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Sample records for hungarian case study

  1. The Challenges of Training with Interpreters and Translators: The Case Study of a Hungarian Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cseh, Maria; Short, Darren

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to present a case study of an HRD team from the UK that delivers training to a large public service Hungarian organization with the aid of interpreters and translators. Design/methodology/approach: The article takes the form of a case study. Findings: The article acts to illustrate good and ineffective…

  2. Historic maps and landscape evolution: a case study in the Little Hungarian Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zámolyi, A.; Székely, B.; Draganits, E.; Timár, G.

    2009-04-01

    Georeferenced historic maps provide a useful tool to derive geomorphologic landscape elements largely uninfluenced by anthropogenic activity, thus allowing the study of natural changes in the landscape evolution of increasingly densely populated areas. The study area, the Little Hungarian Plain (LHP), is located at the geologically and geomorphologically highly interesting region at the transition between the mountain chains of the Eastern Alps and the Carpathians. The area, as transport route and exchange zone of goods has had its specific importance since the Neolithic times. Consequently, the environment has been subject to human influence, especially since the onset of the industrial age. Geographically the LHP lies in the vicinity of major settlement areas (Vienna, Bratislava, Sopron, Győr) and stretches from the Leithagebirge, a mountainous area in Eastern Austria, to the City of Győr in Western Hungary. The political division of the area into two separate countries occurred after World War I. Thus, historic mapping in the Habsburg Empire and later in the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy that was organized and conducted before World War I allows a comprehensive overview of the study area. Map sheets of the 2nd Military Survey of the whole Monarchy were mapped in the time from 1807 to 1873 in the area of the entire Empire (Kretschmer et al., 2004). The Kingdom of Hungary, as part of the Empire was mapped in a homogenous campaign in the time from 1819 - 1869. Beside the increasing human impact the area is characterized by active surface processes. The geologic evolution of the Little Hungarian Plain is dominated by tectonic processes related to the lateral extrusion of the Eastern Alps and the acceleration of northward movement of the Carpathians. Subsidence is accommodated mainly along high- and low angle normal faults with a high vertical movement component. Strike-slip movements at these faults are very rare. Most of these processes have been active also in the

  3. Building Global Learning Experiences: A Case Study of a Hungarian, Ukrainian, and American Educational Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubow, Patricia K.; Crawford, Suzanne H.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the first stage of a 3-year project, the Democratic Education and Exchange Project, sponsored by the Great Lakes Consortium for International Development. An 8-day institute was held in Szeged, Hungary for teams of Hungarian and Ukrainian teachers, who later established Internet connections with American counterparts. The institute…

  4. [Hungarian twin studies: results of four decades].

    PubMed

    Tárnoki, Ádám Domonkos; Tárnoki, Dávid László; Horváth, Tamás; Métneki, Júlia; Littvay, Levente

    2013-10-01

    Twin studies play a role in examining the contribution of genetic variations and environmental factors responsible for the determination of phenotypic variables and of genetic linkage between genotypes. Hungarian twin studies, supported by three twin registries (among them two twin-database), date back to 1970s. Studies mainly focused on various congenital abnormalities, the effect of contraceptive pills and folic acid on the frequency of twin pregnancies, as well as psychosexual and alcohol consumptional behaviors. Monogenic Mendelian inheritance of lactose (mal)absorption was demonstrated for the first time. Hungarian Twin Registry was founded in 2007, which contributed to the current understanding on the background of several disorders, e.g. metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. As part of an international twin study, among others, arterial stiffness, central blood pressure, carotid intima/media thickness, venous biomechanics, body composition, lung function and smoking characteristics were also assessed. Absence of genetic background in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and high inheritance of carotid plaque characteristics were demonstrated for the first time. The review also aims to summarize future plans of the Hungarian Twin Registry.

  5. Radon and thoron levels, their spatial and seasonal variations in adobe dwellings - a case study at the great Hungarian plain.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Jordan, Gyozo; Szabó, Csaba; Horváth, Ákos; Holm, Óskar; Kocsy, Gábor; Csige, István; Szabó, Péter; Homoki, Zsolt

    2014-06-01

    Radon and thoron isotopes are responsible for approximately half of the average annual effective dose to humans. Although the half-life of thoron is short, it can potentially enter indoor air from adobe walls. Adobe was a traditional construction material in the Great Hungarian Plain. Its major raw materials are the alluvial sediments of the area. Here, seasonal radon and thoron activity concentrations were measured in 53 adobe dwellings in 7 settlements by pairs of etched track detectors. The results show that the annual average radon and thoron activity concentrations are elevated in these dwellings and that the proportions with values higher than 300 Bq m(-3) are 14-17 and 29-32% for radon and thoron, respectively. The calculated radon inhalation dose is significantly higher than the world average value, exceeding 10 mSv y(-1) in 7% of the dwellings of this study. Thoron also can be a significant contributor to the inhalation dose with about 30% in the total inhalation dose. The changes of weather conditions seem to be more relevant in the variation of measurement results than the differences in the local sedimentary geology. Still, the highest values were detected on clay. Through the year, radon follows the average temperature changes and is affected by the ventilation, whereas thoron rather seems to follow the amount of precipitation.

  6. Overview of the Hungarian National Youth Fitness Study

    PubMed Central

    Csányi, Tamás; Finn, Kevin J.; Welk, Gregory J.; Zhu, Weimo; Karsai, István; Ihász, Ferenc; Vass, Zoltán; Molnár, László

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 Public Act on Education in Hungary made daily physical education (PE) a mandatory part of the school day starting in the 2012–2013 school year. This directive was linked to a significant reorganization of the Hungarian education system including a new National Core Curriculum that regulates the objectives and contents of PE. The Hungarian School Sport Federation (HSSF) recognized the opportunity and created the Strategic Actions for Health-Enhancing Physical Education or Testnevelés az Egészségfejlesztésben Stratégiai Intézkedések (TESI) project. Physical fitness assessments have been a traditional part of the Hungarian PE program; however, the TESI plan called for the use of a new health-related battery and assessment system to usher in a new era of fitness education in the country. The HSSF enlisted the Cooper Institute to assist in building an infrastructure for full deployment of a national student fitness assessment program based on the FITNESSGRAM® in Hungarian schools. The result is a new software-supported test battery, namely the Hungarian National Student Fitness Test (NETFIT), which uses health-related, criterion-referenced youth fitness standards. The NETFIT system now serves as a compulsory fitness assessment for all Hungarian schools. This article details the development process for the test battery and summarizes the aims and methods of the Hungarian National Youth Fitness Study. PMID:26054954

  7. [Lymphogranuloma venereum: the first Hungarian cases].

    PubMed

    Bánvölgyi, András; Balla, Eszter; Bognár, Péter; Tóth, Béla; Ostorházi, Eszter; Bánhegyi, Dénes; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Marschalkó, Márta

    2015-01-01

    Lymphogranuloma venereum is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the Chlamydia trachomatis serovars L1-3. It has been found to be endemic in tropical countries. In the last decades several cases have been reported in Western Europe, particularly in men who have sex with men population infected with human immunodeficiency virus. The authors present three cases of lymphogranuloma venereum infections, observed at their department in 2013 and 2014. The three human immunodeficiency virus infected patients who belonged to men who have sex with men population had casual sexual contacts in Western Europe. The symptoms included urethral discharge, discomfort and inguinal lymphadenomegaly in two patients, and rectal pain, discharge and perianal ulceration in one patient. The diagnosis was confirmed by nucleic acid amplification test performed in samples obtained from urethral discharge and exudate of perianal ulcer; lymphogranuloma venereum 2b serovars were demonstrated in two patients and serovar 2 in one patient. Doxycyclin (daily dose of two times 100 mg for 21 days) resolved the symptoms in all cases. The authors conclude that lymphogranuloma venereum is a diagnostic challenge in Hungary, too. It is important to be aware of the altered clinical features of this disease to prevent complications and spreading. PMID:25544054

  8. A Comparative Study of Croatian and Hungarian EFL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihaljevic Djigunovic, Jelena; Nikolov, Marianne; Otto, Istvan

    2008-01-01

    This comparative research aims to provide insights into how Croatian and Hungarian 8th graders' proficiency in English as a foreign language (EFL) compares to one another in relation to organizational macro factors. A total of 717 14-year-old students participated in the study in two neighboring regions and towns of Croatia and Hungary examining…

  9. A Special Issue: Geomathematics in practice: Case studies from earth- and environmental sciences - Proceedings of the Croatian-Hungarian Geomathematical Congress, Hungary 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatvani, István Gábor; Horváth, Janina

    2016-01-01

    The present paper aims to introduce the current problems of geomathematics along with giving on overview on the papers published in the special issue covering the Croatian-Hungarian Geomathematical Congress of 2015 in Hungary.

  10. Hungarian Postpositions vs. English Prepositions: A Contrastive Study. The Hungarian-English Contrastive Linguistics Project, Working Papers No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keresztes, Kalman

    This study was conducted to find and collocate the semantically equivalent form patterns of the English and Hungarian relation-marking systems by contrasting the use of the individual relational morphemes. The ultimate aim of the study is to determine interlingual congruences and contrasts for possible use in language teaching. The investigation…

  11. Hungarian case with Costello syndrome and translocation t(1,22)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-03

    The purpose of this short case report is to document the presence of the Costello syndrome in a Hungarian girl. Clinical manifestations include characteristic facial changes, skeletal involvements, mild mental retardation. Chromosome analysis showed a balanced translocation: 46,XX,t(1,22)(q25,q11). 7 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Hungarian Youth in Transylvania Discuss Hybrid Notions of Civic Identity: Making the Case for Cultural Preservation and Multilingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obenchain, Kathryn M.; Alarcón, Jeannette; Ives, Bob; Bellows, Elizabeth; Alama, Madalina

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to understand ways in which Hungarian high school students describe and articulate their civic identity, as members of varied civic communities. We conducted our study in Romania, an emerging democracy with an Hungarian national minority, as it provides a unique opportunity to examine the development of a democratic civic identity…

  13. [Chronic pancreatitis. Evidence based management guidelines of the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    PubMed

    Takács, Tamás; Czakó, László; Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Hegyi, Péter; Hritz, István; Kelemen, Dezső; Lásztity, Natália; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Párniczky, Andrea; Patai, Árpád; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Tiszlavicz, László; Szücs, Ákos

    2015-02-15

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease associated with structural and functional damage of the pancreas. In most cases pain, maldigestion and weight loss are the leading symptoms, which significantly worsen the quality of life. Correct diagnosis and differential diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and treatment of these patients requires up-to-date and evidence based treatment guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare an evidence based guideline based on the available international guidelines and evidence. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and complemented and/or modified the international guidelines if it was necessary. 123 relevant clinical questions in 11 topics were defined. Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate® grading system. The draft of the guidelines were presented and discussed at the consensus meeting in September 12, 2014. All clinical questions were accepted with total or strong agreement. The present guideline is the first evidence based guideline for chronic pancreatitis in Hungary. This guideline provides very important and helpful data for tuition, everyday practice and proper financing of chronic pancreatitis. Therefore, the authors believe that these guidelines will widely become a basic reference in Hungary.

  14. Overview of the Hungarian National Youth Fitness Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csányi, Tamás; Finn, Kevin J.; Welk, Gregory J.; Zhu, Weimo; Karsai, István; Ihász, Ferenc; Vass, Zoltán; Molnár, László

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 Public Act on Education in Hungary made daily physical education (PE) a mandatory part of the school day starting in the 2012-2013 school year. This directive was linked to a significant reorganization of the Hungarian education system including a new National Core Curriculum that regulates the objectives and contents of PE. The Hungarian…

  15. Retrospective Study of the Hungarian National Transplant Team's Cardiorespiratory Capacity.

    PubMed

    Trájer, E; Bosnyák, E; Komka, Z S; Kováts, T; Protzner, A; Szmodis, M; Tóth, S Z; Udvardy, A; Tóth, M

    2015-01-01

    The low availability of donor organs requires long-term successful transplantation as an accepted therapy for patients with end-stage renal and liver diseases. The health benefits of regular physical activity are well known among healthy individuals as well as patients under rehabilitation programs. Our aim was to describe the cardiorespiratory capacity of the Hungarian National Transplant Team. Twenty-five kidney (n = 21) or liver (n = 4) transplant athletes participated in this study. Maximal cardiorespiratory capacity (VO2max) was measured on a treadmill with the use of gas analysis. After a resting pulmonary function test, subjects completed a vita maxima test until exhaustion. Aerobic capacity of transplant athletes was higher than the age- and sex-predicted cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max, 109.9 ± 21.7% of the predicted values; P = .0101). Resting respiratory function indicators exceeded 80% of predicted age- and sex-matched normal values. There were positive correlations between VO2max and workload (r(2) = 0.40; P = .0463), metabolic equivalent (r(2) = 0.72; P < .0001), and oxygen pulse (r(2) = 0.30; P = .0039). However, age showed negative correlation with VO2max (r(2) = 0.32; P = .0031), and there was no significant correlation between graft age and maximal oxygen consumption (r(2) = 0.15; P = .4561). Although the small amount of participants can not represent the general kidney and liver transplant population, the excellent cardiorespiratory performance suggests that a normal level of physical capacity is available after transplantation and can be even higher with regular physical activity. This favorable physiologic background leads to a state that provides proper graft oxygenization, which is an important factor in long-term graft survival. PMID:26293020

  16. A Comparative Study of Learning Strategies Used by Romanian and Hungarian Preuniversity Students in Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingvay, Mónika; Timofte, Roxana S.; Ciascai, Liliana; Predescu, Constantin

    2015-01-01

    Development of pupils' deep learning approach is an important goal of education nowadays, considering that a deep learning approach is mediating conceptual understanding and transfer. Different performance at PISA tests of Romanian and Hungarian pupils cause us to commence a study for the analysis of learning approaches employed by these pupils.…

  17. Hungarian Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montvay, István; Biró, Tamás

    Rolf Hagedorn is introduced from the personal perspective of two Hungarian physics generations. A colleague (IM) and a student (TB) recount memories and events from the early-70-s to mid-80-s, and evaluate Hagedorn's impact on present particle and nuclear Hungarian physics community.

  18. [Pediatric pancreatitis. Evidence based management guidelines of the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    PubMed

    Párniczky, Andrea; Czakó, László; Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Hegyi, Péter; Hritz, István; Kelemen, Dezső; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szabó, Flóra; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Takács, Tamás; Tiszlavicz, László; Veres, Gábor; Szücs, Ákos; Lásztity, Natália

    2015-02-22

    Pediatric pancreatitis is a rare disease with variable etiology. In the past 10-15 years the incidence of pediatric pancreatitis has been increased. The management of pediatric pancreatitis requires up-to-date and evidence based management guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare an evidence based guideline based on the available international guidelines and evidences. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and complemented and/or modified the international guidelines if it was necessary. In 8 clinical topics (diagnosis; etiology; prognosis; imaging; therapy; biliary tract management; complications; chronic pancreatitis) 50 relevant questions were defined. Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate(®) grading system. The draft of the guidelines was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting on September 12, 2014. All clinical statements were accepted with total (more than 95%) agreement. The present Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group guideline is the first evidence based pediatric pancreatitis guideline in Hungary. The present guideline is the first evidence-based pancreatic cancer guideline in Hungary that provides a solid ground for teaching purposes, offers quick reference for daily patient care in pediatric pancreatitis and guides financing options. The authors strongly believe that these guidelines will become a standard reference for pancreatic cancer treatment in Hungary.

  19. Emotional Intelligence of Hungarian Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baracsi, Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    The research focused on the personal and social competencies of Hungarian teachers as unexplored areas. The participants in the survey were 707 Hungarian teachers from elementary and secondary schools. In view of the expectations of the European Union related to new teacher roles, the following research question was formulated to guide the study:…

  20. Use of Noun Morphology by Children with Language Impairment: The Case of Hungarian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukacs, Agnes; Leonard, Laurence B.; Kas, Bence

    2010-01-01

    Background: Children with language impairment often exhibit significant difficulty in the use of grammatical morphology. Although English-speaking children with language impairment have special difficulties with verb morphology, noun morphology can also be problematic in languages of a different typology. Aims: Hungarian is an agglutinating…

  1. Community-Level Approaches in Language Planning: The Case of Hungarian in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatoss, Aniko

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an example of micro-planning which involves community, government and non-government organisations both in the context of immigrants' source and host countries. The community in question is the Hungarian diaspora in Australia. The language planning activities are aimed at maintaining an immigrant heritage language and identity.…

  2. [Acute pancreatitis. Evidence-based practice guidelines, prepared by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    PubMed

    Hritz, István; Czakó, László; Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Kelemen, Dezső; Lásztity, Natália; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Párniczky, Andrea; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Szücs, Ákos; Takács, Tamás; Tiszlavicz, László; Hegyi, Péter

    2015-02-15

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract associated with significant morbidity and mortality that requires up-to-date and evidence based treatment guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare evidence based guideline for the medical and surgical management of acute pancreatitis based on the available international guidelines and evidence. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and, if it was necessary, complemented and/or modified the international guidelines. All together 42 relevant clinical questions were defined in 11 topics (Diagnosis and etiology, Prognosis, Imaging, Fluid therapy, Intensive care management, Prevention of infectious complications, Nutrition, Biliary interventions, Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography pancreatitis, Indication, timing and strategy for intervention in necrotizing pancreatitis, Timing of cholecystectomy [or endoscopic sphincterotomy]). Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate® grading system. The draft of the guideline was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting on September 12, 2014. 25 clinical questions with almost total (more than 95%) and 17 clinical questions with strong (more than 70%) agreement were accepted. The present guideline is the first evidence based acute pancreatitis guideline in Hungary. The guideline may provide important help for tuition, everyday practice and for establishment of proper finance of acute pancreatitis. Therefore, the authors believe that these guidelines will widely become as basic reference in Hungary.

  3. [Autoimmune pancreatitis. Evidence based management guidelines of the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    PubMed

    Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Hegyi, Péter; Hritz, István; Kelemen, Dezső; Lásztity, Natália; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Párniczky, Andrea; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Takács, Tamás; Tiszlavicz, László; Szücs, Ákos; Czakó, László

    2015-02-22

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare disease which can even mimic pancreatic tumor, however, unlike the latter, it requires not surgical but conservative management. Correct diagnosis and differential diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and treatment of these patients requires up-to-date and evidence based management guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare an evidence based guideline based on the available international guidelines and evidences. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and complemented and/or modified the international guidelines if it was necessary. 29 relevant clinical questions in 4 topics were defined (Basics; Diagnosis; Differential diagnostics; Therapy). Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate(®) grading system. The draft of the guidelines was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting on September 12, 2014. All clinial questions were accepted with almost total (more than 95%) agreement. The present guideline is the first evidence based autoimmune pancreatitis guideline in Hungary. The guideline may provide very important and helpful data for tuition of autoimmune pancreatitis, for everyday practice and for establishing proper finance. Therefore, the authors believe that these guidelines will widely become a basic reference in Hungary.

  4. Main results of recent Hungarian family planning studies.

    PubMed

    Klinger, A

    1975-01-01

    The demographic situation in Hungary is analyzed by presenting results of 5 different surveys on family planning carried out between 1958-1974. During those 16 years the practice of planning the number of children desired grew. In 1958 only 63 out of 100 women planned the number of children at marriage, and in 1974 98% gave an affirmative reply. The number of children planned by women declined from 2.25 in 1958 to 2.05 in 1966, and then increased to 2.19 in 1974. More and more childless married women want to give birth to a child. In early studies, 66-67% desired a child, and in 1974 83% desired a child. The idea of a family size with 2 children has become the rule in Hungary. In 1958 only 76% of the women used birth control; by 1966 the percentage was 84. 37% in 1958, 44% in 1966, and 26% in 1969 used both contraception and induced abortion. By 1972, 42% of the women interviewed had had an abortion. The use of contraception has increased considerably from 58% in 1958 to 75% in 1974. In 1974, 36% of the women using contraception were taking oral pills and only 7% were using the IUD.

  5. X-ray microprobe studies of Hungarian background and urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Toeroek, S.; Sandor, S.; Xhoffer, C.; Van Grieken, R.; Jones, K.W.; Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L.

    1991-10-01

    In order to determine the polluting atmospheric sources in urban and background areas source apportionment of the air particulate matter is necessary. Hitherto these studies were mostly based on bulk composition measurements of the aerosol. Source profiles, i.e. the concentrations of several elements for air particulate matter originating from one source, can be deduced from the receptor data using a number of multivariate techniques among which the chemical mass balance. The application is limited by the large number of observations that must be made for each of the variables. Often an elaborated sample preparation is necessary for fractionating the sample into several sub samples, according to the density, particle diameter or other relevant properties. Often this may results in poorly resolved source profiles. The aim of the present work is to find the relative abundance of the particle types originating from two different background monitoring stations in the middle of the Great Hungarian Plain. In urban areas most pollutants originate from traffic and municipal waste incineration. Since heavy metals play an important role in these samples the highly sensitive x-ray microscope (XRM) of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory was used. A feasibility study on individual aerosol particles sampled at the above background stations and in the urban area of Budapest is discussed.

  6. Using Learning Management Systems in Business and Economics Studies in Hungarian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Judit T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores all uses of LMS in teaching Business Mathematics in Hungarian undergraduate training from the point of view of the instructors. Since no similar survey had been carried out in Hungary earlier, the aim was to fill in this gap and to investigate which LMS systems are being used by the instructors, to what specific purposes and…

  7. Processing Relative Clauses by Hungarian Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kas, Bence; Lukacs, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    Hungarian is a language with morphological case marking and relatively free word order. These typological characteristics make it a good ground for testing the crosslinguistic validity of theories on processing sentences with relative clauses. Our study focused on effects of structural factors and processing capacity. We tested 43 typically…

  8. Effects of continuous cover forestry on soil moisture pattern - Beginning steps of a Hungarian study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalicz, Péter; Bartha, Dénes; Brolly, Gábor; Csáfordi, Péter; Csiszár, Ágnes; Eredics, Attila; Gribovszki, Zoltán; Király, Géza; Kollár, Tamás; Korda, Márton; Kucsara, Mihály; Nótári, Krisztina; Kornél Szegedi, Balázs; Tiborcz, Viktor; Zagyvai, Gergely; Zagyvai-Kiss, Katalin Anita

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays Hungarian foresters encounter a new challenge. The traditional management practices do not meet anymore with the demand of the civil society. The good old clearcut is no more a supported technology in forest regeneration. The transition to the continuous cover forestry induces much higher spatial variability compared to the even aged, more or less homogeneous, monoculture stands. The gap cutting is one of the proposed key methods in the Hungarian forestry. There is an active discussion among forest professionals how to determine the optimal gap size to maintain ideal conditions for the seedlings. Among other open questions for example how the surrounding trees modify the moisture pattern of the forest floor in the gap? In the early steps of a multidisciplinary project we established four research plots to study the spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture in the forest gap and the surrounding undisturbed stand. Each plot is located in oak (Quercus spp.) stands. Natural regeneration of oak stands is more problematic in our climate compared to the beech (Fagus sylvatica) which is located in the more humid or semi-humid areas of our country. All plots are located in the western part of Hungary: close to Sopron, Bejcgyertyános, Vép and Vajszló settlements. The last plot is an extensive research area, which is located in the riparian zone of a tributary of Feketevíz River. We monitor here the close-to-surface groundwater level fluctuation with pressure transducers. With a diurnal fluctuation based method it is possible to quantify the evapotranspiration differences between the gap and the stand. In two of the remaining stands (Bejcgyertyános and Vép) the gaps were opened in 2010. The monitoring of soil moisture began in 2013. A mobile sensor is used to monitor soil-moisture in a regular grid. The spatial variability of soil-moisture time-series shows a characteristic pattern during the growing-season. The plot in Sopron was established in 2013

  9. Ethnic Attitudes of Hungarian Students in Romania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ives, Bob; Obenchain, Kathryn M.; Oikonomidoy, Eleni

    2012-01-01

    Participants in this study were ethnic Hungarian secondary students attending high schools in Romania in which Hungarian was the primary language of instruction. Attitudes of participants toward ethnic and cultural groups were measured using a variation of the Bogardus (1933) Scale of Social Distance. Results were consistent with predictions based…

  10. The Hungarian Revolutions of 1848 and 1989: A Comparative Study. Fulbright-Hayes Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2002 (Hungary and Poland).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augsburger, Irene

    This study unit for grade 10 world history classes helps students understand the economic, social, and political causes and effects of revolution, using the Hungarian Revolutions of 1848 and 1989 as examples. The unit cites an educational goal; lists objectives; provides a detailed procedure for classroom implementation; describes standards; notes…

  11. MARS therapy, the bridging to liver retransplantation – Three cases from the Hungarian liver transplant program

    PubMed Central

    Fazakas, János; Zádori, Gergely; Görög, Dénes; Kóbori, László; Dabasi, Eszter; Mándli, Tamás; Piros, László; Smudla, Anikó; Szabó, Tamás; Toronyi, Éva; Tóth, Szabolcs; Tőzsér, Gellért; Végső, Gyula; Doros, Attila; Nemes, Balázs

    2013-01-01

    Besides orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) there is no long-term and effective replacement therapy for severe liver failure. Artificial extracorporeal liver supply devices are able to reduce blood toxin levels, but do not replace any synthetic function of the liver. Molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) is one of the methods that can be used to treat fulminant acute liver failure (ALF) or acute on chronic liver failure (AoCLF). The primary non-function (PNF) of the newly transplanted liver manifests in the clinical settings exactly like acute liver failure. MARS treatment can reduce the severity of complications by eliminating blood toxins, so that it can help hepatic encephalopathy (HE), hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), and the high rate mortality of cerebral herniation. This might serve as a bridging therapy before orthotopic liver retransplantation (reOLT). Three patients after a first liver transplantation became candidate for urgent MARS treatment as a bridging solution prior to reOLT in our center. Authors report these three cases, fo-cusing on indications, MARS sessions, clinical courses, and final outcomes. PMID:24265893

  12. Health status among elderly Hungarians and Americans.

    PubMed

    Buss, T F; Beres, C; Hofstetter, C R; Pomidor, A

    1994-07-01

    Selected health status data for elderly populations from similar industrial cities-Youngstown, Ohio, USA, and Debrecen, Hungary-were compared. Because of their impoverished health care system, unregulated heavily industrialized society, and unhealthful life-styles Hungarians were hypothesized to have poorer health status than Americans, even after taking into account demographic mediating factors. The study provides a health status baseline for elderly Hungarians shortly after communism's fall in 1989-1990 and shows how great a gap exists between Hungarian health status and that in the West. Hungarians were in much poorer health as measured by functional status, symptomatology, medical condition, depression, and subjective health status. Distinctions persisted when controlling for gender, age, and education. Poverty-level (and income) did not explain health status differences. The paper concludes that Hungary should pay more attention to health promotion, prevention, and primary care, as well as to reforming patient management in hospitals, nursing homes, and home care programs. PMID:24390093

  13. Hungarian space research 1981-1985: Lectures and review articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benko, G. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    This monograph presents an overview of Hungarian space research from 1981 to 1985. Topics discussed in the original report include the development of space research centers, the flight of the first Hungarian astronaut, Hungarian participation in international space programs such as the Vega/Halley's Comet mission and the BEALUCA materials science experiment, advances in astronomical research, and activities of the Cosmic Geodetic Observatory. Other topics discussed incude space biomedical studies, meteorological applications of space research, satellite communications, and satellite power supply systems.

  14. Information flow in the hospital: a comparative study of the Hungarian and the Dutch situation using a two axes model of hospital information flow.

    PubMed

    Balkányi, L; Lodder, H

    1992-08-01

    This study compares the organization and structure of information flow in a Dutch and in a Hungarian hospital. The study was carried out as a field orientation part of a Health Care Management project of the Hogeschool van Amsterdam. The host of the field orientation was the BAZIS Foundation, the Central Development and Support Group Hospital Information System, Leiden. The visited hospitals were equipped with the BAZIS Hospital Information System. The method of study consisted of series of formalized interviews with all-level actors of a hospital; the interpretation of data was enhanced by a two axes (patient and management) model of information flow defined by the authors. In summary, Dutch hospitals show a more elaborate information flow system, with more information flow channels sideways among equal levels, less bureaucracy in organization of information flow, and significantly more benefits of automation, compared to the Hungarian situation.

  15. Health related quality of life in patients with bladder cancer: a cross-sectional survey and validation study of the Hungarian version of the Bladder Cancer Index.

    PubMed

    Hevér, Noémi V; Péntek, Márta; Balló, András; Gulácsi, László; Baji, Petra; Brodszky, Valentin; Damásdi, Miklós; Bognár, Zita; Tóth, György; Buzogány, István; Szántó, Árpád

    2015-07-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important outcome in oncology care although an underexplored area in bladder cancer (BC). Our aims were to assess HRQoL of patients with BC, analyse relationships between diverse HRQoL measures and validate the Hungarian version of the Bladder Cancer Index (BCI) questionnaire. A cross-sectional survey was performed among patients with BC (N = 151). Validated Hungarian versions of the FACT-Bl, SF-36 and EQ-5D were applied and SF-6D was derived. Psychometric analysis of the Hungarian BCI was performed. Pearson correlations between the five measures were analysed. Deterioration in SF-36 Physical Functioning was detected among patients aged 45-64 years. The EQ-5D score did not differ significantly from the age-matched population norm. Correlations between the FACT-Bl, EQ-5D and SF-6D utility measures were strong (r > 0.6). Cronbach alpha coefficients of the Hungarian BCI ranged from 0.75 to 0.97 and factor analysis confirmed that data fit to the six predefined subdomains. Test-retest correlations (reliability, N = 50) ranged from 0.67 to 0.87 and interscale correlations between urinary, bowel and sexual BCI domains were weak or moderate (r = 0.29 to 0.49). Convergent validity revealed a stronger correlation with FACT-Bl (r = 0.126 to 0.719) than with generic health state scores (r = 0.096 to 0.584). Results of divergent validity of the Hungarian BCI by treatment groups by Kruskal Wallis test were promising although limited by low sample sizes in cystectomy subgroups. Generic health state measures have limited capacity to capture HRQoL impact of BC. Validity tests yielded favourable results for the Hungarian BCI. Mapping studies to estimate utility scores from FACT-Bl are encouraged but less recommendable with the BCI. PMID:25434791

  16. Testing Central and Inner Asian admixture among contemporary Hungarians.

    PubMed

    Bíró, András; Fehér, Tibor; Bárány, Gusztáv; Pamjav, Horolma

    2015-03-01

    Historically, the Carpathian Basin was the final destination for many nomadic peoples who migrated westward from Inner and Central Asia towards Europe. Proto-Hungarians (Steppe Magyars) were among those who came from the East, the Eurasian Steppe in the early middle ages. In order to detect the paternal genetic contribution from nomadic Steppe tribes, we tested 966 samples from Central Asian (Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan), Inner Asian (Mongolians and Buryats in Mongolia) and Hungarian-speaking European (Hungarian, Sekler and Csango) populations. We constructed median-joining networks of certain haplogroups in Hungarian-speaking European, and Altaic-speaking Central and Inner Asian populations. We estimated that the possible paternal genetic contribution from the above described populations among contemporary Hungarian speaking populations ranged between 5% and 7.4%. It is lowest among Hungarians from Hungary (5.1%), while higher among Hungarian-speaking groups in Romania, notably Sekler (7.4%) and Csango (6.3%). However, these results represent only an upper limit. Actual Central/Inner Asian admixture might be somewhat lower as some of the related lineages may have come from a common third source. The main haplogroups responsible for the Central/Inner Asian admixture among Hungarians are J2*-M172 (xM47, M67, M12), J2-L24, R1a-Z93; Q-M242 and E-M78. Earlier studies showed very limited Uralic genetic influence among Hungarians, and based on the present study, Altaic/Turkic genetic contribution is also not significant, although significantly higher than the Uralic one. The conclusion of this study is that present-day Hungarian speakers are genetically very similar to neighbouring populations, isolated Hungarian speaking groups having relatively higher presence of Central and Inner Asian genetic elements. At the same time, the reliable historical and genetic conclusions require an extension of the study to a significantly larger database with deep haplogroup resolution

  17. Testing Central and Inner Asian admixture among contemporary Hungarians.

    PubMed

    Bíró, András; Fehér, Tibor; Bárány, Gusztáv; Pamjav, Horolma

    2015-03-01

    Historically, the Carpathian Basin was the final destination for many nomadic peoples who migrated westward from Inner and Central Asia towards Europe. Proto-Hungarians (Steppe Magyars) were among those who came from the East, the Eurasian Steppe in the early middle ages. In order to detect the paternal genetic contribution from nomadic Steppe tribes, we tested 966 samples from Central Asian (Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan), Inner Asian (Mongolians and Buryats in Mongolia) and Hungarian-speaking European (Hungarian, Sekler and Csango) populations. We constructed median-joining networks of certain haplogroups in Hungarian-speaking European, and Altaic-speaking Central and Inner Asian populations. We estimated that the possible paternal genetic contribution from the above described populations among contemporary Hungarian speaking populations ranged between 5% and 7.4%. It is lowest among Hungarians from Hungary (5.1%), while higher among Hungarian-speaking groups in Romania, notably Sekler (7.4%) and Csango (6.3%). However, these results represent only an upper limit. Actual Central/Inner Asian admixture might be somewhat lower as some of the related lineages may have come from a common third source. The main haplogroups responsible for the Central/Inner Asian admixture among Hungarians are J2*-M172 (xM47, M67, M12), J2-L24, R1a-Z93; Q-M242 and E-M78. Earlier studies showed very limited Uralic genetic influence among Hungarians, and based on the present study, Altaic/Turkic genetic contribution is also not significant, although significantly higher than the Uralic one. The conclusion of this study is that present-day Hungarian speakers are genetically very similar to neighbouring populations, isolated Hungarian speaking groups having relatively higher presence of Central and Inner Asian genetic elements. At the same time, the reliable historical and genetic conclusions require an extension of the study to a significantly larger database with deep haplogroup resolution

  18. Cross-Validation of FITNESSGRAM® Health-Related Fitness Standards in Hungarian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurson, Kelly R.; Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Karsai, István; Csányi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to cross-validate FITNESSGRAM® aerobic and body composition standards in a representative sample of Hungarian youth. Method: A nationally representative sample (N = 405) of Hungarian adolescents from the Hungarian National Youth Fitness Study (ages 12-18.9 years) participated in an aerobic capacity assessment…

  19. Quantitative Investigations in Hungarian Phonotactics and Syllable Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation investigates statistical properties of segment collocation and syllable geometry of the Hungarian language. A corpus and dictionary based approach to studying language phonologies is outlined. In order to conduct research on Hungarian, a phonological lexicon was created by compiling existing dictionaries and corpora and using a…

  20. Hungarian cosmonaut in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The selection and training of cosmonauts and the preparation of the first Hungarian for flight on Salyut 36 and its linking with Soyuz 6 are described. Biographical sketches of the crew members, the reasons for different types of wearing different types of spacesuits during flight in the space station, and the experiments conducted are discussed. Photographs are included.

  1. Correlation study between sperm concentration, hyaluronic acid-binding capacity and sperm aneuploidy in Hungarian patients.

    PubMed

    Mokánszki, Attila; Molnár, Zsuzsanna; Ujfalusi, Anikó; Balogh, Erzsébet; Bazsáné, Zsuzsa Kassai; Varga, Attila; Jakab, Attila; Oláh, Éva

    2012-12-01

    Infertile men with low sperm concentration and/or less motile spermatozoa have an increased risk of producing aneuploid spermatozoa. Selecting spermatozoa by hyaluronic acid (HA) binding may reduce genetic risks such as chromosomal rearrangements and numerical aberrations. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to evaluate the presence of aneuploidies. This study examined spermatozoa of 10 oligozoospermic, 9 asthenozoospermic, 9 oligoasthenozoospermic and 17 normozoospermic men by HA binding and FISH. Mean percentage of HA-bound spermatozoa in the normozoospermic group was 81%, which was significantly higher than in the oligozoospermic (P<0.001), asthenozoospermic (P<0.001) and oligoasthenozoospermic (P<0.001) groups. Disomy of sex chromosomes (P=0.014) and chromosome 17 (P=0.0019), diploidy (P=0.03) and estimated numerical chromosome aberrations (P=0.004) were significantly higher in the oligoasthenozoospermic group compared with the other groups. There were statistically significant relationships (P<0.001) between sperm concentration and HA binding (r=0.658), between sperm concentration and estimated numerical chromosome aberrations (r=-0.668) and between HA binding and estimated numerical chromosome aberrations (r=-0.682). HA binding and aneuploidy studies of spermatozoa in individual cases allow prediction of reproductive prognosis and provision of appropriate genetic counselling. Infertile men with normal karyotypes and low sperm concentrations and/or less motile spermatozoa have significantly increased risks of producing aneuploid (diminished mature) spermatozoa. Selecting spermatozoa by hyaluronic acid (HA) binding, based on a binding between sperm receptors for zona pellucida and HA, may reduce the potential genetic risks such as chromosomal rearrangements and numerical aberrations. In the present study we examined sperm samples of 45 men with different sperm parameters by HA-binding assay and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). Mean

  2. [Hungarian Hypertension Registry].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Kékes, Ede

    2014-05-11

    Today, hypertension is considered endemic throughout the world. The number of individuals with high blood pressure and the increasing risk, morbidity and mortality caused by hypertension despite modern therapy do not decrease sufficiently. Hypertension has become a public health issue. Prevention and effective care require integrated datasets about many features, clinical presentation and therapy of patients with hypertension. The lack of this database in Hungary prompted the development of the registry which could help to provide population-based data for analysis. Data collection and processing was initiated by the Hungarian Society of Hypertension in 2002. Data recording into the Hungarian Hypertension Registry was performed four times (2002, 2005, 2007, 2011) and the registry currently contains data obtained from 108,473 patients. Analysis of these data indicates that 80% of the patients belong to the high or very high cardiovascular risk group. The registry provides data on cardiovascular risk of the hypertensive populations and the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy in Hungary. Based on international experience and preliminary analysis of data from the Hungarian Hypertension Registry, establishment of hypertension registry may support the effectiveness of public health programs. A further step would be needed for proper data management control and the application of professional principles of evidence-based guidelines in the everyday practice.

  3. Study Abroad Programs as Tools of Internationalization: Which Factors Influence Hungarian Business Students to Participate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huják, Janka

    2015-01-01

    The internationalization of higher education has been on the agenda for decades now all over the world. Study abroad programs are undoubtedly tools of the internationalization endeavors. The ERASMUS Student Mobility Program is one of the flagships of the European Union's educational exchange programs implicitly aiming for the internationalization…

  4. Essential oil composition and preliminary molecular study of four Hungarian Thymus species.

    PubMed

    Pluhár, Zsuzsanna; Kocsis, Marianna; Kuczmog, Anett; Csete, S; Simkó, Hella; Sárosi, Szilvia; Molnár, P; Horváth, Györgyi

    2012-03-01

    Chemical and genetic differences of twenty taxa belonging to four Thymus species were studied in order to determine whether molecular characters and essential oil components could be used as taxonomic markers and to examine the correlation between them. Plant samples, representing different taxa and geographic regions, were collected from experimentally grown populations. Essential oil samples were analysed by GC/MS and cluster analysis of volatile composition resulted in segregation of thymol chemotypes from sesquiterpenic ones. Thymol was characteristic for all the populations of Thymus glabrescens and T. pannonicus as well as for certain taxa belonging to T. praecox and T. pulegioides. Sesquiterpenes occurred in only two taxa of T. glabrescens, in each sample of T. praecox and in three taxa of T. pulegioides. Plant samples were analysed by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The obtained dendrogram revealed high gene diversity. The 13 primers resulted 114 polymorphic RAPD bands, and the average percentage of polymorphism was 80.8%. The RAPD dendogram showed separation neither at interspecific nor at interpopulational levels. Therefore, further specific molecular studies involving more taxa are suggested. Partial correlation have been found between molecular and chemical assessments. PMID:22453802

  5. Historical Personalities, Political Symbols and the Hungarian Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szabo, I.

    1982-01-01

    Characteristics of Hungarian youth political culture were surveyed. The first study investigated the recognition and interpretation of various political symbols. The second study investigated the effect of knowledge on youths' appraisal of political personalities. (AM)

  6. Hungarian climate change action plan

    SciTech Connect

    Molnar, S.; Takacs, T.; Arpasi, M.; Farago, T.; Palvoelgyi, T.; Harnos, Z.; Lontay, Z.; Somogyi, Z.; Tajthy, T.

    1998-12-31

    In 1994--1996, within the framework of the US Country Studies Program, the Hungarian Country Study Team developed the national greenhouse gas emission inventory, and elaborated the mitigation options for the different sectors of the economy. In 1997, the development of a National Action Plan was begun as the continuation of this work. Results of the inventory study showed that greenhouse gas emissions decreased from the selected base level (i.e., from the yearly average emissions of 1985--1987) until 1994 by cca. 25%. However, this decrease was primarily caused by the deep economic recession. Therefore the policy makers have to face the problem of economic recovery without a relevant increase of greenhouse gas emissions in the near future. This is the main focus of the mitigation analysis and the National Action Plan.

  7. Dr Michaels® (Soratinex®) product for the topical treatment of psoriasis: a Hungarian/Czech and Slovak study.

    PubMed

    Hercogovấ, J; Fioranelli, M; Gianfaldoni, S; Chokoeva, A A; Tchernev, G; Wollina, U; Tirant, M; Novotny, F; Roccia, M G; Maximov, G K; França, K; Lotti, T

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory T cell-mediated skin disease, affecting about 2% of Hungarian population. Genetic predisposition as well as environmental triggering factors, and innate immune processes play a role in its etiology. Treatment of psoriasis during the initial stages and first years of disease tend to be conservative and frequently based on topical agents. The aim of this study was to investigate and to describe the efficacy and safety of Dr Michaels® (Soratinex®) skin-care products for the topical treatment of stable chronic plaque psoriasis in a Hungarian population. Two-hundred-and-eight-six (120 female/166 male) patients, aged 10-80 years old (mean age 43 years) with mild to moderate plaque psoriasis had participated in the study. The products, including cleansing gel containing a coal tar solution, herbal oils and emulsifiers, were used twice daily and in the same manner for all the skin lesions. The study period was eight weeks. Assessment, using the Psoriasis Activity Severity Index (PASI) scores and photographic analysis, was done 2 weeks before treatment, at time 0, and after 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. Patient’s improvement was determined by the percentage reduction of the PASI scores. Side effects and tolerability were also evaluated. After 8 weeks treatment course, 46 patients had a moderate improvement, with the regression of 25-50% of skin lesions; 77 patients showed a good improvement, with the resolution of 51-75% of lesions. Another 115 patients had an outstanding improvement, with the regression of 76-98.9% of lesions. Only 13 patients did not achieve an improvement of psoriasis. Fifteen patients experienced folliculitis, which resolved after cessation of treatment. Seven patients worsened and discontinued treatment. Thirteen patients dropped out because of non-compliance. Our investigation demonstrates that Dr Michaels® (Soratinex®) products, an Australian treatment, can be used successfully in the treatment of stable chronic plaque

  8. Dr Michaels® (Soratinex®) product for the topical treatment of psoriasis: a Hungarian/Czech and Slovak study.

    PubMed

    Hercogovấ, J; Fioranelli, M; Gianfaldoni, S; Chokoeva, A A; Tchernev, G; Wollina, U; Tirant, M; Novotny, F; Roccia, M G; Maximov, G K; França, K; Lotti, T

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory T cell-mediated skin disease, affecting about 2% of Hungarian population. Genetic predisposition as well as environmental triggering factors, and innate immune processes play a role in its etiology. Treatment of psoriasis during the initial stages and first years of disease tend to be conservative and frequently based on topical agents. The aim of this study was to investigate and to describe the efficacy and safety of Dr Michaels® (Soratinex®) skin-care products for the topical treatment of stable chronic plaque psoriasis in a Hungarian population. Two-hundred-and-eight-six (120 female/166 male) patients, aged 10-80 years old (mean age 43 years) with mild to moderate plaque psoriasis had participated in the study. The products, including cleansing gel containing a coal tar solution, herbal oils and emulsifiers, were used twice daily and in the same manner for all the skin lesions. The study period was eight weeks. Assessment, using the Psoriasis Activity Severity Index (PASI) scores and photographic analysis, was done 2 weeks before treatment, at time 0, and after 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. Patient’s improvement was determined by the percentage reduction of the PASI scores. Side effects and tolerability were also evaluated. After 8 weeks treatment course, 46 patients had a moderate improvement, with the regression of 25-50% of skin lesions; 77 patients showed a good improvement, with the resolution of 51-75% of lesions. Another 115 patients had an outstanding improvement, with the regression of 76-98.9% of lesions. Only 13 patients did not achieve an improvement of psoriasis. Fifteen patients experienced folliculitis, which resolved after cessation of treatment. Seven patients worsened and discontinued treatment. Thirteen patients dropped out because of non-compliance. Our investigation demonstrates that Dr Michaels® (Soratinex®) products, an Australian treatment, can be used successfully in the treatment of stable chronic plaque

  9. Kinging in Hungarian lesbian culture.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Andrea P

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at the position of the drag king in Hungarian lesbian culture. It focuses on Bandage, Socks and Facial Hair (2006), a documentary about a drag king workshop. The film documents the historical moment when the Hungarian workshop participants encounter the drag king as a lesbian tool for parodying and repoliticizing mainstream masculinity. I examine the ways in which the participants interpret their performances of masculinity and the film negotiates heteronormativity. I argue that the political merits of the film can be spelled out by reading the participants' (trans)gender politics from the perspective of the cultural specificities of post-socialist Hungary.

  10. The National Union Catalog and Its Role in Reference and Research in the Hungarian Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oroszlan, Judith B.

