risk (95% confidence intervals, 1.2 to 3.7) for preterm birth prior to 37 weeks of gestation. BV was associated with low birth weight. Of 49 women with preterm labor, 67% (8 of 12) of women with BV were delivered of low-birth-weight neonates (< 2,500 g) compared with 22% (8 of 37) of women without the condition (P < 0.0005). The presence of hydrogen peroxide-producing facultative Lactobacillus spp. was strongly negatively associated with both preterm delivery and BV. BV-associated microorganisms, i.e., Mobiluncus, Prevotella, and Peptostreptococcus species, Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Mycoplasma hominis, and high numbers of Gardnerella vaginalis were significantly associated with preterm delivery; all species also strongly associated with BV (P = 0.0001 for each comparison). Mobiluncus curtisii and Fusobacterium nucleatum were recovered exclusively from women with preterm delivery. Our study clearly indicates that BV and its associated organisms are correlated with idiopathic premature delivery. PMID:8126176

  18. Characterization of the vaginal microbiota among sexual risk behavior groups of women with bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Muzny, Christina A; Sunesara, Imran R; Kumar, Ranjit; Mena, Leandro A; Griswold, Michael E; Martin, David H; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Schwebke, Jane R; Swiatlo, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis (BV) remains elusive. BV may be more common among women who have sex with women (WSW). The objective of this study was to use 454 pyrosequencing to investigate the vaginal microbiome of WSW, women who have sex with women and men (WSWM), and women who have sex with men (WSM) with BV to determine if there are differences in organism composition between groups that may inform new hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis of BV. Vaginal swab specimens from eligible women with BV at the Mississippi State Department of Health STD Clinic were used. After DNA extraction, 454 pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences was performed. Sequence data was classified using the Ribosomal Database Program classifer. Complete linkage clustering analysis was performed to compare bacterial community composition among samples. Differences in operational taxonomic units with an abundance of ≥ 2% between risk behavior groups were determined. Alpha and beta diversity were measured using Shannon's Index implemented in QIIME and Unifrac analysis, respectively. 33 WSW, 35 WSWM, and 44 WSM were included. The vaginal bacterial communities of all women clustered into four taxonomic groups with the dominant taxonomic group in each being Lactobacillus, Lachnospiraceae, Prevotella, and Sneathia. Regarding differences in organism composition between risk behavior groups, the abundance of Atopobium (relative ratio (RR)=0.24; 95%CI 0.11-0.54) and Parvimonas (RR=0.33; 95%CI 0.11-0.93) were significantly lower in WSW than WSM, the abundance of Prevotella was significantly higher in WSW than WSWM (RR=1.77; 95%CI 1.10-2.86), and the abundance of Atopobium (RR=0.41; 95%CI 0.18-0.88) was significantly lower in WSWM than WSM. Overall, WSM had the highest diversity of bacterial taxa. The microbiology of BV among women in different risk behavior groups is heterogeneous. WSM in this study had the highest diversity of bacterial taxa. Additional studies are

  19. Characterization of the Vaginal Microbiota among Sexual Risk Behavior Groups of Women with Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Muzny, Christina A.; Sunesara, Imran R.; Kumar, Ranjit; Mena, Leandro A.; Griswold, Michael E.; Martin, David H.; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Schwebke, Jane R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis (BV) remains elusive. BV may be more common among women who have sex with women (WSW). The objective of this study was to use 454 pyrosequencing to investigate the vaginal microbiome of WSW, women who have sex with women and men (WSWM), and women who have sex with men (WSM) with BV to determine if there are differences in organism composition between groups that may inform new hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis of BV. Methods Vaginal swab specimens from eligible women with BV at the Mississippi State Department of Health STD Clinic were used. After DNA extraction, 454 pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences was performed. Sequence data was classified using the Ribosomal Database Program classifer. Complete linkage clustering analysis was performed to compare bacterial community composition among samples. Differences in operational taxonomic units with an abundance of ≥2% between risk behavior groups were determined. Alpha and beta diversity were measured using Shannon’s Index implemented in QIIME and Unifrac analysis, respectively. Results 33 WSW, 35 WSWM, and 44 WSM were included. The vaginal bacterial communities of all women clustered into four taxonomic groups with the dominant taxonomic group in each being Lactobacillus, Lachnospiraceae, Prevotella, and Sneathia. Regarding differences in organism composition between risk behavior groups, the abundance of Atopobium (relative ratio (RR)=0.24; 95%CI 0.11-0.54) and Parvimonas (RR=0.33; 95%CI 0.11-0.93) were significantly lower in WSW than WSM, the abundance of Prevotella was significantly higher in WSW than WSWM (RR=1.77; 95%CI 1.10-2.86), and the abundance of Atopobium (RR=0.41; 95%CI 0.18-0.88) was significantly lower in WSWM than WSM. Overall, WSM had the highest diversity of bacterial taxa. Conclusion The microbiology of BV among women in different risk behavior groups is heterogeneous. WSM in this study had the highest diversity of

  20. Comparison of the Effect of Vaginal Zataria multiflora Cream and Oral Metronidazole Pill on Results of Treatments for Vaginal Infections including Trichomoniasis and Bacterial Vaginosis in Women of Reproductive Age.

    PubMed

    Abdali, Khadijeh; Jahed, Leila; Amooee, Sedigheh; Zarshenas, Mahnaz; Tabatabaee, Hamidreza; Bekhradi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Effect of Zataria multiflora on bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis is shown in vivo and in vitro. We compare the effectiveness of Zataria multiflora cream and oral metronidazole pill on results of treatment for vaginal infections including Trichomonas and bacterial vaginosis; these infections occur simultaneously. The study included 420 women with bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis, or both infections together, who were randomly divided into six groups. Criteria for diagnosis were wet smear and Gram stain. Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream and placebo pill were administered to the experiment groups; the control group received oral metronidazole pill and vaginal placebo cream. Comparison of the clinical symptoms showed no significant difference in all three vaginitis groups receiving metronidazole pill and vaginal Zataria multiflora cream. However, comparison of the wet smear test results was significant in patients with trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis associated with trichomoniasis in the two treatment groups (p = 0.001 and p = 0.01). Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream had the same effect of oral metronidazole tablets in improving clinical symptoms of all three vaginitis groups, as well as the treatment for bacterial vaginosis. It can be used as a drug for treatment of bacterial vaginosis and elimination of clinical symptoms of Trichomonas vaginitis.

  1. Comparison of the Effect of Vaginal Zataria multiflora Cream and Oral Metronidazole Pill on Results of Treatments for Vaginal Infections including Trichomoniasis and Bacterial Vaginosis in Women of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Abdali, Khadijeh; Jahed, Leila; Amooee, Sedigheh; Zarshenas, Mahnaz; Tabatabaee, Hamidreza; Bekhradi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Effect of Zataria multiflora on bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis is shown in vivo and in vitro. We compare the effectiveness of Zataria multiflora cream and oral metronidazole pill on results of treatment for vaginal infections including Trichomonas and bacterial vaginosis; these infections occur simultaneously. The study included 420 women with bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis, or both infections together, who were randomly divided into six groups. Criteria for diagnosis were wet smear and Gram stain. Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream and placebo pill were administered to the experiment groups; the control group received oral metronidazole pill and vaginal placebo cream. Comparison of the clinical symptoms showed no significant difference in all three vaginitis groups receiving metronidazole pill and vaginal Zataria multiflora cream. However, comparison of the wet smear test results was significant in patients with trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis associated with trichomoniasis in the two treatment groups (p = 0.001 and p = 0.01). Vaginal Zataria multiflora cream had the same effect of oral metronidazole tablets in improving clinical symptoms of all three vaginitis groups, as well as the treatment for bacterial vaginosis. It can be used as a drug for treatment of bacterial vaginosis and elimination of clinical symptoms of Trichomonas vaginitis. PMID:26266260

  2. Effectiveness of vaginal administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus following conventional metronidazole therapy: how to lower the rate of bacterial vaginosis recurrences.

    PubMed

    Marcone, Valentina; Calzolari, Ettore; Bertini, Marco

    2008-07-01

    Eighty-four patients with bacterial vaginosis diagnosed according to Amsel's criteria were randomized to receive either oral metronidazole 500 mg twice a day for seven days, or one vaginal tablet containing freeze-dried Lactobacillus rhamnosus once a week at bedtime for two months starting one week after the last antibiotic administration. Followup was performed at days 30, 90 and 180. Chi-squared analysis showed a significant difference between the two treatment groups at day 90 (P = 0.05). Safe and effective long-term vaginal administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus appears to be a useful complementary approach in the management of bacterial vaginosis.

  3. Interplay Between the Temporal Dynamics of the Vaginal Microbiota and Human Papillomavirus Detection

    PubMed Central

    Brotman, Rebecca M.; Shardell, Michelle D.; Gajer, Pawel; Tracy, J. Kathleen; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; Ravel, Jacques; Gravitt, Patti E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. We sought to describe the temporal relationship between vaginal microbiota and human papillomavirus (HPV) detection. Methods. Thirty-two reproductive-age women self-collected midvaginal swabs twice weekly for 16 weeks (937 samples). Vaginal bacterial communities were characterized by pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA genes and clustered into 6 community state types (CSTs). Each swab was tested for 37 HPV types. The effects of CSTs on the rate of transition between HPV-negative and HPV-positive states were assessed using continuous-time Markov models. Results. Participants had an average of 29 samples, with HPV point prevalence between 58%–77%. CST was associated with changes in HPV status (P < .001). Lactobacillus gasseri–dominated CSTs had the fastest HPV remission rate, and a low Lactobacillus community with high proportions of the genera Atopobium (CST IV-B) had the slowest rate compared to L. crispatus–dominated CSTs (adjusted transition rate ratio [aTRR], 4.43, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11–17.7; aTRR, 0.33, 95% CI, .12–1.19, respectively). The rate ratio of incident HPV for low Lactobacillus CST IV-A was 1.86 (95% CI, .52–6.74). Conclusions. Vaginal microbiota dominated by L. gasseri was associated with increased clearance of detectable HPV. Frequent longitudinal sampling is necessary for evaluation of the association between HPV detection and dynamic microbiota. PMID:24943724

  4. A Common Clinical Dilemma: Management of Abnormal Vaginal Cytology and Human Papillomavirus Test Results.

    PubMed

    Khan, Michelle J; Massad, L Stewart; Kinney, Walter; Gold, Michael A; Mayeaux, E J; Darragh, Teresa M; Castle, Philip E; Chelmow, David; Lawson, Herschel W; Huh, Warner K

    2016-04-01

    Vaginal cancer is an uncommon cancer of the lower genital tract, and standardized screening is not recommended. Risk factors for vaginal cancer include a history of other lower genital tract neoplasia or cancer, smoking, immunosuppression, and exposure to diethylstilbestrol in utero. Although cervical cancer screening after total hysterectomy for benign disease is not recommended, many women inappropriately undergo vaginal cytology and/or human papillomavirus (HPV) tests, and clinicians are faced with managing their abnormal results. Our objectives were to review the literature on vaginal cytology and high-risk HPV (hrHPV) testing and to develop guidance for the management of abnormal vaginal screening tests. An electronic search of the PubMed database through 2015 was performed. Articles describing vaginal cytology or vaginal hrHPV testing were reviewed, and diagnostic accuracy of these tests when available was noted. The available literature was too limited to develop evidence-based recommendations for managing abnormal vaginal cytology and hrHPV screening tests. However, the data did show that (1) the risk of vaginal cancer in women after hysterectomy is extremely low, justifying the recommendation against routine screening, and (2) in women for whom surveillance is recommended, e.g., women posttreatment for cervical precancer or cancer, hrHPV testing may be useful in identification of vaginal cancer precursors. Vaginal cancer is rare, and asymptomatic low-risk women should not be screened. An algorithm based on expert opinion is proposed for managing women with abnormal vaginal test results.

  5. Comparison of oral and vaginal metronidazole for treatment of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: impact on fastidious bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Caroline M; Hitti, Jane E; Agnew, Kathy J; Fredricks, David N

    2009-06-10

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common condition that is associated with preterm birth and acquisition of complex communities of vaginal bacteria that include several fastidious species. Treatment of BV in pregnancy has mixed effects on the risk of preterm delivery, which some hypothesize is due to variable antibiotic efficacy for the fastidious bacteria. Both oral and intravaginal metronidazole can be used to treat bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy, but little is known about the impact of different routes of antibiotic administration on concentrations of fastidious vaginal bacteria. This was a sub-study of a larger randomized trial of oral versus vaginal metronidazole for treatment of BV in pregnancy. Fifty-three women were evaluated, including 30 women who received oral metronidazole and 23 who received intravaginal metronidazole. Bacterial taxon-specific quantitative PCR assays were used to measure concentrations of bacterial vaginosis associated bacterium (BVAB) 1, 2, and 3, Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium species, Leptotrichia/Sneathia species, Megasphaera species, and Lactobacillus crispatus before and after antibiotic treatment. Concentrations of Leptotrichia and Sneathia spp. and the fastidious Clostridia-like bacterium designated BVAB1 decreased significantly with oral (p = .002, p = .02) but not vaginal therapy (p = .141, p = .126). The fastidious bacterium BVAB3 did not significantly decrease with either treatment. Concentrations of Atopobium spp., reportedly resistant to metronidazole in vitro, dropped significantly with oral (p = .002) and vaginal (p = .001) treatment. There was no significant difference in the magnitude of change in bacterial concentrations between oral and vaginal treatment arms for any of the bacterial species. Lactobacillus crispatus concentrations did not change. Both oral and vaginal metronidazole therapy in pregnant women result in a significant decrease in concentrations of most BV-associated anaerobic bacteria, with the

  6. Comparison of oral and vaginal metronidazole for treatment of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy: impact on fastidious bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common condition that is associated with preterm birth and acquisition of complex communities of vaginal bacteria that include several fastidious species. Treatment of BV in pregnancy has mixed effects on the risk of preterm delivery, which some hypothesize is due to variable antibiotic efficacy for the fastidious bacteria. Both oral and intravaginal metronidazole can be used to treat bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy, but little is known about the impact of different routes of antibiotic administration on concentrations of fastidious vaginal bacteria. Methods This was a sub-study of a larger randomized trial of oral versus vaginal metronidazole for treatment of BV in pregnancy. Fifty-three women were evaluated, including 30 women who received oral metronidazole and 23 who received intravaginal metronidazole. Bacterial taxon-specific quantitative PCR assays were used to measure concentrations of bacterial vaginosis associated bacterium (BVAB) 1, 2, and 3, Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium species, Leptotrichia/Sneathia species, Megasphaera species, and Lactobacillus crispatus before and after antibiotic treatment. Results Concentrations of Leptotrichia and Sneathia spp. and the fastidious Clostridia-like bacterium designated BVAB1 decreased significantly with oral (p = .002, p = .02) but not vaginal therapy (p = .141, p = .126). The fastidious bacterium BVAB3 did not significantly decrease with either treatment. Concentrations of Atopobium spp., reportedly resistant to metronidazole in vitro, dropped significantly with oral (p = .002) and vaginal (p = .001) treatment. There was no significant difference in the magnitude of change in bacterial concentrations between oral and vaginal treatment arms for any of the bacterial species. Lactobacillus crispatus concentrations did not change. Conclusion Both oral and vaginal metronidazole therapy in pregnant women result in a significant decrease in concentrations of most BV

  7. Semen-Derived Enhancer of Viral Infection (SEVI) Binds Bacteria, Enhances Bacterial Phagocytosis by Macrophages, and Can Protect against Vaginal Infection by a Sexually Transmitted Bacterial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Easterhoff, David; Ontiveros, Fernando; Brooks, Lauren R.; Kim, Yoel; Ross, Brittany; Silva, Jharon N.; Olsen, Joanna S.; Feng, Changyong; Hardy, Dwight J.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI) is a positively charged amyloid fibril that is derived from a self-assembling proteolytic cleavage fragment of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP248-286). SEVI efficiently facilitates HIV-1 infection in vitro, but its normal physiologic function remains unknown. In light of the fact that other amyloidogenic peptides have been shown to possess direct antibacterial activity, we investigated whether SEVI could inhibit bacterial growth. Neither SEVI fibrils nor the unassembled PAP248-286 peptide had significant direct antibacterial activity in vitro. However, SEVI fibrils bound to both Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Neisseria gonorrhoeae) bacteria, in a charge-dependent fashion. Furthermore, SEVI fibrils but not the monomeric PAP248-286 peptide promoted bacterial aggregation and enhanced the phagocytosis of bacteria by primary human macrophages. SEVI also enhanced binding of bacteria to macrophages and the subsequent release of bacterially induced proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and IL-1β). Finally, SEVI fibrils inhibited murine vaginal colonization with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. These findings demonstrate that SEVI has indirect antimicrobial activity and that this activity is dependent on both the cationic charge and the fibrillar nature of SEVI. PMID:23507280

  8. Semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI) binds bacteria, enhances bacterial phagocytosis by macrophages, and can protect against vaginal infection by a sexually transmitted bacterial pathogen.

    PubMed

    Easterhoff, David; Ontiveros, Fernando; Brooks, Lauren R; Kim, Yoel; Ross, Brittany; Silva, Jharon N; Olsen, Joanna S; Feng, Changyong; Hardy, Dwight J; Dunman, Paul M; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    The semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI) is a positively charged amyloid fibril that is derived from a self-assembling proteolytic cleavage fragment of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP(248-286)). SEVI efficiently facilitates HIV-1 infection in vitro, but its normal physiologic function remains unknown. In light of the fact that other amyloidogenic peptides have been shown to possess direct antibacterial activity, we investigated whether SEVI could inhibit bacterial growth. Neither SEVI fibrils nor the unassembled PAP(248-286) peptide had significant direct antibacterial activity in vitro. However, SEVI fibrils bound to both Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Neisseria gonorrhoeae) bacteria, in a charge-dependent fashion. Furthermore, SEVI fibrils but not the monomeric PAP(248-286) peptide promoted bacterial aggregation and enhanced the phagocytosis of bacteria by primary human macrophages. SEVI also enhanced binding of bacteria to macrophages and the subsequent release of bacterially induced proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and IL-1β). Finally, SEVI fibrils inhibited murine vaginal colonization with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. These findings demonstrate that SEVI has indirect antimicrobial activity and that this activity is dependent on both the cationic charge and the fibrillar nature of SEVI.

  9. The effects of intravaginal clindamycin and metronidazole therapy on vaginal mobiluncus morphotypes in patients with bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Nyirjesy, Paul; McIntosh, Matthew J; Steinmetz, Jana I; Schumacher, Robert J; Joffrion, James L

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of treatments for bacterial vaginosis (BV) on vaginal Mobiluncus morphotypes. Analyses were performed on Mobiluncus scores from similarly conducted studies evaluating clindamycin vaginal single-dose cream (CVSDC) or metronidazole vaginal gel (MVG) in 55 patients with BV and with Mobiluncus morphotypes at baseline. Both treatment groups demonstrated significant reductions in Mobiluncus score. However, the Mobiluncus score at test-of-cure was lower in the CVSDC than in the MVG group (P=0.0471). More patients in the CVSDC group than in the MVG group achieved microbiologic (57.5% vs. 26.7%; P=0.04), clinical (57.5% vs. 26.7%; P=0.04), and therapeutic cures of BV (45.0% vs. 20.0%; P=0.09). Clindamycin reduces vaginal Mobiluncus morphotypes to a greater extent than metronidazole in patients with BV; this correlates with a higher BV cure rate.

  10. The efficacy and safety of a single dose of Clindesse vaginal cream versus a seven-dose regimen of Cleocin vaginal cream in patients with bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Faro, Sebastian; Skokos, Campbell K

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a single dose of Clindesse vaginal cream is comparable in efficacy and safety to Cleocin vaginal cream administered once daily for 7 days in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. STUDY DESIGN: This multicenter, randomized, single-blind, parallel-group study enrolled 540 patients with BV infections. Treatment consisted of either a single intravaginal dose of Clindesse or 7 daily doses of Cleocin. Efficacy and safety were assessed 21-30 days after the start of treatment. The efficacy endpoints were Investigator Cure, Clinical Cure (a composite of all 4 Amsel's criteria and Investigator Cure), Nugent Cure (Nugent score < 4), and Therapeutic Cure (a composite of Clinical Cure and Nugent Cure). Resolution of individual Amsel's criteria was also evaluated. Treatment-emergent adverse events were monitored throughout the study. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in cure rates between the Clindesse and Cleocin treatment groups in Investigator Cure (P=0.702), Clinical Cure (P=0.945), Nugent Cure (P=0.788), or Therapeutic Cure (P=0.572). Results were also similar for 3 of 4 and 2 of 4 Amsel's criteria and for each individual Amsel's criterion (all P-values >0.200). Ninety-five percent confidence intervals for each endpoint were consistent with equivalence between the 2 products. There was no significant difference between the treatment groups in the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (P=0.386). CONCLUSIONS: A single dose of Clindesse vaginal cream is equivalent in safety and efficacy to a 7-dose regimen of Cleocin vaginal cream in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. This represents a significant advance in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. PMID:16240515

  11. Extravaginal reservoirs of vaginal bacteria as risk factors for incident bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, Jeanne M; Fiedler, Tina L; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Thomas, Katherine K; Liu, Congzhou; Ko, Daisy; Xie, Hu; Saracino, Misty; Fredricks, David N

    2012-05-15

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) represents shifts in microbiota from Lactobacillus spp. to diverse anaerobes. Although antibiotics relieve symptoms and temporarily eradicate BV-associated bacteria (BVAB), BV usually recurs. We investigated the role of extravaginal BVAB reservoirs in recurrence. Risks for BV acquisition over the course of 1 year were defined. DNA in vaginal, anal, and oral swab samples from enrollment was subjected to quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays targeting 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Gardnerella vaginalis, Lactobacillus crispatus, BVAB1, BVAB2, BVAB3, Megasphaera spp., Lactobacillus jensenii, and Leptotrichia/Sneathia spp. A case-control approach analyzed BVAB detection at enrollment for case patients (BV acquisition) versus controls (none). Of 239 women enrolled without BV, 199 were seen in follow-up, and 40 experienced BV; 15 had all samples for analysis. Detection of G. vaginalis in oral cavity or anal samples and Leptotrichia/Sneathia spp. in anal samples was more common at enrollment among case patients, who also had higher concentrations of these bacteria and Megasphaera relative to 30 controls at each site. In contrast, L. crispatus was detected more frequently in anal samples among controls. Women who acquire BV are more likely have previous colonization of extravaginal reservoirs with some BVAB, and less likely to have L. crispatus, suggesting that BVAB may be acquired vaginally from extravaginal reservoirs.

  12. Extravaginal Reservoirs of Vaginal Bacteria as Risk Factors for Incident Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Marrazzo, Jeanne M.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Thomas, Katherine K.; Liu, Congzhou; Ko, Daisy; Xie, Hu; Saracino, Misty; Fredricks, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) represents shifts in microbiota from Lactobacillus spp. to diverse anaerobes. Although antibiotics relieve symptoms and temporarily eradicate BV-associated bacteria (BVAB), BV usually recurs. We investigated the role of extravaginal BVAB reservoirs in recurrence. Methods Risks for BV acquisition over the course of 1 year were defined. DNA in vaginal, anal, and oral swab samples from enrollment was subjected to quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays targeting 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Gardnerella vaginalis, Lactobacillus crispatus, BVAB1, BVAB2, BVAB3, Megasphaera spp., Lactobacillus jensenii, and Leptotrichia/Sneathia spp. A case-control approach analyzed BVAB detection at enrollment for case patients (BV acquisition) versus controls (none). Results Of 239 women enrolled without BV, 199 were seen in follow-up, and 40 experienced BV; 15 had all samples for analysis. Detection of G. vaginalis in oral cavity or anal samples and Leptotrichia/Sneathia spp. in anal samples was more common at enrollment among case patients, who also had higher concentrations of these bacteria and Megasphaera relative to 30 controls at each site. In contrast, L. crispatus was detected more frequently in anal samples among controls. Conclusions Women who acquire BV are more likely have previous colonization of extravaginal reservoirs with some BVAB, and less likely to have L. crispatus, suggesting that BVAB may be acquired vaginally from extravaginal reservoirs. PMID:22448002

  13. Novel PCR-based methods enhance characterization of vaginal microbiota in a bacterial vaginosis patient before and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Janet A; Kalra, Apoorv; Dodge, Cristina T; John, Susan; Sobel, Jack D; Akins, Robert A

    2013-07-01

    Deep characterization, even by next-generation sequencing, of the vaginal microbiota in healthy women or posttreatment bacterial vaginosis patients is limited by the dominance of lactobacilli. To improve detection, we offer two approaches: quantitative PCR (qPCR) using phylogenetic branch-inclusive primers and sequencing of broad-spectrum amplicons generated with oligomers that block amplification of lactobacilli.

  14. Exploration of bacterial community classes in major human habitats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Determining bacterial abundance variation is the first step in understanding bacterial similarity between individuals. Categorization of bacterial communities into groups or community classes is the subsequent step in describing microbial distribution based on abundance patterns. Here, we present an analysis of the groupings of bacterial communities in stool, nasal, skin, vaginal and oral habitats in a healthy cohort of 236 subjects from the Human Microbiome Project. Results We identify distinct community group patterns in the anterior nares, four skin sites, and vagina at the genus level. We also confirm three enterotypes previously identified in stools. We identify two clusters with low silhouette values in most oral sites, in which bacterial communities are more homogeneous. Subjects sharing a community class in one habitat do not necessarily share a community class in another, except in the three vaginal sites and the symmetric habitats of the left and right retroauricular creases. Demographic factors, including gender, age, and ethnicity, significantly influence community composition in several habitats. Community classes in the vagina, retroauricular crease and stool are stable over approximately 200 days. Conclusion The community composition, association of demographic factors with community classes, and demonstration of community stability deepen our understanding of the variability and dynamics of human microbiomes. This also has significant implications for experimental designs that seek microbial correlations with clinical phenotypes. PMID:24887286

  15. Silver Sucrose Octasulfate (IASOS™) as a Valid Active Ingredient into a Novel Vaginal Gel against Human Vaginal Pathogens: In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Marianelli, Cinzia; Petrucci, Paola; Comelli, Maria Cristina; Calderini, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the antimicrobial properties of a novel octasilver salt of Sucrose Octasulfate (IASOS) as well as of an innovative vaginal gel containing IASOS (SilSOS Femme), against bacterial and yeast pathogens isolated from human clinical cases of symptomatic vaginal infections. In BHI and LAPT culture media, different ionic silver concentrations and different pHs were tested. IASOS exerted a strong antimicrobial activity towards all the pathogens tested in both culture media. The results demonstrated that salts and organic compounds present in the culture media influenced IASOS efficacy only to a moderate extent. Whereas comparable MBCs (Minimal Bactericidal Concentrations) were observed for G. vaginalis (10 mg/L Ag+), E. coli and E. aerogenes (25 mg/L Ag+) in both media, higher MBCs were found for S. aureus and S. agalactiae in LAPT cultures (50 mg/L Ag+ versus 25 mg/L Ag+). No minimal concentration totally inhibiting the growth of C. albicans was found. Nevertheless, in both media at the highest ionic silver concentrations (50–200 mg/L Ag+), a significant 34–52% drop in Candida growth was observed. pH differently affected the antimicrobial properties of IASOS against bacteria or yeasts; however, a stronger antimicrobial activity at pH higher than the physiological pH was generally observed. It can be therefore concluded that IASOS exerts a bactericidal action against all the tested bacteria and a clear fungistatic action against C. albicans. The antimicrobial activity of the whole vaginal gel SilSOS Femme further confirmed the antimicrobial activity of IASOS. Overall, our findings support IASOS as a valid active ingredient into a vaginal gel. PMID:24897299

  16. Silver sucrose octasulfate (IASOS™) as a valid active ingredient into a novel vaginal gel against human vaginal pathogens: in vitro antimicrobial activity assessment.

    PubMed

    Marianelli, Cinzia; Petrucci, Paola; Comelli, Maria Cristina; Calderini, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the antimicrobial properties of a novel octasilver salt of Sucrose Octasulfate (IASOS) as well as of an innovative vaginal gel containing IASOS (SilSOS Femme), against bacterial and yeast pathogens isolated from human clinical cases of symptomatic vaginal infections. In BHI and LAPT culture media, different ionic silver concentrations and different pHs were tested. IASOS exerted a strong antimicrobial activity towards all the pathogens tested in both culture media. The results demonstrated that salts and organic compounds present in the culture media influenced IASOS efficacy only to a moderate extent. Whereas comparable MBCs (Minimal Bactericidal Concentrations) were observed for G. vaginalis (10 mg/L Ag+), E. coli and E. aerogenes (25 mg/L Ag+) in both media, higher MBCs were found for S. aureus and S. agalactiae in LAPT cultures (50 mg/L Ag+ versus 25 mg/L Ag+). No minimal concentration totally inhibiting the growth of C. albicans was found. Nevertheless, in both media at the highest ionic silver concentrations (50-200 mg/L Ag+), a significant 34-52% drop in Candida growth was observed. pH differently affected the antimicrobial properties of IASOS against bacteria or yeasts; however, a stronger antimicrobial activity at pH higher than the physiological pH was generally observed. It can be therefore concluded that IASOS exerts a bactericidal action against all the tested bacteria and a clear fungistatic action against C. albicans. The antimicrobial activity of the whole vaginal gel SilSOS Femme further confirmed the antimicrobial activity of IASOS. Overall, our findings support IASOS as a valid active ingredient into a vaginal gel.

  17. Restoring vaginal microbiota: biological control of bacterial vaginosis. A prospective case-control study using Lactobacillus rhamnosus BMX 54 as adjuvant treatment against bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Recine, Nadia; Palma, Ettore; Domenici, Lavinia; Giorgini, Margherita; Imperiale, Ludovica; Sassu, Carolina; Musella, Angela; Marchetti, Claudia; Muzii, Ludovico; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most prevalent lower genital tract infection in reproductive-age women worldwide. BV is an ecological disorder of the vaginal microbiota characterized microbiologically by replacement of the lactobacilli, predominant vaginal microbiota. It is characterized by a high rate of relapse in sexual active women, and these patients show three or more relapses each year. A healthy vagina is characterized by hydrogen peroxide and acid-producing lactobacilli, which are crucial to maintain the physiological vaginal ecosystem and their depletion speeds up bacterial overgrowth with pH elevation, salidase and amine production, leading to the observed signs and symptoms of BV. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of long-term vaginal lactobacilli's implementation in restoring and maintaining vaginal microflora and pH and to collect data about prophylactic approach based on probiotics supplementation with lactobacilli. This is a prospective case-control study, performed between January 2013 and September 2014 at Department of Gynecological Obstetrics and Urologic Sciences of "Sapienza" University of Rome. 250 non-pregnant sexually active women with diagnoses of BV were collected. Patients selected were divided in Group A (125 patients assigned to standard treatment for BV-metronidazole 500 mg orally twice a day for 7 days) and Group B (125 women undergoing the same standard antibiotic regimen followed by vaginal tablets containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus BMX 54). Patients were evaluated after 2, 6, and 9 months (T0, T2, T6, and T9) in term of recurrences rates of BV, vaginal symptoms, re-establishment of healthy vaginal flora, vaginal pH, and treatment tolerability. Vaginal flora was significantly replaced in Group B patients after 2 months comparing with Group A (p = 0.014). These data were confirmed at 6 and 9 months follow-up: patients that underwent prophylactic therapy with NORMOGIN(®) experienced significantly low rate of

  18. The presence of the putative Gardnerella vaginalis sialidase A gene in vaginal specimens is associated with bacterial vaginosis biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Jespers, Vicky; Van den Bulck, Magelien; Buyze, Jozefien; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a difficult-to-treat recurrent condition in which health-associated lactobacilli are outnumbered by other anaerobic bacteria, such as Gardnerella vaginalis. Certain genotypes of G. vaginalis can produce sialidase, while others cannot. Sialidase is known to facilitate the destruction of the protective mucus layer on the vaginal epithelium by hydrolysis of sialic acid on the glycans of mucous membranes. This process possibly facilitates adhesion of bacterial cells on the epithelium since it has been linked with the development of biofilm in other pathogenic conditions. Although it has not been demonstrated yet, it is probable that G. vaginalis benefits from this mechanism by attaching to the vaginal epithelium to initiate biofilm development. In this study, using vaginal specimens of 120 women enrolled in the Ring Plus study, we assessed the association between the putative G. vaginalis sialidase A gene by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), the diagnosis of BV according to Nugent score, and the occurrence of a BV-associated biofilm dominated by G. vaginalis by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). We detected the putative sialidase A gene in 75% of the G. vaginalis-positive vaginal specimens and found a strong association (p<0.001) between the presence of a G. vaginalis biofilm, the diagnosis of BV according to Nugent and the detection of high loads of the G. vaginalis sialidase A gene in the vaginal specimens. These results could redefine diagnosis of BV, and in addition might guide research for new treatment. PMID:28241058

  19. The presence of the putative Gardnerella vaginalis sialidase A gene in vaginal specimens is associated with bacterial vaginosis biofilm.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Liselotte; Jespers, Vicky; Van den Bulck, Magelien; Buyze, Jozefien; Mwambarangwe, Lambert; Musengamana, Viateur; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Crucitti, Tania

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a difficult-to-treat recurrent condition in which health-associated lactobacilli are outnumbered by other anaerobic bacteria, such as Gardnerella vaginalis. Certain genotypes of G. vaginalis can produce sialidase, while others cannot. Sialidase is known to facilitate the destruction of the protective mucus layer on the vaginal epithelium by hydrolysis of sialic acid on the glycans of mucous membranes. This process possibly facilitates adhesion of bacterial cells on the epithelium since it has been linked with the development of biofilm in other pathogenic conditions. Although it has not been demonstrated yet, it is probable that G. vaginalis benefits from this mechanism by attaching to the vaginal epithelium to initiate biofilm development. In this study, using vaginal specimens of 120 women enrolled in the Ring Plus study, we assessed the association between the putative G. vaginalis sialidase A gene by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), the diagnosis of BV according to Nugent score, and the occurrence of a BV-associated biofilm dominated by G. vaginalis by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). We detected the putative sialidase A gene in 75% of the G. vaginalis-positive vaginal specimens and found a strong association (p<0.001) between the presence of a G. vaginalis biofilm, the diagnosis of BV according to Nugent and the detection of high loads of the G. vaginalis sialidase A gene in the vaginal specimens. These results could redefine diagnosis of BV, and in addition might guide research for new treatment.

  20. NORMAL VAGINAL BACTERIAL FLORA OF GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) AND THE ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF THE ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hongning; Li, Caiwu; He, Yongguo; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yuesong; Xu, Changwen; Fan, Chengyun; Xu, Lulai; Huang, Shan; Qu, Chunmao; Li, Guo

    2016-06-01

    To study the typical vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), we took vaginal swabs for the sake of bacterial isolation, from 24 healthy female giant pandas. A total of 203 isolates were identified, representing a total of 17 bacterial species. The most common bacteria isolated were Lactobacillus spp. (54.2%, 13/24), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (41.7%, 10/24) and Escherichia coli (33.3%, 8/24). Some opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae , and Proteus mirabilis , were also isolated but showed no pathology. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacterial isolates was performed with the disk diffusion method. Of the 152 isolates, resistance was most frequently observed with chloramphenicol (17.8%), followed by tetracycline (14.5%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%), streptomycin (11.8%), and florfenicol (11.8%), whereas 7.2% were multidrug resistant. This is the first report of the normal culturable vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas and the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates.

  1. NORMAL VAGINAL BACTERIAL FLORA OF GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA) AND THE ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF THE ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Yang, Jiang; Wang, Hongning; Li, Caiwu; He, Yongguo; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Wang, Pengyan; Xu, Yuesong; Xu, Changwen; Fan, Chengyun; Xu, Lulai; Huang, Shan; Qu, Chunmao; Li, Guo

    2016-03-01

    In order to study the typical vaginal bacterial flora of giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), we took vaginal swabs for the sake of bacterial isolation, from 24 healthy female giant pandas. A total of 203 isolates were identified, representing a total of 17 bacterial species. The most common bacteria isolated were Lactobacillus spp. (54.2%, 13 of 24), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (41.7%, 10 of 24) and Escherichia coli (33.3%, 8 of 24). Some opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Peptostreptococcus spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis, were also isolated but showed no pathology. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of aerobic bacterial isolates was performed with disk diffusion method. Of the 152 isolates, resistance was most frequently observed with chloramphenicol (17.8%), followed by tetracycline (14.5%), ciprofloxacin (12.5%), streptomycin (11.8%), and florfenicol (11.8%), while 7.2% were multidrug resistant. This is the first report of the normal vaginal culturable bacterial flora of giant pandas, followed by the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates.

  2. Treating vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Cullins, V A; Dominguez, L; Guberski, T; Secor, R M; Wysocki, S J

    1999-10-01

    Vaginitis resulting from bacterial, fungal, or protozoal infections can be associated with altered vaginal discharge, odor, pruritus, vulvovaginal irritation, dysuria, or dyspareunia, depending on the type of infection. Bacterial vaginosis, which is primarily characterized by a malodorous discharge, is common in women with multiple sex partners and is caused by the overgrowth of several facultative and anaerobic bacterial species. Vulvovaginal candidiasis is characterized by pruritus and a cottage cheese-like discharge. Vaginal trichomoniasis, a sexually transmitted disease caused by an anaerobic protozoan parasite, is associated with a copious yellow or green, sometimes frothy, discharge. Differential diagnosis of these infections requires a thorough history, vulvovaginal examination, and simple laboratory tests, including microscopy of the vaginal discharge. The information obtained from this workup should enable an accurate diagnosis. Topical or oral metronidazole is the treatment of choice for bacterial vaginosis; terconazole, or other antifungals, for vulvovaginal candidiasis; and oral metronidazole for trichomoniasis.

  3. Vaginal Discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... also be on the lookout for symptoms of yeast infections, bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis, 3 infections that ... cause changes in your vaginal discharge.Signs of yeast infectionsWhite, cottage cheese-like dischargeSwelling and pain around ...

  4. High Aspartyl Proteinase Production and Vaginitis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    de Bernardis, F.; Mondello, F.; Scaravelli, G.; Pachì, A.; Girolamo, A.; Agatensi, L.; Cassone, A.

    1999-01-01

    Vaginal isolates of Candida albicans from human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+) and HIV− women with or without candidal vaginitis were examined for secretory aspartyl proteinase (Sap) production in vitro and in vivo and for the possible correlation of Sap production with pathology and antimycotic susceptibility in vitro. HIV+ women with candidal vaginitis were infected by strains of C. albicans showing significantly higher levels of Sap, a virulence enzyme, than strains isolated from HIV+, C. albicans carrier subjects and HIV− subjects with vaginitis. The greater production of Sap in vitro was paralleled by greater amounts of Sap in the vaginal fluids of infected subjects. In an estrogen-dependent, rat vaginitis model, a strain of C. albicans producing a high level of Sap that was isolated from an HIV+ woman with vaginitis was more pathogenic than a strain of C. albicans that was isolated primarily from an HIV−, Candida carrier. In the same model, pepstatin A, a strong Sap inhibitor, exerted a strong curative effect on experimental vaginitis. No correlation was found between Sap production and antimycotic susceptibility, as most of the isolates were fully susceptible to fluconazole, itraconazole, and other antimycotics, regardless of their source (subjects infected with strains producing high or low levels of Sap, subjects with vaginitis or carrier subjects, or subjects with or without HIV). Thus, high Sap production is associated with virulence of C. albicans but not with fungal resistance to fluconazole in HIV-infected subjects, and Sap is a potentially new therapeutic target in candidal vaginitis. PMID:10203490

  5. The normal vaginal and uterine bacterial microbiome in giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Cheng, Guangyang; Li, Caiwu; Yang, Jiang; Li, Jianan; Chen, Danyu; Zou, Wencheng; Jin, SenYan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; He, Yongguo; Wang, Chengdong; Wang, Min; Wang, Hongning

    2017-06-01

    While the health effects of the colonization of the reproductive tracts of mammals by bacterial communities are widely known, there is a dearth of knowledge specifically in relation to giant panda microbiomes. In order to investigate the vaginal and uterine bacterial diversity of healthy giant pandas, we used high-throughput sequence analysis of portions of the 16S rRNA gene, based on samples taken from the vaginas (GPV group) and uteri (GPU group) of these animals. Results showed that the four most abundant phyla, which contained in excess of 98% of the total sequences, were Proteobacteria (59.2% for GPV and 51.4% for GPU), Firmicutes (34.4% for GPV and 23.3% for GPU), Actinobacteria (5.2% for GPV and 14.0% for GPU) and Bacteroidetes (0.3% for GPV and 10.3% for GPU). At the genus level, Escherichia was most abundant (11.0%) in the GPV, followed by Leuconostoc (8.7%), Pseudomonas (8.0%), Acinetobacter (7.3%), Streptococcus (6.3%) and Lactococcus (6.0%). In relation to the uterine samples, Janthinobacterium had the highest prevalence rate (20.2%), followed by Corynebacterium (13.2%), Streptococcus (19.6%), Psychrobacter (9.3%), Escherichia (7.5%) and Bacteroides (6.2%). Moreover, both Chao1 and abundance-based coverage estimator (ACE) species richness indices, which were operating at the same sequencing depth for each sample, demonstrated that GPV had more species richness than GPU, while Simpson and Shannon indices of diversity indicated that GPV had the higher bacterial diversity. These findings contribute to our understanding of the potential influence abnormal reproductive tract microbial communities have on negative pregnancy outcomes in giant pandas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. 77 FR 70167 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Vaginal Microbicides: Development for the Prevention of Human...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... of HIV Infection.'' The purpose of this guidance is to assist sponsors in all phases of development of vaginal microbicides for the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The... guidance for industry entitled ``Vaginal Microbicides: Development for the Prevention of HIV...

  7. Interplay between the temporal dynamics of the vaginal microbiota and human papillomavirus detection.

    PubMed

    Brotman, Rebecca M; Shardell, Michelle D; Gajer, Pawel; Tracy, J Kathleen; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Ravel, Jacques; Gravitt, Patti E

    2014-12-01

    We sought to describe the temporal relationship between vaginal microbiota and human papillomavirus (HPV) detection. Thirty-two reproductive-age women self-collected midvaginal swabs twice weekly for 16 weeks (937 samples). Vaginal bacterial communities were characterized by pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA genes and clustered into 6 community state types (CSTs). Each swab was tested for 37 HPV types. The effects of CSTs on the rate of transition between HPV-negative and HPV-positive states were assessed using continuous-time Markov models. Participants had an average of 29 samples, with HPV point prevalence between 58%-77%. CST was associated with changes in HPV status (P<.001). Lactobacillus gasseri-dominated CSTs had the fastest HPV remission rate, and a low Lactobacillus community with high proportions of the genera Atopobium (CST IV-B) had the slowest rate compared to L. crispatus-dominated CSTs (adjusted transition rate ratio [aTRR], 4.43, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-17.7; aTRR, 0.33, 95% CI, .12-1.19, respectively). The rate ratio of incident HPV for low Lactobacillus CST IV-A was 1.86 (95% CI, .52-6.74). Vaginal microbiota dominated by L. gasseri was associated with increased clearance of detectable HPV. Frequent longitudinal sampling is necessary for evaluation of the association between HPV detection and dynamic microbiota. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Evidence for Gardnerella vaginalis uptake and internalization by squamous vaginal epithelial cells: implications for the pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Marrs, Christy N.; Knobel, Susan M.; Zhu, Wen Qin; Sweet, Stephanie D.; Chaudhry, Ahsen R.; Alcendor, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a common condition seen in premenopausal women, is associated with preterm labor, pelvic inflammatory disease, and delivery of low birth weight infants. Gardnerella vaginalis is the predominant bacterial species associated with BV, although its exact role in the pathology of BV is unknown. Using immunofluorescence, confocal and transmission electron microscopy, we found that VK2 vaginal epithelial cells take up G. vaginalis after exposure to the bacteria. Confocal microscopy also indicated the presence of internalized G. vaginalis within vaginal epithelial cells obtained from a subject with BV. Using VK2 cells and 35S labeled bacteria in an invasion assay, we found that a 1 h uptake of G. vaginalis was 21.8-fold higher than heat-killed G. vaginalis, 84-fold compared to Lactobacillus acidophilus and 6.6-fold compared to Lactobacillus crispatus. Internalization was inhibited by pre-exposure of cells to cytochalasin-D. In addition, the cytoskeletal protein vimentin was upregulated in VK2 cells exposed to G. vaginalis, but there was no change in actin cytoskeletal polymerization/rearrangements or vimentin subcellular relocalization post exposure. Cytoskeletal protein modifications could represent a potential mechanism for G. vaginalis mediated internalization by vaginal epithelial cells. Finally, understanding vaginal bacteria/host interactions will allow us to better understand the underlying mechanisms of BV pathogenesis. PMID:22227318

  9. Evidence for Gardnerella vaginalis uptake and internalization by squamous vaginal epithelial cells: implications for the pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Marrs, Christy N; Knobel, Susan M; Zhu, Wen Qin; Sweet, Stephanie D; Chaudhry, Ahsen R; Alcendor, Donald J

    2012-06-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a common condition seen in premenopausal women, is associated with preterm labor, pelvic inflammatory disease, and delivery of low birth weight infants. Gardnerella vaginalis is the predominant bacterial species associated with BV, although its exact role in the pathology of BV is unknown. Using immunofluorescence, confocal and transmission electron microscopy, we found that VK2 vaginal epithelial cells take up G. vaginalis after exposure to the bacteria. Confocal microscopy also indicated the presence of internalized G. vaginalis within vaginal epithelial cells obtained from a subject with BV. Using VK2 cells and (35)S labeled bacteria in an invasion assay, we found that a 1 h uptake of G. vaginalis was 21.8-fold higher than heat-killed G. vaginalis, 84-fold compared to Lactobacillus acidophilus and 6.6-fold compared to Lactobacillus crispatus. Internalization was inhibited by pre-exposure of cells to cytochalasin-D. In addition, the cytoskeletal protein vimentin was upregulated in VK2 cells exposed to G. vaginalis, but there was no change in actin cytoskeletal polymerization/rearrangements or vimentin subcellular relocalization post exposure. Cytoskeletal protein modifications could represent a potential mechanism for G. vaginalis mediated internalization by vaginal epithelial cells. Finally, understanding vaginal bacteria/host interactions will allow us to better understand the underlying mechanisms of BV pathogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. A common clinical dilemma: management of abnormal vaginal cytology and human papillomavirus test results

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Michelle J.; Massad, L. Stewart; Kinney, Walter; Gold, Michael A.; Mayeaux, EJ; Darragh, Teresa M.; Castle, Philip E.; Chelmow, David; Lawson, Herschel W.; Huh, Warner K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Vaginal cancer is an uncommon cancer of the lower genital tract, and standardized screening is not recommended. Risk factors for vaginal cancer include a history of other lower genital tract neoplasia or cancer, smoking, immunosuppression, and exposure to diethylstilbestrol in utero. Although cervical cancer screening after total hysterectomy for benign disease is not recommended, many women inappropriately undergo vaginal cytology and/or human papillomavirus (hrHPV) tests, and clinicians are faced with managing their abnormal results. Our objective is to review the literature on vaginal cytology and hrHPV testing and to develop guidance for the management of abnormal vaginal screening tests. Methods An electronic search of the PubMed database through 2015 was performed. Articles describing vaginal cytology or vaginal hrHPV testing were reviewed, and diagnostic accuracy of these tests when available was noted. Results The available literature was too limited to develop evidence-based recommendations for managing abnormal vaginal cytology and hrHPV screening tests. However, the data did show that 1) the risk of vaginal cancer in women after hysterectomy is extremely low, justifying the recommendation against routine screening, and 2) in women for whom surveillance is recommended, e.g. women post-treatment for cervical precancer or cancer, hrHPV testing may be useful in identification of vaginal cancer precursors. Conclusion Vaginal cancer is rare, and asymptomatic low-risk women should not be screened. An algorithm based on expert opinion is proposed for managing women with abnormal vaginal test results. PMID:26915529

  11. A common clinical dilemma: Management of abnormal vaginal cytology and human papillomavirus test results.

    PubMed

    Khan, Michelle J; Massad, L Stewart; Kinney, Walter; Gold, Michael A; Mayeaux, E J; Darragh, Teresa M; Castle, Philip E; Chelmow, David; Lawson, Herschel W; Huh, Warner K

    2016-05-01

    Vaginal cancer is an uncommon cancer of the lower genital tract, and standardized screening is not recommended. Risk factors for vaginal cancer include a history of other lower genital tract neoplasia or cancer, smoking, immunosuppression, and exposure to diethylstilbestrol in utero. Although cervical cancer screening after total hysterectomy for benign disease is not recommended, many women inappropriately undergo vaginal cytology and/or human papillomavirus (hrHPV) tests, and clinicians are faced with managing their abnormal results. Our objective is to review the literature on vaginal cytology and hrHPV testing and to develop guidance for the management of abnormal vaginal screening tests. An electronic search of the PubMed database through 2015 was performed. Articles describing vaginal cytology or vaginal hrHPV testing were reviewed, and diagnostic accuracy of these tests when available was noted. The available literature was too limited to develop evidence-based recommendations for managing abnormal vaginal cytology and hrHPV screening tests. However, the data did show that 1) the risk of vaginal cancer in women after hysterectomy is extremely low, justifying the recommendation against routine screening, and 2) in women for whom surveillance is recommended, e.g. women post-treatment for cervical precancer or cancer, hrHPV testing may be useful in identification of vaginal cancer precursors. Vaginal cancer is rare, and asymptomatic low-risk women should not be screened. An algorithm based on expert opinion is proposed for managing women with abnormal vaginal test results. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of treatment for vaginal yeast infection on the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pawlaczyk, Michal; Friebe, Zbigniew; Pawlaczyk, Mariola T; Sowinska-Przepiera, Elzbieta; Wlosinska, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    Both bacterial vaginosis and candidiasis are commonly seen in pregnancy, with marked differences in pregnancy outcome. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of antifungal treatment on the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in early pregnancy. This prospective randomized study included 126 women in early pregnancy with heavy vaginal yeast colonization and 88 healthy controls. Vaginal flora was evaluated on initial visit and on two check-ups for the presence of bacterial vaginosis. Half of the heavily colonized patients received an antimycotic agent (clotrimazole). The prevalence of vaginosis was compared among the three groups. Xi (2)-test and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical analysis. Three of 72 (4.2%) yeast-free controls, two of 79 (2.5%) yeast infected but not treated patients, and nine of 63 (14.3%) infected and treated patients presented with bacterial vaginosis 4 weeks after the initial visit. There was a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (p<0.03) in yeast infected and treated patients as compared to colonized and untreated patients. Treatment of candidiasis in early pregnancy may contribute to an increased rate of bacterial vaginosis.

  13. Relationship of specific vaginal bacteria and bacterial vaginosis treatment failure in women who have sex with women.

    PubMed

    Marrazzo, Jeanne M; Thomas, Katherine K; Fiedler, Tina L; Ringwood, Kathleen; Fredricks, David N

    2008-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis frequently persists after treatment. The role of newly defined bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria (BVAB), which have a specificity for this condition of 97% or greater, has not been assessed. To define risks for bacterial vaginosis persistence, including pretreatment detection of specific vaginal bacteria, among women reporting sex with women. Observational cohort study. University-based research clinic. 335 women age 16 to 29 years reporting sex with at least 1 woman in the past year. Participants were recruited through advertisements and provider referral. Bacterial vaginosis was treated with intravaginal metronidazole gel (0.75%), 37.5 mg nightly for 5 nights. Species-specific 16S recombinant DNA polymerase chain reaction assays targeting 17 bacterial species were applied to vaginal fluid obtained at baseline. Test of cure by clinical criteria and Gram stain analysis and repeated polymerase chain reaction assays of vaginal fluid were performed 1 month after treatment, and interim behaviors were assessed by using computer-assisted self-interview. Of 335 women, 24% of whom also reported sex with men within 3 months before enrollment, 131 (39%) had bacterial vaginosis. In the 120 (92%) women who returned for follow-up, the incidence of persistent bacterial vaginosis was 26% and was statistically significantly higher in women with baseline detection of 3 Clostridiales bacteria, designated as BVAB1 (risk ratio, 2.0 [95% CI, 1.1 to 4.0]), BVAB2 (risk ratio, 8.7 [CI, 2.5 to infinity]), or BVAB3 (risk ratio, 3.1 [CI, 1.7 to 5.8]); Peptoniphilus lacrimalis (risk ratio, 3.5 [CI, 1.6 to 15.5]); and Megasphaera phylotype 2 (risk ratio, 3.4 [CI, 1.4 to 5.5]). Persistence was lower with treatment adherence (risk ratio, 0.4 [0.2 to 0.9]). Detection of these bacteria at the test-of-cure visit was associated with persistence, whereas posttreatment sexual activity was not. Findings may not be generalizable to women who have sex only with men, or to women

  14. Effects of bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria and sexual intercourse on vaginal colonization with the probiotic Lactobacillus crispatus CTV-05.

    PubMed

    Ngugi, Benjamin M; Hemmerling, Anke; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Kikuvi, Gideon; Gikunju, Joseph; Shiboski, Stephen; Fredricks, David N; Cohen, Craig R

    2011-11-01

    Several fastidious bacteria have been associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV), but their role in lactobacilli recolonization failure is unknown. We studied the effect of 7 BV-associated bacterial species and 2 Lactobacillus species on vaginal colonization with Lactobacillus crispatus CTV-05 (LACTIN-V). Twenty-four women with BV were given a 5-day course of metronidazole vaginal gel and then randomized 3:1 to receive either LACTIN-V or placebo applied vaginally once daily for 5 initial consecutive days, followed by a weekly application over 2 weeks. Vaginal swabs for L. crispatus CTV-05 culture and 9 bacterium-specific 16S rRNA gene quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays were analyzed on several study visits for the 18 women receiving LACTIN-V. Vaginal colonization with CTV-05 was achieved in 61% of the participants receiving LACTIN-V at either day 10 or day 28 visit and 44% at day 28. Participants not colonized with CTV-05 had generally higher median concentrations of BV-associated bacteria compared to those who colonized. Between enrollment and day 28, the median concentration of Gardnerella vaginalis minimally reduced from 10 to 10 16S rRNA gene copies per swab in women who colonized with CTV-05 but increased from 10 to 10 in those who failed to colonize (P = 0.19). Similarly, the median concentration of Atopobium spp. reduced from 10 16S rRNA gene copies per swab to below limit of detection in women who colonized with CTV-05, but increased from 10 to 10 in those who failed to colonize (P = 0.04). The presence of endogenous L. crispatus at enrollment was found to be significantly associated with a reduced odds of colonization with CTV-05 on day 28 (P = 0.003), and vaginal intercourse during the study significantly impaired successful CTV-05 colonization (P = 0.018). Vaginal concentration of certain BV-associated bacteria, vaginal intercourse during treatment, and the presence of endogenous L. crispatus at enrollment predict colonization with probiotic

  15. Prevalence of asymptomatic infections in sexually transmitted diseases attendees diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis, vaginal candidiasis, and trichomoniasis.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, R; Kalaivani, S

    2016-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) are a major health problem affecting mostly young people in both developing and developed countries. STD in women causes both acute morbidity and complications such as infertility, ectopic pregnancy, low-birth weight, and prematurity. The aim of the study is to assess the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis, vaginal candidiasis, and trichomoniasis among asymptomatic females attending STD outpatient department in a tertiary care hospital in South India. A retrospective analysis of data collected from clinical records of 3000 female patients of age 18 to 49 over a period of 12 months (July 2014 to June 2015) was carried out at the Institute of Venereology, Madras Medical College. Complete epidemiological, clinical, and investigational data were recorded and analyzed for the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis, vaginal candidiasis, and trichomoniasis among asymptomatic patients. About 48.37% (228/470) of bacterial vaginosis patients were asymptomatic. Nearly 45.38% (116/235) of vaginal candidiasis patients were asymptomatic and 30.35% (26/87) of trichomoniasis patients were asymptomatic. The above infections were common in the age group 25-35. Holistic screening protocol was incorporated for all female patients attending STD clinic even if asymptomatic and should be treated accordingly to prevent the acquisition of other serious sexually transmitted infections.

  16. Relationship of Specific Vaginal Bacteria and Bacterial Vaginosis Treatment Failure in Women Who Have Sex with Women: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Marrazzo, Jeanne M.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Ringwood, Kathleen; Fredricks, David N.

    2008-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis frequently persists after treatment. The role of newly defined bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria (BVAB), with specificity ≥97% for this condition, has not been assessed. Objective Define risks for bacterial vaginosis persistence, including pre-treatment detection of specific vaginal bacteria, among women reporting sex with other women. Design Observational cohort study. Setting University-based research clinic. Patients 335 women 16–29 years-old reporting sex with ≥1 woman in the prior year recruited through advertisements and provider referral. Intervention Bacterial vaginosis was treated with intravaginal metronidazole gel (0.75%), 37.5 mg nightly for five nights. Measurements Species-specific 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays targeting 17 bacteria were applied to vaginal fluid obtained at baseline. Test of cure by clinical criteria and Gram stain analysis and repeat PCR assays of vaginal fluid were performed one month post-treatment, and interim behaviors assessed using computer-assisted self-interview. Results Of 335 women, 24% of whom also reported sex with men within 3 months before enrollment, 131 (39%) had bacterial vaginosis. In 120 (92%) with follow-up, incidence of persistent bacterial vaginosis was 26%, and significantly higher in women with baseline detection of Clostridia-like bacteria designated BVAB1 (risk ratio (95% C.I.) 2.0 (1.1–4.0), BVAB2 (risk ratio (95% C.I.) 8.7 (2.5-∞), or BVAB3 (risk ratio (95% C.I.) 3.1 (1.7–5.8)), or of Peptoniphilus lacrimalis (risk ratio (95% C.I.) 3.5 (1.6–15.5)) or Megasphaera phylotype 2 (risk ratio (95% C.I.) 3.4 (1.4–5.5)), and lower with treatment adherence (risk ratio (95% C.I.) 0.4 (0.2–0.9)). Detection of these bacteria at test-of-cure was associated with persistence, while post-treatment sexual activity was not. Limitations Findings may not be generalizable to women who have sex only with men, or to women whose bacterial vaginosis is treated

  17. Impact of targeted counseling on reported vaginal hygiene practices and bacterial vaginosis: the HIV Prevention Trials Network 035 study

    PubMed Central

    Kasaro, Margaret P; Husnik, Marla J; Chi, Benjamin H; Reid, Cheri; Magure, Tsitsi; Makanani, Bonus; Tembo, Tchangani; Ramjee, Gita; Maslankowski, Lisa; Rabe, Lorna; Guffey, M Brad

    2016-01-01

    Objective We describe the impact of intense counseling to reduce vaginal hygiene practices and its effect on bacterial vaginosis (BV). Design Secondary data analysis of HPTN 035 trial Setting Seven African and one U.S. site Population HIV negative, non-pregnant women at least 18years old Methods At enrollment and during follow-up quarterly visits, vaginal hygiene practices were determined by face-to-face administration of a behavioral assessment questionnaire. Vaginal hygiene practices were categorized as insertion into the vagina of: (1) nothing; (2) water only; and (3) other substances with or without water. Each practice was quantified by frequency and type/combination of inserted substances. At quarterly visits, diagnosis of BV was made using the Nugent score. Trends for vaginal hygiene practices and BV were evaluated using generalized estimating equation models. Results 3087 participants from the HPTN 035 study were eligible for this analysis. At enrollment, 1859 (60%) reported recent vaginal hygiene practices. By one year, this figure had decreased to 1019 (33%) with counseling. However, BV prevalence remained consistent across the study observation period, with 36–38% of women testing positive for the condition (p for trend= 0.27). Overall, those who reported douching with water only (AOR= 1.03, 95%CI: 0.94 – 1.13) and those who reported inserting other substances (AOR= 0.98, 95%CI: 0.88 – 1.09) in the past quarter were not more likely to have BV compared to those who reported no insertions. However, in South Africa, an increase in BV was seen among those who reported inserting other substances (AOR: 1.48, 95%CI: 1.17, 1.88). Conclusions Targeted counseling against vaginal hygiene practices resulted in change in self-reported behavior, but did not have an impact on BV diagnosis in all but one site. PMID:27277555

  18. Efficacy of Oral Metronidazole with Vaginal Clindamycin or Vaginal Probiotic for Bacterial Vaginosis: Randomised Placebo-Controlled Double-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Catriona S.; Pirotta, Marie; De Guingand, Deborah; Hocking, Jane S.; Morton, Anna N.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Fehler, Glenda; Morrow, Andrea; Walker, Sandra; Vodstrcil, Lenka A.; Fairley, Christopher K.

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine if oral metronidazole (MTZ-400mg bid) with 2% vaginal clindamycin-cream (Clind) or a Lactobacillus acidophilus vaginal-probiotic containing oestriol (Prob) reduces 6-month bacterial vaginosis (BV) recurrence. Methods Double-blind placebo-controlled parallel-group single-site study with balanced randomization (1∶1∶1) conducted at Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Australia. Participants with symptomatic BV [Nugent Score (NS) = 7–10 or ≥3 Amsel's criteria and NS = 4–10], were randomly allocated to MTZ-Clind, MTZ-Prob or MTZ-Placebo and assessed at 1,2,3 and 6 months. MTZ and Clind were administered for 7 days and Prob and Placebo for 12 days. Primary outcome was BV recurrence (NS of 7–10) on self-collected vaginal-swabs over 6-months. Cumulative BV recurrence rates were compared between groups by Chi-squared statistics. Kaplan-Meier, log rank and Cox regression analyses were used to compare time until and risk of BV recurrence between groups. Results 450 18–50 year old females were randomized and 408 (91%), equally distributed between groups, provided ≥1 NS post-randomization and were included in analyses; 42 (9%) participants with no post-randomization data were excluded. Six-month retention rates were 78% (n = 351). One-month BV recurrence (NS 7–10) rates were 3.6% (5/140), 6.8% (9/133) and 9.6% (13/135) in the MTZ-Clind, MTZ-Prob and MTZ-Placebo groups respectively, p = 0.13. Hazard ratios (HR) for BV recurrence at one-month, adjusted for adherence to vaginal therapy, were 0.43 (95%CI 0.15–1.22) and 0.75 (95% CI 0.32–1.76) in the MTZ-Clind and MTZ-Prob groups compared to MTZ-Plac respectively. Cumulative 6-month BV recurrence was 28.2%; (95%CI 24.0–32.7%) with no difference between groups, p = 0.82; HRs for 6-month BV recurrence for MTZ-Clind and MTZ-Prob compared to MTZ-Plac, adjusted for adherence to vaginal therapy were 1.09(95% CI = 0.70–1.70) and 1.03(95% CI = 0.65–1

  19. Efficacy of oral metronidazole with vaginal clindamycin or vaginal probiotic for bacterial vaginosis: randomised placebo-controlled double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Catriona S; Pirotta, Marie; De Guingand, Deborah; Hocking, Jane S; Morton, Anna N; Garland, Suzanne M; Fehler, Glenda; Morrow, Andrea; Walker, Sandra; Vodstrcil, Lenka A; Fairley, Christopher K

    2012-01-01

    To determine if oral metronidazole (MTZ-400 mg bid) with 2% vaginal clindamycin-cream (Clind) or a Lactobacillus acidophilus vaginal-probiotic containing oestriol (Prob) reduces 6-month bacterial vaginosis (BV) recurrence. Double-blind placebo-controlled parallel-group single-site study with balanced randomization (1:1:1) conducted at Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Australia. Participants with symptomatic BV [Nugent Score (NS) = 7-10 or ≥3 Amsel's criteria and NS = 4-10], were randomly allocated to MTZ-Clind, MTZ-Prob or MTZ-Placebo and assessed at 1,2,3 and 6 months. MTZ and Clind were administered for 7 days and Prob and Placebo for 12 days. Primary outcome was BV recurrence (NS of 7-10) on self-collected vaginal-swabs over 6-months. Cumulative BV recurrence rates were compared between groups by Chi-squared statistics. Kaplan-Meier, log rank and Cox regression analyses were used to compare time until and risk of BV recurrence between groups. 450 18-50 year old females were randomized and 408 (91%), equally distributed between groups, provided ≥1 NS post-randomization and were included in analyses; 42 (9%) participants with no post-randomization data were excluded. Six-month retention rates were 78% (n = 351). One-month BV recurrence (NS 7-10) rates were 3.6% (5/140), 6.8% (9/133) and 9.6% (13/135) in the MTZ-Clind, MTZ-Prob and MTZ-Placebo groups respectively, p = 0.13. Hazard ratios (HR) for BV recurrence at one-month, adjusted for adherence to vaginal therapy, were 0.43 (95%CI 0.15-1.22) and 0.75 (95% CI 0.32-1.76) in the MTZ-Clind and MTZ-Prob groups compared to MTZ-Plac respectively. Cumulative 6-month BV recurrence was 28.2%; (95%CI 24.0-32.7%) with no difference between groups, p = 0.82; HRs for 6-month BV recurrence for MTZ-Clind and MTZ-Prob compared to MTZ-Plac, adjusted for adherence to vaginal therapy were 1.09(95% CI = 0.70-1.70) and 1.03(95% CI = 0.65-1.63), respectively. No serious adverse events occurred. Combining

  20. C5A Protects Macaques from Vaginal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Chatterji, Udayan; Bobardt, Michael; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E; Li, Jian; Wang, Xiaolei; Gallay, Philippe A

    2015-11-09

    A safe and effective vaginal microbicide could decrease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in women. Here, we evaluated the safety and microbicidal efficacy of a short amphipathic peptide, C5A, in a rhesus macaque model. We found that a vaginal application of C5A protects 89% of the macaques from a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-162P3) challenge. We observed no signs of lesions or inflammation in animals vaginally treated with repeated C5A applications. With its noncellular cytotoxic activity and rare mechanism of action, C5A represents an attractive microbicidal candidate.

  1. [Efficacy of Lactobacillus Rhamnosus GR-1 and of Lactobacillus Reuteri RC-14 in the treatment and prevention of vaginoses and bacterial vaginitis relapses].

    PubMed

    Cianci, A; Giordano, R; Delia, A; Grasso, E; Amodeo, A; De Leo, V; Caccamo, F

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of the use of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and of Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 administrated orally in the treatment and prevention of vaginoses and bacterial vaginitis relapses. The study enrolled 50 women in good health, aged between 18 and 48 years, with assessed diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis and vaginitis. The women were randomized in two groups: group A comprised 25 patients with bacterial vaginitis and group B comprised 25 patients with vaginosis. Each patient was administered an antibiotic therapy and subsequently a therapy with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 (Dicoflor Elle, Dicofarm, Roma, Italy) with two tablets daily for 15 days. After one week from the end of the therapy all patients have been controlled by vaginal swab and microscopic analysis of vaginal secretion. At the end of the study 46 patients had a complete Lactobacilli recolonization, two patients had no colonization and two dropped out. The results showed that 92% of the enrolled patients benefited from the treatment. The results of the present study shows that Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14, taken orally, were helpful in vaginosis and bacterial vaginitis treatment and in relapse prevention, as they can re-establish the vaginal ecosystem remarkably.

  2. Longitudinal analysis reveals characteristically high proportions of bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria and temporal variability of vaginal microbiota in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina)

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, Lin; LEI, Ai-Hua; ZHENG, Hong-Yi; LYU, Long-Bao; ZHANG, Zhi-Gang; ZHENG, Yong-Tang

    2015-01-01

    The complex and dynamic vaginal microbial ecosystem is critical to both health and disease of the host. Studies focusing on how vaginal microbiota influences HIV-1 infection may face limitations in selecting proper animal models. Given that northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection, they may be an optimal animal model for elucidating the mechanisms by which vaginal microbiota contributes to resistance and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. However, little is known about the composition and temporal variability of vaginal microbiota of the northern pig-tailed macaque. Here, we present a comprehensive catalog of the composition and temporal dynamics of vaginal microbiota of two healthy northern pig-tailed macaques over 19 weeks using 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. We found remarkably high proportions of a diverse array of anaerobic bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis. Atopobium and Sneathia were dominant genera, and interestingly, we demonstrated the presence of Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota. Moreover, longitudinal analysis demonstrated that the temporal dynamics of the vaginal microbiota were considerably individualized. Finally, network analysis revealed that vaginal pH may influence the temporal dynamics of the vaginal microbiota, suggesting that inter-subject variability of vaginal bacterial communities could be mirrored in inter-subject variation in correlation profiles of species with each other and with vaginal pH over time. Our results suggest that the northern pig-tailed macaque could be an ideal animal model for prospective investigation of the mechanisms by which vaginal microbiota influence susceptibility and resistance to HIV-1 infection in the context of highly polymicrobial and Lactobacillus-dominated states. PMID:26452693

  3. Longitudinal analysis reveals characteristically high proportions of bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria and temporal variability of vaginal microbiota in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Lei, Ai-Hua; Zheng, Hong-Yi; Lyu, Long-Bao; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-09-18

    The complex and dynamic vaginal microbial ecosystem is critical to both health and disease of the host. Studies focusing on how vaginal microbiota influences HIV-1 infection may face limitations in selecting proper animal models. Given that northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection, they may be an optimal animal model for elucidating the mechanisms by which vaginal microbiota contributes to resistance and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. However, little is known about the composition and temporal variability of vaginal microbiota of the northern pig-tailed macaque. Here, we present a comprehensive catalog of the composition and temporal dynamics of vaginal microbiota of two healthy northern pig-tailed macaques over 19 weeks using 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. We found remarkably high proportions of a diverse array of anaerobic bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis. Atopobium and Sneathia were dominant genera, and interestingly, we demonstrated the presence of Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota. Moreover, longitudinal analysis demonstrated that the temporal dynamics of the vaginal microbiota were considerably individualized. Finally, network analysis revealed that vaginal pH may influence the temporal dynamics of the vaginal microbiota, suggesting that inter-subject variability of vaginal bacterial communities could be mirrored in inter-subject variation in correlation profiles of species with each other and with vaginal pH over time. Our results suggest that the northern pig-tailed macaque could be an ideal animal model for prospective investigation of the mechanisms by which vaginal microbiota influence susceptibility and resistance to HIV-1 infection in the context of highly polymicrobial and Lactobacillus-dominated states.

  4. Human papillomavirus type-distribution in vulvar and vaginal cancers and their associated precursors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer S; Backes, Danielle M; Hoots, Brooke E; Kurman, Robert J; Pimenta, Jeanne M

    2009-04-01

    Data on human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence in vulvar and vaginal cancers are limited. These data are important to predict the potential future effect of prophylactic HPV vaccines. Our aim was to conduct a systematic review of HPV type distribution in vulvar and vaginal invasive carcinomas, vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN), and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia. A MEDLINE search was conducted using the terms vulvar/vaginal cancer, intraepithelial neoplasia, and HPV/human papillomavirus through September 2007 with no specified start date or language restrictions. A total of 725 abstracts (564 vulvar, 161 vaginal) were reviewed, of which 67 studies (56 vulvar, 11 vaginal) met the inclusion criteria of using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or hybrid capture assays for HPV DNA detection and having more than one case with HPV data available. This review identified 2,790 vulvar (1,379 invasive, 1,340 VIN2/3, 71 VIN1) and 315 vaginal cases (83 invasive, 166 vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia 2/3, 66 vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia 1). Most cases were from North America and Europe (87.2%), with few from Asia (5.5%) and South America (7.3%). Human papillomavirus prevalence in vulvar cancer, VIN2/3, and VIN1 was 40.1%, 80.4%, and 77.5%, respectively. HPV prevalence in vaginal cancer, vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN)2/3, and VAIN1 was relatively higher at 65.5%, 92.6%, and 98.5%, respectively. HPV16 was the most common type in vulvar (29.3%) and vaginal (55.4%) cancers, VIN2/3 (71.2%) and VAIN2/3 (65.8%). Human papillomavirus prevalence was higher among vaginal than vulvar cases, and HPV16 accounted for most HPV-positive cases for both cancers. Although the potential effect of HPV vaccines on these gynecologic cancers may not be as high as for cervical cancer due to their more diverse causes, vaccinating young women against HPV16/18 may help to reduce the incidence of HPV-related cases.

  5. Associations between intravaginal practices and bacterial vaginosis in Kenyan female sex workers without symptoms of vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Wisal M; Lavreys, Ludo; Chohan, Vrasha; Richardson, Barbra A; Mandaliya, Kishorchandra; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah O; Kiarie, James; Jaoko, Walter; Holmes, King K; McClelland, R Scott

    2007-06-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is highly prevalent among African women and has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV-1. The goal of this study was to analyze the relationship among intravaginal practices, bathing, and BV. The authors conducted a cross-sectional study of HIV-1-seronegative Kenyan female sex workers without symptoms of vaginal infections. Of 237 women enrolled, 206 (87%) reported vaginal washing using either a finger or cloth. Increasing frequency of vaginal washing was associated with a higher likelihood of BV (chi(2) test for trend, P = 0.05). In multivariate analysis, vaginal lubrication with petroleum jelly (odds ratio [OR] = 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4-5.6), lubrication with saliva (OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.1-4.8), and bathing less than the median for the cohort (14 times/week; OR = 4.6, 95% CI = 1.2-17.5) were associated with a significantly higher likelihood of BV. Modification of intravaginal and general hygiene practices should be evaluated as potential strategies for reducing the risk of BV.

  6. Bacterial Vaginosis and the Natural History of Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    King, Caroline C.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Wiener, Jeffrey; Cu-Uvin, Susan; Klein, Robert S.; Rompalo, Anne M.; Shah, Keerti V.; Sobel, Jack D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate associations between common vaginal infections and human papillomavirus (HPV). Study Design. Data from up to 15 visits on 756 HIV-infected women and 380 high-risk HIV-uninfected women enrolled in the HIV Epidemiology Research Study (HERS) were evaluated for associations of bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis, and vaginal Candida colonization with prevalent HPV, incident HPV, and clearance of HPV in multivariate analysis. Results. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) was associated with increased odds for prevalent (aOR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.26) and incident (aOR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.47) HPV and with delayed clearance of infection (aHR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.72, 0.97). Whereas BV at the preceding or current visit was associated with incident HPV, in an alternate model for the outcome of incident BV, HPV at the current, but not preceding, visit was associated with incident BV. Conclusion. These findings underscore the importance of prevention and successful treatment of bacterial vaginosis. PMID:21869857

  7. The joint effect of vaginal Ureaplasma urealyticum and bacterial vaginosis on adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Ida; Thorsen, Poul; Hogan, Vijaya K; Schieve, Laura A; Jacobsson, Bo; Ferre, Cynthia D

    2006-01-01

    To examine associations of vaginal Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) and bacterial vaginosis (BV) with preterm delivery (PTD), small for gestational age (SGA), and low birth weight (LBW). A population-based, prospective cohort study of 2,927 pregnancies. After exclusion of multiples and antibiotic use sample size was 2,662. BV (Amsel's criteria) and UU (culture) were assessed in week 17. Gestational age was determined by last menstrual period, confirmed by ultrasound measurement in 97.5%. SGA infants were calculated from intrauterine fetal growth measurements. There was no increased risk for spontaneous PTD among women with BV only (crude odds ratio 1.0, 95% CI 0.4-2.7), among women with UU only (1.3, 0.8-2.0), nor among women with UU + BV (0.9, 0.4-2.3) compared to women without UU and BV. However, there was a threefold increased risk of a LBW birth in women with UU + BV (3.1, 1.8-5.4), a twofold risk of a LBW birth among women with UU only (1.9, 1.3-2.9), but no increased risk among women with BV only (0.8, 0.3-2.2). Similarly, women with UU + BV had over a twofold increased risk of an SGA birth (2.3, 1.3-4.0), women with UU only had a 70% increase (1.7, 1.1-2.5), whereas a nonsignificant increase was found in women with BV only (1.3, 0.6-2.9). Adjustment by established confounders (smoking, previous PTD, previous LBW, and Escherichia coli) did not affect risk estimates. This analysis suggests that UU is independently associated with fetal growth and LBW and that BV with UU may enhance the risk of these outcomes.

  8. Prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in Portuguese pregnant women and vaginal colonization by Gardnerella vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Daniela; Castro, Joana; Martinez-de-Oliveira, José; Nogueira-Silva, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Background We aimed to determine the prevalence of vaginal colonization by Gardnerella vaginalis and of bacterial vaginosis (BV) in Portuguese pregnant women, and to identify risk factors for BV and G. vaginalis colonization in pregnancy. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among pregnant women aged ≥ 18 years who were attending in two public hospitals of the Northwest region of Portugal. Epidemiological data was collected by anonymous questionnaire. BV was diagnosed by Nugent criteria and G. vaginalis presence was identified by polymerase chain reaction. Crude associations between the study variables and BV or G. vaginalis colonization were quantified by odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results The prevalences of BV and of G. vaginalis colonization among Portuguese pregnant women were 3.88% and 67.48%, respectively. Previous preterm delivery and colonization by G. vaginalis were factors with very high OR, but only statistically significant for a 90% CI. Conversely, higher rates of G. vaginalis colonization were found in women with basic educational level (OR = 2.77, 95% CI [1.33–5.78]), during the second trimester of pregnancy (OR = 6.12, 95% CI [1.80–20.85]) and with BV flora (OR = 8.73, 95% CI [0.50–153.60]). Discussion Despite the lower number of women with BV, prevalence ratios and association with risk factors were similar to recent European studies. However, the percentage of healthy women colonized by G. vaginalis was significantly higher than many previous studies, confirming that G. vaginalis colonization does not always lead to BV development. PMID:28875084

  9. Prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in Portuguese pregnant women and vaginal colonization by Gardnerella vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Daniela; Castro, Joana; Martinez-de-Oliveira, José; Nogueira-Silva, Cristina; Cerca, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of vaginal colonization by Gardnerella vaginalis and of bacterial vaginosis (BV) in Portuguese pregnant women, and to identify risk factors for BV and G. vaginalis colonization in pregnancy. A cross-sectional study was conducted among pregnant women aged ≥ 18 years who were attending in two public hospitals of the Northwest region of Portugal. Epidemiological data was collected by anonymous questionnaire. BV was diagnosed by Nugent criteria and G. vaginalis presence was identified by polymerase chain reaction. Crude associations between the study variables and BV or G. vaginalis colonization were quantified by odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The prevalences of BV and of G. vaginalis colonization among Portuguese pregnant women were 3.88% and 67.48%, respectively. Previous preterm delivery and colonization by G. vaginalis were factors with very high OR, but only statistically significant for a 90% CI. Conversely, higher rates of G. vaginalis colonization were found in women with basic educational level (OR = 2.77, 95% CI [1.33-5.78]), during the second trimester of pregnancy (OR = 6.12, 95% CI [1.80-20.85]) and with BV flora (OR = 8.73, 95% CI [0.50-153.60]). Despite the lower number of women with BV, prevalence ratios and association with risk factors were similar to recent European studies. However, the percentage of healthy women colonized by G. vaginalis was significantly higher than many previous studies, confirming that G. vaginalis colonization does not always lead to BV development.

  10. Hydrogen-peroxide producing lactobacilli are associated with lower levels of vaginal IL1β, independent of bacterial vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Caroline; Fredricks, David; Agnew, Kathy; Hitti, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background The presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-producing lactobacilli in the vagina is associated with decreased rates of preterm birth and HIV acquisition. We hypothesize that this is due to immunomodulatory effects of these species. Methods Concentrations of IL1β, IL6, IL8, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) and human beta defensin 2 (HBD2) were quantified from vaginal swabs from 4 groups of women: women with and without bacterial vaginosis (BV) by Nugent score, further stratified by detection of H2O2-producing lactobacilli by semi-quantitative culture. Ten quantitative PCR assays characterized presence and quantity of select Lactobacillus and BV-associated species in each group. Levels of immune markers and bacteria were compared between the four groups using ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann Whitney U or chi-square tests. Results Swabs from 110 women from four groups were included: 26 had a normal Nugent score (BV−), and no H2O2-producing lactobacilli detected(H2O2−), 47 were BV−, H2O2+, 27 BV+, H2O2− and 10 BV+, H2O2+. The groups were similar in age, marital status and reproductive history, but not ethnicity: the BV−, H2O2− group had more Caucasian participants(p = 0.02). In women with and without BV, IL1β was lower in the H2O2+ groups. HBD2 was lowest in BV+ H2O2− women and highest in BV−, H2O2−. SLPI was lower in women with BV, and did not differ by the presence of H2O2–producing lactobacilli. In regression analysis higher quantities of L. crispatus were associated with lower quantities of IL1β. Detection and quantity of BV-associated species by qPCR was significantly different between women with and without BV, but not between women with and without H2O2-producing lactobacilli within those groups. Conclusions The presence of H2O2-producing lactobacilli is associated with lower levels of some vaginal pro-inflammatory cytokines, even in women with BV. PMID:26222747

  11. Human papillomavirus infection and vaginal tape exposure after midurethral sling: a case report.

    PubMed

    Balzarro, M; Rubilotta, E; Artibani, W

    2013-01-01

    Midurethral tape placement is the gold standard procedure for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Among reported complications, tape erosion is uncommon. Several risk factors have been postulated as causes of vaginal erosion, but none have been demonstrated. Cases of vaginal erosion caused by tape infections have been described, but none has been associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. We report the first case of vaginal exposure in a woman who underwent a midurethral sling procedure for SUI after HPV colonization. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Lactobacillus species isolated from vaginal secretions of healthy and bacterial vaginosis-intermediate Mexican women: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus jensenii, L. iners, L. crispatus and L. gasseri are the most frequently occurring lactobacilli in the vagina. However, the native species vary widely according to the studied population. The present study was performed to genetically determine the identity of Lactobacillus strains present in the vaginal discharge of healthy and bacterial vaginosis (BV) intermediate Mexican women. Methods In a prospective study, 31 strains preliminarily identified as Lactobacillus species were isolated from 21 samples collected from 105 non-pregnant Mexican women. The samples were classified into groups according to the Nugent score criteria proposed for detection of BV: normal (N), intermediate (I) and bacterial vaginosis (BV). We examined the isolates using culture-based methods as well as molecular analysis of the V1–V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequence analysis was performed to reject clones. Results Clinical isolates (25/31) were classified into four groups based on sequencing and analysis of the 16S rRNA gene: L. acidophilus (14/25), L. reuteri (6/25), L. casei (4/25) and L. buchneri (1/25). The remaining six isolates were presumptively identified as Enterococcus species. Within the L. acidophilus group, L. gasseri was the most frequently isolated species, followed by L. jensenii and L. crispatus. L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus and L. brevis were also isolated, and were placed in the L. reuteri, L. casei and L. buchneri groups, respectively. ERIC profile analysis showed intraspecific variability amongst the L. gasseri and L. fermentum species. Conclusions These findings agree with previous studies showing that L. crispatus, L. gasseri and L. jensenii are consistently present in the healthy vaginal ecosystem. Additional species or phylotypes were detected in the vaginal microbiota of the non-pregnant Mexican (Hispanic-mestizo) population, and thus, these results further our understanding of

  13. Sensitive Quantitative Analysis of the Meconium Bacterial Microbiota in Healthy Term Infants Born Vaginally or by Cesarean Section.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Ravinder; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Takuya; Kawashima, Kazunari; Nagata, Satoru; Nomoto, Koji; Yamashiro, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    For decades, babies were thought to be born germ-free, but recent evidences suggest that they are already exposed to various bacteria in utero. However, the data on population levels of such pioneer gut bacteria, particularly in context to birth mode, is sparse. We herein aimed to quantify such bacteria from the meconium of 151 healthy term Japanese infants born vaginally or by C-section. Neonatal first meconium was obtained within 24-48 h of delivery; RNA was extracted and subjected to reverse-transcription-quantitative PCR using specific primers for Clostridium coccoides group, C. leptum subgroup, Bacteroides fragilis group, Atopobium cluster, Prevotella, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Enterococcus, Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, C. perfringens, and C. difficile. We detected several bacterial groups in both vaginally- and cesarean-born infants. B. fragilis group, Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus were detected in more than 50% of infants, with counts ranging from 10(5) to 10(8) cells/g sample. About 30-35% samples harbored Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus (10(4)-10(5) cells/g); whereas C. coccoides group, C. leptum subgroup and C. perfringens were detected in 10-20% infants (10(3)-10(5) cells/g). Compared to vaginally-born babies, cesarean-born babies were significantly less often colonized with Lactobacillus genus (6% vs. 37%; P = 0.01) and Lactobacillus gasseri subgroup (6% vs. 31%; P = 0.04). Overall, seven Lactobacillus subgroups/species, i.e., L. gasseri subgroup, L. ruminis subgroup, L. casei subgroup, L. reuteri subgroup, L. sakei subgroup, L. plantarum subgroup, and L. brevis were detected in the samples from vaginally-born group, whereas only two members, i.e., L. gasseri subgroup and L. brevis were detected in the cesarean group. These data corroborate that several bacterial clades may already be present before birth in term infants' gut. Further, lower detection rate of lactobacilli

  14. Sensitive Quantitative Analysis of the Meconium Bacterial Microbiota in Healthy Term Infants Born Vaginally or by Cesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Ravinder; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Takuya; Kawashima, Kazunari; Nagata, Satoru; Nomoto, Koji; Yamashiro, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    For decades, babies were thought to be born germ-free, but recent evidences suggest that they are already exposed to various bacteria in utero. However, the data on population levels of such pioneer gut bacteria, particularly in context to birth mode, is sparse. We herein aimed to quantify such bacteria from the meconium of 151 healthy term Japanese infants born vaginally or by C-section. Neonatal first meconium was obtained within 24–48 h of delivery; RNA was extracted and subjected to reverse-transcription-quantitative PCR using specific primers for Clostridium coccoides group, C. leptum subgroup, Bacteroides fragilis group, Atopobium cluster, Prevotella, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Enterococcus, Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, C. perfringens, and C. difficile. We detected several bacterial groups in both vaginally- and cesarean-born infants. B. fragilis group, Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus were detected in more than 50% of infants, with counts ranging from 105 to 108 cells/g sample. About 30–35% samples harbored Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus (104–105 cells/g); whereas C. coccoides group, C. leptum subgroup and C. perfringens were detected in 10–20% infants (103–105 cells/g). Compared to vaginally-born babies, cesarean-born babies were significantly less often colonized with Lactobacillus genus (6% vs. 37%; P = 0.01) and Lactobacillus gasseri subgroup (6% vs. 31%; P = 0.04). Overall, seven Lactobacillus subgroups/species, i.e., L. gasseri subgroup, L. ruminis subgroup, L. casei subgroup, L. reuteri subgroup, L. sakei subgroup, L. plantarum subgroup, and L. brevis were detected in the samples from vaginally-born group, whereas only two members, i.e., L. gasseri subgroup and L. brevis were detected in the cesarean group. These data corroborate that several bacterial clades may already be present before birth in term infants’ gut. Further, lower detection rate of lactobacilli

  15. Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human ... test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its ...

  16. Vaginal toxic shock reaction triggering desquamative inflammatory vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Nigel; Edlind, Thomas D; Schlievert, Patrick M; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to report 2 cases of desquamative inflammatory vaginitis associated with toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1)-producing Staphylococcus aureus strains. Case report of 2 patients, 1 with an acute and 1 with a chronic presentation, diagnosed with desquamative inflammatory vaginitis on the basis of clinical findings and wet mount microscopy. Pretreatment and posttreatment vaginal bacterial and yeast cultures were obtained. Pretreatment vaginal bacterial cultures from both patients grew TSST-1-producing S. aureus. Subsequent vaginal bacterial culture results after oral antibiotic therapy were negative. Desquamative inflammatory vaginitis may be triggered through TSST-1-mediated vaginal toxic shock reaction.

  17. Rectal and vaginal immunization of mice with human papillomavirus L1 virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Fraillery, Dominique; Zosso, Nathalie; Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise

    2009-04-14

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines based on L1 virus-like particle (VLP) can prevent genital HPV infection and associated lesions after three intramuscular injections. Needle-free administration might facilitate vaccine implementation, especially in developing countries. Here we have investigated rectal and vaginal administration of HPV16 L1 VLPs in mice and their ability to induce anti-VLP and HPV16-neutralizing antibodies in serum and in genital, rectal and oral secretions. Rectal and vaginal immunizations were not effective in the absence of adjuvant. Cholera toxin was able to enhance systemic and mucosal anti-VLPs responses after rectal immunization, but not after vaginal immunization. Rectal immunization with Resiquimod and to a lesser extent Imiquimod, but not monophosphoryl lipid A, induced anti-HPV16 VLP antibodies in serum and secretions. Vaginal immunization was immunogenic only if administered in mice treated with nonoxynol-9, a disrupter of the cervico-vaginal epithelium. Our findings show that rectal and vaginal administration of VLPs can induce significant HPV16-neutralizing antibody levels in secretions, despite the fact that low titers are induced in serum. Imidazoquinolines, largely used to treat genital and anal warts, and nonoxonol-9, used as genital microbicide/spermicide were identified as adjuvants that could be safely used by the rectal or vaginal route, respectively.

  18. Vaginal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Mendling, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge about the normal and abnormal vaginal microbiome has changed over the last years. Culturing techniques are not suitable any more for determination of a normal or abnormal vaginal microbiota. Non culture-based modern technologies revealed a complex and dynamic system mainly dominated by lactobacilli.The normal and the abnormal vaginal microbiota are complex ecosystems of more than 200 bacterial species influenced by genes, ethnic background and environmental and behavioral factors. Several species of lactobacilli per individuum dominate the healthy vagina. They support a defense system together with antibacterial substances, cytokines, defensins and others against dysbiosis, infections and care for an normal pregnancy without preterm birth.The numbers of Lactobacillus (L.) iners increase in the case of dysbiosis.Bacterial vaginosis (BV) - associated bacteria (BVAB), Atopobium vaginae and Clostridiales and one or two of four Gardnerella vaginalis - strains develop in different mixtures and numbers polymicrobial biofilms on the vaginal epithelium, which are not dissolved by antibiotic therapies according to guidelines and, thus, provoke recurrences.Aerobic vaginitis seems to be an immunological disorder of the vagina with influence on the microbiota, which is here dominated by aerobic bacteria (Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli). Their role in AV is unknown.Vaginal or oral application of lactobacilli is obviously able to improve therapeutic results of BV and dysbiosis.

  19. A Comparison of Colorimetric Assessment of Vaginal pH with Nugent Score for the Detection of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Bellad, Mrutyunjaya B.; Charantimath, Umesh S.; Kavi, Avinash; Nagmoti, Jyoti M.; Nagmoti, Mahantesh B.; Mallapur, Ashalata A.; Katageri, Geetanjali M.; Ramadurg, Umesh Y.; Bannale, Sheshidhar G.; Revankar, Amit P.; Ganachari, M. S.; Derman, Richard J.; Goudar, Shivaprasad S.

    2017-01-01

    Background. A Nugent score > 7 has been defined as the gold standard for the diagnosis for bacterial vaginosis (BV), though it is resource intensive and impractical as point of care testing. We sought to determine if colorimetric assessment of vaginal pH can accurately predict the occurrence of BV. Methods. We performed a planned subanalysis of 1,216 pregnant women between 13 0/7 and 19 6/7 weeks who underwent vaginal examination as part of a randomized controlled trial. Using a standardized technique, specimens were obtained for colorimetric assessment and two separate slides for Gram staining. These slides were subsequently evaluated by two independent blinded microbiologists for Nugent scoring. Results. Interrater reliability of the interpretation of the Nugent score was excellent (intraclass correlation-individual 0.93 (95 CI 0.92 to 0.94) and average 0.96 (95% CI 0.95 to 0.97)). The sensitivity of an elevated pH > 5 for a Nugent score > 7 was 21.9% while the specificity was 84.5%. The positive predictive value in our population was 33.7% with a negative predictive value of 75.0%. Conclusion. Though the Nugent score is internally accurate, the prediction of BV using vaginal pH alone has poor sensitivity and specificity. PMID:28293099

  20. Complexity of vaginal microflora as analyzed by PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in a patient with recurrent bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Devillard, Estelle; Burton, Jeremy P; Reid, Gregor

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gardnerella vaginalis has long been the most common pathogen associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV). We aimed to test our hypothesis that symptoms and signs of BV do not necessarily indicate colonization by this organism, and often will not respond to standard metronidazole or clindamycin treatment. METHODS: Using a relatively new molecular tool, PCR denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), the vaginal microflora of a woman with recalcitrant signs and symptoms of BV was investigated over a 6-week timeframe. RESULTS: The vagina was colonized by pathogenic enterobacteriaceae, staphylococci and Candida albicans. The detection of the yeast by PCR-DGGE is particularly novel and enhances the ability of this tool to examine the true nature of the vaginal microflora. The patient had not responded to antifungal treatment, antibiotic therapy targeted at anaerobic Gram-negative pathogens such as Gardnerella, nor daily oral probiotic intake of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. The failure to find the GG strain in the vagina indicated it did not reach the site, and the low counts of lactobacilli demonstrated that therapy with this probiotic did not appear to influence the vaginal flora. CONCLUSIONS: BV is not well understood in terms of its causative organisms, and further studies appear warranted using non-culture, molecular methods. Only when the identities of infecting organisms are confirmed can effective therapy be devized. Such therapy may include the use of probiotic lactobacilli, but only using strains which confer a benefit on the vagina of pre- and postmenopausal women. PMID:16040324

  1. Abnormal Vaginal Pap Test After Hysterectomy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Women.

    PubMed

    Smeltzer, Stephanie; Yu, Xiaoying; Schmeler, Kathleen; Levison, Judy

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of abnormal vaginal cytology and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) and vaginal cancer in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women with no history of abnormal cytologic screening who had a hysterectomy for conditions other than cervical dysplasia and cancer; and to explore the risk factors associated with VAIN and vaginal cancer. A retrospective cohort study was performed identifying 238 women between January 2000 to January 2015 with a history of HIV, previous hysterectomy, and no previous abnormal Pap tests. Medical records from patients with both HIV and history of hysterectomy were reviewed from Thomas Street Health Center and Northwest Community Health Center. Among 238 women, 164(69%) had normal Pap test results, 12(5%) had results showing atypical cells of undermined significance and human papillomavirus-positive, 55(23.1%) had results showing low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, and 7(2.9%) had results showing high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. No demographic risk factor was associated with abnormal Pap test after hysterectomy. Median follow-up time for the Pap test was 16 years. Of those who underwent vaginal biopsies for an abnormal Pap test, 15(28%) were normal, 23(43%) were VAIN1, 9(16%) were VAIN2, and 7(13%) were VAIN3. No patients had invasive vaginal cancer. Over 30% of HIV-infected women who had no pre-hysterectomy history of an abnormal Pap test had abnormal vaginal Pap tests. Among those who had vaginal biopsies, 29% had VAIN2 or VAIN3, suggesting that Pap tests post-hysterectomy in the HIV population may be indicated.

  2. In vivo assessment of human vaginal oxygen and carbon dioxide levels during and post menses.

    PubMed

    Hill, Donna R; Brunner, Marianne E; Schmitz, Deborah C; Davis, Catherine C; Flood, Janine A; Schlievert, Patrick M; Wang-Weigand, Sherry Z; Osborn, Thomas W

    2005-10-01

    Previous in vitro and in vivo animal studies showed that O(2) and CO(2) concentrations can affect virulence of pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. The objective of this work was to measure O(2) and CO(2) levels in the vaginal environment during tampon wear using newly available sensor technology. Measurements by two vaginal sensors showed a decrease in vaginal O(2) levels after tampon insertion. These decreases were independent of the type of tampons used and the time of measurement (mid-cycle or during menstruation). These results are not in agreement with a previous study that concluded that oxygenation of the vaginal environment during tampon use occurred via delivery of a bolus of O(2) during the insertion process. Our measurements of gas levels in menses showed the presence of both O(2) and CO(2) in menses. The tampons inserted into the vagina contained O(2) and CO(2) levels consistent with atmospheric conditions. Over time during tampon use, levels of O(2) in the tampon decreased and levels of CO(2) increased. Tampon absorbent capacity, menses loading, and wear time influenced the kinetics of these changes. Colonization with S. aureus had no effect on the gas profiles during menstruation. Taken collectively, these findings have important implications on the current understanding of gaseous changes in the vaginal environment during menstruation and the potential role(s) they may play in affecting bacterial virulence factor production.

  3. Increased COX-2 expression in human vaginal epithelial cells exposed to nonoxynol-9, a vaginal contraceptive microbicide that failed to protect women from HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Zalenskaya, Irina A; Cerocchi, Orlando G; Joseph, Theresa; Donaghay, Melissa A; Schriver, Suzanne D; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2011-06-01

    Despite displaying virucidal activity in vitro, nonoxynol-9 (N-9), a vaginal contraceptive microbicide candidate, failed to reduce the rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in clinical trials. With frequent use, it even increased the risk of HIV acquisition. Such outcome was postulated to be because of N-9-induced mucosal inflammation, which resulted in recruitment of HIV-target immune cells to the sites of virus entry. Understanding the mechanism underlying the response of the vaginal epithelium to N-9 is critical to properly evaluate the safety of prospective vaginal microbicides and contraceptives. Using DNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR techniques, we observed that N-9 initiated a strong transcriptional upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in immortalized human vaginal epithelial cells (VK2/E6E7 cell line). Increased COX-2 protein expression evaluated by immunoblotting was dose- and time-dependent. The level of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ) increased subsequently to COX-2 elevation. This upregulation was in part because of NF-kB activation. Expression of COX-2, a potent inflammation-related enzyme, as well as increased secretion of PGE(2) , an important local mediator of mucosal immunoinflammatory responses, by human vaginal epithelial cells exposed to vaginal microbicide and contraceptive candidates may be used as a biomarker of undesirable compound properties. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Immunoreactive relaxin in human cervico-vaginal secretion.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, U; Seeger, H; Voelter, W; Lippert, T H

    1988-01-01

    Relaxin was measured in cervico-vaginal secretion of non-pregnant women of reproductive age using the heterologous radioimmuno-assay for porcine relaxin. It was detected in about three-quarters of the samples collected. The mean value of the 529 samplers tested was 599 pg/ml. There was a slight trend to higher relaxin values during the second week of the menstrual cycle.

  5. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Increases Aquaporin 3 Expression in Human Vaginal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Sun-Ouck; Ahn, Kyuyoun; Park, Kwangsung

    2016-12-01

    Water channel aquaporin 3 (AQP3) is an aquaglyceroporin that transports small neutral solutes and water. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a member of the retinoid drug class, acts as a regulator in several biological processes. To investigate the effect of ATRA on the expression of AQP3 in human vaginal epithelial cells. Human vaginal mucosal epithelial cells (CRL2616) were treated with ATRA 0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 μmol/L for 24 hours to examine the dose-dependent effects of ATRA and with ATRA 1 μmol/L for 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours. The expression of AQP3 and retinoic acid receptor (RAR) was determined by western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. AQP3 was detected in the cell membrane of human vaginal epithelial cells. ATRA increased the protein expression and mRNA levels of AQP3 in a dose-dependent manner (P < .05). ATRA also increased the protein expression of RARα (P < .05). Treatment of CRL2616 cells with an RAR antagonist (Ro 41-5253) significantly decreased AQP3 protein expression (P < .05). ATRA mediated by RARα increased AQP3 gene and protein expression in human vaginal mucosal epithelial cells. These results imply that AQP3 regulated by ATRA could play an important role in the mechanism of vaginal lubrication. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Longitudinal analysis of vaginal microbiome dynamics in women with recurrent bacterial vaginosis: recognition of the conversion process.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Janet A; John, Susan; Sobel, Jack D; Akins, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) affects ∼ 30% of women of reproductive age, has a high rate of recurrence, and is associated with miscarriage, preterm birth, and increased risk of acquiring other sexually transmitted infections, including HIV-1. Little is known of the daily changes in the vaginal bacterial composition as it progresses from treatment to recurrence, or whether any of these might be useful in its prediction or an understanding of its causes. We used phylogenetic branch-inclusive quantitative PCR (PB-qPCR) and Lactobacillus blocked/unblocked qPCR (Lb-qPCR) to characterize longitudinal changes in the vaginal microbiota in sequential vaginal self-swabs from five women with recurrent BV, from diagnosis through remission to recurrence. Both patients with acute BV samples dominated by G. vaginalis recurred during the study with similar profiles, whereas the three patients with acute BV samples dominated by other anaerobes did not recur or recurred to an intermediate Nugent score. L. iners dominated remission phases, with intermittent days of abnormal microbial profiles typically associated with menses. The exception was a newly discovered phenomenon, a sustained period of abnormal profiles, termed conversion, which preceded symptomatic acute BV. Species known to have antagonistic activity towards Lactobacillus were detected in pre-conversion samples, possibly contributing to the decline in Lactobacillus. Lb-qPCR scores define two categories of response in the initial post-treatment visit samples; scores <5 may correspond with poor response to treatment or rapid recurrence, whereas scores >8 may predict delayed or no recurrence. Amsel criteria or Nugent scores did not have this potential predictive capability. Larger studies are warranted to evaluate the prognostic potential of detecting conversion and poor Lb-qPCR scores at the post-treatment visit of recurrent BV patients.