    The National Union Catalog (NUC), a repository of the cataloged holdings of major research libraries of the United States and Canada, has significance in the area of Hungarian studies despite special problems encountered in the separation of these cards from those in other languages and in editing Hungarian names and the use of accents. The Union…

  11. Health-Related Physical Fitness in Hungarian Youth: Age, Sex, and Regional Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welk, Gregory J.; Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Csányi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine region, age, and sex profiles of physical fitness in Hungarian youth. Method: A sample of 2,602 Hungarian youth aged 10 to 18 years old completed a series of physical fitness field tests: the Progressive Aerobic Cardiorespiratory Endurance Run (PACER) fitness test, body mass index (BMI), percent…

  12. Tense and Aspect in Childhood Language Impairment: Contributions from Hungarian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Laurence B.; Lukacs, Agnes; Kas, Bence

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of children with language impairment (LI) reveal an insensitivity to aspect that may constitute part of the children's deficit. In this study, we examine aspect as well as tense in Hungarian-speaking children with LI. Twenty-one children with LI, 21 TD children matched for age, and 21 TD children matched for receptive vocabulary…

  13. Establishing Normative Reference Values for Handgrip among Hungarian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Laurson, Kelly R.; Karsai, István; Kaj, Mónika; Csányi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine age- and sex-related variation in handgrip strength and to determine reference values for the Hungarian population. Method: A sample of 1,086 Hungary youth (aged 11-18 years old; 654 boys and 432 girls) completed a handgrip strength assessment using a handheld dynamometer. Quantile regression was…

  14. Change, Continuity and Path-Dependency in Hungarian Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szolár, Éva

    2015-01-01

    In this descriptive study the aim is to analyze the Hungarian educational policy history and event-chain of the comprehensive and post-comprehensive project. As a structuring framework this paper used the historical landmarks and the different institutional arrangement models (governance types and power distribution models). Accordingly, three…

  15. A case-control study of gallbladder cancer in hungary.

    PubMed

    Nakadaira, Hiroto; Lang, Istvan; Szentirmay, Zoltan; Hitre, Erika; Kaster, Miklos; Yamamoto, Masaharu

    2009-01-01

    Our previous study indicated an association of chili pepper consumption with gallbladder cancer (GBC) in the presence of gallstones (GS) in Chile. We investigated whether or not a similar association was present in Hungary, where mortality from GBC is high and chili peppers are frequently consumed. In a case-control study, we compared 41 female GBC patients with GS and 30 gender and GS-matched hospital controls. Trained staff interviewed all subjects to determine socioeconomic status, family history, past history and life style habits (smoking, alcohol intake, dietary habits and elimination habits). Because mean ages differed significantly between the case and control groups, age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were calculated. A shorter education period (< 10 years / > or = 16 years) was indicated to be a risk factor (age-adjusted OR (95%CI): 3.2 (1.2-8.7)). In addition, the intake of Hungarian hot pepper (yes / no) was found to be significantly higher in the GBC cases than in controls (age-adjusted OR (95%CI): 8.4 (2.3-30.4)). There were no differences between the case and control groups for other variables. Multivariate logistic regression analysis retained only Hungarian hot pepper consumption as a significant independent risk factor for GBC. Its age-adjusted OR was 16.2 (95%CI: 2.1-126.2), while there were no differences associated with low education, frequent consumption of fresh fruit and vegetables, low socioeconomic status or smoking. Hungarian hot pepper consumption was identified as a risk factor for GBC by multivariate logistic regression analysis.

  16. Hungarian rocketry in the 19th century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, I. G.

    1977-01-01

    Hungarian rocketry developed in connection with the Hungarian Revolution and the War of Independence is outlined. Progress in weapons technology through the 1840's and 1850's is explored and work by Vincenz Augustin, William Hale, and Sandor Mozer in war rockets is cited.

  17. Neurophysiology of Hungarian subject-verb dependencies with varying intervening complexity.

    PubMed

    Jolsvai, Hajnal; Sussman, Elyse; Csuhaj, Roland; Csépe, Valéria

    2011-12-01

    Non-adjacent dependencies are thought to be more costly to process than sentences wherein dependents immediately follow or precede what they depend on. In English locality effects have been revealed, while in languages with rich case marking (German and Hindi) sentence final structures show anti-locality-effects. The motivation of the current study is to test whether locality effects can be directly applied to a typologically different language than those investigated so far. Hungarian is a "topic prominent" language; it permits a variation of possible word sequencing for semantic reasons, including SVO word order. Hungarian also has a rich morphological system (e.g., rich case system) and postpositions to indicate grammatical functions. In the present ERP study, Hungarian subject-verb dependencies were compared by manipulating the mismatch of number agreement between the sentence's initial noun phrase and the sentence's final intransitive verb as well as the complexity of the intervening sentence material, interrupting the dependencies. Possible lexical class and frequency or cloze-probability effects for the first two words of the intervening sentence material were revealed when used separate baseline for each word, while at the third word of the intervening material as well as at the main verb ERPs were not modulated by complexity but at the verb ERPs were enhanced by grammaticality. Ungrammatical sentences enlarged the amplitude of both LAN and P600 components at the main verb. These results are in line with studies suggesting that the retrieval of the first element of a dependency is not influenced by distance from the second element, as the first element is directly accessible when needed for integration (e.g., McElree, 2000).

  18. A population-based case-control study of isolated anophthalmia and microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Gábor; Puhó, Erzsébet; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to reveal the etiological factors in the origin of isolated an/microphthalmia. The dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-2002 containing 56 cases with isolated an/microphthalmia and 22,744 malformed controls with other non-ocular defects from the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry, in addition of 56 matched control pairs and 37,837 population controls without defects from the National Birth Registry, was evaluated. Exposure data and family history were collected (i) prospectively by prenatal logbook and other medical records, (ii) retrospectively through a structured questionnaire filled-in by mothers, and (iii) information obtained by regional nurses at home visit of non-respondent mothers. The autosomal recessive origin of isolated an/microphthalmia was indicated in about 10% of cases on the basis of sib recurrence. Cases with isolated an/microphthalmia had a much shorter mean gestational age and smaller mean birth weight, a much larger proportion of preterm birth and low birthweight. Their mothers were younger with a predominance of first birth order, frequently unmarried with low socioeconomic status. These findings are in agreement with a much higher prevalence at birth of cases with isolated an/microphthalmia in the gypsy population probably due to the interaction of inbreeding effect and low socioeconomic status. Further molecular genetic studies are needed to identify gene mutations of isolated an/microphthalmia in the Hungarian gypsy population.

  19. Quality of Selected Hungarian Coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, E.R.; Rohrbacher, T.J.; Gluskoter, H.J.; Fodor, B.; Gombar, G.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a program conducted jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Hungarian Geological Survey under the auspices of the United States-Hungarian Science and Technology Fund, a total of 39 samples from five coal mines in Hungary were selected for analysis. The mine areas sampled represent most of the coal mined recently in Hungary. Almost all the coal is used to generate electricity. Coals from the five mines (four underground, one surface) reflect differences in age, depositional setting, organic and inorganic components of the original sediments, and deformational history. Classified according to the ranking system of the American Society for Testing and Materials, the coals range in rank from lignite B (Pliocene[?] coals) to high volatile A bituminous (Jurassic coals). With respect to grade classification, based on seam-weighted averages of moisture, ash, and sulfur contents: (1) all contain high moisture (more than 10 percent), (2) all except the Eocene coals are high (more than 15 percent) in ash yield, and (3) two (Jurassic and Eocene coals) are high in sulfur (more than 3 percent) and three (Cretaceous, Miocene, and Pliocene coals) have medium sulfur contents (1 to 3 percent). Average heat values range from 4,000 to 8,650 British thermal units per pound.

  20. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  1. Wrench tectonics control on Neogene-Quaternary sedimentation along the Mid-Hungarian Mobile Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogacsas, Gyorgy; Juhász, Györgyi; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit; Simon, Szilvia; Lukács, Szilveszter; Csizmeg, János

    2010-05-01

    Africa-Europe convergence vector. Pliocene-Quaternary was characterised by 1-5 km left lateral wrenching along the Mid-Hungarian Mobile Belt. Based on high resolution seismic measurements on the Danube river Toth (2003) supposed an even more recent activity along the Paks-Szolnok wrench fault zone. The supposed late Quaternary activity of the Mid-Hungarian Mobile Belt is supported by recent hydrogeologic investigations. According to Mádl-Szőnyi et al (2005) and Simon et al (in press) from the Pre-Neogene basement originates an ascending overpressured highly saline water flow regime. Deep ascending water rises near to the surface, intercepting the aquifer and aquitard layers along conductive strike slipe faults of the Mid-Hungarian Mobile Belt and mixing with shallower groundwater. Acknowledgements The research work was supported by the Hungarian National Research Fund (OTKA 035168, T 047159). References Detzky Lőrinc K. (1997) Detailed tectonic study of the Western edge of the Szolnok flysch zone using seismic and well data. Thesis Candidate of Science. Hungarian Academy of Science. p. 121. Grow J. A., R. E. Mattick, A. Bérczi-Makk, Cs. Péró, D. Hajdú, Gy. Pogácsás, P. Várnai, E. Varga, (1994) Structure of the Békés basin inferred from seismic reflection, well and gravity data. in Teleki P., J. Kókai, R.E. Mattick eds. Basin analysis in petroleum exploration, a case study from the Békés basin, Hungary. Kluwer Academic Publisher, Dordrecht, Netherlands, p. 1-38. Juhász, Gy., Pogácsás Gy., Magyar I. (2007) A giant canyon system incised into the Late-Neogene (pannonian s.l.) sediments? (in Hungarian Óriáskanyon-rendszer szeli át a pannóniai üledékeket? Földtani Közlöny (Bulletin of the Geological Society of Hungary)137/3. 307-326. Mádlné Szőnyi J. Simon Sz. Tóth J. Pogácsás Gy. (2005) Interrelationship between surface and subsurface waters at the Kelemen-szék and Kolon lakes, Duna-Tisza Interfluve, Hungary (in Hungarian Felszíni és felsz

  2. Processing relative clauses by Hungarian typically developing children

    PubMed Central

    Kas, Bence; Lukács, Ágnes

    2011-01-01

    Hungarian is a language with morphological case marking and relatively free word order. These typological characteristics make it a good ground for testing the crosslinguistic validity of theories on processing sentences with relative clauses. Our study focussed on effects of structural factors and processing capacity. We tested 43 typically developing children in two age groups (ages of 4;11–7;2 and 8;2–11;4) in an act-out task. Differences in comprehension difficulty between different word order patterns and different head function relations were observed independently of each other. The structural properties causing difficulties in comprehension were interruption of main clauses, greater distance between the verb and its arguments, accusative case of relative pronouns, and SO head function relations. Importantly, analyses of associations between working memory and sentence comprehension revealed that structural factors made processing difficult by burdening components of working memory. These results support processing accounts of sentence comprehension in a language typologically different from English. PMID:22888179

  3. Modelling large-scale spatial variability of soil properties with sequential stochastic simulation conditioned by universal kriging in a Hungarian study site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatmári, Gábor; Barta, Károly; Pásztor, László

    2015-04-01

    were generated, respectively. The set of 200 realizations provides a set of 200 simulated values for each grid node, which can be used to model the cumulative distribution function (CDF) for each grid node and provides statistical inferences for the consideration of the spatial uncertainty. The expected value and the corresponding confidence interval for each grid node were mapped, where latter offers an opportunity for estimating the spatial uncertainty. CDFs can also be used to map specific conditions of the modelled property, e.g. the distribution of probability if RD is less than or equal to 30 centimeters. Utilizing this opportunity, functional "soil maps" were generated for the study area, which were used to delineate (with a predefined confidence level) the highly, moderately and weakly erosion affected areas, as well as the accumulation zones. In the last step, the results of SSUK and UK were compared, which showed that, SSUK gave a similar model of regional tendencies as UK for both variables. However, SSUK did not smooth out the local heterogeneities, which is crucial in large-scale digital soil mapping. In conclusion, SSUK proved to be an appropriate technique to model the large-scale spatial distribution and uncertainty of soil variables. Acknowledgements Our work has been supported by the Hungarian National Scientific Research Foundation (OTKA, Grant No. K105167).

  4. Polymorphism of clotting factors in Hungarian patients with Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Shemirani, Amir-Houshang; Szomják, Edit; Balogh, Emese; András, Csilla; Kovács, Dóra; Acs, Judit; Csiki, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon may have a genetically determined risk for clotting factors that predispose them to aberrant microvascular thrombosis. We investigated the prevalence of factor V substitution of G to A at position 1691 (FVLeiden), prothrombin G20210A, and methyltetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutations in these patients. Two hundred (158 women, 42 men, mean age of 42.4 ± 13.7 years) consecutive patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon and 200 age-sex-matched healthy controls of Hungarian origin were included in a case-control study. The prevalence of methyltetrahydrofolate reductase C677T homozygous among patients was significantly lower than in the control group (odds ratio 0.4, 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.9, P < 0.05). The prevalence of other thrombosis-associated alleles did not differ between patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon and control subjects. FVLeiden, prothrombin G20210A, and polymorphism, prothrombin G20210A mutations have no apparent effect on the etiology of primary Raynaud's phenomenon.

  5. [Patients' rights of the deceased and related problems in Hungarian law].

    PubMed

    Kereszty, Eva Margit

    2012-03-01

    In the Hungarian law, non-burial interventions on cadavers are regulated only by the health law and, therefore, other scientific examinations are theoretically not allowed. Only the international ethical code of museums is used in certain cases. Numerous cultures consider this practice as the mutilation of the cadaver. Beyond this and the criminal forms of mutilation, the medical interventions (trial and training) are also appropriate to hurt the dignity of the dead. As a counterweight, the consent of the patient or his/her relatives is needed for post-mortem interventions. This study presents the Hungarian legislation in which the deceased is a 'patient', and the special enforcement of patients' rights takes place in relation to the body. The relatives have many rights concerning autopsy, and the anatomy institutes are also regulated. The presumption of opting-out is used for organ harvesting; objection is accepted only from the patient. Medical data of the deceased are strictly protected, but there are no obstacles to the interests of the relatives. Graduate and postgraduate medical education pays only little attention to these issues, and the legislation is not in line with the present expectations and possibilities, so that it would be advisable to reconsider the full spectrum of the problem. PMID:22348848

  6. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  7. Comparison of running performances and prevalence of overweight and obesity in Hungarian and Ukrainian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kalabiska, I; Uvacsek, Martina; Uvacsek, M; Petrekanits, M; Cseprekál, O; Ihasz, F; Frenkl, R

    2010-12-01

    The 20-m shuttle run (20-mSRT) is a widely used field test to estimate peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) and thus to assess aerobic fitness of adolescents (11). The purpose of this study was to analyse differences in basic anthropometric measurements (stature, body mass, percent body fat, BMI) and in aerobic fitness of Hungarian and Ukrainian adolescent boys and girls. We examined gender differences in maximal speed (km h-1), in peak VO2 (mL kg-1 min-1) and maximal heart rate (HRmax min-1). Two hundred ninety-two Ukrainian (mean age=16.5±0.5) and 374 (mean age=16.5±0.5) Hungarian adolescents volunteered to participate in this study. Differences were analysed using factorial analysis of the variance (ANOVA) and Student's t-test. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Hungarian boys and girls were significantly taller, heavier and had higher percent body fat than their Ukrainian counterparts. Altogether 10% of Hungarians and 7% of Ukrainians were classified overweight or obese according to Cole's BMI classification (4). VO2peak of Ukrainians (mean=49.44±5.29 mL kg-1 min-1) were significantly higher than that of Hungarians (mean=41.93±8.40 mL kg-1 min-1). Maximal heart rate also differed significantly (Ukrainians mean=201.12±8.43 min-1 vs. Hungarians mean=185.38±18.38 min-1).In conclusion, aerobic fitness of the Ukrainian adolescents was significantly higher than that of the Hungarians independently of BMI or gender.

  8. Hungarian Folk Arts and Crafts. Educational Curriculum Kit 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boros-Kazai, Andrew

    This booklet provides a brief introduction to Hungarian arts and crafts. A discussion of the historical development and characteristics of Hungarian folk art supplies the background for a section in which regional styles of Hungarian folk art are described (Transdanubia, the Highlands of northern Hungary, Transylvania, and the Great Hungarian…

  9. Hungarian Folk Traditions Revisited. Educational Curriculum Kit 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biro, Ruth

    This booklet contains materials that highlight Hungarian traditions and customs transplanted to America by Hungarian immigrants. The research and educational activities are designed for practical application in locating, recording, preserving, and analyzing resources on Hungarian American history, particularly those in the Pittsburgh…

  10. Comparison of lactase persistence polymorphism in ancient and present-day Hungarian populations.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Dóra; Tömöry, Gyöngyvér; Csányi, Bernadett; Bogácsi-Szabó, Erika; Czibula, Ágnes; Priskin, Katalin; Bede, Olga; Bartosiewicz, László; Downes, C Stephen; Raskó, István

    2011-06-01

    The prevalence of adult-type hypolactasia varies ethnically and geographically among populations. A C/T-13910 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) upstream of the lactase gene is known to be associated with lactase non-persistence in Europeans. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of lactase persistent and non-persistent genotypes in current Hungarian-speaking populations and in ancient bone samples of classical conquerors and commoners from the 10th-11th centuries from the Carpathian basin; 181 present-day Hungarian, 65 present-day Sekler, and 23 ancient samples were successfully genotyped for the C/T-13910 SNP by the dCAPS PCR-RFLP method. Additional mitochondrial DNA testing was also carried out. In ancient Hungarians, the T-13910 allele was present only in 11% of the population, and exclusively in commoners of European mitochondrial haplogroups who may have been of pre-Hungarian indigenous ancestry. This is despite animal domestication and dairy products having been introduced into the Carpathian basin early in the Neolithic Age. This anomaly may be explained by the Hungarian use of fermented milk products, their greater consumption of ruminant meat than milk, cultural differences, or by their having other lactase-regulating genetic polymorphisms than C/T-13910. The low prevalence of lactase persistence provides additional information on the Asian origin of Hungarians. Present-day Hungarians have been assimilated with the surrounding European populations, since they do not differ significantly from the neighboring populations in their possession of mtDNA and C/T-13910 variants.

  11. Comparison of lactase persistence polymorphism in ancient and present-day Hungarian populations.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Dóra; Tömöry, Gyöngyvér; Csányi, Bernadett; Bogácsi-Szabó, Erika; Czibula, Ágnes; Priskin, Katalin; Bede, Olga; Bartosiewicz, László; Downes, C Stephen; Raskó, István

    2011-06-01

    The prevalence of adult-type hypolactasia varies ethnically and geographically among populations. A C/T-13910 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) upstream of the lactase gene is known to be associated with lactase non-persistence in Europeans. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of lactase persistent and non-persistent genotypes in current Hungarian-speaking populations and in ancient bone samples of classical conquerors and commoners from the 10th-11th centuries from the Carpathian basin; 181 present-day Hungarian, 65 present-day Sekler, and 23 ancient samples were successfully genotyped for the C/T-13910 SNP by the dCAPS PCR-RFLP method. Additional mitochondrial DNA testing was also carried out. In ancient Hungarians, the T-13910 allele was present only in 11% of the population, and exclusively in commoners of European mitochondrial haplogroups who may have been of pre-Hungarian indigenous ancestry. This is despite animal domestication and dairy products having been introduced into the Carpathian basin early in the Neolithic Age. This anomaly may be explained by the Hungarian use of fermented milk products, their greater consumption of ruminant meat than milk, cultural differences, or by their having other lactase-regulating genetic polymorphisms than C/T-13910. The low prevalence of lactase persistence provides additional information on the Asian origin of Hungarians. Present-day Hungarians have been assimilated with the surrounding European populations, since they do not differ significantly from the neighboring populations in their possession of mtDNA and C/T-13910 variants. PMID:21365615

  12. Y-SNP L1034: limited genetic link between Mansi and Hungarian-speaking populations.

    PubMed

    Fehér, T; Németh, E; Vándor, A; Kornienko, I V; Csáji, L K; Pamjav, H

    2015-02-01

    Genetic studies noted that the Hungarian Y-chromosomal gene pool significantly differs from other Uralic-speaking populations. Hungarians show very limited or no presence of haplogroup N-Tat, which is frequent among other Uralic-speaking populations. We proposed that some genetic links need to be observed between the linguistically related Hungarian and Mansi populations.This is the first attempt to divide haplogroup N-Tat into subhaplogroups by testing new downstream SNP markers L708 and L1034. Sixty Northern Mansi samples were collected in Western Siberia and genotyped for Y-chromosomal haplotypes and haplogroups. We found 14 Mansi and 92 N-Tat samples from 7 populations. Comparative results showed that all N-Tat samples carried the N-L708 mutation. Some Hungarian, Sekler, and Uzbek samples were L1034 SNP positive, while all Mongolians, Buryats, Khanty, Finnish, and Roma samples yielded a negative result for this marker. Based on the above, L1034 marker seems to be a subgroup of N-Tat, which is typical for Mansi and Hungarian-speaking ethnic groups so far. Based on our time to most recent common ancestor data, the L1034 marker arose 2,500 years before present. The overall frequency of the L1034 is very low among the analyzed populations, thus it does not necessarily mean that proto-Hungarians and Mansi descend from common ancestors. It does provide, however, a limited genetic link supporting language contact. Both Hungarians and Mansi have much more complex genetic population history than the traditional tree-based linguistic model would suggest. PMID:25258186

  13. Information system in transition: The Hungarian Scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubnya, Gyorgy; Herman, Akos Robert

    1994-01-01

    Recent changes in political and economical conditions in eastern European countries are influencing the function and activities of the Hungarian Library and Information network. The National Technical Information Center and Library (OMIKK) is an active participant in this process of transition. In the first part of this paper, the general transformations of Hungarian libraries and information centers are analyzed and some predictions for future trends are presented. The second part is a short summary of the activities of OMIKK and its present and prospective role in the development of national information policy.

  14. Caesium-137 migration in Hungarian soils.

    PubMed

    Szerbin, P; Koblinger-Bokori, E; Koblinger, L; Végvári, I; Ugron, A

    1999-03-01

    Distribution of 137Cs activity concentration has been measured in soils from 19 Hungarian counties. The levels of soil contamination in Hungary after the Chernobyl fallout are sufficient to study the vertical distribution of the 137Cs under natural conditions. Samples were taken layer by layer on plain, grassy and uncultivated fields down to a depth of 20 cm. The results show that radiocaesium migrates very slowly in the soils investigated. The 137Cs concentration peaks in almost all of the soils remain in the top 5 cm layer, but the distribution patterns are different. Variations in diffusion, sorption-desorption, and complexing processes, plant uptake and plant- and animal-originated mechanical changes result in the formation of site-specific radionuclide distribution profiles. On the basis of the experimental data a model has been developed for the long-term prediction of the 137Cs migration. By application of an applied diffusion-convection model the results can be well fitted, the initial deposition can be calculated and the data can be used for the long-term prediction of the 137Cs distribution profile.

  15. The Use of Tense and Agreement by Hungarian-Speaking Children with Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukacs, Agnes; Leonard, Laurence B.; Kas, Bence; Pleh, Csaba

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Hungarian is a null-subject language with both agglutinating and fusional elements in its verb inflection system, and agreement between the verb and object as well as between the verb and subject. These characteristics make this language a good test case for alternative accounts of the grammatical deficits of children with language…

  16. [Lung transplantation program for Hungarian patients].

    PubMed

    Lang, György; Czebe, Krisztina; Gieszer, Balázs; Rényi-Vámos, Ferenc

    2013-06-01

    When conservative treatment fails, lung transplantation often remains the only therapeutic option for patients with end stage parenchymal or vascular lung diseases. According to the statistics of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation, in 2010 more than 3500 lung transplantations have been performed worldwide. The Department of Thoracic Surgery at the University of Vienna is considered to be one of the world's leading lung transplantation centres; in the last year 115, since 1989 more than 1500 lung transplantation procedures under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Walter Klepetko. Similar to other Central-European countries, lung transplantation procedures of Hungarian patients have also been performed in Vienna whithin the framework of a twinning aggreement. However, many crucial tasks in the process, such indication and patient selection preoperative rehabilitation organ procurement and long term follow-up care have been stepwise taken over by the Hungarian team. Although the surgery itself is still preformed in Vienna, professional experience is already available in Hungary, since the majority of Hungarian recipients have been transplanted by hungarian surgeons who are authors of this article the professional and personal requirements of performing lung transplantations are already available in Hungary. The demand of performing lung transplantation in Hungary has been raising since 1999 and it soon reaches the extent which justifies launching of an individual national program. Providing the technical requirements is a financial an organisational issue. In order to proceed, a health policy decision has to be made.

  17. MtDNA polymorphism in the Hungarians: comparison to three other Finno-Ugric-speaking populations.

    PubMed

    Lahermo, P; Laitinen, V; Sistonen, P; Béres, J; Karcagi, V; Savontaus, M L

    2000-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation as well as restriction site polymorphisms were examined in 437 individuals from four Finno-Ugric-speaking populations. These included the Hungarians (Budapest region and the Csángós from Hungary and Romania), the Finns and two Saami groups from northeastern Finland (Inari Saami and Skolt Saami), and the Erzas from central Russia. The mtDNA data obtained in this study were combined with our previous data on Y chromosomal variation for eight different loci in these populations. The genetic variation observed among the Hungarians resembled closely that found in other European populations. The Hungarians could not be distinguished from the neighboring populations (e.g., the Austrians) any more than from their Finno-Ugric linguistic relatives.

  18. Investigation of Ice Phenomena On The Hungarian Danube Reach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keve, G.; Kontur, I.

    The importance of scientific work in the field of ice floods is high on the southern Hungarian reach of the Danube. The most dangerous floods of the reach in the past were almost all icy. This used to be so for two main reasons, out of which one is a hydro-meteorological, the other is a morphological factor. River training works on the reach have been completed, only maintenance and small corrections are being done. In spite of the process of global warming, that can be concluded analyzing the past few decades' data, an unfortunate constellation of hydro-meteorological factors can anytime cause serious frosts, and, consequently, ice floods. In our study we statisti- cally analyzed the past hundred years' data series of the reach in question. The results proved the existence of a 30-years long, almost iceless period, that we investigated the reasons for. Because of the above-mentioned rare occurence of ice phenomena, the observation and study of these processes also deteriorated. It is a big luck that Hungarian experts have dealt a lot with past ice phenomena up to 1970. Starting out from literal data and ideas, our investigations and new observations can be massively based. The newest computer technology features are now used for ice observations on the southern Hungarian Danube reach. We could gain useful experience already in the winter of 2001-2002 in computer-aided ice observation (CAIO). In our presenta- tion we would like to give an overall impression about the current issues of CAIO in southern Hungary.

  19. Genetic structure in relation to the history of Hungarian ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Guglielmino, C R; Béres, J

    1996-06-01

    The present analysis continues the study of 12 samples of 11 Hungarian ethnic groups and a collection of data from 8 foreign reference populations. The origin of these groups is entangled with the history of Hungary and specifically with the conquest of the Carpathian basin in the ninth century A.D. Given that each of the 11 groups has preserved its ethnic identity and assuming that genetic drift has played a major role, we expect that similarities and differences between the different Hungarian groups and between the Hungarian groups and the eight reference populations can be interpreted with respect to the controversial origin of the groups. The reference populations are those whose ancestors had high involvement in Hungarian history. We use multivariate statistical methods to analyze the gene frequencies of 22 loci. The results show that the Hungarian ethnic groups are genetically separate and that this separation is related to different migration waves. According to our results, Gypsies and Jews, who migrated relatively recently to Hungary, are distant from the other groups and, as predicted, appear to be genetically close to the North Indian and Ashkenazi reference populations, respectively. The Oriental population is least related to the Hungarian groups, but the distance diminishes when the P1 locus, which shows particularly high variability, is included. Some ethnic groups, especially Orség and Csángó, show genetic isolation and specific affinities with the reference populations that are related to their origin, namely, Slavs and Finns-Turks-Iranians, respectively. Other affinities were less striking than tradition would lead us to expect. Gene flow and admixture, as revealed by the significant correlation between genetic and geographic distances, may have played an important role in smoothing genetic differences between groups.

  20. The past, present and future tasks of Hungarian dendrological research.

    PubMed

    Bartha, D

    2010-01-01

    Hungarian dendrological research (research of living woody plants) has more than 200 years old history; the first general work by János Keresztély Grossinger was published in 1797. Further basic works in our time yet are: Forest Botany by Lajos Fekete and Sándor Mágócsy-Dietz (1896); and the chorological work, Distribution of trees and shrubs of sylvicultural importance in the region of Hungarian State by Lajos Fekete and Tibor Blattny (1913). A few dendrologists and many botanists have helped to get better knowledge of Hungarian dendroflora. From the point of view of taxonomy, chorology and habitat - which are interested by field botanists - it can be said that knowledge is fairly heterogeneous. There are sufficient information about most of the rare (protected/endangered) woody plants (an about 50 species) and the important adventives, above all invasive trees and shrubs (an about 10 species). From these two groups beyond there are only few taxa which can be said thoroughly worked up and known (e.g. Castanea sativa, Cornus mas, Fraxinus spp., Quercus spp.). List of the dendrotaxa, hardly known in the above-mentioned point of view is rich in species that are important for forestry or horticulture (e.g. Alnus glutinosa, Acer spp., Betula pendula, Corylusavellana and most of Salix spp.), supplemented with other species (e.g. Clematis vitalba, Colutea arborescens, Lonicera xylosteum, Padus avium, Sambucus nigra, Staphylea pinnata, Viburnum spp.).Followings can be asked from our field botanists: i) look for a specialist in cases of critical dendrotaxa; ii) a circumspect identification is necessary - especially in the case of leaves - by right of great number of samples from the adequate part of shoot; iii) keep in view frequent hybridization (e.g. in the case of Betula, Crataegus, Pyrus, Tilia), and frequent appearance of hybrids (e.g. Betula × rhombifolia, Cerasus × eminens, Salix × rubens); iv) appearance of interim forms are usually typical in the cases of

  1. Agreement and Diagnostic Performance of FITNESSGRAM®, International Obesity Task Force, and Hungarian National BMI Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurson, Kelly R.; Welk, Gregory J.; Marton, Orsolya; Kaj, Mónika; Csányi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined agreement between all 3 standards (as well as relative diagnostic associations with metabolic syndrome) using a representative sample of youth from the Hungarian National Youth Fitness Study. Method: Body mass index (BMI) was assessed in a field sample of 2,352 adolescents (ages 10-18.5 years) and metabolic syndrome…

  2. A Tradition of Excellence Transitions to the 21st Century: Hungarian Mathematics Education, 1988-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Julianna

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the development of the Hungarian mathematics education system from the first half of the 20th century to the present day. The study focused on educational programs for mathematically talented students in Hungary, since it is the success of these talented students that has earned Hungary such an impressive…

  3. Factors Influencing Quality of Life of Hungarian Postmenopausal Women Screened by Osteodensitometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maroti-Nagy, Agnes; Paulik, Edit

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate factors influencing health related quality of life in Hungarian postmenopausal women who underwent osteodensitometry. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was carried out; 359 women aged over 40 years were involved, attending the outpatient Bone Densitometry Centre of Szeged. Two kinds of tools were…

  4. Associations between Attitudes toward Physical Education and Aerobic Capacity in Hungarian High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaj, Mónika; Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Karsai, István; Vass, Zoltán; Csányi, Tamás; Boronyai, Zoltán; Révész, László

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to create a physical education (PE) attitude scale and examine how it is associated with aerobic capacity (AC). Method: Participants (n = 961, aged 15-20 years) were randomly selected from 26 Hungarian high schools. AC was estimated from performance on the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular and Endurance Run…

  5. Beware of the Dog! Private Linguistic Landscapes in Two "Hungarian" Villages in South-West Slovakia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laihonen, Petteri

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates how a single type of sign can be connected to language policy on a larger scale. Focusing on the relationship between language policy and language ideologies, I investigate the private Linguistic Landscape (LL) of Hungarians living in two villages in Slovakia. Through an examination of "beware of the dog" signs,…

  6. Teaching the Romanian Neighbors Hungarian: Language Ideologies and the Debrecen Summer School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiss, Attila Gyula

    2016-01-01

    This article is a contribution to the hitherto scant literature on learning a historical minority language and on language ideologies in the context of a study abroad program in Hungary, Debrecen. I analyse the language ideologies of the decision makers in Hungary and in the Debrecen Summer School in relation to the teaching of Hungarian to the…

  7. The case study approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The case study approach allows in-depth, multi-faceted explorations of complex issues in their real-life settings. The value of the case study approach is well recognised in the fields of business, law and policy, but somewhat less so in health services research. Based on our experiences of conducting several health-related case studies, we reflect on the different types of case study design, the specific research questions this approach can help answer, the data sources that tend to be used, and the particular advantages and disadvantages of employing this methodological approach. The paper concludes with key pointers to aid those designing and appraising proposals for conducting case study research, and a checklist to help readers assess the quality of case study reports. PMID:21707982

  8. [Case and studies].

    PubMed

    Schubert, András

    2015-11-15

    Case studies and case reports form an important and ever growing part of scientific and scholarly literature. The paper deals with the share and citation rate of these publication types on different fields of research. In general, evidence seems to support the opinion that an excessive number of such publications may negatively influence the impact factor of the journal. In the literature of scientometrics, case studies (at least the presence of the term "case study" in the titles of the papers) have a moderate share, but their citation rate is practically equal to that of other publication types.

  9. Hungarian University Students' Misunderstandings in Thermodynamics and Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turanyi, Tamas; Toth, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    The misunderstandings related to thermodynamics (including chemical equilibrium) and chemical kinetics of first and second year Hungarian students of chemistry, environmental science, biology and pharmacy were investigated. We demonstrated that Hungarian university students have similar misunderstandings in physical chemistry to those reported in…

  10. Hungarian Research on the Acquisition of Morphology and Syntax

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macwhinney, Brian

    1976-01-01

    This review analyzes research on acquisition of Hungarian morphology and syntax, specifically, morphological analysis, neologisms, acquisition of first inflections, morpheme order, word order and agreement. Because of Hungarian structure, errors in segmentation of the utterance and the word are minimized. Morphological analysis begins at semantic…

  11. Work Sharing Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Maureen E.; And Others

    Designed to provide private sector employers with the practical information necessary to select and then to design and implement work sharing arrangements, this book presents case studies of some 36 work sharing programs. Topics covered in the case studies include the circumstances leading to adoption of the program, details of compensation and…

  12. Case Study: Challenging Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Steven K.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a case study involving organizational change and its effect on employees. Presents three responses to the case study: "Paradox of Ordering Change: I Insist That We Work as a Team" (Paaige K. Turner); "Managing Change Is Managing Meaning" (Greg Hearn and Abraham Ninan); and "The Psychodynamics of an Organizational Change Initiative"…

  13. [Qualitative case study].

    PubMed

    Debout, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The qualitative case study is a research method which enables a complex phenomenon to be explored through the identification of different factors interacting with each other. The case observed is a real situation. In the field of nursing science, it may be a clinical decision-making process. The study thereby enables the patient or health professional experience to be conceptualised. PMID:27338694

  14. [Qualitative case study].

    PubMed

    Debout, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The qualitative case study is a research method which enables a complex phenomenon to be explored through the identification of different factors interacting with each other. The case observed is a real situation. In the field of nursing science, it may be a clinical decision-making process. The study thereby enables the patient or health professional experience to be conceptualised.

  15. SETDA Case Studies 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Educational Technology Directors Association, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA) published a series of case studies from 28 states to showcase examples of how ARRA EETT ("American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Enhancing Education Through Technology") grant funds have impacted teaching and learning. SETDA collected data for the case studies through a variety…

  16. HLA genetic diversity in Hungarians and Hungarian Gypsies: complementary differentiation patterns and demographic signals revealed by HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Inotai, D; Szilvasi, A; Benko, S; Boros-Major, A; Illes, Z; Bors, A; Kiss, K P; Rajczy, K; Gelle-Hossó, A; Buhler, S; Nunes, J M; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Tordai, A

    2015-08-01

    Systematic analyses of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profiles in different populations may increase the efficiency of bone marrow donor selection and help reconstructing human peopling history. We typed HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 allele groups in two bone marrow donor cohorts of 2402 Hungarians and 186 Hungarian Gypsies and compared them with several Central-European, Spanish Gypsy, and Indian populations. Our results indicate that different European Gypsy populations share a common origin but diverged genetically as a consequence of founder effect and rapid genetic drift, whereas other European populations are related genetically in relation to geography. This study also suggests that while HLA-A accurately depicts the effects of genetic drift, HLA-B, and -DRB1 conserve more signatures of ancient population relationships, as a result of balancing selection. PMID:26149581

  17. HLA genetic diversity in Hungarians and Hungarian Gypsies: complementary differentiation patterns and demographic signals revealed by HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Inotai, D; Szilvasi, A; Benko, S; Boros-Major, A; Illes, Z; Bors, A; Kiss, K P; Rajczy, K; Gelle-Hossó, A; Buhler, S; Nunes, J M; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Tordai, A

    2015-08-01

    Systematic analyses of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profiles in different populations may increase the efficiency of bone marrow donor selection and help reconstructing human peopling history. We typed HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 allele groups in two bone marrow donor cohorts of 2402 Hungarians and 186 Hungarian Gypsies and compared them with several Central-European, Spanish Gypsy, and Indian populations. Our results indicate that different European Gypsy populations share a common origin but diverged genetically as a consequence of founder effect and rapid genetic drift, whereas other European populations are related genetically in relation to geography. This study also suggests that while HLA-A accurately depicts the effects of genetic drift, HLA-B, and -DRB1 conserve more signatures of ancient population relationships, as a result of balancing selection.

  18. No association between periconceptional multivitamin supplementation and risk of multiple congenital abnormalities: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Czeizel, Andrew E; Puhó, Erzsébet H; Bánhidy, Ferenc

    2006-11-15

    Two previous Hungarian intervention trials showed that periconceptional folic acid-containing multivitamin supplementation did not change the total (birth + fetal) prevalence of cases with multiple congenital abnormalities (MCAs). However, two US observational studies found an elevated risk for MCAs in the offspring of women who reported periconceptional use of multivitamins containing folic acid. These conflicting results stimulated us to evaluate the data set of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities and to check the possible association between the use of periconceptional multivitamin supplementations and the total prevalence of cases with MCAs. Of 1,349 cases with MCA, 69 (5.1%) had mothers who used multivitamins during the second and third month of pregnancy. Of 2,405 matched controls without any defect, 126 (5.2%) had mothers who used multivitamin supplementation in early pregnancy. Of 21,494 malformed controls with isolated congenital abnormalities, 1,052 (4.9%) mothers received supplementation with multivitamins during the critical period of CAs including MCAs. There was no difference in the use of multivitamins among the study groups either in the total data set or at the evaluation of only prospective medically recorded data. Medically recorded folic acid use without any multivitamins in the second and third gestational month showed some protective effect for MCAs. In conclusion, our observational case-control study did not detect a folic acid containing multivitamins during the early pregnancy as a risk factor for MCAs.

  19. MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information taken from the arsenic demonstration program projects that have treatment systems removing multiply contaminants from drinking water. The case studies sited in the presentation consist of projects that have arsenic along with either nitrate, ...

  20. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  1. Wealth distribution and Pareto's law in the Hungarian medieval society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegyi, Géza; Néda, Zoltán; Augusta Santos, Maria

    2007-07-01

    The distribution of wealth in the medieval Hungarian aristocratic society is studied and reported. Assuming the wealth of a noble family to be directly related to the size and agricultural potential of the owned land, we take the number of owned serf families as a measure of the respective wealth. Our data analysis reveals the power-law nature of this wealth distribution, confirming the validity of the Pareto law for this society. Since, in the feudal society, land was not commonly traded, our targeted system can be considered as an experimental realization of the no-trade limit of wealth-distribution models. The obtained Pareto exponent ( α=0.92-0.95) close to 1, is in agreement with the prediction of such models.

  2. Differentiating the levels of risk for muscle dysmorphia among Hungarian male weightlifters: a factor mixture modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Babusa, Bernadett; Czeglédi, Edit; Túry, Ferenc; Mayville, Stephen B; Urbán, Róbert

    2015-01-01

    Muscle dysmorphia (MD) is a body image disturbance characterized by a pathological preoccupation with muscularity. The study aimed to differentiate the levels of risk for MD among weightlifters and to define a tentative cut-off score for the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale (MASS) for the identification of high risk MD cases. Hungarian male weightlifters (n=304) completed the MASS, the Exercise Addiction Inventory, and specific exercise and body image related questions. For the differentiation of MD, factor mixture modeling was performed, resulting in three independent groups: low-, moderate-, and high risk MD groups. The estimated prevalence of high risk MD in this sample of weightlifters was 15.1%. To determine a cut-off score for the MASS, sensitivity and specificity analyses were performed and a cut-off point of 63 was suggested. The proposed cut-off score for the MASS can be useful for the early detection of high risk MD. PMID:25280243

  3. Prevalence of Atopic Dermatitis Among Children Under 19 in an East-Hungarian Agricultural County

    PubMed Central

    Kuhnyar, Agnes; Egyud, Katalin; Szabo, Imre; Hunyadi, Janos; Kosa, Lajos

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of atopic dermatitis has significantly increased in developed countries during the past several decades. Surveys performed in Hungary also show a growing number of atopic dermatitis (AD) cases, although, a carefully designed case-controlled studies have not been performed. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence of AD in individuals under 19 years of age within the agricultural area of East-Hungary. Combined data obtained with Schultz-Larsen questionnaire on 1158 children were analyzed, and 25% of the index persons were examined by dermatologist. The mean prevalence of AD determined by questionnaires appeared to be 17.5% in the entire study population. Result of dermatological examination verified the validity and sensitivity of the questionnaire. A negative correlation was found between the severity of the disease and the length of breast feeding period. (Spearman's correlation coefficient = − 0.2247, p = 0.034). The prevalence of AD in an East-Hungarian agricultural area is nearly as high as that reported for populations residing in industrially developed countries, with a higher prevalence during childhood. Data suggest that premature abruption of breast feeding maybe one of the major factors among other environmental factors that is contributing to the development of AD. PMID:17162384

  4. MIDAS case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Brusger, E.C.; Farber, M.A.; Sharpe Hayes, M.M.

    1989-07-01

    This series of three case studies illustrates the validity and usefulness of MIDAS, a microcomputer-based tool for integrated resource planning under uncertainty. The first, at Union Electric, serves to test and validate the model and to illustrate its use for demand/supply option evaluation. Focusing on nuclear plant life extension, the Virginia Power case demonstrates the model's extensive detail, particularly in the production cost and financial areas, as well as its flexibility in addressing approximately 70 uncertainty scenarios. Puget Sound Power Light, the third case, used MIDAS for the preparation of its integrated resource plan. A 108-endpoint decision tree illustrates the full power of the decision analysis capability.

  5. An assessment of the frequency of mutations in the GBA and VPS35 genes in Hungarian patients with sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Török, Rita; Zádori, Dénes; Török, Nóra; Csility, Éva; Vécsei, László; Klivényi, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, with cases of either familial or sporadic origin. Several polymorphisms in a number of genes have been proved to have an important role in the development of PD. Particular attention has recently been paid to genes of the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) and the vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 35 (VPS35). In this study, the three most common mutations (L444P, N370S and R120W) of the GBA gene and the D620N mutation of the VPS35 gene were examined in 124 Hungarian patients diagnosed with sporadic PD (SPD) and 122 control subjects. The frequency of the L444P mutation of the GBA gene proved to be higher in the PD patients (2.4%) than in the controls (0%), although the difference was not statistically significant. All the patients who carried the mutant allele were in the early-onset PD (EOPD) group. However, neither the R120W nor the N370S variant of the GBA gene nor D620N mutation of the VPS35 gene were detected among the PD cases or the controls. Even though these results suggest that the studied mutations are quite rare in SPD patients, the most frequent L444P mutation of the GBA gene may be associated with the development of EOPD in the Hungarian population.

  6. [3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference - Radiotherapy Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Polgár, Csaba; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Csejtei, András; Gábor, Gabriella; Landherr, László; Mangel, László; Mayer, Árpád; Fodor, János

    2016-09-01

    The radiotherapy expert panel revised and updated the radiotherapy (RT) guidelines accepted in 2009 at the 2nd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference based on new scientific evidence. Radiotherapy of the conserved breast is indicated in ductal carcinoma in situ (St. 0), as RT decreases the risk of local recurrence by 60%. In early stage (St. I-II) invasive breast cancer RT remains a standard treatment following breast conserving surgery. However, in elderly (≥70 years) patients with stage I, hormone receptor positive tumour hormonal therapy without RT can be considered. Hypofractionated (15×2.67 Gy) whole breast irradiation and for selected cases accelerated partial breast irradiation are validated treatment alternatives of conventional (25×2 Gy) whole breast irradiation. Following mastectomy RT significantly decreases the risk of locoregional recurrence and improves overall survival of patients having 1 to 3 (pN1a) or ≥4 (pN2a, pN3a) positive axillary lymph nodes. In selected cases of patients with 1 to 2 positive sentinel lymph nodes axillary dissection can be omitted and substituted with axillary RT. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) followed by breast conserving surgery whole breast irradiation is mandatory, while after NAC followed by mastectomy locoregional RT should be given in cases of initial stage III-IV and ypN1 axillary status. PMID:27579722

  7. [Hungarian psychiatry in the light of the Hungarian Presidency of the Council of the European Union].

    PubMed

    Kurimay, Tamás

    2010-01-01

    In order to get an accurate picture of mental health and psychiatric care, the article reviews the relevant structures and functioning of the European Union. It examines a few, important professional events that reflect the gaining significance of the issue of mental health within the EU; the 2005 World Health Organization's European Ministerial Conference, the 2008 European Pact for Mental Health and Well-being, and the results of the so-called Thematic Conferences. For the future of the European Union, the articles stresses the crucial need for the continuing research and development, and highlights the benefits of the European Research Region an its framework programmes especially in the fields of brain research and mental health research. The issue of mental health, its care providing system, and the atmosphere of the work place, as the surveying of the Eurobarometer underscored, should be treated as priorities for the EU and during the Hungarian presidency. The programme of the Hungarian Presidency of the Council of the European Union provides priority to the presentation of the European Pact for Mental Health and Well-being to the Council Conclusion, as well as to the organization of a priority research presidential conference on the regions R and D, entitled "Discovery research in neuropsychiatry: depression, anxiety and schizophrenia in focus." The articles emphasizes the challenges of Hungarian psychiatry, first and foremost the difficulties of human resources, the theoretical context and determined perspectives for the establishment of the new National Psychiatry and Addictology Institute, the need of the move towards GP's and community care, and the importance of the cooperation with civil organizations, and scientific information gathering. The given tasks can only be achieved along with the professional development of psychiatry, with a change of perspectives towards EU since a concentrated multi level allocation of resources is only possible in the

  8. Hungarian population data on seven PCR-based loci.

    PubMed

    Budowle, B; Woller, J; Koons, B W; Furedi, S; Errera, J D; Padar, Z

    1996-07-01

    Hungarian population data for the loci LDLR, GYPA, HBGG, D7S8, Gc, HLA-DQA1, and D1S80 were generated. The genotype frequency distributions for the loci do not deviate from Hardy Weinberg expectations. Furthermore, there was little evidence for departures from expectations of independence between the loci. Using a test for homogeneity all the loci were similar between two Hungarian population samples and only the HLA-DQA1 locus was statistically different between Hungarians and US Caucasians. There generally would be little forensic differences, whether a Hungarian or a US Caucasian database was used, for estimating multiple locus profile frequencies for the seven PCR-based loci. PMID:8754580

  9. [Status report of Hungarian radiotherapy based on treatment data, available infrastucture, and human resources].