  7. Longitudinal Analysis of Vaginal Microbiome Dynamics in Women with Recurrent Bacterial Vaginosis: Recognition of the Conversion Process

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Janet A.; John, Susan; Sobel, Jack D.; Akins, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) affects ∼30% of women of reproductive age, has a high rate of recurrence, and is associated with miscarriage, preterm birth, and increased risk of acquiring other sexually transmitted infections, including HIV-1. Little is known of the daily changes in the vaginal bacterial composition as it progresses from treatment to recurrence, or whether any of these might be useful in its prediction or an understanding of its causes. We used phylogenetic branch-inclusive quantitative PCR (PB-qPCR) and Lactobacillus blocked/unblocked qPCR (Lb-qPCR) to characterize longitudinal changes in the vaginal microbiota in sequential vaginal self-swabs from five women with recurrent BV, from diagnosis through remission to recurrence. Both patients with acute BV samples dominated by G. vaginalis recurred during the study with similar profiles, whereas the three patients with acute BV samples dominated by other anaerobes did not recur or recurred to an intermediate Nugent score. L. iners dominated remission phases, with intermittent days of abnormal microbial profiles typically associated with menses. The exception was a newly discovered phenomenon, a sustained period of abnormal profiles, termed conversion, which preceded symptomatic acute BV. Species known to have antagonistic activity towards Lactobacillus were detected in pre-conversion samples, possibly contributing to the decline in Lactobacillus. Lb-qPCR scores define two categories of response in the initial post-treatment visit samples; scores <5 may correspond with poor response to treatment or rapid recurrence, whereas scores >8 may predict delayed or no recurrence. Amsel criteria or Nugent scores did not have this potential predictive capability. Larger studies are warranted to evaluate the prognostic potential of detecting conversion and poor Lb-qPCR scores at the post-treatment visit of recurrent BV patients. PMID:24376552

  8. Diagnosis of vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Egan, M E; Lipsky, M S

    2000-09-01

    Vaginitis is the most common gynecologic diagnosis in the primary care setting. In approximately 90 percent of affected women, this condition occurs secondary to bacterial vaginosis, vulvovaginal candidiasis or trichomoniasis. Vaginitis develops when the vaginal flora has been altered by introduction of a pathogen or by changes in the vaginal environment that allow pathogens to proliferate. The evaluation of vaginitis requires a directed history and physical examination, with focus on the site of involvement and the characteristics of the vaginal discharge. The laboratory evaluation includes microscopic examination of a saline wet-mount preparation and a potassium hydroxide preparation, a litmus test for the pH of vaginal secretions and a "whiff" test. Metronidazole is the primary treatment for bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis. Topical antifungal agents are the first-line treatments for candidal vaginitis.

  9. A Chinese rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) model for vaginal Lactobacillus colonization and live microbicide development

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rosa R.; Cheng, Andrew T.; Lagenaur, Laurel A.; Huang, Wenjun; Weiss, Deborah E.; Treece, Jim; Sanders-Beer, Brigitte E.; Hamer, Dean H.; Lee, Peter P.; Xu, Qiang; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to establish a nonhuman primate model of vaginal Lactobacillus colonization suitable for evaluating live microbial microbicide candidates. Methods Vaginal and rectal microflora in Chinese rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were analyzed, with cultivable bacteria identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Live lactobacilli were intravaginally administered to evaluate bacterial colonization. Results Chinese rhesus macaques harbored abundant vaginal Lactobacillus, with Lactobacillus johnsonii as the predominant species. Like humans, most examined macaques harbored only one vaginal Lactobacillus species. Vaginal and rectal Lactobacillus isolates from the same animal exhibited different genetic and biochemical profiles. Vaginal Lactobacillus was cleared by a vaginal suppository of azithromycin, and endogenous L. johnsonii was subsequently restored by intravaginal inoculation. Importantly, prolonged colonization of a human vaginal Lactobacillus jensenii was established in these animals. Conclusions The Chinese rhesus macaque harbors vaginal Lactobacillus and is a potentially useful model to support the pre-clinical evaluation of Lactobacillus-based topical microbicides. PMID:19367737

  10. Characterization of the adherence properties of human Lactobacilli strains to be used as vaginal probiotics.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rebeca; Sánchez, Borja; Suárez, Juan Evaristo; Urdaci, María C

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, the adhesion of 43 human lactobacilli isolates to mucin has been studied. The most adherent strains were selected, and their capacities to adhere to three epithelial cell lines were studied. All intestinal strains and one vaginal isolate adhered to HT-29 cells. The latter was the most adherent to Caco-2 cells, although two of the intestinal isolates were also highly adherent. Moreover, five of the eight strains strongly adhered to HeLa cells. The binding of an Actinomyces neuii clinical isolate to HeLa cells was enhanced by two of the lactobacilli and by their secreted proteins, while those of another two strains almost abolished it. None of the strains were able to interfere with the adhesion of Candida albicans to HeLa cells. The components of the extracellular proteome of all strains were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS. Among them, a collagen-binding A precursor and aggregation-promoting factor-like proteins are suggested to participate on adhesion to Caco-2 and HeLa cells, respectively. In this way, several proteins with LysM domains might explain the ability of some bacterial supernatants to block A. neuii adhesion to HeLa cell cultures. Finally, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) could explain the good adhesion of some strains to mucin.

  11. Cloning of 16S rRNA genes amplified from normal and disturbed vaginal microflora suggests a strong association between Atopobium vaginae, Gardnerella vaginalis and bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Verhelst, Rita; Verstraelen, Hans; Claeys, Geert; Verschraegen, Gerda; Delanghe, Joris; Van Simaey, Leen; De Ganck, Catharine; Temmerman, Marleen; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2004-04-21

    The pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis remains largely elusive, although some microorganisms, including Gardnerella vaginalis, are suspected of playing a role in the etiology of this disorder. Recently culture-independent analysis of microbial ecosystems has proven its efficacy in characterizing the diversity of bacterial populations. Here, we report on the results obtained by combining culture and PCR-based methods to characterize the normal and disturbed vaginal microflora. A total of 150 vaginal swab samples from healthy women (115 pregnant and 35 non-pregnant) were categorized on the basis of Gram stain of direct smear as grade I (n = 112), grade II (n = 26), grade III (n = 9) or grade IV (n = 3). The composition of the vaginal microbial community of eight of these vaginal swabs (three grade I, two grade II and three grade III), all from non-pregnant women, were studied by culture and by cloning of the 16S rRNA genes obtained after direct amplification. Forty-six cultured isolates were identified by tDNA-PCR, 854 cloned 16S rRNA gene fragments were analysed of which 156 by sequencing, yielding a total of 38 species, including 9 presumptively novel species with at least five species that have not been isolated previously from vaginal samples. Interestingly, cloning revealed that Atopobium vaginae was abundant in four out of the five non-grade I specimens. Finally, species specific PCR for A. vaginae and Gardnerella vaginalis pointed to a statistically significant co-occurrence of both species in the bacterial vaginosis samples. Although historically the literature regarding bacterial vaginosis has largely focused on G. vaginalis in particular, several findings of this study--like the abundance of A. vaginae in disturbed vaginal microflora and the presence of several novel species--indicate that much is to be learned about the composition of the vaginal microflora and its relation to the etiology of BV.

  12. Cloning of 16S rRNA genes amplified from normal and disturbed vaginal microflora suggests a strong association between Atopobium vaginae, Gardnerella vaginalis and bacterial vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Verhelst, Rita; Verstraelen, Hans; Claeys, Geert; Verschraegen, Gerda; Delanghe, Joris; Van Simaey, Leen; De Ganck, Catharine; Temmerman, Marleen; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2004-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis remains largely elusive, although some microorganisms, including Gardnerella vaginalis, are suspected of playing a role in the etiology of this disorder. Recently culture-independent analysis of microbial ecosystems has proven its efficacy in characterizing the diversity of bacterial populations. Here, we report on the results obtained by combining culture and PCR-based methods to characterize the normal and disturbed vaginal microflora. Results A total of 150 vaginal swab samples from healthy women (115 pregnant and 35 non-pregnant) were categorized on the basis of Gram stain of direct smear as grade I (n = 112), grade II (n = 26), grade III (n = 9) or grade IV (n = 3). The composition of the vaginal microbial community of eight of these vaginal swabs (three grade I, two grade II and three grade III), all from non-pregnant women, were studied by culture and by cloning of the 16S rRNA genes obtained after direct amplification. Forty-six cultured isolates were identified by tDNA-PCR, 854 cloned 16S rRNA gene fragments were analysed of which 156 by sequencing, yielding a total of 38 species, including 9 presumptively novel species with at least five species that have not been isolated previously from vaginal samples. Interestingly, cloning revealed that Atopobium vaginae was abundant in four out of the five non-grade I specimens. Finally, species specific PCR for A. vaginae and Gardnerella vaginalis pointed to a statistically significant co-occurrence of both species in the bacterial vaginosis samples. Conclusions Although historically the literature regarding bacterial vaginosis has largely focused on G. vaginalis in particular, several findings of this study – like the abundance of A. vaginae in disturbed vaginal microflora and the presence of several novel species – indicate that much is to be learned about the composition of the vaginal microflora and its relation to the etiology of BV. PMID:15102329

  13. Vaginal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer; Cancer - vagina; Tumor - vaginal ... Most vaginal cancers occur when another cancer, such as cervical or endometrial cancer , spreads. This is called secondary vaginal cancer. Cancer ...

  14. Common causes of vaginal infections and antibiotic susceptibility of aerobic bacterial isolates in women of reproductive age attending at Felegehiwot Referral Hospital, Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mulu, Wondemagegn; Yimer, Mulat; Zenebe, Yohannes; Abera, Bayeh

    2015-05-13

    Bacterial vaginosis, candidal, trichomonal and Gonococcal vaginal infections are a major health problems associated with gynecologic complications and increase in replication, shedding and transmission of HIV and other STIs in women of reproductive age. The study aimed at determining the prevalence of common vaginal infections and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of aerobic bacterial isolates in women of reproductive age, attending Felegehiwot referral Hospital. A hospital based cross sectional study was conducted from May to November, 2013. Simple random sampling technique was used. Demographic variables were collected using a structured questionnaire. Clinical data were collected by physicians. Two vaginal swab specimens were collected from each participant. Wet mount and Gram staining were carried out to identify motile T.vaginalis, budding yeast and clue cells. All vaginal specimens were cultured for aerobic bacterial isolates using standard microbiology methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed using disc diffusion technique as per the standard by Kirby-Bauer method. The results were analyzed using descriptive, chi-square and fisher's exact test as appropriate. A total of 409 women in reproductive age (15 - 49 years) participated in the study. The median age of the women was 28 years. Overall, 63 (15.4 %) of women had vaginal infections. The proportion of vaginal infection was higher in non-pregnant (17.3 %) than pregnant women (13.3 %) (P = 0.002). The most common identified vaginal infections were candidiasis (8.3 %) and bacterial vaginosis (2.8 %) followed by trichomoniasis (2.1 %). The isolation rate of N. gonorrhoeae and group B Streptococcus colonization was 4 (1 %) and 6 (1.2 %), respectively. Bacterial vaginosis was higher in non-pregnant (5.6 %) than pregnant women (0.5 %) (P = 0.002). Religion, age, living in rural area and having lower abdominal pain were significantly associated with bacterial vaginosis and

  15. Plant innate immunity against human bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Melotto, Maeli; Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana

    2014-01-01

    Certain human bacterial pathogens such as the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are not proven to be plant pathogens yet. Nonetheless, under certain conditions they can survive on, penetrate into, and colonize internal plant tissues causing serious food borne disease outbreaks. In this review, we highlight current understanding on the molecular mechanisms of plant responses against human bacterial pathogens and discuss salient common and contrasting themes of plant interactions with phytopathogens or human pathogens. PMID:25157245

  16. Cervical and Vaginal Flora Specimens Are Highly Concordant with Respect to Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Organisms and Commensal Lactobacillus Species in Women of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Smith, William L.; Hedges, Spencer R.; Mordechai, Eli; Adelson, Martin E.; Trama, Jason P.; Gygax, Scott E.; Kaunitz, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Matched vaginal and cervical specimens from 96 subjects were analyzed by quantitative PCR for the presence and concentration of bacterial vaginosis-associated microbes and commensal Lactobacillus spp. Detection of these microbes was 92% concordant, indicating that microbial floras at these body sites are generally similar. PMID:24899020

  17. Recent Biomarker-Confirmed Unprotected Vaginal Sex, But Not Self-reported Unprotected Sex, Is Associated With Recurrent Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Norris Turner, Abigail; Carr Reese, Patricia; Snead, Margaret Christine; Fields, Karen; Ervin, Melissa; Kourtis, Athena P; Klebanoff, Mark A; Gallo, Maria F

    2016-03-01

    Self-reported unprotected vaginal sex seems to increase risk of bacterial vaginosis (BV). However, the validity of self-reports is questionable, given their inconsistency with more objective measures of recent semen exposure such as detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). We examined whether recent unprotected sex, as measured both by PSA detection on vaginal swabs and by self-report, was associated with increased BV recurrence. We analyzed randomized trial data from nonpregnant, BV-positive adult women recruited from a sexually transmitted disease clinic. Participants received BV therapy at enrollment and were scheduled to return after 4, 12, and 24 weeks. Bacterial vaginosis (by Nugent score) and PSA were measured at each visit. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine the association between PSA positivity and recurrent BV. We also evaluated associations between self-reported unprotected sex (ever/never since the last visit and in the last 48 hours, analyzed separately) and recurrent BV. Prostate-specific antigen and BV results were available for 96 women who contributed 226 follow-up visits. Prostate-specific antigen positivity was associated with increased BV recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 2.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-4.21). In contrast, we observed no significant increase in BV recurrence among women self-reporting unprotected sex since the last visit (aHR, 1.63; 95% CI, 0.77-3.43) or in the last 48 hours (aHR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.70-2.36). Estimates from earlier studies linking self-reported unprotected sex and BV may be biased by misclassification. Biomarkers can improve measurement of unprotected sex, a critical exposure variable in sexual health research.

  18. Vaginal dryness

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginitis - atrophic; Vaginitis due to reduced estrogen; Atrophic vaginitis; Menopause vaginal dryness ... Atrophic vaginitis is caused by a decrease in estrogen. Estrogen keeps the tissues of the vagina lubricated and healthy. ...

  19. Vaginal Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal atrophy Overview Vaginal atrophy (atrophic vaginitis) is thinning, drying and inflammation of the vaginal walls due to your body having less estrogen. Vaginal atrophy occurs most often after ...

  20. Identification of vaginal bacteria diversity and it's association with clinically diagnosed bacterial vaginosis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and correspondence analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qing; Cheng, Lijuan; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Shangwen; Liu, Fang; Li, Hao; Yuan, Jing; Liu, Zhendong; Diao, Yutao

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common complex associated with numerous adverse health outcomes, affecting women of different ages throughout the world. The etiology of BV remains poorly understood due to the difficulty of establishing a molecular genetic criterion to recognize the vaginal microbiota of BV-positive women from that of the normal women. We used techniques of broad-range PCR-DGGE and gel imaging analysis system cooperated with 16S rRNA gene sequencing and statistical analysis to investigate the community structure of the healthy and BV-affected vaginal microbial ecosystems. The community of vaginal bacteria detected in subjects with BV was far more luxuriant and diverse than in subjects without BV. The mean number of microbial species in 128 BV-positive women was nearly two times greater than in 68 subjects without BV(4.05±1.96 versus 2.59±1.14). Our sequencing efforts yielded many novel phylotypes (198 of our sequences represented 59 species), including several novel BV-associated bacteria (BVAB) and many belonging to opportunistic infections, which remain inexplicable for their roles in determining the health condition of vaginal microflora. This study identifies Algoriphagus aquatilis, Atopobium vaginae, Burkholderia fungorum, Megasphaera genomosp species as indicators to BV and subjects with BV harbor particularly taxon-rich and diverse bacterial communities. Maybe Bifidobacterium, Staphylococcus or even more alien species are commensal creatures in normal vaginal microbiota. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictive value of the composition of the vaginal microbiota in bacterial vaginosis, a dynamic study to identify recurrence-related flora

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bingbing; Niu, Xiaoxi; Han, Na; Wang, Ben; Du, Pengcheng; Na, Risu; Chen, Chen; Liao, Qinping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a highly prevalent disease in women, and increases the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. It has been given wide attention because of the high recurrence rate. Traditional diagnostic methods based on microscope providing limited information on the vaginal microbiota increase the difficulty in tracing the development of the disease in bacteria resistance condition. In this study, we used deep-sequencing technology to observe dynamic variation of the vaginal microbiota at three major time points during treatment, at D0 (before treatment), D7 (stop using the antibiotics) and D30 (the 30-day follow-up visit). Sixty-five patients with BV were enrolled (48 were cured and 17 were not cured), and their bacterial composition of the vaginal microbiota was compared. Interestingly, we identified 9 patients might be recurrence. We also introduced a new measurement point of D7, although its microbiota were significantly inhabited by antibiotic and hard to be observed by traditional method. The vaginal microbiota in deep-sequencing-view present a strong correlation to the final outcome. Thus, coupled with detailed individual bioinformatics analysis and deep-sequencing technology, we may illustrate a more accurate map of vaginal microbial to BV patients, which provide a new opportunity to reduce the rate of recurrence of BV. PMID:27253522

  2. Predictive value of the composition of the vaginal microbiota in bacterial vaginosis, a dynamic study to identify recurrence-related flora.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bingbing; Niu, Xiaoxi; Han, Na; Wang, Ben; Du, Pengcheng; Na, Risu; Chen, Chen; Liao, Qinping

    2016-06-02

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a highly prevalent disease in women, and increases the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. It has been given wide attention because of the high recurrence rate. Traditional diagnostic methods based on microscope providing limited information on the vaginal microbiota increase the difficulty in tracing the development of the disease in bacteria resistance condition. In this study, we used deep-sequencing technology to observe dynamic variation of the vaginal microbiota at three major time points during treatment, at D0 (before treatment), D7 (stop using the antibiotics) and D30 (the 30-day follow-up visit). Sixty-five patients with BV were enrolled (48 were cured and 17 were not cured), and their bacterial composition of the vaginal microbiota was compared. Interestingly, we identified 9 patients might be recurrence. We also introduced a new measurement point of D7, although its microbiota were significantly inhabited by antibiotic and hard to be observed by traditional method. The vaginal microbiota in deep-sequencing-view present a strong correlation to the final outcome. Thus, coupled with detailed individual bioinformatics analysis and deep-sequencing technology, we may illustrate a more accurate map of vaginal microbial to BV patients, which provide a new opportunity to reduce the rate of recurrence of BV.

  3. Antimicrobial and immune modulatory effects of lactic acid and short chain fatty acids produced by vaginal microbiota associated with eubiosis and bacterial vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Aldunate, Muriel; Srbinovski, Daniela; Hearps, Anna C.; Latham, Catherine F.; Ramsland, Paul A.; Gugasyan, Raffi; Cone, Richard A.; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced by vaginal microbiota have reported antimicrobial and immune modulatory activities indicating their potential as biomarkers of disease and/or disease susceptibility. In asymptomatic women of reproductive-age the vaginal microbiota is comprised of lactic acid-producing bacteria that are primarily responsible for the production of lactic acid present at ~110 mM and acidifying the vaginal milieu to pH ~3.5. In contrast, bacterial vaginosis (BV), a dysbiosis of the vaginal microbiota, is characterized by decreased lactic acid-producing microbiota and increased diverse anaerobic bacteria accompanied by an elevated pH>4.5. BV is also characterized by a dramatic loss of lactic acid and greater concentrations of mixed SCFAs including acetate, propionate, butyrate, and succinate. Notably women with lactic acid-producing microbiota have more favorable reproductive and sexual health outcomes compared to women with BV. Regarding the latter, BV is associated with increased susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. In vitro studies demonstrate that lactic acid produced by vaginal microbiota has microbicidal and virucidal activities that may protect against STIs and endogenous opportunistic bacteria as well as immune modulatory properties that require further characterization with regard to their effects on the vaginal mucosa. In contrast, BV-associated SCFAs have far less antimicrobial activity with the potential to contribute to a pro-inflammatory vaginal environment. Here we review the composition of lactic acid and SCFAs in respective states of eubiosis (non-BV) or dysbiosis (BV), their effects on susceptibility to bacterial/viral STIs and whether they have inherent microbicidal/virucidal and immune modulatory properties. We also explore their potential as biomarkers for the presence and/or increased susceptibility to STIs. PMID:26082720

  4. Antimicrobial and immune modulatory effects of lactic acid and short chain fatty acids produced by vaginal microbiota associated with eubiosis and bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Aldunate, Muriel; Srbinovski, Daniela; Hearps, Anna C; Latham, Catherine F; Ramsland, Paul A; Gugasyan, Raffi; Cone, Richard A; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced by vaginal microbiota have reported antimicrobial and immune modulatory activities indicating their potential as biomarkers of disease and/or disease susceptibility. In asymptomatic women of reproductive-age the vaginal microbiota is comprised of lactic acid-producing bacteria that are primarily responsible for the production of lactic acid present at ~110 mM and acidifying the vaginal milieu to pH ~3.5. In contrast, bacterial vaginosis (BV), a dysbiosis of the vaginal microbiota, is characterized by decreased lactic acid-producing microbiota and increased diverse anaerobic bacteria accompanied by an elevated pH>4.5. BV is also characterized by a dramatic loss of lactic acid and greater concentrations of mixed SCFAs including acetate, propionate, butyrate, and succinate. Notably women with lactic acid-producing microbiota have more favorable reproductive and sexual health outcomes compared to women with BV. Regarding the latter, BV is associated with increased susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. In vitro studies demonstrate that lactic acid produced by vaginal microbiota has microbicidal and virucidal activities that may protect against STIs and endogenous opportunistic bacteria as well as immune modulatory properties that require further characterization with regard to their effects on the vaginal mucosa. In contrast, BV-associated SCFAs have far less antimicrobial activity with the potential to contribute to a pro-inflammatory vaginal environment. Here we review the composition of lactic acid and SCFAs in respective states of eubiosis (non-BV) or dysbiosis (BV), their effects on susceptibility to bacterial/viral STIs and whether they have inherent microbicidal/virucidal and immune modulatory properties. We also explore their potential as biomarkers for the presence and/or increased susceptibility to STIs.

  5. Immunological characterization of human vaginal xenografts in immunocompromised mice: development of a small animal model for the study of human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kish, T M; Budgeon, L R; Welsh, P A; Howett, M K

    2001-12-01

    A small animal model for the in vivo study of human immunodeficiency virus-1 and other fastidious infectious agents in human host target tissues is critical for the advancement of therapeutic and preventative strategies. Our laboratory has developed a human vaginal xenograft model that histologically recapitulates features of the human vaginal epithelial barrier. Vaginal xenografts were surgically implanted into C.B.-Igh-1(b)/IcrTac-Prkdc(scid) (SCID) and NOD/LtSz-scid/scid (NOD/SCID) mice, with and without human peripheral blood mononuclear cell reconstitution. Immunohistochemical staining of vaginal xenografts demonstrated that in the SCID strain healed vaginal xenografts did not retain intrinsic human immune cells at baseline levels, whereas the NOD/SCID strain supported retention of intrinsic human immune cell populations within the xenografts for at least 2 months after engraftment. In peripheral blood mononuclear cell-reconstituted NOD/SCID mice with vaginal xenografts, flow cytometric analyses detected human immune cell populations in the peripheral blood and immunohistochemical methods detected infiltration of human CD45+ cells in the mouse spleens and vaginal xenografts for at least 2 months after reconstitution. This optimized NOD/SCID human vaginal xenograft model may provide a unique small animal in vivo system for the study of human immunodeficiency virus-1 transmission and infection.

  6. Vaginal Toxic Shock Reaction Triggering Desquamative Inflammatory Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Nigel; Edlind, Thomas D.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report two cases of desquamative inflammatory vaginitis (DIV) associated with toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1)-producing Staphylococcus aureus strains. Materials and Methods Case report of two patients, one with an acute and one with a chronic presentation, diagnosed with DIV on the basis of clinical findings and wet mount microscopy. Pre- and posttreatment vaginal bacterial and yeast cultures were obtained. Results Pretreatment vaginal bacterial cultures from both patients grew TSST-1-producing S. aureus. Subsequent vaginal bacterial cultures following oral antibiotic therapy were negative. Conclusions DIV may be triggered through TSST-1-mediated vaginal toxic shock reaction. PMID:23222054

  7. Dermabacter vaginalis sp. nov., isolated from human vaginal fluid.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dong-Ho; Rhee, Moon-Soo; Kim, Byoung-Chan

    2016-04-01

    A novel actinobacterial strain, AD1-86T, was isolated from the vaginal fluid of a Korean female and was characterized by a polyphasic approach. The strain was a facultatively anaerobic, Gram-stain-positive, non-spore-forming, non-motile, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative short rod. Colonies were creamy white, of low convexity and 1-2 mm in diameter after growth on DSM 92 agar plates at 37 °C for 2 days. The most closely related strains were Dermabacter hominis DSM 7083T and Helcobacillus massiliensis 6401990T (98.3 and 96.3 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). The isolate grew optimally at 37 °C and pH 7 in the presence of 0.5% (w/v) NaCl. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid and the cell-wall hydrolysates contained ribose, galactose and glucose. The DNA G+C content was 62.6 mol% and the mean DNA-DNA relatedness value of the isolate to D. hominis DSM 7083T was 31.1±3.0% (reciprocal: 48.2±5.3%). The major cellular fatty acids (>10%) were anteiso-C17:0, anteiso-C15:0 and iso-C16:0, and the menaquinones were MK-9, MK-8 and MK-7. The polar lipid profile of strain AD1-86T consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, two aminolipids and a glycolipid. Data from this polyphasic study indicate that strain AD1-86T represents a novel species of the genus Dermabacter, for which the name Dermabacter vaginalis sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is AD1-86T (=KCTC 39585T=DSM 100050T).

  8. Self-collected vaginal swabs for the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay of Atopobium vaginae and Gardnerella vaginalis and the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Menard, J-P; Fenollar, F; Raoult, D; Boubli, L; Bretelle, F

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using self-collected vaginal specimens for the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of bacterial vaginosis (BV)-associated bacteria versus practitioner-collected swabs. A cross-sectional study included 190 pregnant women enrolled before 20 weeks' gestation from September 2008 to November 2009. Self- and practitioner-collected swabs were taken during the same prenatal visit for each woman, qPCR assays performed for each, and the results compared. The quantification of the human albumin gene was used as an internal control to ensure sampling quality and accurate comparisons. The level of agreement of the qPCR assays for each microorganism was calculated with the Spearman product moment correlation coefficient and the kappa statistic. In all, 370 vaginal samples (185 self- and 185 practitioner-collected swabs) had a narrow range of values for the number of albumin gene copies and a significant correlation coefficient (Spearman's rho = 0.532; p < 0.001). The agreement between both sampling methods was excellent (Spearman's rho was 0.748 for Atopobium vaginae, 0.918 for Lactobacillus species, 0.940 for Gardnerella vaginalis; p < 0.001), especially for high concentrations of A. vaginae (≥10(8) copies/mL; kappa value = 0.973; p < 0.001) and G. vaginalis (≥10(9) copies/mL; kappa value = 0.903; p < 0.001). This study demonstrates the validity and reliability of self- versus practitioner-collected swabs for the molecular quantification of Lactobacillus species, G. vaginalis, and A. vaginae.

  9. Recent biomarker-confirmed unprotected vaginal sex, but not self-reported unprotected sex, is associated with recurrent bacterial vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, AN; Carr, Reese P; Snead, MC; Fields, K; Ervin, M; Kourtis, AP; Klebanoff, MA; Gallo, MF

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-reported unprotected vaginal sex appears to increase risk of bacterial vaginosis (BV). However, the validity of self-reports is questionable, given their inconsistency with more objective measures of recent semen exposure such as detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA). We examined whether recent unprotected sex, as measured both by PSA detection on vaginal swabs and by self-report, was associated with increased BV recurrence. Methods We analyzed randomized trial data from non-pregnant, BV-positive adult women recruited from a sexually transmitted diseases clinic. Participants received BV therapy at enrollment and were scheduled to return after 4, 12, and 24 weeks. BV (by Nugent score) and PSA were measured at each visit. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine the association between PSA positivity and recurrent BV. We also evaluated associations between self-reported unprotected sex (ever/never since the last visit and in the last 48 hours, analyzed separately) and recurrent BV. Results PSA and BV results were available for 96 women who contributed 226 follow-up visits. PSA positivity was associated with increased BV recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR): 2.32, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.28–4.21). In contrast, we observed no significant increase in BV recurrence among women self-reporting unprotected sex since the last visit (aHR: 1.63, 95% CI: 0.77–3.43) or in the last 48 hours (aHR: 1.28, 95% CI: 0.70–2.36). Conclusions Estimates from earlier studies linking self-reported unprotected sex and BV may be biased by misclassification. Biomarkers can improve measurement of unprotected sex, a critical exposure variable in sexual health research. PMID:26859804

  10. Metronidazole Vaginal Gel 1.3% in the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis: A Dose-Ranging Study

    PubMed Central

    Chavoustie, Steven E.; Jacobs, Mark; Reisman, Howard A.; Waldbaum, Arthur S.; Levy, Sharon F.; Hillier, Sharon L.; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metronidazole vaginal gel (MVG) 0.75% is a US Food and Drug Administration–approved, 5-day treatment for bacterial vaginosis (BV). This study tested the hypothesis that a shorter treatment course at a higher dose (MVG 1.3%) would yield similar efficacy to 5 days of MVG 0.75%. Materials and Methods This phase 2, multicenter, randomized, controlled, investigator-blinded, dose-ranging study enrolled women with a clinical diagnosis of BV. Patients were assigned to MVG 1.3% once daily for 1, 3, or 5 days or MVG 0.75% once daily for 5 days. The therapeutic cure rate, requiring clinical and bacteriological cure, at the end-of-study visit was determined for the per-protocol population. A Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate median time-to-symptom resolution. Results In total, 255 women (mean age = 35 y) were enrolled. The per-protocol population included 189 patients. The therapeutic cure rate was higher in the 1-day (13/43, 30.2%), 3-day (12/48, 25.0%), and 5-day (16/49, 32.7%) MVG 1.3% groups versus the MVG 0.75% group (10/49, 20.4%). Median time-to-resolution of fishy odor was shorter in the 3 MVG 1.3% groups versus the MVG 0.75% group. The 5-day MVG 1.3% group had the lowest rate of symptom return. No clinically important differences were observed in adverse events across treatment groups; most events were mild or moderate in intensity and considered unrelated to treatment. Similar results were found in the modified intent-to-treat population. Conclusions Metronidazole vaginal gel 1.3% applied once daily for 1, 3, or 5 days showed similar efficacy, safety, and tolerability as MVG 0.75% once daily for 5 days. PMID:24983350

  11. Metronidazole vaginal gel 1.3% in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis: a dose-ranging study.

    PubMed

    Chavoustie, Steven E; Jacobs, Mark; Reisman, Howard A; Waldbaum, Arthur S; Levy, Sharon F; Hillier, Sharon L; Nyirjesy, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Metronidazole vaginal gel (MVG) 0.75% is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved, 5-day treatment for bacterial vaginosis (BV). This study tested the hypothesis that a shorter treatment course at a higher dose (MVG 1.3%) would yield similar efficacy to 5 days of MVG 0.75%. This phase 2, multicenter, randomized, controlled, investigator-blinded, dose-ranging study enrolled women with a clinical diagnosis of BV. Patients were assigned to MVG 1.3% once daily for 1, 3, or 5 days or MVG 0.75% once daily for 5 days. The therapeutic cure rate, requiring clinical and bacteriological cure, at the end-of-study visit was determined for the per-protocol population. A Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate median time-to-symptom resolution. In total, 255 women (mean age = 35 y) were enrolled. The per-protocol population included 189 patients. The therapeutic cure rate was higher in the 1-day (13/43, 30.2%), 3-day (12/48, 25.0%), and 5-day (16/49, 32.7%) MVG 1.3% groups versus the MVG 0.75% group (10/49, 20.4%). Median time-to-resolution of fishy odor was shorter in the 3 MVG 1.3% groups versus the MVG 0.75% group. The 5-day MVG 1.3% group had the lowest rate of symptom return. No clinically important differences were observed in adverse events across treatment groups; most events were mild or moderate in intensity and considered unrelated to treatment. Similar results were found in the modified intent-to-treat population. Metronidazole vaginal gel 1.3% applied once daily for 1, 3, or 5 days showed similar efficacy, safety, and tolerability as MVG 0.75% once daily for 5 days.

  12. The Human Microbiome during Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Mary L.; Fichorova, Raina N.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most commonly reported microbiological syndrome among women of childbearing age. BV is characterized by a shift in the vaginal flora from the dominant Lactobacillus to a polymicrobial flora. BV has been associated with a wide array of health issues, including preterm births, pelvic inflammatory disease, increased susceptibility to HIV infection, and other chronic health problems. A number of potential microbial pathogens, singly and in combinations, have been implicated in the disease process. The list of possible agents continues to expand and includes members of a number of genera, including Gardnerella, Atopobium, Prevotella, Peptostreptococcus, Mobiluncus, Sneathia, Leptotrichia, Mycoplasma, and BV-associated bacterium 1 (BVAB1) to BVAB3. Efforts to characterize BV using epidemiological, microscopic, microbiological culture, and sequenced-based methods have all failed to reveal an etiology that can be consistently documented in all women with BV. A careful analysis of the available data suggests that what we term BV is, in fact, a set of common clinical signs and symptoms that can be provoked by a plethora of bacterial species with proinflammatory characteristics, coupled to an immune response driven by variability in host immune function. PMID:26864580

  13. Vaginitis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Quan, Martin

    2010-11-01

    Vaginitis is one of the most common ambulatory problems to occur in women. It is a disorder responsible for > 10% of visits made to providers of women's health care. Although vaginal infections are the most common cause, other considerations include cervicitis, a normal vaginal discharge, foreign-body vaginitis, contact vaginitis, atrophic vaginitis, and desquamative inflammatory vaginitis. The medical history and examination are an important source of clues to the underlying diagnosis. However, making a definitive diagnosis requires skillful performance of office laboratory procedures, including the vaginal pool wet mount examination, determination of the vaginal pH, and the whiff test. Vaginal and cervical cultures, nucleic acid tests, and point-of-care tests are available and may be required in selected patients. Once a specific diagnosis is made, effective therapy can be prescribed. Candida vaginitis is generally treated with either the vaginal administration of an imidazole or triazole antifungal agent or the prescription of oral fluconazole. Oral nitroimidazole agents, metronidazole or tinidazole, are the only effective treatments for trichomoniasis in the United States. Bacterial vaginosis, which has been linked to important gynecologic and pregnancy complications, can be treated with an available oral or topical agent containing either a nitroimidazole or clindamycin.

  14. Comparison of the Effects of Myrtus Communis L, Berberis Vulgaris and Metronidazole Vaginal Gel alone for the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Masoudi, Mansoureh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a growing tendency towards herbal medicines for treatment of vaginitis. Antibacterial and antifungal effects of Myrtus communis L and Berberis vulgaris have been demonstrated invitro and invivo. Aim This study aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of the vaginal gel of Berberis vulgaris 5% (in metronidazole base) and Myrtus communis L 2% (in metronidazole base) with only metronidazole vaginal gel 0.75% on bacterial vaginosis. Materials and Methods This study was a randomized clinical trial research on 120 married women aged 18-40 years affected by bacterial vaginosis attended for treatment to gynaecology clinic of Hajar Hospital (Shahrekord, Iran). They were randomly divided into three groups of 40 participants. Diagnostic criteria were Amsel’s criteria. Myrtus communis L, Berberis vulgaris vaginal gel or metronidazole vaginal gel for five-night usage were prescribed to each group, and after 7 days therapeutic effects were assessed. Data analysis was performed using ANOVA and Chi-square tests. Results A statistically significant difference was observed with regard to treatment response among the study groups (p<0.001), with Myrtus communis L and Berberis vulgaris groups having a better response than metronidazole gel alone. Moreover, there was no significant difference between Myrtus communis L and Berberis vulgaris groups (p= 0.18). The patients in groups of Myrtus communis L or Berberis vulgaris in metronidazole base did not experience any relapse, but in metronidazole group, 30% of patients experienced relapse during three weeks follow up. Conclusion Findings of the study showed that treatment with a combination of Myrtus communis L or Berberis vulgaris in metronidazole base improve the efficacy of bacterial vaginosis therapy. PMID:27134945

  15. Comparison of the Effects of Myrtus Communis L, Berberis Vulgaris and Metronidazole Vaginal Gel alone for the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Masoudi, Mansoureh; Miraj, Sepideh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2016-03-01

    There is a growing tendency towards herbal medicines for treatment of vaginitis. Antibacterial and antifungal effects of Myrtus communis L and Berberis vulgaris have been demonstrated invitro and invivo. This study aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of the vaginal gel of Berberis vulgaris 5% (in metronidazole base) and Myrtus communis L 2% (in metronidazole base) with only metronidazole vaginal gel 0.75% on bacterial vaginosis. This study was a randomized clinical trial research on 120 married women aged 18-40 years affected by bacterial vaginosis attended for treatment to gynaecology clinic of Hajar Hospital (Shahrekord, Iran). They were randomly divided into three groups of 40 participants. Diagnostic criteria were Amsel's criteria. Myrtus communis L, Berberis vulgaris vaginal gel or metronidazole vaginal gel for five-night usage were prescribed to each group, and after 7 days therapeutic effects were assessed. Data analysis was performed using ANOVA and Chi-square tests. A statistically significant difference was observed with regard to treatment response among the study groups (p<0.001), with Myrtus communis L and Berberis vulgaris groups having a better response than metronidazole gel alone. Moreover, there was no significant difference between Myrtus communis L and Berberis vulgaris groups (p= 0.18). The patients in groups of Myrtus communis L or Berberis vulgaris in metronidazole base did not experience any relapse, but in metronidazole group, 30% of patients experienced relapse during three weeks follow up. Findings of the study showed that treatment with a combination of Myrtus communis L or Berberis vulgaris in metronidazole base improve the efficacy of bacterial vaginosis therapy.

  16. Composition of the vaginal microbiota in women of reproductive age--sensitive and specific molecular diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis is possible?

    PubMed

    Shipitsyna, Elena; Roos, Annika; Datcu, Raluca; Hallén, Anders; Fredlund, Hans; Jensen, Jørgen S; Engstrand, Lars; Unemo, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal disorder, characterized by depletion of the normal lactobacillus-dominant microbiota and overgrowth of commensal anaerobic bacteria. This study aimed to investigate the composition of the vaginal microbiota in women of reproductive age (healthy women and women with BV), with the view of developing molecular criteria for BV diagnosis. Vaginal samples from 163 women (79 control, 73 BV and 11 intermediate (Lactobacillary grade II flora) cases) were analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing of the hypervariable regions V3-V4 of the 16S rRNA gene and 16 quantitative bacterial species/genus-specific real-time PCR assays. Sensitivities and specificities of potential BV markers were computed using the Amsel criteria as reference standard for BV. The use of quantitative thresholds for prediction of BV, determined for both relative abundance measured with 454 pyrosequencing and bacterial load measured with qPCR, was evaluated. Relative to the healthy women, the BV patients had in their vaginal microbiota significantly higher prevalence, loads and relative abundances of the majority of BV associated bacteria. However, only Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Eggerthella, Prevotella, BVAB2 and Megasphaera type 1 detected at or above optimal thresholds were highly predictable for BV, with the best diagnostic accuracy shown for A. vaginae. The depletion of Lactobacillus species combined with the presence of either G. vaginalis or A. vaginae at diagnostic levels was a highly accurate BV predictor. Quantitative determination of the presence of G. vaginalis, A. vaginae, Eggerthella, Prevotella, BVAB2 and Megasphaera type 1 as well as the depletion of Lactobacillus was highly accurate for BV diagnosis. Measurements of abundance of normal and BV microbiota relative to total bacteria in vaginal fluid may provide more accurate BV diagnosis, and be used for test-of-cure, rather than qualitative detection or absolute counts of BV related

  17. Composition of the Vaginal Microbiota in Women of Reproductive Age – Sensitive and Specific Molecular Diagnosis of Bacterial Vaginosis Is Possible?

    PubMed Central

    Shipitsyna, Elena; Roos, Annika; Datcu, Raluca; Hallén, Anders; Fredlund, Hans; Jensen, Jørgen S.; Engstrand, Lars; Unemo, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal disorder, characterized by depletion of the normal lactobacillus-dominant microbiota and overgrowth of commensal anaerobic bacteria. This study aimed to investigate the composition of the vaginal microbiota in women of reproductive age (healthy women and women with BV), with the view of developing molecular criteria for BV diagnosis. Materials and Methods Vaginal samples from 163 women (79 control, 73 BV and 11 intermediate (Lactobacillary grade II flora) cases) were analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing of the hypervariable regions V3–V4 of the 16S rRNA gene and 16 quantitative bacterial species/genus-specific real-time PCR assays. Sensitivities and specificities of potential BV markers were computed using the Amsel criteria as reference standard for BV. The use of quantitative thresholds for prediction of BV, determined for both relative abundance measured with 454 pyrosequencing and bacterial load measured with qPCR, was evaluated. Results Relative to the healthy women, the BV patients had in their vaginal microbiota significantly higher prevalence, loads and relative abundances of the majority of BV associated bacteria. However, only Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Eggerthella, Prevotella, BVAB2 and Megasphaera type 1 detected at or above optimal thresholds were highly predictable for BV, with the best diagnostic accuracy shown for A. vaginae. The depletion of Lactobacillus species combined with the presence of either G. vaginalis or A. vaginae at diagnostic levels was a highly accurate BV predictor. Conclusions Quantitative determination of the presence of G. vaginalis, A. vaginae, Eggerthella, Prevotella, BVAB2 and Megasphaera type 1 as well as the depletion of Lactobacillus was highly accurate for BV diagnosis. Measurements of abundance of normal and BV microbiota relative to total bacteria in vaginal fluid may provide more accurate BV diagnosis, and be used for test

  18. Randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy of the vaginal use of metronidazole with a Brazilian pepper tree (Schinus) extract for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Leite, S R R F; Amorim, M M R; Sereno, P F B; Leite, T N F; Ferreira, J A C; Ximenes, R A A

    2011-03-01

    A 7.4% vaginal extract of the Brazilian pepper tree (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi) was compared with 0.75% vaginal metronidazole, both manufactured by the Hebron Laboratory, for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis, used at bedtime for 7 nights. The condition was diagnosed using the combined criteria of Amsel and Nugent in two groups of 140 and 137 women, aged between 18 and 40 years. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed. Women were excluded from the study if they presented delayed menstruation, were pregnant, were using or had used any topical or systemic medication, presented any other vaginal infections, presented hymen integrity, or if they reported any history suggestive of acute pelvic inflammatory disease. According to Amsel's criteria separately, 29 patients (21.2%) treated with the extract and 87 (62.1%) treated with metronidazole were considered to be cured (P < 0.001). According to Nugent's score separately, 19 women (13.9%) treated with the extract and 79 (56.4%) treated with metronidazole were considered to be cured (P < 0.001). Using the two criteria together, the so-called total cure was observed in 17 women (12.4%) treated with the extract and in 79 women (56.4%) treated with metronidazole (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the cure rate for bacterial vaginosis using a vaginal gel from a pepper tree extract was lower than the rate obtained with metronidazole gel, while side effects were infrequent and non-severe in both groups.

  19. A Multi-center, Double-blind, Randomized Study, Comparing Clindamycin Phosphate Vaginal Cream 2% (Watson Laboratories, Inc.) to Clindesse® (Ther-Rx™, Clindamyin Phosphate Vaginal Cream 2%) and Both Active Treatments to a Placebo Control in the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis in Non-pregnant Women

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-18

    BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS; Signs and Symptoms to be Evaluated and Recorded Include:; Vaginal Discharge: Color, Odor, and Consistency;; Vulvovaginal Itching and Irritation (Subjective): Absent, Mild, Moderate, or Severe; Vulvovaginal Inflammation (Objective): Absent, Mild, Moderate, or Severe.

  20. Vaginal infections update.

    PubMed

    Mashburn, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Vaginal symptoms are one of the leading reasons that women visit their health care providers. Women often self-diagnose and may treat themselves inappropriately. This article describes the etiology, risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of the 3 most common vaginal infections: bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis, and vulvovaginal candidiasis.

  1. Cultivable bacterial diversity from the human colon.

    PubMed

    Duncan, S H; Louis, P; Flint, H J

    2007-04-01

    Knowledge of the composition of the colonic microbiota is important for our understanding of how the balance of these microbes is influenced by diet and the environment, and which bacterial groups are important in maintaining gut health or promoting disease. Molecular methodologies have advanced our understanding of the composition and diversity of the colonic microbiota. Importantly, however, it is the continued isolation of bacterial representatives of key groups that offers the best opportunity to conduct detailed metabolic and functional studies. This also permits bacterial genome sequencing which will accelerate the linkage to functionality. Obtaining new human colonic bacterial isolates can be challenging, because most of these are strict anaerobes and many have rather exact nutritional and physical requirements. Despite this many new species are being isolated and described that occupy distinct niches in the colonic microbial community. This review focuses on these under-studied yet important gut anaerobes.

  2. Clinical study comparing probiotic Lactobacillus GR-1 and RC-14 with metronidazole vaginal gel to treat symptomatic bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Anukam, Kingsley C; Osazuwa, Emmanuel; Osemene, Gibson I; Ehigiagbe, Felix; Bruce, Andrew W; Reid, Gregor

    2006-10-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is particularly common in black women, and in Nigeria it is often caused by Mycoplasma, as well as Atopobium, Prevotella and Gardnerella sp. Antimicrobial metronidazole oral therapy is poorly effective in eradicating the condition and restoring the Lactobacillus microbiota in the vagina. In this study, 40 women diagnosed with BV by discharge, fishy odor, sialidase positive test and Nugent Gram stain scoring, were randomized to receive either two dried capsules containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 each night for 5 days, or 0.75% metronidazole gel, applied vaginally twice a day (in the morning and evening). Follow-up at day 6, 15 and 30 showed cure of BV in significantly more probiotic treated subjects (16, 17 and 18/20, respectively) compared to metronidazole treatment (9, 9 and 11/20: P=0.016 at day 6, P=0.002 at day 15 and P=0.056 at day 30). This is the first report of an effective (90%) cure of BV using probiotic lactobacilli. Given the correlation between BV and HIV, and the high risk of the latter in Nigeria, intravaginal use of lactobacilli could provide women with a self-use therapy, similar to over-the-counter anti-yeast medication, for treatment of urogenital infections.

  3. High-dose vaginal maintenance metronidazole for recurrent bacterial vaginosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aguin, Tina; Akins, Robert A; Sobel, Jack D

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the benefit of high-dose intravaginal metronidazole as a maintenance therapy in reducing recurrence rates of bacterial vaginosis (BV). Eighteen women with a history of recurrent BV and symptomatic BV were treated with metronidazole 750 mg suppository intravaginally daily for 7 days. Those in remission by Amsel criteria received metronidazole 750 mg twice weekly for 3 months with further follow-up for 3 months. High-dose metronidazole intravaginally was associated with rare clinical recurrence during the period of use. After cessation of suppression therapy, recurrence was high.

  4. Effects of endopeptidase inhibition on the contraction-relaxation response of isolated human vaginal tissue.

    PubMed

    Rahardjo, Harrina E; Uckert, Stefan; Taher, Akmal; Sonnenberg, Joachim E; Kauffels, Wolfgang; Rahardjo, Djoko; Kuczyk, Markus A

    2013-04-01

    INTRODUCTION.: Vasoactive peptides, such as bradykinin, C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), and endothelin 1 (ET-1), are assumed to be involved in the control of female genital vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle. Tissue levels of said peptides are controlled by the activity of endopeptidase enzymes. Theoretically, in female genital tissues, inhibiting the degradation of bradykinin, CNP, and VIP, or the conversion of Big ET-1 into ET-1 should result in an enhancement in smooth muscle relaxation and, thus, an improvement in sexual response. AIM.: Elucidate the effects of the endopeptidase inhibitor KC 12615 on the contraction/relaxation response of isolated human vaginal smooth muscle to Big ET-1, bradykinin, CNP, or VIP. METHODS.: Tissue bath experiments were carried out to ascertain the responses of human vaginal tissue challenged by ET-1 (0.1 μM) to increasing concentrations of bradykinin, CNP, and VIP (0.01 μM, 0.1 μM, and 1 μM, respectively). The effects were also evaluated following preexposure to KC 12615 (10 μM, for 20 minutes). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES.: Measure the effects of KC 12615 on the relaxation of isolated human vaginal smooth muscle brought about by bradykinin, CNP, or VIP and the contraction mediated by Big ET-1. RESULTS.: The tension induced by ET-1 was reversed by bradykinin, CNP, or VIP (-25 ± 6.6%, -13.3 ± 2.2%, and -17.6 ± 10%, respectively). Big ET-1 induced contraction of the vaginal tissue. Preexposure of the tissue to KC 12615 increased the relaxation exerted by bradykinin, CNP, or VIP (to -39.2 ± 5.8%, -40.7 ± 7.3%, and -44.6 ± 19%, respectively). The contraction induced by Big ET-1 was attenuated in the presence of KC 12615 (to approximately 25% of the initial response). CONCLUSION.: Inhibition of endopeptidase activity can antagonize the contraction of human vaginal tissue induced by Big ET-1 and increase the relaxation induced by vasoactive endogenous

  5. [Effect of Lactobacillus casei var rhamnosus (Gynophilus) in restoring the vaginal flora by female patients with bacterial vaginosis--randomized, open clinical trial].

    PubMed

    Kovachev, S; Dobrevski-Vacheva, R

    2013-01-01

    The vaginal probiotics can increase the clinical and microbiological efficacy of the therapeutic regimens used for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. The Aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of the application of Lactobacillus casei var rhamnosus (Gynophilus--probiotic species Lcr 35) in restoring the vaginal flora and prevention of relapses by female patients with anaerobic vaginal infection undergoing conventional (nitroimidazole) local and main therapy. In the study were included 60 women with established Amsel/Nugent bacterial vaginosis who were randomized in two groups. The first group patients (n-30 beginning/n-25 controls) underwent a 5 day treatment with two daily peroral doses of metronidazole 500 mg, with local application of metronidazole ovules 1000 mg at the 1st and the 3rd day (M+M). In the second group (n-30 beginning/n-26 controls) the therapeutic regimen was the same as in the first group, with additional 7 day treatment with Lactobacillus casei var rhamnosus - Lcr 35. (Gynophilus) vaginal ovules, two daily doses (M+M+G). 30% to 40% was the difference/enhance of the clinical efficacy according to the clinical indicators when Lactobacillus casei var rhamnosus - Lcr 35 was added to the standard nitroimidazole therapy. Concerning the main clinical indicator: Amsel criteria, the improvement after the therapy in the first group (M+M) was 60% (n-15) and in the second group (M+M+G) 88.5% (n-23). According to the microbiological indicators the improvement in the first group (M+M) based on the vaginal flora evaluation (Nugent score) was 60% (n-15) and in the second group, after the addition of Lcr 35 it was 88.5% (n-23). The application of Gynophilus after conventional 5-nitroimidazole treatment for bacterial vaginosis increased the clinical and microbiological efficacy of the therapy by 25% - 30%. The microbial balance in the vaginal ecosystem was restored in the majority of patients (88%), which is a prerequisite for low percentage of bacterial

  6. The effect of introduction of a guideline on the management of vaginal discharge and in particular bacterial vaginosis in primary care.

    PubMed

    Langsford, M J; Dobbs, F F; Morrison, G M; Dance, D A

    2001-06-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the commonest cause of vaginal discharge, and its association with obstetric and gynaecological complications is being recognized increasingly. It was our impression that BV was poorly understood and underdiagnosed in family practice. The aim of this study was to explore the management of patients with vaginal symptoms by family practitioners and to see if the management changed after the assimilation of best practice guidelines. Family practitioners were invited to complete a baseline questionnaire of their perceived practice, and to record actual practice when consulted about vaginal symptoms, for a minimum of 4 weeks. Consensus best practice guidelines were then provided and practice recorded for a similar period. Baseline data was received from 34 practitioners and suggested that the symptoms and signs of different vaginal infections were not well known. Most symptomatic patients were only investigated at re-presentation with unresolved symptoms or at recurrence, and 43% of respondents treated with empirical antifungals as a first line approach. Pregnant patients were only occasionally asked about symptoms and only occasionally examined if symptomatic. Pre-guideline practice data from 30 practitioners showed 1.2 patient consultations/week, of which 60% were examined and 55% had a high vaginal swab (HVS) sent. Only 2% had near-patient tests done. Post-guideline data from 23 family practitioners showed a lower recorded consultation rate at 0.7/week, but 90% of these were examined, 77% had an HVS sent and 69% had near-patient tests done. Of the 36 HVS examined by Gram stain, 19 (53%) showed Lactobacillus predominant flora and 10 (28%) suggested BV. Seven (19%) were borderline or ungradable. Only three (8%) showed yeasts, one of which also showed BV. Baseline data supported our impression that BV was under-recognized. Guidelines appeared to improve the rate of investigation of women consulting with vaginal symptoms.

  7. Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate Increases Immune Cell Numbers and Activation Markers in Human Vaginal Mucosal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Neelima; Anderson, Sharon; Cunningham, Tina Duong; Yousefieh, Nazita; Mauck, Christine; Doncel, Gustavo F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between exogenous contraceptive hormones and permissiveness of the female genital tract to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the subject of renewed debate. To better characterize the effect of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) on HIV-1 cellular targets and epithelial integrity in the vagina, we compared leukocyte populations, markers of activation and proliferation, and the density of intercellular junctional proteins in the vaginal epithelium of women during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle and approximately 12 weeks after receiving a DMPA injection. This prospective cohort study involved 15 healthy women. Vaginal biopsies were obtained in the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle, and approximately 12 weeks following a 150-mg intramuscular injection of DMPA. Leukocyte populations, activation phenotype, and epithelial tight junction and adherens proteins were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. After receiving DMPA, the numbers of CD45, CD3, CD8, CD68, HLA-DR, and CCR5 bearing immune cells were significantly (p<0.05) increased in vaginal tissues, compared to the follicular and/or luteal phases of untreated cycles. There were no significant differences in immune cell populations between the follicular and luteal phases of the control cycle. There were also no statistically significant differences in epithelial thickness and density of epithelial tight junction and adherens proteins among the follicular, luteal, and post-DMPA treatment sampling points. In this pilot study, vaginal immune cell populations were significantly altered by exogenous progesterone, resulting in increased numbers of T cells, macrophages, and HLA-DR- and CCR5-positive cells. PMID:23189932

  8. Vaginal Lactobacillus Inhibits HIV-1 Replication in Human Tissues Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ñahui Palomino, Rogers A.; Zicari, Sonia; Vanpouille, Christophe; Vitali, Beatrice; Margolis, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus species, which dominate vaginal microbiota of healthy reproductive-age women, lower the risks of sexually transmitted infections, including the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. The exact mechanisms of this protection remain to be understood. Here, we investigated these mechanisms in the context of human cervico-vaginal and lymphoid tissues ex vivo. We found that all six Lactobacillus strains tested in these systems significantly suppressed HIV type-1 (HIV-1) infection. We identified at least three factors that mediated this suppression: (i) Acidification of the medium. The pH of the undiluted medium conditioned by lactobacilli was between 3.8 and 4.6. Acidification of the culture medium with hydrochloric acid (HCl) to this pH in control experiments was sufficient to abrogate HIV-1 replication. However, the pH of the Lactobacillus-conditioned medium (CM) diluted fivefold, which reached ∼6.9, was also suppressive for HIV-1 infection, while in control experiments HIV-1 infection was not abrogated when the pH of the medium was brought to 6.9 through the use of HCl. This suggested the existence of other factors responsible for HIV-1 inhibition by lactobacilli. (ii) Lactic acid. There was a correlation between the concentration of lactic acid in the Lactobacillus-CM and its ability to suppress HIV-1 infection in human tissues ex vivo. Addition of lactic acid isomers D and L to tissue culture medium at the concentration that corresponded to their amount released by lactobacilli resulted in HIV-1 inhibition. Isomer L was produced in higher quantities than isomer D and was mostly responsible for HIV-1 inhibition. These results indicate that lactic acid, in particular its L-isomer, inhibits HIV-1 independently of lowering of the pH. (iii) Virucidal effect. Incubation of HIV-1 in Lactobacillus-CM significantly suppressed viral infectivity for human tissues ex vivo. Finally, lactobacilli adsorb HIV-1, serving as a sink decreasing the

  9. A comprehensive review of vaginitis phytotherapy.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Hanieh; Fallah-Tafti, Mehrnaz; Karimi-Darmiyan, Maliheh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2011-11-01

    To overview phytotherapy of vaginitis in order to identify new approaches for new pharmacological treatments. All related literature databases were searched for herbal medicinal treatment in vaginitis. The search terms were plant, herb, herbal therapy, phytotherapy, vaginitis, vaginal, anti-candida, anti-bacterial and anti-trichomonas. All of the human, animal and in vitro studies were included. Anti-candida, anti-bacterial and anti-trichomonas effects were the key outcomes. The plants including carvacrol, 1,8-cineole, geranial, germacrene-D, limonene, linalool, menthol, terpinen-4-ol and thymol exhibited anti-candida effects. A very low concentration of geranium oil and geraniol blocked mycelial growth, but not yeast. Tea tree oil including terpinen-4-ol, alpha-terpinene, gamma-terpinene and alpha-terpineol showed anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-protozoal properties against trichomonas. Allium hirtifolium (persian shallot) comparable to metronidazole exhibited anti-trichomonas activity due to its components such as allicin, ajoene and other organosulfides. The plants having beneficial effects on vaginitis encompass essential oils that clear the pathway that future studies should be focused to standardize theses herbs.

  10. Development and evaluation of a vaginal ring device for sustained delivery of HIV microbicides to non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Promadej-Lanier, Nattawan; Smith, James M; Srinivasan, Priya; McCoy, Clare F; Butera, Sal; Woolfson, A David; Malcolm, R Karl; Otten, Ron A

    2009-08-01

    There is considerable interest in developing coitally independent, sustained release formulations for long-term administration of HIV microbicides. Vaginal ring devices are at the forefront of this formulation strategy. Non-medicated silicone elastomer vaginal rings were prepared having a range of appropriate dimensions for testing vaginal fit in pig-tailed and Chinese rhesus macaques. Cervicovaginal proinflammatory markers were evaluated. Compression testing was performed to compare the relative flexibility of various macaque and commercial human rings. All rings remained in place during the study period and no tissue irritation or significant induction of cervicovaginal proinflammatory markers or signs of physical discomfort were observed during the 8-week study period. Qualitative evaluation suggests that the 25 x 5-mm ring provided optimal fit in both macaque species. Based on the results presented here, low-consistency silicone elastomers do not cause irritation in macaques and are proposed as suitable materials for the manufacture of microbicide-loaded vaginal rings.

  11. A rabbit vaginal cell-derived antimicrobial peptide, RVFHbαP, blocks lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammation in human vaginal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Patgaonkar, Mandar S; Sathe, Ameya; Selvaakumar, C; Reddy, K V R

    2011-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) constitute a phylogenetically ancient form of innate immunity that provides host defense at various mucosal surfaces, including the vagina. Recently, we have identified one such AMP, rabbit vaginal fluid hemoglobin alpha peptide (RVFHbαP), from the vaginal lavage of rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). The recent demonstration of a protective role of this peptide in erythrocytes and vaginal cells led us to investigate (i) the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) interactive domain in RVFHbαP and (ii) whether RVFHbαP of rabbit origin modulates the cellular immune responses of another species (humans) in vitro. HeLa-S3, a human vaginal epithelial cell line (hVEC), was exposed to LPS alone (10 μg/ml for 6 h), or LPS-induced cells were treated with RVFHbαP (70.45 μM for 1 h) and cultured for 24 h, and the results obtained were compared with the medium control. We show here that RVFHbαP exerts an anti-inflammatory activity in hVECs, as suggested by the prevention of LPS-induced production of extracellular (supernatant) and intracellular (lysate) levels of cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6] and IL-1α) and chemokines (IL-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1]). The demonstration of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and NF-κB expression in hVECs and the observations of RVFHbαP suppression of human β-defensin-1 (hBD1) mRNA expression further support the hypothesis of a genomic activity of RVFHbαP. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry results demonstrate that RVFHbαP inhibits LPS-induced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli by macrophages. The chemotaxis studies performed using the Boyden chamber Transwell method showed the increased migration of U937 cells when supernatants of LPS-induced hVECs were used, and this effect was inhibited by RVFHbαP. In conclusion, our study proposes a novel explanation for the protective role of RVFHbαP in inflammation-associated infections, which not only may provide the new cellular targets for the screening of

  12. A new method to repair recto-vaginal fistula: Use of human amniotic membrane in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Roshanravan, Reza; Ghahramani, Leila; Hosseinzadeh, Massood; Mohammadipour, Mastoureh; Moslemi, Sam; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Safarpour, Ali Reza; Rahimikazerooni, Salar; Hosseini, Seyed Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recto-vaginal fistula is primarily one of the co-morbidities of vaginal delivery. These patients suffer from persistent malodor vaginal discharge. Various surgical techniques have been employed by surgeons in the course of time. This is the first trial of applying Human Amniotic Membrane (HAM) as a bio-prosthesis in repairing recto-vaginal fistula. Materials and Methods: In a prospective animal study, 8 mixed-breed female dogs weighing 23-27 kg with the age of 12-18 months were selected. They were randomly divided into two groups for standard recto-vaginal fistula repair and fistula repair with human amniotic membrane. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney tests were performed to indicate statistical differences. Results: After 6 weeks, fistulas were evaluated both grossly and microscopically. In gross examination, there were no difference between the two groups and healing of fistula seemed to have been occurred in all dogs expect for one which had a persistent patent fistulous tract. Microscopic healing was scored according to epithelialization, collagenization inflammation, ulcer and necrosis of samples. Healing score was significantly higher in the HAM group than the standard group (P = 0.029). Conclusion: Our findings revealed that using HAM as a bio-prosthesis to repair recto-vaginal fistula would result in better surgical and histological outcomes comparing to simple repair. PMID:24804188

  13. Spectrum of vaginal discharge in a tertiary care setting

    PubMed Central

    Sivaranjini, R; Jaisankar, TJ; Thappa, Devinder Mohan; Kumari, Rashmi; Chandrasekhar, Laxmisha; Malathi, M; Parija, SC; Habeebullah, S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Vaginal discharge is one of the common reasons for gynecological consultation. Many of the causes of vaginitis have a disturbed vaginal microbial ecosystem associated with them. Effective treatment of vaginal discharge requires that the etiologic diagnosis be established and identifying the same offers a precious input to syndromic management and provides an additional strategy for human immunodeficiency virus prevention. The present study was thus carried out to determine the various causes of vaginal discharge in a tertiary care setting. Materials and Methods: A total of 400 women presenting with vaginal discharge of age between 20 and 50 years, irrespective of marital status were included in this study and women who had used antibiotics or vaginal medication in the previous 14 days and pregnant women were excluded. Results: Of the 400 women with vaginal discharge studied, a diagnosis was established in 303 women. Infectious causes of vaginal discharge were observed in 207 (51.75%) women. Among them, bacterial vaginosis was the most common cause seen in 105 (26.25%) women. The other infections observed were candidiasis alone (61, 15.25%), trichomoniasis alone (12, 3%), mixed infections (22, 5.5%) and mucopurulent cervicitis (7 of the 130 cases looked for, 8.46%). Among the non-infectious causes, 72 (18%) women had physiological vaginal discharge and 13 (3.3%) women had cervical in situ cancers/carcinoma cervix. Conclusion: The pattern of infectious causes of vaginal discharge observed in our study was comparable with the other studies in India. Our study emphasizes the need for including Papanicolaou smear in the algorithm for evaluation of vaginal discharge, as it helps establish the etiology of vaginal discharge reliably and provides a valuable opportunity to screen for cervical malignancies. PMID:24470998

  14. Topically applied recombinant chemokine analogues fully protect macaques from vaginal simian-human immunodeficiency virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Ling, Binhua; Green, Linda C; Ribka, Erin P; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Piatak, Michael; Lederman, Michael M; Mosier, Donald; Offord, Robin; Hartley, Oliver

    2009-05-15

    Effective strategies for preventing human immunodeficiency virus infection are urgently needed, but recent failures in key clinical trials of vaccines and microbicides highlight the need for new approaches validated in relevant animal models. Here, we show that 2 new chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 inhibitors, 5P12-RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) and 6P4-RANTES, fully protect against infection in the rhesus vaginal challenge model. These highly potent molecules, which are amenable to low-cost production, represent promising new additions to the microbicides pipeline.

  15. Topical Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Nanoparticles Prevent HIV-1 Vaginal Transmission in a Humanized Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Subhra; Yuan, Zhe; Kang, Guobin; Date, Abhijit A.; Lu, Wuxun; Shibata, Annemarie; Pham, Rachel; Bruck, Patrick; Rezich, Michael; Zhou, You; Vivekanandan, Renuga; Fletcher, Courtney V.; Li, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with 1% tenofovir (TFV) vaginal gel has failed in clinical trials. To improve TFV efficacy in vaginal gel, we formulated tenofovir disoproxil fumarate nanoparticles in a thermosensitive (TMS) gel (TDF-NP-TMS gel). TDF-NPs were fabricated using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer and an ion-pairing agent by oil-in-water emulsification. The efficacy of TDF-NP-TMS gel was tested in humanized bone marrow-liver-thymus (hu-BLT) mice. Hu-BLT mice in the treatment group (Rx; n = 15) were administered TDF-NP-TMS gel intravaginally, having TDF at 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1% (wt/vol) concentrations, whereas the control (Ctr; n = 8) group received a blank TMS gel. All Rx mice (0.1% [n = 4], 0.5% [n = 6], and 1% [n = 5]) were vaginally challenged with two transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 strains (2.5 × 105 50% tissue culture infectious doses). Rx mice were challenged at 4 h (0.1%), 24 h (0.5%), and 7 days (1%) posttreatment (p.t.) and Ctr mice were challenged at 4 h p.t. Blood was drawn weekly for 4 weeks postinoculation (p.i.) for plasma viral load (pVL) using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Ctr mice had positive pVL within 2 weeks p.i. Rx mice challenged at 4 h and 24 h showed 100% protection and no detectable pVL throughout the 4 weeks of follow-up (P = 0.009; Mantel-Cox test). Mice challenged at 7 days were HIV-1 positive at 14 days p.i. Further, HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA) in vaginal and spleen tissues of Rx group mice with negative pVL were examined using an in situ hybridization (ISH) technique. The detection of vRNA was negative in all Rx mice studied. The present studies elucidate TDF-NP-TMS gel as a long-acting, coitus-independent HIV-1 vaginal protection modality. PMID:27044548

  16. Comparison between the efficacy of metronidazole vaginal gel and Berberis vulgaris (Berberis vulgaris) combined with metronidazole gel alone in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Masoudi, Mansoure; Kopaei, Mahmoud Rafieian; Miraj, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis is one of the most prevalent complications among reproductive-aged women. Antibacterial and antifungal effects of Berberis vulgaris have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Objectives This study aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of the vaginal gel of Berberis vulgaris 5% (in metronidazole base) with metronidazole vaginal gel 0.75% on bacterial vaginosis on 80 patients referred to the Hajar Hospital from January 2012 to April 2013. Methods This study was a randomized clinical trial research on 80 women affected by bacterial vaginosis, who were randomly divided into two groups of 40 participants. Diagnostic criteria were Amsel’s criteria and Gram stain. Berberis vulgaris 5% (in metronidazole gel base) or metronidazole vaginal gel for five-night usage was prescribed to each group, and after two to seven days therapeutic effects and Amsel criteria were assessed. Data analysis was performed by SPSS 16 using Student t-test, chi-square, and ANOVA tests. Results Findings of the study showed a statistically significant difference with regard to treatment response between the study groups (p<0.001), and the Berberis vulgaris group had a better response than the metronidazole gel group. The patients in groups of Berberis vulgaris in a metronidazole gel base did not experience any relapse, but, in the metronidazole group, 30% of patients experienced relapse during three weeks’ follow-up. Conclusions Findings of the study showed that adding Berberis vulgaris fruit extract on metronidazole improve the efficacy of bacterial vaginosis therapy. Clinical trial registration The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCT ID: IRCT201411102085N13. Funding Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences supported this research. PMID:27757195

  17. Comparison between the efficacy of metronidazole vaginal gel and Berberis vulgaris (Berberis vulgaris) combined with metronidazole gel alone in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Masoudi, Mansoure; Kopaei, Mahmoud Rafieian; Miraj, Sepideh

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is one of the most prevalent complications among reproductive-aged women. Antibacterial and antifungal effects of Berberis vulgaris have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. This study aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of the vaginal gel of Berberis vulgaris 5% (in metronidazole base) with metronidazole vaginal gel 0.75% on bacterial vaginosis on 80 patients referred to the Hajar Hospital from January 2012 to April 2013. This study was a randomized clinical trial research on 80 women affected by bacterial vaginosis, who were randomly divided into two groups of 40 participants. Diagnostic criteria were Amsel's criteria and Gram stain. Berberis vulgaris 5% (in metronidazole gel base) or metronidazole vaginal gel for five-night usage was prescribed to each group, and after two to seven days therapeutic effects and Amsel criteria were assessed. Data analysis was performed by SPSS 16 using Student t-test, chi-square, and ANOVA tests. Findings of the study showed a statistically significant difference with regard to treatment response between the study groups (p<0.001), and the Berberis vulgaris group had a better response than the metronidazole gel group. The patients in groups of Berberis vulgaris in a metronidazole gel base did not experience any relapse, but, in the metronidazole group, 30% of patients experienced relapse during three weeks' follow-up. Findings of the study showed that adding Berberis vulgaris fruit extract on metronidazole improve the efficacy of bacterial vaginosis therapy. The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCT ID: IRCT201411102085N13. Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences supported this research.

  18. Expression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Neutralizing Antibody Fragments Using Human Vaginal Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Marcobal, Angela; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Wenlei; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Jia, Letong; Lee, Peter P.; Fouts, Timothy R.; Parks, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Eradication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by vaccination with epitopes that produce broadly neutralizing antibodies is the ultimate goal for HIV prevention. However, generating appropriate immune responses has proven difficult. Expression of broadly neutralizing antibodies by vaginal colonizing lactobacilli provides an approach to passively target these antibodies to the mucosa. We tested the feasibility of expressing single-chain and single-domain antibodies (dAbs) in Lactobacillus to be used as a topical microbicide/live biotherapeutic. Lactobacilli provide an excellent platform to express anti-HIV proteins. Broadly neutralizing antibodies have been identified against epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope and have been made into active antibody fragments. We tested single-chain variable fragment m9 and dAb-m36 and its derivative m36.4 as prototype antibodies. We cloned and expressed the antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 in Lactobacillus jensenii-1153 and tested the expression levels and functionality. We made a recombinant L. jensenii 1153-1128 that expresses dAb-m36.4. All antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 were expressed by lactobacilli. However, we noted the smaller m36/m36.4 were expressed to higher levels, ≥3 μg/ml. All L. jensenii-expressed antibody fragments bound to gp120/CD4 complex; Lactobacillus-produced m36.4 inhibited HIV-1BaL in a neutralization assay. Using a TZM-bl assay, we characterized the breadth of neutralization of the m36.4. Delivery of dAbs by Lactobacillus could provide passive transfer of these antibodies to the mucosa and longevity at the site of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26950606

  19. The role of vaginal Lactobacillus Rhamnosus (Normogin®) in preventing Bacterial Vaginosis in women with history of recurrences, undergoing surgical menopause: a prospective pilot study.

    PubMed

    Parma, M; Dindelli, M; Caputo, L; Redaelli, A; Quaranta, L; Candiani, M

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a poly-microbial clinical syndrome, is the most common cause of vaginal symptoms among women. The recurrence rate of BV is up to 30% after traditional antimicrobial therapy. Lactobacillus rhamnosus vaginal tablets have demonstrated to be a reliable topical effective and safe treatment to reduce the BV recurrence rate. to assess topical long-lasting (6 months) Lactobacillus rhamnosus effectiveness in decreasing recurrences in women with positive anamnesis of recurrent BV and concomitant hypo-estrogenism as consequence of surgical menopause. A total of 22 consecutive patients affected by recurrent BV and treated for surgical menopause for benign pathology were enrolled. All women were treated with Lactobacillus rhamnosus vaginal tablets (Normogin(®)) according to the following protocol: 1 tablet/day for 6 days, than two tablets per week for 2 months and then one tablet once a week till 6 months. Of the 22 women enrolled only one has been lost after the first visit. A total of 21 cases were reported; 7 out of 21 had only one case of recurrence, while 2 out of 21 had two episodes of BV during the year successive to menopause. No side effects have been reported. Considering the low recurrence rate of BV during follow-up it seems that long-lasting treatment with vaginal tablets of Lactobacillus rhamnosus could reduce the BV recurrence also in women at high risk with positive history of pathology and undergoing surgical menopause with a safe profile. This study supports the use of vaginal Lactobacillus rhamnosus administration in high risk population without side effects.

  20. Comparison of Lactobacillus crispatus isolates from Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiomes with isolates from microbiomes containing bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmaksoud, Abdallah A.; Koparde, Vishal N.; Sheth, Nihar U.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Glascock, Abigail L.; Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Buck, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal lactobacilli can inhibit colonization by and growth of other bacteria, thereby preventing development of bacterial vaginosis (BV). Amongst the lactobacilli, Lactobacillus crispatus appears to be particularly effective at inhibiting growth of BV-associated bacteria. Nonetheless, some women who are colonized with this species can still develop clinical BV. Therefore, we sought to determine whether strains of L. crispatus that colonize women with lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microbiomes are distinct from strains that colonize women who develop BV. The genomes of L. crispatus isolates from four women with lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microbiomes ( < 1 % 16S rRNA reads above threshold from genera other than Lactobacillus) and four women with microbiomes containing BV-associated bacteria (>12 % 16S rRNA reads from bacterial taxa associated with BV) were sequenced and compared. Lactic acid production by the different strains was quantified. Phage induction in the strains was also analysed. There was considerable genetic diversity between strains, and several genes were exclusive to either the strains from Lactobacillus-dominated microbiomes or those containing BV-associated bacteria. Overall, strains from microbiomes dominated by lactobacilli did not differ from strains from microbiomes containing BV-associated bacteria with respect to lactic acid production. All of the strains contained multiple phage, but there was no clear distinction between the presence or absence of BV-associated bacteria with respect to phage-induced lysis. Genes found to be exclusive to the Lactobacillus-dominated versus BV-associated bacteria-containing microbiomes could play a role in the maintenance of vaginal health and the development of BV, respectively. PMID:26747455

  1. Comparison of Lactobacillus crispatus isolates from Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiomes with isolates from microbiomes containing bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abdelmaksoud, Abdallah A; Koparde, Vishal N; Sheth, Nihar U; Serrano, Myrna G; Glascock, Abigail L; Fettweis, Jennifer M; Strauss, Jerome F; Buck, Gregory A; Jefferson, Kimberly K

    2016-03-01

    Vaginal lactobacilli can inhibit colonization by and growth of other bacteria, thereby preventing development of bacterial vaginosis (BV). Amongst the lactobacilli, Lactobacillus crispatus appears to be particularly effective at inhibiting growth of BV-associated bacteria. Nonetheless, some women who are colonized with this species can still develop clinical BV. Therefore, we sought to determine whether strains of L. crispatus that colonize women with lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microbiomes are distinct from strains that colonize women who develop BV. The genomes of L. crispatus isolates from four women with lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microbiomes ( <1% 16S rRNA reads above threshold from genera other than Lactobacillus) and four women with microbiomes containing BV-associated bacteria (>12% 16S rRNA reads from bacterial taxa associated with BV) were sequenced and compared. Lactic acid production by the different strains was quantified. Phage induction in the strains was also analysed. There was considerable genetic diversity between strains, and several genes were exclusive to either the strains from Lactobacillus-dominated microbiomes or those containing BV-associated bacteria. Overall, strains from microbiomes dominated by lactobacilli did not differ from strains from microbiomes containing BV-associated bacteria with respect to lactic acid production. All of the strains contained multiple phage, but there was no clear distinction between the presence or absence of BV-associated bacteria with respect to phage-induced lysis. Genes found to be exclusive to the Lactobacillus-dominated versus BV-associated bacteria-containing microbiomes could play a role in the maintenance of vaginal health and the development of BV, respectively.

  2. Basic vaginal pH, bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis: prevalence in early pregnancy and risk of spontaneous preterm delivery, a prospective study in a low socioeconomic and multiethnic South American population.

    PubMed

    Krauss-Silva, Leticia; Almada-Horta, Antonio; Alves, Mariane B; Camacho, Karla G; Moreira, Maria Elizabeth L; Braga, Alcione

    2014-03-19

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) increases the risk of spontaneous preterm deliveries (PD) in developed countries. Its prevalence varies with ethnicity, socioeconomic conditions and gestational age. Aerobic vaginitis (AV) has also been implicated with spontaneous PD. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of asymptomatic BV, the accuracy of vaginal pH level to predict BV and to estimate the risk of spontaneous PD <34 and <37 weeks' gestation of BV and AV. Women attending prenatal public services in Rio de Janeiro were screened to select asymptomatic pregnant women, < 20 weeks' gestation, with no indication for elective PD and without risk factors of spontaneous PD. Vaginal smears of women with vaginal pH > = 4.5 were collected to determine the Nugent score; a sample of those smears was also classified according to a modified Donders' score. Primary outcomes were spontaneous PD < 34 and <37 weeks' gestation and abortion. Prevalence of asymptomatic BV was estimated in 28.1% (n = 1699); 42.4% of the smears were collected before 14 weeks' gestation. After an 8-week follow up, nearly 40% of the initially BV positive women became BV negative. The prevalence of BV among white and black women was 28.1% (95% CI: 24.6%-32.0%) and 32.5% (95% CI: 28.2%-37.2%), respectively. The sensitivity of vaginal pH= > 4.5 and = > 5.0 to predict BV status was 100% and 82%, correspondingly; the 5.0 cutoff value doubled the specificity, from 41% to 84%. The incidence of < 37 weeks' spontaneous PDs among BV pregnant women with a pH= > 4.5 was 3.8%. The RR of spontaneous PD < 34 and <37 weeks among BV women with pH > =4.5, as compared with those with intermediate state, were 1.24 and 1.86, respectively (Fisher's exact test, p value = 1; 0.52, respectively, both ns). No spontaneous case of PD or abortion was associated with severe or moderate AV. A high prevalence of asymptomatic BV was observed without statistically significant difference between black and white women. The RRs of

  3. Basic vaginal pH, bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis: prevalence in early pregnancy and risk of spontaneous preterm delivery, a prospective study in a low socioeconomic and multiethnic South American population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) increases the risk of spontaneous preterm deliveries (PD) in developed countries. Its prevalence varies with ethnicity, socioeconomic conditions and gestational age. Aerobic vaginitis (AV) has also been implicated with spontaneous PD. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of asymptomatic BV, the accuracy of vaginal pH level to predict BV and to estimate the risk of spontaneous PD <34 and <37 weeks’ gestation of BV and AV. Methods Women attending prenatal public services in Rio de Janeiro were screened to select asymptomatic pregnant women, < 20 weeks’ gestation, with no indication for elective PD and without risk factors of spontaneous PD. Vaginal smears of women with vaginal pH > = 4.5 were collected to determine the Nugent score; a sample of those smears was also classified according to a modified Donders’ score. Primary outcomes were spontaneous PD < 34 and <37 weeks’ gestation and abortion. Results Prevalence of asymptomatic BV was estimated in 28.1% (n = 1699); 42.4% of the smears were collected before 14 weeks’ gestation. After an 8-week follow up, nearly 40% of the initially BV positive women became BV negative. The prevalence of BV among white and black women was 28.1% (95% CI: 24.6%-32.0%) and 32.5% (95% CI: 28.2%-37.2%), respectively. The sensitivity of vaginal pH= > 4.5 and = > 5.0 to predict BV status was 100% and 82%, correspondingly; the 5.0 cutoff value doubled the specificity, from 41% to 84%. The incidence of < 37 weeks’ spontaneous PDs among BV pregnant women with a pH= > 4.5 was 3.8%. The RR of spontaneous PD < 34 and <37 weeks among BV women with pH > =4.5, as compared with those with intermediate state, were 1.24 and 1.86, respectively (Fisher’s exact test, p value = 1; 0.52, respectively, both ns). No spontaneous case of PD or abortion was associated with severe or moderate AV. Conclusions A high prevalence of asymptomatic BV was

  4. Vaginal Fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal fistula Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A vaginal fistula is an abnormal opening that connects your vagina to ... or urine to pass through your vagina. Vaginal fistulas can develop as a result of an injury, ...

  5. Vaginal Fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Vaginal fistula By Mayo Clinic Staff A vaginal fistula is an abnormal opening that connects your vagina to another organ, ... stool or urine to pass through your vagina. Vaginal fistulas can develop as a result of an ...

  6. Vaginal Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have ... that affect the vagina include sexually transmitted diseases, vaginal cancer, and vulvar cancer. Treatment of vaginal problems ...

  7. Enterococcus faecalis Inhibits Superantigen Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1-Induced Interleukin-8 from Human Vaginal Epithelial Cells through Tetramic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Brosnahan, Amanda J.; Merriman, Joseph A.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Ford, Bradley; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    The vaginal mucosa can be colonized by many bacteria including commensal organisms and potential pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Some strains of S. aureus produce the superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, which can penetrate the vaginal epithelium to cause toxic shock syndrome. We have observed that a female was mono-colonized with Enterococcus faecalis vaginally as tested in aerobic culture, even upon repeated culture for six months, suggesting this organism was negatively influencing colonization by other bacteria. In recent studies, we demonstrated an “outside-in” mechanism of cytokine signaling and consequent inflammation that facilitates the ability of potential pathogens to initiate infection from mucosal surfaces. Thus, we hypothesized that this strain of E. faecalis may make anti-inflammatory factors which block disease progression of more pathogenic organisms. E. faecalis MN1 inhibited interleukin-8 production from human vaginal epithelial cells in response to the vaginal pathogens Candida albicans, Gardnerella vaginalis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, as well as to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. We further demonstrated that this organism secretes two tetramic acid compounds which appear responsible for inhibition of interleukin-8 production, as well as inhibition of T cell proliferation due to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. Microbicides that include anti-inflammatory molecules, such as these tetramic acid compounds naturally produced by E. faecalis MN1, may be useful in prevention of diseases that develop from vaginal infections. PMID:23613823

  8. Enterococcus faecalis inhibits superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1-induced interleukin-8 from human vaginal epithelial cells through tetramic acids.

    PubMed

    Brosnahan, Amanda J; Merriman, Joseph A; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Ford, Bradley; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2013-01-01

    The vaginal mucosa can be colonized by many bacteria including commensal organisms and potential pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Some strains of S. aureus produce the superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, which can penetrate the vaginal epithelium to cause toxic shock syndrome. We have observed that a female was mono-colonized with Enterococcus faecalis vaginally as tested in aerobic culture, even upon repeated culture for six months, suggesting this organism was negatively influencing colonization by other bacteria. In recent studies, we demonstrated an "outside-in" mechanism of cytokine signaling and consequent inflammation that facilitates the ability of potential pathogens to initiate infection from mucosal surfaces. Thus, we hypothesized that this strain of E. faecalis may make anti-inflammatory factors which block disease progression of more pathogenic organisms. E. faecalis MN1 inhibited interleukin-8 production from human vaginal epithelial cells in response to the vaginal pathogens Candida albicans, Gardnerella vaginalis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, as well as to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. We further demonstrated that this organism secretes two tetramic acid compounds which appear responsible for inhibition of interleukin-8 production, as well as inhibition of T cell proliferation due to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. Microbicides that include anti-inflammatory molecules, such as these tetramic acid compounds naturally produced by E. faecalis MN1, may be useful in prevention of diseases that develop from vaginal infections.

  9. Evaluation of -2 RANTES vaginal microbicide formulations in a nonhuman primate simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge model.

    PubMed

    Kish-Catalone, Tina; Pal, Ranajit; Parrish, John; Rose, Nicholas; Hocker, Lindsey; Hudacik, Lauren; Reitz, Marvin; Gallo, Robert; Devico, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A potential strategy to combat the worldwide AIDS epidemic is to develop a vaginal microbicide that prevents the sexual transmission of HIV-1. One approach for preventing vaginal HIV transmission is to block the viral coreceptor CCR5 with naturally occurring chemokine ligands. In this study, we used a cynomolgus macaque model to evaluate whether a variant of the CCR5 ligand RANTES (-2 RANTES), tested alone or in a nonphospholipid liposome carrier (Novasomes 7474), blocks vaginal challenge with a CCR5-tropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV(162P3)). When tested in vitro, the synthetic chemokine potently inhibited SHIV(162P3) infection of cynomolgus macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Colposcopic examinations of treated animals and histological examination of cervicovaginal biopsies showed minimal signs of tissue inflammation following vaginal application of Novasomes 7474, -2 RANTES formulated in Novasomes 7474, or -2 RANTES alone. Following vaginal challenge with SHIV(162P3), complete protection was observed in four of six animals treated vaginally with -2 RANTES (0.13 mM) formulated in Novasomes 7474. However, the same proportion of animals was protected by treatment with Novasomes 7474 carrier alone. Two of five animals treated with 0.5 mM -2 RANTES in PBS were protected from infection. Further, all animals were infected when treated with lower chemokine concentrations. These findings indicate that natural CCR5 ligands may have limited efficacy in stringent nonhuman primate models for vaginal infection. In comparison, liposomal agents such as Novasomes 7474 provide comparatively robust protection against vaginal transmission.

  10. A study of the osmotic characteristics, water permeability, and cryoprotectant permeability of human vaginal immune cells.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zhiquan; Hughes, Sean M; Fang, Cifeng; Huang, Jinghua; Fu, Baiwen; Zhao, Gang; Fialkow, Michael; Lentz, Gretchen; Hladik, Florian; Gao, Dayong

    2016-04-01

    Cryopreservation of specimens taken from the genital tract of women is important for studying mucosal immunity during HIV prevention trials. However, it is unclear whether the current, empirically developed cryopreservation procedures for peripheral blood cells are also ideal for genital specimens. The optimal cryopreservation protocol depends on the cryobiological features of the cells. Thus, we obtained tissue specimens from vaginal repair surgeries, isolated and flow cytometry-purified immune cells, and determined fundamental cryobiological characteristics of vaginal CD3(+) T cells and CD14(+) macrophages using a microfluidic device. The osmotically inactive volumes of the two cell types (Vb) were determined relative to the initial cell volume (V0) by exposing the cells to hypotonic and hypertonic saline solutions, evaluating the equilibrium volume, and applying the Boyle van't Hoff relationship. The cell membrane permeability to water (Lp) and to four different cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions (Ps) at room temperature were also measured. Results indicated Vb values of 0.516 V0 and 0.457 V0 for mucosal T cells and macrophages, respectively. Lp values at room temperature were 0.196 and 0.295 μm/min/atm for T cells and macrophages, respectively. Both cell types had high Ps values for the three CPAs, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), propylene glycol (PG) and ethylene glycol (EG) (minimum of 0.418 × 10(-3) cm/min), but transport of the fourth CPA, glycerol, occurred 50-150 times more slowly. Thus, DMSO, PG, and EG are better options than glycerol in avoiding severe cell volume excursion and osmotic injury during CPA addition and removal for cryopreservation of human vaginal immune cells. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. A study of the osmotic characteristics, water permeability, and cryoprotectant permeability of human vaginal immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Hughes, Sean M.; Fang, Cifeng; Huang, Jinghua; Fu, Baiwen; Zhao, Gang; Fialkow, Michael; Lentz, Gretchen; Hladik, Florian; Gao, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Cryopreservation of specimens taken from the genital tract of women is important for studying mucosal immunity during HIV prevention trials. However, it is unclear whether the current, empirically developed cryopreservation procedures for peripheral blood cells are also ideal for genital specimens. The optimal cryopreservation protocol depends on the cryobiological features of the cells. Thus, we obtained tissue specimens from vaginal repair surgeries, isolated and flow cytometry-purified immune cells, and determined fundamental cryobiological characteristics of vaginal CD3+ T cells and CD14+ macrophages using a microfluidic device. The osmotically inactive volumes of the two cell types (Vb) were determined relative to the initial cell volume (V0) by exposing the cells to hypotonic and hypertonic saline solutions, evaluating the equilibrium volume, and applying the Boyle van't Hoff relationship. The cell membrane permeability to water (Lp) and to four different cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions (Ps) at room temperature were also measured. Results indicated Vb values of 0.516 V0 and 0.457 V0 for mucosal T cells and macrophages, respectively. Lp values at room temperature were 0.196 and 0.295 μm/min/atm for T cells and macrophages, respectively. Both cell types had high Ps values for the three CPAs, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), propylene glycol (PG) and ethylene glycol (EG) (minimum of 0.418 × 10−3 cm/min), but transport of the fourth CPA, glycerol, occurred 50–150 times more slowly. Thus, DMSO, PG, and EG are better options than glycerol in avoiding severe cell volume excursion and osmotic injury during CPA addition and removal for cryopreservation of human vaginal immune cells. PMID:26976225

  12. In vitro inhibition of human papillomavirus following use of a carrageenan-containing vaginal gel.

    PubMed

    Novetsky, Akiva P; Keller, Marla J; Gradissimo, Ana; Chen, Zigui; Morgan, Stephanie L; Xue, Xiaonan; Strickler, Howard D; Fernández-Romero, José A; Burk, Robert; Einstein, Mark H

    2016-11-01

    To assess in vitro efficacy of Divine 9, a carrageenan-based vaginal lubricant that is being studied as a microbicide to inhibit HPV16 pseudovirus (PsV) infection. Sexually active US women between 19 and 35years without prior HPV vaccination or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia were instructed to use Divine 9 vaginally with an applicator either before sex only or before and after intercourse. Women who applied a single dose of gel returned for cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) collection 1, 4 or 8-12h after intercourse versus those who applied gel before and after intercourse returned 1, 4 or 8-12h after the second gel dose. Carrageenan concentrations were assessed using an ELISA assay and the inhibitory activity was assessed using a PsV-based neutralization assay against HPV16 infection. Carrageenan concentrations and the percentage of PsV16 inhibition were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Thirteen women were enrolled and thirty specimens from different time-points were assessed. 87% of CVL samples had detectable carrageenans with levels decreasing over time from intercourse. 93% of CVL samples had detectable PsV16 inhibition with median inhibition of 97.5%. PsV16 inhibition decreased over time, but remained high, with median inhibition of 98.1%, 97.4% and 83.4% at 1, 4 and 8-12h, respectively. Higher carrageenan concentrations were associated with higher levels of PsV16 inhibition (rho=0.69). This is the first report of a human study investigating in vitro HPV inhibition of a carrageenan-based vaginal lubricant with CVL collected after sexual intercourse. We demonstrate excellent efficacy in preventing PsV16 infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bacterial Respiratory Infections Complicating Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Charles; Anderson, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Opportunistic bacterial and fungal infections of the lower respiratory tract, most commonly those caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Pneumocystis jirovecii, remain the major causes of mortality in those infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Bacterial respiratory pathogens most prevalent in those infected with HIV, other than M. tuberculosis, represent the primary focus of the current review with particular emphasis on the pneumococcus, the leading cause of mortality due to HIV infection in the developed world. Additional themes include (1) risk factors; (2) the predisposing effects of HIV-mediated suppression on pulmonary host defenses, possibly intensified by smoking; (3) clinical and laboratory diagnosis, encompassing assessment of disease severity and outcome; and (4) antibiotic therapy. The final section addresses current recommendations with respect to pneumococcal immunization in the context of HIV infection, including an overview of the rationale underpinning the current "prime-boost" immunization strategy based on sequential administration of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine 23.

  14. Concordant Oral and Vaginal Human Papillomavirus Infection in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kedarisetty, Suraj; Orosco, Ryan K; Hecht, Avram S; Chang, David C; Weissbrod, Philip A; Coffey, Charles S

    2016-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common infection in adults, with tropism for sites in the head and neck and the genital tracts. To date, few studies have addressed concurrent infection in these sites. To understand the prevalence, characteristics, and concordance of HPV infections in the oral and vaginal regions. This study was a retrospective analysis of cross-sectional survey data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009-2012. The database was reviewed for all women aged 18 to 69 years with available oral and vaginal HPV DNA screening data. The study was performed from August 1, 2014, to November 1, 2014. Data analysis was performed from November 1, 2014, to June 30, 2015. Logistic regression models were constructed to identify factors associated with infection. Covariates for multivariate analysis included age, income to poverty ratio, number of prior sexual partners, number of prior oral sex partners, and having recent oral sex partners. Dual infection was defined as having an infection of any serotype in both the oral and vaginal HPV regions. Concordant infection was defined as an infection of matching serotype in both locations. A total of 3463 women were identified (mean [SD] age, 37.5 [12.1] years). Racial distribution was 1341 white (38.7%), 786 black (22.7%), 554 Mexican American (16.0%), 378 other Hispanic (10.9%), and 404 self-identified as other (11.7%). Vaginal HPV infection was present in 1586 (45.2%) and oral HPV infection in 141 (4.1%). Dual infection was identified in 107 (3.0%) of all patients, and concordant infection was observed in 41 (1.1%). The prevalence of dual infection was 75.9% in those with oral infection and 6.8% in those with vaginal infection. On multivariate analysis, age (30-50 years) and higher income to poverty ratios had negative associations with dual and concordant infections. A new sexual partner within the last year was positively associated with dual infection (odds ratio, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.03-5.02; P

  15. Vaginal colonisation by probiotic lactobacilli and clinical outcome in women conventionally treated for bacterial vaginosis and yeast infection.

    PubMed

    Pendharkar, Sonal; Brandsborg, Erik; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold; Larsson, Per-Göran

    2015-07-03

    The aim of this study was to investigate the colonisation by lactobacilli and clinical outcome in women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) and recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (R-VVC) receiving antibiotic or anti-fungal treatment in combination with the probiotic EcoVag® capsules. A total of 40 Scandinavian women diagnosed with BV or VVC on the basis of Amsel's criteria or clinical symptoms were consecutively recruited in two pilot open label clinical trials. In trial I, women with BV were treated with clindamycin and metronidazole followed by vaginal EcoVag® capsules, containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus DSM 14870 and Lactobacillus gasseri DSM 14869, for 5 consecutive days after each antibiotic treatment. In trial II, women were recruited in three groups as follows: women with BV receiving clindamycin and metronidazole treatment together with a prolonged administration of EcoVag® (10 consecutive days after each antibiotic treatment followed by weekly administration of capsules for next four months), women with R-VVC receiving extended fluconazole and EcoVag® treatment, and women receiving extended fluconazole treatments only. The difference in frequency of isolation of EcoVag® strains or other lactobacilli between groups was compared by Fisher's exact test. The 6-month cure rate for BV was 50 % in trial I while both the 6- and 12-month cure rates were 67 % in trial II. The 6- and 12-month cure rates for VVC were 100 % and 89 % in women receiving fluconazole and EcoVag®, and 100 % and 70 % in women receiving fluconazole only. The frequency of isolation of any Lactobacillus species during the course of the study was associated with cure of BV in trial I and II, whereas the frequency of isolation of EcoVag® strains was significantly associated with the cure of BV in trial II only. As previously observed, a change in sexual partner was associated with relapse of BV with an Odds ratio of 77 (95 % CI: 2.665 to 2225). The study suggests that the treatment with

  16. Experimental Models of Vaginal Candidiasis and Their Relevance to Human Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Jack D.

    2016-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a high-incidence disease seriously affecting the quality of life of women worldwide, particularly in its chronic, recurrent forms (RVVC), and with no definitive cure or preventive measure. Experimental studies in currently used rat and mouse models of vaginal candidiasis have generated a large mass of data on pathogenicity determinants and inflammation and immune responses of potential importance for the control of human pathology. However, reflection is necessary about the relevance of these rodent models to RVVC. Here we examine the chemical, biochemical, and biological factors that determine or contrast the forms of the disease in rodent models and in women and highlight the differences between them. We also appeal for approaches to improve or replace the current models in order to enhance their relevance to human infection. PMID:26883592

  17. Experimental Models of Vaginal Candidiasis and Their Relevance to Human Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Cassone, Antonio; Sobel, Jack D

    2016-05-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a high-incidence disease seriously affecting the quality of life of women worldwide, particularly in its chronic, recurrent forms (RVVC), and with no definitive cure or preventive measure. Experimental studies in currently used rat and mouse models of vaginal candidiasis have generated a large mass of data on pathogenicity determinants and inflammation and immune responses of potential importance for the control of human pathology. However, reflection is necessary about the relevance of these rodent models to RVVC. Here we examine the chemical, biochemical, and biological factors that determine or contrast the forms of the disease in rodent models and in women and highlight the differences between them. We also appeal for approaches to improve or replace the current models in order to enhance their relevance to human infection.

  18. In vitro antifungal activity of Myracrodruon urundeuva Allemão against human vaginal Candida species.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Fernando A DE; Rorato, Vanessa C; Almeida-Apolonio, Adriana A; Rodrigues, Allan B; Barros, Aline L DE; Sangalli, Andréia; Arena, Arielle C; Mota, Jonas S; Grisolia, Alexéia B; Oliveira, Kelly M P DE

    2017-07-24

    Myracrodruon urundeuva is a plant native to Brazil, which is used by the indigenous population for the treatment of candidiasis. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antifungal activity of extract against human vaginal Candida species and evaluate the possible toxicological activities of M. urundeuva. Initially, ethanol extracts, ethyl acetate fractions, and hydroalcoholic fractions of the bark and leaf of M. urundeuva were used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration. The extracts that showed antifungal activity were characterized by liquid chromatography and subjected to toxicity assessment. Toxic, cytotoxic, genotoxic, and mutagenic testing were performed using Allium cepa and Ames assays with the ethanol extracts of the bark and leaves. Hemolytic activity was evaluated in erythrocytes and acute toxicity in rats. The ethanol bark extracts showed best activity against Candida albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis ATCC (4-512 µg/mL). Chemical characterization indicated the presence of flavonoids and tannins in the extracts. Hemolytic activity, genotoxicity, and mutagenicity were not observed. The results of the Ames and A. cepa tests were also in agreement, ethanol bark extracts and ethanol leaf extracts of M. urundeuva showed absence of mutagenic activity. Similar results were observed in the A. cepa assay and acute toxicity test in rats. M. urundeuva bark extracts showed potential for the treatment of vaginal infections caused Candida species, as a topical.

  19. Ex vivo 2D and 3D HSV-2 infection model using human normal vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yaqi; Yang, Yan; Guo, Juanjuan; Dai, Ying; Ye, Lina; Qiu, Jianbin; Zeng, Zhihong; Wu, Xiaoting; Xing, Yanmei; Long, Xiang; Wu, Xufeng; Ye, Lin; Wang, Shubin; Li, Hui

    2017-02-28

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infects human genital mucosa and establishes life-long latent infection. It is unmet need to establish a human cell-based microphysiological system for virus biology and anti-viral drug discovery. One of barriers is lacking of culture system of normal epithelial cells in vitro over decades. In this study, we established human normal vaginal epithelial cell (HNVEC) culture using co-culture system. HNVEC cells were then propagated rapidly and stably in a defined culture condition. HNVEC cells exhibited a normal diploid karyotype and formed the well-defined and polarized spheres in matrigel three-dimension (3D) culture, while malignant cells (HeLa) formed disorganized and nonpolar solid spheres. HNVEC cells had a normal cellular response to DNA damage and had no transforming property using soft agar assays. HNVEC expressed epithelial marker cytokeratin 14 (CK14) and p63, but not cytokeratin 18 (CK18). Next, we reconstructed HNVEC-derived 3D vaginal epithelium using air-liquid interface (ALI) culture. This 3D vaginal epithelium has the basal and apical layers with expression of epithelial markers as its originated human vaginal tissue. Finally, we established an HSV-2 infection model based on the reconstructed 3D vaginal epithelium. After inoculation of HSV-2 (G strain) at apical layer of the reconstructed 3D vaginal epithelium, we observed obvious pathological effects gradually spreading from the apical layer to basal layer with expression of a viral protein. Thus, we established an ex vivo 2D and 3D HSV-2 infection model that can be used for HSV-2 virology and anti-viral drug discovery.

  20. Supplementation of standard antibiotic therapy with oral probiotics for bacterial vaginosis and aerobic vaginitis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Heczko, Piotr B; Tomusiak, Anna; Adamski, Paweł; Jakimiuk, Artur J; Stefański, Grzegorz; Mikołajczyk-Cichońska, Aleksandra; Suda-Szczurek, Magdalena; Strus, Magdalena

    2015-12-03

    This multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed to determine whether the use of oral probiotic preparation (prOVag®) containing three Lactobacillus strains together with standard metronidazole treatment and also targeted antibiotic treatment (following the failure of metronidazole therapy) could reduce the recurrence rates of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and aerobic vaginitis (AV). Patients at private gynaecological clinics in Poland with histories of recurrent BV/AV and current symptoms were randomly allocated to receive metronidazole and probiotic or placebo, and assessed monthly on visits II and III-V. The total number of study visits was 5-6 (I, II, II bis - if applicable, III, IV, V). One probiotic or placebo capsule was administered with metronidazole/targeted antibiotic twice daily for 10 days; during follow up, patients took one capsule daily for 10 days perimenstrually. Clinical examination and vaginal swabbing were performed at each visit. Primary outcomes were clinical or microbiological BV/AV recurrence and probiotic safety. Secondary outcomes were vaginal pH, Nugent score, and Lactobacillus counts in the vaginal microbiota. Safety analysis was performed in 578 (probiotic, n = 285; placebo, n = 293) 18-50-year-old women who were randomised. BV/AV was confirmed microbiologically in 241 (probiotic, n = 118; placebo, n = 123) participants, who continued the trial. Data from 154 (probiotic, n = 73; placebo, n = 81) participants who completed the study were analysed to determine the efficacy of prOVag. Additional analyses included 37 (probiotic, n = 22; placebo, n = 15) participants who received targeted antibiotics and probiotics or placebo. prOVag lengthened the time to clinical relapse of BV/AV symptoms up to 51 % (p < 0.05) compared with placebo; AV relapse was delayed by up to 76 % (p < 0.05). Probiotic use also reduced and maintained low vaginal pH and Nugent score, and increased

  1. Characterization of culturable vaginal Lactobacillus species among women with and without bacterial vaginosis from the United States and India: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Madhivanan, Purnima; Raphael, Eva; Rumphs, Alnecia; Krupp, Karl; Ravi, Kavitha; Srinivas, Vijaya; Arun, Anjali; Reingold, Arthur L; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Riley, Lee W

    2014-07-01

    Lactobacillus species play an integral part in the health of the vaginal microbiota. We compared vaginal Lactobacillus species in women from India and the USA with and without bacterial vaginosis (BV). Between July 2009 and November 2010, a cross-sectional study was conducted among 40 women attending a women's health clinic in Mysore, India, and a sexually transmitted diseases clinic in San Francisco, USA. Women were diagnosed with BV using Amsel's criteria and the Nugent score. Lactobacillus 16S rDNA was sequenced to speciate the cultured isolates. Ten Indian and 10 US women without BV were compared with an equal number of women with BV. Lactobacilli were isolated from all healthy women, but from only 10% of Indian and 50% of US women with BV. 16S rDNA from 164 Lactobacillus colonies was sequenced from healthy women (126 colonies) and women with BV (38 colonies). Seven cultivable Lactobacillus species were isolated from 11 Indian women and nine species from 15 US women. The majority of Lactobacillus species among Indian women were L. crispatus (25.0%), L. jensenii (25.0%) and L. reuteri (16.7%). Among US women, L. crispatus (32.0%), L. jensenii (20.0%) and L. coleohominis (12.0%) predominated. L. jensenii and L. crispatus dominated the vaginal flora of healthy Indian and US women. Indian women appeared to have a higher percentage of obligate heterofermentative species, suggesting the need for a larger degree of metabolic flexibility and a more challenging vaginal environment. © 2014 The Authors.