    PubMed

    Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Király, Réka; Fodor, János; Kásler, Miklós

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to report the status of Hungarian radiotherapy (RT) based on the assessment of treatment data in years 2012 to 2014, available infrastructure, and RT staffing. Between December 2014 and January 2015, a RT questionnaire including 3 parts (1. treatment data; 2. infrastructure; 3. staffing) was sent out to all Hungarian RT centers (n=12). All RT centers responded to all questions of the survey. 1. Treatment data: In 2014, 33,162 patients were treated with RT: 31,678 (95.5%) with teletherapy, and 1484 (4.5%) with brachytherapy (BT). Between 2012 and 2014, the number of patients treated with radiotherapy increased with 6.6%, but the number of BT patients decreased by 11%. Forty-two percent of all patients were treated in the two centers of the capital: 9235 patients (28%) at the National Institute of Oncology (NIO), and 4812 (14%) at the Municipial Oncoradiology Center (MOC). Out of the patients treated on megavoltage RT units (n=22,239), only 901 (4%) were treated with intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and 2018 (9%) with image-guided RT (IGRT). In 2014, 52% of all BT treatments were performed in Budapest: NIO - 539 patients (36%); MOC - 239 patients (16%); and BT was not available in 3 RT centers. Prostate I-125 seed implants and interstitial breast BT was utilized in one, prostate HDR BT in two, and head&neck implants in three centers. 2. Infrastructure: Including ongoing development projects funded by the European Union, by the end of year 2015, 39 megavoltage teletherapy units, and 12 HDR BT units will be in use in 13 available Hungarian RT centers. 3. Staffing: Actually, 92 radiation oncologists (RO), 29 RT residents, 61 medical physicists, and 229 radiation therapy technologists are working in 12 RT centers. There are 23 vacant positions (including 11 RO positions) available at the Hungarian RT centers. According to the professional minimal requirements and WHO guidelines, the implementation of 11 new linear accelerators, and 1 BT units

  10. Geothermal Case Studies

    DOE Data Explorer

    Young, Katherine

    2014-09-30

    database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  11. Unionfining: Technical case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.A.; Skripek, M.

    1994-12-31

    Hydrotreating improves the quality of FCC feeds by reducing sulfur, nitrogen, metals, asphaltenes, and polynuclear aromatic content. Four case studies presented in this paper show the benefits of hydrotreating FCC feeds: higher conversion and gasoline yield, better quality products, and lower SO{sub x} emissions.

  12. Case Studies in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeakes, Samuel J.

    1989-01-01

    A case study writing exercise used in a course on parasitology was found to be a powerful learning experience for students because it involved discipline-based technical writing and terminology, brought the students in as evaluators, applied current learning, caused interaction among all students, and simulated real professional activities. (MSE)

  13. Nesidioblastosis: a case study.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, A L

    1997-09-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common problem among neonates. Transient in nature, it usually resolves with an increase in glucose intake. However, as clinicians, we must recognize that prolonged hypoglycemia may be caused by increased insulin production. Nesidioblastosis is one cause of persistent hyperinsulinism of the newborn. This case study reviews fetal physiology, neonatal presentation, and treatment. PMID:9325879

  14. Case Studies in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guceri, Meral; Akin, Ann Riddell

    1998-01-01

    Case studies have been welcomed by English-as-a-foreign-language professionals, especially by those involved in teaching English for Specific Purposes (ESP) in the Departmental English courses at Baskent University English Language School and the English Support Unit (ELSU) of Bilkent University School of English Language in Turkey. This article…

  15. Investigation of the main causes of forest decay in a Hungarian Pinus forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyás, Krisztina; Bidló, András; Horváth, Adrienn

    2015-04-01

    Hungary has several places where the changing conditions (climate, water or soil) have an influence on the natural ecosystems. Lack of the adaptation capacity can lead to the mortality of the affected forests. In our study we try to find the reasons of the decay of a Hungarian old-growth forest (150-200 years old) in Fenyőfő - which is growing on protected area - whether it is caused by the soil properties and other abiotic variables or it is the result of the drying climate. On the studied area 119 samples from 20 soil profiles have been collected to find the causes of the tree mortality. The characteristic soil types are Luvisols, Cambisols, Arenosols mainly sand (56%) or loam (42%) by the physical assessment, but we found buried humus layer in a few cases that improves the water and nutrient supply of soils. Due to this favourable property the CaCO3 content appeared near to the surface, which hinders the vegetation in water utilization or water uptake. The average pH(H2O) of topsoil was between 4.2 and 5.5, where the leaching was characteristic and we found CaCO3 in deeper layers. The effects of climate change on the Pinus forest were also analysed. We used gridded station data from the Hungarian Meteorological Service for the time period 1961-2013. It contains daily, monthly and yearly time series for precipitation and temperature means and extremes. The meteorological data clearly show, that the mean annual temperature of the research plot increased drastically (~1°C). We also analysed the frequency of extreme high temperatures such as the total number of summer days (daily maximum temperature Tmax>25°C), hot days (Tmax>30°C) and extremely hot days (Tmax>35°C). This frequency of these days showed an increase in Fenyőfő, which caused higher water utilization and water deficiency. The annual precipitation sum decreased in the last few decades but this signal is not significant. The intensity and the variability of the precipitation in the vegetation

  16. Case study: mariner's TB.

    PubMed

    McLain, E H

    1989-08-01

    Mycobacterium marinum causes tuberculosis in fish and shellfish and cutaneous lesions in humans. It is transmitted from fish to humans by inoculation. The case presented involved a nodule on the wrist and was misdiagnosed as arthritis; the nodule was excised. Symptoms of tuberculosis persisted over a 2-year period. This case study can be generalized to a population of workers in the seafood industry, water hobbyists, and fish and shellfish enthusiasts. Education and research is needed to inform and protect populations at high risk for this disease.

  17. Radiographic Study of the Prevalence and Distribution of Hypodontia Associated with Unilateral and Bilateral Clef Lip and Palate in a Hungarian Population

    PubMed Central

    Berniczei-Roykó, Ádám; Tappe, Jan-Hendrik; Krinner, Axel; Gredes, Tomasz; Végh, András; Gábor, Katona; Linkowska-Świdzińska, Kamila; Botzenhart, Ute Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Background Cleft defects are one of the most frequent birth-deformities of the orofacial region and they are commonly associated with anomalies of the tooth structure, size, shape, formation, eruption, and tooth number. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence, distribution, and potential association of combined hypodontia in cleft-affected patients with regard to all types of teeth in both jaws in the permanent dentition. Material/Methods This retrospective radiographic analysis included patients with various types of clefts treated orthodontically in the Department of Orofacial Orthopedics and Orthodontics at Heim Pàl Children’s Hospital, Budapest. There were 150 patients (84 males, 66 females) with non-syndromic unilateral (UCLP; n=120 patients) or bilateral (BCLP; n=30 patients) cleft formation (lip, alveolus and palate) who met the inclusion criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test and Fisher’s exact test (significance level p<0.05). Results Hypodontia was significantly more frequent in patients with cleft-sided lateral incisor (104 patients, 69%), with a total of 235 missing teeth, followed by the second premolars of the upper and lower jaw. A significant correlation of congenital missing teeth was observed in left-sided clefts between the upper and lower second premolar in the cleft area. Conclusions Hypodontia inside and outside the cleft area was frequently observed. This should affect the therapy plans, especially if the cleft-sided premolar is also absent. Further comprehensive research including numerous random samples is necessary for better estimating other possible associations. PMID:27767023

  18. Establishing Normative Reference Values for Standing Broad Jump among Hungarian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Laurson, Kelly R.; Kaj, Mónika; Csányi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine age and sex trends in anaerobic power assessed by a standing broad jump and to determine norm-referenced values for youth in Hungary. Method: A sample of 2,427 Hungarian youth (1,360 boys and 1,067 girls) completed the standing broad jump twice, and the highest distance score was recorded. Quantile…

  19. Population genetic data on four STR loci in a Hungarian Romany population.

    PubMed

    Füredi, S; Kozma, Z; Woller, J; Pádár, Z; Angyal, M; Bajnóczky, I; Nishi, K

    1998-01-01

    A population study of Hungarian Romanies was carried out on the STR loci HumLPL, HumF13B, HumFES and HumF1301. There was little evidence for association of alleles within/between the four STR systems. Allele frequency distributions were significantly different between the Romany and the previously reported Central Hungarian population databases. Population differentiation was estimated by computing F- and phi-statistics as well as frequency estimate differences of individual phenotypes for these two population samples. The results suggest that the population structure may have an effect on the interpretation of forensic DNA evidence in Hungary. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction with six populations from three major ethnic groups revealed a relatively distant genetic relationship of the Baranya Romanies with other Caucasian populations.

  20. Establishing an internet-based paediatric cancer registration and communication system for the Hungarian paediatric oncology network.

    PubMed

    Borgulya, Gábor; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Schuler, Dezso; Garami, Miklós

    2004-01-01

    Cancer registration has developed in Europe over the last 50 years, and in the last decade intensive joint activities between the European Cancer Registries, in response to the need of pan-European harmonization of registration practices, have taken place. The Hungarian Paediatric Cancer Registry has been functioning as the database of the Hungarian Paediatric Oncology Network since 1971, aiming to follow the incidence and the treatment efficacy of malignant diseases. The goals of this globally unique open source information system are the following: 1) to raise the quality of the registration system to the European level by developing an Internet-based registration and communication system, modernizing the database, establishing automatic statistical analyses and adding an Internet website, 2) to support clinical epidemiological studies that we conduct with international collaborators on detailed analyses of the characteristics of patients and their diseases, evaluation of new diagnostic and therapeutic methods, prevention programs, and long-term quality of life and side effects. The benefits of the development of the Internet-based registration and communication system are as follows: a) introduction of an Internet-based case reporting system, b) modernization of the registry database according to international recommendations, c) automatic statistical summaries, encrypted mail systems, document repository, d) application of data security and privacy standards, e) establishment of a website and compilation of educational materials. The overall objective of this scientific project is to contribute towards the improvement of cancer prevention and cancer care for the benefit of the public in general and of cancer patients in particular. PMID:15718593

  1. [Presence of the biomedical periodicals of Hungarian editions in international databases].

    PubMed

    Vasas, Lívia; Hercsel, Imréné

    2006-01-15

    Presence of the biomedical periodicals of Hungarian editions in international databases. The majority of Hungarian scientific results in medical and related sciences are published in scientific periodicals of foreign edition with high impact factor (IF) values, and they appear in international scientific literature in foreign languages. In this study the authors dealt with the presence and registered citation in international databases of those periodicals only, which had been published in Hungary and/or in cooperation with foreign publishing companies. The examination went back to year 1980 and covered a 25-year long period. 110 periodicals were selected for more detailed examination. The authors analyzed the situation of the current periodicals in the three most often visited databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science), and discovered, that the biomedical scientific periodicals of Hungarian interests were not represented with reasonable emphasis in the relevant international bibliographic databases. Because of the great number of data the scientific literature of medicine and related sciences could not be represented in its entirety, this publication, however, might give useful information for the inquirers, and call the attention of the competent people.

  2. Emergence and characterisation of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in Hungarian swine herds.

    PubMed

    Bálint, Adám; Kiss, István; Bányai, Krisztián; Biksi, Imre; Szentpáli-Gavallér, Katalin; Magyar, Tibor; Jankovics, István; Rózsa, Mónika; Szalai, Bálint; Takács, Mária; Tóth, Adám György; Dán, Adám

    2013-03-01

    In 2010, two novel porcine H1N1 influenza viruses were isolated from pigs with influenza-like illness in Hungarian swine herds. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of these strains revealed that they shared molecular features with the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus strains, which emerged globally during 2009. The PB2, HA and NA genes contained unique amino acid changes compared to the available new H1N1 influenza virus sequences of pig origin. Furthermore, the investigated strains could be separated with respect to parallel amino acid substitutions affecting the polymerase genes (PB2, PB1 and PA) and the nucleoprotein (NP) gene, supporting the proposed complementarities between these proteins, all required for the viral fitness. Molecular characterisation of two Hungarian human pandemic H1N1 isolates was also performed, so that we could compare contemporaneous strains of different host species origins. Shared molecular motifs in various genes of animal and human influenza strains suggested that the Hungarian porcine strains could have originated from humans through direct interspecies transmission. This study is among the few that support the natural human-to-pig transmission of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus.

  3. Conducting and Reporting Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Merilyn; Taylor, Satomi Izumi

    Issues and elements of case study research are explored and illustrated with the example of a case study of a kindergarten in a suburb of Tokyo (Japan). Case study research is a type of qualitative research that concentrates on a single unit or entity, with boundaries established by the researcher. The case is an example drawn from a larger class,…

  4. [A peculiar man - about Hans Selye, as reflected in his Hungarian connections].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Katalin

    2015-08-30

    Hans Selye made a great impact on the Hungarian medical, scientific and public life. His first Hungarian publication about the alarm-reaction appeared 1938 in the Orvosi Hetilap. His Hungarian relationship was quite extensive after the war as he published, gave lectures, and accepted Hungarian students for specialized training in his Canadian institute saw. The rich documents in archives about Selye are currently being processed and those will surely shed light on Selye's life in further details.

  5. Hungarian intelligent road information system (IRIS) Technical Development Agency (TDA) project inception report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The report provides an overview of the Hungarian Intelligent Road Information System (IRIS), which is designed to apply the latest technologies and transportation skills to provide Hungarians and international road users with the best possible service on the Hungarian roadway system.

  6. [Attitude to death and changes of death image in Hungarian society. Study of the differences in generational value-judgments and of the possibilities of measurement. Is death still a taboo?].

    PubMed

    Zana, Agnes

    2009-06-21

    The aim of our research is to examine the sociological, anthropological, and psychological aspects of attitudes towards death; review the different approaches as a complex system; present the altered death image and the changes of tendency; analyze and interpret the most significant anxiety generating factors according to gender, age, and occupation; validate the fear of death and attitudes towards death scales in the Hungarian population; review the possibilities of interventions designed to reduce anxiety generating fear of death. Our hypotheses of our quantitative research were the following: women are characterized by a marked fear of death and anxiety; young people are more afraid of death; health care workers have a higher level death anxiety in comparison to other professionals due to the fact that they are face the suddenness and inevitability of death on daily basis, and this itself is an anxiety generating factor. We validated, adapted and calibrated two psychometric scales measuring fear of death and attitudes towards death. According to our findings, both the Neimeyer and Moore Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale and the Lester Attitude Toward Death Scale proved valid and suitable for measuring fear of death and attitudes towards death. The Hungarian version of the scales proved reliable. In accordance with our hypothesis, young people and women are characterized by higher level of fear of death and anxiety. Our hypothesis, namely that fear of death among health care workers higher as the normal population, was not confirmed. Yet, contrary to a segment of preceding measurements, lower level of fear and anxiety was found.

  7. Development of the security system of the new Hungarian banknotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterfi, Sandor

    2000-04-01

    The more than 75 year old Hungarian Banknote Printing Corporation is an enterprise with a rich history. It is located in the very center of the capital, only some blocks away form the Parliament. Most people on this side of the Atlantic may not even have heard about the Hungarian currency, the Forint. Some may remember that after the WWII it was Hungary, where the severest hyperinflation in the world took place. As we come from a manufacturing company , we can give you information about deliberation and experiences of application of optically variable features on banknotes and some observations made in the past two years since the new Hungarian bank note series is ins circulation.

  8. [Multidisciplinary approach of hip fractures based on Hungarian data].

    PubMed

    Juhász, Krisztina; Turchányi, Béla; Mintál, Tibor; Somogyi, Péter

    2016-09-01

    Hip fractures are described by increased mortality, loss of quality of life, functional decline and burden of diseases. They show a growing number worldwide. The aim of the present study is to summarise the existing data on the incidence, mortality, complications and rehabilitation of hip fractures, which relevance is reported only by few studies. To reduce mortality and complications of hip fractures the authors emphasize the importance of primary treatment within 12 hours, appropriate selection of surgical methods corresponding to the fracture type after the assessment of femoral head viability, vitamin D supplementation, same conditions for primary treatment during everyday of the week, and an adequate acute treatment and rehabilitation for patient's general health status. In the future integrated processing of multidisciplinary results of hip fractures based on Hungarian data can support the development of efficient treatment and prevention strategies, which can be advantageous for the patient, families, health care system, and the society, too, by the reduction of costly complications of hip fracture healing and mortality. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(37), 1469-1475.

  9. [Multidisciplinary approach of hip fractures based on Hungarian data].

    PubMed

    Juhász, Krisztina; Turchányi, Béla; Mintál, Tibor; Somogyi, Péter

    2016-09-01

    Hip fractures are described by increased mortality, loss of quality of life, functional decline and burden of diseases. They show a growing number worldwide. The aim of the present study is to summarise the existing data on the incidence, mortality, complications and rehabilitation of hip fractures, which relevance is reported only by few studies. To reduce mortality and complications of hip fractures the authors emphasize the importance of primary treatment within 12 hours, appropriate selection of surgical methods corresponding to the fracture type after the assessment of femoral head viability, vitamin D supplementation, same conditions for primary treatment during everyday of the week, and an adequate acute treatment and rehabilitation for patient's general health status. In the future integrated processing of multidisciplinary results of hip fractures based on Hungarian data can support the development of efficient treatment and prevention strategies, which can be advantageous for the patient, families, health care system, and the society, too, by the reduction of costly complications of hip fracture healing and mortality. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(37), 1469-1475. PMID:27615197

  10. Articulatory characteristics of Hungarian ‘transparent’ vowels

    PubMed Central

    Benus, Stefan; Gafos, Adamantios I.

    2007-01-01

    Using a combination of magnetometry and ultrasound, we examined the articulatory characteristics of the so-called ‘transparent’ vowels [iː], [i], and [eː] in Hungarian vowel harmony. Phonologically, transparent vowels are front, but they can be followed by either front or back suffixes. However, a finer look reveals an underlying phonetic coherence in two respects. First, transparent vowels in back harmony contexts show a less advanced (more retracted) tongue body posture than phonemically identical vowels in front harmony contexts: e.g. [i] in buli-val is less advanced than [i] in bili-vel. Second, transparent vowels in monosyllabic stems selecting back suffixes are also less advanced than phonemically identical vowels in stems selecting front suffixes: e.g. [iː] in ír, taking back suffixes, compared to [iː] of hír, taking front suffixes, is less advanced when these stems are produced in bare form (no suffixes). We thus argue that the phonetic degree of tongue body horizontal position correlates with the phonological alternation in suffixes. A hypothesis that emerges from this work is that a plausible phonetic basis for transparency can be found in quantal characteristics of the relation between articulation and acoustics of transparent vowels. More broadly, the proposal is that the phonology of transparent vowels is better understood when their phonological patterning is studied together with their articulatory and acoustic characteristics. PMID:18389086

  11. Natural Learning Case Study Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Learning Case Study Archives (NLCSA) is a research facility for those interested in using case study analysis to deepen their understanding of common sense knowledge and natural learning (how the mind interacts with everyday experiences to develop common sense knowledge). The database comprises three case study corpora based on experiences…

  12. Case Studies in Wilderness Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Melissa; Tarter, Shana Lee

    Five case studies explore issues in wilderness medicine, with emphasis on evacuation decision making. The cases describe medical problems encountered during wilderness trips involving college or high school students. In each case, the situation and facts of the case are outlined, including the patient's medical history and vital signs, and at…

  13. Termination: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Ahron L

    2015-12-01

    In this article I posit and examine certain criteria and qualities for ending an analysis. The case study describes the end phase of a four-year psychoanalysis in which the patient's decision to move to another area forced the end of his analysis. We continued to explore and work through his core neurotic conflicts that included issues of competitive rivalry, dominance and submission, control, and anxiety about birth and death. A shift in the transference from me as a negative father to me as a supportive but competitive older brother was also examined in the context of ending treatment as well as other aspects of the transference. In addition, we analyzed the meaning of his ending treatment based on an extra-analytic circumstance. In discussing this phase of treatment, the definition and history of the term "termination" and its connotations are reviewed. Various criteria for completing an analysis are examined, and technical observations about this phase of treatment are investigated. It was found that while a significant shift in the transference occurred in this phase of the patient's analysis, conflicts related to the transference were not "resolved" in the classical sense. Terminating treatment was considered as a practical matter in which the patient's autonomy and sense of choice were respected and analyzed. PMID:26583444

  14. Media Literacy and Cigarette Smoking in Hungarian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Randy M.; Piko, Bettina F.; Balazs, Mate A.; Struk, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess smoking media literacy in a sample of Hungarian youth and to determine its association with current smoking and susceptibility to future smoking. Design: Quantitative cross-sectional survey. Setting: Four elementary and four high schools in Mako, Hungary. Method: A survey form was administered in regularly-scheduled classes to…

  15. "Great Expectations:" The Motivational Profile of Hungarian English Language Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kormos, Judit; Csizer, Kata; Menyhart, Adrienn; Torok, Dora

    2008-01-01

    In this article we investigate what characterizes the language learning motivation of Hungarian English language students in terms of Dornyei and Otto's process model of motivation ("Motivation in Action," 1998). We used a mixed-method research design, in which qualitative interviews conducted with 20 students were supplemented with questionnaire…

  16. Behaviour Profile of Hungarian Adolescent Outpatients with a Dual Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinya, Elek; Csorba, Janos; Suli, Agota; Grosz, Zsofia

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour dimensions of 244 Hungarian adolescent psychiatric outpatients with a dual diagnosis (intellectual disability and psychiatric diagnosis) were examined by means of the adapted version of the Behaviour Problem Inventory (BPI, Rojahn, Matson, Lott, Esbensen, & Smalls, 2001). Four IQ subgroups were created: borderline, mild, moderate and…

  17. ICT in Hungarian Education--A Brief Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpati, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    The history of ICT education in Hungarian public education dates back to the 1970s. In Hungary, as well as in most countries that introduced computing as a compulsory school discipline, a shift is observable from a technology-centred towards a teaching-learning centred approach. In the late 1970s, teacher training programmes and in-service…

  18. Teaching Pharmacology by Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Sue

    1997-01-01

    Using pharmacology case studies with nursing students encourages theory-practice links and infuses real-life content. Cases provide rich qualitative data for evaluating curriculum. However, they are not a substitute for evidence-based practice. (SK)

  19. The production of nominal and verbal inflection in an agglutinative language: evidence from Hungarian.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Dezso; Janacsek, Karolina; Turi, Zsolt; Lukacs, Agnes; Peckham, Don; Szanka, Szilvia; Gazso, Dorottya; Lovassy, Noemi; Ullman, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    The contrast between regular and irregular inflectional morphology has been useful in investigating the functional and neural architecture of language. However, most studies have examined the regular/irregular distinction in non-agglutinative Indo-European languages (primarily English) with relatively simple morphology. Additionally, the majority of research has focused on verbal rather than nominal inflectional morphology. The present study attempts to address these gaps by introducing both plural and past tense production tasks in Hungarian, an agglutinative non-Indo-European language with complex morphology. Here we report results on these tasks from healthy Hungarian native-speaking adults, in whom we examine regular and irregular nominal and verbal inflection in a within-subjects design. Regular and irregular nouns and verbs were stem on frequency, word length, and phonological structure, and both accuracy and response times were acquired. The results revealed that the regular/irregular contrast yields similar patterns in Hungarian, for both nominal and verbal inflection, as in previous studies of non-agglutinative Indo-European languages: the production of irregular inflected forms was both less accurate and slower than of regular forms, both for plural and past-tense inflection. The results replicate and extend previous findings to an agglutinative language with complex morphology. Together with previous studies, the evidence suggests that the regular/irregular distinction yields a basic behavioral pattern that holds across language families and linguistic typologies. Finally, the study sets the stage for further research examining the neurocognitive substrates of regular and irregular morphology in an agglutinative non-Indo-European language.

  20. The production of nominal and verbal inflection in an agglutinative language: evidence from Hungarian.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Dezso; Janacsek, Karolina; Turi, Zsolt; Lukacs, Agnes; Peckham, Don; Szanka, Szilvia; Gazso, Dorottya; Lovassy, Noemi; Ullman, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    The contrast between regular and irregular inflectional morphology has been useful in investigating the functional and neural architecture of language. However, most studies have examined the regular/irregular distinction in non-agglutinative Indo-European languages (primarily English) with relatively simple morphology. Additionally, the majority of research has focused on verbal rather than nominal inflectional morphology. The present study attempts to address these gaps by introducing both plural and past tense production tasks in Hungarian, an agglutinative non-Indo-European language with complex morphology. Here we report results on these tasks from healthy Hungarian native-speaking adults, in whom we examine regular and irregular nominal and verbal inflection in a within-subjects design. Regular and irregular nouns and verbs were stem on frequency, word length, and phonological structure, and both accuracy and response times were acquired. The results revealed that the regular/irregular contrast yields similar patterns in Hungarian, for both nominal and verbal inflection, as in previous studies of non-agglutinative Indo-European languages: the production of irregular inflected forms was both less accurate and slower than of regular forms, both for plural and past-tense inflection. The results replicate and extend previous findings to an agglutinative language with complex morphology. Together with previous studies, the evidence suggests that the regular/irregular distinction yields a basic behavioral pattern that holds across language families and linguistic typologies. Finally, the study sets the stage for further research examining the neurocognitive substrates of regular and irregular morphology in an agglutinative non-Indo-European language. PMID:25769039

  1. The Production of Nominal and Verbal Inflection in an Agglutinative Language: Evidence from Hungarian

    PubMed Central

    Peckham, Don; Szanka, Szilvia; Gazso, Dorottya; Lovassy, Noemi; Ullman, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The contrast between regular and irregular inflectional morphology has been useful in investigating the functional and neural architecture of language. However, most studies have examined the regular/irregular distinction in non-agglutinative Indo-European languages (primarily English) with relatively simple morphology. Additionally, the majority of research has focused on verbal rather than nominal inflectional morphology. The present study attempts to address these gaps by introducing both plural and past tense production tasks in Hungarian, an agglutinative non-Indo-European language with complex morphology. Here we report results on these tasks from healthy Hungarian native-speaking adults, in whom we examine regular and irregular nominal and verbal inflection in a within-subjects design. Regular and irregular nouns and verbs were stem on frequency, word length, and phonological structure, and both accuracy and response times were acquired. The results revealed that the regular/irregular contrast yields similar patterns in Hungarian, for both nominal and verbal inflection, as in previous studies of non-agglutinative Indo-European languages: the production of irregular inflected forms was both less accurate and slower than of regular forms, both for plural and past-tense inflection. The results replicate and extend previous findings to an agglutinative language with complex morphology. Together with previous studies, the evidence suggests that the regular/irregular distinction yields a basic behavioral pattern that holds across language families and linguistic typologies. Finally, the study sets the stage for further research examining the neurocognitive substrates of regular and irregular morphology in an agglutinative non-Indo-European language. PMID:25769039

  2. Case Study: Case Studies and the Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Schiller, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses the positive and negative aspects of the "flipped classroom." In the flipped classroom model, what is normally done in class and what is normally done as…

  3. Applications of threshold models and the weighted bootstrap for Hungarian precipitation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, László; Rakonczai, Pál; Zempléni, András

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents applications of the peaks-over-threshold methodology for both the univariate and the recently introduced bivariate case, combined with a novel bootstrap approach. We compare the proposed bootstrap methods to the more traditional profile likelihood. We have investigated 63 years of the European Climate Assessment daily precipitation data for five Hungarian grid points, first separately for the summer and winter months, then aiming at the detection of possible changes by investigating 20 years moving windows. We show that significant changes can be observed both in the univariate and the bivariate cases, the most recent period being the most dangerous in several cases, as some return values have increased substantially. We illustrate these effects by bivariate coverage regions.

  4. The Use of Tense and Agreement by Hungarian-Speaking Children with Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Lukács, Ágnes; Leonard, Laurence B.; Kas, Bence; Pléh, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Hungarian is a null-subject language with both agglutinating and fusional elements in its verb inflection system, and agreement between the verb and object as well as between the verb and subject. These characteristics make this language a good test case for alternative accounts of the grammatical deficits of children with language impairment (LI). Method Twenty-five children with LI and 25 younger children serving as vocabulary controls (VC) repeated sentences whose verb inflections were masked by a cough. The verb inflections marked distinctions according to tense, person, number, and definiteness of the object. Results The children with LI were significantly less accurate than the VC children, but generally showed the same performance profile across the inflection types. The types of errors were also similar in the two groups. Conclusions Accounts that assume problems specific to agreement do not provide an explanation for the observed pattern of findings. Although the findings are generally compatible with accounts that assume processing limitations in children with LI, one such account, the morphological richness account, was not accurate in all of its predictions. One non-morphosyntactic factor -- the retention of sequences of sounds – appeared to be functionally related to inflection accuracy and may prove to be important in a language with numerous inflections such as Hungarian. PMID:18723597

  5. Three Community College Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtysiak, Joseph; Sutton, William J., II; Wright, Tommy; Brantley, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This article presents three case studies that focus on specific projects that are underway or have been completed. In the first case study, Joseph Wojtysiak and William J. Sutton, II discuss the Green Center of Central Pennsylvania, which is designed to serve as the state's preeminent source for education, training and public information about…

  6. The Big Read: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Endowment for the Arts, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Big Read evaluation included a series of 35 case studies designed to gather more in-depth information on the program's implementation and impact. The case studies gave readers a valuable first-hand look at The Big Read in context. Both formal and informal interviews, focus groups, attendance at a wide range of events--all showed how…

  7. Genotype analysis in Hungarian patients with multiple primary melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hatvani, Zsófia; Brodszky, Valentin; Mazán, Mercédesz; Pintér, Dóra; Hársing, Judit; Tóth, Veronika; Somlai, Beáta; Kárpáti, Sarolta

    2014-05-01

    Multiple primary melanoma patients (MPMps) have better prognosis and are more prone to genetic predisposition than single melanoma patients. We aimed to compare genetic background (CDKN2A, CDK4, MITF, MC1R) of 43 Hungarian MPMps with their clinicopathological data. We observed a higher rate of synchronous first and second melanoma (MM) (49%) and a higher frequency of non-melanoma tumor co-occurrence (42%) than reported previously. CDKN2A mutation frequency was 4.7% (E69G, R99P). We identified a new human MC1R variant (D117G) and reported MC1R variant distributions in Hungarian MMs for the first time. The rare R163Q was exceptionally common among Hungarian MPMps, a variant otherwise frequent in Asia, but not in Europe. MC1R 'R' carriers showed histopathological signs of a more progressive disease than 'r' carriers did; however, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in their second melanomas occurred significantly more frequently. Calculating 5-year overall survival, 'R' carriers showed more unfavourable prognosis (87%) than 'r' carriers did (95%).

  8. Genotype analysis in Hungarian patients with multiple primary melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hatvani, Zsófia; Brodszky, Valentin; Mazán, Mercédesz; Pintér, Dóra; Hársing, Judit; Tóth, Veronika; Somlai, Beáta; Kárpáti, Sarolta

    2014-05-01

    Multiple primary melanoma patients (MPMps) have better prognosis and are more prone to genetic predisposition than single melanoma patients. We aimed to compare genetic background (CDKN2A, CDK4, MITF, MC1R) of 43 Hungarian MPMps with their clinicopathological data. We observed a higher rate of synchronous first and second melanoma (MM) (49%) and a higher frequency of non-melanoma tumor co-occurrence (42%) than reported previously. CDKN2A mutation frequency was 4.7% (E69G, R99P). We identified a new human MC1R variant (D117G) and reported MC1R variant distributions in Hungarian MMs for the first time. The rare R163Q was exceptionally common among Hungarian MPMps, a variant otherwise frequent in Asia, but not in Europe. MC1R 'R' carriers showed histopathological signs of a more progressive disease than 'r' carriers did; however, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in their second melanomas occurred significantly more frequently. Calculating 5-year overall survival, 'R' carriers showed more unfavourable prognosis (87%) than 'r' carriers did (95%). PMID:24660985

  9. Case Studies in Science Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Karen

    2010-03-01

    Everyone in science should have ethics education training. I have seen graduate students taken advantage of by their mentors. Many of us have seen misconduct...but what should we do about it? Young scientists are often unaware of the rules in science and make mistakes because of their ignorance of the rules in that particular field of study. Then there are an increasing number of cases in the news of overt cases of misrepresentation in science. All are welcome to attend this discussion of case studies. A case study on topics such as: how to treat data properly, how our values in science affect our work, who gets authorship on scientific papers, who is first author on a paper, what you should do if you uncover misconduct or plagiarism in your university, and we will discuss the scientist's role in society. This will be a painless, non-confrontational small group, then large group discussion of each case

  10. The fate of Hungarian Jewish dermatologists during the Holocaust Part 1: Six refugees who fled.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Walter H C; Bock, Julia; Hoenig, Leonard J; Parish, Lawrence Charles

    2016-01-01

    From the times of Moritz Kaposi, Hungarian Jewish physicians have significantly contributed to the development of dermatology. Part 1 of this special report highlights some of the early Jewish dermatologists in Hungary. It also tells the stories of five Hungarian Jewish dermatologists who fled anti-Semitism in Hungary, or other European countries, between 1920 and 1941: Frederick Reiss, Emery Kocsard, Stephen Rothman, Peter Flesch, and George Csonka. A sixth Hungarian dermatologist, Tibor Benedek, was persecuted by the Nazis, because he had a Jewish wife, forcing the couple to flee Germany. Part 2 will focus on the ordeal faced by Hungarian Jewish dermatologists who did not leave their homeland during World War II.

  11. Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Haplotypes in Hungarian Patients with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Griger, Zoltán; Dankó, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are autoimmune diseases characterized by symmetrical proximal muscle weakness. Our aim was to identify a correlation between VDR polymorphisms or haplotypes and myositis. We studied VDR-BsmI, VDR-ApaI, VDR-TaqI, and VDR-FokI polymorphisms and haplotypes in 89 Hungarian poly-/dermatomyositis patients (69 females) and 93 controls (52 females). We did not obtain any significant differences for VDR-FokI, BsmI, ApaI, and TaqI genotypes and allele frequencies between patients with myositis and healthy individuals. There was no association of VDR polymorphisms with clinical manifestations and laboratory profiles in myositis patients. Men with myositis had a significantly different distribution of BB, Bb, and bb genotypes than female patients, control male individuals, and the entire control group. Distribution of TT, Tt, and tt genotypes was significantly different in males than in females in patient group. According to four-marker haplotype prevalence, frequencies of sixteen possible haplotypes showed significant differences between patient and control groups. The three most frequent haplotypes in patients were the fbAt, FBaT, and fbAT. Our findings may reveal that there is a significant association: Bb and Tt genotypes can be associated with myositis in the Hungarian population we studied. We underline the importance of our result in the estimated prevalence of four-marker haplotypes. PMID:25649962

  12. [The most important obstacles of the development of Hungarian psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Kalmár, Sándor

    2015-06-01

    A quarter of a century ago the change of the political system in Hungary precipitated a serious value-crisis and caused a lot of harmful effects in nurturing and the development of psychiatry. The author establishes that the attack against psychiatry is more intensive than previously but neither the education and health management nor the psychiatric leadership could cope with these difficulties. It can't be denied that the foundation of lifelong mental health begins in the early life years and about 75% of the first Mental Disorder manifests in adolescence and youth. We are not able to ensure the special rights of every child according to the Hungarian Constitution and the Declaration of the Rights of the Child by the United Nations. The large inequalities within the country, the lack of paramount mental education and nurturing, the lack of essential, consistent eternal values, the lack of required psychiatric care system are huge obstacles of the development of healthy individual and leads to self-destructive behaviour and several, serious physical and mental disorders. The purpose of the author is to call psychiatrists' attention to the main obstacles of the development of Hungarian Psychiatric Care System. The main obstacles of the present psychiatric care system: 1. Unclarified notions, confusion of ideas. 2. Somatic, neurologic, mental, cultural-social and spiritual ignorance. 3. Lack of organization in Mental Education and Psychiatric Care System. 4. Value-crisis in our society despite the fact that the "Council of Wise Men" created a "Scale of the Essential Consistent Eternal Values" for the Hungarian Education System in 2008. 5. Lack of mental health prevention both in education system and health care system. There is no teaching of hygiene lessons in the Hungarian schools. 6. Negligence and selfishness among the population. 7. Disinterest among competent authorities. 8. Leaving the most important possibilities out of consideration. The author establishes

  13. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (CHICAGO, IL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  14. Hydrogeologic Case Studies (Seattle, WA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  15. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (DENVER PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  16. Nasopharyngeal Case-Control Study

    Cancer.gov

    A case-control study conducted in Taiwan between 1991-1994 among approximately 1,000 individuals to examine the role of viral, environmental, and genetic factors associated with the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  17. Case Study: del Amo Bioventing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The attached presentation discusses the fundamentals of bioventing in the vadose zone. The basics of bioventing are presented. The experience to date with the del Amo Superfund Site is presented as a case study.

  18. Teaching astronomy with case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-11-01

    Breaking the students into small, collaborative learning groups to solve a meaningful task together is one of the most successful and fully evaluated teaching techniques implemented over the last century. Although there are many ways to accomplish small group learning, a long-standing and consistently successful collaborative class activity is to use the case study teaching strategy. The use of case studies is common in medical schools and law schools, but not so common in the teaching of astronomy. Case studies create meaningful conversations among students and with the professor by focusing on life-like dilemmas to be solved. Case study tasks ask audience members to synthesize several ideas or evaluate scenarios that have not been explicitly presented to them in the lecture or in available readings.

  19. An Investigation into the Relationship of Foreign Language Learning Motivation and Sign Language Use among Deaf and Hard of Hearing Hungarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontra, Edit H.; Csizer, Kata

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to point out the relationship between foreign language learning motivation and sign language use among hearing impaired Hungarians. In the article we concentrate on two main issues: first, to what extent hearing impaired people are motivated to learn foreign languages in a European context; second, to what extent sign…

  20. ACE and ACTN3 genes polymorphisms among female Hungarian athletes in the aspect of sport disciplines.

    PubMed

    Bosnyák, E; Trájer, E; Udvardy, A; Komka, Z; Protzner, A; Kováts, T; Györe, I; Tóth, M; Pucsok, J; Szmodis, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the importance of two sport-associated gene polymorphisms, alpha-actinin-3 R577X (ACTN3) and angiotensin-converting enzyme I/D (ACE), among Hungarian athletes in different sports. The examination was carried out only on women (n = 100). Sport-specific groups were formed in order to guarantee the most homogeneous clusters. Human genomic DNA was isolated from blood, and genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction. To measure the differences between the participating groups, Chi-squared test was performed using Statistica 9.0 for Windows® (significance level: p < 0.05). In comparing the ACE I/D allele frequencies, significant difference was detected between water polo (I = 61.11%; D = 38.89%) and combat sports (I = 35.71%, D = 64.29%) athletes (p < 0.03). There was no statistical difference when ACE I/D alleles in combat sports and kayaking/rowing (p > 0.05) were compared. A similarity was detectable in the I allele frequencies of the water polo (61.11%) and kayaking/rowing (56.67%) groups. The ACTN3 R/X polymorphism showed no differences in comparison with the sport groups. R allele frequencies were higher in every group compared to the X allele. The potential significance of the ACE I allele in sports of an aerobic nature was not clearly confirmed among Hungarian athletes. PMID:26690037

  1. [Medicinal perspective of Hungarian Centaurea species in the light of scientific evidence].

    PubMed

    Csupor, Dezso; Peták, Zsolt; Hohmann, Judit

    2011-01-01

    The genus Centaurea comprises 300-350 species, 22 of which are native to Hungary. Several species have been applied in traditional medicine, however, the rationale of their application has been analyzed only in few studies. The decoction of the aerial parts of Centaurea sadleriana Janka, a species native to Hungary, has been used in Hungarian folk medicine for the healing of wounds of livestock. Its ethnomedicinal use was reported first by our research group. There is no data available for similar application of other members of the genus native to Hungary. This paper summarizes the phytochemical and pharmacological data of all Hungarian Centaurea species (C. apiculata, C. are-naria, C. banatica, C. biebersteinii, C. calcitrapa, C. cyanus, C. diffusa, C. grinensis, C. indurata, C. jacea, C. macroptilon, C. montana, C. nigrescens, C. pannonica, C. phrygia, C. rhenana, C. sadleriana, C. salonitana, C. scabiosa, C. solstitialis, C. stenolepis, C. triumfettii), focusing on compounds and activities relevant to the anticipated wound healing effect. Certain compounds (eg. sesquiterpene lactones, flavonoids, polyacetylenes) are characteristic to the genus, and taking into account that they may play role in the anti-inflammatory and wound healing effect, it is plausible that other Centaurea species beyond C. sadleriana would have wound healing promoting effect. Since C. sadleriana is an endangered species native only to the Carpathian Basin, the investigation of wound healing effect of more prevalent species is scientifically warranted. PMID:21800712

  2. Desegregation Case Studies. Volume II: Appendixes, Case Study Working Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Susan Higley; And Others

    This document contains the working report case studies of five urban school districts studied to determine the role of the Emergency School Aid Act (ESAA), Title IV of the Civil Rights Act, and Title IV enforcement by the Office of Civil Rights in school desegregation. Desegregation processes were examined in Dayton, Ohio, San Francisco,…

  3. Qualifying lighting remodelling in a Hungarian city based on light pollution effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolláth, Z.; Dömény, A.; Kolláth, K.; Nagy, B.

    2016-09-01

    The public lighting system has been remodelled in several Hungarian cities. In some cases the majority of the old luminaries were fitted with high pressure sodium lamps and they were replaced with white LED lighting with a typical correlated colour temperature of about 4500 K. Therefore, these remodelling works provide a testbed for methods in measurements and modelling. We measured the luminance of the light domes of selected cities by DSLR photometry before and after the remodelling. Thanks to the full cut off design of the new lighting fixtures we obtained a slight decrease even in the blue part of the sky dome spectra of a tested city. However, we have to note that this positive change is the result of the bad geometry (large ULR) of the previous lighting system. Based on Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations we provide a comparison of different indicators that can be used to qualify the remodelling, and to predict the possible changes in light pollution.

  4. Talar fractures: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, A L; Morgan, J H

    2001-09-01

    Three case studies of fractures are presented that demonstrate the potential morbidity that these injuries can cause as well as the acceptable outcomes if treated appropriately. Two of the cases are talar fracture dislocations; the third is an osteochondral fracture of the talus. The importance of early treatment with open reduction and internal fixation is demonstrated. Success following surgical intervention in a nonhealed osteochondral fracture of the talus is also demonstrated.

  5. Early Morphological Productivity in Hungarian: Evidence from Sentence Repetition and Elicited Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabor, Balint; Lukacs, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates early productivity of morpheme use in Hungarian children aged between 2 ; 1 and 5 ; 3. Hungarian has a rich morphology which is the core marker of grammatical functions. A new method is introduced using the novel word paradigm in a sentence repetition task with masked inflections (i.e. a disguised elicited production task).…

  6. Bibliographical Guide to Hungarian-American Sources. Educational Curriculum Kit 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biro, Ruth

    This bibliography provides a listing of authoritative research materials concerning the Hungarian experience in America. Listings represent sources of information in public libraries, universities, and organizational collections; some are in private collections in the Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania) area. Materials covered are: (1) Hungarian history,…

  7. Guide to Historic Hungarian Places in Greater Pittsburgh. Educational Curriculum Kit 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boros-Kazai, Andrew

    This booklet is a guide to buildings and other sites which have played a significant role in the history of the Hungarian community in Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania). A brief summary of the significance or present use is provided for: (1) the Hungarian Nationality room at the University of Pittsburgh's Cathedral of Learning; (2) special collections of…

  8. Teaching Case: Enterprise Architecture Specification Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steenkamp, Annette Lerine; Alawdah, Amal; Almasri, Osama; Gai, Keke; Khattab, Nidal; Swaby, Carval; Abaas, Ramy

    2013-01-01

    A graduate course in enterprise architecture had a team project component in which a real-world business case, provided by an industry sponsor, formed the basis of the project charter and the architecture statement of work. The paper aims to share the team project experience on developing the architecture specifications based on the business case…

  9. The Language Dilemma: Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teboul, J. C. Bruno

    2002-01-01

    Presents the case study involving a fictitious company's English-only policy and threats of legal action based on that policy. Includes the following responses: "Legal Issues Posed in the Language Dilemma" (Gregory S. Walden); "English Only: A Workplace Dilemma" (Alan Pakiela); "Problems with English-Only Policies" (Barbara Lynn Speicher); and…

  10. Case studies of uncommon headaches.

    PubMed

    Evans, Randolph W

    2006-05-01

    The following interesting and uncommon headache disorders are presented through case studies: exploding head syndrome, hypnic headache, neck-tongue syndrome, "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome, nummular headache, red ear syndrome, burning mouth syndrome, spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome, and cardiac cephalalgia. PMID:16684636

  11. Due Process Hearing Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, David F.; Jones, Marni Gail

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a due process hearing case study of a mother who contended that his son, D.J., has been denied of a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) of his School District after being suspended from school. D.J., an elementary student, had been described as hyperactive, inattentive, defiant, and often volatile. He was identified…

  12. Case Studies in Sports Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Nancy

    1988-01-01

    This article presents case studies of two athletes who wanted to affect a change in their body weight in order to enhance athletic performance. Each athlete's problem and the nutrition approach used to solve it are discussed. Caloric values of fast foods are listed. (JL)

  13. Case Studies in Applied Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematical Association of America, Washington, DC.

    This collection of nine case studies in applied mathematics was written primarily for the use of the instructor by a Conference sponsored by the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM). Each chapter contains exercises of varying degrees of difficulty and several include student projects. The materials were used on a trial…

  14. Dietary Calcium Intake and Calcium Supplementation in Hungarian Patients with Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Szamosujvári, Pál; Dombai, Péter; Csóré, Katalin; Mikófalvi, Kinga; Steindl, Tímea; Streicher, Ildikó; Tarsoly, Júlia; Zajzon, Gergely; Somogyi, Péter; Szamosújvári, Pál; Lakatos, Péter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Adequate calcium intake is the basis of osteoporosis therapy—when this proves insufficient, even specific antiosteoporotic agents cannot exert their actions properly. Methods. Our representative survey analyzed the dietary intake and supplementation of calcium in 8033 Hungarian female and male (mean age: 68 years) (68.01 (CI95: 67.81–68.21)) patients with osteoporosis. Results. Mean intake from dietary sources was 665 ± 7.9 mg (68.01 (CI95: 67.81–68.21)) daily. A significant positive relationship could be detected between total dietary calcium intake and lumbar spine BMD (P = 0.045), whereas such correlation could not be demonstrated with femoral T-score. Milk consumption positively correlated with femur (P = 0.041), but not with lumbar BMD. The ingestion of one liter of milk daily increased the T-score by 0.133. Average intake from supplementation was 558 ± 6.2 mg (68.01 (CI95: 67.81–68.21)) daily. The cumulative dose of calcium—from both dietary intake and supplementation—was significantly associated with lumbar (r = 0.024, P = 0.049), but not with femur BMD (r = 0.021, P = 0.107). The currently recommended 1000–1500 mg total daily calcium intake was achieved in 34.5% of patients only. It was lower than recommended in 47.8% of the cases and substantially higher in 17.7% of subjects. Conclusions. We conclude that calcium intake in Hungarian osteoporotic patients is much lower than the current recommendation, while routinely applied calcium supplementation will result in inappropriately high calcium intake in numerous patients. PMID:23737777

  15. Egocentric mental rotation in Hungarian dyslexic children.

    PubMed

    Karádi, K; Kovács, B; Szepesi, T; Szabó, I; Kállai, J

    2001-01-01

    A mental rotation task was given to 27 dyslexic children (mean age 9 years, 2 months) and to 28 non-dyslexic children (mean age 8 years, 8 months). Pictures of right and left hands were shown at angles of 0, 50, 90 and 180 degrees, and the subjects were required to indicate whether what was shown was a right hand or a left hand. It was found that, in this task, the dyslexics did not show the normal pattern of response times at different angles, and also, that they made more errors than the controls. It is argued that this result is compatible with hypothesis that, in typical cases of dyslexia, there is a malfunctioning in the posterior parietal area.

  16. Nonlinearity between acoustics and articulation in Hungarian transparent vowels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benus, Stefan; Kirke, Karen D.; Gafos, Adamantios I.

    2001-05-01

    We present novel results from the acoustic and articulatory investigation of the production of the transparent vowels (TVs) /i/, /i:/, /e:/ in Hungarian (colon denotes length). The acoustic measurements of the front-back distinction (second formant, the difference of the first and second formants [Ladefoged, 1993]) show that the effect of adjacent back vowels on the front quality of the TVs is only weakly significant. The articulatory measurements of the same data, however, show that adjacent back vowels cause highly significant retraction of the tongue body during the production of the front TVs. The significance of this finding lies in its relevance to the relationship between phonetics and phonology. Our results demonstrate that minor phonetic differences in articulation, impossible to access by traditional theory, correlate with full-fledged phonological alternation of suffix selection in Hungarian. Traditional phonological accounts predict no effect of continuous phonetic details on discrete phonological generalizations. This is supported in our acoustic data but contrasts with our articulatory findings. In the paper we propose a dynamic model where phonological transparency is directly related to nonlinearity between acoustics and articulation [Stevens, 1989; Wood, 1979]. [Work supported by NIH.

  17. A possible association between acute infectious diarrhoea in pregnant women and congenital abnormalities in their offspring--a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Acs, Nándor; Bánhidy, Ferenc; Puhó, Erzsébet H; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2010-05-01

    The possible association between Salmonella gastroenteritis (SGE) and infectious diarrhoea in pregnancy (IDP) and structural birth defects, i.e. congenital abnormalities (CA) in the offspring, has not been studied. The dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996 was evaluated. There were 15 (0.07%) and 82 (0.36%) out of 22,843 cases and 23 (0.06%) and 70 (0.18%) out of 38,151 (0.34%) controls with mothers who had medically recorded SGE and IDP, respectively. There was no association of SGE and a higher risk of CA. However, a higher risk of cleft lip +/- palate, congenital limb deficiencies, multiple CAs and cardiovascular CAs was found in the offspring of mothers with IDP. A possible explanation for the association of IDP with higher risk for some specific CAs may be the high fever in IDP.

  18. Maternal use of oral contraceptives and risk of hypospadias - a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wogelius, Pia; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Pedersen, Lars; Nørgaard, Mette; Czeizel, Andrew E; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this population-based case-control study was to examine the risk of isolated hypospadias in boys born to mothers who have used oral contraceptives in early pregnancy. The study was based on data from the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities from 1980 to 1996, and included 3,038 boys with hypospadias (cases), 24,799 boys without congenital abnormalities (CA-free controls), and 11,881 boys with abnormalities other than hypospadias. We used unconditional logistic regression to adjust for birth order, maternal age, maternal employment status, maternal diabetes, and pre-eclampsia. When comparing cases with CA-free controls the OR for maternal use of OC was 1.21 (95% CI: 0.67-2.17). When comparing cases with boys with other abnormalities, the OR for maternal use of OC was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.46-1.50). Our data showed that self-reported maternal use of oral contraceptives during pregnancy was not associated with an increased risk of hypospadias in the offspring.

  19. Continuing education case study quiz.

    PubMed

    2013-03-01

    Goal- The goal of this program is to educate pharmacists about the use of teriflunomide for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Objectives- At the completion of this program, the reader will be able to:Describe the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of teriflunomide.Discuss the risks associated with the use of teriflunomide.Discuss the potential benefit of teriflunomide for an individual patient.Apply the information on the use of teriflunomide to a case study. PMID:24421468

  20. Sesquiterpenes and flavonoid aglycones from a Hungarian taxon of the Achillea millefolium group.

    PubMed

    Glasl, Sabine; Mucaji, Pavel; Werner, Ingrid; Presser, Armin; Jurenitsch, Johann

    2002-01-01

    The investigation of a dichloromethane extract of flower heads of a Hungarian taxon of the Achillea millefolium group led to the isolation of three flavonoid aglycones, one triterpene, one germacranolide and five guaianolides. Their structures were elucidated by UV-VIS, EI- and CI-MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopic methods as well as by 2D-NMR studies and by selective 1D-NOE experiments. Besides apigenin, luteolin and centaureidin, beta-sitosterol, 3beta-hydroxy-11alpha,13-dihydro-costunolide, desacetylmatricarin, leucodin, achillin, 8alpha-angeloxy-leucodin and 8alpha-angeloxy-achillin were isolated. Both latter substances are reported here for the first time. Their NMR data were compared with those of the other guaianolides. The stereochemistry of 3beta-hydroxy-11alpha,13-dihydro-costunolide was discussed and compared with data of the literature.

  1. Association of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and Parkinson's disease in Hungarians.

    PubMed

    Török, Rita; Török, Nora; Szalardy, Levente; Plangar, Imola; Szolnoki, Zoltan; Somogyvari, Ferenc; Vecsei, Laszlo; Klivenyi, Peter

    2013-09-13

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene encodes a transcription factor that influences calcium homeostasis and immunoregulation, and may play a role in neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD). The investigations of the association between VDR and PD in different populations revealed various results. In a present study 100 PD patients and 109 healthy controls from the Hungarian population were genotyped for four polymorphic sites (BsmI, ApaI, FokI and TaqI) in the VDR gene. The polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Our results demonstrate an association between the FokI C allele and PD; the frequency of the C allele was significantly higher in PD patients than in controls, suggesting that this polymorphism may have a role in the development of PD in these patients.

  2. Designing case-control studies.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, T

    1979-01-01

    Identification of confounding factors, evaluation of their influence on cause-effect associations, and the introduction of appropriate ways to account for these factors are important considerations in designing case-control studies. This paper presents designs useful for these purposes, after first providing a statistical definition of a confounding factor. Differences in the ability to identify and evaluate confounding factors and estimate disease risk between designs employing stratification (matching) and designs randomly sampling cases and controls are noted. Linear logistic models for the analysis of data from such designs are described and are shown to liberalize design requirements and to increase relative risk estimation efficiency. The methods are applied to data from a multiple factor investigation of lung cancer patients and controls. PMID:540588

  3. The Case: Generalisation, Theory and Phronesis in Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Arguments for the value of case study are vitiated by assumptions about the need for generalisation in the warrant of social scientific inquiry--and little generalisation is legitimate from case study, although an argument exists for the role of the case in the establishment of a form of generalisation in a certain kind of theory, a line of…

  4. Continuing education case study quiz.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Goal- The goal of this program is to educate pharmacists about the use of elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (df) combination tablet for the treatment of HIV infection. Objectives-At the completion of this program, the reader will be able to:Describe the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir df combination.Discuss the risks associated with the use of elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir df combination.Discuss the potential benefit of elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir df combination for an individual patient.Apply the information on the use of elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir df combination to a case study. PMID:24550569

  5. Environmental health aspects of drinking water-borne outbreak due to karst flooding: case study.

    PubMed

    Dura, Gyula; Pándics, Tamás; Kádár, Mihály; Krisztalovics, Katalin; Kiss, Zoltánné; Bodnár, Judit; Asztalos, Agnes; Papp, Erzsébet

    2010-09-01

    Climate change may increase the incidence of waterborne diseases due to extreme rainfall events, and consequent microbiological contamination of the water source and supply. As a result of the complexity of the pathways from the surface to the consumer, it is difficult to detect an association between rainfall and human disease. The water supply of a Hungarian city, Miskolc (174,000 inhabitant), is mainly based on karstic water, a vulnerable underground water body. A large amount of precipitation fell on the catchment area of the karstic water source, causing an unusually strong karstic water flow and flooding, and subsequent microbiological contamination. The presence of several potential sources of contamination in the protective zone of the karstic water source should be emphasized. The water supplier was unprepared to treat the risk of waterborne outbreak caused by an extreme weather event. Public health intervention and hygienic measures were taken in line with epidemiological actions, focusing on the protection of consumers by providing safe drinking water. The contamination was identified, and measures were taken for risk reduction and prevention. This case study underlines the increasing importance of preparedness for extreme water events in order to protect the karstic water sources and to avoid waterborne outbreaks. PMID:20375480

  6. Benefits and entitlements in the Hungarian health care system

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This contribution considers entitlements and benefits in the Hungarian health care system. After a brief introduction to the organizational structure of the system the decision-making processes are discussed in detail, including the most important actors, types and pieces of legislation, formal structures, decision-making criteria, and outputs in terms of benefit catalogues. Within the two main public financing systems (social insurance and tax-funded services) there are four types of regulatory regimes: (a) traditional political decision making, (b) price negotiations, (c) updating of classification systems for payment purposes, and (d) the procedure for the inclusion of registered medicines in the scope of the social health insurance system. As an example we discuss the benefit regulations and benefit catalogues in the category of services of curative care (HC.1) of the OECD classification of health services. PMID:16267656

  7. Travel medicine in Eastern Europe--the Hungarian way.

    PubMed

    Felkai, Peter

    2008-07-01

    At the end of the 1980s, a new peoples' migration began, during which the inhabitants of the former Eastern bloc discovered the Western world and the interest of Western tourists turned towards Eastern Europe. Thus, a "travel industrial revolution" took place in Eastern Europe, albeit 20 years after the corresponding Western revolution. Both the common features of their past political systems and the local peculiarities of several Eastern European countries could affect the later development of the ideas and microstructures of travel medicine. By reassessing those particularities that have influenced the formation and development of travel medicine in Eastern European countries, based upon Hungarian experiences, the author has reviewed the primary, secondary, and tertiary tasks required in travel medicine and the "four-leaved-clover structure" of travel medicine, which supports it and makes possible its flexible adaptation to local peculiarities. Building upon the experiences gathered in Western countries, with an already established travel medicine structure, Eastern European travel medicine has the chance to create an appropriate, open, and polychromic interdisciplinary science. However, when building a travel medicine system, we must preserve our traditional primary prevention activity: the well-proven triad of vaccination, chemoprophylaxis, and travel advice. We must also consider the divergent social backgrounds, cultural traditions, and local particularities of the pre-existing health care system. A very strong stress must also be placed on the secondary prevention (preparing patients suffering from preexisting diseases), psychosocial preparation, and evaluation of risk factors, use of possible protective devices, and the possibilities and limitations of self-therapy. A medical provider network abroad must be established by Hungarian travel medicine specialists for tertiary prevention, and to oversee well-established protocols for repatriation.

  8. Physiologic amputation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Long, Jeri; Hall, Virginia

    2014-03-01

    Acute limb ischemia is a complication of severe peripheral arterial disease that can be a threatening limb as well as life. Multiple procedures exist today to help revascularize extremities; however, even with the latest technologies, surgical amputation of the limb may still be necessary. Cryoamputation, or physiologic amputation, is a method used to treat patients who are hemodynamically unstable for the operating room and who are in need of urgent amputation owing to arterial ischemia. This procedure is used in the rare instance where not only a persons' limb is threatened, but also their life. This is a case study regarding one patient who presented to the hospital with limb-threatening ischemia who became hemodynamically unstable owing to the rhabdomyolysis associated with the ischemia of his lower extremity. Cryoamputation was used to stabilize the patient and prevent further deterioration, so that he could safely undergo surgical amputation of the limb without an increase in mortality risk. Cryoamputation must be followed by formal surgical amputation when the patient is hemodynamically stabilized. It is not a limb salvaging, procedure but it is a life-saving procedure. This case study demonstrates the usefulness of the procedure and discusses the technique used for cryoamputation.

  9. The fate of Hungarian Jewish dermatologists during the Holocaust Part 1: Six refugees who fled.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Walter H C; Bock, Julia; Hoenig, Leonard J; Parish, Lawrence Charles

    2016-01-01

    From the times of Moritz Kaposi, Hungarian Jewish physicians have significantly contributed to the development of dermatology. Part 1 of this special report highlights some of the early Jewish dermatologists in Hungary. It also tells the stories of five Hungarian Jewish dermatologists who fled anti-Semitism in Hungary, or other European countries, between 1920 and 1941: Frederick Reiss, Emery Kocsard, Stephen Rothman, Peter Flesch, and George Csonka. A sixth Hungarian dermatologist, Tibor Benedek, was persecuted by the Nazis, because he had a Jewish wife, forcing the couple to flee Germany. Part 2 will focus on the ordeal faced by Hungarian Jewish dermatologists who did not leave their homeland during World War II. PMID:26903191

  10. Hungarian perspectives on emigration and immigration in the new European architecture.

    PubMed

    Szoke, L

    1992-01-01

    After a brief review of Hungary's history as a receiving country, the author assesses projected changes in Hungarian migration policy designed to prevent a massive new influx of refugees and other migrants from eastern and central Europe.

  11. A population-based case-control study of oral chlordiazepoxide use during pregnancy and risk of congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Czeizel, A E; Rockenbauer, M; Sørensen, H T; Olsen, J

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the study was to check the human teratogenic potential of oral chlordiazepoxide treatment during pregnancy at the analysis of pairs of 22,865 cases with congenital abnormalities (CAs) and 38,151 matched healthy controls in the population-based data set of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities (HCCSCA) between 1980 and 1996. Two hundred and one (0.9%) case mothers and 268 (0.7%) control mothers had chlordiazepoxide treatment during pregnancy, respectively. Our analysis showed higher odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI; 2.5, 1.0-6.0) for chlordiazepoxide use during the 2nd-3rd month of gestation in the group of congenital cardiovascular malformations. However, this association was found when exposure data were based mainly on maternal self-reported chlordiazepoxide treatments (80% in cases and 71% in controls). There was no increase in the rate of any specific congenital cardiovascular malformation type. In conclusion, therapeutic doses of chlordiazepoxide during pregnancy are unlikely to pose a substantial teratogenic risk to the human fetus, although a somewhat higher rate of congenital cardiovascular malformations cannot be excluded.

  12. Maternal Genetic Ancestry and Legacy of 10(th) Century AD Hungarians.

    PubMed

    Csősz, Aranka; Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Csákyová, Veronika; Langó, Péter; Bódis, Viktória; Köhler, Kitti; Tömöry, Gyöngyvér; Nagy, Melinda; Mende, Balázs Gusztáv

    2016-01-01

    The ancient Hungarians originated from the Ural region in today's central Russia and migrated across the Eastern European steppe, according to historical sources. The Hungarians conquered the Carpathian Basin 895-907 AD, and admixed with the indigenous communities. Here we present mitochondrial DNA results from three datasets: one from the Avar period (7(th)-9(th) centuries) of the Carpathian Basin (n = 31); one from the Hungarian conquest-period (n = 76); and a completion of the published 10(th)-12(th) century Hungarian-Slavic contact zone dataset by four samples. We compare these mitochondrial DNA hypervariable segment sequences and haplogroup results with published ancient and modern Eurasian data. Whereas the analyzed Avars represents a certain group of the Avar society that shows East and South European genetic characteristics, the Hungarian conquerors' maternal gene pool is a mixture of West Eurasian and Central and North Eurasian elements. Comprehensively analyzing the results, both the linguistically recorded Finno-Ugric roots and historically documented Turkic and Central Asian influxes had possible genetic imprints in the conquerors' genetic composition. Our data allows a complex series of historic and population genetic events before the formation of the medieval population of the Carpathian Basin, and the maternal genetic continuity between 10(th)-12(th) century and modern Hungarians. PMID:27633963

  13. Maternal Genetic Ancestry and Legacy of 10th Century AD Hungarians

    PubMed Central

    Csősz, Aranka; Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Csákyová, Veronika; Langó, Péter; Bódis, Viktória; Köhler, Kitti; Tömöry, Gyöngyvér; Nagy, Melinda; Mende, Balázs Gusztáv

    2016-01-01

    The ancient Hungarians originated from the Ural region in today’s central Russia and migrated across the Eastern European steppe, according to historical sources. The Hungarians conquered the Carpathian Basin 895–907 AD, and admixed with the indigenous communities. Here we present mitochondrial DNA results from three datasets: one from the Avar period (7th–9th centuries) of the Carpathian Basin (n = 31); one from the Hungarian conquest-period (n = 76); and a completion of the published 10th–12th century Hungarian-Slavic contact zone dataset by four samples. We compare these mitochondrial DNA hypervariable segment sequences and haplogroup results with published ancient and modern Eurasian data. Whereas the analyzed Avars represents a certain group of the Avar society that shows East and South European genetic characteristics, the Hungarian conquerors’ maternal gene pool is a mixture of West Eurasian and Central and North Eurasian elements. Comprehensively analyzing the results, both the linguistically recorded Finno-Ugric roots and historically documented Turkic and Central Asian influxes had possible genetic imprints in the conquerors’ genetic composition. Our data allows a complex series of historic and population genetic events before the formation of the medieval population of the Carpathian Basin, and the maternal genetic continuity between 10th–12th century and modern Hungarians. PMID:27633963

  14. Case Study: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Making a Case for Video Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pai, Aditi

    2014-01-01

    A picture, they say, is worth a thousand words. If a mere picture is worth a thousand words, how much more are "moving pictures" or videos worth? The author poses this not merely as a rhetorical question, but because she wishes to make a case for using videos in the traditional case study method. She recommends four main approaches of…

  15. STS Case Study Development Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosa de Jesus, Dan A.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2013-01-01

    The Shuttle Case Study Collection (SCSC) has been developed using lessons learned documented by NASA engineers, analysts, and contractors. The SCSC provides educators with a new tool to teach real-world engineering processes with the goal of providing unique educational materials that enhance critical thinking, decision-making and problem-solving skills. During this third phase of the project, responsibilities included: the revision of the Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) source code to ensure all pages follow World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standards, and the addition and edition of website content, including text, documents, and images. Basic HTML knowledge was required, as was basic knowledge of photo editing software, and training to learn how to use NASA's Content Management System for website design. The outcome of this project was its release to the public.

  16. Genetic risk and protective factors of TNFSF15 gene variants detected using single nucleotide polymorphisms in Hungarians with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Képíró, László; Széll, Márta; Kovács, László; Keszthelyi, Péter; Kemény, Lajos; Gyulai, Rolland

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes of the tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 15 (TNFSF15) gene in Hungarians with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. A case-control study was performed, and five TNFSF15 SNPs (rs3810936, rs6478108, rs6478109, rs7848647, rs7869487) were genotyped in 319 patients with psoriasis, 105 of whom also have psoriatic arthritis, and in 200 healthy individuals. Three haplotypes (A, B, C) based on these five SNPs were also analyzed. Our findings suggest that the rs6478109 SNP may be a genetic risk factor in psoriasis (p=0.0046), while haplotype C may be protective (p=0.0250). These results suggest that certain variants of the TNFSF15 gene contribute to the pathogenesis of the immune-mediated, multifactorial skin disease psoriasis, and that this difference is more readily apparent when groups of patients with and without psoriatic arthritis are examined separately.

  17. Using Case Studies To Teach Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabel, Connie

    Using case studies in science instruction develops problem solving and enhances listening and cooperative learning skills. Unlike other disciplines such as law and medicine, the case study method is rarely used in science education to enrich the curriculum. This study investigates the use of content-based case studies as a means of developing…

  18. Case Study: The Chemistry of Cocaine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo

    2011-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's case study focuses on the chemistry of cocaine to teach a number of core concepts in organic chemistry. It also requires that students read and analyze an original research paper on…

  19. Business and Consumer Education Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delta Pi Epsilon, Minneapolis, Minn. Phi Chapter.

    This publication contains 58 case studies for classroom use in teaching various business and consumer education subjects at the high school level. A supplement to a previous Phi Chapter publication, "Office Education Case Studies" (1973), the case studies are intended to create class discussions and help students acquire the ability to analyze…

  20. Qualitative Case Study in Gifted Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendaglio, Sal

    2003-01-01

    From case study articles drawn from four journals in gifted education, two are identified as exemplars of qualitative case study research. The works of Coleman (2001) and Hebert and Beardsley (2001) are used to illustrate how researchers can plan qualitative case studies so that the perspectives of gifted students are included. (Contains…

  1. Real-Life Case Studies for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, William

    Case studies described in this book reflect conditions present in today's public schools. Situations described in these case studies are intended to introduce education students to the variety of problems existing in today's schools. The 38 case studies highlight: student cheating; teacher's observation by administrator; inclusion; contract…

  2. Allographic agraphia: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Menichelli, Alina; Rapp, Brenda; Semenza, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of patient MN, diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia, who exhibited a severe impairment in writing letters and words in upper-case print in the face of accurate production of the same stimuli in lower-case cursive. In contrast to her written production difficulties, MN was unimpaired in recognizing visually presented letters and words in upper-case print. We find a modest benefit of visual form cueing in the written production of upper-case letters, despite an inability to describe or report visual features of letters in any case or font. This case increases our understanding of the allographic level of letter-shape representation in written language production. It provides strong support for previous reports indicating the neural independence of different types of case and font-specific letter-shape information; it provides evidence that letter-shape production does not require explicit access to information about the visual attributes of letter shapes and, finally, it reveals the possibility of interaction between processes involved in letter-shape production and perception. PMID:18489965

  3. Concentrated photovoltaics, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Piergiorgio; Centro, Sandro; Golfetto, Stelvio; Saccà, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    Concentrated Photovoltaics (CPV), once a niche technology, has now reached the maturity and reliability for large scale power generation. Especially in regions where temperatures are very high, the use of high efficiency triple junction solar cells with concentrating optics allows stable energy yield. Thus CPV can be seen as complementary and not in concurrence with silicon photovoltaics. The state of the art, the advantages and limitations of this technology will be shown. Among the main advantages of CPV is the possibility of a much higher energy supply, when compared to silicon photovoltaics, both comparing CPV and silicon with same area or the same installed power. The use of recycled and recyclable materials allows a more environmentally friendly production. The possibility to couple CPV with desalination facilities, energy storage will be analysed. As an example a case study of a CPV installation in Northern Italy is discussed. Here the use of mature technologies, derived from automotive and lighting sectors resulted in a simple and efficient module.

  4. Cleft palate. Selected case studies.

    PubMed

    Philips, B J

    1991-01-01

    These case studies provide small, selected samples of the results of assessments of articulation skills and their phonologic applications and give some information related to velopharyngeal function during speech. These illustrations were based chiefly on perceptual assessment of speech because this type of assessment is used routinely by SLPs, and does not require instrumentation. Indicators for referral and communication to a cleft palate team were derived from the perceptual evaluation. Other articles in this issue discuss procedures for evaluation in considerable detail. Early identification of possible velopharyngeal problems and early referral to a cleft palate team can help to resolve speech, language, and hearing disorders related to cleft palate and velopharyngeal dysfunction. People who comprise cleft palate and craniofacial teams are most likely to have the experience, and the special instrumentation necessary, to make a definitive diagnosis. The team's comprehensive multidisciplinary evaluation should lead to thorough consideration of the many factors that are important for treatment planning. The information and services provided by the team will assist the audiologist and SLP in the conduct of their services for these clients. In this way, the communication disorders specialist becomes an affiliate of the team. The affiliate not only acts as a referent, but also may provide the necessary longitudinal services. The best interests of the client are promoted by ongoing communication between the team and the affiliates of the team.

  5. [Tempora mutantur... et nos? The future of the Hungarian anatomy teaching in reflection of the German trends].

    PubMed

    Weiczner, Roland

    2015-10-01

    The traditional four-semester anatomy is a subject to change: next to the external pressure, there is an intrinsic need to shift the emphasis. The mapping of the strengths, weaknesses and threats of the Hungarian anatomy teaching helps to formulate the directions of possible development. Current trends in the German medical education should be carefully followed. Nowadays, nearly 25% of the medical students in Germany are studying according to the new, integrated "Modellstudiengang", i.e. all the conventional subjects are reorganised into organ system thematic blocks. The unified German written final exam system provides an objective assessment parameter: to rank the 36 German medical schools according to the results of the anatomy exams. The homepage-published data, the number of semesters or teaching hours, or the thematic concept of the subject alone cannot explain the rankings of the medical schools according to the anatomy exam results. The greatest challenges of the Hungarian anatomy teaching today are: the development of an outcome-oriented, unified, practical system of requirements, the redefinition of the subject, the more effective interaction with the clinical colleagues, solving the problems of faculty recruitment and establishing the vertical integration of anatomy.

  6. [Tempora mutantur... et nos? The future of the Hungarian anatomy teaching in reflection of the German trends].

    PubMed

    Weiczner, Roland

    2015-10-01

    The traditional four-semester anatomy is a subject to change: next to the external pressure, there is an intrinsic need to shift the emphasis. The mapping of the strengths, weaknesses and threats of the Hungarian anatomy teaching helps to formulate the directions of possible development. Current trends in the German medical education should be carefully followed. Nowadays, nearly 25% of the medical students in Germany are studying according to the new, integrated "Modellstudiengang", i.e. all the conventional subjects are reorganised into organ system thematic blocks. The unified German written final exam system provides an objective assessment parameter: to rank the 36 German medical schools according to the results of the anatomy exams. The homepage-published data, the number of semesters or teaching hours, or the thematic concept of the subject alone cannot explain the rankings of the medical schools according to the anatomy exam results. The greatest challenges of the Hungarian anatomy teaching today are: the development of an outcome-oriented, unified, practical system of requirements, the redefinition of the subject, the more effective interaction with the clinical colleagues, solving the problems of faculty recruitment and establishing the vertical integration of anatomy. PMID:26551009

  7. Demystifying Instructional Innovation: The Case of Teaching with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantar, Lina D.

    2013-01-01

    Issues emerging from instructional innovation are inevitable, yet basing any curriculum shift on a theoretical framework is paramount. This paper grounds the case-based pedagogy in three learning theories: behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism. The three theories are described and situated in relation to the case study method. An…

  8. Reusable experiment controllers, case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Brian A.; Gaasbeck, Jim Van

    1996-03-01

    Congress has given NASA and the science community a reality check. The tight and ever shrinking budgets are trimming the fat from many space science programs. No longer can a Principal Investigator (PI) afford to waste development dollars on re-inventing spacecraft controllers, experiment/payload controllers, ground control systems, or test sets. Inheritance of the Ground Support Equipment (GSE) from one program to another is not a significant re-use of technology to develop a science mission in these times. Reduction of operational staff and highly autonomous experiments are needed to reduce the sustaining cost of a mission. The re-use of an infrastructure from one program to another is needed to truly attain the cost and time savings required. Interface and Control Systems, Inc. (ICS) has a long history of re-usable software. Navy, Air Force, and NASA programs have benefited from the re-use of a common control system from program to program. Several standardization efforts in the AIAA have adopted the Spacecraft Command Language (SCL) architecture as a point solution to satisfy requirements for re-use and autonomy. The Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM) has been a long-standing customer of ICS and are working on their 4th generation system using SCL. Much of the hardware and software infrastructure has been re-used from mission to mission with little cost for re-hosting a new experiment. The same software infrastructure has successfully been used on Clementine, and an end-to-end system is being deployed for the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) for Johns Hopkins University. A case study of the ERIM programs, Clementine and FUSE will be detailed in this paper.

  9. Reflection on Four Multisite Evaluation Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    What do the findings of four National Science Foundation evaluation case studies suggest to an evaluation scholar who was not part of the research team that created them? This chapter carefully reviews the cases and summarizes their comparative findings. The four Beyond Use case studies add to the literature on levels of evaluation use, with the…

  10. Case Studies for Effective Business Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister-Kizzier, Donna

    This book is designed as a resource for educators who teach business content in a variety of instructional settings. It contains case studies representing all functional areas of business, including corporate training, for grades 7 through graduate education. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the case study method. The history of the case method,…

  11. Does class matter? SES and psychosocial health among Hungarian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Piko, B; Fitzpatrick, K M

    2001-09-01

    Previous research finds a significant relationship between socioeconomic inequalities and health status: individuals with lower income, education, and occupational prestige have and report more health problems. Interestingly, this relationship is not consistent across the life cycle: health differences among adolescents across socioeconomic groups are not as clearly defined. Using data (n = 1,039) on adolescents from southern Hungary, we examine the role of socioeconomic differences in predicting psychosocial health. We argue that this investigation is of particular importance in a post-communist system where the general perception of SES is undergoing significant transformation. Findings show that classical' SES (socioeconomic status) indicators (manual/nonmanual occupational status) were not significant predictors of psychosocial health in this sample of Hungarian adolescents. While parents' employment status as a 'objective' SES indicator had limited effect, SES self-assessment, as a subjective SES variable, proved to be a strong predictor of adolescents' psychosocial health. We discuss the implications of these findings for the broader SES-health literature with specific attention paid to the impact these relationships may have for adolescent and young adult development in a post-communist country like Hungary. PMID:11511056

  12. Antiinflammatory activities of Hungarian Stachys species and their iridoids.

    PubMed

    Háznagy-Radnai, Erzsébet; Balogh, Ágnes; Czigle, Szilvia; Máthé, Imre; Hohmann, Judit; Blazsó, Gábor

    2012-04-01

    The antiinflammatory activities of aqueous extracts prepared from the aerial parts of ten Hungarian Stachys species were investigated in vivo in the carrageenan-induced paw oedema test after intraperitoneal and oral administration to rats. Some of the extracts were found to display significant antiphlogistic effects when administered intraperitoneally and orally; in particular, the extracts of S. alpina, S. germanica, S. officinalis and S. recta demonstrated high activity following intraperitoneal administration. At the same dose of 5.0 mg/kg, these extracts exhibited similar or greater potency than that of the positive control diclofenac-Na. The main iridoids present in the investigated extracts, ajugoside, aucubin, acetylharpagide, harpagide and harpagoside, were also assayed in the same test, and high dose-dependent antiphlogistic effects were recorded for aucubin and harpagoside. These results led to the conclusion that most probably iridoids are responsible for the antiinflammatory effect of Stachys species, but other active constituents or their synergism must also be implicated in the antiinflammatory effect.

  13. Emergency-culling and mortality in growing/fattening pigs in a large Hungarian "farrow-to-finish" production unit.

    PubMed

    Baumann, B; Bilkei, G

    2002-01-01

    The trial was carried out in a large Hungarian 2000 sow "farrow-to-finish" production unit. Out of a total number of 15,841 evaluated growing/finishing pigs, 1319 pigs died or were emergency-culled and were post-mortem routinely examined. For the purpose of this study the emergency-culling and mortality were recorded into the same category. The average annual emergency-culling/mortality rate was unusual high (8.62%). Five body condition related categories were registered. The majority of the mortality comprised animals of body condition "below average", representing 891 pigs (67.56%) and "average" (407 pigs = 30.85%). The rest of the examined animals comprised 17 pigs (1.29%) "emitted", 2 pigs "kachexia" (stunted pig) or "fat" (0.15% each). The overall study showed that gastrointestinal tract disorders (395 animals = 29.95%) were the most frequently recorded cause of emergency-culling or mortality. Both inflammatory disorders (7.66%) and rectal stricture (7.51%) were in this category the most frequent diagnosis followed by rectal prolapse (5.92%). Gastric ulcers comprised 4.55% of the necropsied animals. Torsion of abdominal organs and miscellaneous cases represented slightly more than 2% of the post-mortem examined pigs. Lesions which involved the respiratory system, comprised 14.85% of the necropsied pigs. Bronchopneumonia due to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae occurred in 5.61%, embolic suppurative or necrotic pneumonia in 4.78% and pleuropneumonia due to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in 3.1% of the cases. Diseases involving the urinary system were diagnosed in 21 cases (1.59%). Five cases of skin disorders were registered (0.38%). Cardiovascular disorders were represented by congestive heart failure (31 pigs = 2.35%), pericarditis (22 animals = 1.66%) or endocarditis (21 pigs = 1.60%). Cardiomyopathy was found in 15 (1.2%) animals. Lesions involved the locomotor system ranked second of all cases (15.92%). Claw lesions accounted 13.72%, arthritis 2.13% of the animals

  14. [Association of the Scientific Societies of Hungarian Medical Doctors (MORTESZ) was founded 80 years ago].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Sótonyi, Péter

    2011-07-31

    After the First World War the professional medical societies in Hungary, which have already organized themselves nationwide, started to operate independently from each other. In that time came the idea to create another association above the others to gather them together while retaining their independent functioning. The Association of the Scientific Societies of Hungarian Medical Doctors (MORTESZ), established in 1931, became the nationwide forum for many medical associations. It also organized the first Hungarian Medical Grand-Week which became the annual meeting of the medical society. In the first year the cooperation only consisted of a common topic of two or three associations presented in the "Grand-Week". From year 1935, reports were appointed annually that each professional association could comment on. The proceedings of the "Grand-Week" were published yearly as appendices of the Hungarian Medical Journal. After the Second World War the activities of the independent associations were shut down by the authorities. The scientific and professional associations could continue their work as sections inside of the Doctors and Health Workers' Union. In 1966 the situation was solved thanks to the initiative of the Trade Union, the Department of Medicine and the Medical Section of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences which resulted in the foundation of the Association of the Hungarian Medical Societies (MOTESZ) which continues to gather together the collective work of many scientific associations and carries out tasks of general interest since then, similarly to the now 80-years-old MORTESZ. PMID:21788207

  15. Neurology Case Studies: Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad U; Gorelick, Philip B

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses interesting vascular neurology cases including the management of intracranial stenosis, migraine headache and stroke risk, retinal artery occlusions associated with impaired hearing, intracranial occlusive disease, a heritable cause of stroke and vascular cognitive impairment, and an interesting clinico-neuroradiologic disorder associated with eclampsia. PMID:27445238

  16. Constitutional Change: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christofferson, Walter D.; Pergande, Donald J.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a lesson for secondary students which teaches that the U.S. Constitution has changed in a variety of ways and that it has a direct effect upon the lives of citizens. Provides a worksheet and a lecture outline covering three methods of constitutional change and Supreme Court cases such as Dred Scott and Brown vs. Board of Education. (GEA)

  17. Case Studies for Management Development in Bangladesh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Gary N.

    Eight case studies appropriate for use in a course in management development were prepared and are provided in this document. The typical case describes a real business situation in which a real manager had to reach a decision. The case gives quantitative and qualitative information that is, or may be, relevant to that decision. Questions for…

  18. Associative visual agnosia: a case study.

    PubMed

    Charnallet, A; Carbonnel, S; David, D; Moreaud, O

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of massive associative visual agnosia. In the light of current theories of identification and semantic knowledge organization, a deficit involving both levels of structural description system and visual semantics must be assumed to explain the case. We suggest, in line with a previous case study, an alternative account in the framework of (non abstractive) episodic models of memory.

  19. Study on Case Teaching of Financial Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Che, Zhenghong; Che, Zhengmei

    2011-01-01

    Case teaching is an efficient teaching method of management. It plays an important role to enhance the students' ability to practice the theory. However, case teaching of financial management has not achieved the expected results. The paper aims to study the importance, characteristics and corresponding methods of case teaching method of financial…

  20. Case study: Group load curtailment

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, D.

    1995-12-31

    This article is a slide show discussion of demand-side management efforts by San Diego Gas and Electric as applied to a particular industry in their service area. The evolution of SDG&E`s rate structure is noted, from interruptible services rates to the present structure of variable time-of-use. For the case noted, this has resulted in a reduction of outages at the manufacturing facility and a 30% reduction in the cost per kwh to the user.

  1. Hungarian norms for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A.

    PubMed

    Költő, András; Gősi-Greguss, Anna C; Varga, Katalin; Bányai, Éva I

    2015-01-01

    Hungarian norms for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A) are presented. The Hungarian translation of the HGSHS:A was administered under standard conditions to 434 participants (190 males, 244 females) of several professions. In addition to the traditional self-scoring, hypnotic behavior was also recorded by trained observers. Female participants proved to be more hypnotizable than males and so were psychology students and professionals as compared to nonpsychologists. Hypnotizability varied across different group sizes. The normative data-including means, standard deviations, and indicators of reliability-are comparable with previously published results. The authors conclude that measuring observer-scores increases the ecological validity of the scale. The Hungarian version of the HGSHS:A seems to be a reliable and valid measure of hypnotizability.

  2. The Soil Degradation Subsystem of the Hungarian Environmental Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, József; Pirkó, Béla; Szabóné Kele, Gabriella; Dombos, Miklós; László, Péter; Koós, Sándor; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Laborczi, Annamária; Pásztor, László

    2013-04-01

    Regular data collection on the state of agricultural soils has not been in operation in Hungary for more than two decades. In the meantime, mainly thanks to the Hungarian Soil Strategy and the planned Soil Framework Directive, the demand for the information on state of Hungarian soils and the follow up of the harmful changes in their conditions and functioning has greatly increased. In 2010 the establishment of a new national soil monitoring system was supported by the Environment and Energy Operational Programme for Informatics Development. The aim of the project was to collect, manage, analyse and publish soil data related to the state of soils and the environmental stresses attributed to the pressures due to agriculture; setting up an appropriate information system in order to fulfil the directives of the Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection. Further objective was the web-based publication of soil data as well as information to support the related public service mission and to inform publicity. The developed information system operates as the Soil Degradation Subsystem of the National Environmental Information System being compatible with its other elements. A suitable representative sampling method was elaborated. The representativity is meant for soil associations, landuse, agricultural practices and typical degradation processes. Soil data were collected on county levels led by regional representatives but altogether they are representative for the whole territory of Hungary. During the project, about 700,000 elementary data were generated, close to 2,000 parcels of 285 farms were surveyed resulting more than 9,000 analysis, 7,000 samples and 28,000 pictures. The overall number of the recorded parcels is 4500, with a total area of about 250,000 hectares. The effect of agricultural land use on soils manifests in rapid changes -related to natural processes- in qualitative and quantitative soil parameters. In intensively used agricultural areas, particularly

  3. Using Case Studies to Teach Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2005-01-01

    Case study teaching has gained a strong foothold in science education. The author discusses: (1) variations on methodology, from whole class discussion to the jigsaw approach; (2) an increase in educational resources on the topic; (3) over a thousand studies that show improved learning when case studies are used; and (4) a survey that illustrates…

  4. 5th Austrian Hungarian workshop on celestial mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süli, Áron

    2011-06-01

    The 5th Hungarian-Austrian Workshop on Celestial Mechanics took place from 9th until the 10th of April 2010 in Vienna, Austria. The workshop was held in the Institute for Astronomy of Vienna University. From the Eötvös University and from the host institute experts and PhD students gathered together to discuss the challenges and new results of the actual problems of celestial mechanics. The workshop was held in the meeting room at the Sternwarte of the Vienna University located in a magnificent park in the heart of Vienna. Following the themes of the four previous events the focus for this workshop ranged from the Trojan problem, dynamics in binary star systems and exoplanetray systems. We were pleased to acknowledge the support of the host university. The talks were characterized by a large spectrum, which is typical of the workshops on celestial mechanics. Several talks discussed different aspects of the trojan problem, such as the three Trojan Problem, dynamics of trojan-like planets in binary stars, the frequencies of their motion around the triangular lagrangian points, etc. Several speakers focused on the formation of planetary systems and on the field of exoplanetary systems, like exoplanetary systems in higher order mean motion resonances, formation of planets in binary systems, stability of exomoons etc. Some of the presentation used sophisticated mathematical tools in order to understand mean motion resonances, the Sitnikov problem applying the KAM and the Nekhoroshev theorem. The theme of a number of talks was the motion of Solar System bodies: dynamics of the newly discovered moons of Pluto and of near-Earth asteroids. General problems were also addressed, among others chaos in Hamiltonian systems, adaptive Lie-integration method and iterative solution approximation to the generalised Sitnikov problem.

  5. How To Set Up Your Own Small Business. Service Company Case Study. Manufacturing Firm Case Study. Retail Store Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallek, Max

    This collection of case studies is intended for use in a course in setting up a small business. The first, a case study of the process of setting up a service company, covers analyzing the pros and cons of starting one's own business, assessing the competition and local market, and selecting a site for and financing the business. The principal…

  6. Case Studies in Neurocritical Care.

    PubMed

    Sakusic, Amra; Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2016-08-01

    The practice of neurocritical care encompasses multiple acute neurologic and neurosurgical diseases and requires detailed knowledge of neurology and critical care. This article presents 5 cases that illustrate just some of the conditions encountered in the daily practice of neurocritical care and exemplify some of the common diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic challenges facing the neurointensivist. Life-threatening medical complications after severe acute ischemic stroke, seizures and extreme agitation from autoimmune encephalitis, refractory seizures after subdural hemorrhage, neurologic and systemic complications related to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, and status epilepticus after cardiac arrest are discussed in this article. PMID:27445248

  7. [Medical education and the needs of human resources in the Hungarian health care system].

    PubMed

    Szócska, G; Romics, L

    2001-04-01

    The strategic aims of medical education are discussing, from the view of the human resource demands in a modern healthcare system. The authors summarise the logical framework of medical functioning based on medical development and economical circumstances, and describe the role of personal skills in the daily work. Afterwards they discuss the development of medical education in the last three decades and present the tight connection between cognitive sciences and developing results mentioned above. The authors analyse some special points of the Hungarian medical faculties. In the conclusion they have shown the possibilities to support the Hungarian healthcare reform by the educational development.

  8. Ethical issues in case study publication: "making our case(s)" ethically.

    PubMed

    McCurdy, David B; Fitchett, George

    2011-01-01

    As chaplains develop richly detailed case studies for publication, ethical questions about case study construction and publication are emerging. Concerns about seeking patients' permission to publish material about them suggest additional questions and raise broad confidentiality and privacy issues. Confidentiality-related practices in health care and psychotherapy provide the most extensive guidance for chaplains, but healthcare chaplaincy has roots in religious and professional traditions with distinct notions of confidentiality that deserve consideration. Single case studies do not appear to be "research" requiring informed consent, yet their publication exposes patients to some risk of harm. Obtaining the patient's/"case study subject's" permission to publish, disguising non-essential information, and allowing the patient to review the case study can mitigate the risks. Striking a balance between protecting patients and providing sufficient detail to make case studies useful is a central ethical challenge of case study publication.

  9. Psychometric properties and construct validity of the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale among Hungarian men.

    PubMed

    Babusa, Bernadett; Urbán, Róbert; Czeglédi, Edit; Túry, Ferenc

    2012-01-01

    Limited studies have evaluated the psychometric properties of the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale (MASS), a measure of muscle dysmorphia, in different cultures and languages. The aims were to examine the psychometric properties of the Hungarian version of the MASS (MASS-HU), and to investigate its relationship with self-esteem and exercise-related variables. Two independent samples of male weight lifters (ns=289 and 43), and a sample of undergraduates (n=240) completed the MASS, Eating Disorder Inventory, and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. Exploratory factor analysis supported the original five-factor structure of the MASS only in the weight lifter sample. The MASS-HU had excellent scale score reliability and good test-retest reliability. The construct validity of the MASS-HU was tested with multivariate regression analyses which indicated an inverse relationship between self-esteem and muscle dysmorphia. The 18-item MASS-HU was found to be a useful measure for the assessment of muscle dysmorphia among male weight lifters. PMID:21962394

  10. Giant adrenal cyst: case study

    PubMed Central

    Carsote, M; Chirita, P; Terzea, D; Paun, S; Beuran, M

    2010-01-01

    One of the rarest situations regarding an adrenal incidentaloma is an adrenal cyst. We present the case of a 61Z–year old male patient diagnosed with peritonitis. During surgery, a right adrenal tumor of 2 cm is discovered. The patient was referred to endocrinology. 6 months later the diameter of the tumor is 7 times bigger than the initial stage. It has no secretory phenotype, except for the small increase of serum aldosterone and the 24–h 17–ketosteroids. Open right adrenalectomy is performed and a cyst of 15 cm is removed. The evolution after surgery is good. The pathological exam reveals an adrenal cyst with calcifications and osteoid metaplasia. The immunohistochemistry showed a positive reaction for CD34 and ACT in the vessels and VIM in the stroma. The adrenal cysts are not frequent and represent a challenge regarding the preoperative diagnostic and surgical procedure of resection. The pathological exam highlights the major aspects. PMID:20945822

  11. Case studies in conservation science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisulca, Christina

    The research presented in this dissertation covers three separate topics of conservation as defined by the National Science Foundation: 1) Materials Stabilization, Strengthening, Monitoring, and Repair; 2. Understanding Material Degradation and Aging; and 3) Materials and Structural Characterization of Cultural Heritage Objects (the 'technical study'). The first topic is addressed through a study to assess the consolidant tetraethoxysilane for the stabilization of alum treated wood. Falling under materials degradation studies is a study published in American Museum Novitates to understand how environmental conditions affect the aging of fossil resins from five different deposits. Two separate studies are included in technical study of cultural heritage objects which comprises the third research area of materials characterization. The first is a survey of red dyes used in Chinese paintings from the Ming Dynasty to the Early Republic (1364-1911). The second is a study of the pigments, dyes and binders used in Hawaiian barkcloth (kapa) from the 19th century.