  2. Management of persistent vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Nyirjesy, Paul

    2014-12-01

    With vaginitis remaining a common condition that leads women to seek care, it is not surprising that some women develop chronic vulvovaginal problems that are difficult to diagnose and treat. With a differential diagnosis that encompasses vulvar disorders and infectious and noninfectious causes of vaginitis, accurate diagnosis is the cornerstone of choosing effective therapy. Evaluation should include a symptom-specific history, careful vulvar and vaginal examination, and office-based tests (vaginal pH, amine test, saline and 10% potassium hydroxide microscopy). Ancillary tests, especially yeast culture with speciation, are frequently crucial to obtaining a correct diagnosis. A heavy but normal physiologic discharge can be determined by excluding other causes. With vulvovaginal candidiasis, differentiating between Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida infection has important treatment ramifications. Most patients with C albicans infections can be successfully treated with maintenance antifungal therapy, usually with fluconazole. Although many non-albicans Candida, particularly Candida glabrata, may at times be innocent bystanders, vaginal boric acid therapy is an effective first choice for many true non-albicans Candida infections. Recurrent bacterial vaginosis, a difficult therapeutic challenge, can often be controlled with maintenance therapy. Multiple options, especially high-dose tinidazole, have been used for metronidazole-resistant trichomoniasis. With the aging of the U.S. population, atrophic vaginitis and desquamative inflammatory vaginitis, both associated with hypoestrogenism, are encountered frequently in women with persistent vaginitis.

  3. Vaginal disorders.

    PubMed

    Soderberg, S F

    1986-05-01

    Chronic vaginitis is the most common vaginal disorder. Dogs with vaginitis show no signs of systemic illness but often lick at the vulva and have purulent or hemorrhagic vaginal discharges. Vaginitis is most commonly secondary to a noninfectious inciting factor such as congenital vaginal anomalies, clitoral hypertrophy, foreign bodies, trauma to the vaginal mucosa, or vaginal tumors. Inspection of the caudal vagina and vestibule both visually and digitally will often reveal the source of vaginal irritation. Vaginal cytology is used to establish the stage of the estrous cycle as well as distinguish uterine from vaginal sources of discharge. Vaginal cultures are used to establish the predominant offending organism associated with vaginal discharges and may be used as a guide for selection of a therapeutic agent. Vaginitis is best managed by removing the inciting cause and treating the area locally with antiseptic douches. Congenital malformations at the vestibulovaginal or vestibulovulvar junction may prevent normal intromission. Affected bitches may be reluctant to breed naturally because of pain. Such defects are detected best by digital examination. Congenital vaginal defects may be corrected by digital or surgical means. Prolapse of tissue through the lips of the vulva may be caused by clitoral hypertrophy, vaginal hyperplasia, or vaginal tumors. Enlargement of clitoral tissue is the result of endogenous or exogenous sources of androgens. Treatment of this condition includes removal of the androgen source and/or surgical removal of clitoral tissue. Vaginal hyperplasia is detected during proestrus or estrus of young bitches. Hyperplastic tissue will regress during diestrus. Tissue that is excessively traumatized and/or prolapse of the entire vaginal circumference may be removed surgically. Ovariohysterectomy may be used to prevent recurrence. Vaginal tumors are detected most often in older intact bitches. Such tumors are generally of smooth muscle or fibrous

  4. The vaginal microbiome, vaginal anti-microbial defence mechanisms and the clinical challenge of reducing infection-related preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Witkin, S S

    2015-01-01

    Ascending bacterial infection is implicated in about 40-50% of preterm births. The human vaginal microbiota in most women is dominated by lactobacilli. In women whose vaginal microbiota is not lactobacilli-dominated anti-bacterial defence mechanisms are reduced. The enhanced proliferation of pathogenic bacteria plus degradation of the cervical barrier increase bacterial passage into the endometrium and amniotic cavity and trigger preterm myometrial contractions. Evaluation of protocols to detect the absence of lactobaciili dominance in pregnant women by self-measuring vaginal pH, coupled with measures to promote growth of lactobacilli are novel prevention strategies that may reduce the occurrence of preterm birth in low-resource areas. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  5. Chlamydia caviae infection alters abundance but not composition of the guinea pig vaginal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Neuendorf, Elizabeth; Gajer, Pawel; Bowlin, Anne K; Marques, Patricia X; Ma, Bing; Yang, Hongqiu; Fu, Li; Humphrys, Michael S; Forney, Larry J; Myers, Garry S A; Bavoil, Patrik M; Rank, Roger G; Ravel, Jacques

    2015-06-01

    In humans, the vaginal microbiota is thought to be the first line of defense again pathogens including Chlamydia trachomatis. The guinea pig has been extensively used as a model to study chlamydial infection because it shares anatomical and physiological similarities with humans, such as a squamous vaginal epithelium as well as some of the long-term outcomes caused by chlamydial infection. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the guinea pig-C. caviae model of genital infection as a surrogate for studying the role of the vaginal microbiota in the early steps of C. trachomatis infection in humans. We used culture-independent molecular methods to characterize the relative and absolute abundance of bacterial phylotypes in the guinea pig vaginal microbiota in animals non-infected, mock-infected or infected by C. caviae. We showed that the guinea pig and human vaginal microbiotas are of different bacterial composition and abundance. Chlamydia caviae infection had a profound effect on the absolute abundance of bacterial phylotypes but not on the composition of the guinea pig vaginal microbiota. Our findings compromise the validity of the guinea pig-C. caviae model to study the role of the vaginal microbiota during the early steps of sexually transmitted infection. © FEMS 2015.

  6. Chlamydia caviae infection alters abundance but not composition of the guinea pig vaginal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Neuendorf, Elizabeth; Gajer, Pawel; Bowlin, Anne K.; Marques, Patricia X.; Ma, Bing; Yang, Hongqiu; Fu, Li; Humphrys, Michael S.; Forney, Larry J.; Myers, Garry S.A.; Bavoil, Patrik M.; Rank, Roger G.; Ravel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    In humans, the vaginal microbiota is thought to be the first line of defense again pathogens including Chlamydia trachomatis. The guinea pig has been extensively used as a model to study chlamydial infection because it shares anatomical and physiological similarities with humans, such as a squamous vaginal epithelium as well as some of the long-term outcomes caused by chlamydial infection. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the guinea pig-C. caviae model of genital infection as a surrogate for studying the role of the vaginal microbiota in the early steps of C. trachomatis infection in humans. We used culture-independent molecular methods to characterize the relative and absolute abundance of bacterial phylotypes in the guinea pig vaginal microbiota in animals non-infected, mock-infected or infected by C. caviae. We showed that the guinea pig and human vaginal microbiotas are of different bacterial composition and abundance. Chlamydia caviae infection had a profound effect on the absolute abundance of bacterial phylotypes but not on the composition of the guinea pig vaginal microbiota. Our findings compromise the validity of the guinea pig-C. caviae model to study the role of the vaginal microbiota during the early steps of sexually transmitted infection. PMID:25761873

  7. Bacterial biofilms in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Probert, H M; Gibson, G R

    2002-09-01

    Microbial biofilms were first described in 1936 and subsequent research has unveiled their ubiquity and physiological distinction from free-living (planktonic) microorganisms. In light of their emerging significance this review examines the bacterial biofilms within the human gastrointestinal tract. Attention is paid to the nature of these mucosally- associated populations, focusing on the protected environment afforded by the continual secretion of mucus by host epithelial cells. It also examines the attributes possessed by various bacterial species that facilitate habitation of this microenvironment. Additionally, contrasts are drawn between planktonic bacteria of the lumen and sessile (biofilm) bacteria growing in close association with host cells and food particles. In particular the different fermentation profiles exhibited by these two fractions are discussed. The potential role of these communities in host health and disease, as well as the stabilisation of the lumenal population, is also considered. Reference is made to the state of mutualism that exists between these little understood populations and the host epithelia, thus highlighting their ecological significance in terms of gastrointestinal health.

  8. Biological and Technical Variables Affecting Immunoassay Recovery of Cytokines from Human Serum and Simulated Vaginal Fluid: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The increase of proinflammatory cytokines in vaginal secretions may serve as a surrogate marker of unwanted inflammatory reaction to microbicide products topically applied for the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV-1. Interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 have been proposed as indicators of inflammation and increased risk of HIV-1 transmission; however, the lack of information regarding detection platforms optimal for vaginal fluids and interlaboratory variation limit their use for microbicide evaluation and other clinical applications. This study examines fluid matrix variants relevant to vaginal sampling techniques and proposes a model for interlaboratory comparisons across current cytokine detection technologies. IL-1β and IL-6 standards were measured by 12 laboratories in four countries, using 14 immunoassays and four detection platforms based on absorbance, chemiluminescence, electrochemiluminescence, and fluorescence. International reference preparations of cytokines with defined biological activity were spiked into (1) a defined medium simulating the composition of human vaginal fluid at pH 4.5 and 7.2, (2) physiologic salt solutions (phosphate-buffered saline and saline) commonly used for vaginal lavage sampling in clinical studies of cytokines, and (3) human blood serum. Assays were assessed for reproducibility, linearity, accuracy, and significantly detectable fold difference in cytokine level. Factors with significant impact on cytokine recovery were determined by Kruskal−Wallis analysis of variance with Dunn’s multiple comparison test and multiple regression models. All assays showed acceptable intra-assay reproducibility; however, most were associated with significant interlaboratory variation. The smallest reliably detectable cytokine differences (P < 0.05) derived from pooled interlaboratory data varied from 1.5- to 26-fold depending on assay, cytokine, and matrix type. IL-6 but not IL-1β determinations were lower in both saline

  9. Menopause and the vaginal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Muhleisen, Alicia L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2016-09-01

    For over a century it has been well documented that bacteria in the vagina maintain vaginal homeostasis, and that an imbalance or dysbiosis may be associated with poor reproductive and gynecologic health outcomes. Vaginal microbiota are of particular significance to postmenopausal women and may have a profound effect on vulvovaginal atrophy, vaginal dryness, sexual health and overall quality of life. As molecular-based techniques have evolved, our understanding of the diversity and complexity of this bacterial community has expanded. The objective of this review is to compare the changes that have been identified in the vaginal microbiota of menopausal women, outline alterations in the microbiome associated with specific menopausal symptoms, and define how hormone replacement therapy impacts the vaginal microbiome and menopausal symptoms; it concludes by considering the potential of probiotics to reinstate vaginal homeostasis following menopause. This review details the studies that support the role of Lactobacillus species in maintaining vaginal homeostasis and how the vaginal microbiome structure in postmenopausal women changes with decreasing levels of circulating estrogen. In addition, the associated transformations in the microanatomical features of the vaginal epithelium that can lead to vaginal symptoms associated with menopause are described. Furthermore, hormone replacement therapy directly influences the dominance of Lactobacillus in the microbiota and can resolve vaginal symptoms. Oral and vaginal probiotics hold great promise and initial studies complement the findings of previous research efforts concerning menopause and the vaginal microbiome; however, additional trials are required to determine the efficacy of bacterial therapeutics to modulate or restore vaginal homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The absorption and uptake of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone through vaginal subcutaneous injections - a pharmacokinetic study

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chao-Chin; Kuo, Hsin-Chih; Hsu, Chao-Tien; Gu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    Background Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) has been routinely used for ovulation induction. Because of rapid clearance of the hormone, FSH is commonly administered by daily intramuscular or subcutaneous injections in in-vitro fertilization (IVF). To reduce the number of visits to the clinic, an intermittent vaginal injection of rhFSH every 3 days employing the concepts of mesotherapy and uterine first-pass effect was invented and has successfully been applied in women receiving IVF treatment. This study was designed to monitor the pharmacokinetic pattern of rhFSH administered vaginally. Methods Twelve healthy women with regular ovulatory cycles were recruited. All volunteers received gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist to suppress pituitary function and were assigned to receive single dose recombinant human FSH (rhFSH, Puregon 300) either using conventional abdominal subcutaneous injection or vaginal subcutaneous injection in a randomized cross-over study. Serum samples were collected at pre- scheduled time intervals after injections of rhFSH to determine immunoreactive FSH levels. Pharmacokinetic parameters characterizing rate [maximal plasma concentrations (Cmax) and time of maximal plasma concentrations (tmax)] and extent [area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and clearance] of absorption of rhFSH were compared. Results Vaginal injection of rhFSH was well tolerated and no drug-related adverse reaction was noted. Our analysis revealed that tmax was significantly earlier (mean 6.67 versus 13.33 hours) and Cmax was significantly higher (mean 17.77 versus 13.96 IU/L) in vaginal versus abdominal injections. The AUC0-∞ was 1640 versus 1134 IU·hour/L in vaginal and abdominal injections, respectively. Smaller plasma elimination rate constant (0.011 versus 0.016 hour-1), longer mean residence time (106.58 versus 70.47 hours), and slower total body clearance (292.2 versus 400.1 mL/hour) were also found in vaginal injection. Conclusion The vaginal

  11. The absorption and uptake of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone through vaginal subcutaneous injections--a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chao-Chin; Kuo, Hsin-Chih; Hsu, Chao-Tien; Gu, Qing

    2009-10-07

    Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) has been routinely used for ovulation induction. Because of rapid clearance of the hormone, FSH is commonly administered by daily intramuscular or subcutaneous injections in in-vitro fertilization (IVF). To reduce the number of visits to the clinic, an intermittent vaginal injection of rhFSH every 3 days employing the concepts of mesotherapy and uterine first-pass effect was invented and has successfully been applied in women receiving IVF treatment. This study was designed to monitor the pharmacokinetic pattern of rhFSH administered vaginally. Twelve healthy women with regular ovulatory cycles were recruited. All volunteers received gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist to suppress pituitary function and were assigned to receive single dose recombinant human FSH (rhFSH, Puregon 300) either using conventional abdominal subcutaneous injection or vaginal subcutaneous injection in a randomized cross-over study. Serum samples were collected at pre- scheduled time intervals after injections of rhFSH to determine immunoreactive FSH levels. Pharmacokinetic parameters characterizing rate [maximal plasma concentrations (Cmax) and time of maximal plasma concentrations (tmax)] and extent [area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and clearance] of absorption of rhFSH were compared. Vaginal injection of rhFSH was well tolerated and no drug-related adverse reaction was noted. Our analysis revealed that tmax was significantly earlier (mean 6.67 versus 13.33 hours) and Cmax was significantly higher (mean 17.77 versus 13.96 IU/L) in vaginal versus abdominal injections. The AUC(0-infinity) was 1640 versus 1134 IU hour/L in vaginal and abdominal injections, respectively. Smaller plasma elimination rate constant (0.011 versus 0.016 hour-1), longer mean residence time (106.58 versus 70.47 hours), and slower total body clearance (292.2 versus 400.1 mL/hour) were also found in vaginal injection. The vaginal injection mode elicited a rapid

  12. Intermediate vaginal flora is associated with HIV prevalence as strongly as bacterial vaginosis in a cross-sectional study of participants screened for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Guédou, Fernand Aimé; Van Damme, Lut; Mirembe, Florence; Solomon, Suniti; Becker, Marissa; Deese, Jennifer; Crucitti, Tania; Alary, Michel

    2012-11-01

    The authors analysed data from female sex workers screened prior to participation in a microbicide trial to examine the association between prevalent vaginal flora abnormalities and HIV infection, with special emphasis on the role of the intermediate vaginal flora (IVF) in this association. Data from the Kampala, Cotonou, Chennai and Mudhol/Jamkhandi sites were analysed. Participants were interviewed and provided blood for HIV and syphilis antibody testing, genital samples for the diagnosis of vaginal flora abnormalities (using Nugent score) and other reproductive tract infections. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate the HIV prevalence ratio (PR) in relation to IVF and bacterial vaginosis (BV). Among 1367 women, BV, IVF and HIV prevalences were 47.6% (95% CI=45.0% to 50.3%), 19.2% (95% CI=17.1% to 21.2%) and 27.0% (95% CI=24.6% to 29.3%), respectively. In multivariate analysis, adjusting for study site, age, years of education, occupation, female sterilisation, oral sex, past history of sexually transmitted infection, gonorrhoea and candidiasis, IVF was significantly associated with HIV infection with a PR similar to that of BV (adjusted PR=1.56 (95% CI=1.22 to 1.98) and 1.48 (95% CI=1.20 to 1.84), respectively). Though the cross-sectional design of the study precludes directional interpretation of the findings, the data do suggest that IVF may be as important as BV in HIV acquisition. The authors recommend prospective research to better understand the association between IVF and HIV acquisition.

  13. Estrogen Vaginal

    MedlinePlus

    ... life; the end of monthly menstrual periods). Femring® brand estradiol vaginal ring is also used to treat ... sweating) in women who are experiencing menopause. Premarin® brand vaginal cream is also used to treat kraurosis ...

  14. Vaginal Odor

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually don't cause vaginal odors. Neither do yeast infections. Generally, if you have vaginal odor without ... Avoid douching. All healthy vaginas contain bacteria and yeast. The normal acidity of your vagina keeps bacteria ...

  15. Clindamycin Vaginal

    MedlinePlus

    ... an infection caused by an overgrowth of harmful bacteria in the vagina). Clindamycin is in a class ... works by slowing or stopping the growth of bacteria. Vaginal clindamycin cannot be used to treat vaginal ...

  16. Effectiveness of the two microorganisms Lactobacillus fermentum LF15 and Lactobacillus plantarum LP01, formulated in slow-release vaginal tablets, in women affected by bacterial vaginosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vicariotto, Franco; Mogna, Luca; Del Piano, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common reason for abnormal vaginal discharge in reproductive-age women and one of its most important causative agents is the gram-variable bacterium Gardnerella vaginalis. BV is not accompanied by significant local inflammation, whereas the "fishy odor" test is always positive. In contrast, aerobic vaginitis (AV) is predominantly associated with Escherichia coli, but Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus are also involved. Standard treatment of BV consists of oral or intravaginal antibiotics, although these are unable to spontaneously restore normal flora characterized by a high concentration of lactobacilli. The main limitation is the inability to offer a long-term defensive barrier, thus facilitating relapses and recurrences. This study was undertaken firstly to assess the ability of selected lactobacilli to in vitro antagonize G. vaginalis to determine an association with a strain able to inhibit E. coli, thus identifying a possible use in AV. The second step of the study was to conduct a human pilot trial in women affected by BV using an association of the most promising and active bacteria. For this purpose, neutralized supernatants of individual lactobacilli were tested at percentages ranging from 0.5% to 4% to determine their ability to hinder the growth of G. vaginalis American Type Culture Collection 10231. The bacterium that was able to exert the strongest inhibition was subsequently tested with Lactobacillus plantarum LP01 in a human intervention, placebo-controlled, pilot trial involving 34 female subjects (aged between 18 and 50, mean 34.7±8.9, no menopausal women) diagnosed with BV. The 2 microorganisms Lactobacillus fermentum LF15 (DSM 26955) and L. plantarum LP01 (LMG P-21021) were delivered to the vagina by means of slow-release vaginal tablets, also containing 50 mg of tara gum. The amount of each strain was 400 million live cells per dose. The women were instructed to apply a vaginal tablet once

  17. Bacterial agents as a cause of infertility in humans.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Melania; Cannas, Sara; Cubeddu, Marina; Molicotti, Paola; Piras, Gennarina Laura; Dessole, Salvatore; Zanetti, Stefania

    2016-07-01

    Infertility is a problem affecting almost 15% of couples. There are many causes for this condition, among which urogenital bacterial infections seem to play an important role. Many studies have explained the mechanisms by which bacteria cause infertility both in men and women. Therefore we undertook this study to evaluate the presence of genito-urinary infections in infertile couples who sought counselling to investigate their condition. Microbiological analysis was performed on semen and vaginal/cervical samples of both partners of each couple. The percentage of individuals affected by a urogenital bacterial infection was between 14 and 20%. More significantly, most of the species isolated both in men and women have been described in the literature as potential causes of infertility.

  18. Chronic estrogen-induced cervical and vaginal squamous carcinogenesis in human papillomavirus type 16 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Arbeit, J M; Howley, P M; Hanahan, D

    1996-04-02

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), including type 16, have been identified as factors in cervical carcinogenesis. However, the presence and expression of the virus per se appear to be insufficient for carcinogenesis. Rather, cofactors most likely are necessary in addition to viral gene expression to initiate neoplasia. One candidate cofactor is prolonged exposure to sex hormones. To examine the possible effects of estrogen on HPV-associated neoplasia, we treated transgenic mice expressing the oncogenes of HPV16 under control of the human keratin-14 promoter (K14-HPV16 transgenic mice) and nontransgenic control mice with slow release pellets of 17beta-estradiol. Squamous carcinomas developed in a multistage pathway exclusively in the vagina and cervix of K14-HPV16 transgenic mice. Estrogen-induced carcinogenesis was accompanied by an incremental increase in the incidence and distribution of proliferating cells solely within the cervical and vaginal squamous epithelium of K14-HPV16 mice. Expression of the HPV transgenes in untreated transgenic mice was detectable only during estrus; estrogen treatment resulted in transgene expression that was persistent but not further upregulated, remaining at low levels at all stages of carcinogenesis. The data demonstrate a novel mechanism of synergistic cooperation between chronic estrogen exposure and the oncogenes of HPV16 that coordinates squamous carcinogenesis in the female reproductive tract of K14-HPV16 transgenic mice.

  19. Establishment of a sensitive system for analysis of human vaginal microbiota on the basis of rRNA-targeted reverse transcription-quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Kurakawa, Takashi; Ogata, Kiyohito; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Kado, Yukiko; Takahashi, Takuya; Kida, Yumi; Ito, Masahiro; Okada, Nobuhiko; Nomoto, Koji

    2015-04-01

    Ten specific primer sets, for Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus crispatus, Atopobium vaginae, Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus curtisii, Chlamydia trachomatis/muridarum, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, and Bifidobacterium angulatum, were developed for quantitative analysis of vaginal microbiota. rRNA-targeted reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of the vaginal samples from 12 healthy Japanese volunteers using the new primer sets together with 25 existing primer sets revealed the diversity of their vaginal microbiota: Lactobacilli such as L. crispatus, L. gasseri, Lactobacillus jensenii, Lactobacillus iners, and Lactobacillus vaginalis, as the major populations at 10(7) cells/ml vaginal fluid, were followed by facultative anaerobes such as Streptococcus and strict anaerobes at lower population levels of 10(4) cells/ml or less. Certain bacterial vaginosis (BV)-related bacteria, such as G. vaginalis, A. vaginae, M. curtisii, and Prevotella, were also detected in some subjects. Especially in one subject, both G. vaginalis and A. vaginae were detected at high population levels of 10(8.8) and 10(8.9) cells/ml vaginal fluid, suggesting that she is an asymptomatic BV patient. These results suggest that the RT-qPCR system is effective for accurate analysis of major vaginal commensals and diagnosis of several vaginal infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [The change of vaginal lactobacillus in patients with high-risk human papillomavirus infection].

    PubMed

    Zhou, D; Cui, Y; Wu, F L; Deng, W H

    2016-07-05

    To study the distribution characteristics of lactobacillus in the vaginal mucosa of patients with HPV infection. The planting density of lactobacillus in vaginal secretions of 95 cases with HPV16/18 infection and 90 cases of normal women of childbearing age were observed by oil microscope. And the strains of vaginal lactobacilli in two groups were analyzed using species-specific polymerase chain reaction (Species-specific PCR) and the distribution of vaginal lactobacilli in patients with HPV16/18 infection were investigated. In HPV16/18 infective groups, the planting density of lactobacillus in the vaginal mucosa was 104 (68-186)/HP. It was significantly lower than that of the normal group (234 (161-326)/HP, P<0.05). Compared with the normal group, the positive rates of lactobacillus iners, lactobacillus crispatus, and lactobacillus gasseri were significantly lower in HPV16/18 infection group (P<0.05). The HPV16/18 infection is associated with the decreased number of lactobacillus and the imbalance of vaginal flora; Lactobacillus iners, lactobacillus crispatus, and lactobacillus gasseri may play a key role in maintaining the vaginal micro ecological environment.

  1. Immunity in the Vagina (Part II): Anti-HIV Activity and Antiviral Content of Human Vaginal Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mickey V.; Ghosh, Mimi; Fahey, John V.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Rossoll, Richard M.; Wira, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Problem Whether the concentrations of antiviral proteins, and anti-HIV activity, within human vaginal secretions changes across the menstrual cycle is unknown. Method of Study Using a menstrual cup, vaginal secretions from premenopausal women were recovered at the proliferative (d6–8), mid-cycle (d13–15) and secretory (d21–23) stages of the menstrual cycle. Antiviral protein concentration was determined by ELISA, and anti-HIV activity assessed using the TZM-bl reporter cell line. Results CCL20, RANTES, elafin, HBD2, SDF-1α and IL-8 levels were detectable in the secretions. Vaginal secretions had anti-HIV activity against specific clade B strains of HIV, with significant inhibition of IIIB and increased infectivity of transmitted/founder CH077.t. No significant differences in either antiviral protein concentration or anti-HIV activity with respect to menstrual cycle stage were measured, but marked differences were observed in both parameters over the course of the cycle between different women, and in consecutive cycles from the same woman. Conclusion The vagina contains a complement of antiviral proteins. The variation in anti-HIV activity demonstrates that immune protection in the vagina is not constant. Intra- and inter-individual variations suggest that factors in addition to sex hormones influence antiviral protection. Lastly, the menstrual cup is a new model for recovering undiluted vaginal secretions from women throughout their reproductive life. PMID:24806967

  2. Atrophic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Stika, Catherine S

    2010-01-01

    With the loss of estrogen that occurs with menopause, physiologic and structural changes occur within the vulvovaginal mucosa that lead to a condition commonly called atrophic vaginitis. Although mild genital changes occur in most women, 10-47% of postmenopausal women will develop one or more debilitating symptoms that include vulvovaginal dryness, dyspareunia, vulvar itching or pain, recurrent urinary tract infections, as well as abnormal vaginal discharge. Topical estrogen replacement therapies reverse these mucosal changes and are effective treatments for the symptoms of atrophic vaginitis. Vaginal moisturizers and lubricants also provide symptomatic relief for vaginal dryness and dyspareunia, respectively. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Vaginitis: current microbiologic and clinical concepts.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, L V; Embil, J A

    1986-01-01

    Infectious vaginitis occurs when the normal vaginal flora is disrupted; it may arise when saprophytes overwhelm the host immune response, when pathogenic organisms are introduced into the vagina or when changes in substrate allow an imbalance of microorganisms to develop. Examples of these types of vaginitis include the presence of chronic fungal infection in women with an inadequate cellular immune response to the yeast, the introduction of trichomonads into vaginal epithelium that has a sufficient supply of glycogen, and the alteration in bacterial flora, normally dominated by Lactobacillus spp., and its metabolites that is characteristic of "nonspecific vaginitis". The authors review microbiologic and clinical aspects of the fungal, protozoal and bacterial infections, including the interactions of bacteria thought to produce nonspecific vaginitis, that are now recognized as causing vaginitis. Other causes of vaginitis are also discussed. PMID:3510698

  4. Durable protection from vaginal simian-human immunodeficiency virus infection in macaques by tenofovir gel and its relationship to drug levels in tissue.

    PubMed

    Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Martin, Amy; Pau, Chou-Pong; Holder, Angela; Kuklenyik, Zsuzsanna; Lipscomb, Jonathan; Hanson, Debra L; Smith, James; Novembre, Francis J; García-Lerma, J Gerardo; Heneine, Walid

    2012-01-01

    A vaginal gel containing 1% tenofovir (TFV) was found to be safe and effective in reducing HIV infection in women when used pericoitally. Because of the long intracellular half-life of TFV and high drug exposure in vaginal tissues, we hypothesized that a vaginal gel containing TFV may provide long-lasting protection. Here, we performed delayed-challenge experiments and showed that vaginal 1% TFV gel protected 4/6 macaques against vaginal simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) exposures occurring 3 days after gel application, demonstrating long-lasting protection. Despite continued gel dosing postinfection, neither breakthrough infection had evidence of drug resistance by ultrasensitive testing of SHIV in plasma and vaginal lavage. Analysis of the active intracellular tenofovir diphosphate (TFV-DP) in vaginal lymphocytes collected 4 h to 3 days after gel dosing persistently showed high TFV-DP levels (median, 1,810 fmol/10(6) cells) between 4 and 24 h that exceed the 95% inhibitory concentration (IC(95)), reflecting rapid accumulation and long persistence. In contrast to those in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) following oral dosing, TFV-DP levels in vaginal lymphocytes decreased approximately 7-fold by 3 days, exhibiting a much higher rate of decay. We observed a strong correlation between intracellular TFV-DP in vaginal lymphocytes, in vitro antiviral activity, and in vivo protection, suggesting that TFV-DP above the in vitro IC(95) in vaginal lymphocytes is a good predictor of high efficacy. Data from this model reveal an extended window of protection by TFV gel that supports coitus-independent use. The identification of protective TFV-DP concentrations in vaginal lymphocytes may facilitate the evaluation of improved delivery methods of topical TFV and inform clinical studies.

  5. Characterization of the vaginal microbiota of ewes and cows reveals a unique microbiota with low levels of lactobacilli and near-neutral pH

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human vaginal microbiota affect reproductive performance and perinatal health. Although a number of common reproductive disorders in livestock involve bacterial infection, very little is known about their normal vaginal microbiota. Therefore, we sought to determine the species composition of sheep a...

  6. [Bacterial proteases and bacterial resistance against human innate immunity factors].

    PubMed

    Tiurin, Iu A; Mustafin, I G; Fassakhov, R S

    2011-01-01

    The molecular and cell-mediated mechanisms that are developed by certain opportunistic and pathogenic bacteria and were obtained over the course of evolution to preserve resistance against principal components of human body innate immunity are summarized.

  7. Neutralizing IgG at the portal of infection mediates protection against vaginal simian/human immunodeficiency virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katja; Veazey, Ronald S; Warrier, Ranjit; Hraber, Peter; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A; Buffa, Viviana; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Shaw, George M; Shattock, Robin J

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies may have critical importance in immunity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, the amount of protective antibody needed at mucosal surfaces has not been fully established. Here, we evaluated systemic and mucosal pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of 2F5 IgG and 2F5 Fab fragments with respect to protection against vaginal challenge with simian-human immunodeficiency virus-BaL in macaques. Antibody assessment demonstrated that 2F5 IgG was more potent than polymeric forms (IgM and IgA) across a range of cellular and tissue models. Vaginal challenge studies demonstrated a dose-dependent protection for 2F5 IgG and no protection with 2F5 Fab despite higher vaginal Fab levels at the time of challenge. Animals receiving 50 or 25 mg/kg of body weight 2F5 IgG were completely protected, while 3/5 animals receiving 5 mg/kg were protected. In the control animals, infection was established by a minimum of 1 to 4 transmitted/founder (T/F) variants, similar to natural human infection by this mucosal route; in the two infected animals that had received 5 mg 2F5 IgG, infection was established by a single T/F variant. Serum levels of 2F5 IgG were more predictive of sterilizing protection than measured vaginal levels. Fc-mediated antiviral activity did not appear to influence infection of primary target cells in cervical explants. However, PK studies highlighted the importance of the Fc portion in tissue biodistribution. Data presented in this study may be important in modeling serum levels of neutralizing antibodies that need to be achieved by either vaccination or passive infusion to prevent mucosal acquisition of HIV-1 infection in humans.

  8. In vivo activity of Sapindus saponaria against azole-susceptible and -resistant human vaginal Candida species

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Study of in vivo antifungal activity of the hydroalcoholic extract (HE) and n-BuOH extract (BUTE) of Sapindus saponaria against azole-susceptible and -resistant human vaginal Candida spp. Methods The in vitro antifungal activity of HE, BUTE, fluconazole (FLU), and itraconazole (ITRA) was determined by the broth microdilution method. We obtained values of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicide concentration (MFC) for 46 strains of C. albicans and 10 of C. glabrata isolated from patients with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). VVC was induced in hyperestrogenic Wistar rats with azole-susceptible C. albicans (SCA), azole-resistant C. albicans (RCA), and azole-resistant C. glabrata (RCG). The rats were treated intravaginally with 0.1 mL of HE or BUTE at concentrations of 1%, 2.5% and 5%; 100 μg/mL of FLU (treatment positive control); or distilled water (negative control) at 1, 24, and 48 h after induction of the infection, and the progress of VVC was monitored by culturing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The toxicity was evaluated in cervical cells of the HeLa cell line. Results The extracts showed in vitro inhibitory and fungicidal activity against all the isolates, and the MIC and MFC values for the C. glabrata isolates were slightly higher. In vivo, the SCA, RCA, and RCG infections were eliminated by 21 days post-infection, with up to 5% HE and BUTE, comparable to the activity of FLU. No cytotoxic action was observed for either extract. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that HE and BUTE from S. saponaria show inhibitory and fungicidal activity in vitro, in addition to in vivo activity against azole-resistant vaginal isolates of C. glabrata and azole-susceptible and resistant isolates of C. albicans. Also considering the lack of cytotoxicity and the low concentrations of the extracts necessary to eliminate the infection in vivo, HE and BUTE show promise for continued studies with purified antifungal substances in VVC yeast

  9. Anatomic distribution of nerves and microvascular density in the human anterior vaginal wall: prospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Liao, Qinping; Zhang, Hong; Gao, Xuelian; Li, Xueying; Zhang, Miao

    2014-01-01

    The presence of the G-spot (an assumed erotic sensitive area in the anterior wall of the vagina) remains controversial. We explored the histomorphological basis of the G-spot. Biopsies were drawn from a 12 o'clock direction in the distal- and proximal-third areas of the anterior vagina of 32 Chinese subjects. The total number of protein gene product 9.5-immunoreactive nerves and smooth muscle actin-immunoreactive blood vessels in each specimen was quantified using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase assay. Vaginal innervation was observed in the lamina propria and muscle layer of the anterior vaginal wall. The distal-third of the anterior vaginal wall had significantly richer small-nerve-fiber innervation in the lamina propria than the proximal-third (p = 0.000) and in the vaginal muscle layer (p = 0.006). There were abundant microvessels in the lamina propria and muscle layer, but no small vessels in the lamina propria and few in the muscle layer. Significant differences were noted in the number of microvessels when comparing the distal- with proximal-third parts in the lamina propria (p = 0.046) and muscle layer (p = 0.002). Significantly increased density of nerves and microvessels in the distal-third of the anterior vaginal wall could be the histomorphological basis of the G-spot. Distal anterior vaginal repair could disrupt the normal anatomy, neurovascular supply and function of the G-spot, and cause sexual dysfunction.

  10. Management of Vaginal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, S B L; Agrawal, Gaurav; Mittal, Megha; Mishra, Priyanshi

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal cancer is a rare gynecologic cancer with very little documentation. Literature search to have useful information for the management of vaginal cancer and share. We have searched the PUBMED database, Google search engine and other database. A total of 26 references were taken into account. Once spread from primary other cancers or vulva is ruled out, vaginal cancer is designated to be primary in origin. It was revealed that majority of vaginal cancers reported are squamous cell carcinomas. The most common risk factors implicated are Human Papiloma Virus, age. Most common presenting symptoms were abnormal vaginal bleeding,. Diagnosis requires pathological confirmation. Management depends on staging work-up. Vaginal cancer is staged by FIGO system of staging and TNM staging. There are many prognostic factors influencing the choice of treatment. Lymph node metastasis is one of the important prognostic factors, others to mention are histology, size, age. In a recent SEER analysis of over 2000 patients, the 5 year disease specific survival was 84% for stage 1, 75% for stage II and 57% for advanced tumors. Early carcinomas are generally treated with either surgery or radiation therapy. Advanced cancers are treated with radiation therapy with simultaneous administration of combined chemotherapy. Preventive strategies include safe sex and HPV vaccination. Primary vaginal cancer is a rare entity, if there is no history of cancer cervix or vulva in past or absence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma or vulvar carcinoma within 5 years is usually considered as primary vaginal cancer. Though early stage vaginal cancers have better outcome treated with surgery or radiotherapy or surgery followed by radiotherapy, radiotherapy alone is preferred mode of treatment in vaginal cancers.

  11. What Are the Symptoms of Vaginitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the type of vaginitis a woman has 1 : Bacterial vaginosis often causes a thin, milky discharge from the ... How is it diagnosed? » Related A-Z Topics Bacterial Vaginosis Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) NICHD News and Spotlights ...

  12. Vaginal Discharge: What's Normal, What's Not

    MedlinePlus

    ... period Vaginal infections, such as bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis (yeast infection), and trichomoniasis are common causes of abnormal ... having sex, such as bacterial vaginosis or a yeast infection. If you notice any changes in your ...

  13. Induction of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in human vaginal epithelial cells in response to TLR ligands and TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Theresa; Zalenskaya, Irina A; Yousefieh, Nazita; Schriver, Suzanne D; Cote, Lyn C; Chandra, Neelima; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2012-06-01

    Mucosal inflammation caused by infections of the female lower genital tract is considered to be an important cofactor for HIV transmission. We hypothesize that COX-2, a key inflammation-related enzyme, is involved in these responses and is upregulated by microbial ligands and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Human vaginal epithelial cells (VK-2/E6E7) and ectocervical biopsy tissues were stimulated with TLR ligands and the cytokine TNF-α, used as surrogates of vaginal infections, and assessed for COX-2 expression and activity by microarray, real-time RT-PCR, immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA. TLR agonists and TNF-α induce transcriptional and translational expression of COX-2 in vaginal cells. TLR ligands, MALP2, Pam3CSK4, LTA, and imiquimod induced high epithelial COX-2 expression, while zymosan and poly dI:dC induced very low enzyme expression. Induced mRNA and protein expression correlated with increased COX-2 activity, which led to increased levels of PGE(2) in the cell culture supernatant. These cell-based findings were confirmed in primary cervicovaginal tissue explants. Induction of COX-2 expression and activity and the consequent increased levels of prostaglandins are common inflammatory pathways in human cervicovaginal epithelial cells and tissues in response to diverse TLR ligands and pro-inflammatory cytokines. These findings are relevant to the understanding of genital mucosal inflammation, its potential treatment, and its possible relationship with increased tissue susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Directed shift of vaginal flora after topical application of sucrose gel in a phase III clinical trial: a novel treatment for bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhong-ming; Liao, Qin-pin; Yao, Chen; Geng, Li; Feng, Li-hua; Shi, Hui-rong; Xin, Xiao-yan; Li, Ping; Wang, Hui-lan; Pang, Yi-cun; Liu, Shu-wen; Jiang, Shi-bo

    2010-08-05

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of the most common infectious diseases among sexually active women and is associated with the increased acquisition of a variety of sexually transmitted diseases. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of a non-antibiotic sucrose gel against an antibiotic metronidazole gel for the treatment of BV. A randomized, double-blinded, multi-center, parallel-group, placebo-controlled phase III clinical trial was conducted at eight hospitals in China. A total of 560 subjects with clinically diagnosed BV were randomly assigned into three groups for vaginally receiving sucrose, metronidazole, and placebo gels, respectively, twice daily for five consecutive days. The efficacy of therapeutic cure, defined as an achievement of both microbiologic cure (a Nugent score of 3 or less) and clinical cure (a resolution of the clinical findings from the baseline visit), was evaluated at the 1st and 2nd test-of-cure (TOC) visits at 7-10 and 21-35 days after the start of treatment, respectively. Therapeutic cure rates for sucrose, metronidazole, and placebo gel groups were 83.13%, 71.30% and 0.92%, at the 1st TOC, and 61.04%, 66.67% and 7.34%, at the 2nd TOC, respectively. While there was no significant difference between the sucrose and metronidazole gel groups at the 2nd TOC (P = 0.305), and sucrose gel was more effective than metronidazole gel at the 1st TOC (P = 0.009). These findings suggest that sucrose gel restores normal vaginal flora more rapidly than metronidazole gel and can be used as a novel treatment for BV.

  15. Intermediate vaginal flora and bacterial vaginosis are associated with the same factors: findings from an exploratory analysis among female sex workers in Africa and India.

    PubMed

    Guédou, Fernand A; Van Damme, Lut; Deese, Jennifer; Crucitti, Tania; Mirembe, Florence; Solomon, Suniti; Becker, Marissa; Alary, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Several recent studies suggest that intermediate vaginal flora (IVF) is associated with similar adverse health outcomes as bacterial vaginosis (BV). Yet, it is still unknown if IVF and BV share the same correlates. We conducted a cross-sectional and exploratory analysis of data from women screened prior to enrolment in a microbicide trial to estimate BV and IVF prevalence and examine their respective correlates. Participants were interviewed, examined and provided blood and genital samples for the diagnosis of IVF and BV (using Nugent score) and other reproductive tract infections. Polytomous logistic regressions were used in estimating respective ORs of IVF and BV, in relation to each potential risk factor. Among 1367 women, BV and IVF prevalences were 47.6% (95% CI 45.0% to 50.3%) and 19.2% (95% CI 17.1% to 21.2%), respectively. Multivariate polytomous analysis of IVF and BV showed that they were generally associated with the same factors. The respective adjusted ORs were for HIV 1.98 (95% CI 1.37 to 2.86) and 1.62 (95% CI 1.20 to 2.20) (p=0.2248), for gonorrhoea 1.25 (95% CI 0.64 to 2.4) and 2.01 (95% CI 1.19 to 3.49) (p=0.0906), for trichomoniasis 3.26 (95% CI 1.71 to 6.31) and 2.39 (95% CI 1.37 to 4.33) (p=0.2630), for candidiasis 0.52 (95% CI 0.36 to 0.75) and 0.59 (95% CI 0.44 to 0.78) (p=0.5288), and for hormonal contraception 0.65 (95% CI 0.40 to 1.04) and 0.62 (95% CI 0.43 to 0.90) (p=0.8819). In addition, the association between vaginal flora abnormalities and factors such as younger age, HIV, gonorrhoea trichomoniasis and candidiasis were modified by the study site (all p for interaction ≤0.05). IVF has almost the same correlates as BV. The relationship between some factors and vaginal flora abnormalities may be site-specific.

  16. Human vaginal histology in long-term users of the injectable contraceptive depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate.

    PubMed

    Bahamondes, M Valeria; Castro, Sara; Marchi, Nadia M; Marcovici, Michele; Andrade, Liliana A L A; Fernandes, Arlete; Bahamondes, Luis

    2014-08-01

    Apparently, depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) increases a woman's risk of acquiring HIV. The objective of this study was to test whether the vaginal mucosal thickness and Langerhans cell counts were significantly different in long-term DMPA users compared with women users of an intrauterine device (IUD) who had never used DMPA. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-three DMPA users were matched with 23 nonusers controlled for age, body mass index (BMI; kg/m²), and duration of contraceptive use. Four groups of women were evaluated according to the duration of DMPA use: >1, <5; ≥5, <10; ≥10, <15 or ≥15 years. Estradiol (E₂) levels were compared between the two groups. Histologic sections of vaginal mucosal biopsies were evaluated to measure the mean epithelial thickness and S100 immunostained sections were used to count the number of Langerhans cells/mm. Mean (±S.D.) E₂ levels were significantly lower in DMPA users (39.4±26.6 pg/mL) compared with nonusers (102.6±60.3 pg/mL) despite similar ages (42.3±7.4 and 42.4±7.4 years, respectively). Mean (±S.D.) vaginal thickness was 232.6±108.1 and 229.7±112.9 in DMPA users and nonusers, respectively. There were no differences in vaginal thickness or Langerhans cell count/mm between users and nonusers even after controlling for DMPA duration of use. Vaginal epithelial thinning or Langerhans cell count was not different between long-term DMPA users and copper-IUD users who had never used DMPA. No differences were found in vaginal epithelial thickness or in Langerhans cell count between long-term users of the injectable contraceptive DMPA and nonusers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of Human Papillomavirus Infection in Patients with Vaginal Intraepithelial Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Lamos, Cristina; Mihaljevic, Charlotte; Aulmann, Sebastian; Bruckner, Thomas; Domschke, Christoph; Wallwiener, Markus; Paringer, Carmen; Fluhr, Herbert; Schott, Sarah; Dinkic, Christine; Brucker, Janina; Golatta, Michael; Gensthaler, Lisa; Eichbaum, Michael; Sohn, Christof; Rom, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) is a pre-malignant lesion, potentially leading to vaginal cancer. It is a rare disease, representing less than 1% of all intraepithelial neoplasia of the female genital tract. Similar to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), there are three different grades of VAIN. VAIN 1 is also known as a low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), whereas VAIN 2 and VAIN 3 both represent high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Risk factors for the development of VAIN are similar to those for cervical neoplasia, i.e. promiscuity, starting sexual activity at an early age, tobacco consumption and infection with human papillomavirus (HPV). However, compared to other intraepithelial neoplasia such as CIN or VIN (vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia), there still is little understanding about the natural course of VAIN and its capacity for pro- or regression. Furthermore, there is controversial data about the HPV detection rate in VAIN lesions. 67 patients with histologically confirmed VAIN, who were diagnosed between 2003 and 2011 at the University Women´s Hospital of Heidelberg Germany, were included in this study. The biopsies of all participating patients were subjected to HPV genotyping. GP-E6/E7 Nested Multiplex PCR (NMPCR) was used to identify and genotype HPV. Eighteen pairs of type-specific nested PCR primers were assessed to detect the following "high-risk" HPV genotypes: 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66 and 68, as well as the "low-risk" genotypes 6/11, 42, 43 and 44. The data was analyzed with the software SAS (Statistical Analysis System). All 67 cases were eligible for DNA analysis. The median age was 53 years. The largest group with 53% (n = 36) was formed by women, who were first diagnosed with VAIN between the age of 41 to 60 years. 50% (n = 37) of the patients presented a VAIN in the upper 1/3 of the vagina. 58 (87%) were diagnosed with HSIL (VAIN). The median age in patients with LSIL

  18. Detection of Human Papillomavirus Infection in Patients with Vaginal Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Aulmann, Sebastian; Bruckner, Thomas; Domschke, Christoph; Wallwiener, Markus; Paringer, Carmen; Fluhr, Herbert; Schott, Sarah; Dinkic, Christine; Brucker, Janina; Golatta, Michael; Gensthaler, Lisa; Eichbaum, Michael; Sohn, Christof; Rom, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) is a pre-malignant lesion, potentially leading to vaginal cancer. It is a rare disease, representing less than 1% of all intraepithelial neoplasia of the female genital tract. Similar to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), there are three different grades of VAIN. VAIN 1 is also known as a low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), whereas VAIN 2 and VAIN 3 both represent high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Risk factors for the development of VAIN are similar to those for cervical neoplasia, i.e. promiscuity, starting sexual activity at an early age, tobacco consumption and infection with human papillomavirus (HPV). However, compared to other intraepithelial neoplasia such as CIN or VIN (vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia), there still is little understanding about the natural course of VAIN and its capacity for pro- or regression. Furthermore, there is controversial data about the HPV detection rate in VAIN lesions. Patients and Methods 67 patients with histologically confirmed VAIN, who were diagnosed between 2003 and 2011 at the University Women´s Hospital of Heidelberg Germany, were included in this study. The biopsies of all participating patients were subjected to HPV genotyping. GP-E6/E7 Nested Multiplex PCR (NMPCR) was used to identify and genotype HPV. Eighteen pairs of type-specific nested PCR primers were assessed to detect the following "high-risk" HPV genotypes: 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66 and 68, as well as the "low-risk" genotypes 6/11, 42, 43 and 44. The data was analyzed with the software SAS (Statistical Analysis System). Results All 67 cases were eligible for DNA analysis. The median age was 53 years. The largest group with 53% (n = 36) was formed by women, who were first diagnosed with VAIN between the age of 41 to 60 years. 50% (n = 37) of the patients presented a VAIN in the upper 1/3 of the vagina. 58 (87%) were diagnosed with HSIL (VAIN

  19. [Local combined therapy of vaginal infections by nifuratel-nistatin].

    PubMed

    Jahić, Mahira; Balić, Adem; Nurkić, Mahmud; Dragović, Jasmina; Adzajlić, Amela; Habibović, Amra; Mesalić, Lejla; Zigić, Aza

    2010-02-01

    A test included 40 women in the reproductive age with clinical symptoms of vaginitis and microbiological examination. They were treated by combined therapy of vaginal tablets of nifuratel, 500 mg and nistatin 200 000 i. u. during six days, after which they underwent gynaecological reexamination and repeated microbiological examination of vaginal and cervical smears. An analiysis of vaginal secretion found bacterial flora in 34 smears (65%), fungus (Candida albicans) in 15 (24%) and Trichomonas vaginalis in 7 (11%). Local vaginal therapy in vaginitis caused by Trichomonas vaginalis was successfull in all 7 patients, vaginitis caused by Candida albicans was successly treated in 14 (93%) patients. Bacterial vaginitis was cured in 29 (71%) patients during this tharapy. Local vaginal combined therapy of nifuratel and nistatin is eficient in patients with vaginitis caused by fungi and Trichomonas vaginalis too.

  20. Influence of the tryptophan-indole-IFNγ axis on human genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection: role of vaginal co-infections

    PubMed Central

    Aiyar, Ashok; Quayle, Alison J.; Buckner, Lyndsey R.; Sherchand, Shardulendra P.; Chang, Theresa L.; Zea, Arnold H.; Martin, David H.; Belland, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The natural history of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections can vary widely; infections can spontaneously resolve but can also last from months to years, potentially progressing to cause significant pathology. The host and bacterial factors underlying this wide variation are not completely understood, but emphasize the bacterium's capacity to evade/adapt to the genital immune response, and/or exploit local environmental conditions to survive this immune response. IFNγ is considered to be a primary host protective cytokine against endocervical C. trachomatis infections. IFNγ acts by inducing the host enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxgenase, which catabolizes tryptophan, thereby depriving the bacterium of this essential amino acid. In vitro studies have revealed that tryptophan deprivation causes Chlamydia to enter a viable but non-infectious growth pattern that is termed a persistent growth form, characterized by a unique morphology and gene expression pattern. Provision of tryptophan can reactivate the bacterium to the normal developmental cycle. There is a significant difference in the capacity of ocular and genital C. trachomatis serovars to counter tryptophan deprivation. The latter uniquely encode a functional tryptophan synthase to synthesize tryptophan via indole salvage, should indole be available in the infection microenvironment. In vitro studies have confirmed the capacity of indole to mitigate the effects of IFNγ; it has been suggested that a perturbed vaginal microbiome may provide a source of indole in vivo. Consistent with this hypothesis, the microbiome associated with bacterial vaginosis includes species that encode a tryptophanase to produce indole. In this review, we discuss the natural history of genital chlamydial infections, morphological and molecular changes imposed by IFNγ on Chlamydia, and finally, the microenvironmental conditions associated with vaginal co-infections that can ameliorate the effects of IFNγ on C. trachomatis. PMID

  1. Ovarian cycling and reproductive state shape the vaginal microbiota in wild baboons.

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth A; Livermore, Joshua A; Alberts, Susan C; Tung, Jenny; Archie, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-19

    The vaginal microbiome is an important site of bacterial-mammalian symbiosis. This symbiosis is currently best characterized for humans, where lactobacilli dominate the microbial community and may help defend women against infectious disease. However, lactobacilli do not dominate the vaginal microbiota of any other mammal studied to date, raising key questions about the forces that shape the vaginal microbiome in non-human mammals. We used Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to investigate variation in the taxonomic composition of the vaginal microbiota in 48 baboons (Papio cynocephalus), members of a well-studied wild population in Kenya. Similar to prior studies, we found that the baboon vaginal microbiota was not dominated by lactobacilli. Despite this difference, and similar to humans, reproductive state was the dominant predictor of baboon vaginal microbiota, with pregnancy, postpartum amenorrhea, and ovarian cycling explaining 18% of the variance in community composition. Furthermore, among cycling females, a striking 39% of variance in community composition was explained by ovarian cycle phase, with an especially distinctive microbial community around ovulation. Periovulatory females exhibited the highest relative abundance of lactic acid-producing bacteria compared to any other phase, with a mean relative abundance of 44%. To a lesser extent, sexual behavior, especially a history of shared sexual partners, also predicted vaginal microbial similarity between baboons. Despite striking differences in their dominant microbes, both human and baboon vaginal microbiota exhibit profound changes in composition in response to reproductive state, ovarian cycle phase, and sexual behavior. We found major shifts in composition during ovulation, which may have implications for disease risk and conception success. These findings highlight the need for future studies to account for fine-scale differences in reproductive state, particularly differences between

  2. Paecilomyces lilacinus Vaginitis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    D’Amico, Ron; Sutton, Deanna A.; Rinaldi, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Paecilomyces lilacinus, an environmental mold found in soil and vegetation, rarely causes human infection. We report the first case of P. lilacinus isolated from a vaginal culture in a patient with vaginitis. PMID:14519255

  3. Emphysematous vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Lima-Silva, Joana; Vieira-Baptista, Pedro; Cavaco-Gomes, João; Maia, Tiago; Beires, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    Emphysematous vaginitis is a rare condition, characterized by the presence of multiple gas-filled cysts in the vaginal and/or exocervical mucosa. Although its etiology is not completely understood, it is self-limited, with a benign clinical course. Vaginal discharge, sometimes bloody, and pruritus are the most common symptoms. Chronic and acute inflammation can be found, and diseases that impair the immune system and pregnancy have been associated with this condition. A 48-year-old postmenopausal woman, with a history of hysterectomy with several comorbidities, presented with a 4-month history of bloody discharge and vulvar pruritus. Examination showed multiple cystic lesions, 1 to 5 mm, occupying the posterior and right lateral vaginal walls. Speculum examination produced crepitus. Vaginal wet mount was normal, except for diminished lactobacilli; results of Trichomonas vaginalis DNA test and vaginal cultures were negative. Lugol's iodine applied to the vagina was taken up by the intact lesions. Biopsy result showed typical features of emphysematous vaginitis. This is an unusual entity, presenting with common gynecological complaints, and both physicians and pathologists should be aware to prevent misdiagnosis and overtreatment.

  4. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: solubility, activity, purification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X; Yard, B A; Iredale, J P; Auer, M; Webster, S P

    2014-03-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington's disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification.

  5. Gene Expression Profiling of Human Vaginal Cells In Vitro Discriminates Compounds with Pro-Inflammatory and Mucosa-Altering Properties: Novel Biomarkers for Preclinical Testing of HIV Microbicide Candidates.

    PubMed

    Zalenskaya, Irina A; Joseph, Theresa; Bavarva, Jasmin; Yousefieh, Nazita; Jackson, Suzanne S; Fashemi, Titilayo; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Settlage, Robert; Fichorova, Raina N; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and immune activation of the cervicovaginal mucosa are considered factors that increase susceptibility to HIV infection. Therefore, it is essential to screen candidate anti-HIV microbicides for potential mucosal immunomodulatory/inflammatory effects prior to further clinical development. The goal of this study was to develop an in vitro method for preclinical evaluation of the inflammatory potential of new candidate microbicides using a microarray gene expression profiling strategy. To this end, we compared transcriptomes of human vaginal cells (Vk2/E6E7) treated with well-characterized pro-inflammatory (PIC) and non-inflammatory (NIC) compounds. PICs included compounds with different mechanisms of action. Gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2 arrays. Data processing was performed using GeneSpring 11.5 (Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, CA). Microarraray comparative analysis allowed us to generate a panel of 20 genes that were consistently deregulated by PICs compared to NICs, thus distinguishing between these two groups. Functional analysis mapped 14 of these genes to immune and inflammatory responses. This was confirmed by the fact that PICs induced NFkB pathway activation in Vk2 cells. By testing microbicide candidates previously characterized in clinical trials we demonstrated that the selected PIC-associated genes properly identified compounds with mucosa-altering effects. The discriminatory power of these genes was further demonstrated after culturing vaginal cells with vaginal bacteria. Prevotella bivia, prevalent bacteria in the disturbed microbiota of bacterial vaginosis, induced strong upregulation of seven selected PIC-associated genes, while a commensal Lactobacillus gasseri associated to vaginal health did not cause any changes. In vitro evaluation of the immunoinflammatory potential of microbicides using the PIC-associated genes defined in this study could help in the initial screening of candidates prior to entering

  6. Trichomonas vaginalis adherence mediates differential gene expression in human vaginal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kucknoor, Ashwini; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Trichomonas vaginalis, an ancient protist, colonizes the vaginal mucosa causing trichomonosis, a vaginitis that sometimes leads to severe health complications. Preparatory to colonization of the vagina is the adhesion to vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) by trichomonads. We hypothesized that VECs alter the gene expression to form a complex signalling cascade in response to trichomonal adherence. In order to identify the genes that are upregulated, we constructed a subtraction cDNA library after contact with parasites that is enriched for differentially expressed genes from the immortalized MS-74 VECs. Sixty cDNA clones were sequenced and to our knowledge for the first time, differentially regulated genes were identified in response to early trichomonal infection. The identified genes were found to encode functional proteins with specific functions associated with cell structure maintenance and extracellular matrix components, proinflammatory molecules and apoptosis. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed expression of selected genes. Further, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) protein expression was analysed using Western blot and immunofluorescence assays. Data suggest that p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and tyrosine kinases play a role in COX-2 induction. Finally, T. vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus but not Pentatrichomonas hominis induce expression of COX-2. This is a first attempt at elucidating the basis of interaction of trichomonads with host cells and the corresponding host responses triggered by the parasites. PMID:15888089

  7. Vaginal parasitosis.

    PubMed

    Garud, M A; Saraiya, U; Paraskar, M; Khokhawalla, J

    1980-01-01

    In two cases the ova of parasitic worms, Ascaris lumbricoides and Enterobius vermicularis, were observed in Papanicolaou-stained vaginal smears. The characteristics of each type of ovum are described.

  8. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss > Pregnancy complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... page It's been added to your dashboard . Bacterial vaginosis (also called BV or vaginitis) is an infection ...

  9. Exosomes in human semen restrict HIV-1 transmission by vaginal cells and block intravaginal replication of LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus complex

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Marisa N.; Jones, Philip H.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous extracellular nanovesicles secreted by diverse cell types. Exosomes from healthy human semen have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication and to impair progeny virus infectivity. In this study, we examined the ability of healthy human semen exosomes to restrict HIV-1 and LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus transmission in three different model systems. We show that vaginal cells internalize exosomes with concomitant transfer of functional mRNA. Semen exosomes blocked the spread of HIV-1 from vaginal epithelial cells to target cells in our cell-to-cell infection model and suppressed transmission of HIV-1 across the vaginal epithelial barrier in our trans-well model. Our in vivo model shows that human semen exosomes restrict intravaginal transmission and propagation of murine AIDS virus. Our study highlights an antiretroviral role for semen exosomes that may be harnessed for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat HIV-1 transmission. PMID:25880110

  10. Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; LAVH - discharge ... were in the hospital, you had a vaginal hysterectomy. Your surgeon made a cut in your vagina. ...

  11. Evaluation of dry and wet transport of at-home self-collected vaginal swabs for human papillomavirus testing.

    PubMed

    Wolfrum, Sarah G; Koutsky, Laura A; Hughes, James P; Feng, Qinghua; Xi, Long Fu; Shen, Zhenping; Winer, Rachel L

    2012-11-01

    Our objective was to compare human papillomavirus (HPV) detection in paired self-collected vaginal samples transported by overnight mail in liquid specimen transport medium (STM) (wet) or in dry tubes (dry). Women aged 18-24 years were recruited online to self-collect vaginal swab samples at home for HPV testing and 159 women returned paired wet and dry samples. Dry samples were rehydrated with STM upon arrival at the laboratory. HPV was detected by the Roche Linear Array HPV genotyping test (37 genotypes) and Kappa and McNemar statistics were used to compare wet versus dry samples for detecting HPV. Of the subjects tested in this study, 51 % were HPV-positive (in either sample) and 40 % were positive for high-risk HPV. A total of 216 type-specific infections were detected among the 80 HPV-positive women. Almost perfect agreement was observed between paired samples for detecting any HPV (subject-level positive agreement: 91.9 %, κ: 0.85) or type-specific HPV (positive agreement across types: 90.1 %, κ: 0.90). Similar agreement between sample types was seen when testing for high-risk types and 81.9 % of all type-specific infections were detected in both samples. Among discordant pairs, wet samples were 3.3 times more likely to be positive for type-specific HPV than dry samples (P = 0.02). However, in 63.6 % of wet-positive/dry-negative discordant pairs analysed for viral load, type-specific HPV was either undetectable or detected at a low level (<100 copies) in the wet samples, suggesting that the majority of infections missed by using dry samples are less likely to be clinically relevant. Our results indicate that dry transport is a feasible option for transporting at-home self-collected vaginal samples for HPV DNA testing.

  12. Initial insights into bacterial succession during human decomposition.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Embriette R; Haarmann, Daniel P; Petrosino, Joseph F; Lynne, Aaron M; Bucheli, Sibyl R

    2015-05-01

    Decomposition is a dynamic ecological process dependent upon many factors such as environment, climate, and bacterial, insect, and vertebrate activity in addition to intrinsic properties inherent to individual cadavers. Although largely attributed to microbial metabolism, very little is known about the bacterial basis of human decomposition. To assess the change in bacterial community structure through time, bacterial samples were collected from several sites across two cadavers placed outdoors to decompose and analyzed through 454 pyrosequencing and analysis of variable regions 3-5 of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene. Each cadaver was characterized by a change in bacterial community structure for all sites sampled as time, and decomposition, progressed. Bacteria community structure is variable at placement and before purge for all body sites. At bloat and purge and until tissues began to dehydrate or were removed, bacteria associated with flies, such as Ignatzschineria and Wohlfahrtimonas, were common. After dehydration and skeletonization, bacteria associated with soil, such as Acinetobacter, were common at most body sites sampled. However, more cadavers sampled through multiple seasons are necessary to assess major trends in bacterial succession.

  13. Exploring the bacterial assemblages along the human nasal passage.

    PubMed

    Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Jáuregui, Ruy; Oxley, Andrew P A; Kaspar, Ursula; Plumeier, Iris; Kahl, Silke; Rudack, Claudia; Becker, Karsten; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2016-07-01

    The human nasal passage, from the anterior nares through the nasal vestibule to the nasal cavities, is an important habitat for opportunistic pathogens and commensals alike. This work sampled four different anatomical regions within the human nasal passage across a large cohort of individuals (n = 79) comprising individuals suffering from chronic nasal inflammation clinically known as chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and individuals not suffering from inflammation (CRS-free). While individuals had their own unique bacterial fingerprint that was consistent across the anatomical regions, these bacterial fingerprints formed into distinct delineated groups comprising core bacterial members, which were consistent across all four swabbed anatomical regions irrespective of health status. The most significant observed pattern was the difference between the global bacterial profiles of swabbed and tissue biopsy samples from the same individuals, being also consistent across different anatomical regions. Importantly, no statistically significant differences could be observed concerning the global bacterial communities, any of the bacterial species or the range of diversity indices used to compare between CRS and CRS-free individuals, and between two CRS phenotypes (without nasal polyps and with nasal polyps). Thus, the role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of sinusitis remains uncertain. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The posttrial effect of oral periodic presumptive treatment for vaginal infections on the incidence of bacterial vaginosis and Lactobacillus colonization.

    PubMed

    Balkus, Jennifer E; Jaoko, Walter; Mandaliya, Kishorchandra; Richardson, Barbra A; Masese, Linnet; Gitau, Ruth; Kiarie, James; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Farquhar, Carey; McClelland, R Scott

    2012-05-01

    We previously demonstrated a decrease in bacterial vaginosis (BV) and an increase in Lactobacillus colonization among randomized controlled trial (RCT) participants who received monthly oral periodic presumptive treatment (PPT; 2 g metronidazole + 150 mg fluconazole). Posttrial data were analyzed to test the hypothesis that the treatment effect would persist after completion of 1 year of PPT. Data were obtained from women who completed all 12 RCT visits and attended ≥ 1 posttrial visit within 120 days after completion of the RCT. We used Andersen-Gill proportional hazards models to estimate the posttrial effect of the intervention on the incidence of BV by Gram stain and detection of Lactobacillus species by culture. The analysis included 165 subjects (83 active and 82 placebo). The posttrial incidence of BV was 260 per 100 person-years in the intervention arm versus 358 per 100 person-years in the placebo arm (hazard ratio = 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-1.12). The posttrial incidence of Lactobacillus colonization was 180 per 100 person-years in the intervention arm versus 127 per 100 person-years in the placebo arm (hazard ratio = 1.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.85-2.71). Despite a decrease in BV and an increase in Lactobacillus colonization during the RCT, the effect of PPT was not sustained at the same level after cessation of the intervention. New interventions that reduce BV recurrence and promote Lactobacillus colonization without the need for ongoing treatment are needed.

  15. Evolution of Bacterial Pathogens within the Human Host

    PubMed Central

    Bliven, Kimberly A.; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    Selective pressures within the human host, including interactions with innate and adaptive immune responses, exposure to medical interventions such as antibiotics, and competition with commensal microbiota all facilitate the evolution of bacterial pathogens. In this chapter, we present examples of pathogen strategies which emerged as a result of selective pressures within the human host niche, and discuss the resulting co-evolutionary ‘arms race’ between these organisms. In bacterial pathogens, many of the genes responsible for these strategies are encoded on mobile pathogenicity islands (PAIs) or plasmids, underscoring the importance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the emergence of virulent microbial species. PMID:26999399

  16. 21 CFR 884.3575 - Vaginal pessary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vaginal pessary. 884.3575 Section 884.3575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... Vaginal pessary. (a) Identification. A vaginal pessary is a removable structure placed in the vagina...

  17. 21 CFR 884.5920 - Vaginal insufflator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vaginal insufflator. 884.5920 Section 884.5920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5920 Vaginal insufflator. (a) Identification. A vaginal insufflator is a device used to...

  18. 21 CFR 884.3575 - Vaginal pessary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vaginal pessary. 884.3575 Section 884.3575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... Vaginal pessary. (a) Identification. A vaginal pessary is a removable structure placed in the vagina...

  19. 21 CFR 884.5920 - Vaginal insufflator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vaginal insufflator. 884.5920 Section 884.5920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5920 Vaginal insufflator. (a) Identification. A vaginal insufflator is a device used to...

  20. 21 CFR 884.3575 - Vaginal pessary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vaginal pessary. 884.3575 Section 884.3575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... Vaginal pessary. (a) Identification. A vaginal pessary is a removable structure placed in the vagina...

  1. 21 CFR 884.5920 - Vaginal insufflator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vaginal insufflator. 884.5920 Section 884.5920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5920 Vaginal insufflator. (a) Identification. A vaginal insufflator is a device used to...

  2. 21 CFR 884.5920 - Vaginal insufflator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vaginal insufflator. 884.5920 Section 884.5920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5920 Vaginal insufflator. (a) Identification. A vaginal insufflator is a device used to...

  3. 21 CFR 884.5920 - Vaginal insufflator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vaginal insufflator. 884.5920 Section 884.5920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5920 Vaginal insufflator. (a) Identification. A vaginal insufflator is a device used to...

  4. 21 CFR 884.3575 - Vaginal pessary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vaginal pessary. 884.3575 Section 884.3575 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... Vaginal pessary. (a) Identification. A vaginal pessary is a removable structure placed in the vagina...

  5. Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma genitalium in the Vaginal Microbiota and Persistent High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Adebamowo, Sally N; Ma, Bing; Zella, Davide; Famooto, Ayotunde; Ravel, Jacques; Adebamowo, Clement

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the vaginal microenvironment plays a role in persistence of high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection and thus cervical carcinogenesis. Furthermore, it has been shown that some mycoplasmas are efficient methylators and may facilitate carcinogenesis through methylation of hrHPV and cervical somatic cells. We examined associations between prevalence and persistence of Mycoplasma spp. in the vaginal microbiota, and prevalent as well as persistent hrHPV infections. We examined 194 Nigerian women who were tested for hrHPV infection using SPF25/LiPA10 and we identified Mycoplasma genitalium and Mycoplasma hominis in their vaginal microbiota established by sequencing the V3-V4 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. We defined the prevalence of M. genitalium, M. hominis, and hrHPV based on positive result of baseline tests, while persistence was defined as positive results from two consecutive tests. We used exact logistic regression models to estimate associations between Mycoplasma spp. and hrHPV infections. The mean (SD) age of the study participants was 38 (8) years, 71% were HIV positive, 30% M. genitalium positive, 45% M. hominis positive, and 40% hrHPV positive at baseline. At follow-up, 16% of the women remained positive for M. genitalium, 30% for M. hominis, and 31% for hrHPV. There was a significant association between persistent M. hominis and persistent hrHPV (OR 8.78, 95% CI 1.49-51.6, p 0.01). Women who were positive for HIV and had persistent M. hominis had threefold increase in the odds of having persistent hrHPV infection (OR 3.28, 95% CI 1.31-8.74, p 0.008), compared to women who were negative for both. We found significant association between persistent M. hominis in the vaginal microbiota and persistent hrHPV in this study, but we could not rule out reverse causation. Our findings need to be replicated in larger, longitudinal studies and if confirmed, could have important diagnostic and therapeutic

  6. Primate vaginal microbiomes exhibit species specificity without universal Lactobacillus dominance.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Suleyman; Yeoman, Carl J; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Thomas, Susan M; Ho, Mengfei; Leigh, Steven R; White, Bryan A; Wilson, Brenda A; Stumpf, Rebecca M

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial communities colonizing the reproductive tracts of primates (including humans) impact the health, survival and fitness of the host, and thereby the evolution of the host species. Despite their importance, we currently have a poor understanding of primate microbiomes. The composition and structure of microbial communities vary considerably depending on the host and environmental factors. We conducted comparative analyses of the primate vaginal microbiome using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of a phylogenetically broad range of primates to test for factors affecting the diversity of primate vaginal ecosystems. The nine primate species included: humans (Homo sapiens), yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus), olive baboons (Papio anubis), lemurs (Propithecus diadema), howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra), red colobus (Piliocolobus rufomitratus), vervets (Chlorocebus aethiops), mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Our results indicated that all primates exhibited host-specific vaginal microbiota and that humans were distinct from other primates in both microbiome composition and diversity. In contrast to the gut microbiome, the vaginal microbiome showed limited congruence with host phylogeny, and neither captivity nor diet elicited substantial effects on the vaginal microbiomes of primates. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance and Wilcoxon tests revealed correlations among vaginal microbiota and host species-specific socioecological factors, particularly related to sexuality, including: female promiscuity, baculum length, gestation time, mating group size and neonatal birth weight. The proportion of unclassified taxa observed in nonhuman primate samples increased with phylogenetic distance from humans, indicative of the existence of previously unrecognized microbial taxa. These findings contribute to our understanding of host-microbe variation and coevolution, microbial biogeography, and disease risk, and have important

  7. Primate vaginal microbiomes exhibit species specificity without universal Lactobacillus dominance

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Suleyman; Yeoman, Carl J; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Thomas, Susan M; Ho, Mengfei; Leigh, Steven R; Consortium, Primate Microbiome; White, Bryan A; Wilson, Brenda A; Stumpf, Rebecca M

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial communities colonizing the reproductive tracts of primates (including humans) impact the health, survival and fitness of the host, and thereby the evolution of the host species. Despite their importance, we currently have a poor understanding of primate microbiomes. The composition and structure of microbial communities vary considerably depending on the host and environmental factors. We conducted comparative analyses of the primate vaginal microbiome using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of a phylogenetically broad range of primates to test for factors affecting the diversity of primate vaginal ecosystems. The nine primate species included: humans (Homo sapiens), yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus), olive baboons (Papio anubis), lemurs (Propithecus diadema), howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra), red colobus (Piliocolobus rufomitratus), vervets (Chlorocebus aethiops), mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Our results indicated that all primates exhibited host-specific vaginal microbiota and that humans were distinct from other primates in both microbiome composition and diversity. In contrast to the gut microbiome, the vaginal microbiome showed limited congruence with host phylogeny, and neither captivity nor diet elicited substantial effects on the vaginal microbiomes of primates. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance and Wilcoxon tests revealed correlations among vaginal microbiota and host species-specific socioecological factors, particularly related to sexuality, including: female promiscuity, baculum length, gestation time, mating group size and neonatal birth weight. The proportion of unclassified taxa observed in nonhuman primate samples increased with phylogenetic distance from humans, indicative of the existence of previously unrecognized microbial taxa. These findings contribute to our understanding of host–microbe variation and coevolution, microbial biogeography, and disease risk, and have important

  8. Quantitation of major human cutaneous bacterial and fungal populations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I; Chen, Yu; Blaser, Martin J

    2010-10-01

    Because the human skin microbiota may play roles in the causation or modification of skin diseases, we sought to provide initial quantitative analysis from different cutaneous locations. We developed quantitative PCRs to enumerate the total bacterial and fungal populations, as well as the most common bacterial and fungal genera present in six locales, in eight healthy subjects. We used a set of primers and TaqMan MGB probes based on the bacterial 16S rRNA and fungal internally transcribed spacer region, as well as bacterial genus-specific probes for Propionibacterium, Corynebacterium, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus and a fungal genus-specific probe for Malassezia. The extent of human DNA contamination of the specimen was determined by quantitating the human housekeeping GAPDH gene. The highest level of 16S rRNA copies of bacteria was present in the axilla (4.44 ± 0.18 log(10) copies/μl [mean ± standard error of the mean]), with normalization based on GAPDH levels, but the other five locations were similar to one another (range, 2.48 to 2.89 log(10) copies/μl). There was strong symmetry between the left and right sides. The four bacterial genera accounted for 31% to 59% of total bacteria, with the highest percent composition in the axilla and the lowest in the forearm. Streptococcus was the most common genus present on the forehead and behind the ear. Corynebacterium spp. were predominant in the axilla. Fungal levels were 1 to 2 log(10) lower than for bacteria, with Malassezia spp. accounting for the majority of fungal gene copies. These results provide the first quantitation of the site and host specificities of major bacterial and fungal populations in human skin and present simple methods for their assessment in studies of disease.

  9. Molecular diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis: Does adjustment for total bacterial load or human cellular content improve diagnostic performance?

    PubMed

    Plummer, E L; Garland, S M; Bradshaw, C S; Law, M G; Vodstrcil, L A; Hocking, J S; Fairley, C K; Tabrizi, S N

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the utility of quantitative PCR assays for diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis and found that while the best model utilized bacterial copy number adjusted for total bacterial load (sensitivity=98%, specificity=93%, AUC=0.95[95%CI=0.93,0.97]), adjusting for total bacterial or human cell load did not consistently increase the diagnostic performance of the assays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes in the aerobic vaginal bacterial mucous load after treatment with intravaginal sponges in anoestrous ewes: effect of medroxiprogesterone acetate and antibiotic treatment use.

    PubMed

    Gatti, M; Zunino, P; Ungerfeld, R

    2011-04-01

    Intravaginal sponges (IS) impregnated with progestagens are widely used for oestrous synchronization in ewes. As progestogens depress the immuno response, the first aim was to determine whether medroxiprogesterone acetate (MAP) content affects the vaginal bacteria number (VBN) in IS-treated anoestrous ewes. The second aim was to compare the effectiveness of different antibiotic treatments to control the VBN increase caused by IS. In both experiments, IS were inserted during 14 days in anoestrous ewes. In the first, 11 ewes received commercial sponges (50 mg MAP), and 10 ewes received placebo sponges. For the second experiment, IS were inserted in three groups (n = 12/group), containing oxytetracycline im (20 mg/kg); injected into the sponge (0.02 mg), or control (no antibiotic). At sponge withdrawal, all ewes received 300 UI eCG. Mucous samples were collected from the vagina before sponge insertion, at sponge withdrawal, 24, 48 and 72 h later, and the VBN (colony-forming units per ml; CFU/ml) was counted after 48-h incubation. Medroxiprogesterone content did not affect VBN (log CFU/ml: 4.3 ± 0.2 vs 4.4 ± 0.2 with and without MAP, respectively). Bacterial number increased from 3.5 ± 0.2 at sponge insertion to 6.9 ± 0.1 at sponge withdrawal (p < 0.0001) and decreased the following day to 4.3 ± 0.2 (p < 0.0001). In the second experiment, VBN increased at sponge withdrawal (p < 0.0001) in all groups and decreased the following day (p < 0.0001). The CFU/ml at sponge withdrawal was lower in ewes treated with antibiotics (p < 0.0001), being even lower when local rather than systemic antibiotic was administered (log CFU/ml: 3.3 ± 1.8 vs 7.2 ± 1.8). The day of oestrous VBN was similar for all treatments and similar to that observed before sponge insertion. We concluded that MAP does not influence the increase in VBN, as the main effect is provoked by the sponge device itself, and local antibiotic treatment resulted in a lower bacterial growth than systemic treatments.

  11. Looking in ticks for human bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Mediannikov, O; Fenollar, F

    2014-12-01

    Ticks are considered to be second worldwide to mosquitoes as vectors of human diseases and the most important vectors of disease-causing pathogens in domestic and wild animals. A number of emerging tick-borne pathogens are already discovered; however, the proportion of undiagnosed infectious diseases, especially in tropical regions, may suggest that there are still more pathogens associated with ticks. Moreover, the identification of bacteria associated with ticks may provide new tool for the control of ticks and tick-borne diseases. Described here molecular methods of screening of ticks, extensive use of modern culturomics approach, newly developed artificial media and different cell line cultures may significantly improve our knowledge about the ticks as the agents of human and animal pathology.

  12. Insights into bacterial protein glycosylation in human microbiota.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The study of human microbiota is an emerging research topic. The past efforts have mainly centered on studying the composition and genomic landscape of bacterial species within the targeted communities. The interaction between bacteria and hosts is the pivotal event in the initiation and progression of infectious diseases. There is a great need to identify and characterize the molecules that mediate the bacteria-host interaction. Bacterial surface exposed proteins play an important role in the bacteria- host interaction. Numerous surface proteins are glycosylated, and the glycosylation is crucial for their function in mediating the bacterial interaction with hosts. Here we present an overview of surface glycoproteins from bacteria that inhabit three major mucosal environments across human body: oral, gut and skin. We describe the important enzymes involved in the process of protein glycosylation, and discuss how the process impacts the bacteria-host interaction. Emerging molecular details underlying glycosylation of bacterial surface proteins may lead to new opportunities for designing anti-infective small molecules, and developing novel vaccines in order to treat or prevent bacterial infection.

  13. Insights into bacterial protein glycosylation in human microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fan; Wu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The study of human microbiota is an emerging research topic. The past efforts have mainly centered on studying the composition and genomic landscape of bacterial species within the targeted communities. The interaction between bacteria and hosts is the pivotal event in the initiation and progression of infectious diseases. There is a great need to identify and characterize the molecules that mediate the bacteria-host interaction. Bacterial surface exposed proteins play an important role in the bacteria-host interaction. Numerous surface proteins are glycosylated, and the glycosylation is crucial for their function in mediating the bacterial interaction with hosts. Here we present an overview of surface glycoproteins from bacteria that inhabit three major mucosal environments across human body: oral, gut and skin. We describe the important enzymes involved in the process of protein glycosylation, and discuss how the process impacts the bacteria-host interaction. Emerging molecular details underlying glycosylation of bacterial surface proteins may lead to new opportunities for designing anti-infective small molecules, and developing novel vaccines in order to treat or prevent bacterial infection. PMID:26712033

  14. [Multipurpose treatment of vaginal infections].

    PubMed

    Nikolov, A; Masseva, A; Shopova, E; Georgiev, S

    2012-01-01

    Untreated bacterial vaginosis is related with many complications for non-pregnant women in reproductive age, most common from them are vaginal discharge and postoperative infections. The aim of our investigation was to compare the effectiveness of two therapeutic regimes which consist in Macmiror/Macmiror Complex alone and in combination with Feminella Vagi C for treatment of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and/or mycotic infection. 117 non-pregnant women with symptoms of vaginal infection were prospectively enrolled into two groups according their treatment. First group consist 66 women treated with Macmiror tablets and vaginal capsules followed with local application of Feminella Vagi C, the second group consist 54 women treated with Macmiror tablets and vaginal capsules only. The impact of treatment on clinical symptoms was observed at the end of medication and 20 days after it. Microbiological testing was repeated 20 days after treatment. Over than 80% (78.6 divided by 86.7%) of the cases with vaginal infection (BV and mycotic one) were successfully treated with Macmiror/Macmiror Complex. Supplement treatment with Feminella Vagi C lead to higher percentage of clinically recovery (86.7% vs 84.6%), better microbiological cleaning (86.7% vs 82.1%) and longer effect of treatment. Used medication showed higher efficacy against BV than to fungal infection. According obtained results we may conclude that bacterial vaginosis was better treated with multipurpose treatment (Nifuratel, Nistatin and vit. C) than with Macmiror alone.

  15. [The etiologic diversity of vaginitis].

    PubMed

    Bohbot, J-M; Sednaoui, P; Verriere, F; Achhammer, I

    2012-10-01

    To establish the different etiologies of vaginitis and, especially, assess the distribution of responsible pathogens through a prospective study. One hundred and sixty-nine women aged between 18 and 65 years (average age: 33.7 years old), consulting a physician for symptoms of vaginitis, were examined in 21 centers of gynaecology or infectious diseases. The clinical evaluation was completed by bacteriological sample that was tested for infections (including sexually transmitted infections (STIs)). One hundred and eighteen patients (69.8%) had one or several infectious etiologies distributed as follows: 79 (46.7%) candidiasis (3 of which were caused by non albicans Candida), 37 (21.9%) bacterial vaginitis and 16 (9.5%) bacterial vaginosis. To be noticed that there were 38 cases of mixed etiologies out of the 118 infectious etiologies (32.2%), 3 of them were STIs. Although candidiasis was the most common etiology in this study, it only represented less than 1 out of every two patients. Among the infectious etiologies, 1 out of 3 women presented a bacterial or mixed vaginitis. The etiological diversity of vaginitis leads to consider broad-spectrum treatment as first-line therapy and to prescribe a microbiological analysis in case of failure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression of hemoglobin-α and β subunits in human vaginal epithelial cells and their functional significance

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Debarchana; Koli, Swanand; Patgaonkar, Mandar; Reddy, Kudumula Venkata Rami

    2017-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is a major protein involved in transport of oxygen (O2). It consists of Hb-α and Hb-β subunits, which are normally expressed by cells of erythroid lineage. However, till recently, it was not known whether non-erythroid cells like vaginal cells synthesize Hb and whether it has any functional significance. Therefore, we designed the following objectives: (1) to establish in-vitro culture system of human primary vaginal epithelial cells (hPVECs), (2) to determine whether Hb-α and Hb-β proteins are truly synthesized by hPVECs, (3) to evaluate the effect of LPS (lipopolysaccharide) on the expression of Hb-α and Hb-β proteins (4) to decipher the significance of the Hb-α and Hb-β expression in hPVECs and (5) to determine the molecular mechanism regulating the expression of Hb-α in hPVECs. To accomplish these studies, we applied a battery of assays such as RT-PCR, qRT-PCR, Flow cytometry, western blot, and immunofluorescence, Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). The results revealed the expression of Hb-α and Hb-β at both mRNA and protein level in hPVECs. The expression was significantly upregulated following LPS treatment (10μg/ml for 6 hrs) and these results are comparable with the expression induced by LPS in human vaginal epithelial cell line (VK2/E6E7). These cells constitutively produced low levels of pro-inflammatory (IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines. Also, the response of phosphorylated (p65)-NF-κB to LPS was upregulated with increased expression of IL-6, Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and human beta defensin-1 (hBD-1) in hPVECs and VK2/E6E7 cells. However, Bay 11–7082 treatment (5μM for 24 hrs) could neutralize the effect of LPS-induced p65-NF-κB activity and represses the production`of Hb-α and Hb-β. The results of EMSA revealed the presence of putative binding sites of NF-κB in the human Hb-α promoter region (nt-115 to -106). ChIP analysis confirmed the binding of NF

  17. Contractile Response of Human Anterior Vaginal Muscularis in Women With and Without Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Northington, Gina M.; Basha, Maureen; Arya, Lily A.; Wein, Alan J.; Chacko, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the contractility of the anterior vaginal muscularis (AVM) from women with and without pelvic organ prolapse (POP). In vitro experiments were performed to measure the peak force generated in response to potassium chloride (KCl; 125 mmol/L) and phenylephrine by AVM tissue from women with and without POP. Cross-sectional areas and co-localization of α1A adrenergic receptor protein with smooth muscle α-actin in AVM strips were determined by histology and immunofluorescence, respectively. There were no differences in the mean amplitude of force generated in response to KCl normalized to either wet weight or muscle cross-sectional area (mN/mm2) between women with and without POP (P > .30). However, AVM from women with prolapse produced a significantly higher mean force to KCl normalized to total cross-sectional area compared to controls (P = .007). While the control samples demonstrated a consistent response to phenylephrine, there was no response to this stimulant generated by AVM tissue from women with POP. The proportion of co-localized α1A adrenergic receptors with smooth muscle α actin in AVM tissue was significantly less in women with POP compared to normal controls (P < .0001). Although there was significantly greater tissue stress generated by AVM from women with prolapse compared to controls, there were no differences in muscle stress. Absent response to phenylephrine by AVM from women with prolapse may be related to a lower expression of α1A adrenergic receptors in vaginal smooth muscle. PMID:21193802

  18. Topographic diversity of fungal and bacterial communities in human skin.

    PubMed

    Findley, Keisha; Oh, Julia; Yang, Joy; Conlan, Sean; Deming, Clayton; Meyer, Jennifer A; Schoenfeld, Deborah; Nomicos, Effie; Park, Morgan; Kong, Heidi H; Segre, Julia A

    2013-06-20

    Traditional culture-based methods have incompletely defined the microbial landscape of common recalcitrant human fungal skin diseases, including athlete's foot and toenail infections. Skin protects humans from invasion by pathogenic microorganisms and provides a home for diverse commensal microbiota. Bacterial genomic sequence data have generated novel hypotheses about species and community structures underlying human disorders. However, microbial diversity is not limited to bacteria; microorganisms such as fungi also have major roles in microbial community stability, human health and disease. Genomic methodologies to identify fungal species and communities have been limited compared with those that are available for bacteria. Fungal evolution can be reconstructed with phylogenetic markers, including ribosomal RNA gene regions and other highly conserved genes. Here we sequenced and analysed fungal communities of 14 skin sites in 10 healthy adults. Eleven core-body and arm sites were dominated by fungi of the genus Malassezia, with only species-level classifications revealing fungal-community composition differences between sites. By contrast, three foot sites--plantar heel, toenail and toe web--showed high fungal diversity. Concurrent analysis of bacterial and fungal communities demonstrated that physiologic attributes and topography of skin differentially shape these two microbial communities. These results provide a framework for future investigation of the contribution of interactions between pathogenic and commensal fungal and bacterial communities to the maintainenace of human health and to disease pathogenesis.

  19. Vaginal cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may need a biopsy to rule out vaginal cancer, especially if the mass appears to be solid. If the cyst is located under the bladder or urethra, x-rays may be needed to see if the cyst extends into these organs.

  20. The effects of hyaluronic acid vaginal gel on the vaginal epithelium of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai-Bin; Liu, Shao-Li; Gan, Xiao-Ling; Zhou, Qin; Hu, Li-Na

    2015-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid is one of the best materials of water retention which can be used in vaginal atrophy. This study is to evaluate the role and mechanism of the hyaluronic acid vaginal gel (Hyalofemme) in the vaginal epithelium of ovariectomized rats. Sixty SD rats were randomly divided into control group (Sham ovariectomy, Sham-OVX), tendency group (ovariectomy, OVX), and experiment group (ovariectomy+Hyalofemme, OVX+Hyalofemme). The hyaluronic acid vaginal gel was administered local vaginal therapy to the experiment group with cytologicaly confirmed vaginal atrophy. The doses were adjusted by animal weight according to human dosage. After daily treatment for 14 days, VEGF and P-AKT activations were detected by Western blot in the experiment group. The hyaluronic acid vaginal gel proved to be very effective in the cytological reversal of vaginal atrophy but did not increase uterine weight. Vaginal microecosystem indicators were negative in the control group and the experiment group. By contrast, the indicators were positive in the tendency group. Hyaluronic acid vaginal gel is effective in the reversal of vaginal atrophy and is beneficial for improving vaginal microecosystem in the postmenopausal rat model. The hyaluronic acid vaginal gel can also improve the repair capacity of the vaginal epithelium.

  1. A universal combination treatment for vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Jacob; Zarfati, Doron

    2008-01-01

    We compared a novel vaginal tablet consisting of 100 mg of clotrimazole and 100 mg of metronidazole ('Clo-Met') to a 100-mg clotrimazole tablet in the treatment of vaginitis. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized controlled study. Women with vaginal discharge and diagnosed as suffering from vaginitis caused by Trichomonas vaginalis, bacterial vaginosis or Candida albicans, or any combination of the three, and who had not received treatment for vaginitis during the previous month, were studied. 165 patients were enrolled into the study--84 into the combined therapy group, and 81 into the clotrimazole group. In women with Candida vaginitis, Clo-Met was more effective than clotrimazole treatment (p < 0.012 and p < 0.05, respectively). A combination vaginal tablet consisting of clotrimazole and metronidazole is therapeutically effective in candidal vaginitis. The effectiveness of Clo-Met on bacterial vaginosis, T. vaginalis infection as well as on vaginal infections due to a combination of these microorganisms should be studied further.

  2. Cultured bacterial diversity and human impact on alpine glacier cryoconite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung Mi; Kim, So-Yeon; Jung, Jia; Kim, Eun Hye; Cho, Kyeung Hee; Schinner, Franz; Margesin, Rosa; Hong, Soon Gyu; Lee, Hong Kum

    2011-06-01

    The anthropogenic effect on the microbial communities in alpine glacier cryoconites was investigated by cultivation and physiological characterization of bacteria from six cryoconite samples taken at sites with different amounts of human impact. Two hundred and forty seven bacterial isolates were included in Actinobacteria (9%, particularly Arthrobacter), Bacteroidetes (14%, particularly Olleya), Firmicutes (0.8%), Alphaproteobacteria (2%), Betaproteobacteria (16%, particularly Janthinobacterium), and Gammaproteobacteria (59%, particularly Pseudomonas). Among them, isolates of Arthrobacter were detected only in samples from sites with no human impact, while isolates affiliated with Enterobacteriaceae were detected only in samples from sites with strong human impact. Bacterial isolates included in Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were frequently isolated from pristine sites and showed low maximum growth temperature and enzyme secretion. Bacterial isolates included in Gammaproteobacteria were more frequently isolated from sites with stronger human impact and showed high maximum growth temperature and enzyme secretion. Ecotypic differences were not evident among isolates of Janthinobacterium lividum, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas veronii, which were frequently isolated from sites with different degrees of anthropogenic effect.

  3. Molecular Methods to Describe the Spectrum and Dynamics of the Vaginal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Fredricks, David N.

    2011-01-01

    The human vagina hosts a collection of microbes that is distinct from other human surfaces and mucosal sites, with reduced microbial diversity that is likely driven by the acidic environment. The microbial ecosystem of the vagina is dominated by lactobacilli in women without bacterial vaginosis (BV), and is characterize by increased species richness, diversity, and evenness in women with BV. The use of molecular, cultivation-independent methods to describe the bacterial biota of the human vagina has revealed many novel putative anaerobes in women with BV, and has demonstrated the almost ubiquitous nature of Lactobacillus iners which is found in most women regardless of BV status. A variety of molecular tools are being employed to study the vaginal microbiota, and each approach has distinct advantages and disadvantages that are reviewed. Longitudinal studies have demonstrated that the vaginal microbiota can be highly dynamic, with dramatic shifts in bacterial composition and concentrations in response to numerous endogenous and exogenous factors. PMID:21376827

  4. Vaginal itching and discharge - child

    MedlinePlus

    Pruritus vulvae; Itching - vaginal area; Vulvar itching; Yeast infection - child ... vagina or the skin around the vagina. Vaginal yeast infection . Vaginitis . Vaginitis in girls before puberty is ...

  5. Increased frequency of bacterial vaginosis and Chlamydia trachomatis in pregnant women with human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cléber Sérgio; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Hazarabedian de Souza, Maria Azniv; Macêdo Barcelos, Ana Cristina; Sarreta Terra, Ana Paula; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the presence of bacterial vaginosis (BV), Candida sp, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, to determine the prevalence of tobacco use and measure vaginal pH (VpH) in pregnant women with (n = 26) and without (n = 26) human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and make comparisons between these 2 groups. HPV, C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae were diagnosed using hybrid capture, BV using clinical criteria, and Candida sp via cultures. A digital pH meter was used to measure VpH. The frequencies of Candida sp were 19.2 and 23.1% (p = 1), and VpH was 4.4 +/- 0.4 and 4.3 +/- 0.4 (p = 0.23), in the HPV-positive and HPV-negative groups, respectively. Compared to the group of pregnant women without HPV infection, those with HPV infection had a significantly higher prevalence of tobacco use (50 vs. 11.5%; p = 0.006), BV (53.8 vs. 15.4%; p = 0.007), and C. trachomatis (34.6 vs. 7.7%; p = 0.039). No case of N. gonorrhoeae was diagnosed. All cases of C. trachomatis and BV had high-grade HPV infection. Copyright (c) 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Contribution of gut bacterial metabolism to human metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Bain, M D; Jones, M; Borriello, S P; Reed, P J; Tracey, B M; Chalmers, R A; Stacey, T E

    1988-05-14

    Metronidazole, an antibiotic with specific activity against anaerobic bacteria, was of clinical and biochemical benefit in two patients with methylmalonic aciduria. The virtual elimination of propionic acid from the stool suggested that propionic acid derived from faecal bacterial metabolism contributes substantially to methylmalonate production. These findings point to a novel avenue of treatment for these disorders of intermediary metabolism, and indicate the importance of microbial gut flora in normal human metabolism.

  7. Selection of a Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Strain Resistant to a Vaginal Microbicide in Macaques▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Dawn M.; Wentzel, Jennifer L.; Lalonde, Matthew S.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Arts, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    PSC-RANTES binds to CCR5, inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry, and has been shown as a vaginal microbicide to protect rhesus macaques from a simian-human immunodeficiency virus chimera (SHIVSF162-p3) infection in a dose-dependent manner. In this study, env gene sequences from SHIVSF162-p3-infected rhesus macaques treated with PSC-RANTES were analyzed for possible drug escape variants. Two specific mutations located in the V3 region of gp120 (K315R) and C-helical domain of gp41 (N640D) were identified in a macaque (m584) pretreated with a 100 μM dose of PSC-RANTES. These two env mutations were found throughout infection (through week 77) but were found at only low frequencies in the inoculating SHIVSF162-p3 stock and in the other SHIVSF162-p3-infected macaques. HIV-1 env genes from macaque m584 (envm584) and from inoculating SHIVSF162-p3 (envp3) were cloned into an HIV-1 backbone. Increases in 50% inhibitory concentrations to PSC-RANTES with envm584 were modest (sevenfold) and most pronounced in cells expressing rhesus macaque CCR5 as compared to human CCR5. Nonetheless, virus harboring envm584, unlike inoculating virus envp3, could replicate even at the highest tissue culture PSC-RANTES concentrations (100 nM). Dual-virus competitions revealed a dramatic increase in fitness of chimeric virus containing envm584 (K315R/N640D) over that containing envp3, but again, only in rhesus CCR5-expressing cells. This study is the first to describe the immediate selection and infection of a drug-resistant SHIV variant in the face of a protective vaginal microbicide, PSC-RANTES. This rhesus CCR5-specific/PSC- RANTES resistance selection is particularly alarming given the relative homogeneity of the SHIVSF162-p3 stock compared to the potential exposure to a heterogeneous HIV-1 population in human transmission. PMID:19279098

  8. Evolution of antibiotic resistance by human and bacterial niche construction.

    PubMed

    Boni, Maciej F; Feldman, Marcus W

    2005-03-01

    Antibiotic treatment by humans generates strong viability selection for antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. The frequency of host antibiotic use often determines the strength of this selection, and changing patterns of antibiotic use can generate many types of behaviors in the population dynamics of resistant and sensitive bacterial populations. In this paper, we present a simple model of hosts dimorphic for their tendency to use/avoid antibiotics and bacterial pathogens dimorphic in their resistance/sensitivity to antibiotic treatment. When a constant fraction of hosts uses antibiotics, the two bacterial strain populations can coexist unless host use-frequency is above a critical value; this critical value is derived as the ratio of the fitness cost of resistance to the fitness cost of undergoing treatment. When strain frequencies can affect host behavior, the dynamics may be analyzed in the light of niche construction. We consider three models underlying changing host behavior: conformism, the avoidance of long infections, and adherence to the advice of public health officials. In the latter two, we find that the pathogen can have quite a strong effect on host behavior. In particular, if antibiotic use is discouraged when resistance levels are high, we observe a classic niche-construction phenomenon of maintaining strain polymorphism even in parameter regions where it would not be expected.

  9. Influence of Age, Reproductive Cycling Status, and Menstruation on the Vaginal Microbiome in Baboons (Papio anubis)

    PubMed Central

    UCHIHASHI, M.; BERGIN, I. L.; BASSIS, C. M.; HASHWAY, S. A.; CHAI, D.; BELL, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    The vaginal microbiome is believed to influence host health by providing protection from pathogens and influencing reproductive outcomes such as fertility and gestational length. In humans, age-associated declines in diversity of the vaginal microbiome occur in puberty and persist into adulthood. Additionally, menstruation has been associated with decreased microbial community stability. Adult female baboons, like other non-human primates (NHPs), have a different and highly diverse vaginal microbiome compared to that of humans, which is most commonly dominated by Lactobacillus spp. We evaluated the influence of age, reproductive cycling status (cycling vs. non-cycling) and menstruation on the vaginal microbiome of 38 wild-caught, captive female olive baboons (Papio anubis) by culture-independent sequencing of the V3–V5 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. All baboons had highly diverse vaginal microbial communities. Adult baboons had significantly lower microbial diversity in comparison to subadult baboons, which was attributable to decreased relative abundance of minor taxa. No significant differences were detected based on cycling state or menstruation. Predictive metagenomic analysis showed uniformity in relative abundance of metabolic pathways regardless of age, cycle stage, or menstruation, indicating conservation of microbial community functions. This study suggests that selection of an optimal vaginal microbial community occurs at puberty. Since decreased diversity occurs in both baboons and humans at puberty, this may reflect a general strategy for selection of adult vaginal microbial communities. Comparative evaluation of vaginal microbial community development and composition may elucidate mechanisms of community formation and function that are conserved across host species or across microbial community types. These findings have implications for host health, evolutionary biology, and microbe-host ecosystems. PMID:25676781

  10. Influence of age, reproductive cycling status, and menstruation on the vaginal microbiome in baboons (Papio anubis).

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, M; Bergin, I L; Bassis, C M; Hashway, S A; Chai, D; Bell, J D

    2015-05-01

    The vaginal microbiome is believed to influence host health by providing protection from pathogens and influencing reproductive outcomes such as fertility and gestational length. In humans, age-associated declines in diversity of the vaginal microbiome occur in puberty and persist into adulthood. Additionally, menstruation has been associated with decreased microbial community stability. Adult female baboons, like other non-human primates (NHPs), have a different and highly diverse vaginal microbiome compared to that of humans, which is most commonly dominated by Lactobacillus spp. We evaluated the influence of age, reproductive cycling status (cycling vs. non-cycling) and menstruation on the vaginal microbiome of 38 wild-caught, captive female olive baboons (Papio anubis) by culture-independent sequencing of the V3-V5 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. All baboons had highly diverse vaginal microbial communities. Adult baboons had significantly lower microbial diversity in comparison to subadult baboons, which was attributable to decreased relative abundance of minor taxa. No significant differences were detected based on cycling state or menstruation. Predictive metagenomic analysis showed uniformity in relative abundance of metabolic pathways regardless of age, cycle stage, or menstruation, indicating conservation of microbial community functions. This study suggests that selection of an optimal vaginal microbial community occurs at puberty. Since decreased diversity occurs in both baboons and humans at puberty, this may reflect a general strategy for selection of adult vaginal microbial communities. Comparative evaluation of vaginal microbial community development and composition may elucidate mechanisms of community formation and function that are conserved across host species or across microbial community types. These findings have implications for host health, evolutionary biology, and microbe-host ecosystems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Staging for vaginal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Shalini; Maheshwari, Amita; Srivastava, Astha

    2015-08-01

    Vaginal cancer is a rare cancer comprising about 3% of all gynecologic cancers. Primary vaginal cancer should be carefully assigned as spread from cervix, vulva, and other metastatic tumors to vagina can occur. Although vaginal cancer traditionally occurs in older postmenopausal women, the incidence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced cancers is increasing in younger women. Squamous cell carcinoma is still the most common histopathologic type followed by adenocarcinoma. With decreasing use of diethylstilbestrol in pregnancy, non-diethylstilbestrol-associated cancers are described. The Federation Internationale de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique (FIGO) staging of vaginal cancer (2009) follows the same rules as cervical cancer; it is clinically staged and allows the use of routine investigative modalities for staging. Although FIGO encourages the use of advanced imaging modalities, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET), to guide therapy, the imaging findings may not be used to change or reassign the stage. TNM staging is the pathologic staging system proposed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, and information available from examination of the resected specimen, including pelvic and inguinal lymph nodes, may be used for staging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Bacterial Vaginosis Page Content Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection in ... in harmful bacteria. The actual organism responsible for vaginosis hasn’t been clearly identified. BV is uncommon ...

  13. A Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate Dose That Models Human Use and Its Effect on Vaginal SHIV Acquisition Risk.