  12. River sinuosity changes as indicators of the possible neotectonic activity - a case study on the Danube River between Paks (Hungary) and Beograd (Serbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovszki, Judit

    2010-05-01

    . However, another possible explanation is based on the significant sediment load of the tributary, that is naturally decreases the river sinuosity. Horváth, F., Bada, G., Windhoffer, G., Csontos, L., Dombrádi, E., Dövényi, P., Fodor, L., Grenerczy, Gy., Síkhegyi, F., Szafián, P., Székely, B., Timár, G., Tóth, L., Tóth, T. (2006): A Pannon-medence jelenkori geodinamikájának atlasza: Euro-konform térképsorozat és magyarázó. Magyar Geofizika 47(4), 133-137. Ouchi, S. (1985): Response of alluvial rivers to slow active tectonic movement. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. 96, 504-515. Timár, G. (2003): Controls on channel sinuosity changes: a case study of the Tisza River, the Great Hungarian Plain. Quaternary Sci. Rev. 22, 2199-2207. Timár, G., Molnár, G., Székely, B., Biszak, S., Varga, J., Jankó, A. (2006): Digitized maps of the Habsburg Empire - The map sheets of the second military survey and their georeferenced version. Arcanum, Budapest, 59 p. van Balen, R. T., Kasse, C., Moor, J. (2008): Impact of groundwater flow on meandering; example from the Geul river, the Netherlands. Earth Surf. Process. and Landf. 33(13), 2010-2028. Zámolyi, A., Székely, B., Draganits, E., Timár, G. (2010): Neotectonic control on river sinuosity at the western margin of the Little Hungarian Plain. Geomorph., in press, DOI: 10.1016/j.geomorph.2009.06.028

  13. Working Together: Case Studies in Cooperative Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Condict Gaye

    This report examines regional and/or state cooperative preservation programs and related activities. The major part of the report is given over to case studies that present a synopsis of the key structural and program elements of cooperative preservation initiatives. These case studies include the: Office of Library and Archival Materials…

  14. Chemical Case Studies: Science-Society "Bonding."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstein, Avi; Nae, Nehemia

    1981-01-01

    Describes a unit designed to illustrate the "science-society-technology connection," in which three case studies of the chemical industry in Israel are presented to high school chemistry students. Chosen for the unit are case studies on copper production in Timna, on plastics, and on life from the Dead Sea. (CS)

  15. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  16. Teaching Case Studies: A Collaborative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffington, James R.; Harper, Jeffrey S.

    Many of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accredited schools require undergraduate Management Information Systems (MIS) majors to take a course in the management of information technology. Over half of these schools utilize case studies in the teaching of this course. The authors emphasize that case studies are an…

  17. Using Case Studies: An International Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClam, Tricia; Woodside, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Case studies as an instructional strategy have been used in many disciplines, including law, teacher education, science, medicine, and business. Among the benefits of this method of instruction are involving students in learning, developing their critical thinking skills, promoting communication, and engaging in critical analysis. Case studies are…

  18. Case Study Considerations for Teaching Educational Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudzina, Mary R.

    This paper examines the decisions, benefits, and difficulties in teaching educational psychology through a constructivist case study approach. Recent interest in and inquiry into constructivism, pedagogical content knowledge, and case study methodology are influencing the content and goals of educational psychology in teacher preparation. The…

  19. Case Studies in Assessment for Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trainor, Audrey A.; Patton, James R.; Clark, Gary M.

    2005-01-01

    This book presents a group of case studies to show how to assess students to develop a clear statement of transition service needs and then use that information for goals and objectives in their IEP or ITP (individual transition plan). The case studies format will help you see in a concrete way how assessment procedures relate to young people with…

  20. A Case Study of "Empathetic Teaching Artistry"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risner, Doug

    2014-01-01

    This case study is one of twenty cases derived from Anderson and Risner's international study of teaching artists in dance, and theatre, which investigated participants' (n=172) artistic and academic preparation in dance, and theatre, initial entry into the teaching artist field, rewards, challenges, and obstacles in participants'…

  1. Education R and D Information. Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Documentation Center for Education in Europe.

    The Council of Europe's Documentation Center for Education in Europe sponsored case studies of research and development information systems for education in Finland, France, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. The resulting case studies are each divided into the following six sections: (1) the problem of information and documentation in…

  2. Twenty Techniques for Teaching with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudzina, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    Problem-based learning and teaching with case studies are instructional approaches that are increasingly being applied in a variety of disciplines, such as business, law, medicine, and education. Instructors who have experienced traditional, teacher-centered instruction are often looking for ways to successfully integrate case studies, a…

  3. The trustworthiness of case study methodology.

    PubMed

    McGloin, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    With the validity of qualitative research currently under scrutiny, this paper by Sarah McGloin considers the contribution of the case study to the evidence base in health care. The author argues that case study methodology offers a creative and credible approach to help underpin contemporary practice.

  4. Iowa College Student Aid Commission Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Rachel A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive case study was to trace the policy production process of a state agency, the Iowa College Student Aid Commission (Commission), to its function today. This case study relied on a review of federal and state statutes, a news article search, biennium reports of the Commission, and information obtained from the…

  5. Collaboration in Distance Education. International Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Louise, Ed.; Mugridge, Ian, Ed.

    This book contains nine case studies of collaboration in distance education. The case studies focus on such aspects of collaboration in distance education as the following: roles of individual institutional partners; importance of personal relationships; benefits of collaboration to individual partners; conflicts between collaboration and…

  6. Five case studies of multifamily weatherization programs

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, L; Wilson, T.; Lewis, G.; MacDonald, M.

    1997-12-31

    The multifamily case studies that are the subject of this report were conducted to provide a better understanding of the approach taken by program operators in weatherizing large buildings. Because of significant variations in building construction and energy systems across the country, five states were selected based on their high level of multifamily weatherization. This report summarizes findings from case studies conducted by multifamily weatherization operations in five cities. The case studies were conducted between January and November 1994. Each of the case studies involved extensive interviews with the staff of weatherization subgrantees conducting multifamily weatherization, the inspection of 4 to 12 buildings weatherized between 1991 and 1993, and the analysis of savings and costs. The case studies focused on innovative techniques which appear to work well.

  7. Regional case studies--Africa.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Andrew M

    2009-01-01

    Africa is the final continent to be affected by the nutrition transition and, as elsewhere, is characterized by the paradoxical coexistence of malnutrition and obesity. Several features of the obesity epidemic in Africa mirror those in other emerging nations: it penetrates the richer nations and urban areas first with a strong urban- rural gradient; initially it affects the wealthy, but later there is a demographic switch as obesity becomes a condition more associated with poverty, and it shares many of the same drivers related to the increasing affordability of highly refined oils and carbohydrates, and a move away from subsistence farm work and towards sedentary lifestyles. Africa also has some characteristics of the obesity epidemic that stand out from other regions such as: (1) excepting some areas of the Pacific, Africa is probably the only region in which obesity (especially among women) is viewed culturally as a positive and desirable trait, leading to major gender differences in obesity rates in many countries; (2) most of Africa has very low rates of obesity in children, and to date African obesity is mostly an adult syndrome; (3) Africans seem genetically prone to higher rates of diabetes and hypertension in association with obesity than Caucasians, but seem to be relatively protected from dislipidemias; (4) the case-specific deaths and disabilities from diabetes and hypertension in Africa are very high due to the paucity of health services and the strain that the 'double burden' of disease places on health systems.

  8. Theoretical pluralism in psychoanalytic case studies

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Jochem; Cornelis, Shana; Geerardyn, Filip M.; Desmet, Mattias; Meganck, Reitske; Inslegers, Ruth; Cauwe, Joachim M. B. D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the scientific activity of different psychoanalytic schools of thought in terms of the content and production of case studies published on ISI Web of Knowledge. Between March 2013 and November 2013, we contacted all case study authors included in the online archive of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic case studies (www.singlecasearchive.com) to inquire about their psychoanalytic orientation during their work with the patient. The response rate for this study was 45%. It appears that the two oldest psychoanalytic schools, Object-relations psychoanalysis and Ego psychology or “Classical psychoanalysis” dominate the literature of published case studies. However, most authors stated that they feel attached to two or more psychoanalytic schools of thought. This confirms that the theoretical pluralism in psychoanalysis stretches to the field of single case studies. The single case studies of each psychoanalytic school are described separately in terms of methodology, patient, therapist, or treatment features. We conclude that published case studies features are fairly similar across different psychoanalytic schools. The results of this study are not representative of all psychoanalytic schools, as some do not publish their work in ISI ranked journals. PMID:26483725

  9. Outage management: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Barriere, M.T. ); Roberts, K.H. . Walter A. Haas School of Business)

    1992-01-01

    Outage management issues identified from a field study conducted at a two-unit commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), when one unit was in a refueling outage and the other unit was at full power operation, are the focus of this paper. The study was conduced as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) organizational factors research program, and therefore the issues to be addressed are from an organizational perspective. Topics discussed refer to areas identified by the NRC as critical for safety during shutdown operations, including outage planning and control, personnel stress, and improvements in training and procedures. Specifically, issues in communication, management attention, involvement and oversight, administrative processes, organizational culture, and human resources relevant to each of the areas are highlighted by example from field data collection. Insights regarding future guidance in these areas are presented based upon additional data collection subsequent to the original study.

  10. Outage management: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Barriere, M.T.; Roberts, K.H.

    1992-09-01

    Outage management issues identified from a field study conducted at a two-unit commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), when one unit was in a refueling outage and the other unit was at full power operation, are the focus of this paper. The study was conduced as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) organizational factors research program, and therefore the issues to be addressed are from an organizational perspective. Topics discussed refer to areas identified by the NRC as critical for safety during shutdown operations, including outage planning and control, personnel stress, and improvements in training and procedures. Specifically, issues in communication, management attention, involvement and oversight, administrative processes, organizational culture, and human resources relevant to each of the areas are highlighted by example from field data collection. Insights regarding future guidance in these areas are presented based upon additional data collection subsequent to the original study.

  11. Disseminated granuloma annulare: study on eight cases.

    PubMed

    Pătraşcu, V; Giurcă, Claudia; Ciurea, Raluca Niculina; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Granuloma annulare (GA) is classified as localized, generalized/disseminated, subcutaneous, and perforating types. The studies show connection with diabetes mellitus, lipidic metabolic disorders, malignant diseases, thyroid disorders, infections (HBV, HCV, HIV). We performed a retrospective study between 2010-2011, regarding disseminated GA (GAD), and the relationship between GAD and other comorbidities. We clinically and histologically diagnosed eight cases of GAD. The patients were also investigated for the diagnosis of associated diseases. The treatment included topical corticosteroids, antihistamines, Calcipotriol/Betamethasone, Tacrolimus 0.03%, Pentoxifylline, Hydroxychloroquine. Therapeutic response was assessed one month and three months after hospitalization. Our patients were five women and three men, aged 46-68 years, mean age 57.25 years, with a disease history of one year and a half (between three months and four years). The lesions occurred in the upper extremities (eight cases), distal extremities (three cases), cervical area (two cases), and trunk (five cases). In seven cases, we found annular appearance and one patient had disseminated small papules eruption. Associated pathology was diabetes mellitus type II (five cases), overweight and obesity (five cases), dyslipidemia (three cases), hypothyroidism (one case), rheumatoid arthritis (one case), external ear canal basal carcinoma (one case). Although there is controversy regarding the relationship between GAD and associated diseases, it is accepted that it is significantly associated with diabetes mellitus, also found in our study in five out of eight cases. We noticed obvious improvements after local and general treatment. It is confirmed that GAD is prevalent in women, over 40-year-old. GAD is often associated with diabetes and dyslipidemia, therefore it is necessary to investigate patients in this direction. The histopathological exam is essential for an accurate confirmation of GA. PMID

  12. Senna treatment in pregnant women and congenital abnormalities in their offspring--a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Acs, Nándor; Bánhidy, Ferenc; Puhó, Erzsébet H; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2009-07-01

    Previously, the possible teratogenic effect of frequently used laxative drug, senna has not been checked in case-control epidemiological study. Objective of the study was the comparison of cases with congenital abnormalities (CAs) and their matched controls without CAs in the population-based large data set of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities. Of 22,843 cases with CA, 506 (2.2%) had mothers with senna treatment, while of 38,151 control newborn infants without CA, 937 (2.5%) were born to mothers with senna treatment (adjusted OR with 95% CI: 1.0, 0.9-1.1), and of 834 malformed controls with Down syndrome, 26 (3.1%) had mothers with the use of senna (OR with 95% CI: 0.7, 0.5-1.1). The range of senna doses was between 10mg and 30 mg, but most pregnant women used 20mg daily. The mothers with senna treatment showed the characteristics of pregnant women with constipation (elder with larger proportion of primiparae). There was no higher risk for 23 different CA groups after the senna treatment during the second and/or third gestational month of 260 mothers, i.e. in the critical period of most major CAs, compared with their 500 matched controls. Gestational age at delivery was somewhat longer (0.2 week) and the rate of preterm birth was lower (6.6% vs. 9.2%) in newborn infants without CA born to mothers with senna treatment compared with babies born to mothers without senna treatment. In conclusion, senna treatment did not associate with a higher risk of CAs in the offspring of pregnant women with constipation.

  13. Case Study on Quality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habib, Zahida

    2011-01-01

    Quality of Education, especially at Primary level, is an important issue to be discussed at the International Forum. This study highlights the quality of primary education through a comparison of the quality of Community Model Schools and Govt. Girls Primary Schools in Pakistan. Community Model Schools were established under Girls Primary…

  14. Medical knowledge and the improvement of vernacular languages in the Habsburg Monarchy: A case study from Transylvania (1770–1830)

    PubMed Central

    Sechel, Teodora Daniela

    2012-01-01

    In all European countries, the eighteenth century was characterised by efforts to improve the vernaculars. The Transylvanian case study shows how both codified medical language and ordinary language were constructed and enriched by a large number of medical books and brochures. The publication of medical literature in Central European vernacular languages in order to popularise new medical knowledge was a comprehensive programme, designed on the one hand by intellectual, political and religious elites who urged the improvement of the fatherland and the promotion of the common good by perfecting the arts and sciences. On the other hand, the imperial administration’s initiatives affected local forms of medical knowledge and the construction of vernacular languages. In the eighteenth century, the construction of vernacular languages in the Habsburg Monarchy took on a significant political character. However, in the process of building of the scientific and medical vocabulary, the main preoccupation was precision, clarity and accessibility of the neologisms being invented to encompass the medical phenomena being described. In spite of political conflicts among the ‘nations’ living in Transylvania, physicians borrowed words from German, Hungarian and Romanian. Thus they elevated several words used in everyday language to the upper social stratum of language use, leading to the invention of new terms to describe particular medical practices or phenomena. PMID:22595134

  15. Arctic bioremediation -- A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Smallbeck, D.R.; Ramert, P.C. ); Liddell, B.V.

    1994-05-01

    This paper discusses the use of bioremediation as an effective method to clean up diesel-range hydrocarbon spills in northern latitudes. The results of a laboratory study of microbial degradation of hydrocarbons under simulated arctic conditions showed that bioremediation can be effective in cold climates and led to the implementation of a large-scale field program. The results of 3 years of field testing have led to a significant reduction in diesel-range hydrocarbon concentrations in the contaminated area.

  16. Knowledge of Emergency Contraceptive Pills among Hungarian Women Presenting for Induced Abortion or Seeking Emergency Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Kozinszky, Z.; Devosa, I.; Fekete, Z.; Szabó, D.; Sikovanyecz, J.; Pásztor, N.; Keresztúri, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the differences in contraceptive characteristics and the knowledge of emergency contraception (ECP) among women who used ECP after unprotected intercourse and those who sought an abortion. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted in a Hungarian university hospital among women for whom ECP was prescribed after unprotected intercourse (n = 940) as well as women who presented for the termination of pregnancy (n = 1592) between January 1, 2005 and November 20, 2006. Their knowledge of ECP and their experience with and attitudes toward ECP use were targeted. Results: The availability of ECP was well known (87.9 %), but it was still greatly underutilized: applied by only 13 of the 1592 women who resorted to abortion. Primarily, the ECP group consisted of those who experienced a condom failure significantly more often (odds ratio [OR] = 4.1), followed by those cases where ECP applications was a consequence of not using any kind of contraception (OR = 3.8). Fewer than one third (32 %) of the abortion seekers had previously used ECP, and only one fifth knew how to obtain it. Appropriate awareness of ECP was influenced by information obtained from health-care providers (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.93) or school education (AOR = 1.82). Conclusions: More thorough education is needed to provide a deeper knowledge of ECP use during contraceptive counseling for women seeking abortion, including those contraceptive mishaps where unintended pregnancy can be prevented by ECP. PMID:27681523

  17. Knowledge of Emergency Contraceptive Pills among Hungarian Women Presenting for Induced Abortion or Seeking Emergency Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Kozinszky, Z.; Devosa, I.; Fekete, Z.; Szabó, D.; Sikovanyecz, J.; Pásztor, N.; Keresztúri, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the differences in contraceptive characteristics and the knowledge of emergency contraception (ECP) among women who used ECP after unprotected intercourse and those who sought an abortion. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted in a Hungarian university hospital among women for whom ECP was prescribed after unprotected intercourse (n = 940) as well as women who presented for the termination of pregnancy (n = 1592) between January 1, 2005 and November 20, 2006. Their knowledge of ECP and their experience with and attitudes toward ECP use were targeted. Results: The availability of ECP was well known (87.9 %), but it was still greatly underutilized: applied by only 13 of the 1592 women who resorted to abortion. Primarily, the ECP group consisted of those who experienced a condom failure significantly more often (odds ratio [OR] = 4.1), followed by those cases where ECP applications was a consequence of not using any kind of contraception (OR = 3.8). Fewer than one third (32 %) of the abortion seekers had previously used ECP, and only one fifth knew how to obtain it. Appropriate awareness of ECP was influenced by information obtained from health-care providers (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.93) or school education (AOR = 1.82). Conclusions: More thorough education is needed to provide a deeper knowledge of ECP use during contraceptive counseling for women seeking abortion, including those contraceptive mishaps where unintended pregnancy can be prevented by ECP.

  18. The Hungarian Patient: Museum Education in Hungary and the Challenges of Democratic Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasarhelyi, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    This article outlines the changes, developments, activities, and challenges faced by Hungarian museums over the last few decades. It shows that there was life behind the "Iron Curtain," with museums enjoying relative financial stability. While the political and economic changes associated with the transition from a communist to a democratically…

  19. Hungarian Innovation Policy: What's the Best Way Forward? OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 445

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Philip

    2005-01-01

    The Hungarian government has recently been focusing on innovation policy as part of a wider campaign to improve the business environment. This paper first underscores the importance of a good general business climate in encouraging both formal and informal R&D activity as well as ensuring Hungary benefits from the international diffusion of…

  20. Cross-Validation of a PACER Prediction Equation for Assessing Aerobic Capacity in Hungarian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Welk, Gregory J.; Finn, Kevin J.; Kaj, Mónika

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to evaluate the validity of the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular and Endurance Run (PACER) test in a sample of Hungarian youth. Method: Approximately 500 participants (aged 10-18 years old) were randomly selected across Hungary to complete both laboratory (maximal treadmill protocol) and field assessments…

  1. Nationwide Network of TalentPoints: The Hungarian Approach to Talent Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csermely, Peter; Rajnai, Gabor; Sulyok, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    In 2006 a novel approach to talent support was promoted by several talent support programmes in Hungary. The new idea was a network approach. The nationwide network of so-called TalentPoints and its framework, the Hungarian Genius Program, gained substantial European Union funding in 2009, and today it is growing rapidly. A novel concept of talent…

  2. The "Cosmopolitan" Project and Hungarian Kindergarten Education: Re-Reading Socialism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millei, Zsuzsa; Imre, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the socialist kindergarten in Hungary (1948-1989) was set up to aid the modernizing of a nation in a particular way and in a historical and political context in which the only way forward was to leave behind aspects of the past and start a new chapter in Hungarian history. Comparing this project to the…

  3. A Retrospective Appraisal of 15 Years' Proceedings of the Hungarian Research Student Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revesz, Tamas; Olah, Mate

    2013-01-01

    In 1996 the Hungarian Research Student Association (HRSA) was founded. Since then more than 6000 young, talented researchers have belonged to the Association. The founders set two principal aims: (1) to support the gifted and the most promising high school students and (2) to establish an active community. The movement has grown through the work…

  4. Quality Management in Hungarian Higher Education: Organisational Responses to Governmental Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csizmadia, Tibor; Enders, Jurgen; Westerheijden, Don F.

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on responses of higher education institutions to governmental policy. We investigate the influence of organisational characteristics on the implementation of quality management in Hungarian higher education institutions. Our theoretical framework is based on organisational theories (resource dependency and…

  5. An Optimality Theoretic Account of Hungarian ESL Learners' Acquisition of /[epsilon]/ and /[ash]/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunta, Ferenc; Major, Roy C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an Optimality Theoretic account of how Hungarian learners of English acquire /[epsilon]/ and /[ash]/. It is hypothesized that as the learners' pronunciation becomes more nativelike, L1 transfer substitutions will diminish; non-transfer substitutions will be especially prevalent in the intermediate stages, and that all learners…

  6. A Survey of Human Resource Management and Qualification Levels in Hungarian Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berde, Csaba; Piros, Marta

    2006-01-01

    The question of quality and value of human resources have been at the forefront of Hungarian agriculture for the past few years. The decreasing number of agricultural employees in Hungary in the last decade (1990-2000) is a result of the crisis caused by the change of the socio-economic system rather than economic and technological development.…

  7. Case Studies in Wilderness Medicine, the Sequel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarter, Shana Lee; Gray, Melissa

    Five case studies illustrate evacuation decision making in a wilderness setting. The cases describe medical problems encountered during wilderness trips: (1) a hiker suffering from hypothermia; (2) a 49-year-old man with chest pains; (3) a 19-year-old woman with abdominal pain; (4) a young woman in anaphylactic shock; and (5) a teenager hit on the…

  8. Abbreviated Case Studies in Organizational Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanguri, Deloris McGee

    2005-01-01

    The cases contained within organizational communication texts are generally two to three pages, often followed by questions. These case studies are certainly useful. They generally describe events in the present, provide some type of organizational context, include first-hand data, include a record of what people say and think, develop a…

  9. Case Studies in Elementary and Secondary Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boboc, Marius; Nordgren, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Practical and engaging, this book contains 21 case studies that help students apply curriculum theory to classroom reality. Each case is authored by an in-service teacher, reflecting on ways to improve instruction by making changes to various aspects of the curriculum. These real-life examples investigate up-to-date curricular issues ranging from…

  10. Malaise of the Spirit: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Paris

    This case study describes an experienced high school teacher's difficulties in an Alaskan town with severe tensions between Caucasian and Eskimo students and between community members and teachers. This "teaching case" helps preservice teachers understand the complex, ambiguous situations which arise in rural teaching. The limitations of…

  11. Case Study of above Average Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez-Morse, Sylvia; Klinker, JoAnn Franklin

    2005-01-01

    This case study explores the duty of midmanagement administrators to enforce district policies with which they do not necessarily agree. The case addresses the issues of moral leadership, distribution of power, emotional responses that impact decision making, class differences, and equity. It also examines the role conflict that many married…

  12. Case Studies of Environmental Risks to Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Lynn R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents case studies on children's exposure to pesticides, including risks through the use of the insecticide aldicarb on bananas, the home use of diazinon, and the use of interior house paint containing mercury. These cases illustrate how regulatory agencies, parents, health-care providers, and others who come into contact with children have…

  13. Case study in psychobiographical ethics.

    PubMed

    Ponterotto, Joseph G

    2013-10-01

    This article addresses ethical issues relative to the conduct and reporting of psychobiographical research. The author's recent psychobiographical study of World Chess Champion Bobby Fischer (1943-2008) is used to illustrate particular ethical challenges and responses in six areas: (1) institutional review board (IRB) evaluation and informed consent; (2) balancing objective research with respect for psychobiographical subject; (3) inviting subject or next-of-kin to read and comment on working drafts of psychobiography; (4) reporting never-before-revealed sensitive information on a subject; (5) role of interdisciplinary consultation in conducting psychobiography; and (6) the value and cautions of including psychological diagnoses as part of the psychological profile. A "bill of rights and responsibilities" for the psychobiographer is introduced as a stimulus for ongoing discussion and empirical research on ethical practice in psychobiography. PMID:24169418

  14. Teratogenic potential of tribenoside, a drug for the treatment of haemorrhoids and varicose veins--a population-based case--control study.

    PubMed

    Kubicsek, Tamás; Kazy, Zoltan; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2011-05-01

    Tribenoside is used for the treatment of haemorrhoids and varicose veins, frequently in pregnant women as well, but published data regarding its possible teratogenic effect are not available. Thus the risk of congenital abnormalities (CAs) was estimated in cases of pregnant women with oral tribenoside treatment (TT) in the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities. Of 22,843 cases with CA, 174 (0.76%), while of 38,151 matched controls without CA, 285 (0.75%) were born to mothers with TT. There was no higher risk for total CAs after TT during any time of pregnancy but congenital hydrocephaly had a higher risk after medically recorded TT in the second and/or third month of pregnancy, i.e. critical period of this CA. In conclusion TT in pregnant women associated with a higher risk of congenital hydrocephalus in their children, however, this finding is based on only 4 cases therefore requires further confirmation in future studies.

  15. A Unique Case of Intraabdominal Polyorchidism: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Alemayehu, Biruk; Kozusko, Steven D.; Borao, Frank; Vates III, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Polyorchidism, alternatively supernumerary testes (SNT), is a condition where an individual is born with more than two testicles. This congenital anomaly is quite rare and the literature has described various presentations. Questions/Purposes. To our knowledge, this presentation of polyorchidism has yet to be described in the literature. The goal of this case study is to add to the pediatric, general, and urologic surgery's body of knowledge of the subject matter. Case Study. A nine-month-old boy was admitted for an impalpable right testis and phimosis. At the time of surgical exploration, there appeared to be polyorchid testis on the right-hand side, with three masses that potentially appeared to be undescended testes. Discussion. Proponents of a conservative approach argue that infertility is common in patients with polyorchidism and, by preserving a potentially functional SNT, there may be improved spermatogenesis. When performing definitive surgical treatment, meticulous intra-abdominal and intrainguinal exploration must be undertaken. Orchiopexy should be performed to reduce the chances of torsion, malignancy, and infertility. Conclusion. Our case is important to the literature as it is the first known case of polyorchidism with 3 SNT on the right side, located intra-abdominally, and in a patient less than 1 year of age. PMID:27722006

  16. A Singapore Case of Lesson Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Lu Pien; Yee, Lee Peng

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present a case study of six Singaporean elementary school teachers working in a Lesson Study team that prepared them for problem solving instruction. The Lesson Study process included preparing, observing, and critiquing mathematics lessons in the context of solving fractions tasks. By conducting Lesson Study, we anticipated…

  17. BTS Case Study: The Galloway Family Home

    SciTech Connect

    Brandegee Group

    1999-03-08

    Case study of an energy-efficient Habitat for Humanity house that uses 30% less energy than conventional residential construction. The project was part of the Jimmy Carter Work Project in rural Appalachia in 1997.

  18. Qualitative Case Study Research in Business Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Bridget N.

    2002-01-01

    This guide to using qualitative case study research in business education explains methodological steps and decisions, illustrated with examples from business research. It addresses data analysis and interpretation, including discussion of software tools. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  19. Birth outcomes of cases with unclassified multiple congenital abnormalities and pregnancy complications in their mothers depending on the number of component defects. Population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Puhó, Erzsébet H; Czeizel, Andrew E; Acs, Nándor; Bánhidy, Ferenc

    2008-09-01

    Multiple congenital abnormalities (MCA) represent the most severe category of structural birth defects, (i.e. congenital abnormalities [CA]). Unfortunately, most MCA are not recognized and/or identified as MCA syndromes or MCA associations in the clinical practice. The term unclassified MCA (UMCA) is used for this category of MCA. We decided to evaluate the component CA of UMCA cases. The population-based large dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities (1980-1996) was evaluated. 'False' MCA, such as complex CA, polytopic field defects and sequences were excluded from the category of MCA. In addition, MCA syndromes caused by chromosomal aberrations and major mutant genes with preconceptional origin were excluded from the dataset of the Surveillance. MCA syndromes caused by teratogens and MCA associations with well-defined component CA were also excluded in the study. Thus, only UMCA cases (i) without the recognition of previously delineated MCA syndromes (ii) and/or without the identification of new MCA syndromes or (iii) caused by random combination of CA were included in the study. We compared data from 1349 cases with UMCA, 2405 matched population controls without any CA, and 21 494 malformed controls with isolated CA. There was a higher rate of stillbirth and a moderate male excess in UMCA cases, a somewhat shorter gestational age at delivery and an obvious reduction in birthweight. The intrauterine fetal growth retardation and rate of low-birthweight newborns showed an association with the number of component CA in UMCA cases. A similar association was not found with gestational age and the rate of preterm birth. UMCA represent one of the most severe categories of CA. The degree of intrauterine fetal growth retardation depends on number of component CA in UMCA cases.

  20. An Efficient Student Loan System: Case Study of Hungary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlinger, Edina

    2009-01-01

    The Hungarian student loan system was introduced in 2001. It has four main attributes: universal access and universal conditions; income contingent repayment; private funding; and self-sustaining (zero-profit) operation without direct state subsidy. This latter characteristic makes the scheme quite unique in international practice. Empirical facts…

  1. Predicting Students Drop Out: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekker, Gerben W.; Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Vleeshouwers, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring and support of university freshmen is considered very important at many educational institutions. In this paper we describe the results of the educational data mining case study aimed at predicting the Electrical Engineering (EE) students drop out after the first semester of their studies or even before they enter the study program…

  2. A Case Study about Communication Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Grace Hui Chin

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this case study was to identify what were Taiwanese University English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners' perceptions about learning communication strategies. This study collected qualitative data about students' beliefs and attitudes as they learned communication strategies. The research question guiding the study was:…

  3. Education and Work Councils: Four Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager, Audrey; And Others

    This collection of four case studies represents the conclusion of a two-phase study of a federal program to sponsor education and work councils. Following an outline of the history and concept of education and work councils as well as the findings of a study of such councils, the importance of council collaboration with selected sectors is…

  4. [3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference - Surgery Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Lázár, György; Bursics, Attila; Farsang, Zoltán; Harsányi, László; Kósa, Csaba; Maráz, Róbert; Mátrai, Zoltán; Paszt, Attila; Pavlovics, Gábor; Tamás, Róbert

    2016-09-01

    Therapy for breast cancer today is characterised by ever more precise diagnostic methods and ever more effective oncological treatments, a trend which will certainly continue in the future. Breast preservation and the application of oncoplastic principles are increasingly popular. A sentinel lymph node biopsy in the surgical treatment of the axilla is primary, with the indication for axillary block dissection (ABD) narrowing and radiation therapy becoming an alternative to ABD in certain cases. This publication summarises our recommendations on the surgical treatment of breast cancer based on the content of the 2nd Breast Cancer Consensus Conference and considering the latest international studies and professional recommendations. PMID:27579720

  5. High prevalence of germline STK11 mutations in Hungarian Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disease characterized by gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyposis and mucocutaneous pigmentation. The genetic predisposition for PJS has been shown to be associated with germline mutations in the STK11/LKB1 tumor suppressor gene. The aim of the present study was to characterize Hungarian PJS patients with respect to germline mutation in STK11/LKB1 and their association to disease phenotype. Methods Mutation screening of 21 patients from 13 PJS families were performed using direct DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Comparative semi-quantitative sequencing was applied to investigate the mRNA-level effects of nonsense and splice-affecting mutations. Results Thirteen different pathogenic mutations in STK11, including a high frequency of large genomic deletions (38%, 5/13), were identified in the 13 unrelated families studied. One of these deletions also affects two neighboring genes (SBNO2 and GPX4), located upstream of STK11, with a possible modifier effect. The majority of the point mutations (88%, 7/8) can be considered novel. Quantification of the STK11 transcript at the mRNA-level revealed that the expression of alleles carrying a nonsense or frameshift mutation was reduced to 30-70% of that of the wild type allele. Mutations affecting splice-sites around exon 2 displayed an mRNA processing pattern indicative of co-regulated splicing of exons 2 and 3. Conclusions A combination of sensitive techniques may assure a high (100%) STK11 mutation detection frequency in PJS families. Characterization of mutations at mRNA level may give a deeper insight into the molecular consequences of the pathogenic mutations than predictions made solely at the genomic level. PMID:21118512

  6. NWCC Transmission Case Study Conclusions Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Wiese, Terry Allison

    2000-09-01

    OAK-B135 The NWCC Transmission Case Studies Conclusions Summary In the spring of 1999, the Utility Wind Interest Group (UWIG), with the cooperation of the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC), conducted a forum on transmission issues associated with the production of energy from wind. As a result of this forum, a number of issues were identified which, if successfully resolved, could help reduce barriers to the future expansion of wind power. The NWCC, being a multi-stakeholder group, was in an ideal position to conduct follow-up activities among a cross-section of the interested parties. The follow-up activities took the form of three case studies in the areas of interest identified by forum participants: (1) Transmission policy and pricing; (2) ''Virtual wheeling'' arrangements; and, (3) Transmission system improvements. The case studies provide an interesting snapshot in time dealing with a range of issues associated with scheduled or planned regulatory and restructuring proceedings related to energy transmission. The NWCC Transmission Subcommittee and the UWIG reviewed early drafts of the case studies in November 1999. The case studies were conducted through a questionnaire and interview process with interested parties. In writing each case study, NWCC staff attempted to identify all stakeholder groups with an interest in each topic and solicit their input. While all parties do not agree on every issue presented, a serious effort has been made to present all views in an unbiased fashion. At the end of each case study, relevant conclusions are drawn and recommendations for next steps are provided where appropriate.

  7. Gigantic Suprapubic Lymphedema: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanhaeivash, Roozbeh; Franiel, Tobias; Grimm, Marc-Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We present the first case study of idiopathic gigantic suprapubic lymphedema and buried penis treated with puboscrotal reconstruction in a patient with initial extreme obesity after an extensive weight reduction (120 kg). Massive localized lymphedema of the suprapubic region should be differentiated from the scrotal type. Severe lymphedema could not resolve on its own and weight reduction does not seem to be helpful in such cases. PMID:27574599

  8. Case Study Research Methodology in Nursing Research.

    PubMed

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-11-01

    Through data collection methods using a holistic approach that focuses on variables in a natural setting, qualitative research methods seek to understand participants' perceptions and interpretations. Common qualitative research methods include ethnography, phenomenology, grounded theory, and historic research. Another type of methodology that has a similar qualitative approach is case study research, which seeks to understand a phenomenon or case from multiple perspectives within a given real-world context.

  9. Gigantic Suprapubic Lymphedema: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Tanhaeivash, Roozbeh; Franiel, Tobias; Grimm, Marc-Oliver; Horstmann, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    We present the first case study of idiopathic gigantic suprapubic lymphedema and buried penis treated with puboscrotal reconstruction in a patient with initial extreme obesity after an extensive weight reduction (120 kg). Massive localized lymphedema of the suprapubic region should be differentiated from the scrotal type. Severe lymphedema could not resolve on its own and weight reduction does not seem to be helpful in such cases. PMID:27574599

  10. Multiple independent variants in 6q21-22 associated with susceptibility to celiac disease in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations

    PubMed Central

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Bevova, Marianna R; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Monsuur, Alienke; Koskinen, Lotta LE; Slot, Ruben van't; Mulder, Chris; Mearin, M Luisa; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle; Kere, Juha; Mäki, Markku; Wijmenga, Cisca; Saavalainen, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an inflammatory enteropathy caused by intolerance to gluten. Previous linkage studies in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations have revealed a locus on chromosome 6q21-22 conferring susceptibility to celiac disease. This locus has previously been implicated in susceptibility to other autoimmune diseases such as Crohn's disease and type 1 diabetes. We performed fine mapping on 446 independent individuals with celiac disease and 641 controls of Dutch origin, testing 872 tagging SNPs in a 22 Mb region of chromosome 6. The 12 most promising SNPs were followed up in 2071 individuals from 284 Finnish and 357 Hungarian celiac disease families to identify risk variants in this region. Multiple markers in the region were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Dutch material. Two SNPs, rs9391227 and rs4946111, were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Finnish population. The association to rs9391227 represents the strongest association signal found in the Finnish (P=0.003, OR 0.66) as well as the combined Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations (P=3.6 × 10−5, OR 0.76). The rs9391227 is situated downstream of the HECT domain and ankyrin repeat containing, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (HACE1) gene and is contained within a region of strong linkage disequilibrium enclosing HACE1. Two additional, independent, susceptibility variants in the 6q21-22 region were also found in a meta-analysis of the three populations. The 6q21-22 region was confirmed as a celiac disease susceptibility locus and harbors multiple independent associations, some of which may implicate ubiquitin-pathways in celiac disease susceptibility. PMID:21326284

  11. First investigations into the prevalence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia spp. in Hungarian drinking water.

    PubMed

    Plutzer, J; Takó, M H; Márialigeti, K; Törökné, A; Karanis, P

    2007-12-01

    Safe drinking water is a top priority in preventing disease outbreaks and is of general concern to everyone. This study examines the occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Hungarian drinking water supplies for the first time. A total of 76 raw and drinking water samples were examined using the U.S. EPA Method 1623. From these 15 of 34 (48.4%) raw water samples tested positive for Giardia and 7 (26.6%) for Cryptosporidium. Twelve of 45 (26.7%) drinking water samples were positive for Giardia and 6 (13.3%) for Cryptosporidium. Overall, Giardia cysts and/or Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 48% of the raw water samples and 35% of the drinking water samples. The highest levels in drinking water were found to be 3 oocysts/100 litres of Cryptosporidium and 63.6 cysts/100 litres for Giardia, enough to cause giardiasis. The highest levels in raw water were 1,030 cysts/100 litres for Giardia and 50 oocysts/100 litres for Cryptosporidium and higher oocyst densities were associated with source water receiving effluents from sewage treatment plants or originating from a forest environment. In addition to this monitoring, riverbank filtrated water and raw water from the River Danube in Budapest were monitored in order to ascertain protozoan removal efficiency of riverbank filtration (RBF). A total of 157 samples, including 87 samples from the River Danube and 70 samples post RBF, were examined. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected regularly in the river water but never in riverbank filtered water suggesting the effectiveness of RBF as a purification method. The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in the investigated water supplies may require the water utilities and water authorities in Hungary to apply additional monitoring and treatment and/or watershed controls.

  12. Matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm (MARSHAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ameet Kumar; Zhou, Yu; Mustufa, Tabish; Clif Burdette, E.; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2005-11-15

    Intraoperative dosimetric quality assurance in prostate brachytherapy critically depends on discerning the three-dimensional (3D) locations of implanted seeds. The ability to reconstruct the implanted seeds intraoperatively will allow us to make immediate provisions for dosimetric deviations from the optimal implant plan. A method for seed reconstruction from segmented C-arm fluoroscopy images is proposed. The 3D coordinates of the implanted seeds can be calculated upon resolving the correspondence of seeds in multiple x-ray images. We formalize seed-matching as a combinatorial optimization problem, which has salient features: (a) extensively studied solutions by the computer science community; (b) proof for the nonexistence of any polynomial time exact algorithm; and (c) a practical pseudo-polynomial algorithm that mostly runs in O(N{sup 3}) time using any number of images. We prove that two images are insufficient to correctly match the seeds, while a third image renders the matching problem to be of nonpolynomial complexity. We utilize the special structure of the problem and propose a pseudopolynomial time algorithm. Using three presegmented images, matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm achieved complete matching in simulation experiments; and 98.5% in phantom experiments. 3D reconstruction error for correctly matched seeds has a mean of 0.63 mm, and 0.9 mm for incorrectly matched seeds. The maximum seed reconstruction error in each implant was typically around 1.32 mm. Both on synthetic data and in phantom experiments, matching rate and reconstruction error achieved using presegmented images was found to be sufficient for prostate brachytherapy. The algorithm is extendable to deal with arbitrary number of images without any loss in speed or accuracy. The algorithm is sufficiently generic to provide a practical solution to any correspondence problem, across different imaging modalities and features.

  13. Matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm (MARSHAL).

    PubMed

    Jain, Ameet Kumar; Zhou, Yu; Mustufa, Tabish; Burdette, E Clif; Chirikjian, Gregory S; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2005-11-01

    Intraoperative dosimetric quality assurance in prostate brachytherapy critically depends on discerning the three-dimensional (3D) locations of implanted seeds. The ability to reconstruct the implanted seeds intraoperatively will allow us to make immediate provisions for dosimetric deviations from the optimal implant plan. A method for seed reconstruction from segmented C-arm fluoroscopy images is proposed. The 3D coordinates of the implanted seeds can be calculated upon resolving the correspondence of seeds in multiple x-ray images. We formalize seed-matching as a combinatorial optimization problem, which has salient features: (a) extensively studied solutions by the computer science community; (b) proof for the nonexistence of any polynomial time exact algorithm; and (c) a practical pseudo-polynomial algorithm that mostly runs in O(N3) time using any number of images. We prove that two images are insufficient to correctly match the seeds, while a third image renders the matching problem to be of nonpolynomial complexity. We utilize the special structure of the problem and propose a pseudopolynomial time algorithm. Using three presegmented images, matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm achieved complete matching in simulation experiments; and 98.5% in phantom experiments. 3D reconstruction error for correctly matched seeds has a mean of 0.63 mm, and 0.9 mm for incorrectly matched seeds. The maximum seed reconstruction error in each implant was typically around 1.32 mm. Both on synthetic data and in phantom experiments, matching rate and reconstruction error achieved using presegmented images was found to be sufficient for prostate brachytherapy. The algorithm is extendable to deal with arbitrary number of images without any loss in speed or accuracy. The algorithm is sufficiently generic to provide a practical solution to any correspondence problem, across different imaging modalities and features. PMID:16372418

  14. Matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm (MARSHAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ameet K.; Zhou, Yu; Mustufa, Tabish; Burdette, E. C.; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative dosimetric quality assurance in prostate brachytherapy critically depends on discerning the 3D locations of implanted seeds. The ability to reconstruct the implanted seeds intraoperatively will allow us to make immediate provisions for dosimetric deviations from the optimal implant plan. A method for seed reconstruction from segmented C-arm fluoroscopy images is proposed. Method: The 3D coordinates of the implanted seeds can be calculated upon resolving the correspondence of seeds in multiple X-ray images. We formalize seed-matching as a network flow problem, which has salient features: (a) extensively studied exact solutions, (b) performance claims on the space-time complexity, (c) optimality bounds on the final solution. A fast implementation is realized using the Hungarian algorithm. Results: We prove that two images can correctly match only about 67% of the seeds, and that a third image renders the matching problem to be of non-polynomial complexity. We utilize the special structure of the problem and propose a pseudo-polynomial time algorithm. Using three images, MARSHAL achieved 100% matching in simulation experiments; and 98.5% in phantom experiments. 3D reconstruction error for correctly matched seeds has a mean of 0:63 mm, and 0:91 mm for incorrectly matched seeds. Conclusion: Both on synthetic data and in phantom experiments, matching rate and reconstruction accuracy were found to be sufficient for prostate brachytherapy. The algorithm is extendable to deal with arbitrary number of images without loss in speed or accuracy. The algorithm is sufficiently generic to be used for establishing correspondences across any choice of features in different imaging modalities.

  15. [Bright's disease is mentioned in an official Hungarian medical document in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István

    2011-10-01

    The World Kidney Day was announced for the fifth time in 2011, that calls attention to chronic renal failure as it attains the title of endemic. Richard Bright (1789-1858), a British doctor was the first to recognize and describe the uremic state and the kidney diseases leading to it. There are many aspects that the readers should remember him about especially in connection with the World Kidney Day. During his European study tour's stage in Hungary, he was not so much interested in the country's medical and health conditions, rather in its economic and cultural life, natural history and geography. He travelled to Hungary on two occasions and recorded his experiences in a personal travel documentation illustrated with his own drawings. He finally established himself in London in 1820 and together with Thomas Addison and Thomas Hodgkin they formed the Guy's Hospital's world-famous "scientist trio". Bright described the nephritis's classical image, nowadays known as Bright's disease for the first time at the age of 38 years in 1827. A presently turned up Hungarian medical certificate from 1870 contains the Bright's disease described by Richard Bright as a written diagnosis. This 140-year-old document also confirms that we can be proud of our predecessors concerning our knowledge of kidney diseases and their application in daily use in Hungary, because in the past they were the ones who used the most advanced knowledge in their practices. One of today's greatest challenges for us is to be able to inform healthy and ill people alike properly about kidney diseases and their prevention or management. Place this in order to stem the epidemic of chronic renal failure and still pay homage to this disease's greatest scientist, Richard Bright.

  16. Social Studies Project Evaluation: Case Study and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development and application of a model for social studies program evaluations. A case study showing how the model's three-step process was used to evaluate the Improving Citizenship Education Project in Fulton County, Georgia is included. (AM)

  17. Importance of the Hungarian phytosociological school established at the University of Debrecen in development of current field botany.

    PubMed

    Borhidi, A; Salamon-Albert, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The paper gives a short panoramic historical survey about the main activities of the Hungarian phytosociology, their chief protagonists, the fundamental role of professor Rezső Soó in the creation and development of the phytosociological school of Debrecen established by him in the Botanical Department of the University of Debrecen, which is celebrating the 80 anniversary of its existence and has played a determinant role in the Hungarian botany.

  18. Case Study: Interventions for an ADHD Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartlep, Nicholas Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This case study was done in partial fulfillment of a Master of Science in Education (M.S.Ed.) Graduate Course the participant-observer was completing. The participant-observer learned a lot about Dmitrov, the child in this study. Dmitrov was a 2nd-grade student who was diagnosed (late in the school year) with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity…

  19. Prader-Willi Disease: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbus, William R., III

    A case study focuses on the characteristics and physical management of a 15-year-old with Prader-Willi Syndrome, a birth defect associated with hypotonia, insatiable appetite, hypogonadism, central nervous system dysfunction, and abnormal growth and development . A literature review addresses studies dealing with behavior modification of obesity…

  20. Case Studies in Australian Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ralph J., Ed.; Rooth, S. John, Ed.

    This publication contains the following 24 case studies of adult education in Australia: "NSW Department of Agriculture Home Study Programme" (O'Neill); "Self-Help Adult Education: The University of the Third Age at the Brisbane CAE" (Swindell); "Marriage Enrichment Programme" (D. Kerr, C. Kerr); "Carringbush Library: A Place to Be" (Letcher);…

  1. Technologies in Literacy Learning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This article draws on outcomes of a study which explored changes in teachers' literacy pedagogies as a result of their participation in a collaborative teacher professional learning project. The educational usability of schemas drawn from multiliteracies and Learning by Design theory is illustrated through a case study of a teacher's work on…

  2. CASE STUDY: DIELDRIN ATTACK IN DALYAN LAGOON

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the first two weeks of December 2005, NATO sponsored an Advanced Study Institute (ASI) in Istanbul, Turkey. Part of this ASI involved a case study of a terrorist attack, where a chemical was assumed to be dumped into Sulunger Lake in Turkey. This chapter documents the re...

  3. Connecting Reading and Writing: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Zhanfang

    2015-01-01

    Connecting reading and writing, proposed by many scholars, is realized in this case study. The 30 participants in this study are the English majors of the third year in one School of Foreign Languages in Beijing. They are encouraged to write journals every week, based on the source text materials in their Intensive Reading class, with the final…

  4. Collaborative Assessment: Middle School Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkison, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing a participant observer research model, a case study of the efficacy of a collaborative assessment methodology within a middle school social studies class was conducted. A review of existing research revealed that students' perceptions of assessment, evaluation, and accountability influence their intrinsic motivation to learn. A…

  5. Teachers as Naturalistic Inquirers -- A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David; Loertscher, Kyleen

    A case study of a teacher as a naturalistic inquirer is presented. A class in naturalistic inquiry methods was offered to practicing teachers and other graduate students during a 15-week semester. During the first two or three weeks, students read extensively about qualitative methods and identified a possible site to conduct a study. The…

  6. A Multiple Case Study of Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Wei; Khoury, Anne E.

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to explore how leadership and contextual factors influence innovation in R&D teams in national laboratories, using the approach of multiple case studies. This paper provides some preliminary findings from two highly innovative teams residing in two national laboratories in the US. The preliminary results suggested several common…

  7. Anthropology and Popular Culture: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Jack

    The study of popular culture in the United States is an appropriate anthropological endeavor, as evidenced in a case study of the volcanic eruption of Mt. St. Helens in Oregon. By examining its popular arts, anthropologists gain understanding of the culture and its people. For example, an analysis of reactions to the Mt. St. Helens eruption…

  8. Integrating ethics into case study assignments.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Pamela A

    2014-12-01

    I teach an upper-level writing course, Genes, Race, Gender, and Society, designed for Life Science majors, in which I utilize a case study to expose students to ethical ways of thinking. Students first work through the topical case study and then are challenged to rethink their responses through the lenses of ethics, taking into account different ethical frameworks. Students then develop their own case study, integrating ethical components. I want to expose my students to this way of thinking because I see technology being driven by the Jurassic Park phenomenon, "Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should," and want future physicians grounded in a sense of how their actions relate to the greater good. PMID:25574287

  9. Shuttle Case Study Collection Website Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Khadijah S.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2012-01-01

    As a continuation from summer 2012, the Shuttle Case Study Collection has been developed using lessons learned documented by NASA engineers, analysts, and contractors. Decades of information related to processing and launching the Space Shuttle is gathered into a single database to provide educators with an alternative means to teach real-world engineering processes. The goal is to provide additional engineering materials that enhance critical thinking, decision making, and problem solving skills. During this second phase of the project, the Shuttle Case Study Collection website was developed. Extensive HTML coding to link downloadable documents, videos, and images was required, as was training to learn NASA's Content Management System (CMS) for website design. As the final stage of the collection development, the website is designed to allow for distribution of information to the public as well as for case study report submissions from other educators online.

  10. Integrating Ethics into Case Study Assignments

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Pamela A.

    2014-01-01

    I teach an upper-level writing course, Genes, Race, Gender, and Society, designed for Life Science majors, in which I utilize a case study to expose students to ethical ways of thinking. Students first work through the topical case study and then are challenged to rethink their responses through the lenses of ethics, taking into account different ethical frameworks. Students then develop their own case study, integrating ethical components. I want to expose my students to this way of thinking because I see technology being driven by the Jurassic Park phenomenon, “Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should,” and want future physicians grounded in a sense of how their actions relate to the greater good. PMID:25574287

  11. Integrating ethics into case study assignments.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Pamela A

    2014-12-01

    I teach an upper-level writing course, Genes, Race, Gender, and Society, designed for Life Science majors, in which I utilize a case study to expose students to ethical ways of thinking. Students first work through the topical case study and then are challenged to rethink their responses through the lenses of ethics, taking into account different ethical frameworks. Students then develop their own case study, integrating ethical components. I want to expose my students to this way of thinking because I see technology being driven by the Jurassic Park phenomenon, "Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should," and want future physicians grounded in a sense of how their actions relate to the greater good.

  12. The Science Manager's Guide to Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Kristi M.; Peffers, Melissa S.; Ruegg, Rosalie T.; Vallario, Robert W.

    2001-09-24

    This guide takes the science manager through the steps of planning, implementing, validating, communicating, and using case studies. It outlines the major methods of analysis, describing their relative merits and applicability while providing relevant examples and sources of additional information. Well-designed case studies can provide a combination of rich qualitative and quantitative information, offering valuable insights into the nature, outputs, and longer-term impacts of the research. An objective, systematic, and credible approach to the evaluation of U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science programs adds value to the research process and is the subject of this guide.

  13. IL23R in the Swedish, Finnish, Hungarian and Italian populations: association with IBD and psoriasis, and linkage to celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Koskinen, Lotta LE; Dukes, Emma; Kainu, Kati; Suomela, Sari; Lappalainen, Maarit; Ziberna, Fabiana; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R; Kurppa, Kalle; Kaukinen, Katri; Ádány, Róza; Pocsai, Zsuzsa; Széles, György; Färkkilä, Martti; Turunen, Ulla; Halme, Leena; Paavola-Sakki, Paulina; Not, Tarcisio; Vatta, Serena; Ventura, Alessandro; Löfberg, Robert; Torkvist, Leif; Bresso, Francesca; Halfvarson, Jonas; Mäki, Markku; Kontula, Kimmo; Saarialho-Kere, Ulpu; Kere, Juha; D'Amato, Mauro; Saavalainen, Päivi

    2009-01-01

    Background Association of the interleukin-23 receptor (IL23R) with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been confirmed in several populations. IL23R also associates with psoriasis, suggesting that the gene may be an important candidate for many chronic inflammatory diseases. Methods We studied association of single-nucleotide variants in IL23R with IBD in Swedish patients, in both Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) subsets. The same genetic variants were also studied in Finnish patients with psoriasis or celiac disease, and in Hungarian and Italian patients with celiac disease. Results Association of IL23R with IBD was replicated in our Swedish patients, and linkage and association of the IL23R region with psoriasis was found in the Finnish population. The IL23R region was also linked to celiac disease in Finnish families, but no association of IL23R variants with celiac disease was found in the Finnish, Hungarian or Italian samples. Conclusion Our study is the first to demonstrate association of IL23R with CD and UC in Swedish patients with IBD. It is also the first study to report linkage and association of the IL23R region with psoriasis in the Finnish population. Importantly, this is the first report of linkage of the IL23R region to celiac disease, a chronic inflammatory condition in which IL23R has not been previously implicated. PMID:19175939

  14. Case study examples using self-assessment.

    PubMed

    Garstecki, D; Hutton, C L; Nerbonne, M A; Newman, C W; Smoski, W J

    1990-10-01

    The following case studies demonstrate the application of self-assessment techniques. The selection of procedures reported here is not meant to imply necessarily that these procedures are more or less effective or more widely used than other available self-assessment tests, but rather to illustrate the various purposes for which self-assessment tools may be employed. Case 1 illustrates the contribution of data obtained from the Hearing Performance Inventory (Giolas, Owens, Lamb, & Shubert, 1979) in the management and counseling of a severely hearing impaired adult. Case 2 involves the use of the Hearing Problem Inventory developed by Hutton in Atlanta (HPI-A, Hutton, 1987). Application of the Self-Assessment of Communication (SAC) and Significant Other Assessment of Communication (SOAC) (Schow and Nerbonne, 1982) is shown in Case 3, whereas Case 4 demonstrates the usefulness of the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE, Ventry and Weinstein, 1982). Both the SAC/SOAC and HHIE batteries involve problem cases associated with hearing aid fitting and assessment of benefit. The final illustration (Case 5) is a report on the Children's Auditory Processing Performance Scale (CHAPPS), a new questionnaire developed by Smoski, Brunt, and Tannahill/ISHA (1987) for assessing parent's judgment of children's listening abilities (Appendix). The versatility of self-assessment applications across a broad assortment of impairment levels, age groups, and clinical settings is demonstrated in these cases. Hopefully the reader will see more clearly the application and value of these and other non-audiometric techniques and will be motivated to increase the use of self-assessment tools in the individual work setting. PMID:2269415

  15. Collagenous ileitis: a study of 13 cases.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Blake Hugh; McClymont, Kelly; Brown, Ian

    2011-08-01

    Collagenous ileitis (CI), characterized by subepithelial collagen deposition in the terminal ileum, is an uncommon condition. The few cases reported to date have been associated with collagenous colitis (CC) or lymphocytic colitis. Thirteen cases of CI retrieved over a 9-year period were retrospectively studied. There were 7 female and 6 male patients, with an age range of 39 to 72 years (mean, 64 y). Two groups were identified: (1) CI associated with collagenous or lymphocytic disease elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract and (2) CI as an isolated process. Diarrhea was the presenting symptom in 11 cases. Most patients had no regular medication use. Subepithelial collagen thickness ranged from 15 to 100 μm (mean, 32 μm) and involved 5% to 80% of the subepithelial region of the submitted biopsies. Six cases had >25 intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs)/100 epithelial cells, and villous blunting was observed in 11 cases. Chronic inflammation of the lamina propria was present in 9 cases, and focal neutrophil infiltration was identified in 3 cases. In biopsies taken from other sites, 7 of 13 colonic biopsies showed CC, 4 of 9 gastric biopsies showed collagenous gastritis, and 2 of 10 duodenal biopsies were abnormal with collagenous sprue (n=1) and partial villous atrophy and increased IELs (n=1) (both celiac disease related). Resolution of the subepithelial collagen deposition was found in the 1 case in which follow-up of terminal ileal biopsies were taken. There was partial or complete resolution of symptoms in 6 of 9 patients for whom follow-up information was available. PMID:21716082

  16. In memory of Eugene (Jenő) von Gothard: a pioneering nineteenth century Hungarian astrophysicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincze, Ildikő J.; Jankovics, István

    2012-07-01

    Eugene von Gothard was a Hungarian engineer/scientist, instrument-maker and astrophysicist who founded the Herény Astrophysical Observatory in 1881 and carried out pioneering work in astronomical photography and spectroscopy. In this paper we provide biographical material about von Gothard and describe his observatory, before discussing his astronomical observations and the contribution that hemade to the early development of astrophysics.

  17. Hungarian population data for 11 Y-STR and 49 Y-SNP markers.

    PubMed

    Völgyi, Antónia; Zalán, Andrea; Szvetnik, Eniko; Pamjav, Horolma

    2009-03-01

    49 Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with TaqMan assay and 11 Y-chromosomal STR loci were tested in 215 independent Hungarian male samples. Genetic distances to 23 other populations were calculated based on haplogroup frequencies with AMOVA implemented in Arlequin2.0. Based on distances phylogenetic tree was constructed with Neighbor-joining method using Phylip 3.66. Haplotype and haplogroup diversity values were calculated. PMID:19215861

  18. Microbial study of meningitis and encephalitis cases.

    PubMed

    Selim, Heba S; El-Barrawy, Mohamed A; Rakha, Magda E; Yingst, Samuel L; Baskharoun, Magda F

    2007-01-01

    Meningitis and/or encephalitis can pose a serious public health problem especially during outbreaks. A rapid and accurate diagnosis is important for effective earlier treatment. This study aimed to identify the possible microbial causes of meningitis and/or encephalitis cases. CSF and serum samples were collected from 322 patients who had signs and symptoms suggestive of meningitis and/or encephalitis. Out of 250 cases with confirmed clinical diagnosis, 83 (33.2%) were definitely diagnosed as bacterial meningitis and/or encephalitis cases (by using CSF culture, biochemical tests, latex agglutination test, and CSF stain), 17 (6.8%) were definitely diagnosed as having viral causes ( by viral isolation on tissue culture, PCR and ELISA), and one (0.4%) was diagnosed as fungal meningitis case (by India ink stain, culture, and biochemical tests). Also, there was one encephalitis case with positive serum ELISA IgM antibodies against Sandfly scilian virus. N. meningitidis, S. pneumonia and M. tuberculosis were the most frequently detected bacterial agents, while Enteroviruses, herpes simplex viruses and varicella zoster viruses were the most common viral agents encountered. Further studies are needed to assess the role of different microbial agents in CNS infections and their effective methods of diagnosis.

  19. Learning Machine Learning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavesson, N.

    2010-01-01

    This correspondence reports on a case study conducted in the Master's-level Machine Learning (ML) course at Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden. The students participated in a self-assessment test and a diagnostic test of prerequisite subjects, and their results on these tests are correlated with their achievement of the course's learning…

  20. INNOVATIVE CLEAN TECHNOLOGIES CASE STUDIES - PROJECT REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The innovative Clean Technologies Case Studies contained herein are the products of the "Pollution Prevention by and for Small Business" Program (P2SB) The P2SB was an outreach program directed to small businesses that had developed innovative concepts for pollution prevention i...

  1. Acoustical case studies of three green buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebein, Gary; Lilkendey, Robert; Skorski, Stephen

    2005-04-01

    Case studies of 3 green buildings with LEED certifications that required extensive acoustical retrofit work to become satisfactory work environments for their intended user groups will be used to define areas where green building design concepts and acoustical design concepts require reconciliation. Case study 1 is an office and conference center for a city environmental education agency. Large open spaces intended to collect daylight through clerestory windows provided large, reverberant volumes with few acoustic finishes that rendered them unsuitable as open office space and a conference room/auditorium. Case Study 2 describes one of the first gold LEED buildings in the southeast whose primary design concepts were so narrowly focused on thermal and lighting issues that they often worked directly against basic acoustical requirements resulting in sound levels of NC 50-55 in classrooms and faculty offices, crosstalk between classrooms and poor room acoustics. Case study 3 is an environmental education and conference center with open public areas, very high ceilings, and all reflective surfaces made from wood and other environmentally friendly materials that result in excessive loudness when the building is used by the numbers of people which it was intended to serve.

  2. Collaborative Programs in Urban Schools: Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Urban Coalition, Washington, DC.

    Presented here are four case studies of urban collaborative educational programs: (1) the Dallas Independent School District - Magnet Arts High School; (2) the Los Angeles Unified School District Regional Occupational Centers Program/Skilled Training Education Program; (3) the Detroit Public Schools - Community High School; and (4) Philadephia's…

  3. LCA – Unique and Controversial Case Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This session will focus on case studies and applications that have a unique or controversial aspect. Some of the most recent topics that seem to have significant interest include: LCA-based product declarations, LCA-based standards, LCA-based labels, alternative energy, agricul...

  4. Interdisciplinary Student Teams Projects: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruck, S. E.; Teer, Faye P.

    2009-01-01

    In today's organizations team work has become an integral part of the day-to-day routine. For this reason, University professors are including group projects in many courses. In such group assessments, we advocate the use of interdisciplinary teams, where possible. As a case study, we report an interdisciplinary group technical project with…

  5. Physics Courses--Some Suggested Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    To communicate the relevance and excitement of science activity to students, the use of more imaginative, and even openly speculative, case studies in physics courses is suggested. Some useful examples are Magnetic Monopoles, Constants, Black Holes, Antimatter, Zero Mass Particles, Tachyons, and the Bootstrap Hypothesis. (DF)

  6. New Case Studies of Citizen Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Thomas

    1977-01-01

    Describes a six-unit case study curriculum package designed for secondary and college-level courses relating to environmental education. The units deal with nuclear power, stream channelization, a river dam project, overgrazing of public lands, agribusiness versus the family farm, and swamp preservation. (Author/DB)

  7. Youth Development: A Case Study from Honduras.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boll, Jay

    This case study documents the experiences of a Peace Corps volunteer who worked as a Youth Development volunteer with disadvantaged institutionalized youth in Honduras. Youth Development volunteers provide direct services in the areas of vocational education, recreational programming, informal education, and counseling. Many are assigned to…

  8. Value for Money Case Studies. Mendip Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kedney, Bob, Ed.

    In response to a shift from the management of curriculum to the management of scarce resources to deliver a changing curriculum, this paper brings together three "value for money" case studies in college administration. The papers identify three levels of activity, ranging from the one-time opportunity for good housekeeping through tactical…

  9. A CASE STUDY OF ENVIRONMENTAL DATA MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to support our ongoing research in watershed ecology and global climate change, we gather and analyze environmental data from several government agencies. This case study demonstrates a researcher’s approach to accessing, organizing, and using intersectoral data. T...

  10. Workplace Education Initiative: Case Studies and Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astrein, Bruce; And Others

    Seven workplace education projects funded in the first year of the Massachusetts Workplace Education Initiative are reported. This report includes both general observations and specific information in case studies of the projects. Overall information is provided on students served, the importance of partnerships, the emphasis on…

  11. The Campus Diversity Initiative: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayak, Sharada

    2005-01-01

    This Case Study presents the Campus Diversity Initiative (CDI), a three-phase project lead by the Educational Resources Project Centre Trust, in New Delhi, India. In a historic and cultural context different from that of India, the American Diversity Initiative was launched by the Ford Foundation in 1990 and addressed their diversity issues by…

  12. Internationalizing the California State University: Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutter Richard L., Ed.; And Others

    The 18 case studies in this volume represent a sample of the internationalization activities of the California State University system. Part 1 presents five papers on organizing for international education: "Internationalization of CSULB [California State University Long Beach]" by Dorothy Abrahamse et al.; "Institutional Coordination of…

  13. Sustainability in Housing: A Curriculum Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrott, Kathleen; Emmel, Joann M.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the influence of environmental issues on the field of housing, from the perspective of sustainable housing. Presents a case study of the development of a college course to address these issues by integrating energy management, air quality, water quality, and waste management. (Author)

  14. Firefighter Workplace Learning: An Exploratory Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite there being a significant amount of research investigating workplace learning, research exploring firefighter workplace learning is almost nonexistent. The purpose of this qualitative multi-case study was to explore how firefighters conceptualize, report, and practice workplace learning. The researcher also investigated how firefighters…

  15. Performance Support Case Studies from IBM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke-Moran, Celia; Swope, Ginger; Morariu, Janis; deKam, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Presents two case studies that show how IBM addressed performance support solutions and electronic learning. The first developed a performance support and expert coaching solution; the second applied performance support to reducing implementation time and total cost of ownership of enterprise resource planning systems. (Author/LRW)

  16. Advanced supplier partnership practices: a case study.

    PubMed

    Williams, B R

    2000-05-01

    This article describes how a supplier partnership was set up to avoid the typical purchasing relationship--price being inversely proportional to quantity and having the purchaser take all the risk of product obsolescence. The case study also describes how rate-based replenishment replaced time-based delivery, and how all these advantages were achieved at reduced administrative costs. PMID:10915375

  17. Case Study of Home-School Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguerrebere, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    This case study evaluated one site of a California teacher home visit program. Home visits have been an important means of connecting families and schooling. In 1999, California inaugurated a statewide home visit program to promote effective partnership between home and school for low-achieving schools. At this site, families in 3 kindergarten…

  18. NACASETAC BAY: AN INTERACTIVE CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This interactive case study or "game" was created to provide a "hands on" experience in the application of a weight of evidence approach to sediment assessment. The game proceeds in two phases. In each phase the players work together as a group. A scenario is presented, and the g...

  19. Fraternization in Accounting Firms: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinze, Tim; Kizirian, Tim; Leese, Wallace

    2004-01-01

    This case study sheds light on how to avoid risks caused by manager-subordinate dating relationships (fraternization) such as employee misunderstandings, retaliation charges, favoritism complaints, wrongful termination lawsuits, and sexual harassment lawsuits, as well as associated ethical risks. Risk avoidance can be accomplished through a better…

  20. WMOST v2 Case Study: Monponsett Ponds

    EPA Science Inventory

    This webinar presents an overview of the preliminary results of a case study application of EPA's Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool v2 (WMOST) for stakeholders in the Monponsett Ponds Watershed Workgroup. Monponsett Ponds is a large water system consisting of two ba...

  1. Performance-Related Pay: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swabe, A. I. R.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses performance-related pay and why the system was introduced, how it was negotiated, and how it has operated. The case study illustrated is in a British financial services company where the system was negotiated in 1986 and began in 1987. (JOW)

  2. Lifelong Learning in SMEs: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Rick; Smith, Vikki; Devins, Dave

    2002-01-01

    Learning centers using information-communications technologies were established in three British industrial estates. A case study of one organization shows the center contributed to lifelong learning and enhanced information technology training and employee confidence. Transfer of training and productivity improvements were not as clear. (Contains…

  3. Phonological Precedence in Dyslexia: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider-Zioga, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is believed to involve a phonological deficit of which the exact properties have not been clearly established. This article presents the findings of a longitudinal case study that suggest that, at least for some people with dyslexia, the fundamental problem involves a disturbance of temporal-spatial ordering abilities. A…

  4. Marietta Celebration of Unity Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philbin, Meg; Phillips, Rebecca

    This case study concerns the forming of a Marietta, Ohio unity committee, entitled Citizens for Social and Racial Justice, in response to the local Ku Klux Klan's (KKK) request for a parade permit in order to demonstrate against blacks in this city. Marietta, the county seat of Washington County, Ohio, has a population composed of both white and…

  5. It's Not Funny: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Méndez-Morse, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    This case study may be used with personnel supervision, school law, and other school leadership courses. It describes the behavior and actions of one teacher toward another. Student discussions can focus on supervision, workplace mobbing, workplace bullying, as well as sexual harassment. Students should focus on a school leader's role in such…

  6. Simulations & Case Studies. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Cathy R., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on simulations and case studies from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: "3-D Virtual Classroom Technology" (Kimberly Arseneau Miller, Angela Glod); "Simulated Lesson Design Studios" (Willis Copeland); "Lights, Camera, Integration: Presentation Programs and…

  7. Successful Fundraising: Case Studies of Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Meredith A., Ed.

    The primary purpose of this book it to assist library directors and those who want to become fundraisers for libraries to learn more about fundraising and find answers to their questions. The 12 case studies presented in this book address issues of building a major gift program; developing library capital campaigns; competing for National…

  8. Framing in the Field: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Strategic Frame Analysis can inform the daily practice of policy advocates by bringing an evidence-based communications approach to their work. This case study of FrameWorks' decade-long association with the national Kids Count Network shares stories from advocates who are transforming their communications strategies, resulting in more effective…

  9. Hidradenitis suppurativa: retrospective study of 20 cases*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Nurimar Conceição; Franco, Camilla Pimentel A.; Lima, Cíntia Maria O.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, twenty cases of severe hidradenitis suppurativa are reported, mainly in non-white people and in axillary areas. Wide surgical excision has offered good results, although relapses have occurred at variable intervals in the follow-up period. PMID:23793188

  10. Pragmatics and Morphosyntactic Acquisition: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dowd, Elizabeth

    According to the linguistic theory of "natural order," eight English morphemes have been ranked in an invariant order of difficulty for learners of English as a Second Language (ESL). Pedagogical implications of this theory have led to the "natural approach" as a comprehensive second language teaching methodology. A case study that suggests the…

  11. Cooperative Training in Telecommunications: Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Margaret; Straw, Ronnie

    1987-01-01

    The authors present two case studies of collaborative efforts between the American Telephone and Telegraph Company and the Communications Workers of America to provide inservice training that enhances productivity, competitiveness, and individual career development. The effort was facilitated by the quality-of-worklife process. (CH)

  12. Case Studies in Exemplary Service Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wollard, Karen Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Twelve exemplary service providers from three highly acclaimed resorts discuss and demonstrate what it takes to deliver award-winning service consistently. This research, using a qualitative, explanatory case study method, sought to investigate how they do it. Three themes emerged from the data that should have a profound impact on HRD (human…

  13. Recurrent perinatal loss: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kavanaugh, K; Robertson, P A

    1999-01-01

    To date, investigators have not demonstrated a clear relationship between a parent's history of prior perinatal losses and intensity of grief response following a subsequent perinatal loss. Examining this relationship for low-income, African-American parents is important because they are a vulnerable population due to the high incidence of perinatal mortality in Blacks and their other life stressors that can impact on grief response and caring needs. The purpose of this case study was to examine the impact of recurrent perinatal loss on a low-income African-American parent. The research design for this study was case report, using interview data collected from a mother who had recently experienced her fourth perinatal loss, which occurred at twenty-five weeks of gestation. Transcripts from two open-ended interviews were analyzed. The theoretical framework used to guide analysis of this case study was Lazarus and Folkman's stress and coping theory. Results demonstrated that the prior perinatal losses did not appear as critical components of the way the mother responded to her most recent loss. Instead, perception of the care she received from healthcare providers and how that care related to her experiences with her one living child who was born at the same gestational age was an important determinant in how she responded to her loss. The results of this case study demonstrate the importance assessing a person's perception of their experience and those factors which contribute to the way they respond.

  14. Experiencing Online Pedagogy: A Canadian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Heather E.; Barnett, John

    2010-01-01

    This case study explored the educational experiences of Canadian preservice teachers in a course designed to teach about online teaching. Students gained experience in course design and delivery, and safe and ethical behavior related to technology. Findings indicated that projects in which students actively applied their knowledge were more…

  15. Biliteracy, Spelling, and Writing: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midgette, Ekaterina; Philippakos, Zoi A.

    2016-01-01

    The overall purpose of this case study is to examine biliteracy and its effects on a young child's orthographic and writing growth. The analysis of the kindergartener's spelling development and compositional growth in reference to both language systems indicates that biliteracy had a positive effect on the student's acquisition of English…

  16. Change and Its Consequences: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Susan Resneck

    2000-01-01

    The University of Puget Sound, Washington, represents a case study in institutional change (and its consequences) through innovative planning and bold initiatives. Over a decade of decisive actions that included ongoing conversation and communication, with all the fallout that entailed, has refashioned the institution into a stronger undergraduate…

  17. Gifted Teenagers with Problems: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaco, Theresa; Goodner, Jane

    Case studies are presented of three gifted students, indicating the social and academic problems which are standing in the way of their potential development. The students include a Vietnamese-American ninth-grade girl who has difficulty with English and does not feel accepted by other students, an underachieving seventh grade boy who speaks out…

  18. Tachycardia During Resistance Exercise: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Andrew C.; Parks, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    This case study examined a weight-trained (WT) male who had an unusually high heart rate response to heavy resistance exercise and self-administered anabolic androgenic steroids as an ergogenic aid to training. The subject was compared to 18 other WT people. His tachycardia response occurred only in the presence of a pressure load and not with a…

  19. Comparative Environmental Threat Analysis: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latour, J. B.; Reiling, R.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews how carrying capacity for different environmental problems is operationalized. Discusses whether it is possible to compare threats, using the exceeding of carrying capacity as a yardstick. Points out problems in comparative threat analysis using three case studies: threats to European groundwater resources, threats to ecosystems in Europe,…

  20. ESL and Digital Video Integration: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, J., Ed.; Gromik, N., Ed.; Edwards, N., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    It should come as no surprise that digital video technology is of particular interest to English language learners; students are drawn to its visual appeal and vibrant creative potential. The seven original case studies in this book demonstrate how video can be an effective and powerful tool to create fluid, fun, interactive, and collaborative…

  1. A Case Study in Learning to Unlearn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Martin; Grummell, Bernie; Murphy, Conor; Ryan, Anne

    2015-01-01

    In this case study, Irish academics reflect on our involvement in a project--Transformative Engagement Network (TEN). This project aims to transform the nature of the engagement between the various stakeholders impacted by or concerned with climate change and to insert the voice and concerns of the most vulnerable food producers into climate…

  2. Physical Science Connected Classrooms: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Karen; Sanalan, Vehbi; Shirley, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Case-study descriptions of secondary and middle school classrooms in diverse contexts provide examples of how teachers implement connected classroom technology to facilitate formative assessment in science instruction. Connected classroom technology refers to a networked system of handheld devices designed for classroom use. Teachers were…

  3. Climate wise case study compendium: Report 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This case study compendium is one of several Climate Wise tools available to help interested companies identify cost-effective options. Climate Wise, a private-public partnership program, is a key Federal initiative to return greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2000.

  4. Aerospace Mechanisms and Tribology Technology: Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter focuses attention on tribology technology practice related to vacuum tribology and space tribology. Two case studies describe aspects of real problems in sufficient detail for the engineer and the scientist to understand the tribological situations and the failures. The nature of the problems is analyzed and the range of potential solutions is evaluated. Courses of action are recommended.

  5. Aerospace Mechanisms and Tribology Technology: Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses attention on tribology technology practice related to vacuum tribology. A case study describes an aspect of a real problem in sufficient detail for the engineer and scientist to understand the tribological situation and the failure. The nature of the problem is analyzed and the tribological properties are examined.

  6. Interactive Videodisc Case Studies for Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Harless, William G.; Zier, Marcia A.; Duncan, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The TIME Project of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications is using interactive videodisc, microprocessor and voice recognition technology to create patient simulations for use in the training of medical students. These interactive case studies embody dramatic, lifelike portrayals of the social and medical conditions of a patient and allow uncued, verbal intervention by the student for independent clinical decisions.

  7. Delivering Online Examinations: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howarth, Jason; Messing, John; Altas, Irfan

    2004-01-01

    This paper represents a brief case study of delivering online examinations to a worldwide audience. These examinations are delivered in partnership with a commercial online testing company as part of the Industry Master's degree at Charles Sturt University (CSU). The Industry Master's degree is an academic program for students currently employed…

  8. Three Case Studies in Green Cleaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Education Standard, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents case studies from three districts implementing green cleaning. In 2008, Missouri passed legislation requiring state education officials to convene a committee of stakeholders with the purpose of developing green cleaning guidelines and specifications for schools. The guide, published by the Department of Elementary and…

  9. Forestry Case Studies. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Case Study CS-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storti, Craig

    Case studies of Peace Corps forestry projects in Morocco, Nepal, the Philippines, Chile, Guatemala, Chad, Liberia, and Niger are presented as a guide in aiding future forestry programming efforts. Each case study includes: (1) general information about the specific country; (2) an overview of forestry programs and efforts in that country; (3) a…

  10. Avio case study: the MRO process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corallo, Angelo; Dimartino, Angelo; Errico, Fabrizio; Giangreco, Enza

    This chapter presents the case study of the Avio Brindisi plant where a profound process of change has been in progress for a number of years. We use the TEKNE Project methodology of change to analyze the different aspects of the case, highlighting the firm's strategic, organizational and technological characteristics and the environment it operates in. In particular, we envisage a change in the plant's business model in response to the expansion of its client segments and a potential new approach to MRO operations based on advanced fleet management practices that would radically change the firm's organization and value network with respect to its MRO service offering, thereby yielding extensive global market opportunities.

  11. A Study of English Second Language Phonology. CUNYForum, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vago, Robert M.; Altenberg, Evelyn

    This study identified two types of interference between Hungarian and English: phonetic and phonological interference. Four native speakers of Hungarian who are second language speakers of English read a passage containing a wide variety of sounds in different phonological environments. A set of rules mapping American English onto…

  12. Empathy Development Through Case Study and Simulation.

    PubMed

    Mennenga, Heidi A; Bassett, Susan; Pasquariello, Libby

    2016-01-01

    Because empathy is integral to the nurse-patient relationship, nurse educators are challenged to explore teaching strategies that may aid in the development of empathy among students. The purpose of this study was to determine whether consistent exposure to a single patient through case study and simulation had an impact on empathy levels in senior-level baccalaureate nursing students. Results provide interesting conclusions for faculty members and offer a basis for ongoing discussion.

  13. Dyslipidemia in Psoriasis: A Case Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Nakhwa, Y. C.; Rashmi, R.; Basavaraj, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple observational studies have demonstrated associations of psoriasis with metabolic syndrome including obesity, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and osteoporosis. However there is paucity of Indian studies on dyslipidemia in psoriasis. The aim of this study was to assess the serum lipids in psoriasis and to investigate the association of lipids with disease severity and its duration. 100 cases of psoriasis (75/M, 25/F), between 15 and 72 years, were recruited with age and sex matched 73 controls. Using Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) cases were graded into mild, moderate, and severe psoriasis. Serum total cholesterol and triglycerides were analyzed using enzymatic method. Using independent t-test, significant elevation of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL) and very low density lipoprotein was observed (P < 0.05) when compared to controls. The levels of low density lipoproteins were comparable in cases and controls. Lipid aberrations in hypertensive patients were significant. There was a decrease in HDL levels with increase in disease severity. A fall in the levels of HDL was seen in cases with long term psoriasis. There is a strong association of dyslipidemia with psoriasis. There exist racial and ethnic variation in the prevalence of psoriasis; however, dyslipidemia is consistently seen in diverse population. Whether genetic factors are implicated in lipid derangements in psoriasis needs further research. PMID:27433517

  14. Seismic damage to pipeline; Case study

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, M.J.; Ayala, G. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1990-03-01

    A case study of damage to a welded steel pipeline in Mexico City, caused by the 1985 Michoacan earthquake, is presented. Seismic damage to pipelines in past earthquakes is briefly reviewed. The damage has typically been due to seismic wave propagation or permanent ground deformations, such as faulting, landslides, or lateral spreads. Physical characteristics of the case study pipeline, pertinent soil conditions, recorded ground motion, and observed seismic damage in Mexico City are then presented. The recorded ground motion in the lake zone of Mexico City suggests a significant contribution from Rayleigh waves. A previously developed analysis procedure is used to estimate stress induced by seismic wave propagation in the case study pipeline. The pipeline stress is a function of the amplitude and wavelength of the ground strain, maximum friction forces at the soil-pipe interface, and the stress-strain characteristics of the pipeline material. It is shown that the estimated stress is only slightly less than the local compressional buckling stress for the case history pipeline.

  15. Higher risk of orofacial clefts in children born to mothers with angina pectoris: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Czeizel, Andrew E; Vereczkey, Attila; Bánhidy, Ferenc

    2015-02-01

    Previously an unexpected association of maternal angina pectoris (MAP) during pregnancy with a higher risk of orofacial clefts in their children was found. There were three objectives of this study: (i) to evaluate the validity of MAP-diagnoses in the previous study and the recent history of mothers with MAP in a follow-up study; (ii) to estimate the prevalence of other congenital abnormalities in the offspring of mothers with MAP; and (iii) to analyze the possible effect of confounders for the risk of orofacial clefts. The large dataset of population-based Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996 was evaluated including 22 843 cases with congenital abnormalities and 38 151 controls without any defect. Twenty-two cases (0.10%) and 12 controls (0.03%) were born to mothers with medically recorded MAP (odds ratio [OR] with 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.7, 1.8-7.3). Of 22 cases, six had isolated cleft lip ± palate (OR with 95% CI: 13.3, 4.9-35.9) and two were affected with isolated cleft palate (OR with 95% CI: 10.5, 2.3-47.6). The diagnosis of MAP was confirmed in seven women visited at home in 2009-2010, two had recent myocardial infarction and five were smokers. There was no higher risk for other congenital abnormalities. In conclusion the higher risk of orofacial clefts was confirmed in the children of mothers with MAP and smoking may trigger the genetic predisposition of both MAP and orofacial clefts. However, the number of cases was limited and therefore further studies are needed to confirm or reject this theoretically and practically important observation.

  16. Legionella prevalence and risk of legionellosis in Hungarian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Barna, Zsófia; Kádár, Mihály; Kálmán, Emese; Róka, Eszter; Szax, Anita Sch; Vargha, Márta

    2015-12-01

    Nosocomial legionellosis is a growing concern worldwide. In Hungary, about 20% of the reported cases are health-care associated, but in the absence of legal regulation, environmental monitoring of Legionella is not routinely performed in hospitals. In the present study, 23 hospitals were investigated. The hot water distribution system was colonized by Legionella in over 90%; counts generally exceeded the public health limit value. Hot water temperature was critically low in all systems (<45 °C), and large differences (3-38 °C temperature drop) were observed within buildings, indicating insufficient circulation. Most facilities were older than 30 years (77%); however, new systems (n = 3) were also shown to be rapidly colonized at low hot water temperature. Vulnerable source of drinking water, complex distribution system, and large volume hot water storage increased the risk of Legionella prevalence (OR = 28.0, 27.3, 27.7, respectively). Risk management interventions (including thermal or chemical disinfection) were only efficient if the system operation was optimized. Though the risk factors were similar, in those hospitals where nosocomial legionellosis was reported, Legionella counts and the proportion of L. pneumophila sg 1 isolates were significantly higher. The results of environmental prevalence of legionellae in hospitals suggest that the incidence of nosocomial legionellosis is likely to be underreported. The observed colonization rates call for the introduction of a mandatory environmental monitoring scheme.

  17. Legionella prevalence and risk of legionellosis in Hungarian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Barna, Zsófia; Kádár, Mihály; Kálmán, Emese; Róka, Eszter; Szax, Anita Sch; Vargha, Márta

    2015-12-01

    Nosocomial legionellosis is a growing concern worldwide. In Hungary, about 20% of the reported cases are health-care associated, but in the absence of legal regulation, environmental monitoring of Legionella is not routinely performed in hospitals. In the present study, 23 hospitals were investigated. The hot water distribution system was colonized by Legionella in over 90%; counts generally exceeded the public health limit value. Hot water temperature was critically low in all systems (<45 °C), and large differences (3-38 °C temperature drop) were observed within buildings, indicating insufficient circulation. Most facilities were older than 30 years (77%); however, new systems (n = 3) were also shown to be rapidly colonized at low hot water temperature. Vulnerable source of drinking water, complex distribution system, and large volume hot water storage increased the risk of Legionella prevalence (OR = 28.0, 27.3, 27.7, respectively). Risk management interventions (including thermal or chemical disinfection) were only efficient if the system operation was optimized. Though the risk factors were similar, in those hospitals where nosocomial legionellosis was reported, Legionella counts and the proportion of L. pneumophila sg 1 isolates were significantly higher. The results of environmental prevalence of legionellae in hospitals suggest that the incidence of nosocomial legionellosis is likely to be underreported. The observed colonization rates call for the introduction of a mandatory environmental monitoring scheme. PMID:26689882

  18. Where Does Literary Study Happen? Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billington, Josie; Sperlinger, Tom

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the question of where literary study happens through reflection on two case studies. The article examines projects within two UK English departments, which were designed to allow students of literature to engage with local communities as part of their studies. The implications of this work are considered for curriculum…

  19. Case Studies for Teacher Evaluation: A Study of Effective Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Arthur E.; And Others

    This document presents the four case studies that constituted the major sources for "Teacher Evaluation: A Study of Effective Practices" by the same authors. The study was undertaken to find teacher evaluation processes that produce information useful to school districts in helping teachers improve or in making personnel decisions. The four school…

  20. Classification of pasture habitats by Hungarian herders in a steppe landscape (Hungary)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Landscape ethnoecology focuses on the ecological features of the landscape, how the landscape is perceived, and used by people who live in it. Though studying folk classifications of species has a long history, the comparative study of habitat classifications is just beginning. I studied the habitat classification of herders in a Hungarian steppe, and compared it to classifications of botanists and laymen. Methods For a quantitative analysis the picture sort method was used. Twenty-three pictures of 7-11 habitat types were sorted by 25 herders.’Density’ of pictures along the habitat gradient of the Hortobágy salt steppe was set as equal as possible, but pictures differed in their dominant species, wetness, season, etc. Before sorts, herders were asked to describe pictures to assure proper recognition of habitats. Results Herders classified the images into three main groups: (1) fertile habitats at the higher parts of the habitat gradient (partos, lit. on the shore); (2) saline habitats (szík, lit. salt or saline place), and (3) meadows and marshes (lapos, lit. flooded) at the lower end of the habitat gradient. Sharpness of delimitation changed along the gradient. Saline habitats were the most isolated from the rest. Botanists identified 6 groups. Laymen grouped habitats in a less coherent way. As opposed to my expectations, botanical classification was not more structured than that done by herders. I expected and found high correspondence between the classifications by herders, botanists and laymen. All tended to recognize similar main groups: wetlands, ”good grass” and dry/saline habitats. Two main factors could have been responsible for similar classifications: salient features correlated (e.g. salinity recognizable by herders and botanists but not by laymen correlated with the density of grasslands or height of vegetation recognizable also for laymen), or the same salient features were used as a basis for sorting (wetness, and abiotic stress

  1. Germline MLH1 and MSH2 mutational spectrum including frequent large genomic aberrations in Hungarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer families: Implications for genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Janos; Kovacs, Marietta E; Olah, Edith

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the prevalence of germline MLH1 and MSH2 gene mutations and evaluate the clinical characteristics of Hungarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families. METHODS: Thirty-six kindreds were tested for mutations using conformation sensitive gel electrophoreses, direct sequencing and also screening for genomic rearrangements applying multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). RESULTS: Eighteen germline mutations (50%) were identified, 9 in MLH1 and 9 in MSH2. Sixteen of these sequence alterations were considered pathogenic, the remaining two were non-conservative missense alterations occurring at highly conserved functional motifs. The majority of the definite pathogenic mutations (81%, 13/16) were found in families fulfilling the stringent Amsterdam I/II criteria, including three rearrangements revealed by MLPA (two in MSH2 and one in MLH1). However, in three out of sixteen HNPCC-suspected families (19%), a disease-causing alteration could be revealed. Furthermore, nine mutations described here are novel, and none of the sequence changes were found in more than one family. CONCLUSION: Our study describes for the first time the prevalence and spectrum of germline mismatch repair gene mutations in Hungarian HNPCC and suspected-HNPCC families. The results presented here suggest that clinical selection criteria should be relaxed and detection of genomic rearrangements should be included in genetic screening in this population. PMID:17569143

  2. [Pilomatricoma: a study of 22 cases].

    PubMed

    Nasreddine, Fatima Zahra; Hali, Fouzia; Chiheb, Soumiya

    2016-01-01

    Pilomatricoma is a common and benign skin tumor of childhood arising from the hair follicle matrix. It is an often misunderstood adnexal tumor, confused with other skin lesions. The most common sites of pilomatricome are the head and the neck. The aim of this study was to report a series of 22 cases with unusual forms collected in the dermatology department from January 2006 to May 2015. The study included 16 women and 6 men. The average age was 23.3 years (4- 80 years). Cervicofacial location was observed in 12 cases, 2 patients had multiple locations, a 4 year-old boy had frontotemporal location, a 14 year-old girl had face and forearm location and a 48 year-old patient had subungual location. Clinical features were typical in all cases, with subcutaneous nodules with a stony-hard consistency. All patients underwent excision of nodules under local anesthesia. Histological study supported a completely excised Malherbe's mummified tumor without malignancy. No patients relapsed. The originality of our study lies in the presence of exceptional locations in laterovertebral region, on limbs and in the subungual region and of unusual age of onset (80 year-old) as well as the presence of multiple tumor locations reported in 2 children. PMID:27516819

  3. [Congenital hepatic fibrosis. Study of 26 cases].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Mayans, J A; Mata Rivera, N; Mora Tiscareño, M A; Cervantes Bustamante, R; Vargas Gómez, M A; Aguinaga, V; Rocío, G

    1994-01-01

    We studied 26 children with congenital hepatic fibrosis during the period 1971-1993. About half of the children were about the 6 years old. Only two had brothers with same disease. The chief clinical manifestation was hematemesis associated or not with liver enlargement, predominantly of left lobe. Only one case showed fever and cholangitis. Liver function tests were usually normal. Twenty-two children had portal hypertension. Liver biopsy was of definitive for diagnosis. Seven children died.

  4. Case studies of soil in art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, C.; Landa, E. R.; Toland, A.; Wessolek, G.

    2015-08-01

    The material and symbolic appropriations of soil in artworks are numerous and diverse, spanning many centuries and artistic traditions, from prehistoric painting and ceramics to early Renaissance works in Western literature, poetry, paintings, and sculpture, to recent developments in film, architecture, and contemporary art. Case studies focused on painting, installation, and film are presented with the view of encouraging further exploration of art about, in, and with soil as a contribution to raising soil awareness.

  5. Neuropathology of supercentenarians - four autopsy case studies.

    PubMed

    Takao, Masaki; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Arai, Yasumichi; Mihara, Ban; Mimura, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Supercentenarians (aged 110 years old or more) are extremely rare in the world population (the number of living supercentenarians is estimated as 47 in the world), and details about their neuropathological information are limited. Based on previous studies, centenarians (aged 100-109 years old) exhibit several types of neuropathological changes, such as Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body disease pathology, primary age-related tauopathy, TDP-43 pathology, and hippocampal sclerosis. In the present study, we provide results from neuropathological analyses of four supercentenarian autopsy cases using conventional and immunohistochemical analysis for neurodegenerative disorders. In particular, we focused on the pathology of Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body disease, as well as the status of hippocampal sclerosis, TDP-43 pathology, aging-related tau astrogliopathy, and cerebrovascular diseases. Three cases were characterized as an "intermediate" level of Alzheimer's disease changes (NIA-AA guideline) and one was characterized as primary age-related tauopathy. TDP-43 deposits were present in the hippocampus in two cases. Neither Lewy body pathology nor hippocampal sclerosis was observed. Aging-related tau astrogliopathy was consistently observed, particularly in the basal forebrain. Small vessel diseases were also present, but they were relatively mild for cerebral amyloid-beta angiopathy and arteriolosclerosis. Although our study involved a small number of cases, the results provide a better understanding about human longevity. Neuropathological alterations associated with aging were mild to moderate in the supercentenarian brain, suggesting that these individuals might have some neuroprotective factors against aging. Future prospective studies and extensive molecular analyses are needed to determine the mechanisms of human longevity. PMID:27590044

  6. Functional Disorders in Neurology: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new consensus term Persistent Posturo-Perceptual Dizziness (PPPD), axial jerking/myoclonus as a functional movement disorder, functional speech symptoms, post-concussion disorder with functional cognitive symptoms and finally advances in treatment of dissociative seizures and functional motor disorders. PMID:27445247

  7. Shuttle Transportation System Case-Study Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Khadijah

    2012-01-01

    A case-study collection was developed for NASA's Space Shuttle Program. Using lessons learned and documented by NASA KSC engineers, analysts, and contractors, decades of information related to processing and launching the Space Shuttle was gathered into a single database. The goal was to provide educators with an alternative means to teach real-world engineering processes and to enhance critical thinking, decision making, and problem solving skills. Suggested formats were created to assist both external educators and internal NASA employees to develop and contribute their own case-study reports to share with other educators and students. Via group project, class discussion, or open-ended research format, students will be introduced to the unique decision making process related to Shuttle missions and development. Teaching notes, images, and related documents will be made accessible to the public for presentation of Space Shuttle reports. Lessons investigated included the engine cutoff (ECO) sensor anomaly which occurred during mission STS-114. Students will be presented with general mission infom1ation as well as an explanation of ECO sensors. The project will conclude with the design of a website that allows for distribution of information to the public as well as case-study report submissions from other educators online.