    PubMed

    Butler, Katherine; Ritter, Jana M; Ellis, Shanon; Morris, Monica R; Hanson, Debra L; McNicholl, Janet M; Kersh, Ellen N

    2016-08-01

    Hormonal contraception with depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) may increase HIV acquisition risk, but observational human studies are inconclusive, and animal models can help investigate this risk. In this study, we test the impact of a low DMPA dose, designed to resemble human contraceptive use, on Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (SHIV) acquisition risk in pigtail macaques (Macaca nemestrina). Macaques metabolize DMPA faster than humans. We previously identified a per-weight DMPA dose and administration frequency that achieves long-lasting suppression of ovulation in macaques. Eight macaques were given 1.5-mg/kg DMPA monthly, whereas 11 were untreated controls. For comparison, women receive 150 mg (approximately 2 mg/kg) every 3 months. We exposed monkeys to 20 suboptimal SHIV challenges, designed to slowly infect half of controls and allow increased infection in the DMPA group. It took a median 5.5 viral challenges to infect DMPA-treated macaques and 9 challenges for controls (P = 0.27; exact conditional logistic regression). The exact odds ratio was 2.2 (CI: 0.6 to 8.3). Ovulation was suppressed, and the vaginal epithelium was thinned after DMPA treatment in all animals (mean, 30 and 219 mm in DMPA-treated and control macaques, respectively, P = 0.03, t test using the Satterthwaite degrees-of-freedom approximation). SHIV infections in DMPA-treated macaques were 2.2 times those of controls, but this was not statistically significant. The result is remarkably similar to studies of human DMPA use, which have shown HIV risk increases of a similar magnitude and of variable significance. Taken together with previous studies of higher DMPA doses in macaques, the results suggest a dose-dependent effect of DMPA on Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) or SHIV acquisition.

  14. Antimicrobial peptide LL-37 promotes bacterial phagocytosis by human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wan, Min; van der Does, Anne M; Tang, Xiao; Lindbom, Lennart; Agerberth, Birgitta; Haeggström, Jesper Z

    2014-06-01

    LL-37/hCAP-18 is the only human member of the cathelicidin family and plays an important role in killing various pathogens, as well as in immune modulation. In this study, we investigated the effect of LL-37 on bacterial phagocytosis by macrophages and demonstrate that LL-37 enhances phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in a dose- and time-dependent manner by dTHP-1 cells. In addition, LL-37 enhanced phagocytosis of nonopsonized Escherichia coli by human macrophages. Consistently, LL-37 elevated the expression of FcγRs on macrophages but not the complement receptors CD11b and -c. Further studies revealed that the expression of TLR4 and CD14 is also increased on LL-37-treated macrophages. Several lines of evidence indicated that the FPR2/ALX receptor mediated LL-37-induced phagocytosis. However, TLR4 signaling was also coupled to the phagocytic response, as a specific TLR4 antibody significantly suppressed phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized E. coli and nonopsonized E. coli by dTHP-1 cells. Finally, macrophages from Cnlp(-/-) mice exhibited diminished bacterial phagocytosis compared with macrophages from their WT littermates. In conclusion, we demonstrate a novel, immune-modulatory mechanism of LL-37, which may contribute to bacterial clearance.

  15. [The role of pro- and antioxidants of microorganisms in regulation of symbiosis homeostasis mechanisms (on the model of human vaginal biotope)].

    PubMed

    Bukharin, O V; Sgibnev, A V; Cherkasov, S V

    2014-01-01

    Study the production of bacterial pro- and antioxidants in vaginal biotope and analysis of their role in regulation of symbiosis homeostasis mechanisms. Hydrogen peroxide, catalase inhibitors and antioxidant production in bacteria isolated from 63 women with vaginal eubiosis and 53--with dysbiosis were studied. Production of pro- and antioxidants was regulated by lactate, volatile fatty acids, polyamines and Lactobacillus plantarum and Corynebacterium minutissimum polysaccharides, metabolite bactericidity of peroxide producing lactobacilli was enhanced by addition of iron (II) ions. A high level of pro- and antioxidant production was noted for eubiosis state, and their ratio was close to 1, for biotopes with dysbiosis a multiple predominance of microbial antioxidant levels over pro-oxidants was characteristic. Peroxide producing symbionts are an important component of system of generation of hydroxyl radicals that are highly effective wide specter disinfectants. Maintenance of balance of pro- and antioxidant production by symbionts determined vaginal biotope symbiosis homeostasis. The detected high biocidic activity of hydroxyl radicals that are formed from hydrogen peroxide of normoflora through the creation of optimal conditions for their generation by selection of the respective concentrations of iron (II) ions and H2O2 opens perspective of development of novel disinfection methods.

  16. Bacterial contamination of human organ-cultured corneas.

    PubMed

    Albon, J; Armstrong, M; Tullo, A B

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to detect and identify bacterial contaminants in human corneoscleral tissue after organ culture storage. Seventy-two corneoscleral rims and corneal buttons trephined from organ cultured corneoscleral discs using aseptic technique and 45 organ-cultured donor corneoscleral rims postpenetrating keratoplasty) were subjected to a mechanical extraction technique using a Stomacher laboratory blender. As a control, 28 of the corneoscleral rims and buttons were halved; one half of each corneoscleral rim and button was decontaminated in formalin for 48 hours before thorough washing in balanced salt solution. Corneal specimens, culture medium, and transport (5% dextran) medium were cultured in brain-heart infusion broth at 37 degrees C for 5 days. Bacterial isolates were identified after culture of turbid enrichment broth. Bacterial contamination was demonstrated in 29% (21 of 72) of the corneoscleral rims and 15% (11 of 72) of the corneal buttons that were trephined aseptically from corneoscleral discs and in 29% (13 of 45) of postkeratoplasty corneoscleral rims. Bacterial contaminants were not isolated from controls. Isolated microorganisms included coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus viridans, Pseudomonas sp, and Bacillus sp. A correlation was not demonstrated between contamination and cause of death, death to enucleation, death to culture time, or time in culture. Postkeratoplasty endophthalmitis was not evident in the patients who had received corneal buttons from those corneoscleral discs that had contaminated corneoscleral rims. Bacterial contamination exists in corneoscleral tissue after organ culture storage. The difference in distribution of bacteria and percentage of contamination between the peripheral and central corneas causes us to question the value of routine postpenetrating keratoplasty corneoscleral rim cultures.

  17. Recognition of human milk oligosaccharides by bacterial exotoxins.

    PubMed

    El-Hawiet, Amr; Kitova, Elena N; Klassen, John S

    2015-08-01

    The affinities of the most abundant oligosaccharides found in human milk for four bacterial exotoxins (from Vibrio cholerae and pathogenic Escherichia coli) were quantified for the first time. Association constants (Ka) for a library of 20 human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) binding to Shiga toxin type 2 holotoxin (Stx2) and the B subunit homopentamers of cholera toxin, heat-labile toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 (CTB5, HLTB5 and Stx1B5) were measured at 25°C and pH 7 using the direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry assay. Notably, all four bacterial toxins bind to a majority of the HMOs tested and five of the HMOs (2'-fucosyllactose, lacto-N-tetraose, lacto-N-fucopentaose I, lacto-N-fucopentaose II and lacto-N-fucopentaose III) are ligands for all four toxins. These five HMOs are also reported to bind to other bacterial toxins (e.g. toxin A and toxin B of Clostridium difficile). In all cases, the HMO affinities (apparent Ka) are relatively modest (≤15,000 M(-1)). However, at the high concentrations of HMOs typically ingested by infants, a significant fraction of these toxins, if present, is expected to be bound to HMOs. Binding measurements carried out with 2'-fucosyllactose or lacto-N-fucopentaose I, together with a high-affinity ligand based on the native carbohydrate receptor, revealed that all four toxins possess HMO-binding sites that are distinct from those of the native receptors, although evidence of competitive binding was found for lacto-N-fucopentaose I with Stx2 and 2'-fucosyllactose and lacto-N-fucopentaose I with HLTB5. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that, while HMOs are expected to bind extensively to these bacterial toxins, it is unlikely that HMO binding will effectively inhibit their interactions with their cellular receptors.

  18. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the ...

  19. Vaginitis test - wet mount

    MedlinePlus

    ... after intercourse. Trichomoniasis , a sexually transmitted disease Vaginal yeast infection Risks There are no risks with this ... Vaginal itching and discharge - adult and adolescent Vaginal yeast infection Review Date 8/14/2015 Updated by: ...

  20. Direct comparison of two vaginal self-sampling devices for the detection of human papillomavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Jentschke, M; Chen, K; Arbyn, M; Hertel, B; Noskowicz, M; Soergel, P; Hillemanns, P

    2016-09-01

    Two devices for vaginal self-sampling of dry cell material (Evalyn Brush, Rovers Medical Devices; Qvintip, Aprovix) were compared using the Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV test. Both self-sampling devices (change of order with every patient) including instructions for use and a questionnaire were handed to 146 patients in a colposcopy clinic prior to scheduled colposcopies with collection of cervical reference specimens by gynaecologists using a broom-like device. Matched self-collected and physician collected specimens were transferred to ThinPrep medium and tested for the presence of hr-HPV. Biopsies were taken if indicated by colposcopy. Evaluation of 136 patients with complete data (136/146; 93.2%) showed high agreement of overall hr-HPV detection rates between self-collected and clinician-collected specimens (Evalyn: 91.2% [kappa 0.822]; Qvintip: 89.0% [kappa 0.779]). Colposcopy and histological evaluation revealed 55 women without cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), 32 CIN1, 34 CIN2, 14 CIN3 and one adenocarcinoma in situ. Hr-HPV testing detected all CIN3+ cases on the clinician-taken or Evalyn self-samples (14/14) and 93% of them on the Qvintip samples (13/14). There was no significant difference regarding the sensitivity for CIN2+ or CIN3+ and specificity of hr-HPV testing on self- vs. clinician samples and on Evalyn vs. Qvintip. Based on signal intensities of β-globin, the observed DNA concentration with Evalyn samples (mean CN: 22.0; 95%-CI: 21.5-22.6) was found to be significantly higher compared to that of Qvintip samples (mean CN: 23.8; 95%-CI 23.2-24.4), regardless of the order of self-sampling (p<0.0001). Most women considered self-sampling easy and comfortable. Qvintip was considered easier than the Evalyn Brush to understand (p<0.001) and to use (p=0.002). This study confirms that hr-HPV testing with a clinically validated PCR-based HPV assay is as accurate on self-samples as on clinician-samples without significant difference between both

  1. Specific vaginal lactobacilli suppress the inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide stimulation through downregulation of toll-like receptor 4 expression in human embryonic intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    TOBITA, Keisuke; WATANABE, Itsuki; SAITO, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal lactobacilli (VLB) spread from the mother to the infant during vaginal delivery. However, the effects of VLB on infant intestinal function remain unclear. We investigated the probiotic function and immune effects of VLB on the human embryonic intestinal epithelial cell line INT-407. VLB survived artificial gastric juice and adhered to INT-407 cells. Exposure of INT-407 cells to VLB attenuated both the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced stimulation of interleukin-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha production and the LPS-stimulated upregulation of TLR4 expression. These results suggest that specific VLB suppresses the inflammation induced by LPS stimulation through downregulation of TLR4 expression in human embryonic intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:28243550

  2. Gene Expression Profiling of Human Vaginal Cells In Vitro Discriminates Compounds with Pro-Inflammatory and Mucosa-Altering Properties: Novel Biomarkers for Preclinical Testing of HIV Microbicide Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Zalenskaya, Irina A.; Joseph, Theresa; Bavarva, Jasmin; Yousefieh, Nazita; Jackson, Suzanne S.; Fashemi, Titilayo; Yamamoto, Hidemi S.; Settlage, Robert; Fichorova, Raina N.; Doncel, Gustavo F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and immune activation of the cervicovaginal mucosa are considered factors that increase susceptibility to HIV infection. Therefore, it is essential to screen candidate anti-HIV microbicides for potential mucosal immunomodulatory/inflammatory effects prior to further clinical development. The goal of this study was to develop an in vitro method for preclinical evaluation of the inflammatory potential of new candidate microbicides using a microarray gene expression profiling strategy. Methods To this end, we compared transcriptomes of human vaginal cells (Vk2/E6E7) treated with well-characterized pro-inflammatory (PIC) and non-inflammatory (NIC) compounds. PICs included compounds with different mechanisms of action. Gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2 arrays. Data processing was performed using GeneSpring 11.5 (Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, CA). Results Microarraray comparative analysis allowed us to generate a panel of 20 genes that were consistently deregulated by PICs compared to NICs, thus distinguishing between these two groups. Functional analysis mapped 14 of these genes to immune and inflammatory responses. This was confirmed by the fact that PICs induced NFkB pathway activation in Vk2 cells. By testing microbicide candidates previously characterized in clinical trials we demonstrated that the selected PIC-associated genes properly identified compounds with mucosa-altering effects. The discriminatory power of these genes was further demonstrated after culturing vaginal cells with vaginal bacteria. Prevotella bivia, prevalent bacteria in the disturbed microbiota of bacterial vaginosis, induced strong upregulation of seven selected PIC-associated genes, while a commensal Lactobacillus gasseri associated to vaginal health did not cause any changes. Conclusions In vitro evaluation of the immunoinflammatory potential of microbicides using the PIC-associated genes defined in this study could help in the initial

  3. Anaerobes and Gardnerella vaginalis in non-specific vaginitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, L V

    1985-01-01

    Clinical evidence of bacterial vaginosis was present in 25 (35%) of 72 patients attending a London venereology clinic and correlated significantly with abnormal organic acids in vaginal secretions (24/25), with Gardnerella vaginalis on culture (17/25), with complaints of vaginal malodour (15/25), and with a relative scarcity of white blood cells in vaginal secretions. Anaerobic vaginal flora were presumptively identified by gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of organic acids found in vaginal secretions. The clinical criteria used to diagnose bacterial vaginosis included the presence of at least three of the four following characteristics: (a) a vaginal pH greater than or equal to 4.5, vaginal secretions that (b) were homogeneous, (c) contained "clue" cells, and (d) released a "fishy" amine odour when mixed with 10% potassium hydroxide. Because 17 of the 25 patients with clinical bacterial vaginosis had both chromatographic bacterial vaginosis and G vaginalis, causative organisms were difficult to identify. None of the six patients who had G vaginalis but not chromatographic bacterial vaginosis had clinical bacterial vaginosis, but seven of the 10 women with chromatographic bacterial vaginosis but not G vaginalis had clinical bacterial vaginosis (p less than 0.02, chi 2 with Yates's correction). This finding supports the recent suggestions that anaerobes are important in the production of clinical signs of bacterial vaginosis. PMID:3872256

  4. Effects of feminine hygiene products on the vaginal mucosal biome

    PubMed Central

    Fashemi, Bisiayo; Delaney, Mary L.; Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Fichorova, Raina N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Over-the-counter (OTC) feminine hygiene products come with little warning about possible side effects. This study evaluates in-vitro their effects on Lactobacillus crispatus, which is dominant in the normal vaginal microbiota and helps maintain a healthy mucosal barrier essential for normal reproductive function and prevention of sexually transmitted infections and gynecologic cancer. Methods A feminine moisturizer (Vagisil), personal lubricant, and douche were purchased OTC. A topical spermicide (nonoxynol-9) known to alter the vaginal immune barrier was used as a control. L. crispatus was incubated with each product for 2 and 24h and then seeded on agar for colony forming units (CFU). Human vaginal epithelial cells were exposed to products in the presence or absence of L. crispatus for 24h, followed by epithelium-associated CFU enumeration. Interleukin-8 was immunoassayed and ANOVA was used for statistical evaluation. Results Nonoxynol-9 and Vagisil suppressed Lactobacillus growth at 2h and killed all bacteria at 24h. The lubricant decreased bacterial growth insignificantly at 2h but killed all at 24h. The douche did not have a significant effect. At full strength, all products suppressed epithelial viability and all, except the douche, suppressed epithelial-associated CFU. When applied at non-toxic dose in the absence of bacteria, the douche and moisturizer induced an increase of IL-8, suggesting a potential to initiate inflammatory reaction. In the presence of L. crispatus, the proinflammatory effects of the douche and moisturizer were countered, and IL-8 production was inhibited in the presence of the other products. Conclusion Some OTC vaginal products may be harmful to L. crispatus and alter the vaginal immune environment. Illustrated through these results, L. crispatus is essential in the preservation of the function of vaginal epithelial cells in the presence of some feminine hygiene products. More research should be invested toward these

  5. Reversible Deficiency of Antimicrobial Polypeptides in Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Valore, Erika V.; Wiley, Dorothy J.; Ganz, Tomas

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common condition associated with increased risk of sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus infections. In contrast, vulvovaginal candidiasis has a much weaker association with sexually transmitted diseases. We found that vaginal lavage fluid from women with bacterial vaginosis is deficient in antimicrobial polypeptides and antimicrobial activity compared to fluid from healthy women or women with vulvovaginal candidiasis. Effective treatment normalized the concentrations of antimicrobial polypeptides in both bacterial vaginosis and in vulvovaginal candidiasis, suggesting that the abnormalities were a result of the diseases. Unlike in vulvovaginal candidiasis, the neutrophil attractant chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) was not increased in bacterial vaginosis, accounting for low concentrations of neutrophil-derived defensins in vaginal fluid. In organotypic cultures of human vaginal epithelium containing dendritic cells, treatment with Lactobacillus jensenii, a typical vaginal resident, induced the synthesis of IL-8 mRNA and the epithelial human β-defensin-2 mRNA, but a typical bacterial vaginosis pathogen, Gardnerella vaginalis, had no effect. When the two bacteria were combined, Gardnerella vaginalis did not interfere with the immunostimulatory effect of Lactobacillus jensenii. The loss of normal immunostimulatory flora in bacterial vaginosis is thus associated with a local deficiency of multiple innate immune factors, and this deficiency could predispose individuals to sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:16988245

  6. Differences in vaginal microbiome in African American women versus women of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Fettweis, Jennifer M; Brooks, J Paul; Serrano, Myrna G; Sheth, Nihar U; Girerd, Philippe H; Edwards, David J; Strauss, Jerome F; Jefferson, Kimberly K; Buck, Gregory A

    2014-10-01

    Women of European ancestry are more likely to harbour a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiome, whereas African American women are more likely to exhibit a diverse microbial profile. African American women are also twice as likely to be diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis and are twice as likely to experience preterm birth. The objective of this study was to further characterize and contrast the vaginal microbial profiles in African American versus European ancestry women. Through the Vaginal Human Microbiome Project at Virginia Commonwealth University, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was used to compare the microbiomes of vaginal samples from 1268 African American women and 416 women of European ancestry. The results confirmed significant differences in the vaginal microbiomes of the two groups and identified several taxa relevant to these differences. Major community types were dominated by Gardnerella vaginalis and the uncultivated bacterial vaginosis-associated bacterium-1 (BVAB1) that were common among African Americans. Moreover, the prevalence of multiple bacterial taxa that are associated with microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity and preterm birth, including Mycoplasma, Gardnerella, Prevotella and Sneathia, differed between the two ethnic groups. We investigated the contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including pregnancy, body mass index, diet, smoking and alcohol use, number of sexual partners, and household income, to vaginal community composition. Ethnicity, pregnancy and alcohol use correlated significantly with the relative abundance of bacterial vaginosis-associated species. Trends between microbial profiles and smoking and number of sexual partners were observed; however, these associations were not statistically significant. These results support and extend previous findings that there are significant differences in the vaginal microbiome related to ethnicity and demonstrate that these differences are pronounced even in healthy women

  7. Differences in vaginal microbiome in African American women versus women of European ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Brooks, J. Paul; Serrano, Myrna G.; Sheth, Nihar U.; Girerd, Philippe H.; Edwards, David J.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Jefferson, Kimberly K.

    2014-01-01

    Women of European ancestry are more likely to harbour a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiome, whereas African American women are more likely to exhibit a diverse microbial profile. African American women are also twice as likely to be diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis and are twice as likely to experience preterm birth. The objective of this study was to further characterize and contrast the vaginal microbial profiles in African American versus European ancestry women. Through the Vaginal Human Microbiome Project at Virginia Commonwealth University, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was used to compare the microbiomes of vaginal samples from 1268 African American women and 416 women of European ancestry. The results confirmed significant differences in the vaginal microbiomes of the two groups and identified several taxa relevant to these differences. Major community types were dominated by Gardnerella vaginalis and the uncultivated bacterial vaginosis-associated bacterium-1 (BVAB1) that were common among African Americans. Moreover, the prevalence of multiple bacterial taxa that are associated with microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity and preterm birth, including Mycoplasma, Gardnerella, Prevotella and Sneathia, differed between the two ethnic groups. We investigated the contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including pregnancy, body mass index, diet, smoking and alcohol use, number of sexual partners, and household income, to vaginal community composition. Ethnicity, pregnancy and alcohol use correlated significantly with the relative abundance of bacterial vaginosis-associated species. Trends between microbial profiles and smoking and number of sexual partners were observed; however, these associations were not statistically significant. These results support and extend previous findings that there are significant differences in the vaginal microbiome related to ethnicity and demonstrate that these differences are pronounced even in healthy women

  8. From bacterial to human dihydrouridine synthase: automated structure determination

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Fiona Jenkins, Huw T.; Griffiths, Samuel C.; Byrne, Robert T.; Dodson, Eleanor J.; Antson, Alfred A.

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of a human dihydrouridine synthase, an enzyme associated with lung cancer, with 18% sequence identity to a T. maritima enzyme, has been determined at 1.9 Å resolution by molecular replacement after extensive molecular remodelling of the template. The reduction of uridine to dihydrouridine at specific positions in tRNA is catalysed by dihydrouridine synthase (Dus) enzymes. Increased expression of human dihydrouridine synthase 2 (hDus2) has been linked to pulmonary carcinogenesis, while its knockdown decreased cancer cell line viability, suggesting that it may serve as a valuable target for therapeutic intervention. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a construct of hDus2 encompassing the catalytic and tRNA-recognition domains (residues 1–340) determined at 1.9 Å resolution is presented. It is shown that the structure can be determined automatically by phenix.mr-rosetta starting from a bacterial Dus enzyme with only 18% sequence identity and a significantly divergent structure. The overall fold of the human Dus2 is similar to that of bacterial enzymes, but has a larger recognition domain and a unique three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet insertion into the catalytic domain that packs next to the recognition domain, contributing to domain–domain interactions. The structure may inform the development of novel therapeutic approaches in the fight against lung cancer.

  9. Human mesenchymal stem cells: New sojourn of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Sakshi; Singh, Yadvir; Sowpati, Divya Tej; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Hacker, Jörg; Hasnain, Seyed E

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), is the leading infectious disease which claims one human life every 15-20s globally. The persistence of this deadly disease in human population can be attributed to the ability of the bacterium to stay in latent form. M. tuberculosis possesses a plethora of mechanisms not only to survive latently under harsh conditions inside the host but also modulate the host immune cells in its favour. Various M. tuberculosis gene families have also been described to play a role in this process. Recently, human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been reported as a niche for dormant M. tuberculosis. MSCs possess abilities to alter the host immune response. The bacterium finds this self-renewal and immune privileged nature of MSCs very favourable not only to modulate the host immune system, with some help from its own genes, but also to avoid the external drug pressure. We suggest that the MSCs not only provide a resting place for M. tuberculosis but could also, by virtue of their intrinsic ability to disseminate in the body, explain the genesis of extra-pulmonary TB. A similar exploitation of stem cells by other bacterial pathogens is a distinct possibility. It may be likely that other intracellular bacterial pathogens adopt this strategy to 'piggy-back' on to ovarian stem cells to ensure vertical transmission and successful propagation to the next generation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. β-human chorionic gonadotropin assay in vaginal washing fluid for the accurate diagnosis of premature rupture of membranes during late pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Temel, Orhan; Çöğendez, Ebru; Selçuk, Selçuk; Asoğlu, Mehmet Reşit; Kaya, Erdal

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the measurement of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) levels in vaginal fluid is useful for the diagnosis of premature rupture of membranes (PROM). Material and Methods A total of 92 pregnant women between 24 and 40 weeks gestation participated in this study. The patients with fluid leaking from the vagina were designated Group 1, the patients with no fluid leaking from the vagina were Group 2, and those with a suspicion of fluid leaking from the vagina were classified as Group 3. Irrigating the posterior vaginal fornix with 5 mL sterile saline was used to measure β-hCG levels of the patients. Receiver operator curve (ROC) analysis was used to determine the cut-off value for a positive diagnosis. Results The β-hCG levels of vaginal fluid were measured as 20.5±25.0 mIU/mL, 254.6±346.8 mIU/mL, and 74.3±100.8 mIU/mL in Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3, respectively. Vaginal β-hCG level was higher statistically significantly in Group 2 than Group 1 and 3 (p<0.001). 100 mIU/mL was accepted as a cut-off value by using the receiver operating characteristic curve. According to 100 mIU/mL, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values were calculated as 71.2, 100, 100, and 65.1%, respectively. Conclusion The study showed that the measurement of β-hCG level in vaginal washing fluid is an efficient and easy diagnostic test for predicting the amount of fluid leaking from the vagina. However, due to the low negative predictive value of the test, it would not be convenient in daily practice. PMID:24592106

  11. Targeting human papillomavirus to reduce the burden of cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancer and pre-invasive neoplasia: establishing the baseline for surveillance.

    PubMed

    Nygård, Mari; Hansen, Bo Terning; Dillner, Joakim; Munk, Christian; Oddsson, Kristján; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Hortlund, Maria; Liaw, Kai-Li; Dasbach, Erik J; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally related to cervical, vulvar and vaginal pre-invasive neoplasias and cancers. Highly effective vaccines against HPV types 16/18 have been available since 2006, and are currently used in many countries in combination with cervical cancer screening to control the burden of cervical cancer. We estimated the overall and age-specific incidence rate (IR) of cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancer and pre-invasive neoplasia in Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden in 2004-2006, prior to the availability of HPV vaccines, in order to establish a baseline for surveillance. We also estimated the population attributable fraction to determine roughly the expected effect of HPV16/18 vaccination on the incidence of these diseases. Information on incident cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancers and high-grade pre-invasive neoplasias was obtained from high-quality national population-based registries. A literature review was conducted to define the fraction of these lesions attributable to HPV16/18, i.e., those that could be prevented by HPV vaccination. Among the four countries, the age-standardised IR/10⁵ of cervical, vaginal and vulvar cancer ranged from 8.4-13.8, 1.3-3.1 and 0.2-0.6, respectively. The risk for cervical cancer was highest in women aged 30-39, while vulvar and vaginal cancers were most common in women aged 70+. Age-standardised IR/10⁵ of cervical, vulvar and vaginal pre-invasive neoplasia ranged between 138.8-183.2, 2.5-8.8 and 0.5-1.3, respectively. Women aged 20-29 had the highest risk for cervical pre-invasive neoplasia, while vulvar and vaginal pre-invasive neoplasia peaked in women aged 40-49 and 60-69, respectively. Over 50% of the observed 47,820 incident invasive and pre-invasive cancer cases in 2004-2006 can be attributed to HPV16/18. In the four countries, vaccination against HPV 16/18 could prevent approximately 8500 cases of gynecological cancer and pre-cancer annually. Population-based cancer

  12. Targeting Human Papillomavirus to Reduce the Burden of Cervical, Vulvar and Vaginal Cancer and Pre-Invasive Neoplasia: Establishing the Baseline for Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Nygård, Mari; Hansen, Bo Terning; Dillner, Joakim; Munk, Christian; Oddsson, Kristján; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Hortlund, Maria; Liaw, Kai-Li; Dasbach, Erik J.; Kjær, Susanne Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Background Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally related to cervical, vulvar and vaginal pre-invasive neoplasias and cancers. Highly effective vaccines against HPV types 16/18 have been available since 2006, and are currently used in many countries in combination with cervical cancer screening to control the burden of cervical cancer. We estimated the overall and age-specific incidence rate (IR) of cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancer and pre-invasive neoplasia in Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden in 2004–2006, prior to the availability of HPV vaccines, in order to establish a baseline for surveillance. We also estimated the population attributable fraction to determine roughly the expected effect of HPV16/18 vaccination on the incidence of these diseases. Methods Information on incident cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancers and high-grade pre-invasive neoplasias was obtained from high-quality national population-based registries. A literature review was conducted to define the fraction of these lesions attributable to HPV16/18, i.e., those that could be prevented by HPV vaccination. Results Among the four countries, the age-standardised IR/105 of cervical, vaginal and vulvar cancer ranged from 8.4–13.8, 1.3–3.1 and 0.2–0.6, respectively. The risk for cervical cancer was highest in women aged 30–39, while vulvar and vaginal cancers were most common in women aged 70+. Age-standardised IR/105 of cervical, vulvar and vaginal pre-invasive neoplasia ranged between 138.8−183.2, 2.5−8.8 and 0.5−1.3, respectively. Women aged 20−29 had the highest risk for cervical pre-invasive neoplasia, while vulvar and vaginal pre-invasive neoplasia peaked in women aged 40−49 and 60−69, respectively. Over 50% of the observed 47,820 incident invasive and pre-invasive cancer cases in 2004−2006 can be attributed to HPV16/18. Conclusion In the four countries, vaccination against HPV 16/18 could prevent approximately 8500 cases of

  13. Microarray analysis of human epithelial cell responses to bacterial interaction.

    PubMed

    Mans, Jeffrey J; Lamont, Richard J; Handfield, Martin

    2006-09-01

    Host-pathogen interactions are inherently complex and dynamic. The recent use of human microarrays has been invaluable to monitor the effects of various bacterial and viral pathogens upon host cell gene expression programs. This methodology has allowed the host response transcriptome of several cell lines to be studied on a global scale. To this point, the great majority of reports have focused on the response of immune cells, including macrophages and dendritic cells. These studies revealed that the immune response to microbial pathogens is tailored to different microbial challenges. Conversely, the paradigm for epithelial cells has--until recently--held that the epithelium mostly served as a relatively passive physical barrier to infection. It is now generally accepted that the epithelial barrier contributes more actively to signaling events in the immune response. In light of this shift, this review will compare transcriptional profiling data from studies that involved host-pathogen interactions occurring with epithelial cells. Experiments that defined both a common core response, as well as pathogen-specific host responses will be discussed. This review will also summarize the contributions that transcriptional profiling analysis has made to our understanding of bacterial physio-pathogensis of infection. This will include a discussion of how host transcriptional responses can be used to infer the function of virulence determinants from bacterial pathogens interacting with epithelial mucosa. In particular, we will expand upon the lessons that have been learned from gastro-intestinal and oral pathogens, as well as from members of the commensal flora.

  14. Targeting and inactivation of bacterial toxins by human defensins.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, Elena; Seveau, Stephanie M; Kudryashov, Dmitri S

    2017-09-26

    Defensins, as a prominent family of antimicrobial peptides (AMP), are major effectors of the innate immunity with a broad range of immune modulatory and antimicrobial activities. In particular, defensins are the only recognized fast-response molecules that can neutralize a broad range of bacterial toxins, many of which are among the deadliest compounds on the planet. For a decade, the mystery of how a small and structurally conserved group of peptides can neutralize a heterogeneous group of toxins with little to no sequential and structural similarity remained unresolved. Recently, it was found that defensins recognize and target structural plasticity/thermodynamic instability, fundamental physicochemical properties that unite many bacterial toxins and distinguish them from the majority of host proteins. Binding of human defensins promotes local unfolding of the affected toxins, destabilizes their secondary and tertiary structures, increases susceptibility to proteolysis, and leads to their precipitation. While the details of toxin destabilization by defensins remain obscure, here we briefly review properties and activities of bacterial toxins known to be affected by or resilient to defensins, and discuss how recognized features of defensins correlate with the observed inactivation.

  15. Lactobacillus species as biomarkers and agents that can promote various aspects of vaginal health

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Mariya I.; Lievens, Elke; Malik, Shweta; Imholz, Nicole; Lebeer, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The human body is colonized by a vast number of microorganisms collectively referred to as the human microbiota. One of the main microbiota body sites is the female genital tract, commonly dominated by Lactobacillus spp., in approximately 70% of women. Each individual species can constitute approximately 99% of the ribotypes observed in any individual woman. The most frequently isolated species are Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus jensenii and Lactobacillus iners. Residing at the port of entry of bacterial and viral pathogens, the vaginal Lactobacillus species can create a barrier against pathogen invasion since mainly products of their metabolism secreted in the cervicovaginal fluid can play an important role in the inhibition of bacterial and viral infections. Therefore, a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota appears to be a good biomarker for a healthy vaginal ecosystem. This balance can be rapidly altered during processes such as menstruation, sexual activity, pregnancy and various infections. An abnormal vaginal microbiota is characterized by an increased diversity of microbial species, leading to a condition known as bacterial vaginosis. Information on the vaginal microbiota can be gathered from the analysis of cervicovaginal fluid, by using the Nugent scoring or the Amsel's criteria, or at the molecular level by investigating the number and type of Lactobacillus species. However, when translating this to the clinical setting, it should be noted that the absence of a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota does not appear to directly imply a diseased condition or dysbiosis. Nevertheless, the widely documented beneficial role of vaginal Lactobacillus species demonstrates the potential of data on the composition and activity of lactobacilli as biomarkers for vaginal health. The substantiation and further validation of such biomarkers will allow the design of better targeted probiotic strategies. PMID:25859220

  16. Dermatologic causes of vaginitis: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Libby

    2010-10-01

    The concept of vaginitis is widely accepted. Most physicians assume that vaginitis represents an infection, with nearly all vaginal complaints diagnosed as Candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, or trichomonas. However, like the mouth, the vagina is covered with squamous epithelium, and therefore affected by various dermatoses. Some dermatoses prominently affect mucous membranes, such as lichen planus, pemphigus vulgaris, cicatricial pemphigoid, and blistering forms of erythema multiforme. In addition, some dermatoses affect only the vagina, including desquamative inflammatory vaginitis and atrophic vaginitis. The diagnosis and management of these diseases are hampered by the difficulty of visualizing the vagina, and the lack of medications other than antimicrobials available for use in the vagina. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. MIV-150/Zinc Acetate Gel Inhibits Cell-Associated Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reverse Transcriptase Infection in a Macaque Vaginal Explant Model

    PubMed Central

    Barnable, Patrick; Calenda, Giulia; Bonnaire, Thierry; Menon, Radhika; Levendosky, Keith; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Cooney, Michael L.; Fernández-Romero, José A.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The transmission of both cell-free and cell-associated immunodeficiency viruses has been demonstrated directly in multiple animal species and possibly occurs in humans, as suggested by genotyping of the infecting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in acutely infected women and in semen from their partners. Therefore, a microbicide may need to block both mechanisms of HIV transmission to achieve maximum efficacy. To date, most of the preclinical evaluation of candidate microbicides has been performed using cell-free HIV. New models of mucosal transmission of cell-associated HIV are needed to evaluate candidate microbicide performance. The MIV-150/zinc acetate/carrageenan (MZC) gel protects Depo-Provera-treated macaques against cell-free simian-human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) infection when applied vaginally up to 8 h before challenge. We recently demonstrated the potent activity of MZC gel against cell-free SHIV-RT in macaque vaginal explants. In the current study, we established a cell-associated SHIV-RT infection model of macaque vaginal tissues and tested the activity of MZC gel in this model. MZC gel protected tissues against cell-associated SHIV-RT infection when present at the time of viral exposure or when applied up to 4 days prior to viral challenge. These data support clinical testing of the MZC gel. Overall, our ex vivo model of cell-associated SHIV-RT infection in macaque vaginal mucosa complements the cell-free infection models, providing tools for prioritization of products that block both modes of HIV transmission. PMID:25870063

  18. The interaction between vaginal microbiota, cervical length, and vaginal progesterone treatment for preterm birth risk.

    PubMed

    Kindinger, Lindsay M; Bennett, Phillip R; Lee, Yun S; Marchesi, Julian R; Smith, Ann; Cacciatore, Stefano; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Teoh, T G; MacIntyre, David A

    2017-01-19

    Preterm birth is the primary cause of infant death worldwide. A short cervix in the second trimester of pregnancy is a risk factor for preterm birth. In specific patient cohorts, vaginal progesterone reduces this risk. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we undertook a prospective study in women at risk of preterm birth (n = 161) to assess (1) the relationship between vaginal microbiota and cervical length in the second trimester and preterm birth risk and (2) the impact of vaginal progesterone on vaginal bacterial communities in women with a short cervix. Lactobacillus iners dominance at 16 weeks of gestation was significantly associated with both a short cervix <25 mm (n = 15, P < 0.05) and preterm birth <34(+0) weeks (n = 18; P < 0.01; 69% PPV). In contrast, Lactobacillus crispatus dominance was highly predictive of term birth (n = 127, 98% PPV). Cervical shortening and preterm birth were not associated with vaginal dysbiosis. A longitudinal characterization of vaginal microbiota (<18, 22, 28, and 34 weeks) was then undertaken in women receiving vaginal progesterone (400 mg/OD, n = 25) versus controls (n = 42). Progesterone did not alter vaginal bacterial community structure nor reduce L. iners-associated preterm birth (<34 weeks). L. iners dominance of the vaginal microbiota at 16 weeks of gestation is a risk factor for preterm birth, whereas L. crispatus dominance is protective against preterm birth. Vaginal progesterone does not appear to impact the pregnancy vaginal microbiota. Patients and clinicians who may be concerned about "infection risk" associated with the use of a vaginal pessary during high-risk pregnancy can be reassured.

  19. [Clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis and its mixed infections].

    PubMed

    Fan, Ai-Ping; Xue, Feng-Xia

    2010-12-01

    To investigate clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis (AV) and its mixed infections for diagnosis efficiently. From April 2008 to December 2008, 516 patients with vaginitis treated in Tianjin Medical University General Hospital were enrolled in this study. AV, bacterial vaginosis (BV), vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), trichomonal vaginitis (TV), and cytolytic vaginosis (CV) were diagnosed based on symptoms, sign and vaginal discharge examination. Among 516 cases, AV cases were found in 14.7% (76/516), and AV was common vaginal infection. AV mixed infections was diagnosed in 58% (44/76), including mixed with BV (45%, 20/44), mixed with VVC (30%, 13/44), and mixed with TV (25%, 11/44). Those common symptom of AV were yellow vaginal discharge (63%, 20/32), more vaginal discharge (44%, 14/32). Vaginal pH value was usually more than 4.5 (84%, 27/32). Vaginal cleanliness mainly was grade III - IV (88%, 28/32). Six cases with enterococcus faecium and 4 cases with streptococci were frequently isolated. The symptom and sign of mixed AV infection was atypical. Aerobic vaginitis is a common lower vaginal infection and easily mixed with other pathogens, especially with BV, VVC or TV. When patients were diagnosed with AV or other vaginal infection, it should be mentioned whether those patients have mixed vaginal infection or AV.

  20. From bacterial to human dihydrouridine synthase: automated structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Fiona; Jenkins, Huw T.; Griffiths, Samuel C.; Byrne, Robert T.; Dodson, Eleanor J.; Antson, Alfred A.

    2015-01-01

    The reduction of uridine to dihydrouridine at specific positions in tRNA is catalysed by dihydrouridine synthase (Dus) enzymes. Increased expression of human dihydrouridine synthase 2 (hDus2) has been linked to pulmonary carcinogenesis, while its knockdown decreased cancer cell line viability, suggesting that it may serve as a valuable target for therapeutic intervention. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a construct of hDus2 encompassing the catalytic and tRNA-recognition domains (residues 1–340) determined at 1.9 Å resolution is presented. It is shown that the structure can be determined automatically by phenix.mr_rosetta starting from a bacterial Dus enzyme with only 18% sequence identity and a significantly divergent structure. The overall fold of the human Dus2 is similar to that of bacterial enzymes, but has a larger recognition domain and a unique three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet insertion into the catalytic domain that packs next to the recognition domain, contributing to domain–domain interactions. The structure may inform the development of novel therapeutic approaches in the fight against lung cancer. PMID:26143927

  1. Detection and Type-Distribution of Human Papillomavirus in Vulva and Vaginal Abnormal Cytology Lesions and Cancer Tissues from Thai Women.

    PubMed

    Ngamkham, Jarunya; Boonmark, Krittika; Phansri, Thainsang

    2016-01-01

    Vulva and Vaginal cancers are rare among all gynecological cancers worldwide, including Thailand, and typically affect women in later life. Persistent high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection is one of several important causes of cancer development. In this study, we focused on HPV investigation and specific type distribution from Thai women with abnormality lesions and cancers of the vulva and Vaginal. A total of ninety paraffin-embedded samples of vulva and Vaginal abnormalities and cancer cells with histologically confirmed were collected from Thai women, who were diagnosed in 2003-2012 at the National Cancer Institute, Thailand. HPV DNA was detected and genotyped using polymerase chain reaction and enzyme immunoassay with GP5+/ bio 6+ consensus specific primers and digoxigenin-labeled specific oligoprobes, respectively. The human β-globin gene was used as an internal control. Overall results represented that HPV frequency was 16/34 (47.1%) and 8/20 (40.0%) samples of vulva with cancer and abnormal cytology lesions, respectively, while, 3/5 (60%) and 16/33 (51.61%) samples of Vaginal cancer and abnormal cytology lesions, respectively, were HPV DNA positive. Single HPV type and multiple HPV type infection could be observed in both type of cancers and abnormal lesion samples in the different histological categorizes. HPV16 was the most frequent type in all cancers and abnormal cytology lesions, whereas HPV 18 was less frequent and could be detected as co-infection with other high risk HPV types. In addition, low risk types such as HPV 6, 11 and 70 could be detected in Vulva cancer and abnormal cytology lesion samples, whereas, all Vaginal cancer samples exhibited only high risk HPV types; HPV 16 and 31. In conclusion, from our results in this study we suggest that women with persistent high risk HPV type infection are at risk of developing vulva and Vaginal cancers and HPV 16 was observed at the highest frequent both of these, similar to the cervical

  2. The dynamics of the vaginal microbiome during infertility therapy with in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Richard W; Herndon, Christopher N; Jiang, Hui; Palm, Curtis; Fukushima, Marilyn; Bernstein, Denise; Vo, Kim Chi; Zelenko, Zara; Davis, Ronald W; Giudice, Linda C

    2012-02-01

    To determine the vaginal microbiome in women undergoing IVF-ET and investigate correlations with clinical outcomes. Thirty patients had blood drawn for estradiol (E(2)) and progesterone (P(4)) at four time points during the IVF-ET cycle and at 4-6 weeks of gestation, if pregnant. Vaginal swabs were obtained in different hormonal milieu, and the vaginal microbiome determined by deep sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. The vaginal microbiome underwent a transition during therapy in some but not all patients. Novel bacteria were found in 33% of women tested during the treatment cycle, but not at 6-8 weeks of gestation. Diversity of species varied across different hormonal milieu, and on the day of embryo transfer correlated with outcome (live birth/no live birth). The species diversity index distinguished women who had a live birth from those who did not. This metagenomics approach has enabled discovery of novel, previously unidentified bacterial species in the human vagina in different hormonal milieu and supports a shift in the vaginal microbiome during IVF-ET therapy using standard protocols. Furthermore, the data suggest that the vaginal microbiome on the day of embryo transfer affects pregnancy outcome.

  3. A topical microbicide gel formulation of CCR5 antagonist maraviroc prevents HIV-1 vaginal transmission in humanized RAG-hu mice.

    PubMed

    Neff, C Preston; Kurisu, Theresa; Ndolo, Thomas; Fox, Kami; Akkina, Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    For prevention of HIV infection many currently licensed anti-HIV drugs and new ones in the pipeline show potential as topically applied microbicides. While macaque models have been the gold standard for in vivo microbicide testing, they are expensive and sufficient numbers are not available. Therefore, a small animal model that facilitates rapid evaluation of potential candidates for their preliminary efficacy is urgently needed in the microbicide field. We previously demonstrated that RAG-hu humanized mouse model permits HIV-1 mucosal transmission via both vaginal and rectal routes and that oral pre-exposure chemo-prophylactic strategies could be tested in this system. Here in these proof-of-concept studies, we extended this system for topical microbicide testing using HIV-1 as the challenge virus. Maraviroc, a clinically approved CCR5 inhibitor drug for HIV treatment, was formulated as a microbicide gel at 5 mM concentration in 2.2% hydroxyl ethyl cellulose. Female RAG-hu mice were challenged vaginally with HIV-1 an hour after intravaginal application of the maraviroc gel. Our results showed that maraviroc gel treated mice were fully protected against vaginal HIV-1 challenge in contrast to placebo gel treated mice which all became infected. These findings highlight the utility of the humanized mouse models for microbicide testing and, together with the recent data from macaque studies, suggest that maraviroc is a promising candidate for future microbicide clinical trials in the field.

  4. Detection and partial characterization of a bacteriocin-like substance produced by Lactobacillus fermentum CS57 isolated from human vaginal secretions.

    PubMed

    Sabia, Carla; Anacarso, Immacolata; Bergonzini, Alberto; Gargiulo, Raffaele; Sarti, Mario; Condò, Carla; Messi, Patrizia; de Niederhausern, Simona; Iseppi, Ramona; Bondi, Moreno

    2014-04-01

    Lactobacilli (150) from human vaginal secretions were tested for the production of antimicrobial substances which can provide a physiological defense against the pathogenic microorganisms in the vaginal area. Sixteen of the isolates (10.6%) showed antibacterial activity against one or several closely related microorganisms used as indicators. Lactobacillus fermentum CS57 was the best producer and secretes a bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) with antagonistic activity against Streptococcus agalactiae and Candida albicans. The compound was susceptible to the proteolytic enzymes and was heat labile. The mode of action was identified as bactericidal. The crude activity of the L. fermentum CS57 BLS was linked to a substance with a molecular weight larger than 30 kDa. Plasmid analysis of L. fermentum CS57 revealed the presence of a plasmid band with molecular weight of 54.7 kb. All L. fermentum CS57 non-producer variants (BLS-) obtained by curing experiments, showed loss of plasmid band and were susceptible to the BLS of the original strain. Therefore antimicrobial activity and immunity production seem to be linked to genes located on that same plasmid. Taking into account our results, L. fermentum CS57 could be considered a candidate for potential use as probiotic for the prophylaxis of vaginal human infections.

  5. Vaginal Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Vaginal Cancer Vaginal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Vaginal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Vaginal Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  6. Vaginal microbiota and viral sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed

    Nardis, C; Mosca, L; Mastromarino, P

    2013-01-01

    Healthy vaginal microbiota is an important biological barrier to pathogenic microorganisms. When this predominantly Lactobacillus community is disrupted, decreased in abundance and replaced by different anaerobes, bacterial vaginosis (BV) may occur. BV is associated with prevalence and incidence of several sexually transmitted infections. This review provides background on BV, discusses the epidemiologic data to support a role of altered vaginal microbiota for acquisition of sexually transmitted diseases and analyzes mechanisms by which lactobacilli could counteract sexually transmitted viral infections.

  7. RNA/DNA co-analysis from human menstrual blood and vaginal secretion stains: results of a fourth and fifth collaborative EDNAP exercise.

    PubMed

    Haas, C; Hanson, E; Anjos, M J; Ballantyne, K N; Banemann, R; Bhoelai, B; Borges, E; Carvalho, M; Courts, C; De Cock, G; Drobnic, K; Dötsch, M; Fleming, R; Franchi, C; Gomes, I; Hadzic, G; Harbison, S A; Harteveld, J; Hjort, B; Hollard, C; Hoff-Olsen, P; Hüls, C; Keyser, C; Maroñas, O; McCallum, N; Moore, D; Morling, N; Niederstätter, H; Noël, F; Parson, W; Phillips, C; Popielarz, C; Roeder, A D; Salvaderi, L; Sauer, E; Schneider, P M; Shanthan, G; Court, D Syndercombe; Turanská, M; van Oorschot, R A H; Vennemann, M; Vidaki, A; Zatkalíková, L; Ballantyne, J

    2014-01-01

    The European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) organized a fourth and fifth collaborative exercise on RNA/DNA co-analysis for body fluid identification and STR profiling. The task was to identify dried menstrual blood and vaginal secretion stains using specific RNA biomarkers, and additionally test 3 housekeeping genes for their suitability as reference genes. Six menstrual blood and six vaginal secretion stains, two dilution series (1/4-1/64 pieces of a menstrual blood/vaginal swab) and, optionally, bona fide or mock casework samples of human or non-human origin were analyzed by 24 participating laboratories, using RNA extraction or RNA/DNA co-extraction methods. Two novel menstrual blood mRNA multiplexes were used: MMP triplex (MMP7, MMP10, MMP11) and MB triplex (MSX1, LEFTY2, SFRP4) in conjunction with a housekeeping gene triplex (B2M, UBC, UCE). Two novel mRNA multiplexes and a HBD1 singleplex were used for the identification of vaginal secretion: Vag triplex (MYOZ1, CYP2B7P1 and MUC4) and a Lactobacillus-specific Lacto triplex (Ljen, Lcris, Lgas). The laboratories used different chemistries and instrumentation and all were able to successfully isolate and detect mRNA in dried stains. The simultaneous extraction of RNA and DNA allowed for positive identification of the tissue/fluid source of origin by mRNA profiling as well as a simultaneous identification of the body fluid donor by STR profiling, also from old and compromised casework samples. The results of this and the previous collaborative RNA exercises support RNA profiling as a reliable body fluid identification method that can easily be combined with current STR typing technology.

  8. Seminal plasma induces prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase (PTGS) 2 expression in immortalized human vaginal cells: involvement of semen prostaglandin E2 in PTGS2 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Theresa; Zalenskaya, Irina A; Sawyer, Lyn C; Chandra, Neelima; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of the cervicovaginal mucosa is considered a risk factor for HIV infection in heterosexual transmission. In this context, seminal plasma (SP) may play an important role that is not limited to being the main carrier for the virions. It is known that SP induces an inflammatory reaction in the cervix called postcoital leukocytic reaction, which has been associated with promotion of fertility. The mechanisms by which SP triggers this reaction, however, have not been clearly established. Previously we reported the expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), also known as cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), in human vaginal cells in response to toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands and other proinflammatory stimuli. In this study, we demonstrate that SP induces transcriptional and translational increase of COX-2 expression in human vaginal cells and cervicovaginal tissue explants. Furthermore, SP potentiates vaginal PTGS2 expression induced by other proinflammatory stimulants, such as TLR ligands and a vaginal mucosal irritant (nonoxynol-9) in a synergistic manner. SP-induced PTGS2 expression is mediated by intracellular signaling pathways involving MAPKs and NF-κB. Using fractionation and functional analysis, seminal prostaglandin (PG)-E(2) was identified as a one of the major factors in PTGS2 induction. Given the critical role of this PG-producing enzyme in mucosal inflammatory processes, the finding that SP induces and potentiates the expression of PTGS2 in cervicovaginal cells and tissues has mechanistic implications for the role of SP in fertility-associated mucosal leukocytic reaction and its potential HIV infection-enhancing effect.