  8. National Environmental Change Information System Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Ritschard, R.; Estes, M. G., Jr.; Hatch, U.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Hydrology and Climate Center and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a fact-finding case study for the Data Management Working Group (DMWG), now referred to as the Data and Information Working Group (DIWG), of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) to determine the feasibility of an interagency National Environmental Change Information System (NECIS). In order to better understand the data and information needs of policy and decision makers at the national, state, and local level, the DIWG asked the case study team to choose a regional water resources issue in the southeastern United States that had an impact on a diverse group of stakeholders. The southeastern United States was also of interest because the region experiences interannual climatic variations and impacts due to El Nino and La Nina. Jointly, with input from the DIWG, a focus on future water resources planning in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River basins of Alabama, Georgia, and Florida was selected. A tristate compact and water allocation formula is currently being negotiated between the states and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) that will affect the availability of water among competing uses within the ACF River basin. All major reservoirs on the ACF are federally owned and operated by the U.S. Army COE. A similar two-state negotiation is ongoing that addresses the water allocations in the adjacent Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) River basin, which extends from northwest Georgia to Mobile Bay. The ACF and ACT basins are the subject of a comprehensive river basin study involving many stakeholders. The key objectives of this case study were to identify specific data and information needs of key stakeholders in the ACF region, determine what capabilities are needed to provide the most practical response to these user requests, and to identify any limitations in the use of federal data and information. The NECIS case study followed the terms of reference

  9. Is there a reduction of congenital abnormalities in the offspring of diabetic pregnant women after folic acid supplementation? A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bánhidy, Ferenc; Dakhlaoui, Abdallah; Puhó, Erzsébet H; Czeizel, Andrew A E

    2011-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to estimate the preventive effect of folic acid for structural birth defects (i.e. congenital abnormalities [CAs]) in the offspring of pregnant women with diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM-1). The occurrence of medically recorded DM-1 in pregnant women who had malformed fetuses/newborns (cases) and delivered healthy babies (controls) with or without folic acid supplementation was compared in the population-based Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities. The case group included 22,843 offspring, and there were 79 (0.35%) pregnant women with DM-1, while the control group comprised of 38,151 newborns, and 88 (0.23%) had mothers with DM-1. Case mothers with DM-1 associated with a higher risk of total rate of CAs in their offspring (OR with 95% CI: 1.5, 1.1-2.0) compared to the total rate of CAs in the offspring of non-diabetic case mothers. This higher risk can be explained by four specific types/groups of CAs: isolated renal a/dysgenesis; obstructive CA of the urinary tract; cardiovascular CAs; and multiple CAs, namely caudal dysplasia sequence. However, there was no higher rate of total CAs in the children of pregnant women with DM-1 after folic acid supplementation; in addition, neural-tube defect and renal a/dysgenesis did not occur. However, this benefit cannot be explained by the CA reduction effect of folic acid during the critical period of major CAs. In conclusion, there was a certain reduction in maternal teratogenic effect of DM-1 after folic acid supplementation during pregnancy, but the explanation of this effect requires further study.

  10. Case study of isosurface extraction algorithm performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, P M; Hansen, C D; Shen, H; Schikore, D

    1999-12-14

    Isosurface extraction is an important and useful visualization method. Over the past ten years, the field has seen numerous isosurface techniques published leaving the user in a quandary about which one should be used. Some papers have published complexity analysis of the techniques yet empirical evidence comparing different methods is lacking. This case study presents a comparative study of several representative isosurface extraction algorithms. It reports and analyzes empirical measurements of execution times and memory behavior for each algorithm. The results show that asymptotically optimal techniques may not be the best choice when implemented on modern computer architectures.

  11. Using Case Studies to Teach About Global Issues, Bali: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, James M.

    1974-01-01

    The South Pacific island of Bali is used as a case study of overpopulation and food shortage. A brief description of the resources, the typical lifestyle of the Balinese farmer, and possible teaching techniques are given. (DE)

  12. The case study of biomaterials and biominerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    The teaching of biomaterials as case study by on-line platform , susceptible to develop both individually and in groups, got different objectives proposed by the European Higher Education System, among which include: participate actively in the teaching-learning process by students, interpreting situations, adapt processes and solutions. It also improves oral and written communication, analytical skills and synthesis and also the ability to think critically. Biomaterials have their origin in biominerals. These are solid inorganic compounds of defined structure, consisting of molecular control mechanisms that operate in biological systems. Its main functions are: structural support, a reservoir of essential elements, sensors, mechanical protection and storage of toxic elements. Following the demand of materials compatible with certain functional systems of our body, developed biomaterials. Always meet the condition of biocompatibility. Should be tolerated by the body and do not provoke rejection. This involves a comprehensive study of physiological conditions and the anatomy of the body where a biomaterial has to be implemented. The possibility of generating new materials from biominerals has a major impact in medicine and other fields could reach as geology, construction, crystallography, etc. While the study of these issues is in its infancy today, can be viewed as an impact on the art and future technology. Planning case study that students would prepare its report for discussion in subgroups. Occurs then the pooling of individual analysis, joint case discussion and adoption by the subgroup of a consensual solution to the problem. The teacher as facilitator and coordinator of the final case analysis, sharing leads to group-wide class and said the unanimous decision reached by the students and gives his opinion on the resolution of the case. REFERENCES D.P. Ausubel. Psicología Educativa. Un punto de vista cognoscitivo. Trillas. Ed. 1983. E.W. Eisner. Procesos

  13. Terahertz applications in cultural heritage: case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannacci, D.; Martos-Levif, D.; Walker, G. C.; Menu, M.; Detalle, V.

    2013-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and imaging is a non-destructive, non-contact, non-invasive technology emerging as a tool for the analysis of cultural heritage. THz Time Domain Spectroscopy (TDS) techniques have the ability to retrieve information from different layers within a stratified sample, that enable the identification of hidden sub-layers in the case of paints and mural paintings. In this paper, we present the THz TDS2 system developed in the European Commission's 7th Framework Program project CHARISMA [grant agreement no. 228330]. Bespoke single processing algorithms; including a deconvolution algorithm can be deployed to increase the resolution and the global performance of the system. The potential and impact of this work is demonstrated through two case studies of mural paintings, where the capability to reveal the stratigraphy of the artworks is demonstrated.

  14. [The prognostic role of expression of p16 tumor suppressor gene in Hungarian patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Vánkos, Judit Borbála; Piurkó, Violetta; Suba, Zsuzsanna; Németh, Zsolt; Tímár, József; Kenessey, István

    2015-12-01

    Beside smoking and alcohol consumption, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common risk factor of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck region (HNSCC). The latter group of patients associates with better prognosis. During HPV infection, the level of p16 tumor suppressor elevates, which could give an additional opportunity for diagnosis: instead of molecular diagnostic tools, the application of immunohistochemistry is acceptable. However, the majority of the published studies focused on the whole head and neck region and did not separately handled cancers of the oral cavity. Our recent work analyzed the expression of p16 in 67 oral squamous cancers, and compared to routine clinicopathologic parameters. From surgical samples tissue microarray blocks were prepared and expression of p16 as well as other molecular markers (p53, Ki67, EGFR) were studied. In contrast to previous studies on HNSCC, with the exception of recurrence, the expression of p16 was not found associated to clinicopathologic parameters. Nuclear stabilization of p53 appeared mainly in younger patients. The expression of p53 and EGFR significantly correlated to each other. We concluded that traditional molecular categorization of HNSCC could not be completely adaptable to Hungarian samples. Potential coexposition of common etiological factors (e.g. HPV, smoking, alcohol) could blur borders between distinct categories.

  15. Detection of a Tumor Suppressor Gene Variant Predisposing to Colorectal Cancer in an 18th Century Hungarian Mummy

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Michal; Hershkovitz, Israel; Sklan, Ella H.; Kahila Bar-Gal, Gila; Pap, Ildikó; Szikossy, Ildikó; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are common and strongly associated with the development of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. While extensively studied in modern populations, reports on visceral tumors in ancient populations are scarce. To the best of our knowledge, genetic characterization of mutations associated with colorectal cancer in ancient specimens has not yet been described. In this study we have sequenced hotspots for mutations in the APC gene isolated from 18th century naturally preserved human Hungarian mummies. While wild type APC sequences were found in two mummies, we discovered the E1317Q missense mutation, known to be a colorectal cancer predisposing mutation, in a large intestine tissue of an 18th century mummy. Our data suggests that this genetic predisposition to cancer already existed in the pre-industrialization era. This study calls for similar investigations of ancient specimens from different periods and geographical locations to be conducted and shared for the purpose of obtaining a larger scale analysis that will shed light on past cancer epidemiology and on cancer evolution. PMID:26863316

  16. Measuring Computer Science Knowledge Level of Hungarian Students Specialized in Informatics with Romanian Students Attending a Science Course or a Mathematics-Informatics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiss, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of Information Technology knowledge of Hungarian and Romanian students was made with the help of a self developed web based Informatics Test. The goal of this research is an analysis of the Computer Science knowledge level of Hungarian and Romanian students attending a Science course or a Mathematics-Informatics course. Analysed was…

  17. Socialization and the Child Rearing Practice. [Proceedings from the] Fenno-Hungarian Conference on Developmental Psychology (4th, Debrecen, Hungary, October 4-6, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugar-Kadar, Julia, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The fourth meeting of the Fenno-Hungarian Conferences on Developmental Psychology had as its theme "Socialization and the Child-Rearing Practice. The conference consisted of three Symposia. The first symposium, "Results of the collaborations on the basis of the series of the Fenno-Hungarian conferences," contains the following papers; (1)…

  18. Case Study Evaluations: A Case in Point. An Illustrative Report and Mathodological Analysis of Case Study Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcolm, Cliff; Welch, Wayne

    To provide a real life example of case study methodology for educational evaluation, a naturalistic study of a Catholic junior college in Minneapolis, Minnesota is presented. Conducted as part of the ongoing evaluation of a federally supported project, the study provides an external observer's descriptive portrayal of the school, plus the…

  19. Wind to Hydrogen in California: Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Antonia, O.; Saur, G.

    2012-08-01

    This analysis presents a case study in California for a large scale, standalone wind electrolysis site. This is a techno-economic analysis of the 40,000 kg/day renewable production of hydrogen and subsequent delivery by truck to a fueling station in the Los Angeles area. This quantity of hydrogen represents about 1% vehicle market penetration for a city such as Los Angeles (assuming 0.62 kg/day/vehicle and 0.69 vehicles/person) [8]. A wind site near the Mojave Desert was selected for proximity to the LA area where hydrogen refueling stations are already built.

  20. Fusion Process Model Implementation Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rupinder; Sengupta, Jyotsna

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we have discussed, three case studies. The first one is applied at Web Shrub Solutions, a software development organization, second is applied at web based job portal (stepintojob.com) for leading Indian firm and the third is web design and development for SCL limited, to observe the results of Fusion Process Model. Fusion Process Model follows component driven approach; it applies 3C Model to generalize the process of solving the problem in each phase, which provides firm control over the software development process.

  1. Metrology in Pharmaceutical Industry - A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuvamoto, Priscila D.; Fermam, Ricardo K. S.; Nascimento, Elizabeth S.

    2016-07-01

    Metrology is recognized by improving production process, increasing the productivity, giving more reliability to the measurements and consequently, it impacts in the economy of a country. Pharmaceutical area developed GMP (Good Manufacture Practice) requeriments, with no introduction of metrological concepts. However, due to Nanomedicines, it is expected this approach and the consequent positive results. The aim of this work is to verify the level of metrology implementation in a Brazilian pharmaceutical industry, using a case study. The purpose is a better mutual comprehension by both areas, acting together and governmental support to robustness of Brazilian pharmaceutical area.

  2. Reinforcement learning: Solving two case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Ana Filipa; Silva, Pedro; dos Santos, Cristina Peixoto

    2012-09-01

    Reinforcement Learning algorithms offer interesting features for the control of autonomous systems, such as the ability to learn from direct interaction with the environment, and the use of a simple reward signalas opposed to the input-outputs pairsused in classic supervised learning. The reward signal indicates the success of failure of the actions executed by the agent in the environment. In this work, are described RL algorithmsapplied to two case studies: the Crawler robot and the widely known inverted pendulum. We explore RL capabilities to autonomously learn a basic locomotion pattern in the Crawler, andapproach the balancing problem of biped locomotion using the inverted pendulum.

  3. Maternal Genetic Composition of a Medieval Population from a Hungarian-Slavic Contact Zone in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Csákyová, Veronika; Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Csősz, Aranka; Nagy, Melinda; Fusek, Gabriel; Langó, Péter; Bauer, Miroslav; Mende, Balázs Gusztáv; Makovický, Pavol; Bauerová, Mária

    2016-01-01

    The genetic composition of the medieval populations of Central Europe has been poorly investigated to date. In particular, the region of modern-day Slovakia is a blank spot in archaeogenetic research. This paper reports the study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in ancient samples from the 9th-12th centuries originating from the cemeteries discovered in Nitra-Šindolka and Čakajovce, located in western Slovakia (Central Europe). This geographical region is interesting to study because its medieval multi-ethnic population lived in the so-called contact zone of the territory of the Great Moravian and later Hungarian state formations. We described 16 different mtDNA haplotypes in 19 individuals, which belong to the most widespread European mtDNA haplogroups: H, J, T, U and R0. Using comparative statistical and population genetic analyses, we showed the differentiation of the European gene pool in the medieval period. We also demonstrated the heterogeneous genetic characteristics of the investigated population and its affinity to the populations of modern Europe.

  4. Maternal Genetic Composition of a Medieval Population from a Hungarian-Slavic Contact Zone in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Csákyová, Veronika; Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Csősz, Aranka; Nagy, Melinda; Fusek, Gabriel; Langó, Péter; Bauer, Miroslav; Mende, Balázs Gusztáv; Makovický, Pavol; Bauerová, Mária

    2016-01-01

    The genetic composition of the medieval populations of Central Europe has been poorly investigated to date. In particular, the region of modern-day Slovakia is a blank spot in archaeogenetic research. This paper reports the study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in ancient samples from the 9th–12th centuries originating from the cemeteries discovered in Nitra-Šindolka and Čakajovce, located in western Slovakia (Central Europe). This geographical region is interesting to study because its medieval multi-ethnic population lived in the so-called contact zone of the territory of the Great Moravian and later Hungarian state formations. We described 16 different mtDNA haplotypes in 19 individuals, which belong to the most widespread European mtDNA haplogroups: H, J, T, U and R0. Using comparative statistical and population genetic analyses, we showed the differentiation of the European gene pool in the medieval period. We also demonstrated the heterogeneous genetic characteristics of the investigated population and its affinity to the populations of modern Europe. PMID:26963389

  5. Nurse practitioner work: A case study.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Sharon; Blanchard, Denise; Doldissen, Rebecca; Maher, Laura; Stoddart, Kiea; Johnston, Nicole; Hungerford, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Within any professional practice, knowledge developments to support service delivery and to understand roles inherent within that practice context are critical. The purpose of this article is to present findings from case study research that used the AUSPRAC Research Toolkit Interview Schedule and to propose an additional theme to the Interview Schedule. Case Study method was used to explore the role of a nurse practitioner (NP) within a specific context of practice in an Australian Healthcare institution. Three semi-structured interviews with a NP using the AUSPRAC Research Toolkit Interview Schedule and one additional interview were employed. Data was analysed where initial free coding, then theme generation contributed to knowledge development. The AUSPRAC Research Toolkit Interview Schedule generated knowledge about the NP role. Themes identified for interviews in the Schedule were: the organisation of care, team functioning and patient service. Analysis of data from these themes identified that information related to ongoing development of professional practice was not forthcoming from the participant. The authors recommend adding a fourth theme to the Interview Schedule to enable exploration of the professional elements of the NP role.

  6. Prehospital airway management: A prospective case study.

    PubMed

    Wilbers, N E R; Hamaekers, A E W; Jansen, J; Wijering, S C; Thomas, O; Wilbers-van Rens, R; van Zundert, A A J

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a one-year prospective study involving a prehospital Emergency Medical Service in the Netherlands to investigate the incidence of failed or difficult prehospital endotracheal intubation. During the study period the paramedics were asked to fill in a registration questionnaire after every endotracheal intubation. Of the 26,271 patient contacts, 256 endotracheal intubations were performed by paramedics in one year. Endotracheal intubation failed in 12 patients (4.8%). In 12.0% of 249 patients, a Cormack and Lehane grade III laryngoscopy was reported and a grade IV laryngoscopy was reported in 10.4%. The average number of endotracheal intubations per paramedic in one year was 4.2 and varied from zero to a maximum of 12. The median time between arrival on the scene and a positive capnograph was 7 min.38 s in the case of a Cormack and Lehane grade I laryngoscopy and 14 min.58 s in the case of a Cormack and Lehane grade 4 laryngoscopy. The incidence of endotracheal intubations performed by Dutch paramedics in one year was low, but endotracheal intubation was successful in 95.2%, which is comparable with findings in international literature. Early capnography should be used consistently in prehospital airway management. PMID:21612142

  7. Case Study of the California Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

    2005-05-01

    California is the largest cement producing state in theU.S., accounting for between 10 percent and 15 percent of U.S. cementproduction and cement industry employment. The cement industry inCalifornia consists of 31 sites that consume large amounts of energy,annually: 1,600 GWh of electricity, 22 million therms of natural gas, 2.3million tons of coal, 0.25 tons of coke, and smaller amounts of wastematerials, including tires. The case study summarized in this paperfocused on providing background information, an assessment ofenergy-efficiency opportunities and barriers, and program recommendationsthat can be used by program planners to better target products to thecement industry. The primary approach to this case study involvedwalk-through surveys of customer facilities and in depth interviews withcustomer decision makers and subsequent analysis of collected data. Inaddition, a basic review of the cement production process was developed,and summary cement industry energy and economic data were collected, andanalyzed. The analysis of secondary data provides background informationon the cement industry and identification of potential energy-efficiencyopportunities. The interviews provide some understanding of the customerperspective about implementation of energy-efficiencyprojects.

  8. Formal Methods Case Studies for DO-333

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, Darren; Miller, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    RTCA DO-333, Formal Methods Supplement to DO-178C and DO-278A provides guidance for software developers wishing to use formal methods in the certification of airborne systems and air traffic management systems. The supplement identifies the modifications and additions to DO-178C and DO-278A objectives, activities, and software life cycle data that should be addressed when formal methods are used as part of the software development process. This report presents three case studies describing the use of different classes of formal methods to satisfy certification objectives for a common avionics example - a dual-channel Flight Guidance System. The three case studies illustrate the use of theorem proving, model checking, and abstract interpretation. The material presented is not intended to represent a complete certification effort. Rather, the purpose is to illustrate how formal methods can be used in a realistic avionics software development project, with a focus on the evidence produced that could be used to satisfy the verification objectives found in Section 6 of DO-178C.

  9. [Scientometrics and publishing in Hungarian medical science. Ethical and technical issues].

    PubMed

    Fazekas, T; Varró, V

    2001-11-11

    The authors present an account of the main ethical and technical aspects relating to the measurement of medical publication activities and the compilation of publications lists. It is demonstrated that the Anglo-American scientometric system (Institute for Scientific Information, USA) is currently gaining stable ground in Hungary. At the same time, however, there continues to be a place for a national publication index used to assess Hungarian-language publication activity, for the two systems conveniently supplement one another. The criterion system of medical publishing established by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) is described in detail, and is recommended for wide-ranging application in Hungary.

  10. Nightmares and psychotic decompensation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Levin, R; Daly, R S

    1998-01-01

    There have been numerous reports in the literature on the descriptive similarities between a severe nightmare and an acute psychotic episode. Nightmares may be a prelude to psychotic decompensation, and it has been suggested that frequent lifelong nightmares may even be diagnostic of an underlying vulnerability to psychosis. In this report, we present a case study of a 40-year old female experiencing chronic paranoid schizophrenia, whose two witnessed psychotic relapses in the hospital were immediately preceded by intense and vivid nightmare attacks. Significantly, the content of these nocturnal dreams was thematically consistent with her waking hallucinations, suggesting a direct continuity between these experiences. We propose that further systematic study of the dreams and nightmares of individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia may be particularly useful in understanding their phenomenological experience.

  11. Scheduling job shop - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abas, M.; Abbas, A.; Khan, W. A.

    2016-08-01

    The scheduling in job shop is important for efficient utilization of machines in the manufacturing industry. There are number of algorithms available for scheduling of jobs which depend on machines tools, indirect consumables and jobs which are to be processed. In this paper a case study is presented for scheduling of jobs when parts are treated on available machines. Through time and motion study setup time and operation time are measured as total processing time for variety of products having different manufacturing processes. Based on due dates different level of priority are assigned to the jobs and the jobs are scheduled on the basis of priority. In view of the measured processing time, the times for processing of some new jobs are estimated and for efficient utilization of the machines available an algorithm is proposed and validated.

  12. Automated semantic annotation of rare disease cases: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Taboada, Maria; Rodríguez, Hadriana; Martínez, Diego; Pardo, María; Sobrido, María Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: As the number of clinical reports in the peer-reviewed medical literature keeps growing, there is an increasing need for online search tools to find and analyze publications on patients with similar clinical characteristics. This problem is especially critical and challenging for rare diseases, where publications of large series are scarce. Through an applied example, we illustrate how to automatically identify new relevant cases and semantically annotate the relevant literature about patient case reports to capture the phenotype of a rare disease named cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis. Results: Our results confirm that it is possible to automatically identify new relevant case reports with a high precision and to annotate them with a satisfactory quality (74% F-measure). Automated annotation with an emphasis to entirely describe all phenotypic abnormalities found in a disease may facilitate curation efforts by supplying phenotype retrieval and assessment of their frequency. Availability and Supplementary information: http://www.usc.es/keam/Phenotype Annotation/. Database URL: http://www.usc.es/keam/PhenotypeAnnotation/ PMID:24903515

  13. Anthocyanin composition, antioxidant efficiency, and α-amylase inhibitor activity of different Hungarian sour cherry varieties (Prunus cerasus L.).

    PubMed

    Homoki, Judit R; Nemes, Andrea; Fazekas, Erika; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Balogh, Péter; Gál, Ferenc; Al-Asri, Jamil; Mortier, Jérémie; Wolber, Gerhard; Babinszky, László; Remenyik, Judit

    2016-03-01

    Five Hungarian sour cherry cultivars were studied to determine their anthocyanin contents and their possible inhibitory properties. The water and methanol soluble antioxidant capacities were separately assessed by photoluminescence showing values ranged from 3.4μgmg(-1) to 15.4μgmg(-1), respectively. The "VN1" variety (selected from "Csengődi csokros") showed the highest antioxidant capacity. The anthocyanin content, measured by pH differential method or isolated by solid phase extraction, was the highest also in "VN1". Correlation was found between the anthocyanin content and the high antioxidant capacity. The main anthocyanin components were cyanidin-3-O-rutinoside and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside. The presence of malvidin-3,5-O-diglycoside was verified by MALDI-TOF MS. Sour cherry extracts and selected anthocyanins inhibited the human salivary alpha-amylase catalyzed hydrolysis competitively. The lowest IC50 value, 55μgmL(-1) or 80μM, was measured for malvidin-3,5-O-diglycoside, for which possible binding modes within the alpha-amylase active site could be investigated in silico using molecular docking and molecular dynamics. PMID:26471548

  14. Anthocyanin composition, antioxidant efficiency, and α-amylase inhibitor activity of different Hungarian sour cherry varieties (Prunus cerasus L.).

    PubMed

    Homoki, Judit R; Nemes, Andrea; Fazekas, Erika; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Balogh, Péter; Gál, Ferenc; Al-Asri, Jamil; Mortier, Jérémie; Wolber, Gerhard; Babinszky, László; Remenyik, Judit

    2016-03-01

    Five Hungarian sour cherry cultivars were studied to determine their anthocyanin contents and their possible inhibitory properties. The water and methanol soluble antioxidant capacities were separately assessed by photoluminescence showing values ranged from 3.4μgmg(-1) to 15.4μgmg(-1), respectively. The "VN1" variety (selected from "Csengődi csokros") showed the highest antioxidant capacity. The anthocyanin content, measured by pH differential method or isolated by solid phase extraction, was the highest also in "VN1". Correlation was found between the anthocyanin content and the high antioxidant capacity. The main anthocyanin components were cyanidin-3-O-rutinoside and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside. The presence of malvidin-3,5-O-diglycoside was verified by MALDI-TOF MS. Sour cherry extracts and selected anthocyanins inhibited the human salivary alpha-amylase catalyzed hydrolysis competitively. The lowest IC50 value, 55μgmL(-1) or 80μM, was measured for malvidin-3,5-O-diglycoside, for which possible binding modes within the alpha-amylase active site could be investigated in silico using molecular docking and molecular dynamics.

  15. Effects of different lairage times after long distance transportation on carcass and meat quality characteristics of Hungarian Simmental bulls.

    PubMed

    Teke, Bulent; Akdag, Filiz; Ekiz, Bulent; Ugurlu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of three lairage times (24 h, 48 h and 72 h) on the meat quality of tame trained to lead Hungarian Simmental bulls subjected to long commercial transportation of approximately 1800 km. A total of 30 bulls, with an average age of 24 months, were used. During the lairage, bulls received 0.5 kg concentrate feed per animal per day and ad libitum access to the hay and water. As the lairage duration increased, the pH(ult) decreased (P<0.05). Bulls lairaged for 24 h had lower L*, b* and H* values than those lairaged for 48 h and 72 h (P<0.05). The effect of lairage time on WHC, cooking loss and Warner-Bratzler shear force values was not significant. The b* value was considered the best predictor of muscle pH(ult). In conclusion, 72 h quiet lairage time is recommended after transportation in order to prevent the adverse effects of transportation on meat quality. PMID:23916957

  16. Microcomputer versus mainframe simulations: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bengtson, Neal M.

    1988-01-01

    The research was conducted to two parts. Part one consisted of a study of the feasibility of running the Space Transportation Model simulation on an office IBM-AT. The second part was to design simulation runs so as to study the effects of certain performance factors on the execution of the simulation model. The results of this research are given in the two reports which follow: Microcomputer vs. Mainframe Simulation: A Case Study and Fractional Factorial Designs of Simulation Runs for the Space Transportation System Operations Model. In the first part, a DOS batch job was written in order to simplify the execution of the simulation model on an office microcomputer. A comparison study was then performed of running the model on NASA-Langley's mainframe computer vs. running on the IBM-AT microcomputer. This was done in order to find the advantages and disadvantages of running the model on each machine with the objective of determining if running of the office PC was practical. The study concluded that it was. The large number of performance parameters in the Space Transportation model precluded running a full factorial design needed to determine the most significant design factors. The second report gives several suggested fractional factorial designs which require far fewer simulation runs in order to determine which factors have significant influence on results.

  17. Building Energy Information Systems: User Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Granderson, Jessica; Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-03-22

    Measured energy performance data are essential to national efforts to improve building efficiency, as evidenced in recent benchmarking mandates, and in a growing body of work that indicates the value of permanent monitoring and energy information feedback. This paper presents case studies of energy information systems (EIS) at four enterprises and university campuses, focusing on the attained energy savings, and successes and challenges in technology use and integration. EIS are broadly defined as performance monitoring software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems to store, analyze and display building energy information. Case investigations showed that the most common energy savings and instances of waste concerned scheduling errors, measurement and verification, and inefficient operations. Data quality is critical to effective EIS use, and is most challenging at the subsystem or component level, and with non-electric energy sources. Sophisticated prediction algorithms may not be well understood but can be applied quite effectively, and sites with custom benchmark models or metrics are more likely to perform analyses external to the EIS. Finally, resources and staffing were identified as a universal challenge, indicating a need to identify additional models of EIS use that extend beyond exclusive in-house use, to analysis services.

  18. Microgravity isolation system design: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, R. D.; Knospe, C. R.; Allaire, P. E.; Grodsinsky, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Many acceleration-sensitive, microgravity science experiments will require active vibration isolation from manned orbiters on which they will be mounted. The isolation problem, especially in the case of a tethered payload, is a complex three-dimensional one that is best suited to modern-control design methods. In this paper, extended H(sub 2) synthesis is used to design an active isolator (i.e., controller) for a realistic single-input-multiple-output (SIMO) microgravity vibration isolation problem. Complex mu-analysis methods are used to analyze the isolation system with respect to sensor, actuator, and umbilical uncertainties. The paper fully discusses the design process employed and the insights gained. This design case study provides a practical approach for isolation problems of greater complexity. Issues addressed include a physically intuitive state-space description of the system, disturbance and noise filters, filters for frequency weighting, and uncertainty models. The controlled system satisfies all the performance specifications and is robust with respect to model uncertainties.

  19. Obsessional Slowness in College Students: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Aleta

    2014-01-01

    Cases of obsessional slowness, a variant of obsessive compulsive disorder, have been documented in case literature regarding relatively low functioning populations. However, obsessional slowness can also present in higher functioning populations, including college and graduate students, as illustrated here by three case examples from a competitive…

  20. Case Studies for School Administrators: Managing Change in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benham, Maenette K. P. Ah Nee

    This book examines case-based learning in educational leadership courses, discusses case-based learning as an educational tool, exemplifies methods of writing a case study, and contains 14 case-studies by teachers and administrators. "Stakeholders in a House of Cards," by Audrey Burgher, discusses integrating technology with innovation. "Reforming…

  1. Case study on industrial hazmat response teams.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Shelly J

    2009-11-01

    In 1991, Amway formed an industrial hazardous materials (hazmat) team in order to respond quickly and efficiently to potential chemical spills. The company's goals were, and still are today, to protect employees, the environment and the local community, and to reduce the amount of resulting downtime. In 1991, the hazmat team was very well funded, enabling it to become a discrete department with its own management staff and nearly 100 hazmat volunteers. Due to changes in the business climate, Amway reorganised in 2000/01, and the hazmat team became part of a company that incorporated contract work into its scope. When this reorganisation occurred, the hazmat team was thoroughly re-evaluated. Its response function was maintained, but was systematically reinvented in the most lean way practicable while still meeting corporate goals. This case study represents Amway's hazmat team's journey through the evaluation process and subsequent reorganisation.

  2. Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Spiro, Jon; Theodosiou, Maria; Doshi, Sagar

    2014-02-01

    Rates of survival after cardiac arrest are low and correlate with the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Devices that deliver automated CPR (A-CPR) can provide sustained and effective chest compressions, which are especially useful during patient transfer and while simultaneous invasive procedures are being performed. The use of such devices can also release members of resuscitation teams for other work. This article presents a case study involving a man with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock and pulmonary oedema. It describes how ED nursing and medical teams worked together to deliver A-CPR, discusses the use of A-CPR devices in a tertiary cardiac centre, and highlights the advantages of using such devices.

  3. Unraveling phonological conspiracies: A case study.

    PubMed

    Dinnsen, Daniel A; Gierut, Judith A; Morrisette, Michele L; Rose, Darcy E

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on three seemingly unrelated error patterns in the sound system of a child with a phonological delay, Child 218 (male, age 4 years 6 months) and ascribes those error patterns to a larger conspiracy to eliminate fricatives from the phonetic inventory. Employing Optimality Theory for its advantages in characterizing conspiracies, our analysis offers a unified account of the observed repairs. The contextual restrictions on those repairs are, moreover, attributed to early developmental prominence effects, which are independently manifested in another error pattern involving rhotic consonants. Comparisons are made with a published case study involving a different implementation of the same conspiracy, the intent being to disambiguate the force behind certain error patterns. The clinical implications of the account are also considered. PMID:25000372

  4. LM2500+ Brush Seal Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haaser, Fred G.

    2006-01-01

    The LM2500+ industrial aeroderivative gas turbine, a 25% enhanced power derivative of the LM2500 gas turbine, recently completed its development test program during the period 5/96 - 10/96. Early in the engine program a Quality Function Deployment (QFD) process was used to determine customer needs for this project.The feedback obtained from the QFD process showed without doubt that gas turbine customers now emphasize product reliability and availability at the top of their needs. One area of development on the LM2500+ was to investigate the use of a brush seal as a means to reduce undesirable turbine cooling leakages within the turbine mid frame in order to enhance part life. This presentation presents a case study on the factors that went into evaluating a brush seal during engine test, test results, and the ultimate decision not to implement the brush seal for cost and other reasons.

  5. Case studies in outcome-based education.

    PubMed

    Davis, Margery H; Amin, Zubair; Grande, Joseph P; O'Neill, Angela E; Pawlina, Wojciech; Viggiano, Thomas R; Zuberi, Rukhsana

    2007-09-01

    Outcome-based education is one of the most significant global developments in medical education in recent years. This paper presents four case studies of outcome-based education from medical schools in different parts of the world; Scotland; USA; Pakistan; and Singapore. The outcome-based curricula have either been in place for some time, are evolving or are at the planning proposal stage. The outcomes, change process and implementation of the outcome-based approach are described. Variation in the extent to which each medical school has implemented outcome-based education is discussed and key points for successful implementation are highlighted. This paper is based on the pre-conference symposium "outcome-based curricula: global perspectives" presented by the authors at the 4th Asia Pacific Medical Education Conference (APMEC) in Singapore, 8-11 February, 2007. PMID:18236260

  6. Unmasking Cleckley's psychopath: assessing historical case studies.

    PubMed

    DeShong, Hilary L; Helle, Ashley C; Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N

    2016-05-01

    The current study investigated original case descriptions of psychopathy (Cleckley, 1941) in relation to current conceptualizations and general personality traits. Attorneys, forensic psychologists and clinical faculty members completed ratings of psychopathy and personality after reading vignettes based on Cleckley's descriptions of a psychopath. The results suggest that professionals' ratings are consistent with current conceptualizations of psychopathy. Furthermore, the five-factor model (FFM) personality traits of the vignettes aligned with the current literature on the FFM and psychopathy (i.e. low neuroticism, conscientiousness and agreeableness). The results further supported that a general trait model, like the FFM, may be well suited to describe the underlying personality traits of psychopathy. Gender differences were also examined. PMID:26931520

  7. Telepractice for Pediatric Dysphagia: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; Roth, Melissa; Sheppard, Justine Joan

    2014-01-01

    A closed-ended intensive pediatric swallowing telepractice program was developed and piloted in one pediatric patient with Opitz BBB/G and Asperger’s Syndromes, oropharyngeal dysphagia and aerophagia. The present study is a case report. Outcome variables included behavioral, swallowing and quality of life variables, and were assessed at baseline and at the end of the four-week program. Selective variables were also assessed at a follow-up family interview four weeks post program completion. Over the four-week intervention period, the patient demonstrated substantial improvements in: oral acceptance of eating-related objects and a variety of foods (behavioral variable), timing of voluntary saliva swallows and aerophagia levels (swallowing variables) and quality of life. Follow-up interview analysis showed that most skills were retained or improved one-month post intervention. This intensive telepractice program proved to be feasible and effective for this pediatric patient with dysphagia. PMID:25945217

  8. Case study on industrial hazmat response teams.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Shelly J

    2009-11-01

    In 1991, Amway formed an industrial hazardous materials (hazmat) team in order to respond quickly and efficiently to potential chemical spills. The company's goals were, and still are today, to protect employees, the environment and the local community, and to reduce the amount of resulting downtime. In 1991, the hazmat team was very well funded, enabling it to become a discrete department with its own management staff and nearly 100 hazmat volunteers. Due to changes in the business climate, Amway reorganised in 2000/01, and the hazmat team became part of a company that incorporated contract work into its scope. When this reorganisation occurred, the hazmat team was thoroughly re-evaluated. Its response function was maintained, but was systematically reinvented in the most lean way practicable while still meeting corporate goals. This case study represents Amway's hazmat team's journey through the evaluation process and subsequent reorganisation. PMID:20378491

  9. The Dog's Tale: Chinese, Hungarian and Swedish Children's Narrative Conventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson, Maj Asplund; Samuelsson, Ingrid Pramling; Soponyai, Anna; Wen, Quifang

    2001-01-01

    This study examined content and conventions of stories made up by 6- and 7-year-olds from China, Hungary, and Sweden. Analyses revealed qualitative differences in children's life worlds, which could be related to their cultural backgrounds. The study also explored the origin of characters in the stories, characteristic plot events, and cultural…

  10. Freedom of information: a case study.

    PubMed

    Worsfold, Denise

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this case study was to find out how easy it was to access information on the hygiene standards of eating places open to the public. Using the Freedom of Information (FOI) Act 2000, four adjacent local authorities in South Wales were asked to provide the last food hygiene report of an eating place in their area. The disclosed reports were assessed to determine how useful they would be to an individual seeking more information on a food premise. It was relatively easy to obtain information from two authorities and difficult if not impossible with the others. One local authority refused to release information despite the intervention of the FOI Commissioner. The quality of the information released was variable. This ranged from a completed comprehensive inspection protocol to a hand-written, illegible, incomplete report that failed to adequately differentiate between requirements and recommendations. Without some training in food law and food hygiene it would be difficult to interpret the reports. There was no evidence from the information provided of inspection scoring. The case study raises concerns about the effectiveness of the Act for consumers who wish to obtain information about the hygiene standards of food premises. While the specialist information provided by hygiene inspection reports may be useful to businesses it is not helpful for the lay public. Consumers must be prepared to exercise patience and tenacity if they want this information. Concerns must be raised about the consistency of the inspection process and about the willingness of some local authorities to be transparent about the inspection and enforcement process. PMID:17004406

  11. Landslide Economics: Concepts and Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Martin; Damm, Bodo

    2015-04-01

    Landslide economics is vital for fundamental understanding of landslide risk as dealing with two important topics: (i) impact assessment, either as damage statistics or cost modeling, and (ii) vulnerability assessment, i.e., the study of exposure, sensitivity, and resilience to landslide damage, ideally from both sociotechnical and financial perspective (e.g., Crovelli and Coe, 2009; Wills et al., 2014). Many aspects addressed in landslide economics have direct influence on landslide risk, including: (i) human activity is often a major causative factor of landslides, not only by predisposing or triggering them, but also as a result of inadequate (low-cost) landslide mitigation; (ii) the level of tolerable or acceptable risk, a measure driving a large part of landslide costs in industrialized countries, is highly variable, differing between individuals, public or private organizations, and societies, with its nature being to change over time; and (iii) decision makers are faced with finding the right balance in landslide mitigation, thus need to weight diverse geological and socioeconomic factors that control its effectiveness in both technical and financial terms (e.g., Klose et al., 2014a). A large part of the complexity in assessing landslide risk as measured by economic costs is due to unique problems in understanding of (i) what types of landslide damage affect human activity and infrastructure in which way, (ii) how society contributes and responds to various kinds of damage, and (iii) how landslide damage is valued in monetary terms. Landslide economics shows the potential to take account of these sociocultural factors to the benefit of risk analysis (e.g., Klose et al., 2014b). The present contribution introduces local and regional case studies in which different economic issues of landslide risk are highlighted using the example of public infrastructures in NW Germany. A special focus is on the following topics: (i) risk culture and created risk, (ii

  12. Case Study: Revising a Formal Case Study Presentation as an Independent Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Patrick R.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the process of researching and revising a case study presentation on an individual who experienced anesthetic awareness during an abdominal surgery and eventually committed suicide. Topics addressed include the author's selection of an undergraduate student with a science and teaching background to work on the case…

  13. The Minnesota Case Study Collection: New Historical Inquiry Case Studies for Nature of Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allchin, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The new Minnesota Case Study Collection is profiled, along with other examples. They complement the work of the HIPST Project in illustrating the aims of: (1) historically informed inquiry learning that fosters explicit NOS reflection, and (2) engagement with faithfully rendered samples of Whole Science.

  14. Case Study: The Mystery of the Seven Deaths--A Case Study in Cellular Respiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazdik, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Cellular respiration, the central component of cellular metabolism, can be a difficult concept for many students to fully understand. In this interrupted, problem-based case study, students explore the purpose of cellular respiration as they play the role of medical examiner, analyzing autopsy evidence to determine the mysterious cause of death…

  15. Problem-Based Learning: Case Studies, Experience and Practice. Case Studies of Teaching in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Peter, Ed.; Mennin, Stewart, Ed.; Webb, Graham, Ed.

    The case studies in this book consider many of the most important issues perceived and experienced by people who are using or developing problem-based learning (PBL). The book focuses on politics, administration, resources, the roles of teachers, and the effects of PBL on students. The chapters are: (1) "Come and See the Real Thing" (David…

  16. Intracranial hemangiopericytoma: study of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Alén, J F; Lobato, R D; Gómez, P A; Boto, G R; Lagares, A; Ramos, A; Ricoy, J R

    2001-01-01

    Most hemangiopericytomas (HPCs) are located in the musculoskeletal system and the skin, while the intracranial location is rare. They represent 2 to 4% in large series of meningeal tumours, thus accounting for less than 1% of all intracranial tumours. Many authors have argued about the true origin of this tumour. The current World Health Organization classification of Central Nervous System tumours distinguishes HPC as an entity of its own, and classified it into the group of "mesenchymal, non-meningothelial tumours". Radical surgery is the treatment of choice, but must be completed with postoperative radiotherapy, which has proved to be the therapy most strongly related to the final prognosis. HPCs have a relentless tendency for local recurrence and metastases outside the central nervous system which can appear even many years after diagnosis and adequate treatment of the primary tumour. Twelve patients with intracranial HPC were treated at our Unit between 1978 and 1999. There were 10 women and 2 men. Ten tumours were supratentorial and most located at frontoparietal parasagittal level. The most common manner of presentation was a focal motor deficit. All tumours were hyperdense in the basal Computed Tomography scans and most enhanced homogeneously following intravenous contrast injection. In 50% of cases, tumour margins were irregular or lobulated. Seven tumours were studied with Magnetic Resonance Imaging, being six of them iso-intense with the cortical gray matter on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. Twenty operations were performed in the 12 patients. In 10 cases radical excision could be achieved with no operative mortality. Total recurrence rate was 33.3%. Eight patients were treated with external radiotherapy at some time through the course of their disease. Eight out of the 12 patients in this series are disease-free (Glasgow Outcome Scale categories 1 and 2) after a mean follow up of 52 months. PMID:11534674

  17. The Development of HRD in Hungarian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cseh, Maria; Krisztian, Bela; Nemeskeri, Zsolt

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a succinct history of the development of human resources in Hungary, the emergence of human resource management and development as an area of study in higher education institutions, the institutions offering programs in this area and their curriculum. The paper is based on a literature review, information gathered from websites…

  18. [Johann Misch Astrophilus' book "Medicina Pauperum" in Hungarian. Copy of a lost or hidden book from 1660].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Tavaszy, Mariann; Kiss, Gergely

    2011-07-01

    Doctors and pharmacies in the 15th Century only used handwritten copies of the prescription collections available in their time. At the beginning of book printing the publishing of prescription collections immediately became popular. They could be found on the pages of medical and pharmaceutical books of many various editions with different structure and origin, as the forerunner of the official pharmacopoeias. From the 16th Century onwards books with the title "Medicina Pauperum" were published which helped the educated people to tend to themselves, the household, the servants and their immediate surroundings case of an illness. The first work specifically on the topic or of genre of the "Medicina Pauperum" according to our knowledge appeared in Hungarian in the year 1660 and currently seems to survived only in fragments under the title of "Medicina Pauperum", from an unknown author. A rare incident occurred in the present days as a "book" believed to be lost for us turned up from thin air. It is a "copied" manuscript in the size of 97×139 mm attached to the ribs with hemp cord, cropped around and in an unbound state. The book known before only in fractions is now available entirety handwritten on 318 pages, distributed to seven distinct parts. The research of its origin suggests that the author lived and worked in Nagyszombat and was called Johann Misch Astrophilus. The identification of the printing office was possible thanks to the examination of the initials and the gaudily, as well as the fonts and the watermark. By these results the printing very likely occurred in the Brewer Printing Press in Lőcse. For the possibility of more extensive research and value preservation the manuscript was bounded. The facsimile edition contains the magnified and digitalized pages of the original one and is published in numbered issues.

  19. A Magnetic Bright Point Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utz, D.; Jurčák, J.; Bellot-Rubio, L.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Thonhofer, S.; Hanslmeier, A.; Veronig, A.; Muller, R.; Lemmerer, B.

    Due to its magnetic fields our host star - the Sun - becomes the interesting object for research as we know it. The magnetic fields themselves cover different spatial, lifetime and strength scales and reach down from enormous flux concentrations like active sunspot groups to single isolated magnetic flux tubes and even weaker, predominantly inclined intranetwork structures. Flux tubes can be seen in filtergram observations as magnetic bright points (MBPs). They are of interest for research not only due to their sheer existence but due to their important role in atmospheric heating (wave heating as well as reconnection processes), to their role in the understanding of creation and annihilation of magnetic fields as well as to their influence on the total solar irradiance variation. In this study we present a close look onto an evolutionary track of an MBP from its formation to its disintegration. Physical quantities of MBPs like their magnetic field strength and inclination, their line-of-sight velocity, and their temperature at different heights are inferred from the inversion of spectropolarimetric data. Original data are taken from the Sunrise/IMaX instrument and constitute a time series of some 60 min. The presented case resembles the convective collapse model and is in agreement with previous studies.

  20. Preadolescent development: case studies in twins.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, R. A.; Cohen, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The authors studied eight sets of healthy twins, ranging in physical maturity from prepubertal to late pubertal, and their parents, to assess psychological changes in early adolescence. A phase-specific psychosocial regression correlates with the biological onset of puberty. We present preliminary findings related to twinship, parental reactions, and longitudinal development, based on detailed case studies. Parents experienced increased conflict, detachment, and pride in response to their twins' psychosocial development at puberty. The more advanced child in a pair tended to lead in all spheres of adjustment-school success, heterosexual interest, peer friendships, and independent behavior. Although the more advanced child began to break away from his twin, in general the twin relationships remained close. Differences in personality traits and rate of psychosocial development within a twinship tended to remain consistent or to become accentuated. They were occasionally narrowed but rarely reversed from early childhood through early adolescence. Some of the differences were fostered by dissimilar patterns of identifying with the parents. PMID:7195631

  1. [Thyroid nodule. Study of 88 cases].

    PubMed

    González Treviño, O; Bolaños Gil, F; Lerman Garber, I; García-Rubí, E; Maisterrena Fernández, J A

    1993-01-01

    We present a prospective study of 88 patients with thyroid nodules seen in our institution in 1985-86 and the results of a 5 year follow up. The algorithm for resolution among different therapeutic options was established in regard to the clinical characteristics, imaging and particularly the histopathologic studies. Their age ranged from 18 to 79 years; 94% of the patients were females. Most of the nodules were solid (69%) and measured 1-4 cm in diameter. The image of 62% of the thyroid scans was of a non-functioning nodule and 13% were hyperfunctioning. In 80% the ultrasonographic pattern was solid or mixed. Surgery was undertaken in 19 patients (21%). In 58%, a diagnosis of malignancy was established. The biopsy (aspiration and tru-cut) suggested the presence of the malignant tumors when taken together in 90% of the cases. Hormonal treatment was given to 62 patients; in 40-45% of them there was a significant reduction in the size of the nodule. Aspiration and sclerosis of cystic nodules were performed in 19 patients with significant shrinkage in 82%. Radioactive iodine was used in 11 patients. Our algorithm reduces costs and precludes unnecessary morbidity in patients with thyroid nodules.

  2. Tactile Astronomy - a Portuguese case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canas, L.; Alves, F.; Correia, A.

    2012-09-01

    Although astronomy plays an important role in the most various outreach initiatives, as well as school science curricula, due to its strong visual component in knowledge acquisition, astronomy subjects are not entirely well addressed and accessed by visually impaired students and/or general public. This stresses the need of more tactile material production, still very scarce in an educational context whether formal or informal. This is a case study activity developed based on different schematic tactile images of several objects present in our solar system. These images in relief, highlight, through touch, several relevant features present in the different astronomical objects studied. The scientific knowledge is apprehended through the use of a tactile key, complemented with additional information. Through proper hands-on activities implementation and careful analysis of the outcome, the adapted images associated with an explanatory key prove to be a valuable resource in tactile astronomy domain. Here we describe the process of implementing such initiative near visually impaired students. The struggles and challenges perceived by all involved and the enrichment experience of engaging astronomy with visually impaired audiences, broadening horizons in an overall experience accessible to all.

  3. Opening Doors: Hungarian and Polish Educational Systems. Fulbright-Hayes Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2002 (Hungary and Poland).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Irma Ned

    This curriculum project examines the current Hungarian and Polish educational systems, which have changed, as have the entire societies of these two countries since the fall of Communism in 1989. The project states that, before 1989, it was difficult for a student to enroll in a university, because education was controlled by the state and…

  4. Using Case Studies in the Introductory Public Relations Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, William C.

    The case study method has received increased attention at both the graduate and undergraduate levels in a number of public relations programs. Unlike the Harvard managerial-oriented case studies, the approach useful in large, introductory public relations courses stems from a simplified team approach to classroom projects, case studies in the…

  5. Revisiting case study as a nursing research design.

    PubMed

    Gangeness, Jeanine E; Yurkovich, Eleanor

    2006-01-01

    Case study research provides nurses with a form of inquiry that is holistic and appropriate for a variety of populations. Jeanine Gangeness and Eleanor Yurkovich discuss components of case study research, including its theoretical base, design methods, multiple data sources and analysis. The information presented is expanded on by using a planned population-based, multiple-case explanatory study.

  6. Case Study Research in Education. A Qualitative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriam, Sharan B.

    A practical guide for designing and carrying out qualitative case study in education is provided. How-to advice for managing all phases of case study research is included. The focus is on case studies that draw from what is commonly known as the qualitative research paradigm rather than a quantitative, positivistic, experimental orientation. Three…

  7. CRIS Case Study Materials in Ethical Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanning, James R.

    Designed for secondary-level classroom discussion, these materials contain nine, short case studies of ethical dilemmas. The cast studies focus mainly on incidents and issues relevant to high school students. Discussion questions for each case study require students to examine the case, discuss the issue, and make an ethical decision about how…

  8. Arsenic Removal: Adsorptive Media and Coagulation/Filtration Case Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides information on the results of three case studies from USEPA arsenic demonstration program. The first case study presented is on the Rimrock, AZ project that used an adsorptive media technology (E33 media) to remove arsenic. The second case study is on...

  9. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of Hungarian wild-growing mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Ványolós, Attila; Orbán-Gyapai, Orsolya; Hohmann, Judit

    2014-08-01

    Mushrooms represent a remarkable and yet largely unexplored source of new, biologically active natural products. In this work, we report on the xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity of 47 wild-growing mushrooms native to Hungary. Aqueous and organic (n-hexane, chloroform, and 50% methanol) extracts of selected mushrooms from different families were screened for their XO inhibitory activities. Among the 188 extracts investigated, the chloroform and 50% methanol fractions proved to be the most effective. Some species exhibited high inhibitory activity, e.g., Hypholoma fasciculare (IC50  =67.76 ± 11.05 µg/mL), Suillus grevillei (IC50  =13.28 ± 1.58 µg/mL), and Tricholoma populinum (IC50  =85.08 ± 15.02 µg/mL); others demonstrated moderate or weak activity. Additional studies are warranted to characterize the compounds responsible for the XO inhibitory activity of mushroom extracts.

  10. The Undergraduate Case Research Study Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Gina

    2010-01-01

    Student-written cases are powerful pedagogical tools that can lead to improved understanding of business situations, more informed analysis, emphasis on reflection, and clearer expository writing, all of which are critical skills for business students. Cases provide an opportunity for students to enjoy an active learning experience and derive the…

  11. Racism in the Classroom: Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhon, Gwendolyn M.

    This book presents 20 cases that address racism in one form or another. Many of the cases are from actual experience. They are intended to bring out actual or possible solutions so that student teachers, novice teachers, and seasoned teachers can find ideas for solving racist problems in their classrooms. The first part focuses on the early years,…

  12. KQED: A Case Study in Confusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttenstine, Marian L.; Hamner, Claire

    The United States Supreme Court's ruling in the "Houchins v KQED" case exemplifies the confusion of that court concerning any consistent view of the First Amendment of the United States Constitution, especially in terms of newsgathering and prior restraint. In this case, the Court reversed a lower court's decision that had held invalid a…

  13. Case Study: Camptocormia, a Rare Conversion Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajmohan, Velayudhan; Thomas, Biju; Sreekumar, Kumaran

    2004-01-01

    Camptocormia is a condition characterized by severe frontal flexion of the spinal cord and knees, with passive drooping of both arms. It occurs as a form of conversion disorder. Some cases are associated with behavioral problems. A case of camptocormia of 2-year duration in a south Indian adolescent girl with oppositional defiant disorder and…

  14. Prokaryotic phylogenetic diversity of Hungarian deep subsurface geothermal well waters.

    PubMed

    Németh, Andrea; Szirányi, Barbara; Krett, Gergely; Janurik, Endre; Kosáros, Tünde; Pekár, Ferenc; Márialigeti, Károly; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2014-09-01

    Geothermal wells characterized by thermal waters warmer than 30°C can be found in more than 65% of the area of Hungary. The examined thermal wells located nearby Szarvas are used for heating industrial and agricultural facilities because of their relatively high hydrocarbon content. The aim of this study was to reveal the prokaryotic community structure of the water of SZR18, K87 and SZR21 geothermal wells using molecular cloning methods and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). Water samples from the outflow pipes were collected in 2012 and 2013. The phylogenetic distribution of archaeal molecular clones was very similar in each sample, the most abundant groups belonged to the genera Methanosaeta, Methanothermobacter and Thermofilum. In contrast, the distribution of bacterial molecular clones was very diverse. Many of them showed the closest sequence similarities to uncultured clone sequences from similar thermal environments. From the water of the SZR18 well, phylotypes closely related to genera Fictibacillus and Alicyclobacillus (Firmicutes) were only revealed, while the bacterial diversity of the K87 well water was much higher. Here, the members of the phyla Thermodesulfobacteria, Proteobacteria, Nitrospira, Chlorobi, OP1 and OPB7 were also detected besides Firmicutes.

  15. Radon concentration in houses over a closed Hungarian uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Somlai, János; Gorjánácz, Zorán; Várhegyi, András; Kovács, Tibor

    2006-08-31

    High radon concentration (average 410 kBq m-3) has been measured in a tunnel of a uranium mine, located 15-55 m below the village of Kovágószolos, Hungary. The mine was closed in 1997; the artificial ventilation of the tunnel was then terminated and recultivation works begun. In this paper, a study has been made as to whether the tunnel has an influence on the radon concentration of surface dwellings over the mining tunnel. At different distances from the surface projection of the mining tunnel, radon concentration, the gamma dose, radon exhalation and radon concentration of soil gas were measured. The average radon concentration in the dwellings was 483 Bq m-3. Significantly higher radon concentrations (average 667 Bq m-3) were measured in houses within +/-150 m from the surface projection of the mining tunnel +50 m, compared with the houses further than the 300-m belt (average 291 Bq m-3). The average radon concentration of the soil gas was 88.8 kBq m-3, the average radon exhalation was 71.4 Bq m-2 s-1 and higher values were measured over the passage as well. Frequent fissures crossing the passage and running up to the surface and the high radon concentration generated in the passage (average 410 kBq m-3) may influence the radon concentration of the houses over the mining tunnel.

  16. Keeping Things Interesting: A Reuse Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troisi, V.; Swick, R.; Seufert, E.

    2006-12-01

    Software reuse has several obvious advantages. By taking advantage of the experience and skill of colleagues one not only saves time, money and resources, but can also jump start a project that might otherwise have floundered from the start, or not even have been possible. One of the least talked about advantages of software reuse is it helps keep the work interesting for the developers. Reuse prevents developers from spending time and energy writing software solutions to problems that have already been solved, and frees them to concentrate on solving new problems, developing new components, and doing things that have never been done before. At the National Snow and Ice Data Center we are fortunate our user community has some unique needs that aren't met by mainstream solutions. Consequently we look for reuse opportunities wherever possible so we can focus on the tasks that add value for our user community. This poster offers a case study of one thread through a decade of reuse at NSIDC that has involved eight different development efforts to date.

  17. High Penetration Photovoltaic Case Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, J.; Mather, B.; Keller, J.; Coddington, M.

    2013-01-01

    Technical concerns with integrating higher penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) systems include grid stability, voltage regulation, power quality (voltage rise, sags, flicker, and frequency fluctuations), and protection and coordination. The current utility grid was designed to accommodate power flows from the central generation source to the transmission system and eventually to the distribution feeders. At the distribution level, the system was designed to carry power from the substation toward the load. Renewable distributed generation, particularly solar PV, provides power at the distribution level challenging this classical paradigm. As these resources become more commonplace the nature of the distribution network and its operation is changing to handle power flow in both directions. This report is focused on large PV installations in which penetration is significantly greater than 15% of maximum daytime feeder load. These case studies are intended to demonstrate success stories with integration of large PV plants at the distribution level as well as some of the solutions used by the utility to ensure safe, reliable operation of both the PV system and the distribution network.

  18. Dynamic optimization case studies in DYNOPT tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozana, Stepan; Pies, Martin; Docekal, Tomas

    2016-06-01

    Dynamic programming is typically applied to optimization problems. As the analytical solutions are generally very difficult, chosen software tools are used widely. These software packages are often third-party products bound for standard simulation software tools on the market. As typical examples of such tools, TOMLAB and DYNOPT could be effectively applied for solution of problems of dynamic programming. DYNOPT will be presented in this paper due to its licensing policy (free product under GPL) and simplicity of use. DYNOPT is a set of MATLAB functions for determination of optimal control trajectory by given description of the process, the cost to be minimized, subject to equality and inequality constraints, using orthogonal collocation on finite elements method. The actual optimal control problem is solved by complete parameterization both the control and the state profile vector. It is assumed, that the optimized dynamic model may be described by a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) or differential-algebraic equations (DAEs). This collection of functions extends the capability of the MATLAB Optimization Tool-box. The paper will introduce use of DYNOPT in the field of dynamic optimization problems by means of case studies regarding chosen laboratory physical educational models.

  19. Jazz improvisers' shared understanding: a case study.

    PubMed

    Schober, Michael F; Spiro, Neta

    2014-01-01

    To what extent and in what arenas do collaborating musicians need to understand what they are doing in the same way? Two experienced jazz musicians who had never previously played together played three improvisations on a jazz standard ("It Could Happen to You") on either side of a visual barrier. They were then immediately interviewed separately about the performances, their musical intentions, and their judgments of their partner's musical intentions, both from memory and prompted with the audiorecordings of the performances. Statements from both (audiorecorded) interviews as well as statements from an expert listener were extracted and anonymized. Two months later, the performers listened to the recordings and rated the extent to which they endorsed each statement. Performers endorsed statements they themselves had generated more often than statements by their performing partner and the expert listener; their overall level of agreement with each other was greater than chance but moderate to low, with disagreements about the quality of one of the performances and about who was responsible for it. The quality of the performances combined with the disparities in agreement suggest that, at least in this case study, fully shared understanding of what happened is not essential for successful improvisation. The fact that the performers endorsed an expert listener's statements more than their partner's argues against a simple notion that performers' interpretations are always privileged relative to an outsider's.

  20. Environmental injustice: case studies from the South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifuentes, Enrique; Frumkin, Howard

    2007-10-01

    We selected three case studies to illustrate environmental injustice issues in the South. These examples relate to migrant agricultural workers, the maquiladora industry and artisanal mining, while reviewing some of the major mechanisms involved, e.g. multinational corporations, the development of free trade zones, multilateral free trade agreements and the export of hazards. A series of strategies are discussed in order to address environmental injustice and health disparities that exist on a global scale. Some of the recommendations involve policy initiatives; others, such as research and mentorship, fall within the traditional domain of public health practice. In this paper, special attention is given to concerned environmental and occupational health professionals using evidence-based data for advocacy. For lasting changes to be made, however, stronger institutions and legislation are required. Those who have the 'right to know' about environmental injustice issues include communities of concern, workers' representatives and lawyers. Government officials and company officials may eventually work on the basis of conflict resolution, compensation and remediation, to quote some examples. Systematic approaches to protect both the environment and public health must be updated.

  1. Case study for a vaccine against leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Alvar, Jorge; Croft, Simon L; Kaye, Paul; Khamesipour, Ali; Sundar, Shyam; Reed, Steven G

    2013-04-18

    Leishmaniasis in many ways offers a unique vaccine case study. Two reasons for this are that leishmaniasis is a disease complex caused by several different species of parasite that are highly related, thus raising the possibility of developing a single vaccine to protect against multiple diseases. Another reason is the demonstration that a leishmaniasis vaccine may be used therapeutically as well as prophylactically. Although there is no registered human leishmaniasis vaccine today, immunization approaches using live or killed organisms, as well as defined vaccine candidates, have demonstrated at least some degree of efficacy in humans to prevent and to treat some forms of leishmaniasis, and there is a vigorous pipeline of candidates in development. Current approaches include using individual or combined antigens of the parasite or of salivary gland extract of the parasites' insect vector, administered with or without formulation in adjuvant. Animal data obtained with several vaccine candidates are promising and some have been or will be entered into clinical testing in the near future. There is sufficient scientific and epidemiological justification to continue to invest in the development of vaccines against leishmaniasis.

  2. Business and Legal Case Genre Networks: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhrig, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The framework of genre systems (Bazerman, 1994; Bhatia, 2004; Swales, 2004) offers an opportunity to illuminate the ways in which students enculturate into their disciplinary cultures (Berkenkotter & Huckin, 1995). To explore the ways in which genre chains are constructed through engagement in specific tasks, this study investigates two…

  3. Ada software productivity prototypes: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hihn, Jairus M.; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Malhotra, Shan

    1988-01-01

    A case study of the impact of Ada on a Command and Control project completed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is given. The data for this study was collected as part of a general survey of software costs and productivity at JPL and other NASA sites. The task analyzed is a successful example of the use of rapid prototyping as applied to command and control for the U.S. Air Force and provides the U.S. Air Force Military Airlift Command with the ability to track aircraft, air crews and payloads worldwide. The task consists of a replicated database at several globally distributed sites. The local databases at each site can be updated within seconds after changes are entered at any one site. The system must be able to handle up to 400,000 activities per day. There are currently seven sites, each with a local area network of computers and a variety of user displays; the local area networks are tied together into a single wide area network. Using data obtained for eight modules, totaling approximately 500,000 source lines of code, researchers analyze the differences in productivities between subtasks. Factors considered are percentage of Ada used in coding, years of programmer experience, and the use of Ada tools and modern programming practices. The principle findings are the following. Productivity is very sensitive to programmer experience. The use of Ada software tools and the use of modern programming practices are important; without such use Ada is just a large complex language which can cause productivity to decrease. The impact of Ada on development effort phases is consistent with earlier reports at the project level but not at the module level.

  4. Cases for the Net Generation: An Empirical Examination of Students' Attitude toward Multimedia Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Michael; Vibert, Conor

    2016-01-01

    Case studies have been an important tool in business, legal, and medical education for generations of students. Traditional text-based cases tend to be self-contained and structured in such a way as to teach a particular concept. The multimedia cases introduced in this study feature unscripted web-hosted video interviews with business owners and…

  5. Case Study: What Makes a Good Case, Revisited: The Survey Monkey Tells All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herried, Clyde Freeman; Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie; Schiller, Nancy A.; Herreid, Ky F.; Wright, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. In this month's issue the authors provide a more definitive answer to the "What Makes a Good Case?" question based on a just-completed Survey Monkey survey given to NCCSTS teachers.

  6. Teaching Business French through Case Studies: Presentation of a Marketing Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federico, Salvatore; Moore, Catherine

    The use of case studies as a means for teaching business French is discussed. The approach is advocated because of the realism of case studies, which are based on actual occurrences. Characteristics of a good case are noted: it tells a story, focuses on interest-arousing issues, is set in the past 10 years, permits empathy with the main…

  7. In Case You Are Interested: Results of a Survey of Case Study Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Schiller, Nancy A.; Herreid, Ky F.; Wright, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    Case study teaching had a long tradition in law and business before it made the jump to medical school education in the form of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) in the 1970s. Today, both the University of Delaware's Clearinghouse and the University of Buffalo's National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science (NCCSTS) have hundreds of cases and…

  8. Do case studies mislead about the nature of reality?

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, S; Dickenson, D; Parker, M; Heller, T

    1999-01-01

    This paper attempts a partial, critical look at the construction and use of case studies in ethics education. It argues that the authors and users of case studies are often insufficiently aware of the literary nature of these artefacts: this may lead to some confusion between fiction and reality. Issues of the nature of the genre, the fictional, story-constructing aspect of case studies, the nature of authorship, and the purposes and uses of case studies as "texts" are outlined and discussed. The paper concludes with some critical questions that can be applied to the construction and use of case studies in the light of the foregoing analysis. PMID:10070638

  9. Jane: A Case Study in Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willingham, Barbara

    1988-01-01

    The article reports the case history of a 15-year-old Australian girl with anorexia nervosa. Information is also given on prevalence, causes, definitions, and treatments including hospitalization, co-therapy, psychotherapy, behavior modification, family therapy, and counseling. (DB)

  10. Structured Controversy: A Case Study Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    1996-01-01

    Introduces a dynamic form of the case instruction method that involves debate and compromise. Discusses two versions of structured controversy and presents an example of structured controversy that involves the use of DNA fingerprinting in forensic medicine. (JRH)

  11. Online Learning and Teaching with Technology: Case Studies, Experience and Practice. Case Studies of Teaching in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, David, Ed.; Walker, Rob, Ed.; Webb, Graham, Ed.

    This book contains case studies that look at using technology in a wide range of situations, from fully online courses to more traditional face-to-face settings. The case studies deal with issues related to student interaction, teaching and assessment, planning and development, and policy. The following case studies are included: (1) "Flame War"…

  12. Combining genetic association study designs: a GWAS case study.

    PubMed

    Estus, Janice L; Fardo, David W

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) explore the relationship between genome variability and disease susceptibility with either population- or family-based data. Here, we have evaluated the utility of combining population- and family-based statistical association tests and have proposed a method for reducing the burden of multiple testing. Unrelated singleton and parent-offspring trio cases and controls from the Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes (GoKinD) study were analyzed for genetic association with diabetic nephropathy (DN) in type 1 diabetics (T1D). The Cochran-Armitage test for trend and the family-based association test were employed using either unrelated cases and controls or trios, respectively. In addition to combining single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) p-values across these tests via Fisher's method, we employed a novel screening approach to rank SNPs based on conditional power for more efficient testing. Using either the population-based or family-based subset alone predictably limited resolution to detect DN SNPs. For 384,197 SNPs passing quality control (QC), none achieved strict genome-wide significance (1.4 × 10(-7)) using 1171 singletons (577/594 cases/controls) or 1738 pooled singletons and offspring probands (841/897). Similarly, none of the 352,004 SNPs passing QC in 567 family trios (264/303 case/control proband trios) reached genome-wide significance. Testing the top 10 SNPs ranked using aggregated conditional power resulted in two SNPs reaching genome-wide significance, rs11645147 on chromosome 16 (p = 1.74 × 10(-4) < 0.05/10 = 0.005) and rs7866522 on chromosome 9 (p = 0.0033). Efficient usage of mixed designs incorporating both unrelated and family-based data may help to uncover associations otherwise difficult to detect in the presence of massive multiple testing corrections. Capitalizing on the strengths of both types while using screening approaches may be useful especially in light of large-scale, next-generation sequencing and rare

  13. Combining genetic association study designs: a GWAS case study

    PubMed Central

    Estus, Janice L.; Fardo, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) explore the relationship between genome variability and disease susceptibility with either population- or family-based data. Here, we have evaluated the utility of combining population- and family-based statistical association tests and have proposed a method for reducing the burden of multiple testing. Unrelated singleton and parent-offspring trio cases and controls from the Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes (GoKinD) study were analyzed for genetic association with diabetic nephropathy (DN) in type 1 diabetics (T1D). The Cochran-Armitage test for trend and the family-based association test were employed using either unrelated cases and controls or trios, respectively. In addition to combining single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) p-values across these tests via Fisher's method, we employed a novel screening approach to rank SNPs based on conditional power for more efficient testing. Using either the population-based or family-based subset alone predictably limited resolution to detect DN SNPs. For 384,197 SNPs passing quality control (QC), none achieved strict genome-wide significance (1.4 × 10−7) using 1171 singletons (577/594 cases/controls) or 1738 pooled singletons and offspring probands (841/897). Similarly, none of the 352,004 SNPs passing QC in 567 family trios (264/303 case/control proband trios) reached genome-wide significance. Testing the top 10 SNPs ranked using aggregated conditional power resulted in two SNPs reaching genome-wide significance, rs11645147 on chromosome 16 (p = 1.74 × 10−4 < 0.05/10 = 0.005) and rs7866522 on chromosome 9 (p = 0.0033). Efficient usage of mixed designs incorporating both unrelated and family-based data may help to uncover associations otherwise difficult to detect in the presence of massive multiple testing corrections. Capitalizing on the strengths of both types while using screening approaches may be useful especially in light of large-scale, next-generation sequencing and rare

  14. Maternal Health: A Case Study of Rajasthan

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, Kirti; Gupta, Vikram

    2009-01-01

    This case study has used the results of a review of literature to understand the persistence of poor maternal health in Rajasthan, a large state of north India, and to make some conclusions on reasons for the same. The rate of reduction in Rajasthan's maternal mortality ratio (MMR) has been slow, and it has remained at 445 per 1000 livebirths in 2003. The government system provides the bulk of maternal health services. Although the service infrastructure has improved in stages, the availability of maternal health services in rural areas remains poor because of low availability of human resources, especially midwives and clinical specialists, and their non-residence in rural areas. Various national programmes, such as the Family Planning, Child Survival and Safe Motherhood and Reproductive and Child Health (phase 1 and 2), have attempted to improve maternal health; however, they have not made the desired impact either because of an earlier emphasis on ineffective strategies, slow implementation as reflected in the poor use of available resources, or lack of effective ground-level governance, as exemplified by the widespread practice of informally charging users for free services. Thirty-two percent of women delivered in institutions in 2005-2006. A 2006 government scheme to give financial incentives for delivering in government institutions has led to substantial increase in the proportion of institutional deliveries. The availability of safe abortion services is limited, resulting in a large number of informal abortion service providers and unsafe abortions, especially in rural areas. The recent scheme of Janani Suraksha Yojana provides an opportunity to improve maternal and neonatal health, provided the quality issues can be adequately addressed. PMID:19489421

  15. Erythroderma: A clinical study of 97 cases

    PubMed Central

    Akhyani, Maryam; Ghodsi, Zahra S; Toosi, Siavash; Dabbaghian, Hossein

    2005-01-01

    Background Erythroderma is a rare skin disorder that may be caused by a variety of underlying dermatoses, infections, systemic diseases and drugs. Methods We reviewed the clinical, laboratory and biopsy material of 97 patients diagnosed with erythroderma who were treated in our department over a 6-year period (1996 through 2002). Results The male-female ratio was 1.85:1. The mean age at diagnosis was 46.2 years. The most common causative factors were dermatoses (59.7%), followed by drug reactions (21.6%), malignancies (11.3%) and idiopathic causes (7.2%). Carbamazepine was the most common drug (57.1%). The best clinicopathologic correlation was found in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and pityriasis rubra pilaris related erythroderma. Apart from scaling and erythema that were present in all patients, pruritus was the most common finding (97.5%), followed by fever (33.6%), lymphadenopathy (21.3%), edema (14.4%) and hyperkeratosis (7.2%). Conclusion This study outlines that underlying etiologic factors of erythroderma may show geographic variations. Our series had a high percentage of erythroderma secondary to preexisting dermatoses and a low percentage of idiopathic cases. There was no HIV-infected patient among our series based on multiple serum antibody tests. The clinical features of erythroderma were identical, irrespective of the etiology. The onset of the disease was usually insidious except in drug-induced erythroderma, where it was acute. The group associated with the best prognosis was that related to drugs. PMID:15882451

  16. Biostratigraphic case studies of six major extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    Biostratigraphic case studies of six major extinctions show all are gradual save one, which is a catastrophic extinction of terrestrial origin. These extinctions show a continuum of environmental insults from major to minor. The major causes of these extinctions are positive and negative eustatic sea level changes, temperature, or ecological competition. Extraterrestrial causes should not be posited without positive association with a stratigraphically sharp extinction. The Cretaceous-Tertiary terrestrial extinction is considerably smaller in percentage of extinction than the marine extinction and is spread over 10 my of the Cretaceous and 1 my of the Tertiary. Sixty percent of the 30 dinosaurs in the northern Great Plains of the U.S. and Canada had become extinct in the 9 my before the late Maastrichtian sea level drop. The best data on the Permo-Triassic terrestrial extinction are from the Karoo basin of South Africa. This is a series of 6 extinctions in some 8 my, recorded in some 2800 meters of sediment. Precision of dating is enhanced by the high rate of accumulation of these sediments. Few data are readily available on the timing of the marine Permo-Triassic extinction, due to the very restricted number of sequences of Tatarian marine rocks. The terminal Ordovician extinction at 438 my is relatively rapid, taking place over about 0.5 my. The most significant aspect of this extinction is a eustatic sea level lowering associated with a major episode of glaciation. New data on this extinction is the reduction from 61 genera of trilobites in North America to 14, for a 77 percent extinction. Another Ordovician extinction present over 10 percent of the North American craton occurs at 454 my in the form of a catastrophic extinction due to a volcanic eruption which blanketed the U.S. east of the Transcontinental Arch. This is the only other sizeable extinction in the Ordovician.

  17. The Analysis of a Murder, a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinan, Frank J.; Szczepankiewicz, Steven H.; Carnaham, Melinda; Colvin, Michael T.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of a Murder case study can be used in general chemistry or nonscience major chemistry courses to teach data handling and analysis in a non-laboratory context. This case study will help students to respond more enthusiastically and with more interest to a set of material placed before them related to a real case rather than…

  18. Report on Federal Productivity. Volume 2, Productivity Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joint Financial Management Improvement Program, Washington, DC.

    Volume 2 contains 15 productivity case studies which illustrate and expand on the causal factors mentioned in volume 1. The cases illustrate many different approaches to productivity measurement improvement. The case studies are: Development of an Output-Productivity Measure for the Air Force Medical Service; Measuring Effectiveness and Efficiency…

  19. A Case Study Model for Augmentative and Alternative Communication Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Katya

    2006-01-01

    Case studies are an accepted method for reporting treatment outcomes. However, to be useful and authentic, a systematic and principled approach to collecting, analyzing, and reporting case data must be observed. This paper proposes a basic case study format for documenting augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) intervention to ensure…

  20. Case Study Digest: Preparing Teachers for Education Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Karen L., Ed.

    This case study digest is intended for classroom teachers who wish to discuss a variety of challenges in school leadership. The publication targets classroom teachers who desire leadership training and aspire to become school administrators. The case studies represent actual incidents experienced by school leaders. The cases are formatted to…

  1. Case Studies of Learning Objects Used in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilomaki, Liisa; Lakkala, Minna; Paavola, Sami

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role and characteristics of virtual learning objects in selected classroom cases. Four Finnish cases represented such pedagogical approaches as student-centeredness, process orientation and collaborative inquiry. The case study approach enabled the investigation of concrete practices in using…

  2. Multiculturalism and Mother Tongue Maintenance--The Case of the Hungarian Diaspora in Queensland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatoss, Aniko

    2004-01-01

    Multicultural policies and language policies claim to provide a favorable environment for the maintenance of immigrant languages. However, the relationship between multiculturalism and multilingualism is complex and contested. Rates of language loss and shift in Australia show that the multilingual heritage is very vulnerable even within the…

  3. Public Administration Education in a Continental European Legalistic Setting: The Hungarian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellén, Márton

    2014-01-01

    The Trans-European Dialogue in 2013 was dedicated to the revisiting of the research undertaken by György Hajnal in 2003 (Hajnal, 2003) on public administration education in Europe. As part of the preparations to the conference, Hajnal also revisited his research after 10 years. The findings presented on the conference offer a theoretical framework…

  4. A true champion of Hungarian kidney research and nephrology education--tribute to László Rosivall.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Navar, L G; Darwin Bell, P; Casellas, D; Carmines, P K; Inscho, E W; Oparil, S

    2009-09-01

    This article pays tribute to the tremendous achievements of Dr. László Rosivall in renal (patho)physiology research and nephrology education in Hungary on the occasion of his 60th birthday. For the past several decades Dr. Rosivall has been a charismatic leader of academic institutions, national and international societies, foundations in physiology, nephrology and hypertension, but the most important of his many contributions, is his role as a scientist. He earned his MD with Summa cum Laude at Semmelweis University (1973) and was invited immediately after that to join the laboratory of Hársing. He studied the distribution of intra-renal blood flow employing then state-of-the-art methods as well as developed his own technique at Semmelweis University and at the University of Bergen with Knut Aukland. This led to his PhD thesis and degree in 1980. An important determinant of his early basic scientific training and development was his postdoctoral research fellowship and later many visiting professorships in the Nephrology Research and Training Center (NRTC) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA between 1981 and 1983. Actually, this research fellowship not only impacted his own future career, but it also cleared the path for many other young Hungarian scientists who later trained with Dr. Rosivall and then at UAB. The early 1980s were the years of significant scientific discoveries and the NRTC team at UAB made important contributions by their studies on renal and glomerular hemodynamics, the renin-angiotensin system (12, 19, 22) and by the development of classic experimental techniques like renal micropuncture, microperfusion, and the juxtamedullary nephron preparation (3) that are still being used worldwide. When Dr. Rosivall joined UAB in the 1980s, the team at the NRTC included Drs. Navar, Bell, Inscho, Carmines, Casellas, and Oparil, among many others, who share their fond memories of working with Dr. Rosivall in this article.

  5. Masked ball: ethics, laws and financial contradictions in Hungarian health care.

    PubMed

    Szebik, Imre

    2003-01-01

    Corruption is a major problem in the societies of the post-communist Central European countries. Corruption in health care has some unique characteristics undermining the efficacy of and respect for Hungarian health care. One of the forms of corruption is tipping. This highly contested phenomenon is present in most of the patient/health professional's interactions in a sophisticated manner, raising serious ethical and legal dilemmas. The present paper analyzes tipping and other corruption-related factors, such as financial conflict of interest between industry and health care and argues that since ethical and legal considerations are often ignored in the country, patient care and clinical research are affected by these controversial issues to a great extent.

  6. Lung Involvement in Multiple Myeloma - Case Study

    PubMed Central

    NIŢU, MIMI; CRIȘAN, EMILIA; OLTEANU, M.; CĂLĂRAŞU, CRISTINA; OLTEANU, MĂDĂLINA; POPESCU, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Mutiple mieloma (MM) cells are rarely found in extramedullary sites. The sites of extramedullary dissemination reported in the literature are spleen, liver, lymph nodes, kidneys, thyroid gland, adrenal gland, ovary, tests, lung, pleura, pericardium, intestinal tract and skin. We report a case in which the myeloma was diagnosed after we discovered the presence of monoclonal plasma cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL). Matherial and method: a case in which diagnosis was established from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid demonstrating the presence of monoclonal plasma cells in Craiova Pneumology Departament. Results: Analysis of BAL fluid for the presence of plasma cells and for cytoplasmic immunoglobulin DNA provides a noninvasive means of establishing the diagnosis. Conclusions: Pulmonary parenchyma is an uncommon site of extramedullary involvement in multiple myeloma. Interstitial lung disease as pulmonary manifestation of multiple myeloma is even rarer; only isolated cases with histological proofs have been reported in the literature. PMID:26788357

  7. [Rare diseases and their patient organization: the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases].

    PubMed

    Pogány, Gábor

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the author is to discuss special issues of rare diseases, with emphasis on circumstances present in Hungary, including those leading to the foundation of the non-governmental organization, the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases. The author briefly reviews the most important findings of current international surveys which have been performed with or without the involvement of member associations of the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases. At the level of medical and social services in Hungary, it is still "incidental" to get to the appropriate expert or centre providing the diagnosis or treatment. It is difficult to find the still very few existing services due to the lack of suitable "pathways" and referrals. There are long delays in obtaining the first appointment, resulting in vulnerability and inequality along the regions. The overall consequence is the insufficiency or lack of access to medical and social services. There are also difficulties related to the supply of orphan medication and the long duration of hospitalization. At the level of patient organizations financial scarcity and uncertainty are typical, combined with inappropriate infrastructural background and human resources. The poor quality of organization of patient bodies along with insufficient cooperation among them are characteristic as well. The author concludes that a National Plan or Strategy is needed to improve the current fragmentation of services which would enable patients and health, social and educational professionals to provide and use the best care in the practice. This would ensure all patients with rare diseases to be diagnosed within a possible shortest time allowing access to the care and support needed in time resulting in a decrease in burden of families and society.

  8. [Participation of Hungarians in the Elaboration of Principles of Genetics and of Biotehchnology].

    PubMed

    Sótonyi, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    It was in 1983 that Robert Bud, director of The Science Museum in London, made it public that the principles of biotechnology, and the term itself were first put into words by a Hungarian scientist, Károly Ereky (The use of life. A history of biotechnology. Cambridge - New York--Melbourne, Cambridge University Press, 1993). Károly Ereky stated that if raw material is used to produce consumer goods with the help of living organisms, the workflow data can be collected in biotechnology. He phrased the principles of biotechnology in his book published in German in 1919 called Biotechnology, ranking him among the world's greatest (Verlag Paul Parey, Berlin, 1919). In 1918 in Brno, three years before the birth of Mendel, count Imre Festetics formulated his theses in 4 points in his publication "Die genetische Gesetze der Natur" (Oekonomische Neuigkeiten und Verhandlungen. Brünn, 22: 169-170, 1819), using the word 'genetics' for the first time in the world. It was Vitezslav Orel, director of the Mendel Museum in Brno, who brought the attention of the world to this fact in 1989, based on the documents possessed by the Museum. The English scientist J.R. Wood published his new findings in 2001, accord- ing to which Festetics summarized his results in the form of four genetic laws well before Mendel, describing principles of the process of mutation and inheritance. Festetics provided evidence for the improvement of the stock by cross-breeding. He stated Mendel's second law on the importance of selection. He called attention to the priority of internal genetic fac- tors. Hungarians can rightly be proud of Károly Ereky (1878-1952) and count Imre Festetics (1764-1847). PMID:26875293

  9. [Participation of Hungarians in the Elaboration of Principles of Genetics and of Biotehchnology].

    PubMed

    Sótonyi, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    It was in 1983 that Robert Bud, director of The Science Museum in London, made it public that the principles of biotechnology, and the term itself were first put into words by a Hungarian scientist, Károly Ereky (The use of life. A history of biotechnology. Cambridge - New York--Melbourne, Cambridge University Press, 1993). Károly Ereky stated that if raw material is used to produce consumer goods with the help of living organisms, the workflow data can be collected in biotechnology. He phrased the principles of biotechnology in his book published in German in 1919 called Biotechnology, ranking him among the world's greatest (Verlag Paul Parey, Berlin, 1919). In 1918 in Brno, three years before the birth of Mendel, count Imre Festetics formulated his theses in 4 points in his publication "Die genetische Gesetze der Natur" (Oekonomische Neuigkeiten und Verhandlungen. Brünn, 22: 169-170, 1819), using the word 'genetics' for the first time in the world. It was Vitezslav Orel, director of the Mendel Museum in Brno, who brought the attention of the world to this fact in 1989, based on the documents possessed by the Museum. The English scientist J.R. Wood published his new findings in 2001, accord- ing to which Festetics summarized his results in the form of four genetic laws well before Mendel, describing principles of the process of mutation and inheritance. Festetics provided evidence for the improvement of the stock by cross-breeding. He stated Mendel's second law on the importance of selection. He called attention to the priority of internal genetic fac- tors. Hungarians can rightly be proud of Károly Ereky (1878-1952) and count Imre Festetics (1764-1847).

  10. The Use of Case Studies in Teaching Undergraduate Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Meil, William M.

    2007-01-01

    Case studies have been the cornerstone of many discoveries in neurology and continue to be an indispensable source of knowledge. Attaching a name, face, and story to the study of neurological disorders makes them more “real” and memorable. This article describes the value of the case study methodology and its advantages as a pedagogical approach. It also illustrates how the seminal case of H.M. can be used to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the case study methodology. Three exercises are described for incorporating case studies into neuroscience courses. The first exercise requires students to conduct a literature review regarding their assigned case and then design an experiment to address a lingering question regarding that neurological disorder. Survey results of 90 students provide quantitative and qualitative support for this approach. The vast majority of students indicated this exercise was a valuable learning experience; sparked interest in the topic and in biopsychology; increased their knowledge and stimulated critical thinking. The second exercise discusses how students might conduct their own case studies. The third exercise emphasizes the use of case studies as a platform to examine competing hypotheses regarding neurological conditions and their treatment. A table listing case studies appropriate for undergraduate neuroscience courses is included. Cases are categorized by the type of neurological disorder and notes regarding the nature of and content of each case are provided. PMID:23493154

  11. Case studies: Soil mapping using multiple methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Hauke; Wunderlich, Tina; Hagrey, Said A. Al; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Stümpel, Harald

    2010-05-01

    Soil is a non-renewable resource with fundamental functions like filtering (e.g. water), storing (e.g. carbon), transforming (e.g. nutrients) and buffering (e.g. contamination). Degradation of soils is meanwhile not only to scientists a well known fact, also decision makers in politics have accepted this as a serious problem for several environmental aspects. National and international authorities have already worked out preservation and restoration strategies for soil degradation, though it is still work of active research how to put these strategies into real practice. But common to all strategies the description of soil state and dynamics is required as a base step. This includes collecting information from soils with methods ranging from direct soil sampling to remote applications. In an intermediate scale mobile geophysical methods are applied with the advantage of fast working progress but disadvantage of site specific calibration and interpretation issues. In the framework of the iSOIL project we present here some case studies for soil mapping performed using multiple geophysical methods. We will present examples of combined field measurements with EMI-, GPR-, magnetic and gammaspectrometric techniques carried out with the mobile multi-sensor-system of Kiel University (GER). Depending on soil type and actual environmental conditions, different methods show a different quality of information. With application of diverse methods we want to figure out, which methods or combination of methods will give the most reliable information concerning soil state and properties. To investigate the influence of varying material we performed mapping campaigns on field sites with sandy, loamy and loessy soils. Classification of measured or derived attributes show not only the lateral variability but also gives hints to a variation in the vertical distribution of soil material. For all soils of course soil water content can be a critical factor concerning a succesful

  12. Comparison of mtDNA haplogroups in Hungarians with four other European populations: a small incidence of descents with Asian origin.

    PubMed

    Nadasi, Edit; Gyurus, P; Czakó, Márta; Bene, Judit; Kosztolányi, Sz; Fazekas, Sz; Dömösi, P; Melegh, B

    2007-06-01

    Hungarians are unique among the other European populations because according to history, the ancient Magyars had come from the eastern side of the Ural Mountains and settled down in the Carpathian basin in the 9th century AD. Since variations in the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) are routinely used to infer the histories of different populations, we examined the distribution of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) sites of the mtDNA in apparently healthy, unrelated Hungarian subjects in order to collect data on the genetic origin of the Hungarian population. Among the 55 samples analyzed, the large majority belonged to haplogroups common in other European populations, however, three samples fulfilled the requirements of haplogroup M. Since haplogroup M is classified as a haplogroup characteristic mainly for Asian populations, the presence of haplogroup M found in approximately 5% of the total suggests that an Asian matrilineal ancestry, even if in a small incidence, can be detected among modern Hungarians.

  13. Comparison of mtDNA haplogroups in Hungarians with four other European populations: a small incidence of descents with Asian origin.

    PubMed

    Nadasi, Edit; Gyurus, P; Czakó, Márta; Bene, Judit; Kosztolányi, Sz; Fazekas, Sz; Dömösi, P; Melegh, B

    2007-06-01

    Hungarians are unique among the other European populations because according to history, the ancient Magyars had come from the eastern side of the Ural Mountains and settled down in the Carpathian basin in the 9th century AD. Since variations in the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) are routinely used to infer the histories of different populations, we examined the distribution of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) sites of the mtDNA in apparently healthy, unrelated Hungarian subjects in order to collect data on the genetic origin of the Hungarian population. Among the 55 samples analyzed, the large majority belonged to haplogroups common in other European populations, however, three samples fulfilled the requirements of haplogroup M. Since haplogroup M is classified as a haplogroup characteristic mainly for Asian populations, the presence of haplogroup M found in approximately 5% of the total suggests that an Asian matrilineal ancestry, even if in a small incidence, can be detected among modern Hungarians. PMID:17585514

  14. Child Survivor of War: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roysircar, Gargi

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the history of a Bosnian survivor of war living in the U.S. using the extended case method. Clinical issues related to acculturative stress, posttraumatic stress disorder, and identity are analyzed. Suggested treatment includes existential therapy and its cognitive--behavioral applications, didactic education on trauma,…

  15. Olympus Imaging Fraud Scandal: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elam, Dennis; Madrigal, Marion; Jackson, Maura

    2014-01-01

    This case examines the two decade long tobashi scheme by Olympus Imaging Executives to hide $1.7 billion in losses. In the 1980s, a soaring yen and falling dollar caused bottom line income problems for many Japanese companies. Some companies sought to offset the declining revenue with zaiteku, a form of speculative investment. While early…

  16. Stuttering, Cluttering, and Phonological Complexity: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaSalle, Lisa R.; Wolk, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    The phonological complexity of dysfluencies in those who clutter and/or stutter may help us better understand phonetic factors in these two types of fluency disorders. In this preliminary investigation, cases were three 14-year-old males, diagnosed as a Stutterer, a Clutterer, and a Stutterer-Clutterer. Spontaneous speech samples were transcribed,…

  17. The Educational System in Japan: Case Study Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Harold; Lee, Shin-Ying; Nerison-Low, Roberta

    This document summarizes the findings of a year-long study that used case studies of specific schools in Japan to collect qualitative data on the Japanese educational experience. From 1994-95 the Case Study Project (a component of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study) collected information from interviews with students, parents,…

  18. Using Online Case Studies to Enhance Teacher Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Laila

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact interactive, online case studies have on learning for preservice teachers. More specifically, it evaluated whether the use of online case studies in instruction could enhance the level of knowledge the preservice teacher gained from the content material. This study utilized a nonequivalent group,…

  19. Late glacial river-bed changes on the Little Hungarian Plain based on preliminary chronological, geological and paleontological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sávai, Szilvia; Molnár, Dávid; Sümegi, Pál

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensive chronological, geological and paleontological investigations were conducted as part of archaeological excavations in 2011 and 2012, prior to the construction of the M85 motorway between Gyor and Csorna, Hungary. These studies clearly show that the alluvial fan that underlies much of the Little Hungarian Plain was built up by streams flowing in a southeasterly to northwesterly direction from the nearby Bakony Hills, and continued to form until the end of the last glacial period. The northern part of the fan, now named the Csorna Plain, became inactive (i.e. became a fossil river-bed system) at about 25-15 ka, when the Rába and Marcal rivers changed theirflowdirection fromsouth-north towest-east.As a result of this change in flow direction, the Rába and Marcal rivers became incised, capturing the Bakony stream beds, stopping sediment deposition on the northern side of the alluvial fan (essentially the left bank of the Rába-Marcal river system), although the southern part of the fan continue to form as before. On the northern side of the fan, the sediment surface dried out due to falling groundwater levels, and aeolian sand-drifts began to form. Eventually, accumulation of the sand-drift sediments ceased due to the deposition of loess-type sediments, which fixed the surface, conserved the sand-drift shapes, and contributed to the straightening and eventual canalization of the fluvial channels. Geoarchaeological examinations indicate that the development of present fluvial features were strongly affected by the settlement and tillage activity of human communities on the Csorna Plain.

  20. Combined Deterministic and Stochastic Approach to Determine Spatial Distribution of Drought Frequency and Duration in the Great Hungarian Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, J. A.; Kuti, L.; Bakacsi, Zs.; Pásztor, L.; Tahy, Á.

    2009-04-01

    data for the multi-year simulation of SVAT processes. In order to test the elaborated methods, a sub-area of the full domain has been designated as a pilot area for this study. Considering our aims, major achievements with respect to the objectives have been accomplished for the pilot area within the scope of this work includes: - Harmonized 3D grid model to describe hydraulic properties of the unsaturated zone has been created (Pásztor, L. et al 2002 and 2005, Kuti, L. 2007); - The spatially distributed physically based distributed parameter SVAT model DIWA (DIstributed WAtershed) (Szabó, J.A., 2007) has been adapted; - The stochastic characteristics and parameters of the weather generator has been derived from measured data series; - Coupling the stochastic weather generator with the deterministic DIWA SVAT-type model also has been done. In this paper, the results of the coupled (deterministic - stochastic) model simulation based analysis of regional drought frequency and duration for a sub-area of the full domain of the Great Hungarian Plain will be reported. First the harmonized 3D grid model of the hydraulic properties of the unsaturated zone will be presented. Then a brief characterisation of the DIWA model will be given. The Markov chain based stochastic weather generator also will be presented. Finally, the results of multi-year drought frequency and duration analysis at the pilot area and conclusions will be discussed. Keywords: Drought frequency and duration analysis; multivariate analyses; recurrence analyses; extreme events; stochastic weather generator; spatially distributed SVAT model; 3D grid model of hydraulic properties of the unsaturated zone. References: Kuti, L. (2007): Agrogeological investigation of soil fertility limiting factors int he soil-parent roc-groundwater system in Hungary. In: Environment & Progress, Cluj-Napoca, nr. 10. pp. 131-145. Pásztor, L. - Szabó, J. - Bakacsi, Zs. (2002): GIS processing of large scale soil maps in Hungary