  9. Effects of intrauterine contraception on the vaginal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Bassis, Christine M; Allsworth, Jenifer E; Wahl, Heather N; Sack, Daniel E; Young, Vincent B; Bell, Jason D

    2017-09-01

    There have been conflicting reports of altered vaginal microbiota and infection susceptibility associated with contraception use. The objectives of this study were to determine if intrauterine contraception altered the vaginal microbiota and to compare the effects of a copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) and a levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on the vaginal microbiota. DNA was isolated from the vaginal swab samples of 76 women using Cu-IUD (n=36) or LNG-IUS (n=40) collected prior to insertion of intrauterine contraception (baseline) and at 6 months. A third swab from approximately 12 months following insertion was available for 69 (Cu-IUD, n=33; LNG-IUS, n=36) of these women. The V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA-encoding gene was amplified from the vaginal swab DNA and sequenced. The 16S rRNA gene sequences were processed and analyzed using the software package mothur to compare the structure and dynamics of the vaginal bacterial communities. The vaginal microbiota from individuals in this study clustered into 3 major vaginal bacterial community types: one dominated by Lactobacillus iners, one dominated by Lactobacillus crispatus and one community type that was not dominated by a single Lactobacillus species. Changes in the vaginal bacterial community composition were not associated with the use of Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS. Additionally, we did not observe a clear difference in vaginal microbiota stability with Cu-IUD versus LNG-IUS use. Although the vaginal microbiota can be highly dynamic, alterations in the community associated with the use of intrauterine contraception (Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS) were not detected over 12 months. We found no evidence that intrauterine contraception (Cu-IUD or LNG-IUS) altered the vaginal microbiota composition. Therefore, the use of intrauterine contraception is unlikely to shift the composition of the vaginal microbiota such that infection susceptibility is altered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation and Management of Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Phyllis L; Felsenstein, Donna; Friedman, Robert H

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate recent advances in our understanding of the clinical relevance, diagnosis, and treatment of vaginal infections, and to determine an efficient and effective method of evaluating this clinical problem in the outpatient setting. DATA SOURCES Relevant papers on vaginitis limited to the English language obtained through a MEDLINE search for the years 1985 to 1997 were reviewed. DATA SYNTHESIS Techniques that enable the identification of the various strains of candida have helped lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of recurrent candida infection. From this information a rationale for the treatment of recurrent disease can be developed. Bacterial vaginosis has been associated with complications, including upper genital tract infection, preterm delivery, and wound infection. Women undergoing pelvic surgery, procedures in pregnancy, or pregnant women at risk of preterm delivery should be evaluated for bacterial vaginosis to decrease the rate of complications associated with this condition. New, more standardized criteria for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis may improve diagnostic consistency among clinicians and comparability of study results. Use of topical therapies in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis are effective and associated with fewer side effects than systemic medication. Trichomonas vaginalis, although decreasing in incidence, has been associated with upper genital tract infection. Therapy of T. vaginalis infection has been complicated by an increasing incidence of resistance to metronidazole. CONCLUSIONS Vaginitis is a common medical problem in women that is associated with significant morbidity and previously unrecognized complications. Research in recent years has improved diagnostic tools as well as treatment modalities for all forms of vaginitis. PMID:9613891

  11. Determination of the Membrane Permeability to Water of Human Vaginal Mucosal Immune Cells at Subzero Temperatures Using Differential Scanning Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zhiquan; Hughes, Sean M; Fang, Cifeng; Hou, Zhiyuan; Zhao, Gang; Fialkow, Michael; Lentz, Gretchen; Hladik, Florian; Gao, Dayong

    2016-08-01

    To study mucosal immunity and conduct HIV vaccine trials, it is important to be able to cryopreserve mucosal specimens and recover them in functional viable form. Obtaining a good recovery depends, in part, on cooling the cells at the appropriate rate, which is determined by the rate of water transport across the cell membrane during the cooling process. In this study, the cell membrane permeabilities to water at subzero temperatures of human vaginal mucosal T cells and macrophages were measured using the differential scanning calorimetry method proposed by Devireddy et al. in 1998. Thermal histograms were measured before and after cell lysis using a Slow-Fast-Fast-Slow cooling program. The difference between the thermal histograms of the live intact cells and the dead lysed cells was used to calculate the temperature-dependent cell membrane permeability at subzero temperatures, which was assumed to follow the Arrhenius relationship, [Formula: see text], where Lpg is the permeability to water at the reference temperature (273.15 K). The results showed that Lpg = 0.0209 ± 0.0108 μm/atm/min and Ea = 41.5 ± 11.4 kcal/mol for T cells and Lpg = 0.0198 ± 0.0102 μm/atm/min and Ea = 38.2 ± 10.4 kcal/mol for macrophages, respectively, in the range 0°C to -40°C (mean ± standard deviation). Theoretical simulations predicted that the optimal cooling rate for both T cells and macrophages was about -3°C/min, which was proven by preliminary immune cell cryopreservation experiments.

  12. Human ecology and behavior and sexually transmitted bacterial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, K K

    1994-01-01

    The three direct determinants of the rate of spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are sexual behaviors, the mean duration of infectiousness, and the mean efficiency of sexual transmission of each STD. Underlying ecological and behavioral factors that operate through one or more of these direct determinants lie on a continuum, ranging from those most proximate back to those more remote (in time or mechanism) from the direct determinants. Most remote and least modifiable are the historical stages of economic development that even today conspicuously influence patterns of sexual behavior. Next are the distribution and changing patterns of climate, hygiene, and population density; the global population explosion and stages of the demographic transition; and ongoing changes in human physiology (e.g., menarche at younger age) and culture (e.g., later marriage). More proximate on the continuum are war, migration, and travel; and current policies for economic development and social welfare. Most recent or modifiable are technologic and commercial product development (e.g., oral contraceptives); circumcision, condom, spermicide, and contraception practices; patterns of illicit drug use that influence sexual behaviors; and the accessibility, quality, and use of STD health care. These underlying factors help explain why the curable bacterial STDs are epidemic in developing countries and why the United States is the only industrialized country that has failed to control bacterial STDs during the AIDS era. Images PMID:8146138

  13. Human cytomegalovirus: bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) cloning and genetic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Anne M; Yu, Dong

    2012-02-01

    The understanding of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) biology was long hindered by the inability to perform efficient viral genetic analysis. This hurdle was recently overcome when the genomes of multiple HCMV strains were cloned as infectious bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The BAC system takes advantage of the single-copy F plasmid of E. coli that can stably carry large pieces of foreign DNA. In this system, a recombinant HCMV virus carrying a modified F plasmid is first generated in eukaryotic cells. Recombinant viral genomes are then isolated and recovered in E. coli as BAC clones. BAC-captured viral genomes can be manipulated using prokaryotic genetics, and recombinant virus can be reconstituted from BAC transfection in eukaryotic cells. The BAC reverse genetic system provides a reliable and efficient method to introduce genetic alterations into the viral genome in E.coli and subsequently analyze their effects on virus biology in eukaryotic cells.

  14. Bacterial Communities in Women with Bacterial Vaginosis: High Resolution Phylogenetic Analyses Reveal Relationships of Microbiota to Clinical Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Hoffman, Noah G.; Morgan, Martin T.; Matsen, Frederick A.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Hall, Robert W.; Ross, Frederick J.; McCoy, Connor O.; Bumgarner, Roger; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.; Fredricks, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common condition that is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes and is characterized by poorly understood changes in the vaginal microbiota. We sought to describe the composition and diversity of the vaginal bacterial biota in women with BV using deep sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene coupled with species-level taxonomic identification. We investigated the associations between the presence of individual bacterial species and clinical diagnostic characteristics of BV. Methodology/Principal Findings Broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR and pyrosequencing were performed on vaginal swabs from 220 women with and without BV. BV was assessed by Amsel’s clinical criteria and confirmed by Gram stain. Taxonomic classification was performed using phylogenetic placement tools that assigned 99% of query sequence reads to the species level. Women with BV had heterogeneous vaginal bacterial communities that were usually not dominated by a single taxon. In the absence of BV, vaginal bacterial communities were dominated by either Lactobacillus crispatus or Lactobacillus iners. Leptotrichia amnionii and Eggerthella sp. were the only two BV-associated bacteria (BVABs) significantly associated with each of the four Amsel’s criteria. Co-occurrence analysis revealed the presence of several sub-groups of BVABs suggesting metabolic co-dependencies. Greater abundance of several BVABs was observed in Black women without BV. Conclusions/Significance The human vaginal bacterial biota is heterogeneous and marked by greater species richness and diversity in women with BV; no species is universally present. Different bacterial species have different associations with the four clinical criteria, which may account for discrepancies often observed between Amsel and Nugent (Gram stain) diagnostic criteria. Several BVABs exhibited race-dependent prevalence when analyzed in separate groups by BV status which may contribute to increased incidence of BV in

  15. Optimal imaging and analysis of human vaginal coating by drug delivery gels

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Marcus H; Couchman, Grace M; Walmer, David K; Peters, Jennifer J; Owen, Derek H; Brown, Matthew A; Lavine, Michael L; Katz, David F

    2007-01-01

    Objective We used a new optical imaging technique to compare human intravaginal coating distributions of Conceptrol® and Advantage™. These gels are surrogates for future microbicidal gels, differing in molecular structures and biophysical properties. Methods For each protocol, a 3-mL gel bolus was inserted to the posterior fornix while the woman was in the supine position. She then either: (1) remained supine (10 min); or (2) sat up (1 min), stood up (1 min), sat down (1 min), and returned to supine for a net elapsed time of 10 min. The imaging device is sized/shaped like a phallus, and measurements while the device was inserted provide data that simulate peri-intromission coating. Results Coating by Advantage™ was more extensive and uniform than coating by Conceptrol®, with smaller bare spots of uncoated epithelium. Change in posture tended to increase extent and uniformity of coating, details differing between gels. Conclusions Results are consistent with predictions of mechanistic coating theory, using gel rheological data as inputs. PMID:17241845

  16. Detection of Intracellular Bacterial Communities in Human Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, David A; Hooton, Thomas M; Stamm, Walter E; Humphrey, Peter A; Hultgren, Scott J

    2007-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections and are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). While UTIs are typically considered extracellular infections, it has been recently demonstrated that UPEC bind to, invade, and replicate within the murine bladder urothelium to form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs). These IBCs dissociate and bacteria flux out of bladder facet cells, some with filamentous morphology, and ultimately establish quiescent intracellular reservoirs that can seed recurrent infection. This IBC pathogenic cycle has not yet been investigated in humans. In this study we sought to determine whether evidence of an IBC pathway could be found in urine specimens from women with acute UTI. Methods and Findings We collected midstream, clean-catch urine specimens from 80 young healthy women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and 20 asymptomatic women with a history of UTI. Investigators were blinded to culture results and clinical history. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy for evidence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria. Evidence of IBCs was found in 14 of 80 (18%) urines from women with UTI. Filamentous bacteria were found in 33 of 80 (41%) urines from women with UTI. None of the 20 urines from the asymptomatic comparative group showed evidence of IBCs or filaments. Filamentous bacteria were present in all 14 of the urines with IBCs compared to 19 (29%) of 66 samples with no evidence of IBCs (p < 0.001). Of 65 urines from patients with E. coli infections, 14 (22%) had evidence of IBCs and 29 (45%) had filamentous bacteria, while none of the gram-positive infections had IBCs or filamentous bacteria. Conclusions The presence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria in the urines of women with acute cystitis suggests that the IBC pathogenic pathway characterized in the murine model may occur in humans. The findings

  17. Desquamative inflammatory vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Reichman, Orna; Sobel, Jack

    2014-10-01

    Desquamative inflammatory vaginitis (DIV) is an uncommon form of chronic purulent vaginitis. It occurs mainly in Caucasians with a peak occurrence in the perimenopause. Symptoms and signs are nonspecific; DIV is a diagnosis of exclusion, and other causes of purulent vaginitis should be excluded. The main symptoms include purulent discharge, vestibulo-vaginal irritation, and dyspareunia. Examination of vaginal walls shows signs of inflammation with increased erythema and petechiae. Through microscopy (wet mount) of the vaginal secretions, DIV is defined by an increase in inflammatory cells and parabasal epithelial cells (immature squamous cells). Vaginal flora is abnormal and pH is always elevated above 4.5. Although etiology and pathogenesis remain unknown, the favorable response to anti-inflammatory agents suggests that the etiology is immune mediated. Either local vaginal clindamycin or vaginal corticosteroids are adequate treatment. As a chronic condition, maintenance treatment should be considered as relapse is common. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Postpartum Vaginal Stenosis Due to Chemical Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurcharan; Gupta, Ridhima

    2016-01-01

    Acquired vaginal stenosis is a rare obstructing anomaly, which can be caused by use of chemicals in the vagina. A 21-year-old gravida 1 para 1, presented with secondary amenorrhea and inability to have sexual intercourse, after normal spontaneous vaginal delivery complicated by post partum bleeding. The delivery was conducted by untrained traditional birth attendant at home. The wash cloth soaked with caustic soda was packed in the patient’s vagina and was left in situ for 10 days, which ultimately led to the severe scarring and stenosis of the vagina. Patient underwent surgical management and the extensive vaginal adhesions were excised and a patent vagina was reconstructed. Patient then reported successful vaginal intercourse without dyspareunia. Post partum vaginal stenosis due to chemical vaginitis is rare. These cases can be prevented by adequate training of untrained health care workers. PMID:27437311

  19. A Single Dose of a MIV-150/Zinc Acetate Gel Provides 24 h of Protection Against Vaginal Simian Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reverse Transcriptase Infection, with More Limited Protection Rectally 8–24 h After Gel Use

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Jessica; Singer, Rachel; Derby, Nina; Aravantinou, Meropi; Abraham, Ciby J.; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Zhang, Shimin; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Fernández-Romero, José A.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Previously we showed that repeated vaginal application of a MIV-150/zinc acetate carrageenan (MIV-150/ZA/CG) gel and a zinc acetate carrageenan (ZA/CG) gel significantly protected macaques from vaginal simian human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) infection. Gels were applied either daily for 2 weeks or every other day for 4 weeks, and the animals were challenged 4–24 h later. Herein, we examined the effects of a single vaginal dose administered either before or after virus challenge. Encouraged by the vaginal protection seen with MIV-150/ZA/CG, we also tested it rectally. Vaginal applications of MIV-150/ZA/CG, ZA/CG, and CG gel were performed once 8–24 h before, 1 h after, or 24 h before and 1 h after vaginal challenge. Rectal applications of MIV-150/ZA/CG and CG gel were performed once 8 or 24 h before rectal challenge. While vaginal pre-challenge and pre/post-challenge application of MIV-150/ZA/CG gel offered significant protection (88%, p<0.002), post-challenge application alone did not significantly protect. ZA/CG gel reduced infection prechallenge, but not significantly, and the effect was completely lost post-challenge. Rectal application of MIV-150/ZA/CG gel afforded limited protection against rectal challenge when applied 8–24 h before challenge. Thus, MIV-150/ZA/CG gel is a highly effective vaginal microbicide that demonstrates 24 h of protection from vaginal infection and may demonstrate efficacy against rectal infection when given close to the time of HIV exposure. PMID:22737981

  20. Characterization of host immunity during persistent vaginal colonization by Group B Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Patras, K A; Rösler, B; Thoman, M L; Doran, K S

    2015-11-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a Gram-positive bacterium, which colonizes the vaginal tract in 10-30% of women. Colonization is transient in nature, and little is known about the host and bacterial factors controlling GBS persistence. Gaining insight into these factors is essential for developing therapeutics to limit maternal GBS carriage and prevent transmission to the susceptible newborn. In this work, we have used human cervical and vaginal epithelial cells, and our established mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization, to characterize key host factors that respond during GBS colonization. We identify a GBS strain that persists beyond a month in the murine vagina, whereas other strains are more readily cleared. Correspondingly, we have detected differential cytokine production in human cell lines after challenge with the persistent strain vs. other GBS strains. We also demonstrate that the persistent strain more readily invades cervical cells compared with vaginal cells, suggesting that GBS may potentially use the cervix as a reservoir to establish long-term colonization. Furthermore, we have identified interleukin-17 production in response to long-term colonization, which is associated with eventual clearance of GBS. We conclude that both GBS strain differences and concurrent host immune responses are crucial in modulating vaginal colonization.

  1. Characterization of host immunity during persistent vaginal colonization by Group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Patras, Kathryn A.; Rösler, Berenice; Thoman, Marilyn L.; Doran, Kelly S.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a Gram-positive bacterium, which colonizes the vaginal tract in 10–30% of women. Colonization is transient in nature, and little is known about the host and bacterial factors controlling GBS persistence. Gaining insight into these factors is essential for developing therapeutics to limit maternal GBS carriage and prevent transmission to the susceptible newborn. In this work, we have used human cervical and vaginal epithelial cells, and our established mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization, to characterize key host factors that respond during GBS colonization. We identify a GBS strain that persists beyond a month in the murine vagina, whereas other strains are more readily cleared. Correspondingly, we have detected differential cytokine production in human cell lines after challenge with the persistent strain versus other GBS strains. We also demonstrate that the persistent strain more readily invades cervical cells compared to vaginal cells, suggesting that GBS may potentially use the cervix as a reservoir to establish long-term colonization. Furthermore, we have identified IL-17 production in response to long-term colonization, which is associated with eventual clearance of GBS. We conclude that both GBS strain differences and concurrent host immune responses are crucial in modulating vaginal colonization. PMID:25850655

  2. Vaginal lactobacilli, probiotics, and IVF.

    PubMed

    Verstraelen, Hans; Senok, Abiola C

    2005-12-01

    Perturbation of the normal lactobacilli-dominated vaginal microflora is associated with reproductive failure and adverse pregnancy outcomes, ranging from early pregnancy loss to late miscarriage and preterm birth. As high rates of bacterial vaginosis are observed with IVF patients, abnormal vaginal microflora presumably explain, at least to some extent, reproductive failure as well as the increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcome seen in these patients. Accordingly, there may be a window of opportunity for improving IVF success rates and outcomes. At present, a screen-and-treat procedure to restore the normal vaginal microflora is not a routine part of the infertility work-up and treatment. While Gram staining of vaginal smears would offer an inexpensive and validated means for screening and diagnosis, probiotics that contain live lactobacilli capable of re-colonizing the vagina may offer an elegant and safe choice of treatment. Carefully designed trials using well characterized probiotic strains and treatment regimens are still required to evaluate the effect of probiotics on IVF-embryo transfer pregnancy rates.

  3. [Vaginal infections screening in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Hájek, Z; Masata, J; Svihovec, P

    2005-01-01

    Preterm birth before the 37th gestational week is most frequently caused by infection. The agents are aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Infection usually ascends from the vagina. Microorganisms entering the choriodecidual space induce pro-inflammatory cytokines, which trigger prostaglandin synthesis and contraction activity of the uterus. Cytokines can also release proteases, which cause premature outflow of the amnionic fluid. Screening of vaginal infections is indicated in all cases of imminent preterm parturition and in the group of risk pregnancies. Screening on Streptococcus B is indicated to all pregnant women in the gravidity weeks 35 to 37. Beside streptococcus infections with the risk of disease of the neonate being 2 to 3 per 1000 of vital newborns, bacterial vaginosis caused by Gardnerela vaginalis is frequently diagnosed. Effective treatment of symptomatic cases of the advanced pregnancy is five days long administration of Metronidazol or Clindamycin--vaginal crème. Another frequent cause of the preterm birth is chlamydial infection. The best contemporary treatment is Azitromycine for five days. Therapy of women without symptoms of the imminent preterm parturition does not decrease its occurrence. It is therefore not recommended as well as is not recommended the therapy of pregnant women with asymptomatic bacterinuria. Beside the classical cultivations, detection of antibodies, DNA analysis and serum infection markers (leucocytes, C-reactive protein), detection of pro- inflammatory cytokines in the serum and in the vaginal secret (IL-6, IL-8, TNFalpha etc.) are used to diagnose vaginal infections.

  4. Is vaginal microscopy an essential tool for the management of women presenting with vaginal discharge?

    PubMed

    Lascar, R M; Devakumar, H; Jungmann, E; Copas, A; Arthur, G; Mercey, D

    2008-12-01

    Point-of-care microscopy is the gold standard for the diagnosis of vaginal discharge in genitourinary (GU) medicine clinics but not used in primary care settings and reproductive health clinics to which many patients present. In our GU medicine clinic setting, we conducted an audit to assess the utility of microscopy of vaginal secretions versus clinical diagnosis alone for the differential diagnosis of uncomplicated lower vaginal infections. Clinical diagnosis (including pH) of bacterial vaginosis had a sensitivity between 85% and 88% at two clinic sites. Our results suggest that it may be safe and more cost-effective to restrict vaginal microscopy to a subgroup of women presenting with vaginal discharge.

  5. Hyperforin Exhibits Antigenotoxic Activity on Human and Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Imreova, Petronela; Feruszova, Jana; Kyzek, Stanislav; Bodnarova, Kristina; Zduriencikova, Martina; Kozics, Katarina; Mucaji, Pavel; Galova, Eliska; Sevcovicova, Andrea; Miadokova, Eva; Chalupa, Ivan

    2017-01-21

    Hyperforin (HF), a substance that accumulates in the leaves and flowers of Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John's wort), consists of a phloroglucinol skeleton with lipophilic isoprene chains. HF exhibits several medicinal properties and is mainly used as an antidepressant. So far, the antigenotoxicity of HF has not been investigated at the level of primary genetic damage, gene mutations, and chromosome aberrations, simultaneously. The present work is designed to investigate the potential antigenotoxic effects of HF using three different experimental test systems. The antigenotoxic effect of HF leading to the decrease of primary/transient promutagenic genetic changes was detected by the alkaline comet assay on human lymphocytes. The HF antimutagenic effect leading to the reduction of gene mutations was assessed using the Ames test on the standard Salmonella typhimurium (TA97, TA98, and TA100) bacterial strains, and the anticlastogenic effect of HF leading to the reduction of chromosome aberrations was evaluated by the in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test on the human tumor cell line HepG2 and the non-carcinogenic cell line VH10. Our findings provided evidence that HF showed antigenotoxic effects towards oxidative mutagen zeocin in the comet assay and diagnostic mutagen (4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide) in the Ames test. Moreover, HF exhibited an anticlastogenic effect towards benzo(a)pyrene and cisplatin in the chromosome aberration test.

  6. Killing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus), Haemophilus ducreyi, and vaginal Lactobacillus by 3-O-octyl-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed

    Moncla, B J; Pryke, K; Isaacs, Charles E

    2008-04-01

    The microbicide candidate octylglycerol inactivates sexually transmitted bacterial pathogens at concentrations which spare normal vaginal flora (lactobacillus). Standard minimum microbicidal concentration assays and time-kill assays revealed the drug concentrations and times required for inactivation. Octylglycerol concentrations must exceed the binding capacity of any human serum albumin to be effective.

  7. The vaginal microbiome: rethinking health and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bing; Forney, Larry J.; Ravel, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Vaginal microbiota form a mutually beneficial relationship with their host and have major impact on health and disease. In recent years our understanding of vaginal bacterial community composition and structure has significantly broadened as a result of investigators using cultivation-independent methods based on the analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences. In asymptomatic, otherwise healthy women, several kinds of vaginal microbiota exist, the majority often dominated by species of Lactobacillus, while others comprise a diverse array of anaerobic microorganisms. Bacterial vaginosis is the most common vaginal conditions and is vaguely characterized as the disruption of the equilibrium of the ‘normal’ vaginal microbiots. A better understanding of ‘normal’ and ‘healthy’ vaginal ecosystems that is based on its ‘true’ function and not simply on its composition would help better define health and further improve disease diagnostics as well as the development of more personalized regimens to promote health and treat diseases. PMID:22746335

  8. Randomized Comparison of Two Vaginal Self-Sampling Methods for Human Papillomavirus Detection: Dry Swab versus FTA Cartridge

    PubMed Central

    Catarino, Rosa; Vassilakos, Pierre; Bilancioni, Aline; Vanden Eynde, Mathieu; Meyer-Hamme, Ulrike; Menoud, Pierre-Alain; Guerry, Frédéric; Petignat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling (self-HPV) is valuable in cervical cancer screening. HPV testing is usually performed on physician-collected cervical smears stored in liquid-based medium. Dry filters and swabs are an alternative. We evaluated the adequacy of self-HPV using two dry storage and transport devices, the FTA cartridge and swab. Methods A total of 130 women performed two consecutive self-HPV samples. Randomization determined which of the two tests was performed first: self-HPV using dry swabs (s-DRY) or vaginal specimen collection using a cytobrush applied to an FTA cartridge (s-FTA). After self-HPV, a physician collected a cervical sample using liquid-based medium (Dr-WET). HPV types were identified by real-time PCR. Agreement between collection methods was measured using the kappa statistic. Results HPV prevalence for high-risk types was 62.3% (95%CI: 53.7–70.2) detected by s-DRY, 56.2% (95%CI: 47.6–64.4) by Dr-WET, and 54.6% (95%CI: 46.1–62.9) by s-FTA. There was overall agreement of 70.8% between s-FTA and s-DRY samples (kappa = 0.34), and of 82.3% between self-HPV and Dr-WET samples (kappa = 0.56). Detection sensitivities for low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse (LSIL+) were: 64.0% (95%CI: 44.5–79.8) for s-FTA, 84.6% (95%CI: 66.5–93.9) for s-DRY, and 76.9% (95%CI: 58.0–89.0) for Dr-WET. The preferred self-collection method among patients was s-DRY (40.8% vs. 15.4%). Regarding costs, FTA card was five times more expensive than the swab (~5 US dollars (USD)/per card vs. ~1 USD/per swab). Conclusion Self-HPV using dry swabs is sensitive for detecting LSIL+ and less expensive than s-FTA. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 43310942 PMID:26630353

  9. Determination of the Membrane Permeability to Water of Human Vaginal Mucosal Immune Cells at Subzero Temperatures Using Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Hughes, Sean M.; Fang, Cifeng; Hou, Zhiyuan; Zhao, Gang; Fialkow, Michael; Lentz, Gretchen

    2016-01-01

    To study mucosal immunity and conduct HIV vaccine trials, it is important to be able to cryopreserve mucosal specimens and recover them in functional viable form. Obtaining a good recovery depends, in part, on cooling the cells at the appropriate rate, which is determined by the rate of water transport across the cell membrane during the cooling process. In this study, the cell membrane permeabilities to water at subzero temperatures of human vaginal mucosal T cells and macrophages were measured using the differential scanning calorimetry method proposed by Devireddy et al. in 1998. Thermal histograms were measured before and after cell lysis using a Slow-Fast-Fast-Slow cooling program. The difference between the thermal histograms of the live intact cells and the dead lysed cells was used to calculate the temperature-dependent cell membrane permeability at subzero temperatures, which was assumed to follow the Arrhenius relationship, \\documentclass{aastex}\\usepackage{amsbsy}\\usepackage{amsfonts}\\usepackage{amssymb}\\usepackage{bm}\\usepackage{mathrsfs}\\usepackage{pifont}\\usepackage{stmaryrd}\\usepackage{textcomp}\\usepackage{portland, xspace}\\usepackage{amsmath, amsxtra}\\pagestyle{empty}\\DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6}\\begin{document} $$L_p ( T ) = L_ { pg } * e^ { - \\frac { E_a } { R } \\left( \\frac { 1 } { T } - \\frac { 1 } { T_r } \\right) } $$ \\end{document}, where Lpg is the permeability to water at the reference temperature (273.15 K). The results showed that Lpg = 0.0209 ± 0.0108 μm/atm/min and Ea = 41.5 ± 11.4 kcal/mol for T cells and Lpg = 0.0198 ± 0.0102 μm/atm/min and Ea = 38.2 ± 10.4 kcal/mol for macrophages, respectively, in the range 0°C to −40°C (mean ± standard deviation). Theoretical simulations predicted that the optimal cooling rate for both T cells and macrophages was about −3°C/min, which was proven by preliminary immune cell cryopreservation experiments. PMID:26977578

  10. Protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV challenge by vaginally delivered inhibitors of virus-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Klasse, Per Johan; Schader, Susan M; Hu, Qinxue; Ketas, Thomas J; Lu, Min; Marx, Preston A; Dufour, Jason; Colonno, Richard J; Shattock, Robin J; Springer, Martin S; Moore, John P

    2005-11-03

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) continues to spread, principally by heterosexual sex, but no vaccine is available. Hence, alternative prevention methods are needed to supplement educational and behavioural-modification programmes. One such approach is a vaginal microbicide: the application of inhibitory compounds before intercourse. Here, we have evaluated the microbicide concept using the rhesus macaque 'high dose' vaginal transmission model with a CCR5-receptor-using simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-162P3) and three compounds that inhibit different stages of the virus-cell attachment and entry process. These compounds are BMS-378806, a small molecule that binds the viral gp120 glycoprotein and prevents its attachment to the CD4 and CCR5 receptors, CMPD167, a small molecule that binds to CCR5 to inhibit gp120 association, and C52L, a bacterially expressed peptide inhibitor of gp41-mediated fusion. In vitro, all three compounds inhibit infection of T cells and cervical tissue explants, and C52L acts synergistically with CMPD167 or BMS-378806 to inhibit infection of cell lines. In vivo, significant protection was achieved using each compound alone and in combinations. CMPD167 and BMS-378806 were protective even when applied 6 h before challenge.

  11. Vaginal birth - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100198.htm Vaginal birth - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... vaginal delivery. Please keep in mind that every birth is unique, and your labor and delivery may ...

  12. Vaginal sponge and spermicides

    MedlinePlus

    Birth control - over the counter; Contraceptives - over the counter; Family planning - vaginal sponge; Contraception - vaginal sponge ... at preventing pregnancy as some other forms of birth control. However, using a spermicide or sponge is much ...

  13. Vaginal Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Vaginal Yeast Infections Print ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  14. Nursing considerations in patients with vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Debra

    Vaginitis is defined as an inflammation of the vagina. It can result in symptoms of any or all of the following: discharge, itching and pain, and often irritation or infection of the vulva. There is no specific cause for vaginitis, and many other conditions can cause the symptoms. Vaginitis is a distressing condition that affects many women of reproductive age and beyond, and encompasses candidiasis (also known as thrush), bacterial vaginosis, and trichomoniasis. It can occur in a single episode, or recur throughout a woman's lifetime. Some women will seek medical help, but many more self-treat with over-the-counter medications, suspecting the recurrence of Candida in particular. This article aims to explore the causes, signs and symptoms, and treatments of vaginitis to provide nurses with the necessary background information to feel more confident in dealing with women's health issues.

  15. A Phase 3, Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind, Vehicle-Controlled Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Metronidazole Vaginal Gel 1.3% in the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Schwebke, Jane R; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Beelen, Andrew P; Sobel, Jack D

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a prevalent infection in women of reproductive age, is associated with increased risk of upper genital tract and sexually transmitted infections, and complications in pregnancy. Currently approved treatments include metronidazole, which requires once or twice daily intravaginal administration for 5 days or twice daily oral administration for 7 days. This phase 3 study determined the safety and efficacy of single-dose metronidazole vaginal gel (MVG) 1.3%. In this double-blind, vehicle-controlled study, 651 women with clinical diagnosis of BV were randomized 1:1 to receive MVG 1.3% or vehicle vaginal gel. Primary efficacy measure was clinical cure (normal discharge, negative "whiff test," and <20% clue cells) at day 21. Secondary measures included therapeutic cure (both clinical and bacteriological; day 21) and bacteriologic cure (Nugent score <4), clinical cure, and time to resolution of symptoms (day 7). A total of 487 participants were included in the primary analysis. Clinical and therapeutic cure rates (day 21) were higher in participants treated with MVG 1.3% compared with vehicle gel (37.2% vs. 26.6% [P = 0.010] and 16.8% vs. 7.2% [P = 0.001], respectively). Clinical and bacteriologic cure rates (day 7) were also higher in the MVG 1.3% group (46.0% vs. 20.0% [P < 0.001] and 32.7% vs. 6.3% [P < 0.001], respectively). The median time to resolution of symptoms was shorter in the MVG 1.3% (day 6) than vehicle group (not reached). No serious adverse events were reported, and incidence was similar across treatment groups. Single-dose MVG 1.3% was safe and superior to vehicle gel in producing cure among women with BV.

  16. A Phase 3, Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind, Vehicle-Controlled Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Metronidazole Vaginal Gel 1.3% in the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Schwebke, Jane R.; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Beelen, Andrew P.; Sobel, Jack D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a prevalent infection in women of reproductive age, is associated with increased risk of upper genital tract and sexually transmitted infections, and complications in pregnancy. Currently approved treatments include metronidazole, which requires once or twice daily intravaginal administration for 5 days or twice daily oral administration for 7 days. This phase 3 study determined the safety and efficacy of single-dose metronidazole vaginal gel (MVG) 1.3%. Methods In this double-blind, vehicle-controlled study, 651 women with clinical diagnosis of BV were randomized 1:1 to receive MVG 1.3% or vehicle vaginal gel. Primary efficacy measure was clinical cure (normal discharge, negative “whiff test,” and <20% clue cells) at day 21. Secondary measures included therapeutic cure (both clinical and bacteriological; day 21) and bacteriologic cure (Nugent score <4), clinical cure, and time to resolution of symptoms (day 7). Results A total of 487 participants were included in the primary analysis. Clinical and therapeutic cure rates (day 21) were higher in participants treated with MVG 1.3% compared with vehicle gel (37.2% vs. 26.6% [P = 0.010] and 16.8% vs. 7.2% [P = 0.001], respectively). Clinical and bacteriologic cure rates (day 7) were also higher in the MVG 1.3% group (46.0% vs. 20.0% [P < 0.001] and 32.7% vs. 6.3% [P < 0.001], respectively). The median time to resolution of symptoms was shorter in the MVG 1.3% (day 6) than vehicle group (not reached). No serious adverse events were reported, and incidence was similar across treatment groups. Conclusions Single-dose MVG 1.3% was safe and superior to vehicle gel in producing cure among women with BV. PMID:26222750

  17. Directed shift of vaginal microbiota induced by vaginal application of sucrose gel in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kai-tao; Zheng, Jin-xin; Yu, Zhi-jian; Chen, Zhong; Cheng, Hang; Pan, Wei-guang; Yang, Wei-zhi; Wang, Hong-yan; Deng, Qi-wen; Zeng, Zhong-ming

    2015-04-01

    Sucrose gel was used to treat bacterial vaginosis in a phase III clinical trial. However, the changes of vaginal flora after treatment were only examined by Nugent score in that clinical trial, While the vaginal microbiota of rhesus macaques is characterized by anaerobic, Gram-negative bacteria, few lactobacilli, and pH levels above 4.6, similar to the microbiota of patients with bacterial vaginosis. This study is aimed to investigate the change of the vaginal microbiota of rehsus macaques after topical use of sucrose gel to reveal more precisely the bacterial population shift after the topical application of sucrose gel. Sixteen rhesus macaques were treated with 0.5 g sucrose gel vaginally and three with 0.5 g of placebo gel. Vaginal swabs were collected daily following treatment. Vaginal pH levels and Nugent scores were recorded. The composition of the vaginal micotbiota was tested by V3∼V4 16S rDNA metagenomic sequencing. Dynamic changes in the Lactobacillus genus were analyzed by qPCR. The vaginal microbiota of rhesus macaques are dominated by anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, with few lactobacilli and high pH levels above 4.6. After five days' treatment with topical sucrose gel, the component percentage of Lactobacillus in vaginal microbiota increased from 1.31% to 81.59%, while the component percentage of Porphyromonas decreased from 18.60% to 0.43%, Sneathia decreased from 15.09% to 0.89%, Mobiluncus decreased from 8.23% to 0.12%, etc.. The average vaginal pH values of 16 rhesus macaques of the sucrose gel group decreased from 5.4 to 3.89. There were no significant changes in microbiota and vaginal pH observed in the placebo group. Rhesus macaques can be used as animal models of bacterial vaginosis to develop drugs and test treatment efficacy. Furthermore, the topical application of sucrose gel induced the shifting of vaginal flora of rhesus macaques from a BV kind of flora to a lactobacilli-dominating flora. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by

  18. Comparison of vaginal microbiota sampling techniques: cytobrush versus swab.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Anita; MacIntyre, David A; Mahajan, Vishakha; Lee, Yun S; Smith, Ann; Marchesi, Julian R; Lyons, Deirdre; Bennett, Phillip R; Kyrgiou, Maria

    2017-08-29

    Evidence suggests the vaginal microbiota (VM) may influence risk of persistent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical carcinogenesis. Established cytology biobanks, typically collected with a cytobrush, constitute a unique resource to study such associations longitudinally. It is plausible that compared to rayon swabs; the most commonly used sampling devices, cytobrushes may disrupt biofilms leading to variation in VM composition. Cervico-vaginal samples were collected with cytobrush and rayon swabs from 30 women with high-grade cervical precancer. Quantitative PCR was used to compare bacterial load and Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the V1-V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene used to compare VM composition. Cytobrushes collected a higher total bacterial load. Relative abundance of bacterial species was highly comparable between sampling devices (R(2) = 0.993). However, in women with a Lactobacillus-depleted, high-diversity VM, significantly less correlation in relative species abundance was observed between devices when compared to those with a Lactobacillus species-dominant VM (p = 0.0049). Cytobrush and swab sampling provide a comparable VM composition. In a small proportion of cases the cytobrush was able to detect underlying high-diversity community structure, not realized with swab sampling. This study highlights the need to consider sampling devices as potential confounders when comparing multiple studies and datasets.

  19. Prevotella as a Hub for Vaginal Microbiota under the Influence of Host Genetics and Their Association with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Si, Jiyeon; You, Hyun Ju; Yu, Junsun; Sung, Joohon; Ko, GwangPyo

    2017-01-11

    While the vaginal ecosystem is maintained through mutualistic relationships between the host and the vaginal bacteria, the effect of host genetics on the vaginal microbiota has not been well characterized. We examined the heritability of vaginal microbiota and its association with obesity in 542 Korean females, including 222 monozygotic and 56 dizygotic twins. The vaginal microbiota significantly varied depending on host menopausal status and bacterial vaginosis. Lactobacillus and Prevotella, whose relative abundances are strongly associated with bacterial vaginosis, were the most heritable bacteria among the beneficial and potentially pathogenic vaginal microbiota, respectively. Candidate gene analysis revealed an association between genetic variants of interleukin-5 and the abundance of Prevotella sp. Furthermore, host obesity significantly increased the diversity of the vaginal microbiota in association with Prevotella. Our results provide insight into the effect of host genetics on the vaginal microbiota and their association with both vaginal and non-vaginal health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of sexual debut on vaginal microbiota in a cohort of young women.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Caroline M; Fredricks, David N; Winer, Rachel L; Koutsky, Laura

    2012-12-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is uncommon in women who are virgins. We estimated effects of sexual debut on vaginal bacterial colonization. Women who were virgins and aged 18-22 years enrolled in a study of human papillomavirus acquisition were followed every 4 months for up to 2 years. Vaginal swabs from before and after sexual debut or two independent visits for those remaining virgins were tested by quantitative polymerase chain reaction for Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii, Lactobacillus iners, Gardnerella vaginalis, and the bacterial vaginosis-associated species Atopobium vaginae, Megasphaera species, Leptotrichia species, Sneathia species, and bacterial vaginosis-associated bacterium-1, -2, and -3. We evaluated 97 women: 71 who became sexually active and 26 who remained virgins. At first sampling, 22 of 26 (85%) women who remained virgins were colonized with Lactobacillus species compared with 22 of 26 (85%) at follow-up (P>.99). G vaginalis was present in 12 of 26 (46%) initially and 11 of 26 (42%) at follow-up (P>.99). Among women who became sexually active, colonization with Lactobacillus species remained stable: 65 of 71 (92%) compared with 66 of 71 (93%) (P>.99), whereas colonization with G vaginalis increased (28 of 71 [39%] compared with 40 of 71 [56%]; P=.02). Among women who did not initiate sexual activity during the study, two of 26 (8%) had any bacterial vaginosis-associated species detected at both the first and second visits (P>.99). Among women who became sexually active during the study, 15 of 71 (21%) were colonized with bacterial vaginosis-associated species initially compared with 13 of 71 (18%) after sexual debut (P=.77). Among women who were virgins, vaginal colonization with bacterial vaginosis-associated bacterial species is uncommon and does not change after sexual debut.

  1. Expansion of altered vaginal flora states in vaginitis to include a spectrum of microflora.

    PubMed

    Fowler, R Stuart

    2007-02-01

    To define the existence of 2 patterns of altered vaginal flora in symptomatic women identified on wet preparations that are not in the current vaginitis classification system. Testing of vaginal secretions from gynecologic patients at Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona, who presented with vulvo-vaginal symptoms by vaginal pH, whiff testing, and saline and potassium hydroxide wet preparations. Over 14 years, approximately 5,000 samples were analyzed. Wet preparations were analyzed under low- (x 100) and high-power (x 400) phase-contrast microscopy. The first pattern has mixed bacteria with few or no lactobacilli, increased leukocytes and elevated pH. This pattern has a spectrum of severity, with the severe form meeting the diagnostic definition of desquamative inflammatory vaginitis. The mild-to-moderate form, termed inflammatory vaginitis, falls outside established diagnostic categories. The second pattern also has a spectrum of severity. The mild-to-moderate form, termed noninflammatory vaginosis, has mixed bacteria speckling squamous cells (but not obscuring edges), few or no lactobacilli, no leukocyte response and mildly elevated pH. This form differs from the severe form, which meets Amsel's criteria for bacterial vaginosis. The current classification system requires revision because it oversimplifies and ignores the full spectrum of altered vaginal microflora.

  2. Identification, quantification and subtyping of Gardnerella vaginalis in noncultured clinical vaginal samples by quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Balashov, Sergey V; Mordechai, Eli; Adelson, Martin E; Gygax, Scott E

    2014-02-01

    Gardnerella vaginalis is an important component of the human vaginal microflora. It is proposed to play a key role in the pathogenesis of bacterial vaginosis (BV), the most common vaginal condition. Here we describe the development, validation and comparative analysis of a novel molecular approach capable of G. vaginalis identification, quantification and subtyping in noncultured vaginal specimens. Using two quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays, we analysed G. vaginalis bacterial loads and clade distribution in 60 clinical vaginal-swab samples. A very high pathogen prevalence was revealed by species-specific qPCR not only among BV patients (100 %), but also in healthy women (97 %), although the G. vaginalis concentration was significantly lower in non-BV samples. G. vaginalis clades identified in vaginal specimens by subtyping multiplex qPCR, which targets four clade-specific genetic markers, had frequencies of 53 % for clade 1, 25 % for clade 2, 32 % for clade 3 and 83 % for clade 4. Multiple clades were found in 70 % of samples. Single G. vaginalis clades were represented by clade 1 and clade 4 in 28 % of specimens. A positive association with BV was shown for clade 1 and clade 3, while clade 2 was positively associated with intermediate vaginal microflora, but not with BV. Clade 4 demonstrated no correlation with the disorder. The presence of multiple clades had a high positive association with BV, whereas G. vaginalis identified as a single clade was negatively linked with the condition. Polyclonal G. vaginalis infection may be a risk factor for BV.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., Strain CCRI-22567T, Isolated from a Vaginal Sample from a Woman with Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, Andrée F.; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K.; Raymond, Frédéric; Corbeil, Jacques; Roy, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., CCRI-22567 is the type strain of the new genus Criibacterium. The strain was isolated from a woman with bacterial vaginosis. The genome assembly comprised 2,384,460 bp, with 34.4% G+C content. This is the first genome announcement of a strain belonging to the genus Criibacterium. PMID:27587833

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., Strain CCRI-22567T, Isolated from a Vaginal Sample from a Woman with Bacterial Vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Maheux, Andrée F; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K; Raymond, Frédéric; Corbeil, Jacques; Roy, Paul H; Boissinot, Maurice; Omar, Rabeea F

    2016-09-01

    Criibacterium bergeronii gen. nov., sp. nov., CCRI-22567 is the type strain of the new genus Criibacterium The strain was isolated from a woman with bacterial vaginosis. The genome assembly comprised 2,384,460 bp, with 34.4% G+C content. This is the first genome announcement of a strain belonging to the genus Criibacterium.

  5. Vaginal flora alterations and clinical symptoms in low-risk pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Gondo, Fausto; da Silva, Márcia G; Polettini, Jossimara; Tristao, Andréa da R; Peracoli, José C; Witkin, Steven S; Rudge, Marilza V C

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate associations between alterations in vaginal flora and clinical symptoms in low-risk pregnant women. Vaginal specimens from 245 pregnant women were analyzed by microscopy for vaginal flora. Signs and symptoms of vaginal infection were determined by patient interviews and gynecologic examinations. Abnormal vaginal flora was identified in 45.7% of the subjects. The final clinical diagnoses were bacterial vaginosis (21.6%), vaginal candidosis (10.2%), intermediate vaginal flora (5.2%), aerobic vaginitis (2.9%), mixed flora (2.9%) and other abnormal findings (2.9%). The percentage of women with or without clinical signs or symptoms was not significantly different between these categories. The presence of vaginal odor or vaginal discharge characteristics was not diagnostic of any specific flora alteration; pruritus was highly associated with candidosis (p < 0.0001). Compared to women with normal flora, pruritus was more prevalent in women with candidosis (p < 0.0001), while vaginal odor was associated with bacterial vaginosis (p = 0.0026). The prevalence of atypical vaginal flora is common in our low-risk pregnant population and is not always associated with pathology. The occurrence of specific signs or symptoms does not always discriminate between women with different types of atypical vaginal flora or between those with abnormal and normal vaginal flora. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Complete protection from repeated vaginal simian-human immunodeficiency virus exposures in macaques by a topical gel containing tenofovir alone or with emtricitabine.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Urvi M; Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Cong, Mian-er; Jia, Hongwei; Martin, Amy; Pau, Chou-Pong; Hanson, Debra L; Guenthner, Patricia; Smith, James; Kersh, Ellen; Garcia-Lerma, J Gerardo; Novembre, Francis J; Otten, Ron; Folks, Thomas; Heneine, Walid

    2009-10-01

    New-generation gels that deliver potent antiretroviral drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 have renewed hopes for topical prophylaxis as a prevention strategy. Previous preclinical research with monkey models suggested that high concentrations and drug combinations are needed for high efficacy. We evaluated two long-acting reverse transcriptase inhibitors, tenofovir (TFV) and emtricitabine (FTC), by using a twice-weekly repeat challenge macaque model and showed that a preexposure vaginal application of gel with 1% TFV alone or in combination with 5% FTC fully protected macaques from a total of 20 exposures to simian-human immunodeficiency virus SF162p3. FTC and TFV were detected in plasma 30 min after vaginal application, suggesting rapid absorption. FTC was detected more frequently than TFV and showed higher levels, reflecting the fivefold-higher concentration of this drug than of TFV. Two of 12 repeatedly exposed but protected macaques showed limited T-cell priming, which did not induce resistance to infection when macaques were rechallenged. Thus, single drugs with durable antiviral activity can provide highly effective topical prophylaxis and overcome the need for noncoital use or for drug combinations which are more complex and costly to formulate and approve.

  7. Complete Protection from Repeated Vaginal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Exposures in Macaques by a Topical Gel Containing Tenofovir Alone or with Emtricitabine▿

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Urvi M.; Dobard, Charles; Sharma, Sunita; Cong, Mian-er; Jia, Hongwei; Martin, Amy; Pau, Chou-Pong; Hanson, Debra L.; Guenthner, Patricia; Smith, James; Kersh, Ellen; Garcia-Lerma, J. Gerardo; Novembre, Francis J.; Otten, Ron; Folks, Thomas; Heneine, Walid

    2009-01-01

    New-generation gels that deliver potent antiretroviral drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 have renewed hopes for topical prophylaxis as a prevention strategy. Previous preclinical research with monkey models suggested that high concentrations and drug combinations are needed for high efficacy. We evaluated two long-acting reverse transcriptase inhibitors, tenofovir (TFV) and emtricitabine (FTC), by using a twice-weekly repeat challenge macaque model and showed that a preexposure vaginal application of gel with 1% TFV alone or in combination with 5% FTC fully protected macaques from a total of 20 exposures to simian-human immunodeficiency virus SF162p3. FTC and TFV were detected in plasma 30 min after vaginal application, suggesting rapid absorption. FTC was detected more frequently than TFV and showed higher levels, reflecting the fivefold-higher concentration of this drug than of TFV. Two of 12 repeatedly exposed but protected macaques showed limited T-cell priming, which did not induce resistance to infection when macaques were rechallenged. Thus, single drugs with durable antiviral activity can provide highly effective topical prophylaxis and overcome the need for noncoital use or for drug combinations which are more complex and costly to formulate and approve. PMID:19656878

  8. Association of HPV infection and clearance with cervicovaginal immunology and the vaginal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, B; Yi, TJ; Perusini, S; Gajer, P; Ma, B; Humphrys, MS; Thomas-Pavanel, J; Chieza, L; Janakiram, P; Saunders, M; Tharao, W; Huibner, S; Shahabi, K; Ravel, J; Rebbapragada, A; Kaul, R

    2016-01-01

    Cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection may increase HIV risk. Since other genital infections enhance HIV susceptibility by inducing inflammation, we assessed the impact of HPV infection and clearance on genital immunology and the cervico-vaginal microbiome. Genital samples were collected from 65 women for HPV testing, immune studies and microbiota assessment; repeat HPV testing was performed after 6 months. All participants were HIV-uninfected and free of bacterial STIs. Cytobrush-derived T cell and dendritic cell subsets were assessed by multiparameter flow cytometry. Undiluted cervico-vaginal secretions were used to determine cytokine levels by multiplex ELISA, and to assess bacterial community composition and structure by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Neither HPV infection nor clearance were associated with broad differences in cervical T cell subsets or cytokines, although HPV clearance was associated with increased Langerhans cells and HPV infection with elevated IP-10 and MIG. Individuals with HPV more frequently had a high diversity cervico-vaginal microbiome (community state type IV) and were less likely to have an L. gasseri predominant microbiome. In summary, HPV infection and/or subsequent clearance was not associated with inflammation or altered cervical T cell subsets, but associations with increased Langerhans cells and the composition of the vaginal microbiome warrant further exploration. PMID:28120845

  9. 16S rRNA survey revealed complex bacterial communities and evidence of bacterial interference on human adenoids.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tiantian; Glatt, Dominique Ulrike; Nguyen, Tam Nhu; Allen, Emma Kaitlynn; Early, Stephen V; Sale, Michele; Winther, Birgit; Wu, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Adenoid microbiota plays an important role in the development of various infectious and non-infectious diseases of the upper airways, such as otitis media, adenotonsillitis, rhinosinusitis and adenoid hypertrophy. Studies have suggested that adenoids could act as a potential reservoir of opportunistic pathogens. However, previous bacterial surveys of adenoids were mainly culture based and therefore might only provide an incomplete and potentially biased assessment of the microbial diversity. To develop an in-depth and comprehensive understanding of the adenoid microbial communities and test the 'pathogen reservoir hypothesis', we carried out a 16S rRNA based, culture-independent survey of bacterial communities on 67 human adenoids removed by surgery. Our survey revealed highly diverse adenoid bacterial communities distinct from those of other body habitats. Despite large interpersonal variations, adenoid microbiota shared a core set of taxa and can be classified into at least five major types based on its bacterial species composition. Our results support the 'pathogen reservoir hypothesis' as we found common pathogens of otitis media to be both prevalent and abundant. Co-occurrence analyses revealed evidence consistent with the bacterial interference theory in that multiple common pathogens showed 'non-coexistence' relationships with non-pathogenic members of the commensal microflora. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Vaginal microbiota and its role in HIV transmission and infection.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Mariya I; van de